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Sample records for a-smooth muscle actin

  1. The Dynamic Actin Cytoskeleton in Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dale D

    2018-01-01

    Smooth muscle contraction requires both myosin activation and actin cytoskeletal remodeling. Actin cytoskeletal reorganization facilitates smooth muscle contraction by promoting force transmission between the contractile unit and the extracellular matrix (ECM), and by enhancing intercellular mechanical transduction. Myosin may be viewed to serve as an "engine" for smooth muscle contraction whereas the actin cytoskeleton may function as a "transmission system" in smooth muscle. The actin cytoskeleton in smooth muscle also undergoes restructuring upon activation with growth factors or the ECM, which controls smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. Abnormal smooth muscle contraction, cell proliferation, and motility contribute to the development of vascular and pulmonary diseases. A number of actin-regulatory proteins including protein kinases have been discovered to orchestrate actin dynamics in smooth muscle. In particular, Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) is an important molecule that controls actin dynamics, contraction, growth, and motility in smooth muscle. Moreover, c-Abl coordinates the regulation of blood pressure and contributes to the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness and vascular/airway remodeling in vivo. Thus, c-Abl may be a novel pharmacological target for the development of new therapy to treat smooth muscle diseases such as hypertension and asthma. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-Straub type actin from molluscan catch muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Shelud'ko, Nikolay S., E-mail: sheludko@stl.ru; Girich, Ulyana V.; Lazarev, Stanislav S.

    We have developed a method of obtaining natural actin from smooth muscles of the bivalves on the example of the Crenomytilus grayanus catch muscle. The muscles were previously rigorized to prevent a loss of thin filaments during homogenization and washings. Thin filaments were isolated with a low ionic strength solution in the presence of ATP and sodium pyrophosphate. Surface proteins of thin filaments-tropomyosin, troponin, calponin and some minor actin-binding proteins-were dissociated from actin filaments by increasing the ionic strength to 0.6 M KCL. Natural fibrillar actin obtained in that way depolymerizes easily in low ionic strength solutions commonly used for themore » extraction of Straub-type actin from acetone powder. Purification of natural actin was carried out by the polymerization–depolymerization cycle. The content of inactivated actin remaining in the supernatant is much less than at a similar purification of Straub-type actin. A comparative investigation was performed between the natural mussel actin and the Straub-type rabbit skeletal actin in terms of the key properties of actin: polymerization, activation of Mg-ATPase activity of myosin, and the electron-microscopic structure of actin polymers. -- Highlights: •We developed method of repolymerizable invertebrate smooth muscle actin obtaining. •Our method does not involve use of denaturating agents, which could modify proteins. •Viscosity and polymerization rate of actin, gained that way, is similar to Straub one. •Electron microscopy showed that repolymerized mussel actin is similar to Straub one. •Repolymerized mussel actin has greater ATPase activating capacity, than Straub actin.« less

  3. Disrupting actin-myosin-actin connectivity in airway smooth muscle as a treatment for asthma?

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Tera L; Dowell, Maria L; Lakser, Oren J; Gerthoffer, William T; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Seow, Chun Y; Mitchell, Richard W; Solway, Julian

    2009-05-01

    Breathing is known to functionally antagonize bronchoconstriction caused by airway muscle contraction. During breathing, tidal lung inflation generates force fluctuations that are transmitted to the contracted airway muscle. In vitro, experimental application of force fluctuations to contracted airway smooth muscle strips causes them to relengthen. Such force fluctuation-induced relengthening (FFIR) likely represents the mechanism by which breathing antagonizes bronchoconstriction. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that regulate FFIR of contracted airway muscle could suggest novel therapeutic interventions to increase FFIR, and so to enhance the beneficial effects of breathing in suppressing bronchoconstriction. Here we propose that the connectivity between actin filaments in contracting airway myocytes is a key determinant of FFIR, and suggest that disrupting actin-myosin-actin connectivity by interfering with actin polymerization or with myosin polymerization merits further evaluation as a potential novel approach for preventing prolonged bronchoconstriction in asthma.

  4. Are non-muscle actin isoforms functionally equivalent?

    PubMed

    Simiczyjew, Aleksandra; Pietraszek-Gremplewicz, Katarzyna; Mazur, Antonina Joanna; Nowak, Dorota

    2017-11-01

    Actin is highly conserved and it is the most widespread protein in eukaryotic cells. One of the most important features of actin, which allows it to have many different functions, is its ability to polymerize and interact with many other proteins. Actins are the major constituent of the actin cytoskeleton, which is an important system that is involved in various aspects of cell function, including cell motility, structure, integrity, regulation of signal transduction and transcription. Six mammal actin isoforms are highly conserved and share common functions. Two of them, β and γ non-muscle actin isoforms, which differ only by four amino acids located at the N-terminus of the polypeptide chain, are required for survival and proper cell functioning. We also summarized data about actbl2, which is suggested to be a newly discovered isoactin. Here, we review the current knowledge about tissue-specific expression of the non-muscle actin isoforms and possible functional differences between them. We also discuss molecular tools, which in recent years have allowed for a better understanding of the role of these proteins in cell functioning.

  5. Cofilin-2 controls actin filament length in muscle sarcomeres

    PubMed Central

    Kremneva, Elena; Makkonen, Maarit H.; Skwarek-Maruszewska, Aneta; Gateva, Gergana; Michelot, Alphee; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY ADF/cofilins drive cytoskeletal dynamics by promoting the disassembly of ‘aged’ ADP-actin filaments. Mammals express several ADF/cofilin isoforms, but their specific biochemical activities and cellular functions have not been studied in detail. Here we demonstrate that the muscle-specific isoform cofilin-2 promotes actin filament disassembly in sarcomeres to control the precise length of thin filaments in the contractile apparatus. In contrast to other isoforms, cofilin-2 efficiently binds and disassembles both ADP- and ATP/ADP-Pi-actin filaments. We mapped surface-exposed cofilin-2-specific residues required for ATP-actin binding and propose that these residues function as an ‘actin nucleotide-state sensor’ among ADF/cofilins. The results suggest that cofilin-2 evolved specific biochemical and cellular properties allowing it to control actin dynamics in sarcomeres, where filament pointed ends may contain a mixture of ADP- and ATP/ADP-Pi-actin subunits. Our findings also offer a rationale for why cofilin-2 mutations in humans lead to myopathies. PMID:25373779

  6. Sumoylated α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscle of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Uda, Munehiro; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Shigenaga, Ayako; Baba, Takeshi; Naito, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Yamakura, Fumiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of two major muscle fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative fibers and fast-twitch glycolytic fibers. The proteins in these muscle fibers are known to differ in their expression, relative abundance, and post-translational modifications. In this study, we report a previously unreported post-translational modification of α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscles of adult male F344 rats in vivo. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), we first examined the differences in the protein expression profiles between the soleus and plantaris muscles. We found higher intensity protein spots at approximately 60 kDa and pH 9 on 2D-PAGE for the soleus muscle compared with the plantaris muscle. These spots were identified as α-skeletal muscle actin by liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and western blot analyses. In addition, we found that the 60 kDa α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1, using 2D-PAGE and western blot analyses. Furthermore, we found that α-skeletal muscle actin with larger molecular weight was localized in the nuclear and cytosol of the skeletal muscle, but not in the myofibrillar fraction by the combination of subcellular fractionation and western blot analyses. These results suggest that α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by SUMO-1 in the skeletal muscles, localized in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, and the extent of this modification is much higher in the slow muscles than in the fast muscles. This is the first study to show the presence of SUMOylated actin in animal tissues.

  7. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Actin as the generator of tension during muscle contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Schutt, C E; Lindberg, U

    1992-01-01

    We propose that the key structural feature in the conversion of chemical free energy into mechanical work by actomyosin is a myosin-induced change in the length of the actin filament. As reported earlier, there is evidence that helical actin filaments can untwist into ribbons having an increased intersubunit repeat. Regular patterns of actomyosin interactions arise when ribbons are aligned with myosin thick filaments, because the repeat distance of the myosin lattice (429 A) is an integral multiple of the subunit repeat in the ribbon (35.7 A). This commensurability property of the actomyosin lattice leads to a simple mechanism for controlling the sequence of events in chemical-mechanical transduction. A role for tropomyosin in transmitting the forces developed by actomyosin is proposed. In this paper, we describe how these transduction principles provide the basis for a theory of muscle contraction. Images PMID:1530888

  9. Structural alterations of thin actin filaments in muscle contraction by synchrotron X-ray fiber diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Katsuzo; Sugimoto, Yasunobu; Takezawa, Yasunori; Ueno, Yutaka; Minakata, Shiho; Oshima, Kanji; Matsuo, Tatsuhito; Kobayashi, Takakazu

    2007-01-01

    Strong evidence has been accumulated that the conformational changes of the thin actin filaments are occurring and playing an important role in the entire process of muscle contraction. The conformational changes and the mechanical properties of the thin actin filaments we have found by X-ray fiber diffraction on skeletal muscle contraction are explored. Recent studies on the conformational changes of regulatory proteins bound to actin filaments upon activation and in the force generation process are also described. Finally, the roles of structural alterations and dynamics of the actin filaments are discussed in conjunction with the regulation mechanism and the force generation mechanism.

  10. Cytoplasmic γ-actin and tropomodulin isoforms link to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.

    2011-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) serves as the Ca2+ reservoir for muscle contraction. Tropomodulins (Tmods) cap filamentous actin (F-actin) pointed ends, bind tropomyosins (Tms), and regulate F-actin organization. In this paper, we use a genetic targeting approach to examine the effect of Tmod1 deletion on the organization of cytoplasmic γ-actin (γcyto-actin) in the SR of skeletal muscle. In wild-type muscle fibers, γcyto-actin and Tmod3 defined an SR microdomain that was distinct from another Z line–flanking SR microdomain containing Tmod1 and Tmod4. The γcyto-actin/Tmod3 microdomain contained an M line complex composed of small ankyrin 1.5 (sAnk1.5), γcyto-actin, Tmod3, Tm4, and Tm5NM1. Tmod1 deletion caused Tmod3 to leave its SR compartment, leading to mislocalization and destabilization of the Tmod3–γcyto-actin–sAnk1.5 complex. This was accompanied by SR morphological defects, impaired Ca2+ release, and an age-dependent increase in sarcomere misalignment. Thus, Tmod3 regulates SR-associated γcyto-actin architecture, mechanically stabilizes the SR via a novel cytoskeletal linkage to sAnk1.5, and maintains the alignment of adjacent myofibrils. PMID:21727195

  11. Capillary pericytes express α-smooth muscle actin, which requires prevention of filamentous-actin depolymerization for detection.

    PubMed

    Alarcon-Martinez, Luis; Yilmaz-Ozcan, Sinem; Yemisci, Muge; Schallek, Jesse; Kılıç, Kıvılcım; Can, Alp; Di Polo, Adriana; Dalkara, Turgay

    2018-03-21

    Recent evidence suggests that capillary pericytes are contractile and play a crucial role in the regulation of microcirculation. However, failure to detect components of the contractile apparatus in capillary pericytes, most notably α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), has questioned these findings. Using strategies that allow rapid filamentous-actin (F-actin) fixation (i.e. snap freeze fixation with methanol at -20°C) or prevent F-actin depolymerization (i.e. with F-actin stabilizing agents), we demonstrate that pericytes on mouse retinal capillaries, including those in intermediate and deeper plexus, express α-SMA. Junctional pericytes were more frequently α-SMA-positive relative to pericytes on linear capillary segments. Intravitreal administration of short interfering RNA (α-SMA-siRNA) suppressed α-SMA expression preferentially in high order branch capillary pericytes, confirming the existence of a smaller pool of α-SMA in distal capillary pericytes that is quickly lost by depolymerization. We conclude that capillary pericytes do express α-SMA, which rapidly depolymerizes during tissue fixation thus evading detection by immunolabeling. © 2018, Alarcon-Martinez et al.

  12. A novel actin binding site of myosin required for effective muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Várkuti, Boglárka H; Yang, Zhenhui; Kintses, Bálint; Erdélyi, Péter; Bárdos-Nagy, Irén; Kovács, Attila L; Hári, Péter; Kellermayer, Miklós; Vellai, Tibor; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2012-02-12

    F-actin serves as a track for myosin's motor functions and activates its ATPase activity by several orders of magnitude, enabling actomyosin to produce effective force against load. Although actin activation is a ubiquitous property of all myosin isoforms, the molecular mechanism and physiological role of this activation are unclear. Here we describe a conserved actin-binding region of myosin named the 'activation loop', which interacts with the N-terminal segment of actin. We demonstrate by biochemical, biophysical and in vivo approaches using transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains that the interaction between the activation loop and actin accelerates the movement of the relay, stimulating myosin's ATPase activity. This interaction results in efficient force generation, but it is not essential for the unloaded motility. We conclude that the binding of actin to myosin's activation loop specifically increases the ratio of mechanically productive to futile myosin heads, leading to efficient muscle contraction.

  13. Changes in actin structural transitions associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Spakowicz, Daniel; Thomas, David D

    2008-11-11

    We have used transient phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) to detect changes in actin structural dynamics associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction. Contractility of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers was inhibited by treatment with 50 mM H 2O 2, which induced oxidative modifications in the myosin head and in actin, as previously reported. Using proteins purified from oxidized and unoxidized muscle, we used TPA to measure the effects of weakly (+ATP) and strongly (no ATP) bound myosin heads (S1) on the microsecond dynamics of actin labeled at Cys374 with erythrosine iodoacetamide. Oxidative modification of S1 had no effect on actin dynamics in the absence of ATP (strong binding complex), but restricted the dynamics in the presence of ATP (weakly bound complex). In contrast, oxidative modification of actin did not have a significant effect on the weak-to-strong transitions. Thus, we concluded that (1) the effects of oxidation on the dynamics of actin in the actomyosin complex are predominantly determined by oxidation-induced changes in S1, and (2) changes in weak-to-strong structural transitions in actin and myosin are coupled to each other and are associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contractility.

  14. Changes in actin structural transitions associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Spakowicz, Daniel; Thomas, David D.

    2011-01-01

    We have used transient phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) to detect changes in actin structural dynamics associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contraction. Contractility of skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers was inhibited by treatment with 50 mM H2O2, which induced oxidative modifications in the myosin head and in actin, as previously reported. Using proteins purified from oxidized and unoxidized muscle, we used TPA to measure the effects of weakly (+ATP) and strongly (no ATP) bound myosin heads (S1) on the microsecond dynamics of actin labeled at Cys374 with erythrosine iodoacetamide. Oxidative modification of S1 had no effect on actin dynamics in the absence of ATP (strong binding complex), but restricted the dynamics in the presence of ATP (weakly bound complex). In contrast, oxidative modification of actin did not have a significant effect on the weak-to-strong transitions. Thus, we concluded that (1) the effects of oxidation on the dynamics of actin in the actomyosin complex are predominantly determined by oxidation-induced changes in S1, and (2) changes in weak-to-strong structural transitions in actin and myosin are coupled to each other and are associated with oxidative inhibition of muscle contractility. PMID:18855423

  15. Qdot Labeled Actin Super Resolution Motility Assay Measures Low Duty Cycle Muscle Myosin Step-Size

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihua; Ajtai, Katalin; Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin powers contraction in heart and skeletal muscle and is a leading target for mutations implicated in inheritable muscle diseases. During contraction, myosin transduces ATP free energy into the work of muscle shortening against resisting force. Muscle shortening involves relative sliding of myosin and actin filaments. Skeletal actin filaments were fluorescence labeled with a streptavidin conjugate quantum dot (Qdot) binding biotin-phalloidin on actin. Single Qdot’s were imaged in time with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy then spatially localized to 1-3 nanometers using a super-resolution algorithm as they translated with actin over a surface coated with skeletal heavy meromyosin (sHMM) or full length β-cardiac myosin (MYH7). Average Qdot-actin velocity matches measurements with rhodamine-phalloidin labeled actin. The sHMM Qdot-actin velocity histogram contains low velocity events corresponding to actin translation in quantized steps of ~5 nm. The MYH7 velocity histogram has quantized steps at 3 and 8 nm in addition to 5 nm, and, larger compliance than sHMM depending on MYH7 surface concentration. Low duty cycle skeletal and cardiac myosin present challenges for a single molecule assay because actomyosin dissociates quickly and the freely moving element diffuses away. The in vitro motility assay has modestly more actomyosin interactions and methylcellulose inhibited diffusion to sustain the complex while preserving a subset of encounters that do not overlap in time on a single actin filament. A single myosin step is isolated in time and space then characterized using super-resolution. The approach provides quick, quantitative, and inexpensive step-size measurement for low duty cycle muscle myosin. PMID:23383646

  16. Tropomyosin movement on F-actin during muscle activation explained by energy landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Orzechowski, Marek; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2014-01-01

    Muscle contraction is regulated by tropomyosin movement across the thin filament surface, which exposes or blocks myosin-binding sites on actin. Recent atomic structures of F-actin-tropomyosin have yielded the positions of tropomyosin on myosin-free and myosin-decorated actin. Here, the repositioning of α-tropomyosin between these locations on F-actin was systematically examined by optimizing the energy of the complex for a wide range of tropomyosin positions on F-actin. The resulting energy landscape provides a full-map of the F-actin surface preferred by tropomyosin, revealing a broad energy basin associated with the tropomyosin position that blocks myosin-binding. This is consistent with previously proposed low-energy oscillations of semi-rigid tropomyosin, necessary for shifting of tropomyosin following troponin-binding. In contrast, the landscape shows much less favorable energies when tropomyosin locates near its myosin-induced “open-state” position. This indicates that spontaneous movement of tropomyosin away from its energetic “ground-state” to the open-state is unlikely in absence of myosin. Instead, myosin-binding must drive tropomyosin toward the open-state to activate the thin filament. Additional energy landscapes were computed for disease-causing actin mutants that distort the topology of the actin-tropomyosin energy landscape, explaining their phenotypes. Thus, the computation of such energy landscapes offers a sensitive way to estimate the impact of mutations. PMID:24412204

  17. Tropomyosin movement on F-actin during muscle activation explained by energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Orzechowski, Marek; Moore, Jeffrey R; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2014-03-01

    Muscle contraction is regulated by tropomyosin movement across the thin filament surface, which exposes or blocks myosin-binding sites on actin. Recent atomic structures of F-actin-tropomyosin have yielded the positions of tropomyosin on myosin-free and myosin-decorated actin. Here, the repositioning of α-tropomyosin between these locations on F-actin was systematically examined by optimizing the energy of the complex for a wide range of tropomyosin positions on F-actin. The resulting energy landscape provides a full-map of the F-actin surface preferred by tropomyosin, revealing a broad energy basin associated with the tropomyosin position that blocks myosin-binding. This is consistent with previously proposed low-energy oscillations of semi-rigid tropomyosin, necessary for shifting of tropomyosin following troponin-binding. In contrast, the landscape shows much less favorable energies when tropomyosin locates near its myosin-induced "open-state" position. This indicates that spontaneous movement of tropomyosin away from its energetic "ground-state" to the open-state is unlikely in absence of myosin. Instead, myosin-binding must drive tropomyosin toward the open-state to activate the thin filament. Additional energy landscapes were computed for disease-causing actin mutants that distort the topology of the actin-tropomyosin energy landscape, explaining their phenotypes. Thus, the computation of such energy landscapes offers a sensitive way to estimate the impact of mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Extraction Protocols for Individual Zebrafish's Ventricle Myosin and Skeletal Muscle Actin for In vitro Motility Assays

    PubMed Central

    Scheid, Lisa-Mareike; Weber, Cornelia; Bopp, Nasrin; Mosqueira, Matias; Fink, Rainer H. A.

    2017-01-01

    The in vitro motility assay (IVMA) is a technique that enables the measurement of the interaction between actin and myosin providing a relatively simple model to understand the mechanical muscle function. For actin-myosin IVMA, myosin is immobilized in a measurement chamber, where it converts chemical energy provided by ATP hydrolysis into mechanical energy. The result is the movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments that can be recorded microscopically and analyzed quantitatively. Resulting sliding speeds and patterns help to characterize the underlying actin-myosin interaction that can be affected by different factors such as mutations or active compounds. Additionally, modulatory actions of the regulatory proteins tropomyosin and troponin in the presence of calcium on actin-myosin interaction can be studied with the IVMA. Zebrafish is considered a suitable model organism for cardiovascular and skeletal muscle research. In this context, straightforward protocols for the isolation and use of zebrafish muscle proteins in the IVMA would provide a useful tool in molecular studies. Currently, there are no protocols available for the mentioned purpose. Therefore, we developed fast and easy protocols for characterization of zebrafish proteins in the IVMA. Our protocols enable the interested researcher to (i) isolate actin from zebrafish skeletal muscle and (ii) extract functionally intact myosin from cardiac and skeletal muscle of individual adult zebrafish. Zebrafish tail muscle actin is isolated after acetone powder preparation, polymerized, and labeled with Rhodamine-Phalloidin. Myosin from ventricles of adult zebrafish is extracted directly into IVMA flow-cells. The same extraction protocol is applicable for comparably small tissue pieces as from zebrafish tail, mouse and frog muscle. After addition of the fluorescently labeled F-actin from zebrafish—or other origin—and ATP, sliding movement can be visualized using a fluorescence microscope and an

  19. Tropomodulin Capping of Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle Development and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient striated muscle contraction requires precise assembly and regulation of diverse actin filament systems, most notably the sarcomeric thin filaments of the contractile apparatus. By capping the pointed ends of actin filaments, tropomodulins (Tmods) regulate actin filament assembly, lengths, and stability. Here, we explore the current understanding of the expression patterns, localizations, and functions of Tmods in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. We first describe the mechanisms by which Tmods regulate myofibril assembly and thin filament lengths, as well as the roles of closely related Tmod family variants, the leiomodins (Lmods), in these processes. We also discuss emerging functions for Tmods in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This paper provides abundant evidence that Tmods are key structural regulators of striated muscle cytoarchitecture and physiology. PMID:22013379

  20. Role of the adapter protein Abi1 in actin-associated signaling and smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Cleary, Rachel A; Wang, Ruping; Tang, Dale D

    2013-07-12

    Actin filament polymerization plays a critical role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. However, our knowledge regarding modulation of the actin cytoskeleton in smooth muscle just begins to accumulate. In this study, stimulation with acetylcholine (ACh) induced an increase in the association of the adapter protein c-Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) with neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) (an actin-regulatory protein) in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Furthermore, contractile stimulation activated N-WASP in live smooth muscle cells as evidenced by changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of an N-WASP sensor. Abi1 knockdown by lentivirus-mediated RNAi inhibited N-WASP activation, actin polymerization, and contraction in smooth muscle. However, Abi1 silencing did not affect myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 in smooth muscle. In addition, c-Abl tyrosine kinase and Crk-associated substrate (CAS) have been shown to regulate smooth muscle contraction. The interaction of Abi1 with c-Abl and CAS has not been investigated. Here, contractile activation induced formation of a multiprotein complex including c-Abl, CAS, and Abi1. Knockdown of c-Abl and CAS attenuated the activation of Abi1 during contractile activation. More importantly, Abi1 knockdown inhibited c-Abl phosphorylation at Tyr-412 and the interaction of c-Abl with CAS. These results suggest that Abi1 is an important component of the cellular process that regulates N-WASP activation, actin dynamics, and contraction in smooth muscle. Abi1 is activated by the c-Abl-CAS pathway, and Abi1 reciprocally controls the activation of its upstream regulator c-Abl.

  1. Role of the Adapter Protein Abi1 in Actin-associated Signaling and Smooth Muscle Contraction*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Cleary, Rachel A.; Wang, Ruping; Tang, Dale D.

    2013-01-01

    Actin filament polymerization plays a critical role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. However, our knowledge regarding modulation of the actin cytoskeleton in smooth muscle just begins to accumulate. In this study, stimulation with acetylcholine (ACh) induced an increase in the association of the adapter protein c-Abl interactor 1 (Abi1) with neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) (an actin-regulatory protein) in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Furthermore, contractile stimulation activated N-WASP in live smooth muscle cells as evidenced by changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of an N-WASP sensor. Abi1 knockdown by lentivirus-mediated RNAi inhibited N-WASP activation, actin polymerization, and contraction in smooth muscle. However, Abi1 silencing did not affect myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 in smooth muscle. In addition, c-Abl tyrosine kinase and Crk-associated substrate (CAS) have been shown to regulate smooth muscle contraction. The interaction of Abi1 with c-Abl and CAS has not been investigated. Here, contractile activation induced formation of a multiprotein complex including c-Abl, CAS, and Abi1. Knockdown of c-Abl and CAS attenuated the activation of Abi1 during contractile activation. More importantly, Abi1 knockdown inhibited c-Abl phosphorylation at Tyr-412 and the interaction of c-Abl with CAS. These results suggest that Abi1 is an important component of the cellular process that regulates N-WASP activation, actin dynamics, and contraction in smooth muscle. Abi1 is activated by the c-Abl-CAS pathway, and Abi1 reciprocally controls the activation of its upstream regulator c-Abl. PMID:23740246

  2. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filamentmore » density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  3. Rho Kinase (ROCK) collaborates with Pak to Regulate Actin Polymerization and Contraction in Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Bhetwal, Bhupal P; Gunst, Susan J

    2018-05-10

    The mechanisms by which Rho kinase (ROCK) regulates airway smooth muscle contraction were determined in tracheal smooth muscle tissues. ROCK may mediate smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphatase. ROCK can also regulate F-actin dynamics during cell migration, and actin polymerization is critical for airway smooth muscle contraction. Our results show that ROCK does not regulate airway smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting myosin RLC phosphatase or by stimulating myosin RLC phosphorylation. We find that ROCK regulates airway smooth muscle contraction by activating the serine-threonine kinase Pak, which mediates the activation of Cdc42 and Neuronal-Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (N-WASp). N-WASP transmits signals from cdc42 to the Arp2/3 complex for the nucleation of actin filaments. These results demonstrate a novel molecular function for ROCK in the regulation of Pak and cdc42 activation that is critical for the processes of actin polymerization and contractility in airway smooth muscle. Rho kinase (ROCK), a RhoA GTPase effector, can regulate the contraction of airway and other smooth muscle tissues. In some tissues, ROCK can inhibit myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphatase, which increases the phosphorylation of myosin RLC and promotes smooth muscle contraction. ROCK can also regulate cell motility and migration by affecting F-actin dynamics. Actin polymerization is stimulated by contractile agonists in airway smooth muscle tissues and is required for contractile tension development in addition to myosin RLC phosphorylation. We investigated the mechanisms by which ROCK regulates the contractility of tracheal smooth muscle tissues by expressing a kinase inactive mutant of ROCK, ROCK-K121G, in the tissues or by treating them with the ROCK inhibitor, H-1152P. Our results show no role for ROCK in the regulation of non-muscle or smooth muscle myosin RLC phosphorylation during contractile stimulation in this tissue

  4. Smooth muscle length adaptation and actin filament length: a network model of the cytoskeletal dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Paulo S P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2005-10-01

    Length adaptation of the airway smooth muscle cell is attributable to cytoskeletal remodeling. It has been proposed that dysregulated actin filaments may become longer in asthma, and that such elongation would prevent a parallel-to-series transition of contractile units, thus precluding the well-known beneficial effects of deep inspirations and tidal breathing. To test the potential effect that actin filament elongation could have in overall muscle mechanics, we present an extremely simple model. The cytoskeleton is represented as a 2-D network of links (contractile filaments) connecting nodes (adhesion plaques). Such a network evolves in discrete time steps by forming and dissolving links in a stochastic fashion. Links are formed by idealized contractile units whose properties are either those from normal or elongated actin filaments. Oscillations were then imposed on the network to evaluate both the effects of breathing and length adaptation. In response to length oscillation, a network with longer actin filaments showed smaller decreases of force, smaller increases in compliance, and higher shortening velocities. Taken together, these changes correspond to a network that is refractory to the effects of breathing and therefore approximates an asthmatic scenario. Thus, an extremely simple model seems to capture some relatively complex mechanics of airway smooth muscle, supporting the idea that dysregulation of actin filament length may contribute to excessive airway narrowing.

  5. Definite differences between in vitro actin-myosin sliding and muscle contraction as revealed using antibodies to myosin head.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Haruo; Chaen, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Abe, Takahiro; Kimura, Kazushige; Saeki, Yasutake; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2014-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from attachment-detachment cycles between myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and actin filaments. It is generally believed that a myosin head first attaches to actin, undergoes conformational changes to produce force and motion in muscle, and then detaches from actin. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanism of myosin head conformational changes still remains to be a matter for debate and speculation. The myosin head consists of catalytic (CAD), converter (CVD) and lever arm (LD) domains. To give information about the role of these domains in the myosin head performance, we have examined the effect of three site-directed antibodies to the myosin head on in vitro ATP-dependent actin-myosin sliding and Ca2+-activated contraction of muscle fibers. Antibody 1, attaching to junctional peptide between 50K and 20K heavy chain segments in the CAD, exhibited appreciable effects neither on in vitro actin-myosin sliding nor muscle fiber contraction. Since antibody 1 covers actin-binding sites of the CAD, one interpretation of this result is that rigor actin-myosin linkage is absent or at most a transient intermediate in physiological actin-myosin cycling. Antibody 2, attaching to reactive lysine residue in the CVD, showed a marked inhibitory effect on in vitro actin-myosin sliding without changing actin-activated myosin head (S1) ATPase activity, while it showed no appreciable effect on muscle contraction. Antibody 3, attaching to two peptides of regulatory light chains in the LD, had no significant effect on in vitro actin-myosin sliding, while it reduced force development in muscle fibers without changing MgATPase activity. The above definite differences in the effect of antibodies 2 and 3 between in vitro actin-myosin sliding and muscle contraction can be explained by difference in experimental conditions; in the former, myosin heads are randomly oriented on a glass surface, while in the latter myosin heads are regularly

  6. Modification of the kinetic parameters of aldolase on binding to the actin-containing filaments of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, T P; Clarke, F M; Masters, C J

    1977-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of fructose bisphosphate aldolase (EC 4.1.2.13) were shown to be modified on binding of the enzyme to the actin-containing filaments of skeletal muscle. Although binding to F-actin or F-actin-tropomyosin filaments results in relative minor changes in kinetic properties, binding to F-actin-tropomyosin-troponin filaments produces major alterations in the kinetic parameters, and, in addition, renders them Ca2+-sensitive. These observations may be relevant to an understanding of the function of this enzyme within the muscle fibre. PMID:889571

  7. CTP synthase 1, a smooth muscle-sensitive therapeutic target for effective vascular repair

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Cui, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Jia-Ning; Chen, Shi-You

    2013-01-01

    Objective Vascular remodeling due to smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and neointima formation is a major medical challenge in cardiovascular intervention. However, anti-neointima drugs often indistinguishably block re-endothelialization, an essential step toward successful vascular repair, due to their non-specific effect on endothelial cells (EC). The objective of this study was to identify a therapeutic target that differentially regulates SMC and EC proliferation. Approach and Results By using both rat balloon-injury and mouse wire-injury models, we identified CTP synthase (CTPS) as one of the potential targets that may be used for developing therapeutics for treating neointima-related disorders. CTPS1 was induced in proliferative SMCs in vitro and neointima SMCs in vivo. Blockade of CTPS1 expression by small hairpin RNA or activity by cyclopentenyl cytosine suppressed SMC proliferation and neointima formation. Surprisingly, cyclopentenyl cytosine had much less effect on EC proliferation. Of importance, blockade of CTPS1 in vivo sustained the re-endothelialization due to induction of CTP synthesis salvage pathway enzymes nucleoside diphosphate kinase A and B in ECs. Diphosphate kinase B appeared to preserve EC proliferation via utilization of extracellular cytidine to synthesize CTP. Indeed, blockade of both CTPS1 and diphosphate kinase B suppressed EC proliferation in vitro and the re-endothelization in vivo. Conclusions Our study uncovered a fundamental difference in CTP biosynthesis between SMCs and ECs during vascular remodeling, which provided a novel strategy by using cyclopentenyl cytosine or other CTPS1 inhibitors to selectively block SMC proliferation without disturbing or even promoting re-endothelialization for effective vascular repair following injury. PMID:24008161

  8. The Kinetics Underlying the Velocity of Smooth Muscle Myosin Filament Sliding on Actin Filaments in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Haldeman, Brian D.; Brizendine, Richard K.; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Baker, Josh E.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2014-01-01

    Actin-myosin interactions are well studied using soluble myosin fragments, but little is known about effects of myosin filament structure on mechanochemistry. We stabilized unphosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (SMM) and phosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (pSMM) filaments against ATP-induced depolymerization using a cross-linker and attached fluorescent rhodamine (XL-Rh-SMM). Electron micrographs showed that these side polar filaments are very similar to unmodified filaments. They are ∼0.63 μm long and contain ∼176 molecules. Rate constants for ATP-induced dissociation and ADP release from acto-myosin for filaments and S1 heads were similar. Actin-activated ATPases of SMM and XL-Rh-SMM were similarly regulated. XL-Rh-pSMM filaments moved processively on F-actin that was bound to a PEG brush surface. ATP dependence of filament velocities was similar to that for solution ATPases at high [actin], suggesting that both processes are limited by the same kinetic step (weak to strong transition) and therefore are attachment-limited. This differs from actin sliding over myosin monomers, which is primarily detachment-limited. Fitting filament data to an attachment-limited model showed that approximately half of the heads are available to move the filament, consistent with a side polar structure. We suggest the low stiffness subfragment 2 (S2) domain remains unhindered during filament motion in our assay. Actin-bound negatively displaced heads will impart minimal drag force because of S2 buckling. Given the ADP release rate, the velocity, and the length of S2, these heads will detach from actin before slack is taken up into a backwardly displaced high stiffness position. This mechanism explains the lack of detachment-limited kinetics at physiological [ATP]. These findings address how nonlinear elasticity in assemblies of motors leads to efficient collective force generation. PMID:24907276

  9. Drebrin-like protein DBN-1 is a sarcomere component that stabilizes actin filaments during muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Bodensiek, Kai; Fakhri, Nikta; von Roden, Kerstin; Schaap, Iwan A T; Majoul, Irina; Schmidt, Christoph F; Klopfenstein, Dieter R

    2015-07-06

    Actin filament organization and stability in the sarcomeres of muscle cells are critical for force generation. Here we identify and functionally characterize a Caenorhabditis elegans drebrin-like protein DBN-1 as a novel constituent of the muscle contraction machinery. In vitro, DBN-1 exhibits actin filament binding and bundling activity. In vivo, DBN-1 is expressed in body wall muscles of C. elegans. During the muscle contraction cycle, DBN-1 alternates location between myosin- and actin-rich regions of the sarcomere. In contracted muscle, DBN-1 is accumulated at I-bands where it likely regulates proper spacing of α-actinin and tropomyosin and protects actin filaments from the interaction with ADF/cofilin. DBN-1 loss of function results in the partial depolymerization of F-actin during muscle contraction. Taken together, our data show that DBN-1 organizes the muscle contractile apparatus maintaining the spatial relationship between actin-binding proteins such as α-actinin, tropomyosin and ADF/cofilin and possibly strengthening actin filaments by bundling.

  10. Critical role of actin-associated proteins in smooth muscle contraction, cell proliferation, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dale D

    2015-10-30

    Asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling, which are largely attributed to increased airway smooth muscle contractility and cell proliferation. It is known that both chemical and mechanical stimulation regulates smooth muscle contraction. Recent studies suggest that contractile activation and mechanical stretch induce actin cytoskeletal remodeling in smooth muscle. However, the mechanisms that control actin cytoskeletal reorganization are not completely elucidated. This review summarizes our current understanding regarding how actin-associated proteins may regulate remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton in airway smooth muscle. In particular, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) plays a critical role in regulating airway smooth muscle contraction and cell proliferation in vitro, and airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling in vivo. These studies indicate that Abl may be a novel target for the development of new therapy to treat asthma.

  11. Low-intensity infrared lasers alter actin gene expression in skin and muscle tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.; Campos, V. M. A.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; Peregrino, A. A. F.; Magalhães, L. A. G.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2013-02-01

    The biostimulative effect of low-intensity lasers is the basis for treatment of diseases in soft tissues. However, data about the influence of biostimulative lasers on gene expression are still scarce. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of low-intensity infrared lasers on the expression of actin mRNA in skin and muscle tissue. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats was exposed to low-intensity infrared laser radiation at different fluences and frequencies. One and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and evaluation of actin gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The data obtained show that laser radiation alters the expression of actin mRNA differently in skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats depending of the fluence, frequency and time after exposure. The results could be useful for laser dosimetry, as well as to justify the therapeutic protocols for treatment of diseases of skin and muscle tissues based on low-intensity infrared laser radiation.

  12. Design of a muscle cell-specific expression vector utilising human vascular smooth muscle alpha-actin regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Keogh, M C; Chen, D; Schmitt, J F; Dennehy, U; Kakkar, V V; Lemoine, N R

    1999-04-01

    The facility to direct tissue-specific expression of therapeutic gene constructs is desirable for many gene therapy applications. We describe the creation of a muscle-selective expression vector which supports transcription in vascular smooth muscle, cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle, while it is essentially silent in other cell types such as endothelial cells, hepatocytes and fibroblasts. Specific transcriptional regulatory elements have been identified in the human vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) alpha-actin gene, and used to create an expression vector which directs the expression of genes in cis to muscle cells. The vector contains an enhancer element we have identified in the 5' flanking region of the human VSMC alpha-actin gene involved in mediating VSMC expression. Heterologous pairing experiments have shown that the enhancer does not interact with the basal transcription complex recruited at the minimal SV40 early promoter. Such a vector has direct application in the modulation of VSMC proliferation associated with intimal hyperplasia/restenosis.

  13. Definite Differences between In Vitro Actin-Myosin Sliding and Muscle Contraction as Revealed Using Antibodies to Myosin Head

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Haruo; Chaen, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Abe, Takahiro; Kimura, Kazushige; Saeki, Yasutake; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2014-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from attachment-detachment cycles between myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and actin filaments. It is generally believed that a myosin head first attaches to actin, undergoes conformational changes to produce force and motion in muscle, and then detaches from actin. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanism of myosin head conformational changes still remains to be a matter for debate and speculation. The myosin head consists of catalytic (CAD), converter (CVD) and lever arm (LD) domains. To give information about the role of these domains in the myosin head performance, we have examined the effect of three site-directed antibodies to the myosin head on in vitro ATP-dependent actin-myosin sliding and Ca2+-activated contraction of muscle fibers. Antibody 1, attaching to junctional peptide between 50K and 20K heavy chain segments in the CAD, exhibited appreciable effects neither on in vitro actin-myosin sliding nor muscle fiber contraction. Since antibody 1 covers actin-binding sites of the CAD, one interpretation of this result is that rigor actin-myosin linkage is absent or at most a transient intermediate in physiological actin-myosin cycling. Antibody 2, attaching to reactive lysine residue in the CVD, showed a marked inhibitory effect on in vitro actin-myosin sliding without changing actin-activated myosin head (S1) ATPase activity, while it showed no appreciable effect on muscle contraction. Antibody 3, attaching to two peptides of regulatory light chains in the LD, had no significant effect on in vitro actin-myosin sliding, while it reduced force development in muscle fibers without changing MgATPase activity. The above definite differences in the effect of antibodies 2 and 3 between in vitro actin-myosin sliding and muscle contraction can be explained by difference in experimental conditions; in the former, myosin heads are randomly oriented on a glass surface, while in the latter myosin heads are regularly

  14. Xin, an actin binding protein, is expressed within muscle satellite cells and newly regenerated skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Thomas J; Atkinson, Daniel J; Kanatous, Shane B; Van der Ven, Peter F M; Goetsch, Sean C; Garry, Daniel J

    2007-11-01

    Xin is a muscle-specific actin binding protein of which its role and regulation within skeletal muscle is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that Xin mRNA is robustly upregulated (>16-fold) within 12 h of skeletal muscle injury and is localized to the muscle satellite cell population. RT-PCR confirmed the expression pattern of Xin during regeneration, as well as within primary muscle myoblast cultures, but not other known stem cell populations. Immunohistochemical staining of single myofibers demonstrate Xin expression colocalized with the satellite cell marker Syndecan-4 further supporting the mRNA expression of Xin in satellite cells. In situ hybridization of regenerating muscle 5-7 days postinjury illustrates Xin expression within newly regenerated myofibers. Promoter-reporter assays demonstrate that known myogenic transcription factors [myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2), myogenic differentiation-1 (MyoD), and myogenic factor-5 (Myf-5)] transactivate Xin promoter constructs supporting the muscle-specific expression of Xin. To determine the role of Xin within muscle precursor cells, proliferation, migration, and differentiation analysis using Xin, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were undertaken in C2C12 myoblasts. Reducing endogenous Xin expression resulted in a 26% increase (P < 0.05) in cell proliferation and a 20% increase (P < 0.05) in myoblast migratory capacity. Skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain protein levels were increased (P < 0.05) with Xin shRNA administration; however, this was not accompanied by changes in myoglobin protein (another marker of differentiation) nor overt morphological differences relative to differentiating control cells. Taken together, the present findings support the hypothesis that Xin is expressed within muscle satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration and is involved in the regulation of myoblast function.

  15. Drosophila melanogaster muscle LIM protein and alpha-actinin function together to stabilize muscle cytoarchitecture: a potential role for Mlp84B in actin-crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kathleen A; Kadrmas, Julie L

    2013-06-01

    Stabilization of tissue architecture during development and growth is essential to maintain structural integrity. Because of its contractile nature, muscle is especially susceptible to physiological stresses, and has multiple mechanisms to maintain structural integrity. The Drosophila melanogaster Muscle LIM Protein (MLP), Mlp84B, participates in muscle maintenance, yet its precise mechanism of action is still controversial. Through a candidate approach, we identified α-actinin as a protein that functions with Mlp84B to ensure muscle integrity. α-actinin RNAi animals die primarily as pupae, and Mlp84B RNAi animals are adult viable. RNAi knockdown of Mlp84B and α-actinin together produces synergistic early larval lethality and destabilization of Z-line structures. We recapitulated these phenotypes using combinations of traditional loss-of-function alleles and single-gene RNAi. We observe that Mlp84B induces the formation of actin loops in muscle cell nuclei in the absence of nuclear α-actinin, suggesting Mlp84B has intrinsic actin cross-linking activity, which may complement α-actinin cross-linking activity at sites of actin filament anchorage. These results reveal a molecular mechanism for MLP stabilization of muscle and implicate reduced actin crosslinking as the primary destabilizing defect in MLP-associated cardiomyopathies. Our data support a model in which α-actinin and Mlp84B have important and overlapping functions at sites of actin filament anchorage to preserve muscle structure and function. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Contribution of α-smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix to the in vitro reorganization of cardiomyocyte contractile system.

    PubMed

    Bildyug, Natalya; Bozhokina, Ekaterina; Khaitlina, Sofia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiomyocytes in culture undergo reversible rearrangement of their contractile apparatus with the conversion of typical myofibrils into the structures of non-muscle type and the loss of contractility. Along with these transformations, the cardiomyocytes gain the capacity to synthesize extracellular matrix. Here we show that during cultivation of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, the inherent α-cardiac actin isoform is transiently replaced by α-smooth-muscle actin, whose expression is accompanied by transformation of myofibrils into stress-fiber-like structures. The following down-regulation of α-smooth muscle actin parallels restoration of myofibrillar system and correlates with the accumulation of extracellular collagen and laminin, initially missing from the cardiomyocytes culture. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  17. Diffusion of myosin light chain kinase on actin: A mechanism to enhance myosin phosphorylation rates in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; Brizendine, Richard K; Carter, Michael S; Alcala, Diego B; Brown, Avery E; Chattin, Amy M; Haldeman, Brian D; Walsh, Michael P; Facemyer, Kevin C; Baker, Josh E; Cremo, Christine R

    2015-10-01

    Smooth muscle myosin (SMM) light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates SMM, thereby activating the ATPase activity required for muscle contraction. The abundance of active MLCK, which is tightly associated with the contractile apparatus, is low relative to that of SMM. SMM phosphorylation is rapid despite the low ratio of MLCK to SMM, raising the question of how one MLCK rapidly phosphorylates many SMM molecules. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor single molecules of streptavidin-coated quantum dot-labeled MLCK interacting with purified actin, actin bundles, and stress fibers of smooth muscle cells. Surprisingly, MLCK and the N-terminal 75 residues of MLCK (N75) moved on actin bundles and stress fibers of smooth muscle cell cytoskeletons by a random one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion mechanism. Although diffusion of proteins along microtubules and oligonucleotides has been observed previously, this is the first characterization to our knowledge of a protein diffusing in a sustained manner along actin. By measuring the frequency of motion, we found that MLCK motion is permitted only if acto-myosin and MLCK-myosin interactions are weak. From these data, diffusion coefficients, and other kinetic and geometric considerations relating to the contractile apparatus, we suggest that 1-D diffusion of MLCK along actin (a) ensures that diffusion is not rate limiting for phosphorylation, (b) allows MLCK to locate to areas in which myosin is not yet phosphorylated, and (c) allows MLCK to avoid getting "stuck" on myosins that have already been phosphorylated. Diffusion of MLCK along actin filaments may be an important mechanism for enhancing the rate of SMM phosphorylation in smooth muscle. © 2015 Hong et al.

  18. Protein Kinase Cζ Mediates Insulin-induced Glucose Transport through Actin Remodeling in L6 Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Zhong; Zhao, Hai-Lu; Zuo, Jin; Ho, Stanley K.S.; Chan, Juliana C.N.; Meng, Yan; Fang, Fu-De; Tong, Peter C.Y.

    2006-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) ζ has been implicated in insulin-induced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cell, although the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of PKCζ on actin remodeling and glucose transport in differentiated rat L6 muscle cells expressing myc-tagged glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). On insulin stimulation, PKCζ translocated from low-density microsomes to plasma membrane accompanied by increase in GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake. Z-scan confocal microscopy revealed a spatial colocalization of relocated PKCζ with the small GTPase Rac-1, actin, and GLUT4 after insulin stimulation. The insulin-mediated colocalization, PKCζ distribution, GLUT4 translocation, and glucose uptake were inhibited by wortmannin and cell-permeable PKCζ pseudosubstrate peptide. In stable transfected cells, overexpression of PKCζ caused an insulin-like effect on actin remodeling accompanied by a 2.1-fold increase in GLUT4 translocation and 1.7-fold increase in glucose uptake in the absence of insulin. The effects of PKCζ overexpression were abolished by cell-permeable PKCζ pseudosubstrate peptide, but not wortmannin. Transient transfection of constitutively active Rac-1 recruited PKCζ to new structures resembling actin remodeling, whereas dominant negative Rac-1 prevented the insulin-mediated PKCζ translocation. Together, these results suggest that PKCζ mediates insulin effect on glucose transport through actin remodeling in muscle cells. PMID:16525020

  19. Vasodilator-stimulated Phosphoprotein (VASP) Regulates Actin Polymerization and Contraction in Airway Smooth Muscle by a Vinculin-dependent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yidi; Gunst, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) can catalyze actin polymerization by elongating actin filaments. The elongation mechanism involves VASP oligomerization and its binding to profilin, a G-actin chaperone. Actin polymerization is required for tension generation during the contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, the role of VASP in regulating actin dynamics in ASM is not known. We stimulated ASM cells and tissues with the contractile agonist acetylcholine (ACh) or the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin (FSK), a dilatory agent. ACh and FSK stimulated VASP Ser157 phosphorylation by different kinases. Inhibition of VASP Ser157 phosphorylation by expression of the mutant VASP S157A in ASM tissues suppressed VASP phosphorylation and membrane localization in response to ACh, and also inhibited contraction and actin polymerization. ACh but not FSK triggered the formation of VASP-VASP complexes as well as VASP-vinculin and VASP-profilin complexes at membrane sites. VASP-VASP complex formation and the interaction of VASP with vinculin and profilin were inhibited by expression of the inactive vinculin mutant, vinculin Y1065F, but VASP phosphorylation and membrane localization were unaffected. We conclude that VASP phosphorylation at Ser157 mediates its localization at the membrane, but that VASP Ser157 phosphorylation and membrane localization are not sufficient to activate its actin catalytic activity. The interaction of VASP with activated vinculin at membrane adhesion sites is a necessary prerequisite for VASP-mediated molecular processes necessary for actin polymerization. Our results show that VASP is a critical regulator of actin dynamics and tension generation during the contractile activation of ASM. PMID:25759389

  20. Z-disc-associated, Alternatively Spliced, PDZ Motif-containing Protein (ZASP) Mutations in the Actin-binding Domain Cause Disruption of Skeletal Muscle Actin Filaments in Myofibrillar Myopathy*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoyan; Ruiz, Janelle; Bajraktari, Ilda; Ohman, Rachel; Banerjee, Soojay; Gribble, Katherine; Kaufman, Joshua D.; Wingfield, Paul T.; Griggs, Robert C.; Fischbeck, Kenneth H.; Mankodi, Ami

    2014-01-01

    The core of skeletal muscle Z-discs consists of actin filaments from adjacent sarcomeres that are cross-linked by α-actinin homodimers. Z-disc-associated, alternatively spliced, PDZ motif-containing protein (ZASP)/Cypher interacts with α-actinin, myotilin, and other Z-disc proteins via the PDZ domain. However, these interactions are not sufficient to maintain the Z-disc structure. We show that ZASP directly interacts with skeletal actin filaments. The actin-binding domain is between the modular PDZ and LIM domains. This ZASP region is alternatively spliced so that each isoform has unique actin-binding domains. All ZASP isoforms contain the exon 6-encoded ZASP-like motif that is mutated in zaspopathy, a myofibrillar myopathy (MFM), whereas the exon 8–11 junction-encoded peptide is exclusive to the postnatal long ZASP isoform (ZASP-LΔex10). MFM is characterized by disruption of skeletal muscle Z-discs and accumulation of myofibrillar degradation products. Wild-type and mutant ZASP interact with α-actin, α-actinin, and myotilin. Expression of mutant, but not wild-type, ZASP leads to Z-disc disruption and F-actin accumulation in mouse skeletal muscle, as in MFM. Mutations in the actin-binding domain of ZASP-LΔex10, but not other isoforms, cause disruption of the actin cytoskeleton in muscle cells. These isoform-specific mutation effects highlight the essential role of the ZASP-LΔex10 isoform in F-actin organization. Our results show that MFM-associated ZASP mutations in the actin-binding domain have deleterious effects on the core structure of the Z-discs in skeletal muscle. PMID:24668811

  1. Twelve actin-encoding cDNAs from the American lobster, Homarus americanus: cloning and tissue expression of eight skeletal muscle, one heart, and three cytoplasmic isoforms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Kwang; Kim, Kyoung Sun; Oh, Chul-Woong; Mykles, Donald L; Lee, Sung Gu; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2009-06-01

    Lobster muscles express a diverse array of myofibrillar protein isoforms. Three fiber types (fast, slow-twitch or S1, and slow-tonic or S2) differ qualitatively and quantitatively in myosin heavy and light chains, troponin-T, -I, and -C, paramyosin, and tropomyosin variants. However, little is known about the diversity of actin isoforms present in crustacean tissues. In this report we characterized cDNAs that encode twelve actin isoforms in the American lobster, Homarus americanus: eight from skeletal muscle (Ha-ActinSK1-8), one from heart (Ha-ActinHT1), and three cytoplasmic type actins from hepatopancreas (Ha-ActinCT1-3). All twelve cDNAs were products of distinct genes, as indicated by differences in the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs). The open reading frames specified polypeptides 376 or 377 amino acids in length. Although key amino residues are conserved in the lobster actins, variations in nearby sequences may affect actin polymerization and/or interactions with other myofibrillar proteins. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed muscle fiber type- and tissue-specific expression patterns. Ha-Actin-HT1 was expressed exclusively in heart (87% of the total; 12% of the total was Ha-ActinCT1). Ha-ActinCT1 was expressed in all tissues, while CT2 and CT3 were expressed only in hepatopancreas, with Ha-ActinCT2 as the major isoform (93% of the total). Ha-ActinSK1 and SK2 were the major isoforms (88% and 12% of the total, respectively) in the S1 fibers of crusher claw closer muscle. Fast fibers in the cutter claw closer and deep abdominal muscles differed in SK isoforms. Ha-ActinSK3, SK4, and SK5 were the major isoforms in cutter claw closer muscle (12%, 48%, and 37% of the total, respectively). Ha-ActinSK5 and SK8 were the major isoforms in deep abdominal flexor (31% and 65% of the total, respectively) and extensor (46% and 53% of the total, respectively) muscles, with SK6 and SK7 expressed at low levels. These data indicate that fast

  2. p21-Activated kinase (Pak) regulates airway smooth muscle contraction by regulating paxillin complexes that mediate actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Huang, Youliang; Gunst, Susan J

    2016-09-01

    In airway smooth muscle, tension development caused by a contractile stimulus requires phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain (MLC), which activates crossbridge cycling and the polymerization of a pool of submembraneous actin. The p21-activated kinases (Paks) can regulate the contractility of smooth muscle and non-muscle cells, and there is evidence that this occurs through the regulation of MLC phosphorylation. We show that Pak has no effect on MLC phosphorylation during the contraction of airway smooth muscle, and that it regulates contraction by mediating actin polymerization. We find that Pak phosphorylates the adhesion junction protein, paxillin, on Ser273, which promotes the formation of a signalling complex that activates the small GTPase, cdc42, and the actin polymerization catalyst, neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP). These studies demonstrate a novel role for Pak in regulating the contractility of smooth muscle by regulating actin polymerization. The p21-activated kinases (Pak) can regulate contractility in smooth muscle and other cell and tissue types, but the mechanisms by which Paks regulate cell contractility are unclear. In airway smooth muscle, stimulus-induced contraction requires phosphorylation of the 20 kDa light chain of myosin, which activates crossbridge cycling, as well as the polymerization of a small pool of actin. The role of Pak in airway smooth muscle contraction was evaluated by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh)-induced Pak activation through the expression of a kinase inactive mutant, Pak1 K299R, or by treating tissues with the Pak inhibitor, IPA3. Pak inhibition suppressed actin polymerization and contraction in response to ACh, but it did not affect myosin light chain phosphorylation. Pak activation induced paxillin phosphorylation on Ser273; the paxillin mutant, paxillin S273A, inhibited paxillin Ser273 phosphorylation and inhibited actin polymerization and contraction. Immunoprecipitation analysis of

  3. p21‐Activated kinase (Pak) regulates airway smooth muscle contraction by regulating paxillin complexes that mediate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenwu; Huang, Youliang

    2016-01-01

    Key points In airway smooth muscle, tension development caused by a contractile stimulus requires phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain (MLC), which activates crossbridge cycling and the polymerization of a pool of submembraneous actin.The p21‐activated kinases (Paks) can regulate the contractility of smooth muscle and non‐muscle cells, and there is evidence that this occurs through the regulation of MLC phosphorylation.We show that Pak has no effect on MLC phosphorylation during the contraction of airway smooth muscle, and that it regulates contraction by mediating actin polymerization.We find that Pak phosphorylates the adhesion junction protein, paxillin, on Ser273, which promotes the formation of a signalling complex that activates the small GTPase, cdc42, and the actin polymerization catalyst, neuronal Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (N‐WASP).These studies demonstrate a novel role for Pak in regulating the contractility of smooth muscle by regulating actin polymerization. Abstract The p21‐activated kinases (Pak) can regulate contractility in smooth muscle and other cell and tissue types, but the mechanisms by which Paks regulate cell contractility are unclear. In airway smooth muscle, stimulus‐induced contraction requires phosphorylation of the 20 kDa light chain of myosin, which activates crossbridge cycling, as well as the polymerization of a small pool of actin. The role of Pak in airway smooth muscle contraction was evaluated by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh)‐induced Pak activation through the expression of a kinase inactive mutant, Pak1 K299R, or by treating tissues with the Pak inhibitor, IPA3. Pak inhibition suppressed actin polymerization and contraction in response to ACh, but it did not affect myosin light chain phosphorylation. Pak activation induced paxillin phosphorylation on Ser273; the paxillin mutant, paxillin S273A, inhibited paxillin Ser273 phosphorylation and inhibited actin polymerization and contraction

  4. A smooth muscle tone-dependent stretch-activated migrating motor pattern in isolated guinea-pig distal colon.

    PubMed

    Smith, Terence K; Oliver, Gavin R; Hennig, Grant W; O'Shea, Deirdre M; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Kang, Sok Han; Spencer, Nick J

    2003-09-15

    We have investigated the tone dependence of the intrinsic nervous activity generated by localized wall distension in isolated segments of guinea-pig distal colon using mechanical recordings and video imaging of wall movements. A segment of colon was threaded through two partitions, which divided the colon for pharmacological purposes into oral, stimulation and anal regions. An intraluminal balloon was located in the stimulation region between the two partitions (12 mm apart). Maintained colonic distension by an intraluminal balloon or an artificial faecal pellet held at a fixed location generated rhythmic (frequency 0.3 contractions min(-1); duration approximately 60 s) peristaltic waves of contraction. Video imaging of colonic wall movements or the selective application of pharmacological agents suggested that peristaltic waves originated just oral (< or = 4 mm) to the pellet and propagated both orally (approximately 11 mm s(-1)) and anally (approximately 1 mm s(-1)). Also, during a peristaltic wave the colon appears to passively shorten in front of a pellet, as a result of an active contraction of the longitudinal muscle oral to the pellet. Faecal pellet movement only occurred when a rhythmic peristaltic wave was generated. Rhythmic peristaltic waves were abolished in all regions by the smooth muscle relaxants isoproterenol (1 microM), nicardipine (1 microM) or papavarine (10 microM), and by the neural antagonists tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.6 microM), hexamethonium (100 microM) or atropine (1 microM), when added selectively to the stimulation region. Nicardipine, atropine, TTX, or hexamethonium (100 microM) also blocked the evoked peristaltic waves when selectively added to the oral region. Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA; 100 microM) added to the anal region reduced the anal relaxation but increased the anal contraction, leading to an increase in the apparent conduction velocity of each peristaltic wave. In conclusion, maintained distension by a fixed artificial pellet

  5. Modulators of actin-myosin dissociation: basis for muscle type functional differences during fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Karatzaferi, Christina; Adamek, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    The muscle types present with variable fatigue tolerance, in part due to the myosin isoform expressed. However, the critical steps that define “fatigability” in vivo of fast vs. slow myosin isoforms, at the molecular level, are not yet fully understood. We examined the modulation of the ATP-induced myosin subfragment 1 (S1) dissociation from pyrene-actin by inorganic phosphate (Pi), pH, and temperature using a specially modified stopped-flow system that allowed fast kinetics measurements at physiological temperature. We contrasted the properties of rabbit psoas (fast) and bovine masseter (slow) myosins (obtained from samples collected from New Zealand rabbits and from a licensed abattoir, respectively, according to institutional and national ethics permits). To identify ATP cycling biochemical intermediates, we assessed ATP binding to a preequilibrated mixture of actomyosin and variable [ADP], pH (pH 7 vs. pH 6.2), and Pi (zero, 15, or 30 added mM Pi) in a range of temperatures (5 to 45°C). Temperature and pH variations had little, if any, effect on the ADP dissociation constant (KADP) for fast S1, but for slow S1, KADP was weakened with increasing temperature or low pH. In the absence of ADP, the dissociation constant for phosphate (KPi) was weakened with increasing temperature for fast S1. In the presence of ADP, myosin type differences were revealed at the apparent phosphate affinity, depending on pH and temperature. Overall, the newly revealed kinetic differences between myosin types could help explain the in vivo observed muscle type functional differences at rest and during fatigue. PMID:28931538

  6. Role of Alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin and Fibroblast Activation Protein Alpha in Ovarian Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ana Carolinne; Jammal, Millena Prata; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Nomelini, Rosekeila Simões

    2018-04-05

    Studies show that tumor growth is not just determined by the presence of malignant cells, since interactions between cancer cells and stromal microenvironment have important impacts on the cancer growth and progression. Cancer-associated fibroblasts play a prominent role in this process. The aims of the study were to investigate 2 cancer-associated fibroblasts markers, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAP) in the stromal microenvironment of benign and malignant ovarian epithelial neoplasms, and to relate their tissue expression with prognostic factors in ovarian cancer. α-SMA and FAP were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in malignant (n = 28) and benign (n = 28) ovarian neoplasms. Fisher's exact test was used with a significance level lower than 0.05. FAP immunostaining was stronger in ovarian cancer when compared to benign neoplasms (p = 0.0366). There was no significant difference in relation to α-SMA expression between malignant and benign ovarian neoplasms as well as prognostic factors. In ovarian cancer, FAP stainings 2/3 was significantly related to histological grades 2 and 3 (p = 0.0183). FAP immunostaining is more intense in malignant neoplasms than in benign ovarian neoplasms, as well as in moderately differentiated and undifferentiated ovarian carcinomas compared to well-differentiated neoplasms, thus indicating that it can be used as a marker of worse prognosis. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Stretching human mesenchymal stromal cells on stiffness-customized collagen type I generates a smooth muscle marker profile without growth factor addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothdiener, Miriam; Hegemann, Miriam; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Walters, Brandan; Papugy, Piruntha; Nguyen, Phong; Claus, Valentin; Seeger, Tanja; Stoeckle, Ulrich; Boehme, Karen A.; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Stegemann, Jan P.; Hart, Melanie L.; Kurz, Bodo; Klein, Gerd; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    Using matrix elasticity and cyclic stretch have been investigated for inducing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation towards the smooth muscle cell (SMC) lineage but not in combination. We hypothesized that combining lineage-specific stiffness with cyclic stretch would result in a significantly increased expression of SMC markers, compared to non-stretched controls. First, we generated dense collagen type I sheets by mechanically compressing collagen hydrogels. Atomic force microscopy revealed a nanoscale stiffness range known to support myogenic differentiation. Further characterization revealed viscoelasticity and stable biomechanical properties under cyclic stretch with >99% viable adherent human MSC. MSCs on collagen sheets demonstrated a significantly increased mRNA but not protein expression of SMC markers, compared to on culture flasks. However, cyclic stretch of MSCs on collagen sheets significantly increased both mRNA and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transgelin, and calponin versus plastic and non-stretched sheets. Thus, lineage-specific stiffness and cyclic stretch can be applied together for inducing MSC differentiation towards SMCs without the addition of recombinant growth factors or other soluble factors. This represents a novel stimulation method for modulating the phenotype of MSCs towards SMCs that could easily be incorporated into currently available methodologies to obtain a more targeted control of MSC phenotype.

  8. Gene transfer with a vector expressing Maxi-K from a smooth muscle-specific promoter restores erectile function in the aging rat.

    PubMed

    Melman, A; Biggs, G; Davies, K; Zhao, W; Tar, M T; Christ, G J

    2008-03-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that gene transfer with the alpha, or pore-forming, subunit of the human Maxi-K channel (hSlo) restores the decline in erectile capacity observed in established rat models of diabetes and aging. Preliminary data from a human clinical trial also showed safety and potential efficacy in 11 men treated with the same plasmid construct expressing the Maxi-K channel. In all instances, the original plasmid was driven by the heterologous cytomegalovirus promoter which is broadly active in a wide variety of cell and tissue types. To more precisely determine the contribution of the corporal myocyte to the observed physiological effects in vivo, we report here our initial work using a distinct vector (pSMAA-hSlo) in which hSlo gene expression was driven off the mouse smooth muscle alpha-actin (SMAA) promoter. Specifically, older rats, with diminished erectile capacity, were given a single intracorporal injection with either 100 mug pVAX-hSlo or 10, 100 or 1000 mug pSMAA-hSlo, or vector or vehicle alone. Significantly increased intracavernous pressure (ICP) responses to cavernous nerve stimulation were observed for all doses of both plasmids encoding hSlo, relative to control injections. These data confirm and extend previous observations to document that smooth muscle cell-specific expression of hSlo in corporal tissue is both necessary and sufficient to restore erectile function in aging rats.

