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Sample records for a-to-i hyperediting substrates

  1. Dynamic hyper-editing underlies temperature adaptation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ashwal-Fluss, Reut; Pandey, Varun; Levanon, Erez Y.; Kadener, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    In Drosophila, A-to-I editing is prevalent in the brain, and mutations in the editing enzyme ADAR correlate with specific behavioral defects. Here we demonstrate a role for ADAR in behavioral temperature adaptation in Drosophila. Although there is a higher level of editing at lower temperatures, at 29°C more sites are edited. These sites are less evolutionarily conserved, more disperse, less likely to be involved in secondary structures, and more likely to be located in exons. Interestingly, hypomorph mutants for ADAR display a weaker transcriptional response to temperature changes than wild-type flies and a highly abnormal behavioral response upon temperature increase. In sum, our data shows that ADAR is essential for proper temperature adaptation, a key behavior trait that is essential for survival of flies in the wild. Moreover, our results suggest a more general role of ADAR in regulating RNA secondary structures in vivo. PMID:28746393

  2. A genome-wide map of hyper-edited RNA reveals numerous new sites.

    PubMed

    Porath, Hagit T; Carmi, Shai; Levanon, Erez Y

    2014-08-27

    Adenosine-to-inosine editing is one of the most frequent post-transcriptional modifications, manifested as A-to-G mismatches when comparing RNA sequences with their source DNA. Recently, a number of RNA-seq data sets have been screened for the presence of A-to-G editing, and hundreds of thousands of editing sites identified. Here we show that existing screens missed the majority of sites by ignoring reads with excessive ('hyper') editing that do not easily align to the genome. We show that careful alignment and examination of the unmapped reads in RNA-seq studies reveal numerous new sites, usually many more than originally discovered, and in precisely those regions that are most heavily edited. Specifically, we discover 327,096 new editing sites in the heavily studied Illumina Human BodyMap data and more than double the number of detected sites in several published screens. We also identify thousands of new sites in mouse, rat, opossum and fly. Our results establish that hyper-editing events account for the majority of editing sites.

  3. Adaptation of A-to-I RNA editing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing is hypothesized to facilitate adaptive evolution by expanding proteomic diversity through an epigenetic approach. However, it is challenging to provide evidences to support this hypothesis at the whole editome level. In this study, we systematically characterized 2,114 A-to-I RNA editing sites in female and male brains of D. melanogaster, and nearly half of these sites had events evolutionarily conserved across Drosophila species. We detected strong signatures of positive selection on the nonsynonymous editing sites in Drosophila brains, and the beneficial editing sites were significantly enriched in genes related to chemical and electrical neurotransmission. The signal of adaptation was even more pronounced for the editing sites located in X chromosome or for those commonly observed across Drosophila species. We identified a set of gene candidates (termed “PSEB” genes) that had nonsynonymous editing events favored by natural selection. We presented evidence that editing preferentially increased mutation sequence space of evolutionarily conserved genes, which supported the adaptive evolution hypothesis of editing. We found prevalent nonsynonymous editing sites that were favored by natural selection in female and male adults from five strains of D. melanogaster. We showed that temperature played a more important role than gender effect in shaping the editing levels, although the effect of temperature is relatively weaker compared to that of species effect. We also explored the relevant factors that shape the selective patterns of the global editomes. Altogether we demonstrated that abundant nonsynonymous editing sites in Drosophila brains were adaptive and maintained by natural selection during evolution. Our results shed new light on the evolutionary principles and functional consequences of RNA editing. PMID:28282384

  4. Bidirectional regulation of adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing by DEAH box helicase 9 (DHX9) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hong, HuiQi; An, Omer; Chan, Tim H M; Ng, Vanessa H E; Kwok, Hui Si; Lin, Jaymie S; Qi, Lihua; Han, Jian; Tay, Daryl J T; Tang, Sze Jing; Yang, Henry; Song, Yangyang; Bellido Molias, Fernando; Tenen, Daniel G; Chen, Leilei

    2018-05-18

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing entails the enzymatic deamination of adenosines to inosines by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). Dysregulated A-to-I editing has been implicated in various diseases, including cancers. However, the precise factors governing the A-to-I editing and their physiopathological implications remain as a long-standing question. Herein, we unravel that DEAH box helicase 9 (DHX9), at least partially dependent of its helicase activity, functions as a bidirectional regulator of A-to-I editing in cancer cells. Intriguingly, the ADAR substrate specificity determines the opposing effects of DHX9 on editing as DHX9 silencing preferentially represses editing of ADAR1-specific substrates, whereas augments ADAR2-specific substrate editing. Analysis of 11 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals a striking overexpression of DHX9 in tumors. Further, tumorigenicity studies demonstrate a helicase-dependent oncogenic role of DHX9 in cancer development. In sum, DHX9 constitutes a bidirectional regulatory mode in A-to-I editing, which is in part responsible for the dysregulated editome profile in cancer.

  5. Prediction of constitutive A-to-I editing sites from human transcriptomes in the absence of genomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is recognized as a cellular mechanism for generating both RNA and protein diversity. Inosine base pairs with cytidine during reverse transcription and therefore appears as guanosine during sequencing of cDNA. Current approaches of RNA editing identification largely depend on the comparison between transcriptomes and genomic DNA (gDNA) sequencing datasets from the same individuals, and it has been challenging to identify editing candidates from transcriptomes in the absence of gDNA information. Results We have developed a new strategy to accurately predict constitutive RNA editing sites from publicly available human RNA-seq datasets in the absence of relevant genomic sequences. Our approach establishes new parameters to increase the ability to map mismatches and to minimize sequencing/mapping errors and unreported genome variations. We identified 695 novel constitutive A-to-I editing sites that appear in clusters (named “editing boxes”) in multiple samples and which exhibit spatial and dynamic regulation across human tissues. Some of these editing boxes are enriched in non-repetitive regions lacking inverted repeat structures and contain an extremely high conversion frequency of As to Is. We validated a number of editing boxes in multiple human cell lines and confirmed that ADAR1 is responsible for the observed promiscuous editing events in non-repetitive regions, further expanding our knowledge of the catalytic substrate of A-to-I RNA editing by ADAR enzymes. Conclusions The approach we present here provides a novel way of identifying A-to-I RNA editing events by analyzing only RNA-seq datasets. This method has allowed us to gain new insights into RNA editing and should also aid in the identification of more constitutive A-to-I editing sites from additional transcriptomes. PMID:23537002

  6. Regulatory factors governing adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Hong, HuiQi; Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Chen, Leilei

    2015-03-31

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, the most prevalent mode of transcript modification in higher eukaryotes, is catalysed by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). A-to-I editing imposes an additional layer of gene regulation as it dictates various aspects of RNA metabolism, including RNA folding, processing, localization and degradation. Furthermore, editing events in exonic regions contribute to proteome diversity as translational machinery decodes inosine as guanosine. Although it has been demonstrated that dysregulated A-to-I editing contributes to various diseases, the precise regulatory mechanisms governing this critical cellular process have yet to be fully elucidated. However, integration of previous studies revealed that regulation of A-to-I editing is multifaceted, weaving an intricate network of auto- and transregulations, including the involvement of virus-originated factors like adenovirus-associated RNA. Taken together, it is apparent that tipping of any regulatory components will have profound effects on A-to-I editing, which in turn contributes to both normal and aberrant physiological conditions. A complete understanding of this intricate regulatory network may ultimately be translated into new therapeutic strategies against diseases driven by perturbed RNA editing events. Herein, we review the current state of knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms governing A-to-I editing and propose the role of other co-factors that may be involved in this complex regulatory process.

  7. An Evolutionary Landscape of A-to-I RNA Editome across Metazoan Species

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Li-Yuan; Chen, Yen-Ju; Mai, Te-Lun; Chen, Chia-Ying; Yang, Min-Yu; Chiang, Tai-Wei; Wang, Yi-Da

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing is widespread across the kingdom Metazoa. However, for the lack of comprehensive analysis in nonmodel animals, the evolutionary history of A-to-I editing remains largely unexplored. Here, we detect high-confidence editing sites using clustering and conservation strategies based on RNA sequencing data alone, without using single-nucleotide polymorphism information or genome sequencing data from the same sample. We thereby unveil the first evolutionary landscape of A-to-I editing maps across 20 metazoan species (from worm to human), providing unprecedented evidence on how the editing mechanism gradually expands its territory and increases its influence along the history of evolution. Our result revealed that highly clustered and conserved editing sites tended to have a higher editing level and a higher magnitude of the ADAR motif. The ratio of the frequencies of nonsynonymous editing to that of synonymous editing remarkably increased with increasing the conservation level of A-to-I editing. These results thus suggest potentially functional benefit of highly clustered and conserved editing sites. In addition, spatiotemporal dynamics analyses reveal a conserved enrichment of editing and ADAR expression in the central nervous system throughout more than 300 Myr of divergent evolution in complex animals and the comparability of editing patterns between invertebrates and between vertebrates during development. This study provides evolutionary and dynamic aspects of A-to-I editome across metazoan species, expanding this important but understudied class of nongenomically encoded events for comprehensive characterization. PMID:29294013

  8. Genome-wide A-to-I RNA editing in fungi independent of ADAR enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Qinhu; He, Yi; Chen, Lingfeng; Hao, Chaofeng; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Dai, Yafeng; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts and filamentous fungi do not have adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) orthologs and are believed to lack A-to-I RNA editing, which is the most prevalent editing of mRNA in animals. However, during this study with the PUK1 (FGRRES_01058) pseudokinase gene important for sexual reproduction in Fusarium graminearum, we found that two tandem stop codons, UA1831GUA1834G, in its kinase domain were changed to UG1831GUG1834G by RNA editing in perithecia. To confirm A-to-I editing of PUK1 transcripts, strand-specific RNA-seq data were generated with RNA isolated from conidia, hyphae, and perithecia. PUK1 was almost specifically expressed in perithecia, and 90% of transcripts were edited to UG1831GUG1834G. Genome-wide analysis identified 26,056 perithecium-specific A-to-I editing sites. Unlike those in animals, 70.5% of A-to-I editing sites in F. graminearum occur in coding regions, and more than two-thirds of them result in amino acid changes, including editing of 69 PUK1-like pseudogenes with stop codons in ORFs. PUK1 orthologs and other pseudogenes also displayed stage-specific expression and editing in Neurospora crassa and F. verticillioides. Furthermore, F. graminearum differs from animals in the sequence preference and structure selectivity of A-to-I editing sites. Whereas A's embedded in RNA stems are targeted by ADARs, RNA editing in F. graminearum preferentially targets A's in hairpin loops, which is similar to the anticodon loop of tRNA targeted by adenosine deaminases acting on tRNA (ADATs). Overall, our results showed that A-to-I RNA editing occurs specifically during sexual reproduction and mainly in the coding regions in filamentous ascomycetes, involving adenosine deamination mechanisms distinct from metazoan ADARs. PMID:26934920

  9. Small RNA and A-to-I Editing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eran, Alal

    One in every 88 children is diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs), a set of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by social impairments, communication deficits, and repetitive behavior. ASDs have a substantial genetic component, but the specific cause of most cases remains unknown. Understanding gene-environment interactions underlying ASD is essential for improving early diagnosis and identifying critical targets for intervention and prevention. Towards this goal, we surveyed adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing in autistic brains. A-to-I editing is an epigenetic mechanism that fine-tunes synaptic function in response to environmental stimuli, shown to modulate complex behavior in animals. We used ultradeep sequencing to quantify A-to-I receding of candidate synaptic genes in postmortem cerebella from individuals with ASD and neurotypical controls. We found unexpectedly wide distributions of human A-to-I editing levels, whose extremes were consistently populated by individuals with ASD. We correlated A-to-I editing with isoform usage, identified clusters of correlated sites, and examined differential editing patterns. Importantly, we found that individuals with ASD commonly use a dysfunctional form of the editing enzyme ADARB1. We next profiled small RNAs thought to regulate A-to-I editing, which originate from one of the most commonly altered loci in ASD, 15q11. Deep targeted sequencing of SNORD115 and SNORD116 transcripts enabled their high-resolution detection in human brains, and revealed a strong gender bias underlying their expression. The consistent 2-fold upregulation of 15q11 small RNAs in male vs. female cerebella could be important in delineating the role of this locus in ASD, a male dominant disorder. Overall, these studies provide an accurate population-level view of small RNA and A-to-I editing in human cerebella, and suggest that A-to-I editing of synaptic genes may be informative for assessing the epigenetic risk for autism

  10. Discriminative Prediction of A-To-I RNA Editing Events from DNA Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangming; Singh, Pratibha; Bagge, Annika; Valtat, Bérengère; Vikman, Petter; Spégel, Peter; Mulder, Hindrik

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional alteration of RNA sequences that, via insertions, deletions or base substitutions, can affect protein structure as well as RNA and protein expression. Recently, it has been suggested that RNA editing may be more frequent than previously thought. A great impediment, however, to a deeper understanding of this process is the paramount sequencing effort that needs to be undertaken to identify RNA editing events. Here, we describe an in silico approach, based on machine learning, that ameliorates this problem. Using 41 nucleotide long DNA sequences, we show that novel A-to-I RNA editing events can be predicted from known A-to-I RNA editing events intra- and interspecies. The validity of the proposed method was verified in an independent experimental dataset. Using our approach, 203 202 putative A-to-I RNA editing events were predicted in the whole human genome. Out of these, 9% were previously reported. The remaining sites require further validation, e.g., by targeted deep sequencing. In conclusion, the approach described here is a useful tool to identify potential A-to-I RNA editing events without the requirement of extensive RNA sequencing. PMID:27764195

  11. Global analysis of A-to-I RNA editing reveals association with common disease variants

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajeev; Jain, Anamika; Betsholtz, Christer; Giannarelli, Chiara; Kovacic, Jason C.; Ruusalepp, Arno; Skogsberg, Josefin; Hao, Ke; Schadt, Eric E.

    2018-01-01

    RNA editing modifies transcripts and may alter their regulation or function. In humans, the most common modification is adenosine to inosine (A-to-I). We examined the global characteristics of RNA editing in 4,301 human tissue samples. More than 1.6 million A-to-I edits were identified in 62% of all protein-coding transcripts. mRNA recoding was extremely rare; only 11 novel recoding sites were uncovered. Thirty single nucleotide polymorphisms from genome-wide association studies were associated with RNA editing; one that influences type 2 diabetes (rs2028299) was associated with editing in ARPIN. Twenty-five genes, including LRP11 and PLIN5, had editing sites that were associated with plasma lipid levels. Our findings provide new insights into the genetic regulation of RNA editing and establish a rich catalogue for further exploration of this process. PMID:29527417

  12. A-to-I RNA editing independent of ADARs in filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong; Liu, Huiquan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ADAR mediated A-to-I RNA editing is thought to be unique to animals and occurs mainly in the non-coding regions. Recently filamentous fungi such as Fusarium graminearum were found to lack orthologs of animal ADARs but have stage-specific A-to-I editing during sexual reproduction. Unlike animals, majority of editing sites are in the coding regions and often result in missense and stop loss changes in fungi. Furthermore, whereas As in RNA stems are targeted by animal ADARs, RNA editing in fungi preferentially targets As in hairpin loops, implying that fungal RNA editing involves mechanisms related to editing of the anticodon loop by ADATs. Identification and characterization of fungal adenosine deaminases and their stage-specific co-factors may be helpful to understand the evolution of human ADARs. Fungi also can be used to study biological functions of missense and stop loss RNA editing events in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:27533598

  13. A-to-I RNA Editing Contributes to Proteomic Diversity in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinxin; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yumeng; Hawke, David H; Yu, Shuangxing; Han, Leng; Zhou, Zhicheng; Mojumdar, Kamalika; Jeong, Kang Jin; Labrie, Marilyne; Tsang, Yiu Huen; Zhang, Minying; Lu, Yiling; Hwu, Patrick; Scott, Kenneth L; Liang, Han; Mills, Gordon B

    2018-05-14

    Adenosine (A) to inosine (I) RNA editing introduces many nucleotide changes in cancer transcriptomes. However, due to the complexity of post-transcriptional regulation, the contribution of RNA editing to proteomic diversity in human cancers remains unclear. Here, we performed an integrated analysis of TCGA genomic data and CPTAC proteomic data. Despite limited site diversity, we demonstrate that A-to-I RNA editing contributes to proteomic diversity in breast cancer through changes in amino acid sequences. We validate the presence of editing events at both RNA and protein levels. The edited COPA protein increases proliferation, migration, and invasion of cancer cells in vitro. Our study suggests an important contribution of A-to-I RNA editing to protein diversity in cancer and highlights its translational potential. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Large-scale prediction of ADAR-mediated effective human A-to-I RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li; Wang, Heming; Song, Yuanyuan; Dai, Zhen; Yu, Hao; Yin, Ming; Wang, Dongxu; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jinlin; Wang, Tiedong; Cao, Nan; Zhu, Jimin; Shen, Xizhong; Song, Guangqi; Zhao, Yicheng

    2017-08-10

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing by adenosine deaminase acting on the RNA (ADAR) proteins is one of the most frequent modifications during post- and co-transcription. To facilitate the assignment of biological functions to specific editing sites, we designed an automatic online platform to annotate A-to-I RNA editing sites in pre-mRNA splicing signals, microRNAs (miRNAs) and miRNA target untranslated regions (3' UTRs) from human (Homo sapiens) high-throughput sequencing data and predict their effects based on large-scale bioinformatic analysis. After analysing plenty of previously reported RNA editing events and human normal tissues RNA high-seq data, >60 000 potentially effective RNA editing events on functional genes were found. The RNA Editing Plus platform is available for free at https://www.rnaeditplus.org/, and we believe our platform governing multiple optimized methods will improve further studies of A-to-I-induced editing post-transcriptional regulation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Comparative analysis of A-to-I editing in human and non-human primate brains reveals conserved patterns and context-dependent regulation of RNA editing.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Richard T; Wang, Xiaojing; Morabito, Michael V; Emeson, Ronald B

    2017-04-06

    A-to-I RNA editing is an important process for generating molecular diversity in the brain through modification of transcripts encoding several proteins important for neuronal signaling. We investigated the relationships between the extent of editing at multiple substrate transcripts (5HT2C, MGLUR4, CADPS, GLUR2, GLUR4, and GABRA3) in brain tissue obtained from adult humans and rhesus macaques. Several patterns emerged from these studies revealing conservation of editing across primate species. Additionally, variability in the human population allows us to make novel inferences about the co-regulation of editing at different editing sites and even across different brain regions.

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis of A-to-I RNA Editing.

    PubMed

    Savva, Yiannis A; Laurent, Georges St; Reenan, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine (A)-to-inosine (I) RNA editing is a fundamental posttranscriptional modification that ensures the deamination of A-to-I in double-stranded (ds) RNA molecules. Intriguingly, the A-to-I RNA editing system is particularly active in the nervous system of higher eukaryotes, altering a plethora of noncoding and coding sequences. Abnormal RNA editing is highly associated with many neurological phenotypes and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying RNA editing-mediated pathogenesis still remain enigmatic and have attracted increasing attention from researchers. Over the last decade, methods available to perform genome-wide transcriptome analysis, have evolved rapidly. Within the RNA editing field researchers have adopted next-generation sequencing technologies to identify RNA-editing sites within genomes and to elucidate the underlying process. However, technical challenges associated with editing site discovery have hindered efforts to uncover comprehensive editing site datasets, resulting in the general perception that the collections of annotated editing sites represent only a small minority of the total number of sites in a given organism, tissue, or cell type of interest. Additionally to doubts about sensitivity, existing RNA-editing site lists often contain high percentages of false positives, leading to uncertainty about their validity and usefulness in downstream studies. An accurate investigation of A-to-I editing requires properly validated datasets of editing sites with demonstrated and transparent levels of sensitivity and specificity. Here, we describe a high signal-to-noise method for RNA-editing site detection using single-molecule sequencing (SMS). With this method, authentic RNA-editing sites may be differentiated from artifacts. Machine learning approaches provide a procedure to improve upon and experimentally validate sequencing outcomes through use of computationally predicted, iterative feedback loops

  17. A-to-I RNA Editing Contributes to Proteomic Diversity in Cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Adenosine (A) to inosine (I) RNA editing introduces many nucleotide changes in cancer transcriptomes. However, due to the complexity of post-transcriptional regulation, the contribution of RNA editing to proteomic diversity in human cancers remains unclear. Here, we performed an integrated analysis of TCGA genomic data and CPTAC proteomic data. Despite limited site diversity, we demonstrate that A-to-I RNA editing contributes to proteomic diversity in breast cancer through changes in amino acid sequences. We validate the presence of editing events at both RNA and protein levels.

  18. A biochemical landscape of A-to-I RNA editing in the human brain transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Masayuki; Ueda, Hiroki; Yano, Takanori; Okada, Shunpei; Terajima, Hideki; Mitsuyama, Toutai; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kawabata, Hitomi; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Inosine is an abundant RNA modification in the human transcriptome and is essential for many biological processes in modulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosines to inosines (A-to-I editing) in double-stranded regions. We previously established a biochemical method called “inosine chemical erasing” (ICE) to directly identify inosines on RNA strands with high reliability. Here, we have applied the ICE method combined with deep sequencing (ICE-seq) to conduct an unbiased genome-wide screening of A-to-I editing sites in the transcriptome of human adult brain. Taken together with the sites identified by the conventional ICE method, we mapped 19,791 novel sites and newly found 1258 edited mRNAs, including 66 novel sites in coding regions, 41 of which cause altered amino acid assignment. ICE-seq detected novel editing sites in various repeat elements as well as in short hairpins. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these edited mRNAs are associated with transcription, energy metabolism, and neurological disorders, providing new insights into various aspects of human brain functions. PMID:24407955

  19. Reduced levels of protein recoding by A-to-I RNA editing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Khermesh, Khen; D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Barak, Michal; Annese, Anita; Wachtel, Chaim; Levanon, Erez Y.; Picardi, Ernesto; Eisenberg, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR enzyme family, acts on dsRNA structures within pre-mRNA molecules. Editing of the coding part of the mRNA may lead to recoding, amino acid substitution in the resulting protein, possibly modifying its biochemical and biophysical properties. Altered RNA editing patterns have been observed in various neurological pathologies. Here, we present a comprehensive study of recoding by RNA editing in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of irreversible dementia. We have used a targeted resequencing approach supplemented by a microfluidic-based high-throughput PCR coupled with next-generation sequencing to accurately quantify A-to-I RNA editing levels in a preselected set of target sites, mostly located within the coding sequence of synaptic genes. Overall, editing levels decreased in AD patients’ brain tissues, mainly in the hippocampus and to a lesser degree in the temporal and frontal lobes. Differential RNA editing levels were observed in 35 target sites within 22 genes. These results may shed light on a possible association between the neurodegenerative processes typical for AD and deficient RNA editing. PMID:26655226

  20. Linkage of A-to-I RNA Editing in Metazoans and the Impact on Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yuange; Dou, Shengqian; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Changcheng; Wu, Mingming

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editomes have been systematically characterized in various metazoan species, and many editing sites were found in clusters. However, it remains unclear whether the clustered editing sites tend to be linked in the same RNA molecules or not. By adopting a method originally designed to detect linkage disequilibrium of DNA mutations, we examined the editomes of ten metazoan species and detected extensive linkage of editing in Drosophila and cephalopods. The prevalent linkages of editing in these two clades, many of which are conserved between closely related species and might be associated with the adaptive proteomic recoding, are maintained by natural selection at the cost of genome evolution. Nevertheless, in worms and humans, we only detected modest proportions of linked editing events, the majority of which were not conserved. Furthermore, the linkage of editing in coding regions of worms and humans might be overall deleterious, which drives the evolution of DNA sites to escape promiscuous editing. Altogether, our results suggest that the linkage landscape of A-to-I editing has evolved during metazoan evolution. This present study also suggests that linkage of editing should be considered in elucidating the functional consequences of RNA editing. PMID:29048557

  1. Population and allelic variation of A-to-I RNA editing in human transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Park, Eddie; Guo, Jiguang; Shen, Shihao; Demirdjian, Levon; Wu, Ying Nian; Lin, Lan; Xing, Yi

    2017-07-28

    A-to-I RNA editing is an important step in RNA processing in which specific adenosines in some RNA molecules are post-transcriptionally modified to inosines. RNA editing has emerged as a widespread mechanism for generating transcriptome diversity. However, there remain significant knowledge gaps about the variation and function of RNA editing. In order to determine the influence of genetic variation on A-to-I RNA editing, we integrate genomic and transcriptomic data from 445 human lymphoblastoid cell lines by combining an RNA editing QTL (edQTL) analysis with an allele-specific RNA editing (ASED) analysis. We identify 1054 RNA editing events associated with cis genetic polymorphisms. Additionally, we find that a subset of these polymorphisms is linked to genome-wide association study signals of complex traits or diseases. Finally, compared to random cis polymorphisms, polymorphisms associated with RNA editing variation are located closer spatially to their respective editing sites and have a more pronounced impact on RNA secondary structure. Our study reveals widespread cis variation in RNA editing among genetically distinct individuals and sheds light on possible phenotypic consequences of such variation on complex traits and diseases.

