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Sample records for a-smooth muscle actin

  1. Expression of cardiac alpha-actin spares extraocular muscles in skeletal muscle alpha-actin diseases--quantification of striated alpha-actins by MRM-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Colley, Stephen M J; Walker, Kendall R; Clement, Sophie; Bringans, Scott; Lipscombe, Richard; Fabian, Victoria A; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J

    2008-12-01

    As with many skeletal muscle diseases, the extraocular muscles (EOMs) are spared in skeletal muscle alpha-actin diseases, with no ophthalmoplegia even in severely affected patients. We hypothesised that the extraocular muscles sparing in these patients was due to significant expression of cardiac alpha-actin, the alpha-actin isoform expressed in heart and foetal skeletal muscle. We have shown by immunochemistry, Western blotting and a novel MRM-mass spectrometry technique, comparable levels of cardiac alpha-actin in the extraocular muscles of human, pig and sheep to those in the heart. The sparing of extraocular muscles in skeletal muscle alpha-actin disease is thus probably due to greater levels of cardiac alpha-actin, than the negligible amounts in skeletal muscles, diluting out the effects of the mutant skeletal muscle alpha-actin.

  2. Purification of Actin from Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Characterization of Functional Differences from Muscle Actin*

    PubMed Central

    Ti, Shih-Chieh; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an important genetic model organism for studying the mechanisms of endocytosis and cytokinesis. However, most work on the biochemical properties of fission yeast actin-binding proteins has been done with skeletal muscle actin for matters of convenience. When simulations of mathematical models of the mechanism of endocytosis were compared with events in live cells, some of the reactions appeared to be much faster than observed in biochemical experiments with muscle actin. Here, we used gelsolin affinity chromatography to purify actin from fission yeast. S. pombe actin shares many properties with skeletal muscle actin but has higher intrinsic nucleotide exchange rate, faster trimer nucleus formation, faster phosphate dissociation rate from polymerized actin, and faster nucleation of actin filaments with Arp2/3 complex. These properties close the gap between the biochemistry and predictions made by mathematical models of endocytosis in S. pombe cells. PMID:21148484

  3. Non-Straub type actin from molluscan catch muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Shelud'ko, Nikolay S. Girich, Ulyana V.; Lazarev, Stanislav S.; Vyatchin, Ilya G.

    2016-05-27

    We have developed a method of obtaining natural actin from smooth muscles of the bivalves on the example of the Crenomytilus grayanus catch muscle. The muscles were previously rigorized to prevent a loss of thin filaments during homogenization and washings. Thin filaments were isolated with a low ionic strength solution in the presence of ATP and sodium pyrophosphate. Surface proteins of thin filaments-tropomyosin, troponin, calponin and some minor actin-binding proteins-were dissociated from actin filaments by increasing the ionic strength to 0.6 M KCL. Natural fibrillar actin obtained in that way depolymerizes easily in low ionic strength solutions commonly used for the extraction of Straub-type actin from acetone powder. Purification of natural actin was carried out by the polymerization–depolymerization cycle. The content of inactivated actin remaining in the supernatant is much less than at a similar purification of Straub-type actin. A comparative investigation was performed between the natural mussel actin and the Straub-type rabbit skeletal actin in terms of the key properties of actin: polymerization, activation of Mg-ATPase activity of myosin, and the electron-microscopic structure of actin polymers. -- Highlights: •We developed method of repolymerizable invertebrate smooth muscle actin obtaining. •Our method does not involve use of denaturating agents, which could modify proteins. •Viscosity and polymerization rate of actin, gained that way, is similar to Straub one. •Electron microscopy showed that repolymerized mussel actin is similar to Straub one. •Repolymerized mussel actin has greater ATPase activating capacity, than Straub actin.

  4. Caffeine relaxes smooth muscle through actin depolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Tazzeo, Tracy; Bates, Genevieve; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Khasnis, Mukta D.; Eto, Masumi

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine is sometimes used in cell physiological studies to release internally stored Ca2+. We obtained evidence that caffeine may also act through a different mechanism that has not been previously described and sought to examine this in greater detail. We ruled out a role for phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition, since the effect was 1) not reversed by inhibiting PKA or adenylate cyclase; 2) not exacerbated by inhibiting PDE4; and 3) not mimicked by submillimolar caffeine nor theophylline, both of which are sufficient to inhibit PDE. Although caffeine is an agonist of bitter taste receptors, which in turn mediate bronchodilation, its relaxant effect was not mimicked by quinine. After permeabilizing the membrane using β-escin and depleting the internal Ca2+ store using A23187, we found that 10 mM caffeine reversed tone evoked by direct application of Ca2+, suggesting it functionally antagonizes the contractile apparatus. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we found that caffeine did not affect phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) by MLC kinase, actin-filament motility catalyzed by MLC kinase, phosphorylation of CPI-17 by either protein kinase C or RhoA kinase, nor the activity of MLC-phosphatase. However, we did obtain evidence that caffeine decreased actin filament binding to phosphorylated myosin heads and increased the ratio of globular to filamentous actin in precontracted tissues. We conclude that, in addition to its other non-RyR targets, caffeine also interferes with actin function (decreased binding by myosin, possibly with depolymerization), an effect that should be borne in mind in studies using caffeine to probe excitation-contraction coupling in smooth muscle. PMID:22683573

  5. Changes in Orientation of Actin during Contraction of Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Borejdo, J.; Shepard, A.; Dumka, D.; Akopova, I.; Talent, J.; Malka, A.; Burghardt, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    It is well documented that muscle contraction results from cyclic rotations of actin-bound myosin cross-bridges. The role of actin is hypothesized to be limited to accelerating phosphate release from myosin and to serving as a rigid substrate for cross-bridge rotations. To test this hypothesis, we have measured actin rotations during contraction of a skeletal muscle. Actin filaments of rabbit psoas fiber were labeled with rhodamine-phalloidin. Muscle contraction was induced by a pulse of ATP photogenerated from caged precursor. ATP induced a single turnover of cross-bridges. The rotations were measured by anisotropy of fluorescence originating from a small volume defined by a narrow aperture of a confocal microscope. The anisotropy of phalloidin-actin changed rapidly at first and was followed by a slow relaxation to a steady-state value. The kinetics of orientation changes of actin and myosin were the same. Extracting myosin abolished anisotropy changes. To test whether the rotation of actin was imposed by cross-bridges or whether it reflected hydrolytic activity of actin itself, we labeled actin with fluorescent ADP. The time-course of anisotropy change of fluorescent nucleotide was similar to that of phalloidin-actin. These results suggest that orientation changes of actin are caused by dissociation and rebinding of myosin cross-bridges, and that during contraction, nucleotide does not dissociate from actin. PMID:15041669

  6. Cardiac actin is the major actin gene product in skeletal muscle cell differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bains, W; Ponte, P; Blau, H; Kedes, L

    1984-01-01

    We examined the expression of alpha-skeletal, alpha-cardiac, and beta- and gamma-cytoskeletal actin genes in a mouse skeletal muscle cell line (C2C12) during differentiation in vitro. Using isotype-specific cDNA probes, we showed that the alpha-skeletal actin mRNA pool reached only 15% of the level reached in adult skeletal muscle and required several days to attain this peak, which was then stably maintained. However, these cells accumulated a pool of alpha-cardiac actin six times higher than the alpha-skeletal actin mRNA peak within 24 h of the initiation of differentiation. After cells had been cultured for an additional 3 days, this pool declined to 10% of its peak level. In contrast, over 95% of the actin mRNA in adult skeletal muscle coded for alpha-actin. This suggests that C2C12 cells express a pattern of sarcomeric actin genes typical of either muscle development or regeneration and distinct from that seen in mature, adult tissue. Concurrently in the course of differentiation the beta- and gamma-cytoskeletal actin mRNA pools decreased to less than 10% of their levels in proliferating cells. The decreases in beta- and gamma-cytoskeletal actin mRNAs are apparently not coordinately regulated. Images PMID:6493226

  7. Cross-linking study on skeletal muscle actin: properties of suberimidate-treated actin.

    PubMed

    Ohara, O; Takahashi, S; Ooi, T; Fujiyoshi, Y

    1982-06-01

    Cross-linking experiments were performed on muscle skeletal actin, using imidoesters of various chain lengths. Chemical analyses on all products except one (derived from succinimidate) show evidence of the presence of intramolecular cross-links in the molecule. The detailed properties of suberimidate-treated actin (SA) are as follows: SA contains nearly 1 mol of intramolecular cross-link per mol of actin and less than 15% of intermolecularly cross-linked products. Even at a low salt concentration, SA is polymeric, exchanges slowly its bound nucleotide with free nucleotides in solution, and shows an F-actin-type CD spectrum. Electron micrographs of SA reveal that SA exists actually as fibrous polymers in solutions of low ionic strength, although the fibers seem to be less rigid than those at high salt concentration. The F-form of SA at a high salt concentration is indistinguishable from intact F-actin. SA can bind heavy meromyosin and activate the ATPase of heavy meromyosin as observed for intact F-actin. Tropomyosin binds SA only at a high salt concentration. These results show that SA possesses the properties of F-actin even in media of low salt concentration, which are favorable for depolymerization of F-actin. Thus, we may infer that the conformation of SA is frozen in the F-state of actin by the introduction of intramolecular cross-links in the protein.

  8. Myosin and actin expression and oxidation in aging muscle

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, LaDora V.; Durand, David; Fugere, Nicole A.; Ferrington, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    While the age-related loss in muscle mass partially explains the decline in strength, other yet undefined mechanisms contribute. This study investigates whether changes in myosin-actin stoichiometry and oxidative modification could help explain the decrement in muscle strength with aging. Protein expression and oxidation were evaluated in myosin and actin isolated from the soleus and semimembranosus muscles from young adult, old, and very old Fischer 344 rats. In the soleus muscle, actin and myosin content did not change with aging. In the semimembranosus, actin content was stable, but myosin exhibited decreased content in muscles from very old rats, resulting in a decrease in the myosin-to-actin ratio. 3-Nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal were used as markers of protein oxidative damage. Although myosin and actin are modified with 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, the extent of chemical modification does not increase with age. The results suggest that the decline in force production with age is not due to the accumulation of these two specific markers of protein oxidation on the myofibrillar proteins. Additionally, age-dependent changes in myofibrillar stoichiometry do not contribute to the decline in force production in the soleus, but may play a role in the semimembranosus with advanced age. PMID:16840579

  9. Contractile properties of thin (actin) filament-reconstituted muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, S; Funatsu, T; Fujita, H

    1998-01-01

    Selective removal and reconstitution of the components of muscle fibers (fibrils) is a useful means of examining the molecular mechanism underlying the formation of the contractile apparatus. In addition, this approach is powerful for examining the structure-function relationship of a specific component of the contractile system. In previous studies, we have achieved the partial structural and functional reconstitution of thin filaments in the skeletal contractile apparatus and full reconstitution in the cardiac contractile apparatus. First, all thin filaments other than short fragments at the Z line were removed by treatment with plasma gelsolin, an actin filament-severing protein. Under these conditions, no active tension could be generated. By incorporating exogenous actin into these thin filament-free fibers, actin filaments were reconstituted by polymerization on the short actin fragments remaining at the Z line, and active tension, which was insensitive to Ca2+, was restored. The active tension after the reconstitution of thin filaments reached as high as 30% of the original level in skeletal muscle, while it reached 140% in cardiac muscle. The augmentation of tension in cardiac muscle is mainly attributable to the elongation of reconstituted filaments, longer than the average length of thin filaments in an intact muscle. These results indicate that a muscle contractile apparatus with a high order structure and function can be constructed by the self-assembly of constituent proteins. Recently, we applied this reconstitution system to the study of the mechanism of spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in thin (actin) filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers. As a result, we found that SPOC occurs even in regulatory protein-free actin filament-reconstituted fibers (Fujita & Ishiwata, manuscript submitted), although the SPOC conditions were slightly different from the standard SPOC conditions. This result strongly suggests that spontaneous oscillation

  10. Peptide Antibody Specific for the Amino Terminus of Skeletal Muscle α -actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulinski, Jeannette Chloe; Kumar, Santosh; Titani, Koiti; Hauschka, Stephen D.

    1983-03-01

    The NH2-terminal peptide of skeletal muscle α -actin (Sα N peptide), which contains a primary sequence unique to this actin isozyme, was used to prepare an isozyme-specific peptide antibody. Sα N peptide was purified from chicken breast muscle actin by preparative reverse-phase HPLC and was coupled to hemocyanin. This complex was used to immunize rabbits in order to elicit actin antibodies specific for the skeletal muscle α -actin isozyme. The antibody obtained, called Sα N antibody, was reactive with Sα N peptide and with skeletal muscle α -actin as well as with cardiac muscle α -actin. Sα N antibody did not react with either of the actin isozymes present in smooth muscle (smooth muscle α and γ ) or in brain (nonmuscle β and γ ). Sα N antibody was used to detect muscle-specific actin in differentiating mouse and human myoblasts by using immunoblots of myoblast extracts and immunofluorescent staining of fixed cells.

  11. Human muscle LIM protein dimerizes along the actin cytoskeleton and cross-links actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Céline; Moreau, Flora; Moes, Michèle; Luthold, Carole; Dieterle, Monika; Goretti, Emeline; Neumann, Katrin; Steinmetz, André; Thomas, Clément

    2014-08-01

    The muscle LIM protein (MLP) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein playing important roles in the regulation of myocyte remodeling and adaptation to hypertrophic stimuli. Missense mutations in human MLP or its ablation in transgenic mice promotes cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The exact function(s) of MLP in the cytoplasmic compartment and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that MLP autonomously binds to, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments (AFs) independently of calcium and pH. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have shown how MLP cross-links actin filaments into both unipolar and mixed-polarity bundles. Quantitative analysis of the actin cytoskeleton configuration confirmed that MLP substantially promotes actin bundling in live myoblasts. In addition, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays revealed MLP self-association. Remarkably, BiFC complexes mostly localize along actin filament-rich structures, such as stress fibers and sarcomeres, supporting a functional link between MLP self-association and actin cross-linking. Finally, we have demonstrated that MLP self-associates through its N-terminal LIM domain, whereas it binds to AFs through its C-terminal LIM domain. Together our data support that MLP contributes to the maintenance of cardiomyocyte cytoarchitecture by a mechanism involving its self-association and actin filament cross-linking. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Human Muscle LIM Protein Dimerizes along the Actin Cytoskeleton and Cross-Links Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Céline; Moreau, Flora; Moes, Michèle; Luthold, Carole; Dieterle, Monika; Goretti, Emeline; Neumann, Katrin; Steinmetz, André

    2014-01-01

    The muscle LIM protein (MLP) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein playing important roles in the regulation of myocyte remodeling and adaptation to hypertrophic stimuli. Missense mutations in human MLP or its ablation in transgenic mice promotes cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The exact function(s) of MLP in the cytoplasmic compartment and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we provide evidence that MLP autonomously binds to, stabilizes, and bundles actin filaments (AFs) independently of calcium and pH. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we have shown how MLP cross-links actin filaments into both unipolar and mixed-polarity bundles. Quantitative analysis of the actin cytoskeleton configuration confirmed that MLP substantially promotes actin bundling in live myoblasts. In addition, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays revealed MLP self-association. Remarkably, BiFC complexes mostly localize along actin filament-rich structures, such as stress fibers and sarcomeres, supporting a functional link between MLP self-association and actin cross-linking. Finally, we have demonstrated that MLP self-associates through its N-terminal LIM domain, whereas it binds to AFs through its C-terminal LIM domain. Together our data support that MLP contributes to the maintenance of cardiomyocyte cytoarchitecture by a mechanism involving its self-association and actin filament cross-linking. PMID:24934443

  13. Cofilin-2 controls actin filament length in muscle sarcomeres

    PubMed Central

    Kremneva, Elena; Makkonen, Maarit H.; Skwarek-Maruszewska, Aneta; Gateva, Gergana; Michelot, Alphee; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY ADF/cofilins drive cytoskeletal dynamics by promoting the disassembly of ‘aged’ ADP-actin filaments. Mammals express several ADF/cofilin isoforms, but their specific biochemical activities and cellular functions have not been studied in detail. Here we demonstrate that the muscle-specific isoform cofilin-2 promotes actin filament disassembly in sarcomeres to control the precise length of thin filaments in the contractile apparatus. In contrast to other isoforms, cofilin-2 efficiently binds and disassembles both ADP- and ATP/ADP-Pi-actin filaments. We mapped surface-exposed cofilin-2-specific residues required for ATP-actin binding and propose that these residues function as an ‘actin nucleotide-state sensor’ among ADF/cofilins. The results suggest that cofilin-2 evolved specific biochemical and cellular properties allowing it to control actin dynamics in sarcomeres, where filament pointed ends may contain a mixture of ADP- and ATP/ADP-Pi-actin subunits. Our findings also offer a rationale for why cofilin-2 mutations in humans lead to myopathies. PMID:25373779

  14. Morphological change and crystal structure of skeletal muscle actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Mieko; Kamiya, Yoshihiro

    1983-04-01

    Actin from skeletal muscle was crystallized in fluorescent dye/acetone solutions. Three different polymorphic forms of the crystals were observed by polarization microscope and video system. Ultrastructural observation and electron diffraction analysis of the crystals have been made using a 1 MeV electron microscope. The specimens were unstained or negatively stained with uranyl acetate. The diffraction spots of the crystals faded within twenty seconds. Minimum dose system and low temperature techniques were effective in taking highly resolved images and diffraction patterns of the crystals. Actin crystals diffracted well to 2 Å resolution. The rod form of actin crystals is orthorhic and the cell dimensions are 61 Å × 41 Å × 33 Å. The unit cell contains one actin monomer.

  15. Sumoylated α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscle of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Uda, Munehiro; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Shigenaga, Ayako; Baba, Takeshi; Naito, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Yamakura, Fumiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of two major muscle fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative fibers and fast-twitch glycolytic fibers. The proteins in these muscle fibers are known to differ in their expression, relative abundance, and post-translational modifications. In this study, we report a previously unreported post-translational modification of α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscles of adult male F344 rats in vivo. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), we first examined the differences in the protein expression profiles between the soleus and plantaris muscles. We found higher intensity protein spots at approximately 60 kDa and pH 9 on 2D-PAGE for the soleus muscle compared with the plantaris muscle. These spots were identified as α-skeletal muscle actin by liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and western blot analyses. In addition, we found that the 60 kDa α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1, using 2D-PAGE and western blot analyses. Furthermore, we found that α-skeletal muscle actin with larger molecular weight was localized in the nuclear and cytosol of the skeletal muscle, but not in the myofibrillar fraction by the combination of subcellular fractionation and western blot analyses. These results suggest that α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by SUMO-1 in the skeletal muscles, localized in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, and the extent of this modification is much higher in the slow muscles than in the fast muscles. This is the first study to show the presence of SUMOylated actin in animal tissues.

  16. Cytoskeletal remodeling in differentiated vascular smooth muscle is actin isoform dependent and stimulus dependent.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Rim; Gallant, Cynthia; Leavis, Paul C; Gunst, Susan J; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton plays an essential role in the migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. It has been suggested that actin remodeling may also play an important functional role in nonmigrating, nonproliferating differentiated vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). In the present study, we show that contractile agonists increase the net polymerization of actin in dVSM, as measured by the differential ultracentrifugation of vascular smooth muscle tissue and the costaining of single freshly dissociated cells with fluorescent probes specific for globular and filamentous actin. Furthermore, induced alterations of the actin polymerization state, as well as actin decoy peptides, inhibit contractility in a stimulus-dependent manner. Latrunculin pretreatment or actin decoy peptides significantly inhibit contractility induced by a phorbol ester or an alpha-agonist, but these procedures have no effect on contractions induced by KCl. Aorta dVSM expresses alpha-smooth muscle actin, beta-actin, nonmuscle gamma-actin, and smooth muscle gamma-actin. The incorporation of isoform-specific cell-permeant synthetic actin decoy peptides, as well as isoform-specific probing of cell fractions and two-dimensional gels, demonstrates that actin remodeling during alpha-agonist contractions involves the remodeling of primarily gamma-actin and, to a lesser extent, beta-actin. Taken together, these results show that net isoform- and agonist-dependent increases in actin polymerization regulate vascular contractility.

  17. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  18. Rotation of actin monomers during isometric contraction of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Borejdo, Julian; Muthu, Priya; Talent, John; Akopova, Irina; Burghardt, Thomas P

    2007-01-01

    Cyclic interactions of myosin and actin are responsible for contraction of muscle. It is not self-evident, however, that the mechanical cycle occurs during steady-state isometric contraction where no work is produced. Studying cross-bridge dynamics during isometric steady-state contraction requires an equilibrium time-resolved method (not involving application of a transient). This work introduces such a method, which analyzes fluctuations of anisotropy of a few actin molecules in muscle. Fluorescence anisotropy, indicating orientation of an actin protomer, is collected from a volume of a few attoliters (10(-18) L) by confocal total internal reflection (CTIR) microscopy. In this method, the detection volume is made shallow by TIR illumination, and narrow by confocal aperture inserted in the conjugate image plane. The signal is contributed by approximately 12 labeled actin molecules. Shortening of a myofibril during contraction is prevented by light cross-linking with 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylamino)-propyl]-carbodiimide. The root mean-squared anisotropy fluctuations are greater in isometrically contracting than in rigor myofibrils. The results support the view that during isometric contraction, cross-bridges undergo a mechanical cycle.

  19. Endothelial cells direct mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle cell fate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cho-Hao; Lilly, Brenda

    2014-11-01

    Under defined conditions, mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into unique cell types, making them attractive candidates for cell-based disease therapies. Ischemic diseases would greatly benefit from treatments that include the formation of new blood vessels from mesenchymal stem cells. However, blood vessels are complex structures composed of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and their assembly and function in a diseased environment is reliant upon joining with the pre-existing vasculature. Although endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell interactions are well known, how endothelial cells may influence mesenchymal stem cells and facilitate their differentiation has not been defined. Therefore, we sought to explore how endothelial cells might drive mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle fate. Our data show that cocultured endothelial cells induce smooth muscle cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. Endothelial cells can promote a contractile phenotype, reduce proliferation, and enhance collagen synthesis and secretion. Our data show that Notch signaling is essential for endothelial cell-dependent differentiation, and this differentiation pathway is largely independent of growth factor signaling mechanisms.

  20. Regulation of actin filament length in erythrocytes and striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Fowler, V M

    1996-02-01

    Actin filaments polymerize in vitro to lengths which display an exponential distribution, yet in many highly differentiated cells they can be precisely maintained at uniform lengths in elaborate supramolecular structures. Recent results obtained using two classic model systems, the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton and the striated muscle sarcomere, reveal surprising similarities and instructive differences in the molecules and mechanisms responsible for determining and maintaining actin filament lengths in these two systems. Tropomodulin caps the slow-growing, pointed filament ends in muscle and in erythrocytes. CapZ caps the fast-growing, barbed filament ends in striated muscle, whereas a newly discovered barbed end capping protein, adducin, may cap the barbed filament ends in erythrocytes. The mechanisms responsible for specifying the characteristic filament lengths in these systems are more elusive and may include strict control of the relative amounts of actin filament capping proteins and side-binding proteins, molecular templates (e.g. tropomyosin and nebulin) and/or verniers (e.g. tropomyosin).

  1. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  2. Fetal akinesia caused by a novel actin filament aggregate myopathy skeletal muscle actin gene (ACTA1) mutation.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Werner; Prokop, Stefan; Kress, Wolfram; Huppmann, Stephanie; Loui, Andrea; Sarioglu, Nanette M E; Laing, Nigel G; Sparrow, John C; Heppner, Frank L; Goebel, Hans H

    2010-08-01

    We report a female newborn, diagnosed with fetal akinesia in utero, who died one hour after birth. Post-mortem muscle biopsy demonstrated actin-filament myopathy based on immunolabelling for sarcomeric actin, and large areas of filaments, without rod formation, ultrastructurally. Analysis of DNA extracted from the muscle disclosed a novel de novo heterozygous c.44G>A, GGC>GAC, 'p.Gly15Asp' mutation in the ACTA1 gene. Analysis of the location of the mutated amino-acid in the actin molecule suggests the mutation most likely causes abnormal nucleotide binding, and consequent pathological actin polymerization. This case emphasizes the association of fetal akinesia with actin-filament myopathy.

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the human gamma cytoskeletal actin mRNA: anomalous evolution of vertebrate non-muscle actin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Erba, H P; Gunning, P; Kedes, L

    1986-01-01

    Two distinct, but iso-coding, gamma non-muscle actin cDNAs were isolated from an SV40-transformed human fibroblast library. The complete nucleotide sequence of the human gamma non-muscle actin cDNAs indicates that they may have arisen from polymorphic alleles. By using genomic DNA and cellular RNA transfer blots, we demonstrate that the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the gamma actin mRNA consists of an evolutionarily conserved 5' and more divergent 3' segments. In fact, the conserved segment of the 3' UTR detects a single-copy sequence in the chicken genome and a 20S RNA transcript in chicken non-muscle tissues. The coding regions of these cDNAs were compared with those of other vertebrate non-muscle actin genes. Surprisingly, the percentage of silent base substitutions between the human beta and gamma actin coding regions is anomalously low and indicates greater sequence conservation than would be expected for a gene pair which arose during pre-avian evolution. We discuss gene conversion and recent selective pressure as possible explanations of the apparently anomalous evolution of the gamma non-muscle actin gene. Images PMID:3737401

  4. Muscle lim protein isoform negatively regulates striated muscle actin dynamics and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Arvanitis, Demetrios A; Papalouka, Vasiliki; Terzis, Gerasimos; Roumeliotis, Theodoros I; Spengos, Konstantinos; Garbis, Spiros D; Manta, Panagiota; Kranias, Evangelia G; Sanoudou, Despina

    2014-07-01

    Muscle lim protein (MLP) has emerged as a critical regulator of striated muscle physiology and pathophysiology. Mutations in cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3 (CSRP3), the gene encoding MLP, have been directly associated with human cardiomyopathies, whereas aberrant expression patterns are reported in human cardiac and skeletal muscle diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that MLP has an important role in both myogenic differentiation and myocyte cytoarchitecture, although the full spectrum of its intracellular roles has not been delineated. We report the discovery of an alternative splice variant of MLP, designated as MLP-b, showing distinct expression in neuromuscular disease and direct roles in actin dynamics and muscle differentiation. This novel isoform originates by alternative splicing of exons 3 and 4. At the protein level, it contains the N-terminus first half LIM domain of MLP and a unique sequence of 22 amino acids. Physiologically, it is expressed during early differentiation, whereas its overexpression reduces C2C12 differentiation and myotube formation. This may be mediated through its inhibition of MLP/cofilin-2-mediated F-actin dynamics. In differentiated striated muscles, MLP-b localizes to the sarcomeres and binds directly to Z-disc components, including α-actinin, T-cap and MLP. The findings of the present study unveil a novel player in muscle physiology and pathophysiology that is implicated in myogenesis as a negative regulator of myotube formation, as well as in differentiated striated muscles as a contributor to sarcomeric integrity. © 2014 FEBS.

  5. Muscle Lim Protein isoform negatively regulates striated muscle actin dynamics and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Arvanitis, Demetrios A.; Papalouka, Vasiliki; Terzis, Gerasimos; Roumeliotis, Theodoros I.; Spengos, Konstantinos; Garbis, Spiros D.; Manta, Panagiota; Kranias, Evangelia G.; Sanoudou, Despina

    2015-01-01

    Muscle Lim Protein (MLP) has emerged as a critical regulator of striated muscle physiology and pathophysiology. Mutations in cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3 (CSRP3), the gene encoding MLP, have been directly associated with human cardiomyopathies, while aberrant expression patterns are reported in human cardiac and skeletal muscle diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that MLP has an important role in both myogenic differentiation and myocyte cytoarchitecture, although the full spectrum of its intracellular roles has not been delineated. We report the discovery of an alternative splice variant of MLP, designated as MLP-b, showing distinct expression in neuromuscular disease and direct roles in actin dynamics and muscle differentiation. This novel isoform originates by alternative splicing of exons 3 and 4. At the protein level, it contains the N-terminus first half LIM domain of MLP and a unique sequence of 22 amino acids. Physiologically it is expressed during early differentiation, whereas its overexpression reduces C2C12 differentiation and myotube formation. This may be mediated through its inhibition of MLP/CFL2-mediated F-actin dynamics. In differentiated striated muscles, MLP-b localizes to the sarcomeres and binds directly to Z-disc components including α-actinin, T-cap and MLP. Our findings unveil a novel player in muscle physiology and pathophysiology that is implicated in myogenesis as a negative regulator of myotube formation, and in differentiated striated muscles as a contributor to sarcomeric integrity. PMID:24860983

  6. Muscle coding sequences and their regulation during myogenesis: cloning of muscle actin cDNA probes.

    PubMed

    Minty, A; Caravatti, M; Robert, B; Cohen, A; Daubas, P; Weydert, A; Gros, F; Buckingham, M

    1981-01-01

    For a number of years our group has been mainly interested in the regulation of muscle gene expression during myogenesis. Using primary cultures and cell lines we have tried to find out whether the coding sequences for muscle proteins are already present in an unexpressed form or if there is a transcriptional switch at the onset of differentiation. Metabolic studies on pulse-labelled RNA, together with translation and molecular hybridization experiments have given a certain number of indications. More recently the development of genetic engineering techniques has made it possible to answer these questions directly with probes which are complementary to specific muscle coding sequences. We have identified a plasmid which contains a coding sequence for muscle actin. Other recombinant plasmids are being characterized. Such plasmids, used as probes, will permit us to study the organization and expression of the genes coding for the contractile proteins in muscle cells.

  7. CAS-1, a C. elegans cyclase-associated protein, is required for sarcomeric actin assembly in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    Assembly of contractile apparatuses in striated muscle requires precisely regulated reorganization of the actin cytoskeletal proteins into sarcomeric organization. Regulation of actin filament dynamics is one of the essential processes of myofibril assembly, but the mechanism of actin regulation in striated muscle is not clearly understood. Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is a key enhancer of actin filament dynamics in striated muscle in both vertebrates and nematodes. Here, we report that CAS-1, a cyclase-associated protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, promotes ADF/cofilin-dependent actin filament turnover in vitro and is required for sarcomeric actin organization in striated muscle. CAS-1 is predominantly expressed in striated muscle from embryos to adults. In vitro, CAS-1 binds to actin monomers and enhances exchange of actin-bound ATP/ADP even in the presence of UNC-60B, a muscle-specific ADF/cofilin that inhibits the nucleotide exchange. As a result, CAS-1 and UNC-60B cooperatively enhance actin filament turnover. The two proteins also cooperate to shorten actin filaments. A cas-1 mutation is homozygous lethal with defects in sarcomeric actin organization. cas-1-mutant embryos and worms have aggregates of actin in muscle cells, and UNC-60B is mislocalized to the aggregates. These results provide genetic and biochemical evidence that cyclase-associated protein is a critical regulator of sarcomeric actin organization in striated muscle.

  8. Dynamin-2 mutations linked to Centronuclear Myopathy impair actin-dependent trafficking in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    González-Jamett, Arlek M; Baez-Matus, Ximena; Olivares, María José; Hinostroza, Fernando; Guerra-Fernández, Maria José; Vasquez-Navarrete, Jacqueline; Bui, Mai Thao; Guicheney, Pascale; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Bevilacqua, Jorge A; Bitoun, Marc; Caviedes, Pablo; Cárdenas, Ana M

    2017-07-04

    Dynamin-2 is a ubiquitously expressed GTP-ase that mediates membrane remodeling. Recent findings indicate that dynamin-2 also regulates actin dynamics. Mutations in dynamin-2 cause dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM), a congenital myopathy characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy of skeletal muscles. However, the muscle-specific roles of dynamin-2 affected by these mutations remain elusive. Here we show that, in muscle cells, the GTP-ase activity of dynamin-2 is involved in de novo actin polymerization as well as in actin-mediated trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT4. Expression of dynamin-2 constructs carrying CNM-linked mutations disrupted the formation of new actin filaments as well as the stimulus-induced translocation of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane. Similarly, mature muscle fibers isolated from heterozygous knock-in mice that harbor the dynamin-2 mutation p.R465W, an animal model of CNM, exhibited altered actin organization, reduced actin polymerization and impaired insulin-induced translocation of GLUT4 to the sarcolemma. Moreover, GLUT4 displayed aberrant perinuclear accumulation in biopsies from CNM patients carrying dynamin-2 mutations, further suggesting trafficking defects. These results suggest that dynamin-2 is a key regulator of actin dynamics and GLUT4 trafficking in muscle cells. Our findings also support a model in which impairment of actin-dependent trafficking contributes to the pathological mechanism in dynamin-2-associated CNM.

  9. Cytoplasmic γ-actin and tropomodulin isoforms link to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.

    2011-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) serves as the Ca2+ reservoir for muscle contraction. Tropomodulins (Tmods) cap filamentous actin (F-actin) pointed ends, bind tropomyosins (Tms), and regulate F-actin organization. In this paper, we use a genetic targeting approach to examine the effect of Tmod1 deletion on the organization of cytoplasmic γ-actin (γcyto-actin) in the SR of skeletal muscle. In wild-type muscle fibers, γcyto-actin and Tmod3 defined an SR microdomain that was distinct from another Z line–flanking SR microdomain containing Tmod1 and Tmod4. The γcyto-actin/Tmod3 microdomain contained an M line complex composed of small ankyrin 1.5 (sAnk1.5), γcyto-actin, Tmod3, Tm4, and Tm5NM1. Tmod1 deletion caused Tmod3 to leave its SR compartment, leading to mislocalization and destabilization of the Tmod3–γcyto-actin–sAnk1.5 complex. This was accompanied by SR morphological defects, impaired Ca2+ release, and an age-dependent increase in sarcomere misalignment. Thus, Tmod3 regulates SR-associated γcyto-actin architecture, mechanically stabilizes the SR via a novel cytoskeletal linkage to sAnk1.5, and maintains the alignment of adjacent myofibrils. PMID:21727195

  10. Myopathy mutations in alpha-skeletal-muscle actin cause a range of molecular defects.

    PubMed

    Costa, Céline F; Rommelaere, Heidi; Waterschoot, Davy; Sethi, Kamaljit K; Nowak, Kristen J; Laing, Nigel G; Ampe, Christophe; Machesky, Laura M

    2004-07-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding alpha-skeletal-muscle actin, ACTA1, cause congenital myopathies of various phenotypes that have been studied since their discovery in 1999. Although much is now known about the clinical aspects of myopathies resulting from over 60 different ACTA1 mutations, we have very little evidence for how mutations alter the behavior of the actin protein and thus lead to disease. We used a combination of biochemical and cell biological analysis to classify 19 myopathy mutants and found a range of defects in the actin. Using in vitro expression systems, we probed actin folding and actin's capacity to interact with actin-binding proteins and polymerization. Only two mutants failed to fold; these represent recessive alleles, causing severe myopathy, indicating that patients produce nonfunctional actin. Four other mutants bound tightly to cyclase-associated protein, indicating a possible instability in the nucleotide-binding pocket, and formed rods and aggregates in cells. Eleven mutants showed defects in the ability to co-polymerize with wild-type actin. Some of these could incorporate into normal actin structures in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, but two of the three tested also formed aggregates. Four mutants showed no defect in vitro but two of these formed aggregates in cells, indicating functional defects that we have not yet tested for. Overall, we found a range of defects and behaviors of the mutants in vitro and in cultured cells, paralleling the complexity of actin-based muscle myopathy phenotypes.

  11. Release of α-actin into serum after skeletal muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Amat, A; Boulaiz, H; Prados, J; Marchal, J; Padial, P; Caba, O; Rodriguez-Serrano, F; Aranega, A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The skeletal muscle protein α-actin was investigated in the serum of subjects with severe skeletal muscle damage to assess its utility as a reliable and predictive marker of muscle damage. Methods: Serum samples were obtained from 33 healthy controls and 33 patients with severe skeletal muscle damage, defined by a total creatine kinase value of >500 IU/l (Rosalki method). Troponin I, troponin T, and myoglobin concentrations were determined by immunoassay and α-actin concentrations by Western blot and densitometry. Results: The mean serum concentration of α-actin in controls and patients with skeletal muscle damage was 600.9 and 1968.51 ng/ml, respectively, a statistically significant difference. Sera of patients with muscle damage showed higher levels of α-actin than of troponin or myoglobin. No significant difference in troponin I levels was observed between the groups. Conclusions: According to these results, α-actin was the most significant skeletal muscle damage marker analysed and may be an ideal candidate for the identification of all types of myofibre injury, including sports injuries. Our findings support the use of α-actin as a marker alongside other currently used biological proteins. PMID:16244192

  12. Game of Zones: how actin-binding proteins organize muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Locomotion of C. elegans requires coordinated, efficient transmission of forces generated on the molecular scale by myosin and actin filaments in myocytes to dense bodies and the hypodermis and cuticle enveloping body wall muscles. The complex organization of the acto-myosin scaffold with its accessory proteins provides a fine-tuned machinery regulated by effectors that guarantees that sarcomere units undergo controlled, reversible cycles of contraction and relaxation. Actin filaments in sarcomeres dynamically undergo polymerization and depolymerization. In a recent study, the actin-binding protein DBN-1, the C. elegans ortholog of human drebrin and drebrin-like proteins, was discovered to stabilize actin in muscle cells. DBN-1 reversibly changes location between actin filaments and myosin-rich regions during muscle contraction. Mutations in DBN-1 result in mislocalization of other actin-binding proteins. Here we discuss implications of this finding for the regulation of sarcomere actin stability and the organization of other actin-binding proteins. PMID:27383012

  13. Structure and Dynamics of the Actin-Based Smooth Muscle Contractile and Cytoskeletal Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, William; Morgan, Kathleen G.

    2012-01-01

    The thin filaments of differentiated smooth muscle cells are composed of actin and tropomyosin isoforms and numerous ancillary actin-binding proteins that assemble together into distinct thin filament classes. These different filament classes are segregated in smooth muscle cells into structurally and functionally separated contractile and cytoskeletal cellular domains. Typically, thin filaments in smooth muscle cells have been considered to be relatively stable structures like those in striated cells. However, recent efforts have shown that smooth muscle thin filaments indeed are dynamic and that remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, in particular, regulates smooth muscle function. Thus, the cytoskeleton of differentiated smooth muscle cells appears to function midway between that of less dynamic striated muscle cells and that of very plastic proliferative cells such as fibroblasts. Michael and Kate Bárány keenly followed and participated in some of these studies, consistent with their broad interest in actin function and smooth muscle mechanisms. As a way of honoring the memory of these two pioneer members of the muscle research community, we review data on distribution and remodeling of thin filaments in smooth muscle cells, one of the many research topics that intrigued them. PMID:22311558

  14. Prolonged vasoconstriction of resistance arteries involves vascular smooth muscle actin polymerization leading to inward remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Staiculescu, Marius C.; Galiñanes, Edgar L.; Zhao, Guiling; Ulloa, Uri; Jin, Minshan; Beig, Mirza I.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Inward remodelling of the resistance vasculature is predictive of hypertension and life-threatening cardiovascular events. We hypothesize that the contractile mechanisms responsible for maintaining a reduced diameter over time in response to prolonged stimulation with vasoconstrictor agonists are in part responsible for the initial stages of the remodelling process. Here we investigated the role of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) actin polymerization on agonist-induced vasoconstriction and development of inward remodelling. Methods and results Experiments were conducted in Sprague–Dawley rat resistance vessels isolated from the cremaster and mesentery. Within blood vessels, actin dynamics of VSM were monitored by confocal microscopy after introduction of fluorescent actin monomers through electroporation and by differential centrifugation to probe globular (G) and filamentous (F) actin content. Results indicated that 4 h of agonist-dependent vasoconstriction induced inward remodelling and caused significant actin polymerization, elevating the F-/total-actin ratio. Inhibition of actin polymerization prevented vessels from maintaining prolonged vasoconstriction and developing inward remodelling. Activation of the small GTPases Rho/Rac/Cdc42 also increased the F-/total-actin ratio and induced inward remodelling, while inhibition of Rho kinase or Rac-1 prevented inward remodelling. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton reversed the inward remodelling caused by prolonged vasoconstriction, but did not affect the passive diameter of freshly isolated vessels. Conclusion These results indicate that vasoconstriction-induced inward remodelling is in part caused by the polymerization of actin within VSM cells through activation of small GTPases. PMID:23417038

  15. Prolonged vasoconstriction of resistance arteries involves vascular smooth muscle actin polymerization leading to inward remodelling.

    PubMed

    Staiculescu, Marius C; Galiñanes, Edgar L; Zhao, Guiling; Ulloa, Uri; Jin, Minshan; Beig, Mirza I; Meininger, Gerald A; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A

    2013-06-01

    Inward remodelling of the resistance vasculature is predictive of hypertension and life-threatening cardiovascular events. We hypothesize that the contractile mechanisms responsible for maintaining a reduced diameter over time in response to prolonged stimulation with vasoconstrictor agonists are in part responsible for the initial stages of the remodelling process. Here we investigated the role of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) actin polymerization on agonist-induced vasoconstriction and development of inward remodelling. Experiments were conducted in Sprague-Dawley rat resistance vessels isolated from the cremaster and mesentery. Within blood vessels, actin dynamics of VSM were monitored by confocal microscopy after introduction of fluorescent actin monomers through electroporation and by differential centrifugation to probe globular (G) and filamentous (F) actin content. Results indicated that 4 h of agonist-dependent vasoconstriction induced inward remodelling and caused significant actin polymerization, elevating the F-/total-actin ratio. Inhibition of actin polymerization prevented vessels from maintaining prolonged vasoconstriction and developing inward remodelling. Activation of the small GTPases Rho/Rac/Cdc42 also increased the F-/total-actin ratio and induced inward remodelling, while inhibition of Rho kinase or Rac-1 prevented inward remodelling. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton reversed the inward remodelling caused by prolonged vasoconstriction, but did not affect the passive diameter of freshly isolated vessels. These results indicate that vasoconstriction-induced inward remodelling is in part caused by the polymerization of actin within VSM cells through activation of small GTPases.

  16. Atrophy of myoepithelial cells in parotid glands of diabetic mice; detection using skeletal muscle actin, a novel marker☆

    PubMed Central

    Nashida, Tomoko; Yoshie, Sumio; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Imai, Akane; Shimomura, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    In mouse parotid glands, we found expression of skeletal muscle actin (actin-α1) protein and mRNA. We isolated myoepithelial cells from the mouse parotid glands and investigated their actin-α1 expression because smooth muscle actin (actin-α2) has been used as a marker for myoepithelial cells. We used actin-α1 expression to identify pathological changes in diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD; NOD/ShiJcl) mice—a mouse model for Sjögren's syndrome—and found myoepithelial cells to be decreased or atrophied in the diabetic state. PMID:23772384

  17. HHF35, a muscle-actin-specific monoclonal antibody. I. Immunocytochemical and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, T; Tippens, D; Gordon, D; Ross, R; Gown, A M

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to muscle cell actin isotypes was produced and characterized. Immunocytochemical analysis of methanol-Carnoy's-fixed, paraffin-embedded human tissue revealed that this antibody, termed HHF35, reacts with skeletal muscle cells, cardiac muscle cells, smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and myoepithelial cells, but is nonreactive with endothelial, epithelial, neural, or connective tissue cells. When assayed by indirect immunofluorescence, HHF35 reacts with microfilament bundles from various cultured mammalian smooth muscle cells, but does not react with cultured human dermal fibroblasts or various epithelial tumor cell lines. In one-dimensional gel electrophoresis immunoblot experiments this antibody detects a 42-kd polypeptide from tissue extracts of uterus, ileum, aorta, diaphragm, and heart and extract from smooth muscle cells. The antibody also reacts with a comigrating 42-kd band of highly purified rabbit skeletal muscle actin. HHF35 is nonreactive on immunoblots of extracts from all tested nonmuscle cell extracts. Immunoelectrophoresis followed by immunoblotting performed in the presence of urea and reducing agents reveals recognition of the alpha isoelectrophoretic variant of actin from skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle sources and of the gamma variant from smooth muscle sources. Because HHF35 reacts with virtually all muscle cells, it will be useful as a marker for muscle and muscle-derived cells.

  18. Differential Interaction of Cardiac, Skeletal Muscle, and Yeast Tropomyosins with Fluorescent (Pyrene235) Yeast Actin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weizu; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Sens, Ashley E.; Rubenstein, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    To monitor binding of tropomyosin to yeast actin, we mutated S235 to C and labeled the actin with pyrene maleimide at both C235 and the normally reactive C374. Saturating cardiac tropomyosin (cTM) caused about a 20% increase in pyrene fluorescence of the doubly labeled F-actin but no change in WT actin C374 probe fluorescence. Skeletal muscle tropomyosin caused only a 7% fluorescence increase, suggesting differential binding modes for the two tropomyosins. The increased cTM-induced fluorescence was proportional to the extent of tropomyosin binding. Yeast tropomyosin (TPM1) produced less increase in fluorescence than did cTM, whereas that caused by yeast TPM2 was greater than either TPM1 or cTM. Cardiac troponin largely reversed the cTM-induced fluorescence increase, and subsequent addition of calcium resulted in a small fluorescence recovery. An A230Y mutation, which causes a Ca+2-dependent hypercontractile response of regulated thin filaments, did not change probe235 fluorescence of actin alone or with tropomyosin ± troponin. However, addition of calcium resulted in twice the fluorescence recovery observed with WT actin. Our results demonstrate isoform-specific binding of different tropomyosins to actin and suggest allosteric regulation of the tropomyosin/actin interaction across the actin interdomain cleft. PMID:16326906

  19. A fluorescent probe for conformational changes in skeletal muscle G-actin.

    PubMed

    Frieden, C; Lieberman, D; Gilbert, H R

    1980-10-10

    Actin from rabbit skeletal muscle has been modified with the fluorescent label N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (1,5-I-AEDANS). Under conditions where the actin is in the unpolymerized form (G-actin), the addition of Mg2+ or KCl results in enhancement of the fluorescence. Titration of the labeled G-actin with Mg2+ at varying concentrations of CaCl2 gives, by extrapolation, a value for the dissociation constant for Mg2+ of 35 microM in the absence of Ca2+ and a calculated value of 10 microM for Ca2+ in the absence of Mg2+. The two metal ions compete with each other. The fluorescence enhancement induced by Mg2+ is reversed by the addition of Ca2+ and both processes are time-dependent, indicating a reversible conformational change of G-actin as a consequence of addition of divalent metal. KCl also enhances the fluorescence of the labeled G-actin but does not appear to compete with the divalent metal ion. The enhancement of the fluorescence is very rapid and any conformational change induced by KCl is probably different from that induced by divalent metal ions. Finally, it is shown that loss of fluorescence of the labeled G-actin may be associated with inactivation of the actin.

  20. Tropomyosin movement on F-actin during muscle activation explained by energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Orzechowski, Marek; Moore, Jeffrey R; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2014-03-01

    Muscle contraction is regulated by tropomyosin movement across the thin filament surface, which exposes or blocks myosin-binding sites on actin. Recent atomic structures of F-actin-tropomyosin have yielded the positions of tropomyosin on myosin-free and myosin-decorated actin. Here, the repositioning of α-tropomyosin between these locations on F-actin was systematically examined by optimizing the energy of the complex for a wide range of tropomyosin positions on F-actin. The resulting energy landscape provides a full-map of the F-actin surface preferred by tropomyosin, revealing a broad energy basin associated with the tropomyosin position that blocks myosin-binding. This is consistent with previously proposed low-energy oscillations of semi-rigid tropomyosin, necessary for shifting of tropomyosin following troponin-binding. In contrast, the landscape shows much less favorable energies when tropomyosin locates near its myosin-induced "open-state" position. This indicates that spontaneous movement of tropomyosin away from its energetic "ground-state" to the open-state is unlikely in absence of myosin. Instead, myosin-binding must drive tropomyosin toward the open-state to activate the thin filament. Additional energy landscapes were computed for disease-causing actin mutants that distort the topology of the actin-tropomyosin energy landscape, explaining their phenotypes. Thus, the computation of such energy landscapes offers a sensitive way to estimate the impact of mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Extraction Protocols for Individual Zebrafish's Ventricle Myosin and Skeletal Muscle Actin for In vitro Motility Assays

    PubMed Central

    Scheid, Lisa-Mareike; Weber, Cornelia; Bopp, Nasrin; Mosqueira, Matias; Fink, Rainer H. A.

    2017-01-01

    The in vitro motility assay (IVMA) is a technique that enables the measurement of the interaction between actin and myosin providing a relatively simple model to understand the mechanical muscle function. For actin-myosin IVMA, myosin is immobilized in a measurement chamber, where it converts chemical energy provided by ATP hydrolysis into mechanical energy. The result is the movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments that can be recorded microscopically and analyzed quantitatively. Resulting sliding speeds and patterns help to characterize the underlying actin-myosin interaction that can be affected by different factors such as mutations or active compounds. Additionally, modulatory actions of the regulatory proteins tropomyosin and troponin in the presence of calcium on actin-myosin interaction can be studied with the IVMA. Zebrafish is considered a suitable model organism for cardiovascular and skeletal muscle research. In this context, straightforward protocols for the isolation and use of zebrafish muscle proteins in the IVMA would provide a useful tool in molecular studies. Currently, there are no protocols available for the mentioned purpose. Therefore, we developed fast and easy protocols for characterization of zebrafish proteins in the IVMA. Our protocols enable the interested researcher to (i) isolate actin from zebrafish skeletal muscle and (ii) extract functionally intact myosin from cardiac and skeletal muscle of individual adult zebrafish. Zebrafish tail muscle actin is isolated after acetone powder preparation, polymerized, and labeled with Rhodamine-Phalloidin. Myosin from ventricles of adult zebrafish is extracted directly into IVMA flow-cells. The same extraction protocol is applicable for comparably small tissue pieces as from zebrafish tail, mouse and frog muscle. After addition of the fluorescently labeled F-actin from zebrafish—or other origin—and ATP, sliding movement can be visualized using a fluorescence microscope and an

  2. Tropomodulin Capping of Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle Development and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient striated muscle contraction requires precise assembly and regulation of diverse actin filament systems, most notably the sarcomeric thin filaments of the contractile apparatus. By capping the pointed ends of actin filaments, tropomodulins (Tmods) regulate actin filament assembly, lengths, and stability. Here, we explore the current understanding of the expression patterns, localizations, and functions of Tmods in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. We first describe the mechanisms by which Tmods regulate myofibril assembly and thin filament lengths, as well as the roles of closely related Tmod family variants, the leiomodins (Lmods), in these processes. We also discuss emerging functions for Tmods in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This paper provides abundant evidence that Tmods are key structural regulators of striated muscle cytoarchitecture and physiology. PMID:22013379

  3. Regulation of muscle force in the absence of actin-myosin-based cross-bridge interaction.

    PubMed

    Leonard, T R; Herzog, W

    2010-07-01

    For the past half century, the sliding filament-based cross-bridge theory has been the cornerstone of our understanding of how muscles contract. According to this theory, active force can only occur if there is overlap between the contractile filaments, actin and myosin. Otherwise, forces are thought to be caused by passive structural elements and are assumed to vary solely because of the length of the muscle. We observed increases in muscle force by a factor of 3 to 4 above the purely passive forces for activated and stretched myofibrils in the absence of actin-myosin overlap. We show that this dramatic increase in force is crucially dependent on the presence of the structural protein titin, cannot be explained with calcium activation, and is regulated by actin-myosin-based cross-bridge forces before stretching. We conclude from these observations that titin is a strong regulator of muscle force and propose that this regulation is based on cross-bridge force-dependent titin-actin interactions. These results suggest a mechanism for stability of sarcomeres on the "inherently unstable" descending limb of the force-length relationship, and they further provide an explanation for the protection of muscles against stretch-induced muscle injuries.

  4. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  5. Molecular Mechanical Differences between Isoforms of Contractile Actin in the Presence of Isoforms of Smooth Muscle Tropomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Lennart; Bates, Genevieve; Roman, Horia N.; Blumenthal, Jenna L.; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Sobieszek, Apolinary; Mackey, Michael C.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The proteins involved in smooth muscle's molecular contractile mechanism – the anti-parallel motion of actin and myosin filaments driven by myosin heads interacting with actin – are found as different isoforms. While their expression levels are altered in disease states, their relevance to the mechanical interaction of myosin with actin is not sufficiently understood. Here, we analyzed in vitro actin filament propulsion by smooth muscle myosin for -actin (A), -actin-tropomyosin- (A-Tm), -actin-tropomyosin- (A-Tm), -actin (A), -actin-tropomyosin- (A-Tm), and -actin-tropomoysin- (A-Tm). Actin sliding analysis with our specifically developed video analysis software followed by statistical assessment (Bootstrapped Principal Component Analysis) indicated that the in vitro motility of A, A, and A-Tm is not distinguishable. Compared to these three ‘baseline conditions’, statistically significant differences () were: A-Tm – actin sliding velocity increased 1.12-fold, A-Tm – motile fraction decreased to 0.96-fold, stop time elevated 1.6-fold, A-Tm – run time elevated 1.7-fold. We constructed a mathematical model, simulated actin sliding data, and adjusted the kinetic parameters so as to mimic the experimentally observed differences: A-Tm – myosin binding to actin, the main, and the secondary myosin power stroke are accelerated, A-Tm – mechanical coupling between myosins is stronger, A-Tm – the secondary power stroke is decelerated and mechanical coupling between myosins is weaker. In summary, our results explain the different regulatory effects that specific combinations of actin and smooth muscle tropomyosin have on smooth muscle actin-myosin interaction kinetics. PMID:24204225

  6. Distribution of alpha-vascular smooth muscle actin in the smooth muscle cells of the gastrointestinal tract of the chicken.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y; Kubota, T; Atoji, Y; Suzuki, Y

    1996-01-01

    Immunoreactivity specific for alpha-vascular smooth muscle actin (ASMA) was examined in the enteric smooth muscle cells along the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract of the chicken. Specificity for gamma-smooth muscle actin (GSMA) and desmin was also examined. All smooth muscle layers, i.e. the muscularis mucosae, and the circular and longitudinal muscle layers, showed immunoreactivity specific for GSMA and desmin throughout the gastrointestinal tract whereas immunoreactivity for ASMA differed between regions and muscle layers. In the oesophagus and crop, immunoreactivity for ASMA was observed in the muscularis mucosae and the inner and outer muscle layers, together with staining for GSMA and desmin. In the proventriculus, immunoreactivity for ASMA was observed in all smooth muscle cells in the inner layer of the muscularis mucosae and the longitudinal muscle layer. In the outer layer of the muscularis mucosae, immunoreactivity for ASMA on smooth muscle cells was observed on the luminal side and decreased in the serosal direction. In the intermediate muscles, immunoreactivity for ASMA was observed in the luminal portion, the intensity of staining decreasing gradually in the serosal direction. In contrast to the intermediate muscles, the latter muscles were negative for ASMA. In the pyloric region, the outer part was weakly immunopositive, while the inner part was intensely positive. In the small and large intestines, the muscularis mucosae and the longitudinal muscle layer were positive for ASMA. The outer part of the circular muscle layer was immunonegative for ASMA whereas the inner part was positive. The complex structure and contractile functions of each organ and muscle layers may be related to the difference patterns of expression of ASMA molecules in the smooth muscle cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8982838

  7. Myosin and Actin Filaments in Muscle: Structures and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Squire, John M; Paul, Danielle M; Morris, Edward P

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, improvements in electron microscopy and image processing have permitted significantly higher resolutions to be achieved (sometimes <1 nm) when studying isolated actin and myosin filaments. In the case of actin filaments the changing structure when troponin binds calcium ions can be followed using electron microscopy and single particle analysis to reveal what happens on each of the seven non-equivalent pseudo-repeats of the tropomyosin α-helical coiled-coil. In the case of the known family of myosin filaments not only are the myosin head arrangements under relaxing conditions being defined, but the latest analysis, also using single particle methods, is starting to reveal the way that the α-helical coiled-coil myosin rods are packed to give the filament backbones.

  8. Calcium-induced movement of troponin-I relative to actin in skeletal muscle thin filaments.

    PubMed

    Tao, T; Gong, B J; Leavis, P C

    1990-03-16

    The role of troponin-I (the inhibitory subunit of troponin) in the regulation by Ca2+ of skeletal muscle contraction was investigated with resonance energy transfer and photo cross-linking techniques. The effect of Ca2+ on the proximity of troponin-I to actin in reconstituted rabbit skeletal thin filaments was determined. The distance between the cysteine residue at position 133 (Cys133) of troponin-I and Cys374 of actin increases by approximately 15 angstroms on binding of Ca2+ to troponin-C. Also, troponin-I labeled at Cys133 with benzophenone-4-maleimide could be photo cross-linked to actin in the absence of Ca2+, but not in its presence. These results suggest that troponin-I is attached to actin in the Ca2(+)-free or relaxed state of muscle, and that it detaches from actin on Ca2+ activation of contraction. Thus, troponin-I may function as a Ca2(+)-dependent molecular switch in regulation of skeletal muscle contraction.

  9. Slug Is Increased in Vascular Remodeling and Induces a Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferative Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Peinado, Victor I.; Pisano, María V.; Párrizas, Marcelina; Blanco, Isabel; Evers, Maurits; Engelmann, Julia C.; García-Lucio, Jessica; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Meister, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have confirmed Slug as a key player in regulating phenotypic changes in several cell models, however, its role in smooth muscle cells (SMC) has never been assessed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of Slug during the phenotypic switch of SMC in vitro and throughout the development of vascular remodeling. Methods and Results Slug expression was decreased during both cell-to-cell contact and TGFβ1 induced SMC differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), a known inductor of a proliferative/dedifferentiated SMC phenotype, induces the expression of Slug in SMC. Slug knockdown blocked TNFα-induced SMC phenotypic change and significantly reduced both SMC proliferation and migration, while its overexpression blocked the TGFβ1-induced SMC differentiation and induced proliferation and migration. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis showed that in SMC, Slug knockdown induced changes mainly in genes related to proliferation and migration, indicating that Slug controls these processes in SMC. Notably, Slug expression was significantly up-regulated in lungs of mice using a model of pulmonary hypertension-related vascular remodeling. Highly remodeled human pulmonary arteries also showed an increase of Slug expression compared to less remodeled arteries. Conclusions Slug emerges as a key transcription factor driving SMC towards a proliferative phenotype. The increased Slug expression observed in vivo in highly remodeled arteries of mice and human suggests a role of Slug in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27441378

  10. Definite differences between in vitro actin-myosin sliding and muscle contraction as revealed using antibodies to myosin head.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Haruo; Chaen, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Abe, Takahiro; Kimura, Kazushige; Saeki, Yasutake; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2014-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from attachment-detachment cycles between myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and actin filaments. It is generally believed that a myosin head first attaches to actin, undergoes conformational changes to produce force and motion in muscle, and then detaches from actin. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanism of myosin head conformational changes still remains to be a matter for debate and speculation. The myosin head consists of catalytic (CAD), converter (CVD) and lever arm (LD) domains. To give information about the role of these domains in the myosin head performance, we have examined the effect of three site-directed antibodies to the myosin head on in vitro ATP-dependent actin-myosin sliding and Ca2+-activated contraction of muscle fibers. Antibody 1, attaching to junctional peptide between 50K and 20K heavy chain segments in the CAD, exhibited appreciable effects neither on in vitro actin-myosin sliding nor muscle fiber contraction. Since antibody 1 covers actin-binding sites of the CAD, one interpretation of this result is that rigor actin-myosin linkage is absent or at most a transient intermediate in physiological actin-myosin cycling. Antibody 2, attaching to reactive lysine residue in the CVD, showed a marked inhibitory effect on in vitro actin-myosin sliding without changing actin-activated myosin head (S1) ATPase activity, while it showed no appreciable effect on muscle contraction. Antibody 3, attaching to two peptides of regulatory light chains in the LD, had no significant effect on in vitro actin-myosin sliding, while it reduced force development in muscle fibers without changing MgATPase activity. The above definite differences in the effect of antibodies 2 and 3 between in vitro actin-myosin sliding and muscle contraction can be explained by difference in experimental conditions; in the former, myosin heads are randomly oriented on a glass surface, while in the latter myosin heads are regularly

  11. Upregulation of alpha-skeletal muscle actin and myosin heavy polypeptide gene products in degenerating rotator cuff muscles.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Bruno; Zumstein, Matthias; Regenfelder, Felix; Steinmann, Patrick; Fuchs, Thomas; Husmann, Knut; Hellermann, Jens; Jost, Bernhard; Hodler, Jürg; Born, Walter; Gerber, C

    2008-07-01

    Impaired function of shoulder muscles, resulting from rotator cuff tears, is associated with abnormal deposition of fat in muscle tissue, but corresponding cellular and molecular mechanisms, likely reflected by altered gene expression profiles, are largely unknown. Here, an analysis of muscle gene expression was carried out by semiquantitative RT-PCR in total RNA extracts of supraspinatus biopsies collected from 60 patients prior to shoulder surgery. A significant increase of alpha-skeletal muscle actin (p = 0.0115) and of myosin heavy polypeptide 1 (p = 0.0147) gene transcripts was observed in parallel with progressive fat deposition in the muscle, assessed on parasagittal T1-weighted turbo-spin-echo magnetic resonance images according to Goutallier. Upregulation of alpha-skeletal muscle actin and of myosin heavy polypeptide-1 has been reported to be associated with increased muscle tissue metabolism and oxidative stress. The findings of the present study, therefore, challenge the hypothesis that increased fat deposition in rotator cuff muscle after injury reflects muscle degeneration.

  12. Alpha Smooth Muscle Actin Expression in a Case of Ameloblastic Carcinoma: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Vipul

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The aim of the present article is to report a case of ameloblastic carcinoma and use a marker alpha smooth muscle actin as a tool to differentiate cases of ameloblastic carcinoma from that of ameloblastoma. Methods Case study reporting a case of ameloblastic carcinoma (AC) with expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) as a marker for emergence of stromal myofibroblasts. The expression of myofibroblasts was also compared with that of ameloblastoma. Results Difference between the two lesions in the pattern of expression of alpha smooth muscle actin was also observed. There was increase in the number of myofibroblasts in the stroma of AC while in ameloblastoma, it was comparatively less. Secondly, few areas of the carcinomatous ameloblastic island also exhibited a mild positivity towards alpha smooth muscle actin. Conclusions Increase in number of stromal myofibroblast may be taken as a predictor for carcinomatous transformation. Further studies with greater sample size can validate the use of alpha-SMA as a marker to differentiate ameloblastic carcinoma from ameloblastoma. PMID:24422027

  13. Regulation of structure and function of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a valuable system to study structure and function of striated muscle. The body wall muscle of C. elegans is obliquely striated muscle with highly organized sarcomeric assembly of actin, myosin, and other accessary proteins. Genetic and molecular biological studies in C. elegans have identified a number of genes encoding structural and regulatory components for the muscle contractile apparatuses, and many of them have counterparts in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscles or striated muscles in other invertebrates. Applicability of genetics, cell biology, and biochemistry has made C. elegans an excellent system to study mechanisms of muscle contractility and assembly and maintenance of myofibrils. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms of structure and function of actin filaments in the C. elegans body wall muscle. Sarcomeric actin filaments in C. elegans muscle are associated with the troponin-tropomyosin system that regulates the actin-myosin interaction. Proteins that bind to the side and ends of actin filaments support ordered assembly of thin filaments. Furthermore, regulators of actin dynamics play important roles in initial assembly, growth, and maintenance of sarcomeres. The knowledge acquired in C. elegans can serve as bases to understand the basic mechanisms of muscle structure and function. PMID:25125169

  14. The kinetics underlying the velocity of smooth muscle myosin filament sliding on actin filaments in vitro.

    PubMed

    Haldeman, Brian D; Brizendine, Richard K; Facemyer, Kevin C; Baker, Josh E; Cremo, Christine R

    2014-07-25

    Actin-myosin interactions are well studied using soluble myosin fragments, but little is known about effects of myosin filament structure on mechanochemistry. We stabilized unphosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (SMM) and phosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (pSMM) filaments against ATP-induced depolymerization using a cross-linker and attached fluorescent rhodamine (XL-Rh-SMM). Electron micrographs showed that these side polar filaments are very similar to unmodified filaments. They are ~0.63 μm long and contain ~176 molecules. Rate constants for ATP-induced dissociation and ADP release from acto-myosin for filaments and S1 heads were similar. Actin-activated ATPases of SMM and XL-Rh-SMM were similarly regulated. XL-Rh-pSMM filaments moved processively on F-actin that was bound to a PEG brush surface. ATP dependence of filament velocities was similar to that for solution ATPases at high [actin], suggesting that both processes are limited by the same kinetic step (weak to strong transition) and therefore are attachment- limited. This differs from actin sliding over myosin monomers, which is primarily detachment-limited. Fitting filament data to an attachment-limited model showed that approximately half of the heads are available to move the filament, consistent with a side polar structure. We suggest the low stiffness subfragment 2 (S2) domain remains unhindered during filament motion in our assay. Actin-bound negatively displaced heads will impart minimal drag force because of S2 buckling. Given the ADP release rate, the velocity, and the length of S2, these heads will detach from actin before slack is taken up into a backwardly displaced high stiffness position. This mechanism explains the lack of detachment- limited kinetics at physiological [ATP]. These findings address how nonlinear elasticity in assemblies of motors leads to efficient collective force generation.