  9. The actin-related p41ARC subunit contributes to p21-activated kinase-1 (PAK1)-mediated glucose uptake into skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Zhang, Jing; Aslamy, Arianne; Salunkhe, Vishal A; Brozinick, Joseph T; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S; Thurmond, Debbie C

    2017-11-17

    Defects in translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 are associated with peripheral insulin resistance, preclinical diabetes, and progression to type 2 diabetes. GLUT4 recruitment to the plasma membrane of skeletal muscle cells requires F-actin remodeling. Insulin signaling in muscle requires p21-activated kinase-1 (PAK1), whose downstream signaling triggers actin remodeling, which promotes GLUT4 vesicle translocation and glucose uptake into skeletal muscle cells. Actin remodeling is a cyclic process, and although PAK1 is known to initiate changes to the cortical actin-binding protein cofilin to stimulate the depolymerizing arm of the cycle, how PAK1 might trigger the polymerizing arm of the cycle remains unresolved. Toward this, we investigated whether PAK1 contributes to the mechanisms involving the actin-binding and -polymerizing proteins neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), cortactin, and ARP2/3 subunits. We found that the actin-polymerizing ARP2/3 subunit p41ARC is a PAK1 substrate in skeletal muscle cells. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that insulin stimulates p41ARC phosphorylation and increases its association with N-WASP coordinately with the associations of N-WASP with cortactin and actin. Importantly, all of these associations were ablated by the PAK inhibitor IPA3, suggesting that PAK1 activation lies upstream of these actin-polymerizing complexes. Using the N-WASP inhibitor wiskostatin, we further demonstrated that N-WASP is required for localized F-actin polymerization, GLUT4 vesicle translocation, and glucose uptake. These results expand the model of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells by implicating p41ARC as a new component of the insulin-signaling cascade and connecting PAK1 signaling to N-WASP-cortactin-mediated actin polymerization and GLUT4 vesicle translocation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Acetylcholine-dependent upregulation of TASK-1 channels in thalamic interneurons by a smooth muscle-like signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Leist, Michael; Rinné, Susanne; Datunashvili, Maia; Aissaoui, Ania; Pape, Hans-Christian; Decher, Niels; Meuth, Sven G; Budde, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The ascending brainstem transmitter acetylcholine depolarizes thalamocortical relay neurons while it induces hyperpolarization in local circuit inhibitory interneurons. Sustained K + currents are modulated in thalamic neurons to control their activity modes; for the interneurons the molecular nature of the underlying ion channels is as yet unknown. Activation of TASK-1 K + channels results in hyperpolarization of interneurons and suppression of their action potential firing. The modulation cascade involves a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Src. The present study identifies a novel pathway for the activation of TASK-1 channels in CNS neurons that resembles cholinergic signalling and TASK-1 current modulation during hypoxia in smooth muscle cells. The dorsal part of the lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) is the main thalamic site for state-dependent transmission of visual information. Non-retinal inputs from the ascending arousal system and inhibition provided by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic local circuit interneurons (INs) control neuronal activity within the dLGN. In particular, acetylcholine (ACh) depolarizes thalamocortical relay neurons by inhibiting two-pore domain potassium (K 2P ) channels. Conversely, ACh also hyperpolarizes INs via an as-yet-unknown mechanism. By using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in brain slices and appropriate pharmacological tools we here report that stimulation of type 2 muscarinic ACh receptors induces IN hyperpolarization by recruiting the G-protein βγ subunit (Gβγ), class-1A phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, and cellular and sarcoma (c-Src) tyrosine kinase, leading to activation of two-pore domain weakly inwardly rectifying K + channel (TWIK)-related acid-sensitive K + (TASK)-1 channels. The latter was confirmed by the use of TASK-1-deficient mice. Furthermore inhibition of phospholipase Cβ as well as an increase in the intracellular level of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate facilitated the

  11. Insulin-induced cortical actin remodeling promotes GLUT4 insertion at muscle cell membrane ruffles

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Peter; Khayat, Zayna A.; Huang, Carol; Patel, Nish; Ueyama, Atsunori; Klip, Amira

    2001-01-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake by recruiting glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) from an intracellular compartment to the cell surface; this phenomenon is defective in type 2 diabetes. Here we examine the involvement of actin filaments in GLUT4 translocation and their possible defects in insulin resistance, using L6 myotubes expressing myc-tagged GLUT4. Insulin caused membrane ruffling, a dynamic distortion of the myotube dorsal surface. Fluorescence microscopy and immunogold staining of surface GLUT4myc coupled to backscatter electron microscopy revealed a high density of this protein in membrane ruffles. The t-SNAREs syntaxin4 and SNAP-23 were also abundant in these regions. Below the membrane, GLUT4 and the vesicular protein VAMP2, but not VAMP3, colocalized with the actin structures supporting the membrane ruffles. GLUT4myc externalization and membrane ruffles were reduced by jasplakinolide and by swinholide-A, drugs that affect actin filament stability and prevent actin branching, respectively. Insulin resistance generated by prolonged (24 hours) exposure of myotubes to high glucose and insulin diminished the acute insulin-dependent remodeling of cortical actin and GLUT4myc translocation, reminiscent of the effect of swinholide-A. We propose that GLUT4 vesicle incorporation into the plasma membrane involves insulin-dependent cortical actin remodeling and that defective actin remodeling contributes to insulin resistance. PMID:11489930

  12. Structural Characterization of the Binding of Myosin*ADP*Pi to Actin in Permeabilized Rabbit Psoas Muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,S.; Gu, J.; Belknap, B.

    2006-01-01

    When myosin is attached to actin in a muscle cell, various structures in the filaments are formed. The two strongly bound states (A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP and A{center_dot}M) and the weakly bound A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP states are reasonably well understood. The orientation of the strongly bound myosin heads is uniform ('stereospecific' attachment), and the attached heads exhibit little spatial fluctuation. In the prehydrolysis weakly bound A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP state, the orientations of the attached myosin heads assume a wide range of azimuthal and axial angles, indicating considerable flexibility in the myosin head. The structure of the other weakly bound state, A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i}, however, is poorly understood. Thismore » state is thought to be the critical pre-power-stroke state, poised to make the transition to the strongly binding, force-generating states, and hence it is of particular interest for understanding the mechanism of contraction. However, because of the low affinity between myosin and actin in the A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} state, the structure of this state has eluded determination both in isolated form and in muscle cells. With the knowledge recently gained in the structures of the weakly binding M{center_dot}ATP, M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} states and the weakly attached A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP state in muscle fibers, it is now feasible to delineate the in vivo structure of the attached state of A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i}. The series of experiments presented in this article were carried out under relaxing conditions at 25{sup o}C, where {approx}95% of the myosin heads in the skinned rabbit psoas muscle contain the hydrolysis products. The affinity for actin is enhanced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) or by lowering the ionic strength in the bathing solution. Solution kinetics and binding constants were determined in the presence

  13. The Effect of Experimental Hyperthyroidism on Characteristics of Actin-Myosin Interaction in Fast and Slow Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Kopylova, G V; Shchepkin, D V; Bershitsky, S Y

    2018-05-01

    The molecular mechanism of the failure of contractile function of skeletal muscles caused by oxidative damage to myosin in hyperthyroidism is not fully understood. Using an in vitro motility assay, we studied the effect of myosin damage caused by oxidative stress in experimental hyperthyroidism on the actin-myosin interaction and its regulation by calcium. We found that hyperthyroidism-induced oxidation of myosin is accompanied by a decrease in the sliding velocity of the regulated thin filaments in the in vitro motility assay, and this effect is increased with the duration of the pathological process.

  14. Renal alpha-smooth muscle actin: a new prognostic factor for lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Makni, Kaouthar; Jarraya, Faïçal; Khabir, Abdelmajid; Hentati, Basma; Hmida, Mohamed Ben; Makni, Hafedh; Boudawara, Tahia; Jlidi, Rchid; Hachicha, Jamil; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2009-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototype of autoimmune disease where renal involvement is frequent and always severe. Histological prognostic factors proposed for lupus nephritis (LN) including the World Health Organization and International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society--Working Group on the Classification classifications, active (AI) and chronicity (CI) indices may not predict response to treatment. The aim of this study was to correlate alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression, an early marker of glomerular and interstitial response to injury, to AI and CI, renal scarring progression and response to treatment. Fifty-seven kidney biopsy specimens obtained from 32 patients suffering from LN were studied. Twenty patients with class IV LN at first biopsy were identified to study renal progression to chronic renal failure until the use of immunosuppressive treatment. Interstitial alpha-SMA (I-alpha-SMA) was correlated only with CI (P < 0.001) whereas mesangial alpha-SMA (M-alpha-SMA) was correlated with neither LN activity (P = 0.126) nor sclerosis (P = 0.297). Only I-alpha-SMA was correlated with renal failure (P = 0.01). We divided patients with class IV LN into progressors and non-progressors based on the slope of serum creatinine. At first biopsy, M-alpha-SMA and I-alpha-SMA, but not AI and CI, were correlated with renal failure progression (M-alpha-SMA, 9.7b1.1 vs 7.8b1.4, P = 0.004; and I-alpha-SMA, 9.3b1.1 vs 6.5b3.2, P = 0.011). The study data highlight that I-alpha-SMA immunostain in class IV LN patients was correlated with chronicity indices. Moreover, M-alpha-SMA and I-alpha-SMA expression in first biopsy predicted renal progression modality. alpha-SMA expression may therefore be a useful marker to predict renal prognosis in LN.

  15. RNA Interference of the Muscle Actin Gene in Bed Bugs: Exploring Injection Versus Topical Application for dsRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Sanjay; Kamble, Shripat T

    2018-05-01

    Bed bugs are one the most troublesome household pests that feed primarily on human blood. RNA interference (RNAi) is currently being pursued as a potential tool for insect population management and has shown efficacy against some phytophagous insects. We evaluated the different techniques to deliver dsRNA specific to bed bug muscle actin (dsactin) into bed bugs. Initially, stability of dsRNA in human blood was studied to evaluate the feasibility of feeding method. Adult bed bugs were injected with dsRNA between last thoracic segment and first abdominal segment on the ventral side, with a dose of 0.2 µg dsactin per insect. In addition to injection, dsactin was mixed in acetone and treated topically in the abdomens of fifth stage nymphs. We found the quick degradation of dsRNA in blood. Injection of dsactin caused significant depletion of actin transcripts and substantial reduction in oviposition and lethality in female adults. Topically treated dsRNA in fifth stage nymphs had no effect on actin mRNA expression and survival. Our results demonstrated that injection is a reliable method of dsRNA delivery into bed bugs while topical treatment was not successful. This research provides an understanding on effective delivery methods of dsRNA into bed bugs for functional genomics research and feasibility of the RNAi based molecules for pest management purposes.

  16. Effects of BTS (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide), an inhibitor for myosin-actin interaction, on myofibrillogenesis in skeletal muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Maiko; Sato, Naruki; Obinata, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    Actin filaments align around myosin filaments in the correct polarity and in a hexagonal arrangement to form cross-striated structures. It has been postulated that this myosin-actin interaction is important in the initial phase of myofibrillogenesis. It was previously demonstrated that an inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction, BDM (2,3-butanedione monoxime), suppresses myofibril formation in muscle cells in culture. However, further study showed that BDM also exerts several additional effects on living cells. In this study, we further examined the role of actin-myosin interaction in myofibril assembly in primary cultures of chick embryonic skeletal muscle by applying a more specific inhibitor, BTS (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide), of myosin ATPase and actin-myosin interaction. The assembly of sarcomeric structures from myofibrillar proteins was examined by immunocytochemical methods with the application of BTS to myotubes just after fusion. Addition of BTS (10-50 microM) significantly suppressed the organization of actin and myosin into cross-striated structures. BTS also interfered in the organization of alpha-actinin, C-protein (or MyBP-C), and connectin (or titin) into ordered striated structures, though the sensitivity was less. Moreover, when myotubes cultured in the presence of BTS were transferred to a control medium, sarcomeric structures were formed in 2-3 days, indicating that the inhibitory effect of BTS on myotubes is reversible. These results show that actin-myosin interaction plays a critical role in the process of myofibrillogenesis.

  17. Platelet rich plasma promotes skeletal muscle cell migration in association with up-regulation of FAK, paxillin, and F-Actin formation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Yu, Tung-Yang; Lin, Li-Ping; Lin, Mioa-Sui; Tsai, Ting-Ta; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2017-11-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) contains various cytokines and growth factors which may be beneficial to the healing process of injured muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and molecular mechanism of PRP on migration of skeletal muscle cells. Skeletal muscle cells intrinsic to Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with PRP. The cell migration was evaluated by transwell filter migration assay and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. The spreading of cells was evaluated microscopically. The formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. The protein expressions of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were assessed by Western blot analysis. Transfection of paxillin small-interfering RNA (siRNAs) to muscle cells was performed to validate the role of paxillin in PRP-mediated promotion of cell migration. Dose-dependently PRP promotes migration of and spreading and muscle cells. Protein expressions of paxillin and FAK were up-regulated dose-dependently. F-actin formation was also enhanced by PRP treatment. Furthermore, the knockdown of paxillin expression impaired the effect of PRP to promote cell migration. It was concluded that PRP promoting migration of muscle cells is associated with up-regulation of proteins expression of paxillin and FAK as well as increasing F-actin formation. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2506-2512, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Improved muscle-derived expression of human coagulation factor IX from a skeletal actin/CMV hybrid enhancer/promoter.

    PubMed

    Hagstrom, J N; Couto, L B; Scallan, C; Burton, M; McCleland, M L; Fields, P A; Arruda, V R; Herzog, R W; High, K A

    2000-04-15

    Hemophilia B is caused by the absence of functional coagulation factor IX (F.IX) and represents an important model for treatment of genetic diseases by gene therapy. Recent studies have shown that intramuscular injection of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector into mice and hemophilia B dogs results in vector dose-dependent, long-term expression of biologically active F.IX at therapeutic levels. In this study, we demonstrate that levels of expression of approximately 300 ng/mL (6% of normal human F.IX levels) can be reached by intramuscular injection of mice using a 2- to 4-fold lower vector dose (1 x 10(11) vector genomes/mouse, injected into 4 intramuscular sites) than previously described. This was accomplished through the use of an improved expression cassette that uses the cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early enhancer/promoter in combination with a 1.2-kilobase portion of human skeletal actin promoter. These results correlated with enhanced levels of F.IX transcript and secreted F.IX protein in transduced murine C2C12 myotubes. Systemic F.IX expression from constructs containing the CMV enhancer/promoter alone was 120 to 200 ng/mL in mice injected with 1 x 10(11) vector genomes. Muscle-specific promoters performed poorly for F.IX transgene expression in vitro and in vivo. However, the incorporation of a sequence from the alpha-skeletal actin promoter containing at least 1 muscle-specific enhancer and 1 enhancer-like element further improved muscle-derived expression of F.IX from a CMV enhancer/promoter-driven expression cassette over previously published results. These findings will allow the design of a clinical protocol for therapeutic levels of F.IX expression with lower vector doses, thus enhancing efficacy and safety of the protocol. (Blood. 2000;95:2536-2542)

  19. Activation of muscle-specific actin genes in Xenopus development by an induction between animal and vegetal cells of a blastula.

    PubMed

    Gurdon, J B; Fairman, S; Mohun, T J; Brennan, S

    1985-07-01

    Muscle gene expression is induced a few hours after vegetal cells of a Xenopus blastula are placed in contact with animal cells that normally develop into epidermis and nerve cells. We have used a muscle-specific actin gene probe to determine the timing of gene activation in animal-vegetal conjugates. Muscle actin RNA is first transcribed in a minority of animal cells at a stage equivalent to late gastrula. The time of muscle gene activation is determined by the developmental stage of the responding (animal) cells, and not by the time when cells are first placed in contact. The minimal cell contact time required for induction is between 1 1/2 and 2 1/2 hr, and the minimal time for gene activation after induction is 5-7 hr.

  20. Myosin heavy chain 2A and α-Actin expression in human and murine skeletal muscles at feeding; particularly amino acids

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein dynamics during non-steady state conditions as feeding are complex. Such studies usually demand combinations of methods to give conclusive information, particularly on myofibrillar proteins with slow turnover. Therefore, time course transcript analyses were evaluated as possible means to monitor changes in myofibrillar biosynthesis in skeletal muscles in conditions with clinical nutrition; i.e. long term exposure of nutrients. Methods Muscle tissue from overnight intravenously fed surgical patients were used as a model combined with muscle tissue from starved and refed mice as well as cultured L6 muscle cells. Transcripts of acta 1 (α-actin), mhc2A (myosin) and slc38 a2/Snat 2 (amino acid transporter) were quantified (qPCR) as markers of muscle protein dynamics. Results Myosin heavy chain 2A transcripts decreased significantly in skeletal muscle tissue from overnight parenterally fed patients but did not change significantly in orally refed mice. Alpha-actin transcripts did not change significantly in muscle cells from fed patients, mice or cultured L6 cells during provision of AA. The AA transporter Snat 2 decreased in L6 cells refed by all AA and by various combinations of AA but did not change during feeding in muscle tissue from patients or mice. Conclusion Our results confirm that muscle cells are sensitive to alterations in extracellular concentrations of AA for induction of protein synthesis and anabolism. However, transcripts of myofibrillar proteins and amino acid transporters showed complex alterations in response to feeding with provision of amino acids. Therefore, muscle tissue transcript levels of actin and myosin do not reflect protein accretion in skeletal muscles at feeding. PMID:23190566

  1. Airways in smooth muscle α-actin null mice experience a compensatory mechanism that modulates their contractile response.

    PubMed

    Shardonofsky, Felix R; Moore, Joan; Schwartz, Robert J; Boriek, Aladin M

    2012-03-01

    We hypothesized that ablation of smooth muscle α-actin (SM α-A), a contractile-cytoskeletal protein expressed in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, abolishes ASM shortening capacity and decreases lung stiffness. In both SM α-A knockout and wild-type (WT) mice, airway resistance (Raw) determined by the forced oscillation technique rose in response to intravenous methacholine (Mch). However, the slope of Raw (cmH(2)O·ml(-1)·s) vs. log(2) Mch dose (μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) was lower (P = 0.007) in mutant (0.54 ± 0.14) than in WT mice (1.23 ± 0.19). RT-PCR analysis performed on lung tissues confirmed that mutant mice lacked SM α-A mRNA and showed that these mice had robust expressions of both SM γ-A mRNA and skeletal muscle (SKM) α-A mRNA, which were not expressed in WT mice, and an enhanced SM22 mRNA expression relative to that in WT mice. Compared with corresponding spontaneously breathing mice, mechanical ventilation-induced lung mechanical strain increased the expression of SM α-A mRNA in WT lungs; in mutant mice, it augmented the expressions of SM γ-A mRNA and SM22 mRNA and did not alter that of SKM α-A mRNA. In mutant mice, the expression of SM γ-A mRNA in the lung during spontaneous breathing and its enhanced expression following mechanical ventilation are consistent with the likely possibility that in the absence of SM α-A, SM γ-A underwent polymerization and interacted with smooth muscle myosin to produce ASM shortening during cholinergic stimulation. Thus our data are consistent with ASM in mutant mice experiencing compensatory mechanisms that modulated its contractile muscle capacity.

  2. Suppression of α Smooth Muscle Actin Accumulation by Bovine Fetal Dermal Collagen Matrix in Full Thickness Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Lineaweaver, William; Bush, Katie; James, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The suppression of elements associated with wound contracture and unfavorable scarring is a potentially important strategy in clinical wound management. In this study, the presence of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), a protein involved in wound contraction, was analyzed in a series of wounds in which bovine fetal collagen (BFC) acellular dermal matrix (PriMatrix) was used in staged split thickness skin graft procedures. The results obtained through histological and quantitative image analyses of incidental biopsies from these wounds demonstrated a suppression of αSMA in the wound regions occupied by assimilated BFC relative to increased levels of αSMA found in other areas of the wound. The αSMA levels found in assimilated BFC were similar to αSMA levels in uninjured human dermis. These findings suggest a mechanism by which application of BFC could decrease contraction of full thickness skin wounds. PMID:25695450

  3. Suppression of α Smooth Muscle Actin Accumulation by Bovine Fetal Dermal Collagen Matrix in Full Thickness Skin Wounds.

    PubMed

    Lineaweaver, William; Bush, Katie; James, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    The suppression of elements associated with wound contracture and unfavorable scarring is a potentially important strategy in clinical wound management. In this study, the presence of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), a protein involved in wound contraction, was analyzed in a series of wounds in which bovine fetal collagen (BFC) acellular dermal matrix (PriMatrix) was used in staged split thickness skin graft procedures. The results obtained through histological and quantitative image analyses of incidental biopsies from these wounds demonstrated a suppression of αSMA in the wound regions occupied by assimilated BFC relative to increased levels of αSMA found in other areas of the wound. The αSMA levels found in assimilated BFC were similar to αSMA levels in uninjured human dermis. These findings suggest a mechanism by which application of BFC could decrease contraction of full thickness skin wounds.

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived solublemore » factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β{sub 1} (TGF-β{sub 1})-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β{sub 1} at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β{sub 1} is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}.« less

  5. Acf7 (MACF) is an actin and microtubule linker protein whose expression predominates in neural, muscle, and lung development.

    PubMed

    Bernier, G; Pool, M; Kilcup, M; Alfoldi, J; De Repentigny, Y; Kothary, R

    2000-10-01

    Several proteins belonging to the plakin family of cytoskeletal linker proteins have recently been identified, including dystonin/Bpag1 and plectin. These proteins are unique in their abilities to form bridges between different cytoskeletal elements through specialized modular domains. We have previously reported the cloning and partial characterization of Acf7, a novel member of the plakin family. More recently, the full-length cDNA for mouse Acf7 has been reported. Acf7 has a hybrid composition, with extended homology to dystonin/Bpag1 and plectin in the N-terminal half, and to dystrophin in the central and C-terminal half. Recent studies have demonstrated that Acf7 has functional actin and microtubule binding domains. Here, we describe the developmental expression profile for mouse Acf7. RNA in situ hybridization experiments revealed Acf7 transcripts in the dermomyotome and neural fold of day 8.5 mouse embryos. Later in development, Acf7 expression was predominant in neural and muscle tissues and was strongly up-regulated just before birth in type II alveolar cells of the lung. Altogether, our results suggest that Acf7 functions as a versatile cytoskeletal linker protein and plays an important role in neural, muscle, and lung development. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Faulknor, Renea A; Olekson, Melissa A; Nativ, Nir I; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J; Berthiaume, François

    2015-02-27

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. SB431542, an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β1 at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β1 is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Actin isoform and alpha 1B-adrenoceptor gene expression in aortic and coronary smooth muscle is influenced by cyclical stretch.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, M S; Sadhu, D N; Grumman, V E; Chilian, W M; Ramos, K S

    1995-09-01

    The occurrence of vascular domains with specific biological and pharmacological characteristics suggests that smooth muscle cells in different arteries may respond differentially to a wide range of environmental stimuli. To determine if some of these vessel-specific differences may be attributable to mechano-sensitive gene regulation, the influence of cyclical stretch on the expression of actin isoform and alpha 1B-adrenoceptor genes was examined in aortic and coronary smooth muscle cells. Cells were seeded on an elastin substrate and subjected to maximal stretching (24% elongation) and relaxation cycles at a frequency of 120 cycles/min in a Flexercell strain unit for 72 h. Total RNA was extracted and hybridized to radiolabeled cDNA probes to assess gene expression. Stretch caused a greater reduction of actin isoform mRNA levels in aortic smooth muscle cells as compared to cells from the coronary artery. Steady-state mRNA levels of alpha 1B-adrenoceptor were also decreased by cyclical stretch in both cell types but the magnitude of the response was greater in coronary smooth muscle cells. No changes in alpha 1B-adrenoceptor or beta/gamma-actin steady-state mRNA levels were observed in H4IIE cells, a nonvascular, immortalized cell line. The relative gene expression of heat shock protein 70 was not influenced by the cyclic stretch regimen in any of these cell types. These results suggest that stretch may participate in the regulation of gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and that this response exhibits some degree of cell-specificity.

  8. Regeneration of the perineurium after microsurgical resection examined with immunolabeling for tenascin-C and alpha smooth muscle actin

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Michiro; Okui, Nobuyuki; Tatebe, Masahiro; Shinohara, Takaaki; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The regenerative process of the perineurium and nerve function were examined using an in vivo model of perineurium resection in the rat sciatic nerve. Our hypothesis is that the regenerative process of the perineurium can be demonstrated by immunolabeling for tenascin-C and alpha smooth muscle actin after microsurgical resection of the perineurium in vivo. A total of 38 Lewis rats were used. Eight-week-old animals were assigned to one of two groups: the epi-perineurium removal group or the sham group. Under operative microscopy, the sciatic nerve was dissected from surrounding tissues at the thigh level from the ischial tuberosity to the fossa poplitea. The epi-perineurium was carefully removed by cutting circumferentially and stripping distally for 15 mm. For CatWalk® dynamic gait analysis, only right sciatic nerves underwent surgery; the left sciatic nerves were left intact. For pathological and electrophysiological tests, both the right and left sciatic nerves underwent surgery. Analysis of data was performed at each time interval with a two-group t-test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. After resection of a 15-mm section of the epi-perineurium, immediate endoneurial swelling occurred in the outer portion and spread into the central portion. Although demyelination and axonal degeneration were found in the swollen area, remyelination and recovery of electrophysiological function were seen after regeneration of the perineurium. An immunohistological and electron microscopic study revealed that the perineurium regenerated via fusion of the residual interfascicular perineurium and endoneurial fibroblast-like cells of mesenchymal origin. CatWalk gait analysis showed not only motor paresis but also neuropathic pain during the early phases of this model. PMID:21265831

  9. Experiment K-6-11. Actin mRNA and cytochrome c mRNA concentrations in the tricepts brachia muscle of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Morrison, P. R.; Thomason, D. B.; Oganov, V. S.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that some skeletal muscles atrophy as a result of weightlessness (Steffen and Musacchia 1986) and as a result of hindlimb suspension (Tischler et al., 1985, Thomason et al., 1987). Because the content of protein is determined by the rates of protein synthesis and degradation, a decrease in protein synthesis rate, or an increase in the protein degradation, or changes in both could produce the atrophy. Indeed, an increased protein degradation (Tischler et al., 1985) and a decreased protein synthesis (Thomason et al., 1988) have been observed in skeletal muscles of suspended hindlimbs of rats. Any decrease in protein synthesis rate could be caused by decreases in mRNA concentrations. Such decreases in the concentration and content of alpha-actin mRNA and cytochrome c mRNA have been noted in skeletal muscles of hindlimb suspended rats (Babij and Booth, 1988). From these findings researchers hypothesized that alpha-actin mRNA and cytochrome c mRNA would decrease in the triceps brachia muscle of Cosmos 1887 rats.

  10. The expression of keratins, vimentin, neurofilament proteins, smooth muscle actin, neuron-specific enolase, and synaptophysin in tumors of the specific glands in the canine anal region.

    PubMed

    Vos, J H; van den Ingh, T S; Ramaekers, F C; Molenbeek, R F; de Neijs, M; van Mil, F N; Ivanyi, D

    1993-07-01

    Eight canine tumors originating from specific glandular structures in the anal region, as well as metastatic tumor tissue of two of these cases (case Nos. 7, 8), were immunohistochemically analyzed using various monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) directed against human keratin types, vimentin, neurofilament proteins, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. These tumors also were stained for the broad-spectrum neuroendocrine markers neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and synaptophysin. In histologically normal canine anal structures, alpha-smooth muscle actin and NSE antibodies stained basally localized (probably myoepithelial) cells in the anal glands and the anal sac glands. NSE staining also was present in a limited number of luminal cells in both anal glands and anal sac glands. Synaptophysin labeling was not observed in any of these glandular structures. Histologically, the tumors were differentiated into well- and moderately differentiated perianal gland tumors (n = 5) and carcinomas without perianal gland differentiation (n = 3), corresponding to the so-called apocrine carcinomas of the anal region. Immunohistochemically, the perianal gland tumors could be differentiated from the carcinomas by marked differences in staining pattern with the various keratin MoAbs, particularly MoAbs directed against human keratin types 7 and 18. The keratin-staining characteristics of the carcinomas suggest a glandular luminal cell origin. Metastases of the carcinomas showed loss of some keratin-staining characteristics as compared with the primary tumor. Staining for NSE was only observed in solitary cells and small cell clusters in the carcinomas and their metastases, whereas the alpha-smooth muscle actin antibody did not react with the carcinoma cells. None of the tumors stained for neurofilament proteins or synaptophysin. An unequivocal neuroendocrine nature of the carcinomas could not be substantiated by our immunohistochemical study, although the presence of a population of neuroendocrine

  11. A Novel Regulatory Mechanism of Smooth Muscle α-Actin Expression by NRG-1/circACTA2/miR-548f-5p Axis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Yang, Zhan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Man-Li; Zhao, Xue-Shan; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Suzuki, Toru; Wen, Jin-Kun

    2017-09-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) includes an extracellular epidermal growth factor-like domain and an intracellular domain (NRG-1-ICD). In response to transforming growth factor-β1, its cleavage by proteolytic enzymes releases a bioactive fragment, which suppresses the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation by activating ErbB (erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog) receptor. However, NRG-1-ICD function in VSMCs remains unknown. Here, we characterize the function of NRG-1-ICD and underlying mechanisms in VSMCs. Immunofluorescence staining, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that NRG-1 was expressed in rat, mouse, and human VSMCs and was upregulated and cleaved in response to transforming growth factor-β1. In the cytoplasm of HASMCs (human aortic smooth muscle cells), the NRG-1-ICD participated in filamentous actin formation by interacting with α-SMA (smooth muscle α-actin). In the nucleus, the Nrg-1-ICD induced circular ACTA2 (alpha-actin-2; circACTA2) formation by recruitment of the zinc-finger transcription factor IKZF1 (IKAROS family zinc finger 1) to the first intron of α-SMA gene. We further confirmed that circACTA2, acting as a sponge binding microRNA (miR)-548f-5p, interacted with miR-548f-5p targeting 3' untranslated region of α-SMA mRNA, which in turn relieves miR-548f-5p repression of the α-SMA expression and thus upregulates α-SMA expression, thereby facilitating stress fiber formation and cell contraction in HASMCs. Accordingly, in vivo studies demonstrated that the localization of the interaction of circACTA2 with miR-548f-5p is significantly decreased in human intimal hyperplastic arteries compared with normal arteries, implicating that dysregulation of circACTA2 and miR-548f-5p expression is involved in intimal hyperplasia. These results suggest that circACTA2 mediates NRG-1-ICD regulation of α-SMA expression in HASMCs via the NRG-1-ICD/circACTA2/miR-548f-5p axis. Our data provide a molecular

  12. Functional adaptation between yeast actin and its cognate myosin motors.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Allingham, John S; Rubenstein, Peter A; Lord, Matthew

    2011-09-02

    We employed budding yeast and skeletal muscle actin to examine the contribution of the actin isoform to myosin motor function. While yeast and muscle actin are highly homologous, they exhibit different charge density at their N termini (a proposed myosin-binding interface). Muscle myosin-II actin-activated ATPase activity is significantly higher with muscle versus yeast actin. Whether this reflects inefficiency in the ability of yeast actin to activate myosin is not known. Here we optimized the isolation of two yeast myosins to assess actin function in a homogenous system. Yeast myosin-II (Myo1p) and myosin-V (Myo2p) accommodate the reduced N-terminal charge density of yeast actin, showing greater activity with yeast over muscle actin. Increasing the number of negative charges at the N terminus of yeast actin from two to four (as in muscle) had little effect on yeast myosin activity, while other substitutions of charged residues at the myosin interface of yeast actin reduced activity. Thus, yeast actin functions most effectively with its native myosins, which in part relies on associations mediated by its outer domain. Compared with yeast myosin-II and myosin-V, muscle myosin-II activity was very sensitive to salt. Collectively, our findings suggest differing degrees of reliance on electrostatic interactions during weak actomyosin binding in yeast versus muscle. Our study also highlights the importance of native actin isoforms when considering the function of myosins.

  13. Some distinctive features of zebrafish myogenesis based on unexpected distributions of the muscle cytoskeletal proteins actin, myosin, desmin, alpha-actinin, troponin and titin.

    PubMed

    Costa, Manoel L; Escaleira, Roberta C; Rodrigues, Viviane B; Manasfi, Muhamed; Mermelstein, Claudia S

    2002-08-01

    The current myofibrillogenesis model is based mostly on in vitro cell cultures and on avian and mammalian embryos in situ. We followed the expression of actin, myosin, desmin, alpha-actinin, titin, and troponin using immunofluorescence microscopy of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. We could see young mononucleated myoblasts with sharp striations. The striations were positive for all the sarcomeric proteins. Desmin distribution during muscle maturation changes from dispersed aggregates to a perinuclear concentration to striated afterwards. We could not observe desmin-positive, myofibrillar-proteins-negative cells, and we could not find any non-striated distribution of sarcomeric proteins, such as stress fiber-like structures. Some steps, like fusion before striation, seem to be different in the zebrafish when compared with the previously described myogenesis sequences.

  14. Molecular interactions between single-stranded DNA-binding proteins associated with an essential MCAT element in the mouse smooth muscle alpha-actin promoter.

    PubMed

    Kelm, R J; Cogan, J G; Elder, P K; Strauch, A R; Getz, M J

    1999-05-14

    Transcriptional activity of the mouse vascular smooth muscle alpha-actin gene in fibroblasts is regulated, in part, by a 30-base pair asymmetric polypurine-polypyrimidine tract containing an essential MCAT enhancer motif. The double-stranded form of this sequence serves as a binding site for a transcription enhancer factor 1-related protein while the separated single strands interact with two distinct DNA binding activities termed VACssBF1 and 2 (Cogan, J. G., Sun, S., Stoflet, E. S., Schmidt, L. J., Getz, M. J., and Strauch, A. R. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 11310-11321; Sun, S., Stoflet, E. S., Cogan, J. G., Strauch, A. R., and Getz, M. J. (1995) Mol. Cell. Biol. 15, 2429-2936). VACssBF2 has been recently cloned and shown to consist of two closely related proteins, Puralpha and Purbeta (Kelm, R. J., Elder, P. K., Strauch, A. R., and Getz, M. J. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 26727-26733). In this study, we demonstrate that Puralpha and Purbeta interact with each other via highly specific protein-protein interactions and bind to the purine-rich strand of the MCAT enhancer in the form of both homo- and heteromeric complexes. Moreover, both Pur proteins interact with MSY1, a VACssBF1-like protein cloned by virtue of its affinity for the pyrimidine-rich strand of the enhancer. Interactions between Puralpha, Purbeta, and MSY1 do not require the participation of DNA. Combinatorial interactions between these three single-stranded DNA-binding proteins may be important in regulating activity of the smooth muscle alpha-actin MCAT enhancer in fibroblasts.

  15. Actinous enigma or enigmatic actin

    PubMed Central

    Povarova, Olga I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2014-01-01

    Being the most abundant protein of the eukaryotic cell, actin continues to keep its secrets for more than 60 years. Everything about this protein, its structure, functions, and folding, is mysteriously counterintuitive, and this review represents an attempt to solve some of the riddles and conundrums commonly found in the field of actin research. In fact, actin is a promiscuous binder with a wide spectrum of biological activities. It can exist in at least three structural forms, globular, fibrillar, and inactive (G-, F-, and I-actin, respectively). G-actin represents a thermodynamically instable, quasi-stationary state, which is formed in vivo as a result of the energy-intensive, complex posttranslational folding events controlled and driven by cellular folding machinery. The G-actin structure is dependent on the ATP and Mg2+ binding (which in vitro is typically substituted by Ca2+) and protein is easily converted to the I-actin by the removal of metal ions and by action of various denaturing agents (pH, temperature, and chemical denaturants). I-actin cannot be converted back to the G-form. Foldable and “natively folded” forms of actin are always involved in interactions either with the specific protein partners, such as Hsp70 chaperone, prefoldin, and the CCT chaperonin during the actin folding in vivo or with Mg2+ and ATP as it takes place in the G-form. We emphasize that the solutions for the mysteries of actin multifunctionality, multistructurality, and trapped unfolding can be found in the quasi-stationary nature of this enigmatic protein, which clearly possesses many features attributed to both globular and intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:28232879

  16. Actin genes and their expression in pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yuan, Jianbo; Du, Jiangli; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2018-04-01

    Actin is a multi-functional gene family that can be divided into muscle-type actins and non-muscle-type actins. In this study, 37 unigenes encoding actins were identified from RNA-Seq data of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. According to phylogenetic analysis, four and three cDNAs belong to cytoplasmic- and heart-type actins and were named LvActinCT and LvActinHT, respectively. 10 cDNAs belong to the slow-type skeletal muscle actins, and 18 belong to the fast-type skeletal muscle actins; they were designated LvActinSSK and LvActinFSK, respectively. Some muscle actin genes formed gene clusters in the genome. Multiple alternative transcription starts sites (ATSSs) were found for LvActinCT1. Based on the early developmental expression profile, almost all LvActins were highly expressed between the early limb bud and post-larval stages. Using LvActinSSK5 as probes, slow-type muscle was localized in pleopod muscle and superficial ventral muscle. We also found three actin genes that were down-regulated in the hemocytes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)- and Vibrio parahaemolyticus-infected L. vannamei. This study provides valuable information on the actin gene structure of shrimp, furthers our understanding of the shrimp muscle system and helps us develop strategies for disease control and sustainable shrimp farming.

  17. Analysis of myofibrillar proteins and transcripts in adult skeletal muscles of the American lobster Homarus americanus: variable expression of myosins, actin and troponins in fast, slow-twitch and slow-tonic fibres.

    PubMed

    Medler, Scott; Mykles, Donald L

    2003-10-01

    Skeletal muscles are diverse in their contractile properties, with many of these differences being directly related to the assemblages of myofibrillar isoforms characteristic of different fibers. Crustacean muscles are similar to other muscles in this respect, although the majority of information about differences in muscle organization comes from vertebrate species. In the present study, we examined the correlation between myofibrillar protein isoforms and the patterns of myofibrillar gene expression in fast, slow-phasic (S(1)) and slow-tonic (S(2)) fibers of the American lobster Homarus americanus. SDS-PAGE and western blotting were used to identify isoform assemblages of myosin heavy chain (MHC), P75, troponin T (TnT) and troponin I (TnI). RT-PCR was used to monitor expression of fast and slow (S(1)) MHC, P75 and actin in different fiber types, and the MHC and actin levels were quantified by real-time PCR. Fast and slow fibers from the claw closers predominantly expressed fast and S(1) MHC, respectively, but also lower levels of the alternate MHC. By contrast, fast fibers from the deep abdominal muscle expressed fast MHC exclusively. In addition, slow muscles expressed significantly higher levels of actin than fast fibers. A distal bundle of fibers in the cutter claw closer muscle was found to be composed of a mixture of S(1) and S(2) fibers, many of which possessed a mixture of S(1) and S(2) MHC isoforms. This pattern supports the idea that S(1) and S(2) fibers represent extremes in a continuum of slow muscle phenotype. Overall, these patterns demonstrate that crustacean skeletal muscles cannot be strictly categorized into discrete fiber types, but a muscle's properties probably represent a point on a continuum of fiber types. This trend may result from differences in innervation pattern, as each muscle is controlled by a unique combination of phasic, tonic or both phasic and tonic motor nerves. In this respect, future studies examining how muscle phenotype

  18. alpha-Smooth muscle actin immunoreactivity may change in nature in interlobular fibrosis of the pancreas in patients with congenital biliary dilatation.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kenro; Suda, Koichi; Suzuki, Fujihiko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Shiotsu, Hidetoshi; Miyano, Takeshi

    2004-07-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis in patients with congenital biliary dilatation (CBD) or choledochal cyst was studied to determine why biliary pancreatitis seldom progresses to chronic pancreatitis/more progressive state. Pancreatic collagenization in eight patients (three adults with pancreatoduodenectomy and five children with biopsy of the pancreas performed when excising the cyst) with CBD was evaluated histopathologically and immunohistochemically. Interlobular and periductal fibrosis with both collagen Type I and Type III immunoreactivities was found in six out of eight cases and in all four cases in which the pancreatic duct was included, respectively. The interlobular area was seldom immunoreactive for alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), a marker for myofibroblasts, but was usually positive for CD34, a human progenitor cell antigen. In contrast, the periductal area was usually immunoreactive for alpha-SMA, but usually negative for CD34 and immunopositive for bcl-2, indicating a continuously progressive state of fibrosis, in which 'pre-existing'alpha-SMA immunoreactivity in the interlobular area may change in nature and lead to CD34-positive fibrosis or apoptosis. In conclusion, biliary pancreatitis is not likely to evolve into chronic pancreatitis/more progressive state because 'pre-existing'alpha-SMA immunoreactivity in the interlobular area may change in nature.

  19. Cerebrovascular Smooth Muscle Actin Is Increased in Non-Demented Subjects with Frequent Senile Plaques at Autopsy: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hulette, Christine M.; Ervin, John F.; Edmonds, Yvette; Antoine, Samantha; Stewart, Nicolas; Szymanski, Mari H.; Hayden, Kathleen M; Pieper, Carl F.; Burke, James R.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    We previously found that vascular smooth muscle actin (SMA) is reduced in the brains of patients with late stage Alzheimer disease (AD) compared to brains of non-demented, neuropathologically normal subjects. To assess the pathogenetic significance and disease specificity of this finding, we studied 3 additional patient groups: non-demented subjects without significant AD type pathology (“Normal”, n = 20); non-demented subjects with frequent senile plaques at autopsy (“Preclinical AD”, n = 20); and subjects with frontotemporal dementia, (“FTD”, n = 10). The groups were matched for gender and age with those previously reported; SMA immunohistochemistry and image analysis were performed as previously described. Surprisingly, SMA expression in arachnoid, cerebral cortex and white matter arterioles was greater in the Preclinical AD group than in the Normal and FTD groups. The plaques were not associated with amyloid angiopathy or other vascular disease in this group. SMA expression in the brains of the Normal group was intermediate between the Preclinical AD and FTD groups. All 3 groups exhibited much greater SMA expression than in our previous report. The presence of frequent plaques and increased arteriolar SMA expression in the brains of non-demented subjects suggest that increased SMA expression might represent a physiologic response to neurodegeneration that could prevent or delay overt expression dementia in AD. PMID:19287310

  20. Bacterial Actins.

    PubMed

    Izoré, Thierry; van den Ent, Fusinita

    2017-01-01

    A diverse set of protein polymers, structurally related to actin filaments contributes to the organization of bacterial cells as cytomotive or cytoskeletal filaments. This chapter describes actin homologs encoded by bacterial chromosomes. MamK filaments, unique to magnetotactic bacteria, help establishing magnetic biological compasses by interacting with magnetosomes. Magnetosomes are intracellular membrane invaginations containing biomineralized crystals of iron oxide that are positioned by MamK along the long-axis of the cell. FtsA is widespread across bacteria and it is one of the earliest components of the divisome to arrive at midcell, where it anchors the cell division machinery to the membrane. FtsA binds directly to FtsZ filaments and to the membrane through its C-terminus. FtsA shows altered domain architecture when compared to the canonical actin fold. FtsA's subdomain 1C replaces subdomain 1B of other members of the actin family and is located on the opposite side of the molecule. Nevertheless, when FtsA assembles into protofilaments, the protofilament structure is preserved, as subdomain 1C replaces subdomain IB of the following subunit in a canonical actin filament. MreB has an essential role in shape-maintenance of most rod-shaped bacteria. Unusually, MreB filaments assemble from two protofilaments in a flat and antiparallel arrangement. This non-polar architecture implies that both MreB filament ends are structurally identical. MreB filaments bind directly to membranes where they interact with both cytosolic and membrane proteins, thereby forming a key component of the elongasome. MreB filaments in cells are short and dynamic, moving around the long axis of rod-shaped cells, sensing curvature of the membrane and being implicated in peptidoglycan synthesis.

  1. Ligand-activated PPARδ upregulates α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts: A potential role for PPARδ in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ham, Sun Ah; Hwang, Jung Seok; Yoo, Taesik; Lee, Won Jin; Paek, Kyung Shin; Oh, Jae-Wook; Park, Chan-Kyu; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Do, Jung Tae; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Seo, Han Geuk

    2015-12-01

    The phenotypic changes that accompany differentiation of resident fibroblasts into myofibroblasts are important aspects of the wound healing process. Recent studies showed that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ plays a critical role in wound healing. To determine whether the nuclear receptor PPARδ can modulate the differentiation of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) into myofibroblasts. These studies were undertaken in primary HDFs using Western blot analyses, small interfering (si)RNA-mediated gene silencing, reporter gene assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), migration assays, collagen gel contraction assays, and real-time PCR. Activation of PPARδ by GW501516, a specific ligand of PPARδ, specifically upregulated the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. This induction was significantly inhibited by the presence of siRNA against PPARδ, indicating that PPARδ is involved in myofibroblast transdifferentiation of HDFs. Ligand-activated PPARδ increased α-SMA promoter activity in a dual mode by directly binding a direct repeat-1 (DR1) site in the α-SMA promoter, and by inducing expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, whose downstream effector Smad3 interacts with a Smad-binding element (SBE) in another region of the promoter. Mutations in these cis-elements totally abrogated transcriptional activation of the α-SMA gene by the PPARδ ligand; thus both sites represent novel types of PPARδ response elements. GW501516-activated PPARδ also increased the migration and contractile properties of HDFs, as demonstrated by Transwell and collagen lattice contraction assays, respectively. In addition, PPARδ-mediated upregulation of α-SMA was correlated with elevated expression of myofibroblast markers such as collagen I and fibronectin, with a concomitant reduction in expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. PPARδ plays pivotal roles in wound healing by promoting

  2. Inhibition of thrombin receptor signaling on α-smooth muscle actin(+) CD34(+) progenitors leads to repair after murine immune vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daxin; Shrivastava, Seema; Ma, Liang; Tham, El-Li; Abrahams, Joel; Coe, J David; Scott, Diane; Lechler, Robert I; McVey, John H; Dorling, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to use mice expressing human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) on α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)(+) cells as recipients of allogeneic aortas to gain insights into the cellular mechanisms of intimal hyperplasia (IH). BALB/c aortas (H-2(d)) transplanted into α-TFPI-transgenic (Tg) mice (H-2(b)) regenerated a quiescent endothelium in contrast to progressive IH seen in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice even though both developed aggressive anti-H-2(d) alloresponses, indicating similar vascular injuries. Adoptively transferred Tg CD34(+) (but not CD34(-)) cells inhibited IH in WT recipients, indicating the phenotype of α-TFPI-Tg mice was due to these cells. Compared with syngeneic controls, endogenous CD34(+) cells were mobilized in significant numbers after allogeneic transplantation, the majority showing sustained expression of tissue factor and protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1). In WT, most were CD45(+) myeloid progenitors coexpressing CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and E-selectin; 10% of these cells coexpressed α-SMA and were recruited to the neointima. In contrast, the α-SMA(+) human TFPI(+) CD34(+) cells recruited in Tg recipients were from a CD45(-) lineage. WT CD34(+) cells incubated with a PAR-1 antagonist or taken from PAR-1-deficient mice inhibited IH as Tg cells did. Specific inhibition of thrombin generation or PAR-1 signaling on α-SMA(+) CD34(+) cells inhibits IH and promotes regenerative repair despite ongoing immune-mediated damage.

  3. Modulation of wound contracture alpha-smooth muscle actin and multispecific vitronectin receptor integrin alphavbeta3 in the rabbit's experimental model.

    PubMed

    El Kahi, Cynthia G; Atiyeh, Bishara S; Abdallah Hajj Hussein, Inaya; Jurjus, Rosalyne; Dibo, Saad A; Jurjus, Alice; Jurjus, Abdo

    2009-06-01

    The myofibroblast, a major component of granulation tissue, is a key cell during wound healing, tissue repair and connective tissue remodelling. Persistence of myofibroblasts within a fibrotic lesion leads to excessive scarring impairing function and aesthetics. Various wound-healing cytokines can be modulated by topical application of active agents to promote optimal wound healing and improve scar quality. Thus, the myofibroblast may represent an important target for wound-healing modulation to improve the evolution of conditions such as hypertrophic scars. The purpose of this work is to study the modulation of myofibroblasts and integrin alphavbeta3 in a full thickness wound performed on rabbits treated with different topical agents using: (1) saline, (2) Tegaderm occlusive dressing (3) silver sulfadiazine and (4) moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO). The reepithelialisation was 4 days faster in the MEBO group compared with the other therapies with less oedema formation, delayed contraction, less inflammatory cells and the lowest transepidermal water loss (TEWL) resulting in a soft scar. Although alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) was the highest around day 12 in the MEBO group, wound contraction and myofibroblast's activity were the least for the same period probably because of a downregulation of the integrin alphavbeta3. It seems that the effect of MEBO could be more pronounced on force transmission rather then on force generation. Greater insight into the pathology of scars may translate into non surgical treatments in the future and further work in myofibroblast biology will eventually result in efficient pharmacological tools, improving the evolution of healing and scar formation.

  4. Structure of the Rigor Actin-Tropomyosin-Myosin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Elmar; Müller, Mirco; Penczek, Pawel A.; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Manstein, Dietmar J.; Raunser, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of myosin with actin filaments is the central feature of muscle contraction and cargo movement along actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. Myosin converts the chemical energy stored in ATP into force and movement along actin filaments. Myosin binding to actin induces conformational changes that are coupled to the nucleotide-binding pocket and amplified by a specialized region of the motor domain for efficient force generation. Tropomyosin plays a key role in regulating the productive interaction between myosins and actin. Here, we report the 8 Å resolution structure of the actin-tropomyosin-myosin complex determined by cryo electron microscopy. The pseudo-atomic model of the complex obtained from fitting crystal structures into the map defines the large actin-myosin-tropomyosin interface and the molecular interactions between the proteins in detail and allows us to propose a structural model for tropomyosin dependent myosin binding to actin and actin-induced nucleotide release from myosin. PMID:22817895

  5. Serum levels of alpha-smooth muscle actin and c-Met as biomarkers of the degree of severity of Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Han, Changsong; Sun, Chuanhui; Meng, Hongxue; Ye, Fei; Na, Shiping; Chen, Fulai; Zhang, Duo; Jin, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) develop Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) after 4 to 6 weeks of subcutaneous hemorrhaging. Immunoglobulin-A nephropathy (IgAN) and HSPN have numerous similarities, which can cause difficulty in correctly diagnosing the disorder during a differential diagnosis. The pathogenesis of the 2 diseases is not clear. We enrolled 137 patients with HSPN, 107 patients with IgAN, and 28 healthy (control) patients in our study. The levels of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), c-Met, and Gal-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) in the 3 patient groups were determined and compared. The α-SMA, c-Met, and Gd-IgA1 levels and the clinical data from the patients with HSPN were analyzed for any correlations. The α-SMA and c-Met levels of the HSPN group were significantly higher than those of the IgAN and healthy control groups (P < 0.01). The Gd-IgA1 levels of the HSPN and IgAN groups were significantly different from the Gd-IgA1 level of the healthy control group (P < 0.01). The α-SMA levels of the HSPN group were positively correlated with blood urea nitrogen levels, serum creatinine levels, hematuria index, and proteinuria levels (P < 0.01). The c-Met levels of the HSPN group were positively correlated with the blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences among the α-SMA, c-Met, and Gd-IgA1 levels or the clinical data for the child and adult patients with HSPN. The serum levels of α-SMA and c-Met in patients with HSPN may be associated with the degree of disease severity. Gd-IgA1 is involved in the common immunologic pathogenesis of HSPN and IgAN. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nuclear Functions of Actin

    PubMed Central

    Visa, Neus; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2010-01-01

    Actin participates in several essential processes in the cell nucleus. Even though the presence of actin in the nucleus was proposed more than 30 years ago, nuclear processes that require actin have been only recently identified. Actin is part of chromatin remodeling complexes; it is associated with the transcription machineries; it becomes incorporated into newly synthesized ribonucleoproteins; and it influences long-range chromatin organization. As in the cytoplasm, nuclear actin works in conjunction with different types of actin-binding proteins that regulate actin function and bridge interactions between actin and other nuclear components. PMID:20452941

  7. Actin expression in some Platyhelminthe species.

    PubMed

    Fagotti, A; Panara, F; Di Rosa, I; Simoncelli, F; Gabbiani, G; Pascolini, R

    1994-10-01

    Actin expression in some Platyhelminthe species was demonstrated by western-blotting and immunocytochemical analysis using two distinct anti-actin antibodies: the anti-total actin that reacts against all actin isoforms of higher vertebrates and the anti-alpha SM-1 that recognizes the alpha-smooth muscle (alpha SM) isotype of endothermic vertebrates (Skalli et al., 1986). Western-blotting experiments showed that all species tested, including some free-living Platyhelminthes (Tricladida and Rhabdocoela) and the parasitic Fasciola hepatica, were stained by anti-total actin antibody while only Dugesidae and Dendrocoelidae showed a positive immunoreactivity against anti-alpha SM-1. These results were confirmed by cytochemical immunolocalization using both avidin biotin conjugated peroxidase reaction on paraffin sections, and immunogold staining on Lowicryl 4KM embedded specimens. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of Platyhelminthes phylogeny.

  8. Myopodin is an F-actin bundling protein with multiple independent actin-binding regions.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Anja; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Bezerra, Eduardo; Orfanos, Zacharias; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; van der Ven, Peter F M; Kirfel, Gregor; Fürst, Dieter O

    2013-02-01

    The assembly of striated muscle myofibrils is a multistep process in which a variety of proteins is involved. One of the first and most important steps in myofibrillogenesis is the arrangement of thin myofilaments into ordered I-Z-I brushes, requiring the coordinated activity of numerous actin binding proteins. The early expression of myopodin prior to sarcomeric α-actinin, as well as its binding to actin, α-actinin and filamin indicate an important role for this protein in actin cytoskeleton remodelling with the precise function of myopodin in this process yet remaining to be resolved. While myopodin was previously described as a protein capable of cross-linking actin filaments into thick bundles upon transient transfections, it has remained unclear whether myopodin alone is capable of bundling actin, or if additional proteins are involved. We have therefore investigated the in vitro actin binding properties of myopodin. High speed cosedimentation assays with skeletal muscle actin confirmed direct binding of myopodin to F-actin and showed that this interaction is mediated by at least two independent actin binding sites, found in all myopodin isoforms identified to date. Furthermore, low-speed cosedimentation assays revealed that not only full length myopodin, but also the fragment containing only the second binding site, bundles microfilaments in the absence of accessory proteins. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that this bundling activity resembled that of α-actinin. Biochemical experiments revealed that bundling was not achieved by myopodin's ability to dimerize, indicating the presence of two individual F-actin binding sites within the second binding segment. Thus full length myopodin contains at least three F-actin binding sites. These data provide further understanding of the mechanisms by which myopodin contributes to actin reorganization during myofibril assembly.

  9. Sarcomeric Pattern Formation by Actin Cluster Coalescence

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Gov, Nir S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells. PMID:22685394

  10. Actin Isoform-specific Conformational Differences Observed with Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Stokasimov, Ema; Rubenstein, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Actin can exist in multiple conformations necessary for normal function. Actin isoforms, although highly conserved in sequence, exhibit different biochemical properties and cellular roles. We used amide proton hydrogen/deuterium (HD) exchange detected by mass spectrometry to analyze conformational differences between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and muscle actins in the G and F forms to gain insight into these differences. We also utilized HD exchange to study interdomain and allosteric communication in yeast-muscle hybrid actins to better understand the conformational dynamics of actin. Areas showing differences in HD exchange between G- and F-actins are areas of intermonomer contacts, consistent with the current filament models. Our results showed greater exchange for yeast G-actin compared with muscle actin in the barbed end pivot region and areas in subdomains 1 and 2 and for F-actin in monomer-monomer contact areas. These results suggest greater flexibility of the yeast actin monomer and filament compared with muscle actin. For hybrid G-actins, the muscle-like and yeastlike parts of the molecule generally showed exchange characteristics resembling their parent actins. A few exceptions were a peptide on top of subdomain 2 and the pivot region between subdomains 1 and 3 with muscle actin-like exchange characteristics although the areas were yeastlike. These results demonstrate that there is cross-talk between subdomains 1 and 2 and the large and small domains. Hybrid F-actin data showing greater exchange compared with both yeast and muscle actins are consistent with mismatched yeast-muscle interfaces resulting in decreased stability of the hybrid filament contacts. PMID:19605362

  11. Tropomyosin inhibits ADF/cofilin-dependent actin filament dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shoichiro; Ono, Kanako

    2002-03-18

    Tropomyosin binds to actin filaments and is implicated in stabilization of actin cytoskeleton. We examined biochemical and cell biological properties of Caenorhabditis elegans tropomyosin (CeTM) and obtained evidence that CeTM is antagonistic to ADF/cofilin-dependent actin filament dynamics. We purified CeTM, actin, and UNC-60B (a muscle-specific ADF/cofilin isoform), all of which are derived from C. elegans, and showed that CeTM and UNC-60B bound to F-actin in a mutually exclusive manner. CeTM inhibited UNC-60B-induced actin depolymerization and enhancement of actin polymerization. Within isolated native thin filaments, actin and CeTM were detected as major components, whereas UNC-60B was present at a trace amount. Purified UNC-60B was unable to interact with the native thin filaments unless CeTM and other associated proteins were removed by high-salt extraction. Purified CeTM was sufficient to restore the resistance of the salt-extracted filaments from UNC-60B. In muscle cells, CeTM and UNC-60B were localized in different patterns. Suppression of CeTM by RNA interference resulted in disorganized actin filaments and paralyzed worms in wild-type background. However, in an ADF/cofilin mutant background, suppression of CeTM did not worsen actin organization and worm motility. These results suggest that tropomyosin is a physiological inhibitor of ADF/cofilin-dependent actin dynamics.

  12. Lights, camera, actin.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Peter A; Wen, Kuo-Kuang

    2005-10-01

    Actin participates in many important biological processes. Currently, intensive investigation is being carried out in a number of laboratories concerning the function of actin in these processes and the molecular basis of its functions. We present a glimpse into four of these areas: actin-like proteins in bacterial cells, actin in the eukaryotic nucleus, the conformational plasticity of the actin filament, and finally, Arp2/3-dependent regulation of actin filament branching and creation of new filament barbed ends. IUBMB Life, 57: 683-687, 2005.

  13. The nature of the globular- to fibrous-actin transition.

    PubMed

    Oda, Toshiro; Iwasa, Mitsusada; Aihara, Tomoki; Maéda, Yuichiro; Narita, Akihiro

    2009-01-22

    Actin plays crucial parts in cell motility through a dynamic process driven by polymerization and depolymerization, that is, the globular (G) to fibrous (F) actin transition. Although our knowledge about the actin-based cellular functions and the molecules that regulate the G- to F-actin transition is growing, the structural aspects of the transition remain enigmatic. We created a model of F-actin using X-ray fibre diffraction intensities obtained from well oriented sols of rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin to 3.3 A in the radial direction and 5.6 A along the equator. Here we show that the G- to F-actin conformational transition is a simple relative rotation of the two major domains by about 20 degrees. As a result of the domain rotation, the actin molecule in the filament is flat. The flat form is essential for the formation of stable, helical F-actin. Our F-actin structure model provides the basis for understanding actin polymerization as well as its molecular interactions with actin-binding proteins.

  14. Distinct Functional Interactions between Actin Isoforms and Nonsarcomeric Myosins

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Mirco; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Chizhov, Igor; Claus, Peter; Heissler, Sarah M.; Preller, Matthias; Taft, Manuel H.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments. PMID:23923011

  15. Muscle Contraction.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, H Lee; Hammers, David W

    2018-02-01

    SUMMARYMuscle cells are designed to generate force and movement. There are three types of mammalian muscles-skeletal, cardiac, and smooth. Skeletal muscles are attached to bones and move them relative to each other. Cardiac muscle comprises the heart, which pumps blood through the vasculature. Skeletal and cardiac muscles are known as striated muscles, because the filaments of actin and myosin that power their contraction are organized into repeating arrays, called sarcomeres, that have a striated microscopic appearance. Smooth muscle does not contain sarcomeres but uses the contraction of filaments of actin and myosin to constrict blood vessels and move the contents of hollow organs in the body. Here, we review the principal molecular organization of the three types of muscle and their contractile regulation through signaling mechanisms and discuss their major structural and functional similarities that hint at the possible evolutionary relationships between the cell types. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. Kinetics of Binding of Caldesmon to Actin*

    PubMed Central

    Chalovich, Joseph M.; Chen, Yi-der; Dudek, Ronald; Luo, Hai

    2005-01-01

    The time course of interaction of caldesmon with actin may be monitored by fluorescence changes that occur upon the binding of 12-(N-methyl-N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-l,3-diazol-4-yl))-labeled caldesmon to actin or to acrylodan actin. The concentration dependence of the observed rate of caldesmon-actin binding was analyzed to a first approximation as a single-step reaction using a Monte Carlo simulation. The derived association and dissociation rates were 107 m−1 s−1 and 18.2 s−1, respectively. Smooth muscle tropomyosin enhances the binding of caldesmon to actin, and this was found to be due to a reduction in the rate of dissociation to 6.3 s −1. There is no evidence from this study for a different mechanism of binding in the presence of tropomyosin. The fluorescence changes that occurred with the binding of 12-(N-methyl-N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-l,3-diazol-4-yl))-labeled caldesmon to actin or actin-tropomyosin were reversed by the addition of myosin subfragment 1 as predicted by a competitive binding mechanism. PMID:7730374

  17. Treatment of Actinic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mature skin is prone to bruising, resulting in a condition known as actinic purpura, characterized by unsightly ecchymosis and purple patches. Similar to other skin conditions, the incidence of actinic purpura increases with advancing age and occurs with equal frequency among men and women. The unsightly appearance of actinic purpura may be a source of emotional distress among the elderly. A new product has been formulated specifically for the treatment of actinic purpura. This product contains retinol, α-hydroxy acids, arnica oil, ceramides, niacinamide, and phytonadione, which effectively treat actinic purpura by improving local circulation, thickening the skin, and repairing the skin barrier. The objective of this paper is to review the beneficial properties of these ingredients and their respective roles in the treatment of actinic purpura. PMID:28979656

  18. Diversification of caldesmon-linked actin cytoskeleton in cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Mayanagi, Taira

    2011-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in regulating cell motility. Caldesmon (CaD) is an actin-linked regulatory protein found in smooth muscle and non-muscle cells that is conserved among a variety of vertebrates. It binds and stabilizes actin filaments, as well as regulating actin-myosin interaction in a calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM)- and/or phosphorylation-dependent manner. CaD function is regulated qualitatively by Ca2+/CaM and by its phosphorylation state and quantitatively at the mRNA level, by three different transcriptional regulation of the CALD1 gene. CaD has numerous functions in cell motility, such as migration, invasion and proliferation, exerted via the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we will outline recent findings regarding CaD's structural features and functions. PMID:21350330

  19. The yeast actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Mithilesh; Huang, Junqi; Balasubramanian, Mohan K

    2014-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a complex network of dynamic polymers, which plays an important role in various fundamental cellular processes, including maintenance of cell shape, polarity, cell division, cell migration, endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and mechanosensation. Precise spatiotemporal assembly and disassembly of actin structures is regulated by the coordinated activity of about 100 highly conserved accessory proteins, which nucleate, elongate, cross-link, and sever actin filaments. Both in vivo studies in a wide range of organisms from yeast to metazoans and in vitro studies of purified proteins have helped shape the current understanding of actin dynamics and function. Molecular genetics, genome-wide functional analysis, sophisticated real-time imaging, and ultrastructural studies in concert with biochemical analysis have made yeast an attractive model to understand the actin cytoskeleton, its molecular dynamics, and physiological function. Studies of the yeast actin cytoskeleton have contributed substantially in defining the universal mechanism regulating actin assembly and disassembly in eukaryotes. Here, we review some of the important insights generated by the study of actin cytoskeleton in two important yeast models the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Control of the Ability of Profilin to Bind and Facilitate Nucleotide Exchange from G-actin*

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Houtman, Jon C. D.; Rubenstein, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    A major factor in profilin regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics is its facilitation of G-actin nucleotide exchange. However, the mechanism of this facilitation is unknown. We studied the interaction of yeast (YPF) and human profilin 1 (HPF1) with yeast and mammalian skeletal muscle actins. Homologous pairs (YPF and yeast actin, HPF1 and muscle actin) bound more tightly to one another than heterologous pairs. However, with saturating profilin, HPF1 caused a faster etheno-ATP exchange with both yeast and muscle actins than did YPF. Based on the -fold change in ATP exchange rate/Kd, however, the homologous pairs are more efficient than the heterologous pairs. Thus, strength of binding of profilin to actin and nucleotide exchange rate are not tightly coupled. Actin/HPF interactions were entropically driven, whereas YPF interactions were enthalpically driven. Hybrid yeast actins containing subdomain 1 (sub1) or subdomain 1 and 2 (sub12) muscle actin residues bound more weakly to YPF than did yeast actin (Kd = 2 μm versus 0.6 μm). These hybrids bound even more weakly to HPF than did yeast actin (Kd = 5 μm versus 3.2 μm). sub1/YPF interactions were entropically driven, whereas the sub12/YPF binding was enthalpically driven. Compared with WT yeast actin, YPF binding to sub1 occurred with a 5 times faster koff and a 2 times faster kon. sub12 bound with a 3 times faster koff and a 1.5 times slower kon. Profilin controls the energetics of its interaction with nonhybrid actin, but interactions between actin subdomains 1 and 2 affect the topography of the profilin binding site. PMID:18223293

  1. The RhoA Activator GEF-H1/Lfc Is a Transforming Growth Factor-β Target Gene and Effector That Regulates α-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression and Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Tsapara, Anna; Luthert, Phillip; Greenwood, John; Hill, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance of the epithelial phenotype is crucial for tissue homeostasis. In the retina, dedifferentiation and loss of integrity of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) leads to retinal dysfunction and fibrosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β critically contributes to RPE dedifferentiation and induces various responses, including increased Rho signaling, up-regulation of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and cell migration and dedifferentiation. Cellular TGF-β responses are stimulated by different signal transduction pathways: some are Smad dependent and others Smad independent. Alterations in Rho signaling are crucial to both types of TGF-β signaling, but how TGF-β-stimulates Rho signaling is poorly understood. Here, we show that primary RPE cells up-regulated GEF-H1 in response to TGF-β. GEF-H1 was the only detectable Rho exchange factor increased by TGF-β1 in a genome-wide expression analysis. GEF-H1 induction was Smad4-dependant and led to Rho activation. GEF-H1 inhibition counteracted α-SMA up-regulation and cell migration. In patients with retinal detachments and fibrosis, migratory RPE cells exhibited increased GEF-H1 expression, indicating that induction occurs in diseased RPE in vivo. Our data indicate that GEF-H1 is a target and functional effector of TGF-β by orchestrating Rho signaling to regulate gene expression and cell migration, suggesting that it represents a new marker and possible therapeutic target for degenerative and fibrotic diseases. PMID:20089843

  2. A novel population of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells activated in a rat model of stroke: an analysis of the spatio-temporal distribution in response to ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Varun; Ling, Tina W; Rewell, Sarah S; Hare, David L; Howells, David W; Kourakis, Angela; Wookey, Peter J

    2012-11-01

    In a rat model of stroke, the spatio-temporal distribution of α-smooth muscle actin-positive, (αSMA+) cells was investigated in the infarcted hemisphere (ipsilateral) and compared with the contralateral hemisphere. At day 3 postischemia, αSMA+ cells were concentrated in two main loci within the ipsilateral hemisphere (Area A) in the medial corpus callosum and (Area B) midway through the striatum adjacent to the lateral ventricle. By day 7 and further by day 14, fewer αSMA+ cells remained in Areas A and B but a steady increase in the peri-infarct was observed. αSMA+ cells also expressed glial acidic fibrillary protein [GFAP: αSMA+/GFAP+ (29%); αSMA+/GFAP- (71%) phenotypes] and feline leukemia virus C receptor 2 (FLVCR2), but not ED1(microglia) and established markers of pericytes normally located in vascular wall. αSMA+ cells were also located close to the subventricular zones (SVZ) adjacent to Areas A and B. In conclusion, αSMA+ cells have been identified in a spatial and temporal sequence from the SVZ, at intermediate loci and in the vicinity of the peri-infarct. It is hypothesized that novel populations of αSMA+ precursors of pericytes are born on the SVZ, migrate into the peri-infarct region and are incorporated into new vessels of the peri-infarct regions.