  2. Linkage of A-to-I RNA Editing in Metazoans and the Impact on Genome Evolution.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuange; Dou, Shengqian; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Changcheng; Wu, Mingming; Lu, Jian

    2018-01-01

    The adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editomes have been systematically characterized in various metazoan species, and many editing sites were found in clusters. However, it remains unclear whether the clustered editing sites tend to be linked in the same RNA molecules or not. By adopting a method originally designed to detect linkage disequilibrium of DNA mutations, we examined the editomes of ten metazoan species and detected extensive linkage of editing in Drosophila and cephalopods. The prevalent linkages of editing in these two clades, many of which are conserved between closely related species and might be associated with the adaptive proteomic recoding, are maintained by natural selection at the cost of genome evolution. Nevertheless, in worms and humans, we only detected modest proportions of linked editing events, the majority of which were not conserved. Furthermore, the linkage of editing in coding regions of worms and humans might be overall deleterious, which drives the evolution of DNA sites to escape promiscuous editing. Altogether, our results suggest that the linkage landscape of A-to-I editing has evolved during metazoan evolution. This present study also suggests that linkage of editing should be considered in elucidating the functional consequences of RNA editing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. A-to-I editing of coding and non-coding RNAs by ADARs

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) convert adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA. This A-to-I editing occurs not only in protein-coding regions of mRNAs, but also frequently in non-coding regions that contain inverted Alu repeats. Editing of coding sequences can result in the expression of functionally altered proteins that are not encoded in the genome, whereas the significance of Alu editing remains largely unknown. Certain microRNA (miRNA) precursors are also edited, leading to reduced expression or altered function of mature miRNAs. Conversely, recent studies indicate that ADAR1 forms a complex with Dicer to promote miRNA processing, revealing a new function of ADAR1 in the regulation of RNA interference. PMID:26648264

  4. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Le, Khiet [Mission Viejo, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA; Yankoski, Edward P [Corona, CA; Smith, Gregory S [Woodland Hills, CA

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  5. The Landscape of A-to-I RNA Editome Is Shaped by Both Positive and Purifying Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yimeng; Pan, Bohu; Chen, Longxian; Wang, Hongbing; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    The hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I editing) in precursor mRNA induces variable gene products at the post-transcription level. How and to what extent A-to-I RNA editing diversifies transcriptome is not fully characterized in the evolution, and very little is known about the selective constraints that drive the evolution of RNA editing events. Here we present a study on A-to-I RNA editing, by generating a global profile of A-to-I editing for a phylogeny of seven Drosophila species, a model system spanning an evolutionary timeframe of approximately 45 million years. Of totally 9281 editing events identified, 5150 (55.5%) are located in the coding sequences (CDS) of 2734 genes. Phylogenetic analysis places these genes into 1,526 homologous families, about 5% of total gene families in the fly lineages. Based on conservation of the editing sites, the editing events in CDS are categorized into three distinct types, representing events on singleton genes (type I), and events not conserved (type II) or conserved (type III) within multi-gene families. While both type I and II events are subject to purifying selection, notably type III events are positively selected, and highly enriched in the components and functions of the nervous system. The tissue profiles are documented for three editing types, and their critical roles are further implicated by their shifting patterns during holometabolous development and in post-mating response. In conclusion, three A-to-I RNA editing types are found to have distinct evolutionary dynamics. It appears that nervous system functions are mainly tested to determine if an A-to-I editing is beneficial for an organism. The coding plasticity enabled by A-to-I editing creates a new class of binary variations, which is a superior alternative to maintain heterozygosity of expressed genes in a diploid mating system. PMID:27467689

  6. A-to-I RNA editing is developmentally regulated and generally adaptive for sexual reproduction in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Chen, Daipeng; Qi, Zhaomei; Wang, Qinhu; Wang, Jianhua; Jiang, Cong; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Although fungi lack adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing was reported recently in Fusarium graminearum during sexual reproduction. In this study, we profiled the A-to-I editing landscape and characterized its functional and adaptive properties in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. A total of 40,677 A-to-I editing sites were identified, and approximately half of them displayed stage-specific editing or editing levels at different sexual stages. RNA-sequencing analysis with the Δstc-1 and Δsad-1 mutants confirmed A-to-I editing occurred before ascus development but became more prevalent during ascosporogenesis. Besides fungal-specific sequence and secondary structure preference, 63.5% of A-to-I editing sites were in the coding regions and 81.3% of them resulted in nonsynonymous recoding, resulting in a significant increase in the proteome complexity. Many genes involved in RNA silencing, DNA methylation, and histone modifications had extensive recoding, including sad-1, sms-3, qde-1, and dim-2. Fifty pseudogenes harbor premature stop codons that require A-to-I editing to encode full-length proteins. Unlike in humans, nonsynonymous editing events in N. crassa are generally beneficial and favored by positive selection. Almost half of the nonsynonymous editing sites in N. crassa are conserved and edited in Neurospora tetrasperma. Furthermore, hundreds of them are conserved in F. graminearum and had higher editing levels. Two unknown genes with editing sites conserved between Neurospora and Fusarium were experimentally shown to be important for ascosporogenesis. This study comprehensively analyzed A-to-I editing in N. crassa and showed that RNA editing is stage-specific and generally adaptive, and may be functionally related to repeat induced point mutation and meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA. PMID:28847945

  7. The Genomic Landscape and Clinical Relevance of A-to-I RNA Editing in Human Cancers | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a widespread post-transcriptional mechanism, but its genomic landscape and clinical relevance in cancer have not been investigated systematically. We characterized the global A-to-I RNA editing profiles of 6,236 patient samples of 17 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas and revealed a striking diversity of altered RNA-editing patterns in tumors relative to normal tissues. We identified an appreciable number of clinically relevant editing events, many of which are in noncoding regions.

  8. Ribbed electrode substrates

    DOEpatents

    Breault, Richard D.; Goller, Glen J.

    1983-01-01

    A ribbed substrate for an electrochemical cell electrode is made from a mixture of carbon fibers and carbonizable resin and has a mean pore size in the ribs which is 60-75% of the mean pore size of the web portions of the substrate which interconnect the ribs. Preferably the mean pore size of the web portion is 25-45 microns; and, if the substrate includes edge seals parallel to the ribs, the edge seals preferably have a mean pore size no greater than about ten microns. Most preferably the substrate has the same ratio of carbon fibers to polymeric carbon in all areas, including the ribs, webs, and edge seals. A substrate according to the present invention will have better overall performance than prior art substrates and minimizes the substrate thickness required for the substrate to perform all its functions well.

  9. Coated substrates and process

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Wei-kan; Childs, Charles B.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a coated substrate and a process for forming films on substrates and for providing a particularly smooth film on a substrate. The method of this invention involves subjecting a surface of a substrate to contact with a stream of ions of an inert gas having sufficient force and energy to substantially change the surface characteristics of said substrate, and then exposing a film-forming material to a stream of ions of an inert gas having sufficient energy to vaporize the atoms of said film-forming material and to transmit the vaporized atoms to the substrate surface with sufficient force to form a film bonded to the substrate. This process is particularly useful commercially because it forms strong bonds at room temperature. This invention is particularly useful for adhering a gold film to diamond and forming ohmic electrodes on diamond, but also can be used to bond other films to substrates.

  10. Polished polymide substrate

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John; Sudarshanam, Venkatapuram S.

    2003-05-13

    Polymer substrates, in particular polyimide substrates, and polymer laminates for optical applications are described. Polyimide substrates are polished on one or both sides depending on their thickness, and single-layer or multi-layer waveguide structures are deposited on the polished polyimide substrates. Optical waveguide devices are machined by laser ablation using a combination of IR and UV lasers. A waveguide-fiber coupler with a laser-machined groove for retaining the fiber is also disclosed.

  11. Recovery of EUVL substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S.P.; Baker, S.L.

    1995-01-19

    Mo/Si multilayers, were removed from superpolished zerodur and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates.

  12. e23D: database and visualization of A-to-I RNA editing sites mapped to 3D protein structures.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Oz; Eyal, Eran; Amariglio, Ninette; Unger, Ron; Rechavi, Gidi

    2016-07-15

    e23D, a database of A-to-I RNA editing sites from human, mouse and fly mapped to evolutionary related protein 3D structures, is presented. Genomic coordinates of A-to-I RNA editing sites are converted to protein coordinates and mapped onto 3D structures from PDB or theoretical models from ModBase. e23D allows visualization of the protein structure, modeling of recoding events and orientation of the editing with respect to nearby genomic functional sites from databases of disease causing mutations and genomic polymorphism. http://www.sheba-cancer.org.il/e23D CONTACT: oz.solomon@live.biu.ac.il or Eran.Eyal@sheba.health.gov.il. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Consistent levels of A-to-I RNA editing across individuals in coding sequences and non-conserved Alu repeats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) RNA-editing is an essential post-transcriptional mechanism that occurs in numerous sites in the human transcriptome, mainly within Alu repeats. It has been shown to have consistent levels of editing across individuals in a few targets in the human brain and altered in several human pathologies. However, the variability across human individuals of editing levels in other tissues has not been studied so far. Results Here, we analyzed 32 skin samples, looking at A-to-I editing level in three genes within coding sequences and in the Alu repeats of six different genes. We observed highly consistent editing levels across different individuals as well as across tissues, not only in coding targets but, surprisingly, also in the non evolutionary conserved Alu repeats. Conclusions Our findings suggest that A-to-I RNA-editing of Alu elements is a tightly regulated process and, as such, might have been recruited in the course of primate evolution for post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:21029430

  14. Genome-wide identification and analysis of A-to-I RNA editing events in bovine by transcriptome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Abdolreza; Rivera, Rocío Melissa

    2018-01-01

    RNA editing increases the diversity of the transcriptome and proteome. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing is the predominant type of RNA editing in mammals and it is catalyzed by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) family. Here, we used a largescale computational analysis of transcriptomic data from brain, heart, colon, lung, spleen, kidney, testes, skeletal muscle and liver, from three adult animals in order to identify RNA editing sites in bovine. We developed a computational pipeline and used a rigorous strategy to identify novel editing sites from RNA-Seq data in the absence of corresponding DNA sequence information. Our methods take into account sequencing errors, mapping bias, as well as biological replication to reduce the probability of obtaining a false-positive result. We conducted a detailed characterization of sequence and structural features related to novel candidate sites and found 1,600 novel canonical A-to-I editing sites in the nine bovine tissues analyzed. Results show that these sites 1) occur frequently in clusters and short interspersed nuclear elements (SINE) repeats, 2) have a preference for guanines depletion/enrichment in the flanking 5′/3′ nucleotide, 3) occur less often in coding sequences than other regions of the genome, and 4) have low evolutionary conservation. Further, we found that a positive correlation exists between expression of ADAR family members and tissue-specific RNA editing. Most of the genes with predicted A-to-I editing in each tissue were significantly enriched in biological terms relevant to the function of the corresponding tissue. Lastly, the results highlight the importance of the RNA editome in nervous system regulation. The present study extends the list of RNA editing sites in bovine and provides pipelines that may be used to investigate the editome in other organisms. PMID:29470549

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Focused A-To-I RNA Editing Sites by Ultra-High-Throughput Sequencing in Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hu; Urban, Daniel J.; Blashka, Jared; McPheeters, Matthew T.; Kroeze, Wesley K.; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Overholser, James C.; Jurjus, George J.; Dieter, Lesa; Mahajan, Gouri J.; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Wang, Zefeng; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Stockmeier, Craig A.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2012-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing is a post-transcriptional modification of single nucleotides in RNA by adenosine deamination, which thereby diversifies the gene products encoded in the genome. Thousands of potential RNA editing sites have been identified by recent studies (e.g. see Li et al, Science 2009); however, only a handful of these sites have been independently confirmed. Here, we systematically and quantitatively examined 109 putative coding region A-to-I RNA editing sites in three sets of normal human brain samples by ultra-high-throughput sequencing (uHTS). Forty of 109 putative sites, including 25 previously confirmed sites, were validated as truly edited in our brain samples, suggesting an overestimation of A-to-I RNA editing in these putative sites by Li et al (2009). To evaluate RNA editing in human disease, we analyzed 29 of the confirmed sites in subjects with major depressive disorder and schizophrenia using uHTS. In striking contrast to many prior studies, we did not find significant alterations in the frequency of RNA editing at any of the editing sites in samples from these patients, including within the 5HT2C serotonin receptor (HTR2C). Our results indicate that uHTS is a fast, quantitative and high-throughput method to assess RNA editing in human physiology and disease and that many prior studies of RNA editing may overestimate both the extent and disease-related variability of RNA editing at the sites we examined in the human brain. PMID:22912834

  16. Decreased A-to-I RNA editing as a source of keratinocytes' dsRNA in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Shallev, Lea; Kopel, Eli; Feiglin, Ariel; Leichner, Gil S; Avni, Dror; Sidi, Yechezkel; Eisenberg, Eli; Barzilai, Aviv; Levanon, Erez Y; Greenberger, Shoshana

    2018-06-01

    Recognition of dsRNA molecules activates the MDA5-MAVS pathway and plays a critical role in stimulating type-I interferon responses in psoriasis. However, the source of the dsRNA accumulation in psoriatic keratinocytes remains largely unknown. A-to-I RNA editing is a common co- or post-transcriptional modification that diversifies adenosine in dsRNA, and leads to unwinding of dsRNA structures. Thus, impaired RNA editing activity can result in an increased load of endogenous dsRNAs. Here we provide a transcriptome-wide analysis of RNA editing across dozens of psoriasis patients, and we demonstrate a global editing reduction in psoriatic lesions. In addition to the global alteration, we also detect editing changes in functional recoding sites located in the IGFBP7 , COPA , and FLNA genes. Accretion of dsRNA activates autoimmune responses, and therefore the results presented here, linking for the first time an autoimmune disease to reduction in global editing level, are relevant to a wide range of autoimmune diseases. © 2018 Shallev et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. Biaxially textured composite substrates

    DOEpatents

    Groves, James R.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.

    2005-04-26

    An article including a substrate, a layer of a metal phosphate material such as an aluminum phosphate material upon the surface of the substrate, and a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the metal phosphate material layer is provided together with additional layers such as a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon a layer of a buffer material such as a SrTi.sub.x Ru.sub.1-x O.sub.3 layer.

  18. A-to-I RNA editing promotes developmental stage–specific gene and lncRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Boaz; Agranat-Tamir, Lily; Light, Dean; Ben-Naim Zgayer, Orna; Fishman, Alla; Lamm, Ayelet T.

    2017-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing is a conserved widespread phenomenon in which adenosine (A) is converted to inosine (I) by adenosine deaminases (ADARs) in double-stranded RNA regions, mainly noncoding. Mutations in ADAR enzymes in Caenorhabditis elegans cause defects in normal development but are not lethal as in human and mouse. Previous studies in C. elegans indicated competition between RNA interference (RNAi) and RNA editing mechanisms, based on the observation that worms that lack both mechanisms do not exhibit defects, in contrast to the developmental defects observed when only RNA editing is absent. To study the effects of RNA editing on gene expression and function, we established a novel screen that enabled us to identify thousands of RNA editing sites in nonrepetitive regions in the genome. These include dozens of genes that are edited at their 3′ UTR region. We found that these genes are mainly germline and neuronal genes, and that they are down-regulated in the absence of ADAR enzymes. Moreover, we discovered that almost half of these genes are edited in a developmental-specific manner, indicating that RNA editing is a highly regulated process. We found that many pseudogenes and other lncRNAs are also extensively down-regulated in the absence of ADARs in the embryo but not in the fourth larval (L4) stage. This down-regulation is not observed upon additional knockout of RNAi. Furthermore, levels of siRNAs aligned to pseudogenes in ADAR mutants are enhanced. Taken together, our results suggest a role for RNA editing in normal growth and development by regulating silencing via RNAi. PMID:28031250

  19. A-to-I RNA editing promotes developmental stage-specific gene and lncRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Boaz; Agranat-Tamir, Lily; Light, Dean; Ben-Naim Zgayer, Orna; Fishman, Alla; Lamm, Ayelet T

    2017-03-01

    A-to-I RNA editing is a conserved widespread phenomenon in which adenosine (A) is converted to inosine (I) by adenosine deaminases (ADARs) in double-stranded RNA regions, mainly noncoding. Mutations in ADAR enzymes in Caenorhabditis elegans cause defects in normal development but are not lethal as in human and mouse. Previous studies in C. elegans indicated competition between RNA interference (RNAi) and RNA editing mechanisms, based on the observation that worms that lack both mechanisms do not exhibit defects, in contrast to the developmental defects observed when only RNA editing is absent. To study the effects of RNA editing on gene expression and function, we established a novel screen that enabled us to identify thousands of RNA editing sites in nonrepetitive regions in the genome. These include dozens of genes that are edited at their 3' UTR region. We found that these genes are mainly germline and neuronal genes, and that they are down-regulated in the absence of ADAR enzymes. Moreover, we discovered that almost half of these genes are edited in a developmental-specific manner, indicating that RNA editing is a highly regulated process. We found that many pseudogenes and other lncRNAs are also extensively down-regulated in the absence of ADARs in the embryo but not in the fourth larval (L4) stage. This down-regulation is not observed upon additional knockout of RNAi. Furthermore, levels of siRNAs aligned to pseudogenes in ADAR mutants are enhanced. Taken together, our results suggest a role for RNA editing in normal growth and development by regulating silencing via RNAi. © 2017 Goldstein et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Systematic characterization of A-to-I RNA editing hotspots in microRNAs across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yumeng; Xu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Shuangxing; Jeong, Kang Jin; Zhou, Zhicheng; Han, Leng; Tsang, Yiu Huen; Li, Jun; Chen, Hu; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Yuan, Yuan; Eterovic, A. Karina; Lu, Yiling; Sood, Anil K.; Scott, Kenneth L.; Mills, Gordon B.; Liang, Han

    2017-01-01

    RNA editing, a widespread post-transcriptional mechanism, has emerged as a new player in cancer biology. Recent studies have reported key roles for individual miRNA editing events, but a comprehensive picture of miRNA editing in human cancers remains largely unexplored. Here, we systematically characterized the miRNA editing profiles of 8595 samples across 20 cancer types from miRNA sequencing data of The Cancer Genome Atlas and identified 19 adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing hotspots. We independently validated 15 of them by perturbation experiments in several cancer cell lines. These miRNA editing events show extensive correlations with key clinical variables (e.g., tumor subtype, disease stage, and patient survival time) and other molecular drivers. Focusing on the RNA editing hotspot in miR-200b, a key tumor metastasis suppressor, we found that the miR-200b editing level correlates with patient prognosis opposite to the pattern observed for the wild-type miR-200b expression. We further experimentally showed that, in contrast to wild-type miRNA, the edited miR-200b can promote cell invasion and migration through its impaired ability to inhibit ZEB1/ZEB2 and acquired concomitant ability to repress new targets, including LIFR, a well-characterized metastasis suppressor. Our study highlights the importance of miRNA editing in gene regulation and suggests its potential as a biomarker for cancer prognosis and therapy. PMID:28411194

  1. Systematic characterization of A-to-I RNA editing hotspots in microRNAs across human cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yumeng; Xu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Shuangxing; Jeong, Kang Jin; Zhou, Zhicheng; Han, Leng; Tsang, Yiu Huen; Li, Jun; Chen, Hu; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Yuan, Yuan; Eterovic, A Karina; Lu, Yiling; Sood, Anil K; Scott, Kenneth L; Mills, Gordon B; Liang, Han

    2017-07-01

    RNA editing, a widespread post-transcriptional mechanism, has emerged as a new player in cancer biology. Recent studies have reported key roles for individual miRNA editing events, but a comprehensive picture of miRNA editing in human cancers remains largely unexplored. Here, we systematically characterized the miRNA editing profiles of 8595 samples across 20 cancer types from miRNA sequencing data of The Cancer Genome Atlas and identified 19 adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing hotspots. We independently validated 15 of them by perturbation experiments in several cancer cell lines. These miRNA editing events show extensive correlations with key clinical variables (e.g., tumor subtype, disease stage, and patient survival time) and other molecular drivers. Focusing on the RNA editing hotspot in miR-200b, a key tumor metastasis suppressor, we found that the miR-200b editing level correlates with patient prognosis opposite to the pattern observed for the wild-type miR-200b expression. We further experimentally showed that, in contrast to wild-type miRNA, the edited miR-200b can promote cell invasion and migration through its impaired ability to inhibit ZEB1/ZEB2 and acquired concomitant ability to repress new targets, including LIFR , a well-characterized metastasis suppressor. Our study highlights the importance of miRNA editing in gene regulation and suggests its potential as a biomarker for cancer prognosis and therapy. © 2017 Wang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  3. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  4. Suspended Substrate Resonator Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    1967. 10. Fred E. Gardiol, "Careful MIC Design Prevents Waveguide Modes", Microwaves, pp. 188-191, May 1977. 11. David Rubin and Alfred R. Hislop ...34Design Techniques for Sus- pended Substrate and Microstrip", Microwave Journal, October 1980 . 12. Robert Grover Brown, Robert A. Sharpe, William E. Post

  5. Nitrification in a zeoponic substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, D. W.; Gruener, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    Clinoptilolite is a zeolite mineral with high cation exchange capacity used in zeoponic substrates that have been proposed as a solid medium for growing plants or as a fertilizer material. The kinetics of nitrification has not been measured for NH4+ saturated zeoponic substrate. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the production of NO2- and NO3-, and nitrifier populations in zeoponic substrates. Small columns were filled with zeoponic substrate inoculated with a commercial inoculum or soil enrichment culture of nitrifying bacteria. In addition to column studies, a growth chamber study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of nitrification in zeoponic substrates used to grow radishes (Raphanus sativus L.). The zeoponic substrate provided a readily available source of NH4+, and nitrifying bacteria were active in the substrate. Ammonium oxidation rates in column studies ranged from 5 to 10 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1, and NO2- oxidation rates were 2 to 9.5 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Rates determined from the growth chamber study were approximately 1.2 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Quantities of NH4+ oxidized to NO2- and NO3- in inoculated zeoponic substrate were in excess of plant up-take. Acidification as a result of NH4+ oxidation resulted in a pH decline, and the zeoponic substrate showed limited buffering capacity.

  6. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chen-An [Milpitas, CA; Abas, Emmanuel Chua [Laguna, PH; Divino, Edmundo Anida [Cavite, PH; Ermita, Jake Randal G [Laguna, PH; Capulong, Jose Francisco S [Laguna, PH; Castillo, Arnold Villamor [Batangas, PH; Ma,; Xiaobing, Diana [Saratoga, CA

    2012-07-17

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  7. Maintainable substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chen-An; Abas, Emmanuel Chua; Divino, Edmundo Anida; Ermita, Jake Randal G.; Capulong, Jose Francisco S.; Castillo, Arnold Villamor; Ma, Diana Xiaobing

    2016-08-02

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are placed and conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of conductive clip attachment parts are attached in a permanent manner to the conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. A plurality of contact clips are attached in a removable manner to the clip attachment parts. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and conductively connecting the substrates with the conductive lines. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  8. Biological substrates of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kovelman, J A; Scheibel, A B

    1986-01-01

    Schizophrenia is increasingly believed to represent a group of organic disorders which primarily, although not exclusively, affect the central nervous system. Our purpose is to review a representative sample of twentieth-century literature which speaks to the biological substrates of the syndrome. Subjects reviewed include genetic and environmental contributions to the onset of illness, early and recent findings of gross structural anomalies, and apparent histopathological alterations in cerebral cortex, cerebellar vermis, limbic system, and brain stem, as well as problems of cerebral asymmetry. Data from a diverse group of electrophysiological studies reveal several promising correlates of these areas of investigation. Despite the inconsistent nature of the findings to date, several themes have begun to emerge, including patterns of hypofrontal/hyperparietal regional cerebral flow and glucose utilization, left hemispheric dysfunction, and deficits of interhemispheric information processing. The interpretation and significance of these emerging patterns remains unclear and must await more profound insights into the nature of normal and abnormal cerebral function.

  9. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    DOEpatents

    Fairchild, Manuel Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine Wk; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-03-29

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  10. PLZT capacitor on glass substrate

    DOEpatents

    Fairchild, M. Ray; Taylor, Ralph S.; Berlin, Carl W.; Wong, Celine W. K.; Ma, Beihai; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2016-01-05

    A lead-lanthanum-zirconium-titanate (PLZT) capacitor on a substrate formed of glass. The first metallization layer is deposited on a top side of the substrate to form a first electrode. The dielectric layer of PLZT is deposited over the first metallization layer. The second metallization layer deposited over the dielectric layer to form a second electrode. The glass substrate is advantageous as glass is compatible with an annealing process used to form the capacitor.