  15. The Kinetics Underlying the Velocity of Smooth Muscle Myosin Filament Sliding on Actin Filaments in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Haldeman, Brian D.; Brizendine, Richard K.; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Baker, Josh E.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2014-01-01

    Actin-myosin interactions are well studied using soluble myosin fragments, but little is known about effects of myosin filament structure on mechanochemistry. We stabilized unphosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (SMM) and phosphorylated smooth muscle myosin (pSMM) filaments against ATP-induced depolymerization using a cross-linker and attached fluorescent rhodamine (XL-Rh-SMM). Electron micrographs showed that these side polar filaments are very similar to unmodified filaments. They are ∼0.63 μm long and contain ∼176 molecules. Rate constants for ATP-induced dissociation and ADP release from acto-myosin for filaments and S1 heads were similar. Actin-activated ATPases of SMM and XL-Rh-SMM were similarly regulated. XL-Rh-pSMM filaments moved processively on F-actin that was bound to a PEG brush surface. ATP dependence of filament velocities was similar to that for solution ATPases at high [actin], suggesting that both processes are limited by the same kinetic step (weak to strong transition) and therefore are attachment-limited. This differs from actin sliding over myosin monomers, which is primarily detachment-limited. Fitting filament data to an attachment-limited model showed that approximately half of the heads are available to move the filament, consistent with a side polar structure. We suggest the low stiffness subfragment 2 (S2) domain remains unhindered during filament motion in our assay. Actin-bound negatively displaced heads will impart minimal drag force because of S2 buckling. Given the ADP release rate, the velocity, and the length of S2, these heads will detach from actin before slack is taken up into a backwardly displaced high stiffness position. This mechanism explains the lack of detachment-limited kinetics at physiological [ATP]. These findings address how nonlinear elasticity in assemblies of motors leads to efficient collective force generation. PMID:24907276

  16. Actin scaffolding by clathrin heavy chain is required for skeletal muscle sarcomere organization.

    PubMed

    Vassilopoulos, Stéphane; Gentil, Christel; Lainé, Jeanne; Buclez, Pierre-Olivier; Franck, Agathe; Ferry, Arnaud; Précigout, Guillaume; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John E; Brodsky, Frances M; Garcia, Luis; Bonne, Gisèle; Voit, Thomas; Piétri-Rouxel, France; Bitoun, Marc

    2014-05-12

    The ubiquitous clathrin heavy chain (CHC), the main component of clathrin-coated vesicles, is well characterized for its role in intracellular membrane traffic and endocytosis from the plasma membrane (PM). Here, we demonstrate that in skeletal muscle CHC regulates the formation and maintenance of PM-sarcomere attachment sites also known as costameres. We show that clathrin forms large coated lattices associated with actin filaments and the muscle-specific isoform of α-actinin at the PM of differentiated myotubes. Depletion of CHC in myotubes induced a loss of actin and α-actinin sarcomeric organization, whereas CHC depletion in vivo induced a loss of contractile force due to the detachment of sarcomeres from the PM. Our results suggest that CHC contributes to the formation and maintenance of the contractile apparatus through interactions with costameric proteins and highlight an unconventional role for CHC in skeletal muscle that may be relevant to pathophysiology of neuromuscular disorders.

  17. Rat alveolar myofibroblasts acquire alpha-smooth muscle actin expression during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vyalov, S. L.; Gabbiani, G.; Kapanci, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The majority of fibroblasts in alveolar septa are characterized by the presence of cytoplasmic bundles of microfilaments that contain cytoplasmic actin isoforms; these cells have been named contractile interstitial cells or V-type myofibroblasts. In the rat, they express desmin as intermediate filament protein. In this study, we explored the possibility that modulation and replication of such septal fibroblasts result in the appearance of alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-SM) actin-positive myofibroblasts, typical of lung fibrosis. Experimental pulmonary fibrosis was produced by a unique intratracheal instillation of bleomycin to 28 rats. Eight additional rats used as controls received the equivalent volume of saline. Paraffin and frozen sections of lungs were examined at days 1, 3, 5 and 7 after treatment. Microfilaments and intermediate filaments were stained using antibodies against total actin, alpha-SM actin, desmin, vimentin, keratin, and SM myosin. Electron microscopic labeling of desmin and alpha-SM actin using immunogold technique was done on Lowicryl K4M resin-embedded specimens. alpha-SM actin appeared in desmin-positive alveolar fibroblasts as early as 24 hours after intratracheal bleomycin instillation; the modulation of alpha-SM actin in these cells was preceded by a lymphomonocytic infiltration of alveolar septa. Twenty-four hours to 3 days after bleomycin administration, a proliferation of alveolar myofibroblasts occurred. Fibrosis with laying down of collagen fibers took place after the above mentioned cellular modifications. Our results support the view that septal fibroblastic cells can modulate into typical alpha-SM actin-containing myofibroblasts during experimental bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In such a modulation a possible role of cytokines, particularly of transforming growth factor-beta, is considered. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14

  18. The inv(16) Fusion Protein Associates with Corepressors via a Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy-Chain Domain

    PubMed Central

    Durst, Kristie L.; Lutterbach, Bart; Kummalue, Tanawan; Friedman, Alan D.; Hiebert, Scott W.

    2003-01-01

    Inversion(16) is one of the most frequent chromosomal translocations found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), occurring in over 8% of AML cases. This translocation results in a protein product that fuses the first 165 amino acids of core binding factor β to the coiled-coil region of a smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (CBFβ/SMMHC). CBFβ interacts with AML1 to form a heterodimer that binds DNA; this interaction increases the affinity of AML1 for DNA. The CBFβ/SMMHC fusion protein cooperates with AML1 to repress the transcription of AML1-regulated genes. We show that CBFβ/SMMHC contains a repression domain in the C-terminal 163 amino acids of the SMMHC region that is required for inv(16)-mediated transcriptional repression. This minimal repression domain is sufficient for the association of CBFβ/SMMHC with the mSin3A corepressor. In addition, the inv(16) fusion protein specifically associates with histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8). inv(16)-mediated repression is sensitive to HDAC inhibitors. We propose a model whereby the inv(16) fusion protein associates with AML1 to convert AML1 into a constitutive transcriptional repressor. PMID:12509458

  19. Drebrin-like protein DBN-1 is a sarcomere component that stabilizes actin filaments during muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Bodensiek, Kai; Fakhri, Nikta; von Roden, Kerstin; Schaap, Iwan A T; Majoul, Irina; Schmidt, Christoph F; Klopfenstein, Dieter R

    2015-07-06

    Actin filament organization and stability in the sarcomeres of muscle cells are critical for force generation. Here we identify and functionally characterize a Caenorhabditis elegans drebrin-like protein DBN-1 as a novel constituent of the muscle contraction machinery. In vitro, DBN-1 exhibits actin filament binding and bundling activity. In vivo, DBN-1 is expressed in body wall muscles of C. elegans. During the muscle contraction cycle, DBN-1 alternates location between myosin- and actin-rich regions of the sarcomere. In contracted muscle, DBN-1 is accumulated at I-bands where it likely regulates proper spacing of α-actinin and tropomyosin and protects actin filaments from the interaction with ADF/cofilin. DBN-1 loss of function results in the partial depolymerization of F-actin during muscle contraction. Taken together, our data show that DBN-1 organizes the muscle contractile apparatus maintaining the spatial relationship between actin-binding proteins such as α-actinin, tropomyosin and ADF/cofilin and possibly strengthening actin filaments by bundling.

  20. Human congenital myopathy actin mutants cause myopathy and alter Z-disc structure in Drosophila flight muscle.

    PubMed

    Sevdali, Maria; Kumar, Vikash; Peckham, Michelle; Sparrow, John

    2013-03-01

    Over 190 mutations in the human skeletal muscle α-actin gene, ACTA1 cause congenital actin myopathies. We transgenically expressed six different mutant actins, G15R, I136M, D154N, V163L, V163M and D292V in Drosophila indirect flight muscles and investigated their effects in flies that express one wild type and one mutant actin copy. All the flies were flightless, and the IFMs showed incomplete Z-discs, disorganised actin filaments and 'zebra bodies'. No differences in levels of sarcomeric protein expression were observed, but tropomodulin staining was somewhat disrupted in D164N, V163L, G15R and V163M heterozygotes. A single copy of D292V mutant actin rescued the hypercontractile phenotypes caused by TnI and TnT mutants, suggesting that the D292V mutation interferes with thin filament regulation. Our results show that expression of actin mutations homologous to those in humans in the indirect flight muscles of Drosophila disrupt sarcomere organisation, with somewhat similar phenotypes to those observed in humans. Using Drosophila to study actin mutations may help aid our understanding of congential myopathies caused by actin mutations.

  1. Loss of cortical actin filaments in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle cells impairs GLUT4 vesicle trafficking and glucose transport

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Alicia M.; Spisak, Kristen O.; Brozinick, Joseph T.; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Study has demonstrated an essential role of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) in insulin-regulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. Here, we tested whether perturbations in F-actin contributed to impaired insulin responsiveness provoked by hyperinsulinemia. In L6 myo-tubes stably expressing GLUT4 that carries an exofacial myc-epitope tag, acute insulin stimulation (20 min, 100 nM) increased GLUT4myc translocation and glucose uptake by ~2-fold. In contrast, a hyperinsulinemic state, induced by inclusion of 5 nM insulin in the medium for 12 h decreased the ability of insulin to stimulate these processes. Defects in insulin signaling did not readily account for the observed disruption. In contrast, hyperinsulinemia reduced cortical F-actin. This occurred concomitant with a loss of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a lipid involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Restoration of plasma membrane PIP2 in hyperinsulinemic cells restored F-actin and insulin responsiveness. Consistent with these in vitro observations suggesting that the hyperinsulinemic state negatively affects cortical F-actin structure, epitrochlearis skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant hyperinsulinemic Zucker fatty rats displayed a similar loss of F-actin structure compared with that in muscle from lean insulin-sensitive littermates. We propose that a component of insulin-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle involves defects in PIP2/F-actin structure essential for insulin-regulated glucose transport. PMID:16774991

  2. Loss of cortical actin filaments in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle cells impairs GLUT4 vesicle trafficking and glucose transport.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Alicia M; Spisak, Kristen O; Brozinick, Joseph T; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2006-11-01

    Study has demonstrated an essential role of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) in insulin-regulated glucose uptake by skeletal muscle. Here, we tested whether perturbations in F-actin contributed to impaired insulin responsiveness provoked by hyperinsulinemia. In L6 myotubes stably expressing GLUT4 that carries an exofacial myc-epitope tag, acute insulin stimulation (20 min, 100 nM) increased GLUT4myc translocation and glucose uptake by approximately 2-fold. In contrast, a hyperinsulinemic state, induced by inclusion of 5 nM insulin in the medium for 12 h decreased the ability of insulin to stimulate these processes. Defects in insulin signaling did not readily account for the observed disruption. In contrast, hyperinsulinemia reduced cortical F-actin. This occurred concomitant with a loss of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)), a lipid involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Restoration of plasma membrane PIP(2) in hyperinsulinemic cells restored F-actin and insulin responsiveness. Consistent with these in vitro observations suggesting that the hyperinsulinemic state negatively affects cortical F-actin structure, epitrochlearis skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant hyperinsulinemic Zucker fatty rats displayed a similar loss of F-actin structure compared with that in muscle from lean insulin-sensitive littermates. We propose that a component of insulin-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle involves defects in PIP(2)/F-actin structure essential for insulin-regulated glucose transport.

  3. Determination of time-dependent inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate concentrations during calcium release in a smooth muscle cell.

    PubMed Central

    Fink, C C; Slepchenko, B; Loew, L M

    1999-01-01

    The level of [InsP3]cyt required for calcium release in A7r5 cells, a smooth muscle cell line, was determined by a new set of procedures using quantitative confocal microscopy to measure release of InsP3 from cells microinjected with caged InsP3. From these experiments, the [InsP3]cyt required to evoke a half-maximal calcium response is 100 nM. Experiments with caged glycerophosphoryl-myo-inositol 4, 5-bisphosphate (GPIP2), a slowly metabolized analogue of InsP3, gave a much slower recovery and a half-maximal response of an order of magnitude greater than InsP3. Experimental data and highly constrained variables were used to construct a mathematical model of the InsP3-dependent [Ca2+]cyt changes; the resulting simulations show high fidelity to experiment. Among the elements considered in constructing this model were the mechanism of the InsP3-receptor, InsP3 degradation, calcium buffering in the cytosol, and refilling of the ER stores via sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA) pumps. The model predicts a time constant of 0.8 s for InsP3 degradation and 13 s for GPIP2. InsP3 degradation was found to be a prerequisite for [Ca2+]cyt recovery to baseline levels and is therefore critical to the pattern of the overall [Ca2+]cyt signal. Analysis of the features of this model provides insights into the individual factors controlling the amplitude and shape of the InsP3-mediated calcium signal. PMID:10388786

  4. Affinity for MgADP and force of unbinding from actin of myosin purified from tonic and phasic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Léguillette, Renaud; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Govindaraju, Karuthapillai; Fong, Laura M.; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Smooth muscle is unique in its ability to maintain force at low MgATP consumption. This property, called the latch state, is more prominent in tonic than phasic smooth muscle. Studies performed at the muscle strip level have suggested that myosin from tonic muscle has a greater affinity for MgADP and therefore remains attached to actin longer than myosin from phasic muscle, allowing for cross-bridge dephosphorylation and latch-bridge formation. An alternative hypothesis is that after dephosphorylation, myosin reattaches to actin and maintains force. We investigated these fundamental properties of smooth muscle at the molecular level. We used an in vitro motility assay to measure actin filament velocity (νmax) when propelled by myosin purified from phasic or tonic muscle at increasing [MgADP]. Myosin was 25% thiophosphorylated and 75% unphosphorylated to approximate in vivo conditions. The slope of νmax versus [MgADP] was significantly greater for tonic (−0.51 ± 0.04) than phasic muscle myosin (−0.15 ± 0.04), demonstrating the greater MgADP affinity of myosin from tonic muscle. We then used a laser trap assay to measure the unbinding force from actin of populations of unphosphorylated tonic and phasic muscle myosin. Both myosin types attached to actin, and their unbinding force (0.092 ± 0.022 pN for phasic muscle and 0.084 ± 0.017 pN for tonic muscle) was not statistically different. We conclude that the greater affinity for MgADP of tonic muscle myosin and the reattachment of dephosphorylated myosin to actin may both contribute to the latch state. PMID:18614813

  5. Role of α‐actin in muscle damage of injured athletes in comparison with traditional markers

    PubMed Central

    Amat, Antonio Martínez; Corrales, Juan Antonio Marchal; Serrano, Fernando Rodríguez; Boulaiz, Houria; Salazar, Jose Carlos Prados; Contreras, Fidel Hita; Perez, Octavio Caba; Delgado, Esmeralda Carrillo; Martín, Ignacio; Jimenez, Antonia Aranega

    2007-01-01

    Objective In order to identify a reliable marker for the early detection of muscle injuries in sports, α‐actin protein and other markers of muscle damage were studied in sera of uninjured sportspeople and those with skeletal muscle injury. Methods Blood samples were obtained from 20 sportspeople with skeletal muscle injury and 48 uninjured sportspeople. Immunoassays were performed to determine cardiac troponin I (TnI), troponin T, lactate dehydrogenase and myoglobin concentrations. Western blot and densitometry were used to measure α‐actin concentrations. Skeletal muscle damage was diagnosed according to physical examination, MRI findings and the biochemical criterion of a creatine kinase value >500 IU/l (Rosalki method, Beckman Instruments SL, Fullerton, California, USA). Results were also compared with previously obtained data on injured and uninjured non‐sportspeople. Results The mean serum concentration of α‐actin was significantly higher in sportspeople with muscle damage (10.49 μg/ml) than in uninjured sportspeople (3.99 μg/ml). Sera from injured sportspeople showed higher levels of α‐actin than of troponin or myoglobin. No significant difference in TnI levels was observed between the groups. Conclusions According to these results, α‐actin is a new and reliable marker of skeletal muscle damage in sportspeople which can be used for the detection of muscle injury. Possible cross interference between skeletal and cardiac muscle damage can be discriminated by the combined use of α‐actin and TnI. These data suggest that early measurement of α‐actin in sportspeople with suspected muscle damage will allow them to receive earlier and more effective treatment and to return sooner to the practice of their sport. PMID:17317758

  6. Molecular mechanical differences between isoforms of contractile actin in the presence of isoforms of smooth muscle tropomyosin.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Lennart; Bates, Genevieve; Roman, Horia N; Blumenthal, Jenna L; Zitouni, Nedjma B; Sobieszek, Apolinary; Mackey, Michael C; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2013-10-01

    The proteins involved in smooth muscle's molecular contractile mechanism - the anti-parallel motion of actin and myosin filaments driven by myosin heads interacting with actin - are found as different isoforms. While their expression levels are altered in disease states, their relevance to the mechanical interaction of myosin with actin is not sufficiently understood. Here, we analyzed in vitro actin filament propulsion by smooth muscle myosin for [Formula: see text]-actin ([Formula: see text]A), [Formula: see text]-actin-tropomyosin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text]), [Formula: see text]-actin-tropomyosin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text]), [Formula: see text]-actin ([Formula: see text]A), [Formula: see text]-actin-tropomyosin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text]), and [Formula: see text]-actin-tropomoysin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text]). Actin sliding analysis with our specifically developed video analysis software followed by statistical assessment (Bootstrapped Principal Component Analysis) indicated that the in vitro motility of [Formula: see text]A, [Formula: see text]A, and [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] is not distinguishable. Compared to these three 'baseline conditions', statistically significant differences ([Formula: see text]) were: [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] - actin sliding velocity increased 1.12-fold, [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] - motile fraction decreased to 0.96-fold, stop time elevated 1.6-fold, [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] - run time elevated 1.7-fold. We constructed a mathematical model, simulated actin sliding data, and adjusted the kinetic parameters so as to mimic the experimentally observed differences: [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] - myosin binding to actin, the main, and the secondary myosin power stroke are accelerated, [Formula: see text

  7. The Qdot-labeled actin super-resolution motility assay measures low-duty cycle muscle myosin step size.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihua; Ajtai, Katalin; Burghardt, Thomas P

    2013-03-05

    Myosin powers contraction in heart and skeletal muscle and is a leading target for mutations implicated in inheritable muscle diseases. During contraction, myosin transduces ATP free energy into the work of muscle shortening against resisting force. Muscle shortening involves relative sliding of myosin and actin filaments. Skeletal actin filaments were fluorescently labeled with a streptavidin conjugate quantum dot (Qdot) binding biotin-phalloidin on actin. Single Qdots were imaged in time with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and then spatially localized to 1-3 nm using a super-resolution algorithm as they translated with actin over a surface coated with skeletal heavy meromyosin (sHMM) or full-length β-cardiac myosin (MYH7). The average Qdot-actin velocity matches measurements with rhodamine-phalloidin-labeled actin. The sHMM Qdot-actin velocity histogram contains low-velocity events corresponding to actin translation in quantized steps of ~5 nm. The MYH7 velocity histogram has quantized steps at 3 and 8 nm in addition to 5 nm and larger compliance compared to that of sHMM depending on the MYH7 surface concentration. Low-duty cycle skeletal and cardiac myosin present challenges for a single-molecule assay because actomyosin dissociates quickly and the freely moving element diffuses away. The in vitro motility assay has modestly more actomyosin interactions, and methylcellulose inhibited diffusion to sustain the complex while preserving a subset of encounters that do not overlap in time on a single actin filament. A single myosin step is isolated in time and space and then characterized using super-resolution. The approach provides a quick, quantitative, and inexpensive step size measurement for low-duty cycle muscle myosin.

  8. Calponin Isoforms CNN1, CNN2 and CNN3: Regulators for Actin Cytoskeleton Functions in Smooth Muscle and Non-Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Jin, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Calponin is an actin filament-associated regulatory protein expressed in smooth muscle and multiple types of non-muscle cells. Three homologous genes, CNN1, CNN2 and CNN3, encoding calponin isoforms 1, 2, and 3, respectively, are present in vertebrate species. All three calponin isoforms are actin-binding proteins with functions in inhibiting actin-activated myosin ATPase and stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton, while each isoform executes different physiological roles based on their cell type-specific expressions. Calponin 1 is specifically expressed in smooth muscle cells and plays a role in fine-tuning smooth muscle contractility. Calponin 2 is expressed in both smooth muscle and non-muscle cells and regulates multiple actin cytoskeleton-based functions. Calponin 3 participates in actin cytoskeleton-based activities in embryonic development and myogenesis. Phosphorylation has been extensively studied for the regulation of calponin functions. Cytoskeleton tension regulates the transcription of CNN2 gene and the degradation of calponin 2 protein. This review summarizes our knowledge learned from studies over the past three decades, focusing on the evolutionary lineage of calponin isoform genes, their tissue- and cell type-specific expressions, structure-function relationships, and mechanoregulation. PMID:26970176

  9. Fluorescence studies of the carboxyl-terminal domain of smooth muscle calponin effects of F-actin and salts.

    PubMed

    Bartegi, A; Roustan, C; Kassab, R; Fattoum, A

    1999-06-01

    The fluorescence parameters of the environment-sensitive acrylodan, selectively attached to Cys273 in the C-terminal domain of smooth muscle calponin, were studied in the presence of F-actin and using varying salt concentrations. The formation of the F-actin acrylodan labeled calponin complex at 75 mm NaCl resulted in a 21-nm blue shift of the maximum emission wavelength from 496 nm to 474 nm and a twofold increase of the fluorescent quantum yield at 460 nm. These spectral changes were observed at the low ionic strengths (< 110 mm) where the calponin : F-actin stoichiometry is 1 : 1 as well as at the high ionic strengths (> 110 mm) where the binding stoichiometry is a 1 : 2 ratio of calponin : actin monomers. On the basis of previous three-dimensional reconstruction and chemical crosslinking of the F-actin-calponin complex, the actin effect is shown to derive from the low ionic strength interaction of calponin with the bottom of subdomain-1 of an upper actin monomer in F-actin and not from its further association with the subdomain-1 of the adjacent lower monomer which occurs at the high ionic strength. Remarkably, the F-actin-dependent fluorescence change of acrylodan is qualitatively but not quantitatively similar to that earlier reported for the complexes of calponin and Ca2+-calmodulin or Ca2+-caltropin. As the three calponin ligands bind to the same segment of the protein, encompassing residues 145-182, the acrylodan can be considered as a sensitive probe of the functioning of this critical region. A distance of 29 A was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between Cys273 of calponin and Cys374 of actin in the 1 : 1 F-actin-calponin complex suggesting that the F-actin effect was allosteric reflecting a global conformational change in the C-terminal domain of calponin.

  10. Regulation of microRNA expression in vascular smooth muscle by MRTF-A and actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Alajbegovic, Azra; Turczyńska, Karolina M; Hien, Tran Thi; Cidad, Pilar; Swärd, Karl; Hellstrand, Per; Della Corte, Alessandro; Forte, Amalia; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic properties of the actin cytoskeleton in smooth muscle cells play an important role in a number of cardiovascular disease states. The state of actin does not only mediate mechanical stability and contractile function but can also regulate gene expression via myocardin related transcription factors (MRTFs). These transcriptional co-activators regulate genes encoding contractile and cytoskeletal proteins in smooth muscle. Regulation of small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) by actin polymerization may mediate some of these effects. MiRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression by post-transcriptional regulation of target messenger RNA. In this study we aimed to determine a profile of miRNAs that were 1) regulated by actin/MRTF-A, 2) associated with the contractile smooth muscle phenotype and 3) enriched in muscle cells. This analysis was performed using cardiovascular disease-focused miRNA arrays in both mouse and human cells. The potential clinical importance of actin polymerization in aortic aneurysm was evaluated using biopsies from mildly dilated human thoracic aorta in patients with stenotic tricuspid or bicuspid aortic valve. By integrating information from multiple qPCR based miRNA arrays we identified a group of five miRNAs (miR-1, miR-22, miR-143, miR-145 and miR-378a) that were sensitive to actin polymerization and MRTF-A overexpression in both mouse and human vascular smooth muscle. With the exception of miR-22, these miRNAs were also relatively enriched in striated and/or smooth muscle containing tissues. Actin polymerization was found to be dramatically reduced in the aorta from patients with mild aortic dilations. This was associated with a decrease in actin/MRTF-regulated miRNAs. In conclusion, the transcriptional co-activator MRTF-A and actin polymerization regulated a subset of miRNAs in vascular smooth muscle. Identification of novel miRNAs regulated by actin/MRTF-A may provide further insight into the mechanisms underlying

  11. Concerted upregulation of CLP36 and smooth muscle actin protein expression in human endometrium during decidualization.

    PubMed

    Miehe, Ulrich; Neumaier-Wagner, Peruka; Kadyrov, Mamed; Goyal, Pankaj; Alfer, Joachim; Rath, Werner; Huppertz, Berthold

    2005-01-01

    The human endometrium prepares for implantation of the blastocyst by reorganization of its whole cellular network. Endometrial stroma cells change their phenotype starting around the 23rd day of the menstrual cycle. These predecidual stroma cells first appear next to spiral arteries, and after implantation these cells further differentiate into decidual stroma cells. The phenotypical changes in these cells during decidualization are characterized by distinct changes in the actin filaments and filament-related proteins such as alpha-actinin. The carboxy-terminal LIM domain protein with a molecular weight of 36 kDa (CLP36) is a cytoskeletal component that has been shown to associate with contractile actin filaments and to bind to alpha-actinin supporting a role for CLP36 in cytoskeletal reorganization and signal transduction by binding to signaling proteins. The expression patterns of CLP36, alpha-actinin and actin were studied in endometrial stroma cells from different stages of the menstrual cycle and in decidual stroma cells from the 6th week of gestation until the end of pregnancy. During the menstrual cycle, CLP36 is only expressed in the luminal and glandular epithelium but not in endometrial stroma cells. During decidualization and throughout pregnancy, a parallel upregulation of CLP36 and smooth muscle actin, an early marker of decidualization in the baboon, was observed in endometrial decidual cells. Since both proteins maintain a high expression level throughout pregnancy, a role of both proteins is suggested in the stabilization of the cytoskeleton of these cells that come into close contact with invading trophoblast cells.

  12. TIMP-1 Induces α-Smooth Muscle Actin in Fibroblasts to Promote Urethral Scar Formation.

    PubMed

    Sa, Yinglong; Li, Chao; Li, Hongbin; Guo, Hailin

    2015-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) has been reported to upregulate in urethral scar. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain undefined. Here, we studied levels of TIMP-1 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the fibroblasts isolated from urethral scar tissues, compared to the fibroblasts isolated from normal urethra. Then we either overexpressed TIMP-1, or inhibited TIMP-1 by lentiviruses carrying a transgene or a short hairpin small interfering RNA for TIMP-1 in human fibroblasts. We examined the effects of modulation of TIMP-1 on α-SMA, and on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes. We also studied the underlying mechanisms. We detected significantly higher levels of TIMP-1 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the fibroblasts isolated from urethral scar tissues, compared to the fibroblasts isolated from normal urethra. Moreover, the levels of TIMP-1 and α-SMA strongly correlated. Moreover, we found that TIMP-1 significantly increased levels of α-SMA, transforming growth factor β 1 (TGFβ1), Collagen I and some other key factors related to an enhanced EMT, suggesting that TIMP-1 may induce transformation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts to promote tissue EMT to enhance the formation of urethral scar. Moreover, increases in TIMP-1 also induced an increase in fibroblast cell growth and cell invasion, in an ERK/MAPK-signaling-dependent manner. Our study thus highlights a pivotal role of TIMP-1 in urethral scar formation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Nemaline myopathy-related skeletal muscle α-actin (ACTA1) mutation, Asp286Gly, prevents proper strong myosin binding and triggers muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    Ochala, Julien; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J

    2012-01-01

    Many mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) lead to muscle weakness and nemaline myopathy. Despite increasing clinical and scientific interest, the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of weakness remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed at unraveling these mechanisms using muscles from a transgenic mouse model of nemaline myopathy expressing the ACTA1 Asp286Gly mutation. We recorded and analyzed the mechanics of membrane-permeabilized single muscle fibers. We also performed molecular energy state computations in the presence or absence of Asp286Gly. Results demonstrated that during contraction, the Asp286Gly acts as a "poison-protein" and according to the computational analysis it modifies the actin-actin interface. This phenomenon is likely to prevent proper myosin cross-bridge binding, limiting the fraction of actomyosin interactions in the strong binding state. At the cell level, this decreases the force-generating capacity, and, overall, induces muscle weakness. To counterbalance such negative events, future potential therapeutic strategies may focus on the inappropriate actin-actin interface or myosin binding.

  14. Variable N-terminal regions of muscle myosin heavy chain modulate ATPase rate and actin sliding velocity.

    PubMed

    Swank, Douglas M; Knowles, Aileen F; Kronert, William A; Suggs, Jennifer A; Morrill, George E; Nikkhoy, Massoud; Manipon, Gracielle G; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2003-05-09

    We integratively assessed the function of alternative versions of a region near the N terminus of Drosophila muscle myosin heavy chain (encoded by exon 3a or 3b). We exchanged the alternative exon 3 regions between an embryonic isoform and the indirect flight muscle isoform. Each chimeric myosin was expressed in Drosophila indirect flight muscle, in the absence of other myosin isoforms, allowing for purified protein analysis and whole organism locomotory studies. The flight muscle isoform generates higher in vitro actin sliding velocity and solution ATPase rates than the embryonic isoform. Exchanging the embryonic exon 3 region into the flight muscle isoform decreased ATPase rates to embryonic levels but did not affect actin sliding velocity or flight muscle ultrastructure. Interestingly, this swap only slightly impaired flight ability. Exchanging the flight muscle-specific exon 3 region into the embryonic isoform increased actin sliding velocity 3-fold and improved indirect flight muscle ultrastructure integrity but failed to rescue the flightless phenotype of flies expressing embryonic myosin. These results suggest that the two structural versions of the exon 3 domain independently influence the kinetics of at least two steps of the actomyosin cross-bridge cycle.

  15. Compliance Accelerates Relaxation in Muscle by Allowing Myosin Heads to Move Relative to Actin

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that limit the speed at which striated muscles relax are poorly understood. This work presents, to our knowledge, novel simulations that show that the time course of relaxation is accelerated by interfilamentary movement resulting from series compliance; force drops faster when myosin heads move relative to actin during relaxation. This insight was obtained by using cross-bridge distribution techniques to simulate the mechanical behavior of half-sarcomeres that were connected in series with springs of varying stiffness. (The springs mimic the combined effects of half-sarcomere heterogeneity and muscle’s series elastic component.) Half-sarcomeres that shortened by >∼10 nm when they were activated subsequently relaxed with a biphasic profile; force initially declined slowly and approximately linearly before collapsing with a fast exponential time course. Stretches imposed during the linear phase quickened relaxation, while shortening movements prolonged the time course. These predictions are consistent with data from experiments performed by many other groups using single muscle fibers and isolated myofibrils. When half-sarcomeres were linked to stiff springs (so that they did not shorten appreciably during the simulations), force relaxed with a slow exponential time course and did not show biphasic behavior. Together, these results suggest that fast relaxation of striated muscle is an emergent property that reflects multiscale interactions within the muscle architecture. The nonlinear behavior during relaxation reflects perturbations to the dynamic coupling of regulated binding sites and cycling myosin heads that are induced by interfilamentary movement. PMID:26840730

  16. Diffusion of myosin light chain kinase on actin: A mechanism to enhance myosin phosphorylation rates in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; Brizendine, Richard K; Carter, Michael S; Alcala, Diego B; Brown, Avery E; Chattin, Amy M; Haldeman, Brian D; Walsh, Michael P; Facemyer, Kevin C; Baker, Josh E; Cremo, Christine R

    2015-10-01

    Smooth muscle myosin (SMM) light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates SMM, thereby activating the ATPase activity required for muscle contraction. The abundance of active MLCK, which is tightly associated with the contractile apparatus, is low relative to that of SMM. SMM phosphorylation is rapid despite the low ratio of MLCK to SMM, raising the question of how one MLCK rapidly phosphorylates many SMM molecules. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor single molecules of streptavidin-coated quantum dot-labeled MLCK interacting with purified actin, actin bundles, and stress fibers of smooth muscle cells. Surprisingly, MLCK and the N-terminal 75 residues of MLCK (N75) moved on actin bundles and stress fibers of smooth muscle cell cytoskeletons by a random one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion mechanism. Although diffusion of proteins along microtubules and oligonucleotides has been observed previously, this is the first characterization to our knowledge of a protein diffusing in a sustained manner along actin. By measuring the frequency of motion, we found that MLCK motion is permitted only if acto-myosin and MLCK-myosin interactions are weak. From these data, diffusion coefficients, and other kinetic and geometric considerations relating to the contractile apparatus, we suggest that 1-D diffusion of MLCK along actin (a) ensures that diffusion is not rate limiting for phosphorylation, (b) allows MLCK to locate to areas in which myosin is not yet phosphorylated, and (c) allows MLCK to avoid getting "stuck" on myosins that have already been phosphorylated. Diffusion of MLCK along actin filaments may be an important mechanism for enhancing the rate of SMM phosphorylation in smooth muscle.

  17. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-10-20

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components.

  18. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  19. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Higher vertebrates (mammals and birds) express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1) sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA) and α-cardiac (α-CAA), 2) smooth muscle actins (SMAs), α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3) cytoplasmic actins (CYAs), β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb) against an actin isoform (α-SMA) was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli  et al., 1986) . We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAbs anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS). In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-regeneration in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes. PMID:27335638

  20. A multi-scale continuum model of skeletal muscle mechanics predicting force enhancement based on actin-titin interaction.

    PubMed

    Heidlauf, Thomas; Klotz, Thomas; Rode, Christian; Altan, Ekin; Bleiler, Christian; Siebert, Tobias; Röhrle, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Although recent research emphasises the possible role of titin in skeletal muscle force enhancement, this property is commonly ignored in current computational models. This work presents the first biophysically based continuum-mechanical model of skeletal muscle that considers, in addition to actin-myosin interactions, force enhancement based on actin-titin interactions. During activation, titin attaches to actin filaments, which results in a significant reduction in titin's free molecular spring length and therefore results in increased titin forces during a subsequent stretch. The mechanical behaviour of titin is included on the microscopic half-sarcomere level of a multi-scale chemo-electro-mechanical muscle model, which is based on the classic sliding-filament and cross-bridge theories. In addition to titin stress contributions in the muscle fibre direction, the continuum-mechanical constitutive relation accounts for geometrically motivated, titin-induced stresses acting in the muscle's cross-fibre directions. Representative simulations of active stretches under maximal and submaximal activation levels predict realistic magnitudes of force enhancement in fibre direction. For example, stretching the model by 20 % from optimal length increased the isometric force at the target length by about 30 %. Predicted titin-induced stresses in the muscle's cross-fibre directions are rather insignificant. Including the presented development in future continuum-mechanical models of muscle function in dynamic situations will lead to more accurate model predictions during and after lengthening contractions.

  1. Modulation of alpha smooth muscle actin and desmin expression in perisinusoidal cells of normal and diseased human livers.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Gräff, A.; Krüger, S.; Bochard, F.; Gabbiani, G.; Denk, H.

    1991-01-01

    It has been suggested that perisinusoidal liver cells (PSC) play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of fibrocontractive changes. Using light and electron microscopic immunolocalization techniques, a series of 207 normal and pathologic human liver specimens were evaluated for the expression of alpha smooth muscle (SM) actin and desmin in this and other nonparenchymal cell types. In normal adult liver tissue, PSCs were practically devoid of desmin and exceptionally stained for alpha-SM actin, whereas this actin isoform frequently was encountered in PSCs from the embryonic to the adolescent period. A broad spectrum of pathologic conditions was accompanied by the presence of alpha-SM actin containing PSCs; these were detected preferentially in periportal or perivenular zones according to the predominant location of the underlying hepatocellular damage. The occurrence of this PSC phenotype generally was associated with fibrogenesis and was in some cases detected earlier than overt collagen accumulation. Fibrous bands subdividing liver tissue in cirrhosis and focal nodular hyperplasia, as well as desmoplastic reaction to malignant tumors, contained alpha-SM actin-rich cells admixed with variable proportions of cells coexpressing desmin. In end stages, this population was less numerous than in active fibrotic or cirrhotic processes. Using immunogold electron microscopy, alpha-SM actin was localized in microfilament bundles of typical PSCs. Our results are compatible with the assumption that the appearance of alpha-SM actin and desmin-expressing myofibroblasts results at least in part from a phenotypic modulation of PSCs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2024709

  2. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and structure integrity in chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Chieh; Kuo, Pei-Yin; Chang, Ching-Fang; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Ho, Larry Low-Tone

    2006-06-01

    The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) during chondrogenesis was investigated by the use of pellet culture. Undifferentiated hMSCs expressed low but detectable amounts of SMA and the addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) to the culture medium increased SMA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Differentiation in pellet culture was rapidly induced in the presence of TGF-beta1 and was accompanied by the development of annular layers at the surface of the pellet. These peripheral layers lacked expression of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen during early differentiation. Progress in differentiation increased the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen and the expression of SMA in these layers. Double-staining for type II collagen and SMA by immunofluorescence demonstrated the differentiation of hMSCs into cells positive for these two proteins. The addition of cytochalasin D, a potent inhibitor of the polymerization of actin microfilaments, caused damage to the structural integrity and surface smoothness of the chondrogenic pellets. The SMA-positive cells in the peripheral layers of the chondrogenic pellets mimic those within the superficial layer of articular cartilage and are speculated to play a major role in cartilage development and maintenance.

  3. Compliance Accelerates Relaxation in Muscle by Allowing Myosin Heads to Move Relative to Actin.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2016-02-02

    The mechanisms that limit the speed at which striated muscles relax are poorly understood. This work presents, to our knowledge, novel simulations that show that the time course of relaxation is accelerated by interfilamentary movement resulting from series compliance; force drops faster when myosin heads move relative to actin during relaxation. This insight was obtained by using cross-bridge distribution techniques to simulate the mechanical behavior of half-sarcomeres that were connected in series with springs of varying stiffness. (The springs mimic the combined effects of half-sarcomere heterogeneity and muscle's series elastic component.) Half-sarcomeres that shortened by >∼10 nm when they were activated subsequently relaxed with a biphasic profile; force initially declined slowly and approximately linearly before collapsing with a fast exponential time course. Stretches imposed during the linear phase quickened relaxation, while shortening movements prolonged the time course. These predictions are consistent with data from experiments performed by many other groups using single muscle fibers and isolated myofibrils. When half-sarcomeres were linked to stiff springs (so that they did not shorten appreciably during the simulations), force relaxed with a slow exponential time course and did not show biphasic behavior. Together, these results suggest that fast relaxation of striated muscle is an emergent property that reflects multiscale interactions within the muscle architecture. The nonlinear behavior during relaxation reflects perturbations to the dynamic coupling of regulated binding sites and cycling myosin heads that are induced by interfilamentary movement. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CADASIL mutations and shRNA silencing of NOTCH3 affect actin organization in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tikka, Saara; Ng, Yan Peng; Di Maio, Giuseppe; Mykkänen, Kati; Siitonen, Maija; Lepikhova, Tatiana; Pöyhönen, Minna; Viitanen, Matti; Virtanen, Ismo; Kalimo, Hannu; Baumann, Marc

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common hereditary vascular dementia caused by mutations in NOTCH3 gene. Pathology is manifested in small- and middle-sized arteries throughout the body, though primarily in cerebral white matter. Hemodynamics is altered in CADASIL and NOTCH3 is suggested to regulate actin filament polymerization and thereby vascular tone. We analyzed NOTCH3 expression and morphology of actin cytoskeleton in genetically genuine cultured human CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) (including a cell line homozygous for p.Arg133Cys mutation) derived from different organs, and in control VSMCs with short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-silenced NOTCH3. NOTCH3 protein level was higher in VSMCs derived from adult than newborn arteries in both CADASIL and control VSMCs. CADASIL VSMCs showed altered actin cytoskeleton including increased branching and node formation, and more numerous and smaller adhesion sites than control VSMCs. Alterations in actin cytoskeleton in shRNA-silenced VSMCs were similar as in CADASIL VSMCs. Severity of the alterations in actin filaments corresponded to NOTCH3 expression level being most severe in VSMCs derived from adult cerebral arteries. These observations suggest that hypomorphic NOTCH3 activity causes alterations in actin organization in CADASIL. Furthermore, arteries from different organs have specific characteristics, which modify the effects of the NOTCH3 mutation and which is one explanation for the exceptional susceptibility of cerebral white matter arteries.

  5. Loss of Smooth Muscle α-Actin Leads to NF-κB-Dependent Increased Sensitivity to Angiotensin II in Smooth Muscle Cells and Aortic Enlargement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiyuan; Peters, Andrew; Papke, Christina L; Villamizar, Carlos; Ringuette, Lea-Jeanne; Cao, Jiumei; Wang, Shanzhi; Ma, Shuangtao; Gong, Limin; Byanova, Katerina L; Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X; Madonna, Rosalinda; Kee, Patrick; Geng, Yong-Jian; Brasier, Allan R; Davis, Elaine C; Prakash, Siddharth; Kwartler, Callie S; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2017-06-09

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle isoform of α-actin, cause thoracic aortic aneurysms, acute aortic dissections, and occlusive vascular diseases. We sought to identify the mechanism by which loss of smooth muscle α-actin causes aortic disease. Acta2(-/-) mice have an increased number of elastic lamellae in the ascending aorta and progressive aortic root dilation as assessed by echocardiography that can be attenuated by treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II (AngII) type 1 receptor blocker. AngII levels are not increased in Acta2(-/-) aortas or kidneys. Aortic tissue and explanted smooth muscle cells from Acta2(-/-) aortas show increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased basal nuclear factor κB signaling, leading to an increase in the expression of the AngII receptor type I a and activation of signaling at 100-fold lower levels of AngII in the mutant compared with wild-type cells. Furthermore, disruption of smooth muscle α-actin filaments in wild-type smooth muscle cells by various mechanisms activates nuclear factor κB signaling and increases expression of AngII receptor type I a. These findings reveal that disruption of smooth muscle α-actin filaments in smooth muscle cells increases reactive oxygen species levels, activates nuclear factor κB signaling, and increases AngII receptor type I a expression, thus potentiating AngII signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells without an increase in the exogenous levels of AngII. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Fat-induced membrane cholesterol accrual provokes cortical filamentous actin destabilisation and glucose transport dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Habegger, K M; Penque, B A; Sealls, W; Tackett, L; Bell, L N; Blue, E K; Gallagher, P J; Sturek, M; Alloosh, M A; Steinberg, H O; Considine, R V; Elmendorf, J S

    2012-02-01

    Diminished cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) has been implicated in skeletal muscle insulin resistance, yet the mechanism(s) is unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that changes in membrane cholesterol could be a causative factor, as organised F-actin structure emanates from cholesterol-enriched raft microdomains at the plasma membrane. Skeletal muscle samples from high-fat-fed animals and insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant human participants were evaluated. The study also used L6 myotubes to directly determine the impact of fatty acids (FAs) on membrane/cytoskeletal variables and insulin action. High-fat-fed insulin-resistant animals displayed elevated levels of membrane cholesterol and reduced F-actin structure compared with normal chow-fed animals. Moreover, human muscle biopsies revealed an inverse correlation between membrane cholesterol and whole-body glucose disposal. Palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myotubes displayed membrane cholesterol accrual and F-actin loss. Cholesterol lowering protected against the palmitate-induced defects, whereas characteristically measured defects in insulin signalling were not corrected. Conversely, cholesterol loading of L6 myotube membranes provoked a palmitate-like cytoskeletal/GLUT4 derangement. Mechanistically, we observed a palmitate-induced increase in O-linked glycosylation, an end-product of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP). Consistent with HBP activity affecting the transcription of various genes, we observed an increase in Hmgcr, a gene that encodes 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis. In line with increased HBP activity transcriptionally provoking a membrane cholesterol-based insulin-resistant state, HBP inhibition attenuated Hmgcr expression and prevented membrane cholesterol accrual, F-actin loss and GLUT4/glucose transport dysfunction. Our results suggest a novel cholesterolgenic-based mechanism of FA-induced membrane

  7. Molt cycle-associated changes in calcium-dependent proteinase activity that degrades actin and myosin in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The role of calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) in the proecdysial atrophy of crustacean claw muscle has been investigated. During atrophy the molar ratio of actin to myosin heavy chain decreased 31%, confirming earlier ultrastructural observations that the ratio of thin:thick myofilaments declined from 9:1 to 6:1 (D.L. Mykles and D.M. Skinner, 1981, J. Ultrastruct. Res. 75, 314 to 325). The release of TCA-soluble material in muscle homogenates at neutral pH was stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ and completely inhibited by EGTA. The specific degradation of the major myofibrillar proteins (actin, myosin heavy and light chains, paramyosin, tropomyosin, troponin-T, and troponin-I) was demonstrated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteolytic activity was more than twofold greater in proecdysial muscle homogenates. Degradation of myofibrillar proteins was inhibited by EGTA, and the two inhibitors of crysteine proteinases, leupeptin, and antipain, but not pepstatin, an inhibitor of aspartic proteinases. Unlike CDPs from vertebrate muscle, the CDP(s) in crab claw muscle degrades actin and myosin in addition to other myofibrillar proteins.

  8. The ALP-Enigma protein ALP-1 functions in actin filament organization to promote muscle structural integrity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Han, Hsiao-Fen; Beckerle, Mary C

    2009-05-01

    Mutations that affect the Z-disk-associated ALP-Enigma proteins have been linked to human muscular and cardiac diseases. Despite their clear physiological significance for human health, the mechanism of action of ALP-Enigma proteins is largely unknown. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the ALP-Enigma protein family is encoded by a single gene, alp-1; thus C. elegans provides an excellent model to study ALP-Enigma function. Here we present a molecular and genetic analysis of ALP-Enigma function in C. elegans. We show that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin colocalize at dense bodies where actin filaments are anchored and that the proper localization of ALP-1 at dense bodies is dependent on alpha-actinin. Our analysis of alp-1 mutants demonstrates that ALP-1 functions to maintain actin filament organization and participates in muscle stabilization during contraction. Reducing alpha-actinin activity enhances the actin filament phenotype of the alp-1 mutants, suggesting that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin function in the same cellular process. Like alpha-actinin, alp-1 also interacts genetically with a connectin/titin family member, ketn-1, to provide mechanical stability for supporting body wall muscle contraction. Taken together, our data demonstrate that ALP-1 and alpha-actinin function together to stabilize actin filaments and promote muscle structural integrity.

  9. Disruption of Cortical Actin in Skeletal Muscle Demonstrates an Essential Role of the Cytoskeleton in Glucose Transporter 4 Translocation in Insulin-sensitive Tissues*

    PubMed Central

    Brozinick, Joseph T.; Hawkins, Eric D.; Strawbridge, Andrew B.; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture work suggests that signaling to polymerize cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) represents a required pathway for the optimal redistribution of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter, GLUT4, to the plasma membrane. Recent in vitro study further suggests that the actin-regulatory neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) mediates the effect of insulin on the actin filament network. Here we tested whether similar cytoskeletal mechanics are essential for insulin-regulated glucose transport in isolated rat epitrochlearis skeletal muscle. Microscopic analysis revealed that cortical F-actin is markedly diminished in muscle exposed to latrunculin B. Depolymerization of cortical F-actin with latrunculin B caused a time- and concentration-dependent decline in 2-deoxyglucose transport. The loss of cortical F-actin and glucose transport was paralleled by a decline in insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, as assessed by photolabeling of cell surface GLUT4 with Bio-LC-ATB-BMPA. Although latrunculin B impaired insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and glucose transport, activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt by insulin was not rendered ineffective. In contrast, the ability of insulin to elicit the cortical F-actin localization of N-WASP was abrogated. These data provide the first evidence that actin cytoskeletal mechanics are an essential feature of the glucose transport process in intact skeletal muscle. Furthermore, these findings support a distal actin-based role for N-WASP in insulin action in vivo. PMID:15247264

  10. p21‐Activated kinase (Pak) regulates airway smooth muscle contraction by regulating paxillin complexes that mediate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenwu; Huang, Youliang

    2016-01-01

    Key points In airway smooth muscle, tension development caused by a contractile stimulus requires phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain (MLC), which activates crossbridge cycling and the polymerization of a pool of submembraneous actin.The p21‐activated kinases (Paks) can regulate the contractility of smooth muscle and non‐muscle cells, and there is evidence that this occurs through the regulation of MLC phosphorylation.We show that Pak has no effect on MLC phosphorylation during the contraction of airway smooth muscle, and that it regulates contraction by mediating actin polymerization.We find that Pak phosphorylates the adhesion junction protein, paxillin, on Ser273, which promotes the formation of a signalling complex that activates the small GTPase, cdc42, and the actin polymerization catalyst, neuronal Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (N‐WASP).These studies demonstrate a novel role for Pak in regulating the contractility of smooth muscle by regulating actin polymerization. Abstract The p21‐activated kinases (Pak) can regulate contractility in smooth muscle and other cell and tissue types, but the mechanisms by which Paks regulate cell contractility are unclear. In airway smooth muscle, stimulus‐induced contraction requires phosphorylation of the 20 kDa light chain of myosin, which activates crossbridge cycling, as well as the polymerization of a small pool of actin. The role of Pak in airway smooth muscle contraction was evaluated by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh)‐induced Pak activation through the expression of a kinase inactive mutant, Pak1 K299R, or by treating tissues with the Pak inhibitor, IPA3. Pak inhibition suppressed actin polymerization and contraction in response to ACh, but it did not affect myosin light chain phosphorylation. Pak activation induced paxillin phosphorylation on Ser273; the paxillin mutant, paxillin S273A, inhibited paxillin Ser273 phosphorylation and inhibited actin polymerization and contraction

  11. Severe protein aggregate myopathy in a knockout mouse model points to an essential role of cofilin2 in sarcomeric actin exchange and muscle maintenance.

    PubMed

    Gurniak, Christine B; Chevessier, Frédéric; Jokwitz, Melanie; Jönsson, Friederike; Perlas, Emerald; Richter, Hendrik; Matern, Gabi; Boyl, Pietro Pilo; Chaponnier, Christine; Fürst, Dieter; Schröder, Rolf; Witke, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human actin depolymerizing factor cofilin2 result in an autosomal dominant form of nemaline myopathy. Here, we report on the targeted ablation of murine cofilin2, which leads to a severe skeletal muscle specific phenotype within the first two weeks after birth. Apart from skeletal muscle, cofilin2 is also expressed in heart and CNS, however the pathology was restricted to skeletal muscle. The two close family members of cofilin2 - ADF and cofilin1 - were co-expressed in muscle, but unable to compensate for the loss of cofilin2. While primary myofibril assembly and muscle development were unaffected in cofilin2 mutant mice, progressive muscle degeneration was observed between postnatal days 3 and 7. Muscle pathology was characterized by sarcoplasmic protein aggregates, fiber size disproportion, mitochondrial abnormalities and internal nuclei. The observed muscle pathology differed from nemaline myopathy, but showed combined features of actin-associated myopathy and myofibrillar myopathy. In cofilin2 mutant mice, the postnatal expression pattern and turnover of sarcomeric α-actin isoforms were altered. Levels of smooth muscle α-actin were increased and remained high in developing muscles, suggesting that cofilin2 plays a crucial role during the exchange of α-actin isoforms during the early postnatal remodeling of the sarcomere.

  12. Stretching human mesenchymal stromal cells on stiffness-customized collagen type I generates a smooth muscle marker profile without growth factor addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothdiener, Miriam; Hegemann, Miriam; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Walters, Brandan; Papugy, Piruntha; Nguyen, Phong; Claus, Valentin; Seeger, Tanja; Stoeckle, Ulrich; Boehme, Karen A.; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Stegemann, Jan P.; Hart, Melanie L.; Kurz, Bodo; Klein, Gerd; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    Using matrix elasticity and cyclic stretch have been investigated for inducing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation towards the smooth muscle cell (SMC) lineage but not in combination. We hypothesized that combining lineage-specific stiffness with cyclic stretch would result in a significantly increased expression of SMC markers, compared to non-stretched controls. First, we generated dense collagen type I sheets by mechanically compressing collagen hydrogels. Atomic force microscopy revealed a nanoscale stiffness range known to support myogenic differentiation. Further characterization revealed viscoelasticity and stable biomechanical properties under cyclic stretch with >99% viable adherent human MSC. MSCs on collagen sheets demonstrated a significantly increased mRNA but not protein expression of SMC markers, compared to on culture flasks. However, cyclic stretch of MSCs on collagen sheets significantly increased both mRNA and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transgelin, and calponin versus plastic and non-stretched sheets. Thus, lineage-specific stiffness and cyclic stretch can be applied together for inducing MSC differentiation towards SMCs without the addition of recombinant growth factors or other soluble factors. This represents a novel stimulation method for modulating the phenotype of MSCs towards SMCs that could easily be incorporated into currently available methodologies to obtain a more targeted control of MSC phenotype.

  13. Stretching human mesenchymal stromal cells on stiffness-customized collagen type I generates a smooth muscle marker profile without growth factor addition

    PubMed Central

    Rothdiener, Miriam; Hegemann, Miriam; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Walters, Brandan; Papugy, Piruntha; Nguyen, Phong; Claus, Valentin; Seeger, Tanja; Stoeckle, Ulrich; Boehme, Karen A.; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Stegemann, Jan P.; Hart, Melanie L.; Kurz, Bodo; Klein, Gerd; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Using matrix elasticity and cyclic stretch have been investigated for inducing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation towards the smooth muscle cell (SMC) lineage but not in combination. We hypothesized that combining lineage-specific stiffness with cyclic stretch would result in a significantly increased expression of SMC markers, compared to non-stretched controls. First, we generated dense collagen type I sheets by mechanically compressing collagen hydrogels. Atomic force microscopy revealed a nanoscale stiffness range known to support myogenic differentiation. Further characterization revealed viscoelasticity and stable biomechanical properties under cyclic stretch with >99% viable adherent human MSC. MSCs on collagen sheets demonstrated a significantly increased mRNA but not protein expression of SMC markers, compared to on culture flasks. However, cyclic stretch of MSCs on collagen sheets significantly increased both mRNA and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transgelin, and calponin versus plastic and non-stretched sheets. Thus, lineage-specific stiffness and cyclic stretch can be applied together for inducing MSC differentiation towards SMCs without the addition of recombinant growth factors or other soluble factors. This represents a novel stimulation method for modulating the phenotype of MSCs towards SMCs that could easily be incorporated into currently available methodologies to obtain a more targeted control of MSC phenotype. PMID:27775041

  14. In vitro expression of the alpha-smooth muscle actin isoform by rat lung mesenchymal cells: regulation by culture condition and transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J J; Woodcock-Mitchell, J L; Perry, L; Zhao, J; Low, R B; Baldor, L; Absher, P M

    1993-07-01

    alpha-Smooth muscle actin (alpha SM actin)-containing cells recently have been demonstrated in intraalveolar lesions in both rat and human tissues following lung injury. In order to develop model systems for the study of such cells, we examined cultured lung cell lines for this phenotype. The adult rat lung fibroblast-like "RL" cell lines were found to express alpha SM actin mRNA and protein and to organize this actin into stress fiber-like structures. Immunocytochemical staining of subclones of the RL87 line demonstrated the presence in the cultures of at least four cell phenotypes, one that fails to express alpha SM actin and three distinct morphologic types that do express alpha SM actin. The proportion of cellular actin that is the alpha-isoform was modulated by the culture conditions. RL cells growing at low density expressed minimal alpha SM actin. On reaching confluent densities, however, alpha SM actin increased to at least 20% of the total actin content. This effect, combined with the observation that the most immunoreactive cells were those that displayed overlapping cell processes in culture, suggests that cell-cell contact may be involved in actin isoform regulation in these cells. Similar to the response of some smooth muscle cell lines, alpha SM actin expression in RL cells also was promoted by conditions, e.g., maintenance in low serum medium, which minimize cell division. alpha SM actin expression was modulated in RL cells by the growth factor transforming growth factor-beta. Addition of this cytokine to growing cells substantially elevated the proportion of alpha SM actin protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Three-dimensional structure of the complex of skeletal muscle actin and bovine pancreatic DNAse I at 6-A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Suck, D; Kabsch, W; Mannherz, H G

    1981-01-01

    The structure of rabbit skeletal muscle actin complexed with bovine pancreatic DNase I has been determined by x-ray crystallographic methods at 6-A resolution. The analysis was based on a new orthorhombic crystal form, space group P212121, with one complex in the asymmetric unit. Six isomorphous heavy-atom derivatives yielding an overall figure of merit of 0.72 have been used to calculate the electron-density map. Molecular models for actin and DNase I derived from this map have dimensions 67 X 40 X 37 A and 50 X 50 X 40 A, respectively. The actin molecule is elongated and consists of a larger and a smaller domain, each containing density regions resembling a central beta-pleated sheet surrounded by alpha-helices. The highest electron-density peak is found in the cleft between the two domains, perhaps indicating the bound ATP. Observed crystal contacts between actin molecules and a model for the F-actin filament are discussed. Two high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites which also bind Ba2+ have been located at the surface of the DNase I molecule. Images PMID:6270671

  16. 12S-lipoxygenase protein associates with {alpha}-actin fibers in human umbilical artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisinger, Gary . E-mail: gary_w@tasmc.health.gov.il; Limor, Rona; Marcus-Perlman, Yonit; Knoll, Esther; Kohen, Fortune; Schinder, Vera; Firer, Michael; Stern, Naftali

    2007-05-11

    The current study sets out to characterize the intracellular localization of the platelet-type 12S-lipoxygenase (12-LO), an enzyme involved in angiotensin-II induced signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Immunohistochemical analysis of VSMC in vitro or human umbilical arteries in vivo showed a clear cytoplasmic localization. On immunogold electron microscopy, 12-LO was found primarily associated with cytoplasmic VSMC muscle fibrils. Upon angiotensin-II treatment of cultured VSMC, immunoprecipitated 12-LO was found bound to {alpha}-actin, a component of the cytoplasmic myofilaments. 12-LO/{alpha}-actin binding was blocked by VSMC pretreatment with the 12-LO inhibitors, baicalien or esculetine and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Moreover, the binding of 12-LO to {alpha}-actin was not associated with 12-LO serine or tyrosine phosphorylation. These observations suggest a previously unrecognized angiotensin-II dependent protein interaction in VSMC through which 12-LO protein may be trafficked, for yet undiscovered purposes towards the much more abundantly expressed cytoskeletal protein {alpha}-actin.

  17. Characterization of bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice expressing mCherry fluorescent protein substituted for the murine smooth muscle-alpha-actin gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Smooth muscle a actin (SMA) is a cytoskeletal protein expressed by mesenchymal and smooth muscle cell types, including mural cells(vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes). Using Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) recombineering technology, we generated transgenic reporter mice that express a ...

  18. The effect of actin filament compliance on the interpretation of the elastic properties of skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Blangé, T; van der Heide, U A; Treijtel, B W; de Beer, E L

    1997-04-01

    Recently, X-ray diffraction studies provided direct evidence for an appreciable length change in the actin filament upon activation. This finding has profound implications on the interpretation of the elastic properties of skeletal muscle fibre. In this study we determined the compliance of the actin filament during activation, using the data obtained previously from quick stretch and release experiments on skeletal muscle fibres of the frog. The effects of filament compliance are demonstrated clearly in the elastic properties of partially activated fibres. The low-frequency elasticity increases linearly with tension, reflecting an increase in the number of force-producing cross-bridges. At higher frequencies, this linearity is lost. In this study we describe the data consistently in terms of a cross-bridge stiffness increasing linearly with tension and a constant Young's modulus for the actin filament of 44 MN m-2. This corresponds to a compliance of 23 pm microns-1 per kN m-2 tension developed. Using this value for the actin filament Young's modulus, its contribution to the elastic properties of skeletal muscle fibre of the frog is considered in rigor and relaxation. The filament compliance hardly affects the overall elasticity of the muscle fibre in relaxation. In contrast, it contributes to a large extent to the overall elasticity in rigor. Taking account of the filament compliance, we find that the Young's modulus in rigor exhibits an increase from 14 MN m-2 at frequencies below 500 Hz to 55 MN m-2 above 40 kHz.

  19. Immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in central giant-cell lesions.

    PubMed

    Maiz, Nancy Noya; de la Rosa-García, Estela; Camacho, María Esther Irigoyen

    2016-04-01

    Central giant-cell lesions (CGCLs) are reactive lesions that consist histologically of spindle-shaped stromal cells, (fibroblasts and myofibroblasts) loosely arranged in a fibrous stroma, multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells with haemorrhagic areas. This study identified the immunoexpression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in spindle-shaped stromal cells, and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells. Their association with the clinical and radiographic characteristics of these lesions was identified. Thirty-five cases of CGCLs were studied. Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, glucocorticoid and calcitonin was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The labelling index was 100 times the quotient of the number of positive cells divided by the total number of cells of each type. Logistic regression analysis was applied. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was positive (54%) for spindle stromal cells (myofibroblasts). A significant association was observed with root resorption (P = 0.004) and cortical bone destruction (P = 0.024). Glucocorticoid immunoexpression was positive for 99% of the giant cells and 86.7% of the mononuclear cells. Glucocorticoid immunoexpression in the mononuclear cells was associated with root resorption (P = 0.031). A longer evolution time was associated with lower immunoexpression of glucocorticoid (OR 12.4: P = 0.047). Calcitonin immunoexpression was positive in 86% of the giant cells. Immunoexpression of calcitonin was associated with age (P = 0.040). Myofibroblasts are important components of CGCLs, stromal cells and alpha-smooth muscle. Actin immunoexpression was associated with root and cortical bone resorption. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Nucleolar organizing regions and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression in a case of ameloblastic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Kavitha P; Vidya, M; Shetty, Nandaprasad; Karkera, Bhavana V; Jogi, Hemanth

    2010-06-01

    Ameloblastic carcinoma is a rare lesion of odontogenic origin. It is defined as a malignant epithelial odontogenic tumor that histologically has retained the features of ameloblastic differentiation and also exhibits cytologic features of malignancy, like atypia and mitotic activity. Although this lesion represents a separate entity, differentiating it from ameloblastoma has been often challenging to pathologists. In this case study reporting a case of ameloblastic carcinoma, we have attempted to verify the previous findings on the use of Argyrophilic nucleolar organizing regions (AgNORs) and immunohistochemical staining for the alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in differentiating ameloblastic carcinoma from ameloblastoma. It was observed that AgNORs was found to be almost twice in ameloblastic carcinoma as it was in ameloblastoma. A difference between the two lesions in the pattern of expression of alpha-SMA was also observed, with alpha-SMA being expressed in the odontogenic epithelium and the stroma of ameloblastic carcinoma whereas, in the case of ameloblastoma, it was found only in the stromal part. These findings suggest that AgNORs and alpha-SMA expression may be used as adjuncts to the routine histopathologic examination to differentiate ameloblastic carcinoma and ameloblastoma.