  3. Increased actin polymerization reduces the inhibition of serum response factor activity by Yin Yang 1.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Peter D; Martin, Karen M; Rickman, Colin; Metcalfe, James C; Kemp, Paul R

    2002-01-01

    Recent evidence has implicated CC(A/T(richG))GG (CArG) boxes, binding sites for serum response factor (SRF), in the regulation of expression of a number of genes in response to changes in the actin cytoskeleton. In many cases, the activity of SRF at CArG boxes is modulated by transcription factors binding to overlapping (e.g. Yin Yang 1, YY1) or adjacent (e.g. ets) binding sites. However, the mechanisms by which SRF activity is regulated by the cytoskeleton have not been determined. To investigate these mechanisms, we screened for cells that did or did not increase the activity of a fragment of the promoter for a smooth-muscle (SM)-specific gene SM22alpha, in response to changes in actin cytoskeletal polymerization induced by LIM kinase. These experiments showed that vascular SM cells (VSMCs) and C2C12 cells increased the activity of promoters containing at least one of the SM22alpha CArG boxes (CArG near) in response to LIM kinase, whereas P19 cells did not. Bandshift assays using a probe to CArG near showed that P19 cells lacked detectable YY1 DNA binding to the CArG box in contrast with the other two cell types. Expression of YY1 in P19 cells inhibited SM22alpha promoter activity and conferred responsiveness to LIM kinase. Mutation of the CArG box to inhibit YY1 or SRF binding indicated that both factors were required for the LIM kinase response in VSMCs and C2C12 cells. The data indicate that changes in the actin cytoskeletal organization modify SRF activity at CArG boxes by modulating YY1-dependent inhibition. PMID:12023898

  4. Actin Polymerization is Stimulated by Actin Crosslinking Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H.; Beck, Moriah R.

    2016-01-01

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the coordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. Here we show that the actin binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro crosslinking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of G-actin, akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  5. Isolation of a 5-Kilodalton Actin-Sequestering Peptide from Human Blood Platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safer, Daniel; Golla, Rajasree; Nachmias, Vivianne T.

    1990-04-01

    Resting human platelets contain ≈0.3 mM unpolymerized actin. When freshly drawn and washed platelets are treated with saponin, 85-90% of the unpolymerized actin diffuses out. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions shows that the bulk of this unpolymerized actin migrates with a higher mobility than does pure G-actin, profilactin, or actin-gelsolin complex. When muscle G-actin is added to fresh or boiled saponin extract, the added muscle actin is shifted to the high-mobility form. The saponin extract contains an acidic peptide having a molecular mass in the range of 5 kDa, which has been purified to homogeneity by reverse-phase HPLC. This peptide also shifts muscle actin to the high-mobility form. Addition of either boiled saponin extract or the purified peptide to muscle G-actin also strongly and stoichiometrically inhibits salt-induced polymerization, as assayed by falling-ball viscometry and by sedimentation. We conclude that this peptide binds to the bulk of the unpolymerized actin in platelets and prevents it from polymerizing.

  6. Actin-induced dimerization of palladin promotes actin-bundling

    PubMed Central

    Vattepu, Ravi; Yadav, Rahul; Beck, Moriah R

    2015-01-01

    A subset of actin binding proteins is able to form crosslinks between two or more actin filaments, thus producing structures of parallel or networked bundles. These actin crosslinking proteins interact with actin through either bivalent binding or dimerization. We recently identified two binding sites within the actin binding domain of palladin, an actin crosslinking protein that plays an important role in normal cell adhesion and motility during wound healing and embryonic development. In this study, we show that actin induces dimerization of palladin. Furthermore, the extent of dimerization reflects earlier comparisons of actin binding and bundling between different domains of palladin. On the basis of these results we hypothesized that actin binding may promote a conformational change that results in dimerization of palladin, which in turn may drive the crosslinking of actin filaments. The proximal distance between two actin binding sites on crosslinking proteins determines the ultrastructural properties of the filament network, therefore we also explored interdomain interactions using a combination of chemical crosslinking experiments and actin cosedimentation assays. Limited proteolysis data reveals that palladin is less susceptible to enzyme digestion after actin binding. Our results suggest that domain movements in palladin are necessary for interactions with actin and are induced by interactions with actin filaments. Accordingly, we put forth a model linking the structural changes to functional dynamics. PMID:25307943

  7. Actinic comedonal plaque.

    PubMed

    Eastern, J S; Martin, S

    1980-12-01

    Solitary plaques developed on the sun-exposed and damaged skin of five elderly, fair-skinned individuals. The lesions, erythematous to bluish confluent nodules and plaques with a cribriform appearance and comedone-like structures, presented a distinctive histologic picture of dilated, keratin-filled follicles within a matrix of amorphous, damaged collagen. We believe these cases demonstrate a distinct entity within the realm of actinic dermatoses, for which the name "actinic comedonal plaque" seems appropriate.

  8. Actin isoform specificity is required for the maintenance of lactation

    PubMed Central

    Weymouth, Nate; Shi, Zengdun; Rockey, Don C.

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) is one of six highly conserved mammalian actin isoforms that appear to exhibit functional redundancy. Nonetheless, we have postulated a specific functional role for the smooth muscle specific isoform. Here, we show that Acta2 deficient mice have a remarkable mammary phenotype such that dams lacking Acta2 are unable to nurse their offspring effectively. The phenotype was rescued in cross fostering experiments with wild type mice, excluding a developmental defect in Acta2 null pups. The mechanism for the underlying phenotype is due to myoepithelial dysfunction postpartum resulting in precocious involution. Further, we demonstrate a specific defect in myoepithelial cell contractility in Acta2 null mammary glands, despite normal expression of cytoplasmic actins. We conclude that Acta2 specifically mediates myoepithelial cell contraction during lactation and that this actin isoform therefore exhibits functional specificity. PMID:22123032

  9. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Actinic keratosis among seafarers.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, M; Kuechmeister, B; Ohnemus, U; Baur, X; Moll, I

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of UV-induced actinic keratosis and further skin lesions. A newly developed questionnaire about lifetime UV radiation exposure was completed by 514 seafarers. An experienced dermatologist inspected the whole-body skin status of all participants. The questionnaire revealed a pre-employment UV radiation exposure in 104 seafarers, sunbed use in 26 subjects and a median work-related UV radiation exposure at sea of 20 years. The diagnosis of actinic keratoses was made in 94 seafarers and the clinical diagnosis of skin cancers in 48 seafarers (28 basal cell carcinoma, 11 squamous cell carcinoma, 9 malignant melanoma). After age standardisation according to a European reference population, the male European seafarers in this study had a 1.80-fold increased risk of actinic keratosis. Actinic keratoses [OR 1.03 (1.01-1.05)] and squamous cell carcinoma [OR 1.07 (1.01-1.13)] were related to the duration of seafaring time in years. A significant association was also found between actinic keratosis/squamous cell carcinoma and sunlight exposure during home leave [OR 1.67 (1.03-2.81) and OR 6.19 (1.18-32.40)]. Furthermore, the engine room personnel-especially the technical officers-were at higher risk of developing actinic keratosis. Due to the high prevalence of actinic keratosis especially among older seafarers with fair skin, with longer duration of seafaring employment at sea and with higher UV exposure during home leave, more intensive advice should be given on sun protection both at sea and ashore.

  11. The actin cytoskeleton in whole mount preparations and sections.

    PubMed

    Resch, Guenter P; Urban, Edit; Jacob, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    In non-muscle cells, the actin cytoskeleton plays a key role by providing a scaffold contributing to the definition of cell shape, force for driving cell motility, cytokinesis, endocytosis, and propulsion of pathogens, as well as tracks for intracellular transport. A thorough understanding of these processes requires insight into the spatial and temporal organisation of actin filaments into diverse higher-order structures, such as networks, parallel bundles, and contractile arrays. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy can be used to visualise the actin cytoskeleton, but due to the delicate nature of actin filaments, they are easily affected by standard preparation protocols, yielding variable degrees of ultrastructural preservation. In this chapter, we describe different conventional and cryo-approaches to visualise the actin cytoskeleton using transmission electron microscopy and discuss their specific advantages and drawbacks. In the first part, we present three different whole mount techniques, which allow visualisation of actin in the peripheral, thinly spread parts of cells grown in monolayers. In the second part, we describe specific issues concerning the visualisation of actin in thin sections. Techniques for three-dimensional visualisation of actin, protein localisation, and correlative light and electron microscopy are also included. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of basic calponin on the flexural mechanics and stability of F-actin.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mikkel Herholdt; Watt, James; Hodgkinson, Julie L; Gallant, Cynthia; Appel, Sarah; El-Mezgueldi, Mohammed; Angelini, Thomas E; Morgan, Kathleen G; Lehman, William; Moore, Jeffrey R

    2012-01-01

    The cellular actin cytoskeleton plays a central role in the ability of cells to properly sense, propagate, and respond to external stresses and other mechanical stimuli. Calponin, an actin-binding protein found both in muscle and non-muscle cells, has been implicated in actin cytoskeletal organization and regulation. In this work, we studied the mechanical and structural interaction of actin with basic calponin, a differentiation marker in smooth muscle cells, on a single filament level. We imaged fluorescently labeled thermally fluctuating actin filaments and found that at moderate calponin binding densities, actin filaments were more flexible, evident as a reduction in persistence length from 8.0 to 5.8 μm. When calponin-decorated actin filaments were subjected to shear, we observed a marked reduction of filament lengths after decoration with calponin, which we argue was due to shear-induced filament rupture rather than depolymerization. This increased shear susceptibility was exacerbated with calponin concentration. Cryo-electron microscopy results confirmed previously published negative stain electron microscopy results and suggested alterations in actin involving actin subdomain 2. A weakening of F-actin intermolecular association is discussed as the underlying cause of the observed mechanical perturbations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Hypertrophic Stimulation Increases β-actin Dynamics in Adult Feline Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Mani, Santhosh K.; Kasiganesan, Harinath; Baicu, Catalin C.; Kuppuswamy, Dhandapani

    2010-01-01

    The myocardium responds to hemodynamic stress through cellular growth and organ hypertrophy. The impact of cytoskeletal elements on this process, however, is not fully understood. While α-actin in cardiomyocytes governs muscle contraction in combination with the myosin motor, the exact role of β-actin has not been established. We hypothesized that in adult cardiomyocytes, as in non-myocytes, β-actin can facilitate cytoskeletal rearrangement within cytoskeletal structures such as Z-discs. Using a feline right ventricular pressure overload (RVPO) model, we measured the level and distribution of β-actin in normal and pressure overloaded myocardium. Resulting data demonstrated enriched levels of β-actin and enhanced translocation to the Triton-insoluble cytoskeletal and membrane skeletal complexes. In addition, RVPO in vivo and in vitro hypertrophic stimulation with endothelin (ET) or insulin in isolated adult cardiomyocytes enhanced the content of polymerized fraction (F-actin) of β-actin. To determine the localization and dynamics of β-actin, we adenovirally expressed GFP-tagged β-actin in isolated adult cardiomyocytes. The ectopically expressed β-actin-GFP localized to the Z-discs, costameres, and cell termini. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) measurements of β-actin dynamics revealed that β-actin at the Z-discs is constantly being exchanged with β-actin from cytoplasmic pools and that this exchange is faster upon hypertrophic stimulation with ET or insulin. In addition, in electrically stimulated isolated adult cardiomyocytes, while β-actin overexpression improved cardiomyocyte contractility, immunoneutralization of β-actin resulted in a reduced contractility suggesting that β-actin could be important for the contractile function of adult cardiomyocytes. These studies demonstrate the presence and dynamics of β-actin in the adult cardiomyocyte and reinforce its usefulness in measuring cardiac cytoskeletal rearrangement during

  14. Hypertrophic stimulation increases beta-actin dynamics in adult feline cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Mani, Santhosh K; Kasiganesan, Harinath; Baicu, Catalin C; Kuppuswamy, Dhandapani

    2010-07-12

    The myocardium responds to hemodynamic stress through cellular growth and organ hypertrophy. The impact of cytoskeletal elements on this process, however, is not fully understood. While alpha-actin in cardiomyocytes governs muscle contraction in combination with the myosin motor, the exact role of beta-actin has not been established. We hypothesized that in adult cardiomyocytes, as in non-myocytes, beta-actin can facilitate cytoskeletal rearrangement within cytoskeletal structures such as Z-discs. Using a feline right ventricular pressure overload (RVPO) model, we measured the level and distribution of beta-actin in normal and pressure overloaded myocardium. Resulting data demonstrated enriched levels of beta-actin and enhanced translocation to the Triton-insoluble cytoskeletal and membrane skeletal complexes. In addition, RVPO in vivo and in vitro hypertrophic stimulation with endothelin (ET) or insulin in isolated adult cardiomyocytes enhanced the content of polymerized fraction (F-actin) of beta-actin. To determine the localization and dynamics of beta-actin, we adenovirally expressed GFP-tagged beta-actin in isolated adult cardiomyocytes. The ectopically expressed beta-actin-GFP localized to the Z-discs, costameres, and cell termini. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) measurements of beta-actin dynamics revealed that beta-actin at the Z-discs is constantly being exchanged with beta-actin from cytoplasmic pools and that this exchange is faster upon hypertrophic stimulation with ET or insulin. In addition, in electrically stimulated isolated adult cardiomyocytes, while beta-actin overexpression improved cardiomyocyte contractility, immunoneutralization of beta-actin resulted in a reduced contractility suggesting that beta-actin could be important for the contractile function of adult cardiomyocytes. These studies demonstrate the presence and dynamics of beta-actin in the adult cardiomyocyte and reinforce its usefulness in measuring cardiac

  15. Torsional Rigidity of Single Actin Filaments and Actin-Actin Bond Breaking Force under Torsion Measured Directly by in vitro Micromanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Yuri; Yasutake, Hironori; Ishijima, Akihiko; Yanagida, Toshio

    1996-11-01

    Knowledge of the elastic properties of actin filaments is crucial for considering its role in muscle contraction, cellular motile events, and formation of cell shape. The stiffness of actin filaments in the directions of stretching and bending has been determined. In this study, we have directly determined the torsional rigidity and breaking force of single actin filaments by measuring the rotational Brownian motion and tensile strength using optical tweezers and microneedles, respectively. Rotational angular fluctuations of filaments supplied the torsional rigidity as (8.0 ± 1.2) × 10-26 Nm2. This value is similar to that deduced from the longitudinal rigidity, assuming the actin filament to be a homogeneous rod. The breaking force of the actin-actin bond was measured while twisting a filament through various angles using microneedles. The breaking force decreased greatly under twist, e.g., from 600-320 pN when filaments were turned through 90 degrees, independent of the rotational direction. Our results indicate that an actin filament exhibits comparable flexibility in the rotational and longitudinal directions, but breaks more easily under torsional load.

  16. Actin, actin-binding proteins, and actin-related proteins in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kristó, Ildikó; Bajusz, Izabella; Bajusz, Csaba; Borkúti, Péter; Vilmos, Péter

    2016-04-01

    Extensive research in the past decade has significantly broadened our view about the role actin plays in the life of the cell and added novel aspects to actin research. One of these new aspects is the discovery of the existence of nuclear actin which became evident only recently. Nuclear activities including transcriptional activation in the case of all three RNA polymerases, editing and nuclear export of mRNAs, and chromatin remodeling all depend on actin. It also became clear that there is a fine-tuned equilibrium between cytoplasmic and nuclear actin pools and that this balance is ensured by an export-import system dedicated to actin. After over half a century of research on conventional actin and its organizing partners in the cytoplasm, it was also an unexpected finding that the nucleus contains more than 30 actin-binding proteins and new classes of actin-related proteins which are not able to form filaments but had evolved nuclear-specific functions. The actin-binding and actin-related proteins in the nucleus have been linked to RNA transcription and processing, nuclear transport, and chromatin remodeling. In this paper, we attempt to provide an overview of the wide range of information that is now available about actin, actin-binding, and actin-related proteins in the nucleus.

  17. Management of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    Actinic keratoses are common, often multiple, epidermal lesions found mainly on the sun-exposed skin of fair-skinned middle-aged and older people.(1) Over time, lesions may remain unchanged or may proliferate, regress, reappear or develop into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).(2) Detectable (spot) lesions are often associated with alteration of the surrounding skin (field) where subclinical lesions might be present.(2) Interventions may target individual or multiple lesions or a whole field.(2) Here, we update our previous review(3) on the prevention and treatment of actinic keratoses, focusing on the licensed treatments most commonly used in the UK and recommended in UK guidelines.

  18. Characterization of actin filament deformation in response to actively driven microspheres propagated through entangled actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Tobias; Blair, Savanna; Robertson-Anderson, Rae

    2014-03-01

    The semi-flexible biopolymer actin is a ubiquitous component of nearly all biological organisms, playing an important role in many biological processes such as cell structure and motility, cancer invasion and metastasis, muscle contraction, and cell signaling. Concentrated actin networks possess unique viscoelastic properties that have been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. However, much is still unknown regarding the correlation of the applied stress on the network to the induced filament strain at the molecular level. Here, we use dual optical traps alongside fluorescence microscopy to carry out active microrheology measurements that link mechanical stress to structural response at the micron scale. Specifically, we actively drive microspheres through entangled actin networks while simultaneously measuring the force the surrounding filaments exert on the sphere and visualizing the deformation and subsequent relaxation of fluorescent labeled filaments within the network. These measurements, which provide much needed insight into the link between stress and strain in actin networks, are critical for clarifying our theoretical understanding of the complex viscoelastic behavior exhibited in actin networks.

  19. Control of actin-based motility through localized actin binding

    PubMed Central

    Banigan, Edward J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Liu, Andrea J.

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of cell biological and biomimetic systems use actin polymerization to drive motility. It has been suggested that an object such as a bacterium can propel itself by self-assembling a high concentration of actin behind it if it is repelled by actin. However, it is also known that it is essential for the moving object to bind actin. Therefore, a key question is how the actin tail can propel an object when it both binds and repels the object. We present a physically consistent Brownian dynamics model for actin-based motility that includes the minimal components of the dendritic nucleation model and allows for both attractive and repulsive interactions between actin and a moveable disk. We find that the concentration gradient of filamentous actin generated by polymerization is sufficient to propel the object, even with moderately strong binding interactions. Additionally, actin binding can act as a biophysical cap, and may directly control motility through modulation of network growth. Overall, this mechanism is robust in that it can drive motility against a load up to a stall pressure that depends on the Young’s modulus of the actin network and can explain several aspects of actin-based motility. PMID:24225232

  20. Actin stress in cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick; Meng, Fanjie

    2014-01-01

    Cell mechanics plays a role in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation. To understand this process better, we created a genetically encoded optical probe, named actin–cpstFRET–actin (AcpA), to report forces in actin in living cells in real time. We showed that stemness was associated with increased force in actin. We reprogrammed HEK-293 cells into stem-like cells using no transcription factors but simply by softening the substrate. However, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell reprogramming required, in addition to a soft substrate, Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog expression. Replating the stem-like cells on glass led to redifferentiation and reduced force in actin. The actin force probe was a FRET sensor, called cpstFRET (circularly permuted stretch sensitive FRET), flanked by g-actin subunits. The labeled actin expressed efficiently in HEK, MDCK, 3T3, and bovine aortic endothelial cells and in multiple stable cell lines created from those cells. The viability of the cell lines demonstrated that labeled actin did not significantly affect cell physiology. The labeled actin distribution was similar to that observed with GFP-tagged actin. We also examined the stress in the actin cross-linker actinin. Actinin force was not always correlated with actin force, emphasizing the need for addressing protein specificity when discussing forces. Because actin is a primary structural protein in animal cells, understanding its force distribution is central to understanding animal cell physiology and the many linked reactions such as stress-induced gene expression. This new probe permits measuring actin forces in a wide range of experiments on preparations ranging from isolated proteins to transgenic animals. PMID:25422450

  1. Modes of caldesmon binding to actin: sites of caldesmon contact and modulation of interactions by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Foster, D Brian; Huang, Renjian; Hatch, Victoria; Craig, Roger; Graceffa, Philip; Lehman, William; Wang, C-L Albert

    2004-12-17

    Smooth muscle caldesmon binds actin and inhibits actomyosin ATPase activity. Phosphorylation of caldesmon by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) reverses this inhibitory effect and weakens actin binding. To better understand this function, we have examined the phosphorylation-dependent contact sites of caldesmon on actin by low dose electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction of actin filaments decorated with a C-terminal fragment, hH32K, of human caldesmon containing the principal actin-binding domains. Helical reconstruction of negatively stained filaments demonstrated that hH32K is located on the inner portion of actin subdomain 1, traversing its upper surface toward the C-terminal segment of actin, and forms a bridge to the neighboring actin monomer of the adjacent long pitch helical strand by connecting to its subdomain 3. Such lateral binding was supported by cross-linking experiments using a mutant isoform, which was capable of cross-linking actin subunits. Upon ERK phosphorylation, however, the mutant no longer cross-linked actin to polymers. Three-dimensional reconstruction of ERK-phosphorylated hH32K indeed indicated loss of the interstrand connectivity. These results, together with fluorescence quenching data, are consistent with a phosphorylation-dependent conformational change that moves the C-terminal end segment of caldesmon near the phosphorylation site but not the upstream region around Cys(595), away from F-actin, thus neutralizing its inhibitory effect on actomyosin interactions. The binding pattern of hH32K suggests a mechanism by which unphosphorylated, but not ERK-phosphorylated, caldesmon could stabilize actin filaments and resist F-actin severing or depolymerization in both smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells.

  2. Actin turnover maintains actin filament homeostasis during cytokinetic ring contraction

    PubMed Central

    Palani, Saravanan; Sommese, Ruth; Kamnev, Anton; Hatano, Tomoyuki; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2017-01-01

    Cytokinesis in many eukaryotes involves a tension-generating actomyosin-based contractile ring. Many components of actomyosin rings turn over during contraction, although the significance of this turnover has remained enigmatic. Here, using Schizosaccharomyces japonicus, we investigate the role of turnover of actin and myosin II in its contraction. Actomyosin ring components self-organize into ∼1-µm-spaced clusters instead of undergoing full-ring contraction in the absence of continuous actin polymerization. This effect is reversed when actin filaments are stabilized. We tested the idea that the function of turnover is to ensure actin filament homeostasis in a synthetic system, in which we abolished turnover by fixing rings in cell ghosts with formaldehyde. We found that these rings contracted fully upon exogenous addition of a vertebrate myosin. We conclude that actin turnover is required to maintain actin filament homeostasis during ring contraction and that the requirement for turnover can be bypassed if homeostasis is achieved artificially. PMID:28655757

  3. Plant vegetative and animal cytoplasmic actins share functional competence for spatial development with protists.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Muthugapatti K; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Roy, Eileen; Meagher, Richard B

    2012-05-01

    Actin is an essential multifunctional protein encoded by two distinct ancient classes of genes in animals (cytoplasmic and muscle) and plants (vegetative and reproductive). The prevailing view is that each class of actin variants is functionally distinct. However, we propose that the vegetative plant and cytoplasmic animal variants have conserved functional competence for spatial development inherited from an ancestral protist actin sequence. To test this idea, we ectopically expressed animal and protist actins in Arabidopsis thaliana double vegetative actin mutants that are dramatically altered in cell and organ morphologies. We found that expression of cytoplasmic actins from humans and even a highly divergent invertebrate Ciona intestinalis qualitatively and quantitatively suppressed the root cell polarity and organ defects of act8 act7 mutants and moderately suppressed the root-hairless phenotype of act2 act8 mutants. By contrast, human muscle actins were unable to support prominently any aspect of plant development. Furthermore, actins from three protists representing Choanozoa, Archamoeba, and green algae efficiently suppressed all the phenotypes of both the plant mutants. Remarkably, these data imply that actin's competence to carry out a complex suite of processes essential for multicellular development was already fully developed in single-celled protists and evolved nonprogressively from protists to plants and animals.

  4. Leiomodin and tropomodulin in smooth muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that actin filament remodeling is critical for smooth muscle contraction, which implicates actin filament ends as important sites for regulation of contraction. Tropomodulin (Tmod) and smooth muscle leiomodin (SM-Lmod) have been found in many tissues containing smooth muscle by protein immunoblot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Both proteins cofractionate with tropomyosin in the Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton of rabbit stomach smooth muscle and are solubilized by high salt. SM-Lmod binds muscle tropomyosin, a biochemical activity characteristic of Tmod proteins. SM-Lmod staining is present along the length of actin filaments in rat intestinal smooth muscle, while Tmod stains in a punctate pattern distinct from that of actin filaments or the dense body marker alpha-actinin. After smooth muscle is hypercontracted by treatment with 10 mM Ca(2+), both SM-Lmod and Tmod are found near alpha-actinin at the periphery of actin-rich contraction bands. These data suggest that SM-Lmod is a novel component of the smooth muscle actin cytoskeleton and, furthermore, that the pointed ends of actin filaments in smooth muscle may be capped by Tmod in localized clusters.

  5. Actin filaments as tension sensors.

    PubMed

    Galkin, Vitold E; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H

    2012-02-07

    The field of mechanobiology has witnessed an explosive growth over the past several years as interest has greatly increased in understanding how mechanical forces are transduced by cells and how cells migrate, adhere and generate traction. Actin, a highly abundant and anomalously conserved protein, plays a large role in forming the dynamic cytoskeleton that is so essential for cell form, motility and mechanosensitivity. While the actin filament (F-actin) has been viewed as dynamic in terms of polymerization and depolymerization, new results suggest that F-actin itself may function as a highly dynamic tension sensor. This property may help explain the unusual conservation of actin's sequence, as well as shed further light on actin's essential role in structures from sarcomeres to stress fibers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural dynamics of F-actin: I. Changes in the C terminus.

    PubMed

    Orlova, A; Egelman, E H

    1995-02-03

    The biochemical properties of G-actin, and the kinetics of polymerization of G-actin into F-actin, are dependent upon whether Mg2+ or Ca2+ is bound at the high-affinity metal-binding site in actin. Three-dimensional reconstructions from electron micrographs show that a bridge of density, that we interpret as arising from a major shift of the C terminus, exists between the two strands of the filament in Ca(2+)-actin that is absent in Mg(2+)-actin. This bridge is also absent in models of F-actin built from an atomic structure of G-Ca(2+)-actin. The cleavage of the DNase I-binding loop in actin between residues 42 and 43, with the non-covalent association of the 42 cleaved residues with the remainder of the actin, induces an even larger bridge of density between the two strands. When the bridge is absent, the two C-terminal residues in F-actin are easily cleaved by trypsin, while these residues become increasingly resistant to tryptic cleavage as the bridge becomes more prominent. Conversely, cleavage of the two C-terminal residues leads to a conformational change in the DNase I-binding loop. Since both the DNase I-binding loop and the metal-binding site are quite distant from the C terminus, large allosteric effects must exist in F-actin. The conformational change in F-actin that results from the creation of this bridge may be induced by myosin binding, since this movement generates changes in actin's diffraction that are very similar to the changes in the muscle X-ray pattern during activation that are associated with the binding of myosin to the thin filament.

  7. Cloning and characterization of an abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) actin gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongming; Xu, Wei; Mai, Kangsen; Liufu, Zhiguo; Chen, Hong

    2004-10-01

    An actin encoding gene was cloned by using RT-PCR, 3‧ RACE and 5‧ RACE from abalone Haliotis discus hannai. The full length of the gene is 1532 base pairs, which contains a long 3‧ untranslated region of 307 base pairs and 79 base pairs of 5‧ untranslated sequence. The open reading frame encodes 376 amino acid residues. Sequence comparison with those of human and other mollusks showed high conservation among species at amino acid level. The identities was 96%, 97% and 96% respectively compared with Aplysia californica, Biomphalaria glabrata and Homo sapience β-actin. It is also indicated that this actin is more similar to the human cytoplasmic actin (β-actin) than to human muscle actin.

  8. The effects of near-UV radiation on elasmobranch lens cytoskeletal actin.

    PubMed

    Zigman, S; Rafferty, N S; Scholz, D L; Lowe, K

    1992-08-01

    The role of near-UV radiation as a cytoskeletal actin-damaging agent was investigated. Two procedures were used to analyse fresh smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis) eye lenses that were incubated for up to 22 hr in vitro, with elasmobranch Ringer's medium, and with or without exposure to a near-UV lamp (emission principally at 365 nm; irradiance of 2.5 mW cm-2). These were observed histologically using phalloidin-rhodamine specific staining and by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, solutions of purified polymerized rabbit muscle actin were exposed to the same UV conditions and depolymerization was assayed by ultracentrifugation and high-pressure liquid chromatography. While the two actins studied do differ very slightly in some amino acid sequences, they would react physically nearly identically. The results showed that dogfish lenses developed superficial opacities due to near-UV exposure. Whole mounts of lens epithelium exhibited breakdown of actin filaments in the basal region of the cells within 18 hr of UV exposure. TEM confirmed the breakdown of actin filaments due to UV exposure. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting positively identified actin in these cells. Direct exposure of purified polymerized muscle actin in polymerizing buffer led to an increase in actin monomer of approximately 25% in the UV-exposed solutions within 3-18 hr, whether assayed by ultracentrifugation or HPLC. The above indicates that elasmobranch lens epithelial cells contain UV-labile actin filaments, and that near-UV radiation, as is present in the sunlit environment, can break down the actin structure in these cells. Furthermore, breakdown of purified polymerized muscle actin does occur due to near-UV light exposure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. The Effect of Crosslinking on the Microscale Stress Response and Molecular Deformations in Actin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurmessa, Bekele; Fitzpatrick, Robert; Valdivia, Jonathon; Anderson, Rae M. R.

    Actin, the most abundant protein in eukaryotic cells, is a semi-flexible biopolymer in the cytoskeleton that plays a crucial structural and mechanical role in cell stability, motion and replication, as well as muscle contraction. Most of these mechanically driven structural changes in cells stem from the complex viscoelastic nature of entangled actin networks and the presence of a myriad of proteins that cross-link actin filaments. Despite their importance, the mechanical response of actin networks is not yet well understood, particularly at the molecular level. Here, we use optical trapping - coupled with fluorescence microscopy - to characterize the microscale stress response and induced filament deformations in entangled and cross-linked actin networks subject to localized mechanical perturbations. In particular, we actively drive a microsphere 10 microns through an entangled or cross- linked actin network at a constant speed and measure the resistive force that the deformed actin filaments exert on the bead during and following strain. We simultaneously visualize and track individual sparsely-labeled actin filaments to directly link force response to molecular deformations, and map the propagation of the initially localized perturbation field throughout the rest of the network (~100 um). By varying the concentration of actin and cross-linkers we directly determine the role of crosslinking and entanglements on the length and time scales of stress propagation, molecular deformation and relaxation mechanisms in actin networks.

  10. Brownian dynamics simulations of interactions between aldolase and G- or F-actin.

    PubMed Central

    Ouporov, I V; Knull, H R; Thomasson, K A

    1999-01-01

    Compartmentation of proteins in cells is important to proper cell function. Interactions of F-actin and glycolytic enzymes is one mechanism by which glycolytic enzymes can compartment. Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of the binding of the muscle form of the glycolytic enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (aldolase) to F- or G-actin provide first-encounter snapshots of these interactions. Using x-ray structures of aldolase, G-actin, and three-dimensional models of F-actin, the electrostatic potential about each protein was predicted by solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for use in BD simulations. The BD simulations provided solution complexes of aldolase with F- or G-actin. All complexes demonstrate the close contacts between oppositely charged regions of the protein surfaces. Positively charged surface regions of aldolase (residues Lys 13, 27, 288, 293, and 341 and Arg 257) are attracted to the negatively charged amino terminus (Asp 1 and Glu 2 and 4) and other patches (Asp 24, 25, and 363 and Glu 361, 364, 99, and 100) of actin subunits. According to BD results, the most important factor for aldolase binding to actin is the quaternary structure of aldolase and actin. Two pairs of adjacent aldolase subunits greatly add to the positive electrostatic potential of each other creating a region of attraction for the negatively charged subdomain 1 of the actin subunit that is exposed to solvent in the quaternary F-actin structure. PMID:9876119

  11. Orientation of the N-terminal lobe of the myosin regulatory light chain in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Romano, Daniela; Brandmeier, Birgit D; Sun, Yin-Biao; Trentham, David R; Irving, Malcolm

    2012-03-21

    The orientation of the N-terminal lobe of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) in demembranated fibers of rabbit psoas muscle was determined by polarized fluorescence. The native RLC was replaced by a smooth muscle RLC with a bifunctional rhodamine probe attached to its A, B, C, or D helix. Fiber fluorescence data were interpreted using the crystal structure of the head domain of chicken skeletal myosin in the nucleotide-free state. The peak angle between the lever axis of the myosin head and the fiber or actin filament axis was 100-110° in relaxation, isometric contraction, and rigor. In each state the hook helix was at an angle of ∼40° to the lever/filament plane. The in situ orientation of the RLC D and E helices, and by implication of its N- and C-lobes, was similar in smooth and skeletal RLC isoforms. The angle between these two RLC lobes in rigor fibers was different from that in the crystal structure. These results extend previous crystallographic evidence for bending between the two lobes of the RLC to actin-attached myosin heads in muscle fibers, and suggest that such bending may have functional significance in contraction and regulation of vertebrate striated muscle. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nucleation of actin polymerization by gelsolin.

    PubMed

    Ditsch, A; Wegner, A

    1994-08-15

    The time-course of assembly of actin with gelsolin was measured by the fluorescence increase of a fluorescent label covalently linked to actin. The actin concentrations ranged from values far below the critical concentration to values above the critical concentration of the pointed ends of actin filaments. If the concentration of actin was in the range of the critical monomer concentration (0.64 microM), the time-course of the concentration of actin assembled with gelsolin revealed a sigmoidal shape. At higher actin concentrations the time-course of association of actin with gelsolin approximated an exponential curve. The measured time-courses of assembly were quantitatively interpreted by kinetic rate equations. A poor fit was obtained if two actin molecules were assumed to bind to gelsolin to form a 1:2 gelsolin-actin complex and subsequently further actin molecules were assumed to polymerize onto the 1:2 gelsolin-actin complex toward the pointed end. A considerably better agreement between calculated and measured time-courses was achieved if additional creation of actin filaments by fast fragmentation of newly formed actin filaments by not yet consumed gelsolin was assumed to occur. This suggests that both polymerization of actin onto gelsolin and fragmentation of actin filaments contribute to formation of new actin filaments by gelsolin. Furthermore it could be demonstrated that below the critical monomer concentration appreciable amounts of actin are incorporated into gelsolin-actin oligomers.

  13. Plasma Actin, Gelsolin and Orosomucoid Levels after Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tékus, Éva; Váczi, Márk; Horváth-Szalai, Zoltán; Ludány, Andrea; Kőszegi, Tamás; Wilhelm, Márta

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the acute effect of eccentric exercise on blood plasma actin, gelsolin (GSN) and orosomucoid (AGP) levels in untrained and moderately trained individuals, and their correlation with exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) markers (CK, intensity of muscle soreness and maximal voluntary contraction torque deficit). Healthy physical education students (6 untrained, 12 moderately trained) participated in this research. Actin, GSN, AGP and CK levels were measured in blood plasma at baseline, immediately, 1 h, 6 h and 24 h post-exercise comprising 90 eccentric quadriceps contractions performed on a dynamometer. There was significant time main effect for GSN, AGP, CK and significant difference was found between baseline and the lowest value of post-exercise GSN (p < 0.05), as well as baseline and the highest value of post-exercise AGP (p < 0.05). Relationships were found between GSN levels and other indirect EIMD markers (between all GSN levels at post-exercise and CK activity at 6 h, p < 0.05; GSNMIN and muscle soreness at post-exercise, p < 0.04), GSN and AGP; however, actin did not correlate at any time points with GSN. Actin, GSN, AGP and CK responses after eccentric exercise do not seem sensitive to training status. The plasma actin level is used as an indicator of injury, however, our results suggest that it is not an accurate marker of EIMD, while plasma GSN concentrations show a better relationship with EIMD and the post-exercise inflammatory process. The elevated plasma AGP and the correlation between GSN and AGP seem to be promising for assessment of exercise-induced muscle injury.

  14. Plasma Actin, Gelsolin and Orosomucoid Levels after Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Váczi, Márk; Horváth-Szalai, Zoltán; Ludány, Andrea; Kőszegi, Tamás; Wilhelm, Márta

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The present study investigated the acute effect of eccentric exercise on blood plasma actin, gelsolin (GSN) and orosomucoid (AGP) levels in untrained and moderately trained individuals, and their correlation with exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) markers (CK, intensity of muscle soreness and maximal voluntary contraction torque deficit). Healthy physical education students (6 untrained, 12 moderately trained) participated in this research. Actin, GSN, AGP and CK levels were measured in blood plasma at baseline, immediately, 1 h, 6 h and 24 h post-exercise comprising 90 eccentric quadriceps contractions performed on a dynamometer. There was significant time main effect for GSN, AGP, CK and significant difference was found between baseline and the lowest value of post-exercise GSN (p < 0.05), as well as baseline and the highest value of post-exercise AGP (p < 0.05). Relationships were found between GSN levels and other indirect EIMD markers (between all GSN levels at post-exercise and CK activity at 6 h, p < 0.05; GSNMIN and muscle soreness at post-exercise, p < 0.04), GSN and AGP; however, actin did not correlate at any time points with GSN. Actin, GSN, AGP and CK responses after eccentric exercise do not seem sensitive to training status. The plasma actin level is used as an indicator of injury, however, our results suggest that it is not an accurate marker of EIMD, while plasma GSN concentrations show a better relationship with EIMD and the post-exercise inflammatory process. The elevated plasma AGP and the correlation between GSN and AGP seem to be promising for assessment of exercise-induced muscle injury. PMID:28469748

  15. The Formin Diaphanous Regulates Myoblast Fusion through Actin Polymerization and Arp2/3 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Su; Bothe, Ingo; Baylies, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multinucleated muscle cells through cell-cell fusion is a conserved process from fruit flies to humans. Numerous studies have shown the importance of Arp2/3, its regulators, and branched actin for the formation of an actin structure, the F-actin focus, at the fusion site. This F-actin focus forms the core of an invasive podosome-like structure that is required for myoblast fusion. In this study, we find that the formin Diaphanous (Dia), which nucleates and facilitates the elongation of actin filaments, is essential for Drosophila myoblast fusion. Following cell recognition and adhesion, Dia is enriched at the myoblast fusion site, concomitant with, and having the same dynamics as, the F-actin focus. Through analysis of Dia loss-of-function conditions using mutant alleles but particularly a dominant negative Dia transgene, we demonstrate that reduction in Dia activity in myoblasts leads to a fusion block. Significantly, no actin focus is detected, and neither branched actin regulators, SCAR or WASp, accumulate at the fusion site when Dia levels are reduced. Expression of constitutively active Dia also causes a fusion block that is associated with an increase in highly dynamic filopodia, altered actin turnover rates and F-actin distribution, and mislocalization of SCAR and WASp at the fusion site. Together our data indicate that Dia plays two roles during invasive podosome formation at the fusion site: it dictates the level of linear F-actin polymerization, and it is required for appropriate branched actin polymerization via localization of SCAR and WASp. These studies provide new insight to the mechanisms of cell-cell fusion, the relationship between different regulators of actin polymerization, and invasive podosome formation that occurs in normal development and in disease. PMID:26295716

  16. A peek into tropomyosin binding and unfolding on the actin filament.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Hitchcock-Degregori, Sarah E

    2009-07-24

    Tropomyosin is a prototypical coiled coil along its length with subtle variations in structure that allow interactions with actin and other proteins. Actin binding globally stabilizes tropomyosin. Tropomyosin-actin interaction occurs periodically along the length of tropomyosin. However, it is not well understood how tropomyosin binds actin. Tropomyosin's periodic binding sites make differential contributions to two components of actin binding, cooperativity and affinity, and can be classified as primary or secondary sites. We show through mutagenesis and analysis of recombinant striated muscle alpha-tropomyosins that primary actin binding sites have a destabilizing coiled-coil interface, typically alanine-rich, embedded within a non-interface recognition sequence. Introduction of an Ala cluster in place of the native, more stable interface in period 2 and/or period 3 sites (of seven) increased the affinity or cooperativity of actin binding, analysed by cosedimentation and differential scanning calorimetry. Replacement of period 3 with period 5 sequence, an unstable region of known importance for cooperative actin binding, increased the cooperativity of binding. Introduction of the fluorescent probe, pyrene, near the mutation sites in periods 2 and 3 reported local instability, stabilization by actin binding, and local unfolding before or coincident with dissociation from actin (measured using light scattering), and chain dissociation (analyzed using circular dichroism). This, and previous work, suggests that regions of tropomyosin involved in binding actin have non-interface residues specific for interaction with actin and an unstable interface that is locally stabilized upon binding. The destabilized interface allows residues on the coiled-coil surface to obtain an optimal conformation for interaction with actin by increasing the number of local substates that the side chains can sample. We suggest that local disorder is a property typical of coiled coil binding

  17. Molecular Architecture of Muscles in an Acoel and Its Evolutionary Implications

    PubMed Central

    CHIODIN, MARTA; ACHATZ, JOHANNES G.; WANNINGER, ANDREAS; MARTINEZ, PEDRO

    2011-01-01

    We have characterized the homologs of an actin, a troponin I, and a tropomyosin gene in the acoel Symsagittifera roscoffensis. These genes are expressed in muscles and most likely coexpressed in at least a subset of them. In addition, and for the first time for Acoela, we have produced a species-specific muscular marker, an antibody against the tropomyosin protein. We have followed tropomyosin gene and protein expression during postembryonic development and during the posterior regeneration of amputated adults, showing that preexisting muscle fibers contribute to the wound closure. The three genes characterized in this study interact in the striated muscles of vertebrates and invertebrates, where troponin I and tropomyosin are key regulators of the contraction of the sarcomere. S. roscoffensis and all other acoels so far described have only smooth muscles, but the molecular architecture of these is the same as that of striated fibers of other bilaterians. Given the proposed basal position of acoels within the Bilateria, we suggest that sarcomeric muscles arose from a smooth muscle type, which had the molecular repertoire of striated musculature already in place. We discuss this model in a broad comparative perspective. PMID:21538843

  18. Vascular disease-causing mutation R258C in ACTA2 disrupts actin dynamics and interaction with myosin

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hailong; Fagnant, Patricia M.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Joel, Peteranne; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Point mutations in vascular smooth muscle α-actin (SM α-actin), encoded by the gene ACTA2, are the most prevalent cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD). Here, we provide the first molecular characterization, to our knowledge, of the effect of the R258C mutation in SM α-actin, expressed with the baculovirus system. Smooth muscles are unique in that force generation requires both interaction of stable actin filaments with myosin and polymerization of actin in the subcortical region. Both aspects of R258C function therefore need investigation. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy was used to quantify the growth of single actin filaments as a function of time. R258C filaments are less stable than WT and more susceptible to severing by cofilin. Smooth muscle tropomyosin offers little protection from cofilin cleavage, unlike its effect on WT actin. Unexpectedly, profilin binds tighter to the R258C monomer, which will increase the pool of globular actin (G-actin). In an in vitro motility assay, smooth muscle myosin moves R258C filaments more slowly than WT, and the slowing is exacerbated by smooth muscle tropomyosin. Under loaded conditions, small ensembles of myosin are unable to produce force on R258C actin-tropomyosin filaments, suggesting that tropomyosin occupies an inhibitory position on actin. Many of the observed defects cannot be explained by a direct interaction with the mutated residue, and thus the mutation allosterically affects multiple regions of the monomer. Our results align with the hypothesis that defective contractile function contributes to the pathogenesis of TAAD. PMID:26153420

  19. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: ats-kawaguchi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Nagata, Kyosuke, E-mail: knagata@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregatedmore » on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network.« less

  20. Interventions for actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Paquet, Maryse; Villanueva, Elmer; Brintnell, William

    2012-12-12

    Actinic keratoses are a skin disease caused by long-term sun exposure, and their lesions have the potential to develop into squamous cell carcinoma. Treatments for actinic keratoses are sought for cosmetic reasons, for the relief of associated symptoms, or for the prevention of skin cancer development. Detectable lesions are often associated with alteration of the surrounding skin (field) where subclinical lesions might be present. The interventions available for the treatment of actinic keratoses include individual lesion-based (e.g. cryotherapy) or field-directed (e.g. topical) treatments. These might vary in terms of efficacy, safety, and cosmetic outcomes. To assess the effects of topical, oral, mechanical, and chemical interventions for actinic keratosis. We searched the following databases up to March 2011: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2010), and LILACS (from 1982). We also searched trials registers, conference proceedings, and grey literature sources. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the treatment of actinic keratoses with either placebo, vehicle, or another active therapy. At least two authors independently abstracted data, which included adverse events, and assessed the quality of evidence. We performed meta-analysis to calculate a weighted treatment effect across trials, and we expressed the results as risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes (e.g. participant complete clearance rates), and mean difference (MD) and 95% CI for continuous outcomes (e.g. mean reduction in lesion counts). We included 83 RCTs in this review, with a total of 10,036 participants. The RCTs covered 18 topical treatments, 1 oral treatment, 2 mechanical interventions, and 3 chemical interventions, including photodynamic therapy (PDT). Most of the studies lacked descriptions of some methodological details, such as the generation of the randomisation

  1. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner.

  2. Cell Elasticity Is Regulated by the Tropomyosin Isoform Composition of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian, Iman; Heu, Celine; Cheng, Hong; Freittag, Hannah; Desouza, Melissa; Stehn, Justine R.; Bryce, Nicole S.; Whan, Renee M.; Hardeman, Edna C.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm), in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin) pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments. PMID:25978408

  3. A periodic pattern of evolutionarily conserved basic and acidic residues constitutes the binding interface of actin-tropomyosin.

    PubMed

    Barua, Bipasha; Fagnant, Patricia M; Winkelmann, Donald A; Trybus, Kathleen M; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E

    2013-04-05

    Actin filament cytoskeletal and muscle functions are regulated by actin binding proteins using a variety of mechanisms. A universal actin filament regulator is the protein tropomyosin, which binds end-to-end along the length of the filament. The actin-tropomyosin filament structure is unknown, but there are atomic models in different regulatory states based on electron microscopy reconstructions, computational modeling of actin-tropomyosin, and docking of atomic resolution structures of tropomyosin to actin filament models. Here, we have tested models of the actin-tropomyosin interface in the "closed state" where tropomyosin binds to actin in the absence of myosin or troponin. Using mutagenesis coupled with functional analyses, we determined residues of actin and tropomyosin required for complex formation. The sites of mutations in tropomyosin were based on an evolutionary analysis and revealed a pattern of basic and acidic residues in the first halves of the periodic repeats (periods) in tropomyosin. In periods P1, P4, and P6, basic residues are most important for actin affinity, in contrast to periods P2, P3, P5, and P7, where both basic and acidic residues or predominantly acidic residues contribute to actin affinity. Hydrophobic interactions were found to be relatively less important for actin binding. We mutated actin residues in subdomains 1 and 3 (Asp(25)-Glu(334)-Lys(326)-Lys(328)) that are poised to make electrostatic interactions with the residues in the repeating motif on tropomyosin in the models. Tropomyosin failed to bind mutant actin filaments. Our mutagenesis studies provide the first experimental support for the atomic models of the actin-tropomyosin interface.

  4. [Photodynamic therapy for actinic cheilitis].

    PubMed

    Castaño, E; Comunión, A; Arias, D; Miñano, R; Romero, A; Borbujo, J

    2009-12-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a subtype of actinic keratosis that mainly affects the lower lip and has a higher risk of malignant transformation. Its location on the labial mucosa influences the therapeutic approach. Vermilionectomy requires local or general anesthetic and is associated with a risk of an unsightly scar, and the treatment with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod lasts for several weeks and the inflammatory reaction can be very intense. A number of authors have used photodynamic therapy as an alternative to the usual treatments. We present 3 patients with histologically confirmed actinic cheilitis treated using photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolevulinic acid as the photosensitizer and red light at 630 nm. The clinical response was good, with no recurrences after 3 to 6 months of follow-up. Our experience supports the use of photodynamic therapy as a good alternative for the treatment of actinic cheilitis.

  5. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  6. Sliding movement of single actin filaments on one-headed myosin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Yoshie; Noguchi, Akira; Kishino, Akiyoshi; Yanagida, Toshio

    1987-04-01

    The myosin molecule consists of two heads, each of which contains an enzymatic active site and an actin-binding site. The fundamental problem of whether the two heads function independently or cooperatively during muscle contraction has been studied by methods using an actomyosin thread1, superprecipitation2-4 and chemical modification of muscle fibres5. No clear conclusion has yet been reached. We have approached this question using an assay system in which sliding movements of fluorescently labelled single actin filaments along myosin filaments can be observed directly6,7. Here, we report direct measurement of the sliding of single actin filaments along one-headed myosin filaments in which the density of heads was varied over a wide range. Our results show that cooperative interaction between the two heads of myosin is not essential for inducing the sliding movement of actin filaments.

  7. A Note on the Definition of a Smooth Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euler, Russell; Sadek, Jawad

    2005-01-01

    In many elementary calculus textbooks in use today, the definition of a "smooth curve" is slightly ambiguous from the students' perspective. Even when smoothness is defined carefully, there is a shortage of relevant exercises that would serve to elaborate on related subtle points which many students may find confusing. In this article, the authors…

  8. Live-Cell Imaging of Mitochondria and the Actin Cytoskeleton in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Swayne, Theresa C; Boldogh, Istvan R; Pon, Liza A

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance and regulation of proper mitochondrial dynamics and functions are necessary for cellular homeostasis. Numerous diseases, including neurodegeneration and muscle myopathies, and overall cellular aging are marked by declining mitochondrial function and subsequent loss of multiple other cellular functions. For these reasons, optimized protocols are needed for visualization and quantification of mitochondria and their function and fitness. In budding yeast, mitochondria are intimately associated with the actin cytoskeleton and utilize actin for their movement and inheritance. This chapter describes optimal approaches for labeling mitochondria and the actin cytoskeleton in living budding yeast cells, for imaging the labeled cells, and for analyzing the resulting images.

  9. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    SciTech Connect

    Bekyarova, T.I.; Reedy, M.C.; Baumann, B.A.J.

    2008-09-03

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the 'steric blocking' mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca{sup 2+} with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at highmore » [Ca{sup 2+}], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca{sup 2+}], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored 'actin target zones.' Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca{sup 2+}] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca{sup 2+}], Vi-'paralyzed' fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa {approx} 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding 'brakes' by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions.« less

  10. Myosin isoform determines the conformational dynamics and cooperativity of actin filaments in the strongly bound actomyosin complex

    PubMed Central

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Chin, Harvey F.; Henn, Arnon; Hannemann, Diane E.; Olivares, Adrian O.; Thomas, David D.; De La Cruz, Enrique M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We have used transient phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) to detect the microsecond rotational dynamics of erythrosin iodoacetamide (ErIA)-labeled actin strongly bound to single-headed fragments of muscle myosin (muscle S1) and non-muscle myosin V (MV). The conformational dynamics of actin filaments in solution are markedly influenced by the isoform of bound myosin. Both myosins increase the final anisotropy of actin at sub-stoichiometric binding densities, indicating long-range, non-nearest neighbor cooperative restriction of filament rotational dynamics amplitude, but the cooperative unit is larger with MV than muscle S1. Both myosin isoforms also cooperatively affect the actin filament rotational correlation time, but with opposite effects; muscle S1 decreases rates of intrafilament torsional motion, while binding of MV increases the rates of motion. The cooperative effects on the rates of intrafilament motions correlate with the kinetics of myosin binding to actin filaments such that MV binds more rapidly, and muscle myosin more slowly, to partially decorated filaments than to bare filaments. The two isoforms also differ in their effects on the phosphorescence lifetime of the actin-bound ErIA; while muscle S1 increases the lifetime, suggesting decreased aqueous exposure of the probe, MV does not induce a significant change. We conclude that the dynamics and structure of actin in the strongly bound actomyosin complex is determined by the isoform of the bound myosin, in a manner likely to accommodate the diverse functional roles of actomyosin in muscle and non-muscle cells. PMID:19962990

  11. Nucleus-associated actin in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Berdieva, Mariia; Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Podlipaeva, Yuliya; Goodkov, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence, spatial distribution and forms of intranuclear and nucleus-associated cytoplasmic actin were studied in Amoeba proteus with immunocytochemical approaches. Labeling with different anti-actin antibodies and staining with TRITC-phalloidin and fluorescent deoxyribonuclease I were used. We showed that actin is abundant within the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm of A. proteus cells. According to DNase I experiments, the predominant form of intranuclear actin is G-actin which is associated with chromatin strands. Besides, unpolymerized actin was shown to participate in organization of a prominent actin layer adjacent to the outer surface of nuclear envelope. No significant amount of F-actin was found in the nucleus. At the same time, the amoeba nucleus is enclosed in a basket-like structure formed by circumnuclear actin filaments and bundles connected with global cytoplasmic actin cytoskeleton. A supposed architectural function of actin filaments was studied by treatment with actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. It disassembled the circumnuclear actin system, but did not affect the intranuclear chromatin structure. The results obtained for amoeba cells support the modern concept that actin is involved in fundamental nuclear processes that have evolved in the cells of multicellular organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  13. Nuclear positioning by actin cables and perinuclear actin

    PubMed Central

    Huelsmann, Sven; Brown, Nicholas H

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear positioning is an important process during development and homeostasis. Depending on the affected tissue, mislocalized nuclei can alter cellular processes such as polarization, differentiation, or migration and lead ultimately to diseases. Many cells actively control the position of their nucleus using their cytoskeleton and motor proteins. We have recently shown that during Drosophila oogenesis, nurse cells employ cytoplasmic actin cables in association with perinuclear actin to position their nucleus. Here, we briefly summarize our work and discuss why nuclear positioning in nurse cells is specialized but the molecular mechanisms are likely to be more generally used. PMID:24905988

  14. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  15. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hu, S; Brady, S R; Kovar, D R; Staiger, C J; Clark, G B; Roux, S J; Muday, G K

    2000-10-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  16. Star Products with Separation of Variables Admitting a Smooth Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabegov, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    Given a complex manifold M with an open dense subset Ω endowed with a pseudo-Kähler form ω which cannot be smoothly extended to a larger open subset, we consider various examples where the corresponding Kähler-Poisson structure and a star product with separation of variables on (Ω, ω) admit smooth extensions to M. We give a simple criterion of the existence of a smooth extension of a star product and apply it to these examples.

  17. Treatment options for actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, William J; Downs, Michael R; Bedwell, Sondra A

    2007-09-01

    Actinic keratoses are rough, scaly lesions that commonly occur on sun-exposed areas of the skin. The prevalence of the condition increases with age. Actinic keratoses are thought to be carcinomas in situ, which can progress to squamous cell carcinomas. The decision to treat can be based on cosmetic reasons; symptom relief; or, most importantly, the prevention of malignancy and metastasis. Treatment options include ablative (destructive) therapies such as cryosurgery, curettage with electrosurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Topical therapies are used in patients with multiple lesions. Fluorouracil has been the traditional topical treatment for actinic keratoses, although imiquimod 5% cream and diclofenac 3% gel are effective alternative therapies. There are too few controlled trials comparing treatment modalities for physicians to make sound, evidence-based treatment decisions.

  18. Actin Engine in Immunological Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Piragyte, Indre

    2012-01-01

    T cell activation and function require physical contact with antigen presenting cells at a specialized junctional structure known as the immunological synapse. Once formed, the immunological synapse leads to sustained T cell receptor-mediated signalling and stabilized adhesion. High resolution microscopy indeed had a great impact in understanding the function and dynamic structure of immunological synapse. Trends of recent research are now moving towards understanding the mechanical part of immune system, expanding our knowledge in mechanosensitivity, force generation, and biophysics of cell-cell interaction. Actin cytoskeleton plays inevitable role in adaptive immune system, allowing it to bear dynamic and precise characteristics at the same time. The regulation of mechanical engine seems very complicated and overlapping, but it enables cells to be very sensitive to external signals such as surface rigidity. In this review, we focus on actin regulators and how immune cells regulate dynamic actin rearrangement process to drive the formation of immunological synapse. PMID:22916042

  19. Bacterial Actins? An Evolutionary Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.; York, Amanda L.

    2003-01-01

    According to the conventional wisdom, the existence of a cytoskeleton in eukaryotes and its absence in prokaryotes constitute a fundamental divide between the two domains of life. An integral part of the dogma is that a cytoskeleton enabled an early eukaryote to feed upon prokaryotes, a consequence of which was the occasional endosymbiosis and the eventual evolution of organelles. Two recent papers present compelling evidence that actin, one of the principal components of a cytoskeleton, has a homolog in Bacteria that behaves in many ways like eukaryotic actin. Sequence comparisons reveml that eukaryotic actin and the bacterial homolog (mreB protein), unlike many other proteins common to eukaryotes and Bacteria, have very different and more highly extended evolutionary histories.

  20. An atomic model of the tropomyosin cable on F-actin.

    PubMed

    Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2014-08-05

    Tropomyosin regulates a wide variety of actin filament functions and is best known for the role that it plays together with troponin in controlling muscle activity. For effective performance on actin filaments, adjacent 42-nm-long tropomyosin molecules are joined together by a 9- to 10-residue head-to-tail overlapping domain to form a continuous cable that wraps around the F-actin helix. Yet, despite the apparent simplicity of tropomyosin's coiled-coil structure and its well-known periodic association with successive actin subunits along F-actin, the structure of the tropomyosin cable on actin is uncertain. This is because the conformation of the overlap region that joins neighboring molecules is poorly understood, thus leaving a significant gap in our understanding of thin-filament structure and regulation. However, recent molecular-dynamics simulations of overlap segments defined their overall shape and provided unique and sufficient cues to model the whole actin-tropomyosin filament assembly in atomic detail. In this study, we show that these MD structures merge seamlessly onto the ends of tropomyosin coiled-coils. Adjacent tropomyosin molecules can then be joined together to provide a comprehensive model of the tropomyosin cable running continuously on F-actin. The resulting complete model presented here describes for the first time (to our knowledge) an atomic-level structure of αα-striated muscle tropomyosin bound to an actin filament that includes the critical overlap domain. Thus, the model provides a structural correlate to evaluate thin-filament mechanics, self-assembly mechanisms, and the effect of disease-causing mutations. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fascin regulates nuclear actin during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Groen, Christopher M.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Sudhir, Sweta; Tootle, Tina L.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila oogenesis provides a developmental system with which to study nuclear actin. During Stages 5–9, nuclear actin levels are high in the oocyte and exhibit variation within the nurse cells. Cofilin and Profilin, which regulate the nuclear import and export of actin, also localize to the nuclei. Expression of GFP-tagged Actin results in nuclear actin rod formation. These findings indicate that nuclear actin must be tightly regulated during oogenesis. One factor mediating this regulation is Fascin. Overexpression of Fascin enhances nuclear GFP-Actin rod formation, and Fascin colocalizes with the rods. Loss of Fascin reduces, whereas overexpression of Fascin increases, the frequency of nurse cells with high levels of nuclear actin, but neither alters the overall nuclear level of actin within the ovary. These data suggest that Fascin regulates the ability of specific cells to accumulate nuclear actin. Evidence indicates that Fascin positively regulates nuclear actin through Cofilin. Loss of Fascin results in decreased nuclear Cofilin. In addition, Fascin and Cofilin genetically interact, as double heterozygotes exhibit a reduction in the number of nurse cells with high nuclear actin levels. These findings are likely applicable beyond Drosophila follicle development, as the localization and functions of Fascin and the mechanisms regulating nuclear actin are widely conserved. PMID:27535426

  2. Intermicrotubular actin filaments in the transalar cytoskeletal arrays of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, M M; Tucker, J B

    1988-11-01

    Rabbit muscle myosin subfragment S1 decorates 6 nm diameter filaments in Drosophila wing epidermal cells in the arrowhead fashion characteristic of the binding of subfragment S1 to actin filaments. The filaments in question are concentrated between microtubules that are mostly composed of 15 protofilaments and form cell surface-associated transcellular bundles. There are indications that the majority of the actin filaments have the same polarity and that, like the microtubules, they may elongate from sites at the apical surfaces of the cells. The bundles of F actin and microtubules occur in dorsal and ventral epidermal cell layers of a wing blade. They are joined in dorso-ventral pairs by attachment desmosomes. These transalar cytoskeletal arrays may provide an example of a situation where actin filaments operate as stiffeners rather than active generators of force in conjunction with myosin. The arrays probably function as noncontractile pillars to maintain basal cell extensions and keep haemocoelic spaces open in the highly folded and expanding wing blades of late pupae.