  11. Pedestal substrate for coated optics

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.; Malsbury, Terry N.; Patterson, Steven R.

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  12. Sealed substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Ganti, Kalyana Bhargava [Fremont, CA

    2012-07-17

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The substrate carrier includes a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are held, and conductive lines are embedded within the carrier body. A conductive bus bar is embedded into a top side of the carrier body and is conductively coupled to the conductive lines. A thermoplastic overmold covers a portion of the bus bar, and there is a plastic-to-plastic bond between the thermoplastic overmold and the non-conductive carrier body. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  13. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  14. Substrate With Low Secondary Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Curren, Arthur N. (Inventor); Roman, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for producing a highly -textured surface on a copper substrate -with only extremely small amounts of texture-inducing seeding or masking material. The texture-inducing seeding material is delivered to the copper substrate electrically switching the seeding material in and out of a circuit loop.

  15. Photoresist substrate having robust adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M [Sunol, CA

    2005-07-26

    A substrate material for LIGA applications w hose general composition is Ti/Cu/Ti/SiO.sub.2. The SiO.sub.2 is preferably applied to the Ti/Cu/Ti wafer as a sputtered coating, typically about 100 nm thick. This substrate composition provides improved adhesion for epoxy-based photoresist materials, and particularly the photoresist material SU-8.

  16. Composite substrate for bipolar electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Tekkanat, B.; Bolstad, J.J.

    1992-12-22

    Substrates for electrode systems, particularly those to be used for bipolar electrodes in zinc-bromine batteries, are disclosed. The substrates preferably include carbon-black as a conductive filler in a polymeric matrix, with reinforcing materials such as glass fibers. Warpage of the zinc-bromine electrodes which was experienced in the prior art and which was believed to be caused by physical expansion of the electrodes due to bromine absorption by the carbon-black, is substantially eliminated when new substrate fabrication techniques are employed. In the present invention, substrates are prepared using a lamination process known as glass mat reinforced thermoplastics technology or, in an alternate embodiment, the substrate is made using a slurry process. 4 figs.

  17. Composite substrate for bipolar electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Tekkanat, Bora; Bolstad, James J.

    1992-12-22

    Substrates for electrode systems, particularly those to be used for bipolar electrodes in zinc-bromine batteries, are disclosed. The substrates preferably include carbon-black as a conductive filler in a polymeric matrix, with reinforcing materials such as glass fibers. Warpage of the zinc-bromine electrodes which was experienced in the prior art and which was believed to be caused by physical expansion of the electrodes due to bromine absorption by the carbon-black, is substantially eliminated when new substrate fabrication techniques are employed. In the pesent invention, substrates are prepared using a lamination process known as glass mat reinforced thermoplastics technology or, in an alternate embodiment, the substrate is made using a slurry process.

  18. Method of processing a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Babayan, Steven E [Huntington Beach, CA; Hicks, Robert F [Los Angeles, CA

    2008-02-12

    The invention is embodied in a plasma flow device or reactor having a housing that contains conductive electrodes with openings to allow gas to flow through or around them, where one or more of the electrodes are powered by an RF source and one or more are grounded, and a substrate or work piece is placed in the gas flow downstream of the electrodes, such that said substrate or work piece is substantially uniformly contacted across a large surface area with the reactive gases emanating therefrom. The invention is also embodied in a plasma flow device or reactor having a housing that contains conductive electrodes with openings to allow gas to flow through or around them, where one or more of the electrodes are powered by an RF source and one or more are grounded, and one of the grounded electrodes contains a means of mixing in other chemical precursors to combine with the plasma stream, and a substrate or work piece placed in the gas flow downstream of the electrodes, such that said substrate or work piece is contacted by the reactive gases emanating therefrom. In one embodiment, the plasma flow device removes organic materials from a substrate or work piece, and is a stripping or cleaning device. In another embodiment, the plasma flow device kills biological microorganisms on a substrate or work piece, and is a sterilization device. In another embodiment, the plasma flow device activates the surface of a substrate or work piece, and is a surface activation device. In another embodiment, the plasma flow device etches materials from a substrate or work piece, and is a plasma etcher. In another embodiment, the plasma flow device deposits thin films onto a substrate or work piece, and is a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition device or reactor.

  19. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  20. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Bystroff, Roman I.; Miller, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  1. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOEpatents

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  2. Coated substrate apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Zhenan; Diao, Ying; Mannsfeld, Stefan Christian Bernhardt

    A coated substrate is formed with aligned objects such as small molecules, macromolecules and nanoscale particulates, such as inorganic, organic or inorganic/organic hybrid materials. In accordance with one or more embodiments, an apparatus or method involves an applicator having at least one surface patterned with protruded or indented features, and a coated substrate including a solution-based layer of objects having features and morphology attributes arranged as a function of the protruded or indented features.

  3. A-to-I RNA editing occurs at over a hundred million genomic sites, located in a majority of human genes.

    PubMed

    Bazak, Lily; Haviv, Ami; Barak, Michal; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Deng, Patricia; Zhang, Rui; Isaacs, Farren J; Rechavi, Gideon; Li, Jin Billy; Eisenberg, Eli; Levanon, Erez Y

    2014-03-01

    RNA molecules transmit the information encoded in the genome and generally reflect its content. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing by ADAR proteins converts a genomically encoded adenosine into inosine. It is known that most RNA editing in human takes place in the primate-specific Alu sequences, but the extent of this phenomenon and its effect on transcriptome diversity are not yet clear. Here, we analyzed large-scale RNA-seq data and detected ∼1.6 million editing sites. As detection sensitivity increases with sequencing coverage, we performed ultradeep sequencing of selected Alu sequences and showed that the scope of editing is much larger than anticipated. We found that virtually all adenosines within Alu repeats that form double-stranded RNA undergo A-to-I editing, although most sites exhibit editing at only low levels (<1%). Moreover, using high coverage sequencing, we observed editing of transcripts resulting from residual antisense expression, doubling the number of edited sites in the human genome. Based on bioinformatic analyses and deep targeted sequencing, we estimate that there are over 100 million human Alu RNA editing sites, located in the majority of human genes. These findings set the stage for exploring how this primate-specific massive diversification of the transcriptome is utilized.

  4. A Novel Computational Strategy to Identify A-to-I RNA Editing Sites by RNA-Seq Data: De Novo Detection in Human Spinal Cord Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; Gallo, Angela; Galeano, Federica; Tomaselli, Sara; Pesole, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process occurring in a wide range of organisms. In human brain, the A-to-I RNA editing, in which individual adenosine (A) bases in pre-mRNA are modified to yield inosine (I), is the most frequent event. Modulating gene expression, RNA editing is essential for cellular homeostasis. Indeed, its deregulation has been linked to several neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. To date, many RNA editing sites have been identified by next generation sequencing technologies employing massive transcriptome sequencing together with whole genome or exome sequencing. While genome and transcriptome reads are not always available for single individuals, RNA-Seq data are widespread through public databases and represent a relevant source of yet unexplored RNA editing sites. In this context, we propose a simple computational strategy to identify genomic positions enriched in novel hypothetical RNA editing events by means of a new two-steps mapping procedure requiring only RNA-Seq data and no a priori knowledge of RNA editing characteristics and genomic reads. We assessed the suitability of our procedure by confirming A-to-I candidates using conventional Sanger sequencing and performing RNA-Seq as well as whole exome sequencing of human spinal cord tissue from a single individual. PMID:22957051

  5. Mapping protease substrates using a biotinylated phage substrate library.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholle, M. D.; Kriplani, U.; Pabon, A.

    We describe a bacteriophage M13 substrate library encoding the AviTag (BirA substrate) and combinatorial heptamer peptides displayed at the N terminus of the mature form of capsid protein III. Phages are biotinylated efficiently (> or = 50%) when grown in E. coli cells coexpressing BirA, and such viral particles can be immobilized on a streptavidin-coated support and released by protease cleavage within the combinatorial peptide. We have used this library to map the specificity of human Factor Xa and a neuropeptidase, neurolysin (EC3.4.24.16). Validation by analysis of isolated peptide substrates has revealed that neurolysin recognizes the motif hydrophobic-X-Pro-Arg-hydrophobic, where Arg-hydrophobicmore » is the scissile bond.« less

  6. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  7. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2018-04-03

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  8. Coatings on reflective mask substrates

    DOEpatents

    Tong, William Man-Wai; Taylor, John S.; Hector, Scott D.; Mangat, Pawitter J. S.; Stivers, Alan R.; Kofron, Patrick G.; Thompson, Matthew A.

    2002-01-01

    A process for creating a mask substrate involving depositing: 1) a coating on one or both sides of a low thermal expansion material EUVL mask substrate to improve defect inspection, surface finishing, and defect levels; and 2) a high dielectric coating, on the backside to facilitate electrostatic chucking and to correct for any bowing caused by the stress imbalance imparted by either other deposited coatings or the multilayer coating of the mask substrate. An film, such as TaSi, may be deposited on the front side and/or back of the low thermal expansion material before the material coating to balance the stress. The low thermal expansion material with a silicon overlayer and a silicon and/or other conductive underlayer enables improved defect inspection and stress balancing.

  9. Substrate Cooperativity in Marine Luciferases

    PubMed Central

    Tzertzinis, George; Schildkraut, Ezra; Schildkraut, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Marine luciferases are increasingly used as reporters to study gene regulation. These luciferases have utility in bioluminescent assay development, although little has been reported on their catalytic properties in response to substrate concentration. Here, we report that the two marine luciferases from the copepods, Gaussia princeps (GLuc) and Metridia longa (MLuc) were found, surprisingly, to produce light in a cooperative manner with respect to their luciferin substrate concentration; as the substrate concentration was decreased 10 fold the rate of light production decreased 1000 fold. This positive cooperative effect is likely a result of allostery between the two proposed catalytic domains found in Gaussia and Metridia. In contrast, the marine luciferases from Renilla reniformis (RLuc) and Cypridina noctiluca (CLuc) demonstrate a linear relationship between the concentration of their respective luciferin and the rate of light produced. The consequences of these enzyme responses are discussed. PMID:22768230

  10. Imparting Icephobicity with Substrate Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Schutzius, Thomas M; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-07-11

    Ice accumulation hinders the performance of, and poses safety threats for, infrastructure both on the ground and in the air. Previously, rationally designed superhydrophobic surfaces have demonstrated some potential as a passive means to mitigate ice accretion; however, further studies on material solutions that reduce impalement and the contact time for impacting supercooled droplets (high viscosity) and can also repel droplets that freeze during surface contact are urgently needed. Here we demonstrate the collaborative effect of substrate flexibility and surface micro/nanotexture on enhancing both icephobicity and the repellency of viscous droplets (typical of supercooled water). We first investigate the influence of increased viscosity (spanning from 0.9 to 1078 mPa·s using water-glycerol mixtures) on impalement resistance and the droplet-substrate contact time after impact. Then we examine the effect of droplet partial solidification on recoil and simulate more challenging icing conditions by impacting supercooled water droplets (down to -15 °C) onto flexible and rigid surfaces containing ice nucleation promoters (AgI). We demonstrate a passive mechanism for shedding partially solidified (recalescent) droplets-under conditions where partial solidification occurs much faster than the natural droplet oscillation-which does not rely on converting droplet surface energy into kinetic energy (classic recoil mechanism). Using an energy-based model (kinetic-elastic-capillary), we identify a previously unexplored mechanism whereby the substrate oscillation and velocity govern the rebound process, with low areal density and moderately stiff substrates acting to efficiently absorb the incoming droplet kinetic energy and rectify it back, allowing droplets to overcome adhesion and gravitational forces, and recoil. This mechanism applies for a range of droplet viscosities, spanning from low- to high-viscosity fluids and even ice slurries, which do not rebound from rigid

  11. Substrate for thin silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1998-01-01

    A substrate for a photovoltaic device wherein the substrate is the base upon which photosensitive material is to be grown and the substrate comprises an alloy having boron in a range from 0.1 atomic % of the alloy to 1.3 atomic % of the alloy and the substrate has a resistivity less than 3.times.10.sup.-3 ohm-cm.

  12. Semiconductor films on flexible iridium substrates

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2005-03-29

    A laminate semiconductor article includes a flexible substrate, an optional biaxially textured oxide buffer system on the flexible substrate, a biaxially textured Ir-based buffer layer on the substrate or the buffer system, and an epitaxial layer of a semiconductor. Ir can serve as a substrate with an epitaxial layer of a semiconductor thereon.

  13. Prenucleation Induced by Crystalline Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, H.; Fan, Z.

    2018-04-01

    Prenucleation refers to the phenomenon of atomic ordering in the liquid adjacent to the substrate/liquid interface at temperatures above the liquidus. In this paper, we have systematically investigated and holistically quantified the prenucleation phenomenon as a function of temperature and the lattice misfit between the substrate and the solid, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results have confirmed that at temperatures above the liquidus, the atoms in the liquid at the interface may exhibit pronounced atomic ordering, manifested by atomic layering normal to the interface, in-plane atomic ordering parallel to the interface, and the formation of a 2-dimensional (2D) ordered structure (a few atomic layers in thickness) on the substrate surface. Holistic quantification of such atomic ordering at the interface has revealed that the atomic layering is independent of lattice misfit and is only slightly enhanced by reducing temperature while both in-plane atomic ordering and the formation of the 2D ordered structure are significantly enhanced by reducing the lattice misfit and/or temperature. This substrate-induced atomic ordering in the liquid may have a significant influence on the subsequent heterogeneous nucleation process.

  14. Imparting Icephobicity with Substrate Flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutzius, Thomas; Vasileiou, Thomas; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-11-01

    Ice accumulation poses serious safety and performance issues for modern infrastructure. Rationally designed superhydrophobic surfaces have demonstrated potential as a passive means to mitigate ice accretion; however, further studies on solutions that reduce impalement and contact time for impacting supercooled droplets are urgently needed. Here we demonstrate the collaborative effect of substrate flexibility and surface texture on enhancing icephobicity and repelling viscous droplets. We first investigate the influence of increased viscosity on impalement resistance and droplet-substrate contact time. Then we examine the effect of droplet partial solidification on recoil by impacting supercooled water droplets onto surfaces containing ice nucleation promoters. We demonstrate a passive method for shedding partially solidified droplets that does not rely on the classic recoil mechanism. Using an energy-based model, we identify a previously unexplored mechanism whereby the substrate oscillation governs the rebound process by efficiently absorbing the droplet kinetic energy and rectifying it back, allowing for droplet recoil. This mechanism applies for a range of droplet viscosities and ice slurries, which do not rebound from rigid superhydrophobic substrates. Partial support of the Swiss National Science Foundation under Grant No. 162565 and the European Research Council under Advanced Grant No. 669908 (INTICE) is acknowledged.

  15. Synthetic substrates for enzyme analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, E.R.; Mitchell, A.R.; Pearson, K.W.; Smith, R.E.

    1983-06-14

    Synthetic substrates are provided which may be represented as A-D. The A moiety includes an amino acid, polypeptide, or derivative. The D moiety includes 7-amino coumarin derivatives having an electron withdrawing substituent group at the 3 position carbon or fused between the 3 and 4 position carbons. No Drawings

  16. Optical connections on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Erwin; Geerinck, Peter; Christiaens, Wim; Van Steenberge, Geert; Vanfleteren, Jan; Van Daele, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Optical interconnections integrated on a flexible substrate combine the advantages of optical data transmissions (high bandwidth, no electromagnetic disturbance and low power consumption) and those of flexible substrates (compact, ease of assembly...). Especially the flexible character of the substrates can significantly lower the assembly cost and leads to more compact modules. Especially in automotive-, avionic-, biomedical and sensing applications there is a great potential for these flexible optical interconnections because of the increasing data-rates, increasing use of optical sensors and requirement for smaller size and weight. The research concentrates on the integration of commercially available polymer optical layers (Truemode Backplane TM Polymer, Ormocer®) on a flexible Polyimide film, the fabrication of waveguides and out-of plane deflecting 45° mirrors, the characterization of the optical losses due to the bending of the substrate, and the fabrication of a proof-of-principal demonstrator. The resulting optical structures should be compatible with the standard fabrication of flexible printed circuit boards.

  17. Sensor Technologies on Flexible Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehne, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    NASA Ames has developed sensor technologies on flexible substrates integrated into textiles for personalized environment monitoring and human performance evaluation. Current technologies include chemical sensing for gas leak and event monitoring and biological sensors for human health and performance monitoring. Targeted integration include next generation EVA suits and flexible habitats.

  18. Flexible substrate for printed wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakura, M.; Yabe, K.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, A.

    1982-01-01

    A very flexible substrate for printed wiring is disclosed which is composed of a blend of phenoxy resin-polyisocyanate-brominated epoxy resin in which the equivalent ration of the functional groups is hydroxyl grouped: isocyanate group: epoxy group = 1:0.2 to 2:0.5 to 3. The product has outstanding solder resistance and is applied to metal without using adhesives.

  19. Synthetic substrates for enzyme analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Eugene R.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Pearson, Karen W.; Smith, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    Synthetic substrates are provided which may be represented as A-D. The A moiety thereof includes an amino acid, polypeptide, or derivative thereof. The D moiety thereof includes 7-amino coumarin derivatives having an electron withdrawing substituent group at the 3 position carbon or fused between the 3 and 4 position carbons.

  20. Cellulosic Substrates and Challenges Ahead

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cost of production of butanol (acetone-butanol-ethanol; or ABE) is determined by feedstock prices, fermentation, recovery, by-product credits and the waste water treatment. Along these lines, we have an intensive research program on the use of various agricultural substrates, fermentation strate...

  1. [Substrate specifity in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2006-01-01

    Three different phosphatases ("slow", "middle" and "fast") were found in Amoeba proteus (strain B) after PAGE and a subsequent gel staining in 1-naphthyl phosphate containing incubation mixture (pH 9.0). Substrate specificity of these phosphatases was determined in supernatants of homogenates using inhibitors of phosphatase activity. All phosphatases showed a broad substrate specificity. Of 10 tested compounds, p-nitrophenyl phosphate was a preferable substrate for all 3 phosphatases. All phosphatases were able to hydrolyse bis-p-nitrophenyl phosphate and, hence, displayed phosphodiesterase activity. All phosphatases hydrolysed O-phospho-L-tyrosine to a greater or lesser degree. Only little differences in substrate specificity of phosphatases were noticed: 1) "fast" and "middle" phosphatases hydrolysed naphthyl phosphates and O-phospho-L-tyrosine less efficiently than did "slow" phosphatase; 2) "fast" and "middle" phosphatases hydrolysed 2- naphthyl phosphate to a lesser degree than 1-naphthyl phosphate 3) "fast" and "middle" phosphatases hydrolysed O-phospho-L-serine and O-phospho-L-threonine with lower intensity as compared with "slow" phosphatase; 4) as distinct from "middle" and "slow" phosphatases, the "fast" phosphatase hydrolysed glucose-6-phosphate very poorly. The revealed broad substrate specificity of "slow" phosphatase together with data of inhibitory analysis and results of experiments with reactivation of this phosphatase by Zn2+-ions after its inactivation by EDTA strongly suggest that only the "slow" phosphatase is a true alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1). The alkaline phosphatase of A. proteus is secreted into culture medium where its activity is low. The enzyme displays both phosphomono- and phosphodiesterase activities, in addition to supposed protein phosphatase activity. It still remains unknown, to which particular phosphatase class the amoeban "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may be assigned.

  2. PREFACE: Cell-substrate interactions Cell-substrate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardel, Margaret; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    One of the most striking achievements of evolution is the ability to build cellular systems that are both robust and dynamic. Taken by themselves, both properties are obvious requirements: robustness reflects the fact that cells are there to survive, and dynamics is required to adapt to changing environments. However, it is by no means trivial to understand how these two requirements can be implemented simultaneously in a physical system. The long and difficult quest to build adaptive materials is testimony to the inherent difficulty of this goal. Here materials science can learn a lot from nature, because cellular systems show that robustness and dynamics can be achieved in a synergetic fashion. For example, the capabilities of tissues to repair and regenerate are still unsurpassed in the world of synthetic materials. One of the most important aspects of the way biological cells adapt to their environment is their adhesive interaction with the substrate. Numerous aspects of the physiology of metazoan cells, including survival, proliferation, differentiation and migration, require the formation of adhesions to the cell substrate, typically an extracellular matrix protein. Adhesions guide these diverse processes both by mediating force transmission from the cell to the substrate and by controlling biochemical signaling pathways. While the study of cell-substrate adhesions is a mature field in cell biology, a quantitative biophysical understanding of how the interactions of the individual molecular components give rise to the rich dynamics and mechanical behaviors observed for cell-substrate adhesions has started to emerge only over the last decade or so. The recent growth of research activities on cell-substrate interactions was strongly driven by the introduction of new physical techniques for surface engineering into traditional cell biological work with cell culture. For example, microcontact printing of adhesive patterns was used to show that cell fate depends

  3. Human cancer tissues exhibit reduced A-to-I editing of miRNAs coupled with elevated editing of their targets

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Yishay; Buchumenski, Ilana

    2018-01-01

    Abstract A-to-I RNA editing is an important post-transcriptional modification, known to be altered in tumors. It targets dozens of sites within miRNAs, some of which impact miRNA biogenesis and function, as well as many miRNA recognition sites. However, the full extent of the effect of editing on regulation by miRNAs and its behavior in human cancers is still unknown. Here we systematically characterized miRNA editing in 10 593 human samples across 32 cancer types and normal controls. We find that the majority of previously reported sites show little to no evidence for editing in this dataset, compile a list of 58 reliable miRNA editing sites, and study them across normal and cancer samples. Edited miRNA versions tend to suppress expression of known oncogenes, and, consistently, we observe a clear global tendency for hypo-editing in tumors, in strike contrast to the behavior for mRNA editing, allowing an accurate classification of normal/tumor samples based on their miRNA editing profile. In many cancers this profile correlates with patients' survival. Finally, thousands of miRNA binding sites are differentially edited in cancer. Our study thus establishes the important effect of RNA editing on miRNA-regulation in the tumor cell, with prospects for diagnostic and prognostic applications. PMID:29165639

  4. The absence of A-to-I editing in the anticodon of plant cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG demands a relaxation of the wobble decoding rules.

    PubMed

    Aldinger, Carolin A; Leisinger, Anne-Katrin; Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A; Igloi, Gabor L

    2012-10-01

    It is a prevalent concept that, in line with the Wobble Hypothesis, those tRNAs having an adenosine in the first position of the anticodon become modified to an inosine at this position. Sequencing the cDNA derived from the gene coding for cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG from several higher plants as well as mass spectrometric analysis of the isoacceptor has revealed that for this kingdom an unmodified A in the wobble position of the anticodon is the rule rather than the exception. In vitro translation shows that in the plant system the absence of inosine in the wobble position of tRNA (Arg) does not prevent decoding. This isoacceptor belongs to the class of tRNA that is imported from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria of higher plants. Previous studies on the mitochondrial tRNA pool have demonstrated the existence of tRNA (Arg) ICG in this organelle. In moss the mitochondrial encoded distinct tRNA (Arg) ACG isoacceptor possesses the I34 modification. The implication is that for mitochondrial protein biosynthesis A-to-I editing is necessary and occurs by a mitochondrion-specific deaminase after import of the unmodified nuclear encoded tRNA (Arg) ACG.

  5. Methods of repairing a substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium boride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  6. 40 CFR 230.20 - Substrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.20 Substrate. (a) The substrate of the aquatic ecosystem underlies open waters of the United States and constitutes the surface of wetlands. It consists of...

  7. 40 CFR 230.20 - Substrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.20 Substrate. (a) The substrate of the aquatic ecosystem underlies open waters of the United States and constitutes the surface of wetlands. It consists of...

  8. 40 CFR 230.20 - Substrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.20 Substrate. (a) The substrate of the aquatic ecosystem underlies open waters of the United States and constitutes the surface of wetlands. It consists of...

  9. Substrate effects on endothelial cell adherence rates.

    PubMed

    Scott, W J; Mann, P

    1990-01-01

    Endothelial cell attachment to a synthetic substrate was studied using an in vitro model system. Attachment rate was defined as the number of tritium-labeled endothelial cells attached to a synthetic substrate after 30 minutes. The surface of the synthetic substrate was chemically modified with either laminin or fibronectin. Labeled endothelial cells attached more rapidly to synthetic substrate, chemically modified with biomolecules, as compared with the untreated substrate controls. Unlabeled endothelial cells were grown to confluency on a second set of modified and untreated substrates. The cells were removed with 1% Triton, and the rate of re-endothelialization with tritium-labeled endothelial cells was determined. The rate was 11-13 times that of the same cells on untreated substrate. These data confirm that biomolecules increase the attachment rate of endothelial cells to synthetic substrate, and also suggest that endothelial cells may secrete a Triton-insoluble product (Sigma, St. Louis, MO) into subendothelial matrix that increases re-endothelialization.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Patterning on a Metal Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A CNT electron source, a method of manufacturing a CNT electron source, and a solar cell utilizing a CNT patterned sculptured substrate are disclosed. Embodiments utilize a metal substrate which enables CNTs to be grown directly from the substrate. An inhibitor may be applied to the metal substrate to inhibit growth of CNTs from the metal substrate. The inhibitor may be precisely applied to the metal substrate in any pattern, thereby enabling the positioning of the CNT groupings to be more precisely controlled. The surface roughness of the metal substrate may be varied to control the density of the CNTs within each CNT grouping. Further, an absorber layer and an acceptor layer may be applied to the CNT electron source to form a solar cell, where a voltage potential may be generated between the acceptor layer and the metal substrate in response to sunlight exposure.