  1. Nucleolar Organizing Regions and α-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression in a Case of Ameloblastic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vidya, M.; Shetty, Nandaprasad; Karkera, Bhavana V.; Jogi, Hemanth

    2010-01-01

    Ameloblastic carcinoma is a rare lesion of odontogenic origin. It is defined as a malignant epithelial odontogenic tumor that histologically has retained the features of ameloblastic differentiation and also exhibits cytologic features of malignancy, like atypia and mitotic activity. Although this lesion represents a separate entity, differentiating it from ameloblastoma has been often challenging to pathologists. In this case study reporting a case of ameloblastic carcinoma, we have attempted to verify the previous findings on the use of Argyrophilic nucleolar organizing regions (AgNORs) and immunohistochemical staining for the alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in differentiating ameloblastic carcinoma from ameloblastoma. It was observed that AgNORs was found to be almost twice in ameloblastic carcinoma as it was in ameloblastoma. A difference between the two lesions in the pattern of expression of alpha-SMA was also observed, with alpha-SMA being expressed in the odontogenic epithelium and the stroma of ameloblastic carcinoma whereas, in the case of ameloblastoma, it was found only in the stromal part. These findings suggest that AgNORs and alpha-SMA expression may be used as adjuncts to the routine histopathologic examination to differentiate ameloblastic carcinoma and ameloblastoma. PMID:20333560

  2. CD34 and α smooth muscle actin distinguish verrucous hyperplasia from verrucous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Paral, Kristen M; Taxy, Jerome B; Lingen, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the use of stromal biomarkers CD34 and α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) to distinguish verrucous carcinoma (VC) from verrucous hyperplasia (VH). Thirteen VH, 15 VC, 20 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 16 of uninvolved adjacent stroma specimens were analyzed for α-SMA and CD34 expression by immunohistochemistry. Stromal α-SMA positivity was observed in 100% (20 of 20) of the SCC and in 93% (14 of 15) of the VC, whereas none of the VH (0 of 13) or adjacent uninvolved stroma (0 of 16) demonstrated α-SMA reactivity. Stromal CD34 positivity was observed in 100% (13 of 13) of VH and adjacent stroma (16 of 16), while 20% (3 of 15) of VC and 11% (2 of 18) of SCC stroma expressed CD34. The SCC and VC groups differed significantly from the VH and uninvolved stroma groups for both α-SMA and CD34 expression (P < .0001). Stromal CD34 and α-SMA protein expression patterns may aid in distinguishing between VC and VH in challenging cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of α-Smooth Muscle Actin Determines the Fate of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Talele, Nilesh P.; Fradette, Julie; Davies, John E.; Kapus, Andras; Hinz, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pro-fibrotic microenvironments of scars and tumors characterized by increased stiffness stimulate mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to express α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). We investigated whether incorporation of α-SMA into contractile stress fibers regulates human MSC fate. Sorted α-SMA-positive MSCs exhibited high contractile activity, low clonogenicity, and differentiation potential limited to osteogenesis. Knockdown of α-SMA was sufficient to restore clonogenicity and adipogenesis in MSCs. Conversely, α-SMA overexpression induced YAP translocation to the nucleus and reduced the high clonogenicity and adipogenic potential of α-SMA-negative MSCs. Inhibition of YAP rescued the decreased adipogenic differentiation potential induced by α-SMA, establishing a mechanistic link between matrix stiffness, α-SMA, YAP, and MSC differentiation. Consistent with in vitro findings, nuclear localization of YAP was positively correlated in α-SMA expressing stromal cells of adiposarcoma and osteosarcoma. We propose that α-SMA mediated contraction plays a critical role in mechanically regulating MSC fate by controlling YAP/TAZ activation. PMID:26028530

  4. Immortalized CNS pericytes are quiescent smooth muscle actin-negative and pluripotent

    PubMed Central

    Dore-Duffy, Paula; Mehedi, Afroza; Wang, Xueqian; Bradley, Michael; Trotter, Richard; Gow, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Despite their identification more than 100 years ago by the French scientist Charles-Marie Benjamin Rouget, microvascular pericytes have proven difficult to functionally characterize, due in part to their relatively low numbers and the lack of specific cell markers. However, recent progress is beginning to shed light on the diverse biological functions of these cells. Pericytes are thought to be involved in regulating vascular homeostasis and hemostasis as well as serving as a local source of adult stem cells. To further define the properties of these intriguing cells, we have isolated pericytes from transgenic mice (Immortomouse®) harboring a temperature-sensitive mutant of the SV40 virus target T-gene. This Immortopericyte (IMP) conditional cell line is stable for long periods of time and, at 33°C in the presence of interferon gamma, does not differentiate. Under these conditions IMPs are alpha muscle actin-negative and exhibit a pluripotent phenotype, but can be induced to differentiate along both mesenchymal and neuronal lineages at 37°C. Alternatively, differentiation of wild type pericytes and IMPs can be induced directly from capillaries in culture. Finally, the addition of endothelial cells to purified IMP cultures augments their rate of self-renewal and differentiation, possibly in a cell-to-cell contact dependent manner. PMID:21515289

  5. Co-axial bioassay of a smooth muscle relaxant factor released from guinea-pig tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, L B; Paterson, J W; Goldie, R G

    1989-01-01

    -oxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor BW 755C (150 microM) and the leukotriene receptor antagonist FPL 55712 (10 microM) each failed significantly to alter EpDRF-mediated relaxation of vascular smooth muscle suggesting that EpDRF is not a prostanoid. Platelet activating factor (Pat) failed to cause relaxation of endothelium-denuded rat aorta, indicating that this mediator was also not EpDRF. 7. EpDRF was also released from human bronchial segments. 8. This study provides direct evidence for the release of an EpDRF from non-diseased airway tissue and further suggests that healthy airway reactivity to spasmogens is modulated by the release of an endogenous protective, spasmolytic substance. The bronchial hyperreactivity of asthma may be partly caused by attenuated production of such an inhibitory signal.

  6. Cholera toxin treatment of vascular smooth muscle cells decreases smooth muscle α-actin content and abolishes the platelet-derived growth factor-BB-stimulated DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sachinidis, Agapios; Seul, Claudia; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Seewald, Stefan; Ko, Yon; Vetter, Hans; Fingerle, Jürgen; Hoppe, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic AMP regulates diverse biological processes such as cell morphology and cell growth. We examined the role of the second messenger cyclic AMP on rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) morphology and the intracellular transduction pathway mediated by platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor (PDGF-Rβ). The effect of PDGF-BB on VSMCs growth was assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Tyrosine phosphorylation of PDGF-Rβ, PLC-γ1, ERK1 and ERK2, p125FAK and paxillin as well as Sm α-actin was examined by the chemiluminescence Western blotting method. Actin mRNA level was quantitated by Northern blotting. Visualization of Sm α-actin filaments, paxillin and PDGF-Rβ was performed by immunfluorescence microscopy. Cholera toxin (CTX; 10 nM) treatment lead to a large and sustained increase in the cyclic AMP concentration after 2 h which correlated with change of VSMC morphology including complete disruption of the Sm α-actin filament array and loss of focal adhesions. Treatment of VSMCs with CTX did not influence tyrosine phosphorylation of p125FAK and paxillin but decreased the content of a Sm α-actin protein. Maximal decrease of 70% was observed after 24 h of treatment. CTX also caused a 90% decrease of the actin mRNA level. CTX treatment completely abolished PDGF-BB stimulated DNA-synthesis although PDGF-Rβ level and subcellular distribution and translocation was not altered. Furthermore CTX attenuated the PDGF-BB-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the PDGF-Rβ, PI 3′-K, PLC-γ1 and ERK1/2 indicating an action of cyclic AMP on PDGF-β receptor. We conclude that although cyclic AMP attenuates the PDGF-Rβ mediated intracellular transduction pathway, an intact actin filament may be required for the PDGF-BB-induced DNA synthesis in VSMCs. PMID:10928958

  7. Skeletal muscle myopathy mutations at the actin tropomyosin interface that cause gain- or loss-of-function.

    PubMed

    Memo, Massimiliano; Marston, Steven

    2013-08-01

    It is well known that the regulation of muscle contraction relies on the ability of tropomyosin to switch between different positions on the actin filament, but it is still not well understood which amino acids are directly involved in the different states of the interaction. Recently the structure of the actin-tropomyosin interface has been determined both in the absence and presence of myosin heads. Interestingly, a number of mutations in tropomyosin that are associated with skeletal muscle myopathy are located within this interface. We first give an overview of the functional effect of mutations on amino acids that are involved in the contact with actin asp25, which represent a pattern repeated seven times along tropomyosin. It is explained how some of these amino acids (R167 and R244) which are thought to be involved in a salt bridge contact with actin in the closed state can produce a loss-of-function when mutated, while other positively charged tropomyosin amino acids positioned on the downstream side of the contact (K7, K49, R91, K168) can produce a gain-of-function when mutated. We then consider mutations of amino acids involved in another salt bridge contact between the two proteins in the closed state, actin K326N (which binds on five different points of tropomyosin) and tropomyosin ∆E139 and E181K, and we report how all of these mutations produce a gain-of-function. These observations can be important to validate the proposed structures and to understand more deeply how mutations affect the function of these proteins and to enable prediction of their outcomes.

  8. Mechanical activation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors causes actin remodelling and myogenic responsiveness in skeletal muscle arterioles.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kwangseok; Zhao, Guiling; Hong, Zhongkui; Sun, Zhe; Yang, Yan; Clifford, Philip S; Davis, Michael J; Meininger, Gerald A; Hill, Michael A

    2016-12-01

    Candesartan, an inverse agonist of the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT1 R), causes a concentration-dependent inhibition of pressure-dependent myogenic tone consistent with previous reports of mechanosensitivity of this G protein-coupled receptor. Mechanoactivation of the AT1 R occurs independently of local angiotensin II production and the type 2 angiotensin receptor. Mechanoactivation of the AT1 R stimulates actin polymerization by a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism, but independently of a change in intracellular Ca(2+) . Using atomic force microscopy, changes in single vascular smooth muscle cell cortical actin are observed to remodel following mechanoactivation of the AT1 R. The Gq/11 protein-coupled angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1 R) has been shown to be activated by mechanical stimuli. In the vascular system, evidence supports the AT1 R being a mechanosensor that contributes to arteriolar myogenic constriction. The aim of this study was to determine if AT1 R mechanoactivation affects myogenic constriction in skeletal muscle arterioles and to determine underlying cellular mechanisms. Using pressure myography to study rat isolated first-order cremaster muscle arterioles the AT1 R inhibitor candesartan (10(-7) -10(-5)  m) showed partial but concentration-dependent inhibition of myogenic reactivity. Inhibition was demonstrated by a rightward shift in the pressure-diameter relationship over the intraluminal pressure range, 30-110 mmHg. Pressure-induced changes in global vascular smooth muscle intracellular Ca(2+) (using Fura-2) were similar in the absence or presence of candesartan, indicating that AT1 R-mediated myogenic constriction relies on Ca(2+) -independent downstream signalling. The diacylglycerol analogue 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) reversed the inhibitory effect of candesartan, while this rescue effect was prevented by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF 109203X. Both candesartan and PKC inhibition caused increased G-actin levels

  9. S-NO-actin: S-nitrosylation kinetics and the effect on isolated vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dalle-Donne, I; Milzani, A; Giustarini, D; Di Simplicio, P; Colombo, R; Rossi, R

    2000-02-01

    We describe the modification of reactive actin sulfhydryls by S-nitrosoglutathione. Kinetics of S-nitrosylation and denitrosylation suggest that only one cysteine of actin is involved in the reactions. By using the bifunctional sulfhydryl cross-linking reagent N,N'-1,4-phenylenebismaleimide and the monofunctional reagent N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulpho-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine, we identified this residue as Cys374. The time course of filament formation followed by high-shear viscosity changes revealed that S-nitrosylated G-actin polymerizes less efficiently than native monomers. The observed decrease in specific viscosity at steady state is due mainly to a marked inhibition of filament end-to-end annealing and, partially, to a reduction in F-actin concentration. Finally, S-nitrosylated actin acts as nitric oxide donor showing a fast, potent vasodilating activity at unusually low concentrations, being comparable with that of low molecular weight nitrosothiols.

  10. A Theoretical Model for F-actin Remodeling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Subjected to Cyclic Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Na, S.; Meininger, G.A.; Humphrey, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    A constrained mixture theory model was developed and used to estimate remodeling of F-actin in vascular smooth muscle cells that were subjected to 10% equibiaxial stretching for up to 30 minutes. The model was based on a synthesis of data on time-dependent changes in atomic force microscopy measured cell stiffness and immunofluorescence measured focal adhesion associated vinculin as well as data on stress fiber stiffness and pre-stretch. Results suggest that an observed acute (after 2 minutes of stretching) increase in cell stiffness is consistent with an increased stretch of the originally present F-actin plus an assembly of new F-actin having nearly homeostatic values of stretch. Moreover, the subsequent (after 30 minutes of stretching) decrease in cell stiffness back towards the baseline value is consistent with a replacement of the overstretched original filaments with the new (reassembled), less stretched filaments. That is, overall cell response is consistent with a recently proposed concept of “tensional homeostasis” whereby cells seek to maintain constant certain mechanical factors via a remodeling of intracellular and transmembrane proteins. Although there is a need to refine the model based on more comprehensive data sets, using multiple experimental approaches, the present results suggest that a constrained mixture theory can capture salient features of the dynamics of F-actin remodeling and that it offers some advantages over many past methods of modeling, particularly those based on classical linearized viscoelasticity. PMID:17240401

  11. Is sarcomere lattice geometry optimal? Analysis of several potential virtual polygon cross-sectional patterns for actin and myosin myofilaments in muscle.

    PubMed

    Kepner, Gordon R

    2014-09-01

    The hexagonal arrangement of actin filaments in skeletal muscle is not the fundamental geometrical or functioning myofilament unit. This analysis of several possible sarcomere lattice geometries for the arrangement of the actin and myosin filaments identifies several geometrical constraints that can be compared for their effect on muscle sarcomere functioning and efficiency. Three distinct virtual polygons, with myosins at their vertices and that tessellate the plane, are compared for both centered actin and perimeter actin arrangements. The analysis evaluates the optimal ratio of myosin to actin filaments, the packing density, and the effect on new myofilament formation in muscle hypertrophy for the various lattice geometries. The results support the view that no single measure of geometrical effectiveness can evaluate definitively the efficiency of any particular arrangement of the myofilaments. The analysis provides quantitative measures of several parameters that, taken overall, support the effectiveness of the myofilament arrangement in Nature. It provides a new definition of the fundamental myofilament unit (FMU). It is possible to calculate the number of actin and myosin myofilaments that need to be added to each polygon arrangement of the myofilaments to create a new FMU for that specific geometry. This leads to useful conclusions about the biochemical efficiency involved in where such units arise in the course of muscle hypertrophy. It supports the idea that the evolutionary endpoint for optimizing muscle's force-generating function can be better understood via the concepts of a FMU and the polygon arrangement of the sarcomere lattice geometry.

  12. Role of Active Contraction and Tropomodulins in Regulating Actin Filament Length and Sarcomere Structure in Developing Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mazelet, Lise; Parker, Matthew O.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Ashworth, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Whilst it is recognized that contraction plays an important part in maintaining the structure and function of mature skeletal muscle, its role during development remains undefined. In this study the role of movement in skeletal muscle maturation was investigated in intact zebrafish embryos using a combination of genetic and pharmacological approaches. An immotile mutant line (cacnb1ts25) which lacks functional voltage-gated calcium channels (dihydropyridine receptors) in the muscle and pharmacological immobilization of embryos with a reversible anesthetic (Tricaine), allowed the study of paralysis (in mutants and anesthetized fish) and recovery of movement (reversal of anesthetic treatment). The effect of paralysis in early embryos (aged between 17 and 24 hours post-fertilization, hpf) on skeletal muscle structure at both myofibrillar and myofilament level was determined using both immunostaining with confocal microscopy and small angle X-ray diffraction. The consequences of paralysis and subsequent recovery on the localization of the actin capping proteins Tropomodulin 1 & 4 (Tmod) in fish aged from 17 hpf until 42 hpf was also assessed. The functional consequences of early paralysis were investigated by examining the mechanical properties of the larval muscle. The length-force relationship, active and passive tension, was measured in immotile, recovered and control skeletal muscle at 5 and 7 day post-fertilization (dpf). Recovery of muscle function was also assessed by examining swimming patterns in recovered and control fish. Inhibition of the initial embryonic movements (up to 24 hpf) resulted in an increase in myofibril length and a decrease in width followed by almost complete recovery in both moving and paralyzed fish by 42 hpf. In conclusion, myofibril organization is regulated by a dual mechanism involving movement-dependent and movement-independent processes. The initial contractile event itself drives the localization of Tmod1 to its sarcomeric position

  13. Interaction of rabbit skeletal muscle troponin T and F-actin at physiological ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Heeley, D.H.; Smillie, L.B. )

    1988-10-18

    Troponin T has been shown to interact significantly with F-actin at 150 mM KC1 by using an F-actin pelleting assay and {sup 125}I-labeled proteins. While troponin T fragment T1 (residues 1-158) fails to pellet with F-actin, fragment T2 (residues 159-259) mimics the binding properties of the intact molecule. The weak competition of T2 binding to F-actin, shown by subfragments of T2, indicates that the interaction site(s) encompass(es) an extensive segment of troponin T. The extent of pelleting of troponin T (or T2) with F-actin is only marginally altered in the binary complex troponin IT (or T2), indicating that the direct interactions either of troponin T (or T2) or of troponin I, or both, with F-actin are weakened when these components are incorporated into a binary complex. The binding of troponin T (or T2) is moderately ({minus}Ca{sup 2+}) or more extensively reduced (+Ca{sup 2+}) in the presence of troponin C. The pelleting of Tn-T seen in the presence of Tn-C ({minus}Ca{sup 2+}) and Tn-I was further reduced when either Tn-I or Tn-C ({minus}Ca{sup 2+}) was added, respectively, to form a fully reconstituted Tn complex. As noted by others, whole troponin shows little sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} in its binding to F-actin ({minus}tropomyosin). These and other observations, taken together with the restoration of troponin IC ({plus minus}Ca{sup 2+}) binding to F-actin by troponin T, implicate a role for the interaction of troponin T and F-actin in the thin filament assembly.

  14. Both N-terminal myosin-binding and C-terminal actin-binding sites on smooth muscle caldesmon are required for caldesmon-mediated inhibition of actin filament velocity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Jiang, H; Yang, Z Q; Chacko, S

    1997-10-28

    It has been suggested that the tethering caused by binding of the N-terminal region of smooth muscle caldesmon (CaD) to myosin and its C-terminal region to actin contributes to the inhibition of actin-filament movement over myosin heads in an in vitro motility assay. However, direct evidence for this assumption has been lacking. In this study, analysis of baculovirus-generated N-terminal and C-terminal deletion mutants of chicken-gizzard CaD revealed that the major myosin-binding site on the CaD molecule resides in a 30-amino acid stretch between residues 24 and 53, based on the very low level of binding of CaDDelta24-53 lacking the residues 24-53 to myosin compared with the level of binding of CaDDelta54-85 missing the adjacent residues 54-85 or of the full-length CaD. As expected, deletion of the region between residues 24 and 53 or between residues 54 and 85 had no effect on either actin-binding or inhibition of actomyosin ATPase activity. Deletion of residues 24-53 nearly abolished the ability of CaD to inhibit actin filament velocity in the in vitro motility experiments, whereas CaDDelta54-85 strongly inhibited actin filament velocity in a manner similar to that of full-length CaD. Moreover, CaD1-597, which lacks the major actin-binding site(s), did not inhibit actin-filament velocity despite the presence of the major myosin-binding site. These data provide direct evidence for the inhibition of actin filament velocity in the in vitro motility assay caused by the tethering of myosin to actin through binding of both the CaD N-terminal region to myosin and the C-terminal region to actin.

  15. Disruption of cortical actin in skeletal muscle demonstrates an essential role of the cytoskeleton in glucose transporter 4 translocation in insulin-sensitive tissues.

    PubMed

    Brozinick, Joseph T; Hawkins, Eric D; Strawbridge, Andrew B; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2004-09-24

    Cell culture work suggests that signaling to polymerize cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) represents a required pathway for the optimal redistribution of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter, GLUT4, to the plasma membrane. Recent in vitro study further suggests that the actin-regulatory neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) mediates the effect of insulin on the actin filament network. Here we tested whether similar cytoskeletal mechanics are essential for insulin-regulated glucose transport in isolated rat epitrochlearis skeletal muscle. Microscopic analysis revealed that cortical F-actin is markedly diminished in muscle exposed to latrunculin B. Depolymerization of cortical F-actin with latrunculin B caused a time- and concentration-dependent decline in 2-deoxyglucose transport. The loss of cortical F-actin and glucose transport was paralleled by a decline in insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, as assessed by photolabeling of cell surface GLUT4 with Bio-LC-ATB-BMPA. Although latrunculin B impaired insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and glucose transport, activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt by insulin was not rendered ineffective. In contrast, the ability of insulin to elicit the cortical F-actin localization of N-WASP was abrogated. These data provide the first evidence that actin cytoskeletal mechanics are an essential feature of the glucose transport process in intact skeletal muscle. Furthermore, these findings support a distal actin-based role for N-WASP in insulin action in vivo. Copyright 2004 American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. X-ray recordings reveal how a human disease-linked skeletal muscle α-actin mutation leads to contractile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ochala, Julien; Ravenscroft, Gianina; McNamara, Elyshia; Nowak, Kristen J; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    In humans, mutant skeletal muscle α-actin proteins are associated with contractile dysfunction, skeletal muscle weakness and a wide range of primarily skeletal muscle diseases. Despite this knowledge, the exact molecular mechanisms triggering the contractile dysfunction remain unknown. Here, we aimed to unravel these. Hence, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing a well-described D286G mutant skeletal muscle α-actin protein and recapitulating the human condition of contractile deregulation and severe skeletal muscle weakness. We then recorded and analyzed the small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns of isolated membrane-permeabilized myofibers. Results showed that upon addition of Ca(2+), the intensity changes of the second (1/19 nm(-1)) and sixth (1/5.9 nm(-1)) actin layer lines and of the first myosin meridional reflection (1/14.3 nm(-1)) were disrupted when the thin-thick filament overlap was optimal (sarcomere length of 2.5-2.6 μm). However these reflections were normal when the thin and thick filaments were not interacting (sarcomere length>3.6 μm). These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the replacement of just one amino acid in the skeletal muscle α-actin protein partly prevents actin conformational changes during activation, disrupting the strong binding of myosin molecules. This leads to a limited myosin-related tropomyosin movement over the thin filaments, further affecting the amount of cross-bridges, explaining the contractile dysfunction.

  17. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 induces alpha-smooth muscle actin expression in granulation tissue myofibroblasts and in quiescent and growing cultured fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Granulation tissue fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) develop several ultrastructural and biochemical features of smooth muscle (SM) cells, including the presence of microfilament bundles and the expression of alpha-SM actin, the actin isoform typical of vascular SM cells. Myofibroblasts have been proposed to play a role in wound contraction and in retractile phenomena observed during fibrotic diseases. We show here that the subcutaneous administration of transforming growth factor- beta 1 (TGF beta 1) to rats results in the formation of a granulation tissue in which alpha-SM actin expressing myofibroblasts are particularly abundant. Other cytokines and growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, despite their profibrotic activity, do not induce alpha-SM actin in myofibroblasts. In situ hybridization with an alpha-SM actin probe shows a high level of alpha-SM actin mRNA expression in myofibroblasts of TGF beta 1-induced granulation tissue. Moreover, TGF beta 1 induces alpha-SM actin protein and mRNA expression in growing and quiescent cultured fibroblasts and preincubation of culture medium containing whole blood serum with neutralizing antibodies to TGF beta 1 results in a decrease of alpha-SM actin expression by fibroblasts in replicative and non-replicative conditions. These results suggest that TGF beta 1 plays an important role in myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing and fibrocontractive diseases by regulating the expression of alpha-SM actin in these cells. PMID:8314838

  18. Structural Characterization of the Binding of Myosin*ADP*Pi to Actin in Permeabilized Rabbit Psoas Muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,S.; Gu, J.; Belknap, B.; White, H.; Yu, L.

    2006-01-01

    When myosin is attached to actin in a muscle cell, various structures in the filaments are formed. The two strongly bound states (A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP and A{center_dot}M) and the weakly bound A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP states are reasonably well understood. The orientation of the strongly bound myosin heads is uniform ('stereospecific' attachment), and the attached heads exhibit little spatial fluctuation. In the prehydrolysis weakly bound A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP state, the orientations of the attached myosin heads assume a wide range of azimuthal and axial angles, indicating considerable flexibility in the myosin head. The structure of the other weakly bound state, A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i}, however, is poorly understood. This state is thought to be the critical pre-power-stroke state, poised to make the transition to the strongly binding, force-generating states, and hence it is of particular interest for understanding the mechanism of contraction. However, because of the low affinity between myosin and actin in the A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} state, the structure of this state has eluded determination both in isolated form and in muscle cells. With the knowledge recently gained in the structures of the weakly binding M{center_dot}ATP, M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i} states and the weakly attached A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ATP state in muscle fibers, it is now feasible to delineate the in vivo structure of the attached state of A{center_dot}M{center_dot}ADP{center_dot}P{sub i}. The series of experiments presented in this article were carried out under relaxing conditions at 25{sup o}C, where {approx}95% of the myosin heads in the skinned rabbit psoas muscle contain the hydrolysis products. The affinity for actin is enhanced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG) or by lowering the ionic strength in the bathing solution. Solution kinetics and binding constants were determined in the presence and in

  19. Signaling of the p21-activated kinase (PAK1) coordinates insulin-stimulated actin remodeling and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Chiu, Tim T.; Ramalingam, Latha; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.; Klip, Amira; Thurmond, Debbie C.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle accounts for ~80% of postprandial glucose clearance, and skeletal muscle glucose clearance is crucial for maintaining insulin sensitivity and euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated glucose clearance/uptake entails recruitment of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM) in a process that requires cortical F-actin remodeling; this process is dysregulated in Type 2 Diabetes. Recent studies have implicated PAK1 as a required element in GLUT4 recruitment in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo, although its underlying mechanism of action and requirement in glucose uptake remains undetermined. Toward this, we have employed the PAK1 inhibitor, IPA3, in studies using L6-GLUT4-myc muscle cells. IPA3 fully ablated insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation to the PM, corroborating the observation of ablated insulin-stimulated GLUT4 accumulation in the PM of skeletal muscle from PAK1−/− knockout mice. IPA3-treatment also abolished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into skeletal myotubes. Mechanistically, live-cell imaging of myoblasts expressing the F-actin biosensor LifeAct-GFP treated with IPA3 showed blunting of the normal insulin-induced cortical actin remodeling. This blunting was underpinned by a loss of normal insulin-stimulated cofilin dephosphorylation in IPA3-treated myoblasts. These findings expand upon the existing model of actin remodeling in glucose uptake, by placing insulin-stimulated PAK1 signaling as a required upstream step to facilitate actin remodeling and subsequent cofilin dephosphorylation. Active, dephosphorylated cofilin then provides the G-actin substrate for continued F-actin remodeling to facilitate GLUT4 vesicle translocation for glucose uptake into the skeletal muscle cell. PMID:25199455

  20. Signaling of the p21-activated kinase (PAK1) coordinates insulin-stimulated actin remodeling and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Chiu, Tim T; Ramalingam, Latha; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S; Klip, Amira; Thurmond, Debbie C

    2014-11-15

    Skeletal muscle accounts for ∼ 80% of postprandial glucose clearance, and skeletal muscle glucose clearance is crucial for maintaining insulin sensitivity and euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated glucose clearance/uptake entails recruitment of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM) in a process that requires cortical F-actin remodeling; this process is dysregulated in Type 2 Diabetes. Recent studies have implicated PAK1 as a required element in GLUT4 recruitment in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo, although its underlying mechanism of action and requirement in glucose uptake remains undetermined. Toward this, we have employed the PAK1 inhibitor, IPA3, in studies using L6-GLUT4-myc muscle cells. IPA3 fully ablated insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation to the PM, corroborating the observation of ablated insulin-stimulated GLUT4 accumulation in the PM of skeletal muscle from PAK1(-/-) knockout mice. IPA3-treatment also abolished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into skeletal myotubes. Mechanistically, live-cell imaging of myoblasts expressing the F-actin biosensor LifeAct-GFP treated with IPA3 showed blunting of the normal insulin-induced cortical actin remodeling. This blunting was underpinned by a loss of normal insulin-stimulated cofilin dephosphorylation in IPA3-treated myoblasts. These findings expand upon the existing model of actin remodeling in glucose uptake, by placing insulin-stimulated PAK1 signaling as a required upstream step to facilitate actin remodeling and subsequent cofilin dephosphorylation. Active, dephosphorylated cofilin then provides the G-actin substrate for continued F-actin remodeling to facilitate GLUT4 vesicle translocation for glucose uptake into the skeletal muscle cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid actin-cytoskeleton–dependent recruitment of plasma membrane–derived dysferlin at wounds is critical for muscle membrane repair

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Joel R.; Archambeau, Ashley; Michele, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in membrane repair may contribute to disease progression in dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy. Dysferlin, a type-II transmembrane phospholipid-binding protein, is hypothesized to regulate fusion of repair vesicles with the sarcolemma to facilitate membrane repair, but the dysferlin-containing compartments involved in membrane repair and the mechanism by which these compartments contribute to resealing are unclear. A dysferlin-pHluorin [dysf-pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (pHGFP)] muscle-specific transgenic mouse was developed to examine the dynamic behavior and subcellular localization of dysferlin during membrane repair in adult skeletal muscle fibers. Live-cell confocal microscopy of uninjured adult dysf-pHGFP muscle fibers revealed that dysferlin is highly enriched in the sarcolemma and transverse tubules. Laser-wounding induced rapid recruitment of ∼30 μm of local dysferlin-containing sarcolemma, leading to formation of stable dysferlin accumulations surrounding lesions, endocytosis of dysferlin, and formation of large cytoplasmic vesicles from distal regions of the fiber. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton decreased recruitment of sarcolemma-derived dysferlin to lesions in dysf-pHGFP fibers without affecting endocytosis and impaired membrane resealing in wild-type fibers, similar to findings in dysferlin deficiency (a 2-fold increase in FM1-43 uptake). Our data support a new mechanism whereby recruitment of sarcolemma-derived dysferlin creates an active zone of high lipid-binding activity at wounds to interact with repair vesicles and facilitate membrane resealing in skeletal muscle.—McDade, J. R., Archambeau, A., Michele, D. E. Rapid actin-cytoskeleton–dependent recruitment of plasma membrane–derived dysferlin at wounds is critical for muscle membrane repair. PMID:24784578

  2. An α-Smooth Muscle Actin (acta2/αsma) Zebrafish Transgenic Line Marking Vascular Mural Cells and Visceral Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Alyson D.; Rollins, Evvi-Lynn; Georgijevic, Sonja; Santoro, Massimo M.; Childs, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Mural cells of the vascular system include vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and pericytes whose role is to stabilize and/or provide contractility to blood vessels. One of the earliest markers of mural cell development in vertebrates is α smooth muscle actin (acta2; αsma), which is expressed by pericytes and SMCs. In vivo models of vascular mural cell development in zebrafish are currently lacking, therefore we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines driving expression of GFP or mCherry in acta2-expressing cells. These transgenic fish were used to trace the live development of mural cells in embryonic and larval transgenic zebrafish. acta2:EGFP transgenic animals show expression that largely mirrors native acta2 expression, with early pan-muscle expression starting at 24 hpf in the heart muscle, followed by skeletal and visceral muscle. At 3.5 dpf, expression in the bulbus arteriosus and ventral aorta marks the first expression in vascular smooth muscle. Over the next 10 days of development, the number of acta2:EGFP positive cells and the number of types of blood vessels associated with mural cells increases. Interestingly, the mural cells are not motile and remain in the same position once they express the acta2:EGFP transgene. Taken together, our data suggests that zebrafish mural cells develop relatively late, and have little mobility once they associate with vessels. PMID:24594685

  3. Abnormal actin binding of aberrant β-tropomyosins is a molecular cause of muscle weakness in TPM2-related nemaline and cap myopathy.

    PubMed

    Marttila, Minttu; Lemola, Elina; Wallefeld, William; Memo, Massimiliano; Donner, Kati; Laing, Nigel G; Marston, Steven; Grönholm, Mikaela; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2012-02-15

    NM (nemaline myopathy) is a rare genetic muscle disorder defined on the basis of muscle weakness and the presence of structural abnormalities in the muscle fibres, i.e. nemaline bodies. The related disorder cap myopathy is defined by cap-like structures located peripherally in the muscle fibres. Both disorders may be caused by mutations in the TPM2 gene encoding β-Tm (tropomyosin). Tm controls muscle contraction by inhibiting actin-myosin interaction in a calcium-sensitive manner. In the present study, we have investigated the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying five disease-causing mutations in Tm. We show that four of the mutations cause changes in affinity for actin, which may cause muscle weakness in these patients, whereas two show defective Ca2+ activation of contractility. We have also mapped the amino acids altered by the mutation to regions important for actin binding and note that two of the mutations cause altered protein conformation, which could account for impaired actin affinity.

  4. Platelet rich plasma promotes skeletal muscle cell migration in association with up-regulation of FAK, paxillin, and F-Actin formation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chung; Yu, Tung-Yang; Lin, Li-Ping; Lin, Mioa-Sui; Tsai, Ting-Ta; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2017-02-24

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) contains various cytokines and growth factors which may be beneficial to the healing process of injured muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and molecular mechanism of PRP on migration of skeletal muscle cells. Skeletal muscle cells intrinsic to Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with PRP. The cell migration was evaluated by transwell filter migration assay and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. The spreading of cells was evaluated microscopically. The formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. The protein expressions of paxillin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were assessed by Western blot analysis. Transfection of paxillin small-interfering RNA (siRNAs) to muscle cells was performed to validate the role of paxillin in PRP-mediated promotion of cell migration. Dose-dependently PRP promotes migration of and spreading and muscle cells. Protein expressions of paxillin and FAK were up-regulated dose-dependently. F-actin formation was also enhanced by PRP treatment. Furthermore, the knockdown of paxillin expression impaired the effect of PRP to promote cell migration. It was concluded that PRP promoting migration of muscle cells is associated with up-regulation of proteins expression of paxillin and FAK as well as increasing F-actin formation. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Rapid actin-cytoskeleton-dependent recruitment of plasma membrane-derived dysferlin at wounds is critical for muscle membrane repair.

    PubMed

    McDade, Joel R; Archambeau, Ashley; Michele, Daniel E

    2014-08-01

    Deficits in membrane repair may contribute to disease progression in dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy. Dysferlin, a type-II transmembrane phospholipid-binding protein, is hypothesized to regulate fusion of repair vesicles with the sarcolemma to facilitate membrane repair, but the dysferlin-containing compartments involved in membrane repair and the mechanism by which these compartments contribute to resealing are unclear. A dysferlin-pHluorin [dysf-pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (pHGFP)] muscle-specific transgenic mouse was developed to examine the dynamic behavior and subcellular localization of dysferlin during membrane repair in adult skeletal muscle fibers. Live-cell confocal microscopy of uninjured adult dysf-pHGFP muscle fibers revealed that dysferlin is highly enriched in the sarcolemma and transverse tubules. Laser-wounding induced rapid recruitment of ∼30 μm of local dysferlin-containing sarcolemma, leading to formation of stable dysferlin accumulations surrounding lesions, endocytosis of dysferlin, and formation of large cytoplasmic vesicles from distal regions of the fiber. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton decreased recruitment of sarcolemma-derived dysferlin to lesions in dysf-pHGFP fibers without affecting endocytosis and impaired membrane resealing in wild-type fibers, similar to findings in dysferlin deficiency (a 2-fold increase in FM1-43 uptake). Our data support a new mechanism whereby recruitment of sarcolemma-derived dysferlin creates an active zone of high lipid-binding activity at wounds to interact with repair vesicles and facilitate membrane resealing in skeletal muscle.

  6. Molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle weakness in human cancer: reduced myosin-actin cross-bridge formation and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Toth, Michael J; Miller, Mark S; Callahan, Damien M; Sweeny, Andrew P; Nunez, Ivette; Grunberg, Steven M; Der-Torossian, Hirak; Couch, Marion E; Dittus, Kim

    2013-04-01

    Many patients with cancer experience physical disability following diagnosis, although little is known about the mechanisms underlying these functional deficits. To characterize skeletal muscle adaptations to cancer in humans, we evaluated skeletal muscle structure and contractile function at the molecular, cellular, whole-muscle, and whole-body level in 11 patients with cancer (5 cachectic, 6 noncachectic) and 6 controls without disease. Patients with cancer showed a 25% reduction in knee extensor isometric torque after adjustment for muscle mass (P < 0.05), which was strongly related to diminished power output during a walking endurance test (r = 0.889; P < 0.01). At the cellular level, single fiber isometric tension was reduced in myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIA fibers (P = 0.05) in patients with cancer, which was explained by a reduction (P < 0.05) in the number of strongly bound cross-bridges. In MHC I fibers, myosin-actin cross-bridge kinetics were reduced in patients, as evidenced by an increase in myosin attachment time (P < 0.01); and reductions in another kinetic parameter, myosin rate of force production, predicted reduced knee extensor isometric torque (r = 0.689; P < 0.05). Patients with cancer also exhibited reduced mitochondrial density (-50%; P < 0.001), which was related to increased myosin attachment time in MHC I fibers (r = -0.754; P < 0.01). Finally, no group differences in myofilament protein content or ultrastructure were noted that explained the observed functional alterations. Collectively, our results suggest reductions in myofilament protein function as a potential molecular mechanism contributing to muscle weakness and physical disability in human cancer.

  7. NADPH OXIDASE 4 MEDIATES TGF-β-INDUCED SMOOTH MUSCLE α-ACTIN VIA p38MAPK AND SRF

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Garrido, Abel; Brown, David I.; Lyle, Alicia N.; Dikalova, Anna; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Lassègue, Bernard; Martín, Alejandra San; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to other cell types, vascular smooth muscle cells modify their phenotype in response to external signals. NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) is critical for maintenance of smooth muscle gene expression; however, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely characterized. Using smooth muscle α-actin (SMA) as a prototypical smooth muscle gene and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) as a differentiating agent, we examined Nox4-dependent signaling. TGF-β increases Nox4 expression and activity in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). Transfection of HASMC with siRNA against Nox4 (siNox4) abolishes TGF-β-induced SMA expression and stress fiber formation. siNox4 also significantly inhibits TGF-β-stimulated p38MAPK phosphorylation, as well as that of its substrate, mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase-2 (MK-2). Moreover, the p38MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 nearly completely blocks the SMA increase induced by TGF-β. Inhibition of either p38MAPK or NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species impairs the TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Ser103 on serum response factor (SRF) and reduces its transcriptional activity. Binding of SRF to myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF) is also necessary, because downregulation of MRTF by siRNA abolishes TGF-β-induced SMA expression. Taken together, these data suggest that Nox4 regulates SMA expression via activation of a p38MAPK/SRF/MRTF pathway in response to TGF-β. PMID:21074607

  8. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy region gene-1 (FRG-1) is an actin-bundling protein associated with muscle-attachment sites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Jones, Takako Iida; Tang, Vivian W; Brieher, William M; Jones, Peter L

    2010-04-01

    In vertebrates, overexpression of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) recapitulates the pathophysiology exhibited by FSHD patients, although the role of FRG1 in FSHD remains controversial and no precise function for FRG1 has been described in any organism. To gain insight into the function and potential role of FRG1 in FSHD, we analyzed the highly conserved Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog, frg-1. C. elegans body-wall muscles contain two distinct subcellular pools of FRG-1: nuclear FRG-1, concentrated in the nucleoli; and cytoplasmic FRG-1, associated with the Z-disk and costamere-like structures known as dense bodies. Functionally, we demonstrate that FRG-1 is an F-actin-bundling protein, consistent with its localization to dense bodies; this activity is conserved in human FRG1. This is particularly intriguing because it places FRG-1 along side the list of dense-body components whose vertebrate orthologs are involved in the myriad myopathies associated with disrupted costameres and Z-disks. Interestingly, overexpressed FRG-1 preferentially accumulates in the nucleus and, when overexpressed specifically from the frg-1 promoter, disrupts the adult ventral muscle structure and organization. Together, these data further support a role for FRG1 overexpression in FSHD pathophysiology and reveal the previously unsuspected direct involvement of FRG-1 in muscle structure and integrity.

  9. HHF35, a muscle actin-specific monoclonal antibody. II. Reactivity in normal, reactive, and neoplastic human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, T.; McNutt, M. A.; Ross, R.; Gown, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody HHF35 has previously been characterized biochemically as recognizing isotypes of actin (alpha and gamma) which are specific to muscle cells. In this study, the authors have investigated the normal and pathologic tissue distribution of HHF35-positive cells using the avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method on methacarn-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of human tissue. In addition to muscle tissues (smooth, skeletal, and cardiac) the antibody localizes to myoepithelium, as well as most of the capsular cells of several parenchymal organs, including liver, kidney, and spleen, with extension of the latter cells into the splenic trabeculaes. In pathologic tissues, the antibody localizes to cells, identified by some investigators as "myofibroblasts," in the stroma of certain tumors, within hyperplastic fibrous tissue responses ("fibromatoses") such as Dupuytren's contracture, and within fibrotic lung tissue. HHF35 also localizes to cells that proliferate within the intima in lesions of atherosclerosis and to a unique population of reactive mesothelial and submesothelial cells. Among tumors, it is positive only on leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas, and rhabdomyosarcomas, and negative on all nonmuscle sarcomas. This antibody thus shows great potential utility as a diagnostic reagent in various pathologic conditions, most especially in the diagnosis of tumors of muscle origin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p392-a Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 p397-a p398-a Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:3555106

  10. GAPDH and β-actin protein decreases with aging, making Stain-Free technology a superior loading control in Western blotting of human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Dybboe, Rie; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Dela, Flemming; Helge, Jørn W; Guadalupe Grau, Amelia

    2015-02-01

    Reference proteins (RP) or the total protein (TP) loaded is used to correct for uneven loading and/or transfer in Western blotting. However, the signal sensitivity and the influence of physiological conditions may question the normalization methods. Therefore, three widely used reference proteins [β-actin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and α-tubulin], as well as TP loaded measured by Stain-Free technology (SF) as normalization tool were tested. This was done using skeletal muscle samples from men subjected to physiological conditions often investigated in applied physiology where the intervention has been suggested to impede normalization (ageing, muscle atrophy, and different muscle fiber type composition). The linearity of signal and the methodological variation coefficient was obtained. Furthermore, the inter- and intraindividual variation in signals obtained from SF and RP was measured in relation to ageing, muscle atrophy, and different muscle fiber type composition, respectively. A stronger linearity of SF and β-actin compared with GAPDH and α-tubulin was observed. The methodological variation was relatively low in all four methods (4-11%). Protein level of β-actin and GAPDH was lower in older men compared with young men. In conclusion, β-actin, GAPDH, and α-tubulin may not be used for normalization in studies that include subjects with a large age difference. In contrast, the RPs may not be affected in studies that include muscle wasting and differences in muscle fiber type. The novel SF technology adds lower variation to the results compared with the existing methods for correcting for loading inaccuracy in Western blotting of human skeletal muscle in applied physiology.

  11. Suppression of α Smooth Muscle Actin Accumulation by Bovine Fetal Dermal Collagen Matrix in Full Thickness Skin Wounds.

    PubMed

    Lineaweaver, William; Bush, Katie; James, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    The suppression of elements associated with wound contracture and unfavorable scarring is a potentially important strategy in clinical wound management. In this study, the presence of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), a protein involved in wound contraction, was analyzed in a series of wounds in which bovine fetal collagen (BFC) acellular dermal matrix (PriMatrix) was used in staged split thickness skin graft procedures. The results obtained through histological and quantitative image analyses of incidental biopsies from these wounds demonstrated a suppression of αSMA in the wound regions occupied by assimilated BFC relative to increased levels of αSMA found in other areas of the wound. The αSMA levels found in assimilated BFC were similar to αSMA levels in uninjured human dermis. These findings suggest a mechanism by which application of BFC could decrease contraction of full thickness skin wounds.

  12. A new method for direct detection of the sites of actin polymerization in intact cells and its application to differentiated vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Rim; Leavis, Paul C; Graceffa, Philip; Gallant, Cynthia; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2010-11-01

    Here we report and validate a new method, suitable broadly, for use in differentiated cells and tissues, for the direct visualization of actin polymerization under physiological conditions. We have designed and tested different versions of fluorescently labeled actin, reversibly attached to the protein transduction tag TAT, and have introduced this novel reagent into intact differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells (dVSMCs). A thiol-reactive version of the TAT peptide was synthesized by adding the amino acids glycine and cysteine to its NH(2)-terminus and forming a thionitrobenzoate adduct: viz. TAT-Cys-S-STNB. This peptide reacts readily with G-actin, and the complex is rapidly taken up by freshly enzymatically isolated dVSMC, as indicated by the fluorescence of a FITC tag on the TAT peptide. By comparing different versions of the construct, we determined that the optimal construct for biological applications is a nonfluorescently labeled TAT peptide conjugated to rhodamine-labeled actin. When TAT-Cys-S-STNB-tagged rhodamine actin (TSSAR) was added to live, freshly enzymatically isolated cells, we observed punctae of incorporated actin at the cortex of the cell. The punctae are indistinguishable from those we have previously reported to occur in the same cell type when rhodamine G-actin is added to permeabilized cells. Thus this new method allows the delivery of labeled G-actin into intact cells without disrupting the native state and will allow its further use to study the effect of physiological intracellular Ca(2+) concentration transients and signal transduction on actin dynamics in intact cells.

  13. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J.; Berthiaume, François

    2015-02-27

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β{sub 1} (TGF-β{sub 1})-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β{sub 1} at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β{sub 1} is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}.

  14. Evaluation of Myofibroblasts by Expression of Alpha Smooth Muscle Actin: A Marker in Fibrosis, Dysplasia and Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Malathi, N.; Narashiman, Sangeetha; Rajan, Sharada T

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of Myofibroblasts by studying expression of Alpha smooth muscle actin: A marker of Fibrosis, Dysplasia and Carcinoma. Background: Myofibroblasts are cells that have contractile properties and are involved in inflammation, wound healing, fibrosis and oncogenesis in most of the organs and tissues. They are involved in healing and granulation tissue formation which occur after tissue injuries, also produce inflammatory mediators, growth factors and help in extracellular matrix reorganization by secretion of proteins like collagen, fibronectin, etc. Because of their component, Alpha smooth muscle actin ([alpha]-SMA), they are involved in the contraction of extracellular matrix and aid in tissue contraction. The myofibroblasts disappear by apoptosis after completion of repair, but their persistence causes a dysfunction in the repair mechanism, leading to excessive contraction and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion and thus, fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of myofibroblasts in cases of Oral Submucous fibrosis (OSMF), which consisted of very early, early and moderately advanced OSMF, OSMF with dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), by detecting (alpha)-SMA, which is a specific marker for myofibroblasts. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of three groups which comprised of 41 cases of OSMF, 10 cases of OSMF with dysplasia and 11 cases of OSCC. All the cases were subjected to immunohistochemistry by using (alpha)-SMA antibody for detection of myofibroblasts. Results: The presence of myofibroblasts was significantly higher in oral squamous cell carcinomas as compared to that in OSMF with dysplasia and OSMF. A statistical significance was also noted between the staining index and age of the individuals and the staining index and duration of the habit. Conclusion: Myofibroblasts play a role in fibrosis, as was seen in OSMF. Activated myofibroblasts secrete proteolytic enzymes and cause matrix

  15. Elevated Glucose Levels Promote Contractile and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle via Rho/Protein Kinase C and Actin Polymerization*

    PubMed Central

    Hien, Tran Thi; Turczyńska, Karolina M.; Dahan, Diana; Ekman, Mari; Grossi, Mario; Sjögren, Johan; Nilsson, Johan; Braun, Thomas; Boettger, Thomas; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Stenkula, Karin; Swärd, Karl; Gomez, Maria F.; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This is in part attributed to the effects of hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In diabetic animal models, hyperglycemia results in hypercontractility of vascular smooth muscle possibly due to increased activation of Rho-kinase. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of contractile smooth muscle markers by glucose and to determine the signaling pathways that are activated by hyperglycemia in smooth muscle cells. Microarray, quantitative PCR, and Western blot analyses revealed that both mRNA and protein expression of contractile smooth muscle markers were increased in isolated smooth muscle cells cultured under high compared with low glucose conditions. This effect was also observed in hyperglycemic Akita mice and in diabetic patients. Elevated glucose activated the protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathways and stimulated actin polymerization. Glucose-induced expression of contractile smooth muscle markers in cultured cells could be partially or completely repressed by inhibitors of advanced glycation end products, L-type calcium channels, protein kinase C, Rho-kinase, actin polymerization, and myocardin-related transcription factors. Furthermore, genetic ablation of the miR-143/145 cluster prevented the effects of glucose on smooth muscle marker expression. In conclusion, these data demonstrate a possible link between hyperglycemia and vascular disease states associated with smooth muscle contractility. PMID:26683376

  16. Disruption of actin cytoskeleton mediates loss of tensile stress induced early phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Pu; Ju, Donghong; Shen, Jianbin; Yang, Maozhou; Li, Li

    2010-02-01

    Aorta organ culture has been widely used as an ex vivo model for studying vessel pathophysiology. Recent studies show that the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in organ culture undergo drastic dedifferentiation within the first few hours (termed early phenotypic modulation). Loss of tensile stress to which aorta is subject in vivo is the cause of this early phenotypic modulation. However, no underlying molecular mechanism has been discovered thus far. The purpose of the present study is to identify intracellular signals involved in the early phenotypic modulation of VSMC in organ culture. We find that the drastic VSMC dedifferentiation is accompanied by accelerated actin cytoskeleton dynamics and downregulation of SRF and myocardin. Among the variety of signal pathways examined, increasing actin polymerization by jasplakinolide is the only one hindering VSMC dedifferentiation in organ culture. Moreover, jasplakinolide reverses actin dynamics during organ culture. Latrunculin B (disrupting actin cytoskeleton) and jasplakinolide respectively suppressed and enhanced the expression of VSMC markers, SRF, myocardin, and CArG-box-mediated SMC promoters in PAC1, a VSMC line. These results identify actin cytoskeleton degradation as a major intracellular signal for loss of tensile stress-induced early phenotypic modulation of VSMC in organ culture. This study suggests that disrupting actin cytoskeleton integrity may contribute to the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. A model of cross-bridge attachment to actin in the A*M*ATP state based on x-ray diffraction from permeabilized rabbit psoas muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jin; Xu, Sengen; Yu, Leepo C

    2002-01-01

    A model of cross-bridges binding to actin in the weak binding A*M*ATP state is presented. The modeling was based on the x-ray diffraction patterns from the relaxed skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers where ATP hydrolysis was inhibited by N-phenylmaleimide treatment (S. Xu, J. Gu, G. Melvin, L. C. Yu. 2002. Biophys. J. 82:2111-2122). Calculations included both the myosin filaments and the actin filaments of the muscle cells, and the binding to actin was assumed to be single headed. To achieve a good fit, considerable flexibility in the orientation of the myosin head and the position of the S1-S2 junction is necessary, such that the myosin head can bind to a nearby actin whereas the tail end was kept in the proximity of the helical track of the myosin filament. Hence, the best-fit model shows that the head binds to actin in a wide range of orientations, and the tail end deviates substantially from its lattice position in the radial direction (approximately 60 A). Surprisingly, the best fit model reveals that the detached head, whose location thus far has remained undetected, seems to be located close to the surface of the myosin filament. Another significant requirement of the best-fit model is that the binding site on actin is near the N terminus of the actin subunit, a position distinct from the putative rigor-binding site. The results support the idea that the essential role played by the weak binding states M*ATP <--> A*M*ATP for force generation lies in its flexibility, because the probability of attachment is greatly increased, compared with the weak binding M*ADP*P(i) <--> A*M*ADP*P(i) states. PMID:11916868

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans Kettin, a Large Immunoglobulin-like Repeat Protein, Binds to Filamentous Actin and Provides Mechanical Stability to the Contractile Apparatuses in Body Wall Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kanako; Yu, Robinson; Mohri, Kurato

    2006-01-01

    Kettin is a large actin-binding protein with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) repeats, which is associated with the thin filaments in arthropod muscles. Here, we report identification and functional characterization of kettin in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that one of the monoclonal antibodies that were raised against C. elegans muscle proteins specifically reacts with kettin (Ce-kettin). We determined the entire cDNA sequence of Ce-kettin that encodes a protein of 472 kDa with 31 Ig repeats. Arthropod kettins are splice variants of much larger connectin/titin-related proteins. However, the gene for Ce-kettin is independent of other connectin/titin-related genes. Ce-kettin localizes to the thin filaments near the dense bodies in both striated and nonstriated muscles. The C-terminal four Ig repeats and the adjacent non-Ig region synergistically bind to actin filaments in vitro. RNA interference of Ce-kettin caused weak disorganization of the actin filaments in body wall muscle. This phenotype was suppressed by inhibiting muscle contraction by a myosin mutation, but it was enhanced by tetramisole-induced hypercontraction. Furthermore, Ce-kettin was involved in organizing the cytoplasmic portion of the dense bodies in cooperation with α-actinin. These results suggest that kettin is an important regulator of myofibrillar organization and provides mechanical stability to the myofibrils during contraction. PMID:16597697

  19. Myosin flares and actin leptomeres as myofibril assembly/disassembly intermediates in sonic muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Nahirney, Patrick C; Fischman, Donald A; Wang, Kuan

    2006-04-01

    The sonic muscle of type 1 male midshipman fish produces loud and enduring mating calls. Each sonic muscle fiber contains a tubular contractile apparatus with radially arranged myofibrillar plates encased in a desmin-rich cytoskeleton that is anchored to broad Z bands (approximately 1.2 micro m wide). Immunomicroscopy has revealed patches of myosin-rich "flares" emanating from the contractile tubes into the peripheral sarcoplasm along the length of the fibers. These flares contain swirls of thick filaments devoid of associated thin filaments. In other regions of the sarcoplasm at the inner surface of the sarcolemma and near Z bands, abundant ladder-like leptomeres occur with rungs every 160 nm. Leptomeres consist of dense arrays of filaments (approximately 4 nm) with a structure that resembles myofibrillar Z band structure. We propose that flares and leptomeres are distinct filamentous arrays representing site-specific processing of myofibrillar components during the assembly and disassembly of the sarcomere. Recent reports that myosin assembles into filamentous aggregates before incorporating into the A band in the skeletal muscles of vertebrates and Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that sonic fibers utilize a similar pathway. Thus, sonic muscle fibers, with their tubular design and abundant sarcoplasmic space, may provide an attractive muscle model to identify myofibrillar intermediates by structural and molecular techniques.

  20. Tra2β Protein Is Required for Tissue-specific Splicing of a Smooth Muscle Myosin Phosphatase Targeting Subunit Alternative Exon*

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kang; Mende, Ylva; Bhetwal, Bhupal P.; Baker, Salah; Perrino, Brian A.; Wirth, Brunhilde; Fisher, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the smooth muscle myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (Mypt1) exon 23 (E23) is tissue-specific and developmentally regulated and, thus, an attractive model for the study of smooth muscle phenotypic specification. We have proposed that Tra2β functions as a tissue-specific activator of Mypt1 E23 splicing on the basis of concordant expression patterns and Tra2β activation of Mypt1 E23 mini-gene splicing in vitro. In this study we examined the relationship between Tra2β and Mypt1 E23 splicing in vivo in the mouse. Tra2β was 2- to 5-fold more abundant in phasic smooth muscle tissues, such as the portal vein, small intestine, and small mesenteric artery, in which Mypt1 E23 is predominately included as compared with the tonic smooth muscle tissues, such as the aorta and inferior vena cava, in which Mypt1 E23 is predominately skipped. Tra2β was up-regulated in the small intestine postnatally, concordant with a switch to Mypt1 E23 splicing. Targeting of Tra2β in smooth muscle cells using SM22α-Cre caused a substantial reduction in Mypt1 E23 inclusion specifically in the intestinal smooth muscle of heterozygotes, indicating sensitivity to Tra2β gene dosage. The switch to the Mypt1 E23 skipped isoform coding for the C-terminal leucine zipper motif caused increased sensitivity of the muscle to the relaxant effects of 8-Br-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). We conclude that Tra2β is necessary for the tissue-specific splicing of Mypt1 E23 in the phasic intestinal smooth muscle. Tra2β, by regulating the splicing of Mypt1 E23, sets the sensitivity of smooth muscle to cGMP-mediated relaxation. PMID:22437831

  1. Multiple 5'-flanking regions of the human alpha-skeletal actin gene synergistically modulate muscle-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Muscat, G E; Kedes, L

    1987-11-01

    Transfection into myogenic and nonmyogenic cell lines was used to investigate the transcriptional regulation of the human alpha-skeletal actin gene. We demonstrated that 1,300 base pairs of the 5'-flanking region directed high-level transient expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in differentiated mouse C2C12 and rat L8 myotubes but not in mouse nonmuscle L.TK- and HuT-12 cells. Unidirectional 5' deletion analysis and heterologous promoter stimulation experiments demonstrated that at least three transcription-regulating subdomains lie in this 1,300-base-pair region. A proximal cis-acting transcriptional element located between positions -153 and -87 relative to the start of transcription at +1 was both sufficient and necessary for muscle-specific expression and developmental regulation during myogenesis in the two myogenic cell systems. The region 3' of position -87 interacted with factors present in both myogenic and fibroblastic cells and appeared to define, or to be a major component of, the basal promoter. In C2C12 myotubes, but not in L8 myotubes, a distal sequence domain between positions -1300 and -626 and the proximal sequence domain between positions -153 and -87 each induced transcription about 10-fold and synergistically increased CAT expression 100-fold over levels achieved by the sequences 3' of position -87. Furthermore, these cis-acting elements independently and synergistically modulated an enhancerless, heterologous simian virus 40 promoter in a tissue-specific manner. DNA fragments which included the proximal domain displayed classical enhancerlike properties. The central region between positions -626 and -153, although required in neither cell line, had a positive, two- to threefold, additive role in augmenting expression in L8 cells but not in C2C12 cells. This suggests that certain elements between positions -1300 and -153 appear to be differentially utilized for maximal expression in different myogenic cells and

  2. Actin capping proteins, CapZ (β-actinin) and tropomodulin in amphioxus striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yulong; Kake, Takei; Hanashima, Akira; Nomiya, Yui; Kubokawa, Kaoru; Kimura, Sumiko

    2012-11-15

    CapZ (β-actinin) and tropomodulin (Tmod) are capping proteins involved in the maintenance of thin filaments in vertebrate skeletal muscles. In this study, we focused on amphioxus, the most primitive chordate. We searched for CapZ and Tmod genes in the amphioxus genome and determined their primary structures. Amphioxus possess one CapZα gene (CAPZA) and one CapZβ gene (CAPZB), and the transcripts of these genes were found to be 67%-85% identical to those of human CapZ genes. On the other hand, amphioxus contain one Tmod gene (TMOD), and the product of this gene has an identity of approximately 50% with human Tmod genes 1-4. However, helix 2 of amphioxus Tmod, which is involved in protein-binding to tropomyosin, was highly conserved with approximately 74% identity to human Tmod genes. Western blotting indicated the presence of CapZ and Tmod in the striated muscle of amphioxus. These results suggest that unlike most of vertebrates, such as fish, amphibian, bird, and mammal, CapZ from amphioxus striated muscle is derived from two genes CAPZA and CAPZB, and Tmod is derived from one TMOD gene.

  3. Acceleration of the sliding movement of actin filaments with the use of a non-motile mutant myosin in in vitro motility assays driven by skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Kohei; Tanaka, Masateru; Hirose, Keiko; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Honda, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    We examined the movement of an actin filament sliding on a mixture of normal and genetically modified myosin molecules that were attached to a glass surface. For this purpose, we used a Dictyostelium G680V mutant myosin II whose release rates of Pi and ADP were highly suppressed relative to normal myosin, leading to a significantly extended life-time of the strongly bound state with actin and virtually no motility. When the mixing ratio of G680V mutant myosin II to skeletal muscle HMM (heavy myosin) was 0.01%, the actin filaments moved intermittently. When they moved, their sliding velocities were about two-fold faster than the velocity of skeletal HMM alone. Furthermore, sliding movements were also faster when the actin filaments were allowed to slide on skeletal muscle HMM-coated glass surfaces in the motility buffer solution containing G680V HMM. In this case no intermittent movement was observed. When the actin filaments used were copolymerized with a fusion protein consisting of Dictyostelium actin and Dictyostelium G680V myosin II motor domain, similar faster sliding movements were observed on skeletal muscle HMM-coated surfaces. The filament sliding velocities were about two-fold greater than the velocities of normal actin filaments. We found that the velocity of actin filaments sliding on skeletal muscle myosin molecules increased in the presence of a non-motile G680V mutant myosin motor.

  4. The actin regulator zyxin reinforces airway smooth muscle and accumulates in airways of fatal asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Blankman, Elizabeth; Jensen, Christopher C.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; James, Alan L.; Elliot, John G.; Green, Francis H.; Liu, Jeffrey C.; Seow, Chun Y.; Park, Jin-Ah; Beckerle, Mary C.; Paré, Peter D.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Smith, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Bronchospasm induced in non-asthmatic human subjects can be easily reversed by a deep inspiration (DI) whereas bronchospasm that occurs spontaneously in asthmatic subjects cannot. This physiological effect of a DI has been attributed to the manner in which a DI causes airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells to stretch, but underlying molecular mechanisms–and their failure in asthma–remain obscure. Using cells and tissues from wild type and zyxin-/- mice we report responses to a transient stretch of physiologic magnitude and duration. At the level of the cytoskeleton, zyxin facilitated repair at sites of stress fiber fragmentation. At the level of the isolated ASM cell, zyxin facilitated recovery of contractile force. Finally, at the level of the small airway embedded with a precision cut lung slice, zyxin slowed airway dilation. Thus, at each level zyxin stabilized ASM structure and contractile properties at current muscle length. Furthermore, when we examined tissue samples from humans who died as the result of an asthma attack, we found increased accumulation of zyxin compared with non-asthmatics and asthmatics who died of other causes. Together, these data suggest a biophysical role for zyxin in fatal asthma. PMID:28278518

  5. The actin regulator zyxin reinforces airway smooth muscle and accumulates in airways of fatal asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Sonia R; Pascoe, Christopher D; Blankman, Elizabeth; Jensen, Christopher C; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; James, Alan L; Elliot, John G; Green, Francis H; Liu, Jeffrey C; Seow, Chun Y; Park, Jin-Ah; Beckerle, Mary C; Paré, Peter D; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Smith, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    Bronchospasm induced in non-asthmatic human subjects can be easily reversed by a deep inspiration (DI) whereas bronchospasm that occurs spontaneously in asthmatic subjects cannot. This physiological effect of a DI has been attributed to the manner in which a DI causes airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells to stretch, but underlying molecular mechanisms-and their failure in asthma-remain obscure. Using cells and tissues from wild type and zyxin-/- mice we report responses to a transient stretch of physiologic magnitude and duration. At the level of the cytoskeleton, zyxin facilitated repair at sites of stress fiber fragmentation. At the level of the isolated ASM cell, zyxin facilitated recovery of contractile force. Finally, at the level of the small airway embedded with a precision cut lung slice, zyxin slowed airway dilation. Thus, at each level zyxin stabilized ASM structure and contractile properties at current muscle length. Furthermore, when we examined tissue samples from humans who died as the result of an asthma attack, we found increased accumulation of zyxin compared with non-asthmatics and asthmatics who died of other causes. Together, these data suggest a biophysical role for zyxin in fatal asthma.