  3. Molecular and Genetic Characterization of the Drosophila Melanogaster 87e Actin Gene Region

    PubMed Central

    Manseau, L. J.; Ganetzky, B.; Craig, E. A.

    1988-01-01

    A combined molecular and genetic analysis of the 87E actin gene (Act87E) in Drosophila melanogaster was undertaken. A clone of Act87E was isolated and characterized. The Act87E transcription unit is 1.57 kb and includes a 556-base intervening sequence in the 5' leader of the gene. The protein-coding region is contiguous and encodes a protein that is >93% identical to the other Drosophila actins. By in situ hybridization with a series of deficiencies that break in 87E, Act87E was localized to a region encompassing one to three faint, polytene chromosome bands. The region between the deficiency endpoints that flank the actin gene was isolated and measures approximately 24-30 kb. The closest proximal deficiency endpoint lies 8-10 kb 5' to the actin gene; the closest distal deficiency endpoint lies 16-20 kb 3' to the actin gene. A single, recessive lethal complementation group lies between the deficiency endpoints that flank the actin gene. An EMS mutagenesis screen produced four additional members of this recessive lethal complementation group. Molecular analysis of the members of this complementation group indicated that two of the newly induced mutations have deletions of approximately 1 kb in a transcribed region 4-5 kb 3' (distal) to the actin gene. This result suggests that the recessive lethal complementation group represents a gene separate from and distal to the actin gene. The mutagenesis screen failed to identify additional recessive lethal complementation groups in the actin gene-containing region. The implications of the failure to identify recessive lethal mutations in the actin gene are discussed in reference to studies of other conserved multigene families and other muscle protein mutations. PMID:2840338

  4. Steady-state nuclear actin levels are determined by export competent actin pool.

    PubMed

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Huet, Guillaume; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2013-10-01

    A number of studies in the last decade have irrevocably promoted actin into a fully fledged member of the nuclear compartment, where it, among other crucial tasks, facilitates transcription and chromatin remodeling. Changes in nuclear actin levels have been linked to different cellular processes: decreased nuclear actin to quiescence and increased nuclear actin to differentiation. Importin 9 and exportin 6 transport factors are responsible for the continuous nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of actin, but the mechanisms, which result in modulated actin levels, have not been characterized. We find that in cells growing under normal growth conditions, the levels of nuclear actin vary considerably from cell to cell. To understand the basis for this, we have extensively quantified several cellular parameters while at the same time recording the import and export rates of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged actin. Surprisingly, our dataset shows that the ratio of nuclear to cytoplasmic fluorescence intensity, but not nuclear shape, size, cytoplasm size, or their ratio, correlates negatively with both import and export rate of actin. This suggests that high-nuclear actin content is maintained by both diminished import and export. The high nuclear actin containing cells still show high mobility of actin, but it is not export competent, suggesting increased binding of actin to nuclear complexes. Creation of such export incompetent actin pool would ensure enough actin is retained in the nucleus and make it available for the various nuclear functions described for actin. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Plant Vegetative and Animal Cytoplasmic Actins Share Functional Competence for Spatial Development with Protists[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Muthugapatti K.; McKinney, Elizabeth C.; Roy, Eileen; Meagher, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Actin is an essential multifunctional protein encoded by two distinct ancient classes of genes in animals (cytoplasmic and muscle) and plants (vegetative and reproductive). The prevailing view is that each class of actin variants is functionally distinct. However, we propose that the vegetative plant and cytoplasmic animal variants have conserved functional competence for spatial development inherited from an ancestral protist actin sequence. To test this idea, we ectopically expressed animal and protist actins in Arabidopsis thaliana double vegetative actin mutants that are dramatically altered in cell and organ morphologies. We found that expression of cytoplasmic actins from humans and even a highly divergent invertebrate Ciona intestinalis qualitatively and quantitatively suppressed the root cell polarity and organ defects of act8 act7 mutants and moderately suppressed the root-hairless phenotype of act2 act8 mutants. By contrast, human muscle actins were unable to support prominently any aspect of plant development. Furthermore, actins from three protists representing Choanozoa, Archamoeba, and green algae efficiently suppressed all the phenotypes of both the plant mutants. Remarkably, these data imply that actin’s competence to carry out a complex suite of processes essential for multicellular development was already fully developed in single-celled protists and evolved nonprogressively from protists to plants and animals. PMID:22589468

  6. Case for diagnosis. Actinic prurigo.

    PubMed

    Daldon, Patricia Erica Christofoletti; Pascini, Mirella; Correa, Mariane

    2010-01-01

    A 13-year-old black boy had pruritic papular and nodular lesions on his forearms associated to edema of the lower lip, photophobia, conjunctivitis and pterygium. Skin biopsy of the lower lip revealed acanthosis, spongiosis with dermal perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration composed by lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils consistent with actinic prurigo. Lesions improved considerably with the use of thalidomide 100mg/ day.

  7. Actinic cheilitis in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Savage, N W; McKay, C; Faulkner, C

    2010-06-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially premalignant condition involving predominantly the vermilion of the lower lip. The aim of the current paper was to review the clinical presentation of actinic cheilitis and demonstrate the development of management plans using a series of cases. These are designed to provide immediate treatment where required but also to address the medium and long-term requirements of the patient. The authors suggest that the clinical examination of lips and the assessment of actinic cheilitis and other lip pathology become a regular part of the routine soft tissue examination undertaken as a part of the periodic examination of dental patients. Early recognition of actinic cheilitis can allow the development of strategies for individual patients that prevent progression. These are based on past sun exposure, future lifestyle changes and the daily use of emollient sunscreens, broad-brimmed hats and avoidance of sun exposure during the middle of the day. This is a service that is not undertaken as a matter of routine in general medical practice as patients are not seen with the regularity of dental patients and generally not under the ideal examination conditions available in the dental surgery.

  8. Intermediate filament proteins and actin isoforms as markers for soft-tissue tumor differentiation and origin. III. Hemangiopericytomas and glomus tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, W.; Skalli, O.; Lagacé, R.; Seemayer, T. A.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    Intermediate filament proteins and actin isoforms of a series of 12 malignant hemangiopericytomas and five glomus tumors were examined by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE), and by immunohistochemistry, the latter using monoclonal or affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to desmin, vimentin, cytokeratins, alpha-smooth muscle, and alpha-sarcomeric actins. By light microscopy, all hemangiopericytomas disclosed a predominant vascular pattern with scant storiform, myxoid and spindle cell areas, and with variable degrees of perivascular fibrosis. By ultrastructure, smooth muscle differentiation was observed in each hemangiopericytoma. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells of hemangiopericytomas expressed vimentin as the sole intermediate filament protein and lacked alpha-smooth muscle or alpha-sarcomeric actins. 2D-GE revealed only beta and gamma actins, in proportions typical for fibroblastic tissues. Glomus tumors revealed vimentin and alpha-smooth muscle actin within glomus cells by immunohistochemical techniques and disclosed ultrastructurally distinct smooth muscle differentiation. Therefore hemangiopericytomas represent a distinct soft-tissue neoplasm with uniform morphologic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical features most likely related to glomus tumors, the former representing an aggressive and potentially malignant neoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cells and the latter a well-differentiated neoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cells. Because malignant hemangiopericytomas disclose smooth muscle differentiation by ultrastructure, but do not express alpha-smooth muscle actin, as normal pericytes and glomus cells, it is suggested that these neoplasms represent highly vascularized smooth muscle neoplasms, ie, poorly differentiated leiomyosarcomas derived from vascular smooth muscle cells or their equivalent, the pericytes, which have lost alpha-smooth muscle actin as a differentiation marker that is

  9. Plakins in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Justin G; Bernstein, Marija A; Boudreau-Larivière, Céline

    2010-03-01

    Striated muscle cells contain numerous architectural proteins that contribute to the function of muscle as generators of mechanical force. Among these proteins are crosslinkers belonging to the plakin family, namely plectin, microtubule-actin crosslinking factor (ACF7/MACF1), bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (Bpag1/dystonin), and desmoplakin. These plakin family members, in particular plectin and Bpag1/dystonin, exist as several isoforms. The domain organization of these plakin variants dictates their subcellular location and the proteins with which they interact. Several studies suggest that plakins exert unique functions within various compartments of the muscle cell including the sarcolemma, the sarcomere, both neuromuscular and myotendinous junctions in skeletal muscle, and the intercalated discs in cardiac muscle. Plakins may also regulate the cellular placement and function of specific organelles, notably the nucleus, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Here we review and summarize our current knowledge of the function of plakins in striated muscle cells.

  10. Restoring a smooth function from its noisy integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulko, Olga; Prokof'ev, Nikolay; Svistunov, Boris

    2018-05-01

    Numerical (and experimental) data analysis often requires the restoration of a smooth function from a set of sampled integrals over finite bins. We present the bin hierarchy method that efficiently computes the maximally smooth function from the sampled integrals using essentially all the information contained in the data. We perform extensive tests with different classes of functions and levels of data quality, including Monte Carlo data suffering from a severe sign problem and physical data for the Green's function of the Fröhlich polaron.

  11. Peeling off an elastica from a smooth attractive substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyharcabal, Xabier; Frisch, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    Using continuum mechanics, we study theoretically the unbinding of an inextensible rod with free ends attracted by a smooth substrate and submitted to a vertical force. We use the elastica model in a medium-range van der Waals potential. We numerically solve a nonlinear boundary value problem and obtain the force-stretching relation at zero temperature. We obtain the critical force for which the rod unbinds from the substrate as a function of three dimensionless parameters, and we find two different regimes of adhesion. We study analytically the contact potential case as the van der Waals radius goes to zero.

  12. Cell migration without a lamellipodium: translation of actin dynamics into cell movement mediated by tropomyosin.

    PubMed

    Gupton, Stephanie L; Anderson, Karen L; Kole, Thomas P; Fischer, Robert S; Ponti, Aaron; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E; Danuser, Gaudenz; Fowler, Velia M; Wirtz, Denis; Hanein, Dorit; Waterman-Storer, Clare M

    2005-02-14

    The actin cytoskeleton is locally regulated for functional specializations for cell motility. Using quantitative fluorescent speckle microscopy (qFSM) of migrating epithelial cells, we previously defined two distinct F-actin networks based on their F-actin-binding proteins and distinct patterns of F-actin turnover and movement. The lamellipodium consists of a treadmilling F-actin array with rapid polymerization-dependent retrograde flow and contains high concentrations of Arp2/3 and ADF/cofilin, whereas the lamella exhibits spatially random punctae of F-actin assembly and disassembly with slow myosin-mediated retrograde flow and contains myosin II and tropomyosin (TM). In this paper, we microinjected skeletal muscle alphaTM into epithelial cells, and using qFSM, electron microscopy, and immunolocalization show that this inhibits functional lamellipodium formation. Cells with inhibited lamellipodia exhibit persistent leading edge protrusion and rapid cell migration. Inhibition of endogenous long TM isoforms alters protrusion persistence. Thus, cells can migrate with inhibited lamellipodia, and we suggest that TM is a major regulator of F-actin functional specialization in migrating cells.

  13. Actin Interacting Protein1 and Actin Depolymerizing Factor Drive Rapid Actin Dynamics in Physcomitrella patens[W

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Robert C.; Pattavina, Kelli A.; Tüzel, Erkan; Vidali, Luis; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    The remodeling of actin networks is required for a variety of cellular processes in eukaryotes. In plants, several actin binding proteins have been implicated in remodeling cortical actin filaments (F-actin). However, the extent to which these proteins support F-actin dynamics in planta has not been tested. Using reverse genetics, complementation analyses, and cell biological approaches, we assessed the in vivo function of two actin turnover proteins: actin interacting protein1 (AIP1) and actin depolymerizing factor (ADF). We report that AIP1 is a single-copy gene in the moss Physcomitrella patens. AIP1 knockout plants are viable but have reduced expansion of tip-growing cells. AIP1 is diffusely cytosolic and functions in a common genetic pathway with ADF to promote tip growth. Specifically, ADF can partially compensate for loss of AIP1, and AIP1 requires ADF for function. Consistent with a role in actin remodeling, AIP1 knockout lines accumulate F-actin bundles, have fewer dynamic ends, and have reduced severing frequency. Importantly, we demonstrate that AIP1 promotes and ADF is essential for cortical F-actin dynamics. PMID:22003077

  14. The Actin Depolymerizing Factor (ADF)/Cofilin Signaling Pathway and DNA Damage Responses in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Yuan; Leu, Jyh-Der; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family is essential for actin dynamics, cell division, chemotaxis and tumor metastasis. Cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is a primary non-muscle isoform of the ADF/cofilin protein family accelerating the actin filamental turnover in vitro and in vivo. In response to environmental stimulation, CFL-1 enters the nucleus to regulate the actin dynamics. Although the purpose of this cytoplasm-nucleus transition remains unclear, it is speculated that the interaction between CFL-1 and DNA may influence various biological responses, including DNA damage repair. In this review, we will discuss the possible involvement of CFL-1 in DNA damage responses (DDR) induced by ionizing radiation (IR), and the implications for cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25689427

  15. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  16. The Role of Structural Dynamics of Actin in Class-Specific Myosin Motility

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Taro Q. P.; Morimatsu, Masatoshi; Iwane, Atsuko H.; Yanagida, Toshio; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2015-01-01

    The structural dynamics of actin, including the tilting motion between the small and large domains, are essential for proper interactions with actin-binding proteins. Gly146 is situated at the hinge between the two domains, and we previously showed that a G146V mutation leads to severe motility defects in skeletal myosin but has no effect on motility of myosin V. The present study tested the hypothesis that G146V mutation impaired rotation between the two domains, leading to such functional defects. First, our study showed that depolymerization of G146V filaments was slower than that of wild-type filaments. This result is consistent with the distinction of structural states of G146V filaments from those of the wild type, considering the recent report that stabilization of actin filaments involves rotation of the two domains. Next, we measured intramolecular FRET efficiencies between two fluorophores in the two domains with or without skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin or the heavy meromyosin equivalent of myosin V in the presence of ATP. Single-molecule FRET measurements showed that the conformations of actin subunits of control and G146V actin filaments were different in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin. This altered conformation of G146V subunits may lead to motility defects in myosin II. In contrast, distributions of FRET efficiencies of control and G146V subunits were similar in the presence of myosin V, consistent with the lack of motility defects in G146V actin with myosin V. The distribution of FRET efficiencies in the presence of myosin V was different from that in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin, implying that the roles of actin conformation in myosin motility depend on the type of myosin. PMID:25945499

  17. A cardiomyocyte-specific Wdr1 knockout demonstrates essential functional roles for actin disassembly during myocardial growth and maintenance in mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Baiyin; Wan, Ping; Chu, Dandan; Nie, Junwei; Cao, Yunshan; Luo, Wen; Lu, Shuangshuang; Chen, Jiong; Yang, Zhongzhou

    2014-07-01

    Actin dynamics are critical for muscle development and function, and mutations leading to deregulation of actin dynamics cause various forms of heritable muscle diseases. AIP1 is a major cofactor of the actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin in eukaryotes, promoting actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin-mediated actin disassembly. Its function in vertebrate muscle has been unknown. To investigate functional roles of AIP1 in myocardium, we generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice with cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Wdr1, the mammalian homolog of yeast AIP1. Wdr1 cKO mice began to die at postnatal day 13 (P13), and none survived past P24. At P12, cKO mice exhibited cardiac hypertrophy and impaired contraction of the left ventricle. Electrocardiography revealed reduced heart rate, abnormal P wave, and abnormal T wave at P10 and prolonged QT interval at P12. Actin filament (F-actin) accumulations began at P10 and became prominent at P12 in the myocardium of cKO mice. Within regions of F-actin accumulation in myofibrils, the sarcomeric components α-actinin and tropomodulin-1 exhibited disrupted patterns, indicating that F-actin accumulations caused by Wdr1 deletion result in disruption of sarcomeric structure. Ectopic cofilin colocalized with F-actin aggregates. In adult mice, Wdr1 deletion resulted in similar but much milder phenotypes of heart hypertrophy, F-actin accumulations within myofibrils, and lethality. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AIP1-regulated actin dynamics play essential roles in heart function in mice. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Actin Bodies in Yeast Quiescent Cells: An Immediately Available Actin Reserve?

    PubMed Central

    Pinson, Benoît; Salin, Bénédicte; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand

    2006-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells spend most of their life in a quiescent state, poised to respond to specific signals to proliferate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, entry into and exit from quiescence are dependent only on the availability of nutrients in the environment. The transition from quiescence to proliferation requires not only drastic metabolic changes but also a complete remodeling of various cellular structures. Here, we describe an actin cytoskeleton organization specific of the yeast quiescent state. When cells cease to divide, actin is reorganized into structures that we named “actin bodies.” We show that actin bodies contain F-actin and several actin-binding proteins such as fimbrin and capping protein. Furthermore, by contrast to actin patches or cables, actin bodies are mostly immobile, and we could not detect any actin filament turnover. Finally, we show that upon cells refeeding, actin bodies rapidly disappear and actin cables and patches can be assembled in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. This led us to propose that actin bodies are a reserve of actin that can be immediately mobilized for actin cables and patches formation upon reentry into a proliferation cycle. PMID:16914523

  19. Simultaneous recordings of force and sliding movement between a myosin-coated glass microneedle and actin cables in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chaen, S; Oiwa, K; Shimmen, T; Iwamoto, H; Sugi, H

    1989-03-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction resulting from the ATP-dependent actin-myosin interaction, we constructed an assay system with which both the force and the movement produced by the actin-myosin interaction in vitro can be simultaneously recorded and analyzed. The assay system consisted of the giant internodal cells of an alga, Nitellopsis obtusa, which contain well-organized arrays of actin filaments (actin cables) running along the cell long axis, and a glass microneedle (tip diameter, approximately 7 microns; elastic coefficient, approximately 40 pN/microns), which was coated with skeletal muscle myosin at the tip and extended from a micromanipulator at right angles with the actin cables. When the myosin-coated tip of the microneedle was brought into contact with the exposed surface of the actin cables, it exhibited ATP-dependent movement along the actin cables over a distance of 20-150 microns in 20-200 s (20-23 degrees C) and eventually stopped due to a balance between forces generated by the actin-myosin interaction (800-6000 pN) and by the bent microneedle. Since the load on the force-generating myosin molecules increased with the bending displacement of the microneedle (auxotonic condition), the relation between the load and the sliding velocity of the myosin heads past the actin cables was determined from the time course of the microneedle movement recorded with a video system. The shape of the force-velocity curve thus obtained was convex upwards, similar to that of the force-velocity curve of intact frog muscle fibers obtained under the auxotonic condition.

  20. Simultaneous recordings of force and sliding movement between a myosin-coated glass microneedle and actin cables in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Chaen, S; Oiwa, K; Shimmen, T; Iwamoto, H; Sugi, H

    1989-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction resulting from the ATP-dependent actin-myosin interaction, we constructed an assay system with which both the force and the movement produced by the actin-myosin interaction in vitro can be simultaneously recorded and analyzed. The assay system consisted of the giant internodal cells of an alga, Nitellopsis obtusa, which contain well-organized arrays of actin filaments (actin cables) running along the cell long axis, and a glass microneedle (tip diameter, approximately 7 microns; elastic coefficient, approximately 40 pN/microns), which was coated with skeletal muscle myosin at the tip and extended from a micromanipulator at right angles with the actin cables. When the myosin-coated tip of the microneedle was brought into contact with the exposed surface of the actin cables, it exhibited ATP-dependent movement along the actin cables over a distance of 20-150 microns in 20-200 s (20-23 degrees C) and eventually stopped due to a balance between forces generated by the actin-myosin interaction (800-6000 pN) and by the bent microneedle. Since the load on the force-generating myosin molecules increased with the bending displacement of the microneedle (auxotonic condition), the relation between the load and the sliding velocity of the myosin heads past the actin cables was determined from the time course of the microneedle movement recorded with a video system. The shape of the force-velocity curve thus obtained was convex upwards, similar to that of the force-velocity curve of intact frog muscle fibers obtained under the auxotonic condition. Images PMID:2922395

  1. Criticality in the quantum kicked rotor with a smooth potential.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Rina; Shukla, Pragya

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the possibility of an Anderson-type transition in the quantum kicked rotor with a smooth potential due to dynamical localization of the wave functions. Our results show the typical characteristics of a critical behavior, i.e., multifractal eigenfunctions and a scale-invariant level statistics at a critical kicking strength which classically corresponds to a mixed regime. This indicates the existence of a localization to delocalization transition in the quantum kicked rotor. Our study also reveals the possibility of other types of transition in the quantum kicked rotor, with a kicking strength well within the strongly chaotic regime. These transitions, driven by the breaking of exact symmetries, e.g., time reversal and parity, are similar to weak-localization transitions in disordered metals.

  2. Mesoscopic model of actin-based propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Mogilner, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Two theoretical models dominate current understanding of actin-based propulsion: microscopic polymerization ratchet model predicts that growing and writhing actin filaments generate forces and movements, while macroscopic elastic propulsion model suggests that deformation and stress of growing actin gel are responsible for the propulsion. We examine both experimentally and computationally the 2D movement of ellipsoidal beads propelled by actin tails and show that neither of the two models can explain the observed bistability of the orientation of the beads. To explain the data, we develop a 2D hybrid mesoscopic model by reconciling these two models such that individual actin filaments undergoing nucleation, elongation, attachment, detachment and capping are embedded into the boundary of a node-spring viscoelastic network representing the macroscopic actin gel. Stochastic simulations of this 'in silico' actin network show that the combined effects of the macroscopic elastic deformation and microscopic ratchets can explain the observed bistable orientation of the actin-propelled ellipsoidal beads. To test the theory further, we analyze observed distribution of the curvatures of the trajectories and show that the hybrid model's predictions fit the data. Finally, we demonstrate that the model can explain both concave-up and concave-down force-velocity relations for growing actin networks depending on the characteristic time scale and network recoil. To summarize, we propose that both microscopic polymerization ratchets and macroscopic stresses of the deformable actin network are responsible for the force and movement generation.

  3. Titin Based Viscosity in Ventricular Physiology: An Integrative Investigation of PEVK-Actin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Charles S; Methawasin, Methajit; Nelson, O Lynne; Radke, Michael H; Hidalgo, Carlos G; Gotthardt, Michael; Granzier, Henk L

    2011-01-01

    Viscosity is proposed to modulate diastolic function, but only limited understanding of the source(s) of viscosity exists. In-vitro experiments have shown that the proline-glutamic acid-valine-lysine (PEVK) rich element of titin interacts with actin, causing a viscous force in the sarcomere. It is unknown whether this mechanism contributes to viscosity in-vivo. We tested the hypothesis that PEVK-actin interaction causes cardiac viscosity and is important in-vivo via an integrative physiological study on a unique PEVK-knockout (KO) model. Both skinned cardiomyocytes and papillary muscle fibers were isolated from wildtype (WT) and PEVK KO mice and passive viscosity was examined using stretch-hold-release and sinusoidal analysis. Viscosity was reduced by ~60% in KO myocytes and ~50% in muscle fibers at room temperature. The PEVK-actin interaction was not modulated by temperature or diastolic calcium, but was increased by lattice compression. Stretch-hold and sinusoidal frequency protocols on intact isolated mouse hearts showed a smaller, 30–40% reduction in viscosity, possibly due to actomyosin interactions, and showed that microtubules did not contribute to viscosity. Transmitral Doppler echocardiography similarly revealed a 40% decrease in LV chamber viscosity in the PEVK KO in-vivo. This integrative study is the first to quantify the influence of a specific molecular (PEVK-actin) viscosity in-vivo and shows that PEVK-actin interactions are an important physiological source of viscosity. PMID:21708170

  4. Apical and basal epitheliomuscular F-actin dynamics during Hydra bud evagination

    PubMed Central

    Aufschnaiter, Roland; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bending of 2D cell sheets is a fundamental morphogenetic mechanism during animal development and reproduction. A critical player driving cell shape during tissue bending is the actin cytoskeleton. Much of our current knowledge about actin dynamics in whole organisms stems from studies of embryonic development in bilaterian model organisms. Here, we have analyzed actin-based processes during asexual bud evagination in the simple metazoan Hydra. We created transgenic Hydra strains stably expressing the actin marker Lifeact-GFP in either ectodermal or endodermal epitheliomuscular cells. We then combined live imaging with conventional phalloidin staining to directly follow actin reorganization. Bending of the Hydra epithelial double layer is initiated by a group of epitheliomuscular cells in the endodermal layer. These cells shorten their apical-basal axis and arrange their basal muscle processes in a circular configuration. We propose that this rearrangement generates the initial forces to bend the endoderm towards the ectoderm. Convergent tissue movement in both epithelial layers towards the centre of evagination then leads to elongation and extension of the bud along its new body axis. Tissue movement into the bud is associated with lateral intercalation of epithelial cells, remodelling of apical septate junctions, and rearrangement of basal muscle processes. The work presented here extends the analysis of morphogenetic mechanisms beyond embryonic tissues of model bilaterians. PMID:28630355

  5. Force measurements by micromanipulation of a single actin filament by glass needles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishino, Akiyoshi; Yanagida, Toshio

    1988-07-01

    Single actin filaments (~7nm in diameter) labelled with fluorescent phalloidin can be clearly seen by video-fluorescence microscopy1. This technique has been used to observe motions of single filaments in solution and in several in vitro movement assays1-5. In a further development of the technique, we report here a method to catch and manipulate a single actin filament (F-actin) by glass microneedles under conditions in which external force on the filament can be applied and measured. Using this method, we directly measured the tensile strength of a filament (the force necessary to break the bond between two actin monomers) and the force required for a filament to be moved by myosin or its proteolytic fragment bound to a glass surface in the presence of ATP. The first result shows that the tensile strength of the F-actin-phalloidin complex is comparable with the average force exerted on a single thin filament in muscle fibres during isometric contraction. This force is increased only slightly by tropomyosin. The second measurement shows that the myosin head (subfragment-1) can produce the same ATP-dependent force as intact myosin. The magnitude of this force is comparable with that produced by each head of myosin in muscle during isometric contraction.

  6. Filopodia-like Actin Cables Position Nuclei in Association with Perinuclear Actin in Drosophila Nurse Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huelsmann, Sven; Ylänne, Jari; Brown, Nicholas H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Controlling the position of the nucleus is vital for a number of cellular processes from yeast to humans. In Drosophila nurse cells, nuclear positioning is crucial during dumping, when nurse cells contract and expel their contents into the oocyte. We provide evidence that in nurse cells, continuous filopodia-like actin cables, growing from the plasma membrane and extending to the nucleus, achieve nuclear positioning. These actin cables move nuclei away from ring canals. When nurse cells contract, actin cables associate laterally with the nuclei, in some cases inducing nuclear turning so that actin cables become partially wound around the nuclei. Our data suggest that a perinuclear actin meshwork connects actin cables to nuclei via actin-crosslinking proteins such as the filamin Cheerio. We provide a revised model for how actin structures position nuclei in nurse cells, employing evolutionary conserved machinery. PMID:24091012

  7. CaMKIIβ Association with the Actin Cytoskeleton Is Regulated by Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Heather; Lasda, Erika

    2006-01-01

    The Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)β has morphogenic functions in neurons not shared by the α isoform. CaMKIIβ contains three exons (v1, v3, and v4) not present in the CaMKIIα gene, and two of these exons (v1 and v4) are subject to differential alternative splicing. We show here that CaMKIIβ, but not α, mediated bundling of F-actin filaments in vitro. Most importantly, inclusion of exon v1 was required for CaMKIIβ association with the F-actin cytoskeleton within cells. CaMKIIβe, which is the dominant variant around birth and lacks exon v1 sequences, failed to associate with F-actin. By contrast, CaMKIIβ′, which instead lacks exon v4, associated with F-actin as full-length CaMKIIβ. Previous studies with CaMKIIβ mutants have indicated a role of nonstimulated kinase activity in enhancing dendritic arborization. Here, we show that F-actin–targeted CaMKIIβ, but not α, was able to phosphorylate actin in vitro even by nonstimulated basal activity in absence of Ca2+/CaM. In rat pancreatic islets and in skeletal muscle, the actin-associated CaMKIIβ′ and βM were the predominant variants, respectively. Thus, cytoskeletal targeting may mediate functions of CaMKIIβ variants also outside the nervous system. PMID:16928958

  8. Co-transcriptional nuclear actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Actin is a key player for nuclear structure and function regulating both chromosome organization and gene activity. In the cell nucleus actin interacts with many different proteins. Among these proteins several studies have identified classical nuclear factors involved in chromatin structure and function, transcription and RNA processing as well as proteins that are normally involved in controlling the actin cytoskeleton. These discoveries have raised the possibility that nuclear actin performs its multi task activities through tight interactions with different sets of proteins. This high degree of promiscuity in the spectrum of protein-to-protein interactions correlates well with the conformational plasticity of actin and the ability to undergo regulated changes in its polymerization states. Several of the factors involved in controlling head-to-tail actin polymerization have been shown to be in the nucleus where they seem to regulate gene activity. By focusing on the multiple tasks performed by actin and actin-binding proteins, possible models of how actin dynamics controls the different phases of the RNA polymerase II transcription cycle are being identified. PMID:23138849

  9. Geometrical Determinants of Neuronal Actin Waves.

    PubMed

    Tomba, Caterina; Braïni, Céline; Bugnicourt, Ghislain; Cohen, Floriane; Friedrich, Benjamin M; Gov, Nir S; Villard, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons produce in their early stages of growth propagative, actin-rich dynamical structures called actin waves. The directional motion of actin waves from the soma to the tip of neuronal extensions has been associated with net forward growth, and ultimately with the specification of neurites into axon and dendrites. Here, geometrical cues are used to control actin wave dynamics by constraining neurons on adhesive stripes of various widths. A key observable, the average time between the production of consecutive actin waves, or mean inter-wave interval (IWI), was identified. It scales with the neurite width, and more precisely with the width of the proximal segment close to the soma. In addition, the IWI is independent of the total number of neurites. These two results suggest a mechanistic model of actin wave production, by which the material conveyed by actin waves is assembled in the soma until it reaches the threshold leading to the initiation and propagation of a new actin wave. Based on these observations, we formulate a predictive theoretical description of actin wave-driven neuronal growth and polarization, which consistently accounts for different sets of experiments.

  10. Geometrical Determinants of Neuronal Actin Waves

    PubMed Central

    Tomba, Caterina; Braïni, Céline; Bugnicourt, Ghislain; Cohen, Floriane; Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Gov, Nir S.; Villard, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons produce in their early stages of growth propagative, actin-rich dynamical structures called actin waves. The directional motion of actin waves from the soma to the tip of neuronal extensions has been associated with net forward growth, and ultimately with the specification of neurites into axon and dendrites. Here, geometrical cues are used to control actin wave dynamics by constraining neurons on adhesive stripes of various widths. A key observable, the average time between the production of consecutive actin waves, or mean inter-wave interval (IWI), was identified. It scales with the neurite width, and more precisely with the width of the proximal segment close to the soma. In addition, the IWI is independent of the total number of neurites. These two results suggest a mechanistic model of actin wave production, by which the material conveyed by actin waves is assembled in the soma until it reaches the threshold leading to the initiation and propagation of a new actin wave. Based on these observations, we formulate a predictive theoretical description of actin wave-driven neuronal growth and polarization, which consistently accounts for different sets of experiments. PMID:28424590

  11. Bioinformatics study of the mangrove actin genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basyuni, M.; Wasilah, M.; Sumardi

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the bioinformatics methods to analyze eight actin genes from mangrove plants on DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, subcellular localization, similarity, and phylogenetic. The physical and chemical properties of eight mangroves showed variation among the genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of eight mangrove actin genes followed the order of a helix > random coil > extended chain structure for BgActl, KcActl, RsActl, and A. corniculatum Act. In contrast to this observation, the remaining actin genes were random coil > extended chain structure > a helix. This study, therefore, shown the prediction of secondary structure was performed for necessary structural information. The values of chloroplast or signal peptide or mitochondrial target were too small, indicated that no chloroplast or mitochondrial transit peptide or signal peptide of secretion pathway in mangrove actin genes. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity and functional of properties of the different amino acids in mangrove actin genes. To clarify the relationship among the mangrove actin gene, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Three groups of mangrove actin genes were formed, the first group contains B. gymnorrhiza BgAct and R. stylosa RsActl. The second cluster which consists of 5 actin genes the largest group, and the last branch consist of one gene, B. sexagula Act. The present study, therefore, supported the previous results that plant actin genes form distinct clusters in the tree.

  12. Organization of actin in the leading edge of cultured cells: influence of osmium tetroxide and dehydration on the ultrastructure of actin meshworks

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The ordered structure of the leading edge (lamellipodium) of cultured fibroblasts is readily revealed in cells extracted briefly in Triton X- 100-glutaraldehyde mixtures, fixed further in glutaraldehyde, and then negatively stained for electron microscopy. By this procedure, the leading edge regions show a highly organised, three-dimensional network of actin filaments together with variable numbers of radiating actin filament bundles or microspikes. The use of Phalloidin after glutaraldehyde fixation resulted in a marginal improvement in filament order. Processing of the cytoskeletons though the additional steps generally employed for conventional electron microscopy resulted in a marked deterioration or complete disruption of the order of the actin filament networks. In contrast, the actin filaments of the stress fiber bundles were essentially unaffected. Thus, postfixation in osmium tetroxide (1% for 7 min at room temperature) transformed the networks to a reticulum of kinked fibers, resembling those produced by the exposure of muscle F-actin to OsO4 in vitro (P. Maupin-Szamier and T. D. Pollard. 1978. J. Cell Biol. 77:837--852). While limited exposure to OsO4 (0.2+ for 20 min at 0 degrees C) obviated this destruction, dehydration in acetone or ethanol, with or without post-osmication, caused a further and unavoidable disordering and aggregation of the meshwork filaments. The meshwork regions of the leading edge then showed a striking resemblance to the networks hitherto described in critical point-dried preparations of cultured cells. I conclude that much of the "microtrabecular lattice" described by Wolosewick and Porter (1979. J. Cell Biol. 82:114--139) in the latter preparations constitutes actin meshworks and actin filament arrays, with their associated components, that have been distorted and aggregated by the preparative procedures employed. PMID:6799521

  13. Cofilin Changes the Twist of F-Actin: Implications for Actin Filament Dynamics and Cellular Function

    PubMed Central

    McGough, Amy; Pope, Brian; Chiu, Wah; Weeds, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Cofilin is an actin depolymerizing protein found widely distributed in animals and plants. We have used electron cryomicroscopy and helical reconstruction to identify its binding site on actin filaments. Cofilin binds filamentous (F)-actin cooperatively by bridging two longitudinally associated actin subunits. The binding site is centered axially at subdomain 2 of the lower actin subunit and radially at the cleft between subdomains 1 and 3 of the upper actin subunit. Our work has revealed a totally unexpected (and unique) property of cofilin, namely, its ability to change filament twist. As a consequence of this change in twist, filaments decorated with cofilin have much shorter ‘actin crossovers' (∼75% of those normally observed in F-actin structures). Although their binding sites are distinct, cofilin and phalloidin do not bind simultaneously to F-actin. This is the first demonstration of a protein that excludes another actin-binding molecule by changing filament twist. Alteration of F-actin structure by cofilin/ADF appears to be a novel mechanism through which the actin cytoskeleton may be regulated or remodeled. PMID:9265645

  14. A smooth mixture of Tobits model for healthcare expenditure.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Stavrunova, Olena

    2011-09-01

    This paper develops a smooth mixture of Tobits (SMTobit) model for healthcare expenditure. The model is a generalization of the smoothly mixing regressions framework of Geweke and Keane (J Econometrics 2007; 138: 257-290) to the case of a Tobit-type limited dependent variable. A Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm with data augmentation is developed to obtain the posterior distribution of model parameters. The model is applied to the US Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey data on total medical expenditure. The results suggest that the model can capture the overall shape of the expenditure distribution very well, and also provide a good fit to a number of characteristics of the conditional (on covariates) distribution of expenditure, such as the conditional mean, variance and probability of extreme outcomes, as well as the 50th, 90th, and 95th, percentiles. We find that healthier individuals face an expenditure distribution with lower mean, variance and probability of extreme outcomes, compared with their counterparts in a worse state of health. Males have an expenditure distribution with higher mean, variance and probability of an extreme outcome, compared with their female counterparts. The results also suggest that heart and cardiovascular diseases affect the expenditure of males more than that of females. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Spracklen, Andrew J.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Lovander, Kaylee E.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools – Utrophin, Lifeact, and F-tractin – for characterizing the actin remodeling events occurring within the germline-derived nurse cells during Drosophila mid-oogenesis or follicle development. Specifically, we used the UAS/GAL4 system to express these tools at different levels and in different cells, and analyzed these tools for effects on fertility, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and ability to label filamentous actin (F-actin) structures by both fixed and live imaging. While both Utrophin and Lifeact robustly label F-actin structures within the Drosophila germline, when strongly expressed they cause sterility and severe actin defects including cortical actin breakdown resulting in multi-nucleate nurse cells, early F-actin filament and aggregate formation during stage 9 (S9), and disorganized parallel actin filament bundles during stage 10B (S10B). However, by using a weaker germline GAL4 driver in combination with a higher temperature, Utrophin can label F-actin with minimal defects. Additionally, strong Utrophin expression within the germline causes F-actin formation in the nurse cell nuclei and germinal vesicle during mid-oogenesis. Similarly, Lifeact expression results in nuclear F-actin only within the germinal vesicle. F-tractin expresses at a lower level than the other two labeling tools, but labels cytoplasmic F-actin structures well without causing sterility or striking actin defects. Together these studies reveal how critical it is to evaluate the utility of each actin labeling

  16. Rotational dynamics of spin-labeled F-actin during activation of myosin S1 ATPase using caged ATP.

    PubMed Central

    Ostap, E. M.; Thomas, D. D.

    1991-01-01

    The most probable source of force generation in muscle fibers in the rotation of the myosin head when bound to actin. This laboratory has demonstrated that ATP induces microsecond rotational motions of spin-labeled myosin heads bound to actin (Berger, C. L. E. C. Svensson, and D. D. Thomas. 1989. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 86:8753-8757). Our goal is to determine whether the observed ATP-induced rotational motions of actin-bound heads are accompanied by changes in actin rotational motions. We have used saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance (ST-EPR) and laser-induced photolysis of caged ATP to monitor changes in the microsecond rotational dynamics of spin-labeled F-actin in the presence of myosin subfragment-1 (S1). A maleimide spin label was attached selectively to cys-374 on actin. In the absence of ATP (with or without caged ATP), the ST-EPR spectrum (corresponding to an effective rotational time of approximately 150 microseconds) was essentially the same as observed for the same spin label bound to cys-707 (SH1) on S1, indicating that S1 is rigidly bound to actin in rigor. At normal ionic strength (micro = 186 mM), a decrease in ST-EPR intensity (increase in microsecond F-actin mobility) was clearly indicated upon photolysis of 1 mM caged ATP with a 50-ms, 351-nm laser pulse. This increase in mobility is due to the complete dissociation of Si from the actin filament. At low ionic strength (micro, = 36 mM), when about half the Si heads remain bound during ATP hydrolysis, no change in the actin mobility was detected, despite much faster motions of labeled S1 bound to actin. Therefore, we conclude that the active interaction of Si, actin,and ATP induces rotation of myosin heads relative to actin, but does not affect the microsecond rotational motion of actin itself, as detected at cys-374 of actin. PMID:1651780

  17. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Sederoff, Heike [Raleigh, NC; Huber, Steven C [Savoy, IL; Larabell, Carolyn A [Berkeley, CA

    2011-10-18

    Synthetic peptides derived from sucrose synthase, and having homology to actin and actin-related proteins, sharing a common motif, useful for causing acting bundling and preventing actin depolymerization. Peptides exhibiting the common motif are described, as well as specific synthetic peptides which caused bundled actin and inhibit actin depolymerization. These peptides can be useful for treating a subject suffering from a disease characterized by cells having neoplastic growth, for anti-cancer therapeutics, delivered to subjects solely, or concomitantly or sequentially with other known cancer therapeutics. These peptides can also be used for stabilizing microfilaments in living cells and inhibiting growth of cells.

  18. Microscopy basics and the study of actin-actin-binding protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, Maggie S; Macnaughtan, Megan A

    2013-12-15

    Actin is a multifunctional eukaryotic protein with a globular monomer form that polymerizes into a thin, linear microfilament in cells. Through interactions with various actin-binding proteins (ABPs), actin plays an active role in many cellular processes, such as cell motility and structure. Microscopy techniques are powerful tools for determining the role and mechanism of actin-ABP interactions in these processes. In this article, we describe the basic concepts of fluorescent speckle microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and cryoelectron microscopy and review recent studies that utilize these techniques to visualize the binding of actin with ABPs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Markers for human brain pericytes and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Leon C D; Rustenhoven, Justin; Scotter, Emma L; Schweder, Patrick; Faull, Richard L M; Park, Thomas I H; Dragunow, Mike

    2018-06-07

    Brain pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) are a critical component of the neurovascular unit and are important in regulating cerebral blood flow and blood-brain barrier integrity. Identification of subtypes of mural cells in tissue and in vitro is important to any study of their function, therefore we identified distinct mural cell morphologies in neurologically normal post-mortem human brain. Further, the distribution of mural cell markers platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ), α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), CD13, neural/glial antigen-2 (NG2), CD146 and desmin was examined. We determined that PDGFRβ, NG2, CD13, and CD146 were expressed in capillary-associated pericytes. NG2, and CD13 were also present on vSMCs in large vessels, however abundant CD146 and desmin staining was also detected in vSMCs on large vessels, co-labelling with αSMA. To determine whether cultures recapitulated observations from tissue, primary human brain pericytes derived from neurologically normal autopsies were analysed for the presence of pericyte markers by immunocytochemistry, western blotting and qPCR. The proteins observed in brain pericytes in tissue (PDGFRβ, αSMA, desmin, CD146, CD13, and NG2) were present in vitro, validating a panel of proteins that can be used to label brain pericytes and vSMCs in tissue and in vitro. Finally, we showed that the proteins CD146 and desmin that are expressed on large vessels in situ, are also selective markers of a smooth muscle cell phenotype in vitro. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface-induced polymerization of actin.

    PubMed Central

    Renault, A; Lenne, P F; Zakri, C; Aradian, A; Vénien-Bryan, C; Amblard, F

    1999-01-01

    Living cells contain a very large amount of membrane surface area, which potentially influences the direction, the kinetics, and the localization of biochemical reactions. This paper quantitatively evaluates the possibility that a lipid monolayer can adsorb actin from a nonpolymerizing solution, induce its polymerization, and form a 2D network of individual actin filaments, in conditions that forbid bulk polymerization. G- and F-actin solutions were studied beneath saturated Langmuir monolayers containing phosphatidylcholine (PC, neutral) and stearylamine (SA, a positively charged surfactant) at PC:SA = 3:1 molar ratio. Ellipsometry, tensiometry, shear elastic measurements, electron microscopy, and dark-field light microscopy were used to characterize the adsorption kinetics and the interfacial polymerization of actin. In all cases studied, actin follows a monoexponential reaction-limited adsorption with similar time constants (approximately 10(3) s). At a longer time scale the shear elasticity of the monomeric actin adsorbate increases only in the presence of lipids, to a 2D shear elastic modulus of mu approximately 30 mN/m, indicating the formation of a structure coupled to the monolayer. Electron microscopy shows the formation of a 2D network of actin filaments at the PC:SA surface, and several arguments strongly suggest that this network is indeed causing the observed elasticity. Adsorption of F-actin to PC:SA leads more quickly to a slightly more rigid interface with a modulus of mu approximately 50 mN/m. PMID:10049338

  1. Actin dynamics in Amoeba proteus motility.

    PubMed

    Pomorski, P; Krzemiński, P; Wasik, A; Wierzbicka, K; Barańska, J; Kłopocka, W

    2007-01-01

    We studied the distribution of the endogenous Arp2/3 complex in Amoeba proteus and visualised the ratio of filamentous (F-actin) to total actin in living cells. The presented results show that in the highly motile Amoeba proteus, Arp2/3 complex-dependent actin polymerisation is involved in the formation of the branching network of the contractile layer, adhesive structures, and perinuclear cytoskeleton. The aggregation of the Arp2/3 complex in the cortical network, with the exception of the uroid and advancing fronts, and the spatial orientation of microfilaments at the leading edge suggest that actin polymerisation in this area is not sufficient to provide the driving force for membrane displacement. The examined proteins were enriched in the pinocytotic pseudopodia and the perinuclear cytoskeleton in pinocytotic amoebae. In migrating amoebae, the course of changes in F-actin concentration corresponded with the distribution of tension in the cell cortex. The maximum level of F-actin in migrating amoebae was observed in the middle-posterior region and in the front of retracting pseudopodia. Arp2/3 complex-dependent actin polymerisation did not seem to influence F-actin concentration. The strongly condensed state of the microfilament system could be attributed to strong isometric contraction of the cortical layer accompanied by its retraction from distal cell regions. Isotonic contraction was limited to the uroid.

  2. Actin motility: formin a SCAry tail.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Art; Way, Michael

    2011-01-11

    A new biochemical analysis has revealed that the Rickettsia bacterial protein Sca2--recently shown to be essential for virulence and actin-dependent motility--assembles actin filaments using a mechanism that functionally resembles the processive elongation tactics used by formins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Intensity Of The 2.7nm Reflection As A Constraint For Models Of Myosin Docking To Actin

    SciTech Connect

    Reconditi, Massimo; Irving, Tom C.; IIT)

    2009-03-16

    Previous workers have proposed high resolution models for the docking of the myosin heads on actin on the basis of combined crystallographic and electron microscopy data (Mendelson and Morris, 1997 PNAS 94:8533; Holmes et al. 2003 Nature 425:423). We have used data from small angle X-ray fiber diffraction from living muscle to check the predictions of these models. Whole sartorius muscles from Rana pipiens were mounted in a chamber containing Ringer's solution at 10 C and at rest length at the BioCAT beamline (18 ID, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL-U.S.A.). The muscles were activated by electrical stimulation and the forcemore » was recorded with a muscle lever system type 300B (Aurora Scientific). X-ray patterns were collected with 1s total exposures at rest and during isometric contraction out to 0.5 nm{sup -1} in reciprocal space, as the higher angle reflections are expected to be more sensitive to the arrangement of myosin heads on actin. We observed that during isometric contraction the meridional reflection originating from the 2.73nm repeat of the actin monomers along the actin filament increases its intensity by a factor 2.1 {+-} 0.2 relative to rest. Among the models tested, Holmes et al. fits the data when the actin filament is decorated with 30-40% the total available myosin heads, a fraction similar to that estimated with fast single fiber mechanics by Piazzesi et al. (2007, Cell 131:784). However, when the mismatch between the periodicities of actin and myosin filaments is taken into account, none of the models can reproduce the fiber diffraction data. We suggest that the fiber diffraction data should be used as a further constraint on new high resolution models for the docking of the myosin heads on actin.« less

  4. Molecular architecture of the Spire-actin nucleus and its implication for actin filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Sitar, Tomasz; Gallinger, Julia; Ducka, Anna M; Ikonen, Teemu P; Wohlhoefler, Michael; Schmoller, Kurt M; Bausch, Andreas R; Joel, Peteranne; Trybus, Kathleen M; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Huber, Robert; Holak, Tad A

    2011-12-06

    The Spire protein is a multifunctional regulator of actin assembly. We studied the structures and properties of Spire-actin complexes by X-ray scattering, X-ray crystallography, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and actin polymerization assays. We show that Spire-actin complexes in solution assume a unique, longitudinal-like shape, in which Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein homology 2 domains (WH2), in an extended configuration, line up actins along the long axis of the core of the Spire-actin particle. In the complex, the kinase noncatalytic C-lobe domain is positioned at the side of the first N-terminal Spire-actin module. In addition, we find that preformed, isolated Spire-actin complexes are very efficient nucleators of polymerization and afterward dissociate from the growing filament. However, under certain conditions, all Spire constructs--even a single WH2 repeat--sequester actin and disrupt existing filaments. This molecular and structural mechanism of actin polymerization by Spire should apply to other actin-binding proteins that contain WH2 domains in tandem.

  5. Molecular architecture of the Spire–actin nucleus and its implication for actin filament assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sitar, Tomasz; Gallinger, Julia; Ducka, Anna M.; Ikonen, Teemu P.; Wohlhoefler, Michael; Schmoller, Kurt M.; Bausch, Andreas R.; Joel, Peteranne; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Noegel, Angelika A.; Schleicher, Michael; Huber, Robert; Holak, Tad A.

    2011-01-01

    The Spire protein is a multifunctional regulator of actin assembly. We studied the structures and properties of Spire–actin complexes by X-ray scattering, X-ray crystallography, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and actin polymerization assays. We show that Spire–actin complexes in solution assume a unique, longitudinal-like shape, in which Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein homology 2 domains (WH2), in an extended configuration, line up actins along the long axis of the core of the Spire–actin particle. In the complex, the kinase noncatalytic C-lobe domain is positioned at the side of the first N-terminal Spire–actin module. In addition, we find that preformed, isolated Spire–actin complexes are very efficient nucleators of polymerization and afterward dissociate from the growing filament. However, under certain conditions, all Spire constructs—even a single WH2 repeat—sequester actin and disrupt existing filaments. This molecular and structural mechanism of actin polymerization by Spire should apply to other actin-binding proteins that contain WH2 domains in tandem. PMID:22106272

  6. Effects of polymerization and nucleotide identity on the conformational dynamics of the bacterial actin homolog MreB

    PubMed Central

    Colavin, Alexandre; Hsin, Jen; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of protein filaments drives many cellular processes, from nucleoid segregation, growth, and division in single cells to muscle contraction in animals. In eukaryotes, shape and motility are regulated through cycles of polymerization and depolymerization of actin cytoskeletal networks. In bacteria, the actin homolog MreB forms filaments that coordinate the cell-wall synthesis machinery to regulate rod-shaped growth and contribute to cellular stiffness through unknown mechanisms. Like actin, MreB is an ATPase and requires ATP to polymerize, and polymerization promotes nucleotide hydrolysis. However, it is unclear whether other similarities exist between MreB and actin because the two proteins share low sequence identity and have distinct cellular roles. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal surprising parallels between MreB and actin structural dynamics. We observe that MreB exhibits actin-like polymerization-dependent structural changes, wherein polymerization induces flattening of MreB subunits, which restructures the nucleotide-binding pocket to favor hydrolysis. MreB filaments exhibited nucleotide-dependent intersubunit bending, with hydrolyzed polymers favoring a straighter conformation. We use steered simulations to demonstrate a coupling between intersubunit bending and the degree of flattening of each subunit, suggesting cooperative bending along a filament. Taken together, our results provide molecular-scale insight into the diversity of structural states of MreB and the relationships among polymerization, hydrolysis, and filament properties, which may be applicable to other members of the broad actin family. PMID:24550504

  7. Effects of polymerization and nucleotide identity on the conformational dynamics of the bacterial actin homolog MreB.

    PubMed

    Colavin, Alexandre; Hsin, Jen; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2014-03-04

    The assembly of protein filaments drives many cellular processes, from nucleoid segregation, growth, and division in single cells to muscle contraction in animals. In eukaryotes, shape and motility are regulated through cycles of polymerization and depolymerization of actin cytoskeletal networks. In bacteria, the actin homolog MreB forms filaments that coordinate the cell-wall synthesis machinery to regulate rod-shaped growth and contribute to cellular stiffness through unknown mechanisms. Like actin, MreB is an ATPase and requires ATP to polymerize, and polymerization promotes nucleotide hydrolysis. However, it is unclear whether other similarities exist between MreB and actin because the two proteins share low sequence identity and have distinct cellular roles. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal surprising parallels between MreB and actin structural dynamics. We observe that MreB exhibits actin-like polymerization-dependent structural changes, wherein polymerization induces flattening of MreB subunits, which restructures the nucleotide-binding pocket to favor hydrolysis. MreB filaments exhibited nucleotide-dependent intersubunit bending, with hydrolyzed polymers favoring a straighter conformation. We use steered simulations to demonstrate a coupling between intersubunit bending and the degree of flattening of each subunit, suggesting cooperative bending along a filament. Taken together, our results provide molecular-scale insight into the diversity of structural states of MreB and the relationships among polymerization, hydrolysis, and filament properties, which may be applicable to other members of the broad actin family.

  8. The spatial response of nonlinear strain propagation in response to actively driven microspheres through entangled actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Tobias; Blair, Savanna; Robertson-Anderson, Rae

    2015-03-01

    The semiflexible biopolymer actin, a ubiquitous component of nearly all biological organisms, plays an important role in many mechanically-driven processes such as muscle contraction, cancer invasion and cell motility. As such, entangled actin networks, which possess unique and complex viscoelastic properties, have been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. However, due to this viscoelastic complexity, much is still unknown regarding the correlation of the applied stress on actin networks to the induced filament strain at the molecular and micro scale. Here, we use simultaneous optical trapping and fluorescence microscopy to characterize the link between applied microscopic forces and strain propagation as a function of strain rate and concentration. Specifically, we track fiduciary markers on entangled actin filaments before, during and after actively driving embedded microspheres through the network. These measurements provide much needed insight into the molecular-level dynamics connecting stress and strain in semiflexible polymer networks.

  9. Resistance of Actin to Cleavage during Apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qizhong; Wei, Tie; Lees-Miller, Susan; Alnemri, Emad; Watters, Dianne; Lavin, Martin F.

    1997-01-01

    A small number of cellular proteins present in the nucleus, cytosol, and membrane fraction are specifically cleaved by the interleukin-1β -converting enzyme (ICE)-like family of proteases during apoptosis. Previous results have demonstrated that one of these, the cytoskeletal protein actin, is degraded in rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cells upon serum withdrawal. Extracts from etoposide-treated U937 cells are also capable of cleaving actin. It was assumed that cleavage of actin represented a general phenomenon, and a mechanism coordinating proteolytic, endonucleolytic, and morphological aspects of apoptosis was proposed. We demonstrate here that actin is resistant to degradation in several different human cells induced to undergo apoptosis in response to a variety of stimuli, including Fas ligation, serum withdrawal, cytotoxic T-cell killing, and DNA damage. On the other hand, cell-free extracts from these cells and the ICE-like protease CPP32 were capable of cleaving actin in vitro. We conclude that while actin contains cleavage sites for ICE-like proteases, it is not degraded in vivo in human cells either because of lack of access of these proteases to actin or due to the presence of other factors that prevent degradation.

  10. Managing actinic keratosis in primary care.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Nicola; Tidman, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Actinic, or solar, keratosis is caused by chronic ultraviolet-induced damage to the epidermis. In the UK, 15-23% of individuals have actinic keratosis lesions. Risk factors include: advanced age; male gender; cumulative sun exposure or phototherapy; Fitzpatrick skin phototypes I-II; long-term immuno-suppression and genetic syndromes e.g. xeroderma pigmentosum and albinism. Actinic keratoses are regarded by some authorities as premalignant lesions that may transform into invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and by others as in situ SCC that may progress to an invasive stage. The risk of malignant change appears low; up to 0.5% per lesion per year. Up to 20-30% of lesions may spontaneously regress but in the absence of any reliable prognostic clinical indicators regarding malignant potential active treatment is considered appropriate. Actinic keratosis lesions may present as discrete hyperkeratotic papules, cutaneous horns, or more subtle flat lesions on sun-exposed areas of skin. The single most helpful diagnostic sign is an irregularly roughened surface texture: a sandpaper-like feel almost always indicates actinic damage. Dermatoscopy can be helpful in excluding signs of basal cell carcinoma when actinic keratosis is non-keratotic. It is always important to consider the possibility of SCC. The principal indication for referral to secondary care is the possibility of cutaneous malignancy. However, widespread and severe actinic damage in patients who are immunosuppressed is also a reason for referral.

  11. Erbium laser resurfacing for actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L

    2013-11-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a precancerous condition characterized by grayish-whitish area(s) of discoloration on the mucosal lip, often blunting the demarcation between mucosa and cutaneous lip. Actinic cheilitis is considered to be an early part of the spectrum of squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma specifically of the lip has a high rate of recurrence and metastasis through the oral cavity leading to a poor overall survival. Risk factors for the development of actinic cheilitis include chronic solar irradiation, increasing age, male gender, light skin complexion, immunosuppression, and possibly tobacco and alcohol consumption. Treatment options include topical pharmacotherapy (eg, fluorouracil, imiquimod) or procedural interventions (eg, cryotherapy, electrosurgery, surgical vermillionectomy, laser resurfacing), each with their known advantages and disadvantages. There is little consensus as to which treatment options offer the most clinical utility given the paucity of comparative clinical data. In my practice, laser resurfacing has become an important tool for the treatment of actinic cheilitis owing to its ease of use and overall safety, tolerability, and cosmetic acceptability. Herein the use of erbium laser resurfacing is described for three actinic cheilitis presentations for which I find it particularly useful: clinically prominent actinic cheilitis, biopsy-proven actinic cheilitis, and treatment of the entire lip following complete tumor excision of squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with a 2940-nm erbium laser (Sciton Profile Contour Tunable Resurfacing Laser [TRL], Sciton, Inc., Palo Alto, CA).

  12. Investigating Molecular Level Stress-Strain Relationships in Entangled F-Actin Networks by Combined Force-Measuring Optical Tweezers and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kent; Henze, Dean; Robertson-Anderson, Rae

    2013-03-01

    Actin is an important cytoskeletal protein involved in cell structure and motility, cancer invasion and metastasis, and muscle contraction. The intricate viscoelastic properties of filamentous actin (F-actin) networks allow for the many dynamic roles of actin, thus warranting investigation. Exploration of this unique stress-strain/strain-rate relationship in complex F-actin networks can also improve biomimetic materials engineering. Here, we use optical tweezers with fluorescence microscopy to study the viscoelastic properties of F-actin networks on the microscopic level. Optically trapped microspheres embedded in various F-actin networks are moved through the network using a nanoprecision piezoelectric stage. The force exerted on the microspheres by the F-actin network and subsequent force relaxation are measured, while a fraction of the filaments in the network are fluorescent-labeled to observe filament deformation in real-time. The dependence of the viscoelastic properties of the network on strain rates and amplitudes as well as F-actin concentration is quantified. This approach provides the much-needed link between induced force and deformation over localized regimes (tens of microns) and down to the single molecule level.

  13. A Potential Yeast Actin Allosteric Conduit Dependent on Hydrophobic Core Residues Val-76 and Trp-79*

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Stokasimov, Ema; Fields, Jonathon; Rubenstein, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Intramolecular allosteric interactions responsible for actin conformational regulation are largely unknown. Previous work demonstrated that replacing yeast actin Val-76 with muscle actin Ile caused decreased nucleotide exchange. Residue 76 abuts Trp-79 in a six-residue linear array beginning with Lys-118 on the surface and ending with His-73 in the nucleotide cleft. To test if altering the degree of packing of these two residues would affect actin dynamics, we constructed V76I, W79F, and W79Y single mutants as well as the Ile-76/Phe-79 and Ile-76/Tyr-79 double mutants. Tyr or Phe should decrease crowding and increase protein flexibility. Subsequent introduction of Ile should restore packing and dampen changes. All mutants showed decreased growth in liquid medium. W79Y alone was severely osmosensitive and exhibited vacuole abnormalities. Both properties were rescued by Ile-76. Phe-79 or Tyr decreased the thermostability of actin and increased its nucleotide exchange rate. These effects, generally greater for Tyr than for Phe, were reversed by introduction of Ile-76. HD exchange showed that the mutations caused propagated conformational changes to all four subdomains. Based on results from phosphate release and light-scattering assays, single mutations affected polymerization in the order of Ile, Phe, and Tyr from least to most. Introduction of Ile-76 partially rescued the polymerization defects caused by either Tyr-79 or Phe-79. Thus, alterations in crowding of the 76–79 residue pair can strongly affect actin conformation and behavior, and these results support the theory that the amino acid array in which they are located may play a central role in actin regulation. PMID:20442407

  14. Binding of actin to lens alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Actin has been coupled to a cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column, then tested for binding to alpha, beta, and gamma crystallin preparations from the bovine lens. Alpha, but not beta or gamma, crystallins bound to the actin affinity column in a time dependent and saturable manner. Subfractionation of the alpha crystallin preparation into the alpha-A and alpha-B species, followed by incubation with the affinity column, demonstrated that both species bound approximately the same. Together, these studies demonstrate a specific and saturable binding of lens alpha-A and alpha-B with actin.

  15. Actin-based propulsion of a microswimmer.

    PubMed

    Leshansky, A M

    2006-07-01

    A simple hydrodynamic model of actin-based propulsion of microparticles in dilute cell-free cytoplasmic extracts is presented. Under the basic assumption that actin polymerization at the particle surface acts as a force dipole, pushing apart the load and the free (nonanchored) actin tail, the propulsive velocity of the microparticle is determined as a function of the tail length, porosity, and particle shape. The anticipated velocities of the cargo displacement and the rearward motion of the tail are in good agreement with recently reported results of biomimetic experiments. A more detailed analysis of the particle-tail hydrodynamic interaction is presented and compared to the prediction of the simplified model.

  16. Creatine kinase and alpha-actin mRNA levels decrease in diabetic rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, B.; Barrieux, A.; Dillmann, W.H.

    1987-05-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with cardiac atrophy and isoenzyme redistribution. To determine if tissue specific changes occur in mRNAs coding for ..cap alpha..-actin and creatine kinase (CK), they performed RNA blot analysis. Total ventricular RNA from control (C) and 4 wk old diabetic (D) rats were hybridized with /sup 32/P cDNA probes for ..cap alpha..-actin and CK. A tissue independent cDNA probe, CHOA was also used. Signal intensity was quantified by photodensitometry. D CK mRNA was 47 +/- 16% lower in D vs C. Insulin increases CK mRNA by 20% at 1.5 hs, and completely reverses the deficit after 4more » wks. D ..cap alpha..-actin mRNA is 66 +/- 18% lower in D vs C. Insulin normalized ..cap alpha..-actin mRNA by 5 hs. CHOA mRNA is unchanged in D vs C, but D + insulin CHOA mRNA is 30 +/- 2% lower than C. In rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy, muscle specific CK and ..cap alpha..-actin mRNAs are decreased. Insulin treatment reverses these changes.« less

  17. An epidermal plakin that integrates actin and microtubule networks at cellular junctions.

    PubMed

    Karakesisoglou, I; Yang, Y; Fuchs, E

    2000-04-03

    Plakins are cytoskeletal linker proteins initially thought to interact exclusively with intermediate filaments (IFs), but recently were found to associate additionally with actin and microtubule networks. Here, we report on ACF7, a mammalian orthologue of the Drosophila kakapo plakin genetically involved in epidermal-muscle adhesion and neuromuscular junctions. While ACF7/kakapo is divergent from other plakins in its IF-binding domain, it has at least one actin (K(d) = 0.35 microM) and one microtubule (K(d) approximately 6 microM) binding domain. Similar to its fly counterpart, ACF7 is expressed in the epidermis. In well spread epidermal keratinocytes, ACF7 discontinuously decorates the cytoskeleton at the cell periphery, including microtubules (MTs) and actin filaments (AFs) that are aligned in parallel converging at focal contacts. Upon calcium induction of intercellular adhesion, ACF7 and the cytoskeleton reorganize at cell-cell borders but with different kinetics from adherens junctions and desmosomes. Treatments with cytoskeletal depolymerizing drugs reveal that ACF7's cytoskeletal association is dependent upon the microtubule network, but ACF7 also appears to stabilize actin at sites where microtubules and microfilaments meet. We posit that ACF7 may function in microtubule dynamics to facilitate actin-microtubule interactions at the cell periphery and to couple the microtubule network to cellular junctions. These attributes provide a clear explanation for the kakapo mutant phenotype in flies.