  11. Patterned substrates and methods for nerve regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Heath, Carole; Shanks, Howard; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija

    2004-01-13

    Micropatterned substrates and methods for fabrication of artificial nerve regeneration conduits and methods for regenerating nerves are provided. Guidance compounds or cells are seeded in grooves formed on the patterned substrate. The substrates may also be provided with electrodes to provide electrical guidance cues to the regenerating nerve. The micropatterned substrates give physical, chemical, cellular and/or electrical guidance cues to promote nerve regeneration at the cellular level.

  12. A new lime material for container substrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary component in greenhouse potting substrates is sphagnum peatmoss. Substrate solution pH of non-amended peatmoss ranges from 4.0 to 4.5. Ideal pH for most greenhouse floriculture crops ranges from 5.8 to 6.2. Dolomitic lime is most often used to elevate substrate pH in peatmoss-based me...

  13. Amending pine bark with alternative substrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due to a number of factors, pine bark supplies have significantly decreased over the past few years. While alternative substrates are being evaluated, many growers are asking if these alternative substrates can be used to stretch existing PB supplies. In this study, two alternative substrates, “Cl...

  14. Superhydrophobicity enhancement through substrate flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Gerber, Julia; Prautzsch, Jana; Schutzius, Thomas; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2017-11-01

    Inspired by manifestations in nature, micro/nanoengineering superhydrophobic surfaces has been the focus of much work. Generally, hydrophobicity is increased through the combined effects of surface texturing and chemistry; being durable, rigid substrate materials are the norm. However, many natural and technical materials are flexible, and the resulting effect on hydrophobicity has been largely unexplored. Here, we show that the rational tuning of flexibility can work collaboratively with the surface micro/nanotexture to enhance liquid repellency performance, defined by impalement and breakup resistance, contact time reduction, and restitution coefficient increase. Reduction in substrate stiffness and areal density imparts immediate acceleration and intrinsic responsiveness to impacting droplets, mitigating the collision and lowering the impalement probability by 60 % without the need for active actuation. We demonstrate the above discoveries with materials ranging from thin steel or polymer sheets to butterfly wings. Partial support of the Swiss National Science Foundation under Grant 162565 and the European Research Council under Advanced Grant 669908 (INTICE) is acknowledged.

  15. Polycrystalline silicon on tungsten substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevolo, A. J.; Schmidt, F. A.; Shanks, H. R.; Campisi, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    Thin films of electron-beam-vaporized silicon were deposited on fine-grained tungsten substrates under a pressure of about 1 x 10 to the -10th torr. Mass spectra from a quadrupole residual-gas analyzer were used to determine the partial pressure of 13 residual gases during each processing step. During separate silicon depositions, the atomically clean substrates were maintained at various temperatures between 400 and 780 C, and deposition rates were between 20 and 630 A min. Surface contamination and interdiffusion were monitored by in situ Auger electron spectrometry before and after cleaning, deposition, and annealing. Auger depth profiling, X-ray analysis, and SEM in the topographic and channeling modes were utilized to characterize the samples with respect to silicon-metal interface, interdiffusion, silicide formation, and grain size of silicon. The onset of silicide formation was found to occur at approximately 625 C. Above this temperature tungsten silicides were formed at a rate faster than the silicon deposition. Fine-grain silicon films were obtained at lower temperatures.

  16. Quartz substrate infrared photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiri, Khosrow; Rejeb, Jalel; Vitchev, Vladimir N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of a planar photonic crystal (p2c) made of a square array of dielectric rods embedded in air, operating in the infrared spectrum. A quartz substrate is employed instead of the commonly used silicon or column III-V substrate. Our square structure has a normalized cylinder radius-to-pitch ratio of r/a = 0.248 and dielectric material contrast ɛr of 4.5. We choose a Z-cut synthetic quartz for its cut (geometry), and etching properties. Then a particular Z-axis etching process is employed in order to ensure the sharp-edged verticality of the rods and fast etching speed. We also present the computer simulations that allowed the establishment of the photonic band gaps (PBG) of our photonic crystal, as well as the actual measurements. An experimental measurement have been carried out and compared with different simulations. It was found that experimental results are in good agreement with different simulation results. Finally, a frequency selective device for optical communication based on the introduction of impurity sites in the photonic crystal is presented. With our proposed structure Optical System on a Chip (OsoC) with micro-cavity based active devices such as lasers, diodes, modulators, couplers, frequency selective emitters, add-drop filters, detectors, mux/demuxes and polarizers connected by passive waveguide links can be realized.

  17. Butanol formation from gaseous substrates.

    PubMed

    Dürre, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Mostly, butanol is formed as a product by saccharolytic anaerobes, employing the so-called ABE fermentation (for acetone-butanol-ethanol). However, this alcohol can also be produced from gaseous substrates such as syn(thesis) gas (major components are carbon monoxide and hydrogen) by autotrophic acetogens. In view of economic considerations, a biotechnological process based on cheap and abundant gases such as CO and CO2 as a carbon source is preferable to more expensive sugar or starch fermentation. In addition, any conflict for use of substrates that can also serve as human nutrition is avoided. Natural formation of butanol has been found with, e.g. Clostridium carboxidivorans, while metabolic engineering for butanol production was successful using, e.g. C. ljungdahlii. Production of butanol from CO2 under photoautotrophic conditions was also possible by recombinant DNA construction of a respective cyanobacterial Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 strain. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Graphene transport mediated by micropatterned substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnefeld, J. Henry; Gill, Stephen T.; Mason, Nadya

    2018-04-01

    Engineered substrates offer a promising avenue towards graphene devices having tunable properties. In particular, topographically patterned substrates can expose unique behavior due to their ability to induce local variations in strain and electrostatic doping. However, to explore the range of possible science and applications, it is important to create topographic substrates that both have tunable features and are suitable for transport measurements. In this letter, we describe the fabrication of tunable, topographically patterned substrates suitable for transport measurements. We report both optical and transport measurements of graphene devices fabricated on these substrates and demonstrate the characteristic strain and local doping behavior induced by the topographic features.

  19. Textured substrate tape and devices thereof

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2006-08-08

    A method for forming a sharply biaxially textured substrate, such as a single crystal substrate, includes the steps of providing a deformed metal substrate, followed by heating above the secondary recrystallization temperature of the deformed substrate, and controlling the secondary recrystallization texture by either using thermal gradients and/or seeding. The seed is selected to shave a stable texture below a predetermined temperature. The sharply biaxially textured substrate can be formed as a tape having a length of 1 km, or more. Epitaxial articles can be formed from the tapes to include an epitaxial electromagnetically active layer. The electromagnetically active layer can be a superconducting layer.

  20. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycely O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers. acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors, in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors. weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 1000 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  1. Superhydrophobicity enhancement through substrate flexibility.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Gerber, Julia; Prautzsch, Jana; Schutzius, Thomas M; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-11-22

    Inspired by manifestations in nature, microengineering and nanoengineering of synthetic materials to achieve superhydrophobicity has been the focus of much work. Generally, hydrophobicity is enhanced through the combined effects of surface texturing and chemistry; being durable, rigid materials are the norm. However, many natural and technical surfaces are flexible, and the resulting effect on hydrophobicity has been largely ignored. Here, we show that the rational tuning of flexibility can work synergistically with the surface microtexture or nanotexture to enhance liquid repellency performance, characterized by impalement and breakup resistance, contact time reduction, and restitution coefficient increase. Reduction in substrate areal density and stiffness imparts immediate acceleration and intrinsic responsiveness to impacting droplets (∼350 × g), mitigating the collision and lowering the impalement probability by ∼60% without the need for active actuation. Furthermore, we exemplify the above discoveries with materials ranging from man-made (thin steel or polymer sheets) to nature-made (butterfly wings).

  2. Mosaic of Commemorative Microscope Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Written by electron beam lithography in the Microdevices Laboratory of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this Optical Microscope substrate helps the Phoenix Mars Mission science team learn how to assemble individual microscope images into a mosaic by aligning rows of text.

    Each line is about 0.1 millimeter tall, the average thickness of a human hair. Except for the Mogensen twins, the names are of babies born and team members lost during the original development of MECA (the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer) for the canceled 2001 Mars lander mission. The plaque also acknowledges the MECA 2001 principal investigator, now retired.

    This image was taken by the MECA Optical Microscope on Sol 111, or the 111th day of the Phoenix mission (Sept. 16, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Modeling liquid organic thin films on substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.

    We present the rationale, methods, and results of modeling of thin film organic liquids on various substrates. These liquids may coat surfaces (substrates) either as a result of their production, dispersal via aerosols or spills. Identification of unknown coated surfaces using either reflectance or emittance spectroscopy cannot be accomplished simply through reference to reflectance signature libraries since neither the thickness of the liquid layer nor the substrate type is known beforehand and both contribute to the signature. Liquid spectral libraries offer the complex index of refraction (n,k) as a function of wavelength which by itself is useful only for thickmore » (bulk) liquid layers via computation of reflectance and transmittance coefficients using the Fresnel equations. Thin liquid layers both reflect and refract incident light in combination with reflectance from the substrate. We show modeling of various organic liquids on substrates using commercial thin film design and modeling software, as well as Monte Carlo ray tracing software to demonstrate the variety of potential signatures encountered that depend on the thickness of the liquid layer as well as the characteristics of the substrate (metal or dielectric). These substrates give rise to transflectance behavior, while many dielectric substrates have rich absorption features that provide complex signatures that combine attributes of both the liquid and the substrate. Knowledge of the complex index of refraction of both target liquids and substrates is essential in order to synthesize spectra necessary in the application of target identification algorithms.« less

  4. Non-permeable substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Abas, Emmanuel Chua; Chen, Chen-An; Ma, Diana Xiaobing; Ganti, Kalyana Bhargava

    2012-11-27

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The substrate carrier comprises a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are to be held. Electrically-conductive lines are embedded within the carrier body, and a plurality of contact clips are coupled to the electrically-conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and electrically couple the substrates to the electrically-conductive lines. The non-conductive carrier body is continuous so as to be impermeable to flow of electroplating solution through the non-conductive carrier body. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  5. Non-permeable substrate carrier for electroplating

    DOEpatents

    Abas, Emmanuel Chua; Chen, Chen-an; Ma, Diana Xiaobing; Ganti, Kalyana; Divino, Edmundo Anida; Ermita, Jake Randal G.; Capulong, Jose Francisco S.; Castillo, Arnold Villamor

    2015-12-29

    One embodiment relates to a substrate carrier for use in electroplating a plurality of substrates. The substrate carrier comprises a non-conductive carrier body on which the substrates are to be held. Electrically-conductive lines are embedded within the carrier body, and a plurality of contact clips are coupled to the electrically-conductive lines embedded within the carrier body. The contact clips hold the substrates in place and electrically couple the substrates to the electrically-conductive lines. The non-conductive carrier body is continuous so as to be impermeable to flow of electroplating solution through the non-conductive carrier body. Other embodiments, aspects and features are also disclosed.

  6. Removing bonded skin from a substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartier, E. N.

    1980-01-01

    Metal skin is peeled off like sardine-can cover with key. Method is useful in removing bonded skins from any substrate where substrate is strong enough not to buckle or tear when bonded skin is rolled free. Also, it is useful for removing sections of damaged skin where bladders of other equipment below substrate might be damaged if saw or router were used to cut completely through skin.

  7. Optically controlled electrophoresis with a photoconductive substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Wataru; Nagashima, Taiki; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2018-05-01

    A photoconductive substrate is used to perform electrophoresis. Light-induced micro-particle flow manipulation is demonstrated without using a fabricated flow channel. The path along which the particles were moved was formed by an illuminated light pattern on the substrate. Because the substrate conductivity and electric field distribution can be modified by light illumination, the forces acting on the particles can be controlled. This technique has potential applications as a high functionality analytical device.

  8. High quality oxide films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Gao, Y.L.

    1994-02-01

    A method is described for providing an oxide film of a material on the surface of a substrate using a reactive deposition of the material onto the substrate surface in the presence of a solid or liquid layer of an oxidizing gas. The oxidizing gas is provided on the substrate surface in an amount sufficient to dissipate the latent heat of condensation occurring during deposition as well as creating a favorable oxidizing environment for the material. 4 figures.

  9. High quality oxide films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ruckman, Mark W.; Strongin, Myron; Gao, Yong L.

    1994-01-01

    A method for providing an oxide film of a material on the surface of a substrate using a reactive deposition of the material onto the substrate surface in the presence of a solid or liquid layer of an oxidizing gas. The oxidizing gas is provided on the substrate surface in an amount sufficient to dissipate the latent heat of condensation occurring during deposition as well as creating a favorable oxidizing environment for the material.

  10. Substrate for thin silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1995-01-01

    A photovoltaic device for converting solar energy into electrical signals comprises a substrate, a layer of photoconductive semiconductor material grown on said substrate, wherein the substrate comprises an alloy of boron and silicon, the boron being present in a range of from 0.1 to 1.3 atomic percent, the alloy having a lattice constant substantially matched to that of the photoconductive semiconductor material and a resistivity of less than 1.times.10.sup.-3 ohm-cm.

  11. Substrate for thin silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1995-03-28

    A photovoltaic device for converting solar energy into electrical signals comprises a substrate, a layer of photoconductive semiconductor material grown on said substrate, wherein the substrate comprises an alloy of boron and silicon, the boron being present in a range of from 0.1 to 1.3 atomic percent, the alloy having a lattice constant substantially matched to that of the photoconductive semiconductor material and a resistivity of less than 1{times}10{sup {minus}3} ohm-cm. 4 figures.

  12. Substrate Sorting by a Supercharged Nanoreactor

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Compartmentalization of proteases enables spatially and temporally controlled protein degradation in cells. Here we show that an engineered lumazine synthase protein cage, which possesses a negatively supercharged lumen, can exploit electrostatic effects to sort substrates for an encapsulated protease. This proteasome-like nanoreactor preferentially cleaves positively charged polypeptides over both anionic and zwitterionic substrates, inverting the inherent substrate specificity of the guest enzyme approximately 480 fold. Our results suggest that supercharged nanochambers could provide a simple and potentially general means of conferring substrate specificity to diverse encapsulated catalysts. PMID:29278496

  13. Photovoltaic cell with nano-patterned substrate

    DOEpatents

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Zhou, Xiaowang; Zubia, David

    2016-10-18

    A photovoltaic solar cell comprises a nano-patterned substrate layer. A plurality of nano-windows are etched into an intermediate substrate layer to form the nano-patterned substrate layer. The nano-patterned substrate layer is positioned between an n-type semiconductor layer composed of an n-type semiconductor material and a p-type semiconductor layer composed of a p-type semiconductor material. Semiconductor material accumulates in the plurality of nano-windows, causing a plurality of heterojunctions to form between the n-type semiconductor layer and the p-type semiconductor layer.

  14. Thin glass substrates for mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauch, Reiner H.; Wegener, Holger; Kruse, Anke; Hildebrand, Norbert

    2000-10-01

    Flat panel displays play an important role as the visual interface for today's electronic devices (Notebook computers, PDA's, pagers, mobile phones, etc.). Liquid Crystal Display's are dominating the market. While for higher resolution displays active matrix displays like Thin Film Transistor LCD's are used, portable devices are mainly using Super Twisted Nematic (STN) displays. Based on the application, STN displays for mobile applications require thinner glass substrates with improved surface quality at a lower cost. The requirements and trends for STN glass substrates are identified and discussed. Different glass manufacturing processes are used today for the manufacture of these substrates. Advantages and disadvantages of the different glass substrate types are presented and discussed.

  15. Dancing drops over vibrating substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borcia, Rodica; Borcia, Ion Dan; Helbig, Markus; Meier, Martin; Egbers, Christoph; Bestehorn, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We study the motion of a liquid drop on a solid plate simultaneously submitted to horizontal and vertical harmonic vibrations. The investigation is done via a phase field model earlier developed for describing static and dynamic contact angles. The density field is nearly constant in every bulk region (ρ = 1 in the liquid phase, ρ ≈ 0 in the vapor phase) and varies continuously from one phase to the other with a rapid but smooth variation across the interfaces. Complicated explicit boundary conditions along the interface are avoided and captured implicitly by gradient terms of ρ in the hydrodynamic basic equations. The contact angle θ is controlled through the density at the solid substrate ρ S , a free parameter varying between 0 and 1 [R. Borcia, I.D. Borcia, M. Bestehorn, Phys. Rev. E 78, 066307 (2008)]. We emphasize the swaying and the spreading modes, earlier theoretically identified by Benilov and Billingham via a shallow-water model for drops climbing uphill along an inclined plane oscillating vertically [E.S. Benilov, J. Billingham, J. Fluid Mech. 674, 93 (2011)]. The numerical phase field simulations will be completed by experiments. Some ways to prevent the release of the dancing drops along a hydrophobic surface into the gas atmosphere are also discussed in this paper.

  16. Cancer and the metastatic substrate

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Seventy percent of cancer patients have detectable metastases when they receive a diagnosis and 90% of cancer deaths result from metastases. These two facts emphasise the urgency for research to study the mechanisms and processes that enable metastasis. We need to develop a greater understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that cause metastasis and also we need to do more. We must also consider the micro- and macro-environmental factors that influence this disease. Studying this environmental context has led us to update the ‘seed and soil’ hypothesis which dates back to the 19th century. This theory describes cancerous cells as seeds and the substrate as the soil in target organs though this may seem antiquated. Nonetheless, the tissue specificity that researchers have recently observed in metastatic colonisation supports the validity of the seed and soil theory. We now know that the metastatic potential of a tumour cell depends on multiple, reciprocal interactions between the primary tumour and distant sites. These interactions determine tumour progression. Studies of metastasis have allowed us to develop treatments that focus on therapeutic effectiveness. These new treatments account for the frequent metastasis of some tumours to target organs such as bones, lungs, brain, and liver. The purpose of this review is first to describe interactions between the cellular and molecular entities and the target organ tumour environment that enables metastasis. A second aim is to describe the complex mechanisms that mediate these interactions. PMID:28105072

  17. Neural substrates underlying intentional empathy.

    PubMed

    de Greck, Moritz; Wang, Gang; Yang, Xuedong; Wang, Xiaoying; Northoff, Georg; Han, Shihui

    2012-02-01

    Although empathic responses to stimuli with emotional contents may occur automatically, humans are capable to intentionally empathize with other individuals. Intentional empathy for others is even possible when they do not show emotional expressions. However, little is known about the neuronal mechanisms of this intentionally controlled empathic process. To investigate the neuronal substrates underlying intentional empathy, we scanned 20 healthy Chinese subjects, using fMRI, when they tried to feel inside the emotional states of neutral or angry faces of familiar (Asian) and unfamiliar (Caucasian) models. Skin color evaluation of the same stimuli served as a control task. Compared to a baseline condition, the empathy task revealed a network of established empathy regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral inferior frontal cortex and bilateral anterior insula. The contrast of intentional empathy vs skin color evaluation, however, revealed three regions: the bilateral inferior frontal cortex, whose hemodynamic responses were independent of perceived emotion and familiarity and the right-middle temporal gyrus, whose activity was modulated by emotion but not by familiarity. These findings extend our understanding of the role of the inferior frontal cortex and the middle temporal gyrus in empathy by demonstrating their involvement in intentional empathy.

  18. Surface Modification of Nanocellulose Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoppe, Justin Orazio

    Cellulose fibers constitute an important renewable raw material that is utilized in many commercial applications in non-food, paper, textiles and composite materials. Chemical functionalization is an important approach for improving the properties of cellulose based materials. Different approaches are used to graft polymeric chains onto cellulose substrates, which can be classified by two principal routes, namely 'grafting onto' or 'grafting from' methods. Never-dried cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) or nanowhiskers produced from sulfuric acid hydrolysis of ramie fibers were used as substrates for surface chemical functionalization with various macromolecules. In addition, the use of cellulose nanocrystals to reinforce poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers was studied. Chemical grafting with low molecular weight polycaprolactone diol onto cellulose nanocrystals was carried out in an attempt to improve the interfacial adhesion with the fiber matrix. Significant improvements in the mechanical properties of the nanofibers after reinforcement with unmodified cellulose nanocrystals were confirmed. Fiber webs from PCL reinforced with 2.5% unmodified CNCs showed ca. 1.5-fold increase in Young's modulus and ultimate strength compared to PCL webs. The CNCs were also grafted with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (poly(NiPAAm)) brushes via surface-initiated single-electron transfer living radical polymerization (SI-SETLRP) under various conditions at room temperature. The grafting process depended on the initiator and/or monomer concentrations used. No observable damage occurred to the CNCs after grafting, as determined by X-ray diffraction. Size exclusion chromatography analyses of polymer chains cleaved from the cellulose nanocrystals indicated that a higher degree of polymerization was achieved by increasing initiator or monomer loading, most likely caused by local heterogeneities yielding higher rates of polymerization. In addition, the colloidal stability and thermo

  19. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can includemore » a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.« less

  20. Buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  1. Cellulose Nanofiber Composite Substrates for Flexible Electronics

    Treesearch

    Ronald Sabo; Jung-Hun Seo; Zhenqiang Ma

    2012-01-01

    Flexible electronics have a large number of potential applications including malleable displays and wearable computers. The current research into high-speed, flexible electronic substrates employs the use of plastics for the flexible substrate, but these plastics typically have drawbacks, such as high thermal expansion coefficients. Transparent films made from...

  2. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiz G P; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo T

    2013-10-29

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate, which needs to be removed afterward. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied in this work, including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate's hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate current processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene.

  3. MINERALIZATION OF MTBE WITH VARIOUS PRIMARY SUBSTRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five specialized bioreactors have been operated for over a year to evaluate the biodegradability of the fuel oxygenate methyl-t-butyl -t-butyl ether (MTBE) under difference substrate/co-substrate conditions. One bioreactor has been fed MTBE at an influent concentration of 150 ...

  4. Substrate Effects for Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A substrate for future atomic chain electronics, where adatoms are placed at designated positions and form atomically precise device components, is studied theoretically. The substrate has to serve as a two-dimensional template for adatom mounting with a reasonable confinement barrier and also provide electronic isolation, preventing unwanted coupling between independent adatom structures. For excellent structural stability, we demand chemical bonding between the adatoms and substrate atoms, but then good electronic isolation may not be guaranteed. Conditions are clarified for good isolation. Because of the chemical bonding, fundamental adatom properties are strongly influenced: a chain with group IV adatoms having two chemical bonds, or a chain with group III adatoms having one chemical bond is semiconducting. Charge transfer from or to the substrate atoms brings about unintentional doping, and the electronic properties have to be considered for the entire combination of the adatom and substrate systems even if the adatom modes are well localized at the surface.

  5. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, Timothy J.; Ginley, David S.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

  6. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1989-05-09

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

  7. Thin Film Transistors On Plastic Substrates

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Sigmon, Thomas W.; Aceves, Randy C.

    2004-01-20

    A process for formation of thin film transistors (TFTs) on plastic substrates replaces standard thin film transistor fabrication techniques, and uses sufficiently lower processing temperatures so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The silicon based thin film transistor produced by the process includes a low temperature substrate incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures greater than about 250.degree. C., an insulating layer on the substrate, a layer of silicon on the insulating layer having sections of doped silicon, undoped silicon, and poly-silicon, a gate dielectric layer on the layer of silicon, a layer of gate metal on the dielectric layer, a layer of oxide on sections of the layer of silicon and the layer of gate metal, and metal contacts on sections of the layer of silicon and layer of gate metal defining source, gate, and drain contacts, and interconnects.

  8. Method of forming fluorine-bearing diamond layer on substrates, including tool substrates

    DOEpatents

    Chang, R. P. H.; Grannen, Kevin J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of forming a fluorine-bearing diamond layer on non-diamond substrates, especially on tool substrates comprising a metal matrix and hard particles, such as tungsten carbide particles, in the metal matrix. The substrate and a fluorine-bearing plasma or other gas are then contacted under temperature and pressure conditions effective to nucleate fluorine-bearing diamond on the substrate. A tool insert substrate is treated prior to the diamond nucleation and growth operation by etching both the metal matrix and the hard particles using suitable etchants.