  6. Lubricin and smooth muscle α-actin-containing myofibroblasts in the pseudomembranes around loose hip and knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Cheriyan, Thomas; Ready, John E; Brick, Gregory W; Martin, Scott D; Martin, Tamara L; Schmid, Thomas M; Padera, Robert F; Spector, Myron

    2013-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate the presence and distribution of the lubricating and anti-adhesion glycoprotein lubricin and cells containing the contractile isoform smooth muscle α-actin (SMA) in pseudomembranes around loose hip prostheses. Periprosthetic tissue was obtained at revision arthroplasty of eight aseptic, loose hip implants, and for comparison three loose knee prostheses. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed in 3 zones: zone 1, within 300μm of the edge of the implant-tissue interface; zone 2, between zones 1 and 3; zone 3, within 300μm of the resected/trimmed edge. The presence of lubricin was extensive in all samples: (1) as a discrete layer at the implant-tissue interface; (2) within the extracellular matrix (ECM); (3) intracellularly. There was significantly more high grade (>50%) lubricin surface staining at the implant-tissue interface compared with the resected edge. While there was also a significant effect of location of high grade ECM lubricin staining, there was no significant effect of implant type (i.e. hip versus knee). All but two hip pseudomembrane samples showed the presence of many SMA-containing cells. There was a significant effect of location on the number of SMA-expressing cells, but not of implant type. These findings might explain why the management of loose prosthesis is so challenging.

  7. Elevated Glucose Levels Promote Contractile and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle via Rho/Protein Kinase C and Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hien, Tran Thi; Turczyńska, Karolina M; Dahan, Diana; Ekman, Mari; Grossi, Mario; Sjögren, Johan; Nilsson, Johan; Braun, Thomas; Boettger, Thomas; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Stenkula, Karin; Swärd, Karl; Gomez, Maria F; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2016-02-12

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This is in part attributed to the effects of hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In diabetic animal models, hyperglycemia results in hypercontractility of vascular smooth muscle possibly due to increased activation of Rho-kinase. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of contractile smooth muscle markers by glucose and to determine the signaling pathways that are activated by hyperglycemia in smooth muscle cells. Microarray, quantitative PCR, and Western blot analyses revealed that both mRNA and protein expression of contractile smooth muscle markers were increased in isolated smooth muscle cells cultured under high compared with low glucose conditions. This effect was also observed in hyperglycemic Akita mice and in diabetic patients. Elevated glucose activated the protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathways and stimulated actin polymerization. Glucose-induced expression of contractile smooth muscle markers in cultured cells could be partially or completely repressed by inhibitors of advanced glycation end products, L-type calcium channels, protein kinase C, Rho-kinase, actin polymerization, and myocardin-related transcription factors. Furthermore, genetic ablation of the miR-143/145 cluster prevented the effects of glucose on smooth muscle marker expression. In conclusion, these data demonstrate a possible link between hyperglycemia and vascular disease states associated with smooth muscle contractility. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Origin and characterization of alpha smooth muscle actin-positive cells during murine lung development.

    PubMed

    Moiseenko, Alena; Kheirollahi, Vahid; Chao, Cho-Ming; Ahmadvand, Negah; Quantius, Jennifer; Wilhelm, Jochen; Herold, Susanne; Ahlbrecht, Katrin; Morty, Rory E; Rizvanov, Albert A; Minoo, Parviz; El Agha, Elie; Bellusci, Saverio

    2017-04-03

    ACTA2 expression identifies pulmonary airway and vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as well as alveolar myofibroblasts (MYF). Mesenchymal progenitors expressing fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10), Wilms tumor 1 (Wt1), or glioma-associated oncogene 1 (Gli1) contribute to SMC formation from early stages of lung development. However, their respective contribution and specificity to the SMC and/or alveolar MYF lineages remain controversial. In addition, the contribution of mesenchymal cells undergoing active WNT signaling remains unknown. Using Fgf10(CreERT2) , Wt1(CreERT2) , Gli1(CreERT2) , and Axin2(CreERT2) inducible driver lines in combination with a tdTomato(flox) reporter line, the respective differentiation of each pool of labeled progenitor cells along the SMC and alveolar MYF lineages was quantified. The results revealed that while FGF10(+) and WT1(+) cells show a minor contribution to the SMC lineage, GLI1(+) and AXIN2(+) cells significantly contribute to both the SMC and alveolar MYF lineages, but with limited specificity. Lineage tracing using the Acta2-CreERT2 transgenic line showed that ACTA2(+) cells labeled at embryonic day (E)11.5 do not expand significantly to give rise to new SMCs at E18.5. However, ACTA2(+) cells labeled at E15.5 give rise to the majority (85%-97%) of the SMCs in the lung at E18.5 as well as alveolar MYF progenitors in the lung parenchyma. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based isolation of different subpopulations of ACTA2(+) lineage-traced cells followed by gene arrays, identified transcriptomic signatures for alveolar MYF progenitors versus airway and vascular SMCs at E18.5. Our results establish a new transcriptional landscape for further experiments addressing the function of signaling pathways in the formation of different subpopulations of ACTA2(+) cells. Stem Cells 2017.

  9. Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and fibronectin in tubulointerstitial lesions of cats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Sawashima, K; Mizuno, S; Mizuno-Horikawa, Y; Shimada, A; Kudo, T; Kurosawa, T

    2000-09-01

    To examine renal expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and fibronectin in cats with tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) for use in predicting progression to renal fibrosis. 19 cats with TIN and 9 cats without nephritis. Serum creatinine and BUN concentrations were measured. Indices for glomerular extra-cellular matrix (ECM), tubular injury (TI), and fibronectin were determined in renal specimens to quantify the extent of injury and fibrotic lesions. Expression of alpha-SMA in renal tissue was immunohistochemically detected, and correlations were evaluated between the alpha-SMA index and other histologic and clinical variables. The alpha-SMA index in tubulointerstitial areas (1.63 +/- 0.78) was significantly higher in cats with TIN, especially in the periglomerular and peritubular areas, than in cats without nephritis (0.20 +/- 0.14). The alpha-SMA index was significantly associated with the TI index (r2 = 0.70), fibronectin index (r2 = 0.95), BUN concentration (r = 0.64), and serum creatinine concentration () = 0.66). Of special interest was that interstitial alpha-SMA expression appeared evident in the kidneys at an early stage of TIN, prior to the onset of ECM deposition. Analysis of results of histologic and clinical examinations revealed that interstitial alpha-SMA expression may have clinical importance and may be a useful early histologic marker for development of chronic renal failure in cats. An immunohistochemical examination for fibrogenic molecules (such as alpha-SMA expression) may provide fundamental information on the pathogenesis of early-stage renal disease and aid clinical management of cats with chronic renal failure, including TIN.

  10. Botulinum Toxin Type A Inhibits α-Smooth Muscle Actin and Myosin II Expression in Fibroblasts Derived From Scar Contracture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minliang; Yan, Tongtong; Ma, Kui; Lai, Linying; Liu, Chang; Liang, Liming; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Scar contracture (SC) is one of the most common complications resulting from major burn injuries. Numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Recent reports suggest that botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) is effective at reducing SC clinically, but the molecular mechanism for this action is unknown. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and myosin II are the main components of stress fibers, which are the contractile structures of fibroblasts. The effects of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II in SC are still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II expression in fibroblasts derived from SC and to elucidate its actual mechanism further. Fibroblasts were isolated from tissue specimens of SC. Fibroblasts were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium with different concentrations of BTXA and their proliferation was analyzed through the tetrazolium-based colorimetric method at 1, 4, and 7 days. Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II were checked using Western blot in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations of BTXA at 1, 4, and 7 days. Fibroblasts without BTXA treatment had a higher proliferation than that in other groups, which indicated that the proliferation of fibroblasts was significantly inhibited by BTXA (P < 0.05). Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II between fibroblasts with BTXA and fibroblasts without BTXA are statistically significant (P < 0.05). These results suggest that BTXA effectively inhibited the growth of fibroblasts derived from SC and reduced the expression of α-SMA and myosin II, which provided theoretical support for the application of BTXA to control SC.

  11. Mediatory role of interleukin-6 in α smooth muscle actin induction and myofibroblast formation around silicone tissue expander.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Josna; Variathu, Kumary Thrikkovil; Mohanty, Mira

    2013-10-01

    Materials used for medical devices are usually tested for their biocompatibility, before use. However, it is known that long-term implantation in the body may lead to degradation of the material leading to an adverse tissue response. The failure of silicone breast implants due to excessive fibrosis and contracture has led to studies to delineate the cause of fibrosis around this material. To detect the biological moieties involved, conditioned media from RAW 264.7 macrophages seeded over commercially available silicone tissue expander material was added to L929 fibroblasts. Ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene and tissue culture grade polystyrene served as the control materials. The gene expression of fibrogenic cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) in the RAW macrophages and myofibroblast marker alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) in L929 cells were quantitated by real time polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression analysis of αSMA was carried out by immunocytochemical staining and confocal microscopy. An in vitro degradation study of silicone expander material in pseudoextracellular fluid (PECF) and the αSMA expression in fibroblasts incubated with the silicone extract containing PECF has revealed the role of silicone leachants in induction of myofibroblasts. This in vitro expression study revealed the additional profibrotic role of IL-6 in fibroblast to myofibroblast transition and the synergy between material aspects and biomolecules in regulating fibrosis around Silicone implants. These findings may help in targeting newer biological moieties in the profibrotic pathway and in devising better manufacturing processes aiding the life of millions of patients.

  12. Expression of embryonic fibronectin isoform EIIIA parallels alpha-smooth muscle actin in maturing and diseased kidney.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V L; Musa, J; Mitchell, R J; Barnes, J L

    1999-06-01

    In this study we examined if an association exists between expression of an alternatively spliced "embryonic" fibronectin isoform EIIIA (Fn-EIIIA) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in the maturing and adult rat kidney and in two unrelated models of glomerular disease, passive accelerated anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Habu venom (HV)-induced proliferative glomerulonephritis, using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Fn-EIIIA and alpha-SMA proteins were abundantly expressed in mesangium and in periglomerular and peritubular interstitium of 20-day embryonic and 7-day (D-7) postnatal kidneys in regions of tubule and glomerular development. Staining was markedly reduced in these structures in maturing juvenile (D-14) kidney and was largely lost in adult kidney. Expression of Fn-EIIIA and alpha-SMA was reinitiated in the mesangium and the periglomerular and peritubular interstitium in both models and was also observed in glomerular crescents in anti-GBM nephritis. Increased expression of Fn-EIIIA mRNA by in situ hybridization corresponded to the localization of protein staining. Dual labeling experiments verified co-localization of Fn-EIIIA and alpha-SMA, showing a strong correlation of staining between location and staining intensity during kidney development, maturation, and disease. Expression of EIIIA mRNA corresponded to protein expression in developing and diseased kidneys and was lost in adult kidney. These studies show a recapitulation of the co-expression of Fn-EIIIA and alpha-SMA in anti-GBM disease and suggest a functional link for these two proteins.

  13. Experiment K-6-11. Actin mRNA and cytochrome c mRNA concentrations in the tricepts brachia muscle of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Morrison, P. R.; Thomason, D. B.; Oganov, V. S.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that some skeletal muscles atrophy as a result of weightlessness (Steffen and Musacchia 1986) and as a result of hindlimb suspension (Tischler et al., 1985, Thomason et al., 1987). Because the content of protein is determined by the rates of protein synthesis and degradation, a decrease in protein synthesis rate, or an increase in the protein degradation, or changes in both could produce the atrophy. Indeed, an increased protein degradation (Tischler et al., 1985) and a decreased protein synthesis (Thomason et al., 1988) have been observed in skeletal muscles of suspended hindlimbs of rats. Any decrease in protein synthesis rate could be caused by decreases in mRNA concentrations. Such decreases in the concentration and content of alpha-actin mRNA and cytochrome c mRNA have been noted in skeletal muscles of hindlimb suspended rats (Babij and Booth, 1988). From these findings researchers hypothesized that alpha-actin mRNA and cytochrome c mRNA would decrease in the triceps brachia muscle of Cosmos 1887 rats.

  14. Visceral smooth muscle α-actin deficiency associated with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a Bengal cat (Felis catus x Prionailurus bengalensis).

    PubMed

    Imai, D M; Miller, J L; Leonard, B C; Bach, J; Drees, R; Steinberg, H; Teixeira, L B C

    2014-05-01

    An adult Bengal cat (Felis catus × Prionailurus bengalensis) with a prolonged history of partial anorexia, regurgitation, and weight loss and a clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic diagnosis of persistent megaesophagus and gastrointestinal ileus was submitted for necropsy. The intestinal tract was diffusely distended by gas and fluid with appreciable loss of muscle tone and an absence of luminal obstruction, consistent with the clinical history of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Histologically, the autonomic nervous system was intact, but the smooth muscle within the gastrointestinal wall exhibited a marked basophilia that was most pronounced in the jejunum. Immunohistochemistry for neurofilament, synaptophysin, CD117, and desmin demonstrated that the number of myenteric ganglia, number of interstitial cells, and leiomyocyte desmin content were similar when compared with the unaffected age- and species-matched control. Immunohistochemistry for smooth muscle α-actin demonstrated a striking loss of immunoreactivity, predominantly in the circular layer of the jejunum, that corresponded with the tinctorial change in leiomyocytes. Transmission electron microscopy revealed loss of myofibrils, loss of organelle polarity, and significantly larger central mitochondria (megamitochondria) in affected leiomyocytes, as well as nonspecific degenerative changes. Although the presence of a primary leiomyopathy and a causal relationship could not be confirmed in this case, leiomyopathies are considered a cause of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in human medicine, and loss of smooth muscle α-actin immunoreactivity is one recognized marker for intestinal dysmotility.

  15. The de novo missense mutation N117S in skeletal muscle α‑actin 1 causes a mild form of congenital nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Yu, Ping; Chen, Xiang; Cai, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) constitutes a spectrum of primary skeletal muscle disorders, the diagnosis of which is based on muscle weakness and the visualization of nemaline bodies in muscle biopsies. Mutations in several NM causal genes have been attributed to the majority of NM cases, particularly mutations in nebulin and skeletal muscle α‑actin 1 (ACTA1), which are responsible for ~70% of cases; therefore, a genetic diagnostic strategy using targeted gene sequencing may potentially improve the diagnosis of suspected NM. The present study identified a de novo mutation in ACTA1 (c.350A>G; p.Asn117Ser) in a Chinese patient using target‑capture sequencing of a panel containing 125 known causal genes for inherited muscle diseases. Clinical analyses revealed that the case described in the present study exhibited a relatively mild phenotype with regards to muscle weakness, as compared with more severe phenotypes reported in several other patients with the same mutation, thus suggesting the existence of genetic modifiers. In conclusion, this approach may be helpful for the identification of clinically undiagnosed patients with highly heterogeneous disorders.

  16. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar); Skin lesion - actinic keratosis ... likely to develop it if you: Have fair skin, blue or green eyes, or blond or red ...

  17. Cerebrovascular smooth muscle actin is increased in nondemented subjects with frequent senile plaques at autopsy: implications for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Hulette, Christine M; Ervin, John F; Edmonds, Yvette; Antoine, Samantha; Stewart, Nicolas; Szymanski, Mari H; Hayden, Kathleen M; Pieper, Carl F; Burke, James R; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A

    2009-04-01

    We previously found that vascular smooth muscle actin (SMA) is reduced in the brains of patients with late stage Alzheimer disease (AD) compared with brains of nondemented, neuropathologically normal subjects. To assess the pathogenetic significance and disease specificity of this finding, we studied 3 additional patient groups: nondemented subjects without significant AD type pathology ("Normal"; n = 20), nondemented subjects with frequent senile plaques at autopsy ("Preclinical AD"; n = 20), and subjects with frontotemporal dementia ("FTD"; n = 10). The groups were matched for sex and age with those previously reported; SMA immunohistochemistry and image analysis were performed as previously described. Surprisingly, SMA expression in arachnoid, cerebral cortex, and white matter arterioles was greater in the Preclinical AD group than in the Normal and FTD groups. The plaques were not associated with amyloid angiopathy or other vascular disease in this group. Smooth muscle actin expression in the brains of the Normal group was intermediate between the Preclinical AD and FTD groups. All 3 groups exhibited much greater SMA expression than in our previous report. The presence of frequent plaques and increased arteriolar SMA expression in the brains of nondemented subjects suggest that increased SMA expression might represent a physiological response to neurodegeneration that could prevent or delay overt expression dementia in AD.

  18. Effects of actin-binding proteins on the thermal stability of monomeric actin.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Chebotareva, Natalia A; Kremneva, Elena V; Lappalainen, Pekka; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2013-01-08

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was applied to investigate the thermal unfolding of rabbit skeletal muscle G-actin in its complexes with actin-binding proteins, cofilin, twinfilin, and profilin. The results show that the effects of these proteins on the thermal stability of G-actin depend on the nucleotide, ATP or ADP, bound in the nucleotide-binding cleft between actin subdomains 2 and 4. Interestingly, cofilin binding stabilizes both ATP-G-actin and ADP-G-actin, whereas twinfilin increases the thermal stability of the ADP-G-actin but not that of the ATP-G-actin. By contrast, profilin strongly decreases the thermal stability of the ATP-G-actin but has no appreciable effect on the ADP-G-actin. Comparison of these DSC results with literature data reveals a relationship between the effects of actin-binding proteins on the thermal unfolding of G-actin, stabilization or destabilization, and their effects on the rate of nucleotide exchange in the nucleotide-binding cleft, decrease or increase. These results suggest that the thermal stability of G-actin depends, at least partially, on the conformation of the nucleotide-binding cleft: the actin molecule is more stable when the cleft is closed, while an opening of the cleft leads to significant destabilization of G-actin. Thus, DSC studies of the thermal unfolding of G-actin can provide new valuable information about the conformational changes induced by actin-binding proteins in the actin molecule.

  19. The skeletal muscle alpha-actin gene of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and its association with piscine specific SINE elements.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Karsi, A; Dunham, R A; Liu, Z

    2000-07-11

    The alpha-actin gene of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) was cloned and sequenced. The gene has a similar organization and exhibited a high level of sequence similarity to those from other vertebrate animals. The upstream region of the alpha-actin gene included a TATA box, a CAAT box, three E-boxes, and a CArG box. Nested deletion segments containing these transcriptional motifs were fused to the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). Transfection of the clones into C2C12 cells indicated that all these motifs are required for transcriptional activities. The channel catfish alpha-actin gene is associated with two distinct short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs). The first SINE element showed high levels of sequence similarity to the zebrafish Mermaid element, while the second SINE element is not similar to the Mermaid element except for an 8bp sequence CCCCGTGC suggesting their evolutionary linkage. However, the second SINE element appeared to co-exist with the Mermaid element in most cases and therefore was designated as the Merman element. Approximately 9000 copies and 1200 copies of the Mermaid and Merman elements exist per haploid channel catfish genome, respectively. BLAST searches indicated that both the Mermaid and the Merman elements were frequently associated with gene sequences, mostly those of aquatic animals, suggesting their evolutionary origin in association with aquatic organisms and their function in shaping the evolution of genomes in aquatic animals.

  20. A Novel Regulatory Mechanism of Smooth Muscle α-Actin Expression by NRG-1/circACTA2/miR-548f-5p Axis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Yang, Zhan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Man-Li; Zhao, Xue-Shan; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Suzuki, Toru; Wen, Jin-Kun

    2017-09-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) includes an extracellular epidermal growth factor-like domain and an intracellular domain (NRG-1-ICD). In response to transforming growth factor-β1, its cleavage by proteolytic enzymes releases a bioactive fragment, which suppresses the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation by activating ErbB (erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog) receptor. However, NRG-1-ICD function in VSMCs remains unknown. Here, we characterize the function of NRG-1-ICD and underlying mechanisms in VSMCs. Immunofluorescence staining, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that NRG-1 was expressed in rat, mouse, and human VSMCs and was upregulated and cleaved in response to transforming growth factor-β1. In the cytoplasm of HASMCs (human aortic smooth muscle cells), the NRG-1-ICD participated in filamentous actin formation by interacting with α-SMA (smooth muscle α-actin). In the nucleus, the Nrg-1-ICD induced circular ACTA2 (alpha-actin-2; circACTA2) formation by recruitment of the zinc-finger transcription factor IKZF1 (IKAROS family zinc finger 1) to the first intron of α-SMA gene. We further confirmed that circACTA2, acting as a sponge binding microRNA (miR)-548f-5p, interacted with miR-548f-5p targeting 3' untranslated region of α-SMA mRNA, which in turn relieves miR-548f-5p repression of the α-SMA expression and thus upregulates α-SMA expression, thereby facilitating stress fiber formation and cell contraction in HASMCs. Accordingly, in vivo studies demonstrated that the localization of the interaction of circACTA2 with miR-548f-5p is significantly decreased in human intimal hyperplastic arteries compared with normal arteries, implicating that dysregulation of circACTA2 and miR-548f-5p expression is involved in intimal hyperplasia. These results suggest that circACTA2 mediates NRG-1-ICD regulation of α-SMA expression in HASMCs via the NRG-1-ICD/circACTA2/miR-548f-5p axis. Our data provide a molecular

  1. Quantitative evaluation of tryptophan oxidation in actin and troponin I from skeletal muscles using a rat model of acute oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Maria; Todorovsky, Toni; Kuleva, Nadezda; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2010-07-01

    Increased levels of "ROS" cause oxidative stress and are believed to play a key role in the development of age-related diseases and mammalian aging, e.g. through the oxidation of residues, at or close to, the protein surface. In this study, we have investigated the effects of ROS on tryptophan residues in alpha skeletal actin and troponin I (fast skeletal muscle isoform) using an established rat model of acute oxidative stress induced by X-ray irradiation. In the control samples (no oxidative stress), the single Trp residue of troponin I (position 161) and the four tryptophan residues present in actin (positions 79, 86, 340, and 356) were only oxidized at very low levels. Post-irradiation, the level of oxidized versions increased for most positions within 3 h. Tryptophan residues located inside the proteins, however, required longer time periods. Based on the increment masses of the tryptophan positions calculated from the b- and y-ion series of the tandem mass spectra, the following oxidation products of tryptophan were detected: kynurenine; oxolactone; hydroxytryptophan or oxindolylalanine (isobaric); hydroxykynurenine; dioxindolylalanine, N-formylkynurenine or dihydroxytryptophan (all three isobaric); and hydroxyl-N-formylkynurenine, with mass gains relative to tryptophan of 4, 14, 16, 20, 32, and 48 u, respectively. Despite a partial recovery after 24 h, the degree of oxidation of all oxidized versions was still higher than in the control samples.

  2. Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin in stromal cells are possible biomarkers for metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported a case of giant basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in a 75-year-old Japanese man, who subsequently developed a pulmonary metastasis. With regard to the pathogenesis of metastasis of BCC, recently, it has been reported that high levels of expression of Twist1 and N-cadherin in primary and metastatic tumor cells, suggesting that Twist1 expression and an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells are important for the promotion of tumor invasion and subsequent metastasis. In this report, we identified the expressions of Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in stromal cells in the primary and metastatic sites of giant BCC. These results suggest that Twist1-induced EMT of tumor cells might have been associated with distant organ metastasis in our case, and the presence of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts surrounding a BCC nest can be one of hallmarks of the aggressiveness of BCC.

  3. Relative expression of α-smooth muscle actin and matrix metalloproteinases-2 in ameloblastoma of a black African sub-population.

    PubMed

    Adisa, Akinyele O; Udeabor, Samuel E; Adeyemi, Bukola F; Alica, Kubesch; Booms, Patrick; Ghanaati, Shahram; Sader, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma although a benign odontogenic tumor, is locally invasive. The abundant presence of myofibroblasts (marked by α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) in the stroma and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the neoplastic or stromal cells have been linked with the tumor's ability for both local and distant spread. We aim to estimate the relative expression of α-SMA and MMP-2 in ameloblastoma from a black African subgroup to gauge their relative potential for enhancing local invasiveness and hence, their prospects as possible chemotherapeutic targets. Twenty-five formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks of ameloblastoma cases from Nigeria were prepared for antibody processing to α-SMA (Dako Monoclonal Mouse Anti-Human α-SMA antibody clone 1A4) and MMP-2 (Abcam Mouse Monoclonal Anti-MMP-2 antibody [CA-4001/CA719E3C] ab3158). The score for percentage positivity of the tumor cells and the score for staining intensities were then multiplied in order to generate an immunoreactive score. α-smooth muscle actin was only expressed in the fibrous connective tissues adjacent to the tumor islands while MMP-2 was expressed in the ameloblasts, stellate reticulum, and the connective tissues in varying proportions. All the variants analyzed expressed α-SMA mildly or moderately, except for the follicular variant that either did not express α-SMA or expressed it mildly. The highest number of strong immunoreactivity to MMP-2 in the ameloblast region was found in the plexiform variant. Chemotherapeutic targeting of both molecules may, therefore, be a vital step in the control of local ameloblastoma invasiveness.

  4. Substrate Elastic Modulus Regulates the Morphology, Focal Adhesions, and α-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression of Retinal Müller Cells.

    PubMed

    Bu, Shao-Chong; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J; van Putten, Sander M; Wouters, Olaf; Li, Xiao-Rong; Hooymans, Johanna M M; Los, Leonoor I

    2015-09-01

    The stiffness of the extracellular matrix has been shown to regulate cell adhesion, migration, and transdifferentiation in fibrotic processes. Retinal Müller cells have been shown to be mechanosensitive; they are involved in fibrotic vitreoretinal diseases. Since fibrosis increases the rigidity of the extracellular matrix, our aim was to develop an in vitro model for studying Müller cell morphology and differentiation state in relation to matrix stiffness. A spontaneously immortalized human Müller cell line (MIO-M1) was cultured on type I collagen-coated polyacrylamide gels with Young's moduli ranging from 2 to 92 kPa. Cell surface area, focal adhesion, and the expression and morphology of α-smooth muscle actin induced by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β [10 ng/mL for 48 hours]) were analyzed by immunocytology. The images were documented by using fluorescence microscopy and confocal scanning laser microscopy. MIO-M1 cells cultured on stiff substrates exhibited a significant increase in cell surface area, stress fiber, and mature focal adhesion formation. Furthermore, Müller cells treated with TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 and cultured on stiff substrates showed an increased incorporation of α-smooth muscle actin into stress fibers when compared to those grown on soft surfaces. Compliance of the surrounding matrix seems to influence the morphology and contraction of retinal Müller cells in fibrotic conditions. Development of an in vitro model simulating both the normally compliant retinal tissue and the rigid retinal fibrotic tissue helps fill the gap between the results of petri-dish cell culture with rigid surfaces and in vivo findings.

  5. Functional adaptation between yeast actin and its cognate myosin motors.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Allingham, John S; Rubenstein, Peter A; Lord, Matthew

    2011-09-02

    We employed budding yeast and skeletal muscle actin to examine the contribution of the actin isoform to myosin motor function. While yeast and muscle actin are highly homologous, they exhibit different charge density at their N termini (a proposed myosin-binding interface). Muscle myosin-II actin-activated ATPase activity is significantly higher with muscle versus yeast actin. Whether this reflects inefficiency in the ability of yeast actin to activate myosin is not known. Here we optimized the isolation of two yeast myosins to assess actin function in a homogenous system. Yeast myosin-II (Myo1p) and myosin-V (Myo2p) accommodate the reduced N-terminal charge density of yeast actin, showing greater activity with yeast over muscle actin. Increasing the number of negative charges at the N terminus of yeast actin from two to four (as in muscle) had little effect on yeast myosin activity, while other substitutions of charged residues at the myosin interface of yeast actin reduced activity. Thus, yeast actin functions most effectively with its native myosins, which in part relies on associations mediated by its outer domain. Compared with yeast myosin-II and myosin-V, muscle myosin-II activity was very sensitive to salt. Collectively, our findings suggest differing degrees of reliance on electrostatic interactions during weak actomyosin binding in yeast versus muscle. Our study also highlights the importance of native actin isoforms when considering the function of myosins.

  6. Bacterial nucleators: actin' on actin

    PubMed Central

    Bugalhão, Joana N.; Mota, Luís Jaime; Franco, Irina S.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key target of numerous microbial pathogens, including protozoa, fungi, bacteria and viruses. In particular, bacterial pathogens produce and deliver virulence effector proteins that hijack actin dynamics to enable bacterial invasion of host cells, allow movement within the host cytosol, facilitate intercellular spread or block phagocytosis. Many of these effector proteins directly or indirectly target the major eukaryotic actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, by either mimicking nucleation promoting factors or activating upstream small GTPases. In contrast, this review is focused on a recently identified class of effector proteins from Gram-negative bacteria that function as direct actin nucleators. These effector proteins mimic functional activities of formins, WH2-nucleators and Ena/VASP assembly promoting factors demonstrating that bacteria have coopted the complete set of eukaryotic actin assembly pathways. Structural and functional analyses of these nucleators have revealed several motifs and/or mechanistic activities that are shared with eukaryotic actin nucleators. However, functional effects of these proteins during infection extend beyond plain actin polymerization leading to interference with other host cell functions such as vesicle trafficking, cell cycle progression and cell death. Therefore, their use as model systems could not only help in the understanding of the mechanistic details of actin polymerization but also provide novel insights into the connection between actin dynamics and other cellular pathways. PMID:26416078

  7. [Actinic keratoses].

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Landthaler, M; Szeimies, R-M

    2003-06-01

    Actinic keratoses are defined as proliferation of cytologically atypical keratinocytes in the zone of epidermal-dermal junction in photodamaged skin. In the northern hemisphere the prevalence of actinic keratoses ranges depending on different epidemiological studies from 11% to 25% for people aged 40 or older. The main cause of actinic keratoses is exposure to UVB radiation in sunlight UVB radiation induces mutations in the telomerase gene and in the tumor suppressor gene P53, which can also be detected in invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The only histological parameter to distinguish between actinic keratoses and SCC is the level of invasiveness. The risk for actinic keratoses to develop into SCC is about 16% over lo years. For this reason and because of the high prevalence of actinic keratoses, it has been suggested to replace the term,, actinic keratosis K with intraepidermal squamous cell carcinoma' to better characterize the lesion. In the following review recent aspects of pathogenesis and therapy of actinic keratoses are discussed.

  8. Actinous enigma or enigmatic actin

    PubMed Central

    Povarova, Olga I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2014-01-01

    Being the most abundant protein of the eukaryotic cell, actin continues to keep its secrets for more than 60 years. Everything about this protein, its structure, functions, and folding, is mysteriously counterintuitive, and this review represents an attempt to solve some of the riddles and conundrums commonly found in the field of actin research. In fact, actin is a promiscuous binder with a wide spectrum of biological activities. It can exist in at least three structural forms, globular, fibrillar, and inactive (G-, F-, and I-actin, respectively). G-actin represents a thermodynamically instable, quasi-stationary state, which is formed in vivo as a result of the energy-intensive, complex posttranslational folding events controlled and driven by cellular folding machinery. The G-actin structure is dependent on the ATP and Mg2+ binding (which in vitro is typically substituted by Ca2+) and protein is easily converted to the I-actin by the removal of metal ions and by action of various denaturing agents (pH, temperature, and chemical denaturants). I-actin cannot be converted back to the G-form. Foldable and “natively folded” forms of actin are always involved in interactions either with the specific protein partners, such as Hsp70 chaperone, prefoldin, and the CCT chaperonin during the actin folding in vivo or with Mg2+ and ATP as it takes place in the G-form. We emphasize that the solutions for the mysteries of actin multifunctionality, multistructurality, and trapped unfolding can be found in the quasi-stationary nature of this enigmatic protein, which clearly possesses many features attributed to both globular and intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:28232879

  9. Seasonal immunohistochemical reactivity of S-100 and α-smooth muscle actin proteins in the epididymis of dromedary camel, Camelus dromedarius.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Z H; Joshi, D; Singh, S K

    2016-08-10

    The S-100 and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) proteins have been localised in epididymal tissue of several mammalian species, but there have been no data for a seasonal work in camel. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunoreactivities of S-100 and α-SMA proteins in the epididymis of dromedary camel during breeding and nonbreeding seasons. The immunopositive signals for both proteins were observed in different regions of camel epididymis. S-100-immunopositive signals were noted in both the epididymal epithelium and the intertubular connective tissue, while α-SMA signals were confined to the intertubular connective tissue, especially in the peritubular smooth muscle coat and the blood vessels. This study showed an increase in the intensity of S-100 and α-SMA immunoreactions during the breeding season in different regions of camel epididymis than that seen in the nonbreeding season. In conclusion, epididymis might be considered as a source of S-100 and α-SMA proteins in the camel and the secretion of these proteins showed distinct seasonal variations. Further, S-100 and α-SMA may affect the structural and physiological states of the epididymal duct.

  10. Alpha-smooth muscle actin containing contractile fibroblastic cells in human knee arthrofibrosis tissue. Winner of the AGA-DonJoy Award 2003.

    PubMed

    Unterhauser, Frank N; Bosch, Ulrich; Zeichen, Johannes; Weiler, Andreas

    2004-11-01

    Primary arthrofibrosis is of major concern after joint trauma or knee ligament surgery. The underlying mechanism in detail remains unclear. Highly differentiated fibroblastic cells, so-called myofibroblasts, express the actin isoform alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) and have been found to play a major role in tissue contraction during wound healing and organ fibrosis. We therefore studied the expression of myofibroblasts in human primary knee arthrofibrosis tissue. Tissue samples were taken from the infrapatellar fat pad and intercondylar region of nine patients who underwent revision surgery due to arthrofibrosis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction (study group). Control tissue was taken from five patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction (control group I) and from eight patients, who underwent second-look arthroscopy after primary ACL reconstruction (control group II). ASMA containing fibroblasts were immunostained with a monoclonal antibody. Histomorphometry was performed for total cell amount, ASMA containing fibroblasts, and vessel cross-sections. The arthrofibrosis group showed a tenfold higher amount of ASMA containing myofibroblasts (23.4% vs. 2.3%) than in control group I. There was a significantly higher total cell count and lower vessel density than in control group I. Control group II showed an upregulation of myofibroblasts almost five times that in control group I; nevertheless there was no evidence of scar formation or tissue fibrosis. Myofibroblasts are responsible for scar tissue contraction during wound healing. In arthrofibrosis tissue fibroblast contraction may be involved in tissue fibrosis and contraction with consecutive loss of motion. We found that myofibroblasts are upregulated in arthrofibrosis tissue. ACL reconstruction itself caused an up regulation of myofibroblast content. Nevertheless these patients did not show any clinical or histological signs of arthrofibrosis. Thus it is reasonable to assume that the

  11. Immunohistochemical analysis of two stem cell markers of α-smooth muscle actin and STRO-1 during wound healing of human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Yoshiba, Nagako; Yoshiba, Kunihiko; Ohkura, Naoto; Shigetani, Yoshimi; Takei, Erika; Hosoya, Akihiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Okiji, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies have employed two markers, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and STRO-1, to detect cells with mesenchymal stem cell properties in dental pulp. The present study aimed to explore the expression profile of α-SMA and STRO-1 in intact dental pulp as well as during wound healing in adult dental pulp tissue. Healthy pulps were mechanically exposed and capped with the clinically used materials MTA (ProRoot White MTA) or Ca(OH)₂ to induce a mineralized barrier at the exposed surface. After 7-42 days, the teeth were extracted and processed for immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against α-SMA, STRO-1 and nestin (a neurogenic cytoskeletal protein expressed in odontoblasts). In normal pulp, α-SMA was detected in vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes. Double immunofluorescent staining with STRO-1 and α-SMA showed that STRO-1 was localized in vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes and endothelial cells, in addition to nerve fibers. During the process of dental pulp healing, numerous α-SMA-positive cells emerged at the wound margin at 14 days, and the initially formed mineralized barrier was lined with α-SMA-positive cells similar in appearance to reparative odontoblasts, some of which co-expressed nestin. STRO-1 was abundant in nerve fibers. In the advanced stage of mineralized barrier formation at 42 days, cells lining the barrier were stained with nestin, and no staining of α-SMA was detected in those cells. These observations indicate that α-SMA-positive cells temporarily appear along the wound margin during the earlier phase of mineralized barrier formation and STRO-1 is confined in vascular and neuronal elements.

  12. Synergistic effect of a novel oxymatrine-baicalin combination against hepatitis B virus replication, α smooth muscle actin expression and type I collagen synthesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Ping, Jian; Xu, Huai-Dong; Fu, Hai-Jun; Zhou, Zhao-Hui

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of oxymatrine-baicalin combination (OB) against HBV replication in 2.2.15 cells and α smooth muscle actin (α SMA) expression, type I, collagen synthesis in HSC-T6 cells. METHODS: The 2.2.15 cells and HSC-T6 cells were cultured and treated respectively. HBsAg and HBeAg in the culture supernatants were detected by ELISA and HBV DNA levels were determined by fluorescence quantitative PCR. Total RNA was extracted from HSC-T6 cells and reverse transcribed into cDNA. The cDNAs were amplified by PCR and the quantities were expressed in proportion to β actin. The total cellular proteins extracted from HSC-T6 cells were separated by electrophoresis. Resolved proteins were electrophoretically transferred to nitrocellulose membrane. Protein bands were revealed and the quantities were corrected by β actin. RESULTS: In the 2.2.15 cell culture system, the inhibitory rate against secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg in the OB group was significantly stronger than that in the oxymatrine group (HBsAg, P = 0.043; HBeAg, P = 0.026; respectively); HBV DNA level in the OB group was significantly lower than that in the oxymatrine group (P = 0.041). In HSC-T6 cells the mRNA and protein expression levels of α SMA in the OB group were significantly lower as compared with those in the oxymatrine group (mRNA, P = 0.013; protein, P = 0.042; respectively); The mRNA and protein expression levels of type I collagen in the OB group were significantly lower as compared with those in the oxymatrine group (mRNA, P < 0.01; protein, P < 0.01; respectively). CONCLUSION: OB combination has a better effect against HBV replication in 2.2.15 cells and is more effective against α SMA expression and typeI collagen synthesis in HSC-T6 cells than oxymatrine in vitro. PMID:16937525

  13. Toxofilin, a Novel Actin-binding Protein from Toxoplasma gondii, Sequesters Actin Monomers and Caps Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Poupel, Olivier; Boleti, Haralabia; Axisa, Sophie; Couture-Tosi, Evelyne; Tardieux, Isabelle

    2000-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii relies on its actin cytoskeleton to glide and enter its host cell. However, T. gondii tachyzoites are known to display a strikingly low amount of actin filaments, which suggests that sequestration of actin monomers could play a key role in parasite actin dynamics. We isolated a 27-kDa tachyzoite protein on the basis of its ability to bind muscle G-actin and demonstrated that it interacts with parasite G-actin. Cloning and sequence analysis of the gene coding for this protein, which we named Toxofilin, showed that it is a novel actin-binding protein. In in vitro assays, Toxofilin not only bound to G-actin and inhibited actin polymerization as an actin-sequestering protein but also slowed down F-actin disassembly through a filament end capping activity. In addition, when green fluorescent protein-tagged Toxofilin was overexpressed in mammalian nonmuscle cells, the dynamics of actin stress fibers was drastically impaired, whereas green fluorescent protein-Toxofilin copurified with G-actin. Finally, in motile parasites, during gliding or host cell entry, Toxofilin was localized in the entire cytoplasm, including the rear end of the parasite, whereas in intracellular tachyzoites, especially before they exit from the parasitophorous vacuole of their host cell, Toxofilin was found to be restricted to the apical end. PMID:10637313

  14. Polymorphism in the Alpha Cardiac Muscle Actin 1 Gene Is Associated to Susceptibility to Chronic Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Frade, Amanda Farage; Teixeira, Priscila Camilo; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Pissetti, Cristina Wide; Saba, Bruno; Wang, Lin Hui Tzu; Kuramoto, Andréia; Nogueira, Luciana Gabriel; Buck, Paula; Dias, Fabrício; Giniaux, Helene; Llored, Agnes; Alves, Sthefanny; Schmidt, Andre; Donadi, Eduardo; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Hirata, Mario; Sampaio, Marcelo; Fragata, Abílio; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Stolf, Antonio Noedir; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inacio; Santos, Ronaldo Honorato Barros; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Chevillard, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Aims Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America, and may lead to a life-threatening inflammatory dilated, chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). One third of T. cruzi-infected individuals progress to CCC while the others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Since mutations in multiple sarcomeric genes, including alpha-cardiac actin (ACTC1) have been involved in hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy, we investigated the involvement of the ACTC1 gene in CCC pathogenesis. Methods and Results We conducted a proteomic and genetic study on a Brazilian study population. The genetic study was done on a main cohort including 118 seropositive asymptomatic subjects and 315 cases and the replication was done on 36 asymptomatic and 102 CCC cases. ACTC1 protein and mRNA levels were lower in myocardial tissue from patients with end-stage CCC than those found in hearts from organ donors. Genotyping a case-control cohort of CCC and ASY subjects for all informative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ACTC1 gene identified rs640249 SNP, located at the 5’ region, as associated to CCC. Associations are borderline after correction for multiple testing. Correlation and haplotype analysis led to the identification of a susceptibility haplotype. Functional assays have shown that the rs640249A/C polymorphism affects the binding of transcriptional factors in the promoter regions of the ACTC1 gene. Confirmation of the detected association on a larger independent replication cohort will be useful. Conclusions Genetic variations at the ACTC1 gene may contribute to progression to chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy among T. cruzi-infected patients, possibly by modulating transcription factor binding to ACTC1 promoter regions. PMID:24367596

  15. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three- dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells. PMID:6682423

  16. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Niederman, R; Amrein, P C; Hartwig, J

    1983-05-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three-dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells.

  17. Mutations in Smooth Muscle Alpha-Actin (ACTA2) Cause Coronary Artery Disease, Stroke, and Moyamoya Disease, Along with Thoracic Aortic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-Chuan; Papke, Christina L.; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Regalado, Ellen S.; Avidan, Nili; Johnson, Ralph Jay; Kim, Dong H.; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Willing, Marcia C.; Sparks, Elizabeth; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Singh, Michael N.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Grotta, James C.; Marian, Ali J.; Boerwinkle, Eric A.; Frazier, Lorraine Q.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Muzny, Donna M.; Wheeler, David A.; Willerson, James T.; Yu, Robert K.; Shete, Sanjay S.; Scherer, Steven E.; Raman, C.S.; Buja, L. Maximilian; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2009-01-01

    The vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (ACTA2) is a major component of the contractile apparatus in SMCs located throughout the arterial system. Heterozygous ACTA2 mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), but only half of mutation carriers have aortic disease. Linkage analysis and association studies of individuals in 20 families with ACTA2 mutations indicate that mutation carriers can have a diversity of vascular diseases, including premature onset of coronary artery disease (CAD) and premature ischemic strokes (including Moyamoya disease [MMD]), as well as previously defined TAAD. Sequencing of DNA from patients with nonfamilial TAAD and from premature-onset CAD patients independently identified ACTA2 mutations in these patients and premature onset strokes in family members with ACTA2 mutations. Vascular pathology and analysis of explanted SMCs and myofibroblasts from patients harboring ACTA2 suggested that increased proliferation of SMCs contributed to occlusive diseases. These results indicate that heterozygous ACTA2 mutations predispose patients to a variety of diffuse and diverse vascular diseases, including TAAD, premature CAD, ischemic strokes, and MMD. These data demonstrate that diffuse vascular diseases resulting from either occluded or enlarged arteries can be caused by mutations in a single gene and have direct implications for clinical management and research on familial vascular diseases. PMID:19409525

  18. Small gastrointestinal stromal tumor in the stomach: identification of precursor for clinical gastrointestinal stromal tumor using c-kit and α-smooth muscle actin expression.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Tetuo; Nemoto, Yuta; Numata, Yoshiko; Hana, Kiyomi; Nakada, Norihiro; Ichinoe, Masaaki; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Okayasu, Isao

    2013-12-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. To find precursors for clinical GISTs of the stomach, small gastric stromal tumors of less than 3 cm were collected and examined immunohistochemically with analysis of the KIT mutation. Sixty-eight of 74 lesions were classified into 4 representative groups according to the expression of c-kit and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA): group A, c-kit diffusely positive and αSMA negative (18 cases); group B, c-kit diffusely positive and αSMA focally positive (13); group C, c-kit focally positive and αSMA diffusely positive (27); and group D, c-kit negative and αSMA diffusely positive (10). Of the 4 groups, groups A and B of c-kit diffuse expression showed higher cellularity and labeling indices of p27(Kip1) and Ki-67 than did groups C and D of diffuse αSMA expression. Incidence of KIT exon 11 mutation in groups A and B was 86% (25/29), whereas that in groups C and D was 0% (0/20). Small gastric stromal tumors with c-kit diffuse expression were considered precursors for clinical GIST because they were significantly different from c-kit focally positive or negative tumors. The mutation of KIT is considered as an early event in tumorigenesis of GIST.

  19. Cerebrovascular Smooth Muscle Actin Is Increased in Non-Demented Subjects with Frequent Senile Plaques at Autopsy: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hulette, Christine M.; Ervin, John F.; Edmonds, Yvette; Antoine, Samantha; Stewart, Nicolas; Szymanski, Mari H.; Hayden, Kathleen M; Pieper, Carl F.; Burke, James R.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    We previously found that vascular smooth muscle actin (SMA) is reduced in the brains of patients with late stage Alzheimer disease (AD) compared to brains of non-demented, neuropathologically normal subjects. To assess the pathogenetic significance and disease specificity of this finding, we studied 3 additional patient groups: non-demented subjects without significant AD type pathology (“Normal”, n = 20); non-demented subjects with frequent senile plaques at autopsy (“Preclinical AD”, n = 20); and subjects with frontotemporal dementia, (“FTD”, n = 10). The groups were matched for gender and age with those previously reported; SMA immunohistochemistry and image analysis were performed as previously described. Surprisingly, SMA expression in arachnoid, cerebral cortex and white matter arterioles was greater in the Preclinical AD group than in the Normal and FTD groups. The plaques were not associated with amyloid angiopathy or other vascular disease in this group. SMA expression in the brains of the Normal group was intermediate between the Preclinical AD and FTD groups. All 3 groups exhibited much greater SMA expression than in our previous report. The presence of frequent plaques and increased arteriolar SMA expression in the brains of non-demented subjects suggest that increased SMA expression might represent a physiologic response to neurodegeneration that could prevent or delay overt expression dementia in AD. PMID:19287310

  20. Scleraxis modulates bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4)-Smad1 protein-smooth muscle α-actin (SMA) signal transduction in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hideharu; Tominaga, Tatsuya; Matsubara, Takeshi; Abe, Naoko; Kishi, Seiji; Nagai, Kojiro; Murakami, Taichi; Araoka, Toshikazu; Doi, Toshio

    2012-06-08

    Activation of mesangial cells (MCs), which is characterized by induction of smooth muscle α-actin (SMA) expression, contributes to a key event in various renal diseases; however, the mechanisms controlling MC differentiation are still largely undefined. Activated Smad1 induced SMA in a dose-dependent manner in MCs. As a direct regulating molecule for SMA, we identified and characterized scleraxis (Scx) as a new phenotype modulator in advanced glycation end product (AGE)-exposed MCs. Scx physically associated with E12 and bound the E-box in the promoter of SMA and negatively regulated the AGE-induced SMA expression. Scx induced expression and secretion of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), thereby controlling the Smad1 activation in AGE-treated MCs. In diabetic mice, Scx was concomitantly expressed with SMA in the glomeruli. Inhibitor of differentiation 1 (Id1) was further induced by extended treatment with AGE, thereby dislodging Scx from the SMA promoter. These data suggest that Scx and Id1 are involved in the BMP4-Smad1-SMA signal transduction pathway besides the TGFβ1-Smad1-SMA signaling pathway and modulate phenotypic changes in MCs in diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Actinic reticuloid

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.L.; Vale, M.; Dermer, P.; Ragaz, A.; Michaelides, P.; Gladstein, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    A 58-year-old man has his condition diagnosed as actinic reticuloid on the basis of clinical and histologic findings and phototesting data. He had clinical features resembling mycosis fungoides in light-exposed areas. Histologic findings disclosed a bandlike infiltrate with atypical mononuclear cells in the dermis and scattered atypical cells in the epidermis. Electron microscopy disclosed mononuclear cells with bizarre, convoluted nuclei, resembling cerebriform cells of Lutzner. Phototesting disclosed a diminished minimal erythemal threshold to UV-B and UV-A. Microscopic changes resembling actinic reticuloid were reproduced in this patient 24 and 72 hours after exposure to 15 minimal erythemal doses of UV-B.

  2. Bacterial Actins.

    PubMed

    Izoré, Thierry; van den Ent, Fusinita

    2017-01-01

    A diverse set of protein polymers, structurally related to actin filaments contributes to the organization of bacterial cells as cytomotive or cytoskeletal filaments. This chapter describes actin homologs encoded by bacterial chromosomes. MamK filaments, unique to magnetotactic bacteria, help establishing magnetic biological compasses by interacting with magnetosomes. Magnetosomes are intracellular membrane invaginations containing biomineralized crystals of iron oxide that are positioned by MamK along the long-axis of the cell. FtsA is widespread across bacteria and it is one of the earliest components of the divisome to arrive at midcell, where it anchors the cell division machinery to the membrane. FtsA binds directly to FtsZ filaments and to the membrane through its C-terminus. FtsA shows altered domain architecture when compared to the canonical actin fold. FtsA's subdomain 1C replaces subdomain 1B of other members of the actin family and is located on the opposite side of the molecule. Nevertheless, when FtsA assembles into protofilaments, the protofilament structure is preserved, as subdomain 1C replaces subdomain IB of the following subunit in a canonical actin filament. MreB has an essential role in shape-maintenance of most rod-shaped bacteria. Unusually, MreB filaments assemble from two protofilaments in a flat and antiparallel arrangement. This non-polar architecture implies that both MreB filament ends are structurally identical. MreB filaments bind directly to membranes where they interact with both cytosolic and membrane proteins, thereby forming a key component of the elongasome. MreB filaments in cells are short and dynamic, moving around the long axis of rod-shaped cells, sensing curvature of the membrane and being implicated in peptidoglycan synthesis.

  3. Force generation and work production by covalently cross-linked actin-myosin cross-bridges in rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Bershitsky, S Y; Tsaturyan, A K

    1995-01-01

    To separate a fraction of the myosin cross-bridges that are attached to the thin filaments and that participate in the mechanical responses, muscle fibers were cross-linked with 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide and then immersed in high-salt relaxing solution (HSRS) of 0.6 M ionic strength for detaching the unlinked myosin heads. The mechanical properties and force-generating ability of the cross-linked cross-bridges were tested with step length changes (L-steps) and temperature jumps (T-jumps) from 6-10 degrees C to 30-40 degrees C. After partial cross-linking, when instantaneous stiffness in HSRS was 25-40% of that in rigor, the mechanical behavior of the fibers was similar to that during active contraction. The kinetics of the T-jump-induced tension transients as well as the rate of the fast phase of tension recovery after length steps were close to those in unlinked fibers during activation. Under feedback force control, the T-jump initiated fiber shortening by up to 4 nm/half-sarcomere. Work produced by a cross-linked myosin head after the T-jump was up to 30 x 10(-21) J. When the extent of cross-linking was increased and fiber stiffness in HSRS approached that in rigor, the fibers lost their viscoelastic properties and ability to generate force with a rise in temperature. PMID:8519956

  4. Seropositivity and Titers of Anti-Smooth Muscle Actin Antibody Are Associated with Relapse of Type 1 Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Shibuki, Taro; Otsuka, Taiga; Isoda, Hiroshi; Araki, Norimasa; Kubotsu, Yoshihito; Kawaguchi, Yasunori; Nakashita, Shunya; Yoshioka, Wataru; Kawazoe, Seiji; Kawasoe, Hiroaki; Ide, Yasushi; Mizuta, Toshihiko; Liver Diseases Sasld, Saga Study Group Of

    2017-08-20

    BACKGROUND It is important to avoid relapse in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) because repeated multiple relapses have been associated with a worse prognosis. However, risk factors for relapse before initiation of treatment are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to find predictive markers for relapse of type 1 AIH. MATERIAL AND METHODS We reviewed the records of 53 patients diagnosed with type 1 AIH based on the revised scoring system proposed by the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG) between 2009 and 2014 at 4 hospitals belonging to the Saga Study Group of Liver Diseases (SASLD). We analyzed the differences in background characteristics between patients with or without relapse. RESULTS All patients achieved remission after treatment, and 9 (17%) subsequently relapsed. The relapsed patients were significantly younger and had a higher positive rate of anti-smooth muscle antibody (ASMA) than the non-relapsed patients (100% vs. 25%, P=0.0012). Moreover, relapse rate increased with titer of ASMA, while titer of antinuclear antibody was not associated with relapse rate. CONCLUSIONS ASMA is a useful predictive marker for relapse of type 1 AIH during or after withdrawal of medical therapy. More careful attention should be paid to immunosuppressive therapy in patients with high titers of ASMA.

  5. Ligand-activated PPARδ upregulates α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts: A potential role for PPARδ in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ham, Sun Ah; Hwang, Jung Seok; Yoo, Taesik; Lee, Won Jin; Paek, Kyung Shin; Oh, Jae-Wook; Park, Chan-Kyu; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Do, Jung Tae; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Seo, Han Geuk

    2015-12-01

    The phenotypic changes that accompany differentiation of resident fibroblasts into myofibroblasts are important aspects of the wound healing process. Recent studies showed that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ plays a critical role in wound healing. To determine whether the nuclear receptor PPARδ can modulate the differentiation of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) into myofibroblasts. These studies were undertaken in primary HDFs using Western blot analyses, small interfering (si)RNA-mediated gene silencing, reporter gene assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), migration assays, collagen gel contraction assays, and real-time PCR. Activation of PPARδ by GW501516, a specific ligand of PPARδ, specifically upregulated the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. This induction was significantly inhibited by the presence of siRNA against PPARδ, indicating that PPARδ is involved in myofibroblast transdifferentiation of HDFs. Ligand-activated PPARδ increased α-SMA promoter activity in a dual mode by directly binding a direct repeat-1 (DR1) site in the α-SMA promoter, and by inducing expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, whose downstream effector Smad3 interacts with a Smad-binding element (SBE) in another region of the promoter. Mutations in these cis-elements totally abrogated transcriptional activation of the α-SMA gene by the PPARδ ligand; thus both sites represent novel types of PPARδ response elements. GW501516-activated PPARδ also increased the migration and contractile properties of HDFs, as demonstrated by Transwell and collagen lattice contraction assays, respectively. In addition, PPARδ-mediated upregulation of α-SMA was correlated with elevated expression of myofibroblast markers such as collagen I and fibronectin, with a concomitant reduction in expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. PPARδ plays pivotal roles in wound healing by promoting

  6. Integrin α3 blockade enhances microtopographical down-regulation of α-smooth muscle actin: role of microtopography in ECM regulation.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Perla; Desai, Tejal A

    2011-07-01

    Development of functional engineered matrices for regenerative therapies can benefit from an understanding of how physical cues at the microscale affect cell behavior. In this work, we use microfabricated systems to study how stiffness and microscale topographical cues in the form of "micropegs" affect extracellular matrix synthesis. Previous work from our lab has shown that microtopographical cues in 2D and 3D systems decrease cellular proliferation and regulate matrix synthesis. In this work, the combined role of stiffness and topography on ECM synthesis is investigated in a 2D micropeg system. These studies show that fibroblasts cultured on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with micropegs have reduced expression of collagen type I (Col I) and collagen type VI (Col VI) compared to fibroblasts cultured on flat substrates. In addition, cells on micropegged substrates exhibit down-regulation of other important regulators of ECM synthesis such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and integrin α3 (Int α3). Interestingly, this effect is dependent on the contractility and adhesion of the cells. When cultured in the presence of RhoA kinase (ROCK) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitors, no significant differences in the expression of collagen, α-SMA, Int α3, and TGFB1 are observed. Additionally, disruptions in cell adhesion prevent microtopographical regulation of ECM synthesis. When using an antibody to block the extracellular domain of Int α3, no differences in the expression of collagen are observed and blocking Int α3 results in enhanced down-regulation of α-SMA on the stiffer micropegged substrates. These findings demonstrate that regulation of extracellular matrix production by cells on a synthetic substrate can be guided via physical cues at the microscale, and add to the body of knowledge on the role of integrin-mediated mechanotransduction.

  7. Triple combination of siRNAs targeting TGFβ1, TGFβR2, and CTGF enhances reduction of collagen I and smooth muscle actin in corneal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Sriniwas; Robinson, Paulette; Pi, Liya; Lewin, Alfred S; Schultz, Gregory

    2013-12-17

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), TGFβ receptor (TGFβR2), and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) are key regulators of fibrosis in the cornea and in other tissues, including liver, skin, and kidney. We developed an antifibrotic treatment targeting these three critical scarring genes by using a combination of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and assessed its effect on downstream scarring genes, collagen I, and α smooth muscle actin (SMA). Up to six individual siRNAs for each of the three target gene mRNAs were transfected into cultures of rabbit corneal fibroblasts at concentrations from 15 to 90 nM. The knockdown of target gene proteins was measured by ELISA, and the two most effective siRNAs were tested in dual combinations. Knockdown percentages of both individual and dual siRNA combinations were analyzed for synergy by using combination index to predict "effective" and "ineffective" triple siRNA combinations. Effects of both triple siRNA combinations on target and downstream mRNAs were measured by using quantitative RT-PCR, and levels of SMA protein were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Single and dual siRNA combinations produced a wide range of protein knockdown of target genes (5%-80%). The effective triple siRNA combination significantly reduced mRNA levels of target genes (>80%) and downstream scarring genes (>85%), and of SMA protein (>95%), and significantly reduced cell migration without reducing cell viability. Simultaneous targeting of TGFβ1, TGFβR2, and CTGF genes by effective triple siRNA combination produced high knockdown of target and downstream scarring genes without cell toxicity, which may have clinical applications in reducing corneal fibrosis and scarring in other tissues.

  8. High-voltage pulsed current stimulation enhances wound healing in diabetic rats by restoring the expression of collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, and TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Cho, Hwi-Young; Lee, Suk Min

    2014-09-01

    Impaired wound healing is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and a major morbidity that leads to pain and severely diminished quality of life. Diabetic wounds are commonly associated with defective immune cell responses or abnormality of extracellular matrix. Various types of electrical stimulation interventions have been used to promote tissue healing. However, it is unclear whether high-voltage pulsed current stimulation (HVPCS) enhances diabetic wound healing. In this study, the effects of HVPCS on wound healing were investigated in diabetic rats. Three groups of rats (10 per group) were used: non-diabetic control, diabetic control, and diabetic rats that were administered HVPCS for 40 minutes daily for 1 week. Rats from control groups were administered sham interventions. Dorsal incision wounds were generated in all animals, and wound-healing rate was determined during one-week intervention. After interventions, we measured the relative expression levels of collagen type I (collagen-I), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) mRNAs in the wounded skin. Wound closure was delayed in diabetic control rats compared to the non-diabetic control rats, and the diabetic control rats showed the reduced expression levels of collagen-I, α-SMA and TGF-β1 mRNAs. Importantly, compared to diabetic control rats, rats with HVPCS showed accelerated wound closure and healing (p < 0.01) and restored expression levels of collagen-I (p = 0.02), α-SMA (p = 0.04), and TGF-β1 (p = 0.01) mRNAs. In conclusion, HVPCS may be beneficial for enhancing the healing of diabetic wounds by restoring the expression levels of TGF-β1, collagen-I, and α-SMA.

  9. Triple Combination of siRNAs Targeting TGFβ1, TGFβR2, and CTGF Enhances Reduction of Collagen I and Smooth Muscle Actin in Corneal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Sriniwas; Robinson, Paulette; Pi, Liya; Lewin, Alfred S.; Schultz, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), TGFβ receptor (TGFβR2), and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) are key regulators of fibrosis in the cornea and in other tissues, including liver, skin, and kidney. We developed an antifibrotic treatment targeting these three critical scarring genes by using a combination of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and assessed its effect on downstream scarring genes, collagen I, and α smooth muscle actin (SMA). Methods. Up to six individual siRNAs for each of the three target gene mRNAs were transfected into cultures of rabbit corneal fibroblasts at concentrations from 15 to 90 nM. The knockdown of target gene proteins was measured by ELISA, and the two most effective siRNAs were tested in dual combinations. Knockdown percentages of both individual and dual siRNA combinations were analyzed for synergy by using combination index to predict “effective” and “ineffective” triple siRNA combinations. Effects of both triple siRNA combinations on target and downstream mRNAs were measured by using quantitative RT-PCR, and levels of SMA protein were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results. Single and dual siRNA combinations produced a wide range of protein knockdown of target genes (5%–80%). The effective triple siRNA combination significantly reduced mRNA levels of target genes (>80%) and downstream scarring genes (>85%), and of SMA protein (>95%), and significantly reduced cell migration without reducing cell viability. Conclusions. Simultaneous targeting of TGFβ1, TGFβR2, and CTGF genes by effective triple siRNA combination produced high knockdown of target and downstream scarring genes without cell toxicity, which may have clinical applications in reducing corneal fibrosis and scarring in other tissues. PMID:24282226

  10. Desmoplastic stromal response as defined by positive α-smooth muscle actin staining is predictive of invasion in adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Sara M; Watanabe, Tawny; Osann, Kathryn; Monk, Bradley J; Lin, Fritz; Rutgers, Joanne K L

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the immunohistochemical profiles of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and early invasive adenocarcinoma (AC) to identify biomarkers that enhance the accurate diagnosis of early invasive glandular lesions of the cervix. The University of California, Irvine, and Long Beach Memorial tumor registries were used to identify 20 women with AIS or early AC treated between 1990 and 2008. An immunohistochemical study was performed, and the primary endpoint measured was the correlation between biomarker expression and invasive disease as diagnosed on hematoxylin and eosin examination. The biomarkers studied included α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), estrogen receptor, carcinoembryonic antigen, Ki67, p16, cyclooxygenase-2, and cluster of differentiation 1a. Stains were described on the basis of (1) positive or negative staining; (2) intensity; (3) percentage of positive cells; and (4) pattern of staining. Statistical analysis was performed using SYSTAT v. 11.0. Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney nonparametric test, κ statistic, and intraclass correlation coefficient were used to evaluate results and interpreter agreement. A statistically significant increase in the staining of the periglandular stroma for α-SMA was seen in AC as compared with AIS. The intensity was 2.2 versus 1.2 (P=0.04) and the percent of positive-staining cells was 44% versus 18% (P=0.05) in AC and AIS, respectively. The presence of a desmoplastic stromal response as identified by the increased periglandular staining for α-SMA is useful in identifying invasive glandular lesions of the endocervix. Further studies are necessary to establish biologically relevant cut-off values for α-SMA staining.