  18. Covalent and non-covalent chemical engineering of actin for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saroj; Mansson, Alf

    2017-11-15

    The cytoskeletal filaments are self-assembled protein polymers with 8-25nm diameters and up to several tens of micrometres length. They have a range of pivotal roles in eukaryotic cells, including transportation of intracellular cargoes (primarily microtubules with dynein and kinesin motors) and cell motility (primarily actin and myosin) where muscle contraction is one example. For two decades, the cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor systems have been explored for nanotechnological applications including miniaturized sensor systems and lab-on-a-chip devices. Several developments have also revolved around possible exploitation of the filaments alone without their motor partners. Efforts to use the cytoskeletal filaments for applications often require chemical or genetic engineering of the filaments such as specific conjugation with fluorophores, antibodies, oligonucleotides or various macromolecular complexes e.g. nanoparticles. Similar conjugation methods are also instrumental for a range of fundamental biophysical studies. Here we review methods for non-covalent and covalent chemical modifications of actin filaments with focus on critical advantages and challenges of different methods as well as critical steps in the conjugation procedures. We also review potential uses of the engineered actin filaments in nanotechnological applications and in some key fundamental studies of actin and myosin function. Finally, we consider possible future lines of investigation that may be addressed by applying chemical conjugation of actin in new ways. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Loss of γ-cytoplasmic actin triggers myofibroblast transition of human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Li, Chao; Naydenov, Nayden G.; Kuemmerle, John F.; Dugina, Vera; Chaponnier, Christine; Ivanov, Andrei I.

    2014-01-01

    Transdifferentiation of epithelial cells into mesenchymal cells and myofibroblasts plays an important role in tumor progression and tissue fibrosis. Such epithelial plasticity is accompanied by dramatic reorganizations of the actin cytoskeleton, although mechanisms underlying cytoskeletal effects on epithelial transdifferentiation remain poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that selective siRNA-mediated knockdown of γ-cytoplasmic actin (γ-CYA), but not β-cytoplasmic actin, induced epithelial-to-myofibroblast transition (EMyT) of different epithelial cells. The EMyT manifested by increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin and other contractile proteins, along with inhibition of genes responsible for cell proliferation. Induction of EMyT in γ-CYA–depleted cells depended on activation of serum response factor and its cofactors, myocardial-related transcriptional factors A and B. Loss of γ-CYA stimulated formin-mediated actin polymerization and activation of Rho GTPase, which appear to be essential for EMyT induction. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated, unique role of γ-CYA in regulating epithelial phenotype and suppression of EMyT that may be essential for cell differentiation and tissue fibrosis. PMID:25143399

  20. The myosin converter domain modulates muscle performance.

    PubMed

    Swank, Douglas M; Knowles, Aileen F; Suggs, Jennifer A; Sarsoza, Floyd; Lee, Annie; Maughan, David W; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2002-04-01

    Myosin is the molecular motor that powers muscle contraction as a result of conformational changes during its mechanochemical cycle. We demonstrate that the converter, a compact structural domain that differs in sequence between Drosophila melanogaster myosin isoforms, dramatically influences the kinetic properties of myosin and muscle fibres. Transgenic replacement of the converter in the fast indirect flight muscle with the converter from an embryonic muscle slowed muscle kinetics, forcing a compensatory reduction in wing beat frequency to sustain flight. Conversely, replacing the embryonic converter with the flight muscle converter sped up muscle kinetics and increased maximum power twofold, compared to flight muscles expressing the embryonic myosin isoform. The substitutions also dramatically influenced in vitro actin sliding velocity, suggesting that the converter modulates a rate-limiting step preceding cross-bridge detachment. Our integrative analysis demonstrates that isoform-specific differences in the myosin converter allow different muscle types to meet their specific locomotion demands.

  1. Computational model of polarized actin cables and cytokinetic actin ring formation in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haosu; Bidone, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast actin cables and contractile ring are important for polarized growth and division, revealing basic aspects of cytoskeletal function. To study these formin-nucleated structures, we built a 3D computational model with actin filaments represented as beads connected by springs. Polymerization by formins at the bud tip and bud neck, crosslinking, severing, and myosin pulling, are included. Parameter values were estimated from prior experiments. The model generates actin cable structures and dynamics similar to those of wild type and formin deletion mutant cells. Simulations with increased polymerization rate result in long, wavy cables. Simulated pulling by type V myosin stretches actin cables. Increasing the affinity of actin filaments for the bud neck together with reduced myosin V pulling promotes the formation of a bundle of antiparallel filaments at the bud neck, which we suggest as a model for the assembly of actin filaments to the contractile ring. PMID:26538307

  2. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle ( myopathic changes ) Tissue death of the muscle (necrosis) Disorders that involve inflammation of the blood vessels and affect muscles ( necrotizing vasculitis ) Traumatic muscle damage ...

  3. Mechanics model for actin-based motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  4. Actin expression in trypanosomatids (Euglenozoa: Kinetoplastea)

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Ligia Cristina Kalb; Pinho, Rosana Elisa Gonçalves Gonçalves; Lima, Carla Vanessa de Paula; Fragoso, Stênio Perdigão; Soares, Maurilio José

    2013-01-01

    Heteroxenic and monoxenic trypanosomatids were screened for the presence of actin using a mouse polyclonal antibody produced against the entire sequence of the Trypanosoma cruzi actin gene, encoding a 41.9 kDa protein. Western blot analysis showed that this antibody reacted with a polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa in the whole-cell lysates of parasites targeting mammals (T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major), insects (Angomonas deanei, Crithidia fasciculata, Herpetomonas samuelpessoai and Strigomonas culicis) and plants (Phytomonas serpens). A single polypeptide of approximately 42 kDa was detected in the whole-cell lysates of T. cruzi cultured epimastigotes, metacyclic trypomastigotes and amastigotes at similar protein expression levels. Confocal microscopy showed that actin was expressed throughout the cytoplasm of all the tested trypanosomatids. These data demonstrate that actin expression is widespread in trypanosomatids. PMID:23903980

  5. Mechanics model for actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  6. Selective Blockade of Cytoskeletal Actin Remodeling Reduces Experimental Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Sergio; Yang, Ru; Chaqour, Brahim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The efficacy of the peptide Ac-EEED on reducing cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in vivo was examined. Methods. The peptide chimera containing the Ac-EEED sequence was chemically linked to the N terminus of the XMTM delivery peptide from the Erns viral surface protein. Ac-EEED or scrambled control peptide (SCRAM) was added to cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts, and adhesion, growth, and matrix production was assessed. Ac-EEED or SCRAM was injected into the vitreous of mice undergoing laser rupture of Bruch's membrane to induce CNV and lesion volume, neovascularization and lesion fibrosis were assessed. Results. Ac-EEED–induced changes in the morphology of the actin cytoskeleton by inhibiting polymerization of G-actin and disrupting the formation of stress fibers. Pretreatment with Ac-EEED resulted in endothelial cells becoming less responsive to the mitogenic and pro-adhesive effects of VEGF. Ac-EEED treatment in fibroblasts reduced TGF-β–induced fibrosis as assessed by decreased levels of connective tissue growth factor, cysteine-rich 61, collagen I (COL1A2), and collagen III (COL3A1). CNV lesion size and fibrosis were reduced in a concentration-dependent manner by up to 60%. Conclusions. In vitro studies showed that Ac-EEED affects a broad range of mechanical properties associated with cytoskeletal actin to reduce growth factor effects. The utilization of Ac-EEED in vivo may offer a novel therapeutic strategy by both suppressed neovessel growth and curtailing fibrosis typically associated with the involutional stage of CNV. PMID:21178140

  7. Characterization of f-actin tryptophan phosphorescence in the presence and absence of tryptophan-free myosin motor domain.

    PubMed

    Bódis, Emöke; Strambini, Giovanni B; Gonnelli, Margherita; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Somogyi, Béla

    2004-08-01

    The effect of binding the Trp-free motor domain mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum, rabbit skeletal muscle myosin S1, and tropomyosin on the dynamics and conformation of actin filaments was characterized by an analysis of steady-state tryptophan phosphorescence spectra and phosphorescence decay kinetics over a temperature range of 140-293 K. The binding of the Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum to actin caused red shifts in the phosphorescence spectrum of two internal Trp residues of actin and affected the intrinsic lifetime of each emitter, decreasing by roughly twofold the short phosphorescence lifetime components (tau(1) and tau(2)) and increasing by approximately 20% the longest component (tau(3)). The alteration of actin phosphorescence by the motor protein suggests that i), structural changes occur deep down in the core of actin and that ii), subtle changes in conformation appear also on the surface but in regions distant from the motor domain binding site. When actin formed complexes with skeletal S1, an extra phosphorescence lifetime component appeared (tau(4), twice as long as tau(3)) in the phosphorescence decay that is absent in the isolated proteins. The lack of this extra component in the analogous actin-Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum complex suggests that it should be assigned to Trps in S1 that in the complex attain a more compact local structure. Our data indicated that the binding of tropomyosin to actin filaments had no effect on the structure or flexibility of actin observable by this technique.

  8. How actin network dynamics control the onset of actin-based motility

    PubMed Central

    Kawska, Agnieszka; Carvalho, Kévin; Manzi, John; Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Blanchoin, Laurent; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Sykes, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    Cells use their dynamic actin network to control their mechanics and motility. These networks are made of branched actin filaments generated by the Arp2/3 complex. Here we study under which conditions the microscopic organization of branched actin networks builds up a sufficient stress to trigger sustained motility. In our experimental setup, dynamic actin networks or “gels” are grown on a hard bead in a controlled minimal protein system containing actin monomers, profilin, the Arp2/3 complex and capping protein. We vary protein concentrations and follow experimentally and through simulations the shape and mechanical properties of the actin gel growing around beads. Actin gel morphology is controlled by elementary steps including “primer” contact, growth of the network, entanglement, mechanical interaction and force production. We show that varying the biochemical orchestration of these steps can lead to the loss of network cohesion and the lack of effective force production. We propose a predictive phase diagram of actin gel fate as a function of protein concentrations. This work unveils how, in growing actin networks, a tight biochemical and physical coupling smoothens initial primer-caused heterogeneities and governs force buildup and cell motility. PMID:22908255

  9. The actin multigene family and livestock speciation using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, K S; Hopwood, A J; Lockley, A K; Bardsley, R G

    1998-01-01

    Actins constitute a family of highly-conserved multifunctional intracellular proteins, best known as myofibrillar components in striated muscle fibres. Most vertebrate genomes contain numerous actin genes with high sequence homology in protein coding regions but considerable variability in intron number and sizes. This genetic diversity can be utilised for livestock speciation purposes. The high sequence conservation has enabled a single pair of oligonucleotides to be used to prime the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with DNA extracted from all animals so far studied. Multiple amplification products were obtained which on gel electrophoresis constituted characteristic species-specific 'fingerprints'. The patterns were reproducible, did not vary between individuals of the same breed or between different breeds within a species, and could be generated even from heat-processed muscle held at 120 degrees C for one hour. Given the capacity of PCR to amplify relatively short sequences in highly-degraded DNA, this approach may be suitable for authentication of processed meat products.

  10. Actin cable dynamics in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Pon, Liza A.

    2002-01-01

    Actin cables, bundles of actin filaments that align along the long axis of budding yeast, are crucial for establishment of cell polarity. We fused green fluorescent protein (GFP) to actin binding protein 140 (Abp140p) and visualized actin cable dynamics in living yeast. We detected two populations of actin cables: (i) bud-associated cables, which extend from the bud along the mother-bud axis, and (ii) randomly oriented cables, which are relatively short. Time-lapse imaging of Abp140p–GFP revealed an apparent increase in the length of bud-associated actin cables. Analysis of movement of Abp140p–GFP fiduciary marks on bud-associated cables and fluorescence loss in photobleaching experiments revealed that this apparent elongation occurs by assembly of new material at the end of the cable within the bud and movement of the opposite end of the cable toward the tip of the mother cell distal to the bud. The rate of extension of the tip of an elongating actin cable is 0.29 ± 0.08 μm/s. Latrunculin A (Lat-A) treatment completely blocked this process. We also observed movement of randomly oriented cables around the cortex of cells at a rate of 0.59 ± 0.14 μm/s. Mild treatment with Lat-A did not affect the velocity of movement of randomly oriented cables. However, Lat-A treatment did increase the number of randomly oriented, motile cables per cell. Our observations suggest that establishment of bud-associated actin cables during the cell cycle is accomplished not by realignment of existing cables but by assembly of new cables within the bud or bud neck, followed by elongation. PMID:11805329

  11. From Cytoskeleton to Gene Expression: Actin in the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Viita, Tiina; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2017-01-01

    Although most people still associate actin mainly with the cytoskeleton, several lines of evidence, with the earliest studies dating back to decades ago, have emphasized the importance of actin also inside the cell nucleus. Actin has been linked to many gene expression processes from gene activation to chromatin remodeling, but also to maintenance of genomic integrity and intranuclear movement of chromosomes and chromosomal loci. Recent advances in visualizing different forms and dynamic properties of nuclear actin have clearly advanced our understanding of the basic concepts by which actin operates in the nucleus. In this chapter we address the different breakthroughs in nuclear actin studies, as well as discuss the regulation nuclear actin and the importance of nuclear actin dynamics in relation to its different nuclear functions. Our aim is to highlight the fact that actin should be considered as an essential component of the cell nucleus, and its nuclear actions should be taken into account also in experiments on cytoplasmic actin networks.

  12. Actin-associated protein palladin is required for migration behavior and differentiation potential of C2C12 myoblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ngoc Uyen Nhi; Liang, Vincent Roderick; Wang, Hao-Ven, E-mail: hvwang@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Palladin is involved in myogenesis in vitro. • Palladin knockdown by siRNA increases myoblast proliferation, viability and differentiation. • Palladin knockdown decreases C2C12 myoblast migration ability. - Abstract: The actin-associated protein palladin has been shown to be involved in differentiation processes in non-muscle tissues. However, but its function in skeletal muscle has rarely been studied. Palladin plays important roles in the regulation of diverse actin-related signaling in a number of cell types. Since intact actin-cytoskeletal remodeling is necessary for myogenesis, in the present study, we pursue to investigate the role of actin-associated palladin in skeletal muscle differentiation. Palladinmore » in C2C12 myoblasts is knocked-down using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results show that down-regulation of palladin decreased migratory activity of mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts. Furthermore, the depletion of palladin enhances C2C12 vitality and proliferation. Of note, the loss of palladin promotes C2C12 to express the myosin heavy chain, suggesting that palladin has a role in the modulation of C2C12 differentiation. It is thus proposed that palladin is required for normal C2C12 myogenesis in vitro.« less

  13. Drosophila Spire is an actin nucleation factor.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Margot E; Heuser, John E; Kerkhoff, Eugen; Mullins, R Dyche

    2005-01-27

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential for many cellular functions including shape determination, intracellular transport and locomotion. Previous work has identified two factors--the Arp2/3 complex and the formin family of proteins--that nucleate new actin filaments via different mechanisms. Here we show that the Drosophila protein Spire represents a third class of actin nucleation factor. In vitro, Spire nucleates new filaments at a rate that is similar to that of the formin family of proteins but slower than in the activated Arp2/3 complex, and it remains associated with the slow-growing pointed end of the new filament. Spire contains a cluster of four WASP homology 2 (WH2) domains, each of which binds an actin monomer. Maximal nucleation activity requires all four WH2 domains along with an additional actin-binding motif, conserved among Spire proteins. Spire itself is conserved among metazoans and, together with the formin Cappuccino, is required for axis specification in oocytes and embryos, suggesting that multiple actin nucleation factors collaborate to construct essential cytoskeletal structures.

  14. Actin filament curvature biases branching direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evan; Risca, Viviana; Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Chia, Jia-Jun; Geissler, Phillip; Fletcher, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Actin filaments are key components of the cellular machinery, vital for a wide range of processes ranging from cell motility to endocytosis. Actin filaments can branch, and essential in this process is a protein complex known as the Arp2/3 complex, which nucleate new ``daughter'' filaments from pre-existing ``mother'' filaments by attaching itself to the mother filament. Though much progress has been made in understanding the Arp2/3-actin junction, some very interesting questions remain. In particular, F-actin is a dynamic polymer that undergoes a wide range of fluctuations. Prior studies of the Arp2/3-actin junction provides a very static notion of Arp2/3 binding. The question we ask is how differently does the Arp2/3 complex interact with a straight filament compared to a bent filament? In this study, we used Monte Carlo simulations of a surface-tethered worm-like chain to explore possible mechanisms underlying the experimental observation that there exists preferential branch formation by the Arp2/3 complex on the convex face of a curved filament. We show that a fluctuation gating model in which Arp2/3 binding to the actin filament is dependent upon a rare high-local-curvature shape fluctuation of the filament is consistent with the experimental data.

  15. CRYO-EM STRUCTURES OF THE ACTIN:TROPOMYOSIN FILAMENT REVEAL THE MECHANISM FOR THE TRANSITION FROM C- TO M-STATE

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Duncan R.; Stagg, Scott M.; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Tropomyosin is a key factor in the molecular mechanisms that regulate the binding of myosin motors to actin filaments in most eukaryotic cells. This regulation is achieved by the azimuthal repositioning of tropomyosin along the actin:tropomyosin:troponin thin filament to block or expose myosin binding sites on actin. In striated muscle, including involuntary cardiac muscle, tropomyosin regulates muscle contraction by coupling Ca2+ binding to troponin with myosin binding to the thin filament. In smooth muscle, the switch is the post-translational modification of the myosin. Depending on the activation state of troponin and the binding state of myosin, tropomyosin can occupy the blocked, closed, or open position on actin. Using native cryogenic 3DEM, we have directly resolved and visualized cardiac and gizzard muscle tropomyosin on filamentous actin in the position that corresponds to the closed state. From the 8-Å resolution structure of the reconstituted Ac:Tm filament formed with gizzard-derived Tm we discuss two possible mechanisms for the transition from closed to open state and describe the role Tm plays in blocking myosin tight binding in the closed state position. PMID:24021812

  16. The tymbal muscle of cicada has flight muscle-type sarcomeric architecture and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The structural and biochemical features of the tymbal (sound-producing) muscle of cicadas were studied by X-ray diffraction and immunochemistry, and compared with those of flight muscles from the same species. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the tymbal muscle was very similar to that of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscle: In both muscles, the 2,0 equatorial reflection is much more intense than the 1,1, indicating that both muscles have a flight muscle-type myofilament lattice. In rigor, the first myosin/actin layer line reflection was finely lattice-sampled, indicating that the contractile proteins are arranged with a crystalline regularity as in asynchronous flight muscles. In contrast, the diffraction pattern from the tensor muscle, which modulates the sound by stressing the tymbal, did not show signs of such high regularity or flight muscle-type filament lattice. Electrophoretic patterns of myofibrillar proteins were also very similar in the tymbal muscle and flight muscles, but distinct from those from the tensor or leg muscles. The antibody raised against the flight muscle-specific troponin-I isoform reacted with an 80-kDa band from both tymbal and flight muscles, but with none of the bands from the tensor or leg muscles. The close similarities of the structural and biochemical profiles between the tymbal and the flight muscles suggest the possibility that a set of flight muscle-specific proteins is diverted to the tymbal muscle to meet its demand for fast, repetitive contractions.

  17. Resemblance of actin-binding protein/actin gels to covalently crosslinked networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janmey, Paul A.; Hvidt, Søren; Lamb, Jennifer; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1990-05-01

    THE maintainance of the shape of cells is often due to their surface elasticity, which arises mainly from an actin-rich cytoplasmic cortex1,2. On locomotion, phagocytosis or fission, however, these cells become partially fluid-like. The finding of proteins that can bind to actin and control the assembly of, or crosslink, actin filaments, and of intracellular messages that regulate the activities of some of these actin-binding proteins, indicates that such 'gel sol' transformations result from the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich networks3. Alternatively, on the basis of a study of the mechanical properties of mixtures of actin filaments and an Acanthamoeba actin-binding protein, α-actinin, it has been proposed that these transformations can be accounted for by rapid exchange of crosslinks between actin filaments4: the cortical network would be solid when the deformation rate is greater than the rate of crosslink exchange, but would deform or 'creep' when deformation is slow enough to permit crosslinker molecules to rearrange. Here we report, however, that mixtures of actin filaments and actin-binding protein (ABP), an actin crosslinking protein of many higher eukaryotes, form gels Theologically equivalent to covalently crosslinked networks. These gels do not creep in response to applied stress on a time scale compatible with most cell-surface movements. These findings support a more complex and controlled mechanism underlying the dynamic mechanical properties of cortical cytoplasm, and can explain why cells do not collapse under the constant shear forces that often exist in tissues.

  18. Control of the actin cytoskeleton in root hair development.

    PubMed

    Pei, Weike; Du, Fei; Zhang, Yi; He, Tian; Ren, Haiyun

    2012-05-01

    The development of root hair includes four stages: bulge site selection, bulge formation, tip growth, and maturation. The actin cytoskeleton is involved in all of these stages and is organized into distinct arrangements in the different stages. In addition to the actin configuration, actin isoforms also play distinct roles in the different stages. The actin cytoskeleton is regulated by actin-binding proteins, such as formin, Arp2/3 complex, profilin, actin depolymerizing factor, and villin. Some upstream signals, i.e. calcium, phospholipids, and small GTPase regulate the activity of these actin-binding proteins to produce the proper actin configuration. We constructed a working model on how the actin cytoskeleton is controlled by actin-binding proteins and upstream signaling in root hair development based on the current literature: at the tip of hairs, actin polymerization appears to be facilitated by Arp2/3 complex that is activated by small GTPase, and profilin that is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Meanwhile, actin depolymerization and turnover are likely mediated by villin and actin depolymerizing factor, which are stimulated by calcium. At the shank, actin cables are produced by formin and villin. Under the complicated interaction, the actin cytoskeleton is controlled spatially and temporally during root hair development. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of Cyclic Nucleotide-Dependent Actin Cytoskeletal Dynamics: [Ca2+]i and Force Suppression in Forskolin-Pretreated Porcine Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Kyle M.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.; Putumbaka, Gowthami; Venkatraman, Sneha; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M.; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2013-01-01

    Initiation of force generation during vascular smooth muscle contraction involves a rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) and phosphorylation of myosin light chains (MLC). However, reversal of these two processes alone does not account for the force inhibition that occurs during relaxation or inhibition of contraction, implicating that other mechanisms, such as actin cytoskeletal rearrangement, play a role in the suppression of force. In this study, we hypothesize that forskolin-induced force suppression is dependent upon changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. To focus on the actin cytoskeletal changes, a physiological model was developed in which forskolin treatment of intact porcine coronary arteries (PCA) prior to treatment with a contractile agonist resulted in complete suppression of force. Pretreatment of PCA with forskolin suppressed histamine-induced force generation but did not abolish [Ca2+]i rise or MLC phosphorylation. Additionally, forskolin pretreatment reduced filamentous actin in histamine-treated tissues, and prevented histamine-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory proteins HSP20, VASP, cofilin, and paxillin. Taken together, these results suggest that forskolin-induced complete force suppression is dependent upon the actin cytoskeletal regulation initiated by the phosphorylation changes of the actin regulatory proteins and not on the MLC dephosphorylation. This model of complete force suppression can be employed to further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for smooth muscle tone, and may offer cues to pathological situations, such as hypertension and vasospasm. PMID:23593369

  20. Role of cyclic nucleotide-dependent actin cytoskeletal dynamics:Ca(2+)](i) and force suppression in forskolin-pretreated porcine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Hocking, Kyle M; Baudenbacher, Franz J; Putumbaka, Gowthami; Venkatraman, Sneha; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2013-01-01

    Initiation of force generation during vascular smooth muscle contraction involves a rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) and phosphorylation of myosin light chains (MLC). However, reversal of these two processes alone does not account for the force inhibition that occurs during relaxation or inhibition of contraction, implicating that other mechanisms, such as actin cytoskeletal rearrangement, play a role in the suppression of force. In this study, we hypothesize that forskolin-induced force suppression is dependent upon changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. To focus on the actin cytoskeletal changes, a physiological model was developed in which forskolin treatment of intact porcine coronary arteries (PCA) prior to treatment with a contractile agonist resulted in complete suppression of force. Pretreatment of PCA with forskolin suppressed histamine-induced force generation but did not abolish [Ca(2+)]i rise or MLC phosphorylation. Additionally, forskolin pretreatment reduced filamentous actin in histamine-treated tissues, and prevented histamine-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory proteins HSP20, VASP, cofilin, and paxillin. Taken together, these results suggest that forskolin-induced complete force suppression is dependent upon the actin cytoskeletal regulation initiated by the phosphorylation changes of the actin regulatory proteins and not on the MLC dephosphorylation. This model of complete force suppression can be employed to further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for smooth muscle tone, and may offer cues to pathological situations, such as hypertension and vasospasm.

  1. Treatment considerations in actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, G

    2017-03-01

    The chronic skin condition actinic keratosis (AK) is characterized by the formation of keratotic lesions of variable thickness that are poorly delimited. AK occurs on areas of the skin that have had long-term exposure to the sun or UV radiation. Although AKs may regress, they usually persist and can progress to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Clinicians are unable to predict which AKs will progress; therefore, both clinically visible lesions and subclinical, non-visible (i.e. the entire area affected by AK/field cancerization) should be treated. AK treatment options include lesion-directed therapies that target specific AK lesions and field-directed therapies that target multiple clinical lesions and the underlying field damage. This article reviews currently available treatment options in AK, with a focus on patient-applied field therapies, and their suitability according to specific disease characteristics and patient needs. Choice of treatment in AK depends on lesion-, patient- and treatment-related factors and should be individualized. Considerations when choosing a therapy include site of application, treatment duration, surface area of application, tolerability profiles and implications on adherence. Field-directed therapies treat clinical and subclinical damage (i.e. the entire area affected by AK), achieve high rates of sustained clearance of AKs and may reduce the risk of progression to SCC. There is a clear need for field therapies with short duration of treatment and predictable, short-lived, mild local skin reactions that can be used over a large surface area. Therapies with shorter and simpler treatment courses are often associated with better adherence than treatments with longer courses. These may, therefore, represent more appropriate choices in patients for whom convenience and/or adherence are an issue. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  2. Actin assembly factors regulate the gelation kinetics and architecture of F-actin networks.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Tobias T; Oakes, Patrick W; Sees, Jennifer; Kovar, David R; Gardel, Margaret L

    2013-04-16

    Dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is required for diverse cellular processes. Proteins regulating the assembly kinetics of the cytoskeletal biopolymer F-actin are known to impact the architecture of actin cytoskeletal networks in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that changes to actin assembly kinetics with physiologically relevant proteins profilin and formin (mDia1 and Cdc12) have dramatic consequences on the architecture and gelation kinetics of otherwise biochemically identical cross-linked F-actin networks. Reduced F-actin nucleation rates promote the formation of a sparse network of thick bundles, whereas increased nucleation rates result in a denser network of thinner bundles. Changes to F-actin elongation rates also have marked consequences. At low elongation rates, gelation ceases and a solution of rigid bundles is formed. By contrast, rapid filament elongation accelerates dynamic arrest and promotes gelation with minimal F-actin density. These results are consistent with a recently developed model of how kinetic constraints regulate network architecture and underscore how molecular control of polymer assembly is exploited to modulate cytoskeletal architecture and material properties. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Actin Assembly Factors Regulate the Gelation Kinetics and Architecture of F-actin Networks

    PubMed Central

    Falzone, Tobias T.; Oakes, Patrick W.; Sees, Jennifer; Kovar, David R.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is required for diverse cellular processes. Proteins regulating the assembly kinetics of the cytoskeletal biopolymer F-actin are known to impact the architecture of actin cytoskeletal networks in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that changes to actin assembly kinetics with physiologically relevant proteins profilin and formin (mDia1 and Cdc12) have dramatic consequences on the architecture and gelation kinetics of otherwise biochemically identical cross-linked F-actin networks. Reduced F-actin nucleation rates promote the formation of a sparse network of thick bundles, whereas increased nucleation rates result in a denser network of thinner bundles. Changes to F-actin elongation rates also have marked consequences. At low elongation rates, gelation ceases and a solution of rigid bundles is formed. By contrast, rapid filament elongation accelerates dynamic arrest and promotes gelation with minimal F-actin density. These results are consistent with a recently developed model of how kinetic constraints regulate network architecture and underscore how molecular control of polymer assembly is exploited to modulate cytoskeletal architecture and material properties. PMID:23601318

  4. Tropomyosin 4 defines novel filaments in skeletal muscle associated with muscle remodelling/regeneration in normal and diseased muscle.

    PubMed

    Vlahovich, Nicole; Schevzov, Galina; Nair-Shaliker, Visalini; Ilkovski, Biljana; Artap, Stanley T; Joya, Josephine E; Kee, Anthony J; North, Kathryn N; Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C

    2008-01-01

    The organisation of structural proteins in muscle into highly ordered sarcomeres occurs during development, regeneration and focal repair of skeletal muscle fibers. The involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in this process has been documented, with nonmuscle gamma-actin found to play a role in sarcomere assembly during muscle differentiation and also shown to be up-regulated in dystrophic muscles which undergo regeneration and repair [Lloyd et al.,2004; Hanft et al.,2006]. Here, we show that a cytoskeletal tropomyosin (Tm), Tm4, defines actin filaments in two novel compartments in muscle fibers: a Z-line associated cytoskeleton (Z-LAC), similar to a structure we have reported previously [Kee et al.,2004], and longitudinal filaments that are orientated parallel to the sarcomeric apparatus, present during myofiber growth and repair/regeneration. Tm4 is upregulated in paradigms of muscle repair including induced regeneration and focal repair and in muscle diseases with repair/regeneration features, muscular dystrophy and nemaline myopathy. Longitudinal Tm4-defined filaments also are present in diseased muscle. Transition of the Tm4-defined filaments from a longitudinal to a Z-LAC orientation is observed during the course of muscle regeneration. This Tm4-defined cytoskeleton is a marker of growth and repair/regeneration in response to injury, disease state and stress in skeletal muscle.

  5. The minus-end actin capping protein, UNC-94/tropomodulin, regulates development of the Caenorhabditis elegans intestine

    PubMed Central

    Cox-Paulson, Elisabeth; Cannataro, Vincent; Gallagher, Thomas; Hoffman, Corey; Mantione, Gary; McIntosh, Matthew; Silva, Malan; Vissichelli, Nicole; Walker, Rachel; Simske, Jeffrey; Ono, Shoichiro; Hoops, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Background Tropomodulins are actin capping proteins that regulate the stability of the slow growing, minus-ends of actin filaments. The C. elegans tropomodulin homolog, UNC-94 has sequence and functional similarity to vertebrate tropomodulins. We investigated the role of UNC-94 in C. elegans intestinal morphogenesis. Results In the embryonic C. elegans intestine, UNC-94 localizes to the terminal web, an actin and intermediate filament rich structure that underlies the apical membrane. Loss of UNC-94 function results in areas of flattened intestinal lumen. In worms homozygous for the strong loss-of-function allele, unc-94(tm724), the terminal web is thinner and the amount of F-actin is reduced, pointing to a role for UNC-94 in regulating the structure of the terminal web. The non-muscle myosin, NMY-1, also localizes to the terminal web; and we present evidence that increasing actomyosin contractility by depleting the myosin phosphatase regulatory subunit, mel-11, can rescue the flattened lumen phenotype of unc-94 mutants. Conclusions The data support a model in which minus-end actin capping by UNC-94 promotes proper F-actin structure and contraction in the terminal web, yielding proper shape of the intestinal lumen. This establishes a new role for a tropomodulin in regulating lumen shape during tubulogenesis. PMID:24677443

  6. The effects of crowding agents Dextran-70k and PEG-8k on actin structure and unfolding reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagarskaia, Iuliia A.; Povarova, Olga I.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2017-07-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies on proteins' structure, stability and folding are trying to bring the experimental conditions closer to those existing in a living cell, namely to the conditions of macromolecular crowding. In vitro such conditions are typically imitated by the ;inert; highly water-soluble polymers with different hydrodynamic dimensions. In this work, the effects of crowded milieu on the structure and conformational stability of actin, which is a key component of the muscle contraction system, was examined. The crowded milieu was simulated by high concentrations of PEG-8k or Dextran-70k. It was revealed that both crowding agents decelerated but not inhibited actin unfolding and made a compact state of inactivated actin thermodynamically more favorable in comparison with the unfolded state. At the same time, the high viscosity of the solution of crowding agents slowed down all processes and especially inactivated actin formation, since it involves the interaction of 14-16 partially unfolded actin molecules. The effects of crowding agent were larger when its hydrodynamic dimensions were closer to the size of globular actin.

  7. Electrostatic interaction map reveals a new binding position for tropomyosin on F-actin.

    PubMed

    Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Schott, Veronika; Orzechowski, Marek; Lehman, William; Fischer, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Azimuthal movement of tropomyosin around the F-actin thin filament is responsible for muscle activation and relaxation. Recently a model of αα-tropomyosin, derived from molecular-mechanics and electron microscopy of different contractile states, showed that tropomyosin is rather stiff and pre-bent to present one specific face to F-actin during azimuthal transitions. However, a new model based on cryo-EM of troponin- and myosin-free filaments proposes that the interacting-face of tropomyosin can differ significantly from that in the original model. Because resolution was insufficient to assign tropomyosin side-chains, the interacting-face could not be unambiguously determined. Here, we use structural analysis and energy landscapes to further examine the proposed models. The observed bend in seven crystal structures of tropomyosin is much closer in direction and extent to the original model than to the new model. Additionally, we computed the interaction map for repositioning tropomyosin over the F-actin surface, but now extended over a much larger surface than previously (using the original interacting-face). This map shows two energy minima-one corresponding to the "blocked-state" as in the original model, and the other related by a simple 24 Å translation of tropomyosin parallel to the F-actin axis. The tropomyosin-actin complex defined by the second minimum fits perfectly into the recent cryo-EM density, without requiring any change in the interacting-face. Together, these data suggest that movement of tropomyosin between regulatory states does not require interacting-face rotation. Further, they imply that thin filament assembly may involve an interplay between initially seeded tropomyosin molecules growing from distinct binding-site regions on actin.

  8. Design and evaluation of Actichip, a thematic microarray for the study of the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Jean; Mehlen, André; Vetter, Guillaume; Yatskou, Mikalai; Muller, Arnaud; Chalmel, Frédéric; Poch, Olivier; Friederich, Evelyne; Vallar, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background The actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in supporting and regulating numerous cellular processes. Mutations or alterations in the expression levels affecting the actin cytoskeleton system or related regulatory mechanisms are often associated with complex diseases such as cancer. Understanding how qualitative or quantitative changes in expression of the set of actin cytoskeleton genes are integrated to control actin dynamics and organisation is currently a challenge and should provide insights in identifying potential targets for drug discovery. Here we report the development of a dedicated microarray, the Actichip, containing 60-mer oligonucleotide probes for 327 genes selected for transcriptome analysis of the human actin cytoskeleton. Results Genomic data and sequence analysis features were retrieved from GenBank and stored in an integrative database called Actinome. From these data, probes were designed using a home-made program (CADO4MI) allowing sequence refinement and improved probe specificity by combining the complementary information recovered from the UniGene and RefSeq databases. Actichip performance was analysed by hybridisation with RNAs extracted from epithelial MCF-7 cells and human skeletal muscle. Using thoroughly standardised procedures, we obtained microarray images with excellent quality resulting in high data reproducibility. Actichip displayed a large dynamic range extending over three logs with a limit of sensitivity between one and ten copies of transcript per cell. The array allowed accurate detection of small changes in gene expression and reliable classification of samples based on the expression profiles of tissue-specific genes. When compared to two other oligonucleotide microarray platforms, Actichip showed similar sensitivity and concordant expression ratios. Moreover, Actichip was able to discriminate the highly similar actin isoforms whereas the two other platforms did not. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that

  9. Selective, retrieval-independent disruption of methamphetamine-associated memory by actin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Young, Erica J; Aceti, Massimiliano; Griggs, Erica M; Fuchs, Rita A; Zigmond, Zachary; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A

    2014-01-15

    Memories associated with drugs of abuse, such as methamphetamine (METH), increase relapse vulnerability to substance use disorder. There is a growing consensus that memory is supported by structural and functional plasticity driven by F-actin polymerization in postsynaptic dendritic spines at excitatory synapses. However, the mechanisms responsible for the long-term maintenance of memories, after consolidation has occurred, are largely unknown. Conditioned place preference (n = 112) and context-induced reinstatement of self-administration (n = 19) were used to assess the role of F-actin polymerization and myosin II, a molecular motor that drives memory-promoting dendritic spine actin polymerization, in the maintenance of METH-associated memories and related structural plasticity. Memories formed through association with METH but not associations with foot shock or food reward were disrupted by a highly-specific actin cycling inhibitor when infused into the amygdala during the postconsolidation maintenance phase. This selective effect of depolymerization on METH-associated memory was immediate, persistent, and did not depend upon retrieval or strength of the association. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II also resulted in a disruption of METH-associated memory. Thus, drug-associated memories seem to be actively maintained by a unique form of cycling F-actin driven by myosin II. This finding provides a potential therapeutic approach for the selective treatment of unwanted memories associated with psychiatric disorders that is both selective and does not rely on retrieval of the memory. The results further suggest that memory maintenance depends upon the preservation of polymerized actin. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural Basis of Actin Filament Nucleation by Tandem W Domains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaorui; Ni, Fengyun; Tian, Xia; Kondrashkina, Elena; Wang, Qinghua; Ma, Jianpeng

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Spontaneous nucleation of actin is very inefficient in cells. To overcome this barrier, cells have evolved a set of actin filament nucleators to promote rapid nucleation and polymerization in response to specific stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of actin nucleation remains poorly understood. This is hindered largely by the fact that actin nucleus, once formed, rapidly polymerizes into filament, thus making it impossible to capture stable multisubunit actin nucleus. Here, we report an effective double-mutant strategy to stabilize actin nucleus by preventing further polymerization. Employing this strategy, we solved the crystal structure of AMPPNP-actin in complex with the first two tandem W domains of Cordon-bleu (Cobl), a potent actin filament nucleator. Further sequence comparison and functional studies suggest that the nucleation mechanism of Cobl is probably shared by the p53 cofactor JMY, but not Spire. Moreover, the double-mutant strategy opens the way for atomic mechanistic study of actin nucleation and polymerization. PMID:23727244

  11. Oligomerization of coronin: Implication on actin filament length in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rashmi; Prasadareddy Kajuluri, Lova; Pathak, Neelam; Gupta, Chhitar M; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A

    2015-12-01

    Coronin proteins bind with actin filaments and participate in regulation of actin-dependent processes. These proteins contain a coiled-coil domain at their C-terminus, which is responsible for their dimeric or trimeric forms. However, the functional significance of these oligomeric configurations in organizing the actin cytoskeleton is obscure. Here, we report that the Leishmania coronin exists in a higher oligomeric form through its coiled-coil domain, the truncation of which ablates the ability of Leishmania coronin to assist actin-filament formation. F-actin co-sedimentation assay using purified proteins shows that the coiled-coil domain does not interact with actin-filaments and its absence does not abrogate actin-coronin interaction. Furthermore, it was shown that unlike other coronins, Leishmania coronin interacts with actin-filaments through its unique region. These results provided important insights into the role of coronin oligomerization in modulating actin-network. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Microtubule actin cross-linking factor (MACF): a hybrid of dystonin and dystrophin that can interact with the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Leung, C L; Sun, D; Zheng, M; Knowles, D R; Liem, R K

    1999-12-13

    We cloned and characterized a full-length cDNA of mouse actin cross-linking family 7 (mACF7) by sequential rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR. The completed mACF7 cDNA is 17 kb and codes for a 608-kD protein. The closest relative of mACF7 is the Drosophila protein Kakapo, which shares similar architecture with mACF7. mACF7 contains a putative actin-binding domain and a plakin-like domain that are highly homologous to dystonin (BPAG1-n) at its NH(2) terminus. However, unlike dystonin, mACF7 does not contain a coiled-coil rod domain; instead, the rod domain of mACF7 is made up of 23 dystrophin-like spectrin repeats. At its COOH terminus, mACF7 contains two putative EF-hand calcium-binding motifs and a segment homologous to the growth arrest-specific protein, Gas2. In this paper, we demonstrate that the NH(2)-terminal actin-binding domain of mACF7 is functional both in vivo and in vitro. More importantly, we found that the COOH-terminal domain of mACF7 interacts with and stabilizes microtubules. In transfected cells full-length mACF7 can associate not only with actin but also with microtubules. Hence, we suggest a modified name: MACF (microtubule actin cross-linking factor). The properties of MACF are consistent with the observation that mutations in kakapo cause disorganization of microtubules in epidermal muscle attachment cells and some sensory neurons.

  13. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular and functional analyses of the contractile apparatus in lymphatic muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Gashev, Anatoliy; Boswell, Niven; Dawson, Nancy; Zawieja, David; Delp, Z. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Lymphatics are necessary for the generation and regulation of lymph flow. Lymphatics use phasic contractions and extrinsic compressions to generate flow; tonic contractions alter resistance. Lymphatic muscle exhibits important differences from typical vascular smooth muscle. In this study, the thoracic duct exhibited significant functional differences from mesenteric lymphatics. To understand the molecular basis for these differences, we examined the profiles of contractile proteins and their messages in mesenteric lymphatics, thoracic duct, and arterioles. Results demonstrated that mesenteric lymphatics express only SMB smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), whereas thoracic duct and arterioles expressed both SMA and SMB isoforms. Both SM1 and SM2 isoforms of SM-MHC were detected in arterioles and mesenteric and thoracic lymphatics. In addition, the fetal cardiac/skeletal slow-twitch muscle-specific beta-MHC message was detected only in mesenteric lymphatics. All four actin messages, cardiac alpha-actin, vascular alpha-actin, enteric gamma-actin, and skeletal alpha-actin, were present in both mesenteric lymphatics and arterioles. However, in thoracic duct, predominantly cardiac alpha-actin and vascular alpha-actin were found. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses corroborated the mRNA studies. However, in arterioles only vascular alpha-actin protein was detected. These data indicate that lymphatics display genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of vascular, cardiac, and visceral myocytes, which are needed to fulfill the unique roles of the lymphatic system.

  15. A new F-actin structure in fungi: actin ring formation around the cell nucleus of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Kopecká, Marie; Kawamoto, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Masashi

    2013-04-01

    The F-actin cytoskeleton of Cryptococcus neoformans is known to comprise actin cables, cortical patches and cytokinetic ring. Here, we describe a new F-actin structure in fungi, a perinuclear F-actin collar ring around the cell nucleus, by fluorescent microscopic imaging of rhodamine phalloidin-stained F-actin. Perinuclear F-actin rings form in Cryptococcus neoformans treated with the microtubule inhibitor Nocodazole or with the drug solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or grown in yeast extract peptone dextrose (YEPD) medium, but they are absent in cells treated with Latrunculin A. Perinuclear F-actin rings may function as 'funicular cabin' for the cell nucleus, and actin cables as intracellular 'funicular' suspending nucleus in the central position in the cell and moving nucleus along the polarity axis along actin cables.

  16. Fropofol decreases force development in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xianfeng; Schmidt, William; Huang, Yiyuan; Lu, Haisong; Liu, Wenjie; Bu, Weiming; Eckenhoff, Roderic; Cammarato, Anthony; Gao, Wei Dong

    2018-03-09

    Supranormal contractile properties are frequently associated with cardiac diseases. Anesthetic agents, including propofol, can depress myocardial contraction. We tested the hypothesis that fropofol, a propofol derivative, reduces force development in cardiac muscles via inhibition of cross-bridge cycling and may therefore have therapeutic potential. Force and intracellular Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+ ] i ) transients of rat trabecular muscles were determined. Myofilament ATPase, actin-activated myosin ATPase, and velocity of actin filaments propelled by myosin were also measured. Fropofol dose dependently decreased force without altering [Ca 2+ ] i in normal and pressure-induced hypertrophied-hypercontractile muscles. Similarly, fropofol depressed maximum Ca 2+ -activated force ( F max ) and increased the [Ca 2+ ] i required for 50% activation at steady-state (Ca 50 ) without affecting the Hill coefficient in both intact and skinned cardiac fibers. The drug also depressed cardiac myofibrillar and actin-activated myosin ATPase activity. In vitro actin sliding velocity was significantly reduced when fropofol was introduced during rigor binding of cross-bridges. The data suggest that the depressing effects of fropofol on cardiac contractility are likely to be related to direct targeting of actomyosin interactions. From a clinical standpoint, these findings are particularly significant, given that fropofol is a nonanesthetic small molecule that decreases myocardial contractility specifically and thus may be useful in the treatment of hypercontractile cardiac disorders.-Ren, X., Schmidt, W., Huang, Y., Lu, H., Liu, W., Bu, W., Eckenhoff, R., Cammarato, A., Gao, W. D. Fropofol decreases force development in cardiac muscle.

  17. Actin cytoskeleton and exocytosis in rat melanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Helana H; Popoff, Michel R; Zorec, Robert

    2000-01-01

    We monitored secretory activity of single rat melanotrophs by the patch-clamp membrane capacitance measurements (C m ). Secretory activity was stimulated by cytosol dialysis with a patch-pipette solution containing 1μM [Ca 2+ ] i . Actin cytoskeleton was disaggregated by pretreating cells with Clostridium spiroforme toxin, which specifically ADP-ribosylates cellular actin. The extent of cytoskeleton disaggregation was monitored by phalloidin immunostaining. The maximal rate of secretion increases two folds in toxin-treated cells in comparison to controls, whereas the extent of calcium-induced secretory response was similar to that obtained in the non-treated cells. The results show that the subcortical actin network attenuates the rate of secretory activity, which we interpret to reflect a barrier function of cytoskeleton for exocytosis.

  18. Actin cytoskeleton and exocytosis in rat melanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, H H; Popoff, M R; Zorec, R

    2000-01-01

    We monitored secretory activity of single rat melanotrophs by the patch-clamp membrane capacitance measurements (Cm). Secretory activity was stimulated by cytosol dialysis with a patch-pipette solution containing 1 microM [Ca2+]i. Actin cytoskeleton was disaggregated by pretreating cells with Clostridium spiroforme toxin, which specifically ADP-ribosylates cellular actin. The extent of cytoskeleton disaggregation was monitored by phalloidin immunostaining. The maximal rate of secretion increases two folds in toxin-treated cells in comparison to controls, whereas the extent of calcium-induced secretory response was similar to that obtained in the non-treated cells. The results show that the subcortical actin network attenuates the rate of secretory activity, which we interpret to reflect a barrier function of cytoskeleton for exocytosis.

  19. Actin Out: Regulation of the Synaptic Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Erin F.; Soderling, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    The small size of dendritic spines belies the elaborate role they play in excitatory synaptic transmission and ultimately complex behaviors. The cytoskeletal architecture of the spine is predominately composed of actin filaments. These filaments, which at first glance might appear simple, are also surprisingly complex. They dynamically assemble into different structures and serve as a platform for orchestrating the elaborate responses of the spine during spinogenesis and experience-dependent plasticity. Multiple mutations associated with human neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders involve genes that encode regulators of the synaptic cytoskeleton. A major, unresolved question is how the disruption of specific actin filament structures leads to the onset and progression of complex synaptic and behavioral phenotypes. This review will cover established and emerging mechanisms of actin cytoskeletal remodeling and how this influences specific aspects of spine biology that are implicated in disease. PMID:26453304

  20. Spontaneous actin dynamics in contractile rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Karsten; Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Riveline, Daniel

    Networks of polymerizing actin filaments are known to be capable to self-organize into a variety of structures. For example, spontaneous actin polymerization waves have been observed in living cells in a number of circumstances, notably, in crawling neutrophils and slime molds. During later stages of cell division, they can also spontaneously form a contractile ring that will eventually cleave the cell into two daughter cells. We present a framework for describing networks of polymerizing actin filaments, where assembly is regulated by various proteins. It can also include the effects of molecular motors. We show that the molecular processes driven by these proteins can generate various structures that have been observed in contractile rings of fission yeast and mammalian cells. We discuss a possible functional role of each of these patterns. The work was supported by Agence Nationale de la Recherche, France, (ANR-10-LABX-0030-INRT) and by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through SFB1027.

  1. Actinic Keratosis Pathogenesis Update and New Patents.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Paolino, Giovanni; Melis, Marcello; Faina, Valentina; Romaniello, Federico; Didona, Dario; Cardone, Michele; Calvieri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Actinic keratosis is a common premalignant skin lesion. Because of its increasing incidence, several efforts have been made to earlier detectection and to improve knowledge on photocarcinogenic pathways of keratinocytes. As a consequence, recently new discoveries have been done in this field. Starting from our previous review on actinic keratosis, we reviewed the literature focusing on pathogenesis and new patents in order to highlight the most recent progresses in diagnosis and therapeutic approach. Although several efforts have been done in the field of photodamaged skin, new upgrades in diagnosis and therapy are needed to detect superficial actinic keratosis earlier, to improve the disease free survival of patient and to better treat the field cancerization.

  2. The Bacterial Actin MamK

    PubMed Central

    Ozyamak, Ertan; Kollman, Justin; Agard, David A.; Komeili, Arash

    2013-01-01

    It is now recognized that actin-like proteins are widespread in bacteria and, in contrast to eukaryotic actins, are highly diverse in sequence and function. The bacterial actin, MamK, represents a clade, primarily found in magnetotactic bacteria, that is involved in the proper organization of subcellular organelles, termed magnetosomes. We have previously shown that MamK from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 (AMB-1) forms dynamic filaments in vivo. To gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie MamK dynamics and function, we have now studied the in vitro properties of MamK. We demonstrate that MamK is an ATPase that, in the presence of ATP, assembles rapidly into filaments that disassemble once ATP is depleted. The mutation of a conserved active site residue (E143A) abolishes ATPase activity of MamK but not its ability to form filaments. Filament disassembly depends on both ATPase activity and potassium levels, the latter of which results in the organization of MamK filaments into bundles. These data are consistent with observations indicating that accessory factors are required to promote filament disassembly and for spatial organization of filaments in vivo. We also used cryo-electron microscopy to obtain a high resolution structure of MamK filaments. MamK adopts a two-stranded helical filament architecture, but unlike eukaryotic actin and other actin-like filaments, subunits in MamK strands are unstaggered giving rise to a unique filament architecture. Beyond extending our knowledge of the properties and function of MamK in magnetotactic bacteria, this study emphasizes the functional and structural diversity of bacterial actins in general. PMID:23204522

  3. Nucleotide-dependent conformational states of actin

    PubMed Central

    Pfaendtner, Jim; Branduardi, Davide; Parrinello, Michele; Pollard, Thomas D.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the state of the bound nucleotide (ATP, ADP-Pi, or ADP) on the conformational free-energy landscape of actin is investigated. Nucleotide-dependent folding of the DNase-I binding (DB) loop in monomeric actin and the actin trimer is carried out using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) calculations accelerated with a multiscale implementation of the metadynamics algorithm. Additionally, an investigation of the opening and closing of the actin nucleotide binding cleft is performed. Nucleotide-dependent free-energy profiles for all of these conformational changes are calculated within the framework of metadynamics. We find that in ADP-bound monomer, the folded and unfolded states of the DB loop have similar relative free-energy. This result helps explain the experimental difficulty in obtaining an ordered crystal structure for this region of monomeric actin. However, we find that in the ADP-bound actin trimer, the folded DB loop is stable and in a free-energy minimum. It is also demonstrated that the nucleotide binding cleft favors a closed conformation for the bound nucleotide in the ATP and ADP-Pi states, whereas the ADP state favors an open confirmation, both in the monomer and trimer. These results suggest a mechanism of allosteric interactions between the nucleotide binding cleft and the DB loop. This behavior is confirmed by an additional simulation that shows the folding free-energy as a function of the nucleotide cleft width, which demonstrates that the barrier for folding changes significantly depending on the value of the cleft width. PMID:19620726

  4. Cytoskeletal actin dynamics shape a ramifying actin network underpinning immunological synapse formation

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Marco; Fernandes, Ricardo A.; Chang, Veronica T.; Colin-York, Huw; Clausen, Mathias P.; Felce, James H.; Galiani, Silvia; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Santos, Ana M.; Heddleston, John M.; Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Waithe, Dominic; de la Serna, Jorge Bernardino; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Liu, Tsung-li; Chew, Teng-Leong; Betzig, Eric; Davis, Simon J.; Eggeling, Christian

    2017-01-01

    T cell activation and especially trafficking of T cell receptor microclusters during immunological synapse formation are widely thought to rely on cytoskeletal remodeling. However, important details on the involvement of actin in the latter transport processes are missing. Using a suite of advanced optical microscopes to analyze resting and activated T cells, we show that, following contact formation with activating surfaces, these cells sequentially rearrange their cortical actin across the entire cell, creating a previously unreported ramifying actin network above the immunological synapse. This network shows all the characteristics of an inward-growing transportation network and its dynamics correlating with T cell receptor rearrangements. This actin reorganization is accompanied by an increase in the nanoscale actin meshwork size and the dynamic adjustment of the turnover times and filament lengths of two differently sized filamentous actin populations, wherein formin-mediated long actin filaments support a very flat and stiff contact at the immunological synapse interface. The initiation of immunological synapse formation, as highlighted by calcium release, requires markedly little contact with activating surfaces and no cytoskeletal rearrangements. Our work suggests that incipient signaling in T cells initiates global cytoskeletal rearrangements across the whole cell, including a stiffening process for possibly mechanically supporting contact formation at the immunological synapse interface as well as a central ramified transportation network apparently directed at the consolidation of the contact and the delivery of effector functions. PMID:28691087

  5. Actin-binding proteins sensitively mediate F-actin bundle stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claessens, Mireille M. A. E.; Bathe, Mark; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2006-09-01

    Bundles of filamentous actin (F-actin) form primary structural components of a broad range of cytoskeletal processes including filopodia, sensory hair cell bristles and microvilli. Actin-binding proteins (ABPs) allow the cell to tailor the dimensions and mechanical properties of the bundles to suit specific biological functions. Therefore, it is important to obtain quantitative knowledge on the effect of ABPs on the mechanical properties of F-actin bundles. Here we measure the bending stiffness of F-actin bundles crosslinked by three ABPs that are ubiquitous in eukaryotes. We observe distinct regimes of bundle bending stiffness that differ by orders of magnitude depending on ABP type, concentration and bundle size. The behaviour observed experimentally is reproduced quantitatively by a molecular-based mechanical model in which ABP shearing competes with F-actin extension/compression. Our results shed new light on the biomechanical function of ABPs and demonstrate how single-molecule properties determine mesoscopic behaviour. The bending mechanics of F-actin fibre bundles are general and have implications for cytoskeletal mechanics and for the rational design of functional materials.

  6. Actin Age Orchestrates Myosin-5 and Myosin-6 Runlengths

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Dennis; Santos, Alicja; Kovar, David R.; Rock, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Unlike a static and immobile skeleton, the actin cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic network of filamentous actin (F-actin) polymers that continuously turn over. In addition to generating mechanical forces and sensing mechanical deformation, dynamic F-actin networks serve as cellular tracks for myosin motor traffic. However, much of our mechanistic understanding of processive myosins comes from in vitro studies where motility was studied on pre-assembled and artificially stabilized, static F-actin tracks. In this work, we examine the role of actin dynamics in single-molecule myosin motility using assembling F-actin and the two highly processive motors, myosin-5 and myosin-6. These two myosins have distinct functions in the cell and travel in opposite directions along actin filaments [1–3]. Myosin-5 walks towards the barbed ends of F-actin, traveling to sites of actin polymerization at the cell periphery [4]. Myosin-6 walks towards the pointed end of F-actin [5], traveling towards the cell center along older segments of the actin filament. We find that myosin-5 takes 1.3 to 1.5-fold longer runs on ADP•Pi (young) F-actin, while myosin-6 takes 1.7 to 3.6-fold longer runs along ADP (old) F-actin. These results suggest that conformational differences between ADP•Pi and ADP F-actin tailor these myosins to walk farther toward their preferred actin filament end. Taken together, these experiments define a new mechanism by which myosin traffic may sort to different F-actin networks depending on filament age. PMID:26190073

  7. A Continuum Model of Actin Waves in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Khamviwath, Varunyu; Hu, Jifeng; Othmer, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    Actin waves are complex dynamical patterns of the dendritic network of filamentous actin in eukaryotes. We developed a model of actin waves in PTEN-deficient Dictyostelium discoideum by deriving an approximation of the dynamics of discrete actin filaments and combining it with a signaling pathway that controls filament branching. This signaling pathway, together with the actin network, contains a positive feedback loop that drives the actin waves. Our model predicts the structure, composition, and dynamics of waves that are consistent with existing experimental evidence, as well as the biochemical dependence on various protein partners. Simulation suggests that actin waves are initiated when local actin network activity, caused by an independent process, exceeds a certain threshold. Moreover, diffusion of proteins that form a positive feedback loop with the actin network alone is sufficient for propagation of actin waves at the observed speed of . Decay of the wave back can be caused by scarcity of network components, and the shape of actin waves is highly dependent on the filament disassembly rate. The model allows retraction of actin waves and captures formation of new wave fronts in broken waves. Our results demonstrate that a delicate balance between a positive feedback, filament disassembly, and local availability of network components is essential for the complex dynamics of actin waves. PMID:23741312

  8. Anti-actin IgA antibodies in severe coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Granito, A; Muratori, P; Cassani, F; Pappas, G; Muratori, L; Agostinelli, D; Veronesi, L; Bortolotti, R; Petrolini, N; Bianchi, F B; Volta, U

    2004-01-01

    Anti-actin IgA antibodies have been found in sera of coeliacs. Our aim was to define the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-actin IgA in coeliacs before and after gluten withdrawal. One hundred and two biopsy-proven coeliacs, 95 disease controls and 50 blood donors were studied. Anti-actin IgA were evaluated by different methods: (a) antimicrofilament positivity on HEp-2 cells and on cultured fibroblasts by immunofluorescence; (b) anti-actin positivity by enzyme-linked immuosorbent assay (ELISA); and (c) presence of the tubular/glomerular pattern of anti-smooth muscle antibodies on rat kidney sections by immunofluorescence. Antimicrofilament IgA were present in 27% of coeliacs and in none of the controls. Antimicrofilament antibodies were found in 25 of 54 (46%) coeliacs with severe villous atrophy and in three of 48 (6%) with mild damage (P < 0·0001). In the 20 patients tested, antimicrofilaments IgA disappeared after gluten withdrawal in accordance with histological recovery. Our study shows a significant correlation between antimicrofilament IgA and the severity of intestinal damage in untreated coeliacs. The disappearance of antimicrofilament IgA after gluten withdrawal predicts the normalization of intestinal mucosa and could be considered a useful tool in the follow-up of severe coeliac disease. PMID:15270857

  9. Conformational distributions and proximity relationships in the rigor complex of actin and myosin subfragment-1.

    PubMed

    Nyitrai, M; Hild, G; Lukács, A; Bódis, E; Somogyi, B

    2000-01-28

    Cyclic conformational changes in the myosin head are considered essential for muscle contraction. We hereby show that the extension of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer method described originally by Taylor et al. (Taylor, D. L., Reidler, J., Spudich, J. A., and Stryer, L. (1981) J. Cell Biol. 89, 362-367) allows determination of the position of a labeled point outside the actin filament in supramolecular complexes and also characterization of the conformational heterogeneity of an actin-binding protein while considering donor-acceptor distance distributions. Using this method we analyzed proximity relationships between two labeled points of S1 and the actin filament in the acto-S1 rigor complex. The donor (N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonate) was attached to either the catalytic domain (Cys-707) or the essential light chain (Cys-177) of S1, whereas the acceptor (5-(iodoacetamido)fluorescein) was attached to the actin filament (Cys-374). In contrast to the narrow positional distribution (assumed as being Gaussian) of Cys-707 (5 +/- 3 A), the positional distribution of Cys-177 was found to be broad (102 +/- 4 A). Such a broad positional distribution of the label on the essential light chain of S1 may be important in accommodating the helically arranged acto-myosin binding relative to the filament axis.

  10. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    PubMed

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  11. A Comparison of Total and Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Among Flexors and Extensors of the Ankle, Knee and Elbow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Sandra M.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined 3 methods that assessed muscle stiffness. Muscle stiffness has been quantified by tissue reactive force (transverse stiffness), vibration, and force (or torque) over displacement. Muscle stiffness also has two components: reflex (due to muscle sensor activity) and intrinsic (tonic firing of motor units, elastic nature of actin and myosin cross bridges, and connective tissue). This study compared three methods of measuring muscle stiffness of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs of the ankle, knee and elbow.

  12. Excited hydrogen bonds in the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Bespalova, S V; Tolpygo, K B

    1991-11-21

    The mechanism of muscle contraction is considered. The hydrolysis of an ATP molecule is assumed to produce the excitation of hydrogen bonds A--H...B between electronegative atoms A and B, which are contained in the myosin head and actin filament. This excitation energy epsilon f depends on the interatomic distance AB = R and generates the tractive force f = -delta epsilon f/delta R, that makes atoms AB approach each other. The swing of the myosin head results in macroscopic mutual displacement of actin and myosin polymers. The motion of the actin filament under the action of this force is studied. The conditions under which a considerable portion of the excitation energy converts into the potential tension energy of the actin filament are analysed, and the probability of higher muscle efficiency existence is discussed.

  13. Length-dependent modulation of cytoskeletal remodeling and mechanical energetics in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Rim; Liu, Katrina; Roberts, Thomas J; Hai, Chi-Ming

    2011-06-01

    Actin cytoskeletal remodeling is an important mechanism of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. We tested the hypothesis that mechanical strain modulates the cholinergic receptor-mediated cytoskeletal recruitment of actin-binding and integrin-binding proteins in intact airway smooth muscle, thereby regulating the mechanical energetics of airway smooth muscle. We found that the carbachol-stimulated cytoskeletal recruitment of actin-related protein-3 (Arp3), metavinculin, and talin were up-regulated at short muscle lengths and down-regulated at long muscle lengths, suggesting that the actin cytoskeleton--integrin complex becomes enriched in cross-linked and branched actin filaments in shortened ASM. The mechanical energy output/input ratio during sinusoidal length oscillation was dependent on muscle length, oscillatory amplitude, and cholinergic activation. The enhancing effect of cholinergic stimulation on mechanical energy output/input ratio at short and long muscle lengths may be explained by the length-dependent modulation of cytoskeletal recruitment and crossbridge cycling, respectively. We postulate that ASM functions as a hybrid biomaterial, capable of switching between operating as a cytoskeleton-based mechanical energy store at short muscle lengths to operating as an actomyosin-powered mechanical energy generator at long muscle lengths. This postulate predicts that targeting the signaling molecules involved in cytoskeletal recruitment may provide a novel approach to dilating collapsed airways in obstructive airway disease.

  14. Towards the Structure Determination of a Modulated Protein Crystal: The Semicrystalline State of Profilin:Actin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgstahl, G.; Lovelace, J.; Snell, E. H.; Bellamy, H.