  9. An Acrobatic Substrate Metamorphosis Reveals a Requirement for Substrate Conformational Dynamics in Trypsin Proteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Kayode, Olumide; Wang, Ruiying; Pendlebury, Devon F.; Cohen, Itay; Henin, Rachel D.; Hockla, Alexandra; Soares, Alexei S.; Papo, Niv; Caulfield, Thomas R.; Radisky, Evette S.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of enzyme catalytic power and specificity derives from dynamic interactions between enzyme and substrate during catalysis. Although considerable effort has been devoted to understanding how conformational dynamics within enzymes affect catalysis, the role of conformational dynamics within protein substrates has not been addressed. Here, we examine the importance of substrate dynamics in the cleavage of Kunitz-bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor protease inhibitors by mesotrypsin, finding that the varied conformational dynamics of structurally similar substrates can profoundly impact the rate of catalysis. A 1.4-Å crystal structure of a mesotrypsin-product complex formed with a rapidly cleaved substrate reveals a dramatic conformational change in the substrate upon proteolysis. By using long all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of acyl-enzyme intermediates with proteolysis rates spanning 3 orders of magnitude, we identify global and local dynamic features of substrates on the nanosecond-microsecond time scale that correlate with enzymatic rates and explain differential susceptibility to proteolysis. By integrating multiple enhanced sampling methods for molecular dynamics, we model a viable conformational pathway between substrate-like and product-like states, linking substrate dynamics on the nanosecond-microsecond time scale with large collective substrate motions on the much slower time scale of catalysis. Our findings implicate substrate flexibility as a critical determinant of catalysis. PMID:27810896

  10. An Acrobatic Substrate Metamorphosis Reveals a Requirement for Substrate Conformational Dynamics in Trypsin Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kayode, Olumide; Wang, Ruiying; Pendlebury, Devon F; Cohen, Itay; Henin, Rachel D; Hockla, Alexandra; Soares, Alexei S; Papo, Niv; Caulfield, Thomas R; Radisky, Evette S

    2016-12-16

    The molecular basis of enzyme catalytic power and specificity derives from dynamic interactions between enzyme and substrate during catalysis. Although considerable effort has been devoted to understanding how conformational dynamics within enzymes affect catalysis, the role of conformational dynamics within protein substrates has not been addressed. Here, we examine the importance of substrate dynamics in the cleavage of Kunitz-bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor protease inhibitors by mesotrypsin, finding that the varied conformational dynamics of structurally similar substrates can profoundly impact the rate of catalysis. A 1.4-Å crystal structure of a mesotrypsin-product complex formed with a rapidly cleaved substrate reveals a dramatic conformational change in the substrate upon proteolysis. By using long all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of acyl-enzyme intermediates with proteolysis rates spanning 3 orders of magnitude, we identify global and local dynamic features of substrates on the nanosecond-microsecond time scale that correlate with enzymatic rates and explain differential susceptibility to proteolysis. By integrating multiple enhanced sampling methods for molecular dynamics, we model a viable conformational pathway between substrate-like and product-like states, linking substrate dynamics on the nanosecond-microsecond time scale with large collective substrate motions on the much slower time scale of catalysis. Our findings implicate substrate flexibility as a critical determinant of catalysis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Luiz G. P.; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate, which needs to be removed afterward. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied in this work, including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate’s hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate current processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene. PMID:24127582

  12. Metallic coatings on silicon substrates, and methods of forming metallic coatings on silicon substrates

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J [Idaho Falls, ID; Hyde, Timothy A [Idaho Falls, ID; Fincke, James R [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-03-11

    The invention includes methods of forming a metallic coating on a substrate which contains silicon. A metallic glass layer is formed over a silicon surface of the substrate. The invention includes methods of protecting a silicon substrate. The substrate is provided within a deposition chamber along with a deposition target. Material from the deposition target is deposited over at least a portion of the silicon substrate to form a protective layer or structure which contains metallic glass. The metallic glass comprises iron and one or more of B, Si, P and C. The invention includes structures which have a substrate containing silicon and a metallic layer over the substrate. The metallic layer contains less than or equal to about 2 weight % carbon and has a hardness of at least 9.2 GPa. The metallic layer can have an amorphous microstructure or can be devitrified to have a nanocrystalline microstructure.

  13. Dynamics of Preferential Substrate Recognition in HIV-1 Protease: Redefining the Substrate Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Özen, Ayşegül; Haliloğlu, Türkan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) permits viral maturation by processing the Gag and Gag-Pro-Pol polyproteins. Though HIV-1 PR inhibitors (PIs) are used in combination antiviral therapy, the emergence of drug resistance has limited their efficacy. The rapid evolution of HIV-1 necessitates the consideration of drug resistance in novel drug-design strategies. Drug-resistant HIV-1 PR variants, while no longer efficiently inhibited, continue to efficiently hydrolyze the natural viral substrates. Though highly diverse in sequence, the HIV-1 PR substrates bind in a conserved three-dimensional shape we defined as the “substrate envelope”. We previously showed that resistance mutations arise where PIs protrude beyond the substrate envelope, as these regions are crucial for drug binding but not for substrate recognition. Here, we extend this model by considering the role of protein dynamics in the interaction of HIV-1 PR with its substrates. Seven molecular dynamics simulations of PR-substrate complexes were performed to estimate the conformational flexibility of substrates in their complexes. Interdependency of the substrate-protease interactions may compensate for the variations in cleavage-site sequences, and explain how a diverse set of sequences can be recognized as substrates by the same enzyme. This diversity may be essential for regulating sequential processing of substrates. We also define a dynamic substrate envelope as a more accurate representation of PR-substrate interactions. This dynamic substrate envelope, described by a probability distribution function, is a powerful tool for drug design efforts targeting ensembles of resistant HIV-1 PR variants with the aim of developing drugs that are less susceptible to resistance. PMID:21762811

  14. Rolling process for producing biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2004-05-25

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured article includes the steps of: rolling a metal preform while applying shear force thereto to form as-rolled biaxially textured substrate having an a rotated cube texture wherein a (100) cube face thereof is parallel to a surface of said substrate, and wherein a [100] direction thereof is at an angle of at least 30.degree. relative to the rolling direction; and depositing onto the surface of the biaxially textured substrate at least one epitaxial layer of another material to form a biaxially textured article.

  15. Substrates for clinical applicability of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Enam, Sanjar; Jin, Sha

    2015-01-01

    The capability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to differentiate into a variety of cells in the human body holds great promise for regenerative medicine. Many substrates exist on which hPSCs can be self-renewed, maintained and expanded to further the goal of clinical application of stem cells. In this review, we highlight numerous extracellular matrix proteins, peptide and polymer based substrates, scaffolds and hydrogels that have been pioneered. We discuss their benefits and shortcomings and offer future directions as well as emphasize commercially available synthetic peptides as a type of substrate that can bring the benefits of regenerative medicine to clinical settings. PMID:25815112

  16. Manufacturing Process for OLED Integrated Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Cheng-Hung; McCamy, James; Ashtosh, Ganjoo

    2017-01-27

    The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate manufacturing processes for technologies that will enable commercialization of a large-area and low-cost “integrated substrate” product for rigid OLED SSL lighting. The integrated substrate product will consist of a low cost, float glass substrate combined with a transparent conductive anode film layer, and light out-coupling (internal and external extraction layers) structures. In combination, these design elements will enable an integrated substrate meeting or exceeding 2015 performance targets for cost ($60/m2), extraction efficiency (50%) and sheet resistance (<10 ohm/sq).

  17. Wafer bonded virtual substrate and method for forming the same

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr., Harry A.; Zahler, James M [Pasadena, CA; Morral, Anna Fontcuberta i [Paris, FR

    2007-07-03

    A method of forming a virtual substrate comprised of an optoelectronic device substrate and handle substrate comprises the steps of initiating bonding of the device substrate to the handle substrate, improving or increasing the mechanical strength of the device and handle substrates, and thinning the device substrate to leave a single-crystal film on the virtual substrate such as by exfoliation of a device film from the device substrate. The handle substrate is typically Si or other inexpensive common substrate material, while the optoelectronic device substrate is formed of more expensive and specialized electro-optic material. Using the methodology of the invention a wide variety of thin film electro-optic materials of high quality can be bonded to inexpensive substrates which serve as the mechanical support for an optoelectronic device layer fabricated in the thin film electro-optic material.

  18. Wafer bonded virtual substrate and method for forming the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, Jr., Harry A. (Inventor); Zahler, James M. (Inventor); Morral, Anna Fontcuberta i (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of forming a virtual substrate comprised of an optoelectronic device substrate and handle substrate comprises the steps of initiating bonding of the device substrate to the handle substrate, improving or increasing the mechanical strength of the device and handle substrates, and thinning the device substrate to leave a single-crystal film on the virtual substrate such as by exfoliation of a device film from the device substrate. The handle substrate is typically Si or other inexpensive common substrate material, while the optoelectronic device substrate is formed of more expensive and specialized electro-optic material. Using the methodology of the invention a wide variety of thin film electro-optic materials of high quality can be bonded to inexpensive substrates which serve as the mechanical support for an optoelectronic device layer fabricated in the thin film electro-optic material.

  19. Pressure-Sensitive Paint: Effect of Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Mark Kenneth; Yang, Leichao; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous ways in which pressure-sensitive paint can be applied to a surface. The choice of substrate and application method can greatly affect the results obtained. The current study examines the different methods of applying pressure-sensitive paint to a surface. One polymer-based and two porous substrates (anodized aluminum and thin-layer chromatography plates) are investigated and compared for luminescent output, pressure sensitivity, temperature sensitivity and photodegradation. Two luminophores [tris-Bathophenanthroline Ruthenium(II) Perchlorate and Platinum-tetrakis (pentafluorophenyl) Porphyrin] will also be compared in all three of the substrates. The results show the applicability of the different substrates and luminophores to different testing environments. PMID:22247685

  20. Substrate stress relaxation regulates cell spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Gu, Luo; Darnell, Max; Klumpers, Darinka; Bencherif, Sidi A.; Weaver, James C.; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Mooney, David J.

    2015-02-01

    Studies of cellular mechanotransduction have converged upon the idea that cells sense extracellular matrix (ECM) elasticity by gauging resistance to the traction forces they exert on the ECM. However, these studies typically utilize purely elastic materials as substrates, whereas physiological ECMs are viscoelastic, and exhibit stress relaxation, so that cellular traction forces exerted by cells remodel the ECM. Here we investigate the influence of ECM stress relaxation on cell behaviour through computational modelling and cellular experiments. Surprisingly, both our computational model and experiments find that spreading for cells cultured on soft substrates that exhibit stress relaxation is greater than cells spreading on elastic substrates of the same modulus, but similar to that of cells spreading on stiffer elastic substrates. These findings challenge the current view of how cells sense and respond to the ECM.

  1. Mueller matrix characterization of flexible plastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Nina; Synowicki, Ron A.; Hilfiker, James N.

    2017-11-01

    This work reports on Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization of various flexible plastic substrates that are optically anisotropic with varying degrees of birefringence. The samples are divided into three groups according to the suggested characterization strategy: low birefringence, high birefringence, and twisted birefringence. The first group includes poly(methyl methacrylate) and cyclic olefin copolymer substrates. These are modeled with biaxial anisotropy for the real part of the refractive index while the imaginary part is approximated as isotropic due to small light absorption. The second group includes polyethylene terephthalate and polyethylene naphthalate substrates, which are modeled with biaxial anisotropy for both real and imaginary refractive indices. Lastly, a polyimide substrate is described as two birefringent layers with twisted in-plane orientation.

  2. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOEpatents

    Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-10-23

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In molecular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating. 1 tab.

  3. Iron films deposited on porous alumina substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Kenichi; Nishida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Iron films were deposited on porous alumina substrates using an arc plasma gun. The pore sizes (120 - 250 nm) of the substrates were controlled by changing the temperature during the anodic oxidation of aluminum plates. Iron atoms penetrated into pores with diameters of less than 160 nm, and were stabilized by forming γ-Fe, whereas α-Fe was produced as a flat plane covering the pores. For porous alumina substrates with pore sizes larger than 200 nm, the deposited iron films contained many defects and the resulting α-Fe had smaller hyperfine magnetic fields. In addition, only a very small amount of γ-Fe was obtained. It was demonstrated that the composition and structure of an iron film can be affected by the surface morphology of the porous alumina substrate on which the film is grown.

  4. Off-axis silicon carbide substrates

    DOEpatents

    Edgar, James; Dudley, Michael; Kuball, Martin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Guan; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Yu

    2014-09-02

    A method of epitaxial growth of a material on a crystalline substrate includes selecting a substrate having a crystal plane that includes a plurality of terraces with step risers that join adjacent terraces. Each terrace of the plurality or terraces presents a lattice constant that substantially matches a lattice constant of the material, and each step riser presents a step height and offset that is consistent with portions of the material nucleating on adjacent terraces being in substantial crystalline match at the step riser. The method also includes preparing a substrate by exposing the crystal plane; and epitaxially growing the material on the substrate such that the portions of the material nucleating on adjacent terraces merge into a single crystal lattice without defects at the step risers.

  5. Flexible Substrates Comparison for Pled Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenna, G.; Miscioscia, R.; Tassini, P.; Minarini, C.; Vacca, P.; Valentino, O.

    2008-08-01

    Flexible substrate displays are critical to organic electronics, e-paper's and e-ink's development. Many different types of materials are under investigation, including glass, polymer films and metallic foils. In this work we report a comparison study of polymer films as flexible substrates for polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) technology. The selected polymer substrates are two thermoplastic semi-crystalline polymers (PET and PEN) and a high Tg material that cannot be melt processed (PAR). Firstly, the chosen films were characterized in morphology and optical properties with the aim to confirm their suitability for optoelectronic applications. Transmittance was analysed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry and roughness by a surface profilometer. Finally, the surface energy of substrates (untreated and after UV-ozone treatment) was estimated by contact angle measurements in order to evaluate their wettability for active materials deposition.

  6. Substrate Control in Stereoselective Lanthionine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weixin; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Houk, K. N.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are typically highly stereoselective catalysts that enforce a reactive conformation on their native substrates. We report here a rare example where the substrate controls the stereoselectivity of an enzyme-catalyzed Michael-type addition during the biosynthesis of lanthipeptides. These natural products contain thioether crosslinks formed by cysteine attack on dehydrated Ser and Thr residues. We demonstrate that several lanthionine synthetases catalyze highly selective anti additions in which the substrate (and not the enzyme) determines whether the addition occurs from the Re or Si face. A single point mutation in the peptide substrate completely inverted the stereochemical outcome of the enzymatic modification. Quantum mechanical calculations reproduced the experimentally observed selectivity and suggest that conformational restraints imposed by the amino acid sequence on the transition states determine the face selectivity of the Michael-type cyclization. PMID:25515891

  7. An Acrobatic Substrate Metamorphosis Reveals a Requirement for Substrate Conformational Dynamics in Trypsin Proteolysis

    DOE PAGES

    Kayode, Olumide; Wang, Ruiying; Pendlebury, Devon F.; ...

    2016-11-03

    The molecular basis of enzyme catalytic power and specificity derives from dynamic interactions between enzyme and substrate during catalysis. While considerable effort has been devoted to understanding how conformational dynamics within enzymes affect catalysis, the role of conformational dynamics within protein substrates has not been addressed. Here in this paper, we examine the importance of substrate dynamics in the cleavage of Kunitz-BPTI protease inhibitors by mesotrypsin, finding that the varied conformational dynamics of structurally similar substrates can profoundly impact the rate of catalysis. A 1.4 Å crystal structure of a mesotrypsin-product complex formed with a rapidly cleaved substrate reveals amore » dramatic conformational change in the substrate upon proteolysis. Using long all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of acyl-enzyme intermediates with proteolysis rates spanning three orders of magnitude, we identify global and local dynamic features of substrates on the ns-μs timescale that correlate with enzymatic rates and explain differential susceptibility to proteolysis. By integrating multiple enhanced sampling methods for molecular dynamics, we model a viable conformational pathway between substratelike and product-like states, linking substrate dynamics on the ns-μs timescale with large collective substrate motions on the much slower timescale of catalysis. Our findings implicate substrate flexibility as a critical determinant of catalysis.« less

  8. Substrate specificity of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Lindstad, R I; Köll, P; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-01-01

    The substrate specificity of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase has been studied by steady-state kinetics over the range pH 7-10. Sorbitol dehydrogenase stereo-selectively catalyses the reversible NAD-linked oxidation of various polyols and other secondary alcohols into their corresponding ketones. The kinetic constants are given for various novel polyol substrates, including L-glucitol, L-mannitol, L-altritol, D-altritol, D-iditol and eight heptitols, as well as for many aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. The maximum velocities (kcat) and the substrate specificity-constants (kcat/Km) are positively correlated with increasing pH. The enzyme-catalysed reactions occur by a compulsory ordered kinetic mechanism with the coenzyme as the first, or leading, substrate. With many substrates, the rate-limiting step for the overall reaction is the enzyme-NADH product dissociation. However, with several substrates there is a transition to a mechanism with partial rate-limitation at the ternary complex level, especially at low pH. The kinetic data enable the elucidation of new empirical rules for the substrate specificity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. The specificity-constants for polyol oxidation vary as a function of substrate configuration with D-xylo> D-ribo > L-xylo > D-lyxo approximately L-arabino > D-arabino > L-lyxo. Catalytic activity with a polyol or an aromatic substrate and various 1-deoxy derivatives thereof varies with -CH2OH > -CH2NH2 > -CH2OCH3 approximately -CH3. The presence of a hydroxyl group at each of the remaining chiral centres of a polyol, apart from the reactive C2, is also nonessential for productive ternary complex formation and catalysis. A predominantly nonpolar enzymic epitope appears to constitute an important structural determinant for the substrate specificity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. The existence of two distinct substrate binding regions in the enzyme active site, along with that of the catalytic zinc, is suggested to account for the lack of

  9. Composition containing aerogel substrate loaded with tritium

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ellefson, Robert E.; Gill, John T.; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

  10. Fermentative hydrogen production from agroindustrial lignocellulosic substrates

    PubMed Central

    Reginatto, Valeria; Antônio, Regina Vasconcellos

    2015-01-01

    To achieve economically competitive biological hydrogen production, it is crucial to consider inexpensive materials such as lignocellulosic substrate residues derived from agroindustrial activities. It is possible to use (1) lignocellulosic materials without any type of pretreatment, (2) lignocellulosic materials after a pretreatment step, and (3) lignocellulosic materials hydrolysates originating from a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. According to the current literature data on fermentative H2 production presented in this review, thermophilic conditions produce H2 in yields approximately 75% higher than those obtained in mesophilic conditions using untreated lignocellulosic substrates. The average H2 production from pretreated material is 3.17 ± 1.79 mmol of H2/g of substrate, which is approximately 50% higher compared with the average yield achieved using untreated materials (2.17 ± 1.84 mmol of H2/g of substrate). Biological pretreatment affords the highest average yield 4.54 ± 1.78 mmol of H2/g of substrate compared with the acid and basic pretreatment - average yields of 2.94 ± 1.85 and 2.41 ± 1.52 mmol of H2/g of substrate, respectively. The average H2 yield from hydrolysates, obtained from a pretreatment step and enzymatic hydrolysis (3.78 ± 1.92 mmol of H2/g), was lower compared with the yield of substrates pretreated by biological methods only, demonstrating that it is important to avoid the formation of inhibitors generated by chemical pretreatments. Based on this review, exploring other microorganisms and optimizing the pretreatment and hydrolysis conditions can make the use of lignocellulosic substrates a sustainable way to produce H2. PMID:26273246

  11. Superconducting thin films on potassium tantalate substrates

    DOEpatents

    Feenstra, Roeland; Boatner, Lynn A.

    1992-01-01

    A superconductive system for the lossless transmission of electrical current comprising a thin film of superconducting material Y.sub.1 Ba.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x epitaxially deposited upon a KTaO.sub.3 substrate. The KTaO.sub.3 is an improved substrate over those of the prior art since the it exhibits small lattice constant mismatch and does not chemically react with the superconducting film.

  12. Biaxially oriented film on flexible polymeric substrate

    DOEpatents

    Finkikoglu, Alp T [Los Alamos, NM; Matias, Vladimir [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-10-13

    A flexible polymer-based template having a biaxially oriented film grown on the surface of a polymeric substrate. The template having the biaxially oriented film can be used for further epitaxial growth of films of interest for applications such as photovoltaic cells, light emitting diodes, and the like. Methods of forming such a flexible template and providing the polymeric substrate with a biaxially oriented film deposited thereon are also described.

  13. Biomechanics of substrate boring by fig wasps.

    PubMed

    Kundanati, Lakshminath; Gundiah, Namrata

    2014-06-01

    Female insects of diverse orders bore into substrates to deposit their eggs. Such insects must overcome several biomechanical challenges to successfully oviposit, which include the selection of suitable substrates through which the ovipositor can penetrate without itself fracturing. In many cases, the insect may also need to steer and manipulate the ovipositor within the substrate to deliver eggs at desired locations before rapidly retracting her ovipositor to avoid predation. In the case of female parasitoid ichneumonid wasps, this process is repeated multiple times during her lifetime, thus testing the ability of the ovipositioning apparatus to endure fracture and fatigue. What specific adaptations does the ovipositioning apparatus of a female ichneumonoid wasp possess to withstand these challenges? We addressed this question using a model system composed of parasitoid and pollinator fig wasps. First, we show that parasitoid ovipositor tips have teeth-like structures, preferentially enriched with zinc, unlike the smooth morphology of pollinator ovipositors. We describe sensillae present on the parasitoid ovipositor tip that are likely to aid in the detection of chemical species and mechanical deformations and sample microenvironments within the substrate. Second, using atomic force microscopy, we show that parasitoid tip regions have a higher modulus compared with regions proximal to the abdomen in parasitoid and pollinator ovipositors. Finally, we use videography to film wasps during substrate boring and analyse buckling of the ovipositor to estimate the forces required for substrate boring. Together, these results allow us to describe the biomechanical principles underlying substrate boring in parasitoid ichneumonid wasps. Such studies may be useful for the biomimetic design of surgical tools and in the use of novel mechanisms to bore through hard substrates. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Substrates and method for determining enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Robert E.; Bissell, Eugene R.

    1981-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the presence of an enzyme in a biological fluid, which includes the steps of contacting the fluid with a synthetic chromogenic substrate, which is an amino acid derivative of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin; incubating the substrate-containing fluid to effect enzymatic hydrolysis; and fluorometrically determining the presence of the free 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin chromophore in the hydrolyzate.

  15. Substrates and method for determining enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.E.; Bissell, E.R.

    1981-10-13

    A method is disclosed for determining the presence of an enzyme in a biological fluid, which includes the steps of contacting the fluid with a synthetic chromogenic substrate, which is an amino acid derivative of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin; incubating the substrate-containing fluid to effect enzymatic hydrolysis; and fluorometrically determining the presence of the free 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin chromophore in the hydrolyzate. No Drawings

  16. Fabrication of novel plasmonics-active substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Anuj; Gerhold, Michael; Du, Yan; Misra, Veena; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes methodologies for fabricating of highly efficient plasmonics-active SERS substrates - having metallic nanowire structures with pointed geometries and sub-5 nm gap between the metallic nanowires enabling concentration of high EM fields in these regions - on a wafer-scale by a reproducible process that is compatible with large-scale development of these substrates. Excitation of surface plasmons in these nanowire structures leads to substantial enhancement in the Raman scattering signal obtained from molecules lying in the vicinity of the nanostructure surface. The methodologies employed included metallic coating of silicon nanowires fabricated by employing deep UV lithography as well as controlled growth of silicon germanium on silicon nanostructures to form diamond-shaped nanowire structures followed by metallic coating. These SERS substrates were employed for detecting chemical and biological molecules of interest. In order to characterize the SERS substrates developed in this work, we obtained SERS signals from molecules such as p-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA) and cresyl fast violet (CFV) attached to or adsorbed on the metal-coated SERS substrates. It was observed that both gold-coated triangular shaped nanowire substrates as well as gold-coated diamond shaped nanowire substrates provided very high SERS signals for the nanowires having sub-15 nm gaps and that the SERS signal depends on the closest spacing between the metal-coated silicon and silicon germanium nanowires. SERS substrates developed by the different processes were also employed for detection of biological molecules such as DPA (Dipicolinic Acid), an excellent marker for spores of bacteria such as Anthrax.