  11. Gamma-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression Is Associated with Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Stem-Like Properties in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benzoubir, Nassima; Mussini, Charlotte; Lejamtel, Charlène; Dos Santos, Alexandre; Guillaume, Claire; Desterke, Christophe; Samuel, Didier; Bréchot, Christian; Bourgeade, Marie-Françoise; Guettier, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is hampered by frequent tumour recurrence and metastases. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is now recognized as a key process in tumour invasion, metastasis and the generation of cancer initiating cells. The morphological identification of EMT in tumour samples from the expression of novel mesenchymal markers could provide relevant prognostic information and aid in understanding the metastatic process. Methods The expression of Smooth Muscle Actins was studied using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry assays in cultured liver cells during an induced EMT process and in liver specimens from adult and paediatric HCC series. Results We report here that in HCC cell lines treated with TGF-β and in HCC specimens, the expression of αSMA, a known mesenchymal marker of EMT, could never be detected. In addition, our in vitro studies identified the enteric form of SMA, γSMA, as being a marker of EMT. Moreover, this SMA isoform was expressed in 46% of 58 tumours from 42 adult HCC patients and in 90% of 16 tumours from 12 paediatric HCC patients. Interestingly, this expression was significantly correlated with poor tumour differentiation and progenitor cell features characterized by the expression of EpCAM and K19. Conclusion Taken together, our results support the conclusion that γSMA expression in HCC is strongly correlated with the EMT process, HCC aggressiveness and the identification of cancer stem cells. This correlation suggests that γSMA represents a novel and powerful marker to predict HCC progression. PMID:26110787

  12. Nuclear actin and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bin; Han, Mei; Bernier, Michel; Wen, Jin-kun

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear actin is involoved in transcription of all three RNA polymerases, chromatin remodeling, and formation of hnRNP complexes as well as recruitment of histone modifier to the active gene. In addition, actin-binding proteins (ABPs) control actin nucleation, bundling, filament capping, fragmentation, and monomer availability in the cytoplasm. In recent years, more and more attention is on the role of actin and ABPs in the modulation of the subcellular localization of transcriptional regulators. This review focuses on the recent developments about transcription and transcriptional regulation by nuclear actin, regulation of muscle-specific gene expression, nuclear receptor and transcription complexes by ABPs. Among them, STARS and ABLIM regulate actin dynamics and SRF-dependent muscle-specific gene expression. Functionally and structurally unrelated cytoplasmic ABPs interact cooperatively with nuclear receptor and regulate its transactivation. Furthermore, ABPs also participate in the formation of transcription complexes. PMID:19459931

  13. Microtubules as Platforms for Assaying Actin Polymerization In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Oelkers, J. Margit; Vinzenz, Marlene; Nemethova, Maria; Jacob, Sonja; Lai, Frank P. L.; Block, Jennifer; Szczodrak, Malgorzata; Kerkhoff, Eugen; Backert, Steffen; Schlüter, Kai; Stradal, Theresia E. B.; Small, J. Victor

    2011-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is continuously remodeled through cycles of actin filament assembly and disassembly. Filaments are born through nucleation and shaped into supramolecular structures with various essential functions. These range from contractile and protrusive assemblies in muscle and non-muscle cells to actin filament comets propelling vesicles or pathogens through the cytosol. Although nucleation has been extensively studied using purified proteins in vitro, dissection of the process in cells is complicated by the abundance and molecular complexity of actin filament arrays. We here describe the ectopic nucleation of actin filaments on the surface of microtubules, free of endogenous actin and interfering membrane or lipid. All major mechanisms of actin filament nucleation were recapitulated, including filament assembly induced by Arp2/3 complex, formin and Spir. This novel approach allows systematic dissection of actin nucleation in the cytosol of live cells, its genetic re-engineering as well as screening for new modifiers of the process. PMID:21603613

  14. Recombinant alpha-actin for specific fluorescent labeling.

    PubMed

    Iwane, Atsuko H; Morimatsu, Masatoshi; Yanagida, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, actin was thought to act merely as a passive track for its motility partner, myosin, during actomyosin interactions. Yet a recent report having observed dynamical conformational changes in labeled skeletal muscle alpha-actin suggests that actin has a more active role. Because the labeling technique was still immature, however, conclusions regarding the significance of the different conformations are difficult to make. Here, we describe the preparation of fully active alpha-actin obtained from a baculovirus expression system. We developed alpha-actin recombinants, of which subdomains 1 and 2 have specific sites for fluorescent probes. This specific labeling technique offers to significantly expand the information acquired from actin studies.

  15. Structure of the Rigor Actin-Tropomyosin-Myosin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Elmar; Müller, Mirco; Penczek, Pawel A.; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Manstein, Dietmar J.; Raunser, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of myosin with actin filaments is the central feature of muscle contraction and cargo movement along actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. Myosin converts the chemical energy stored in ATP into force and movement along actin filaments. Myosin binding to actin induces conformational changes that are coupled to the nucleotide-binding pocket and amplified by a specialized region of the motor domain for efficient force generation. Tropomyosin plays a key role in regulating the productive interaction between myosins and actin. Here, we report the 8 Å resolution structure of the actin-tropomyosin-myosin complex determined by cryo electron microscopy. The pseudo-atomic model of the complex obtained from fitting crystal structures into the map defines the large actin-myosin-tropomyosin interface and the molecular interactions between the proteins in detail and allows us to propose a structural model for tropomyosin dependent myosin binding to actin and actin-induced nucleotide release from myosin. PMID:22817895

  16. Actin: Structure, Function, Dynamics, and Interactions with Bacterial Toxins.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Sonja; Mannherz, Hans Georg

    Actin is one of the most abundant proteins in any eukaryotic cell and an indispensable component of the cytoskeleton. In mammalian organisms, six highly conserved actin isoforms can be distinguished, which differ by only a few amino acids. In non-muscle cells, actin polymerizes into actin filaments that form actin structures essential for cell shape stabilization, and participates in a number of motile activities like intracellular vesicle transport, cytokinesis, and also cell locomotion. Here, we describe the structure of monomeric and polymeric actin, the polymerization kinetics, and its regulation by actin-binding proteins. Probably due to its conserved nature and abundance, actin and its regulating factors have emerged as prefered targets of bacterial toxins and effectors, which subvert the host actin cytoskeleton to serve bacterial needs.

  17. Actin-related proteins in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and their interactions with actin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Barrera, A L; de la Garza, M; Mondragón, R; García-Cuéllar, C; Segura-Nieto, M

    1999-11-01

    A group of prokaryotic actin-related proteins (PARP) with an Mr of 43000 was detected in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. These proteins were enriched by a depolymerization/polymerization cycle, under similar conditions to those used to polymerize muscle actin, and purified by affinity chromatography on a DNase I-Sepharose column. Three isoforms of A. pleuropneumoniae PARP (Ap-PARP) with pI values of 5.8, 6.15 and 6.2 were detected. Ap-PARP were recognized by four different anti-actin antibodies (one anti-muscle and three anti-cytoplasmic isoforms). Ap-PARP were also recognized by antibodies against Anabaena variabilis PARP (Av-PARP) and against actin-binding proteins such as alpha-actinin and spectrin, and also by a monoclonal antibody against heat-shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70). Specific binding of phalloidin to Ap-PARP was detected both in permeabilized cells and in vitro. Purified Ap-PARP can polymerize under similar conditions to those required for skeletal muscle actin polymerization and the filaments formed appear to be decorated with myosin subfragment-1(S1) as observed by transmission electron microscopy. The amino acid composition of Ap-PARP revealed more similarities to muscle gamma-actin and the cytoplasmic beta-actin isoform than to eukaryotic actin-related proteins.

  18. A stable explant culture of HER2/neu invasive carcinoma supported by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin expressing stromal cells to evaluate therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Piechocki, Marie P

    2008-01-01

    Background To gain a better understanding of the effects of therapeutic agents on the tumor microenvironment in invasive cancers, we developed a co-culture model from an invasive lobular carcinoma. Tumor cells expressing HER2/neu organize in nests surrounded by alpha-Smooth Muscle Actin (α-SMA) expressing tumor stroma to resemble the morphology of an invading tumor. This co-culture, Mammary Adenocarcinoma Model (MAM-1) maintains a 1:1 ratio of HER2/neu positive tumor cells to α-SMA-reactive stromal cells and renews this configuration for over 20 passages in vitro. Methods We characterized the cellular elements of the MAM-1 model by microarray analysis, and immunocytochemistry. We developed flow cytometric assays to evaluate the relative responses of the tumor and stroma to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Iressa. Results The MAM-1 gene expression profile contains clusters that represent the ErbB-2 breast cancer signature and stroma-specific clusters associated with invasive breast cancers. The stability of this model and the ability to antigenically label the tumor and stromal fractions allowed us to determine the specificity of Iressa, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for targeting the tumor cell population. Treatment resulted in a selective dose-dependent reduction in phospho-pMEK1/2 and pp44/42MAPK in tumor cells. Within 24 h the tumor cell fraction was reduced 1.9-fold while the stromal cell fraction increased >3-fold, consistent with specific reductions in phospho-pp44/42 MAPK, MEK1/2 and PCNA in tumor cells and reciprocal increases in the stromal cells. Erosion of the tumor cell nests and augmented growth of the stromal cells resembled a fibrotic response. Conclusion This model demonstrates the specificity of Iressa for HER2/neu expressing tumor cells versus the tumor associated myofibroblasts and is appropriate for delineating effects of therapy on signal transduction in the breast tumor microenvironment and improving strategies that can dually or

  19. Actinic Prurigo.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carreón, Alma Angélica; Rodríguez-Lobato, Erika; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Georgina; Cuevas-González, Juan Carlos; Mancheno-Valencia, Alexandra; Solís-Arias, Martha Patricia; Vega-Memije, María Elisa; Hojyo-Tomoka, María Teresa; Domínguez-Soto, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Actinic prurigo is an idiopathic photodermatosis that affects the skin, as well as the labial and conjunctival mucosa in indigenous and mestizo populations of Latin America. It starts predominantly in childhood, has a chronic course, and is exacerbated with solar exposure. Little is known of its pathophysiology, including the known mechanisms of the participation of HLA-DR4 and an abnormal immunologic response with increase of T CD4+ lymphocytes. The presence of IgE, eosinophils, and mast cells suggests that it is a hypersensitivity reaction (likely type IVa or b). The diagnosis is clinical, and the presence of lymphoid follicles in the mucosal histopathologic study of mucosa is pathognomonic. The best available treatment to date is thalidomide, despite its secondary effects.

  20. Morphological changes in liposomes caused by polymerization of encapsulated actin and spontaneous formation of actin bundles.

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, H; Hotani, H

    1992-01-01

    Spherical giant liposomes that had encapsulated skeletal-muscle G-actin were made by swelling a dried lipid mixture of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/cardiolipin, 1:1 (wt/wt), in a solution of G-actin/CaCl2 at 0 degree C. Polymerization of the encapsulated G-actin into actin filaments was achieved by raising the temperature to 30 degrees C. We observed the subsequent shape changes of the liposomes by dark-field and differential interference-contrast light microscopy. After approximately 40 min, which was required for completion of actin polymerization, two shapes of liposome were evident: dumbbell and disk. Elongation of the dumbbell-shaped liposomes was concomitant with actin polymerization. Polarization microscopy showed that actin filaments formed thick bundles in the liposomes and that these filaments lay contiguous to the periphery of the liposome. Localization of actin filaments in the liposomes was confirmed by observation of rhodamine phalloidin-conjugated actin filaments by fluorescence microscopy. Both dumbbell- and disk-shaped liposomes were rigid and kept their shapes as far as actin filaments were stabilized. In contrast, liposomes containing bovine serum albumin were fragile, and their shapes continually fluctuated from Brownian motion, indicating that the actin bundles served as mechanical support for the liposome shapes. Images PMID:1454846

  1. Smooth muscle hyperplasia due to loss of smooth muscle α-actin is driven by activation of focal adhesion kinase, altered p53 localization and increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Christina L.; Cao, Jiumei; Kwartler, Callie S.; Villamizar, Carlos; Byanova, Katerina L.; Lim, Soon-Mi; Sreenivasappa, Harini; Fischer, Grant; Pham, John; Rees, Meredith; Wang, Miranda; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Khakoo, Aarif Y.; Chandra, Joya; Trache, Andreea; Zimmer, Warren; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (α-SMA), cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and occlusive vascular diseases, including early onset coronary artery disease and stroke. We have shown that occlusive arterial lesions in patients with heterozygous ACTA2 missense mutations show increased numbers of medial or neointimal SMCs. The contribution of SMC hyperplasia to these vascular diseases and the pathways responsible for linking disruption of α-SMA filaments to hyperplasia are unknown. Here, we show that the loss of Acta2 in mice recapitulates the SMC hyperplasia observed in ACTA2 mutant SMCs and determine the cellular pathways responsible for SMC hyperplasia. Acta2−/− mice showed increased neointimal formation following vascular injury in vivo, and SMCs explanted from these mice demonstrated increased proliferation and migration. Loss of α-SMA induced hyperplasia through focal adhesion (FA) rearrangement, FA kinase activation, re-localization of p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and increased expression and ligand-independent activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfr-β). Disruption of α-SMA in wild-type SMCs also induced similar cellular changes. Imatinib mesylate inhibited Pdgfr-β activation and Acta2−/− SMC proliferation in vitro and neointimal formation with vascular injury in vivo. Loss of α-SMA leads to SMC hyperplasia in vivo and in vitro through a mechanism involving FAK, p53 and Pdgfr-β, supporting the hypothesis that SMC hyperplasia contributes to occlusive lesions in patients with ACTA2 missense mutations. PMID:23591991

  2. Smooth muscle hyperplasia due to loss of smooth muscle α-actin is driven by activation of focal adhesion kinase, altered p53 localization and increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Papke, Christina L; Cao, Jiumei; Kwartler, Callie S; Villamizar, Carlos; Byanova, Katerina L; Lim, Soon-Mi; Sreenivasappa, Harini; Fischer, Grant; Pham, John; Rees, Meredith; Wang, Miranda; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Khakoo, Aarif Y; Chandra, Joya; Trache, Andreea; Zimmer, Warren; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (α-SMA), cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and occlusive vascular diseases, including early onset coronary artery disease and stroke. We have shown that occlusive arterial lesions in patients with heterozygous ACTA2 missense mutations show increased numbers of medial or neointimal SMCs. The contribution of SMC hyperplasia to these vascular diseases and the pathways responsible for linking disruption of α-SMA filaments to hyperplasia are unknown. Here, we show that the loss of Acta2 in mice recapitulates the SMC hyperplasia observed in ACTA2 mutant SMCs and determine the cellular pathways responsible for SMC hyperplasia. Acta2(-/-) mice showed increased neointimal formation following vascular injury in vivo, and SMCs explanted from these mice demonstrated increased proliferation and migration. Loss of α-SMA induced hyperplasia through focal adhesion (FA) rearrangement, FA kinase activation, re-localization of p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and increased expression and ligand-independent activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfr-β). Disruption of α-SMA in wild-type SMCs also induced similar cellular changes. Imatinib mesylate inhibited Pdgfr-β activation and Acta2(-/-) SMC proliferation in vitro and neointimal formation with vascular injury in vivo. Loss of α-SMA leads to SMC hyperplasia in vivo and in vitro through a mechanism involving FAK, p53 and Pdgfr-β, supporting the hypothesis that SMC hyperplasia contributes to occlusive lesions in patients with ACTA2 missense mutations.

  3. Actin and Actin-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Thomas D

    2016-08-01

    Organisms from all domains of life depend on filaments of the protein actin to provide structure and to support internal movements. Many eukaryotic cells use forces produced by actin polymerization for their motility, and myosin motor proteins use ATP hydrolysis to produce force on actin filaments. Actin polymerizes spontaneously, followed by hydrolysis of a bound adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Dissociation of the γ-phosphate prepares the polymer for disassembly. This review provides an overview of the properties of actin and shows how dozens of proteins control both the assembly and disassembly of actin filaments. These players catalyze nucleotide exchange on actin monomers, initiate polymerization, promote phosphate dissociation, cap the ends of polymers, cross-link filaments to each other and other cellular components, and sever filaments. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  4. Actin cytoskeleton demonstration in Trichomonas vaginalis and in other trichomonads.

    PubMed

    Brugerolle, G; Bricheux, G; Coffe, G

    1996-01-01

    The flagellate form of Trichomonas vaginalis (T v) transforms to amoeboid cells upon adherence to converslips. They grow and their nuclei divide without undergoing cytokinesis, yielding giant cells and a monolayer of T v F-actin was demonstrated in Trichomonas vaginalis by fluorescence microscopy using phalloidin and an anti-actin mAb which labelled the cytoplasm of both the flagellate and amoeboid forms. Comparative electrophoresis and immunoblotting established that the actin band has the same 42 kDa as muscle actin, but 2-D electrophoresis resolved the actin band into four spots; the two major spots observed were superimposable with major muscle actin isoforms. Electron microscopy demonstrated an ectoplasmic microfibrillar layer along the adhesion zone of amoeboid T v adhering to coverslips. Immunogold staining, using anti-actin monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that this layer was mainly composed of actin microfilaments. A comparative immunoblotting study comprising seven trichomonad species showed that all trichomonads studied expressed actin. The mAb Sigma A-4700 specific for an epitope on the actin C-terminal sequence labelled only actin of Trichomonas vaginalis, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum. Trichomitus batrachorum and Hypotrichomonas acosta, but not the actin of Tritrichomonas foetus, Tritrichomonas augusta and Monocercomonas sp. This discrimination between a 'trichomonas branch' and a 'tritrichomonas branch' is congruent with inferred sequence phylogeny from SSu rRNA and with classical phylogeny of trichomonads.

  5. Exercise training prevents skeletal muscle plasma membrane cholesterol accumulation, cortical actin filament loss, and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice fed a western-style high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Ambery, Ashley G; Tackett, Lixuan; Penque, Brent A; Brozinick, Joseph T; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2017-08-01

    Insulin action and glucose disposal are enhanced by exercise, yet the mechanisms involved remain imperfectly understood. While the causes of skeletal muscle insulin resistance also remain poorly understood, new evidence suggest excess plasma membrane (PM) cholesterol may contribute by damaging the cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) structure essential for GLUT4 glucose transporter redistribution to the PM upon insulin stimulation. Here, we investigated whether PM cholesterol toxicity was mitigated by exercise. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on low-fat (LF, 10% kCal) or high-fat (HF, 45% kCal) diets for a total of 8 weeks. During the last 3 weeks of this LF/HF diet intervention, all mice were familiarized with a treadmill for 1 week and then either sham-exercised (0 m/min, 10% grade, 50 min) or exercised (13.5 m/min, 10% grade, 50 min) daily for 2 weeks. HF-feeding induced a significant gain in body mass by 3 weeks. Sham or chronic exercise did not affect food consumption, water intake, or body mass gain. Prior to sham and chronic exercise, "pre-intervention" glucose tolerance tests were performed on all animals and demonstrated that HF-fed mice were glucose intolerant. While sham exercise did not affect glucose tolerance in the LF or HF mice, exercised mice showed an improvement in glucose tolerance. Muscle from sham-exercised HF-fed mice showed a significant increase in PM cholesterol, loss of cortical F-actin, and decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose transport compared to sham-exercised LF-fed mice. These HF-fed skeletal muscle membrane/cytoskeletal abnormalities and insulin resistance were improved in exercised mice. These data reveal a new therapeutic aspect of exercise being regulation of skeletal muscle PM cholesterol homeostasis. Further studies on this mechanism of insulin resistance and the benefits of exercise on its prevention are needed. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The

  6. Actin from pig and rat uterus.

    PubMed Central

    Elce, J S; Elbrecht, A S; Middlestadt, M U; McIntyre, E J; Anderson, P J

    1981-01-01

    Smooth-muscle actin was isolated from pig uterus and from pregnant-rat uterus. Methods involving acetone-dried powders were unsuccessful, and a column-chromatographic procedure was developed, with proteinase inhibitors and avoiding polymerization as a purification step. The yield of pure actin was 0.8--1.5 mg/g wet wt. of uterus, which should be compared with an expected yield of actin from skeletal muscle of 2--4 mg/g wet wt. The actin was pure as judged by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, and exhibited alpha-, beta-, and gamma-forms on isoelectric focusing. It possessed a blocked N-terminal amino acid residue, and its amino acid analysis conformed to those of other actins. The rat uterine actin was available only in small amounts (5--10 mg) and did not polymerize. The pig uterine actin could be obtained in amounts up to 30 mg, polymerized reversibly, and activated a skeletal myosin Mg2+-dependent ATPase. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:6458278

  7. Sarcomeric Pattern Formation by Actin Cluster Coalescence

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Gov, Nir S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Contractile function of striated muscle cells depends crucially on the almost crystalline order of actin and myosin filaments in myofibrils, but the physical mechanisms that lead to myofibril assembly remains ill-defined. Passive diffusive sorting of actin filaments into sarcomeric order is kinetically impossible, suggesting a pivotal role of active processes in sarcomeric pattern formation. Using a one-dimensional computational model of an initially unstriated actin bundle, we show that actin filament treadmilling in the presence of processive plus-end crosslinking provides a simple and robust mechanism for the polarity sorting of actin filaments as well as for the correct localization of myosin filaments. We propose that the coalescence of crosslinked actin clusters could be key for sarcomeric pattern formation. In our simulations, sarcomere spacing is set by filament length prompting tight length control already at early stages of pattern formation. The proposed mechanism could be generic and apply both to premyofibrils and nascent myofibrils in developing muscle cells as well as possibly to striated stress-fibers in non-muscle cells. PMID:22685394

  8. Direct Observation of Tropomyosin Binding to Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, William M.; Lehman, William; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Tropomyosin is an elongated α-helical coiled-coil that binds to seven consecutive actin subunits along the long-pitch helix of actin filaments. Once bound, tropomyosin polymerizes end-to-end and both stabilizes F-actin and regulates access of various actin binding proteins including myosin in muscle and non-muscle cells. Single tropomyosin molecules bind weakly to F-actin with millimolar Kd, whereas the end-to-end linked tropomyosin associates with about a one thousand-fold greater affinity. Despite years of study, the assembly mechanism of tropomyosin onto actin filaments remains unclear. In the current study, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to directly monitor the cooperative binding of fluorescently labeled tropomyosin molecules to phalloidin-stabilized actin filaments. We find that tropomyosin molecules assemble from multiple growth sites following random low affinity binding of single molecules to actin. As the length of the tropomyosin chain increases, the probability of detachment decreases, which leads to further chain growth. Tropomyosin chain extension is linearly dependent on tropomyosin concentration, occurring at approximately 100 monomers/(μM*s). The random tropomyosin binding to F-actin leads to discontinuous end-to-end association where gaps in the chain continuity smaller than the required seven sequential actin monomers are available. Direct observation of tropomyosin detachment revealed the number of gaps in actin-bound tropomyosin, the time course of gap annealing, and the eventual filament saturation process. PMID:26033920

  9. Direct tests of muscle cross-bridge theories: predictions of a Brownian dumbbell model for position-dependent cross-bridge lifetimes and step sizes with an optically trapped actin filament.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A

    1998-01-01

    Force and displacement events from a single myosin molecule interacting with an actin filament suspended between optically trapped beads (Finer, J. T., R. M. Simmons, and J. A. Spudich. 1994. Nature. 368:113-119) can be interpreted in terms of a generalized cross-bridge model that includes the effects of Brownian forces on the beads. Steady-state distributions of force and displacement can be obtained directly from a generalized Smoluchowski equation for Brownian motion of the actin-bead "dumbbell," and time series from Monte Carlo simulations of the corresponding Langevin equation. When the frequency spectrum of Brownian motion extends beyond cross-bridge transition rates, the inverse mean lifetimes of force/displacement pulses are given by cross-bridge rate constants averaged over a Boltzmann distribution of Brownian noise. These averaged rate constants reflect the strain-dependence of the rate constants for the stationary filament, most faithfully at high trap stiffness. Hence, measurements of the lifetimes and displacements of single events as a function of the resting position of the dumbbell can provide a direct test of different cross-bridge theories of muscle contraction. Quantitative demonstrations are given for Huxley models with 1) faster binding or 2) slower dissociation at positive cross-bridge strain. Predictions for other models can be inferred from the averaging procedure. PMID:9826619

  10. Modification of Lys-237 on actin by 2,4-pentanedione. Alteration of the interaction of actin with tropomyosin.

    PubMed

    El-Saleh, S C; Thieret, R; Johnson, P; Potter, J D

    1984-09-10

    It has been possible to specifically label rabbit skeletal muscle actin at Lys-237 with 2,4-pentanedione, producing an enamine. This reaction can be reversed with hydroxylamine. The modification can be carried out with actin in either the G- or F-forms and does not affect polymerization-depolymerization. The modification does affect, however, the interaction of tropomyosin (Tm) with the modified F-actin. In the absence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ (mu = 0.12), Tm failed to bind to the modified F-actin whereas it did bind to unmodified F-actin (1 Tm:7 actins). Tm binding could be restored under these conditions by the addition of either troponin (Tn), Mg2+, or Mg2+ and Ca2+. Under certain conditions, Tm alone has been shown to inhibit actin-activated heavy meromyosin (HMM)-Mg2+-ATPase. This inhibition did not occur with the modified F-actin even though Tm was bound (approximately 1 Tm:7 actins). Even when Tn was added to this system (in the absence of Ca2+), no inhibition of ATPase could be observed. Thus, this modification appears to prevent F-actin X Tm from assuming the "blocking" inhibitory position (conformation). In addition, Tn appears to enhance the activation of heavy meromyosin-Mg2+-ATPase by the modified F-actin X Tm complex whether Ca2+ is present or not. This state may be analogous to the potentiated state (Murray, J. M., Knox, M. K., Trueblood, C. E., and Weber, A. (1982) Biochemistry 27, 906-915) seen with myosin subfragment 1-saturated actin at low ATP levels. Thus, using modified and unmodified F-actin, it is possible to produce three Tm X actin states: off (F-actin X Tm), on (modified F-actin X Tm), and "potentiated" (modified F-actin X Tm X Tn).

  11. Structure of the F-actin-tropomyosin complex.

    PubMed

    von der Ecken, Julian; Müller, Mirco; Lehman, William; Manstein, Dietmar J; Penczek, Pawel A; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-03-05

    Filamentous actin (F-actin) is the major protein of muscle thin filaments, and actin microfilaments are the main component of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Mutations in different actin isoforms lead to early-onset autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, and multiple variations of myopathies. In striated muscle fibres, the binding of myosin motors to actin filaments is mainly regulated by tropomyosin and troponin. Tropomyosin also binds to F-actin in smooth muscle and in non-muscle cells and stabilizes and regulates the filaments there in the absence of troponin. Although crystal structures for monomeric actin (G-actin) are available, a high-resolution structure of F-actin is still missing, hampering our understanding of how disease-causing mutations affect the function of thin muscle filaments and microfilaments. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of F-actin at a resolution of 3.7 Å in complex with tropomyosin at a resolution of 6.5 Å, determined by electron cryomicroscopy. The structure reveals that the D-loop is ordered and acts as a central region for hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that stabilize the F-actin filament. We clearly identify map density corresponding to ADP and Mg(2+) and explain the possible effect of prominent disease-causing mutants. A comparison of F-actin with G-actin reveals the conformational changes during filament formation and identifies the D-loop as their key mediator. We also confirm that negatively charged tropomyosin interacts with a positively charged groove on F-actin. Comparison of the position of tropomyosin in F-actin-tropomyosin with its position in our previously determined F-actin-tropomyosin-myosin structure reveals a myosin-induced transition of tropomyosin. Our results allow us to understand the role of individual mutations in the genesis of actin- and tropomyosin-related diseases and will serve as a strong foundation for the targeted

  12. Differential regulation of smooth muscle markers in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hegner, Björn; Weber, Manfred; Dragun, Duska; Schulze-Lohoff, Eckhard

    2005-06-01

    To study smooth-muscle differentiation and de-differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been shown to enter the circulation and to contribute to vascular repair and atherosclerosis. Human MSCs from bone marrow were cultured with 20% fetal calf serum (FCS) or with 10% FCS and various concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Expression of smooth muscle markers was determined by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. For signalling studies, involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was tested by treatment with rapamycin. MSCs cultured with 20% FCS acquired a smooth muscle-like appearance and expressed the smooth muscle (sm) markers sm-alpha-actin, desmin, sm-calponin and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). DMSO induced a spindle-like morphology with marked reduction of stress fibers. As judged by Western blot analysis, treatment with 2.5% DMSO strongly downregulated expression of sm-calponin (-85%), short MLCK (-98%) and sm-alpha-actin expression (-51%). Reduced calponin expression was detected by day 2 of treatment with 0.5-2.5% DMSO. After withdrawal of DMSO, MSCs regained high expression of sm-calponin. Treatment with 6 nmol/l rapamycin partly antagonized the effect of DMSO, indicating the involvement of mTOR in regulation of the smooth muscle phenotype of MSCs. DMSO strongly downregulates the smooth muscle markers sm-calponin, short MLCK and sm-alpha-actin in human MSCs, indicating a transition from a smooth muscle-like phenotype to an undifferentiated state by an mTOR-dependent mechanism. Regulating the phenotype of human MSCs may be of relevance for novel therapeutic approaches in atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia after vascular injury.

  13. Transformation of actin-encapsulating liposomes induced by cytochalasin D.

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, H; Kinosita, K

    1994-01-01

    Liposomes encapsulating actin filaments were prepared by swelling at 0 degrees C lipid film consisting of a mixture of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin (equal amounts by weight) in 100 microM rabbit skeletal muscle actin and 0.5 mM CaCl2 followed by polymerization of actin at 30 degrees C. Liposomes initially assumed either disk or dumbbell shape, but when cytochalasin D was added to the medium surrounding the liposomes, they were found to become spindle shaped. Liposomes containing bovine serum albumin that were given cytochalasin D and actin-containing liposomes that were given dimethylformamide, the solvent for cytochalasin D, did not transform. These results indicated actin-cytochalasin interaction is involved in the transformation process. Falling-ball viscometry and sedimentation analysis of actin solution indicated that cytochalasin cleaved actin filaments and caused depolymerization. The observation of polarized fluorescence of encapsulated actin labeled with acrylodan indicated that the actin filaments in the transformed liposomes aligned along the long axis of the liposomes. Because the actin filaments in the disk- or dumbbell-shaped liposomes formed bundles running along the liposome contour, the transformation was likely to be accompanied by the change in the actin filament arrangement in the liposomes, which was induced by actin-cytochalasin interaction. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:7948706

  14. Cysteine-rich protein 2 accelerates actin filament cluster formation

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Satoko; Takaoka, Shunpei; Miyake, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Filamentous actin (F-actin) forms many types of structures and dynamically regulates cell morphology and movement, and plays a mechanosensory role for extracellular stimuli. In this study, we determined that the smooth muscle-related transcription factor, cysteine-rich protein 2 (CRP2), regulates the supramolecular networks of F-actin. The structures of CRP2 and F-actin in solution were analyzed by small-angle X-ray solution scattering (SAXS). The general shape of CRP2 was partially unfolded and relatively ellipsoidal in structure, and the apparent cross sectional radius of gyration (Rc) was about 15.8 Å. The predicted shape, derived by ab initio modeling, consisted of roughly four tandem clusters: LIM domains were likely at both ends with the middle clusters being an unfolded linker region. From the SAXS analysis, the Rc of F-actin was about 26.7 Å, and it was independent of CRP2 addition. On the other hand, in the low angle region of the CRP2-bound F-actin scattering, the intensities showed upward curvature with the addition of CRP2, which indicates increasing branching of F-actin following CRP2 binding. From biochemical analysis, the actin filaments were augmented and clustered by the addition of CRP2. This F-actin clustering activity of CRP2 was cooperative with α-actinin. Thus, binding of CRP2 to F-actin accelerates actin polymerization and F-actin cluster formation. PMID:28813482

  15. Geometrical Wake of a Smooth Flat Collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    A transverse geometrical wake generated by a beam passing through a smooth flat collimator with a gradually varying gap between the upper and lower walls is considered. Based on generalization of the approach recently developed for a smooth circular taper we reduce the electromagnetic problem of the impedance calculation to the solution of two much simpler static problems - a magnetostatic and an electrostatic ones. The solution shows that in the limit of not very large frequencies, the impedance increases with the ratio h/d where h is the width and d is the distance between the collimating jaws. Numerical results are presented for the NLC Post Linac collimator.

  16. Indoxyl sulfate-induced activation of (pro)renin receptor is involved in expression of TGF-β1 and α-smooth muscle actin in proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shinichi; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Yisireyili, Maimaiti; Nishijima, Fuyuhiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Niwa, Toshimitsu

    2014-05-01

    Activation of (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is involved in the progression of chronic kidney disease. However, the role of indoxyl sulfate, a uremic toxin, in the activation of PRR is not clear. The present study aimed to clarify the role of indoxyl sulfate in activation of PRR, in relation to renal expression of fibrotic genes. Renal expression of PRR and renin/prorenin was up-regulated in chronic kidney disease rats compared with normal rats, whereas AST-120 suppressed these expression by reducing serum levels of indoxyl sulfate. Furthermore, administration of indoxyl sulfate to normotensive and hypertensive rats increased renal expression of PRR and renin/prorenin. Indoxyl sulfate induced expression of PRR and prorenin in cultured human proximal tubular cells (HK-2 cells). Indoxyl sulfate-induced PRR expression was inhibited by small interfering RNAs of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and nuclear factor-κB p65 in proximal tubular cells. N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, and diphenyleneiodonium, an inhibitor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, suppressed indoxyl sulfate-induced PRR expression in proximal tubular cells. N-acetylcysteine prevented indoxyl sulfate-induced phosphorylation of Stat3 in proximal tubular cells. PRR small interfering RNA inhibited indoxyl sulfate-induced expression of TGF-β1 and α-smooth muscle actin in proximal tubular cells. Taken together, indoxyl sulfate-induced up-regulation of prorenin expression and activation of PRR through production of reactive oxygen species and activation of Stat3 and nuclear factor-κB play an important role in the expression of TGF-β1 and α-smooth muscle actin in proximal tubular cells. Thus, indoxyl sulfate-induced activation of prorenin/PRR might be involved in renal fibrosis.

  17. [Actin in the wound healing process].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota; Popow-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Raźnikiewicz, Linda; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is an important biological process of crucial value for organisms survival and retention of its proper functions. The recognition of molecular mechanisms of these phenomenon is still under investigation. The transition of mesenchymal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a key point in wound healing. The contraction ability of myofibroblast enables the shrinkage of a wound and closes its edges. Alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), one of six actin isoforms, is a marker of compeletely differentiated myofibroblast. The regulation of differentiation process depends on many growth factors (especially TGF beta 1), the level of active thymosin beta 4, extracellular matrix proteins--including fibronectin, and also on specificity of microenvironment. Thymosin beta 4 is responsible for maintenance of pool of monomeric actin and actin filaments depolymerization. It can also act as a transcription factor, migration stimulator and immunomodulator, so this protein deserves for more attention in wound healing research field.

  18. Why is Actin Patchy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Anders

    2009-03-01

    The intracellular protein actin, by reversibly polymerizing into filaments, generates forces for motion and shape changes of many types of biological cells. Fluorescence imaging studies show that actin often occurs in the form of localized patches of size roughly one micrometer at the cell membrane. Patch formation is most prevalent when the free-actin concentration is low. I investigate possible mechanisms for the formation of actin patches by numerically simulating the ``dendritic nucleation'' model of actin network growth. The simulations include filament growth, capping, branching, severing, and debranching. The attachment of membrane-bound activators to actin filaments, and subsequent membrane diffusion of unattached activators, are also included. It is found that as the actin concentration increases from zero, the actin occurs in patches at lower actin concentrations, and the size of the patches increases with increasing actin concentration. At a critical value of the actin concentration, the system undergoes a transition to complete coverage. The results are interpreted within the framework of reaction-diffusion equations in two dimensions.

  19. Deuterostomic actin genes and the definition of the chordates: cDNA cloning and gene organization for cephalochordates and hemichordates.

    PubMed

    Bovenschulte, M; Weber, K

    1997-12-01

    The evolutionary relationship of muscle and nonmuscle actin isoforms in deuterostomia was studied by the isolation and characterization of two actin genes from the cephalochordate Branchiostoma lanceolatum and two from the hemichordate Saccoglossus kowalevskii The Branchiostoma genes specify a muscle and a nonmuscle actin type, respectively. Together with earlier results on muscle actins from vertebrates and urochordates, a N-terminal sequence signature is defined for chordate muscle actins. These diagnostic amino acid residues separate the chordates from the echinoderms and other metazoa. Although the two Saccoglossus actins characterized so far lack the diagnostic residues, in line with the presumptive phylogenetic position of hemichordates outside the chordates, a definitive conclusion can only be expected once the full complement of actin genes of Saccoglossus is established. Comparison of the intron patterns of the various deuterostomic actin genes shows that intron 330-3, which is present in all vertebrate genes, is conspicuously absent from nonvertebrate genes. The possible origin of this intron is discussed.

  20. Cardiac α-actin over-expression therapy in dominant ACTA1 disease.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; McNamara, Elyshia; Griffiths, Lisa M; Papadimitriou, John M; Hardeman, Edna C; Bakker, Anthony J; Davies, Kay E; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J

    2013-10-01

    More than 200 mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) cause either dominant or recessive skeletal muscle disease. Currently, there are no specific therapies. Cardiac α-actin is 99% identical to skeletal muscle α-actin and the predominant actin isoform in fetal muscle. We previously showed cardiac α-actin can substitute for skeletal muscle α-actin, preventing the early postnatal death of Acta1 knock-out mice, which model recessive ACTA1 disease. Dominant ACTA1 disease is caused by the presence of 'poison' mutant actin protein. Experimental and anecdotal evidence nevertheless indicates that the severity of dominant ACTA1 disease is modulated by the relative amount of mutant skeletal muscle α-actin protein present. Thus, we investigated whether transgenic over-expression of cardiac α-actin in postnatal skeletal muscle could ameliorate the phenotype of mouse models of severe dominant ACTA1 disease. In one model, lethality of ACTA1(D286G). Acta1(+/-) mice was reduced from ∼59% before 30 days of age to ∼12%. In the other model, Acta1(H40Y), in which ∼80% of male mice die by 5 months of age, the cardiac α-actin transgene did not significantly improve survival. Hence cardiac α-actin over-expression is likely to be therapeutic for at least some dominant ACTA1 mutations. The reason cardiac α-actin was not effective in the Acta1(H40Y) mice is uncertain. We showed that the Acta1(H40Y) mice had endogenously elevated levels of cardiac α-actin in skeletal muscles, a finding not reported in dominant ACTA1 patients.

  1. Disease causing mutations of troponin alter regulated actin state distributions.

    PubMed

    Chalovich, Joseph M

    2012-12-01

    Striated muscle contraction is regulated primarily through the action of tropomyosin and troponin that are bound to actin. Activation requires Ca(2+) binding to troponin and/or binding of high affinity myosin complexes to actin. Mutations within components of the regulatory complex may lead to familial cardiomyopathies and myopathies. In several cases examined, either physiological or pathological changes in troponin alter the distribution among states of actin-tropomyosin-troponin that differ in their abilities to stimulate myosin ATPase activity. These observations open possibilities for managing disorders of the troponin complex. Furthermore, analyses of mutant forms of troponin give insights into the regulation of striated muscle contraction.

  2. Diversification of caldesmon-linked actin cytoskeleton in cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Mayanagi, Taira

    2011-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in regulating cell motility. Caldesmon (CaD) is an actin-linked regulatory protein found in smooth muscle and non-muscle cells that is conserved among a variety of vertebrates. It binds and stabilizes actin filaments, as well as regulating actin-myosin interaction in a calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM)- and/or phosphorylation-dependent manner. CaD function is regulated qualitatively by Ca2+/CaM and by its phosphorylation state and quantitatively at the mRNA level, by three different transcriptional regulation of the CALD1 gene. CaD has numerous functions in cell motility, such as migration, invasion and proliferation, exerted via the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we will outline recent findings regarding CaD's structural features and functions. PMID:21350330

  3. Actin and Myosin in Pea Tendrils 1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Ze; Yen, Lung-Fei

    1989-01-01

    We demonstrate here the presence of actin and myosin in pea (Pisum sativum L.) tendrils. The molecular weight of tendril actin is 43,000, the same as rabbit skeletal muscle actin. The native molecular weight of tendril myosin is about 440,000. Tendril myosin is composed of two heavy chains of molecular weight approximately 165,000 and four (two pairs) light chains of 17,000 and 15,000. At high ionic strength, the ATPase activity of pea tendril myosin is activated by K+-EDTA and Ca2+ and is inhibited by Mg2+. At low ionic strength, the Mg2+-ATPase activity of pea tendril myosin is activated by rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin. Superprecipitation occurred after incubation at room temperature when ATP was added to the crude actomyosin extract. It is suggested that the interaction of actin and myosin may play a role in the coiling movement of pea tendril. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16666586

  4. F-actin retains a memory of angular order.

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, A; Egelman, E H

    2000-01-01

    Modifications can be made to F-actin that do not interfere with the binding of myosin but inhibit force generation, suggesting that actin's internal dynamics are important for muscle contraction. Observations from electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction have shown that subunits in F-actin have a relatively fixed axial rise but a variable twist. One possible explanation for this is that the actin subunits randomly exist in different discrete states of "twist, " with a significant energy barrier separating these states. This would result in very slow torsional transitions. Paracrystals impose increased order on F-actin filaments by reducing the variability in twist. By looking at filaments that have recently been dissociated from paracrystals, we find that F-actin retains a "memory" of its previous environment that persists for many seconds. This would be consistent with slow torsional transitions between discrete states of twist. PMID:10733996

  5. High Actin Concentrations in Brain Dendritic Spines and Postsynaptic Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, Andrew; Ackermann, Marcel; Pehling, Gundula; Randolph Byers, H.; Fujiwara, Keigi

    1982-12-01

    Antibodies against actin were used to corroborate the presence of actin as a major component protein of isolated brain postsynaptic densities. The same antibodies also were used as an immunohistochemical stain to study the distribution of actin in sections of intact brain tissue. This showed two major sites where actin is concentrated: smooth muscle cells around blood vessels and postsynaptic sites. In the postsynaptic area the highest concentration of actin occurs in postsynaptic densities and there also is intense staining in the surrounding cytoplasm, especially within dendritic spines. Antiactin staining was much weaker in other parts of neurons and in glial cells. The high concentration of actin in dendritic spines may be related to shape changes that these structures have been found to undergo in response to prolonged afferent stimulation.

  6. Distinct interactions between actin and essential myosin light chain isoforms.

    PubMed

    Petzhold, Daria; Simsek, Burcu; Meißner, Ralf; Mahmoodzadeh, Shokoufeh; Morano, Ingo

    2014-07-04

    Binding of the utmost N-terminus of essential myosin light chains (ELC) to actin slows down myosin motor function. In this study, we investigated the binding constants of two different human cardiac ELC isoforms with actin. We employed circular dichroism (CD) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy to determine structural properties and protein-protein interaction of recombinant human atrial and ventricular ELC (hALC-1 and hVLC-1, respectively) with α-actin as well as α-actin with alanin-mutated ELC binding site (α-actin(ala3)) as control. CD spectroscopy showed similar secondary structure of both hALC-1 and hVLC-1 with high degree of α-helicity. SPR spectroscopy revealed that the affinity of hALC-1 to α-actin (KD=575 nM) was significantly (p<0.01) lower compared with the affinity of hVLC-1 to α-actin (KD=186 nM). The reduced affinity of hALC-1 to α-actin was mainly due to a significantly (p<0.01) lower association rate (kon: 1,018 M(-1)s(-1)) compared with kon of the hVLC-1/α-actin complex interaction (2,908 M(-1)s(-1)). Hence, differential expression of ELC isoforms could modulate muscle contractile activity via distinct α-actin interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cloning and characterization of an actin gene of Chlamys farreri and the phylogenetic analysis of mollusk actins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongming; Mai, Kangsen; Liufu, Zhiguo; Xu, Wei

    2007-07-01

    An actingene (CfACTI) was cloned by using RT-PCR, 3’ and 5’RACE from hemocytes of the sea scallop Chlamys farreri. The full length of the transcript is 1 535 bp, which contains a long 3’ un-translated region of 436bp and 59bp of a 5’ un-translated sequence. The open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 376 amino acids. Sequence comparisons indicated that CfACTI is more closely related to vertebrate cytoplasmic actins than muscle types. Phylogenetic analysis showed that molluscan actins could be generally divided into two categories: muscle and cytoplasmic, although both are similar to vertebrate cytoplasmic actins. It was also inferred that different isotypes existed in muscle or cytoplasma in mollusks. The genomic sequence of CfACTI was cloned and sequenced. Only one intron was detected: it was located between codons 42 and 43 and different from vertebrate actin genes.

  8. The yeast actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Mithilesh; Huang, Junqi; Balasubramanian, Mohan K

    2014-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a complex network of dynamic polymers, which plays an important role in various fundamental cellular processes, including maintenance of cell shape, polarity, cell division, cell migration, endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and mechanosensation. Precise spatiotemporal assembly and disassembly of actin structures is regulated by the coordinated activity of about 100 highly conserved accessory proteins, which nucleate, elongate, cross-link, and sever actin filaments. Both in vivo studies in a wide range of organisms from yeast to metazoans and in vitro studies of purified proteins have helped shape the current understanding of actin dynamics and function. Molecular genetics, genome-wide functional analysis, sophisticated real-time imaging, and ultrastructural studies in concert with biochemical analysis have made yeast an attractive model to understand the actin cytoskeleton, its molecular dynamics, and physiological function. Studies of the yeast actin cytoskeleton have contributed substantially in defining the universal mechanism regulating actin assembly and disassembly in eukaryotes. Here, we review some of the important insights generated by the study of actin cytoskeleton in two important yeast models the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Diclofenac Topical (actinic keratosis)

    MedlinePlus

    Solaraze® Gel ... Diclofenac topical gel (Solaraze) is used to treat actinic keratosis (flat, scaly growths on the skin caused by too much sun ... nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The way diclofenac gel works to treat actinic keratosis is not known. ...

  10. The RhoA Activator GEF-H1/Lfc Is a Transforming Growth Factor-β Target Gene and Effector That Regulates α-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression and Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Tsapara, Anna; Luthert, Phillip; Greenwood, John; Hill, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance of the epithelial phenotype is crucial for tissue homeostasis. In the retina, dedifferentiation and loss of integrity of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) leads to retinal dysfunction and fibrosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β critically contributes to RPE dedifferentiation and induces various responses, including increased Rho signaling, up-regulation of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and cell migration and dedifferentiation. Cellular TGF-β responses are stimulated by different signal transduction pathways: some are Smad dependent and others Smad independent. Alterations in Rho signaling are crucial to both types of TGF-β signaling, but how TGF-β-stimulates Rho signaling is poorly understood. Here, we show that primary RPE cells up-regulated GEF-H1 in response to TGF-β. GEF-H1 was the only detectable Rho exchange factor increased by TGF-β1 in a genome-wide expression analysis. GEF-H1 induction was Smad4-dependant and led to Rho activation. GEF-H1 inhibition counteracted α-SMA up-regulation and cell migration. In patients with retinal detachments and fibrosis, migratory RPE cells exhibited increased GEF-H1 expression, indicating that induction occurs in diseased RPE in vivo. Our data indicate that GEF-H1 is a target and functional effector of TGF-β by orchestrating Rho signaling to regulate gene expression and cell migration, suggesting that it represents a new marker and possible therapeutic target for degenerative and fibrotic diseases. PMID:20089843

  11. Calcium Regulation of an Actin Spring

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Barney K.; Shin, Jennifer H.; Pfeiffer, Emily; Matsudaira, P.; Mahadevan, L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Calcium is essential for many biological processes involved in cellular motility. However, the pathway by which calcium influences motility, in processes such as muscle contraction and neuronal growth, is often indirect and complex. We establish a simple and direct mechanochemical link that shows how calcium quantitatively regulates the dynamics of a primitive motile system, the actin-based acrosomal bundle of horseshoe crab sperm. The extension of this bundle requires the continuous presence of external calcium. Furthermore, the extension rate increases with calcium concentration, but at a given concentration, we find that the volumetric rate of extension is constant. Our experiments and theory suggest that calcium sequentially binds to calmodulin molecules decorating the actin filaments. This binding leads to a collective wave of untwisting of the actin filaments that drives bundle extension. PMID:19686660

  12. Muscle and neuronal differentiation in primary cell culture of larval Mytilus trossulus (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Odintsova, Nelly A; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav A; Nezlin, Leonid P

    2010-03-01

    Molluscan in vitro technology allows the study of the differentiation of isolated cells undergoing experimental manipulations. We have used the immunofluorescence technique and laser scanning microscopy to investigate the organization of muscle proteins (actin, myosin, paramyosin, and twitchin) and the localization of neurotransmitters (serotonin and FMRFamide) in cultured mussel larval cells. Differentiation into muscle and neuron-like cells occurs during the cultivation of mussel cells from premyogenic and prenervous larval stages. Muscle proteins are colocalized in contractile cells through all stages of cultivation. The cultivation of mussel cells on various substrates and the application of integrin receptor blockers suggest that an integrin-dependent mechanism is involved in cell adhesion and differentiation. Dissociated mussel cells aggregate and become self-organized in culture. After 20 days of cultivation, they form colonies in which serotonin- and FMRFamide-immunoreactive cells are located centrally, whereas muscle cells form a contractile network at the periphery. The pattern of thick and thin filaments in cultivated mussel cells changes according to the scenario of muscle arrangement in vivo: initially, a striated pattern of muscle filaments forms but is then replaced by a smooth muscle pattern with a diffuse distribution of muscle proteins, typical of muscles of adult molluscs. Myogenesis in molluscs thus seems to be a highly dynamic and potentially variable process. Such a "flexible" developmental program can be regarded as a prerequisite for the evolution of the wide variety of striated and smooth muscles in larval and adult molluscs.

  13. Actin Mechanics and Fragmentation*

    PubMed Central

    De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell physiological processes require the regulation and coordination of both mechanical and dynamical properties of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we review recent advances in understanding the mechanical properties and stability of actin filaments and how these properties are manifested at larger (network) length scales. We discuss how forces can influence local biochemical interactions, resulting in the formation of mechanically sensitive dynamic steady states. Understanding the regulation of such force-activated chemistries and dynamic steady states reflects an important challenge for future work that will provide valuable insights as to how the actin cytoskeleton engenders mechanoresponsiveness of living cells. PMID:25957404

  14. Evidence for {gamma}-actin as a Z disc component in skeletal myofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Papponen, Hinni; Kaisto, Tuula; Leinonen, Sanna; Kaakinen, Mika; Metsikkoe, Kalervo

    2009-01-15

    We investigated the targeting of the {gamma}-actin isoform in skeletal myofibers. For this purpose we used expression vectors to produce green fluorescent protein (GFP-) as well as myc-tagged {gamma}-actin in rat flexor digitorum brevis myofibers. We found that the {gamma}-actin fusion proteins accumulated into Z discs but not beneath the sarcolemma. Instead, the GFP-tagged skeletal muscle-specific {alpha}-actin isoform was preferentially incorporated into the pointed ends of thin contractile filaments. The localization pattern of the {gamma}-actin fusion proteins was completely different from that of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex on the sarcolemma. The results emphasize the role of {gamma}-actin as a Z disc component but fail to reveal an actin-based sub-sarcolemmal cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle cells.

  15. Divergent Regulation of Actin Dynamics and Megakaryoblastic Leukemia-1 and -2 (Mkl1/2) by cAMP in Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Madeleine C; Hudson, Claire A; Kimura, Tomomi E; White, Stephen J; Sala-Newby, Graciela B; Newby, Andrew C; Bond, Mark

    2017-06-16

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) or endothelial cell (ECs) promote or inhibit, respectively, restenosis after angioplasty, vein graft intimal thickening and atherogenesis. Here we investigated the effects of cAMP-induced cytoskeletal remodelling on the serum response factor (SRF) co-factors Megakaryoblastic Leukemia-1 and -2 (MKL1 and MKL2) and their role in controlling VSMC and EC proliferation and migration. Elevation of cAMP using forskolin, dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP), BAY60-6583 or Cicaprost induced rapid cytoskeleton remodelling and inhibited proliferation and migration in VSMCs but not EC. Furthermore, elevated cAMP inhibited mitogen-induced nuclear-translocation of MKL1 and MKL2 in VSMCs but not ECs. Forskolin also significantly inhibited serum response factor (SRF)-dependent reporter gene (SRE-LUC) activity and mRNA expression of pro-proliferative and pro-migratory MKL1/2 target genes in VSMCs but not in ECs. In ECs, MKL1 was constitutively nuclear and MKL2 cytoplasmic, irrespective of mitogens or cAMP. Pharmacological or siRNA inhibition of MKL1 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of VSMC and EC. Our new data identifies and important contribution of MKL1/2 to explaining the strikingly different response of VSMCs and ECs to cAMP elevation. Elucidation of these pathways promises to identify targets for specific inhibition of VSMC migration and proliferation.

  16. Actin Polymerization is Stimulated by Actin Crosslinking Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H.; Beck, Moriah R.

    2016-01-01

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the coordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. Here we show that the actin binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro crosslinking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of G-actin, akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  17. β- and γ-Actins in the nucleus of human melanoma A375 cells.

    PubMed

    Migocka-Patrzałek, Marta; Makowiecka, Aleksandra; Nowak, Dorota; Mazur, Antonina J; Hofmann, Wilma A; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein that is expressed in all eukaryotic cells and has essential functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Nuclear actin is involved in transcription by all three RNA polymerases, chromatin remodelling, RNA processing, intranuclear transport, nuclear export and in maintenance of the nuclear architecture. The nuclear actin level and polymerization state are important factors regulating nuclear processes such as transcription. Our study shows that, in contrast to the cytoplasm, the majority of endogenous nuclear actin is unpolymerized in human melanoma A375 cells. Most mammalian cells express the two non-muscle β- and γ-actin isoforms that differ in only four amino acids. Despite their sequence similarity, studies analysing the cytoplasmic functions of these isoforms demonstrated that β- and γ-actins show differences in localization and function. However, little is known about the involvement of the individual actin isoforms in nuclear processes. Here, we used the human melanoma A375 cell line to analyse actin isoforms in regard to their nuclear localization. We show that both β- and γ-non-muscle actin isoforms are present in nuclei of these cells. Immunolocalization studies demonstrate that both isoforms co-localize with RNA polymerase II and hnRNP U. However, we observe differences in the ratio of cytoplasmic to nuclear actin distribution between the isoforms. We show that β-actin has a significantly higher nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio than γ-actin.

  18. Differential Effects of Caldesmon on the Intermediate Conformational States of Polymerizing Actin*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renjian; Grabarek, Zenon; Wang, Chih-Lueh Albert

    2010-01-01

    The actin-binding protein caldesmon (CaD) reversibly inhibits smooth muscle contraction. In non-muscle cells, a shorter CaD isoform co-exists with microfilaments in the stress fibers at the quiescent state, but the phosphorylated CaD is found at the leading edge of migrating cells where dynamic actin filament remodeling occurs. We have studied the effect of a C-terminal fragment of CaD (H32K) on the kinetics of the in vitro actin polymerization by monitoring the fluorescence of pyrene-labeled actin. Addition of H32K or its phosphorylated form either attenuated or accelerated the pyrene emission enhancement, depending on whether it was added at the early or the late phase of actin polymerization. However, the CaD fragment had no effect on the yield of sedimentable actin, nor did it affect the actin ATPase activity. Our findings can be explained by a model in which nascent actin filaments undergo a maturation process that involves at least two intermediate conformational states. If present at early stages of actin polymerization, CaD stabilizes one of the intermediate states and blocks the subsequent filament maturation. Addition of CaD at a later phase accelerates F-actin formation. The fact that CaD is capable of inhibiting actin filament maturation provides a novel function for CaD and suggests an active role in the dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:19889635

  19. Axonal actin in action: Imaging actin dynamics in neurons.

    PubMed

    Ladt, Kelsey; Ganguly, Archan; Roy, Subhojit

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved, key cytoskeletal protein involved in numerous structural and functional roles. In neurons, actin has been intensively investigated in axon terminals-growth cones-and dendritic spines, but details about actin structure and dynamics in axon shafts have remained obscure for decades. A major barrier in the field has been imaging actin. Actin exists as soluble monomers (G-actin) as well as actin filaments (F-actin), and labeling actin with conventional fluorescent probes like GFP/RFP typically leads to a diffuse haze that makes it difficult to discern kinetic behaviors. In a recent publication, we used F-actin selective probes to visualize actin dynamics in axons, resolving striking actin behaviors that have not been described before. However, using these probes to visualize actin dynamics is challenging as they can cause bundling of actin filaments; thus, experimental parameters need to be strictly optimized. Here we describe some practical methodological details related to using these probes for visualizing F-actin dynamics in axons.

  20. Actin isoform specificity is required for the maintenance of lactation

    PubMed Central

    Weymouth, Nate; Shi, Zengdun; Rockey, Don C.

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) is one of six highly conserved mammalian actin isoforms that appear to exhibit functional redundancy. Nonetheless, we have postulated a specific functional role for the smooth muscle specific isoform. Here, we show that Acta2 deficient mice have a remarkable mammary phenotype such that dams lacking Acta2 are unable to nurse their offspring effectively. The phenotype was rescued in cross fostering experiments with wild type mice, excluding a developmental defect in Acta2 null pups. The mechanism for the underlying phenotype is due to myoepithelial dysfunction postpartum resulting in precocious involution. Further, we demonstrate a specific defect in myoepithelial cell contractility in Acta2 null mammary glands, despite normal expression of cytoplasmic actins. We conclude that Acta2 specifically mediates myoepithelial cell contraction during lactation and that this actin isoform therefore exhibits functional specificity. PMID:22123032

  1. Effects of interferon-alpha on expression of hepatic stellate cell and transforming growth factor-β1 and α-smooth muscle actin in rats with hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xin-Ming; Chang, Ying; Jia, Ai

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of interferon-α (IFN-α) on preventing or reversing hepatic fibrosis in rat experimental model induced by CCl4. METHODS: One hundred and ten Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: group A (normal controls, n = 18), group B (fibrotic model controls, n = 22), group C (IFN-α prevention, n = 22) initially treated with intra-muscular injection of IFN-α in saline daily at the doses of 1×105 U for 6 wk, group D (IFN-α treatment, n = 24) treated with intra-muscular injection of IFN-α in saline daily at the doses of 1×105 U for 6 wk after the first 6 wk, group E (0.9% sodium chloride treatment control, n = 24) treated with intra-muscular injection of 0.01 mL/kg daily for 6 wk after the first 6 wk. At the end of the experiment, all rats of each group were killed. Samples of the liver obtained by biopsy were subjected to histological, immunohistochemical and electron microscopic studies for the expressions of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF- β1) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). RESULTS: The expressions of TGF-β1, the number of activated hepatic stellate cells and α-SMA in hepatic tissue of group C were significantly less than those of group B (P<0.01). The degree of fibrosis score in group B was also significantly less than that of group C under light microscope (P<0.01). CONCLUSION: IFN-α can inhibit the production of TGF-β1, decrease HSC activation and stimulate its apoptosis. PMID:15849824

  2. Effect of all-trans retinoic acids (ATRA) on the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the lung tissues of rats with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).

    PubMed

    Xin, Y; Lv, J-Q; Wang, Y-Z; Zhang, J; Zhang, X

    2015-11-13

    The effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in rats with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was studied, and the mechanism of the effect of ATRA on PAH was proposed. Thirty male SD rats were randomly divided into normal control, monocrotaline (MCT) model, and ATRA [30 mg/(kg.day)]intervention groups (N = 10 each). The mean pulmonary arterial pressure was recorded. Right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI) was calculated (weight of right ventricle: total weight of left ventricle and interventricular septum). The percentages of wall thickness of pulmonary arteriole (WT) to external diameter of artery (WT%) and vascular wall area (WA) to total vascular area (WA%) were determined. Real-time fluorescence-based quantitative PCR and western blot analyses were employed to detect the α-SMA mRNA and protein expressions. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure, RVHI, WT%, and WA% were all obviously higher in the model group than in the control and intervention groups. The values of these indicators in the intervention group were also higher than those in the control group (P < 0.01). The mRNA and protein expression levels of α-SMA were significantly higher in the lung tissue of model rats than those in the control and intervention groups. However, the intervention group showed no statistically significant differences in α-SMA mRNA and protein expression levels compared to the control (P < 0.05). ATRA inhibited the α-SMA mRNA and protein expressionin the lung tissues of rats with MCT-induced PAH, and could be used to treat PAH.

  3. Drop splash on a smooth, dry surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Korobkin, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    It is our purpose here to determine the conditions under which a drop of a given liquid with a known radius R impacting against a smooth impermeable surface at a velocity V, will either spread axisymmetrically onto the substrate or will create a splash, giving rise to usually undesired star-shaped patterns. In our experimental setup, drops are generated injecting low viscosity liquids falling under the action of gravity from a stainless steel hypodermic needle. The experimental observations using two high speed cameras operating simultaneously and placed perpendicularly to each other reveal that, initially, the drop deforms axisymmetrically, with A (T) the radius of the wetted area. For high enough values of the drop impact velocity, a thin sheet of liquid starts to be ejected from A (T) at a velocity Vjet > V for instants of time such that T >=Tc . If Vjet is above a certain threshold, which depends on the solid wetting properties as well as on the material properties of both the liquid and the atmospheric gas, the rim of the lamella dewets the solid to finally break into drops. Using Wagner's theory we demonstrate that A (T) =√{ 3 RVT } and our results also reveal that Tc We - 1 / 2 =(ρV2 R / σ) - 1 / 2 and Vjet We 1 / 4 .

  4. Observations on the actin content of the rabbit myofibril

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, A.; Ronchetti, Ivonne; Cigognetti, Clara

    1966-01-01

    1. On extraction of whole muscle by the procedure of Hasselbach & Schneider (1951), the amount of actin that passes into solution seems to account for little more than 10% of the protein content of the myofibrils. 2. Extraction of isolated myofibrils with suitable media that allow identification and estimation of dissolved proteins seems to give about the same yield of actin (10–13% of the total). 3. A comparatively large residue of myofibrillar components remains after extraction. The amount of actin present in the residue can be only hypothetical. PMID:4290530

  5. Aluminum modifies the viscosity of filamentous actin solutions as measured by optical displacement microviscometry.

    PubMed

    Arnoys, E J; Schindler, M

    2000-01-01

    A microtechnique has been developed that is capable of measuring the viscosity of filamentous actin (F-actin) solutions. This method, called optical displacement microviscometry (ODM), was utilized to determine the changes in viscosity of solutions of rabbit muscle, human platelet, and maize pollen actin when measured in the absence and presence of aluminum. Measurements demonstrated that the viscosity of the different actin solutions decreased with aluminum concentration. In contrast, increases in viscosity were observed when aluminum was added to F-actin solutions containing filamin (chicken gizzard), a protein that bundles actin filaments. Confocal fluorescence imaging of pure actin solutions in the presence of aluminum showed a disrupted actin network composed of fragmented actin filaments in the form of small aggregates. In contrast, in the presence of filamin, aluminum promoted the formation of thicker actin filaments. These measurements demonstrate that aluminum can affect actin filaments differentially depending on the presence of an actin-binding protein. In addition, a strong correlation is observed between the changes in viscosity as measured by ODM and the thickness and assembled state of bundles of actin filaments.

  6. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

    PubMed

    Blotnick, Edna; Sol, Asaf; Muhlrad, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III) and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  7. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder.

  8. Cytochemical evidence for the presence of actin in the nucleus of the voodoo lily appendix.

    PubMed

    Skubatz, H; Orellana, M V; Yablonka-Reuveni, Z

    2000-08-01

    Immunoflorescence microscopy of sections of the voodoo lily Sauromatum guttatum appendix stained with monoclonal antibodies against alpha-smooth muscle actin and cytoplasmic actin revealed different staining intensity of different parts of the cell. The anti-cytoplasmic-actin recognized antigens present mainly in the cytoplasm, and the anti-alpha-smooth muscle-actin recognized more intensively antigens present in the nuclei. A positive staining of the nucleus was also obtained with FITC-phalloidin confirming the presence of actin in its filamenous form in the nucleus. The presence of a nuclear alpha-smooth muscle-actin-like protein was further confirmed by confocal laser microscopy. On Western blots, the two anti-actins labelled a protein band that comigrated with standard actin at the approximate molecular weight of 43 kDa. Several other proteins interacted with the two antibodies to a different degree. The monoclonal antibodies against beta-tubulin subunit stained only the periphery of the cytoplasm and anti-pan cytoplasmic myosin stained the cytoplasm weakly. On a Western blot, anti-beta-tubulin subunit primarily recognized a protein band at the appropriate molecular weight of 50 kDa. This is the first cytochemical evidence for the presence of alpha-smooth muscle-actin-like protein in the plant nucleus.

  9. Actin up: regulation of podocyte structure and function by components of the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Faul, Christian; Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Yanagida-Asanuma, Etsuko; Kim, Kwanghee; Mundel, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Podocytes of the renal glomerulus are unique cells with a complex cellular organization consisting of a cell body, major processes and foot processes. Podocyte foot processes form a characteristic interdigitating pattern with foot processes of neighboring podocytes, leaving in between the filtration slits that are bridged by the glomerular slit diaphragm. The highly dynamic foot processes contain an actin-based contractile apparatus comparable to that of smooth muscle cells or pericytes. Mutations affecting several podocyte proteins lead to rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, disruption of the filtration barrier and subsequent renal disease. The fact that the dynamic regulation of the podocyte cytoskeleton is vital to kidney function has led to podocytes emerging as an excellent model system for studying actin cytoskeleton dynamics in a physiological context.