    2003-01-01

    microfilament system to be restructured in a controlled manner via polymerization, depolymerization, severing, cross-linking, and anchorage. The structure the semicrystalline state of profilin:actin will challenge and validate current models of muscle contraction and cell motility. The methodology and theory under development will be easily extendable to other systems.

  15. A systems-biology approach to yeast actin cables.

    PubMed

    Drake, Tyler; Yusuf, Eddy; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    We focus on actin cables in yeast as a model system for understanding cytoskeletal organization and the workings of actin itself. In particular, we highlight quantitative approaches on the kinetics of actin-cable assembly and methods of measuring their morphology by image analysis. Actin cables described by these studies can span greater lengths than a thousand end-to-end actin-monomers. Because of this difference in length scales, control of the actin-cable system constitutes a junction between short-range interactions - among actin-monomers and nucleating, polymerization-facilitating, side-binding, severing, and cross-linking proteins - and the emergence of cell-scale physical form as embodied by the actin cables themselves.

  16. A Systems-Biology Approach to Yeast Actin Cables

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Tyler; Yusuf, Eddy; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    We focus on actin cables in yeast as a model system for understanding cytoskeletal organization and the workings of actin itself. In particular, we highlight quantitative approaches on the kinetics of actin cable assembly and methods of measuring their morphology by image analysis. Actin cables described by these studies can span greater lengths than a thousand end-to-end actin monomers. Because of this difference in length scales, control of the actin-cable system constitutes a junction between short-range interactions—among actin monomers and nucleating, polymerization-facilitating, side-binding, severing, and cross-linking proteins—and the emergence of cell-scale physical form as embodied by the actin cables themselves. PMID:22161338

  17. Affimer proteins for F-actin: novel affinity reagents that label F-actin in live and fixed cells.

    PubMed

    Lopata, Anna; Hughes, Ruth; Tiede, Christian; Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R; Knight, Peter J; Tomlinson, Darren; Peckham, Michelle

    2018-04-26

    Imaging the actin cytoskeleton in cells uses a wide range of approaches. Typically, a fluorescent derivative of the small cyclic peptide phalloidin is used to image F-actin in fixed cells. Lifeact and F-tractin are popular for imaging the cytoskeleton in live cells. Here we characterised novel affinity reagents called Affimers that specifically bind to F-actin in vitro to determine if they are suitable alternatives as eGFP-fusion proteins, to label actin in live cells, or for labeling F-actin in fixed cells. In vitro experiments showed that 3 out of the 4 Affimers (Affimers 6, 14 and 24) tested bind tightly to purified F-actin, and appear to have overlapping binding sites. As eGFP-fusion proteins, the same 3 Affimers label F-actin in live cells. FRAP experiments suggest that eGFP-Affimer 6 behaves most similarly to F-tractin and Lifeact. However, it does not colocalise with mCherry-actin in dynamic ruffles, and may preferentially bind stable actin filaments. All 4 Affimers label F-actin in methanol fixed cells, while only Affimer 14 labels F-actin after paraformaldehyde fixation. eGFP-Affimer 6 has potential for use in selectively imaging the stable actin cytoskeleton in live cells, while all 4 Affimers are strong alternatives to phalloidin for labelling F-actin in fixed cells.

  18. Interactions between G-actin and myosin subfragment 1: immunochemical probing of the NH2-terminal segment on actin.

    PubMed

    DasGupta, G; White, J; Cheung, P; Reisler, E

    1990-09-11

    The role of the N-terminal segment of actin in myosin-induced polymerization of G-actin was studied by using peptide antibodies directed against the first seven N-terminal residues of alpha-skeletal actin. Light scattering, fluorescence, and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the Fab fragments of these antibodies inhibited the polymerization of G-actin by myosin subfragment 1 (S-1) by inhibiting the binding of these proteins to each other. Fluorescence measurements using actin labeled with pyrenyliodoacetamide revealed that Fab inhibited the initial step in the binding of S-1 to G-actin. It is deduced from these results and from other literature data that the initial contact between G-actin and S-1 involves residues 1-7 on actin and residues 633-642 on the S-1 heavy chain. This interaction appears to be of major importance for the binding of S-1 and G-actin. The presence of additional myosin contact sites on G-actin was indicated by concentration-dependent recovery of S-1 binding to G-actin without displacement of Fab. The reduced Fab inhibition of S-1 binding to polymerizing and polymerized actin is consistent with the tightening of acto-S-1 binding at these sites or the creation of new sites upon formation of F-actin.

  19. Interactions of histatin-3 and histatin-5 with actin.

    PubMed

    Blotnick, Edna; Sol, Asaf; Bachrach, Gilad; Muhlrad, Andras

    2017-03-06

    Histatins are histidine rich polypeptides produced in the parotid and submandibular gland and secreted into the saliva. Histatin-3 and -5 are the most important polycationic histatins. They possess antimicrobial activity against fungi such as Candida albicans. Histatin-5 has a higher antifungal activity than histatin-3 while histatin-3 is mostly involved in wound healing in the oral cavity. We found that these histatins, like other polycationic peptides and proteins, such as LL-37, lysozyme and histones, interact with extracellular actin. Histatin-3 and -5 polymerize globular actin (G-actin) to filamentous actin (F-actin) and bundle F-actin filaments. Both actin polymerization and bundling by histatins is pH sensitive due to the high histidine content of histatins. In spite of the equal number of net positive charges and histidine residues in histatin-3 and -5, less histatin-3 is needed than histatin-5 for polymerization and bundling of actin. The efficiency of actin polymerization and bundling by histatins greatly increases with decreasing pH. Histatin-3 and -5 induced actin bundles are dissociated by 100 and 50 mM NaCl, respectively. The relatively low NaCl concentration required to dissociate histatin-induced bundles implies that the actin-histatin filaments bind to each other mainly by electrostatic forces. The binding of histatin-3 to F-actin is stronger than that of histatin-5 showing that hydrophobic forces have also some role in histatin-3- actin interaction. Histatins affect the fluorescence of probes attached to the D-loop of G-actin indicating histatin induced changes in actin structure. Transglutaminase cross-links histatins to actin. Competition and limited proteolysis experiments indicate that the main histatin cross-linking site on actin is glutamine-49 on the D-loop of actin. Both histatin-3 and -5 interacts with actin, however, histatin 3 binds stronger to actin and affects actin structure at lower concentration than histatin-5 due to the extra 8

  20. Why Muscle is an Efficient Shock Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Kopylova, Galina V.; Fernandez, Manuel; Narayanan, Theyencheri

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscles power body movement by converting free energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work. During the landing phase of running or jumping some activated skeletal muscles are subjected to stretch. Upon stretch they absorb body energy quickly and effectively thus protecting joints and bones from impact damage. This is achieved because during lengthening, skeletal muscle bears higher force and has higher instantaneous stiffness than during isometric contraction, and yet consumes very little ATP. We wish to understand how the actomyosin molecules change their structure and interaction to implement these physiologically useful mechanical and thermodynamical properties. We monitored changes in the low angle x-ray diffraction pattern of rabbit skeletal muscle fibers during ramp stretch compared to those during isometric contraction at physiological temperature using synchrotron radiation. The intensities of the off-meridional layer lines and fine interference structure of the meridional M3 myosin x-ray reflection were resolved. Mechanical and structural data show that upon stretch the fraction of actin-bound myosin heads is higher than during isometric contraction. On the other hand, the intensities of the actin layer lines are lower than during isometric contraction. Taken together, these results suggest that during stretch, a significant fraction of actin-bound heads is bound non-stereo-specifically, i.e. they are disordered azimuthally although stiff axially. As the strong or stereo-specific myosin binding to actin is necessary for actin activation of the myosin ATPase, this finding explains the low metabolic cost of energy absorption by muscle during the landing phase of locomotion. PMID:24465673

  1. Actin capping protein CAPZB regulates cell morphology, differentiation, and neural crest migration in craniofacial morphogenesis†

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Kusumika; Ishii, Kana; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Kammin, Tammy; Atkin, Joan F.; Hickey, Scott E.; Xi, Qiongchao J.; Zepeda, Cinthya J.; Gusella, James F.; Talkowski, Michael E.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Maas, Richard L.; Liao, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    CAPZB is an actin-capping protein that caps the growing end of F-actin and modulates the cytoskeleton and tethers actin filaments to the Z-line of the sarcomere in muscles. Whole-genome sequencing was performed on a subject with micrognathia, cleft palate and hypotonia that harbored a de novo, balanced chromosomal translocation that disrupts the CAPZB gene. The function of capzb was analyzed in the zebrafish model. capzb−/− mutants exhibit both craniofacial and muscle defects that recapitulate the phenotypes observed in the human subject. Loss of capzb affects cell morphology, differentiation and neural crest migration. Differentiation of both myogenic stem cells and neural crest cells requires capzb. During palate morphogenesis, defective cranial neural crest cell migration in capzb−/− mutants results in loss of the median cell population, creating a cleft phenotype. capzb is also required for trunk neural crest migration, as evident from melanophores disorganization in capzb−/− mutants. In addition, capzb over-expression results in embryonic lethality. Therefore, proper capzb dosage is important during embryogenesis, and regulates both cell behavior and tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26758871

  2. Myopathy-inducing mutation H40Y in ACTA1 hampers actin filament structure and function

    DOE PAGES

    Chan, Chun; Fan, Jun; Messer, Andrew E.; ...

    2016-04-22

    In humans, more than 200 missense mutations have been identified in the ACTA1 gene. The exact molecular mechanisms by which, these particular mutations become toxic and lead to muscle weakness and myopathies remain obscure. To address this, here, we performed a molecular dynamics simulation, and we used a broad range of biophysical assays to determine how the lethal and myopathy-related H40Y amino acid substitution in actin affects the structure, stability, and function of this protein. Interestingly, our results showed that H40Y severely disrupts the DNase I-binding-loop structure and actin filaments. In addition, we observed that normal and mutant actin monomersmore » are likely to form distinctive homopolymers, with mutant filaments being very stiff, and not supporting proper myosin binding. Lastly, these phenomena underlie the toxicity of H40Y and may be considered as important triggering factors for the contractile dysfunction, muscle weakness and disease phenotype seen in patients.« less

  3. Myopathy-inducing mutation H40Y in ACTA1 hampers actin filament structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chun; Fan, Jun; Messer, Andrew E.

    In humans, more than 200 missense mutations have been identified in the ACTA1 gene. The exact molecular mechanisms by which, these particular mutations become toxic and lead to muscle weakness and myopathies remain obscure. To address this, here, we performed a molecular dynamics simulation, and we used a broad range of biophysical assays to determine how the lethal and myopathy-related H40Y amino acid substitution in actin affects the structure, stability, and function of this protein. Interestingly, our results showed that H40Y severely disrupts the DNase I-binding-loop structure and actin filaments. In addition, we observed that normal and mutant actin monomersmore » are likely to form distinctive homopolymers, with mutant filaments being very stiff, and not supporting proper myosin binding. Lastly, these phenomena underlie the toxicity of H40Y and may be considered as important triggering factors for the contractile dysfunction, muscle weakness and disease phenotype seen in patients.« less

  4. Load Adaptation of Lamellipodial Actin Networks.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jan; Szep, Gregory; Nemethova, Maria; de Vries, Ingrid; Lieber, Arnon D; Winkler, Christoph; Kruse, Karsten; Small, J Victor; Schmeiser, Christian; Keren, Kinneret; Hauschild, Robert; Sixt, Michael

    2017-09-21

    Actin filaments polymerizing against membranes power endocytosis, vesicular traffic, and cell motility. In vitro reconstitution studies suggest that the structure and the dynamics of actin networks respond to mechanical forces. We demonstrate that lamellipodial actin of migrating cells responds to mechanical load when membrane tension is modulated. In a steady state, migrating cell filaments assume the canonical dendritic geometry, defined by Arp2/3-generated 70° branch points. Increased tension triggers a dense network with a broadened range of angles, whereas decreased tension causes a shift to a sparse configuration dominated by filaments growing perpendicularly to the plasma membrane. We show that these responses emerge from the geometry of branched actin: when load per filament decreases, elongation speed increases and perpendicular filaments gradually outcompete others because they polymerize the shortest distance to the membrane, where they are protected from capping. This network-intrinsic geometrical adaptation mechanism tunes protrusive force in response to mechanical load. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Curvature and torsion in growing actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2008-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Rickettsia rickettsii move within a host cell by polymerizing a comet-tail of actin fibers that ultimately pushes the cell forward. This dense network of cross-linked actin polymers typically exhibits a striking curvature that causes bacteria to move in gently looping paths. Theoretically, tail curvature has been linked to details of motility by considering force and torque balances from a finite number of polymerizing filaments. Here we track beads coated with a prokaryotic activator of actin polymerization in three dimensions to directly quantify the curvature and torsion of bead motility paths. We find that bead paths are more likely to have low rather than high curvature at any given time. Furthermore, path curvature changes very slowly in time, with an autocorrelation decay time of 200 s. Paths with a small radius of curvature, therefore, remain so for an extended period resulting in loops when confined to two dimensions. When allowed to explore a three-dimensional (3D) space, path loops are less evident. Finally, we quantify the torsion in the bead paths and show that beads do not exhibit a significant left- or right-handed bias to their motion in 3D. These results suggest that paths of actin-propelled objects may be attributed to slow changes in curvature, possibly associated with filament debranching, rather than a fixed torque.

  6. A Mechanistic Model of the Actin Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bindschadler, M.; Osborn, E. A.; Dewey, C. F.; McGrath, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    We have derived a broad, deterministic model of the steady-state actin cycle that includes its major regulatory mechanisms. Ours is the first model to solve the complete nucleotide profile within filaments, a feature that determines the dynamics and geometry of actin networks at the leading edges of motile cells, and one that has challenged investigators developing models to interpret steady-state experiments. We arrived at the nucleotide profile through analytic and numerical approaches that completely agree. Our model reproduces behaviors seen in numerous experiments with purified proteins, but allows a detailed inspection of the concentrations and fluxes that might exist in these experiments. These inspections provide new insight into the mechanisms that determine the rate of actin filament treadmilling. Specifically, we find that mechanisms for enhancing Pi release from the ADP·Pi intermediate on filaments, for increasing the off rate of ADP-bound subunits at pointed ends, and the multiple, simultaneous functions of profilin, make unique and essential contributions to increased treadmilling. In combination, these mechanisms have a theoretical capacity to increase treadmilling to levels limited only by the amount of available actin. This limitation arises because as the cycle becomes more dynamic, it tends toward the unpolymerized state. PMID:15111391

  7. Molecular cloning of actin genes in Trichomonas vaginalis and phylogeny inferred from actin sequences.

    PubMed

    Bricheux, G; Brugerolle, G

    1997-08-01

    The parasitic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis is known to contain the ubiquitous and highly conserved protein actin. A genomic library and a cDNA library have been screened to identify and clone the actin gene(s) of T. vaginalis. The nucleotide sequence of one gene and its flanking regions have been determined. The open reading frame encodes a protein of 376 amino acids. The sequence is not interrupted by any introns and the promoter could be represented by a 10 bp motif close to a consensus motif also found upstream of most sequenced T. vaginalis genes. The five different clones isolated from the cDNA library have similar sequences and encode three actin proteins differing only by one or two amino acids. A phylogenetic analysis of 31 actin sequences by distance matrix and parsimony methods, using centractin as outgroup, gives congruent trees with Parabasala branching above Diplomonadida.

  8. Effects of oxidative stress-induced changes in the actin cytoskeletal structure on myoblast damage under compressive stress: confocal-based cell-specific finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yifei; Lacroix, Damien; Mak, Arthur F T

    2016-12-01

    Muscle cells are frequently subjected to both mechanical and oxidative stresses in various physiological and pathological situations. To explore the mechanical mechanism of muscle cell damage under loading and oxidative stresses, we experimentally studied the effects of extrinsic hydrogen peroxides on the actin cytoskeletal structure in C2C12 myoblasts and presented a finite element (FE) analysis of how such changes in the actin cytoskeletal structure affected a myoblast's capability to resist damage under compression. A confocal-based cell-specific FE model was built to parametrically study the effects of stress fiber density, fiber cross-sectional area, fiber tensile prestrain, as well as the elastic moduli of the stress fibers, actin cortex, nucleus and cytoplasm. The results showed that a decrease in the elastic moduli of both the stress fibers and actin cortex could increase the average tensile strain on the actin cortex-membrane structure and reduce the apparent cell elastic modulus. Assuming the cell would die when a certain percentage of membrane elements were strained beyond a threshold, a lower elastic modulus of actin cytoskeleton would compromise the compressive resistance of a myoblast and lead to cell death more readily. This model was used with a Weibull distribution function to successfully describe the extent of myoblasts damaged in a monolayer under compression.

  9. Possible Role of Non-Muscle Alpha-Actinins in Muscle Cell Mechanosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ogneva, Irina V.; Biryukov, Nikolay S.; Leinsoo, Toomas A.; Larina, Irina M.

    2014-01-01

    The main hypothesis suggested that changes in the external mechanical load would lead to different deformations of the submembranous cytoskeleton and, as a result, dissociation of different proteins from its structure (induced by increased/decreased mechanical stress). The study subjects were fibers of the soleus muscle and cardiomyocytes of Wistar rats. Changes in external mechanical conditions were reconstructed by means of antiorthostatic suspension of the animals by their tails for 6, 12, 18, 24 and 72 hours. Transversal stiffness was measured by atomic force microscopy imaging; beta-, gamma-actin, alpha-actinin 1 and alpha-actinin 4 levels in membranous and cytoplasmic fractions were quantified by Western blot analysis; expression rates of the corresponding genes were studied using RT-PCR. Results: In 6 hours, alpha-actinin 1 and alpha-actinin 4 levels decreased in the membranous fraction of proteins of cardiomyocytes and soleus muscle fibers, respectively, but increased in the cytoplasmic fraction of the abovementioned cells. After 6–12 hours of suspension, the expression rates of beta-, gamma-actin, alpha-actinin 1 and alpha-actinin 4 were elevated in the soleus muscle fibers, but the alpha-actinin 1 expression rate returned to the reference level in 72 hours. After 18–24 hours, the expression rates of beta-actin and alpha-actinin 4 increased in cardiomyocytes, while the alpha-actinin 1 expression rate decreased in soleus muscle fibers. After 12 hours, the beta- and gamma-actin content dropped in the membranous fraction and increased in the cytoplasmic protein fractions from both cardiomyocytes and soleus muscle fibers. The stiffness of both cell types decreased after the same period of time. Further, during the unloading period the concentration of nonmuscle actin and different isoforms of alpha-actinins increased in the membranous fraction from cardiomyocytes. At the same time, the concentration of the abovementioned proteins decreased in the soleus

  10. {beta}-Catenin regulates airway smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Sepp R; Van Ziel, Anna M; Baarsma, Hoeke A; Gosens, Reinoud

    2010-08-01

    beta-Catenin is an 88-kDa member of the armadillo family of proteins that is associated with the cadherin-catenin complex in the plasma membrane. This complex interacts dynamically with the actin cytoskeleton to stabilize adherens junctions, which play a central role in force transmission by smooth muscle cells. Therefore, in the present study, we hypothesized a role for beta-catenin in the regulation of smooth muscle force production. beta-Catenin colocalized with smooth muscle alpha-actin (sm-alpha-actin) and N-cadherin in plasma membrane fractions and coimmunoprecipitated with sm-alpha-actin and N-cadherin in lysates of bovine tracheal smooth muscle (BTSM) strips. Moreover, immunocytochemistry of cultured BTSM cells revealed clear and specific colocalization of sm-alpha-actin and beta-catenin at the sites of cell-cell contact. Treatment of BTSM strips with the pharmacological beta-catenin/T cell factor-4 (TCF4) inhibitor PKF115-584 (100 nM) reduced beta-catenin expression in BTSM whole tissue lysates and in plasma membrane fractions and reduced maximal KCl- and methacholine-induced force production. These changes in force production were not accompanied by changes in the expression of sm-alpha-actin or sm-myosin heavy chain (MHC). Likewise, small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of beta-catenin in BTSM strips reduced beta-catenin expression and attenuated maximal KCl- and methacholine-induced contractions without affecting sm-alpha-actin or sm-MHC expression. Conversely, pharmacological (SB-216763, LiCl) or insulin-induced inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) enhanced the expression of beta-catenin and augmented maximal KCl- and methacholine-induced contractions. We conclude that beta-catenin is a plasma membrane-associated protein in airway smooth muscle that regulates active tension development, presumably by stabilizing cell-cell contacts and thereby supporting force transmission between neighboring cells.

  11. Generation of contractile actomyosin bundles depends on mechanosensitive actin filament assembly and disassembly.

    PubMed

    Tojkander, Sari; Gateva, Gergana; Husain, Amjad; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2015-12-10

    Adhesion and morphogenesis of many non-muscle cells are guided by contractile actomyosin bundles called ventral stress fibers. While it is well established that stress fibers are mechanosensitive structures, physical mechanisms by which they assemble, align, and mature have remained elusive. Here we show that arcs, which serve as precursors for ventral stress fibers, undergo lateral fusion during their centripetal flow to form thick actomyosin bundles that apply tension to focal adhesions at their ends. Importantly, this myosin II-derived force inhibits vectorial actin polymerization at focal adhesions through AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of VASP, and thereby halts stress fiber elongation and ensures their proper contractility. Stress fiber maturation additionally requires ADF/cofilin-mediated disassembly of non-contractile stress fibers, whereas contractile fibers are protected from severing. Taken together, these data reveal that myosin-derived tension precisely controls both actin filament assembly and disassembly to ensure generation and proper alignment of contractile stress fibers in migrating cells.

  12. PLCβ3 mediates cortactin interaction with WAVE2 in MCP1-induced actin polymerization and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Chandaka, Giri Kumar; Kotla, Sivareddy; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2015-12-15

    Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration in vascular wall remodeling. However, the mechanisms underlying MCP1-induced VSMC migration have not been understood. Here we identify the signaling pathway associated with MCP1-induced human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) migration. MCP1, a G protein-coupled receptor agonist, activates phosphorylation of cortactin on S405 and S418 residues in a time-dependent manner, and inhibition of its phosphorylation attenuates MCP1-induced HASMC G-actin polymerization, F-actin stress fiber formation, and migration. Cortactin phosphorylation on S405/S418 is found to be critical for its interaction with WAVE2, a member of the WASP family of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins required for cell migration. In addition, the MCP1-induced cortactin phosphorylation is dependent on PLCβ3-mediated PKCδ activation, and siRNA-mediated down-regulation of either of these molecules prevents cortactin interaction with WAVE2, affecting G-actin polymerization, F-actin stress fiber formation, and HASMC migration. Upstream, MCP1 activates CCR2 and Gαq/11 in a time-dependent manner, and down-regulation of their levels attenuates MCP1-induced PLCβ3 and PKCδ activation, cortactin phosphorylation, cortactin-WAVE2 interaction, G-actin polymerization, F-actin stress fiber formation, and HASMC migration. Together these findings demonstrate that phosphorylation of cortactin on S405 and S418 residues is required for its interaction with WAVE2 in MCP1-induced cytoskeleton remodeling, facilitating HASMC migration. © 2015 Janjanam et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. PLCβ3 mediates cortactin interaction with WAVE2 in MCP1-induced actin polymerization and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Chandaka, Giri Kumar; Kotla, Sivareddy; Rao, Gadiparthi N.

    2015-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration in vascular wall remodeling. However, the mechanisms underlying MCP1-induced VSMC migration have not been understood. Here we identify the signaling pathway associated with MCP1-induced human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) migration. MCP1, a G protein–coupled receptor agonist, activates phosphorylation of cortactin on S405 and S418 residues in a time-dependent manner, and inhibition of its phosphorylation attenuates MCP1-induced HASMC G-actin polymerization, F-actin stress fiber formation, and migration. Cortactin phosphorylation on S405/S418 is found to be critical for its interaction with WAVE2, a member of the WASP family of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins required for cell migration. In addition, the MCP1-induced cortactin phosphorylation is dependent on PLCβ3-mediated PKCδ activation, and siRNA-mediated down-regulation of either of these molecules prevents cortactin interaction with WAVE2, affecting G-actin polymerization, F-actin stress fiber formation, and HASMC migration. Upstream, MCP1 activates CCR2 and Gαq/11 in a time-dependent manner, and down-regulation of their levels attenuates MCP1-induced PLCβ3 and PKCδ activation, cortactin phosphorylation, cortactin–WAVE2 interaction, G-actin polymerization, F-actin stress fiber formation, and HASMC migration. Together these findings demonstrate that phosphorylation of cortactin on S405 and S418 residues is required for its interaction with WAVE2 in MCP1-induced cytoskeleton remodeling, facilitating HASMC migration. PMID:26490115

  14. Diverse roles of actin in C. elegans early embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Velarde, Nathalie; Gunsalus, Kristin C; Piano, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    Background The actin cytoskeleton plays critical roles in early development in Caenorhabditis elegans. To further understand the complex roles of actin in early embryogenesis we use RNAi and in vivo imaging of filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics. Results Using RNAi, we found processes that are differentially sensitive to levels of actin during early embryogenesis. Mild actin depletion shows defects in cortical ruffling, pseudocleavage, and establishment of polarity, while more severe depletion shows defects in polar body extrusion, cytokinesis, chromosome segregation, and eventually, egg production. These defects indicate that actin is required for proper oocyte development, fertilization, and a wide range of important events during early embryogenesis, including proper chromosome segregation. In vivo visualization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton shows dynamics that parallel but are distinct from the previously described myosin dynamics. Two distinct types of actin organization are observed at the cortex. During asymmetric polarization to the anterior, or the establishment phase (Phase I), actin forms a meshwork of microfilaments and focal accumulations throughout the cortex, while during the anterior maintenance phase (Phase II) it undergoes a morphological transition to asymmetrically localized puncta. The proper asymmetric redistribution is dependent on the PAR proteins, while both asymmetric redistribution and morphological transitions are dependent upon PFN-1 and NMY-2. Just before cytokinesis, actin disappears from most of the cortex and is only found around the presumptive cytokinetic furrow. Finally, we describe dynamic actin-enriched comets in the early embryo. Conclusion During early C. elegans embryogenesis actin plays more roles and its organization is more dynamic than previously described. Morphological transitions of F-actin, from meshwork to puncta, as well as asymmetric redistribution, are regulated by the PAR proteins. Results from this study

  15. Demonstration of prominent actin filaments in the root columella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, D. A.; Zsuppan, G.; Allen, N. S.; Blancaflor, E. B.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of actin filaments within the gravity-sensing columella cells of plant roots remains poorly understood, with studies over numerous years providing inconsistent descriptions of actin organization in these cells. This uncertainty in actin organization, and thus in actin's role in graviperception and gravisignaling, has led us to investigate actin arrangements in the columella cells of Zea mays L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn., Linum usitatissiilium L. and Nicotianla benthamiana Domin. Actin organization was examined using a combination of optimized immunofluorescence techniques, and an improved fluorochrome-conjugated phalloidin labeling method reliant on 3-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide ester (MBS) cross-linking combined with glycerol permeabilization. Confocal microscopy of root sections labeled with anti-actin antibodies revealed patterns suggestive of actin throughout the columella region. These patterns included short and fragmented actin bundles, fluorescent rings around amyloplasts and intense fluorescence originating from the nucleus. Additionally, confocal microscopy of MBS-stabilized and Alexa Fluor-phalloidin-labeled root sections revealed a previously undetected state of actin organization in the columella. Discrete actin structures surrounded the amyloplasts and prominent actin cables radiated from the nuclear surface toward the cell periphery. Furthermore, the cortex of the columella cells contained fine actin bundles (or single filaments) that had a predominant transverse orientation. We also used confocal microscopy of plant roots expressing endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted green fluorescent protein to demonstrate rapid ER movements within the columella cells, suggesting that the imaged actin network is functional. The successful identification of discrete actin structures in the root columella cells forms the perception and signaling.

  16. Flexibility of myosin attachment to surfaces influences F-actin motion.

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, D A; Bourdieu, L; Ott, A; Kinose, F; Libchaber, A

    1995-01-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament sliding movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain (LC2) located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. This method of attachment provides a means of controlling the flexibility and density of myosin on the surface. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these mAbs, and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments was analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform motion of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM mAbs yielded significantly higher velocities (10 microns/s at 30 degrees C) than attachment through anti-LC2 (4-5 microns/s at 30 degrees C). For each antibody, we observed a characteristic value of the myosin density for the onset of F-actin motion and a second critical density for velocity saturation. The specific mode of attachment influences the velocity of actin filaments and the characteristic surface density needed to support movement. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 8 PMID:7544167

  17. Actin dynamics at the living cell submembrane imaged by total internal reflection fluorescence photobleaching.

    PubMed Central

    Sund, S E; Axelrod, D

    2000-01-01

    Although reversible chemistry is crucial to dynamical processes in living cells, relatively little is known about relevant chemical kinetic rates in vivo. Total internal reflection/fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (TIR/FRAP), an established technique previously demonstrated to measure reversible biomolecular kinetic rates at surfaces in vitro, is extended here to measure reversible biomolecular kinetic rates of actin at the cytofacial (subplasma membrane) surface of living cells. For the first time, spatial imaging (with a charge-coupled device camera) is used in conjunction with TIR/FRAP. TIR/FRAP imaging produces both spatial maps of kinetic parameters (off-rates and mobile fractions) and estimates of kinetic correlation distances, cell-wide kinetic gradients, and dependences of kinetic parameters on initial fluorescence intensity. For microinjected rhodamine actin in living cultured smooth muscle (BC3H1) cells, the unbinding rate at or near the cytofacial surface of the plasma membrane (averaged over the entire cell) is measured at 0.032 +/- 0.007 s(-1). The corresponding rate for actin marked by microinjected rhodamine phalloidin is very similar, 0.033 +/- 0.013 s(-1), suggesting that TIR/FRAP is reporting the dynamics of entire filaments or protofilaments. For submembrane fluorescence-marked actin, the intensity, off-rate, and mobile fraction show a positive correlation over a characteristic distance of 1-3 microm and a negative correlation over larger distances greater than approximately 7-14 microm. Furthermore, the kinetic parameters display a statistically significant cell-wide gradient, with the cell having a "fast" and "slow" end with respect to actin kinetics. PMID:10969025

  18. Loss of γ-cytoplasmic actin triggers myofibroblast transition of human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Li, Chao; Naydenov, Nayden G; Kuemmerle, John F; Dugina, Vera; Chaponnier, Christine; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2014-10-15

    Transdifferentiation of epithelial cells into mesenchymal cells and myofibroblasts plays an important role in tumor progression and tissue fibrosis. Such epithelial plasticity is accompanied by dramatic reorganizations of the actin cytoskeleton, although mechanisms underlying cytoskeletal effects on epithelial transdifferentiation remain poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that selective siRNA-mediated knockdown of γ-cytoplasmic actin (γ-CYA), but not β-cytoplasmic actin, induced epithelial-to-myofibroblast transition (EMyT) of different epithelial cells. The EMyT manifested by increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin and other contractile proteins, along with inhibition of genes responsible for cell proliferation. Induction of EMyT in γ-CYA-depleted cells depended on activation of serum response factor and its cofactors, myocardial-related transcriptional factors A and B. Loss of γ-CYA stimulated formin-mediated actin polymerization and activation of Rho GTPase, which appear to be essential for EMyT induction. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated, unique role of γ-CYA in regulating epithelial phenotype and suppression of EMyT that may be essential for cell differentiation and tissue fibrosis. © 2014 Lechuga, Baranwal, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. Role of gelsolin interaction with actin in regulation and creation of actin nuclei in chemotactic peptide activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Deaton, J D; Guerrero, T; Howard, T H

    1992-01-01

    In vitro Ca++ activates gelsolin to sever F-actin and form a gelsolin-actin (GA) complex at the+end of F-actin that is not dissociated by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) but is separated by EGTA+PIP/PIP2. The gelsolin blocks the+end on the actin filament, but the-end of the filament can still initiate actin polymerization. In thrombin activated platelets, evidence suggests that severing of F-actin by gelsolin increases GA complex, creates one-end actin nucleus and one cryptic+end actin nucleus per cut, and then dissociates to yield free+ends to nucleate rapid actin assembly. We examined the role of F-actin severing in creation and regulation of nuclei and polymerization in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). At 2-s intervals after formyl peptide (FMLP) activation of endotoxin free (ETF) PMNs, change in GA complex was correlated with change in+end actin nuclei,-end actin nuclei, and F-actin content. GA complex was quantitated by electrophoretograms of proteins absorbed by antigelsolin from cells lysed in 10 mM EGTA,+end actin nuclei as cytochalasin (CD) sensitive and-end actin nuclei as CD insensitive increases in G-pyrenyl actin polymerization rates induced by the same PMNs, and F-actin content by NBDphallacidin binding to fixed cells. Thirty three percent of gelsolin was in GA complex in basal ETF PMNs; from 2-6 s, GA complexes dissociate (low = 15% at 10 s) and sequentially+end nuclei and F-actin content and then-end nuclei increase to a maximum at 10 s. At > s GA complex increase toward basal and + end nuclei and F-actin content returned toward basal. These kinetic data show gelsolin regulates availability of + end nuclei and actin polymerization in FMLP. However, absence of an initial increase in GA complex or - end nucleating activity shows FMLP activation does not cause gelsolin to sever F- or to bind G-actin to create cryptic + end nuclei in PMNs; the results suggest the + nucleus formation is gelsolin

  20. Role of gelsolin interaction with actin in regulation and creation of actin nuclei in chemotactic peptide activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Deaton, J D; Guerrero, T; Howard, T H

    1992-12-01

    In vitro Ca++ activates gelsolin to sever F-actin and form a gelsolin-actin (GA) complex at the+end of F-actin that is not dissociated by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) but is separated by EGTA+PIP/PIP2. The gelsolin blocks the+end on the actin filament, but the-end of the filament can still initiate actin polymerization. In thrombin activated platelets, evidence suggests that severing of F-actin by gelsolin increases GA complex, creates one-end actin nucleus and one cryptic+end actin nucleus per cut, and then dissociates to yield free+ends to nucleate rapid actin assembly. We examined the role of F-actin severing in creation and regulation of nuclei and polymerization in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). At 2-s intervals after formyl peptide (FMLP) activation of endotoxin free (ETF) PMNs, change in GA complex was correlated with change in+end actin nuclei,-end actin nuclei, and F-actin content. GA complex was quantitated by electrophoretograms of proteins absorbed by antigelsolin from cells lysed in 10 mM EGTA,+end actin nuclei as cytochalasin (CD) sensitive and-end actin nuclei as CD insensitive increases in G-pyrenyl actin polymerization rates induced by the same PMNs, and F-actin content by NBDphallacidin binding to fixed cells. Thirty three percent of gelsolin was in GA complex in basal ETF PMNs; from 2-6 s, GA complexes dissociate (low = 15% at 10 s) and sequentially+end nuclei and F-actin content and then-end nuclei increase to a maximum at 10 s. At > s GA complex increase toward basal and + end nuclei and F-actin content returned toward basal. These kinetic data show gelsolin regulates availability of + end nuclei and actin polymerization in FMLP. However, absence of an initial increase in GA complex or - end nucleating activity shows FMLP activation does not cause gelsolin to sever F- or to bind G-actin to create cryptic + end nuclei in PMNs; the results suggest the + nucleus formation is gelsolin

  1. Soft Listeria: actin-based propulsion of liquid drops.

    PubMed

    Boukellal, Hakim; Campás, Otger; Joanny, Jean-François; Prost, Jacques; Sykes, Cécile

    2004-06-01

    We study the motion of oil drops propelled by actin polymerization in cell extracts. Drops deform and acquire a pearlike shape under the action of the elastic stresses exerted by the actin comet, a tail of cross-linked actin filaments. We solve this free boundary problem and calculate the drop shape taking into account the elasticity of the actin gel and the variation of the polymerization velocity with normal stress. The pressure balance on the liquid drop imposes a zero propulsive force if gradients in surface tension or internal pressure are not taken into account. Quantitative parameters of actin polymerization are obtained by fitting theory to experiment.

  2. STEF/TIAM2-mediated Rac1 activity at the nuclear envelope regulates the perinuclear actin cap.

    PubMed

    Woroniuk, Anna; Porter, Andrew; White, Gavin; Newman, Daniel T; Diamantopoulou, Zoi; Waring, Thomas; Rooney, Claire; Strathdee, Douglas; Marston, Daniel J; Hahn, Klaus M; Sansom, Owen J; Zech, Tobias; Malliri, Angeliki

    2018-05-29

    The perinuclear actin cap is an important cytoskeletal structure that regulates nuclear morphology and re-orientation during front-rear polarisation. The mechanisms regulating the actin cap are currently poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that STEF/TIAM2, a Rac1 selective guanine nucleotide exchange factor, localises at the nuclear envelope, co-localising with the key perinuclear proteins Nesprin-2G and Non-muscle myosin IIB (NMMIIB), where it regulates perinuclear Rac1 activity. We show that STEF depletion reduces apical perinuclear actin cables (a phenotype rescued by targeting active Rac1 to the nuclear envelope), increases nuclear height and impairs nuclear re-orientation. STEF down-regulation also reduces perinuclear pMLC and decreases myosin-generated tension at the nuclear envelope, suggesting that STEF-mediated Rac1 activity regulates NMMIIB activity to promote stabilisation of the perinuclear actin cap. Finally, STEF depletion decreases nuclear stiffness and reduces expression of TAZ-regulated genes, indicating an alteration in mechanosensing pathways as a consequence of disruption of the actin cap.

  3. The chicken skeletal alpha-actin gene promoter region exhibits partial dyad symmetry and a capacity to drive bidirectional transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Grichnik, J M; French, B A; Schwartz, R J

    1988-01-01

    The chicken skeletal alpha-actin gene promoter region (-202 to -12) provides myogenic transcriptional specificity. This promoter contains partial dyad symmetry about an axis at nucleotide -108 and in transfection experiments is capable of directing transcription in a bidirectional manner. At least three different transcription initiation start sites, oriented toward upstream sequences, were mapped 25 to 30 base pairs from TATA-like regions. The opposing transcriptional activity was potentiated upon the deletion of sequences proximal to the alpha-actin transcription start site. Thus, sequences which serve to position RNA polymerase for alpha-actin transcription may allow, in their absence, the selection of alternative and reverse-oriented start sites. Nuclear runoff transcription assays of embryonic muscle indicated that divergent transcription may occur in vivo but with rapid turnover of nuclear transcripts. Divergent transcriptional activity enabled us to define the 3' regulatory boundary of the skeletal alpha-actin promoter which retains a high level of myogenic transcriptional activity. The 3' regulatory border was detected when serial 3' deletions bisected the element (-91 CCAAA TATGG -82) which reduced transcriptional activity by 80%. Previously we showed that disruption of its upstream counterpart (-127 CCAAAGAAGG -136) resulted in about a 90% decrease in activity. These element pairs, which we describe as CCAAT box-associated repeats, are conserved in all sequenced vertebrate sarcomeric actin genes and may act in a cooperative manner to facilitate transcription in myogenic cells. Images PMID:3211124

  4. Geometrical and Mechanical Properties Control Actin Filament Organization

    PubMed Central

    Ennomani, Hajer; Théry, Manuel; Nedelec, Francois; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The different actin structures governing eukaryotic cell shape and movement are not only determined by the properties of the actin filaments and associated proteins, but also by geometrical constraints. We recently demonstrated that limiting nucleation to specific regions was sufficient to obtain actin networks with different organization. To further investigate how spatially constrained actin nucleation determines the emergent actin organization, we performed detailed simulations of the actin filament system using Cytosim. We first calibrated the steric interaction between filaments, by matching, in simulations and experiments, the bundled actin organization observed with a rectangular bar of nucleating factor. We then studied the overall organization of actin filaments generated by more complex pattern geometries used experimentally. We found that the fraction of parallel versus antiparallel bundles is determined by the mechanical properties of actin filament or bundles and the efficiency of nucleation. Thus nucleation geometry, actin filaments local interactions, bundle rigidity, and nucleation efficiency are the key parameters controlling the emergent actin architecture. We finally simulated more complex nucleation patterns and performed the corresponding experiments to confirm the predictive capabilities of the model. PMID:26016478

  5. Mechanism of Cdc42-induced Actin Polymerization in Neutrophil Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Zigmond, Sally H.; Joyce, Michael; Yang, Changsong; Brown, Kevin; Huang, Minzhou; Pring, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Cdc42, activated with GTPγS, induces actin polymerization in supernatants of lysed neutrophils. This polymerization, like that induced by agonists, requires elongation at filament barbed ends. To determine if creation of free barbed ends was sufficient to induce actin polymerization, free barbed ends in the form of spectrin-actin seeds or sheared F-actin filaments were added to cell supernatants. Neither induced polymerization. Furthermore, the presence of spectrin-actin seeds did not increase the rate of Cdc42-induced polymerization, suggesting that the presence of Cdc42 did not facilitate polymerization from spectrin-actin seeds such as might have been the case if Cdc42 inhibited capping or released G-actin from a sequestered pool. Electron microscopy revealed that Cdc42-induced filaments elongated rapidly, achieving a mean length greater than 1 μm in 15 s. The mean length of filaments formed from spectrin-actin seeds was <0.4 μm. Had spectrin-actin seeds elongated at comparable rates before they were capped, they would have induced longer filaments. There was little change in mean length of Cdc42-induced filaments between 15 s and 5 min, suggesting that the increase in F-actin over this time was due to an increase in filament number. These data suggest that Cdc42 induction of actin polymerization requires both creation of free barbed ends and facilitated elongation at these ends. PMID:9722612

  6. Mechanism of Cdc42-induced actin polymerization in neutrophil extracts.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, S H; Joyce, M; Yang, C; Brown, K; Huang, M; Pring, M

    1998-08-24

    Cdc42, activated with GTPgammaS, induces actin polymerization in supernatants of lysed neutrophils. This polymerization, like that induced by agonists, requires elongation at filament barbed ends. To determine if creation of free barbed ends was sufficient to induce actin polymerization, free barbed ends in the form of spectrin-actin seeds or sheared F-actin filaments were added to cell supernatants. Neither induced polymerization. Furthermore, the presence of spectrin-actin seeds did not increase the rate of Cdc42-induced polymerization, suggesting that the presence of Cdc42 did not facilitate polymerization from spectrin-actin seeds such as might have been the case if Cdc42 inhibited capping or released G-actin from a sequestered pool. Electron microscopy revealed that Cdc42-induced filaments elongated rapidly, achieving a mean length greater than 1 micron in 15 s. The mean length of filaments formed from spectrin-actin seeds was <0.4 micron. Had spectrin-actin seeds elongated at comparable rates before they were capped, they would have induced longer filaments. There was little change in mean length of Cdc42-induced filaments between 15 s and 5 min, suggesting that the increase in F-actin over this time was due to an increase in filament number. These data suggest that Cdc42 induction of actin polymerization requires both creation of free barbed ends and facilitated elongation at these ends.

  7. A Second Las17 Monomeric Actin-Binding Motif Functions in Arp2/3-Dependent Actin Polymerization During Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Daniel; Tolsma, Thomas O.; Farrell, Kristen B.; Aradi, Al; Di Pietro, Santiago M.

    2018-01-01

    During clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), actin assembly provides force to drive vesicle internalization. Members of the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family play a fundamental role stimulating actin assembly. WASP family proteins contain a WH2 motif that binds globular actin (G-actin) and a central-acidic motif that binds the Arp2/3 complex, thus promoting the formation of branched actin filaments. Yeast WASP (Las17) is the strongest of five factors promoting Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization during CME. It was suggested that this strong activity may be caused by a putative second G-actin-binding motif in Las17. Here, we describe the in vitro and in vivo characterization of such Las17 G-actin-binding motif (LGM) and its dependence on a group of conserved arginine residues. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, GST-pulldown, fluorescence polarization and pyrene-actin polymerization assays, we show that LGM binds G-actin and is necessary for normal Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization in vitro. Live-cell fluorescence microscopy experiments demonstrate that LGM is required for normal dynamics of actin polymerization during CME. Further, LGM is necessary for normal dynamics of endocytic machinery components that are recruited at early, intermediate and late stages of endocytosis, as well as for optimal endocytosis of native CME cargo. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments show that LGM has relatively lower potency compared to the previously known Las17 G-actin-binding motif, WH2. These results establish a second G-actin-binding motif in Las17 and advance our knowledge on the mechanism of actin assembly during CME. PMID:25615019

  8. Three’s company: The fission yeast actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Kovar, David R.; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    How the actin cytoskeleton assembles into different structures to drive diverse cellular processes is a fundamental cell biological question. In addition to orchestrating the appropriate combination of regulators and actin-binding proteins, different actin-based structures must insulate themselves from one another to maintain specificity within a crowded cytoplasm. Actin specification is particularly vexing in complex eukaryotes where a multitude of protein isoforms and actin structures operate within the same cell. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe possesses a single actin isoform that functions in three distinct structures throughout the cell cycle. In this review, we explore recent studies in fission yeast that help unravel how different actin structures operate in cells. PMID:21145239

  9. The unusual dynamics of parasite actin result from isodesmic polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Skillman, Kristen M.; Ma, Christopher I.; Fremont, Daved H.; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Cooper, John A.; Sept, David; Sibley, L. David

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that parasite actins are short and inherently unstable, despite being required for motility. Here, we re-examine the polymerization properties of actin in Toxoplasma gondii (TgACTI), unexpectedly finding that it exhibits isodesmic polymerization in contrast to the conventional nucleation-elongation process of all previously studied actins from both eukaryotes and bacteria. TgACTI polymerization kinetics lacks both a lag phase and critical concentration, normally characteristic of actins. Unique among actins, the kinetics of assembly can be fit with a single set of rate constants for all subunit interactions, without need for separate nucleation and elongation rates. This isodesmic model accurately predicts the assembly, disassembly, and the size distribution of TgACTI filaments in vitro, providing a mechanistic explanation for actin dynamics in vivo. Our findings expand the repertoire of mechanisms by which actin polymerization is governed and offer clues about the evolution of self-assembling, stabilized protein polymers. PMID:23921463

  10. Actin-interacting Protein 1 Promotes Disassembly of Actin-depolymerizing Factor/Cofilin-bound Actin Filaments in a pH-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazumi; Hayakawa, Kimihide; Tatsumi, Hitoshi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-03-04

    Actin-interacting protein 1 (AIP1) is a conserved WD repeat protein that promotes disassembly of actin filaments when actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is present. Although AIP1 is known to be essential for a number of cellular events involving dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, the regulatory mechanism of the function of AIP1 is unknown. In this study, we report that two AIP1 isoforms from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, known as UNC-78 and AIPL-1, are pH-sensitive in enhancement of actin filament disassembly. Both AIP1 isoforms only weakly enhance disassembly of ADF/cofilin-bound actin filaments at an acidic pH but show stronger disassembly activity at neutral and basic pH values. However, a severing-defective mutant of UNC-78 shows pH-insensitive binding to ADF/cofilin-decorated actin filaments, suggesting that the process of filament severing or disassembly, but not filament binding, is pH-dependent. His-60 of AIP1 is located near the predicted binding surface for the ADF/cofilin-actin complex, and an H60K mutation of AIP1 partially impairs its pH sensitivity, suggesting that His-60 is involved in the pH sensor for AIP1. These biochemical results suggest that pH-dependent changes in AIP1 activity might be a novel regulatory mechanism of actin filament dynamics. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. F-actin and G-actin binding are uncoupled by mutation of conserved tyrosine residues in maize actin depolymerizing factor (ZmADF)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chang-Jie; Weeds, Alan G.; Khan, Safina; Hussey, Patrick J.

    1997-01-01

    Actin depolymerizing factors (ADF) are stimulus responsive actin cytoskeleton modulating proteins. They bind both monomeric actin (G-actin) and filamentous actin (F-actin) and, under certain conditions, F-actin binding is followed by filament severing. In this paper, using mutant maize ADF3 proteins, we demonstrate that the maize ADF3 binding of F-actin can be spatially distinguished from that of G-actin. One mutant, zmadf3–1, in which Tyr-103 and Ala-104 (equivalent to destrin Tyr-117 and Ala-118) have been replaced by phenylalanine and glycine, respectively, binds more weakly to both G-actin and F-actin compared with maize ADF3. A second mutant, zmadf3–2, in which both Tyr-67 and Tyr-70 are replaced by phenylalanine, shows an affinity for G-actin similar to maize ADF3, but F-actin binding is abolished. The two tyrosines, Tyr-67 and Tyr-70, are in the equivalent position to Tyr-82 and Tyr-85 of destrin, respectively. Using the tertiary structure of destrin, yeast cofilin, and Acanthamoeba actophorin, we discuss the implications of removing the aromatic hydroxyls of Tyr-82 and Tyr-85 (i.e., the effect of substituting phenylalanine for tyrosine) and conclude that Tyr-82 plays a critical role in stabilizing the tertiary structure that is essential for F-actin binding. We propose that this tertiary structure is maintained as a result of a hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl of Tyr-82 and the carbonyl of Tyr-117, which is located in the long α-helix; amino acid components of this helix (Leu-111 to Phe-128) have been implicated in G-actin and F-actin binding. The structures of human destrin and yeast cofilin indicate a hydrogen distance of 2.61 and 2.77 Å, respectively, with corresponding bond angles of 99.5° and 113°, close to the optimum for a strong hydrogen bond. PMID:9275236

  12. PI(3,5)P2 controls endosomal branched actin dynamics by regulating cortactin–actin interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Nan Hyung; Qi, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Branched actin critically contributes to membrane trafficking by regulating membrane curvature, dynamics, fission, and transport. However, how actin dynamics are controlled at membranes is poorly understood. Here, we identify the branched actin regulator cortactin as a direct binding partner of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) and demonstrate that their interaction promotes turnover of late endosomal actin. In vitro biochemical studies indicated that cortactin binds PI(3,5)P2 via its actin filament-binding region. Furthermore, PI(3,5)P2 competed with actin filaments for binding to cortactin, thereby antagonizing cortactin activity. These findings suggest that PI(3,5)P2 formation on endosomes may remove cortactin from endosome-associated branched actin. Indeed, inhibition of PI(3,5)P2 production led to cortactin accumulation and actin stabilization on Rab7+ endosomes. Conversely, inhibition of Arp2/3 complex activity greatly reduced cortactin localization to late endosomes. Knockdown of cortactin reversed PI(3,5)P2-inhibitor–induced actin accumulation and stabilization on endosomes. These data suggest a model in which PI(3,5)P2 binding removes cortactin from late endosomal branched actin networks and thereby promotes net actin turnover. PMID:26323691

  13. A chemical kinetic theory on muscle contraction and spontaneous oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei-Sheng; Luo, Liao-Fu; Li, Qian-Zhong

    2002-09-01

    From a set of chemical kinetic equations describing the actin-activated myosin ATPase cycle, we show that, in active muscle, the fraction of myosin heads in any given biochemical state is independent of both [ADP] and [P i]. Combining muscle mechanics data of Pate and Cooke, we deduce the muscle state equation in which muscle force is a state variable of the muscle system. The theoretical results are consistent with Baker's experimental data but somewhat different from conventional muscle theory. Based on the muscle state equation with the knowledge of special structure of muscle, we present a physical mechanism which can lead to both contraction and oscillation of sarcomeres. It explains the muscle spontaneous oscillatory contraction in a natural way and agrees well with experimental data. The model will be helpful in studying the oscillatory behavior of cilia and flagella.

  14. Repetitive reddish discoloration of urine in a female adolescent following short-distance walking on a smooth road: Questions.

    PubMed

    Siomou, Ekaterini; Baziou, Maria; Premetis, Evagelos; Vercellati, Cristina; Chaliasos, Nikolaos; Makis, Alexandros

    2017-12-01

    A previously healthy 15-year-old girl was evaluated following five episodes of reddish urine discoloration after walking for approximately 30 min on a smooth roadway. In each episode, the discoloration lasted for four to five urinations and followed by normal urine dipstick tests. No other exercise-produced urine discoloration and no other symptoms were reported. Laboratory evaluation during the episodes revealed a reddish urine sample with 3+ hemoglobin/myoglobin and absence of hematuria. Full blood count, serum creatinine, liver function tests, and electrolyte levels were all within normal limits. Myoglobulinuria was excluded, since muscle enzymes were within normal limits. Blood smear analysis showed mild anisopoikilocytosis with stomatocytes and ovalocytes, leading to extended evaluation for erythrocyte disorders. This case is interesting in that the hemoglobinuria occurred after mild walking and was accompanied by erythrocyte morphological changes. This quiz discusses the differential diagnosis of hemoglobinuria with particular reference to the conditions of appearance (after walking) and emphasizes the importance of step-by-step investigations to reach a definitive diagnosis.

  15. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Juliane; Lutz, Katrin A; Neumayer, Katharina M H; Klein, Gerd; Seeger, Tanja; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Wörgötter, Katharina; Schmid, Sandra; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late) myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1-2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2), transgelin (TAGLN), calponin (CNN1), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11) according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion channel

  16. Drosophila small heat shock protein CryAB ensures structural integrity of developing muscles, and proper muscle and heart performance.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Inga; Jabłońska, Jadwiga; Zmojdzian, Monika; Taghli-Lamallem, Ouarda; Renaud, Yoan; Junion, Guillaume; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Huelsmann, Sven; Jagla, Krzysztof; Jagla, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    Molecular chaperones, such as the small heat shock proteins (sHsps), maintain normal cellular function by controlling protein homeostasis in stress conditions. However, sHsps are not only activated in response to environmental insults, but also exert developmental and tissue-specific functions that are much less known. Here, we show that during normal development the Drosophila sHsp CryAB [L(2)efl] is specifically expressed in larval body wall muscles and accumulates at the level of Z-bands and around myonuclei. CryAB features a conserved actin-binding domain and, when attenuated, leads to clustering of myonuclei and an altered pattern of sarcomeric actin and the Z-band-associated actin crosslinker Cheerio (filamin). Our data suggest that CryAB and Cheerio form a complex essential for muscle integrity: CryAB colocalizes with Cheerio and, as revealed by mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, binds to Cheerio, and the muscle-specific attenuation of cheerio leads to CryAB-like sarcomeric phenotypes. Furthermore, muscle-targeted expression of CryAB(R120G), which carries a mutation associated with desmin-related myopathy (DRM), results in an altered sarcomeric actin pattern, in affected myofibrillar integrity and in Z-band breaks, leading to reduced muscle performance and to marked cardiac arrhythmia. Taken together, we demonstrate that CryAB ensures myofibrillar integrity in Drosophila muscles during development and propose that it does so by interacting with the actin crosslinker Cheerio. The evidence that a DRM-causing mutation affects CryAB muscle function and leads to DRM-like phenotypes in the fly reveals a conserved stress-independent role of CryAB in maintaining muscle cell cytoarchitecture. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Novel roles for actin in mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Anna L.; Gurel, Pinar S.; Higgs, Henry N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial dynamics, including fusion, fission and translocation, are crucial to cellular homeostasis, with roles in cellular polarity, stress response and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission has received particular attention, owing to links with several neurodegenerative diseases. A central player in fission is the cytoplasmic dynamin-related GTPase Drp1, which oligomerizes at the fission site and hydrolyzes GTP to drive membrane ingression. Drp1 recruitment to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) is a key regulatory event, which appears to require a pre-constriction step in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrion interact extensively, a process termed ERMD (ER-associated mitochondrial division). It is unclear how ER–mitochondrial contact generates the force required for pre-constriction or why pre-constriction leads to Drp1 recruitment. Recent results, however, show that ERMD might be an actin-based process in mammals that requires the ER-associated formin INF2 upstream of Drp1, and that myosin II and other actin-binding proteins might be involved. In this Commentary, we present a mechanistic model for mitochondrial fission in which actin and myosin contribute in two ways; firstly, by supplying the force for pre-constriction and secondly, by serving as a coincidence detector for Drp1 binding. In addition, we discuss the possibility that multiple fission mechanisms exist in mammals. PMID:25217628

  18. Glutathione depletion triggers actin cytoskeleton changes via actin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Zepeta-Flores, Nahum; Valverde, Mahara; Lopez-Saavedra, Alejandro; Rojas, Emilio

    2018-06-04

    The importance of glutathione (GSH) in alternative cellular roles to the canonically proposed, were analyzed in a model unable to synthesize GSH. Gene expression analysis shows that the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton pathway is strongly impacted by the absence of GSH. To test this hypothesis, we evaluate the effect of GSH depletion via buthionine sulfoximine (5 and 12.5 mM) in human neuroblastoma MSN cells. In the present study, 70% of GSH reduction did not induce reactive oxygen species, lipoperoxidation, or cytotoxicity, which enabled us to evaluate the effect of glutathione in the absence of oxidative stress. The cells with decreasing GSH levels acquired morphology changes that depended on the actin cytoskeleton and not on tubulin. We evaluated the expression of three actin-binding proteins: thymosin β4, profilin and gelsolin, showing a reduced expression, both at gene and protein levels at 24 hours of treatment; however, this suppression disappears after 48 hours of treatment. These changes were sufficient to trigger the co-localization of the three proteins towards cytoplasmic projections. Our data confirm that a decrease in GSH in the absence of oxidative stress can transiently inhibit the actin binding proteins and that this stimulus is sufficient to induce changes in cellular morphology via the actin cytoskeleton.

  19. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin.

  20. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1–actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1–actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson–Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  1. Actin Depolymerizing Factor (ADF/Cofilin) Enhances the Rate of Filament Turnover: Implication in Actin-based Motility

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Marie-France; Laurent, Valérie; Santolini, Jérôme; Melki, Ronald; Didry, Dominique; Xia, Gui-Xian; Hong, Yan; Chua, Nam-Hai; Pantaloni, Dominique

    1997-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins of the actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family are thought to control actin-based motile processes. ADF1 from Arabidopsis thaliana appears to be a good model that is functionally similar to other members of the family. The function of ADF in actin dynamics has been examined using a combination of physical–chemical methods and actin-based motility assays, under physiological ionic conditions and at pH 7.8. ADF binds the ADPbound forms of G- or F-actin with an affinity two orders of magnitude higher than the ATP- or ADP-Pi– bound forms. A major property of ADF is its ability to enhance the in vitro turnover rate (treadmilling) of actin filaments to a value comparable to that observed in vivo in motile lamellipodia. ADF increases the rate of propulsion of Listeria monocytogenes in highly diluted, ADF-limited platelet extracts and shortens the actin tails. These effects are mediated by the participation of ADF in actin filament assembly, which results in a change in the kinetic parameters at the two ends of the actin filament. The kinetic effects of ADF are end specific and cannot be accounted for by filament severing. The main functionally relevant effect is a 25-fold increase in the rate of actin dissociation from the pointed ends, while the rate of dissociation from the barbed ends is unchanged. This large increase in the rate-limiting step of the monomer-polymer cycle at steady state is responsible for the increase in the rate of actin-based motile processes. In conclusion, the function of ADF is not to sequester G-actin. ADF uses ATP hydrolysis in actin assembly to enhance filament dynamics. PMID:9087445

  2. The role of titin in eccentric muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Walter

    2014-08-15

    Muscle contraction and force regulation in skeletal muscle have been thought to occur exclusively through the relative sliding of and the interaction between the contractile filaments actin and myosin. While this two-filament sarcomere model has worked well in explaining the properties of isometrically and concentrically contracting muscle, it has failed miserably in explaining experimental observations in eccentric contractions. Here, I suggest, and provide evidence, that a third filament, titin, is involved in force regulation of sarcomeres by adjusting its stiffness in an activation-dependent (calcium) and active force-dependent manner. Upon muscle activation, titin binds calcium at specific sites, thereby increasing its stiffness, and cross-bridge attachment to actin is thought to free up binding sites for titin on actin, thereby reducing titin's free-spring length, thus increasing its stiffness and force upon stretch of active muscle. This role of titin as a third force regulating myofilament in sarcomeres, although not fully proven, would account for many of the unexplained properties of eccentric muscle contraction, while simultaneously not affecting the properties predicted by the two-filament cross-bridge model in isometric and concentric muscle function. Here, I identify the problems of the two-filament sarcomere model and demonstrate the advantages of the three-filament model by providing evidence of titin's contribution to active force in eccentric muscle function. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  4. Overview of the Muscle Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Christine A.; Gomez, Christopher G.; Novak, Stefanie M.; Mi-Mi, Lei; Gregorio, Carol C.

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac and skeletal striated muscles are intricately designed machines responsible for muscle contraction. Coordination of the basic contractile unit, the sarcomere, and the complex cytoskeletal networks are critical for contractile activity. The sarcomere is comprised of precisely organized individual filament systems that include thin (actin), thick (myosin), titin, and nebulin. Connecting the sarcomere to other organelles (e.g., mitochondria and nucleus) and serving as the scaffold to maintain cellular integrity are the intermediate filaments. The costamere, on the other hand, tethers the sarcomere to the cell membrane. Unique structures like the intercalated disc in cardiac muscle and the myotendinous junction in skeletal muscle help synchronize and transmit force. Intense investigation has been done on many of the proteins that make up these cytoskeletal assemblies. Yet the details of their function and how they interconnect have just started to be elucidated. A vast number of human myopathies are contributed to mutations in muscle proteins; thus understanding their basic function provides a mechanistic understanding of muscle disorders. In this review, we highlight the components of striated muscle with respect to their interactions, signaling pathways, functions, and connections to disease. PMID:28640448

  5. Actin Turnover-Mediated Gravity Response in Maize Root Apices

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Stefano; Barlow, Peter W; Volkmann, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be linked to gravity sensing in plants but the mechanistic understanding of these processes remains unknown. We have performed detailed pharmacological analyses of the role of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton in gravibending of maize (Zea mays) root apices. Depolymerization of actin filaments with two drugs having different mode of their actions, cytochalasin D and latrunculin B, stimulated root gravibending. By contrast, drug-induced stimulation of actin polymerization and inhibition of actin turnover, using two different agents phalloidin and jasplakinolide, compromised the root gravibending. Importantly, all these actin drugs inhibited root growth to similar extents suggesting that high actin turnover is essential for the gravity-related growth responses rather than for the general growth process. Both latrunculin B and cytochalasin D treatments inhibited root growth but restored gravibending of the decapped root apices, indicating that there is a strong potential for effective actin-mediated gravity sensing outside the cap. This elusive gravity sensing outside the root cap is dependent not only on the high rate of actin turnover but also on weakening of myosin activities, as general inhibition of myosin ATPases induced stimulation of gravibending of the decapped root apices. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the actin turnover-mediated gravity sensing outside the root cap. PMID:19521476

  6. F-Actin Dynamics in Neurospora crassa ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Berepiki, Adokiye; Lichius, Alexander; Shoji, Jun-Ya; Tilsner, Jens; Read, Nick D.

    2010-01-01

    This study demonstrates the utility of Lifeact for the investigation of actin dynamics in Neurospora crassa and also represents the first report of simultaneous live-cell imaging of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in filamentous fungi. Lifeact is a 17-amino-acid peptide derived from the nonessential Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-binding protein Abp140p. Fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (TagRFP), Lifeact allowed live-cell imaging of actin patches, cables, and rings in N. crassa without interfering with cellular functions. Actin cables and patches localized to sites of active growth during the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in germ tubes and conidial anastomosis tubes (CATs). Recurrent phases of formation and retrograde movement of complex arrays of actin cables were observed at growing tips of germ tubes and CATs. Two populations of actin patches exhibiting slow and fast movement were distinguished, and rapid (1.2 μm/s) saltatory transport of patches along cables was observed. Actin cables accumulated and subsequently condensed into actin rings associated with septum formation. F-actin organization was markedly different in the tip regions of mature hyphae and in germ tubes. Only mature hyphae displayed a subapical collar of actin patches and a concentration of F-actin within the core of the Spitzenkörper. Coexpression of Lifeact-TagRFP and β-tubulin–GFP revealed distinct but interrelated localization patterns of F-actin and microtubules during the initiation and maintenance of tip growth. PMID:20139238

  7. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  8. Nuclear positioning by actin cables and perinuclear actin: Special and general?