  17. Direct Printing of Graphene onto Plastic Substrates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Daniel; Lock, Evgeniya; Walton, Scott; Baraket, Mira; Laskoski, Matthew; Mulvaney, Shawn; Sheehan, Paul; Lee, Woo; Robinson, Jeremy

    2011-03-01

    Graphene films have been synthesized on metal foils using CVD growth and have the potential to be compatible with roll-to-roll printing. To be usable in electronic devices, these films need to be removed from the metallic substrate. Currently this is accomplished by spin coating a polymer film over the graphene and chemically etching away the metal substrate. We have developed a direct printing method that allows graphene films to be printed off the metal substrate onto a polymer substrate. This printing process does not generate chemical waste, is compatible with roll-to-toll processing and renders the metal foil reusable. Adhesion of the graphene film to the polymer substrate is established by attaching perfluorophenylazides (PFPA) azide linker molecules to a plasma activated polymer surface. The transfer printing was performed by placing the PFPA treated polymer surface in contact with a graphene covered Cu foil and heating under pressure. Graphene films successfully printed onto a polystyrene substrate have been characterized by Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements revealed the presence of Gr on the polymer surface. Details of the printing process along with characteristics of the graphene film after printing will be presented.

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of substrate-borne polyacrylamide.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianhang; Wu, Laosheng

    2002-08-28

    Polyacrylamides (PAMs) have wide application in many industries and in agriculture. Scientific research and industrial applications manifested a need for a method that can quantify substrate-borne PAM. The N-bromination method (a PAM analytical technique based on N-bromination of amide groups and spectrophotometric determination of the formed starch-triiodide complex), which was originally developed for determining PAM in aqueous solutions, was modified to quantify substrate-borne PAM. In the modified method, the quantity of substrate-borne PAM was converted to a concentration of starch-triiodide complex in aqueous solution that was then measured by spectrophotometry. The method sensitivity varied with substrates due to sorption of reagents and reaction intermediates on the substrates. Therefore, separate calibration for each substrate was required. Results from PAM samples in sand, cellulose, organic matter burnt soils, and clay minerals showed that this method had good accuracy and reproducibility. The PAM recoveries ranged from 95.8% to 103.7%, and the relative standard deviations (n = 4) were <7.5% in all cases. The optimum range of PAM in each sample is 10-80 microg. The technique can serve as an effective tool in improving PAM application and facilitating PAM-related research.

  19. Substrate inhibition kinetics of phenol biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Goudar, C.T.; Ganji, S.H.; Pujar, B.G.

    Phenol biodegradation was studied in batch experiments using an acclimated inoculum and initial phenol concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.3 g/L. Phenol depletion an associated microbial growth were monitored over time to provide information that was used to estimate the kinetics of phenol biodegradation. Phenol inhibited biodegradation at high concentrations, and a generalized substrate inhibition model based on statistical thermodynamics was used to describe the dynamics of microbial growth in phenol. For experimental data obtained in this study, the generalized substrate inhibition model reduced to a form that is analogous to the Andrews equation, and the biokinetic parameters {micro}{sub max},more » maximum specific growth; K{sub s}, saturation constant; and K{sub i}, inhibition constant were estimated as 0.251 h{sup {minus}1}, 0.011 g/L, and 0.348 g/L, respectively, using a nonlinear least squares technique. Given the wide variability in substrate inhibition models used to describe phenol biodegradation, an attempt was made to justify selection of particular model based on theoretical considerations. Phenol biodegradation data from nine previously published studies were used in the generalized substrate inhibition model to determine the appropriate form of the substrate inhibition model. In all nine cases, the generalized substrate inhibition model reduced to a form analogous to the Andrews equation suggesting the suitability of the Andrews equation to describe phenol biodegradation data.« less

  20. Virtual substrate method for nanomaterials characterization

    PubMed Central

    Da, Bo; Liu, Jiangwei; Yamamoto, Mahito; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Cuong, Nguyen Thanh; Li, Songlin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Iwai, Hideo; Tanuma, Shigeo; Guo, Hongxuan; Gao, Zhaoshun; Sun, Xia; Ding, Zejun

    2017-01-01

    Characterization techniques available for bulk or thin-film solid-state materials have been extended to substrate-supported nanomaterials, but generally non-quantitatively. This is because the nanomaterial signals are inevitably buried in the signals from the underlying substrate in common reflection-configuration techniques. Here, we propose a virtual substrate method, inspired by the four-point probe technique for resistance measurement as well as the chop-nod method in infrared astronomy, to characterize nanomaterials without the influence of underlying substrate signals from four interrelated measurements. By implementing this method in secondary electron (SE) microscopy, a SE spectrum (white electrons) associated with the reflectivity difference between two different substrates can be tracked and controlled. The SE spectrum is used to quantitatively investigate the covering nanomaterial based on subtle changes in the transmission of the nanomaterial with high efficiency rivalling that of conventional core-level electrons. The virtual substrate method represents a benchmark for surface analysis to provide ‘free-standing' information about supported nanomaterials. PMID:28548114

  1. Both Intrinsic Substrate Preference and Network Context Contribute to Substrate Selection of Classical Tyrosine Phosphatases*

    PubMed Central

    Tinti, Michele; Paoluzi, Serena; Santonico, Elena; Masch, Antonia; Schutkowski, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation is a widespread post-translational modification mechanism underlying cell physiology. Thus, understanding the mechanisms responsible for substrate selection by kinases and phosphatases is central to our ability to model signal transduction at a system level. Classical protein-tyrosine phosphatases can exhibit substrate specificity in vivo by combining intrinsic enzymatic specificity with the network of protein-protein interactions, which positions the enzymes in close proximity to their substrates. Here we use a high throughput approach, based on high density phosphopeptide chips, to determine the in vitro substrate preference of 16 members of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase family. This approach helped identify one residue in the substrate binding pocket of the phosphatase domain that confers specificity for phosphopeptides in a specific sequence context. We also present a Bayesian model that combines intrinsic enzymatic specificity and interaction information in the context of the human protein interaction network to infer new phosphatase substrates at the proteome level. PMID:28159843

  2. Evaporation of liquid droplets on solid substrates. II. Periodic substrates with moving contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Amirhossein; Homsy, G. M.

    2017-04-01

    Experiments on evaporating droplets on structured surfaces have shown that the contact line does not move with constant speed, but rather in a steplike "stick-slip" fashion. As a first step in understanding such behavior, we study the evaporation of a two-dimensional volatile liquid droplet on a nonplanar heated solid substrate with a moving contact line and fixed contact angle. The model for the flat case is adapted to include curved substrates, numerical solutions are achieved for various periodic and quasiperiodic substrate profiles, and the dynamics of the contact line and the apparent contact angle are studied. In contrast with our results for a flat substrate, for which the contact line recedes in a nearly constant speed, we observe that the contact line speed and position show significant time variation and that the contact line moves in an approximate steplike fashion on relatively steep substrates. For the simplest case of a periodic substrate, we find that the apparent contact angle is periodic in time. For doubly periodic substrates, we find that the apparent contact angle is periodic and that the problem exhibits a phase-locking behavior. For multimode quasiperiodic substrates, we find the contact line behavior to be temporally complex and not only limited to a stick-slip motion. In all cases, we find that the overall evaporation is increased relative to the flat substrate.

  3. Automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Joseph Arthur; Boyer, Jeremy James; Mack, Joseph

    2014-03-18

    An automated cassette-to-cassette substrate handling system includes a cassette storage module for storing a plurality of substrates in cassettes before and after processing. A substrate carrier storage module stores a plurality of substrate carriers. A substrate carrier loading/unloading module loads substrates from the cassette storage module onto the plurality of substrate carriers and unloads substrates from the plurality of substrate carriers to the cassette storage module. A transport mechanism transports the plurality of substrates between the cassette storage module and the plurality of substrate carriers and transports the plurality of substrate carriers between the substrate carrier loading/unloading module and amore » processing chamber. A vision system recognizes recesses in the plurality of substrate carriers corresponding to empty substrate positions in the substrate carrier. A processor receives data from the vision system and instructs the transport mechanism to transport substrates to positions on the substrate carrier in response to the received data.« less

  4. Review of SERS Substrates for Chemical Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Mosier-Boss, Pamela A.

    2017-01-01

    The SERS effect was initially discovered in the 1970s. Early research focused on understanding the phenomenon and increasing enhancement to achieve single molecule detection. From the mid-1980s to early 1990s, research started to move away from obtaining a fundamental understanding of the phenomenon to the exploration of analytical applications. At the same time, significant developments occurred in the field of photonics that led to the advent of inexpensive, robust, compact, field-deployable Raman systems. The 1990s also saw rapid development in nanoscience. This convergence of technologies (photonics and nanoscience) has led to accelerated development of SERS substrates to detect a wide range of chemical and biological analytes. It would be a monumental task to discuss all the different kinds of SERS substrates that have been explored. Likewise, it would be impossible to discuss the use of SERS for both chemical and biological detection. Instead, a review of the most common metallic (Ag, Cu, and Au) SERS substrates for chemical detection only is discussed, as well as SERS substrates that are commercially available. Other issues with SERS for chemical detection have been selectivity, reversibility, and reusability of the substrates. How these issues have been addressed is also discussed in this review. PMID:28594385

  5. Hydrophobic properties of a wavy rough substrate.

    PubMed

    Carbone, G; Mangialardi, L

    2005-01-01

    The wetting/non-wetting properties of a liquid drop in contact with a chemically hydrophobic rough surface (thermodynamic contact angle theta(e)>pi/2) are studied for the case of an extremely idealized rough profile: the liquid drop is considered to lie on a simple sinusoidal profile. Depending on surface geometry and pressure values, it is found that the Cassie and Wenzel states can coexist. But if the amplitude h of the substrate is sufficiently large the only possible stable state is the Cassie one, whereas if h is below a certain critical value hcr a transition to the Wenzel state occurs. Since in many potential applications of such super-hydrophobic surfaces, liquid drops often collide with the substrate (e.g. vehicle windscreens), in the paper the critical drop pressure pW is calculated at which the Cassie state is no longer stable and the liquid jumps into full contact with the substrate (Wenzel state). By analyzing the asymptotic behavior of the systems in the limiting case of a large substrate corrugation, a simple criterion is also proposed to calculate the minimum height asperity h necessary to prevent the Wenzel state from being formed, to preserve the super-hydrophobic properties of the substrate, and, hence, to design a robust super-hydrophobic surface.

  6. Substrate-Directed Catalytic Selective Chemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Sawano, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2018-05-04

    The development of highly efficient reactions at only the desired position is one of the most important subjects in organic chemistry. Most of the reactions in current organic chemistry are reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions, and the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reactions are determined by the inherent nature of the reagent or catalyst. In sharp contrast, substrate-directed reaction determines the selectivity of the reactions by the functional group on the substrate and can strictly distinguish sterically and electronically similar multiple reaction sites in the substrate. In this Perspective, three topics of substrate-directed reaction are mainly reviewed: (1) directing group-assisted epoxidation of alkenes, (2) ring-opening reactions of epoxides by various nucleophiles, and (3) catalytic peptide synthesis. Our newly developed synthetic methods with new ligands including hydroxamic acid derived ligands realized not only highly efficient reactions but also pinpointed reactions at the expected position, demonstrating the substrate-directed reaction as a powerful method to achieve the desired regio- and stereoselective functionalization of molecules from different viewpoints of reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions.

  7. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orza, Anamaria I.; Mihu, Carmen; Soritau, Olga; Diudea, Mircea; Florea, Adrian; Matei, Horea; Balici, Stefana; Mudalige, Thilak; Kanarpardy, Ganesh K.; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2014-02-01

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues.

  8. Multifunctionality is affected by interactions between green roof plant species, substrate depth, and substrate type.

    PubMed

    Dusza, Yann; Barot, Sébastien; Kraepiel, Yvan; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Abbadie, Luc; Raynaud, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services through evapotranspiration and nutrient cycling that depend, among others, on plant species, substrate type, and substrate depth. However, no study has assessed thoroughly how interactions between these factors alter ecosystem functions and multifunctionality of green roofs. We simulated some green roof conditions in a pot experiment. We planted 20 plant species from 10 genera and five families (Asteraceae, Caryophyllaceae, Crassulaceae, Fabaceae, and Poaceae) on two substrate types (natural vs. artificial) and two substrate depths (10 cm vs. 30 cm). As indicators of major ecosystem functions, we measured aboveground and belowground biomasses, foliar nitrogen and carbon content, foliar transpiration, substrate water retention, and dissolved organic carbon and nitrates in leachates. Interactions between substrate type and depth strongly affected ecosystem functions. Biomass production was increased in the artificial substrate and deeper substrates, as was water retention in most cases. In contrast, dissolved organic carbon leaching was higher in the artificial substrates. Except for the Fabaceae species, nitrate leaching was reduced in deep, natural soils. The highest transpiration rates were associated with natural soils. All functions were modulated by plant families or species. Plant effects differed according to the observed function and the type and depth of the substrate. Fabaceae species grown on natural soils had the most noticeable patterns, allowing high biomass production and high water retention but also high nitrate leaching from deep pots. No single combination of factors enhanced simultaneously all studied ecosystem functions, highlighting that soil-plant interactions induce trade-offs between ecosystem functions. Substrate type and depth interactions are major drivers for green roof multifunctionality.

  9. Silica substrate or portion formed from oxidation of monocrystalline silicon

    DOEpatents

    Matzke, Carolyn M.; Rieger, Dennis J.; Ellis, Robert V.

    2003-07-15

    A method is disclosed for forming an inclusion-free silica substrate using a monocrystalline silicon substrate as the starting material and oxidizing the silicon substrate to convert it entirely to silica. The oxidation process is performed from both major surfaces of the silicon substrate using a conventional high-pressure oxidation system. The resulting product is an amorphous silica substrate which is expected to have superior etching characteristics for microfabrication than conventional fused silica substrates. The present invention can also be used to convert only a portion of a monocrystalline silicon substrate to silica by masking the silicon substrate and locally thinning a portion the silicon substrate prior to converting the silicon portion entirely to silica. In this case, the silica formed by oxidizing the thinned portion of the silicon substrate can be used, for example, as a window to provide optical access through the silicon substrate.

  10. Holographic fabrication of gratings in metal substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, R. M.; Wagner, D. K.; Ballantyne, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A program for investigating the grain enlargement resulting from the laser recrystallization of a thin gallium arsenide film on a patterned substrate, a technique known as graphoepitaxy was evaluated. More specifically, the effects of recrystallizing an uncapped gallium arsenide film using a continuous wave neodymium YAG laser operating at 1.06 microns were studied. In an effort to minimize arsenic loss from the film, the specimens were held in an arsine atmosphere during recrystallization. Two methods for fabricating patterned substrates were developed, one using reactive ion etching of a molybdenum film on both sapphire and silicon substates and another by preferential wet etching of a silicon substrate onto which a film of molybdenum was subsequently deposited.

  11. Plasma jet printing for flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Singh, Eric; Diaz-Cartagena, Diana C.

    2016-03-21

    Recent interest in flexible electronics and wearable devices has created a demand for fast and highly repeatable printing processes suitable for device manufacturing. Robust printing technology is critical for the integration of sensors and other devices on flexible substrates such as paper and textile. An atmospheric pressure plasma-based printing process has been developed to deposit different types of nanomaterials on flexible substrates. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were deposited on paper to demonstrate site-selective deposition as well as direct printing without any type of patterning. Plasma-printed nanotubes were compared with non-plasma-printed samples under similar gas flow and other experimental conditions and foundmore » to be denser with higher conductivity. The utility of the nanotubes on the paper substrate as a biosensor and chemical sensor was demonstrated by the detection of dopamine, a neurotransmitter, and ammonia, respectively.« less

  12. Aerobic biodegradation of trichloroethene without auxiliary substrates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kathrin R; Gaza, Sarah; Voropaev, Andrey; Ertl, Siegmund; Tiehm, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE) represents a priority pollutant and is among the most frequently detected contaminants in groundwater. The current bioremediation measures have certain drawbacks like e.g. the need for auxiliary substrates. Here, the aerobic biodegradation of TCE as the sole growth substrate is demonstrated. This new process of metabolic TCE degradation was first detected in groundwater samples. TCE degradation was stable in an enriched mixed bacterial culture in mineral salts medium for over five years and repeated transfers of the culture resulting in a 10(10) times dilution of the original groundwater. Aerobic TCE degradation resulted in stoichiometric chloride formation. Stable carbon isotope fractionation was observed providing a reliable analytical tool to assess this new biodegradation process at field sites. The results suggest that aerobic biodegradation of TCE without auxiliary substrate could be considered as an option for natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation of contaminated sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. On Substrate for Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A substrate for future atomic chain electronics, where adatoms are placed at designated positions and form atomically precise device components, is studied theoretically. The substrate has to serve as a two-dimensional template for adatom mounting with a reasonable confinement barrier and also provide electronic isolation, preventing unwanted coupling between independent adatom structures. However, the two requirements conflict. For excellent electronic isolation, we may seek adatom confinement via van der Waals interaction without chemical bonding to the substrate atoms, but the confinement turns out to be very weak and hence unsatisfactory. An alternative chemical bonding scheme with excellent structural strength is examined, but even fundamental adatom chain properties such as whether chains are semiconducting or metallic are strongly influenced by the nature of the chemical bonding, and electronic isolation is not always achieved. Conditions for obtaining semiconducting chains with well-localized surface-modes, leading to good isolation, are clarified and discussed.

  14. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between themore » implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.« less

  15. Printed electronic on flexible and glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futera, Konrad; Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Kozioł, Grażyna

    2010-09-01

    Organic electronics is a platform technology that enables multiple applications based on organic electronics but varied in specifications. Organic electronics is based on the combination of new materials and cost-effective, large area production processes that provide new fields of application. Organic electronic by its size, weight, flexibility and environmental friendliness electronics enables low cost production of numerous electrical components and provides for such promising fields of application as: intelligent packaging, low cost RFID, flexible solar cells, disposable diagnostic devices or games, and printed batteries [1]. The paper presents results of inkjetted electronics elements on flexible and glass substrates. The investigations was target on characterizing shape, surface and geometry of printed structures. Variety of substrates were investigated, within some, low cost, non specialized substrate, design for other purposes than organic electronic.

  16. CVD diamond substrate for microelectronics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, J.; Gat, R.

    1996-11-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of diamond films has evolved dramatically in recent years, and commercial opportunities for diamond substrates in thermal management applications are promising. The objective of this technology transfer initiative (TTI) is for Applied Science and Technology, Inc. (ASTEX) and AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM&T) to jointly develop and document the manufacturing processes and procedures required for the fabrication of multichip module circuits using CVD diamond substrates, with the major emphasis of the project concentrating on lapping/polishing prior to metallization. ASTEX would provide diamond films for the study, and FM&T would use its experience in lapping, polishing,more » and substrate metallization to perform secondary processing on the parts. The primary goal of the project was to establish manufacturing processes that lower the manufacturing cost sufficiently to enable broad commercialization of the technology.« less

  17. Methods of selectively incorporating metals onto substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ernst; Richard D. , Eyring; Edward M. , Turpin; Gregory C. , Dunn; Brian C.

    2008-09-30

    A method for forming multi-metallic sites on a substrate is disclosed and described. A substrate including active groups such as hydroxyl can be reacted with a pretarget metal complex. The target metal attached to the active group can then be reacted with a secondary metal complex such that an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction occurs to form a multi-metallic species. The substrate can be a highly porous material such as aerogels, xerogels, zeolites, and similar materials. Additional metal complexes can be reacted to increase catalyst loading or control co-catalyst content. The resulting compounds can be oxidized to form oxides or reduced to form metals in the ground state which are suitable for practical use.

  18. Passivation coating for flexible substrate mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.

    1990-01-01

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors. Also, the silver or other reflective metal layer on mirrors comprising thin, lightweight, flexible substrates of metal or polymer sheets coated with glassy layers can be protected with silicon nitride according to this invention.

  19. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP

    PubMed Central

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.

    2011-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5′ ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed. PMID:21173200

  20. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP.

    PubMed

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5' ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  1. Equilibrium Droplets on Deformable Substrates: Equilibrium Conditions.

    PubMed

    Koursari, Nektaria; Ahmed, Gulraiz; Starov, Victor M

    2018-05-15

    Equilibrium conditions of droplets on deformable substrates are investigated, and it is proven using Jacobi's sufficient condition that the obtained solutions really provide equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformed support. At the equilibrium, the excess free energy of the system should have a minimum value, which means that both necessary and sufficient conditions of the minimum should be fulfilled. Only in this case, the obtained profiles provide the minimum of the excess free energy. The necessary condition of the equilibrium means that the first variation of the excess free energy should vanish, and the second variation should be positive. Unfortunately, the mentioned two conditions are not the proof that the obtained profiles correspond to the minimum of the excess free energy and they could not be. It is necessary to check whether the sufficient condition of the equilibrium (Jacobi's condition) is satisfied. To the best of our knowledge Jacobi's condition has never been verified for any already published equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate. A simple model of the equilibrium droplet on the deformable substrate is considered, and it is shown that the deduced profiles of the equilibrium droplet and deformable substrate satisfy the Jacobi's condition, that is, really provide the minimum to the excess free energy of the system. To simplify calculations, a simplified linear disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm is adopted for the calculations. It is shown that both necessary and sufficient conditions for equilibrium are satisfied. For the first time, validity of the Jacobi's condition is verified. The latter proves that the developed model really provides (i) the minimum of the excess free energy of the system droplet/deformable substrate and (ii) equilibrium profiles of both the droplet and the deformable substrate.

  2. Thin film photovoltaic device with multilayer substrate

    DOEpatents

    Catalano, Anthony W.; Bhushan, Manjul

    1984-01-01

    A thin film photovoltaic device which utilizes at least one compound semiconductor layer chosen from Groups IIB and VA of the Periodic Table is formed on a multilayer substrate The substrate includes a lowermost support layer on which all of the other layers of the device are formed. Additionally, an uppermost carbide or silicon layer is adjacent to the semiconductor layer. Below the carbide or silicon layer is a metal layer of high conductivity and expansion coefficient equal to or slightly greater than that of the semiconductor layer.

  3. RF Transmission Lines on Silicon Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.

    1999-01-01

    A review of RF transmission lines on silicon substrates is presented. Through measurements and calculated results, it is shown that attenuation is dominated by conductor loss if silicon substrates with a resistivity greater than 2500 Ohm-cm are used. Si passivation layers affect the transmission line attenuation; however, measured results demonstrate that passivation layers do not necessarily increase attenuation. If standard, low resistivity Si wafers must be used, alternative transmission lines such as thin film microstrip and Co-Planar Waveguide (CPW) on thick polyimide layers must be used. Measured results presented here show that low loss per unit length is achievable with these transmission lines.

  4. Mechanics of hard films on soft substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Nanshu

    2009-12-01

    Flexible electronics have been developed for various applications, including paper-like electronic readers, rollable solar cells, electronic skins etc., with the merits of light weight, low cost, large area, and ruggedness. The systems may be subject to one-time or repeated large deformation during manufacturing and application. Although organic materials can be highly deformable, currently they are not able to fulfill every electronic function. Therefore flexible electronic devices are usually made as organic/inorganic hybrids, with diverse materials, complex architecture, and micro features. While the polymer substrates can recover from large deformations, thin films of electronic materials such as metals, silicon, oxides, and nitrides fracture at small strains, usually less than a few percent. Mechanics of hard films on soft substrates hence holds the key to build high-performance and highly reliable flex circuits. This thesis investigates the deformability and failure mechanisms of thin films of metallic and ceramic materials supported by soft polymeric substrates through combined experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods. When subject to tension, micron-thick metal films with stable microstructure and strong interfacial adhesion to the substrate can be stretched beyond 50% without forming cracks. They eventually rupture by a ductile transgranular fracture which involves simultaneous necking and debonding. When metal films become nanometer-thick, intergranular fracture dominates the failure mode at elongations of only a few percent. Unannealed films show unstable microstructure at room temperature when subject to mechanical loading. In this case, films also rupture at small strains but by three concurrent mechanisms: deformation-induced grain growth, strain localization at large grains, and simultaneous debonding. In contrast to metal films, ceramic films rupture by brittle mechanisms. The only way to prevent rupture of ceramic films is to reduce the

  5. Cleaning process for EUV optical substrates

    DOEpatents

    Weber, Frank J.; Spiller, Eberhard A.

    1999-01-01

    A cleaning process for surfaces with very demanding cleanliness requirements, such as extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) optical substrates. Proper cleaning of optical substrates prior to applying reflective coatings thereon is very critical in the fabrication of the reflective optics used in EUV lithographic systems, for example. The cleaning process involves ultrasonic cleaning in acetone, methanol, and a pH neutral soap, such as FL-70, followed by rinsing in de-ionized water and drying with dry filtered nitrogen in conjunction with a spin-rinse.

  6. Hybrid stretchable circuits on silicone substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A., E-mail: adam.1.robinson@nokia.com; Aziz, A., E-mail: a.aziz1@lancaster.ac.uk; Liu, Q.