  10. All histological types of primary human rhabdomyosarcoma express alpha-cardiac and not alpha-skeletal actin messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, W.; Bochaton-Piallat, M. L.; Geinoz, A.; d'Amore, E.; Laurini, R. N.; Cintorino, M.; Bégin, L. R.; Boivin, Y.; Gabbiani, G.

    1994-01-01

    Eleven human primary rhabdomyosarcomas (RMSs), including all histological variants, were analyzed morphologically, immunohistochemically for intermediate filament proteins and actin isoforms, and by means of Northern blots with probes specific for total actin, alpha-skeletal (SK), alpha-cardiac (CARD), and alpha-smooth muscle actin messenger (m)RNAs. All tumors disclosed ultrastructural evidence of skeletal muscle features with terminal differentiation in three cases. The RMSs contained immunohistochemically the intermediate filament proteins vimentin and desmin and reacted positively with the alpha-sarcomeric actin antibody, which recognizes alpha-SK and alpha-CARD actin isoforms. All RMSs reacted with the total actin probe, recognizing at 2.1 kb cytoplasmic actin mRNAs and at 1.7 kb alpha-actin mRNAs. With the specific probes, all RMSs expressed alpha-CARD actin mRNA, four neoplasms expressed also alpha-smooth muscle actin mRNA, whereas the probe for alpha-SK actin mRNA never produced a signal except in one case, in which the tumor masses were intermingled with non-neoplastic preexistent striated muscle fibers. Because alpha-CARD and alpha-smooth muscle actins are transiently expressed during normal skeletal muscle development, RMSs seem to follow normal skeletal myogenesis without completing the final step, consisting of alpha-SK actin mRNA expression. The use of Northern blots for alpha-CARD actin as an adjunct to conventional techniques may be helpful for the precise identification of primary RMSs compared to other soft tissue neoplasms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8160781

  11. Directed actin assembly and motility.

    PubMed

    Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Galland, Rémi; Suarez, Cristian; Guérin, Christophe; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a key component of the cellular architecture. However, understanding actin organization and dynamics in vivo is a complex challenge. Reconstitution of actin structures in vitro, in simplified media, allows one to pinpoint the cellular biochemical components and their molecular interactions underlying the architecture and dynamics of the actin network. Previously, little was known about the extent to which geometrical constraints influence the dynamic ultrastructure of these networks. Therefore, in order to study the balance between biochemical and geometrical control of complex actin organization, we used the innovative methodologies of UV and laser patterning to design a wide repertoire of nucleation geometries from which we assembled branched actin networks. Using these methods, we were able to reconstitute complex actin network organizations, closely related to cellular architecture, to precisely direct and control their 3D connections. This methodology mimics the actin networks encountered in cells and can serve in the fabrication of innovative bioinspired systems.

  12. Cytoplasmic γ-Actin Expression in Diverse Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hanft, Laurin M.; Bogan, Daniel J.; Mayer, Ulrike; Kaufman, Stephen J.; Kornegay, Joe N.; Ervasti, James M.

    2007-01-01

    We recently showed that cytoplasmic γ-actin (γcyto-actin) is dramatically elevated in striated muscle of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Here we demonstrate that γcyto-actin is markedly increased in golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD), which better recapitulates the dystrophinopathy phenotype in humans. γcyto-Actin was also elevated in muscle from α-sarcoglycan null mice, but not in several other dystrophic animal models, including mice deficient in β-sarcoglycan, α-dystrobrevin, laminin-2, or α7 integrin. Muscle from mice lacking dystrophin and utrophin also expressed elevated γcyto-actin, which was not restored to normal by transgenic overexpression of α7 integrin. However, γcyto-actin was further elevated in skeletal muscle from GRMD animals treated with the glucocorticoid prednisone at doses shown to improve the dystrophic phenotype and muscle function. These data suggest that elevated γcyto-actin is part of a compensatory cytoskeletal remodeling program that may partially stabilize dystrophic muscle in some cases where the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is compromised. PMID:17475492

  13. Liberation of actin from actomyosin in meats heated to 65°C.

    PubMed

    Okitani, Akihiro; Ichinose, Naoki; Itoh, Jun; Tsuji, Yuika; Oneda, Yayoi; Hatae, Keiko; Migita, Koshiro; Matsuishi, Masanori

    2009-03-01

    This study investigated whether actin liberation from myofibrils occurs during the heating of various muscles, as well as squid mantle muscle at temperatures, such as 60°C, employed for vacuum cooking of meats. Actin liberation was demonstrated in scallop striated adductor muscle, but not in beef, pork, or chicken, using the detection method previously employed with squid muscle, in which liberated actin was detected with SDS-PAGE, in the supernatant obtained by centrifugation of the homogenate of heated muscle in 0.2M KCl at a neutral pH. However, actin liberation was demonstrated in beef, pork and chicken by a new detection method, in which heated muscle was homogenized in 0.6M KCl or NaCl at a slightly alkaline pH and maintained at 4°C for 16h with stirring, after which the homogenate was diluted three times with water and centrifuged to obtain the supernatant containing the liberated actin. This new method indicated that actin liberation in beef, pork, and chicken was marked by heating at 65°C, but scarcely induced at 80°C. Thus, the liberation of actin from myofibrils may contribute to the greater tenderness of vacuum-cooked meat (meat heated at a low temperature for long time), as compared with meat prepared by cooking at a higher temperature.

  14. Nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 mediates p21-activated kinase 1 activation in the modulation of chemokine-induced human aortic smooth muscle cell F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation and injury-induced vascular wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kundumani-Sridharan, Venkatesh; Singh, Nikhlesh K; Kumar, Sanjay; Gadepalli, Ravisekhar; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2013-07-26

    Recent literature suggests that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) mediate cell migration. However, the mechanisms were not known. Therefore, the objective of this study is to test whether cyclin/CDKs activate Pak1, an effector of Rac1, whose involvement in the modulation of cell migration and proliferation is well established. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in a delayed time-dependent manner. MCP1 also stimulated F-actin stress fiber formation in a delayed manner in HASMCs, as well as the migration and proliferation of these cells. Inhibition of Pak1 suppressed MCP1-induced HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. MCP1 induced cyclin D1 expression as well as CDK6 and CDK4 activities, and these effects were dependent on activation of NFATc1. Depletion of NFATc1, cyclin D1, CDK6, or CDK4 levels attenuated MCP1-induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation and resulted in decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. CDK4, which appeared to be activated downstream of CDK6, formed a complex with Pak1 in response to MCP1. MCP1 also activated Rac1 in a time-dependent manner, and depletion/inhibition of its levels/activation abrogated MCP1-induced NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling and, thereby, decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 led to decreased cyclin D1 expression and CDK6, CDK4, and Pak1 activities, resulting in reduced neointima formation in response to injury. Thus, these observations reveal that Pak1 is a downstream effector of CDK4 and Rac1-dependent, NFATc1-mediated cyclin D1 expression and CDK6 activity mediate this effect. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 prevented the capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells for MCP-1-induced activation of the cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling axis, affecting

  15. A new model for the interaction of dystrophin with F-actin

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The F-actin binding and cross-linking properties of skeletal muscle dystrophin-glycoprotein complex were examined using high and low speed cosedimentation assays, microcapillary falling ball viscometry, and electron microscopy. Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex binding to F-actin saturated near 0.042 +/- 0.005 mol/ mol, which corresponds to one dystrophin per 24 actin monomers. Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex bound to F-actin with an average apparent Kd for dystrophin of 0.5 microM. These results demonstrate that native, full-length dystrophin in the glycoprotein complex binds F-actin with some properties similar to those measured for several members of the actin cross-linking super- family of proteins. However, we failed to observe dystrophin- glycoprotein complex-induced cross-linking of F-actin by three different methods, each positively controlled with alpha-actinin. Furthermore, high speed cosedimentation analysis of dystrophin- glycoprotein complex digested with calpain revealed a novel F-actin binding site located near the middle of the dystrophin rod domain. Recombinant dystrophin fragments corresponding to the novel actin binding site and the first 246 amino acids of dystrophin both bound F- actin but with significantly lower affinity and higher capacity than was observed with purified dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Finally, dystrophin-glycoprotein complex was observed to significantly slow the depolymerization of F-actin, Suggesting that dystrophin may lie along side an actin filament through interaction with multiple actin monomers. These data suggest that although dystrophin is most closely related to the actin cross-linking superfamily based on sequence homology, dystrophin binds F-actin in a manner more analogous to actin side-binding proteins. PMID:8909541

  16. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  17. Amplification of actin polymerization forces.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-03-28

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments.

  18. Actinic keratosis. Current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Jeffes, E W; Tang, E H

    2000-01-01

    Actinic keratoses are hyperkeratotic skin lesions that represent focal abnormal proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. Some actinic keratoses evolve into squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, while others resolve spontaneously. The conversion rate of actinic keratosis to squamous cell carcinoma is not accurately known, but appears to be in the range of 0.25 to 1% per year. Although there is a low rate of conversion of actinic keratoses to squamous cell carcinoma, 60% of squamous cell carcinomas of the skin probably arise from actinic keratoses. The main cause of actinic keratoses in otherwise healthy Caucasians appears to be the sun. Therapy for actinic keratoses begins with prevention which starts with sun avoidance and physical protection. Sunprotection with sunscreens actually slows the return of actinic keratoses in patients already getting actinic keratoses. Interestingly, a few studies are available that demonstrate that a high fat diet is associated with the production of more actinic keratoses than is a low fat diet. One of the mainstays of therapy has been local destruction of the actinic keratoses with cryotherapy, and curettage and electrodesiccation. A new addition to this group of therapies to treat individual actinic keratoses is photodynamic therapy with topical aminolevulinic acid and light. In patients who have numerous actinic keratoses in an area of severely sun damaged skin, therapies which are applied to the whole actinic keratosis area are used. The goal of treating such an area of skin is to treat all of the early as well as the numerous clinically evident actinic keratoses at the same time. The classical approaches for treating areas of photodamaged skin without treating actinic keratoses individually include: the use of topically applied fluorouracil cream, dermabrasion, and cutaneous peels with various agents like trichloroacetic acid. Both topically as well as orally administered retinoids have been used to treat actinic keratoses but

  19. Control of actin-based motility through localized actin binding

    PubMed Central

    Banigan, Edward J.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Liu, Andrea J.

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of cell biological and biomimetic systems use actin polymerization to drive motility. It has been suggested that an object such as a bacterium can propel itself by self-assembling a high concentration of actin behind it if it is repelled by actin. However, it is also known that it is essential for the moving object to bind actin. Therefore, a key question is how the actin tail can propel an object when it both binds and repels the object. We present a physically consistent Brownian dynamics model for actin-based motility that includes the minimal components of the dendritic nucleation model and allows for both attractive and repulsive interactions between actin and a moveable disk. We find that the concentration gradient of filamentous actin generated by polymerization is sufficient to propel the object, even with moderately strong binding interactions. Additionally, actin binding can act as a biophysical cap, and may directly control motility through modulation of network growth. Overall, this mechanism is robust in that it can drive motility against a load up to a stall pressure that depends on the Young’s modulus of the actin network and can explain several aspects of actin-based motility. PMID:24225232

  20. Structure of the rigor actin-tropomyosin-myosin complex.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Elmar; Müller, Mirco; Penczek, Pawel A; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Manstein, Dietmar J; Raunser, Stefan

    2012-07-20

    Regulation of myosin and filamentous actin interaction by tropomyosin is a central feature of contractile events in muscle and nonmuscle cells. However, little is known about molecular interactions within the complex and the trajectory of tropomyosin movement between its "open" and "closed" positions on the actin filament. Here, we report the 8 Å resolution structure of the rigor (nucleotide-free) actin-tropomyosin-myosin complex determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The pseudoatomic model of the complex, obtained from fitting crystal structures into the map, defines the large interface involving two adjacent actin monomers and one tropomyosin pseudorepeat per myosin contact. Severe forms of hereditary myopathies are linked to mutations that critically perturb this interface. Myosin binding results in a 23 Å shift of tropomyosin along actin. Complex domain motions occur in myosin, but not in actin. Based on our results, we propose a structural model for the tropomyosin-dependent modulation of myosin binding to actin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Microtubule Actin Cross-Linking Factor (Macf)

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Conrad L.; Sun, Dongming; Zheng, Min; Knowles, David R.; Liem, Ronald K.H.

    1999-01-01

    We cloned and characterized a full-length cDNA of mouse actin cross-linking family 7 (mACF7) by sequential rapid amplification of cDNA ends–PCR. The completed mACF7 cDNA is 17 kb and codes for a 608-kD protein. The closest relative of mACF7 is the Drosophila protein Kakapo, which shares similar architecture with mACF7. mACF7 contains a putative actin-binding domain and a plakin-like domain that are highly homologous to dystonin (BPAG1-n) at its NH2 terminus. However, unlike dystonin, mACF7 does not contain a coiled–coil rod domain; instead, the rod domain of mACF7 is made up of 23 dystrophin-like spectrin repeats. At its COOH terminus, mACF7 contains two putative EF-hand calcium-binding motifs and a segment homologous to the growth arrest–specific protein, Gas2. In this paper, we demonstrate that the NH2-terminal actin-binding domain of mACF7 is functional both in vivo and in vitro. More importantly, we found that the COOH-terminal domain of mACF7 interacts with and stabilizes microtubules. In transfected cells full-length mACF7 can associate not only with actin but also with microtubules. Hence, we suggest a modified name: MACF (microtubule actin cross-linking factor). The properties of MACF are consistent with the observation that mutations in kakapo cause disorganization of microtubules in epidermal muscle attachment cells and some sensory neurons. PMID:10601340

  2. Structure, chromosome location, and expression of the human. gamma. -actin gene: Differential evolution, location, and expression of the cytoskeletal BETA- and. gamma. -actin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Erba, H.P.; Eddy, R.; Shows, T.; Kedes, L.; Gunning, P.

    1988-04-01

    The accumulation of the cytoskeletal ..beta..-and ..gamma..-actin mRNAs was determined in a variety of mouse tissues and organs. The ..beta..-iosform is always expressed in excess of the ..gamma..-isoform. However, the molar ratio of ..beta..- to ..gamma..-actin mRNA varies from 1.7 in kidney and testis to 12 in sarcomeric muscle to 114 in liver. The authors conclude that, whereas the cytoskeletal ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actins are truly coexpressed, their mRNA levels are subject to differential regulation between different cell types. The human ..gamma..-actin gene has been cloned and sequenced, and its chromosome location has been determined. The gene is located on human chromosome 17, unlike ..beta..-actin which is on chromosome 7. Thus, if these genes are also unlinked in the mouse, the coexpression of the ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin genes in rodent tissues cannot be determined by gene linkage. Comparison of the human ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin genes reveals that noncoding sequences in the 5'-flanking region and in intron III have been conserved since the duplication that gave rise to these two genes. In contrast, there are sequences in intron III and the 3'-untranslated region which are not present in the ..beta..-actin gene but are conserved between the human ..gamma..-actin and the Xenopus borealis type 1 actin genes. Such conserved noncoding sequences may contribute to the coexpression of ..beta..- and ..gamma..-actin or to the unique regulation and function of the ..gamma..-actin gene. Finally, the authors demonstrate that the human ..gamma..-actin gene is expressed after introduction into mouse L cells and C2 myoblasts and that, upon fusion of C2 cells to form myotubes, the human ..gamma..-actin gene is appropriately regulated.

  3. Interaction of Phalloidin with Actin

    PubMed Central

    Lengsfeld, Anneliese M.; Löw, Irmentraut; Wieland, Theodor; Dancker, Peter; Hasselbach, Wilhelm

    1974-01-01

    Phalloidin, a toxic bicyclic peptide of rapid action from the toadstool, Amanita phalloides, gives rise to polymerization of G-actin to filamentous structures (Ph-actin) in a medium of low ionic strength. Ph-actin closely resembles the microfilaments found in liver membrane fractions (Ph-filaments) after in vivo or in vitro poisoning. Both phalloidin induced filaments are resistant to 0.6 M KI in contrast to F-actin, and become decorated by heavy meromyosin. After preincubation with cytochalasin B significantly fewer actin filaments are observed. Images PMID:4368830

  4. Actin stress in cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick; Meng, Fanjie

    2014-01-01

    Cell mechanics plays a role in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation. To understand this process better, we created a genetically encoded optical probe, named actin–cpstFRET–actin (AcpA), to report forces in actin in living cells in real time. We showed that stemness was associated with increased force in actin. We reprogrammed HEK-293 cells into stem-like cells using no transcription factors but simply by softening the substrate. However, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell reprogramming required, in addition to a soft substrate, Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog expression. Replating the stem-like cells on glass led to redifferentiation and reduced force in actin. The actin force probe was a FRET sensor, called cpstFRET (circularly permuted stretch sensitive FRET), flanked by g-actin subunits. The labeled actin expressed efficiently in HEK, MDCK, 3T3, and bovine aortic endothelial cells and in multiple stable cell lines created from those cells. The viability of the cell lines demonstrated that labeled actin did not significantly affect cell physiology. The labeled actin distribution was similar to that observed with GFP-tagged actin. We also examined the stress in the actin cross-linker actinin. Actinin force was not always correlated with actin force, emphasizing the need for addressing protein specificity when discussing forces. Because actin is a primary structural protein in animal cells, understanding its force distribution is central to understanding animal cell physiology and the many linked reactions such as stress-induced gene expression. This new probe permits measuring actin forces in a wide range of experiments on preparations ranging from isolated proteins to transgenic animals. PMID:25422450

  5. Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Panta; Fischer, Max; Meehan, Shane; Pomeranz, Miriam Keltz

    2012-12-15

    Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis, which was described in 1966, is characterized by small, atrophic patches with distinctive keratin rims that occur on sun-exposed areas of the extremities, shoulders, and back. The diagnosis is based on the histopathologic finding of a cornoid lamella, absence of a granular layer, and often a thin epidermis. It is associated with exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Gene studies suggest a pathway defect in which several mutations in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation lead to development of porokeratosis.

  6. Structural dynamics of F-actin: II. Cooperativity in structural transitions.

    PubMed

    Orlova, A; Prochniewicz, E; Egelman, E H

    1995-02-03

    A large body of biochemical evidence suggests that the F-actin filament can have internal cooperativity. We have observed large cooperative effects on the low-resolution structure of actin filaments under three very different conditions. First, when G-Ca(2+)-actin is polymerized by both Mg2+ and KCl, filaments may be found in two different populations, with two discrete positions seen for subdomain 2. When G-Ca2+ actin is polymerized by only Mg2+, a single F-Mg(2+)-actin population is seen. The structural data suggest that an entire filament exists with subdomain 2 in one state or the other when there is a heterogenous mixture of Mg2+ and Ca(2+)-actin. Second, when actin filaments are nucleated from gelsolin there is a conformational change that can be observed throughout the filament that is consistent with a large shift in the actin C terminus. There must be a large cooperative propagation of this effect throughout the filament from the nucleation point. Third, we have used phalloidin to stabilize F-actin in which two C-terminal residues have been proteolytically removed by trypsin. It has been shown biochemically that this stabilization occurs at substoichiometric amounts of phalloidin. Phalloidin, at either a 1:1 or a 1:20 molar ratio with actin, restores the connectivity between the long-pitch helical strands. F-actin's internal cooperativity will have large implications in vivo, particularly in muscle.

  7. A novel type of protein kinase phosphorylates actin in the actin-fragmin complex.

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, L; Bomblies, L; Vandekerckhove, J; Schleicher, M; Gettemans, J

    1996-01-01

    Actin-fragmin kinase (AFK) from Physarum polycephalum specifically phosphorylates actin in the EGTA-resistant 1:1 actin-fragmin complex. The cDNA deduced amino acid sequence reveals two major domains of approximately 35 kDa each that are separated by a hinge-like proline/serine-rich segment of 50 residues. Whereas the N-terminal domain does not show any significant similarity to protein sequences from databases, there are six complete kelch repeats in the protein that comprise almost the entire C-terminal half of the molecule. To prove the intrinsic phosphorylation activity of AFK, full-length or partial cDNA fragments were expressed both in a reticulocyte lysate and in Escherichia coli. In both expression systems, we obtained specific actin phosphorylation and located the catalytic domain in the N-terminal half. Interestingly, this region did not contain any of the known protein kinase consensus sequences. The only known sequence motif present that could have been involved in nucleotide binding was a nearly perfect phosphate binding loop (P-loop). However, introduction of two different point mutations into this putative P-loop sequence did not alter the catalytic activity of the kinase, which indicates an as yet unknown mechanism for phosphate transfer. Our data suggest that AFK belongs to a new class of protein kinases and that this actin phosphorylation might be the first example of a widely distributed novel type of regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in non-muscle cells. Images PMID:8896448

  8. The Myosin C-Loop Is an Allosteric Actin Contact Sensor in Actomyosin†

    PubMed Central

    Ajtai, Katalin; Halstead, Miriam F.; Nyitrai, Miklós; Penheiter, Alan R.; Zheng, Ye; Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2009-01-01

    Actin and myosin form the molecular motor in muscle. Myosin is the enzyme performing ATP hydrolysis under the allosteric control of actin such that actin binding initiates product release and force generation in the myosin power stroke. Non-equilibrium Monte Carlo molecular dynamics simulation of the power stroke suggested that a structured surface loop on myosin, the C-loop, is the actin contact sensor initiating actin activation of the myosin ATPase. Previous experimental work demonstrated C-loop binds actin and established the forward and reverse allosteric link between the C-loop and the myosin active site. Here, smooth muscle heavy meromyosin C-loop chimeras were constructed with skeletal (sCl) and cardiac (cCl) myosin C-loops substituted for the native sequence. In both cases, actin-activated ATPase inhibition is indicated mainly by the lower Vmax. In vitro motility was also inhibited in the chimeras. Motility data were collected as a function of myosin surface density, with unregulated actin, and with skeletal and cardiac isoforms of tropomyosin-bound actin for the wild type, cCl, and sCl. Slow and fast subpopulations of myosin velocities in the wild-type species were discovered and represent geometrically unfavorable and favorable actomyosin interactions, respectively. Unfavorable interactions are detected at all surface densities tested. Favorable interactions are more probable at higher myosin surface densities. Cardiac tropomyosin-bound actin promotes the favorable actomyosin interactions by lowering the inhibiting geometrical constraint barriers with a structural effect on actin. Neither higher surface density nor cardiac tropomyosin-bound actin can accelerate motility velocity in cCl or sCl, suggesting the element initiating maximal myosin activation by actin resides in the C-loop. PMID:19408946

  9. Leiomodin and tropomodulin in smooth muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that actin filament remodeling is critical for smooth muscle contraction, which implicates actin filament ends as important sites for regulation of contraction. Tropomodulin (Tmod) and smooth muscle leiomodin (SM-Lmod) have been found in many tissues containing smooth muscle by protein immunoblot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Both proteins cofractionate with tropomyosin in the Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton of rabbit stomach smooth muscle and are solubilized by high salt. SM-Lmod binds muscle tropomyosin, a biochemical activity characteristic of Tmod proteins. SM-Lmod staining is present along the length of actin filaments in rat intestinal smooth muscle, while Tmod stains in a punctate pattern distinct from that of actin filaments or the dense body marker alpha-actinin. After smooth muscle is hypercontracted by treatment with 10 mM Ca(2+), both SM-Lmod and Tmod are found near alpha-actinin at the periphery of actin-rich contraction bands. These data suggest that SM-Lmod is a novel component of the smooth muscle actin cytoskeleton and, furthermore, that the pointed ends of actin filaments in smooth muscle may be capped by Tmod in localized clusters.

  10. Leiomodin and tropomodulin in smooth muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that actin filament remodeling is critical for smooth muscle contraction, which implicates actin filament ends as important sites for regulation of contraction. Tropomodulin (Tmod) and smooth muscle leiomodin (SM-Lmod) have been found in many tissues containing smooth muscle by protein immunoblot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Both proteins cofractionate with tropomyosin in the Triton-insoluble cytoskeleton of rabbit stomach smooth muscle and are solubilized by high salt. SM-Lmod binds muscle tropomyosin, a biochemical activity characteristic of Tmod proteins. SM-Lmod staining is present along the length of actin filaments in rat intestinal smooth muscle, while Tmod stains in a punctate pattern distinct from that of actin filaments or the dense body marker alpha-actinin. After smooth muscle is hypercontracted by treatment with 10 mM Ca(2+), both SM-Lmod and Tmod are found near alpha-actinin at the periphery of actin-rich contraction bands. These data suggest that SM-Lmod is a novel component of the smooth muscle actin cytoskeleton and, furthermore, that the pointed ends of actin filaments in smooth muscle may be capped by Tmod in localized clusters.

  11. Characterization of an actin-myosin head interface in the 40-113 region of actin using specific antibodies as probes.

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, J P; Méjean, C; Benyamin, Y; Roustan, C

    1990-01-01

    Evidence for the participation of the 1-7 and 18-28 N-terminal sequences of actin at different steps of actin-myosin interaction process is well documented in the literature. Cross-linking of the rigor complex between filamentous actin and skeletal-muscle myosin subfragment 1 was accomplished by the carboxy-group-directed zero-length protein cross-linker, 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodi-imide. After chaotropic depolymerization and thrombin digestion, which cleaves only actin, the covalent complex with Mr 100,000 was characterized by PAGE. The linkage was identified as being between myosin subfragment 1 (S-1) heavy chain and actin-(1-28)-peptide. The purified complex retained in toto its ability to combine reversibly with fresh filamentous actin, but showed a decrease in the Vmax. of actin-dependent Mg2(+)-ATPase. By using e.l.i.s.a., S-1 was observed to bind to coated monomeric actin or its 1-226 N-terminal peptide. This interaction strongly interfered with the binding of antibodies directed against the 95-113 actin sequence. Moreover, S-1 was able to bind with coated purified actin-(40-113)-peptide. Finally, antibodies directed against the 18-28 and 95-113 actin sequence, which strongly interfered with S1 binding, were unable to compete with each other. These results suggest that two topologically independent regions are involved in the actin-myosin interface: one located in the conserved 18-28 sequence and the other near residues 95-113, including the variable residue at position 89. Other experiments support the 'multisite interface model', where the two actin sites could modulate each other during S-1 interaction. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:2146951

  12. Upregulation of two actin genes and redistribution of actin during diapause and cold stress in the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mijung; Robich, Rebecca M.; Rinehart, Joseph P.; Denlinger, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Two actin genes cloned from Culex pipiens L. are upregulated during adult diapause. Though actins 1 and 2 were expressed throughout diapause, both genes were most highly expressed early in diapause. These changes in gene expression were accompanied by a conspicuous redistribution of polymerized actin that was most pronounced in the midguts of diapausing mosquitoes that were exposed to low temperature. In nondiapausing mosquitoes reared at 25°C and in diapausing mosquitoes reared at 18°C, polymerized actin was clustered at high concentrations at the intersections of the muscle fibers that form the midgut musculature. When adults 7–10 days post-eclosion were exposed to low temperature (-5°C for 12h), the polymerized actin was evenly distributed along the muscle fibers in both nondiapausing and diapausing mosquitoes. Exposure of older adults (1month post-eclosion) to low temperature (−5°C for 12h) elicited an even greater distribution of polymerized actin, an effect that was especially pronounced in diapausing mosquitoes. These changes in gene expression and actin distribution suggest a role for actins in enhancing survival of diapausing adults during the low temperatures of winter by fortification of the cytoskeleton. PMID:17078965

  13. Differential binding of tropomyosin isoforms to actin modified with m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Skórzewski, Radosław; Robaszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Jarzebińska, Justyna; Suder, Piotr; Silberring, Jerzy; Moraczewska, Joanna

    2009-11-01

    Differential interactions of tropomyosin (TM) isoforms with actin can be important for determination of the thin filament functions. A mechanism of tropomyosin binding to actin was studied by comparing interactions of five alphaTM isoforms with actin modified with m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (MBS) and with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC). MBS attachment sites were revealed with mass spectrometry methods. We found that the predominant actin fraction was cross-linked by MBS within subdomain 3. A smaller fraction of the modified actin was cross-linked within subdomain 2 and between subdomains 2 and 1. Moreover, investigated actins carried single labels in subdomains 1, 2, and 3. Such extensive modification caused a large decrease in actin affinity for skeletal and smooth muscle tropomyosins, nonmuscle TM2, and chimeric TM1b9a. In contrast, binding of nonmuscle isoform TM5a was less affected. Isoform's affinity for actin modified in subdomain 2 by binding of FITC to Lys61 was intermediate between the affinity for native actin and MBS-modified actin except for TM5a, which bound to FITC-actin with similar affinity as to actin modified with MBS. The analysis of binding curves according to the McGhee-von Hippel model revealed that binding to an isolated site, as well as cooperativity of binding to a contiguous site, was affected by both actin modifications in a TM isoform-specific manner.

  14. A membrane cytoskeleton from Dictyostelium discoideum. I. Identification and partial characterization of an actin-binding activity

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum plasma membranes isolated by each of three procedures bind F-actin. The interactions between these membranes and actin are examined by a novel application of falling ball viscometry. Treating the membranes as multivalent actin-binding particles analogous to divalent actin-gelation factors, we observe large increases in viscosity (actin cross-linking) when membranes of depleted actin and myosin are incubated with rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin. Pre- extraction of peripheral membrane proteins with chaotropes or the inclusion of Triton X-100 during the assay does not appreciably diminish this actin cross-linking activity. Lipid vesicles, heat- denatured membranes, proteolyzed membranes, or membranes containing endogenous actin show minimal actin cross-linking activity. Heat- denatured, but not proteolyzed, membranes regain activity when assayed in the presence of Triton X-100. Thus, integral membrane proteins appear to be responsible for some or all of the actin cross-linking activity of D. discoideum membranes. In the absence of MgATP, Triton X- 100 extraction of isolated D. discoideum membranes results in a Triton- insoluble residue composed of actin, myosin, and associated membrane proteins. The inclusion of MgATP before and during Triton extraction greatly diminishes the amount of protein in the Triton-insoluble residue without appreciably altering its composition. Our results suggest the existence of a protein complex stabilized by actin and/or myosin (membrane cytoskeleton) associated with the D. discoideum plasma membrane. PMID:6894148

  15. Loss of LMOD1 impairs smooth muscle cytocontractility and causes megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Danny; Wilson, Michael P.; Oliver, Daniel; Brosens, Erwin; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Han, Yu; Nanda, Vivek; Lyu, Qing; Doukas, Michael; Stoop, Hans; Brouwer, Rutger W. W.; van IJcken, Wilfred F. J.; Slivano, Orazio J.; Burns, Alan J.; Christie, Christine K.; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Brooks, Alice S.; Tibboel, Dick; Xu, Suowen; Jin, Zheng Gen; Djuwantono, Tono; Yan, Wei; Alves, Maria M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Miano, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a congenital visceral myopathy characterized by severe dilation of the urinary bladder and defective intestinal motility. The genetic basis of MMIHS has been ascribed to spontaneous and autosomal dominant mutations in actin gamma 2 (ACTG2), a smooth muscle contractile gene. However, evidence suggesting a recessive origin of the disease also exists. Using combined homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing, a genetically isolated family was found to carry a premature termination codon in Leiomodin1 (LMOD1), a gene preferentially expressed in vascular and visceral smooth muscle cells. Parents heterozygous for the mutation exhibited no abnormalities, but a child homozygous for the premature termination codon displayed symptoms consistent with MMIHS. We used CRISPR-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein) genome editing of Lmod1 to generate a similar premature termination codon. Mice homozygous for the mutation showed loss of LMOD1 protein and pathology consistent with MMIHS, including late gestation expansion of the bladder, hydronephrosis, and rapid demise after parturition. Loss of LMOD1 resulted in a reduction of filamentous actin, elongated cytoskeletal dense bodies, and impaired intestinal smooth muscle contractility. These results define LMOD1 as a disease gene for MMIHS and suggest its role in establishing normal smooth muscle cytoskeletal–contractile coupling. PMID:28292896

  16. Loss of LMOD1 impairs smooth muscle cytocontractility and causes megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Halim, Danny; Wilson, Michael P; Oliver, Daniel; Brosens, Erwin; Verheij, Joke B G M; Han, Yu; Nanda, Vivek; Lyu, Qing; Doukas, Michael; Stoop, Hans; Brouwer, Rutger W W; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Slivano, Orazio J; Burns, Alan J; Christie, Christine K; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L; Brooks, Alice S; Tibboel, Dick; Xu, Suowen; Jin, Zheng Gen; Djuwantono, Tono; Yan, Wei; Alves, Maria M; Hofstra, Robert M W; Miano, Joseph M

    2017-03-28

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a congenital visceral myopathy characterized by severe dilation of the urinary bladder and defective intestinal motility. The genetic basis of MMIHS has been ascribed to spontaneous and autosomal dominant mutations in actin gamma 2 (ACTG2), a smooth muscle contractile gene. However, evidence suggesting a recessive origin of the disease also exists. Using combined homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing, a genetically isolated family was found to carry a premature termination codon in Leiomodin1 (LMOD1), a gene preferentially expressed in vascular and visceral smooth muscle cells. Parents heterozygous for the mutation exhibited no abnormalities, but a child homozygous for the premature termination codon displayed symptoms consistent with MMIHS. We used CRISPR-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein) genome editing of Lmod1 to generate a similar premature termination codon. Mice homozygous for the mutation showed loss of LMOD1 protein and pathology consistent with MMIHS, including late gestation expansion of the bladder, hydronephrosis, and rapid demise after parturition. Loss of LMOD1 resulted in a reduction of filamentous actin, elongated cytoskeletal dense bodies, and impaired intestinal smooth muscle contractility. These results define LMOD1 as a disease gene for MMIHS and suggest its role in establishing normal smooth muscle cytoskeletal-contractile coupling.

  17. Cloning and characterization of an abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) actin gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongming; Xu, Wei; Mai, Kangsen; Liufu, Zhiguo; Chen, Hong

    2004-10-01

    An actin encoding gene was cloned by using RT-PCR, 3‧ RACE and 5‧ RACE from abalone Haliotis discus hannai. The full length of the gene is 1532 base pairs, which contains a long 3‧ untranslated region of 307 base pairs and 79 base pairs of 5‧ untranslated sequence. The open reading frame encodes 376 amino acid residues. Sequence comparison with those of human and other mollusks showed high conservation among species at amino acid level. The identities was 96%, 97% and 96% respectively compared with Aplysia californica, Biomphalaria glabrata and Homo sapience β-actin. It is also indicated that this actin is more similar to the human cytoplasmic actin (β-actin) than to human muscle actin.

  18. A role for actin polymerization in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Fediuk, Jena; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala

    2015-03-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is defined as the failure of normal pulmonary vascular relaxation at birth. Hypoxia is known to impede postnatal disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton in pulmonary arterial myocytes, resulting in elevation of smooth muscle α-actin and γ-actin content in elastic and resistance pulmonary arteries in PPHN compared with age-matched controls. This review examines the original histological characterization of PPHN with attention to cytoskeletal structural remodeling and actin isoform abundance, reviews the existing evidence for understanding the biophysical and biochemical forces at play during neonatal circulatory transition, and specifically addresses the role of the cortical actin architecture, primarily identified as γ-actin, in the transduction of mechanical force in the hypoxic PPHN pulmonary circuit.

  19. Effect of temperature on the mechanism of actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zimmerle, C T; Frieden, C

    1986-10-21

    The rate of the Mg2+-induced polymerization of rabbit skeletal muscle G-actin has been measured as as function of temperature at pH 8 by using various concentrations of Mg2+, Ca2+, and G-actin. A polymerization mechanism similar to that proposed at this pH [Frieden, C. (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 80, 6513-6517] was found to fit the data from 10 to 35 degrees C. From the kinetic data, no evidence for actin filament fragmentation was found at any temperature. Dimer formation is the most temperature-sensitive step, with the ratio of forward and reverse rate constants changing 4 orders of magnitude from 10 to 35 degrees C. Over this temperature change, all other ratios of forward and reverse rate constants change 7-fold or less, and the critical concentration remains nearly constant. The reversible Mg2+-induced isomerization of G-actin monomer occurs to a greater extent with increasing temperature, measured either by using N-(iodoacetyl)-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine-labeled actin or by simulation of the full-time course of the polymerization reaction. This is partially due to Mg2+ binding becoming tighter, and Ca2+ binding becoming weaker, with increasing temperature. Elongation rates from the filament-pointed end, determined by using actin nucleated by plasma gelsolin, show a temperature dependence slightly larger than that expected for a diffusion-limited reaction.

  20. Calcium regulation of muscle contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1975-01-01

    Calcium triggers contraction by reaction with regulatory proteins that in the absence of calcium prevent interaction of actin and myosin. Two different regulatory systems are found in different muscles. In actin-linked regulation troponin and tropomyosin regulate actin by blocking sites on actin required for complex formation with myosin; in myosin-linked regulation sites on myosin are blocked in the absence of calcium. The major features of actin control are as follows: there is a requirement for tropomyosin and for a troponin complex having three different subunits with different functions; the actin displays a cooperative behavior; and a movement of tropomyosin occurs controlled by the calcium binding on troponin. Myosin regulation is controlled by a regulatory subunit that can be dissociated in scallop myosin reversibly by removing divalent cations with EDTA. Myosin control can function with pure actin in the absence of tropomyosin. Calcium binding and regulation of molluscan myosins depend on the presence of regulatory light chains. It is proposed that the light chains function by sterically blocking myosin sites in the absence of calcium, and that the "off" state of myosin requires cooperation between the two myosin heads. Both myosin control and actin control are widely distributed in different organisms. Many invertebrates have muscles with both types of regulation. Actin control is absent in the muscles of molluscs and in several minor phyla that lack troponin. Myosin control is not found in striated vertebrate muscles and in the fast muscles of crustacean decapods, although regulatory light chains are present. While in vivo myosin control may not be excluded from vertebrate striated muscles, myosin control may be absent as a result of mutations of the myosin heavy chain. PMID:806311

  1. Possible association of actin filaments with chloroplasts of spinach mesophyll cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kumatani, T; Sakurai-Ozato, N; Miyawaki, N; Yokota, E; Shimmen, T; Terashima, I; Takagi, S

    2006-11-01

    In palisade mesophyll cells of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) kept under low-intensity white light, chloroplasts were apparently immobile and seemed to be surrounded by fine bundles of actin filaments. High-intensity blue light induced actin-dependent chloroplast movement concomitant with the appearance of a couple of long, straight bundles of actin filaments in each cell, whereas high-intensity red light was essentially ineffective in inducing these responses. The actin organization observed under low-intensity white light has been postulated to function in anchoring chloroplasts at proper intracellular positions through direct interaction with the chloroplasts. Intact chloroplasts, which retained their outer envelopes, were isolated after homogenization of leaves and Percoll centrifugation. No endogenous actin was detected by immunoblotting in the final intact-chloroplast fraction prepared from the leaves kept under low-intensity white light or in darkness. In cosedimentation assays with exogenously added skeletal muscle filamentous actin, however, actin was detected in the intact-chloroplast fraction precipitated after low-speed centrifugation. The association of actin with chloroplasts was apparently dependent on incubation time and chloroplast density. After partial disruption of the outer envelope of isolated chloroplasts by treatment with trypsin, actin was no longer coprecipitated. The results suggest that chloroplasts in spinach leaves can directly interact with actin, and that this interaction may be involved in the regulation of intracellular positioning of chloroplasts.

  2. The Effect of Crosslinking on the Microscale Stress Response and Molecular Deformations in Actin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurmessa, Bekele; Fitzpatrick, Robert; Valdivia, Jonathon; Anderson, Rae M. R.

    Actin, the most abundant protein in eukaryotic cells, is a semi-flexible biopolymer in the cytoskeleton that plays a crucial structural and mechanical role in cell stability, motion and replication, as well as muscle contraction. Most of these mechanically driven structural changes in cells stem from the complex viscoelastic nature of entangled actin networks and the presence of a myriad of proteins that cross-link actin filaments. Despite their importance, the mechanical response of actin networks is not yet well understood, particularly at the molecular level. Here, we use optical trapping - coupled with fluorescence microscopy - to characterize the microscale stress response and induced filament deformations in entangled and cross-linked actin networks subject to localized mechanical perturbations. In particular, we actively drive a microsphere 10 microns through an entangled or cross- linked actin network at a constant speed and measure the resistive force that the deformed actin filaments exert on the bead during and following strain. We simultaneously visualize and track individual sparsely-labeled actin filaments to directly link force response to molecular deformations, and map the propagation of the initially localized perturbation field throughout the rest of the network (~100 um). By varying the concentration of actin and cross-linkers we directly determine the role of crosslinking and entanglements on the length and time scales of stress propagation, molecular deformation and relaxation mechanisms in actin networks.

  3. Involvement of β- and γ-actin isoforms in actin cytoskeleton organization and migration abilities of bleb-forming human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Simiczyjew, Aleksandra; Mazur, Antonina Joanna; Dratkiewicz, Ewelina; Nowak, Dorota

    2017-01-01

    Amoeboid movement is characteristic for rounded cells, which do not form strong adhesion contacts with the ECM and use blebs as migratory protrusions. It is well known that actin is the main component of mature forms of these structures, but the exact role fulfilled by non-muscle actin isoforms β- and γ- in bleb formation and migration of these cells is still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to establish the role of β- and γ-actin in migration of bleb-forming cancer cells using isoform-specific antibodies and expression of fluorescently tagged actin isoforms. We observed, after staining with monoclonal antibodies, that both actins are present in these cells in the form of a cortical ring as well as in the area of blebs. Additionally, using simultaneous expression of differentially tagged β- and γ-actin in cells, we observed that the actin isoforms are present together in a single bleb. They were involved during bleb expansion as well as retraction. Also present in the area of these protrusions formed by both isoforms were the bleb markers–ezrin and myosin II. The overexpression of β- or γ-actin led to actin cytoskeletal rearrangement followed by the growth of migration and invasion abilities of examined human colon cancer cells, LS174T line. In summary these data prove that both actin isoforms have an impact on motility of bleb-forming cancer cells. Moreover, we conclude that monoclonal antibodies directed against actin isoforms in combination with the tagged actins are good tools to study their role in important biological processes. PMID:28333953

  4. Spontaneous oscillatory contraction without regulatory proteins in actin filament-reconstituted fibers.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Ishiwata, S

    1998-09-01

    Skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers exhibits spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in the presence of MgATP, MgADP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi)1 but the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not yet clear. We have investigated the role of regulatory proteins in SPOC using cardiac muscle fibers of which the actin filaments had been reconstituted without tropomyosin and troponin, according to a previously reported method (Fujita et al., 1996. Biophys. J. 71:2307-2318). That is, thin filaments in glycerinated cardiac muscle fibers were selectively removed by treatment with gelsolin. Then, by adding exogenous actin to these thin filament-free cardiac muscle fibers under polymerizing conditions, actin filaments were reconstituted. The actin filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers generated active tension in a Ca(2+)-insensitive manner because of the lack of regulatory proteins. Herein we have developed a new solvent condition under which SPOC occurs, even in actin filament-reconstituted fibers: the coexistence of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), a reversible inhibitor of actomyosin interactions, with MgATP, MgADP and Pi. The role of BDM in the mechanism of SPOC in the actin filament-reconstituted fibers was analogous to that of the inhibitory function of the tropomyosin-troponin complex (-Ca2+) in the control fibers. The present results suggest that SPOC is a phenomenon that is intrinsic to the actomyosin motor itself.

  5. Spontaneous oscillatory contraction without regulatory proteins in actin filament-reconstituted fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, H; Ishiwata, S

    1998-01-01

    Skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers exhibits spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in the presence of MgATP, MgADP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi)1 but the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not yet clear. We have investigated the role of regulatory proteins in SPOC using cardiac muscle fibers of which the actin filaments had been reconstituted without tropomyosin and troponin, according to a previously reported method (Fujita et al., 1996. Biophys. J. 71:2307-2318). That is, thin filaments in glycerinated cardiac muscle fibers were selectively removed by treatment with gelsolin. Then, by adding exogenous actin to these thin filament-free cardiac muscle fibers under polymerizing conditions, actin filaments were reconstituted. The actin filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers generated active tension in a Ca(2+)-insensitive manner because of the lack of regulatory proteins. Herein we have developed a new solvent condition under which SPOC occurs, even in actin filament-reconstituted fibers: the coexistence of 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM), a reversible inhibitor of actomyosin interactions, with MgATP, MgADP and Pi. The role of BDM in the mechanism of SPOC in the actin filament-reconstituted fibers was analogous to that of the inhibitory function of the tropomyosin-troponin complex (-Ca2+) in the control fibers. The present results suggest that SPOC is a phenomenon that is intrinsic to the actomyosin motor itself. PMID:9726945

  6. Magnesium Modulates Actin Binding and ADP Release in Myosin Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Anja M.; Trivedi, Darshan V.; Rauscher, Anna A.; Wang, Yuan; Takagi, Yasuharu; Palmer, Bradley M.; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Debold, Edward P.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the magnesium dependence of five class II myosins, including fast skeletal muscle myosin, smooth muscle myosin, β-cardiac myosin (CMIIB), Dictyostelium myosin II (DdMII), and nonmuscle myosin IIA, as well as myosin V. We found that the myosins examined are inhibited in a Mg2+-dependent manner (0.3–9.0 mm free Mg2+) in both ATPase and motility assays, under conditions in which the ionic strength was held constant. We found that the ADP release rate constant is reduced by Mg2+ in myosin V, smooth muscle myosin, nonmuscle myosin IIA, CMIIB, and DdMII, although the ADP affinity is fairly insensitive to Mg2+ in fast skeletal muscle myosin, CMIIB, and DdMII. Single tryptophan probes in the switch I (Trp-239) and switch II (Trp-501) region of DdMII demonstrate these conserved regions of the active site are sensitive to Mg2+ coordination. Cardiac muscle fiber mechanic studies demonstrate cross-bridge attachment time is increased at higher Mg2+ concentrations, demonstrating that the ADP release rate constant is slowed by Mg2+ in the context of an activated muscle fiber. Direct measurements of phosphate release in myosin V demonstrate that Mg2+ reduces actin affinity in the M·ADP·Pi state, although it does not change the rate of phosphate release. Therefore, the Mg2+ inhibition of the actin-activated ATPase activity observed in class II myosins is likely the result of Mg2+-dependent alterations in actin binding. Overall, our results suggest that Mg2+ reduces the ADP release rate constant and rate of attachment to actin in both high and low duty ratio myosins. PMID:25006251

  7. Plasma Actin, Gelsolin and Orosomucoid Levels after Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tékus, Éva; Váczi, Márk; Horváth-Szalai, Zoltán; Ludány, Andrea; Kőszegi, Tamás; Wilhelm, Márta

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the acute effect of eccentric exercise on blood plasma actin, gelsolin (GSN) and orosomucoid (AGP) levels in untrained and moderately trained individuals, and their correlation with exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) markers (CK, intensity of muscle soreness and maximal voluntary contraction torque deficit). Healthy physical education students (6 untrained, 12 moderately trained) participated in this research. Actin, GSN, AGP and CK levels were measured in blood plasma at baseline, immediately, 1 h, 6 h and 24 h post-exercise comprising 90 eccentric quadriceps contractions performed on a dynamometer. There was significant time main effect for GSN, AGP, CK and significant difference was found between baseline and the lowest value of post-exercise GSN (p < 0.05), as well as baseline and the highest value of post-exercise AGP (p < 0.05). Relationships were found between GSN levels and other indirect EIMD markers (between all GSN levels at post-exercise and CK activity at 6 h, p < 0.05; GSNMIN and muscle soreness at post-exercise, p < 0.04), GSN and AGP; however, actin did not correlate at any time points with GSN. Actin, GSN, AGP and CK responses after eccentric exercise do not seem sensitive to training status. The plasma actin level is used as an indicator of injury, however, our results suggest that it is not an accurate marker of EIMD, while plasma GSN concentrations show a better relationship with EIMD and the post-exercise inflammatory process. The elevated plasma AGP and the correlation between GSN and AGP seem to be promising for assessment of exercise-induced muscle injury.

  8. Suppressors of Yeast Actin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Novick, P.; Osmond, B. C.; Botstein, D.

    1989-01-01

    Suppressors of a temperature-sensitive mutation (act1-1) in the single actin gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were selected that had simultaneously acquired a cold-sensitive growth phenotype. Five genes, called SAC (suppressor of actin) were defined by complementation tests; both suppression and cold-sensitive phenotypes were recessive. Three of the genes (SAC1, SAC2 and SAC3) were subjected to extensive genetic and phenotypic analysis, including molecular cloning. Suppression was found to be allele-specific with respect to actin alleles. The sac mutants, even in ACT1(+) genetic backgrounds, displayed phenotypes similar to those of actin mutants, notably aberrant organization of intracellular actin and deposition of chitin at the cell surface. These results are interpreted as being consistent with the idea that the SAC genes encode proteins that interact with actin, presumably as components or controllers of the assembly or stability of the yeast actin cytoskeleton. Two unexpected properties of the SAC1 gene were noted. Disruptions of the gene indicated that its function is essential only at temperatures below about 17° and all sac1 alleles are inviable when combined with act1-2. These properties are interpreted in the context of the evolution of the actin cytoskeleton of yeast. PMID:2656401

  9. Ring closure in actin polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Supurna; Chattopadhyay, Sebanti

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers.

  10. Structural Analysis of Human Cofilin 2/Filamentous Actin Assemblies: Atomic-Resolution Insights from Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yehl, Jenna; Kudryashova, Elena; Reisler, Emil; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Polenova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Cellular actin dynamics is an essential element of numerous cellular processes, such as cell motility, cell division and endocytosis. Actin’s involvement in these processes is mediated by many actin-binding proteins, among which the cofilin family plays unique and essential role in accelerating actin treadmilling in filamentous actin (F-actin) in a nucleotide-state dependent manner. Cofilin preferentially interacts with older filaments by recognizing time-dependent changes in F-actin structure associated with the hydrolysis of ATP and release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) from the nucleotide cleft of actin. The structure of cofilin on F-actin and the details of the intermolecular interface remain poorly understood at atomic resolution. Here we report atomic-level characterization by magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of the muscle isoform of human cofilin 2 (CFL2) bound to F-actin. We demonstrate that resonance assignments for the majority of atoms are readily accomplished and we derive the intermolecular interface between CFL2 and F-actin. The MAS NMR approach reported here establishes the foundation for atomic-resolution characterization of a broad range of actin-associated proteins bound to F-actin. PMID:28303963

  11. Differences in G-actin containing bound ATP or ADP: the Mg2+-induced conformational change requires ATP.

    PubMed

    Frieden, C; Patane, K

    1985-07-16

    The role of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the Mg2+-induced conformational change of rabbit skeletal muscle G-actin has been investigated by comparing actin containing bound ADP with actin containing bound ATP. As previously described [Frieden, C. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 2882-2886], N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine-labeled G-actin containing ATP undergoes a time-dependent Mg2+-induced fluorescence change that reflects a conformational change in the actin. Addition of Mg2+ to labeled G-actin containing ADP gives no fluorescence change, suggesting that the conformational change does not occur. The fluorescence change can be restored on the addition of ATP. Examination of the time courses of these experiments suggests that ATP must replace ADP prior to the Mg2+-induced change. The Mg2+-induced polymerization of actin containing ADP is extraordinarily slow compared to that of actin containing ATP. The lack of the Mg2+-induced conformational change, which is an essential step in the Mg2+-induced polymerization, is probably the cause for the very slow polymerization of actin containing ADP. On the other hand, at 20 degrees C, at pH 8, and in 2 mM Mg2+, the elongation rate from the slow growing end of an actin filament, measured by using the protein brevin to block growth at the fast growing end, is only 4 times slower for actin containing ADP than for actin containing ATP.

  12. Transgenic overexpression of γ-cytoplasmic actin protects against eccentric contraction-induced force loss in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Baltgalvis, Kristen A; Jaeger, Michele A; Fitzsimons, Daniel P; Thayer, Stanley A; Lowe, Dawn A; Ervasti, James M

    2011-10-13

    γ-cytoplasmic (γ-cyto) actin levels are elevated in dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine whether further elevation of γ-cyto actin levels improve or exacerbate the dystrophic phenotype of mdx mice. We transgenically overexpressed γ-cyto actin, specifically in skeletal muscle of mdx mice (mdx-TG), and compared skeletal muscle pathology and force-generating capacity between mdx and mdx-TG mice at different ages. We investigated the mechanism by which γ-cyto actin provides protection from force loss by studying the role of calcium channels and stretch-activated channels in isolated skeletal muscles and muscle fibers. Analysis of variance or independent t-tests were used to detect statistical differences between groups. Levels of γ-cyto actin in mdx-TG skeletal muscle were elevated 200-fold compared to mdx skeletal muscle and incorporated into thin filaments. Overexpression of γ-cyto actin had little effect on most parameters of mdx muscle pathology. However, γ-cyto actin provided statistically significant protection against force loss during eccentric contractions. Store-operated calcium entry across the sarcolemma did not differ between mdx fibers compared to wild-type fibers. Additionally, the omission of extracellular calcium or the addition of streptomycin to block stretch-activated channels did not improve the force-generating capacity of isolated extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice during eccentric contractions. The data presented in this study indicate that upregulation of γ-cyto actin in dystrophic skeletal muscle can attenuate force loss during eccentric contractions and that the mechanism is independent of activation of stretch-activated channels and the accumulation of extracellular calcium.

  13. The Formin Diaphanous Regulates Myoblast Fusion through Actin Polymerization and Arp2/3 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Su; Bothe, Ingo; Baylies, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multinucleated muscle cells through cell-cell fusion is a conserved process from fruit flies to humans. Numerous studies have shown the importance of Arp2/3, its regulators, and branched actin for the formation of an actin structure, the F-actin focus, at the fusion site. This F-actin focus forms the core of an invasive podosome-like structure that is required for myoblast fusion. In this study, we find that the formin Diaphanous (Dia), which nucleates and facilitates the elongation of actin filaments, is essential for Drosophila myoblast fusion. Following cell recognition and adhesion, Dia is enriched at the myoblast fusion site, concomitant with, and having the same dynamics as, the F-actin focus. Through analysis of Dia loss-of-function conditions using mutant alleles but particularly a dominant negative Dia transgene, we demonstrate that reduction in Dia activity in myoblasts leads to a fusion block. Significantly, no actin focus is detected, and neither branched actin regulators, SCAR or WASp, accumulate at the fusion site when Dia levels are reduced. Expression of constitutively active Dia also causes a fusion block that is associated with an increase in highly dynamic filopodia, altered actin turnover rates and F-actin distribution, and mislocalization of SCAR and WASp at the fusion site. Together our data indicate that Dia plays two roles during invasive podosome formation at the fusion site: it dictates the level of linear F-actin polymerization, and it is required for appropriate branched actin polymerization via localization of SCAR and WASp. These studies provide new insight to the mechanisms of cell-cell fusion, the relationship between different regulators of actin polymerization, and invasive podosome formation that occurs in normal development and in disease. PMID:26295716

  14. Vascular disease-causing mutation R258C in ACTA2 disrupts actin dynamics and interaction with myosin

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hailong; Fagnant, Patricia M.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Joel, Peteranne; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Point mutations in vascular smooth muscle α-actin (SM α-actin), encoded by the gene ACTA2, are the most prevalent cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD). Here, we provide the first molecular characterization, to our knowledge, of the effect of the R258C mutation in SM α-actin, expressed with the baculovirus system. Smooth muscles are unique in that force generation requires both interaction of stable actin filaments with myosin and polymerization of actin in the subcortical region. Both aspects of R258C function therefore need investigation. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy was used to quantify the growth of single actin filaments as a function of time. R258C filaments are less stable than WT and more susceptible to severing by cofilin. Smooth muscle tropomyosin offers little protection from cofilin cleavage, unlike its effect on WT actin. Unexpectedly, profilin binds tighter to the R258C monomer, which will increase the pool of globular actin (G-actin). In an in vitro motility assay, smooth muscle myosin moves R258C filaments more slowly than WT, and the slowing is exacerbated by smooth muscle tropomyosin. Under loaded conditions, small ensembles of myosin are unable to produce force on R258C actin-tropomyosin filaments, suggesting that tropomyosin occupies an inhibitory position on actin. Many of the observed defects cannot be explained by a direct interaction with the mutated residue, and thus the mutation allosterically affects multiple regions of the monomer. Our results align with the hypothesis that defective contractile function contributes to the pathogenesis of TAAD. PMID:26153420

  15. Functional effects of nemaline myopathy mutations on human skeletal alpha-actin.

    PubMed

    Miller, Becky M; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2008-07-11

    Mutations in human alpha-skeletal actin have been implicated in causing congenital nemaline myopathy, a disease characterized histopathologically by nemaline bodies in skeletal muscle and manifested in the patient as skeletal muscle weakness. Here we investigate the functional effects of three severe nemaline myopathy mutations (V43F, A138P, and R183G) in human alpha-skeletal actin. Wild-type and mutant actins were expressed and purified from the baculovirus/insect cell expression system. The mutations are located in different subdomains of actin; Val-43 is located in a flexible loop of subdomain 2, Ala-138 is near a hydrophobic cleft in the "hinge" region between subdomains 1 and 3, and Arg-183 is near the nucleotide-binding site. None of the three mutations affected the folding of the actin monomer, the velocity at which skeletal myosin moves actin in an in vitro motility assay, or the relative average isometric force supported by F-actin. Defects in fundamental actomyosin interactions are, therefore, unlikely to account for the muscle weakness observed in affected patients. There were, however, significant changes observed in the polymerization kinetics of V43F and A138P and in the rate of nucleotide release for V43F. No detectable defect was found for R183G. If these subtle changes in polymerization observed in vitro are amplified in the context of the sarcomere, it could in principle be one of the primary insults that triggers the development of nemaline myopathy.

  16. Actin binding proteins and spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mruk, Dolores D

    2011-01-01

    Drebrin E, an actin-binding protein lacking intrinsic activity in the regulation of actin dynamics (e.g., polymerization, capping, nucleation, branching, cross-linking, bundling and severing), is known to recruit actin regulatory proteins to a specific cellular site. Herein, we critically evaluate recent findings in the field which illustrate that drebrin E works together with two other actin-binding proteins, namely Arp3 (actin-related protein 3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex that simultaneously controls actin nucleation for polymerization and branching of actin filaments) and Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 that controls capping of the barbed ends of actin filaments, as well as actin filament bundling) to regulate the homeostasis of F-actin filament bundles at the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific atypical adherens junction (AJ) in the seminiferous epithelium. This is mediated by the strict temporal and spatial expression of these three actin-binding proteins at the apical and basal ES at the Sertoli cell-spermatid (step 8–19) and Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface, respectively, during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. In this Commentary, we put forth a possible model by which drebrin E may be acting as a platform upon which proteins (e.g., Arp3) that are needed to alter the conformation of actin filament bundles at the ES can be recruited to the site, thus facilitating changes in cell shape and cell position in the epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. In short, drebrin E may be acting as a “logistic” distribution center to manage different regulatory proteins at the apical ES, thereby regulating the dynamics of actin filament bundles and modulating the plasticity of the apical ES. This would allow adhesion to be altered continuously throughout the epithelial cycle to accommodate spermatid movement in the seminiferous epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. We also

  17. Bacterial Actins and Their Interactors.

    PubMed

    Gayathri, Pananghat

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial actins polymerize in the presence of nucleotide (preferably ATP), form a common arrangement of monomeric interfaces within a protofilament, and undergo ATP hydrolysis-dependent change in stability of the filament-all of which contribute to performing their respective functions. The relative stability of the filament in the ADP-bound form compared to that of ATP and the rate of addition of monomers at the two ends decide the filament dynamics. One of the major differences between eukaryotic actin and bacterial actins is the variety in protofilament arrangements and dynamics exhibited by the latter. The filament structure and the polymerization dynamics enable them to perform various functions such as shape determination in rod-shaped bacteria (MreB), cell division (FtsA), plasmid segregation (ParM family of actin-like proteins), and organelle positioning (MamK). Though the architecture and dynamics of a few representative filaments have been studied, information on the effect of interacting partners on bacterial actin filament dynamics is not very well known. The chapter reviews some of the structural and functional aspects of bacterial actins, with special focus on the effect that interacting partners exert on the dynamics of bacterial actins, and how these assist them to carry out the functions within the bacterial cell.

  18. Novel actin depolymerizing macrolide aplyronine A.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Watabe, S; Ozaki, H; Kigoshi, H; Yamada, K; Fusetani, N; Karaki, H

    1996-09-01

    Aplyronine A is a macrolide isolated from Aplysia kurodai. By monitoring fluorescent intensity of pyrenyl-actin, it was found that aplyronine A inhibited both the velocity and the degree of actin polymerization. Aplyronine A also quickly depolymerized F-actin. The kinetics of depolymerization suggest that aplyronine A severs F-actin. The relationship between the concentration of total actin and F-actin at different concentrations of aplyronine A suggests that aplyronine A forms a 1:1 complex with G-actin. From these results, it is concluded that aplyronine A inhibits actin polymerization and depolymerizes F-actin by nibbling. Comparison of the chemical structure of aplyronine A and another actin-depolymerizing macrolide, mycalolide B, suggests that the side-chain but not the macrolide ring of aplyronine A may account for its actin binding and severing activity.

  19. Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin on actin during thin filament activation.

    PubMed

    Lehman, William; Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Our thesis is that thin filament function can only be fully understood and muscle regulation then elucidated if atomic structures of the thin filament are available to reveal the positions of tropomyosin on actin in all physiological states. After all, it is tropomyosin influenced by troponin that regulates myosin-crossbridge cycling on actin and therefore controls contraction in all muscles. In addition, we maintain that a complete appreciation of thin filament activation also requires that the mechanical properties of tropomyosin itself are recognized and then related to the effect of myosin-association on actin. Taking the Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin into account, coupled with our electron microscopy structures and computational chemistry, we propose a comprehensive mechanism for tropomyosin regulatory movement over the actin filament surface that explains the cooperative muscle activation process. In fact, well-known point mutations of critical amino acids on the actin-tropomyosin binding interface disrupt Gestalt-binding and are associated with a number of inherited myopathies. Moreover, dysregulation of tropomyosin may also be a factor that interferes with the gatekeeping operation of non-muscle tropomyosin in the controlling interactions of a wide variety of cellular actin-binding proteins. The clinical relevance of Gestalt-binding is discussed in articles by the Marston and the Gunning groups in this special journal issue devoted to the impact of tropomyosin on biological systems.

  20. Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin on actin during thin filament activation

    PubMed Central

    Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Our thesis is that thin filament function can only be fully understood and muscle regulation then elucidated if atomic structures of the thin filament are available to reveal the positions of tropomyosin on actin in all physiological states. After all, it is tropomyosin influenced by troponin that regulates myosin-crossbridge cycling on actin and therefore controls contraction in all muscles. In addition, we maintain that a complete appreciation of thin filament activation also requires that the mechanical properties of tropomyosin itself are recognized and then related to the effect of myosin-association on actin. Taking the Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin into account, coupled with our electron microscopy structures and computational chemistry, we propose a comprehensive mechanism for tropomyosin regulatory movement over the actin filament surface that explains the cooperative muscle activation process. In fact, well-known point mutations of critical amino acids on the actin-tropomyosin binding interface disrupt Gestalt-binding and are associated with a number of inherited myopathies. Moreover, dysregulation of tropomyosin may also be a factor that interferes with the gatekeeping operation of non-muscle tropomyosin in the controlling interactions of a wide variety of cellular actin-binding proteins. The clinical relevance of Gestalt-binding is discussed in articles by the Marston and the Gunning groups in this special journal issue devoted to the impact of tropomyosin on biological systems. PMID:23666668

  1. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi Nagata, Kyosuke

    2015-02-15

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network.

  2. A new Tetrahymena actin-binding protein is localized in the division furrow.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, A; Kurasawa, Y; Watanabe, Y; Numata, O

    1998-04-01

    Using an F-actin affinity column, a 60 kDa fragment of a 71 kDa F-actin-binding protein was partially purified from Tetrahymena pyriformis. After digestion of the 60 kDa fragment with cyanogen bromide, the N-terminal 21-amino acid sequence of one of the resulting peptides was found to show sequence similarity to a region near the actin-binding site (amino acid residues 260-281) of yeast fimbrin. An antibody prepared against a synthesized 21-mer oligopeptide reacted with the 71 kDa proteins in T. pyriformis and T. thermophila cell extracts, suggesting that the 60 kDa fragment was produced from the 71 kDa protein through partial digestion occurring during isolation. The 60 kDa fragment bound to Tetrahymena F-actin as well as to rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin, and induced the bundling of Tetrahymena F-actin. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed colocalization of the 71 kDa protein and actin in the oral apparatus and the deep fiber bundles in T. pyriformis. On the other hand, in T. thermophila, the 71 kDa protein was localized in the oral apparatus and the contractile vacuole pores during the interphase. During cytokinesis, the 71 kDa protein was localized in the division furrow. Therefore, the 71 kDa protein seems to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, and to regulate the actin filament organization during phagocytosis and cytokinesis in Tetrahymena.