    PubMed

    Huelsmann, Sven; Brown, Nicholas H

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear positioning is an important process during development and homeostasis. Depending on the affected tissue, mislocalized nuclei can alter cellular processes such as polarization, differentiation, or migration and lead ultimately to diseases. Many cells actively control the position of their nucleus using their cytoskeleton and motor proteins. We have recently shown that during Drosophila oogenesis, nurse cells employ cytoplasmic actin cables in association with perinuclear actin to position their nucleus. Here, we briefly summarize our work and discuss why nuclear positioning in nurse cells is specialized but the molecular mechanisms are likely to be more generally used.

  9. Adhesive F-actin Waves: A Novel Integrin-Mediated Adhesion Complex Coupled to Ventral Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Case, Lindsay B.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    At the leading lamellipodium of migrating cells, protrusion of an Arp2/3-nucleated actin network is coupled to formation of integrin-based adhesions, suggesting that Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and integrin-dependent adhesion may be mechanistically linked. Arp2/3 also mediates actin polymerization in structures distinct from the lamellipodium, in “ventral F-actin waves” that propagate as spots and wavefronts along the ventral plasma membrane. Here we show that integrins engage the extracellular matrix downstream of ventral F-actin waves in several mammalian cell lines as well as in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These “adhesive F-actin waves” require a cycle of integrin engagement and disengagement to the extracellular matrix for their formation and propagation, and exhibit morphometry and a hierarchical assembly and disassembly mechanism distinct from other integrin-containing structures. After Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization, zyxin and VASP are co-recruited to adhesive F-actin waves, followed by paxillin and vinculin, and finally talin and integrin. Adhesive F-actin waves thus represent a previously uncharacterized integrin-based adhesion complex associated with Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization. PMID:22069459

  10. Impact of weightlessness on muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Slentz, M.

    1995-01-01

    The most studied skeletal muscles which depend on gravity, "antigravity" muscles, are located in the posterior portion of the legs. Antigravity muscles are characterized generally by a different fiber type composition than those which are considered nonpostural. The gravity-dependent function of the antigravity muscles makes them particularly sensitive to weightlessness (unweighting) resulting in a substantial loss of muscle protein, with a relatively greater loss of myofibrillar (structural) proteins. Accordingly alpha-actin mRNA decreases in muscle of rats exposed to microgravity. In the legs, the soleus seems particularly responsive to the lack of weight-bearing associated with space flight. The loss of muscle protein leads to a decreased cross-sectional area of muscle fibers, particularly of the slow-twitch, oxidative (SO) ones compared to fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) or oxidative-glycolytic (FOG) fibers. In some muscles, a shift in fiber composition from SO to FOG has been reported in the adaptation to spaceflight. Changes in muscle composition with spaceflight have been associated with decreased maximal isometric tension (Po) and increased maximal shortening velocity. In terms of fuel metabolism, results varied depending on the pathway considered. Glucose uptake, in the presence of insulin, and activities of glycolytic enzymes are increased by space flight. In contrast, oxidation of fatty acids may be diminished. Oxidation of pyruvate, activity of the citric acid cycle, and ketone metabolism in muscle seem to be unaffected by microgravity.

  11. Mechanical output of myosin II motors is regulated by myosin filament size and actin network mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Samantha; Alberts, Jonathan; Gardel, Margaret; Munro, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    The interactions of bipolar myosin II filaments with actin arrays are a predominate means of generating forces in numerous physiological processes including muscle contraction and cell migration. However, how the spatiotemporal regulation of these forces depends on motor mechanochemistry, bipolar filament size, and local actin mechanics is unknown. Here, we simulate myosin II motors with an agent-based model in which the motors have been benchmarked against experimental measurements. Force generation occurs in two distinct regimes characterized either by stable tension maintenance or by stochastic buildup and release; transitions between these regimes occur by changes to duty ratio and myosin filament size. The time required for building force to stall scales inversely with the stiffness of a network and the actin gliding speed of a motor. Finally, myosin motors are predicted to contract a network toward stiffer regions, which is consistent with experimental observations. Our representation of myosin motors can be used to understand how their mechanical and biochemical properties influence their observed behavior in a variety of in vitro and in vivo contexts.

  12. Bacterial subversion of host actin dynamics at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Carabeo, Rey

    2011-10-01

    Invasion of non-phagocytic cells by a number of bacterial pathogens involves the subversion of the actin cytoskeletal remodelling machinery to produce actin-rich cell surface projections designed to engulf the bacteria. The signalling that occurs to induce these actin-rich structures has considerable overlap among a diverse group of bacteria. The molecular organization within these structures act in concert to internalize the invading pathogen. This dynamic process could be subdivided into three acts - actin recruitment, engulfment, and finally, actin disassembly/internalization. This review will present the current state of knowledge of the molecular processes involved in each stage of bacterial invasion, and provide a perspective that highlights the temporal and spatial control of actin remodelling that occurs during bacterial invasion. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Liquid behavior of cross-linked actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Kimberly L; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Witten, Thomas A; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan; Gardel, Margaret L

    2017-02-28

    The actin cytoskeleton is a critical regulator of cytoplasmic architecture and mechanics, essential in a myriad of physiological processes. Here we demonstrate a liquid phase of actin filaments in the presence of the physiological cross-linker, filamin. Filamin condenses short actin filaments into spindle-shaped droplets, or tactoids, with shape dynamics consistent with a continuum model of anisotropic liquids. We find that cross-linker density controls the droplet shape and deformation timescales, consistent with a variable interfacial tension and viscosity. Near the liquid-solid transition, cross-linked actin bundles show behaviors reminiscent of fluid threads, including capillary instabilities and contraction. These data reveal a liquid droplet phase of actin, demixed from the surrounding solution and dominated by interfacial tension. These results suggest a mechanism to control organization, morphology, and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton.

  14. Cations Modulate Actin Bundle Mechanics, Assembly Dynamics, and Structure.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Nicholas; Zheng, Tianyu; Rivera-Jacquez, Hector J; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Hyun, Jaekyung; Balaeff, Alexander; Huo, Qun; Kang, Hyeran

    2018-04-12

    Actin bundles are key factors in the mechanical support and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. High concentrations of multivalent counterions promote bundle formation through electrostatic attraction between actin filaments that are negatively charged polyelectrolytes. In this study, we evaluate how physiologically relevant divalent cations affect the mechanical, dynamic, and structural properties of actin bundles. Using a combination of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering, we demonstrate that divalent cations modulate bundle stiffness, length distribution, and lateral growth. Molecular dynamics simulations of an all-atom model of the actin bundle reveal specific actin residues coordinate cation-binding sites that promote the bundle formation. Our work suggests that specific cation interactions may play a fundamental role in the assembly, structure, and mechanical properties of actin bundles.

  15. Spatial control of actin polymerization during neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Orion D.; Servant, Guy; Welch, Matthew D.; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Sedat, John W.; Bourne, Henry R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils respond to chemotactic stimuli by increasing the nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments, but the location and regulation of these processes are not well understood. Here, using a permeabilized-cell assay, we show that chemotactic stimuli cause neutrophils to organize many discrete sites of actin polymerization, the distribution of which is biased by external chemotactic gradients. Furthermore, the Arp2/3 complex, which can nucleate actin polymerization, dynamically redistributes to the region of living neutrophils that receives maximal chemotactic stimulation, and the least-extractable pool of the Arp2/3 complex co-localizes with sites of actin polymerization. Our observations indicate that chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils may establish discrete foci of actin polymerization that are similar to those generated at the posterior surface of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We propose that asymmetrical establishment and/or maintenance of sites of actin polymerization produces directional migration of neutrophils in response to chemotactic gradients. PMID:10559877

  16. Spatial control of actin polymerization during neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Weiner, O D; Servant, G; Welch, M D; Mitchison, T J; Sedat, J W; Bourne, H R

    1999-06-01

    Neutrophils respond to chemotactic stimuli by increasing the nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments, but the location and regulation of these processes are not well understood. Here, using a permeabilized-cell assay, we show that chemotactic stimuli cause neutrophils to organize many discrete sites of actin polymerization, the distribution of which is biased by external chemotactic gradients. Furthermore, the Arp2/3 complex, which can nucleate actin polymerization, dynamically redistributes to the region of living neutrophils that receives maximal chemotactic stimulation, and the least-extractable pool of the Arp2/3 complex co-localizes with sites of actin polymerization. Our observations indicate that chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils may establish discrete foci of actin polymerization that are similar to those generated at the posterior surface of the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We propose that asymmetrical establishment and/or maintenance of sites of actin polymerization produces directional migration of neutrophils in response to chemotactic gradients.

  17. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  18. Measurement and Analysis of in vitro Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Doolittle, Lynda K.; Rosen, Michael K.; Padrick, Shae B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The polymerization of actin underlies force generation in numerous cellular processes. While actin polymerization can occur spontaneously, cells maintain control over this important process by preventing actin filament nucleation and then allowing stimulated polymerization and elongation by several regulated factors. Actin polymerization, regulated nucleation and controlled elongation activities can be reconstituted in vitro, and used to probe the signaling cascades cells use to control when and where actin polymerization occurs. Introducing a pyrene fluorophore allows detection of filament formation by an increase in pyrene fluorescence. This method has been used for many years and continues to be broadly used, owing to its simplicity and flexibility. Here we describe how to perform and analyze these in vitro actin polymerization assays, with an emphasis on extracting useful descriptive parameters from kinetic data. PMID:23868594

  19. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle atrophy may include: Burns Long-term corticosteroid therapy Malnutrition Muscular dystrophy and other diseases of the muscle Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Home Care An exercise program ...

  20. Actin filaments in the acrosomal reaction of Limulus sperm. Motion generated by alterations in the packing of the filaments.

    PubMed

    Tilney, L G

    1975-02-01

    When Limulus sperm are induced to undergo the acrosomal reaction, a process, 50 mum in length, is generated in a few seconds. This process rotates as it elongates; thus the acrosomal process literally screws through the jelly of the egg. Within the process is a bundle of filaments which before induction are coiled up inside the sperm. The filament bundle exists in three stable states in the sperm. One of the states can be isolated in pure form. It is composed of only three proteins whose molecular weights (mol wt) are 43,000, 55,000, and 95,000. The 43,000 mol wt protein is actin, based on its molecular weight, net charge, morphology, G-F transformation, and heavy meromyosin (HMM) binding. The 55,000 mol wt protein is in equimolar ratio to actin and is not tubulin, binds tenaciously to actin, and inhibits HMM binding. Evidence is presented that both the 55,000 mol wt protein and the 95,000 mol wt protein (possibly alpha-actinin) are also present in Limulus muscle. Presumably these proteins function in the sperm in holding the actin filaments together. Before the acrosomal reaction, the actin filaments are twisted over one another in a supercoil; when the reaction is completed, the filaments lie parallel to each other and form an actin paracrystal. This change in their packing appears to give rise to the motion of the acrosomal process and is under the control of the 55,000 mol wt protein and the 95,000 mol wt protein.

  1. Phase retrieval in digital speckle pattern interferometry by use of a smoothed space-frequency distribution.

    PubMed

    Federico, Alejandro; Kaufmann, Guillermo H

    2003-12-10

    We evaluate the use of a smoothed space-frequency distribution (SSFD) to retrieve optical phase maps in digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI). The performance of this method is tested by use of computer-simulated DSPI fringes. Phase gradients are found along a pixel path from a single DSPI image, and the phase map is finally determined by integration. This technique does not need the application of a phase unwrapping algorithm or the introduction of carrier fringes in the interferometer. It is shown that a Wigner-Ville distribution with a smoothing Gaussian kernel gives more-accurate results than methods based on the continuous wavelet transform. We also discuss the influence of filtering on smoothing of the DSPI fringes and some additional limitations that emerge when this technique is applied. The performance of the SSFD method for processing experimental data is then illustrated.

  2. Gravitational lensing by a smoothly variable three-dimensional mass distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Man Hoi; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1990-01-01

    A smooth three-dimensional mass distribution is approximated by a model with multiple thin screens, with surface mass density varying smoothly on each screen. It is found that 16 screens are sufficient for a good approximation of the three-dimensional distribution of matter. It is also found that in this multiscreen model the distribution of amplifications of single images is dominated by the convergence due to matter within the beam. The shear caused by matter outside the beam has no significant effect. This finding considerably simplifies the modeling of lensing by a smooth three-dimensional mass distribution by effectively reducing the problem to one dimension, as it is sufficient to know the mass distribution along a straight light ray.

  3. Actin filaments-A target for redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Carlos; Terman, Jonathan R; González-Billault, Christian; Ahmed, Giasuddin

    2016-10-01

    Actin and its ability to polymerize into dynamic filaments is critical for the form and function of cells throughout the body. While multiple proteins have been characterized as affecting actin dynamics through noncovalent means, actin and its protein regulators are also susceptible to covalent modifications of their amino acid residues. In this regard, oxidation-reduction (Redox) intermediates have emerged as key modulators of the actin cytoskeleton with multiple different effects on cellular form and function. Here, we review work implicating Redox intermediates in post-translationally altering actin and discuss what is known regarding how these alterations affect the properties of actin. We also focus on two of the best characterized enzymatic sources of these Redox intermediates-the NADPH oxidase NOX and the flavoprotein monooxygenase MICAL-and detail how they have both been identified as altering actin, but share little similarity and employ different means to regulate actin dynamics. Finally, we discuss the role of these enzymes and redox signaling in regulating the actin cytoskeleton in vivo and highlight their importance for neuronal form and function in health and disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Surfing pathogens and the lessons learned for actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Frischknecht, F; Way, M

    2001-01-01

    A number of unrelated bacterial species as well as vaccinia virus (ab)use the process of actin polymerization to facilitate and enhance their infection cycle. Studies into the mechanism by which these pathogens hijack and control the actin cytoskeleton have provided many interesting insights into the regulation of actin polymerization in migrating cells. This review focuses on what we have learnt from the actin-based motilities of Listeria, Shigella and vaccinia and discusses what we would still like to learn from our nasty friends, including enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Rickettsia

  5. Filamentous actin organization in the unfertilized sea urchin egg cortex.

    PubMed

    Henson, J H; Begg, D A

    1988-06-01

    We have investigated the organization of filamentous actin in the cortex of unfertilized eggs of the sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus variegatus. Rhodamine phalloidin and anti-actin immunofluorescent staining of isolated cortices reveal a punctate pattern of fluorescent sources. Comparison of this pattern with SEM images of microvillar morphology and distribution indicates that filamentous actin in the cortex is predominantly localized in the microvilli. Thin-section TEM and quick-freeze deep-etch ultrastructure of isolated cortices demonstrates that this microvillar-associated actin is in a novel organizational state composed of very short filaments arranged in a tight network and that these filament networks form mounds that extend beyond the plane of the plasma membrane. Actin filaments within the networks do not exhibit free ends and make end-on attachments with the membrane only within the region of the evaginating microvilli. Myosin S-1 dissociable crosslinks, 2-3 nm in diameter, are observed between network filaments and between network filaments and the membrane. A second population of long, individual actin filaments is observed in close lateral association with the plasma membrane and frequently complexes with the microvillar actin networks. The filamentous actin of the unfertilized egg cortex may participate in establishing the mechanical properties of the egg surface and may function in nucleating the assembly of cortical actin following fertilization.

  6. Traveling waves in actin dynamics and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Jun; Mogilner, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Much of current understanding of cell motility arose from studying steady treadmilling of actin arrays. Recently, there have been a growing number of observations of a more complex, non-steady, actin behavior, including self-organized waves. It is becoming clear that these waves result from activation and inhibition feedbacks in actin dynamics acting on different scales, but the exact molecular nature of these feedbacks and respective roles of biomechanics and biochemistry are still unclear. Here, we review recent advances achieved in experimental and theoretical studies of actin waves and discuss mechanisms and physiological significance of wavy protrusions. PMID:22985541

  7. Myosin Vs organize actin cables in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lo Presti, Libera; Chang, Fred; Martin, Sophie G.

    2012-01-01

    Myosin V motors are believed to contribute to cell polarization by carrying cargoes along actin tracks. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Myosin Vs transport secretory vesicles along actin cables, which are dynamic actin bundles assembled by the formin For3 at cell poles. How these flexible structures are able to extend longitudinally in the cell through the dense cytoplasm is unknown. Here we show that in myosin V (myo52 myo51) null cells, actin cables are curled, bundled, and fail to extend into the cell interior. They also exhibit reduced retrograde flow, suggesting that formin-mediated actin assembly is impaired. Myo52 may contribute to actin cable organization by delivering actin regulators to cell poles, as myoV∆ defects are partially suppressed by diverting cargoes toward cell tips onto microtubules with a kinesin 7–Myo52 tail chimera. In addition, Myo52 motor activity may pull on cables to provide the tension necessary for their extension and efficient assembly, as artificially tethering actin cables to the nuclear envelope via a Myo52 motor domain restores actin cable extension and retrograde flow in myoV mutants. Together these in vivo data reveal elements of a self-organizing system in which the motors shape their own tracks by transporting cargoes and exerting physical pulling forces. PMID:23051734

  8. Myosin Vs organize actin cables in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Libera; Chang, Fred; Martin, Sophie G

    2012-12-01

    Myosin V motors are believed to contribute to cell polarization by carrying cargoes along actin tracks. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Myosin Vs transport secretory vesicles along actin cables, which are dynamic actin bundles assembled by the formin For3 at cell poles. How these flexible structures are able to extend longitudinally in the cell through the dense cytoplasm is unknown. Here we show that in myosin V (myo52 myo51) null cells, actin cables are curled, bundled, and fail to extend into the cell interior. They also exhibit reduced retrograde flow, suggesting that formin-mediated actin assembly is impaired. Myo52 may contribute to actin cable organization by delivering actin regulators to cell poles, as myoV defects are partially suppressed by diverting cargoes toward cell tips onto microtubules with a kinesin 7-Myo52 tail chimera. In addition, Myo52 motor activity may pull on cables to provide the tension necessary for their extension and efficient assembly, as artificially tethering actin cables to the nuclear envelope via a Myo52 motor domain restores actin cable extension and retrograde flow in myoV mutants. Together these in vivo data reveal elements of a self-organizing system in which the motors shape their own tracks by transporting cargoes and exerting physical pulling forces.

  9. Electrostatics Control Actin Filament Nucleation and Elongation Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Crevenna, Alvaro H.; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L.; Lamb, Don C.; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment. PMID:23486468

  10. Actin filaments – a target for redox regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carlos; Terman, Jonathan R.; González-Billault, Christian; Ahmed, Giasuddin

    2016-01-01

    Actin and its ability to polymerize into dynamic filaments is critical for the form and function of cells throughout the body. While multiple proteins have been characterized as affecting actin dynamics through non-covalent means, actin and its protein regulators are also susceptible to covalent modifications of their amino acid residues. In this regard, oxidation-reduction (Redox) intermediates have emerged as key modulators of the actin cytoskeleton with multiple different effects on cellular form and function. Here, we review work implicating Redox intermediates in post-translationally altering actin and discuss what is known regarding how these alterations affect the properties of actin. We also focus on two of the best characterized enzymatic sources of these Redox intermediates – the NADPH oxidase NOX and the flavoprotein monooxygenase MICAL – and detail how they have both been identified as altering actin, but share little similarity and employ different means to regulate actin dynamics. Finally, we discuss the role of these enzymes and redox signaling in regulating the actin cytoskeleton in vivo and highlight their importance for neuronal form and function in health and disease. PMID:27309342

  11. Characterization of actin filament severing by actophorin from Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Actophorin is an abundant 15-kD actinbinding protein from Acanthamoeba that is thought to form a nonpolymerizable complex with actin monomers and also to reduce the viscosity of polymerized actin by severing filaments (Cooper et al., 1986. J. Biol. Chem. 261:477-485). Homologous proteins have been identified in sea urchin, chicken, and mammalian tissues. Chemical crosslinking produces a 1:1 covalent complex of actin and actophorin. Actophorin and profilin compete for crosslinking to actin monomers. The influence of actophorin on the steady-state actin polymer concentration gave a Kd of 0.2 microM for the complex of actophorin with actin monomers. Several new lines of evidence, including assays for actin filament ends by elongation rate and depolymerization rate, show that actophorin severs actin filaments both at steady state and during spontaneous polymerization. This is confirmed by direct observation in the light microscope and by showing that the effects of actophorin on the low shear viscosity of polymerized actin cannot be explained by monomer sequestration. The severing activity of actophorin is strongly inhibited by stoichiometric concentrations of phalloidin or millimolar concentrations of inorganic phosphate. PMID:1757465

  12. Altered Actin Centripetal Retrograde Flow in Physically Restricted Immunological Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-han; Wu, Hung-Jen; Kaizuka, Yoshihisa; Vale, Ronald D.; Groves, Jay T.

    2010-01-01

    Antigen recognition by T cells involves large scale spatial reorganization of numerous receptor, adhesion, and costimulatory proteins within the T cell-antigen presenting cell (APC) junction. The resulting patterns can be distinctive, and are collectively known as the immunological synapse. Dynamical assembly of cytoskeletal network is believed to play an important role in driving these assembly processes. In one experimental strategy, the APC is replaced with a synthetic supported membrane. An advantage of this configuration is that solid structures patterned onto the underlying substrate can guide immunological synapse assembly into altered patterns. Here, we use mobile anti-CD3ε on the spatial-partitioned supported bilayer to ligate and trigger T cell receptor (TCR) in live Jurkat T cells. Simultaneous tracking of both TCR clusters and GFP-actin speckles reveals their dynamic association and individual flow patterns. Actin retrograde flow directs the inward transport of TCR clusters. Flow-based particle tracking algorithms allow us to investigate the velocity distribution of actin flow field across the whole synapse, and centripetal velocity of actin flow decreases as it moves toward the center of synapse. Localized actin flow analysis reveals that, while there is no influence on actin motion from substrate patterns directly, velocity differences of actin are observed over physically trapped TCR clusters. Actin flow regains its velocity immediately after passing through confined TCR clusters. These observations are consistent with a dynamic and dissipative coupling between TCR clusters and viscoelastic actin network. PMID:20686692

  13. A structural study of F-actin - filamin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens-Braunstein, Ashley; Nguyen, Lam; Hirst, Linda

    2010-03-01

    The cell's ability to move and contract is attributed to the semi-flexible filamentous protein, F -actin, one of the three filaments in the cytoskeleton. Actin bundling can be formed by a cross-linking actin binding protein (ABP) filamin. By examining filamin's cross-linking abilities at different concentrations and molar ratios, we can study the flexibility, structure and multiple network formations created when cross-linking F-actin with this protein. We have studied the phase diagram of this protein system using fluorescence microscopy, analyzing the network structures observed in the context of a coarse grained molecular dynamics simulation carried out by our group.

  14. Correlative nanoscale imaging of actin filaments and their complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shivani; Zhu, Huanqi; Grintsevich, Elena E.; Reisler, Emil; Gimzewski, James K.

    2013-06-01

    Actin remodeling is an area of interest in biology in which correlative microscopy can bring a new way to analyze protein complexes at the nanoscale. Advances in EM, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and single molecule techniques have provided a wealth of information about the modulation of the F-actin structure and its regulation by actin binding proteins (ABPs). Yet, there are technological limitations of these approaches to achieving quantitative molecular level information on the structural and biophysical changes resulting from ABPs interaction with F-actin. Fundamental questions about the actin structure and dynamics and how these determine the function of ABPs remain unanswered. Specifically, how local and long-range structural and conformational changes result in ABPs induced remodeling of F-actin needs to be addressed at the single filament level. Advanced, sensitive and accurate experimental tools for detailed understanding of ABP-actin interactions are much needed. This article discusses the current understanding of nanoscale structural and mechanical modulation of F-actin by ABPs at the single filament level using several correlative microscopic techniques, focusing mainly on results obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis of ABP-actin complexes.

  15. A Robust Actin Filaments Image Analysis Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Benadiba, Carine; Goossens, Katty; Kasas, Sandor; Dietler, Giovanni; Willaert, Ronnie; Sahli, Hichem

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamical protein network that plays a central role in numerous cellular physiological processes, and is traditionally divided into three components according to its chemical composition, i.e. actin, tubulin and intermediate filament cytoskeletons. Understanding the cytoskeleton dynamics is of prime importance to unveil mechanisms involved in cell adaptation to any stress type. Fluorescence imaging of cytoskeleton structures allows analyzing the impact of mechanical stimulation in the cytoskeleton, but it also imposes additional challenges in the image processing stage, such as the presence of imaging-related artifacts and heavy blurring introduced by (high-throughput) automated scans. However, although there exists a considerable number of image-based analytical tools to address the image processing and analysis, most of them are unfit to cope with the aforementioned challenges. Filamentous structures in images can be considered as a piecewise composition of quasi-straight segments (at least in some finer or coarser scale). Based on this observation, we propose a three-steps actin filaments extraction methodology: (i) first the input image is decomposed into a ‘cartoon’ part corresponding to the filament structures in the image, and a noise/texture part, (ii) on the ‘cartoon’ image, we apply a multi-scale line detector coupled with a (iii) quasi-straight filaments merging algorithm for fiber extraction. The proposed robust actin filaments image analysis framework allows extracting individual filaments in the presence of noise, artifacts and heavy blurring. Moreover, it provides numerous parameters such as filaments orientation, position and length, useful for further analysis. Cell image decomposition is relatively under-exploited in biological images processing, and our study shows the benefits it provides when addressing such tasks. Experimental validation was conducted using publicly available datasets, and in osteoblasts

  16. Cauchy problem with general discontinuous initial data along a smooth curve for 2-d Euler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuxing; Li, Dening

    2014-09-01

    We study the Cauchy problems for the isentropic 2-d Euler system with discontinuous initial data along a smooth curve. All three singularities are present in the solution: shock wave, rarefaction wave and contact discontinuity. We show that the usual restrictive high order compatibility conditions for the initial data are automatically satisfied. The local existence of piecewise smooth solution containing all three waves is established.

  17. Two-dimensional potential flow past a smooth wall with partly constant curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppenfels, Werner Von

    1941-01-01

    The speed of a two-dimensional flow potential flow past a smooth wall, which evinces a finite curvature jump at a certain point and approximates to two arcs in the surrounding area, has a vertical tangent of inflection in the critical point as a function of the arc length of the boundary curve. This report looks at a general theorem of the local character of the conformal function at the critical point as well as the case of the finite curvature jump.

  18. Topological analysis of the motion of an ellipsoid on a smooth plane

    SciTech Connect

    Ivochkin, M Yu

    2008-06-30

    The problem of the motion of a dynamically and geometrically symmetric heavy ellipsoid on a smooth horizontal plane is investigated. The problem is integrable and can be considered a generalization of the problem of motion of a heavy rigid body with fixed point in the Lagrangian case. The Smale bifurcation diagrams are constructed. Surgeries of tori are investigated using methods developed by Fomenko and his students. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  19. Twitchin can regulate the ATPase cycle of actomyosin in a phosphorylation-dependent manner in skinned mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Avrova, Stanislava V; Rysev, Nikita A; Matusovsky, Oleg S; Shelud'ko, Nikolay S; Borovikov, Yurii S

    2012-05-01

    The effect of twitchin, a thick filament protein of molluscan muscles, on the actin-myosin interaction at several mimicked sequential steps of the ATPase cycle was investigated using the polarized fluorescence of 1.5-IAEDANS bound to myosin heads, FITC-phalloidin attached to actin and acrylodan bound to twitchin in the glycerol-skinned skeletal muscle fibres of mammalian. The phosphorylation-dependent multi-step changes in mobility and spatial arrangement of myosin SH1 helix, actin subunit and twitchin during the ATPase cycle have been revealed. It was shown that nonphosphorylated twitchin inhibited the movements of SH1 helix of the myosin heads and actin subunits and decreased the affinity of myosin to actin by freezing the position and mobility of twitchin in the muscle fibres. The phosphorylation of twitchin reverses this effect by changing the spatial arrangement and mobility of the actin-binding portions of twitchin. In this case, enhanced movements of SH1 helix of the myosin heads and actin subunits are observed. The data imply a novel property of twitchin incorporated into organized contractile system: its ability to regulate the ATPase cycle in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion by changing the affinity and spatial arrangement of the actin-binding portions of twitchin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recruitment of β-Catenin to N-Cadherin Is Necessary for Smooth Muscle Contraction*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ruping; Cleary, Rachel A.; Gannon, Olivia J.; Tang, Dale D.

    2015-01-01

    β-Catenin is a key component that connects transmembrane cadherin with the actin cytoskeleton at the cell-cell interface. However, the role of the β-catenin/cadherin interaction in smooth muscle has not been well characterized. Here stimulation with acetylcholine promoted the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Knockdown of β-catenin by lentivirus-mediated shRNA attenuated smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, myosin light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 and actin polymerization in response to contractile activation were not reduced by β-catenin knockdown. In addition, the expression of the β-catenin armadillo domain disrupted the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin. Force development, but not myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin polymerization, was reduced by the expression of the β-catenin armadillo domain. Furthermore, actin polymerization and microtubules have been implicated in intracellular trafficking. In this study, the treatment with the inhibitor latrunculin A diminished the interaction of β-catenin with N-cadherin in smooth muscle. In contrast, the exposure of smooth muscle to the microtubule depolymerizer nocodazole did not affect the protein-protein interaction. Together, these findings suggest that smooth muscle contraction is mediated by the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin, which may facilitate intercellular mechanotransduction. The association of β-catenin with N-cadherin is regulated by actin polymerization during contractile activation. PMID:25713069

  1. Tissue-specific mechanical and geometrical control of cell viability and actin cytoskeleton alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Zheng, Wenfu; Xie, Yunyan; Gong, Peiyuan; Zhao, Fang; Yuan, Bo; Ma, Wanshun; Cui, Yan; Liu, Wenwen; Sun, Yi; Piel, Matthieu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-08-01

    Different tissues have specific mechanical properties and cells of different geometries, such as elongated muscle cells and polygonal endothelial cells, which are precisely regulated during embryo development. However, the mechanisms that underlie these processes are not clear. Here, we built an in vitro model to mimic the cellular microenvironment of muscle by combining both mechanical stretch and geometrical control. We found that mechanical stretch was a key factor that determined the optimal geometry of myoblast C2C12 cells under stretch, whereas vascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts had no such dependency. We presented the first experimental evidence that can explain why myoblasts are destined to take the elongated geometry so as to survive and maintain parallel actin filaments along the stretching direction. The study is not only meaningful for the research on myogenesis but also has potential application in regenerative medicine.

  2. The Regulation of Catch in Molluscan Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Twarog, Betty M.

    1967-01-01

    Molluscan catch muscles are smooth muscles. As with mammalian smooth muscles, there is no transverse ordering of filaments or dense bodies. In contrast to mammalian smooth muscles, two size ranges of filaments are present. The thick filaments are long as well as large in diameter and contain paramyosin. The thin filaments contain actin and appear to run into and join the dense bodies. Vesicles are present which may be part of a sarcoplasmic reticulum. Neural activation of contraction in Mytilus muscle is similar to that observed in mammalian smooth muscles, and in some respects to frog striated muscle. The relaxing nerves, which reduce catch, are unique to catch muscles. 5-Hydroxytryptamine, which appears to mediate relaxation, specifically blocks catch tension but increases the ability of the muscle to fire spikes. It is speculated that Mytilus muscle actomyosin is activated by a Ca++-releasing mechanism, and that 5-hydroxytryptamine may reduce catch and increase excitability by influencing the rate of removal of intracellular free Ca++. PMID:6050594

  3. The cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana influences actin network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tolmie, Frances; Poulet, Axel; McKenna, Joseph; Sassmann, Stefan; Graumann, Katja; Deeks, Michael; Runions, John

    2017-07-20

    In plant cells, molecular connections link the cell wall-plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton to form a continuum. It is hypothesized that the cell wall provides stable anchor points around which the actin cytoskeleton remodels. Here we use live cell imaging of fluorescently labelled marker proteins to quantify the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton and to determine the impact of disrupting connections within the continuum. Labelling of the actin cytoskeleton with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fimbrin actin-binding domain 2 (FABD2) resulted in a network composed of fine filaments and thicker bundles that appeared as a highly dynamic remodelling meshwork. This differed substantially from the GFP-Lifeact-labelled network that appeared much more sparse with thick bundles that underwent 'simple movement', in which the bundles slightly change position, but in such a manner that the structure of the network was not substantially altered during the time of observation. Label-dependent differences in actin network morphology and remodelling necessitated development of two new image analysis techniques. The first of these, 'pairwise image subtraction', was applied to measurement of the more rapidly remodelling actin network labelled with GFP-FABD2, while the second, 'cumulative fluorescence intensity', was used to measure bulk remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton when labelled with GFP-Lifeact. In each case, these analysis techniques show that the actin cytoskeleton has a decreased rate of bulk remodelling when the cell wall-plasma membrane-actin continuum is disrupted either by plasmolysis or with isoxaben, a drug that specifically inhibits cellulose deposition. Changes in the rate of actin remodelling also affect its functionality, as observed by alteration in Golgi body motility. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Mechanics of composite actin networks: in vitro and cellular perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2014-03-01

    Actin filaments and associated actin binding proteins play an essential role in governing the mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells. Even though cells have multiple actin binding proteins (ABPs) that exist simultaneously to maintain the structural and mechanical integrity of the cellular cytoskeleton, how these proteins work together to determine the properties of actin networks is not well understood. The ABP, palladin, is essential for the integrity of cell morphology and movement during development. Palladin coexists with alpha-actinin in stress fibers and focal adhesions and binds to both actin and alpha-actinin. To obtain insight into how mutually interacting actin crosslinking proteins modulate the properties of actin networks, we have characterized the micro-structure and mechanics of actin networks crosslinked with palladin and alpha-actinin. Our studies on composite networks of alpha-actinin/palladin/actin show that palladin and alpha-actinin synergistically determine network viscoelasticity. We have further examined the role of palladin in cellular force generation and mechanosensing. Traction force microscopy revealed that TAFs are sensitive to substrate stiffness as they generate larger forces on substrates of increased stiffness. Contrary to expectations, knocking down palladin increased the forces generated by cells, and also inhibited the ability to sense substrate stiffness for very stiff gels. This was accompanied by significant differences in the actin organization and adhesion dynamics of palladin knock down cells. Perturbation experiments also suggest altered myosin activity in palladin KD cells. Our results suggest that the actin crosslinkers such as palladin and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant behavior as in cancer metastasis.

  5. Actin and Endocytosis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Bruce L.; Eskin, Julian A.; Wendland, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, the process whereby the plasma membrane invaginates to form vesicles, is essential for bringing many substances into the cell and for membrane turnover. The mechanism driving clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) involves > 50 different protein components assembling at a single location on the plasma membrane in a temporally ordered and hierarchal pathway. These proteins perform precisely choreographed steps that promote receptor recognition and clustering, membrane remodeling, and force-generating actin-filament assembly and turnover to drive membrane invagination and vesicle scission. Many critical aspects of the CME mechanism are conserved from yeast to mammals and were first elucidated in yeast, demonstrating that it is a powerful system for studying endocytosis. In this review, we describe our current mechanistic understanding of each step in the process of yeast CME, and the essential roles played by actin polymerization at these sites, while providing a historical perspective of how the landscape has changed since the preceding version of the YeastBook was published 17 years ago (1997). Finally, we discuss the key unresolved issues and where future studies might be headed. PMID:25657349

  6. Regulatory T cells in the actinic cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Gasparoto, Thaís Helena; de Souza Malaspina, Tatiana Salles; Damante, José Humberto; de Mello, Edgard Franco; Ikoma, Maura Rosane Valério; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Costa, Maria Renata Sales Nogueira; Cavassani, Karen Angélica; da Silva, João Santana; Campanelli, Ana Paula

    2014-11-01

    Actinic cheilitis (AC) is an oral potentially malignant lesion which is the counterpart of actinic keratosis of the skin and has potential to develop into squamous cell carcinoma. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a critical role in modulating the antitumor immune responses. The presence of regulatory T cells in potentially malignant lesions has not been described. We chose investigate the involvement of regulatory T cells in potentially malignant lesions. The frequency, phenotype, and activity of CD4+CD25+ T cells isolated from blood and lesion of AC patients were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokines were quantified by ELISA. Data were compared with samples from healthy subjects. The frequency and suppressor activity of circulating CD4+CD25+ T cells was similar in AC patients and control subjects. However, the frequencies of IL-10-positive Tregs were higher in AC patients, and these cells inhibited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and increased interleukin (IL)-10 productions in co-cultures. Furthermore, CD4+CD25+ T cells accumulate in AC lesions. Lesions-derived regulatory T cells suppressed lymphocyte proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, high levels of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and low IFN-γ were detected in the potentially malignant lesions. Therefore, our data show that Tregs accumulate in AC lesions, and these cells could be suppressing immune responses in a potentially malignant microenvironment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Functional correction of dystrophin actin binding domain mutations by genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Kyrychenko, Viktoriia; Kyrychenko, Sergii; Tiburcy, Malte; Shelton, John M.; Long, Chengzu; Schneider, Jay W.; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2017-01-01

    Dystrophin maintains the integrity of striated muscles by linking the actin cytoskeleton with the cell membrane. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in progressive, debilitating muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and a shortened lifespan. Mutations of dystrophin that disrupt the amino-terminal actin-binding domain 1 (ABD-1), encoded by exons 2–8, represent the second-most common cause of DMD. In the present study, we compared three different strategies for CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to correct mutations in the ABD-1 region of the DMD gene by deleting exons 3–9, 6–9, or 7–11 in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and by assessing the function of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. All three exon deletion strategies enabled the expression of truncated dystrophin protein and restoration of cardiomyocyte contractility and calcium transients to varying degrees. We show that deletion of exons 3–9 by genomic editing provides an especially effective means of correcting disease-causing ABD-1 mutations. These findings represent an important step toward eventual correction of common DMD mutations and provide a means of rapidly assessing the expression and function of internally truncated forms of dystrophin-lacking portions of ABD-1. PMID:28931764

  8. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1.

    PubMed

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian; Richter, Erik A; Jensen, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    Rac1 regulates stretch-stimulated (i.e. mechanical stress) glucose transport in muscle. Actin depolymerization decreases stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Rac1 is a required part of the mechanical stress-component of the contraction-stimulus to glucose transport in skeletal muscle. An alternative to the canonical insulin signalling pathway for glucose transport is muscle contraction/exercise. Mechanical stress is an integrated part of the muscle contraction/relaxation cycle, and passive stretch stimulates muscle glucose transport. However, the signalling mechanism regulating stretch-stimulated glucose transport is not well understood. We recently reported that the actin cytoskeleton regulating GTPase, Rac1, was activated in mouse muscle in response to stretching. Rac1 is a regulator of contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose transport, however, its role in stretch-stimulated glucose transport and signalling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. In addition, the role of Rac1 in contraction-stimulated glucose transport during conditions without mechanical load on the muscles was evaluated in loosely hanging muscles and muscles in which cross-bridge formation was blocked by the myosin ATPase inhibitors BTS and Blebbistatin. Knockout as well as pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 reduced stretch-stimulated glucose transport by 30-50% in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle. The actin depolymerizing agent latrunculin B similarly decreased glucose transport in response to stretching by 40-50%. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose transport by 30-40% in tension developing muscle but did not affect contraction-stimulated glucose transport in

  9. Stretch-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle is regulated by Rac1

    PubMed Central

    Sylow, Lykke; Møller, Lisbeth L V; Kleinert, Maximilian; Richter, Erik A; Jensen, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    An alternative to the canonical insulin signalling pathway for glucose transport is muscle contraction/exercise. Mechanical stress is an integrated part of the muscle contraction/relaxation cycle, and passive stretch stimulates muscle glucose transport. However, the signalling mechanism regulating stretch-stimulated glucose transport is not well understood. We recently reported that the actin cytoskeleton regulating GTPase, Rac1, was activated in mouse muscle in response to stretching. Rac1 is a regulator of contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose transport, however, its role in stretch-stimulated glucose transport and signalling is unknown. We therefore investigated whether stretch-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle required Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We used muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice as well as pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton in isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. In addition, the role of Rac1 in contraction-stimulated glucose transport during conditions without mechanical load on the muscles was evaluated in loosely hanging muscles and muscles in which cross-bridge formation was blocked by the myosin ATPase inhibitors BTS and Blebbistatin. Knockout as well as pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 reduced stretch-stimulated glucose transport by 30–50% in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle. The actin depolymerizing agent latrunculin B similarly decreased glucose transport in response to stretching by 40–50%. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose transport by 30–40% in tension developing muscle but did not affect contraction-stimulated glucose transport in muscles in which force development was prevented. Our findings suggest that Rac1 and the actin cytoskeleton regulate stretch-stimulated glucose transport and that Rac1 is a required part of the mechanical stress-component of the contraction-stimulus to glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Key

  10. Cloning and characterization of mouse ACF7, a novel member of the dystonin subfamily of actin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Bernier, G; Mathieu, M; De Repentigny, Y; Vidal, S M; Kothary, R

    1996-11-15

    We have recently cloned the gene responsible for the mouse neurological disorder dystonia musculorum. The predicted product of this gene, dystonin (Dst), is a neural isoform of bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (Bpag1) with an N-terminal actin binding domain. Here we report on the cloning and characterization of mouse ACF7. Sequence analysis revealed extended homology of mACF7 with both the actin binding domain (ABD) and the Bpag1 portions of dystonin. Moreover, mACF7 and Dst display similar isoform diversity and encode similar sized transcripts in the nervous system. Phylogenetic analysis of mACF7 and dystonin ABD sequences suggests a recent evolutionary origin and that these proteins form a separate novel subfamily within the beta-spectrin superfamily of actin binding proteins. Given the implication of several actin binding proteins in genetic disorders, it is important to know the pattern of mACF7 expression. mACF7 transcripts are detected principally in lung, brain, spinal cord, skeletal and cardiac muscle, and skin. Intriguingly, mACF7 expression in lung is strongly induced just before birth and is restricted to type II alveolar cells. To determine whether spontaneous mutants that may be defective in mACF7 exist, we have mapped the mACF7 gene to mouse chromosome 4.

  11. In Vivo Function of the Chaperonin TRiC in α-Actin Folding during Sarcomere Assembly.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joachim; Berger, Silke; Li, Mei; Jacoby, Arie S; Arner, Anders; Bavi, Navid; Stewart, Alastair G; Currie, Peter D

    2018-01-09

    The TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) is a multi-subunit group II chaperonin that assists nascent or misfolded proteins to attain their native conformation in an ATP-dependent manner. Functional studies in yeast have suggested that TRiC is an essential and generalized component of the protein-folding machinery of eukaryotic cells. However, TRiC's involvement in specific cellular processes within multicellular organisms is largely unknown because little validation of TRiC function exists in animals. Our in vivo analysis reveals a surprisingly specific role of TRiC in the biogenesis of skeletal muscle α-actin during sarcomere assembly in myofibers. TRiC acts at the sarcomere's Z-disk, where it is required for efficient assembly of actin thin filaments. Binding of ATP specifically by the TRiC subunit Cct5 is required for efficient actin folding in vivo. Furthermore, mutant α-actin isoforms that result in nemaline myopathy in patients obtain their pathogenic conformation via this function of TRiC. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cofilin promotes stimulus-induced lamellipodium formation by generating an abundant supply of actin monomers

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Tai; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Kurita, Souichi; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2007-01-01

    Cofilin stimulates actin filament disassembly and accelerates actin filament turnover. Cofilin is also involved in stimulus-induced actin filament assembly during lamellipodium formation. However, it is not clear whether this occurs by replenishing the actin monomer pool, through filament disassembly, or by creating free barbed ends, through its severing activity. Using photoactivatable Dronpa-actin, we show that cofilin is involved in producing more than half of all cytoplasmic actin monomers and that the rate of actin monomer incorporation into the tip of the lamellipodium is dependent on the size of this actin monomer pool. Finally, in cofilin-depleted cells, stimulus-induced actin monomer incorporation at the cell periphery is attenuated, but the incorporation of microinjected actin monomers is not. We propose that cofilin contributes to stimulus-induced actin filament assembly and lamellipodium extension by supplying an abundant pool of cytoplasmic actin monomers. PMID:17470633

  13. Actin is an essential component of plant gravitropic signaling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Markus; Hauslage, Jens; Limbach, Christoph

    2003-08-01

    A role of the actin cytoskeleton in the different phases of gravitropism in higher plant organs seems obvious, but experimental evidence is still inconclusive and contradictory. In gravitropically tip-growing rhizoids and protonemata, however, it is well documented that actin is an essential component of the tip-growth machinery and is involved either in the cellular mechanisms that lead to gravity sensing and in the processes of the graviresponses that result in the reorientation of the growth direction. All these processes depend on a complexly organized and highly dynamic organization of actin filaments whose diverse functions are coordinated by numerous associated proteins. Actin filaments and myosins mediate the transport of secretory vehicles to the growing tip and precisely control the delivery of cell wall material. In addition, both cell types use a very efficient actomyosin-based system to control and correct the position of their statoliths and to direct sedimenting statoliths to confined graviperception sites at the plasma membrane. The studies presented in this paper provide evidence for the essential role of actin in plant gravity sensing and the gravitropic responses. A unique actin-organizing center exists in the tip of characean rhizoids and protonemata which is associated with and dynamically regulated by a specific set of actin-dynamizing proteins. It is concluded that this highly dynamic apical actin array is an essential prerequisite for gravity sensing and gravity-oriented tip growth.

  14. Coactosin accelerates cell dynamism by promoting actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xubin; Katahira, Tatsuya; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Sugiyama, Sayaka; Nakamura, Harukazu

    2013-07-01

    During development, cells dynamically move or extend their processes, which are achieved by actin dynamics. In the present study, we paid attention to Coactosin, an actin binding protein, and studied its role in actin dynamics. Coactosin was associated with actin and Capping protein in neural crest cells and N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. Accumulation of Coactosin to cellular processes and its association with actin filaments prompted us to reveal the effect of Coactosin on cell migration. Coactosin overexpression induced cellular processes in cultured neural crest cells. In contrast, knock-down of Coactosin resulted in disruption of actin polymerization and of neural crest cell migration. Importantly, Coactosin was recruited to lamellipodia and filopodia in response to Rac signaling, and mutated Coactosin that cannot bind to F-actin did not react to Rac signaling, nor support neural crest cell migration. It was also shown that deprivation of Rac signaling from neural crest cells by dominant negative Rac1 (DN-Rac1) interfered with neural crest cell migration, and that co-transfection of DN-Rac1 and Coactosin restored neural crest cell migration. From these results we have concluded that Coactosin functions downstream of Rac signaling and that it is involved in neurite extension and neural crest cell migration by actively participating in actin polymerization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lateral Membrane Diffusion Modulated by a Minimal Actin Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Fabian; Vogel, Sven K.; Schwille, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion of lipids and proteins within the cell membrane is essential for numerous membrane-dependent processes including signaling and molecular interactions. It is assumed that the membrane-associated cytoskeleton modulates lateral diffusion. Here, we use a minimal actin cortex to directly study proposed effects of an actin meshwork on the diffusion in a well-defined system. The lateral diffusion of a lipid and a protein probe at varying densities of membrane-bound actin was characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A clear correlation of actin density and reduction in mobility was observed for both the lipid and the protein probe. At high actin densities, the effect on the protein probe was ∼3.5-fold stronger compared to the lipid. Moreover, addition of myosin filaments, which contract the actin mesh, allowed switching between fast and slow diffusion in the minimal system. Spot variation FCS was in accordance with a model of fast microscopic diffusion and slower macroscopic diffusion. Complementing Monte Carlo simulations support the analysis of the experimental FCS data. Our results suggest a stronger interaction of the actin mesh with the larger protein probe compared to the lipid. This might point toward a mechanism where cortical actin controls membrane diffusion in a strong size-dependent manner. PMID:23561523

  16. The evolution of compositionally and functionally distinct actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Peter W; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Whitaker, Shane; Popp, David; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    The actin filament is astonishingly well conserved across a diverse set of eukaryotic species. It has essentially remained unchanged in the billion years that separate yeast, Arabidopsis and man. In contrast, bacterial actin-like proteins have diverged to the extreme, and many of them are not readily identified from sequence-based homology searches. Here, we present phylogenetic analyses that point to an evolutionary drive to diversify actin filament composition across kingdoms. Bacteria use a one-filament-one-function system to create distinct filament systems within a single cell. In contrast, eukaryotic actin is a universal force provider in a wide range of processes. In plants, there has been an expansion of the number of closely related actin genes, whereas in fungi and metazoa diversification in tropomyosins has increased the compositional variety in actin filament systems. Both mechanisms dictate the subset of actin-binding proteins that interact with each filament type, leading to specialization in function. In this Hypothesis, we thus propose that different mechanisms were selected in bacteria, plants and metazoa, which achieved actin filament compositional variation leading to the expansion of their functional diversity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Filament assembly by Spire: key residues and concerted actin binding.

    PubMed

    Rasson, Amy S; Bois, Justin S; Pham, Duy Stephen L; Yoo, Haneul; Quinlan, Margot E

    2015-02-27

    The most recently identified class of actin nucleators, WASp homology domain 2 (WH2) nucleators, use tandem repeats of monomeric actin-binding WH2 domains to facilitate actin nucleation. WH2 domains are involved in a wide variety of actin regulatory activities. Structurally, they are expected to clash with interprotomer contacts within the actin filament. Thus, the discovery of their role in nucleation was surprising. Here we use Drosophila Spire (Spir) as a model system to investigate both how tandem WH2 domains can nucleate actin and what differentiates nucleating WH2-containing proteins from their non-nucleating counterparts. We found that the third WH2 domain in Spir (Spir-C or SC) plays a unique role. In the context of a short nucleation construct (containing only two WH2 domains), placement of SC in the N-terminal position was required for the most potent nucleation. We found that the native organization of the WH2 domains with respect to each other is necessary for binding to actin with positive cooperativity. We identified two residues within SC that are critical for its activity. Using this information, we were able to convert a weak synthetic nucleator into one with activity equal to a native Spir construct. Lastly, we found evidence that SC binds actin filaments, in addition to monomers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Actin growth profile in clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweten, D. J.; Bayly, P. V.; Carlsson, A. E.

    2017-05-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis in yeast is driven by a protein patch containing close to 100 different types of proteins. Among the proteins are 5000 -10 000 copies of polymerized actin, and successful endocytosis requires growth of the actin network. Since it is not known exactly how actin network growth drives endocytosis, we calculate the spatial distribution of actin growth required to generate the force that drives the process. First, we establish the force distribution that must be supplied by actin growth, by combining membrane-bending profiles obtained via electron microscopy with established theories of membrane mechanics. Next, we determine the profile of actin growth, using a continuum mechanics approach and an iterative procedure starting with an actin growth profile obtained from a linear analysis. The profile has fairly constant growth outside a central hole of radius 45-50 nm, but very little growth in this hole. This growth profile can reproduce the required forces if the actin shear modulus exceeds 80 kPa, and the growing filaments can exert very large polymerization forces. The growth profile prediction could be tested via electron-microscopy or super-resolution experiments in which the turgor pressure is suddenly turned off.

  19. Stochastic Severing of Actin Filaments by Actin Depolymerizing Factor/Cofilin Controls the Emergence of a Steady Dynamical Regime

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Jeremy; Berro, Julien; Michelot, Alphée; Blanchoin, Laurent; Martiel, Jean-Louis

    2008-01-01

    Actin dynamics (i.e., polymerization/depolymerization) powers a large number of cellular processes. However, a great deal remains to be learned to explain the rapid actin filament turnover observed in vivo. Here, we developed a minimal kinetic model that describes key details of actin filament dynamics in the presence of actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin. We limited the molecular mechanism to 1), the spontaneous growth of filaments by polymerization of actin monomers, 2), the ageing of actin subunits in filaments, 3), the cooperative binding of ADF/cofilin to actin filament subunits, and 4), filament severing by ADF/cofilin. First, from numerical simulations and mathematical analysis, we found that the average filament length, 〈L〉, is controlled by the concentration of actin monomers (power law: 5/6) and ADF/cofilin (power law: −2/3). We also showed that the average subunit residence time inside the filament, 〈T〉, depends on the actin monomer (power law: −1/6) and ADF/cofilin (power law: −2/3) concentrations. In addition, filament length fluctuations are ∼20% of the average filament length. Moreover, ADF/cofilin fragmentation while modulating filament length keeps filaments in a high molar ratio of ATP- or ADP-Pi versus ADP-bound subunits. This latter property has a protective effect against a too high severing activity of ADF/cofilin. We propose that the activity of ADF/cofilin in vivo is under the control of an affinity gradient that builds up dynamically along growing actin filaments. Our analysis shows that ADF/cofilin regulation maintains actin filaments in a highly dynamical state compatible with the cytoskeleton dynamics observed in vivo. PMID:18065447

  20. Initiation of DNA replication requires actin dynamics and formin activity.

    PubMed

    Parisis, Nikolaos; Krasinska, Liliana; Harker, Bethany; Urbach, Serge; Rossignol, Michel; Camasses, Alain; Dewar, James; Morin, Nathalie; Fisher, Daniel

    2017-11-02

    Nuclear actin regulates transcriptional programmes in a manner dependent on its levels and polymerisation state. This dynamics is determined by the balance of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, formin- and redox-dependent filament polymerisation. Here, using Xenopus egg extracts and human somatic cells, we show that actin dynamics and formins are essential for DNA replication. In proliferating cells, formin inhibition abolishes nuclear transport and initiation of DNA replication, as well as general transcription. In replicating nuclei from transcriptionally silent Xenopus egg extracts, we identified numerous actin regulators, and disruption of actin dynamics abrogates nuclear transport, preventing NLS (nuclear localisation signal)-cargo release from RanGTP-importin complexes. Nuclear formin activity is further required to promote loading of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) onto chromatin, as well as initiation and elongation of DNA replication. Therefore, actin dynamics and formins control DNA replication by multiple direct and indirect mechanisms. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. Actinic prurigo of the lip: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Ana MO; Ferrari, Thiago M; Werneck, Juliana T; Junior, Arley Silva; Cunha, Karin S; Dias, Eliane P

    2014-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is a photodermatosis that can affect the skin, conjunctiva and lips. It is caused by an abnormal reaction to sunlight and is more common in high-altitude living people, mainly in indigenous descendants. The diagnosis of actinic prurigo can be challenging, mainly when lip lesions are the only manifestation, which is not a common clinical presentation. The aim of this article is to report two cases of actinic prurigo showing only lip lesions. The patients were Afro-American and were unaware of possible Indian ancestry. Clinical exam, photographs, videoroscopy examination and biopsy were performed, and the diagnosis of actinic prurigo was established. Topical corticosteroid and lip balm with ultraviolet protection were prescribed with excellent results. The relevance of this report is to show that although some patients may not demonstrate the classical clinical presentation of actinic prurigo, the associated clinical and histological exams are determinants for the correct diagnosis and successful treatment of this disease. PMID:25133153

  2. A nucleator arms race: cellular control of actin assembly.

    PubMed

    Campellone, Kenneth G; Welch, Matthew D

    2010-04-01

    For over a decade, the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, a handful of nucleation-promoting factors and formins were the only molecules known to directly nucleate actin filament formation de novo. However, the past several years have seen a surge in the discovery of mammalian proteins with roles in actin nucleation and dynamics. Newly recognized nucleation-promoting factors, such as WASP and SCAR homologue (WASH), WASP homologue associated with actin, membranes and microtubules (WHAMM), and junction-mediating regulatory protein (JMY), stimulate ARP2/3 activity at distinct cellular locations. Formin nucleators with additional biochemical and cellular activities have also been uncovered. Finally, the Spire, cordon-bleu and leiomodin nucleators have revealed new ways of overcoming the kinetic barriers to actin polymerization.

  3. Actin dynamics, architecture, and mechanics in cell motility.

    PubMed

    Blanchoin, Laurent; Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Sykes, Cécile; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Tight coupling between biochemical and mechanical properties of the actin cytoskeleton drives a large range of cellular processes including polarity establishment, morphogenesis, and motility. This is possible because actin filaments are semi-flexible polymers that, in conjunction with the molecular motor myosin, can act as biological active springs or "dashpots" (in laymen's terms, shock absorbers or fluidizers) able to exert or resist against force in a cellular environment. To modulate their mechanical properties, actin filaments can organize into a variety of architectures generating a diversity of cellular organizations including branched or crosslinked networks in the lamellipodium, parallel bundles in filopodia, and antiparallel structures in contractile fibers. In this review we describe the feedback loop between biochemical and mechanical properties of actin organization at the molecular level in vitro, then we integrate this knowledge into our current understanding of cellular actin organization and its physiological roles.

  4. Clinical Response to Ingenol Mebutate in Patients With Actinic Keratoses.

    PubMed

    Batalla, A; Flórez, Á; Feal, C; Peón, G; Abalde, M T; Salgado-Boquete, L; de la Torre, C

    2015-12-01

    Cryotherapy is the most common treatment for actinic keratosis, but its effect is limited to individual lesions. Several topical drugs, however, are available that, in addition to treating individual actinic keratoses, target field cancerization and thereby act on subclinical lesions. Examples are 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, diclofenac, and ingenol mebutate. We report on 17 patients with actinic keratoses treated with ingenol mebutate and describe our findings on treatment effectiveness, adherence, and tolerance. Complete and partial response rates were 35% and 53%, respectively. Ninety-four percent of patients fully adhered to treatment and 18% developed severe local reactions. Ingenol mebutate is an effective treatment for actinic keratosis. Although it has a similar rate of local reactions to other treatments available for actinic keratosis, its short treatment regimen favors better adherence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. Toward the Structure of Dynamic Membrane-Anchored Actin Networks

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Igor

    2007-01-01

    In the cortex of a motile cell, membrane-anchored actin filaments assemble into structures of varying shape and function. Filopodia are distinguished by a core of bundled actin filaments within finger-like extensions of the membrane. In a recent paper by Medalia et al1 cryo-electron tomography has been used to reconstruct, from filopodia of Dictyostelium cells, the 3-dimensional organization of actin filaments in connection with the plasma membrane. A special arrangement of short filaments converging toward the filopod's tip has been called a “terminal cone”. In this region force is applied for protrusion of the membrane. Here we discuss actin organization in the filopodia of Dictyostelium in the light of current views on forces that are generated by polymerizing actin filaments, and on the resistance of membranes against deformation that counteracts these forces. PMID:19262130

  6. Increased IGF-IEc expression and mechano-growth factor production in intestinal muscle of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease and smooth muscle hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Vu, Kent; Hazelgrove, Krystina

    2015-01-01

    The igf1 gene is alternatively spliced as IGF-IEa and IGF-IEc variants in humans. In fibrostenotic Crohn's disease, the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1 induces IGF-IEa expression and IGF-I production in intestinal smooth muscle and results in muscle hyperplasia and collagen I production that contribute to stricture formation. Mechano-growth factor (MGF) derived from IGF-IEc induces skeletal and cardiac muscle hypertrophy following stress. We hypothesized that increased IGF-IEc expression and MGF production mediated smooth muscle hypertrophy also characteristic of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease. IGF-IEc transcripts and MGF protein were increased in muscle cells isolated from fibrostenotic intestine under regulation by endogenous TGF-β1. Erk5 and MEF2C were phosphorylated in vivo in fibrostenotic muscle; both were phosphorylated and colocalized to nucleus in response to synthetic MGF in vitro. Smooth muscle-specific protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, γ-smooth muscle actin, and smoothelin was increased in affected intestine. Erk5 inhibition or MEF2C siRNA blocked smooth muscle-specific gene expression and hypertrophy induced by synthetic MGF. Conditioned media of cultured fibrostenotic muscle induced muscle hypertrophy that was inhibited by immunoneutralization of endogenous MGF or pro-IGF-IEc. The results indicate that TGF-β1-dependent IGF-IEc expression and MGF production in patients with fibrostenotic Crohn's disease regulates smooth muscle cell hypertrophy a critical factor that contributes to intestinal stricture formation. PMID:26428636

  7. Detection of a troponin I-like protein in non-striated muscle of the tardigrades (water bears)

    PubMed Central

    Obinata, Takashi; Ono, Kanako

    2011-01-01

    Tardigrades, also known as water bears, have somatic muscle fibers that are responsible for movement of their body and legs. These muscle fibers contain thin and thick filaments in a non-striated pattern. However, the regulatory mechanism of muscle contraction in tardigrades is unknown. In the absence of extensive molecular and genomic information, we detected a protein of 31 kDa in whole lysates of tardigrades that cross-reacted with the antibody raised against nematode troponin I (TnI). TnI is a component of the troponin complex that regulates actin-myosin interaction in a Ca2+-dependent and actin-linked manner. This TnI-like protein was co-extracted with actin in a buffer containing ATP and EGTA, which is known to induce relaxation of a troponin-regulated contractile system. The TnI-like protein was specifically expressed in the somatic muscle fibers in adult animals and partially co-localized with actin filaments in a non-striated manner. Interestingly, the pharyngeal muscle did not express this protein. These observations suggest that the non-striated somatic muscle of tardigrades has an actin-linked and troponin-regulated system for muscle contraction. PMID:21866271

  8. Dynamics of actin evolution in dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunju; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Handy, Sara M; Delwiche, Charles F

    2011-04-01

    Dinoflagellates have unique nuclei and intriguing genome characteristics with very high DNA content making complete genome sequencing difficult. In dinoflagellates, many genes are found in multicopy gene families, but the processes involved in the establishment and maintenance of these gene families are poorly understood. Understanding the dynamics of gene family evolution in dinoflagellates requires comparisons at different evolutionary scales. Studies of closely related species provide fine-scale information relative to species divergence, whereas comparisons of more distantly related species provides broad context. We selected the actin gene family as a highly expressed conserved gene previously studied in dinoflagellates. Of the 142 sequences determined in this study, 103 were from the two closely related species, Dinophysis acuminata and D. caudata, including full length and partial cDNA sequences as well as partial genomic amplicons. For these two Dinophysis species, at least three types of sequences could be identified. Most copies (79%) were relatively similar and in nucleotide trees, the sequences formed two bushy clades corresponding to the two species. In comparisons within species, only eight to ten nucleotide differences were found between these copies. The two remaining types formed clades containing sequences from both species. One type included the most similar sequences in between-species comparisons with as few as 12 nucleotide differences between species. The second type included the most divergent sequences in comparisons between and within species with up to 93 nucleotide differences between sequences. In all the sequences, most variation occurred in synonymous sites or the 5' UnTranslated Region (UTR), although there was still limited amino acid variation between most sequences. Several potential pseudogenes were found (approximately 10% of all sequences depending on species) with incomplete open reading frames due to frameshifts or early stop

  9. Generation of life in a test tube: Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, Bruno Straub, and the discovery of actin.

    PubMed

    Rall, Jack A

    2018-06-01

    This is a story about a great scientist, luck, great discovery that changed the future direction of muscle research, war, a clandestine war mission, postwar politics, and an attempt to rewrite scientific history. Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, at 44 yr of age, won the Nobel Prize in 1937 for his work on vitamin C and the establishment of the groundwork of the citric acid cycle. He now wanted to investigate one of the fundamental aspects of life and settled on the study of muscle contraction. The Szent-Gyorgyi laboratory in Hungary during World War II demonstrated that contraction could be reproduced in vitro by threads consisting of just two proteins, myosin and the newly discovered protein by Bruno Straub that they called actin. Szent-Gyorgyi called seeing the contraction of these threads, which occurred in the presence of ATP and ions, "the most thrilling moment" of his scientific life. This major discovery of the generation of "life" in a test tube was totally unknown for years by the rest of the world because of the war. When the discovery was finally communicated to the world, it was not immediately accepted by all as being relevant to the physiology of muscle contraction. Nonetheless, this discovery opened up the modern phase of muscle research. Serendipity played an important role in the great discovery, and much later politics would lead to a shocking controversy around the true discoverer of actin.