    When rigid and stretchable components are integrated onto a single elastic carrier substrate, large strain heterogeneities appear in the vicinity of the deformable-non-deformable interfaces. In this paper, we report on a generic approach to manufacture hybrid stretchable circuits where commercial electronic components can be mounted on a stretchable circuit board. Similar to printed circuit board development, the components are electrically bonded on the elastic substrate and interconnected with stretchable electrical traces. The substrate—a silicone matrix carrying concentric rigid disks—ensures both the circuit elasticity and the mechanical integrity of the most fragile materials.

  7. Substrate quality alters the microbial mineralization of added substrate and soil organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadamma, S.; Mayes, M. A.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.

    2014-09-01

    The rate and extent of decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is dependent, among other factors, on substrate chemistry and microbial dynamics. Our objectives were to understand the influence of substrate chemistry on microbial decomposition of carbon (C), and to use model fitting to quantify differences in pool sizes and mineralization rates. We conducted an incubation experiment for 270 days using four uniformly labeled 14C substrates (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) on four different soils (a temperate Mollisol, a tropical Ultisol, a sub-arctic Andisol, and an arctic Gelisol). The 14C labeling enabled us to separate CO2 respired from added substrates and from native SOC. Microbial gene copy numbers were quantified at days 4, 30 and 270 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Substrate C respiration was always higher for glucose than other substrates. Soils with cinnamic and stearic acid lost more native SOC than glucose- and starch-amended soils. Cinnamic and stearic acid amendments also exhibited higher fungal gene copy numbers at the end of incubation compared to unamended soils. We found that 270 days were sufficient to model the decomposition of simple substrates (glucose and starch) with three pools, but were insufficient for more complex substrates (cinnamic and stearic acid) and native SOC. This study reveals that substrate quality exerts considerable control on the microbial decomposition of newly added and native SOC, and demonstrates the need for multi-year incubation experiments to constrain decomposition parameters for the most recalcitrant fractions of SOC and complex substrates.

  8. Substrate quality alters microbial mineralization of added substrate and soil organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadamma, S.; Mayes, M. A.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.

    2014-03-01

    The rate and extent of decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is dependent on substrate chemistry and microbial dynamics. Our objectives were to understand the influence of substrate chemistry on microbial processing of carbon (C), and to use model fitting to quantify differences in pool sizes and mineralization rates. We conducted an incubation experiment for 270 days using four uniformly-labeled 14C substrates (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) on four different soils (a temperate Mollisol, a tropical Ultisol, a sub-arctic Andisol, and an arctic Gelisol). The 14C labeling enabled us to separate CO2 respired from added substrates and from native SOC. Microbial gene copy numbers were quantified at days 4, 30 and 270 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Substrate C respiration was always higher for glucose than other substrates. Soils with cinnamic and stearic acid lost more native SOC than glucose- and starch-amended soils, despite an initial delay in respiration. Cinnamic and stearic acid amendments also exhibited higher fungal gene copy numbers at the end of incubation compared to unamended soils. We found that 270 days was sufficient to model decomposition of simple substrates (glucose and starch) with three pools, but was insufficient for more complex substrates (cinnamic and stearic acid) and native SOC. This study reveals that substrate quality imparts considerable control on microbial decomposition of newly added and native SOC, and demonstrates the need for multi-year incubation experiments to constrain decomposition parameters for the most recalcitrant fractions of SOC and added substrates.

  9. Inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David Harold [San Pedro, CA; Korich, Mark D [Chino Hills, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-08-21

    Systems and/or methods are provided for an inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling. An inverter module comprises a power electronic substrate. A first support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and has a first region adapted to allow direct cooling of the power electronic substrate. A gasket is interposed between the power electronic substrate and the first support frame. The gasket is configured to provide a seal between the first region and the power electronic substrate. A second support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and joined to the first support frame to form the seal.

  10. Bicarbonate is a recycling substrate for cyanase.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W V; Anderson, P M

    1987-07-05

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes bicarbonate-dependent decomposition of cyanate to ammonia and bicarbonate. Previous studies provided evidence that carbamate is an initial product and that the kinetic mechanism is rapid equilibrium random (bicarbonate serving as substrate as opposed to activator); the following mechanism was proposed (Anderson, P. M. (1980) Biochemistry 19, 2282-2888; Anderson, P. M., and Little, R. M. (1986) Biochemistry 25, 1621-1626). (formula; see text) Direct evidence for this mechanism was obtained in this study by 1) determining whether CO2 or HCO3- serves as substrate and is formed as product, 2) identifying the products formed from [14C]HCO3- and [14C] OCN-, 3) identifying the products formed from [13C] HCO3- and [12C]OCN- in the presence of [18O]H2O, and 4) determining whether 18O from [18O]HCO3- is incorporated into CO2 derived from OCN-. Bicarbonate (not CO2) is the substrate. Carbon dioxide (not HCO3-) is produced in stoichiometric amounts from both HCO3- and OCN-. 18O from [18O]H2O is not incorporated into CO2 formed from either HCO3- or OCN-. Oxygen-18 from [18O]HCO3- is incorporated into CO2 derived from OCN-. These results support the above mechanism, indicating that decomposition of cyanate catalyzed by cyanase is not a hydrolysis reaction and that bicarbonate functions as a recycling substrate.

  11. Flexible SERS Substrates: Challenges and Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-28

    interactions between the analyte, silver nanoparticles , and a salt. This system has also been applied to detection of trace antibiotics for food safety...Cleanable SERS Substrates Based on Silver Nanoparticle Decorated Electrospun Nano-fibrous Membranes Chaoyang Jiang Porous electrospun nanofibrous...present our recent work on the preparation, characterization, and SERS activity of silver nanoparticle decorated polymeric electrospun nanofibers

  12. Scalable cell alignment on optical media substrates.

    PubMed

    Anene-Nzelu, Chukwuemeka G; Choudhury, Deepak; Li, Huipeng; Fraiszudeen, Azmall; Peh, Kah-Yim; Toh, Yi-Chin; Ng, Sum Huan; Leo, Hwa Liang; Yu, Hanry

    2013-07-01

    Cell alignment by underlying topographical cues has been shown to affect important biological processes such as differentiation and functional maturation in vitro. However, the routine use of cell culture substrates with micro- or nano-topographies, such as grooves, is currently hampered by the high cost and specialized facilities required to produce these substrates. Here we present cost-effective commercially available optical media as substrates for aligning cells in culture. These optical media, including CD-R, DVD-R and optical grating, allow different cell types to attach and grow well on them. The physical dimension of the grooves in these optical media allowed cells to be aligned in confluent cell culture with maximal cell-cell interaction and these cell alignment affect the morphology and differentiation of cardiac (H9C2), skeletal muscle (C2C12) and neuronal (PC12) cell lines. The optical media is amenable to various chemical modifications with fibronectin, laminin and gelatin for culturing different cell types. These low-cost commercially available optical media can serve as scalable substrates for research or drug safety screening applications in industry scales. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Invisible Substrate of Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Marcia J.

    1999-01-01

    Articulates key elements in the "invisible substrate" of information science. Emphasizes information science's role as a meta-science--conducting research and developing theory around documentary products of other disciplines and activities. Suggests that mental activities of information science center around "representation" and "organization" of…

  14. Optical characterization of nanoporous AAO sensor substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassu, Aschalew; Farley, Carlton W.; Sharma, Anup

    2014-05-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) has been investigated as an ideal and cost-effective chemical and biosensing platform. In this paper, we report the optical properties of periodic 100 micron thick nanoporous anodic alumina membranes with uniform and high density cylindrical pores penetrating the entire thickness of the substrate, ranging in size from 18 nm to 150 nm in diameter and pore periods from 44 nm to 243 nm. The surface geometry of the top and bottom surface of each membrane is studied using atomic force microscopy. The optical properties including transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance spectra on both sides of each substrate are studied and found to be symmetrical. It is observed that, as the pore size increases, the peak resonance intensity in transmittance decreases and in absorbance increases. The effects of the pore sizes on the optical properties of the bare nanoporous membranes and the benefit of using arrays of nanohole arrays with varying hole size and periodicity as a chemical sensing platform is also discussed. To characterize the optical sensing technique, transmittance and reflectance measurements of various concentrations of a standard chemical adsorbed on the bare nanoporous substrates are investigated. The preliminary results presented here show variation in transmittance and reflectance spectra with the concentration of the chemical used or the amount of the material adsorbed on the surface of the substrate.

  15. Identification of MAPK Substrates Using Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Schneider, Jacqueline D; Zhu, Ning; Chen, Sixue

    2017-01-01

    Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) under diverse biotic and abiotic factors and identification of an array of downstream MAPK target proteins are hot topics in plant signal transduction. Through interactions with a plethora of substrate proteins, MAPK cascades regulate many physiological processes in the course of plant growth, development, and response to environmental factors. Identification and quantification of potential MAPK substrates are essential, but have been technically challenging. With the recent advancement in phosphoproteomics, here we describe a method that couples metal dioxide for phosphopeptide enrichment with tandem mass tags (TMT) mass spectrometry (MS) for large-scale MAPK substrate identification and quantification. We have applied this method to a transient expression system carrying a wild type (WT) and a constitutive active (CA) version of a MAPK. This combination of genetically engineered MAPKs and phosphoproteomics provides a high-throughput, unbiased analysis of MAPK-triggered phosphorylation changes on the proteome scale. Therefore, it is a robust method for identifying potential MAPK substrates and should be applicable in the study of other kinase cascades in plants as well as in other organisms.

  16. Buckling Behavior of Substrate Supported Graphene Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kuijian; Chen, Yuli; Pan, Fei; Wang, Shengtao; Ma, Yong; Liu, Qijun

    2016-01-01

    The buckling of graphene sheets on substrates can significantly degrade their performance in materials and devices. Therefore, a systematic investigation on the buckling behavior of monolayer graphene sheet/substrate systems is carried out in this paper by both molecular mechanics simulations and theoretical analysis. From 70 simulation cases of simple-supported graphene sheets with different sizes under uniaxial compression, two different buckling modes are investigated and revealed to be dominated by the graphene size. Especially, for graphene sheets with length larger than 3 nm and width larger than 1.1 nm, the buckling mode depends only on the length/width ratio. Besides, it is revealed that the existence of graphene substrate can increase the critical buckling stress and strain to 4.39 N/m and 1.58%, respectively, which are about 10 times those for free-standing graphene sheets. Moreover, for graphene sheets with common size (longer than 20 nm), both theoretical and simulation results show that the critical buckling stress and strain are dominated only by the adhesive interactions with substrate and independent of the graphene size. Results in this work provide valuable insight and guidelines for the design and application of graphene-derived materials and nano-electromechanical systems. PMID:28787831

  17. Drosophila as an unconventional substrate for microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Angela J.; Parviz, Babak A.

    2007-02-01

    We present the application of Drosophila fruit flies as an unconventional substrate for microfabrication. Drosophila by itself represents a complex system capable of many functions not attainable with current microfabrication technology. By using Drosophila as a substrate, we are able to capitalize on these natural functions while incorporating additional functionality into a superior hybrid system. In the following, development of microfabrication processes for Drosophila substrates is discussed. In particular, results of a study on Drosophila tolerance to vacuum pressure during multiple stages of development are given. A remarkable finding that adult Drosophila may withstand up to 3 hours of exposure to vacuum with measurable survival is noted. This finding opens a number of new opportunities for performing fabrication processes, similar to the ones performed on a silicon wafer, on a fruit fly as a live substrate. As a model microfabrication process, it is shown how a collection of Drosophila can be made to self-assemble into an array of microfabricated recesses on a silicon wafer and how a shadow mask can be used to thermally evaporate 100 nm of indium on flies. The procedure resulted in the production of a number of live flies with a pre-designed metal micropattern on their wings. This demonstration of vacuum microfabrication on a live organism provides the first step towards the development of a hybrid biological/solid-state manufacturing process for complex microsystems.

  18. Inhibition of Glucuronokinase by Substrate Analogs 1

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Douglas F.; Dickinson, David B.

    1978-01-01

    Glucuronokinase from Lilium longiflorum pollen was purified 30- to 40- fold on a blue dextran-Sepharose column. Substrate analogs were tested for inhibitory effects, and nucleotide substrate specificity of the enzyme was determined. Nine nucleotides were tested, and all were inhibitory when the substrate was ATP. ADP was competitive with ATP and had a Ki value of 0.23 mm. None of the other nucleotide triphosphates could effectively substitute for ATP as a nucleotide substrate. Ten mm dATP and ITP reacted only 3% as rapidly as 10 mm ATP, while the rates for 10 mm GTP, CTP, UTP, and TTP were less than 1%. The glucuronic acid analogs, methyl α-glucuronoside, methyl β-glucuronoside, β-glucuronic acid-1-phosphate, and 4-O-methylglucuronic acid were tested as possible enzyme inhibitors. The three methyl derivatives showed little or no inhibition. The β-glucuronic acid-1-phosphate was inhibitory, with 50% inhibition obtained at 1 to 3 mm depending on the concentration of the glucuronic acid. It is concluded that the glucuronic acid-binding site on the enzyme is highly selective. PMID:16660589

  19. Drying of Pigment-Cellulose Nanofibril Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Timofeev, Oleg; Torvinen, Katariina; Sievänen, Jenni; Kaljunen, Timo; Kouko, Jarmo; Ketoja, Jukka A.

    2014-01-01

    A new substrate containing cellulose nanofibrils and inorganic pigment particles has been developed for printed electronics applications. The studied composite structure contains 80% fillers and is mechanically stable and flexible. Before drying, the solids content can be as low as 20% due to the high water binding capacity of the cellulose nanofibrils. We have studied several drying methods and their effects on the substrate properties. The aim is to achieve a tight, smooth surface keeping the drying efficiency simultaneously at a high level. The methods studied include: (1) drying on a hot metal surface; (2) air impingement drying; and (3) hot pressing. Somewhat surprisingly, drying rates measured for the pigment-cellulose nanofibril substrates were quite similar to those for the reference board sheets. Very high dewatering rates were observed for the hot pressing at high moisture contents. The drying method had significant effects on the final substrate properties, especially on short-range surface smoothness. The best smoothness was obtained with a combination of impingement and contact drying. The mechanical properties of the sheets were also affected by the drying method and associated temperature. PMID:28788220

  20. Gender differences in substrate utilisation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Ruby, B C; Robergs, R A

    1994-06-01

    The selection and utilisation of metabolic substrates during endurance exercise are regulated by a complex array of effectors. These factors include, but are not limited to, endurance training and cardiorespiratory fitness, exercise intensity and duration, muscle morphology and histology, hormonal factors and diet. Although the effects of these factors on substrate utilisation patterns are well understood, the variation in substrate utilisation during endurance exercise between males and females is not. Because of the extreme heterogeneity in exercise protocols and individuals studied, the differences in substrate utilisation between males and females remain somewhat inconclusive. Regardless of heterogeneity, if the results from studies are interpreted collectively, an apparent gender difference in the selection and metabolism of substrates can be seen in sedentary individuals. However, this difference between genders diminishes as the level of cardiorespiratory fitness is increased to that of highly trained individuals. During rest and lower intensity exercise, the preferential metabolism of lipid occurs with a concomitant sparing of muscle glycogen. However, as the intensity of exercise is increased, the relative contribution of carbohydrate also increases. The exercise intensity at which the shift from lipid to carbohydrate is determined and regulated by the previously mentioned factors. Because the intensity and duration of exercise play a predominant role, the variation in exercise protocols poses a methodological concern when interpreting previous research. When attempting to compare the metabolism of substrates during endurance exercise, appropriate selection and interpretation of measurement techniques are necessary. Measurement techniques include the nonprotein respiratory exchange ratio, muscle and fat biopsies and the measurement of various blood metabolites, such as free fatty acids and glycerol. Similarly, in vitro analysis of lipolytic activity has

  1. Silvering substrates after CO2 snow cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2005-09-01

    There have been some questions in the astronomical community concerning the quality of silver coatings deposited on substrates that have been cleaned with carbon dioxide snow. These questions center around the possible existence of carbonate ions left behind on the substrate by CO2. Such carbonate ions could react with deposited silver to produce insoluble silver carbonate, thereby reducing film adhesion and reflectivity. Carbonate ions could be produced from CO2 via the following mechanism. First, during CO2 snow cleaning, a small amount of moisture can condense on a surface. This is especially true if the jet of CO2 is allowed to dwell on one spot. CO2 gas can dissolve in this moisture, producing carbonic acid, which can undergo two acid dissociations to form carbonate ions. In reality, it is highly unlikely that charged carbonate ions will remain stable on a substrate for very long. As condensed water evaporates, Le Chatelier's principle will shift the equilibrium of the chain of reactions that produced carbonate back to CO2 gas. Furthermore, the hydration of CO2 reaction of CO2 with H20) is an extremely slow process, and the total dehydrogenation of carbonic acid is not favored. Living tissues that must carry out the equilibration of carbonic acid and CO2 use the enzyme carbonic anhydrase to speed up the reaction by a factor of one million. But no such enzymatic action is present on a clean mirror substrate. In short, the worst case analysis presented below shows that the ratio of silver atoms to carbonate radicals must be at least 500 million to one. The results of chemical tests presented here support this view. Furthermore, film lift-off tests, also presented in this report, show that silver film adhesion to fused silica substrates is actually enhanced by CO2 snow cleaning.

  2. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  3. Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: ssingam@ncsu.edu; Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709; Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968

    2016-09-15

    Multifunctional heterostructures can exhibit a wide range of functional properties, including colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric, and multiferroic behavior, and can display interesting physical phenomena including spin and charge ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. However, putting this functionality to work remains a challenge. To date, most of the work reported in the literature has dealt with heterostructures deposited onto closely lattice matched insulating substrates such as DyScO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3} (STO), or STO buffered Si(100) using concepts of lattice matching epitaxy (LME). However, strain in heterostructures grown by LME is typically not fully relaxed and the layers contain detrimental defects such asmore » threading dislocations that can significantly degrade the physical properties of the films and adversely affect the device characteristics. In addition, most of the substrates are incompatible with existing CMOS-based technology, where Si (100) substrates dominate. This review discusses recent advances in the integration of multifunctional oxide and non-oxide materials onto silicon substrates. An alternative thin film growth approach, called “domain matching epitaxy,” is presented which identifies approaches for minimizing lattice strain and unwanted defects in large misfit systems (7%–25% and higher). This approach broadly allows for the integration of multifunctional materials onto silicon substrates, such that sensing, computation, and response functions can be combined to produce next generation “smart” devices. In general, pulsed laser deposition has been used to epitaxially grow these materials, although the concepts developed here can be extended to other deposition techniques, as well. It will be shown that TiN and yttria-stabilized zirconia template layers provide promising platforms for the integration of new functionality into silicon-based computer chips. This review paper reports on a number of thin

  4. Measuring the Global Substrate Specificity of Mycobacterial Serine Hydrolases Using a Library of Fluorogenic Ester Substrates.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Braden; Waibel, Brent; White, Alex; Hansen, Heather; Stephens, Dominique; Koelper, Andrew; Larsen, Erik M; Kim, Charles; Glanzer, Adam; Lavis, Luke D; Hoops, Geoffrey C; Johnson, R Jeremy

    2018-04-16

    Among the proteins required for lipid metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis are a significant number of uncharacterized serine hydrolases, especially lipases and esterases. Using a streamlined synthetic method, a library of immolative fluorogenic ester substrates was expanded to better represent the natural lipidomic diversity of Mycobacterium. This expanded fluorogenic library was then used to rapidly characterize the global structure activity relationship (SAR) of mycobacterial serine hydrolases in M. smegmatis under different growth conditions. Confirmation of fluorogenic substrate activation by mycobacterial serine hydrolases was performed using nonspecific serine hydrolase inhibitors and reinforced the biological significance of the SAR. The hydrolases responsible for the global SAR were then assigned using gel-resolved activity measurements, and these assignments were used to rapidly identify the relative substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized mycobacterial hydrolases. These measurements provide a global SAR of mycobacterial hydrolase activity, a picture of cycling hydrolase activity, and a detailed substrate specificity profile for previously uncharacterized hydrolases.

  5. Carbon nanotube substrates and catalyzed hot stamp for polishing and patterning the substrates

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yuhuang [Evanston, IL; Hauge, Robert H [Houston, TX; Schmidt, Howard K [Houston, TX; Kim, Myung Jong [Houston, TX; Kittrell, W Carter [Houston, TX

    2009-09-08

    The present invention is generally directed to catalyzed hot stamp methods for polishing and/or patterning carbon nanotube-containing substrates. In some embodiments, the substrate, as a carbon nanotube fiber end, is brought into contact with a hot stamp (typically at 200-800.degree. C.), and is kept in contact with the hot stamp until the morphology/patterns on the hot stamp have been transferred to the substrate. In some embodiments, the hot stamp is made of material comprising one or more transition metals (Fe, Ni, Co, Pt, Ag, Au, etc.), which can catalyze the etching reaction of carbon with H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2O, and/or O.sub.2. Such methods can (1) polish the carbon nanotube-containing substrate with a microscopically smooth finish, and/or (2) transfer pre-defined patterns from the hot stamp to the substrate. Such polished or patterned carbon nanotube substrates can find application as carbon nanotube electrodes, field emitters, and field emitter arrays for displays and electron sources.

  6. A VCP inhibitor substrate trapping approach (VISTA) enables proteomic profiling of endogenous ERAD substrates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edmond Y; To, Milton; Tran, Erica; Dionisio, Lorraine T Ador; Cho, Hyejin J; Baney, Katherine L M; Pataki, Camille I; Olzmann, James A

    2018-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) mediates the proteasomal clearance of proteins from the early secretory pathway. In this process, ubiquitinated substrates are extracted from membrane-embedded dislocation complexes by the AAA ATPase VCP and targeted to the cytosolic 26S proteasome. In addition to its well-established role in the degradation of misfolded proteins, ERAD also regulates the abundance of key proteins such as enzymes involved in cholesterol synthesis. However, due to the lack of generalizable methods, our understanding of the scope of proteins targeted by ERAD remains limited. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a VCP inhibitor substrate trapping approach (VISTA) to identify endogenous ERAD substrates. VISTA exploits the small-molecule VCP inhibitor CB5083 to trap ERAD substrates in a membrane-associated, ubiquitinated form. This strategy, coupled with quantitative ubiquitin proteomics, identified previously validated (e.g., ApoB100, Insig2, and DHCR7) and novel (e.g., SCD1 and RNF5) ERAD substrates in cultured human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Moreover, our results indicate that RNF5 autoubiquitination on multiple lysine residues targets it for ubiquitin and VCP--dependent clearance. Thus, VISTA provides a generalizable discovery method that expands the available toolbox of strategies to elucidate the ERAD substrate landscape.

  7. Antibacterial graphene oxide coatings on polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiming; Wen, Jing; Gao, Yang; Li, Tianyang; Wang, Huifang; Yan, Hong; Niu, Baolong; Guo, Ruijie

    2018-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was thought to be a promising antibacterial material. In this work, graphene oxide coatings on polymer substrate were prepared and the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus was investigated. It was demonstrated that the coatings exhibited stronger antibacterial activity against E. coli with thin membrane than S. aureus with thick membrane. Take into consideration the fact that the coatings presented smooth, sharp edges-free morphology and bonded parallelly to substrate, which was in mark contrast with their precursor GO nanosheets, oxidative stress mechanism was considered the main factor of antibacterial activity. The coatings, which are easy to recycle and have no inhalation risk, provide an alternative for application in antibacterial medical instruments.

  8. Development of Mullite Substrates and Containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibold, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The mullite-molten silicon interaction was evaluated through fabrication of a series of bodies made with variations in density, alumina-silica ratio, and glass-crystalline ratio. The materials were tested in a sessile drop technique. None of the variations stood up to extended exposure to molten silicon sufficiently to be recommended as a container material. However, directional solidification experiments suggest that, under proper conditions, contamination of the silicon by mullite containers can be minimized. To improve an already good thermal expansion match between mullite and silicon, compositional variations were studied. Altering of the alumina-silica ratio was determined to give a continuously varying thermal expansion. A standard mullite composition was selected and substrates 40 x 4 x .040 inches were fabricated. Slotted substrates of various configurations and various compositions were also fabricated.

  9. Microorganisms detection on substrates using QCL spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Jiménez, Amira C.; Ortiz-Rivera, William; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Vázquez-Ayala, Iris; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    Recent investigations have focused on the improvement of rapid and accurate methods to develop spectroscopic markers of compounds constituting microorganisms that are considered biological threats. Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) systems have revolutionized many areas of research and development in defense and security applications, including his area of research. Infrared spectroscopy detection based on QCL was employed to acquire mid infrared (MIR) spectral signatures of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), Escherichia coli (Ec) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (Se), which were used as biological agent simulants of biothreats. The experiments were carried out in reflection mode on various substrates such as cardboard, glass, travel baggage, wood and stainless steel. Chemometrics statistical routines such as principal component analysis (PCA) regression and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the recorded MIR spectra. The results show that the infrared vibrational techniques investigated are useful for classification/detection of the target microorganisms on the types of substrates studied.