  3. Dynamic actin remodeling during epithelial-mesenchymal transition depends on increased moesin expression.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Jennifer; Srivastava, Jyoti; Madson, Nikki; Wittmann, Torsten; Barber, Diane L

    2011-12-01

    Remodeling of actin filaments is necessary for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); however, understanding of how this is regulated in real time is limited. We used an actin filament reporter and high-resolution live-cell imaging to analyze the regulated dynamics of actin filaments during transforming growth factor-β-induced EMT of mammary epithelial cells. Progressive changes in cell morphology were accompanied by reorganization of actin filaments from thin cortical bundles in epithelial cells to thick, parallel, contractile bundles that disassembled more slowly but remained dynamic in transdifferentiated cells. We show that efficient actin filament remodeling during EMT depends on increased expression of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) protein moesin. Cells suppressed for moesin expression by short hairpin RNA had fewer, thinner, and less stable actin bundles, incomplete morphological transition, and decreased invasive capacity. These cells also had less α-smooth muscle actin and phosphorylated myosin light chain in cortical patches, decreased abundance of the adhesion receptor CD44 at membrane protrusions, and attenuated autophosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. Our findings suggest that increased moesin expression promotes EMT by regulating adhesion and contractile elements for changes in actin filament organization. We propose that the transciptional program driving EMT controls progressive remodeling of actin filament architectures.

  4. Actin cytoskeleton: putting a CAP on actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, V A; Theurkauf, W E

    2000-10-05

    Two recent studies have identified a Drosophila homolog of cyclase-associated protein (CAP) as a developmentally important negative regulator of actin polymerization that may also directly mediate signal transduction.

  5. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner.

  6. Fluorescent beads disintegrate actin networks.

    PubMed

    Golde, Tom; Schuldt, Carsten; Schnauß, Jörg; Strehle, Dan; Glaser, Martin; Käs, Josef

    2013-10-01

    We studied the influence of fluorescent polystyrene beads on both entangled and cross-linked actin networks. Thermal bead fluctuations were observed via video particle tracking and analyzed with one-point microrheology. Illumination of fluorescent beads with their appropriate excitation wavelength leads to a drastic softening of actin gels. Other wavelengths and bright field microscopy do not increase thermal bead fluctuations. This effect cannot be significantly reduced by adding common oxygen scavengers. We conclude that the usage of fluorescent beads impairs results when studying the microrheology of actin networks.

  7. Actin dynamics and cofilin-actin rods in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Bamburg, James R.; Bernstein, Barbara W.

    2017-01-01

    Cytoskeletal abnormalities and synaptic loss, typical of both familial and sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD), are induced by diverse stresses such as neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and energetic stress, each of which may be initiated or enhanced by proinflammatory cytokines or amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Extracellular Aβ-containing plaques and intracellular phospho-tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles are postmortem pathologies required to confirm AD and have been the focus of most studies. However, AD brain, but not normal brain, also have increased levels of cytoplasmic rod-shaped bundles of filaments composed of ADF/cofilin-actin in a 1:1 complex (rods). Cofilin, the major ADF/cofilin isoform in mammalian neurons, severs actin filaments at low cofilin/actin ratios and stabilizes filaments at high cofilin/actin ratios. It binds cooperatively to ADP-actin subunits in F-actin. Cofilin is activated by dephosphorylation and may be oxidized in stressed neurons to form disulfide-linked dimers, required for bundling cofilin-actin filaments into stable rods. Rods form within neurites causing synaptic dysfunction by sequestering cofilin, disrupting normal actin dynamics, blocking transport, and exacerbating mitochondrial membrane potential loss. Aβ and proinflammatory cytokines induce rods through a cellular prion protein-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase and production of reactive oxygen species. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of cofilin biochemistry, rod formation, and the development of cognitive deficits. We will then discuss rod formation as a molecular pathway for synapse loss that may be common between all three prominent current AD hypotheses, thus making rods an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26873625

  8. Cell elasticity is regulated by the tropomyosin isoform composition of the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Iman; Heu, Celine; Cheng, Hong; Freittag, Hannah; Desouza, Melissa; Stehn, Justine R; Bryce, Nicole S; Whan, Renee M; Hardeman, Edna C; Fath, Thomas; Schevzov, Galina; Gunning, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm), in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin) pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments.

  9. Cell Elasticity Is Regulated by the Tropomyosin Isoform Composition of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian, Iman; Heu, Celine; Cheng, Hong; Freittag, Hannah; Desouza, Melissa; Stehn, Justine R.; Bryce, Nicole S.; Whan, Renee M.; Hardeman, Edna C.

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm), in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin) pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments. PMID:25978408

  10. A new paradigm for muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Walter; Powers, Krysta; Johnston, Kaleena; Duvall, Mike

    2015-01-01

    For the past 60 years, muscle contraction had been thought to be governed exclusively by the contractile filaments, actin, and myosin. This thinking explained most observations for concentric and isometric, but not for eccentric muscle contractions. Just over a decade ago, we discovered that eccentric contractions were associated with a force that could not be assigned to actin and myosin, but was at least in part associated with the filamentous protein titin. Titin was found to bind calcium upon activation, thereby increasing its structural stability, and thus its stiffness and force. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that the proximal part of titin binds to actin in an activation- and force-dependent manner, thereby shortening its free length, thus increasing its stiffness and force. Therefore, we propose that muscle contraction involves three filaments, actin, myosin and titin, and that titin regulates force by binding calcium and by shortening its spring length by binding to actin. PMID:26113821

  11. Dual pools of actin at presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed

    Bleckert, Adam; Photowala, Huzefa; Alford, Simon

    2012-06-01

    We investigated actin's function in vesicle recycling and exocytosis at lamprey synapses and show that FM1-43 puncta and phalloidin-labeled filamentous actin (F-actin) structures are colocalized, yet recycling vesicles are not contained within F-actin clusters. Additionally, phalloidin also labels a plasma membrane-associated cortical actin. Injection of fluorescent G-actin revealed activity-independent dynamic actin incorporation into presynaptic synaptic vesicle clusters but not into cortical actin. Latrunculin-A, which sequesters G-actin, dispersed vesicle-associated actin structures and prevented subsequent labeled G-actin and phalloidin accumulation at presynaptic puncta, yet cortical phalloidin labeling persisted. Dispersal of presynaptic F-actin structures by latrunculin-A did not disrupt vesicle clustering or recycling or alter the amplitude or kinetics of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). However, it slightly enhanced release during repetitive stimulation. While dispersal of presynaptic actin puncta with latrunculin-A failed to disperse synaptic vesicles or inhibit synaptic transmission, presynaptic phalloidin injection blocked exocytosis and reduced endocytosis measured by action potential-evoked FM1-43 staining. Furthermore, phalloidin stabilization of only cortical actin following pretreatment with latrunculin-A was sufficient to inhibit synaptic transmission. Conversely, treatment of axons with jasplakinolide, which induces F-actin accumulation but disrupts F-actin structures in vivo, resulted in increased synaptic transmission accompanied by a loss of phalloidin labeling of cortical actin but no loss of actin labeling within vesicle clusters. Marked synaptic deficits seen with phalloidin stabilization of cortical F-actin, in contrast to the minimal effects of disruption of a synaptic vesicle-associated F-actin, led us to conclude that two structurally and functionally distinct pools of actin exist at presynaptic sites.

  12. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  13. [Photodynamic therapy for actinic cheilitis].

    PubMed

    Castaño, E; Comunión, A; Arias, D; Miñano, R; Romero, A; Borbujo, J

    2009-12-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a subtype of actinic keratosis that mainly affects the lower lip and has a higher risk of malignant transformation. Its location on the labial mucosa influences the therapeutic approach. Vermilionectomy requires local or general anesthetic and is associated with a risk of an unsightly scar, and the treatment with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod lasts for several weeks and the inflammatory reaction can be very intense. A number of authors have used photodynamic therapy as an alternative to the usual treatments. We present 3 patients with histologically confirmed actinic cheilitis treated using photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolevulinic acid as the photosensitizer and red light at 630 nm. The clinical response was good, with no recurrences after 3 to 6 months of follow-up. Our experience supports the use of photodynamic therapy as a good alternative for the treatment of actinic cheilitis.

  14. Thermal unfolding and aggregation of actin.

    PubMed

    Levitsky, Dmitrii I; Pivovarova, Anastasiya V; Mikhailova, Valeria V; Nikolaeva, Olga P

    2008-09-01

    Actin is one of the most abundant proteins in nature. It is found in all eukaryotes and plays a fundamental role in many diverse and dynamic cellular processes. Also, actin is one of the most ubiquitous proteins because actin-like proteins have recently been identified in bacteria. Actin filament (F-actin) is a highly dynamic structure that can exist in different conformational states, and transitions between these states may be important in cytoskeletal dynamics and cell motility. These transitions can be modulated by various factors causing the stabilization or destabilization of actin filaments. In this review, we look at actin stabilization and destabilization as expressed by changes in the thermal stability of actin; specifically, we summarize and analyze the existing data on the thermal unfolding of actin as measured by differential scanning calorimetry. We also analyze in vitro data on the heat-induced aggregation of actin, the process that normally accompanies actin thermal denaturation. In this respect, we focus on the effects of small heat shock proteins, which can prevent the aggregation of thermally denatured actin with no effect on actin thermal unfolding. As a result, we have proposed a mechanism describing the thermal denaturation and aggregation of F-actin. This mechanism explains some of the special features of the thermal unfolding of actin filaments, including the effects of their stabilization and destabilization; it can also explain how small heat shock proteins protect the actin cytoskeleton from damage caused by the accumulation of large insoluble aggregates under heat shock conditions.

  15. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C decorates F-actin: Implications for cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Andrew E.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Harris, Samantha P.; Trewhella, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is an accessory protein of striated muscle sarcomeres that is vital for maintaining regular heart function. Its 4 N-terminal regulatory domains, C0-C1-m-C2 (C0C2), influence actin and myosin interactions, the basic contractile proteins of muscle. Using neutron contrast variation data, we have determined that C0C2 forms a repeating assembly with filamentous actin, where the C0 and C1 domains of C0C2 attach near the DNase I-binding loop and subdomain 1 of adjacent actin monomers. Direct interactions between the N terminus of cMyBP-C and actin thereby provide a mechanism to modulate the contractile cycle by affecting the regulatory state of the thin filament and its ability to interact with myosin. PMID:19011110

  16. Logical gates in actin monomer.

    PubMed

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2017-09-18

    We evaluate information processing capacity of a single actin molecule by calculating distributions of logical gates implemented by the molecule via propagating patterns of excitation. We represent a filamentous actin molecule as an excitable automaton network (F-actin automaton). where every atom updates its state depending on states of atoms its connected to with chemical bonds (hard neighbours) and atoms being in physical proximity to the atom (soft neighbours). A resting atom excites if a sum of its excited hard neighbours and a weighted sum of its soft neighbours belong to some specified interval. We demonstrate that F-actin automata implement OR, AND, XOR and AND-NOT gates via interacting patterns of excitation. Gate AND is the most common gate and gate XOR is the rarest. Using the architectures of gates discovered we implement one bit half-adder and controlled-not circuits in the F-actin automata. Speed and space values of the F-actin molecular computers are discussed.

  17. Rho GTPases, phosphoinositides, and actin

    PubMed Central

    Croisé, Pauline; Estay-Ahumada, Catherine; Gasman, Stéphane; Ory, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are well known regulators of the actin cytoskeleton that act by binding and activating actin nucleators. They are therefore involved in many actin-based processes, including cell migration, cell polarity, and membrane trafficking. With the identification of phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases as potential binding partners or effectors, Rho GTPases also appear to participate in the regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism. Since both actin dynamics and phosphoinositide turnover affect the efficiency and the fidelity of vesicle transport between cell compartments, Rho GTPases have emerged as critical players in membrane trafficking. Rho GTPase activity, actin remodeling, and phosphoinositide metabolism need to be coordinated in both space and time to ensure the progression of vesicles along membrane trafficking pathways. Although most molecular pathways are still unclear, in this review, we will highlight recent advances made in our understanding of how Rho-dependent signaling pathways organize actin dynamics and phosphoinositides and how phosphoinositides potentially provide negative feedback to Rho GTPases during endocytosis, exocytosis and membrane exchange between intracellular compartments. PMID:24914539

  18. [Conformational changes of actin induced by strong or weak myosin subfragment-1 binding].

    PubMed

    Dedova, I V; Avrova, S V; Vikhoreva, N N; Vikhorev, R G; Hazlett, T L; Van der Meer, W; Dos Remedios, C G; Borovikov, Iu S

    2004-01-01

    Movements of different areas of polypeptide chains within F-actin monomers induced by S1 or pPDM-S1 binding were studied by polarized fluorimetry. Thin filaments of ghost muscle were reconstructed by adding G-actin labeled with fluorescent probes attached alternatively to different sites of actin molecule. These sites were: Cys-374 labeled with 1,5-IAEDANS, TMRIA or 5-IAF; Lys-373 labeled with NBD-Cl; Lys-113 labeled with Alexa-488; Lys-61 labeled with FITC; Gln-41 labeled with DED and Cys-10 labeled with 1,5-IAEDANS, 5-IAF or fluorescein-maleimid. In addition, we used TRITC-, FITC-falloidin and e-ADP that were located, respectively, in filament groove and interdomain cleft. The data were analysed by model-dependent and model-independent methods (see appendixes). The orientation and mobility of fluorescent probes were significantly changed when actin and myosin interacted, depending on fluorophore location and binding site of actomyosin. Strong binding of S with actin leads to 1) a decrease in the orientation of oscillators of derivatives of falloidin (TRITC-falloidin, FITC-falloidin) and actin-bound nucleotide (e-ADP); 2) an increase in the orientation of dye oscillators located in the "front' surface of the small domain (where actin is viewed in the standard orientation with subdomains 1/2 and 3/4 oriented to the right and to the left, respectively); 3) a decrease in the angles of dye oscillators located on the "back" surface of subdomain-1. In contrast, a weak binding of S1 to actin induces the opposite effects in orientation of these probes. These data suggest that during the ATP hydrolysis cycle myosin heads induce a change in actin monomer (a tilt and twisting of its small domain). Presumably, these alterations in F-actin conformation play an important role in muscle contraction.

  19. Cofilin-mediated actin dynamics promotes actin bundle formation during Drosophila bristle development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Heng; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    The actin bundle is an array of linear actin filaments cross-linked by actin-bundling proteins, but its assembly and dynamics are not as well understood as those of the branched actin network. Here we used the Drosophila bristle as a model system to study actin bundle formation. We found that cofilin, a major actin disassembly factor of the branched actin network, promotes the formation and positioning of actin bundles in the developing bristles. Loss of function of cofilin or AIP1, a cofactor of cofilin, each resulted in increased F-actin levels and severe defects in actin bundle organization, with the defects from cofilin deficiency being more severe. Further analyses revealed that cofilin likely regulates actin bundle formation and positioning by the following means. First, cofilin promotes a large G-actin pool both locally and globally, likely ensuring rapid actin polymerization for bundle initiation and growth. Second, cofilin limits the size of a nonbundled actin-myosin network to regulate the positioning of actin bundles. Third, cofilin prevents incorrect assembly of branched and myosin-associated actin filament into bundles. Together these results demonstrate that the interaction between the dynamic dendritic actin network and the assembling actin bundles is critical for actin bundle formation and needs to be closely regulated. PMID:27385345

  20. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    SciTech Connect

    Bekyarova, T.I.; Reedy, M.C.; Baumann, B.A.J.; Tregear, R.T.; Ward, A.; Krzic, U.; Prince, K.M.; Perz-Edwards, R.J.; Reconditi, M.; Gore, D.; Irving, T.C.; Reedy, M.K.

    2008-09-03

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the 'steric blocking' mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca{sup 2+} with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca{sup 2+}], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca{sup 2+}], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored 'actin target zones.' Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca{sup 2+}] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca{sup 2+}], Vi-'paralyzed' fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa {approx} 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding 'brakes' by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions.

  1. Genomic and cDNA actin sequences from a virulent strain of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Edman, U; Meza, I; Agabian, N

    1987-01-01

    Invasiveness of Entamoeba histolytica strains that cause acute amoebiasis is characterized by aggressive behavior associated with cell motility and actin function. Analysis of actin genes from E. histolytica was initiated by devising methods for the isolation of biologically active nucleic acids, which allowed the preparation of cDNA and genomic DNA libraries. E. histolytica actin-encoding cDNAs and genomic clones have been isolated from libraries prepared from the virulent HM1:IMSS strain using a heterologous actin probe. Nucleotide sequence analysis of three independent cDNA clones and one genomic clone reveals a highly unusual codon bias and the absence of intervening sequences in E. histolytica actin. The coding sequence of the genomic clone is identical to that of two of the three cDNA clones. These represent at least two distinct mRNAs differing only by five silent changes in the protein coding sequence. Multiple genomic copies of the actin gene can be detected by Southern hybridization. E. histolytica actin exhibits a higher degree of homology to cytoplasmic than to muscle actin. Although the protein has been shown not to bind DNase I, the inferred amino acid sequence indicates conservation of all residues implied to participate in this binding. Images PMID:2883657

  2. Purification of multiple functional leaf-actin isoforms from Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Camino, C; Villanueva, M A

    1999-01-01

    Plant actins show diversity in their gene sequences, protein isovariants and tissue distribution in eukaryotes. Besides general difficulties with the isolation of proteins from plant material (i.e. the presence of a cell wall and high proteolytic activity), the actin concentration in any vegetative plant tissue is much lower than in cytoplasmic animal tissues. In this study, we adapted a deoxyribonuclease I-Sepharose affinity purification scheme and we were able to enrich and isolate multiple functional plant actin isovariants from common bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris). Urea (4 M) elution proved that the DNase I column was able to bind at least eight actin isoforms with pI values ranging from 5.5 to 5.9, as observed by two-dimensional Western blots. Three of the most acidic actin isoforms, with pI values of approximately 5.6-5.7, were eluted partially with 0.75 M urea. The purified actin was also able to bind leaf and rabbit muscle profilin, phalloidin and DNase I. Moreover, the protein could polymerize into filaments that contained the main isoforms eluted from the column. The average actin recovery using this procedure was approximately 4-8 microg from 20 g of fresh tissue, of which at least 80% was able to form filaments. This is the first report of the purification of multiple plant-actin isoforms that are functional by the criteria of both binding to other ligands and polymerization. PMID:10527938

  3. The polymerization of actin: Structural changes from small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Alexander I.; Ivkov, Robert; Forbes, Jeffrey G.; Greer, Sandra C.

    2005-10-01

    We present a new analysis of small-angle neutron-scattering data from rabbit muscle actin in the course of the polymerization from G-actin to F-actin as a function of temperature. The data, from Ivkov et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 5599 (1998)], were taken in D2O buffer with Ca2+ as the divalent cation on the G-actin in the presence of ATP and with KCl as the initiating salt. The new analysis of the data using modeling and the method of generalized indirect fourier transform (O. Glatter, GIFT, University of Graz, Austria, http://physchem.kfunigraz.ac.at/sm/) provide shapes and dimensions of the G-actin monomer and of the growing actin oligomer in solution as a function of temperature and salt concentration. This analysis indicates that the G-actin monomer, under the conditions given above, is a sphere 50-54Å in diameter as opposed to the oblate ellipsoid seen by x-ray crystallography. The F-actin dimensions are consistent with x-ray crystal structure determinations.

  4. p75NTR Mediates Neurotrophin-Induced Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyang; Bray, Paula; McCaffrey, Timothy; March, Keith; Hempstead, Barbara L.; Kraemer, Rosemary

    2000-01-01

    The development of atherosclerotic lesions results from aberrant cell migration, proliferation, and extracellular matrix production. In advanced lesions, however, cellular apoptosis, leading to lesion remodeling, predominates. During lesion formation, the neurotrophins and the neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinases, trks B and C, are induced and mediate smooth muscle cell migration. Here we demonstrate that a second neurotrophin receptor, p75NTR, is expressed by established human atherosclerotic lesions and late lesions that develop after balloon injury of the rat thoracic aorta. The p75NTR, a member of the tumor necrosis factor/FAS receptor family, can modulate trk receptor function as well as initiate cell death when expressed in cells of the nervous system that lack kinase-active trk receptors. p75NTR expression colocalizes to neointimal cells, which express smooth muscle cell α-actin and are expressed by cultured human endarterectomy-derived cells (HEDC). Areas of the plaque expressing p75NTR demonstrate increased TUNEL positivity, and HEDC undergo apoptosis in response to the neurotrophins. Finally, neurotrophins also induced apoptosis of a smooth muscle cell line genetically manipulated to express p75NTR, but lacking trk receptor expression. These studies identify the regulated expression of neurotrophins and p75NTR as an inducer of smooth muscle cell apoptosis in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:11021829

  5. Live Imaging Provides New Insights on Dynamic F-Actin Filopodia and Differential Endocytosis during Myoblast Fusion in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Haralalka, Shruti; Shelton, Claude; Cartwright, Heather N.; Guo, Fengli; Trimble, Rhonda; Kumar, Ram P.; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The process of myogenesis includes the recognition, adhesion, and fusion of committed myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia. In the larval body wall muscles of Drosophila, this elaborate process is initiated by Founder Cells and Fusion-Competent Myoblasts (FCMs), and cell adhesion molecules Kin-of-IrreC (Kirre) and Sticks-and-stones (Sns) on their respective surfaces. The FCMs appear to provide the driving force for fusion, via the assembly of protrusions associated with branched F-actin and the WASp, SCAR and Arp2/3 pathways. In the present study, we utilize the dorsal pharyngeal musculature that forms in the Drosophila embryo as a model to explore myoblast fusion and visualize the fusion process in live embryos. These muscles rely on the same cell types and genes as the body wall muscles, but are amenable to live imaging since they do not undergo extensive morphogenetic movement during formation. Time-lapse imaging with F-actin and membrane markers revealed dynamic FCM-associated actin-enriched protrusions that rapidly extend and retract into the myotube from different sites within the actin focus. Ultrastructural analysis of this actin-enriched area showed that they have two morphologically distinct structures: wider invasions and/or narrow filopodia that contain long linear filaments. Consistent with this, formin Diaphanous (Dia) and branched actin nucleator, Arp3, are found decorating the filopodia or enriched at the actin focus, respectively, indicating that linear actin is present along with branched actin at sites of fusion in the FCM. Gain-of-function Dia and loss-of-function Arp3 both lead to fusion defects, a decrease of F-actin foci and prominent filopodia from the FCMs. We also observed differential endocytosis of cell surface components at sites of fusion, with actin reorganizing factors, WASp and SCAR, and Kirre remaining on the myotube surface and Sns preferentially taken up with other membrane proteins into early endosomes and lysosomes in the

  6. Nucleus-associated actin in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Berdieva, Mariia; Bogolyubov, Dmitry; Podlipaeva, Yuliya; Goodkov, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The presence, spatial distribution and forms of intranuclear and nucleus-associated cytoplasmic actin were studied in Amoeba proteus with immunocytochemical approaches. Labeling with different anti-actin antibodies and staining with TRITC-phalloidin and fluorescent deoxyribonuclease I were used. We showed that actin is abundant within the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm of A. proteus cells. According to DNase I experiments, the predominant form of intranuclear actin is G-actin which is associated with chromatin strands. Besides, unpolymerized actin was shown to participate in organization of a prominent actin layer adjacent to the outer surface of nuclear envelope. No significant amount of F-actin was found in the nucleus. At the same time, the amoeba nucleus is enclosed in a basket-like structure formed by circumnuclear actin filaments and bundles connected with global cytoplasmic actin cytoskeleton. A supposed architectural function of actin filaments was studied by treatment with actin-depolymerizing agent latrunculin A. It disassembled the circumnuclear actin system, but did not affect the intranuclear chromatin structure. The results obtained for amoeba cells support the modern concept that actin is involved in fundamental nuclear processes that have evolved in the cells of multicellular organisms.

  7. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  8. Actin Automata: Phenomenology and Localizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Mayne, Richard

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton, whose roles in cell function include structural support, contractile activity to intracellular signaling. We model actin filaments as two chains of one-dimensional binary-state semi-totalistic automaton arrays to describe hypothetical signaling events therein. Each node of the actin automaton takes state "0" (resting) or "1" (excited) and updates its state in discrete time depending on its neighbor's states. We analyze the complete rule space of actin automata using integral characteristics of space-time configurations generated by these rules and compute state transition rules that support traveling and mobile localizations. Approaches towards selection of the localization supporting rules using the global characteristics are outlined. We find that some properties of actin automata rules may be predicted using Shannon entropy, activity and incoherence of excitation between the polymer chains. We also show that it is possible to infer whether a given rule supports traveling or stationary localizations by looking at ratios of excited neighbors that are essential for generations of the localizations. We conclude by applying biomolecular hypotheses to this model and discuss the significance of our findings in context with cell signaling and emergent behavior in cellular computation.

  9. Regulation of muscular contraction. Distribution of actin control and myosin control in the animal kingdom

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The control systems regulating muscle contraction in approximately 100 organisms have been categorized. Both myosin control and actin control operate simultaneously in the majority of invertebrates tested. These include insects, chelicerates, most crustaceans, annelids, priapulids, nematodes, and some sipunculids. Single myosin control is present in the muscles of molluscs, brachiopods, echinoderms, echiuroids, and nemertine worms. Single actin control was found in the fast muscles of decapods, in mysidacea, in a single sipunculid species, and in vertebrate striated muscles. Classification is based on functional tests that include measurements of the calcium dependence of the actomyosin ATPase activity in the presence and the absence of purified rabbit actin and myosin. In addition, isolated thin filaments and myosins were also analyzed. Molluscs lack actin control since troponin is not present in sufficient quantities. Even though the functional tests indicate the complete lack of myosin control in vertebrate striated muscle, it is difficult to exclude unambiguously the in vivo existence of this regulation. Both control systems have been found in animals from phyla which evolved early. We cannot ascribe any simple correlation between ATPase activity, muscle structure, and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:125778

  10. Extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) interaction with actin and the calponin homology (CH) domain of actin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Leinweber, B D; Leavis, P C; Grabarek, Z; Wang, C L; Morgan, K G

    1999-01-01

    An interaction between extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) and calponin has previously been reported (Menice, Hulvershorn, Adam, Wang and Morgan (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272 (40), 25157-25161) and has been suggested to reflect a function of calponin as a signalling molecule. We report in this study that calponin binds to both ERK1 and ERK2 under native conditions as well as in an overlay assay. Using chymotryptic fragments of calponin, the binding site of ERK on calponin was identified as the calponin homology (CH) domain, an N-terminal region of calponin found in other actin-binding proteins. ERK also bound, in a gel overlay assay, alpha-actinin, a protein with two tandem CH domains, as well as a 27 kDa thermolysin product of alpha-actinin containing the CH domains of alpha-actinin. The CH domain of calponin could compete with intact calponin or alpha-actinin for ERK binding. Titration of acrylodan-labelled calponin with ERK gave a K(a) of 6x10(6) M(-1) and titration of acrylodan-labelled calponin with a peptide from the alphaL16 helix of ERK gave a K(a) of 1x10(6) M(-1). Recombinant ERK was found to co-sediment with purified actin and induced a fluorescence change in pyrene-labelled F-actin (K(a)=5x10(6) M(-1)). The interaction of ERK with CH domains points to a new potential function for CH domains. The interaction of ERK with actin raises the possibility that actin may provide a scaffold for ERK signalling complexes in both muscle and non-muscle cells. PMID:10548541

  11. G-actin regulates rapid induction of actin nucleation by mDia1 to restore cellular actin polymers.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Chiharu; Suetsugu, Shiro; Tsuji, Takahiro; Monypenny, James; Narumiya, Shuh; Watanabe, Naoki

    2008-10-15

    mDia1 belongs to the formin family of proteins that share FH1 and FH2 domains. Although formins play a critical role in the formation of many actin-based cellular structures, the physiological regulation of formin-mediated actin assembly within the cell is still unknown. Here we show that cells possess an acute actin polymer restoration mechanism involving mDia1. By using single-molecule live-cell imaging, we found that several treatments including low-dose G-actin-sequestering drugs and unpolymerizable actin mutants activate mDia1 to initiate fast directional movement. The FH2 region, the core domain for actin nucleation, is sufficient to respond to latrunculin B (LatB) to increase its actin nucleation frequency. Simulation analysis revealed an unexpected paradoxical effect of LatB that leads to a several fold increase in free G-actin along with an increase in total G-actin. These results indicate that in cells, the actin nucleation frequency of mDia1 is enhanced not only by Rho, but also strongly through increased catalytic efficiency of the FH2 domain. Consistently, frequent actin nucleation by mDia1 was found around sites of vigorous actin disassembly. Another major actin nucleator, the Arp2/3 complex, was not affected by the G-actin increase induced by LatB. Taken together, we propose that transient accumulation of G-actin works as a cue to promote mDia1-catalyzed actin nucleation to execute rapid reassembly of actin filaments.

  12. Resisting sarcolemmal rupture: dystrophin repeats increase membrane-actin stiffness.

    PubMed

    Sarkis, Joe; Vié, Véronique; Winder, Steve J; Renault, Anne; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Hubert, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Dystrophin is an essential part of a membrane protein complex that provides flexible support to muscle fiber membranes. Loss of dystrophin function leads to membrane fragility and muscle-wasting disease. Given the importance of cytoskeletal interactions in strengthening the sarcolemma, we have focused on actin-binding domain 2 of human dystrophin, constituted by repeats 11 to 15 of the central domain (DYS R11-15). We previously showed that DYS R11-15 also interacts with membrane lipids. We investigated the shear elastic constant (μ) and the surface viscosity (η(s)) of Langmuir phospholipid monolayers mimicking the inner leaflet of the sarcolemma in the presence of DYS R11-15 and actin. The initial interaction of 100 nM DYS R11-15 with the monolayers slightly modifies their rheological properties. Injection of 0.125 μM filamentous actin leads to a strong increase of μ and η(s,) from 0 to 5.5 mN/m and 2.4 × 10(-4) N · s/m, respectively. These effects are specific to DYS R11-15, require filamentous actin, and depend on phospholipid nature and lateral surface pressure. These findings suggest that the central domain of dystrophin contributes significantly to the stiffness and the stability of the sarcolemma through its simultaneous interactions with the cytoskeleton and lipid membrane. This mechanical link is likely to be a major contributing factor to the shock absorber function of dystrophin and muscle sarcolemmal integrity on mechanical stress.

  13. The role of cyclase-associated protein in regulating actin filament dynamics - more than a monomer-sequestration factor.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-08-01

    Dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is fundamental to a number of cell biological events. A variety of actin-regulatory proteins modulate polymerization and depolymerization of actin and contribute to actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved actin-monomer-binding protein that has been studied for over 20 years. Early studies have shown that CAP sequesters actin monomers; recent studies, however, have revealed more active roles of CAP in actin filament dynamics. CAP enhances the recharging of actin monomers with ATP antagonistically to ADF/cofilin, and also promotes the severing of actin filaments in cooperation with ADF/cofilin. Self-oligomerization and binding to other proteins regulate activities and localization of CAP. CAP has crucial roles in cell signaling, development, vesicle trafficking, cell migration and muscle sarcomere assembly. This Commentary discusses the recent advances in our understanding of the functions of CAP and its implications as an important regulator of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, which are involved in various cellular activities.

  14. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  15. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  16. Bacterial Actins? An Evolutionary Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.; York, Amanda L.

    2003-01-01

    According to the conventional wisdom, the existence of a cytoskeleton in eukaryotes and its absence in prokaryotes constitute a fundamental divide between the two domains of life. An integral part of the dogma is that a cytoskeleton enabled an early eukaryote to feed upon prokaryotes, a consequence of which was the occasional endosymbiosis and the eventual evolution of organelles. Two recent papers present compelling evidence that actin, one of the principal components of a cytoskeleton, has a homolog in Bacteria that behaves in many ways like eukaryotic actin. Sequence comparisons reveml that eukaryotic actin and the bacterial homolog (mreB protein), unlike many other proteins common to eukaryotes and Bacteria, have very different and more highly extended evolutionary histories.

  17. Bacterial Actins? An Evolutionary Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.; York, Amanda L.

    2003-01-01

    According to the conventional wisdom, the existence of a cytoskeleton in eukaryotes and its absence in prokaryotes constitute a fundamental divide between the two domains of life. An integral part of the dogma is that a cytoskeleton enabled an early eukaryote to feed upon prokaryotes, a consequence of which was the occasional endosymbiosis and the eventual evolution of organelles. Two recent papers present compelling evidence that actin, one of the principal components of a cytoskeleton, has a homolog in Bacteria that behaves in many ways like eukaryotic actin. Sequence comparisons reveml that eukaryotic actin and the bacterial homolog (mreB protein), unlike many other proteins common to eukaryotes and Bacteria, have very different and more highly extended evolutionary histories.

  18. Regulation of the actin cycle in vivo by actin filament severing

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, James L.; Osborn, Eric A.; Tardy, Yanik S.; Dewey, C. Forbes; Hartwig, John H.

    2000-01-01

    Cycling of actin subunits between monomeric and filamentous phases is essential for cell crawling behavior. We investigated actin filament turnover rates, length, number, barbed end exposure, and binding of cofilin in bovine arterial endothelial cells moving at different speeds depending on their position in a confluent monolayer. Fast-translocating cells near the wound edge have short filament lifetimes compared with turnover values that proportionately increase in slower moving cells situated at increasing distances from the wound border. Contrasted with slow cells exhibiting slow actin filament turnover speeds, fast cells have less polymerized actin, shorter actin filaments, more free barbed ends, and less actin-associated cofilin. Cultured primary fibroblasts manifest identical relationships between speed and actin turnover as the endothelial cells, and fast fibroblasts expressing gelsolin have higher actin turnover rates than slow fibroblasts that lack this actin-severing protein. These results implicate actin filament severing as an important control mechanism for actin cycling in cells. PMID:10823888

  19. Actin polymerization is stimulated by actin cross-linking protein palladin.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H; Beck, Moriah R

    2016-02-15

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the co-ordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the actin-binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro cross-linking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of globular or monomeric actin (G-actin), akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or through conformational changes.

  20. An atomic model of the tropomyosin cable on F-actin.

    PubMed

    Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2014-08-05

    Tropomyosin regulates a wide variety of actin filament functions and is best known for the role that it plays together with troponin in controlling muscle activity. For effective performance on actin filaments, adjacent 42-nm-long tropomyosin molecules are joined together by a 9- to 10-residue head-to-tail overlapping domain to form a continuous cable that wraps around the F-actin helix. Yet, despite the apparent simplicity of tropomyosin's coiled-coil structure and its well-known periodic association with successive actin subunits along F-actin, the structure of the tropomyosin cable on actin is uncertain. This is because the conformation of the overlap region that joins neighboring molecules is poorly understood, thus leaving a significant gap in our understanding of thin-filament structure and regulation. However, recent molecular-dynamics simulations of overlap segments defined their overall shape and provided unique and sufficient cues to model the whole actin-tropomyosin filament assembly in atomic detail. In this study, we show that these MD structures merge seamlessly onto the ends of tropomyosin coiled-coils. Adjacent tropomyosin molecules can then be joined together to provide a comprehensive model of the tropomyosin cable running continuously on F-actin. The resulting complete model presented here describes for the first time (to our knowledge) an atomic-level structure of αα-striated muscle tropomyosin bound to an actin filament that includes the critical overlap domain. Thus, the model provides a structural correlate to evaluate thin-filament mechanics, self-assembly mechanisms, and the effect of disease-causing mutations.

  1. Optimal treatment of actinic keratoses

    PubMed Central

    Uhlenhake, Elizabeth E

    2013-01-01

    The most compelling reason and primary goal of treating actinic keratoses is to prevent malignant transformation into invasive squamous cell carcinoma, and although there are well established guidelines outlining treatment modalities and regimens for squamous cell carcinoma, the more commonly encountered precancerous actinic lesions have no such standard. Many options are available with variable success and patient compliance rates. Prevention of these lesions is key, with sun protection being a must in treating aging patients with sun damage as it is never too late to begin protecting the skin. PMID:23345970

  2. Formation and Destabilization of Actin Filaments with Tetramethylrhodamine-Modified Actin

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashov, Dmitry S.; Phillips, Martin; Reisler, Emil

    2004-01-01

    Actin labeling at Cys374 with tethramethylrhodamine derivatives (TMR-actin) has been widely used for direct observation of the in vitro filaments growth, branching, and treadmilling, as well as for the in vivo visualization of actin cytoskeleton. The advantage of TMR-actin is that it does not lock actin in filaments (as rhodamine-phalloidin does), possibly allowing for its use in investigating the dynamic assembly behavior of actin polymers. Although it is established that TMR-actin alone is polymerization incompetent, the impact of its copolymerization with unlabeled actin on filament structure and dynamics has not been tested yet. In this study, we show that TMR-actin perturbs the filaments structure when copolymerized with unlabeled actin; the resulting filaments are more fragile and shorter than the control filaments. Due to the increased severing of copolymer filaments, TMR-actin accelerates the polymerization of unlabeled actin in solution also at mole ratios lower than those used in most fluorescence microscopy experiments. The destabilizing and severing effect of TMR-actin is countered by filament stabilizing factors, phalloidin, S1, and tropomyosin. These results point to an analogy between the effects of TMR-actin and severing proteins on F-actin, and imply that TMR-actin may be inappropriate for investigations of actin filaments dynamics. PMID:15298916

  3. Fascin regulates nuclear actin during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Groen, Christopher M.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Sudhir, Sweta; Tootle, Tina L.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila oogenesis provides a developmental system with which to study nuclear actin. During Stages 5–9, nuclear actin levels are high in the oocyte and exhibit variation within the nurse cells. Cofilin and Profilin, which regulate the nuclear import and export of actin, also localize to the nuclei. Expression of GFP-tagged Actin results in nuclear actin rod formation. These findings indicate that nuclear actin must be tightly regulated during oogenesis. One factor mediating this regulation is Fascin. Overexpression of Fascin enhances nuclear GFP-Actin rod formation, and Fascin colocalizes with the rods. Loss of Fascin reduces, whereas overexpression of Fascin increases, the frequency of nurse cells with high levels of nuclear actin, but neither alters the overall nuclear level of actin within the ovary. These data suggest that Fascin regulates the ability of specific cells to accumulate nuclear actin. Evidence indicates that Fascin positively regulates nuclear actin through Cofilin. Loss of Fascin results in decreased nuclear Cofilin. In addition, Fascin and Cofilin genetically interact, as double heterozygotes exhibit a reduction in the number of nurse cells with high nuclear actin levels. These findings are likely applicable beyond Drosophila follicle development, as the localization and functions of Fascin and the mechanisms regulating nuclear actin are widely conserved. PMID:27535426

  4. ATP-dependent regulation of actin monomer-filament equilibrium by cyclase-associated protein and ADF/cofilin.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-07-15

    CAP (cyclase-associated protein) is a conserved regulator of actin filament dynamics. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, CAS-1 is an isoform of CAP that is expressed in striated muscle and regulates sarcomeric actin assembly. In the present study, we report that CAS-2, a second CAP isoform in C. elegans, attenuates the actin-monomer-sequestering effect of ADF (actin depolymerizing factor)/cofilin to increase the steady-state levels of actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. CAS-2 binds to actin monomers without a strong preference for either ATP- or ADP-actin. CAS-2 strongly enhances the exchange of actin-bound nucleotides even in the presence of UNC-60A, a C. elegans ADF/cofilin that inhibits nucleotide exchange. UNC-60A induces the depolymerization of actin filaments and sequesters actin monomers, whereas CAS-2 reverses the monomer-sequestering effect of UNC-60A in the presence of ATP, but not in the presence of only ADP or the absence of ATP or ADP. A 1:100 molar ratio of CAS-2 to UNC-60A is sufficient to increase actin filaments. CAS-2 has two independent actin-binding sites in its N- and C-terminal halves, and the C-terminal half is necessary and sufficient for the observed activities of the full-length CAS-2. These results suggest that CAS-2 (CAP) and UNC-60A (ADF/cofilin) are important in the ATP-dependent regulation of the actin monomer-filament equilibrium.

  5. Regulation of Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Haeng; Dominguez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic remolding of the actin cytoskeleton is a critical part of most cellular activities, and malfunction of cytoskeletal proteins results in various human diseases. The transition between two forms of actin, monomeric or G-actin and filamentous or F-actin, is tightly regulated in time and space by a large number of signaling, scaffolding and actin-binding proteins (ABPs). New ABPs are constantly being discovered in the post-genomic era. Most of these proteins are modular, integrating actin binding, protein-protein interaction, membrane-binding, and signaling domains. In response to extracellular signals, often mediated by Rho family GTPases, ABPs control different steps of actin cytoskeleton assembly, including filament nucleation, elongation, severing, capping, and depolymerization. This review summarizes structure-function relationships among ABPs in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton assembly. PMID:20446344

  6. Myosin binding surface on actin probed by hydroxyl radical footprinting and site-directed labels.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Kamal, J K Amisha; Benchaar, Sabrina; Chance, Mark R; Reisler, Emil

    2011-11-25

    Actin and myosin are the two main proteins required for cell motility and muscle contraction. The structure of their strongly bound complex-rigor state-is a key for delineating the functional mechanism of actomyosin motor. Current knowledge of that complex is based on models obtained from the docking of known atomic structures of actin and myosin subfragment 1 (S1; the head and neck region of myosin) into low-resolution electron microscopy electron density maps, which precludes atomic- or side-chain-level information. Here, we use radiolytic protein footprinting for global mapping of sites across the actin molecules that are impacted directly or allosterically by myosin binding to actin filaments. Fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and cysteine actin mutants are used for independent, residue-specific probing of S1 effects on two structural elements of actin. We identify actin residue candidates involved in S1 binding and provide experimental evidence to discriminate between the regions of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Focusing on the role of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop) and the W-loop residues of actin in their interactions with S1, we found that the emission properties of acrylodan and the mobility of electron paramagnetic resonance spin labels attached to cysteine mutants of these residues change strongly and in a residue-specific manner upon S1 binding, consistent with the recently proposed direct contacts of these loops with S1. As documented in this study, the direct and indirect changes on actin induced by myosin are more extensive than known until now and attest to the importance of actin dynamics to actomyosin function.

  7. F-actin buckling coordinates contractility and severing in a biomimetic actomyosin cortex

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Michael P.; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2012-01-01

    Here we develop a minimal model of the cell actomyosin cortex by forming a quasi-2D cross-linked filamentous actin (F-actin) network adhered to a model cell membrane and contracted by myosin thick filaments. Myosin motors generate both compressive and tensile stresses on F-actin and consequently induce large bending fluctuations, which reduces their effective persistence length to <1 μm. Over a large range of conditions, we show the extent of network contraction corresponds exactly to the extent of individual F-actin shortening via buckling. This demonstrates an essential role of buckling in breaking the symmetry between tensile and compressive stresses to facilitate mesoscale network contraction of up to 80% strain. Portions of buckled F-actin with a radius of curvature ∼300 nm are prone to severing and thus compressive stresses mechanically coordinate contractility with F-actin severing, the initial step of F-actin turnover. Finally, the F-actin curvature acquired by myosin-induced stresses can be further constrained by adhesion of the network to a membrane, accelerating filament severing but inhibiting the long-range transmission of the stresses necessary for network contractility. Thus, the extent of membrane adhesion can regulate the coupling between network contraction and F-actin severing. These data demonstrate the essential role of the nonlinear response of F-actin to compressive stresses in potentiating both myosin-mediated contractility and filament severing. This may serve as a general mechanism to mechanically coordinate contractility and cortical dynamics across diverse actomyosin assemblies in smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells. PMID:23213249

  8. Using baculovirus/insect cell expressed recombinant actin to study the molecular pathogenesis of HCM caused by actin mutation A331P

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fan; Caster, Hannah M.; Rubenstein, Peter A.; Dawson, John F.; Kawai, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant WT human cardiac actin (WT actin) was expressed using the baculovirus/insect cell expression system, purified, and used to reconstitute the thin-filament of bovine cardiac muscle fibers, together with bovine cardiac tropomyosin (Tm) and troponin (Tn). Effects of [Ca2+], [ATP], [phosphate] and [ADP] on tension and tension transients were studied at 25°C by using sinusoidal analysis, and the results were compared with those of native fibers and fibers reconstituted with purified bovine cardiac actin (BVC actin). In actin filament reconstituted fibers (without Tm/Tn), those reconstituted with WT actin showed exactly the same active tension as those reconstituted with purified BVC actin (WT: 0.75±0.06 T0, N=11; BVC: 0.73±0.07 T0, N=12, where T0 is tension of original fibers before extraction). After Tm/Tn reconstitution, fibers reconstituted with WT actin generated 0.85±0.06 T0 (N=11) compared to 0.98±0.04 T0 (N=12) recovered by those reconstituted with BVC actin. In the presence of Tm/Tn, WT actin reconstituted fibers showed exactly the same Ca2+ sensitivity as those of the native fibers and BVC actin reconstituted fibers (pCa50: native fibers: 5.69±0.01, N=10; WT: 5.69±0.02, N=11; BVC: 5.68±0.02, N=12). Sinusoidal analysis showed that the cross-bridge kinetics were the same among native fibers, BVC actin reconstituted fibers, and WT actin reconstituted fibers, followed by reconstitution of Tm/Tn. These results demonstrate that baculovirus/insect cell expressed actin has no significant differences from tissue purified actin and can be used for thin-filament reconstitution assays. One hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) causing actin mutant A331P actin was also expressed and studied similarly, and the results were compared to those of the WT actin. In the reconstituted fibers, A331P significantly decreased the tension both in the absence of Tm/Tn (0.55±0.03 T0, N=13) and in their presence (0.65±0.02 T0, N=13) compared to those of the WT (0.75±0

  9. Actinic cheilitis in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Savage, N W; McKay, C; Faulkner, C

    2010-06-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially premalignant condition involving predominantly the vermilion of the lower lip. The aim of the current paper was to review the clinical presentation of actinic cheilitis and demonstrate the development of management plans using a series of cases. These are designed to provide immediate treatment where required but also to address the medium and long-term requirements of the patient. The authors suggest that the clinical examination of lips and the assessment of actinic cheilitis and other lip pathology become a regular part of the routine soft tissue examination undertaken as a part of the periodic examination of dental patients. Early recognition of actinic cheilitis can allow the development of strategies for individual patients that prevent progression. These are based on past sun exposure, future lifestyle changes and the daily use of emollient sunscreens, broad-brimmed hats and avoidance of sun exposure during the middle of the day. This is a service that is not undertaken as a matter of routine in general medical practice as patients are not seen with the regularity of dental patients and generally not under the ideal examination conditions available in the dental surgery.

  10. Plant actin controls membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Hohenberger, Petra; Eing, Christian; Straessner, Ralf; Durst, Steffen; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The biological effects of electric pulses with low rise time, high field strength, and durations in the nanosecond range (nsPEFs) have attracted considerable biotechnological and medical interest. However, the cellular mechanisms causing membrane permeabilization by nanosecond pulsed electric fields are still far from being understood. We investigated the role of actin filaments for membrane permeability in plant cells using cell lines where different degrees of actin bundling had been introduced by genetic engineering. We demonstrate that stabilization of actin increases the stability of the plasma membrane against electric permeabilization recorded by penetration of Trypan Blue into the cytoplasm. By use of a cell line expressing the actin bundling WLIM domain under control of an inducible promotor we can activate membrane stabilization by the glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone. By total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy we can visualize a subset of the cytoskeleton that is directly adjacent to the plasma membrane. We conclude that this submembrane cytoskeleton stabilizes the plasma membrane against permeabilization through electric pulses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Force of an Actin Spring

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jennifer H.; Tam, Barney K.; Brau, Ricardo R.; Lang, Matthew J.; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Cellular movements are produced by forces. Typically, cytoskeletal proteins such as microtubules and actin filaments generate forces via polymerization or in conjunction with molecular motors. However, the fertilization of a Limulus polyphemus egg involves a third type of actin-based cellular engine—a biological spring. During the acrosome reaction, a 60-μm long coiled and twisted bundle of actin filaments straightens and extends from a sperm cell, penetrating the vitelline layer surrounding the egg. A subtle overtwist of 0.2°/subunit underlies the mechanochemical basis for the extension of this actin spring. Upon calcium activation, this conformational strain energy is converted to mechanical work, generating the force required to extend the bundle through the vitelline layer. In this article, we stall the extension of the acrosome bundle in agarose gels of different concentrations. From the stall forces, we estimate a maximum force of 2 nN and a puncturing pressure of 1.6 MPa. We show the maximum force of extension is three times larger than the force required to puncture the vitelline layer. Thus, the elastic strain energy stored in the acrosome bundle is more than sufficient to power the acrosome reaction through the egg envelope. PMID:17351007

  12. Antibodies to Actin in Autoimmune Neutropenia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    protein as actin. Purified Acanthamoeba actin by anti-neutrophil antibodies in autoimmune neutropenia, comigrated with the protein and was specifically...anti-rabbit IgG were obtained from ICN Immunobiolog- formed using purified Acanthamoeba actin (gift of Dr Blair Bowers. icals, Naperville, IL. Cells...preparations𔃼 1 - was the protein recognized by these anti-neutrophil antibody 6 .2- positive sera, lgG, and F(ab’) 2. Purified Acanthamoeba actin

  13. Association of actin with alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Boyle, D.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The alpha crystallins are cytosolic proteins that co-localize and co-purify with actin-containing microfilaments. Affinity column chromatography employing both covalently-coupled actin or alpha crystallin was used to demonstrate specific and saturable binding of actin with alpha crystallin. This conclusion was confirmed by direct visualization of alpha aggregates bound to actin polymerized in vitro. The significance of this interaction in relation to the functional properties of these two polypeptides will be discussed.

  14. An actin cytoskeleton with evolutionarily conserved functions in the absence of canonical actin-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Paredez, Alexander R.; Assaf, Zoe June; Sept, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Dawson, Scott C.; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Cande, W. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis, a human intestinal parasite and member of what is perhaps the earliest-diverging eukaryotic lineage, contains the most divergent eukaryotic actin identified to date and is the first eukaryote known to lack all canonical actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We sought to investigate the properties and functions of the actin cytoskeleton in Giardia to determine whether Giardia actin (giActin) has reduced or conserved roles in core cellular processes. In vitro polymerization of giActin produced filaments, indicating that this divergent actin is a true filament-forming actin. We generated an anti-giActin antibody to localize giActin throughout the cell cycle. GiActin localized to the cortex, nuclei, internal axonemes, and formed C-shaped filaments along the anterior of the cell and a flagella-bundling helix. These structures were regulated with the cell cycle and in encysting cells giActin was recruited to the Golgi-like cyst wall processing vesicles. Knockdown of giActin demonstrated that giActin functions in cell morphogenesis, membrane trafficking, and cytokinesis. Additionally, Giardia contains a single G protein, giRac, which affects the Giardia actin cytoskeleton independently of known target ABPs. These results imply that there exist ancestral and perhaps conserved roles for actin in core cellular processes that are independent of canonical ABPs. Of medical significance, the divergent giActin cytoskeleton is essential and commonly used actin-disrupting drugs do not depolymerize giActin structures. Therefore, the giActin cytoskeleton is a promising drug target for treating giardiasis, as we predict drugs that interfere with the Giardia actin cytoskeleton will not affect the mammalian host. PMID:21444821

  15. An actin cytoskeleton with evolutionarily conserved functions in the absence of canonical actin-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Paredez, Alexander R; Assaf, Zoe June; Sept, David; Timofejeva, Ljudmilla; Dawson, Scott C; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel; Cande, W Z

    2011-04-12

    Giardia intestinalis, a human intestinal parasite and member of what is perhaps the earliest-diverging eukaryotic lineage, contains the most divergent eukaryotic actin identified to date and is the first eukaryote known to lack all canonical actin-binding proteins (ABPs). We sought to investigate the properties and functions of the actin cytoskeleton in Giardia to determine whether Giardia actin (giActin) has reduced or conserved roles in core cellular processes. In vitro polymerization of giActin produced filaments, indicating that this divergent actin is a true filament-forming actin. We generated an anti-giActin antibody to localize giActin throughout the cell cycle. GiActin localized to the cortex, nuclei, internal axonemes, and formed C-shaped filaments along the anterior of the cell and a flagella-bundling helix. These structures were regulated with the cell cycle and in encysting cells giActin was recruited to the Golgi-like cyst wall processing vesicles. Knockdown of giActin demonstrated that giActin functions in cell morphogenesis, membrane trafficking, and cytokinesis. Additionally, Giardia contains a single G protein, giRac, which affects the Giardia actin cytoskeleton independently of known target ABPs. These results imply that there exist ancestral and perhaps conserved roles for actin in core cellular processes that are independent of canonical ABPs. Of medical significance, the divergent giActin cytoskeleton is essential and commonly used actin-disrupting drugs do not depolymerize giActin structures. Therefore, the giActin cytoskeleton is a promising drug target for treating giardiasis, as we predict drugs that interfere with the Giardia actin cytoskeleton will not affect the mammalian host.

  16. Fluorescence Lifetime of Actin in the FHC Transgenic Heart1

    PubMed Central

    Mettikolla, P.; Luchowski, R.; Gryczynski, I.; Gryczynski, Z.; Szczesna-Cordary, D.; Borejdo, J.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical studies have revealed that the D166V mutation in the ventricular myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) can cause a malignant phenotype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). It has been proposed that RLC induced FHC in the heart originates at the level of the myosin cross-bridge due to alterations in the rates of cross-bridge cycling. In this report we examine whether the environment of an active cross-bridge in cardiac myofibrils from transgenic (Tg) mice is altered by the D166V mutation in RLC. The cross-bridge environment was monitored by tracking the fluorescence lifetime (τ) of Alexa488-phalloidin labeled actin. The fluorescence lifetime is the averaged rate of decay of a fluorescent species from the excited state, which strongly depends on various environmental factors. We observed that the lifetime was high when cross-bridges were bound to actin and low when they were dissociated from it. The lifetime was measured every 50 msec from the center half of the I-band during 60 sec of rigor, relaxation and contraction of muscle. We found no differences between lifetimes of Tg-WT and Tg-D166V muscle during rigor, relaxation and contraction. The duty ratio expressed as a fraction of time that cross-bridges spend attached to the thin filaments during isometric contraction was similar in Tg-WT and Tg-D166V muscles. Since independent measurements showed a large decrease in the cross-bridge turnover rate in Tg-D166V muscle compared to Tg-WT, the fact that the duty cycle remains constant suggests that the D166V mutation of RLC causes a decrease in the rate of cross-bridge attachment to actin. PMID:19159226

  17. Actin crosslinkers: repairing the sense of touch.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sean X; Walcott, Sam

    2010-10-26

    Cells use actin bundles infused with myosin to exert contractile forces on the extracellular environment. This active tension is essential for cellular mechanosensation. Now, the role of actin crosslinkers in stabilizing and repairing the actin bundles is coming into clearer view.

  18. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis.

  19. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis. PMID:25664724

  20. Expression of actin genes in the arrow worm Paraspadella gotoi (Chaetognatha).

    PubMed

    Yasuda, E; Goto, T; Makabe, K W; Satoh, N

    1997-12-01

    Arrow worms (the phylum Chaetognatha), one of the major marine planktonic animals, exhibit features characteristic to both deuterostomes and protostomes, and their ancestry therefore remains unknown. As the first step to elucidate the molecular bases of arrow worm phylogeny, physiology and embryology, we isolated cDNA clones for three different actin genes (PgAct1, PgAct2 and PgAct3) from the benthic species Paraspadella gotoi, and examined their expression patterns in adults and juveniles. The amino acid sequences of the three actins resembled each other, with identities ranging from 86% to 92%. However, the patterns of the spatial expression of the genes were independent. The PgAct1 gene might encode a cytoplasmic actin and was expressed in oogenic cells, spermatogenic cells, and cells in the ventral ganglion. The PgAct2 and PgAct3 genes encoded actins of divergent types. The former was expressed in well-developed muscle of the head (gnathic) region and trunk muscle cells, whereas the latter was expressed in muscle of the trunk and tail regions and oogenic cells. These results suggest that, similarly to other metazoans, the chaetognath contains multiple forms of actins, which are expressed in various manners in the adult and juvenile arrow worm.

  1. The Actin Depolymerizing Factor (ADF)/Cofilin Signaling Pathway and DNA Damage Responses in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Yuan; Leu, Jyh-Der; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family is essential for actin dynamics, cell division, chemotaxis and tumor metastasis. Cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is a primary non-muscle isoform of the ADF/cofilin protein family accelerating the actin filamental turnover in vitro and in vivo. In response to environmental stimulation, CFL-1 enters the nucleus to regulate the actin dynamics. Although the purpose of this cytoplasm-nucleus transition remains unclear, it is speculated that the interaction between CFL-1 and DNA may influence various biological responses, including DNA damage repair. In this review, we will discuss the possible involvement of CFL-1 in DNA damage responses (DDR) induced by ionizing radiation (IR), and the implications for cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25689427

  2. Direct observation of motion of single F-actin filaments in the presence of myosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Toshio; Nakase, Michiyuki; Nishiyama, Katsumi; Oosawa, Fumio

    1984-01-01

    Actin is found in almost all kinds of non-muscle cells where it is thought to have an important role in cell motility. A proper understanding of that role will only be possible when reliable in vitro systems are available for investigating the interaction of cellular actin and myosin. A start has been made on several systems1-4, most recently by Sheetz and Spudich who demonstrated unidirectional movement of HMM-coated beads along F-actin cables on arrays of chloroplasts exposed by dissection of a Nitella cell5. As an alternative approach, we report here the direct observation by fluorescence microscopy of the movements of single F-actin filaments interacting with soluble myosin fragments energized by Mg2+-ATP.

  3. The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin signaling pathway and DNA damage responses in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Yuan; Leu, Jyh-Der; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2015-02-13

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family is essential for actin dynamics, cell division, chemotaxis and tumor metastasis. Cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is a primary non-muscle isoform of the ADF/cofilin protein family accelerating the actin filamental turnover in vitro and in vivo. In response to environmental stimulation, CFL-1 enters the nucleus to regulate the actin dynamics. Although the purpose of this cytoplasm-nucleus transition remains unclear, it is speculated that the interaction between CFL-1 and DNA may influence various biological responses, including DNA damage repair. In this review, we will discuss the possible involvement of CFL-1 in DNA damage responses (DDR) induced by ionizing radiation (IR), and the implications for cancer radiotherapy.

  4. F-actin and myosin II accelerate catecholamine release from chromaffin granules

    PubMed Central

    Berberian, Khajak; Torres, Alexis J; Fang, Qinghua; Kisler, Kassandra

    2009-01-01

    The roles of non-muscle myosin II and cortical actin filaments in chromaffin granule exocytosis were studied by confocal fluorescence microscopy, amperometry, and cell-attached capacitance measurements. Fluorescence imaging indicated decreased mobility of granules near the plasma membrane following inhibition of myosin II function with Blebbistatin. Slower fusion pore expansion rates and longer fusion pore lifetimes were observed after inhibition of actin polymerization using Cytochalasin-D. Amperometric recordings revealed increased amperometric spike half-widths without change in quantal size after either myosin II inhibition or actin disruption. These results suggest that actin and myosin II facilitate release from individual chromaffin granules by accelerating dissociation of catecholamines from the intragranular matrix possibly through generation of mechanical forces. PMID:19158310

  5. Microtissues Enhance Smooth Muscle Differentiation and Cell Viability of hADSCs for Three Dimensional Bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Yipeng, Jin; Yongde, Xu; Yuanyi, Wu; Jilei, Sun; Jiaxiang, Guo; Jiangping, Gao; Yong, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Smooth muscle differentiated human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) provide a crucial stem cell source for urinary tissue engineering, but the induction of hADSCs for smooth muscle differentiation still has several issues to overcome, including a relatively long induction time and equipment dependence, which limits access to abundant stem cells within a short period of time for further application. Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting holds great promise in regenerative medicine due to its controllable construction of a designed 3D structure. When evenly mixed with bioink, stem cells can be spatially distributed within a bioprinted 3D structure, thus avoiding drawbacks such as, stem cell detachment in a conventional cell-scaffold strategy. Notwithstanding the advantages mentioned above, cell viability is often compromised during 3D bioprinting, which is often due to pressure during the bioprinting process. The objective of our study was to improve the efficiency of hADSC smooth muscle differentiation and cell viability of a 3D bioprinted structure. Here, we employed the hanging-drop method to generate hADSC microtissues in a smooth muscle inductive medium containing human transforming growth factor β1 and bioprinted the induced microtissues onto a 3D structure. After 3 days of smooth muscle induction, the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and smoothelin was higher in microtissues than in their counterpart monolayer cultured hADSCs, as confirmed by immunofluorescence and western blotting analysis. The semi-quantitative assay showed that the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was 0.218 ± 0.077 in MTs and 0.082 ± 0.007 in Controls; smoothelin expression was 0.319 ± 0.02 in MTs and 0.178 ± 0.06 in Controls. Induced MTs maintained their phenotype after the bioprinting process. Live/dead and cell count kit 8 assays showed that cell viability and cell proliferation in the 3D structure printed with microtissues were higher at all time points compared to

  6. An actin monomer binding activity localizes to the carboxyl-terminal half of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Chen, Z; Horenstein, J; Weber, A; Field, J

    1995-03-10

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex contains at least two subunits, a 200-kDa catalytic subunit and a 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein, CAP (also called Srv2p). Genetic studies suggested two roles for CAP, one as a positive regulator of cAMP levels in yeast and a second role as a cytoskeletal regulator. We present evidence showing that CAP sequesters monomeric actin (Kd in the range of 0.5-5 microM), decreasing actin incorporation into actin filaments. Anti-CAP monoclonal antibodies co-immunoprecipitate a protein with a molecular size of about 46 kDa. When CAP was purified from yeast using an anti-CAP monoclonal antibody column, the 46-kDa protein co-purified with a stoichiometry of about 1:1 with CAP. Western blots identified the 46-kDa protein as yeast actin. CAP also bound to muscle actin in vitro in immunoprecipitation assays and falling ball viscometry assays. Experiments with pyrene-labeled actin demonstrated that CAP sequesters actin monomers. The actin monomer binding activity is localized to the carboxyl-terminal half of CAP. Together, these data suggest that yeast CAP regulates the yeast cytoskeleton by sequestering actin monomers.