  10. IFT88 influences chondrocyte actin organization and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Wann, A K T; Thompson, C L; Hassen, A; Wang, W; Knight, M M

    2016-03-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule based organelles which control a variety of signalling pathways important in cartilage development, health and disease. This study examines the role of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88, in regulating fundamental actin organisation and mechanics in articular chondrocytes. The study used an established chondrocyte cell line with and without hypomorphic mutation of IFT88 (IFT88(orpk)). Confocal microscopy was used to quantify F-actin and myosin IIB organisation. Viscoelastic cell and actin cortex mechanics were determined using micropipette aspiration with actin dynamics visualised in live cells transfected with LifeACT-GFP. IFT88(orpk) cells exhibited a significant increase in acto-myosin stress fibre organisation relative to wild-type (WT) cells in monolayer and an altered response to cytochalasin D. Rounded IFT88(orpk) cells cultured in suspension exhibited reduced cortical actin expression with reduced cellular equilibrium modulus. Micropipette aspiration resulted in reduced membrane bleb formation in IFT88(orpk) cells. Following membrane blebbing, IFT88(orpk) cells exhibited slower reformation of the actin cortex. IFT88(orpk) cells showed increased actin deformability and reduced cortical tension confirming that IFT regulates actin cortex mechanics. The reduced cortical tension is also consistent with the reduced bleb formation. This study demonstrates for the first time that the ciliary protein IFT88 regulates fundamental actin organisation and the stiffness of the actin cortex leading to alterations in cell deformation, mechanical properties and blebbing in an IFT88 chondrocyte cell line. This adds to the growing understanding of the role of primary cilia and IFT in regulating cartilage biology. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. A dynamic formin-dependent deep F-actin network in axons

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Archan; Tang, Yong; Wang, Lina; Ladt, Kelsey; Loi, Jonathan; Dargent, Bénédicte; Leterrier, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Although actin at neuronal growth cones is well-studied, much less is known about actin organization and dynamics along axon shafts and presynaptic boutons. Using probes that selectively label filamentous-actin (F-actin), we found focal “actin hotspots” along axons—spaced ∼3–4 µm apart—where actin undergoes continuous assembly/disassembly. These foci are a nidus for vigorous actin polymerization, generating long filaments spurting bidirectionally along axons—a phenomenon we call “actin trails.” Super-resolution microscopy reveals intra-axonal deep actin filaments in addition to the subplasmalemmal “actin rings” described recently. F-actin hotspots colocalize with stationary axonal endosomes, and blocking vesicle transport diminishes the actin trails, suggesting mechanistic links between vesicles and F-actin kinetics. Actin trails are formin—but not Arp2/3—dependent and help enrich actin at presynaptic boutons. Finally, formin inhibition dramatically disrupts synaptic recycling. Collectively, available data suggest a two-tier F-actin organization in axons, with stable “actin rings” providing mechanical support to the plasma membrane and dynamic "actin trails" generating a flexible cytoskeletal network with putative physiological roles. PMID:26216902

  12. Arp2/3 complex–dependent actin networks constrain myosin II function in driving retrograde actin flow

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    The Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin filaments to generate networks at the leading edge of motile cells. Nonmuscle myosin II produces contractile forces involved in driving actin network translocation. We inhibited the Arp2/3 complex and/or myosin II with small molecules to investigate their respective functions in neuronal growth cone actin dynamics. Inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex with CK666 reduced barbed end actin assembly site density at the leading edge, disrupted actin veils, and resulted in veil retraction. Strikingly, retrograde actin flow rates increased with Arp2/3 complex inhibition; however, when myosin II activity was blocked, Arp2/3 complex inhibition now resulted in slowing of retrograde actin flow and veils no longer retracted. Retrograde flow rate increases induced by Arp2/3 complex inhibition were independent of Rho kinase activity. These results provide evidence that, although the Arp2/3 complex and myosin II are spatially segregated, actin networks assembled by the Arp2/3 complex can restrict myosin II–dependent contractility with consequent effects on growth cone motility. PMID:22711700

  13. Mechanisms of mechanical strain memory in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Rim; Hai, Chi-Ming

    2005-10-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that mechanical deformation of airway smooth muscle induces structural remodeling of airway smooth muscle cells, thereby modulating mechanical performance in subsequent contractions. This hypothesis implied that past experience of mechanical deformation was retained (or "memorized") as structural changes in airway smooth muscle cells, which modulated the cell's subsequent contractile responses. We termed this phenomenon mechanical strain memory. Preshortening has been found to induce attenuation of both force and isotonic shortening velocity in cholinergic receptor-activated airway smooth muscle. Rapid stretching of cholinergic receptor-activated airway smooth muscle from an initial length to a final length resulted in post-stretch force and myosin light chain phosphorylation that correlated significantly with initial length. Thus post-stretch muscle strips appeared to retain memory of the initial length prior to rapid stretch (mechanical strain memory). Cytoskeletal recruitment of actin- and integrin-binding proteins and Erk 1/2 MAPK appeared to be important mechanisms of mechanical strain memory. Sinusoidal length oscillation led to force attenuation during oscillation and in subsequent contractions in intact airway smooth muscle, and p38 MAPK appeared to be an important mechanism. In contrast, application of local mechanical strain to cultured airway smooth muscle cells induced local actin polymerization and cytoskeletal stiffening. It is conceivable that deep inspiration-induced bronchoprotection may be a manifestation of mechanical strain memory such that mechanical deformation from past breathing cycles modulated the mechanical performance of airway smooth muscle in subsequent cycles in a continuous and dynamic manner.

  14. MCAT elements and the TEF-1 family of transcription factors in muscle development and disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi

    2008-01-01

    MCAT elements are located in the promoter-enhancer regions of cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle-specific genes including cardiac troponin T, beta-myosin heavy chain, smooth muscle alpha-actin, and skeletal alpha-actin, and play a key role in the regulation of these genes during muscle development and disease. The binding factors of MCAT elements are members of the transcriptional enhancer factor-1 (TEF-1) family. However, it has not been fully understood how these transcription factors confer cell-specific expression in muscle, because their expression patterns are relatively broad. Results of recent studies revealed multiple mechanisms whereby TEF-1 family members control MCAT element-dependent muscle-specific gene expression, including posttranslational modifications of TEF-1 family members, the presence of muscle-selective TEF-1 cofactors, and cell-selective control of TEF-1 accessibility to MCAT elements. In addition, of particular interest, recent studies regarding MCAT element-dependent transcription of the myocardin gene and the smooth muscle alpha-actin gene in muscle provide evidence for the transcriptional diversity among distinct cell types and subtypes. This article summarizes the role of MCAT elements and the TEF-1 family of transcription factors in muscle development and disease, and reviews recent progress in our understanding of the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involved in MCAT element-dependent muscle-specific gene expression.

  15. [Actinic keratosis: New concept and therapeutic update].

    PubMed

    Carmena-Ramón, Rafael; Mateu-Puchades, Almudena; Santos-Alarcón, Sergio; Lucas-Truyols, Sofía

    2017-10-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common reason for consultation in both Primary Care and Specialised Care. It is the third or fourth most common reason for consultation in dermatology, accounting for up to 5-6% of patients attended. It has also been observed that its prevalence has been increasing in the last 10years, compared to other dermatoses. This is also expected to continue to increase due to longer life expectancy, and by the changes in sun exposure habits since the middle of the last century. The aim of this article is to update the concepts of AK, cancerisation field and to present the currently available therapeutic tools. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. Ingenol Mebutate for Recalcitrant Chronic Actinic Cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Tzika, Evangelia; Masouyé, Isabelle; Mühlstädt, Michael; Laffitte, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a healthy 76-year-old man with a whitish, hyperkeratotic lesion of the lower lip diagnosed as actinic cheilitis (AC) previously treated with classic red light photodynamic therapy 5 years ago. Initial treatment with 5% imiquimod cream - also with intensified application - failed. After 2 cycles thrice daily, consecutive applications of 150 μg/g ingenol mebutate gel at 3 weeks' interval, the lesions cleared completely. Surprisingly, no pustular or crusting reaction or other side effect occurred contrary to expectation. Remission was stable for 10 months, when recurrence occurred. Ingenol mebutate proved to be a feasible and safe treatment in this otherwise refractory case of AC. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Histone deacetylase 8 regulates cortactin deacetylation and contraction in smooth muscle tissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Chen, Shu; Cleary, Rachel A.; Wang, Ruping; Gannon, Olivia J.; Seto, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of enzymes that mediate nucleosomal histone deacetylation and gene expression. Some members of the HDAC family have also been implicated in nonhistone protein deacetylation, which modulates cell-cycle control, differentiation, and cell migration. However, the role of HDACs in smooth muscle contraction is largely unknown. Here, HDAC8 was localized both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of mouse and human smooth muscle cells. Knockdown of HDAC8 by lentivirus-encoding HDAC8 shRNA inhibited force development in response to acetylcholine. Treatment of smooth muscle tissues with HDAC8 inhibitor XXIV (OSU-HDAC-44) induced relaxation of precontracted smooth muscle tissues. In addition, cortactin is an actin-regulatory protein that undergoes deacetylation during migration of NIH 3T3 cells. In this study, acetylcholine stimulation induced cortactin deacetylation in mouse and human smooth muscle tissues, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis using antibody against acetylated lysine. Knockdown of HDAC8 by RNAi or treatment with the inhibitor attenuated cortactin deacetylation and actin polymerization without affecting myosin activation. Furthermore, expression of a charge-neutralizing cortactin mutant inhibited contraction and actin dynamics during contractile activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. In response to contractile stimulation, HDAC8 may mediate cortactin deacetylation, which subsequently promotes actin filament polymerization and smooth muscle contraction. PMID:24920679

  18. Overexpression of Striated Muscle Activator of Rho Signaling (STARS) Increases C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Marita A; Della Gatta, Paul A; Ahmad Mir, Bilal; Kowalski, Greg M; Kloehn, Joachim; McConville, Malcom J; Russell, Aaron P; Lamon, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration depend on the activation of satellite cells, which leads to myocyte proliferation, differentiation and fusion with existing muscle fibers. Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly coordinated by a continuum of molecular signaling pathways. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) is an actin binding protein that regulates the transcription of genes involved in muscle cell growth, structure and function via the stimulation of actin polymerization and activation of serum-response factor (SRF) signaling. STARS mediates cell proliferation in smooth and cardiac muscle models; however, whether STARS overexpression enhances cell proliferation and differentiation has not been investigated in skeletal muscle cells. We demonstrate for the first time that STARS overexpression enhances differentiation but not proliferation in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Increased differentiation was associated with an increase in the gene levels of the myogenic differentiation markers Ckm, Ckmt2 and Myh4, the differentiation factor Igf2 and the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) Myf5 and Myf6. Exposing C2C12 cells to CCG-1423, a pharmacological inhibitor of SRF preventing the nuclear translocation of its co-factor MRTF-A, had no effect on myotube differentiation rate, suggesting that STARS regulates differentiation via a MRTF-A independent mechanism. These findings position STARS as an important regulator of skeletal muscle growth and regeneration.

  19. Prominent expression of phosphodiesterase 5 in striated muscle of the rat urethra and levator ani.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guiting; Huang, Yun-Ching; Wang, Guifang; Lue, Tom F; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2010-08-01

    We investigated phosphodiesterase 5 distribution and activity in the urethra. Rat tissues were examined for phosphodiesterase 5 and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression. Urethral phosphodiesterase 5 activity was examined by tissue bath in the presence of sildenafil (Pfizer, New York, New York). Anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin antibody (Abcam) stained all known smooth muscles in all tested tissues and revealed a few smooth muscle fibers in the levator ani muscle. Anti-phosphodiesterase 5 antibody (Abcam) stained smooth muscle in the penis and bladder but not striated leg muscle. However, it stained predominantly striated muscle in the urethra and the levator ani muscle. In the urethra the amount of phosphodiesterase 5 in striated muscle was 6 times that in smooth muscle. In urethral striated muscle phosphodiesterase 5 expression was localized to Z-band striations. Smooth and striated muscle intermingling was clearly visible on the inner and outer rims of the circularly arranged striated muscle layer. Relaxation of precontracted urethral tissues by sodium nitroprusside (Sigma-Aldrich) was enhanced by sildenafil, indicating phosphodiesterase 5 activity, which was primarily located in the striated muscle according to phosphodiesterase 5 staining. Despite its presumed smooth muscle specificity phosphodiesterase 5 was predominantly expressed in the striated muscle of the urethra and in the levator ani muscle. Results are consistent with earlier studies in which these striated muscles were developmentally related to smooth muscle. They also suggest that these striated muscles are possibly regulated by phosphodiesterase 5. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Actomyosin kinetics and in vitro motility of wild-type Drosophila actin and the effects of two mutations in the Act88F gene.

    PubMed Central

    Anson, M; Drummond, D R; Geeves, M A; Hennessey, E S; Ritchie, M D; Sparrow, J C

    1995-01-01

    Two missense mutations of the flight muscle-specific actin gene of Drosophila melanogaster, Act88F, assemble into normally structured myofibrils but affect the flight ability of flies and the mechanical kinetics of isolated muscle fibers. We describe the isolation of actin from different homozygous Act88F strains, including wild-type, an Act88F null mutant (KM88), and two Act88F single point mutations (E316K and G368E), their biochemical interactions with rabbit myosin subfragment 1 (S1), and behavior with rabbit myosin and heavy meromyosin in in vitro motility assays. The rabbit and wild-type Drosophila actins have different association rate constants with S1 (2.64 and 1.77 microM-1 s-1, respectively) and in vitro motilities (2.51, 1.60 microns s-1) clearly demonstrating an isoform-specific difference. The G368E mutation shows a reduced affinity for rabbit S1 compared with the wild type (increasing from 0.11 to 0.17 microM) and a reduced velocity in vitro (reduced by 19%). The E316K mutant actin has no change in affinity for myosin S1 or in vitro motility with heavy meromyosin but does have a reduced in vitro motility (15%) with myosin. These results are discussed with respect to the recently published atomic models for the actomyosin structure and our findings that G368E fibers show a reduced rate constant for delayed tension development and increased fiber stiffness. We interpret these results as possibly caused either by effects on A1 myosin light chain binding or conformational changes within the subdomain 1 of actin, which contains the myosin binding site. E316K is discussed with respect to its likely position within the tropomyosin binding site of actin. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 9 PMID:7612841

  1. Muscle twitching

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some are common and normal. Others are signs of a nervous system disorder. Causes Causes may include: Autoimmune disorders , such ... muscle Spinal muscular atrophy Weak muscles (myopathy) Symptoms of a nervous system disorder include: Loss of, or change in, sensation ...

  2. Biphasic interactions between a cationic dendrimer and actin.

    PubMed

    Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Florence, Alexander T

    2010-12-01

    Gene delivery systems face the problem not only of the route toward the cell and tissues in question, but also of the molecularly crowded environment of both the cytoplasm and the nucleus itself. One of the physical barriers in the cytoplasm for diffusing nanoparticles is an actin network. Here, we describe the finding that a self-fluorescent sixth generation cationic dendrimer (6 nm in diameter) interacts reversibly and possibly electrostatically with actin filaments in vitro. Not only does this interaction slow the diffusion of the dendrimer but it also affects actin polymerization in a biphasic manner. At low concentrations the dendrimer behaves like a G-binding actin protein, retarding actin polymerization, whereas at high concentrations the dendrimer acts as a nucleating protein accelerating the polymerization. Thus in vivo the diffusion of a dendrimer carrier such as this has both physical and chemical elements: by decreasing polymerization it might accelerate its own transport, and by enhancing actin polymerization retard it. This finding suggests that such a dendrimer may have a role as an anticancer agent through its inhibitory effect on actin polymerization.

  3. Symmetry breaking in actin gels - Implications for cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Peyla, Philippe; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2007-03-01

    The physical origin of cell motility is not fully understood. Recently minimal model systems have shown, that polymerizing actin itself can produce a motile force, without the help of motor proteins. Pathogens like Shigella or Listeria use actin to propel themselves forward in their host cell. The same process can be mimicked with polystyrene beads covered with the activating protein ActA, which reside in a solution containing actin monomers. ActA induces the growth of an actin gel at the bead surface. Initially the gel grows symmetrically around the bead until a critical size is reached. Subsequently one observes a symmetry breaking and the gel starts to grow asymmetrically around the bead developing a tail of actin at one side. This symmetry breaking is accompanied by a directed movement of the bead, with the actin tail trailing behind the bead. Force generation relies on the combination of two properties: growth and elasticity of the actin gel. We study this phenomenon theoretically within the framework of a linear elasticity theory and linear flux-force relationships for the evolution of an elastic gel around a hard sphere. Conditions for a parity symmetry breaking are identified analytically and illustrated numerically with the help of a phasefield model.

  4. Expanding Actin Rings Zipper the Mouse Embryo for Blastocyst Formation.

    PubMed

    Zenker, Jennifer; White, Melanie D; Gasnier, Maxime; Alvarez, Yanina D; Lim, Hui Yi Grace; Bissiere, Stephanie; Biro, Maté; Plachta, Nicolas

    2018-04-19

    Transformation from morula to blastocyst is a defining event of preimplantation embryo development. During this transition, the embryo must establish a paracellular permeability barrier to enable expansion of the blastocyst cavity. Here, using live imaging of mouse embryos, we reveal an actin-zippering mechanism driving this embryo sealing. Preceding blastocyst stage, a cortical F-actin ring assembles at the apical pole of the embryo's outer cells. The ring structure forms when cortical actin flows encounter a network of polar microtubules that exclude F-actin. Unlike stereotypical actin rings, the actin rings of the mouse embryo are not contractile, but instead, they expand to the cell-cell junctions. Here, they couple to the junctions by recruiting and stabilizing adherens and tight junction components. Coupling of the actin rings triggers localized myosin II accumulation, and it initiates a tension-dependent zippering mechanism along the junctions that is required to seal the embryo for blastocyst formation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Concentration profiles of actin-binding molecules in lamellipodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcke, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Motile cells form lamellipodia in the direction of motion, which are flat membrane protrusions containing an actin filament network. The network flows rearward relative to the leading edge of the lamellipodium due to actin polymerization at the front. Thus, actin binding molecules are subject to transport towards the rear of the cell in the bound state and diffuse freely in the unbound state. We analyze this reaction-diffusion-advection process with respect to the concentration profiles of these species and provide an analytic approximation for them. Network flow may cause a depletion zone of actin binding molecules close to the leading edge. The existence of such zone depends on the free molecule concentration in the cell body, on the ratio of the diffusion length to the distance bound molecules travel rearward with the flow before dissociating, and the ratio of the diffusion length to the width of the region with network flow and actin binding. Our calculations suggest the existence of depletion zones for the F-actin cross-linkers filamin and α-actinin in fish keratocytes (and other cell types), which is in line with the small elastic moduli of the F-actin network close to the leading edge found in measurements of the force motile cells are able to exert.

  6. Analysis of actinic flux profiles measured from an ozonesonde balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Allaart, M.; Knap, W. H.; Stammes, P.

    2015-04-01

    A green light sensor has been developed at KNMI to measure actinic flux profiles using an ozonesonde balloon. In total, 63 launches with ascending and descending profiles were performed between 2006 and 2010. The measured uncalibrated actinic flux profiles are analysed using the Doubling-Adding KNMI (DAK) radiative transfer model. Values of the cloud optical thickness (COT) along the flight track were taken from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) Cloud Physical Properties (CPP) product. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux profile is evaluated on the basis of the cloud modification factor (CMF) at the cloud top and cloud base, which is the ratio between the actinic fluxes for cloudy and clear-sky scenes. The impact of clouds on the actinic flux is clearly detected: the largest enhancement occurs at the cloud top due to multiple scattering. The actinic flux decreases almost linearly from cloud top to cloud base. Above the cloud top the actinic flux also increases compared to clear-sky scenes. We find that clouds can increase the actinic flux to 2.3 times the clear-sky value at cloud top and decrease it to about 0.05 at cloud base. The relationship between CMF and COT agrees well with DAK simulations, except for a few outliers. Good agreement is found between the DAK-simulated actinic flux profiles and the observations for single-layer clouds in fully overcast scenes. The instrument is suitable for operational balloon measurements because of its simplicity and low cost. It is worth further developing the instrument and launching it together with atmospheric chemistry composition sensors.

  7. Role of actin in auxin transport and transduction of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Basu, S.; Brady, S.; Muday, G.

    Transport of the plant hormone auxin is polar and the direction of the hormone movement appears to be controlled by asymmetric distribution of auxin transport protein complexes. Changes in the direction of auxin transport are believed to drive asymmetric growth in response to changes in the gravity vector. To test the possibility that asymmetric distribution of the auxin transport protein complex is mediated by attachment to the actin cytoskeleton, a variety of experimental approaches have been used. The most direct demonstration of the role of the actin cytoskeleton in localization of the protein complex is the ability of one protein in this complex to bind to affinity columns containing actin filaments. Additionally, treatments of plant tissues with drugs that fragment the actin c toskeleton reducey polar transport. In order to explore this actin interaction and the affect of gravity on auxin transport and developmental polarity, embryos of the brown alga, Fucus have been examined. Fucus zygotes are initially symmetrical, but develop asymmetry in response to environmental gradients, with light gradients being the best- characterized signal. Gravity will polarize these embryos and gravity-induced polarity is randomized by clinorotation. Auxin transport also appears necessary for environmental controls of polarity, since auxin efflux inhibitors perturb both photo- and gravity-polarization at a very discrete temporal window within six hours after fertilization. The actin cytoskeleton has previously been shown to reorganize after fertilization of Fucus embryos leading to formation of an actin patch at the site of polar outgrowth. These actin patches still form in Fucus embryos treated with auxin efflux inhibitors, yet the position of these patches is randomized. Together, these results suggest that there are connections between the actin cytoskeleton, auxin transport, and gravity oriented growth and development. (Supported by NASA Grant: NAG2-1203)

  8. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  9. Two MCAT elements of the SM alpha-actin promoter function differentially in SM vs. non-SM cells.

    PubMed

    Swartz, E A; Johnson, A D; Owens, G K

    1998-08-01

    Transcriptional activity of the smooth muscle (SM) alpha-actin gene is differentially regulated in SM vs. non-SM cells. Contained within the rat SM alpha-actin promoter are two MCAT motifs, binding sites for transcription enhancer factor 1 (TEF-1) transcriptional factors implicated in the regulation of many muscle-specific genes. Transfections of SM alpha-actin promoter-CAT constructs containing wild-type or mutagenized MCAT elements were performed to evaluate their functional significance. Mutation of the MCAT elements resulted in increased transcriptional activity in SM cells, whereas these mutations either had no effect or decreased activity in L6 myotubes or endothelial cells. High-resolution gel shift assays resolved several complexes of different mobilities that were formed between MCAT oligonucleotides and nuclear extracts from the different cell types, although no single band was unique to SM. Western blot analysis of nuclear extracts with polyclonal antibodies to conserved domains of the TEF-1 gene family revealed multiple reactive bands, some that were similar and others that differed between SM and non-SM. Supershift assays with a polyclonal antibody to the TEF-related protein family demonstrated that TEF-1 or TEF-1-related proteins were contained in the shifted complexes. Results suggest that the MCAT elements may contribute to cell type-specific regulation of the SM alpha-actin gene. However, it remains to be determined whether the differential transcriptional activity of MCAT elements in SM vs. non-SM is due to differences in expression of TEF-1 or TEF-1-related proteins or to unique (cell type specific) combinatorial interactions of the MCAT elements with other cis-elements and trans-factors.

  10. Dock mediates Scar- and WASp-dependent actin polymerization through interaction with cell adhesion molecules in founder cells and fusion-competent myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kaipa, Balasankara Reddy; Shao, Huanjie; Schäfer, Gritt; Trinkewitz, Tatjana; Groth, Verena; Liu, Jianqi; Beck, Lothar; Bogdan, Sven; Abmayr, Susan M; Önel, Susanne-Filiz

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the larval body wall musculature of Drosophila depends on the asymmetric fusion of two myoblast types, founder cells (FCs) and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs). Recent studies have established an essential function of Arp2/3-based actin polymerization during myoblast fusion, formation of a dense actin focus at the site of fusion in FCMs, and a thin sheath of actin in FCs and/or growing muscles. The formation of these actin structures depends on recognition and adhesion of myoblasts that is mediated by cell surface receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily. However, the connection of the cell surface receptors with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization is poorly understood. To date only the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Crk has been suggested to link cell adhesion with Arp2/3-based actin polymerization in FCMs. Here, we propose that the SH2-SH3 adaptor protein Dock, like Crk, links cell adhesion with actin polymerization. We show that Dock is expressed in FCs and FCMs and colocalizes with the cell adhesion proteins Sns and Duf at cell-cell contact points. Biochemical data in this study indicate that different domains of Dock are involved in binding the cell adhesion molecules Duf, Rst, Sns and Hbs. We emphasize the importance of these interactions by quantifying the enhanced myoblast fusion defects in duf dock, sns dock and hbs dock double mutants. Additionally, we show that Dock interacts biochemically and genetically with Drosophila Scar, Vrp1 and WASp. Based on these data, we propose that Dock links cell adhesion in FCs and FCMs with either Scar- or Vrp1-WASp-dependent Arp2/3 activation.

  11. Fine-tuning of actin dynamics by the HSPB8-BAG3 chaperone complex facilitates cytokinesis and contributes to its impact on cell division.

    PubMed

    Varlet, Alice Anaïs; Fuchs, Margit; Luthold, Carole; Lambert, Herman; Landry, Jacques; Lavoie, Josée N

    2017-07-01

    The small heat shock protein HSPB8 and its co-chaperone BAG3 are proposed to regulate cytoskeletal proteostasis in response to mechanical signaling in muscle cells. Here, we show that in dividing cells, the HSPB8-BAG3 complex is instrumental to the accurate disassembly of the actin-based contractile ring during cytokinesis, a process required to allow abscission of daughter cells. Silencing of HSPB8 markedly decreased the mitotic levels of BAG3 in HeLa cells, supporting its crucial role in BAG3 mitotic functions. Cells depleted of HSPB8 were delayed in cytokinesis, remained connected via a disorganized intercellular bridge, and exhibited increased incidence of nuclear abnormalities that result from failed cytokinesis (i.e., bi- and multi-nucleation). Such phenotypes were associated with abnormal accumulation of F-actin at the intercellular bridge of daughter cells at telophase. Remarkably, the actin sequestering drug latrunculin A, like the inhibitor of branched actin polymerization CK666, normalized F-actin during cytokinesis and restored proper cell division in HSPB8-depleted cells, implicating deregulated actin dynamics as a cause of abscission failure. Moreover, this HSPB8-dependent phenotype could be corrected by rapamycin, an autophagy-promoting drug, whereas it was mimicked by drugs impairing lysosomal function. Together, the results further support a role for the HSPB8-BAG3 chaperone complex in quality control of actin-based structure dynamics that are put under high tension, notably during cell cytokinesis. They expand a so-far under-appreciated connection between selective autophagy and cellular morphodynamics that guide cell division.

  12. The association of cortactin with profilin-1 is critical for smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruping; Cleary, Rachel A; Wang, Tao; Li, Jia; Tang, Dale D

    2014-05-16

    Profilin-1 (Pfn-1) is an actin-regulatory protein that has a role in modulating smooth muscle contraction. However, the mechanisms that regulate Pfn-1 in smooth muscle are not fully understood. Here, stimulation with acetylcholine induced an increase in the association of the adapter protein cortactin with Pfn-1 in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Furthermore, disruption of the protein/protein interaction by a cell-permeable peptide (CTTN-I peptide) attenuated actin polymerization and smooth muscle contraction without affecting myosin light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19. Knockdown of cortactin by lentivirus-mediated RNAi also diminished actin polymerization and smooth muscle force development. However, cortactin knockdown did not affect myosin activation. In addition, cortactin phosphorylation has been implicated in nonmuscle cell migration. In this study, acetylcholine stimulation induced cortactin phosphorylation at Tyr-421 in smooth muscle cells. Phenylalanine substitution at this position impaired cortactin/Pfn-1 interaction in response to contractile activation. c-Abl is a tyrosine kinase that is necessary for actin dynamics and contraction in smooth muscle. Here, c-Abl silencing inhibited the agonist-induced cortactin phosphorylation and the association of cortactin with Pfn-1. Finally, treatment with CTTN-I peptide reduced airway resistance and smooth muscle hyperreactivity in a murine model of asthma. These results suggest that the interaction of cortactin with Pfn-1 plays a pivotal role in regulating actin dynamics, smooth muscle contraction, and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. The association of cortactin with Pfn-1 is regulated by c-Abl-mediated cortactin phosphorylation. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The Association of Cortactin with Profilin-1 Is Critical for Smooth Muscle Contraction*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruping; Cleary, Rachel A.; Wang, Tao; Li, Jia; Tang, Dale D.

    2014-01-01

    Profilin-1 (Pfn-1) is an actin-regulatory protein that has a role in modulating smooth muscle contraction. However, the mechanisms that regulate Pfn-1 in smooth muscle are not fully understood. Here, stimulation with acetylcholine induced an increase in the association of the adapter protein cortactin with Pfn-1 in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Furthermore, disruption of the protein/protein interaction by a cell-permeable peptide (CTTN-I peptide) attenuated actin polymerization and smooth muscle contraction without affecting myosin light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19. Knockdown of cortactin by lentivirus-mediated RNAi also diminished actin polymerization and smooth muscle force development. However, cortactin knockdown did not affect myosin activation. In addition, cortactin phosphorylation has been implicated in nonmuscle cell migration. In this study, acetylcholine stimulation induced cortactin phosphorylation at Tyr-421 in smooth muscle cells. Phenylalanine substitution at this position impaired cortactin/Pfn-1 interaction in response to contractile activation. c-Abl is a tyrosine kinase that is necessary for actin dynamics and contraction in smooth muscle. Here, c-Abl silencing inhibited the agonist-induced cortactin phosphorylation and the association of cortactin with Pfn-1. Finally, treatment with CTTN-I peptide reduced airway resistance and smooth muscle hyperreactivity in a murine model of asthma. These results suggest that the interaction of cortactin with Pfn-1 plays a pivotal role in regulating actin dynamics, smooth muscle contraction, and airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. The association of cortactin with Pfn-1 is regulated by c-Abl-mediated cortactin phosphorylation. PMID:24700464

  14. Highly Dynamic Host Actin Reorganization around Developing Plasmodium Inside Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gomes-Santos, Carina S. S.; Itoe, Maurice A.; Afonso, Cristina; Henriques, Ricardo; Gardner, Rui; Sepúlveda, Nuno; Simões, Pedro D.; Raquel, Helena; Almeida, António Paulo; Moita, Luis F.; Frischknecht, Friedrich; Mota, Maria M.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium sporozoites are transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes and infect hepatocytes, where a single sporozoite replicates into thousands of merozoites inside a parasitophorous vacuole. The nature of the Plasmodium-host cell interface, as well as the interactions occurring between these two organisms, remains largely unknown. Here we show that highly dynamic hepatocyte actin reorganization events occur around developing Plasmodium berghei parasites inside human hepatoma cells. Actin reorganization is most prominent between 10 to 16 hours post infection and depends on the actin severing and capping protein, gelsolin. Live cell imaging studies also suggest that the hepatocyte cytoskeleton may contribute to parasite elimination during Plasmodium development in the liver. PMID:22238609

  15. Interactions Between DNA and Actin in Model Cystic Fibrosis Sputum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Hee; Sanders, Lori; Angelini, Thomas; Butler, John; Wong, Gerard

    2003-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis sputum is a complex fluid which has a high concentration of DNA and F-actin, two anionic biological polyelectrolytes. In this work, we study the interactions between DNA and actin in an aqueous environment over a wide range of polyelectrolyte lengths and salt levels, using synchrotron Small Angle X-ray Scattering(SAXS) and confocal microscopy. Perliminary results indicate the existence of a compressed phase of nematic F-actin in the presence of DNA. This work was supported by NSF DMR-0071761, the Beckman Young Investigator Program, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

  16. Ionic interaction of myosin loop 2 with residues located beyond the N-terminal part of actin probed by chemical cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Pliszka, Barbara; Martin, Brian M; Karczewska, Emilia

    2008-02-01

    To probe ionic contacts of skeletal muscle myosin with negatively charged residues located beyond the N-terminal part of actin, myosin subfragment 1 (S1) and actin split by ECP32 protease (ECP-actin) were cross-linked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC). We have found that unmodified S1 can be cross-linked not only to the N-terminal part, but also to the C-terminal 36 kDa fragment of ECP-actin. Subsequent experiments performed on S1 cleaved by elastase or trypsin indicate that the cross-linking site in S1 is located within loop 2. This site is composed of Lys-636 and Lys-637 and can interact with negatively charged residues of the 36 kDa actin fragment, most probably with Glu-99 and Glu-100. Cross-links are formed both in the absence and presence of MgATP.P(i) analog, although the addition of nucleotide decreases the efficiency of the cross-linking reaction.

  17. C-terminal fragment of amebin promotes actin filament bundling, inhibits acto-myosin ATPase activity and is essential for amoeba migration.

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak, Jolanta; Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Sobczak, Magdalena; Kocik, Elżbieta; Skórzewski, Radosław; Kłopocka, Wanda; Rędowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2011-02-01

    Amebin [formerly termed as ApABP-FI; Sobczak et al. (2007) Biochem. Cell Biol. 85] is encoded in Amoeba proteus by two transcripts, 2672-nt and 1125-nt. A product of the shorter transcript (termed as C-amebin), comprising C-terminal 375 amino-acid-residue fragment of amebin, has been expressed and purified as the recombinant GST-fusion protein. GST-C-amebin bound both to monomeric and filamentous actin. The binding was Ca(2+)-independent and promoted filament bundling, as revealed with the transmission electron microscopy. GST-C-amebin significantly decreased MgATPase activity of rabbit skeletal muscle acto-S1. Removal with endoproteinase ArgC of a positively charged C-terminal region of GST-amebin containing KLASMWEQ sequence abolished actin-binding and bundling as well as the ATPase-inhibitory effect of C-amebin, indicating that this protein region was involved in the interaction with actin. Microinjection of amoebae with antibody against C-terminus of amebin significantly affected amoebae morphology, disturbed cell polarization and transport of cytoplasmic granules as well as blocked migration. These data indicate that amebin may be one of key regulators of the actin-cytoskeleton dynamics and actin-dependent motility in A. proteus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrostatic interactions between the Bni1p formin FH2 domain and actin influence actin filament nucleation

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Joseph L.; Courtemanche, Naomi; Parton, Daniel L.; ...

    2014-12-04

    Formins catalyze nucleation and growth of actin filaments. In this paper, we study the structure and interactions of actin with the FH2 domain of budding yeast formin Bni1p. We built an all-atom model of the formin dimer on an Oda actin filament 7-mer and studied structural relaxation and interprotein interactions by molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations produced a refined model for the FH2 dimer associated with the barbed end of the filament and showed electrostatic interactions between the formin knob and actin target-binding cleft. Mutations of two formin residues contributing to these interactions (R1423N, K1467L, or both) reduced the interactionmore » energies between the proteins, and in coarse-grained simulations, the formin lost more interprotein contacts with an actin dimer than with an actin 7-mer. Finally, biochemical experiments confirmed a strong influence of these mutations on Bni1p-mediated actin filament nucleation, but not elongation, suggesting that different interactions contribute to these two functions of formins.« less

  19. The recruitment of acetylated and unacetylated tropomyosin to distinct actin polymers permits the discrete regulation of specific myosins in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Coulton, Arthur T.; East, Daniel A.; Galinska-Rakoczy, Agnieszka; Lehman, William; Mulvihill, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is a conserved dimeric coiled-coil protein, which forms polymers that curl around actin filaments in order to regulate actomyosin function. Acetylation of the Tm N-terminal methionine strengthens end-to-end bonds, which enhances actin binding as well as the ability of Tm to regulate myosin motor activity in both muscle and non-muscle cells. In this study we explore the function of each Tm form within fission yeast cells. Electron microscopy and live cell imaging revealed that acetylated and unacetylated Tm associate with distinct actin structures within the cell, and that each form has a profound effect upon the shape and integrity of the polymeric actin filament. We show that, whereas Tm acetylation is required to regulate the in vivo motility of class II myosins, acetylated Tm had no effect on the motility of class I and V myosins. These findings illustrate a novel Tm-acetylation-state-dependent mechanism for regulating specific actomyosin cytoskeletal interactions. PMID:20807799

  20. Two-wave model of the muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Molski, Marcin

    2009-05-01

    The Matsuno model of the muscle contraction is considered in the framework of the two-wave Corben's theory of composite objects built up of both time- and space-like components. It has been proved that during muscle contraction the locally coherent aggregates distributed along the actin filament interact by means of space-like fields, which are solutions of the relativistic Feinberg equation. The existence of such interactions and lack of decoherence are conditions sine qua non for appearance of the quantum entanglement between actin monomers in an ATP-activated filament. A possible role of a quantum potential in the muscle contraction is discussed and the mass of the carrier of space-like interactions is estimated m0' = 7.3 x 10(-32) g (46 eV).

  1. Muscle-specific androgen receptor deletion shows limited actions in myoblasts but not in myofibers in different muscles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kesha; Chiu, Maria W S; Russell, Patricia K; Skinner, Jarrod P; Lee, Nicole K L; Fam, Barbara C; Zajac, Jeffrey D; MacLean, Helen E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the direct muscle cell-mediated actions of androgens by comparing two different mouse lines. The cre-loxP system was used to delete the DNA-binding activity of the androgen receptor (AR) in mature myofibers (MCK mAR(ΔZF2)) in one model and the DNA-binding activity of the AR in both proliferating myoblasts and myofibers (α-actin mAR(ΔZF2)) in another model. We found that hind-limb muscle mass was normal in MCK mAR(ΔZF2) mice and that relative mass of only some hind-limb muscles was reduced in α-actin mAR(ΔZF2) mice. This suggests that myoblasts and myofibers are not the major cellular targets mediating the anabolic actions of androgens on male muscle during growth and development. Levator ani muscle mass was decreased in both mouse lines, demonstrating that there is a myofiber-specific effect in this unique androgen-dependent muscle. We found that the pattern of expression of genes including c-myc, Fzd4 and Igf2 is associated with androgen-dependent changes in muscle mass; therefore, these genes are likely to be mediators of anabolic actions of androgens. Further research is required to identify the major targets of androgen actions in muscle, which are likely to include indirect actions via other tissues. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Live-cell imaging of G-actin dynamics using sequential FDAP

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Tai; Nagai, Tomoaki; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Watanabe, Naoki; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2011-01-01

    Various microscopic techniques have been developed to understand the mechanisms that spatiotemporally control actin filament dynamics in live cells. Kinetic data on the processes of actin assembly and disassembly on F-actin have been accumulated. However, the kinetics of cytoplasmic G-actin, a key determinant for actin polymerization, has remained unclear because of a lack of appropriate methods to measure the G-actin concentration quantitatively. We have developed two new microscopic techniques based on the fluorescence decay after photoactivation (FDAP) time-lapse imaging of photoswitchable Dronpa-labeled actin. These techniques, sequential FDAP (s-FDAP) and multipoint FDAP, were used to measure the time-dependent changes in and spatial distribution of the G-actin concentration in live cells. Use of s-FDAP provided data on changes in the G-actin concentration with high temporal resolution; these data were useful for the model analysis of actin assembly processes in live cells. The s-FDAP analysis also provided evidence that the cytoplasmic G-actin concentration substantially decreases after cell stimulation and that the extent of stimulus-induced actin assembly and cell size extension are linearly correlated with the G-actin concentration before cell stimulation. The advantages of using s-FDAP and multipoint FDAP to measure spatiotemporal G-actin dynamics and the roles of G-actin concentration and ADF/cofilin in stimulus-induced actin assembly and lamellipodium extension in live cells are discussed. PMID:22754616

  3. Disturbance of smooth muscle regulatory function by Eisenia foetida toxin lysenin: insight into the mechanism of smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Czuryło, Edward A; Kulikova, Natalia; Sobota, Andrzej

    2008-05-01

    Lysenin, a toxin present in the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia foetida, is known to cause a long-lasting contraction of rat aorta smooth muscle strips. We addressed the mechanisms underlying its action on smooth muscle cells and present the first report demonstrating a completely new property of lysenin unrelated to its basic sphingomyelin-binding ability. Here we report lysenin enhancement effect on smooth muscle actomyosin ATPase activity and the ability of networking the actin filaments. The maximum enhancement of the ATPase activity of actomyosin at 120 mM KCl was observed at a molar ratio of lysenin to actin of about 1:10(5), while at 70 mM KCl at the ratio of about 1:10(6). The effect of lysenin became most pronounced only when both smooth muscle regulatory proteins, tropomyosin and caldesmon, were present. Co-sedimentation experiments indicated that lysenin did not displace neither tropomyosin nor caldesmon from the thin filament. Thus, the lysenin-dependent abolishment of the inhibitory effect of caldesmon on the ATPase activity was related rather to the modification of the filament structure. The ability of the toxin to exert its stimulatory effect at extremely low concentrations (as low as one molecule of lysenin per 10(6) actin molecules) may result from the long-range cooperative transitions in the entire thin filament with an involvement of smooth muscle tropomyosin, while the role of caldesmon may be limited exclusively to the inhibition of ATPase activity.

  4. Curved trajectories of actin-based motility in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fu-Lai; Leung, Kwan-tai; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2012-05-01

    Recent experiments have reported fascinating geometrical trajectories for actin-based motility of bacteria Listeria monocytogenes and functionalized beads. To understand the physical mechanism for these trajectories, we constructed a phenomenological model to study the motion of an actin-propelled disk in two dimensions. In our model, the force and actin density on the surface of the disk are influenced by the translation and rotation of the disk, which in turn is induced by the asymmetric distributions of those densities. We show that this feedback can destabilize a straight trajectory, leading to circular, S-shape and other geometrical trajectories observed in the experiments through bifurcations in the distributions of the force and actin density. The relation between our model and the models for self-propelled deformable particles is emphasized and discussed.

  5. Cortactin Branches Out: Roles in Regulating Protrusive Actin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ammer, Amanda Gatesman; Weed, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery in the early 1990’s, cortactin has emerged as a key signaling protein in many cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, endocytosis, and tumor invasion. While the list of cellular functions influenced by cortactin grows, the ability of cortactin to interact with and alter the cortical actin network is central to its role in regulating these processes. Recently, several advances have been made in our understanding of the interaction between actin and cortactin, providing insight into how these two proteins work together to provide a framework for normal and altered cellular function. This review examines how regulation of cortactin through post-translational modifications and interactions with multiple binding partners elicits changes in cortical actin cytoskeletal organization, impacting the regulation and formation of actin-rich motility structures. PMID:18615630

  6. Tension modulates actin filament polymerization mediated by formin and profilin

    PubMed Central

    Courtemanche, Naomi; Lee, Ja Yil; Pollard, Thomas D.; Greene, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    Formins promote processive elongation of actin filaments for cytokinetic contractile rings and other cellular structures. In vivo, these structures are exposed to tension, but the effect of tension on these processes was unknown. Here we used single-molecule imaging to investigate the effects of tension on actin polymerization mediated by yeast formin Bni1p. Small forces on the filaments dramatically slowed formin-mediated polymerization in the absence of profilin, but resulted in faster polymerization in the presence of profilin. We propose that force shifts the conformational equilibrium of the end of a filament associated with formin homology 2 domains toward the closed state that precludes polymerization, but that profilin–actin associated with formin homology 1 domains reverses this effect. Thus, physical forces strongly influence actin assembly by formin Bni1p. PMID:23716666

  7. Topical Imiquimod in the Treatment of Conjunctival Actinic Keratosis.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Megan A; Giacometti, Joseph N; Servat, Javier; Materin, Miguel A; Levin, Flora

    Conjunctival actinic keratosis is rare and difficult to treat, as recurrences are common. Imiquimod, an immune response modulator, is currently Food and Drug Administration-approved for cutaneous actinic keratosis and superficial basal cell carcinomas. Emerging reports have shown it to be effective in treating some periocular and conjunctival lesions. The authors present a case of a 68-year-old white man with recurrent actinic keratosis involving the pretarsal conjunctiva, which was successfully treated with 5% topical imiquimod following previous failure with cryotherapy and interferon α-2b. The patient had ocular irritation that resolved on cessation of treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of conjunctival actinic keratosis being treated with and successfully eradicated by topical imiquimod.

  8. Improving the resolution for Lamb wave testing via a smoothed Capon algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xuwei; Zeng, Liang; Lin, Jing; Hua, Jiadong

    2018-04-01

    Lamb wave testing is promising for damage detection and evaluation in large-area structures. The dispersion of Lamb waves is often unavoidable, restricting testing resolution and making the signal hard to interpret. A smoothed Capon algorithm is proposed in this paper to estimate the accurate path length of each wave packet. In the algorithm, frequency domain whitening is firstly used to obtain the transfer function in the bandwidth of the excitation pulse. Subsequently, wavenumber domain smoothing is employed to reduce the correlation between wave packets. Finally, the path lengths are determined by distance domain searching based on the Capon algorithm. Simulations are applied to optimize the number of smoothing times. Experiments are performed on an aluminum plate consisting of two simulated defects. The results demonstrate that spatial resolution is improved significantly by the proposed algorithm.

  9. Electrodes synthesized from carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal metal adlayer

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Harris, Alexander

    2014-04-15

    High-surface-area carbon nanostructures coated with a smooth and conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin metal films and their method of manufacture are described. The preferred manufacturing process involves the initial oxidation of the carbon nanostructures followed by a surface preparation process involving immersion in a solution with the desired pH to create negative surface dipoles. The nanostructures are subsequently immersed in an alkaline solution containing a suitable quantity of non-noble metal ions which adsorb at surface reaction sites. The metal ions are then reduced via chemical or electrical means. The nanostructures are exposed to a solution containing a salt of one or more noble metals which replace adsorbed non-noble surface metal atoms by galvanic displacement. The process can be controlled and repeated to obtain a desired film coverage. The resulting coated nanostructures may be used, for example, as high-performance electrodes in supercapacitors, batteries, or other electric storage devices.

  10. Honeybees Prefer to Steer on a Smooth Wall With Tetrapod Gaits

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jieliang; Zhu, Fei; Yan, Shaoze

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Insects are well equipped in walking on complex three-dimensional terrain, allowing them to overcome obstacles or catch prey. However, the gait transition for insects steering on a wall remains unexplored. Here, we find that honeybees adopted a tetrapod gait to change direction when climbing a wall. On the contrary to the common tripod gait, honeybees propel their body forward by synchronously stepping with both middle legs and then both front legs. This process ensures the angle of the central axis of the honeybee to be consistent with the crawling direction. Interestingly, when running in an alternating tripod gait, the central axis of honeybee sways around the center of mass under alternating tripod gait to maintain stability. Experimental results show that tripod, tetrapod, and random gaits result in the amazing consensus harmony on the climbing speed and gait stability, whether climbing on a smooth wall or walking on smooth ground. PMID:29722862

  11. The SH2-containing inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, SHIP-2, binds filamin and regulates submembraneous actin

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Jennifer M.; O'Malley, Cindy J.; Becanovic, Jelena; Munday, Adam D.; Berndt, Michael C.; Coghill, Imogen D.; Nandurkar, Harshal H.; Ooms, Lisa M.; Mitchell, Christina A.

    2001-01-01

    SHIP-2 is a phosphoinositidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate (PtdIns[3,4,5]P3) 5-phosphatase that contains an NH2-terminal SH2 domain, a central 5-phosphatase domain, and a COOH-terminal proline-rich domain. SHIP-2 negatively regulates insulin signaling. In unstimulated cells, SHIP-2 localized in a perinuclear cytosolic distribution and at the leading edge of the cell. Endogenous and recombinant SHIP-2 localized to membrane ruffles, which were mediated by the COOH-terminal proline–rich domain. To identify proteins that bind to the SHIP-2 proline–rich domain, yeast two-hybrid screening was performed, which isolated actin-binding protein filamin C. In addition, both filamin A and B specifically interacted with SHIP-2 in this assay. SHIP-2 coimmunoprecipitated with filamin from COS-7 cells, and association between these species did not change after epidermal growth factor stimulation. SHIP-2 colocalized with filamin at Z-lines and the sarcolemma in striated muscle sections and at membrane ruffles in COS-7 cells, although the membrane ruffling response was reduced in cells overexpressing SHIP-2. SHIP-2 membrane ruffle localization was dependent on filamin binding, as SHIP-2 was expressed exclusively in the cytosol of filamin-deficient cells. Recombinant SHIP-2 regulated PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels and submembraneous actin at membrane ruffles after growth factor stimulation, dependent on SHIP-2 catalytic activity. Collectively these studies demonstrate that filamin-dependent SHIP-2 localization critically regulates phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase signaling to the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:11739414

  12. Microtubule-Actin Cross-Linking Factor 1: Domains, Interaction Partners, and Tissue-Specific Functions.

    PubMed

    Goryunov, Dmitry; Liem, Ronald K H

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of most eukaryotic cells is composed of three principal filamentous components: actin filaments, microtubules (MTs), and intermediate filaments. It is a highly dynamic system that plays crucial roles in a wide range of cellular processes, including migration, adhesion, cytokinesis, morphogenesis, intracellular traffic and signaling, and structural flexibility. Among the large number of cytoskeleton-associated proteins characterized to date, microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1 (MACF1) is arguably the most versatile integrator and modulator of cytoskeleton-related processes. MACF1 belongs to the plakin family of proteins, and within it, to the spectraplakin subfamily. These proteins are characterized by the ability to bridge MT and actin cytoskeletal networks in a dynamic fashion, which underlies their involvement in the regulation of cell migration, axonal extension, and vesicular traffic. Studying MACF1 functions has provided insights not only into the regulation of the cytoskeleton but also into molecular mechanisms of both normal cellular physiology and cellular pathology. Multiple MACF1 isoforms exist, composed of a large variety of alternatively spliced domains. Each of these domains mediates a specific set of interactions and functions. These functions are manifested in tissue and cell-specific phenotypes observed in conditional MACF1 knockout mice. The conditional models described to date reveal critical roles of MACF1 in mammalian skin, nervous system, heart muscle, and intestinal epithelia. Complete elimination of MACF1 is early embryonic lethal, indicating an essential role for MACF1 in early development. Further studies of MACF1 domains and their interactions will likely reveal multiple new roles of this protein in various tissues. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells in culture: maturation as indicated by titin and desmin striation.

    PubMed

    van der Ven, P F; Schaart, G; Jap, P H; Sengers, R C; Stadhouders, A M; Ramaekers, F C

    1992-10-01

    This report describes a phenotyping study of differentiating human skeletal muscle cells in tissue culture. Satellite cells (adult myoblasts), isolated from biopsy material, showed a proliferative behaviour in high-nutrition medium, but fused to form myotubes when grown in low-nutrition medium. The expression and structural organization of the intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin as well as the sarcomeric constituents alpha-actin, alpha-actinin, nebulin, myosin and especially titin during myofibrillogenesis in vitro, were studied by means of indirect immunofluorescence assays. The proliferating myoblasts contained both desmin and vimentin, alpha-actinin and the filamentous form of actin. Shortly after the change of medium, expression of titin, sarcomeric myosin and skeletal muscle alpha-actin was found in mononuclear cells in a diffuse, filamentous (titin, myosin, alpha-actin) or punctate (titin, myosin) pattern. Four to 10 days after the medium change, mature myotubes showed desmin, titin, alpha-actinin, nebulin, sarcomeric myosin and actin cross-striations, while vimentin was no longer detected. We conclude that human skeletal muscle cell cultures are an appropriate model system to study the molecular basis of myofibrillogenesis. Especially the presence of desmin in a striated fashion points to a high degree of maturation of the muscle cell cultures.

  14. The role of actin networks in cellular mechanosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azatov, Mikheil

    Physical processes play an important role in many biological phenomena, such as wound healing, organ development, and tumor metastasis. During these processes, cells constantly interact with and adapt to their environment by exerting forces to mechanically probe the features of their surroundings and generating appropriate biochemical responses. The mechanisms underlying how cells sense the physical properties of their environment are not well understood. In this thesis, I present my studies to investigate cellular responses to the stiffness and topography of the environment. In order to sense the physical properties of their environment, cells dynamically reorganize the structure of their actin cytoskeleton, a dynamic network of biopolymers, altering the shape and spatial distribution of protein assemblies. Several observations suggest that proteins that crosslink actin filaments may play an important role in cellular mechanosensitivity. Palladin is an actin-crosslinking protein that is found in the lamellar actin network, stress fibers and focal adhesions, cellular structures that are critical for mechanosensing of the physical environment. By virtue of its close interactions with these structures in the cell, palladin may play an important role in cell mechanics. However, the role of actin crosslinkers in general, and palladin in particular, in cellular force generation and mechanosensing is not well known. I have investigated the role of palladin in regulating the plasticity of the actin cytoskeleton and cellular force generation in response to alterations in substrate stiffness. I have shown that the expression levels of palladin modulate the forces exerted by cells and their ability to sense substrate stiffness. Perturbation experiments also suggest that palladin levels in cells altered myosin motor activity. These results suggest that the actin crosslinkers, such as palladin, and myosin motors coordinate for optimal cell function and to prevent aberrant

  15. Microheterogeneity of actin gels formed under controlled linear shear.

    PubMed

    Cortese, J D; Frieden, C

    1988-10-01

    The diffusion coefficients and fluorescence polarization properties of actin subjected to a known shear have been determined both during and after polymerization, using a modification of a cone-plate Wells-Brookfield rheometer that allows monitoring of samples with an epifluorescence microscope. Fluorescence polarization and fluorescence photobleaching recovery experiments using rhodamine-labeled actin as a tracer showed that under conditions of low shear (shear rates of 0.05 s-1), a spatial heterogeneity of polymerized actin was observed with respect to fluorescence intensity and the diffusion coefficients with actin mobility becoming quite variable in different regions of the sample. In addition, complex changes in fluorescence polarization were noted after stopping the shear. Actin filaments of controlled length were obtained using plasma gelsolin (gelsolin/actin molar ratios of 1:50 to 1:300). At ratios of 1:50, neither spatial heterogeneity nor changes in polarization were observed on subjecting the polymerized actin to shear. At ratios of approximately 1:100, a decrease on the intensity of fluorescence polarization occurs on stopping the shear. Longer filaments exhibit spatial micro-heterogeneity and complex changes in fluorescence polarization. In addition, at ratios of 1:100 or 1:300, the diffusion coefficient decreases as the total applied shear increased. This behavior is interpreted as bundling of filaments aligned under shear. We also find that the F-actin translational diffusion coefficients decrease as the total applied shear increases (shear rates between 0.05 and 12.66 s-1), as expected for a cumulative process. When chicken gizzard filamin was added to gelsolin-actin filaments (at filamin/actin molar ratios of 1:300 to 1:10), a similar decrease in the diffusion coefficients was observed for unsheared samples. Spatial microheterogeneity might be related to the effects of the shear field in the alignment of filaments, and the balance between a three

  16. Actinic Flux Calculations: A Model Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Flittner, D.; Ahmad, Z.; Herman, J. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    calculate direct and diffuse surface irradiance and actinic flux (downwelling (2p) and total (4p)) for the reference model. Sensitivity analysis has shown that the accuracy of the radiative transfer flux calculations for a unit ETS (i.e. atmospheric transmittance) together with a numerical interpolation technique for the constituents' vertical profiles is better than 1% for SZA less than 70(sub o) and wavelengths longer than 310 nm. The differences increase for shorter wavelengths and larger SZA, due to the differences in pseudo-spherical correction techniques and vertical discretetization among the codes. Our sensitivity study includes variation of ozone cross-sections, ETS spectra and the effects of wavelength shifts between vacuum and air scales. We also investigate the effects of aerosols on the spectral flux components in the UV and visible spectral regions. The "aerosol correction factors" (ACFs) were calculated at discrete wavelengths and different SZAs for each flux component (direct, diffuse, reflected) and prescribed IPMMI aerosol parameters. Finally, the sensitivity study was extended to calculation of selected photolysis rates coefficients.

  17. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs. PMID:25961006

  18. Poorly understood aspects of striated muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Månsson, Alf; Rassier, Dilson; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs.

  19. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Gomibuchi, Yuki; Uyeda, Taro Q.P.; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki, E-mail: tw007@nasu.bio.teikyo-u.ac.jp

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The effect of mutation of Tyr143 that becomes more exposed on assembly was examined. •Mutation of tyrosine-143 of Dictyostelium actin changed actin polymerizability. •The bulkiness or aromatic nature of Tyr143 is important for the weak binding. •The weak interaction between myosin and actin strengthened by Tyr143Trp mutation. -- Abstract: Actin filaments (F-actin) interact with myosin and activate its ATPase to support force generation. By comparing crystal structures of G-actin and the quasi-atomic model of F-actin based on high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, the tyrosine-143 was found to be exposed more than 60 Å{sup 2} to the solvent in F-actin. Because tyrosine-143more » flanks the hydrophobic cleft near the hydrophobic helix that binds to myosin, the mutant actins, of which the tyrosine-143 was replaced with tryptophan, phenylalanine, or isoleucine, were generated using the Dictyostelium expression system. It polymerized significantly poorly when induced by NaCl, but almost normally by KCl. In the presence of phalloidin and KCl, the extents of the polymerization of all the mutant actins were comparable to that of the wild-type actin so that the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity could be reliably compared. The affinity of skeletal heavy meromyosin to F-actin and the maximum ATPase activity (V{sub max}) were estimated by a double reciprocal plot. The Tyr143Trp-actin showed the higher affinity (smaller K{sub app}) than that of the wild-type actin, with the V{sub max} being almost unchanged. The K{sub app} and V{sub max} of the Tyr143Phe-actin were similar to those of the wild-type actin. However, the activation by Tyr143Ile-actin was much smaller than the wild-type actin and the accurate determination of K{sub app} was difficult. Comparison of the myosin ATPase activated by the various mutant actins at the same concentration of F-actin showed that the extent of activation correlates well with the solvent-accessible surface areas

  20. Is imiquimod effective and safe for actinic keratosis?

    PubMed

    Walker, J Kendall; Koenig, Clint

    2003-03-01

    Imiquimod 5% cream, applied 3 times per week for 12 weeks, is effective for treatment of actinic keratosis. Severe erythema and other local reactions occurred in almost everyone receiving treatment, due to imiquimod's immune system-modulating effects. The 25 patients in the treatment group tolerated these adverse effects well. Despite these effects, imiquimod can be used as an alternative to traditional cryotherapy for the treatment of actinic keratosis among selected, motivated

  1. Actinic Prurigo in Scandinavian Adolescent Successfully Treated with Cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Sitek, Jan C.

    2017-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is a pruritic sun-induced dermatosis classified among the immunologically mediated photodermatoses. The disease is a well-known entity among Native Americans and in Central and South America, however rare in Caucasians with only a few reports from Australia, Britain and France. We report the first case of actinic prurigo in a Scandinavian patient, responding favorably to systemic treatment with cyclosporine A. PMID:29142659

  2. A Legionella Effector Disrupts Host Cytoskeletal Structure by Cleaving Actin

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Wenhan; Tan, Yunhao; ...

    2017-01-27

    Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires' disease, replicates intracellularly in protozoan and human hosts. Successful colonization and replication of this pathogen in host cells requires the Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system, which translocates approximately 300 effector proteins into the host cell to modulate various cellular processes. In this study, we identified RavK as a Dot/Icm substrate that targets the host cytoskeleton and reduces actin filament abundance in mammalian cells upon ectopic expression. RavK harbors an H 95E XXH 99 motif associated with diverse metalloproteases, which is essential for the inhibition of yeast growth and for the induction of cellmore » rounding in HEK293T cells. We demonstrate that the actin protein itself is the cellular target of RavK and that this effector cleaves actin at a site between residues Thr351 and Phe352. Importantly, RavK-mediated actin cleavage also occurs during L. pneumophila infection. Cleavage by RavK abolishes the ability of actin to form polymers. Furthermore, an F352A mutation renders actin resistant to RavK-mediated cleavage; expression of the mutant in mammalian cells suppresses the cell rounding phenotype caused by RavK, further establishing that actin is the physiological substrate of RavK. Furthermore, L. pneumophila exploits components of the host cytoskeleton by multiple effectors with distinct mechanisms, highlighting the importance of modulating cellular processes governed by the actin cytoskeleton in the intracellular life cycle of this pathogen.« less

  3. Actinic Prurigo in Scandinavian Adolescent Successfully Treated with Cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Jan C

    2017-03-13

    Actinic prurigo is a pruritic sun-induced dermatosis classified among the immunologically mediated photodermatoses. The disease is a well-known entity among Native Americans and in Central and South America, however rare in Caucasians with only a few reports from Australia, Britain and France. We report the first case of actinic prurigo in a Scandinavian patient, responding favorably to systemic treatment with cyclosporine A.

  4. Cross-Linking Molecules Modify Composite Actin Networks Independently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoller, K. M.; Lieleg, O.; Bausch, A. R.

    2008-09-01

    While cells make use of many actin binding proteins (ABPs) simultaneously to tailor the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton, the detailed interplay of different ABPs is not understood. By a combination of macrorheological measurements and confocal microscopy, we show that the ABPs fascin and filamin modify the structural and viscoelastic properties of composite in vitro actin networks independently. The outnumbering ABP dictates the local network structure and therefore also dominates the macromechanical network response.

  5. Course 6: Physics of Composite Cell Membrane and Actin Based Cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackmann, E.; Bausch, A. R.; Vonna, L.

    1 Architecture of composite cell membranes 1.1 The lipid/protein bilayer is a multicomponent smectic phase with mosaic like architecture 1.2 The spectrin/actin cytoskeleton as hyperelastic cell stabilizer 1.3 The actin cortex: Architecture and function 2 Physics of the actin based cytoskeleton 2.1 Actin is a living semiflexible polymer 2.2 Actin network as viscoelastic body 2.3 Correlation between macroscopic viscoelasticity and molecular 3 Heterogeneous actin gels in cells and biological function 3.1 Manipulation of actin gels 3.2 Control of organization and function of actin cortex by cell signalling 4 Micromechanics and microrheometry of cells 5 Activation of endothelial cells: On the possibility of formation of stress fibers as phase transition of actin-network triggered by cell signalling pathways 6 On cells as adaptive viscoplastic bodies 7 Controll of cellular protrusions controlled by actin/myosin cortex

  6. Actin protofilament orientation in deformation of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Picart, C; Dalhaimer, P; Discher, D E

    2000-01-01

    The red cell's spectrin-actin network is known to sustain local states of shear, dilation, and condensation, and yet the short actin filaments are found to maintain membrane-tangent and near-random azimuthal orientations. When calibrated with polarization results for single actin filaments, imaging of micropipette-deformed red cell ghosts has allowed an assessment of actin orientations and possible reorientations in the network. At the hemispherical cap of the aspirated projection, where the network can be dilated severalfold, filaments have the same membrane-tangent orientation as on a relatively unstrained portion of membrane. Likewise, over the length of the network projection pulled into the micropipette, where the network is strongly sheared in axial extension and circumferential contraction, actin maintains its tangent orientation and is only very weakly aligned with network extension. Similar results are found for the integral membrane protein Band 3. Allowing for thermal fluctuations, we deduce a bound for the effective coupling constant, alpha, between network shear and azimuthal orientation of the protofilament. The finding that alpha must be about an order of magnitude or more below its tight-coupling value illustrates how nanostructural kinematics can decouple from more macroscopic responses. Monte Carlo simulations of spectrin-actin networks at approximately 10-nm resolution further support this conclusion and substantiate an image of protofilaments as elements of a high-temperature spin glass. PMID:11106606

  7. Actin filaments participate in West Nile (Sarafend) virus maturation process.

    PubMed

    Chu, J J H; Choo, B G H; Lee, J W M; Ng, M L

    2003-11-01

    West Nile (Sarafend) virus has previously been shown to egress by budding at the plasma membrane of infected cells, but relatively little is known about the mechanism involved in this mode of release. During the course of this study, it was discovered that actin filaments take part in the virus maturation process. Using dual-labeled immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy at late infection (10 hr p.i.), co-localization of viral structural (envelope and capsid) proteins with actin filaments was confirmed. The virus structural proteins were also immuno