  7. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  8. Unphosphorylated calponin enhances the binding force of unphosphorylated myosin to actin

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Horia Nicolae; Zitouni, Nedjma B.; Kachmar, Linda; Ijpma, Gijs; Hilbert, Lennart; Matusovskiy, Oleg; Benedetti, Andrea; Sobieszek, Apolinary; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background Smooth muscle has the distinctive ability to maintain force for long periods of time and at low energy costs. While it is generally agreed that this property, called the latch-state, is due to the dephosphorylation of myosin while attached to actin, dephosphorylated-detached myosin can also attach to actin and may contribute to force maintenance. Thus, we investigated the role of calponin in regulating and enhancing the binding force of unphosphorylated tonic muscle myosin to actin. Methods To measure the effect of calponin on the binding of unphosphorylated myosin to actin, we used the laser trap assay to quantify the average force of unbinding (Funb) in the absence and presence of calponin or phosphorylated calponin. Results Funb from F-actin alone (0.12±0.01pN; mean±SE) was significantly increased in the presence of calponin (0.20±0.02pN). This enhancement was lost when calponin was phosphorylated (0.12±0.01pN). To further verify that this enhancement of Funb was due to cross-linking of actin to myosin by calponin, we repeated the measurements at high ionic strength. Indeed, the Funb obtained at a [KCl] of 25mM (0.21±0.02pN; mean±SE) was significantly decreased at a [KCl] of 150mM, (0.13±0.01pN). Conclusions This study provides direct molecular level-evidence that calponin enhances the binding force of unphosphorylated myosin to actin by cross-linking them and that this is reversed upon calponin phosphorylation. Thus, calponin might play an important role in the latch-state. General Significance This study suggests a new mechanism that likely contributes to the latch-state, a fundamental and important property of smooth muscle that remains unresolved. PMID:23747303

  9. Nuclear Actin in Development and Transcriptional Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Misu, Shinji; Takebayashi, Marina; Miyamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Actin is a highly abundant protein in eukaryotic cells and dynamically changes its polymerized states with the help of actin-binding proteins. Its critical function as a constituent of cytoskeleton has been well-documented. Growing evidence demonstrates that actin is also present in nuclei, referred to as nuclear actin, and is involved in a number of nuclear processes, including transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The contribution of nuclear actin to transcriptional regulation can be explained by its direct interaction with transcription machineries and chromatin remodeling factors and by controlling the activities of transcription factors. In both cases, polymerized states of nuclear actin affect the transcriptional outcome. Nuclear actin also plays an important role in activating strongly silenced genes in somatic cells for transcriptional reprogramming. When these nuclear functions of actin are considered, it is plausible to speculate that nuclear actin is also implicated in embryonic development, in which numerous genes need to be activated in a well-coordinated manner. In this review, we especially focus on nuclear actin's roles in transcriptional activation, reprogramming and development, including stem cell differentiation and we discuss how nuclear actin can be an important player in development and cell differentiation.

  10. Actin Dynamics: From Nanoscale to Microscale

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Anders E.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic nature of actin in cells manifests itself in many ways: Polymerization near the cell edge is balanced by depolymerization in the interior, externally induced actin polymerization is followed by depolymerization, and spontaneous oscillations of the cell periphery are frequently seen. I discuss how mathematical modeling relates quantitative measures of actin dynamics to the rates of underlying molecular level processes. The rate of actin incorporation at the leading edge of a moving cell is roughly consistent with existing theories, and the factors determining the characteristic time of actin polymerization are fairly well understood. However, our understanding of actin disassembly is limited, in particular the interplay between severing and depolymerization and the role of specific combinations of proteins in implementing disassembly events. The origins of cell-edge oscillations, and their possible relation to actin waves, are a fruitful area of future research. PMID:20462375

  11. Papaverine Prevents Vasospasm by Regulation of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation and Actin Polymerization in Human Saphenous Vein

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Kyle M.; Putumbaka, Gowthami; Wise, Eric S.; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M.; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    Objective Papaverine is used to prevent vasospasm in human saphenous veins (HSV) during vein graft preparation prior to implantation as a bypass conduit. Papaverine is a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases, leading to increases in both intracellular cGMP and cAMP. We hypothesized that papaverine reduces force by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and myosin light chain phosphorylation, and increasing actin depolymerization via regulation of actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Approach and Results HSV was equilibrated in a muscle bath, pre-treated with 1 mM papaverine followed by 5 μM norepinephrine, and force along with [Ca2+]i levels were concurrently measured. Filamentous actin (F-actin) level was measured by an in vitro actin assay. Tissue was snap frozen to measure myosin light chain and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with papaverine completely inhibited norepinephrine-induced force generation, blocked increases in [Ca2+]i and led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Papaverine pre-treatment also led to increased phosphorylation of the heat shock-related protein 20 (HSPB6) and the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), as well as decreased filamentous actin (F-actin) levels suggesting depolymerization of actin. Conclusions These results suggest that papaverine-induced force inhibition of HSV involves [Ca2+]i-mediated inhibition of myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation-mediated actin depolymerization. Thus, papaverine induces sustained inhibition of contraction of HSV by the modulation of both myosin cross-bridge formation and actin cytoskeletal dynamics and is a pharmacological alternative to high pressure distention to prevent vasospasm. PMID:27136356

  12. Actin cytoskeletal defects in immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Moulding, Dale A; Record, Julien; Malinova, Dessislava; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the cytoskeleton in mounting a successful immune response is evident from the wide range of defects that occur in actin-related primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Studies of these PIDs have revealed a pivotal role for the actin cytoskeleton in almost all stages of immune system function, from hematopoiesis and immune cell development, through to recruitment, migration, intercellular and intracellular signaling, and activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. The major focus of this review is the immune defects that result from mutations in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene (WAS), which have a broad impact on many different processes and give rise to clinically heterogeneous immunodeficiencies. We also discuss other related genetic defects and the possibility of identifying new genetic causes of cytoskeletal immunodeficiency. PMID:24117828

  13. E93K charge reversal on actin perturbs steric regulation of thin filaments.

    PubMed

    Cammarato, Anthony; Craig, Roger; Sparrow, John C; Lehman, William

    2005-04-15

    Contraction in striated muscles is regulated by Ca2+-dependent movement of tropomyosin-troponin on thin filaments. Interactions of charged amino acid residues between the surfaces of tropomyosin and actin are believed to play an integral role in this steric mechanism by influencing the position of tropomyosin on the filaments. To investigate this possibility further, thin filaments were isolated from troponin-regulated, indirect flight muscles of Drosophila mutants that express actin with an amino acid charge reversal at residue 93 located at the interface between actin subdomains 1 and 2, in which a lysine residue is substituted for a glutamic acid. Electron microscopy and 3D helical reconstruction were employed to evaluate the structural effects of the mutation. In the absence of Ca2+, tropomyosin was in a position that blocked the myosin-binding sites on actin, as previously found with wild-type filaments. However, in the presence of Ca2+, tropomyosin position in the mutant filaments was much more variable than in the wild-type ones. In most cases (approximately 60%), tropomyosin remained in the blocking position despite the presence of Ca2+, failing to undergo a normal Ca2+-induced change in position. Thus, switching of a negative to a positive charge at position 93 on actin may stabilize negatively charged tropomyosin in the Ca2+-free state regardless of Ca2+ levels, an alteration that, in turn, is likely to interfere with steric regulation and consequently muscle activation. These results highlight the importance of actin's surface charges in determining the distribution of tropomyosin positions on thin filaments derived from troponin-regulated striated muscles.

  14. Chlamydia trachomatis Tarp harbors distinct G and F actin binding domains that bundle actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Jiwani, Shahanawaz; Alvarado, Stephenie; Ohr, Ryan J; Romero, Adriana; Nguyen, Brenda; Jewett, Travis J

    2013-02-01

    All species of Chlamydia undergo a unique developmental cycle that transitions between extracellular and intracellular environments and requires the capacity to invade new cells for dissemination. A chlamydial protein called Tarp has been shown to nucleate actin in vitro and is implicated in bacterial entry into human cells. Colocalization studies of ectopically expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-Tarp indicate that actin filament recruitment is restricted to the C-terminal half of the effector protein. Actin filaments are presumably associated with Tarp via an actin binding alpha helix that is also required for actin nucleation in vitro, but this has not been investigated. Tarp orthologs from C. pneumoniae, C. muridarum, and C. caviae harbor between 1 and 4 actin binding domains located in the C-terminal half of the protein, but C. trachomatis serovar L2 has only one characterized domain. In this work, we examined the effects of domain-specific mutations on actin filament colocalization with EGFP-Tarp. We now demonstrate that actin filament colocalization with Tarp is dependent on two novel F-actin binding domains that endow the Tarp effector with actin-bundling activity. Furthermore, Tarp-mediated actin bundling did not require actin nucleation, as the ability to bundle actin filaments was observed in mutant Tarp proteins deficient in actin nucleation. These data shed molecular insight on the complex cytoskeletal rearrangements required for C. trachomatis entry into host cells.

  15. Control of actin filament length by phosphorylation of fragmin-actin complex

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Fragmin is a Ca2(+)-sensitive F-actin-severing protein purified from a slime mold, Physarum polycephalum (Hasegawa, T., S. Takahashi, H. Hayashi, and S. Hatano. 1980. Biochemistry. 19:2677-2683). It binds to G-actin to form a 1:1 fragmin/actin complex in the presence of micromolar free Ca2+. The complex nucleates actin polymerization and caps the barbed end of the short F-actin (Sugino, H., and S. Hatano. 1982. Cell Motil. 2:457-470). Subsequent removal of Ca2+, however, hardly dissociates the complex. This complex nucleates actin polymerization and caps the F-actin regardless of Ca2+ concentration. Here we report that this activity of fragmin-actin complex can be abolished by phosphorylation of actin of the complex. When crude extract from Physarum plasmodium was incubated with 5 mM ATP and 1 mM EGTA, the activities of the complex decreased to a great extent. The inactivation of the complex in the crude extract was not observed in the presence of Ca2+. In addition, the activities of the complex inactivated in the crude extract were restored under conditions suitable for phosphatase reactions. We purified factors that inactivated fragmin-actin complex from the crude extract. These factors phosphorylated actin of the complex, and the activities of the complex decreased with an increased level of phosphorylation of the complex. These factors, termed actin kinase, also inactivated the complex that capped the barbed end of short F-actin, leading to elongation of the short F-actin to long F-actin. Thus the length of F-actin can be controlled by phosphorylation of fragmin-actin complex by actin kinase. PMID:2202733

  16. Heat transfer measurements from a smooth NACA 0012 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsatte, Philip E.; Van Fossen, G. J.; Newton, James E.; De Witt, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Local convective heat transfer coefficients were measured from a smooth NACA 0012 airfoil having a chord length of 0.533 m. Flight data were taken for the smooth airfoil at Reynolds numbers based on chord in the range 1.24 to 2.50 million and at various angles of attack up to 4 deg. During these flight tests, the freestream velocity turbulence intensity was found to be very low. Wind tunnel data were acquired in the Reynolds number range 1.20 to 4.52 million and at angles of attack from -4 to +8 deg. The turbulence intensity in the IRT was 0.5-0.7 percent with the cloud-generating sprays off. A direct comparison between the results obtained in flight and in the IRT showed that the higher level of turbulence intensity in the IRT had little effect on the heat transfer for the lower Reynolds numbers but caused a moderate increase in heat transfer at the higher Reynolds numbers. Turning on the cloud-generating spray nozzle atomizing air in the IRT did not alter the heat transfer. The present data were compared with leading-edge cylinder and flat plate heat transfer correlations that are often used to estimate airfoil heat transfer in computer codes.

  17. SPHRAY: A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Ray Tracer for Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Pelupessy, Inti

    2011-03-01

    SPHRAY, a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) ray tracer, is designed to solve the 3D, time dependent, radiative transfer (RT) equations for arbitrary density fields. The SPH nature of SPHRAY makes the incorporation of separate hydrodynamics and gravity solvers very natural. SPHRAY relies on a Monte Carlo (MC) ray tracing scheme that does not interpolate the SPH particles onto a grid but instead integrates directly through the SPH kernels. Given initial conditions and a description of the sources of ionizing radiation, the code will calculate the non-equilibrium ionization state (HI, HII, HeI, HeII, HeIII, e) and temperature (internal energy/entropy) of each SPH particle. The sources of radiation can include point like objects, diffuse recombination radiation, and a background field from outside the computational volume. The MC ray tracing implementation allows for the quick introduction of new physics and is parallelization friendly. A quick Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) test taken from computer graphics applications allows for the acceleration of the raytracing component. We present the algorithms used in SPHRAY and verify the code by performing all the test problems detailed in the recent Radiative Transfer Comparison Project of Iliev et. al. The Fortran 90 source code for SPHRAY and example SPH density fields are made available online.

  18. Mesoscopic model of actin-based propulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Mogilner, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Two theoretical models dominate current understanding of actin-based propulsion: microscopic polymerization ratchet model predicts that growing and writhing actin filaments generate forces and movements, while macroscopic elastic propulsion model suggests that deformation and stress of growing actin gel are responsible for the propulsion. We examine both experimentally and computationally the 2D movement of ellipsoidal beads propelled by actin tails and show that neither of the two models can explain the observed bistability of the orientation of the beads. To explain the data, we develop a 2D hybrid mesoscopic model by reconciling these two models such that individual actin filaments undergoing nucleation, elongation, attachment, detachment and capping are embedded into the boundary of a node-spring viscoelastic network representing the macroscopic actin gel. Stochastic simulations of this 'in silico' actin network show that the combined effects of the macroscopic elastic deformation and microscopic ratchets can explain the observed bistable orientation of the actin-propelled ellipsoidal beads. To test the theory further, we analyze observed distribution of the curvatures of the trajectories and show that the hybrid model's predictions fit the data. Finally, we demonstrate that the model can explain both concave-up and concave-down force-velocity relations for growing actin networks depending on the characteristic time scale and network recoil. To summarize, we propose that both microscopic polymerization ratchets and macroscopic stresses of the deformable actin network are responsible for the force and movement generation.

  19. Nuclear Actin in Development and Transcriptional Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Misu, Shinji; Takebayashi, Marina; Miyamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Actin is a highly abundant protein in eukaryotic cells and dynamically changes its polymerized states with the help of actin-binding proteins. Its critical function as a constituent of cytoskeleton has been well-documented. Growing evidence demonstrates that actin is also present in nuclei, referred to as nuclear actin, and is involved in a number of nuclear processes, including transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The contribution of nuclear actin to transcriptional regulation can be explained by its direct interaction with transcription machineries and chromatin remodeling factors and by controlling the activities of transcription factors. In both cases, polymerized states of nuclear actin affect the transcriptional outcome. Nuclear actin also plays an important role in activating strongly silenced genes in somatic cells for transcriptional reprogramming. When these nuclear functions of actin are considered, it is plausible to speculate that nuclear actin is also implicated in embryonic development, in which numerous genes need to be activated in a well-coordinated manner. In this review, we especially focus on nuclear actin’s roles in transcriptional activation, reprogramming and development, including stem cell differentiation and we discuss how nuclear actin can be an important player in development and cell differentiation. PMID:28326098

  20. Mesoscopic Model of Actin-Based Propulsion

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Mogilner, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Two theoretical models dominate current understanding of actin-based propulsion: microscopic polymerization ratchet model predicts that growing and writhing actin filaments generate forces and movements, while macroscopic elastic propulsion model suggests that deformation and stress of growing actin gel are responsible for the propulsion. We examine both experimentally and computationally the 2D movement of ellipsoidal beads propelled by actin tails and show that neither of the two models can explain the observed bistability of the orientation of the beads. To explain the data, we develop a 2D hybrid mesoscopic model by reconciling these two models such that individual actin filaments undergoing nucleation, elongation, attachment, detachment and capping are embedded into the boundary of a node-spring viscoelastic network representing the macroscopic actin gel. Stochastic simulations of this ‘in silico’ actin network show that the combined effects of the macroscopic elastic deformation and microscopic ratchets can explain the observed bistable orientation of the actin-propelled ellipsoidal beads. To test the theory further, we analyze observed distribution of the curvatures of the trajectories and show that the hybrid model's predictions fit the data. Finally, we demonstrate that the model can explain both concave-up and concave-down force-velocity relations for growing actin networks depending on the characteristic time scale and network recoil. To summarize, we propose that both microscopic polymerization ratchets and macroscopic stresses of the deformable actin network are responsible for the force and movement generation. PMID:23133366

  1. Labeling F-actin barbed ends with rhodamine-actin in permeabilized neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Marsick, Bonnie M; Letourneau, Paul C

    2011-03-17

    The motile tips of growing axons are called growth cones. Growth cones lead navigating axons through developing tissues by interacting with locally expressed molecular guidance cues that bind growth cone receptors and regulate the dynamics and organization of the growth cone cytoskeleton. The main target of these navigational signals is the actin filament meshwork that fills the growth cone periphery and that drives growth cone motility through continual actin polymerization and dynamic remodeling. Positive or attractive guidance cues induce growth cone turning by stimulating actin filament (F-actin) polymerization in the region of the growth cone periphery that is nearer the source of the attractant cue. This actin polymerization drives local growth cone protrusion, adhesion of the leading margin and axonal elongation toward the attractant. Actin filament polymerization depends on the availability of sufficient actin monomer and on polymerization nuclei or actin filament barbed ends for the addition of monomer. Actin monomer is abundantly available in chick retinal and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) growth cones. Consequently, polymerization increases rapidly when free F-actin barbed ends become available for monomer addition. This occurs in chick DRG and retinal growth cones via the local activation of the F-actin severing protein actin depolymerizing factor (ADF/cofilin) in the growth cone region closer to an attractant. This heightened ADF/cofilin activity severs actin filaments to create new F-actin barbed ends for polymerization. The following method demonstrates this mechanism. Total content of F-actin is visualized by staining with fluorescent phalloidin. F-actin barbed ends are visualized by the incorporation of rhodamine-actin within growth cones that are permeabilized with the procedure described in the following, which is adapted from previous studies of other motile cells. When rhodamine-actin is added at a concentration above the critical concentration

  2. The Interaction of Vinculin with Actin

    PubMed Central

    Golji, Javad; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2013-01-01

    Vinculin can interact with F-actin both in recruitment of actin filaments to the growing focal adhesions and also in capping of actin filaments to regulate actin dynamics. Using molecular dynamics, both interactions are simulated using different vinculin conformations. Vinculin is simulated either with only its vinculin tail domain (Vt), with all residues in its closed conformation, with all residues in an open I conformation, and with all residues in an open II conformation. The open I conformation results from movement of domain 1 away from Vt; the open II conformation results from complete dissociation of Vt from the vinculin head domains. Simulation of vinculin binding along the actin filament showed that Vt alone can bind along the actin filaments, that vinculin in its closed conformation cannot bind along the actin filaments, and that vinculin in its open I conformation can bind along the actin filaments. The simulations confirm that movement of domain 1 away from Vt in formation of vinculin 1 is sufficient for allowing Vt to bind along the actin filament. Simulation of Vt capping actin filaments probe six possible bound structures and suggest that vinculin would cap actin filaments by interacting with both S1 and S3 of the barbed-end, using the surface of Vt normally occluded by D4 and nearby vinculin head domain residues. Simulation of D4 separation from Vt after D1 separation formed the open II conformation. Binding of open II vinculin to the barbed-end suggests this conformation allows for vinculin capping. Three binding sites on F-actin are suggested as regions that could link to vinculin. Vinculin is suggested to function as a variable switch at the focal adhesions. The conformation of vinculin and the precise F-actin binding conformation is dependent on the level of mechanical load on the focal adhesion. PMID:23633939

  3. Cortical actin regulation modulates vascular contractility and compliance in veins

    PubMed Central

    Saphirstein, Robert J; Gao, Yuan Z; Lin, Qian Qian; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The literature on arterial mechanics is extensive, but far less is known about mechanisms controlling mechanical properties of veins. We use here a multi-scale approach to identify subcellular sources of venous stiffness. Portal vein tissue displays a severalfold decrease in passive stiffness compared to aortic tissues. The α-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE) increased tissue stress and stiffness, both attenuated by cytochalasin D (CytoD) and PP2, inhibitors of actin polymerization and Src activity, respectively. We quantify, for the first time, cortical cellular stiffness in freshly isolated contractile vascular smooth muscle cells using magnetic microneedle technology. Cortical stiffness is significantly increased by PE and CytoD inhibits this increase but, surprisingly, PP2 does not. No detectable change in focal adhesion size, measured by immunofluorescence of FAK and zyxin, accompanies the PE-induced changes in cortical stiffness. Probing with phospho-specific antibodies confirmed activation of FAK/Src and ERK pathways and caldesmon phosphorylation. Thus, venous tissue stiffness is regulated both at the level of the smooth muscle cell cortex, via cortical actin polymerization, and by downstream smooth muscle effectors of Src/ERK signalling pathways. These findings identify novel potential molecular targets for the modulation of venous capacitance and venous return in health and disease. Key points Most cardiovascular research focuses on arterial mechanisms of disease, largely ignoring venous mechanisms. Here we examine ex vivo venous stiffness, spanning tissue to molecular levels, using biomechanics and magnetic microneedle technology, and show for the first time that venous stiffness is regulated by a molecular actin switch within the vascular smooth muscle cell in the wall of the vein. This switch connects the contractile apparatus within the cell to adhesion structures and facilitates stiffening of the vessel wall, regulating blood flow return

  4. Two novel members of the ABLIM protein family, ABLIM-2 and -3, associate with STARS and directly bind F-actin.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Tomasa; Frank, Derk; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Pipes, G C Teg; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Richardson, James A; Katus, Hugo A; Olson, Eric N; Frey, Norbert

    2007-03-16

    In addition to regulating cell motility, contractility, and cytokinesis, the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role in the regulation of transcription and gene expression. We have previously identified a novel muscle-specific actin-binding protein, STARS (striated muscle activator of Rho signaling), which directly binds actin and stimulates serum-response factor (SRF)-dependent transcription. To further dissect the STARS/SRF pathway, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a skeletal muscle cDNA library using STARS as bait, and we identified two novel members of the ABLIM protein family, ABLIM-2 and -3, as STARS-interacting proteins. ABLIM-1, which is expressed in retina, brain, and muscle tissue, has been postulated to function as a tumor suppressor. ABLIM-2 and -3 display distinct tissue-specific expression patterns with the highest expression levels in muscle and neuronal tissue. Moreover, these novel ABLIM proteins strongly bind F-actin, are localized to actin stress fibers, and synergistically enhance STARS-dependent activation of SRF. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous ABLIM expression utilizing small interfering RNA significantly blunted SRF-dependent transcription in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. These findings suggest that the members of the novel ABLIM protein family may serve as a scaffold for signaling modules of the actin cytoskeleton and thereby modulate transcription.

  5. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network

    PubMed Central

    Hariadi, Rizal F.; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-01-01

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions. PMID:24591646

  6. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, Rizal F; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-03-18

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions.

  7. Tropomyosin-1 protects endothelial cell-cell junctions against cigarette smoke extract through F-actin stabilization in EA.hy926 cell line.

    PubMed

    Gagat, Maciej; Grzanka, Dariusz; Izdebska, Magdalena; Sroka, Wiktor Dariusz; Marszałł, Michał Piotr; Grzanka, Alina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on EA.hy926 endothelial cells in culture in the context of maintenance of cell-cell junctions through the structural stabilization of the actin cytoskeleton. In the present study, F-actin was stabilized by the overexpression of tropomyosin-1, which is known to stabilize actin filaments in muscle and non-muscle cells. Our study showed that the stabilization of F-actin significantly increased the survival of cells treated with 25% CSE. In addition, after stabilization of F-actin the migratory potential of EA.hy926 cells subjected to CSE treatment was increased. Our results also showed increased fluorescence intensity of alpha- and beta-catenin after CSE treatment in cells which had stabilized F-actin. Analysis of fluorescence intensity of Zonula occludens-1 did not reveal any significant differences when EA.hy926 cells overexpressing tropomyosin-1 were compared with those lacking overexpression. It would appear that overexpression of tropomyosin-1 preserved the structure of actin filaments in the cells treated with CSE. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that stabilization of F-actin protects EA.hy926 cells against CSE-induced loss of both adherens and tight junctions. The data presented in this study suggest that overexpression of tropomyosin-1 stabilizes the organizational structure of actin filaments and helps preserve the endothelial barrier function under conditions of strong oxidative stress.

  8. Actin cortex architecture regulates cell surface tension.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Priyamvada; Clark, Andrew G; Smith, Matthew B; Cassani, Davide A D; Dierkes, Kai; Ragab, Anan; Roux, Philippe P; Charras, Guillaume; Salbreux, Guillaume; Paluch, Ewa K

    2017-06-01

    Animal cell shape is largely determined by the cortex, a thin actin network underlying the plasma membrane in which myosin-driven stresses generate contractile tension. Tension gradients result in local contractions and drive cell deformations. Previous cortical tension regulation studies have focused on myosin motors. Here, we show that cortical actin network architecture is equally important. First, we observe that actin cortex thickness and tension are inversely correlated during cell-cycle progression. We then show that the actin filament length regulators CFL1, CAPZB and DIAPH1 regulate mitotic cortex thickness and find that both increasing and decreasing thickness decreases tension in mitosis. This suggests that the mitotic cortex is poised close to a tension maximum. Finally, using a computational model, we identify a physical mechanism by which maximum tension is achieved at intermediate actin filament lengths. Our results indicate that actin network architecture, alongside myosin activity, is key to cell surface tension regulation.

  9. Elasticity, adhesion and actin based propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinathan, Ajay

    2006-03-01

    When a cells crawls, its shape re-organizes via polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments. The growing ends of the filaments are oriented towards the outside of the cell, and their polymerization pushes the cell membrane forwards. The same mechanism comes into play when the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes infects a cell. The bacterium hijacks the host cell's actin machinery to create an actin network (the actin comet tail) that propels the bacterium through cells and into neighboring cells. We propose a mechanism for how polymerization gives rise to motility that incorporates the effects of inhomogeneous polymerization. We treat the actin comet tail as an elastic continuum tethered to the rear of the bacterium. The interplay of polymerization and tethering gives rise to inhomogeneous stresses calculated with a finite element analysis. We quantitatively reproduce many distinctive features of actin propulsion that have been observed experimentally, including stepped motion, hopping, tail shape and the propulsion of flat surfaces.

  10. Actin dynamics in mouse fibroblasts in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moes, Maarten J. A.; Bijvelt, Jose J.; Boonstra, Johannes

    2007-09-01

    After stimulating with the growth factor PDGF, cells exhibit abundant membrane ruffling and other morphological changes under normal gravity conditions. These morphological changes are largely determined by the actin microfilament system. Now these actin dynamics were studied under microgravity conditions in mouse fibroblasts during the DELTA mission. The aim of the present study was to describe the actin morphology in detail, to establish the effect of PDGF on actin morphology and to study the role of several actin-interacting proteins involved in introduced actin dynamics in microgravity. Identical experiments were conducted at 1G on earth as a reference. No results in microgravity were obtained due to a combination of malfunctioning hardware and unfulfilled temperature requirements.

  11. Polymerization of actin by positively charged liposomes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    By cosedimentation, spectrofluorimetry, and electron microscopy, we have established that actin is induced to polymerize at low salt concentrations by positively charged liposomes. This polymerization occurs only at the surface of the liposomes, and thus monomers not in direct contact with the liposome remain monomeric. The integrity of the liposome membrane is necessary to maintain actin in its polymerized state since disruption of the liposome depolymerizes actin. Actin polymerized at the surface of the liposome is organized into two filamentous structures: sheets of parallel filaments in register and a netlike organization. Spectrofluorimetric analysis with the probe N- pyrenyl-iodoacetamide shows that actin is in the F conformation, at least in the environment of the probe. However, actin assembly induced by the liposome is not accompanied by full ATP hydrolysis as observed in vitro upon addition of salts. PMID:3360852

  12. Apical and basal epitheliomuscular F-actin dynamics during Hydra bud evagination

    PubMed Central

    Aufschnaiter, Roland; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bending of 2D cell sheets is a fundamental morphogenetic mechanism during animal development and reproduction. A critical player driving cell shape during tissue bending is the actin cytoskeleton. Much of our current knowledge about actin dynamics in whole organisms stems from studies of embryonic development in bilaterian model organisms. Here, we have analyzed actin-based processes during asexual bud evagination in the simple metazoan Hydra. We created transgenic Hydra strains stably expressing the actin marker Lifeact-GFP in either ectodermal or endodermal epitheliomuscular cells. We then combined live imaging with conventional phalloidin staining to directly follow actin reorganization. Bending of the Hydra epithelial double layer is initiated by a group of epitheliomuscular cells in the endodermal layer. These cells shorten their apical-basal axis and arrange their basal muscle processes in a circular configuration. We propose that this rearrangement generates the initial forces to bend the endoderm towards the ectoderm. Convergent tissue movement in both epithelial layers towards the centre of evagination then leads to elongation and extension of the bud along its new body axis. Tissue movement into the bud is associated with lateral intercalation of epithelial cells, remodelling of apical septate junctions, and rearrangement of basal muscle processes. The work presented here extends the analysis of morphogenetic mechanisms beyond embryonic tissues of model bilaterians. PMID:28630355

  13. Titin Based Viscosity in Ventricular Physiology: An Integrative Investigation of PEVK-Actin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Charles S; Methawasin, Methajit; Nelson, O Lynne; Radke, Michael H; Hidalgo, Carlos G; Gotthardt, Michael; Granzier, Henk L

    2011-01-01

    Viscosity is proposed to modulate diastolic function, but only limited understanding of the source(s) of viscosity exists. In-vitro experiments have shown that the proline-glutamic acid-valine-lysine (PEVK) rich element of titin interacts with actin, causing a viscous force in the sarcomere. It is unknown whether this mechanism contributes to viscosity in-vivo. We tested the hypothesis that PEVK-actin interaction causes cardiac viscosity and is important in-vivo via an integrative physiological study on a unique PEVK-knockout (KO) model. Both skinned cardiomyocytes and papillary muscle fibers were isolated from wildtype (WT) and PEVK KO mice and passive viscosity was examined using stretch-hold-release and sinusoidal analysis. Viscosity was reduced by ~60% in KO myocytes and ~50% in muscle fibers at room temperature. The PEVK-actin interaction was not modulated by temperature or diastolic calcium, but was increased by lattice compression. Stretch-hold and sinusoidal frequency protocols on intact isolated mouse hearts showed a smaller, 30–40% reduction in viscosity, possibly due to actomyosin interactions, and showed that microtubules did not contribute to viscosity. Transmitral Doppler echocardiography similarly revealed a 40% decrease in LV chamber viscosity in the PEVK KO in-vivo. This integrative study is the first to quantify the influence of a specific molecular (PEVK-actin) viscosity in-vivo and shows that PEVK-actin interactions are an important physiological source of viscosity. PMID:21708170

  14. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N; Bayer, K Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J; Klip, Amira

    2012-10-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding-deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells.

  15. Smoothelin is a specific marker for smooth muscle neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Coco, Dominique P; Hirsch, Michelle S; Hornick, Jason L

    2009-12-01

    Smoothelin is a smooth muscle-specific cytoskeletal protein exclusively found in differentiated smooth muscle cells. This contrasts with other smooth muscle proteins (eg, h-caldesmon, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin), which are expressed in proliferative (early) stages of smooth muscle development and occasionally in other cell types (striated muscle, myofibroblasts, myoepithelial cells, pericytes). Smoothelin has been shown to be expressed predominantly in visceral smooth muscle and to a lesser extent in vascular smooth muscle. Smoothelin expression in mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract has not been evaluated earlier. The purpose of this study was to determine whether immunostaining for smoothelin could help distinguish smooth muscle neoplasms from their morphologic mimics, particularly KIT-negative gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), desmin-positive GISTs, and desmoid fibromatosis. A total of 150 mesenchymal neoplasms of the GI tract, abdominal cavity, and retroperitoneum were retrieved from consult and surgical pathology archives, including 54 GISTs (8 KIT-negative; 13 desmin-positive), 17 GI leiomyosarcomas (LMS), 11 GI mural leiomyomas, 13 leiomyomas of the muscularis mucosae, 12 gastric schwannomas, 15 inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, 9 cases of mesenteric desmoid fibromatosis, 10 dedifferentiated liposarcomas, and 9 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Immunostaining for smoothelin was performed on all cases. Cytoplasmic and nuclear staining was recorded. Cytoplasmic expression of smoothelin was present in all 24 (100%) benign smooth muscle tumors (mural leiomyomas and leiomyomas of the muscularis mucosae). In contrast, only 4 (24%) GI LMS showed cytoplasmic staining for smoothelin. None of the GISTs, desmoid tumors, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, schwannomas, dedifferentiated liposarcomas, or malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors showed cytoplasmic reactivity for smoothelin. Interestingly, 7

  16. Asymmetry and transition to turbulence in a smooth axisymmetric constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v?Tel, J.; Garon, A.; Pelletier, D.; Farinas, M.-I.

    The flow through a smooth axisymmetric constriction (a stenosis in medical applications) of 75% restriction in area is measured using stereoscopic and time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) in the Reynolds number range Re ~ 100-1100. At low Reynolds numbers, steady flow results reveal an asymmetry of the flow downstream of the constriction. The jet emanating from the throat of the nozzle is deflected towards the wall causing the formation of a one-sided recirculation region. The asymmetry results from a Coanda-type wall attachment already observed in symmetric planar sudden expansion flows. When the Reynolds number is increased above the critical value of 400, the separation surface cannot remain attached and an unsteady flow regime begins. Low-frequency axial oscillations of the reattachment point are observed along with a slow swirling motion of the jet. The phenomenon is linked to a periodic discharge of the unstable recirculation region inducing alternating laminar and turbulent flow phases. The resulting flow is highly non-stationary and intermittent. Discrete wavelet transforms are used to discriminate between the large-scale motions of the mean flow and the vortical and turbulent fluctuations. Continuous wavelet transforms reveal the spectral structure of flow disturbances. Temporal measurements of the three velocity components in cross-sections are used with the Taylor hypothesis to qualitatively reconstruct the three-dimensional velocity vector fields, which are validated by comparing with two-dimensional PIV measurements in meridional planes. Visualizations of isosurfaces of the swirling strength criterion allow the identification of the topology of the vortices and highlight the formation and evolution of hairpin-like vortex structures in the flow. Finally, with further increase of the Reynolds number, the flow exhibits less intermittency and becomes stationary for Re ~ 900. Linear stochastic estimation identifies the predominance of vortex rings

  17. Intracellular transport based on actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Khaitlina, S Yu

    2014-09-01

    In addition to the intracellular transport of particles (cargo) along microtubules, there are in the cell two actin-based transport systems. In the actomyosin system the transport is driven by myosin, which moves the cargo along actin microfilaments. This transport requires the hydrolysis of ATP in the myosin molecule motor domain that induces conformational changes in the molecule resulting in the myosin movement along the actin filament. The other actin-based transport system of the cell does not involve myosin or other motor proteins. This system is based on a unidirectional actin polymerization, which depends on ATP hydrolysis in actin polymers and is initiated by proteins bound to the surface of transported particles. Obligatory components of the actin-based transport are proteins of the WASP/Scar family and a complex of Arp2/3 proteins. Moreover, the actin-based systems often contain dynamin and cortactin. It is known that a system of actin filaments formed on the surface of particles, the so-called "comet-like tail", is responsible for intracellular movements of pathogenic bacteria, micropinocytotic vesicles, clathrin-coated vesicles, and phagosomes. This movement is reproduced in a cell-free system containing extract of Xenopus oocytes. The formation of a comet-like structure capable of transporting vesicles from the plasma membrane into the cell depth has been studied in detail by high performance electron microscopy combined with electron tomography. A similar mechanism provides the movement of vesicles containing membrane rafts enriched with sphingolipids and cholesterol, changes in position of the nuclear spindle at meiosis, and other processes. This review will consider current ideas about actin polymerization and its regulation by actin-binding proteins and show how these mechanisms are realized in the intracellular actin-based vesicular transport system.

  18. Three-dimensional structure of the complex of actin and DNase I at 4.5 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Kabsch, W; Mannherz, H G; Suck, D

    1985-01-01

    The shape of an actin subunit has been derived from an improved 6 A map of the complex of rabbit skeletal muscle actin and bovine pancreatic DNase I obtained by X-ray crystallographic methods. The three-dimensional structure of DNase I determined independently at 2.5 A resolution was compared with the DNase I electron density in the actin:DNase map. The two structures are very similar at 6 A resolution thus leading to an unambiguous identification of actin as well as DNase I electron density. Furthermore the correct hand of the actin structure is determined from the DNase I atomic structure. The resolution of the actin structure was extended to 4.5 A by using a single heavy-atom derivative and the knowledge of the atomic coordinates of DNase I. The dimensions of an actin subunit are 67 A X 40 A X 37 A. It consists of a small and a large domain, the small domain containing the N terminus. Actin is an alpha,beta-protein with a beta-pleated sheet in each domain. These sheets are surrounded by several alpha-helices, comprising at least 40% of the structure. The phosphate peak of the adenine nucleotide is located between the two domains. The complex of actin and DNase I as found in solution (i.e., the actin:DNase I contacts which do not depend on crystal packing) was deduced from a comparison of monoclinic with orthorhombic crystals. Residues 44-46, 51, 52, 60-62 of DNase I are close to a loop region in the small domain of actin. At a distance of approximately 15 A there is a second contact in the large domain in which Glu13 of DNase I is involved. A possible binding region for myosin is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:4065103

  19. [The reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and microtubule system of human endothelial vein in the intercellular contacts formation].

    PubMed

    Shahov, A S; Dugina, V B; Alieva, I B

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are tightly fitted to each other and lining the interior surface of all vessels of living organism to provide vascular permeability regulation and interchange between the blood circulating in vessels and tissue fluids of those organs in which these vessels are located. In vitro endothelial monolayer conserve it's basic barrier function which is native for vessels endothelium. Based on this fact we used endothelial cells growing in vitro as a model system in experimental studies of cytoskeletal and adhesion cell components interaction. In current paper, cultured human vein endothelial cells monolayer was used to quantify cytoskeleton alterations in the of endothelial cells from spreading and formation of the first cell-cell contacts to confluent monolayer formation. The system of actin filaments formed two different cytoskeletal structures in the cells of venous endothelium: 1) cortical actin network; 2) actin stress fibers (bundles) arranged parallel to the substrate. Two actin isoforms, β- and γ-cytoplasmic (non-muscle) actins, are expressed in endothelial cells. The bundles of actin stress fibers were detected by immunofluorescent staining with antibody against β-actin, whereas antibodies against γ-actin identified cortical and lamellar networks. For assessment of the actin cytoskeleton organization it's fluorescence intensity on the area of 10 μM2 located (1) near the free edge, and (2) in the zone of cell-cell contacts were analyzed. Fluorescence intensity of β-actin structures was higher in the areas of cell-cell contact. The fluorescence of γ-actin structures was more intensive at the leading edges of the lamellae, and was the lowest on the stable edges of the cells with formed cell-cell contacts. The endothelial monolayer formation was accompanied by microtubule system alteration: the number of microtubules increased at the cell edge, and besides the microtubules quantity in the area of already formed cell-cell contact was always

  20. Quantitative assessment of actin transcript number in eggs, embryos, and tube feet of the sea star Pisaster ochraceus.

    PubMed Central

    Kovesdi, I; Smith, M J

    1985-01-01

    Actin coding sequence cDNA probes were used to quantitate the number of transcripts in RNA from eggs, embryos, and tube feet of the sea star Pisaster ochraceus. Transcript concentrations were measured in both total RNA and in poly(A)+ RNA by titration and hybridization kinetic methods. Surprisingly, the actin transcript number in sea star eggs is two orders of magnitude greater than in sea urchin eggs. There are at least 2.9 X 10(5) actin transcripts per sea star egg, 1.2 X 10(5) per 48-h gastrula and 1.9 X 10(5) per 72-h gastrula. The number of actin transcripts per unit mass of extracted tube foot RNA is lower than in developmental stages. The relative abundance and size of actin transcripts was determined by Northern and dot blot analyses using probes containing actin coding DNA or 3'-untranslated-region sequences. The actin transcript in eggs and embryos is 2,300 nucleotides (nt) long and originates from the Cy (cytoplasmic) gene class. In tube feet, the most abundant actin transcript is 2,200 nt long and originates from the M (muscle) gene class. Tube feet also contain, at lower abundance, 2,300-nt transcripts of the Cy gene type expressed in eggs and embryos. Images PMID:3018493

  1. Filopodia-like actin cables position nuclei in association with perinuclear actin in Drosophila nurse cells.

    PubMed

    Huelsmann, Sven; Ylänne, Jari; Brown, Nicholas H

    2013-09-30

    Controlling the position of the nucleus is vital for a number of cellular processes from yeast to humans. In Drosophila nurse cells, nuclear positioning is crucial during dumping, when nurse cells contract and expel their contents into the oocyte. We provide evidence that in nurse cells, continuous filopodia-like actin cables, growing from the plasma membrane and extending to the nucleus, achieve nuclear positioning. These actin cables move nuclei away from ring canals. When nurse cells contract, actin cables associate laterally with the nuclei, in some cases inducing nuclear turning so that actin cables become partially wound around the nuclei. Our data suggest that a perinuclear actin meshwork connects actin cables to nuclei via actin-crosslinking proteins such as the filamin Cheerio. We provide a revised model for how actin structures position nuclei in nurse cells, employing evolutionary conserved machinery.

  2. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the “status” of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  3. Filopodia-like Actin Cables Position Nuclei in Association with Perinuclear Actin in Drosophila Nurse Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huelsmann, Sven; Ylänne, Jari; Brown, Nicholas H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Controlling the position of the nucleus is vital for a number of cellular processes from yeast to humans. In Drosophila nurse cells, nuclear positioning is crucial during dumping, when nurse cells contract and expel their contents into the oocyte. We provide evidence that in nurse cells, continuous filopodia-like actin cables, growing from the plasma membrane and extending to the nucleus, achieve nuclear positioning. These actin cables move nuclei away from ring canals. When nurse cells contract, actin cables associate laterally with the nuclei, in some cases inducing nuclear turning so that actin cables become partially wound around the nuclei. Our data suggest that a perinuclear actin meshwork connects actin cables to nuclei via actin-crosslinking proteins such as the filamin Cheerio. We provide a revised model for how actin structures position nuclei in nurse cells, employing evolutionary conserved machinery. PMID:24091012

  4. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  5. Photodynamic therapy for actinic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Kalisiak, Michal S; Rao, Jaggi

    2007-01-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are one of the most common conditions that are treated by dermatologists and they have the potential to progress to squamous cell carcinoma if left untreated. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has emerged as a novel and versatile method of treating those lesions. Topical preparations of aminolevulinic acid and methyl aminolevulinate are commercially available photosensitizers, and numerous light sources may be used for photoactivation. This article focuses on practical aspects of PDT in the treatment of AKs, outcomes of relevant clinical trials, and special applications of PDT in transplant recipients and other who are predisposed to AK formation. Step-by-step descriptions of PDT sessions are presented.

  6. GPCRs and actin-cytoskeleton dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; González-Espinosa, Claudia; Espinosa-Riquer, Zyanya P; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    A multitude of physiological processes regulated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling are accomplished by the participation of active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton. In general, it is common that a cross talk occurs among networks of microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments in order to reach specific cell responses. In particular, actin-cytoskeleton dynamics regulate processes such as cell shape, cell division, cell motility, and cell polarization, among others. This chapter describes the current knowledge about the regulation of actin-cytoskeleton dynamic by diverse GPCR signaling pathways, and also includes some protocols combining immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy for the visualization of the different rearrangements of the actin-cytoskeleton. We report how both the S1P-GPCR/G12/13/Rho/ROCK and glucagon-GPCR/Gs/cAMP axes induce differential actin-cytoskeleton rearrangements in epithelial cells. We also show that specific actin-binding molecules, like phalloidin and LifeAct, are very useful to analyze F-actin reorganization by confocal microscopy, and also that both molecules show similar results in fixed cells, whereas the anti-actin antibody is useful to detect both the G- and F-actin, as well as their compartmentalization. Thus, it is highly recommended to utilize different approaches to investigate the regulation of actin dynamics by GPCR signaling, with the aim to get a better picture of the phenomenon under study.

  7. Geometrical Determinants of Neuronal Actin Waves

    PubMed Central

    Tomba, Caterina; Braïni, Céline; Bugnicourt, Ghislain; Cohen, Floriane; Friedrich, Benjamin M.; Gov, Nir S.; Villard, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons produce in their early stages of growth propagative, actin-rich dynamical structures called actin waves. The directional motion of actin waves from the soma to the tip of neuronal extensions has been associated with net forward growth, and ultimately with the specification of neurites into axon and dendrites. Here, geometrical cues are used to control actin wave dynamics by constraining neurons on adhesive stripes of various widths. A key observable, the average time between the production of consecutive actin waves, or mean inter-wave interval (IWI), was identified. It scales with the neurite width, and more precisely with the width of the proximal segment close to the soma. In addition, the IWI is independent of the total number of neurites. These two results suggest a mechanistic model of actin wave production, by which the material conveyed by actin waves is assembled in the soma until it reaches the threshold leading to the initiation and propagation of a new actin wave. Based on these observations, we formulate a predictive theoretical description of actin wave-driven neuronal growth and polarization, which consistently accounts for different sets of experiments. PMID:28424590

  8. Stochastic model of profilin-actin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Brandon; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    A driving factor in cell motility and other processes that involve changes of cell shape is the rapid polymerization of actin subunits into long filaments. This process is regulated by profilin, a protein which binds to actin subunits and regulates elongation of actin filaments. Whether profilin stimulates polymerization by coupling to hydrolysis of ATP-bound actin is debated. Previous studies have proposed indirect coupling to ATP hydrolysis using rate equations, but did not include the effects of fluctuations that are important near the critical concentration. We developed stochastic simulations using the Gillespie algorithm to study single filament elongation at the barbed end in the presence of profilin. We used recently measured rate constants and estimated the rate of profilin binding to the barbed end such that detailed balance is satisfied. Fast phosphate release at the tip of the filament was accounted for. The elongation rate and length diffusivity as functions of profilin and actin concentration were calculated and used to extract the critical concentrations of free actin and of total actin. We show under what conditions profilin leads to an increase in the critical concentration of total actin but a decrease in the critical concentration of free actin.

  9. Co-transcriptional nuclear actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Actin is a key player for nuclear structure and function regulating both chromosome organization and gene activity. In the cell nucleus actin interacts with many different proteins. Among these proteins several studies have identified classical nuclear factors involved in chromatin structure and function, transcription and RNA processing as well as proteins that are normally involved in controlling the actin cytoskeleton. These discoveries have raised the possibility that nuclear actin performs its multi task activities through tight interactions with different sets of proteins. This high degree of promiscuity in the spectrum of protein-to-protein interactions correlates well with the conformational plasticity of actin and the ability to undergo regulated changes in its polymerization states. Several of the factors involved in controlling head-to-tail actin polymerization have been shown to be in the nucleus where they seem to regulate gene activity. By focusing on the multiple tasks performed by actin and actin-binding proteins, possible models of how actin dynamics controls the different phases of the RNA polymerase II transcription cycle are being identified. PMID:23138849

  10. Modeling actin waves in dictyostelium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasnik, Vaibhav; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2011-03-01

    Actin networks in living cells demonstrate a high capacity for self-organization and are responsible for the formation of a variety of structures such as lamellopodia, phagocytic cups, and cleavage furrows. Recent experiments have studied actin waves formed on the surface of dictyostelium cells that have been treated with a depolymerizing agent. These waves are believed to be physiologically important, for example, for the formation of phagocytic cups. We propose and study a minimal model, based on the dendritic nucleation of actin polymers, to explain the formation of these waves. This model can be extended to study the dynamics of the coupled actin-membrane system.

  11. Dynamic actin gene family evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liucun; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Yijun; Wen, Tieqiao; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Actin is one of the most highly conserved proteins and plays crucial roles in many vital cellular functions. In most eukaryotes, it is encoded by a multigene family. Although the actin gene family has been studied a lot, few investigators focus on the comparison of actin gene family in relative species. Here, the purpose of our study is to systematically investigate characteristics and evolutionary pattern of actin gene family in primates. We identified 233 actin genes in human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, rhesus monkey, and marmoset genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that actin genes in the seven species could be divided into two major types of clades: orthologous group versus complex group. Codon usages and gene expression patterns of actin gene copies were highly consistent among the groups because of basic functions needed by the organisms, but much diverged within species due to functional diversification. Besides, many great potential pseudogenes were found with incomplete open reading frames due to frameshifts or early stop codons. These results implied that actin gene family in primates went through "birth and death" model of evolution process. Under this model, actin genes experienced strong negative selection and increased the functional complexity by reproducing themselves.

  12. Architecture and Connectivity Govern Actin Network Contractility.

    PubMed

    Ennomani, Hajer; Letort, Gaëlle; Guérin, Christophe; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Cao, Wenxiang; Nédélec, François; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2016-03-07

    Actomyosin contractility plays a central role in a wide range of cellular processes, including the establishment of cell polarity, cell migration, tissue integrity, and morphogenesis during development. The contractile response is variable and depends on actomyosin network architecture and biochemical composition. To determine how this coupling regulates actomyosin-driven contraction, we used a micropatterning method that enables the spatial control of actin assembly. We generated a variety of actin templates and measured how defined actin structures respond to myosin-induced forces. We found that the same actin filament crosslinkers either enhance or inhibit the contractility of a network, depending on the organization of actin within the network. Numerical simulations unified the roles of actin filament branching and crosslinking during actomyosin contraction. Specifically, we introduce the concept of "network connectivity" and show that the contractions of distinct actin architectures are described by the same master curve when considering their degree of connectivity. This makes it possible to predict the dynamic response of defined actin structures to transient changes in connectivity. We propose that, depending on the connectivity and the architecture, network contraction is dominated by either sarcomeric-like or buckling mechanisms. More generally, this study reveals how actin network contractility depends on its architecture under a defined set of biochemical conditions.

  13. Bioinformatics study of the mangrove actin genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basyuni, M.; Wasilah, M.; Sumardi

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the bioinformatics methods to analyze eight actin genes from mangrove plants on DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, subcellular localization, similarity, and phylogenetic. The physical and chemical properties of eight mangroves showed variation among the genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of eight mangrove actin genes followed the order of a helix > random coil > extended chain structure for BgActl, KcActl, RsActl, and A. corniculatum Act. In contrast to this observation, the remaining actin genes were random coil > extended chain structure > a helix. This study, therefore, shown the prediction of secondary structure was performed for necessary structural information. The values of chloroplast or signal peptide or mitochondrial target were too small, indicated that no chloroplast or mitochondrial transit peptide or signal peptide of secretion pathway in mangrove actin genes. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity and functional of properties of the different amino acids in mangrove actin genes. To clarify the relationship among the mangrove actin gene, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Three groups of mangrove actin genes were formed, the first group contains B. gymnorrhiza BgAct and R. stylosa RsActl. The second cluster which consists of 5 actin genes the largest group, and the last branch consist of one gene, B. sexagula Act. The present study, therefore, supported the previous results that plant actin genes form distinct clusters in the tree.

  14. F-actin waves, actin cortex disassembly and focal exocytosis driven by actin-phosphoinositide positive feedback.

    PubMed

    Masters, Thomas A; Sheetz, Michael P; Gauthier, Nils C

    2016-04-01

    Actin polymerization is controlled by the phosphoinositide composition of the plasma membrane. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the spatiotemporal regulation of actin network organization over extended length scales are still unclear. To observe phosphoinositide-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics we combined the model system of frustrated phagocytosis, total internal reflection microscopy and manipulation of the buffer tonicity. We found that macrophages interacting with IgG-coated glass substrates formed circular F-actin waves on their ventral surface enclosing a region of plasma membrane devoid of cortical actin. Plasma membrane free of actin cortex was strongly depleted of PI(4,5)P2 , but enriched in PI(3,4)P2 and displayed a fivefold increase in exocytosis. Wave formation could be promoted by application of a hypotonic shock. The actin waves were characteristic of a bistable wavefront at the boundary between the regions of membrane containing and lacking cortical actin. Phosphoinositide modifiers and RhoGTPase activities dramatically redistributed with respect to the wavefronts, which often exhibited spatial oscillations. Perturbation of either lipid or actin cytoskeleton-related pathways led to rapid loss of both the polarized lipid distribution and the wavefront. As waves travelled over the plasma membrane, wavefront actin was seen to rapidly polymerize and depolymerize at pre-existing clusters of FcγRIIA, coincident with rapid changes in lipid composition. Thus the potential of receptors to support rapid F-actin polymerization appears to depend acutely on the local concentrations of multiple lipid species. We propose that interdependence through positive feedback from the cytoskeleton to lipid modifiers leads to coordinated local cortex remodeling, focal exocytosis, and organizes extended actin networks.

  15. Cofilin Changes the Twist of F-Actin: Implications for Actin Filament Dynamics and Cellular Function

    PubMed Central

    McGough, Amy; Pope, Brian; Chiu, Wah; Weeds, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Cofilin is an actin depolymerizing protein found widely distributed in animals and plants. We have used electron cryomicroscopy and helical reconstruction to identify its binding site on actin filaments. Cofilin binds filamentous (F)-actin cooperatively by bridging two longitudinally associated actin subunits. The binding site is centered axially at subdomain 2 of the lower actin subunit and radially at the cleft between subdomains 1 and 3 of the upper actin subunit. Our work has revealed a totally unexpected (and unique) property of cofilin, namely, its ability to change filament twist. As a consequence of this change in twist, filaments decorated with cofilin have much shorter ‘actin crossovers' (∼75% of those normally observed in F-actin structures). Although their binding sites are distinct, cofilin and phalloidin do not bind simultaneously to F-actin. This is the first demonstration of a protein that excludes another actin-binding molecule by changing filament twist. Alteration of F-actin structure by cofilin/ADF appears to be a novel mechanism through which the actin cytoskeleton may be regulated or remodeled. PMID:9265645

  16. Reconstitution of a Minimal Actin Cortex by Coupling Actin Filaments to Reconstituted Membranes.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Sven K

    2016-01-01

    A thin layer of actin filaments in many eukaryotic cell types drives pivotal aspects of cell morphogenesis and is generally cited as the actin cortex. Myosin driven contractility and actin cytoskeleton membrane interactions form the basis of fundamental cellular processes such as cytokinesis, cell migration, and cortical flows. How the interplay between the actin cytoskeleton, the membrane, and actin binding proteins drives these processes is far from being understood. The complexity of the actin cortex in living cells and the hardly feasible manipulation of the omnipotent cellular key players, namely actin, myosin, and the membrane, are challenging in order to gain detailed insights about the underlying mechanisms. Recent progress in developing bottom-up in vitro systems where the actin cytoskeleton is combined with reconstituted membranes may provide a complementary route to reveal general principles underlying actin cortex properties. In this chapter the reconstitution of a minimal actin cortex by coupling actin filaments to a supported membrane is described. This minimal system may be very well suited to study for example protein interactions on membrane bound actin filaments in a very controlled and quantitative manner as it may be difficult to perform in living systems.

  17. A Beetle Flight Muscle Displays Leg Muscle Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Madoka

    2016-09-20

    In contrast to major flight muscles in the Mecynorrhina torquata beetle, the third axillary (3Ax) muscle is a minor flight muscle that uniquely displays a powerful mechanical function despite its considerably small volume, ∼1/50 that of a major flight muscle. The 3Ax muscle contracts relatively slowly, and in flight strongly pulls the beating wing to attenuate the stroke amplitude. This attenuation leads to left-right turning in flight or wing folding to cease flying. What enables this small muscle to be so powerful? To explore this question, we examined the microstructure of the 3Ax muscle using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the 3Ax muscle has long (∼5 μm) myofilaments and that the ratio of thick (myosin) filaments to thin (actin) filaments is 1:5 or 1:6. These characteristics are not observed in the major flight muscles, which have shorter myofilaments (∼3.5 μm) with a smaller ratio (1:3), and instead are more typical of a leg muscle. Furthermore, the flight-muscle-specific troponin isoform, TnH, is not expressed in the 3Ax muscle. Since such a microstructure is suitable for generating large tension, the 3Ax muscle is appropriately designed to pull the wing strongly despite its small volume. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spracklen, Andrew J; Fagan, Tiffany N; Lovander, Kaylee E; Tootle, Tina L

    2014-09-15

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools--Utrophin, Lifeact, and F-tractin--for characterizing the actin remodeling events occurring within the germline-derived nurse cells during Drosophila mid-oogenesis or follicle development. Specifically, we used the UAS/GAL4 system to express these tools at different levels and in different cells, and analyzed these tools for effects on fertility, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and ability to label filamentous actin (F-actin) structures by both fixed and live imaging. While both Utrophin and Lifeact robustly label F-actin structures within the Drosophila germline, when strongly expressed they cause sterility and severe actin defects including cortical actin breakdown resulting in multi-nucleate nurse cells, early F-actin filament and aggregate formation during stage 9 (S9), and disorganized parallel actin filament bundles during stage 10B (S10B). However, by using a weaker germline GAL4 driver in combination with a higher temperature, Utrophin can label F-actin with minimal defects. Additionally, strong Utrophin expression within the germline causes F-actin formation in the nurse cell nuclei and germinal vesicle during mid-oogenesis. Similarly, Lifeact expression results in nuclear F-actin only within the germinal vesicle. F-tractin expresses at a lower level than the other two labeling tools, but labels cytoplasmic F-actin structures well without causing sterility or striking actin defects. Together these studies reveal how critical it is to evaluate the utility of each actin labeling tool

  19. The pros and cons of common actin labeling tools for visualizing actin dynamics during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Spracklen, Andrew J.; Fagan, Tiffany N.; Lovander, Kaylee E.; Tootle, Tina L.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton is required for both development and tissue homeostasis. While fixed image analysis has provided significant insight into such events, a complete understanding of cytoskeletal dynamics requires live imaging. Numerous tools for the live imaging of actin have been generated by fusing the actin-binding domain from an actin-interacting protein to a fluorescent protein. Here we comparatively assess the utility of three such tools – Utrophin, Lifeact, and F-tractin – for characterizing the actin remodeling events occurring within the germline-derived nurse cells during Drosophila mid-oogenesis or follicle development. Specifically, we used the UAS/GAL4 system to express these tools at different levels and in different cells, and analyzed these tools for effects on fertility, alterations in the actin cytoskeleton, and ability to label filamentous actin (F-actin) structures by both fixed and live imaging. While both Utrophin and Lifeact robustly label F-actin structures within the Drosophila germline, when strongly expressed they cause sterility and severe actin defects including cortical actin breakdown resulting in multi-nucleate nurse cells, early F-actin filament and aggregate formation during stage 9 (S9), and disorganized parallel actin filament bundles during stage 10B (S10B). However, by using a weaker germline GAL4 driver in combination with a higher temperature, Utrophin can label F-actin with minimal defects. Additionally, strong Utrophin expression within the germline causes F-actin formation in the nurse cell nuclei and germinal vesicle during mid-oogenesis. Similarly, Lifeact expression results in nuclear F-actin only within the germinal vesicle. F-tractin expresses at a lower level than the other two labeling tools, but labels cytoplasmic F-actin structures well without causing sterility or striking actin defects. Together these studies reveal how critical it is to evaluate the utility of each actin labeling

  20. Constitutive phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit-1 in smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Ho; Chang, Audrey N; Huang, Jian; He, Weiqi; Sweeney, H Lee; Zhu, Minsheng; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle contraction initiated by myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation is dependent on the relative activities of Ca2+–calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). We have investigated the physiological role of the MLCP regulatory subunit MYPT1 in bladder smooth muscle containing a smooth muscle-specific deletion of MYPT1 in adult mice. Deep-sequencing analyses of mRNA and immunoblotting revealed that MYPT1 depletion reduced the amount of PP1cδ with no compensatory changes in expression of other MYPT1 family members. Phosphatase activity towards phosphorylated smooth muscle heavy meromyosin was proportional to the amount of PP1cδ in total homogenates from wild-type or MYPT1-deficient tissues. Isolated MYPT1-deficient tissues from MYPT1SM−/− mice contracted with moderate differences in response to KCl and carbachol treatments, and relaxed rapidly with comparable rates after carbachol removal and only 1.5-fold slower after KCl removal. Measurements of phosphorylated proteins in the RLC signalling and actin polymerization modules during contractions revealed moderate changes. Using a novel procedure to quantify total phosphorylation of MYPT1 at Thr696 and Thr853, we found substantial phosphorylation in wild-type tissues under resting conditions, predicting attenuation of MLCP activity. Reduced PP1cδ activity in MYPT1-deficient tissues may be similar to the attenuated MLCP activity in wild-type tissues resulting from constitutively phosphorylated MYPT1. Constitutive phosphorylation of MYPT1 Thr696 and Thr853 may thus represent a physiological mechanism acting in concert with agonist-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation to inhibit MLCP activity. In summary, MYPT1 deficiency may not cause significant derangement of smooth muscle contractility because the effective MLCP activity is not changed. PMID:24835173

  1. Force of an actin spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jennifer; Mahadevan, L.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The acrosomal process of the horseshoe crab sperm is a novel mechanochemical molecular spring that converts its elastic stain energy to mechanical work upon the chemical activation by Ca2+. Twisted and bent, the initial state of the acrosomal bundle features a high degree of complexity in its structure and the energy is believed to be stored in the highly strained actin filaments as an elastic potential energy. When activated, the bundle relaxes from the coil of the highly twisted and bent filaments to its straight conformation at a mean velocity of 15um/s. The mean extension velocity increases dramatically from 3um/s to 27um/s when temperature of the medium is changed from 9.6C to 32C (respective viscosities of 1.25-0.75cp), yet it exhibits a very weak dependence on changes in the medium viscosity (1cp-33cp). These experiments suggest that the uncoiling of the actin spring should be limited not by the viscosity of the medium but by the unlatching events of involved proteins at a molecular level. Unlike the viscosity-limited processes, where force is directly related to the rate of the reaction, a direct measurement is required to obtain the spring force of the acrosomal process. The extending acrosomal bundle is forced to push against a barrier and its elastic buckling response is analyzed to measure the force generated during the uncoiling.

  2. Actin-Regulator Feedback Interactions during Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinxin; Galletta, Brian J.; Cooper, John A.; Carlsson, Anders E.

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis mediated by clathrin, a cellular process by which cells internalize membrane receptors and their extracellular ligands, is an important component of cell signaling regulation. Actin polymerization is involved in endocytosis in varying degrees depending on the cellular context. In yeast, clathrin-mediated endocytosis requires a pulse of polymerized actin and its regulators, which recruit and activate the Arp2/3 complex. In this article, we seek to identify the main protein-protein interactions that 1) cause actin and its regulators to appear in pulses, and 2) determine the effects of key mutations and drug treatments on actin and regulator assembly. We perform a joint modeling/experimental study of actin and regulator dynamics during endocytosis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We treat both a stochastic model that grows an explicit three-dimensional actin network, and a simpler two-variable Fitzhugh-Nagumo type model. The models include a negative-feedback interaction of F-actin onto the Arp2/3 regulators. Both models explain the pulse time courses and the effects of interventions on actin polymerization: the surprising increase in the peak F-actin count caused by reduced regulator branching activity, the increase in F-actin resulting from slowing of actin disassembly, and the increased Arp2/3 regulator lifetime resulting from latrunculin treatment. In addition, they predict that decreases in the regulator branching activity lead to increases in accumulation of regulators, and we confirmed this prediction with experiments on yeast harboring mutations in the Arp2/3 regulators, using quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Our experimental measurements suggest that the regulators act quasi-independently, in the sense that accumulation of a particular regulator is most strongly affected by mutations of that regulator, as opposed to the others. PMID:27028652

  3. Contribution of human smooth muscle cells to amyloid angiopathy in AL (light-chain) amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Vora, Moiz; Kevil, Christopher G; Herrera, Guillermo A

    2017-01-01

    deposited in peripheral vessels. VSMCs participate in the formation of amyloid by the intracellular processing of AL-LCs, which is possible due to their transformation from a smooth muscle to a macrophage phenotype. The formation of amyloid fibrils occurs in the mature lysosomal compartment of transformed cells. The amyloid that is formed is then extruded into the extracellular matrix.

  4. Unconventional actin conformations localize on intermediate filaments in mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Unconventional actin conformations colocalize with vimentin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. {yields} These conformations are detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 ('lower dimer') and 2G2 ('nuclear actin'), but not C4 (monomeric actin). {yields} Mitotic unconventional actin cables are independent of filamentous actin or microtubules. {yields} Unconventional actin colocalizes with vimentin on a nocodazole-induced perinuclear dense mass of cables. -- Abstract: Different structural conformations of actin have been identified in cells and shown to reside in distinct subcellular locations of cells. In this report, we describe the localization of actin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. Actin was detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 and 2G2, but not with the anti-actin antibody C4. Actin contained in this structure is independent of microtubules and actin filaments, and colocalizes with vimentin. Taking advantage of intermediate filament collapse into a perinuclear dense mass of cables when microtubules are depolymerized, we were able to relocalize actin to such structures. We hypothesize that phosphorylation of intermediate filaments at mitosis entry triggers the recruitment of different actin conformations to mitotic intermediate filaments. Storage and partition of the nuclear actin and antiparallel 'lower dimer' actin conformations between daughter cells possibly contribute to gene transcription and transient actin filament dynamics at G1 entry.

  5. Synthetic peptides that cause F-actin bundling and block actin depolymerization