  10. Optical substrate materials for synchrotron radiation beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Paquin, R.A.

    1997-06-01

    The authors consider the materials choices available for making optical substrates for synchrotron radiation beam lines. They find that currently the optical surfaces can only be polished to the required finish in fused silica and other glasses, silicon, CVD silicon carbide, electroless nickel and 17-4 PH stainless steel. Substrates must therefore be made of one of these materials or of a metal that can be coated with electroless nickel. In the context of material choices for mirrors they explore the issues of dimensional stability, polishing, bending, cooling, and manufacturing strategy. They conclude that metals are best from an engineering andmore » cost standpoint while the ceramics are best from a polishing standpoint. They then give discussions of specific materials as follows: silicon carbide, silicon, electroless nickel, Glidcop{trademark}, aluminum, precipitation-hardening stainless steel, mild steel, invar and superinvar. Finally they summarize conclusions and propose ideas for further research.« less

  11. A cellular glass substrate solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedard, R.; Bell, D.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a second generation point focusing solar concentration is discussed. The design is based on reflective gores fabricated of thin glass mirror bonded continuously to a contoured substrate of cellular glass. The concentrator aperture and structural stiffness was optimized for minimum concentrator cost given the performance requirement of delivering 56 kWth to a 22 cm diameter receiver aperture with a direct normal insolation of 845 watts sq m and an operating wind of 50 kmph. The reflective panel, support structure, drives, foundation and instrumentation and control subsystem designs, optimized for minimum cost, are summarized. The use of cellular glass as a reflective panel substrate material is shown to offer significant weight and cost advantages compared to existing technology materials.

  12. Generation of Micropatterned Substrates Using Micro Photopatterning

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Micro photopatterning (µPP) has been developed to rapidly test and generate different patterns for extracellular matrix adsorption without being hindered with the process of making physical stamps through nanolithography techniques. It uses two-photon excitation guided through a point-scanning confocal microscope to locally photoablate poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) thin films in user-defined computer-controlled patterns. PVA thin films are ideal for surface blocking, being hydrophilic substrates that deter protein adsorption and cell attachment. Because gold substrates are not used during µPP, all live-cell fluorescent imaging techniques including total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of GFP–linked proteins can be performed with minimal loss of fluorescence signal. Furthermore, because µPP does not require physical stamps for pattern generation, multiple ECMs or other proteins can be localized within microns of each other. This unit details the setup of µPP as well as giving troubleshooting techniques. PMID:20013752

  13. Natural cellulose fiber as substrate for supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Gui, Zhe; Zhu, Hongli; Gillette, Eleanor; Han, Xiaogang; Rubloff, Gary W; Hu, Liangbing; Lee, Sang Bok

    2013-07-23

    Cellulose fibers with porous structure and electrolyte absorption properties are considered to be a good potential substrate for the deposition of energy material for energy storage devices. Unlike traditional substrates, such as gold or stainless steel, paper prepared from cellulose fibers in this study not only functions as a substrate with large surface area but also acts as an interior electrolyte reservoir, where electrolyte can be absorbed much in the cellulose fibers and is ready to diffuse into an energy storage material. We demonstrated the value of this internal electrolyte reservoir by comparing a series of hierarchical hybrid supercapacitor electrodes based on homemade cellulose paper or polyester textile integrated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by simple solution dip and electrodeposited with MnO2. Atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 onto the fiber surface was used to limit electrolyte absorption into the fibers for comparison. Configurations designed with different numbers of ion diffusion pathways were compared to show that cellulose fibers in paper can act as a good interior electrolyte reservoir and provide an effective pathway for ion transport facilitation. Further optimization using an additional CNT coating resulted in an electrode of paper/CNTs/MnO2/CNTs, which has dual ion diffusion and electron transfer pathways and demonstrated superior supercapacitive performance. This paper highlights the merits of the mesoporous cellulose fibers as substrates for supercapacitor electrodes, in which the water-swelling effect of the cellulose fibers can absorb electrolyte, and the mesoporous internal structure of the fibers can provide channels for ions to diffuse to the electrochemical energy storage materials.

  14. Substrate Selectivity Check of the Ergothioneine Transporter.

    PubMed

    Tschirka, Julia; Kreisor, Madlen; Betz, Janina; Gründemann, Dirk

    2018-06-01

    The candidate vitamin ergothioneine (ET) is a unique antioxidant. Expression of the ET transporter (ETT) (gene symbol SLC22A4 ) in distinct cells is thought to signal intracellular ET activity, since we have previously shown that the ETT is highly selective for ET. Unfortunately, some continue to hold the ETT as a relevant drug transporter, using the misleading functional name OCTN1, novel organic cation transporter. The present study was provoked by two recent reports in which new ETT substrates were declared. Astonishingly, the transport efficiencies (TEs) of ETT for saracatinib and some nucleoside drugs were as high as the TE for ET. Here we examined, based on regulated expression of ETT from human and rat in 293 cells and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry quantification, the transport of several drugs. With the nucleosides cytarabine, gemcitabine, 2'-deoxycytidine, and 2'-deoxyadenosine, and the drugs saracatinib, ipratropium, metformin, and oxaliplatin, the uptake into cells expressing ETT was not increased over control cells. ETT-mediated uptake of gabapentin was detectable, but the TE was approximately 100-fold lower than the TE for ergothioneine (50-200 µ l/min per milligram of protein). In conclusion, the ETT remains highly specific for its physiologic substrate ergothioneine. Our results contradict several reports on additional substrates. The ETT does not provide multiple substrate specificities, and it is not a transporter of cationic drugs. Only compounds that are related to ET in substructure-for example, gabapentin, carnitine, and TEA-can be transported, but with very low efficiency. Thus, ETT persists as a specific molecular indicator of ET activity. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. Hydrogenation of biomass-derived substrates

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John C.; Waidmann, Christopher R.

    2016-06-07

    The .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated ketone moiety of a substrate representative of non-food based biomass was hydrogenated to the corresponding saturated alcohol moiety using a composition including (1) a copper salt; (2) a phosphine; (3) a polar aprotic solvent such as acetonitrile, and (4) a compound suitable for providing hydrogen for the hydrogenation, such as a suitable silane material or a suitable siloxane material.

  16. Purity of targets prepared on Cu substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méens, A.; Rossini, I.; Sens, J. C.

    1993-09-01

    The purity of several elemental self-supporting targets usually prepared by evaporation onto soluble Cu substrates has been studied. The targets were analysed by Rutherford backscattering and instrumental neutron activation analysis. Because of the high percentage of Cu observed in some Si targets, further measurements, including transmission electron microscopy, have been performed on Si targets deposited by e-gun bombardment onto Cu and ion-beam sputtering onto betaine.

  17. Thick crystalline films on foreign substrates

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Henry I.; Atwater, Harry A.; Geis, Michael W.

    1986-01-01

    To achieve a uniform texture, large crystalline grains or, in some cases, a single crystalline orientation in a thick (>1 .mu.m) film on a foreign substrate, the film is formed so as to be thin (<1 .mu.m) in a certain section. Zone-melting recrystallization is initiated in the thin section and then extended into the thick section. The method may employ planar constriction patterns of orientation filter patterns.

  18. Targeting Biological Sensing with Commercial SERS Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Research Laboratory ATTN: RDRL-SEE-E 2800 Powder Mill Road Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 8. PERFORMING...Pellegrino* *U.S. Army Research Laboratories, RDRL-SEE-E, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 Department of Mechanical Engineering and...demonstrated typical RSDs ranging from 10-15% under drop and dry conditions. While these standard Klarite substrates do demonstrate a high

  19. Thick crystalline films on foreign substrates

    DOEpatents

    Smith, H.I.; Atwater, H.A.; Geis, M.W.

    1986-03-18

    To achieve a uniform texture, large crystalline grains or, in some cases, a single crystalline orientation in a thick (>1 [mu]m) film on a foreign substrate, the film is formed so as to be thin (<1 [mu]m) in a certain section. Zone-melting recrystallization is initiated in the thin section and then extended into the thick section. The method may employ planar constriction patterns of orientation filter patterns. 2 figs.

  20. Microsphere coated substrate containing reactive aldehyde groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Richard C. K. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A synthetic organic resin is coated with a continuous layer of contiguous, tangential, individual microspheres having a uniform diameter preferably between 100 Angstroms and 2000 Angstroms. The microspheres are an addition polymerized polymer of an unsaturated aldehyde containing 4 to 20 carbon atoms and are covalently bonded to the substrate by means of high energy radiation grafting. The microspheres contain reactive aldehyde groups and can form conjugates with proteins such as enzymes or other aldehyde reactive materials.

  1. Laminate articles on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2003-12-16

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  2. Urate as a Physiological Substrate for Myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Meotti, Flavia C.; Jameson, Guy N. L.; Turner, Rufus; Harwood, D. Tim; Stockwell, Samantha; Rees, Martin D.; Thomas, Shane R.; Kettle, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Urate and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are associated with adverse outcomes in cardiovascular disease. In this study, we assessed whether urate is a likely physiological substrate for MPO and if the products of their interaction have the potential to exacerbate inflammation. Urate was readily oxidized by MPO and hydrogen peroxide to 5-hydroxyisourate, which decayed to predominantly allantoin. The redox intermediates of MPO were reduced by urate with rate constants of 4.6 × 105 m−1 s−1 for compound I and 1.7 × 104 m−1 s−1 for compound II. Urate competed with chloride for oxidation by MPO and at hyperuricemic levels is expected to be a substantive substrate for the enzyme. Oxidation of urate promoted super-stoichiometric consumption of glutathione, which indicates that it is converted to a free radical intermediate. In combination with superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, MPO oxidized urate to a reactive hydroperoxide. This would form by addition of superoxide to the urate radical. Urate also enhanced MPO-dependent consumption of nitric oxide. In human plasma, stimulated neutrophils produced allantoin in a reaction dependent on the NADPH oxidase, MPO and superoxide. We propose that urate is a physiological substrate for MPO that is oxidized to the urate radical. The reactions of this radical with superoxide and nitric oxide provide a plausible link between urate and MPO in cardiovascular disease. PMID:21266577

  3. Nanowire surface fastener fabrication on flexible substrate.

    PubMed

    Toku, Yuhki; Uchida, Keita; Morita, Yasuyuki; Ju, Yang

    2018-07-27

    The market for wearable devices has increased considerably in recent years. In response to this demand, flexible electronic circuit technology has become more important. The conventional bonding technology in electronic assembly depends on high-temperature processes such as reflow soldering, which result in undesired thermal damages and residual stress at a bonding interface. In addition, it exhibits poor compatibility with bendable or stretchable device applications. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement to attach electronic parts on printed circuit boards with good mechanical and electrical properties at room temperature. Nanowire surface fasteners (NSFs) are candidates for resolving these problems. This paper describes the fabrication of an NSF on a flexible substrate, which can be used for room temperature conductive bonding. The template method is used for preparing high-density nanowire arrays. A Cu thin film is layered on the template as the flexible substrate. After etching the template, a Cu NSF is obtained on the Cu film substrate. In addition, the electrical and mechanical properties of the Cu NSF are studied under various fabrication conditions. The Cu NSF exhibits high shear adhesion strength (∼234 N cm -2 ) and low contact resistivity (2.2 × 10 -4 Ω cm 2 ).

  4. Liquid crystal displays with plastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueder, Ernst H.

    1998-04-01

    Plastic substrates for the cells of displays exhibit only 1/6 of the weight of glass substrates; they are virtually unbreakable; their flexibility allows the designer to give them a shape suppressing reflections, to realize a display board on a curved surface or meeting the requirements for an appealing styling; displays with plastics are thinner which provides a wider viewing angle. These features render them attractive for displays in portable systems such as mobile phones, pagers, smart cards, personal digital assistants (PDAs) and portable computers. Reflective displays are especially attractive as they don't need a back light. The most important requirements are the protection of plastics against gas permeation and chemical agents, the prevention of layers on plastics to crack or peel off when the plastic is bent and the development of low temperature thin film processes because the plastics, as a rule, only tolerate temperatures below 150 degrees Celsius. Bistable reflective FLC- and PSCT-displays with plastic substrates will be introduced. Special sputtered SiO2-orientation layers preserve the displayed information even if pressure or torsion is applied. MIM-addressed PDLC-displays require additional Al- or Ti-layers which provide the necessary ductility. Sputtered or PECVD-generated TFTs can be fabricated on plastics at temperatures below 150 degrees Celsius.

  5. Nanowire surface fastener fabrication on flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toku, Yuhki; Uchida, Keita; Morita, Yasuyuki; Ju, Yang

    2018-07-01

    The market for wearable devices has increased considerably in recent years. In response to this demand, flexible electronic circuit technology has become more important. The conventional bonding technology in electronic assembly depends on high-temperature processes such as reflow soldering, which result in undesired thermal damages and residual stress at a bonding interface. In addition, it exhibits poor compatibility with bendable or stretchable device applications. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement to attach electronic parts on printed circuit boards with good mechanical and electrical properties at room temperature. Nanowire surface fasteners (NSFs) are candidates for resolving these problems. This paper describes the fabrication of an NSF on a flexible substrate, which can be used for room temperature conductive bonding. The template method is used for preparing high-density nanowire arrays. A Cu thin film is layered on the template as the flexible substrate. After etching the template, a Cu NSF is obtained on the Cu film substrate. In addition, the electrical and mechanical properties of the Cu NSF are studied under various fabrication conditions. The Cu NSF exhibits high shear adhesion strength (∼234 N cm‑2) and low contact resistivity (2.2 × 10‑4 Ω cm2).

  6. Quantitative framework for ordered degradation of APC/C substrates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dan; Girard, Juliet R; Li, Weihan; Mizrak, Arda; Morgan, David O

    2015-11-16

    During cell-cycle progression, substrates of a single master regulatory enzyme can be modified in a specific order. Here, we used experimental and computational approaches to dissect the quantitative mechanisms underlying the ordered degradation of the substrates of the ubiquitin ligase APC/C(Cdc20), a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis. We show experimentally that the rate of catalysis varies with different substrates of APC/C(Cdc20). Using a computational model based on multi-step ubiquitination, we then show how changes in the interaction between a single substrate and APC/C(Cdc20) can alter the timing of degradation onset relative to APC/C(Cdc20) activation, while ensuring a fast degradation rate. Degradation timing and dynamics depend on substrate affinity for the enzyme as well as the catalytic rate at which the substrate is modified. When two substrates share the same pool of APC/C(Cdc20), their relative enzyme affinities and rates of catalysis influence the partitioning of APC/C(Cdc20) among substrates, resulting in substrate competition. Depending on how APC/C(Cdc20) is partitioned among its substrates, competition can have minor or major effects on the degradation of certain substrates. We show experimentally that increased expression of the early APC/C(Cdc20) substrate Clb5 does not delay the degradation of the later substrate securin, arguing against a role for competition with Clb5 in establishing securin degradation timing. The degradation timing of APC/C(Cdc20) substrates depends on the multi-step nature of ubiquitination, differences in substrate-APC/C(Cdc20) interactions, and competition among substrates. Our studies provide a conceptual framework for understanding how ordered modification can be established among substrates of the same regulatory enzyme, and facilitate our understanding of how precise temporal control is achieved by a small number of master regulators to ensure a successful cell division cycle.

  7. Surface control alloy substrates and methods of manufacture therefor

    DOEpatents

    Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Li, Qi; Rupich, Martin W.; Thompson, Elliott D.; Siegal, Edward J.; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans; Annavarapu, Suresh; Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2004-05-04

    Methods and articles for controlling the surface of an alloy substrate for deposition of an epitaxial layer. The invention includes the use of an intermediate layer to stabilize the substrate surface against oxidation for subsequent deposition of an epitaxial layer.

  8. Substrate binding ability of chemically inactivated pectinase for the substrate pectic acid.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Y; Kobayashi, M

    1995-07-01

    Pectinase (polygalacturonase) was purified from a commercial pectinase preparation from a mold. Substrate binding of pectinase was measured by centrifugal affinity chromatography using an immobilized substrate, pectic acid. Desorption of pectinase from the affinity matrix with the substrate pectin and pectic acid gave Kd values of 5.3 and 8.5 mg/ml, respectively. Chemical modification of pectinase by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEP) caused a loss of most of the enzyme activity, but the substrate binding ability was not impaired. Thus, the pectinase preparation was digested with lysyl endopeptidase and the resulting peptides were treated with pectic acid-affinity gel. Three peptide fragments, which were recovered from the affinity column and sequenced, were identical to sequences in the second pectinase gene from Aspergillus niger. The first peptide contained 17 amino acids, Asp101-Ser117, and the second and third peptides corresponded to 18 amino acids of Asn152-Asp169. These results indicate that the inactivated pectinase retained substrate binding ability and would function as an acidic polysaccharide recognizing protein.

  9. Rich variety of substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nhung Tran, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The efficiency of the application of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique to each specified purpose significantly depends on the choice of the SERS substrate with an appropriate structure as well as on its performance. Until the present time a rich variety of SERS substrates was fabricated. They can be classified according to their structures. The present work is a review of main types of SERS substrates for using in the trace analysis application. They can be classified into 4 groups: (1) Substrates using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with spherical shape such as colloidal AuNPs, AuNPs fabricated by pulsed laser deposition, by sputtering or by capillary force assembly (CFA), substrates fabricated by electrospinning technique, substrates using metallic nanoparticle arrays fabricated by electron beam lithography combined with CFA method, substrates using silver nanoparticle (AgNP) arrays grain by chemical seeded method, substrates with tunable surface plasmon resonance, substrates based on precies subnanometer plasmonic junctions within AuNP assemblies, substrates fabricated by simultaneously immobilizing both AuNPs and AgNPs on the same glass sides etc. (2) Substrates using nanostructures with non-spherical shapes such as gold nanowire (NW), or highly anisotropic nickel NW together with large area, free-standing carpets, substrates with obviously angular, quasi-vertically aligned cuboid-shaped TiO2 NW arrays decorated with AgNPs, substrates using gold nanoprism monolayer films, substrates using silver nanocube dimmers or monodisperse close-packed gold nanotriangle monolayers. (3) Substrates using multiparticle complex nanostructure such as nanoparticle cluster arrays, gold nanoflowers and nanodendrites. (4) Flexible substrate such as paper-based swab with gold nanorods, adhesive polymer tapes fabricated by inkjet printing method and flexible and adhesive SERS tapes fabricated by decorating AuNPs via the conventional drop-dry method.

  10. Graphene-on-semiconductor substrates for analog electronics

    DOEpatents

    Lagally, Max G.; Cavallo, Francesca; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2016-04-26

    Electrically conductive material structures, analog electronic devices incorporating the structures and methods for making the structures are provided. The structures include a layer of graphene on a semiconductor substrate. The graphene layer and the substrate are separated by an interfacial region that promotes transfer of charge carriers from the surface of the substrate to the graphene.

  11. Densification of porous refractory substrates. [space shuttle orbiter tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecord, G. M.; Schomburg, C. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A hydrolyzed tetraethyl orthosilicate is applied to the surface of a porous refractory substrate following which the substrate is heated to a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to bond the silica released from the tetraethyl orthosilicate to the substrate. The surface is thus densified and strengthened.

  12. Counterintuitive effects of substrate roughness on PDCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.; Manga, M.

    2012-12-01

    We model dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) using scaled, warm, particle-laden density currents in a 6 m long, 0.6 m wide, 1.8 m tall air-filled tank. In this set of experiments, we run currents over substrates with characteristic roughness scales, hr, ranging over ~3 orders of magnitude from smooth, through 250 μm sandpaper, 0.1-, 1-, 2-, 5-, and 10 cm hemispheres. As substrate roughness increases, runout distance increases until a critical roughness height, hrc, is reached; further increases in roughness height decrease runout. The critical roughness height appears to be 0.25-0.5 htb, the thickness of the turbulent lower layer of the density currents. The dependence of runout on hr is most likely the result of increases in substrate roughness decreasing the average current velocity and converting that energy into increased turbulence intensity. Small values of hr thus result in increased runout as sedimentation is inhibited by the increased turbulence intensity. At larger values of hr current behavior is controlled by much larger decreases in average current velocity, even though sedimentation decreases. Scaling our experiments up to the size of real volcanic eruptions suggests that landscapes must have characteristic roughness hr>10 m to reduce the runout of natural PDCs, smaller roughness scales can increase runout. Comparison of relevant bulk (Reynolds number, densimetric and thermal Richardson numbers, excess buoyant thermal energy density) and turbulent (Stokes and settling numbers) between our experiments and natural dilute PDCs indicates that we are accurately modeling at least the large scale behaviors and dynamics of dilute PDCs.

  13. Metallic substrates for high temperature superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Truchan, Thomas G.; Miller, Dean J.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Foley, Robert

    2002-01-01

    A biaxially textured face-centered cubic metal article having grain boundaries with misorientation angles greater than about 8.degree. limited to less than about 1%. A laminate article is also disclosed having a metal substrate first rolled to at least about 95% thickness reduction followed by a first annealing at a temperature less than about 375.degree. C. Then a second rolling operation of not greater than about 6% thickness reduction is provided, followed by a second annealing at a temperature greater than about 400.degree. C. A method of forming the metal and laminate articles is also disclosed.

  14. Molybdenum protective coatings adhesion to steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.; Teplouhov, A. A.; Tyukin, A. V.; Tkachenko, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Protection of the critical parts, components and assemblies from corrosion is an urgent engineering problem and many other industries. Protective coatings’ forming on surface of metal products is a promising way of corrosionprevention. The adhesion force is one of the main characteristics of coatings’ durability. The paper presents theoretical and experimental adhesion force assessment for coatings formed by molybdenum magnetron sputtering ontoa steel substrate. Validity and reliability of results obtained by simulation and sclerometry method allow applying the developed model for adhesion force evaluation in binary «steel-coating» systems.

  15. Elastomeric silicone substrates for terahertz fishnet metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodasevych, I. E.; Shah, C. M.; Sriram, S.; Bhaskaran, M.; Withayachumnankul, W.; Ung, B. S. Y.; Lin, H.; Rowe, W. S. T.; Abbott, D.; Mitchell, A.

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we characterize the electromagnetic properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and use this as a free-standing substrate for the realization of flexible fishnet metamaterials at terahertz frequencies. Across the 0.2-2.5 THz band, the refractive index and absorption coefficient of PDMS are estimated as 1.55 and 0-22 cm-1, respectively. Electromagnetic modeling, multi-layer flexible electronics microfabrication, and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy are used in the design, fabrication, and characterization of the metamaterials, respectively. The properties of PDMS add a degree of freedom to terahertz metamaterials, with the potential for tuning by elastic deformation or integrated microfluidics.

  16. Vacuum Head Checks Foam/Substrate Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, James F.

    1989-01-01

    Electromechanical inspection system quickly gives measurements indicating adhesion, or lack thereof, between rigid polyurethane foam and aluminum substrate. Does not damage inspected article, easy to operate, and used to perform "go/no-go" evaluations or as supplement to conventional destructive pull-plug testing. Applies vacuum to small area of foam panel and measures distance through which foam pulled into vacuum. Probe head applied to specimen and evacuated through hose to controller/monitor unit. Digital voltmeter in unit reads deflection of LVDT probe head.

  17. A thermophone on porous polymeric substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, G.; Kim, A.; Song, S. H.; Jessop, A. M.; Bolton, J. S.; Ziaie, B.

    2012-07-01

    In this Letter, we present a simple, low-temperature method for fabricating a wide-band (>80 kHz) thermo-acoustic sound generator on a porous polymeric substrate. We were able to achieve up to 80 dB of sound pressure level with an input power of 0.511 W. No significant surface temperature increase was observed in the device even at an input power level of 2.5 W. Wide-band ultrasonic performance, simplicity of structure, and scalability of the fabrication process make this device suitable for many ranging and imaging applications.

  18. Methods for both coating a substrate with aluminum oxide and infusing the substrate with elemental aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-11-01

    Methods of aluminizing the surface of a metal substrate. The methods of the present invention do not require establishment of a vacuum or a reducing atmosphere, as is typically necessary. Accordingly, aluminization can occur in the presence of oxygen, which greatly simplifies and reduces processing costs by allowing deposition of the aluminum coating to be performed, for example, in air. Embodiments of the present invention can be characterized by applying a slurry that includes a binder and powder granules containing aluminum to the metal substrate surface. Then, in a combined step, a portion of the aluminum is diffused into the substrate and a portion of the aluminum is oxidized by heating the slurry to a temperature greater than the melting point of the aluminum in an oxygen-containing atmosphere.

  19. Method of forming through substrate vias (TSVs) and singulating and releasing die having the TSVs from a mechanical support substrate

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-12-09

    Accessing a workpiece object in semiconductor processing is disclosed. The workpiece object includes a mechanical support substrate, a release layer over the mechanical support substrate, and an integrated circuit substrate coupled over the release layer. The integrated circuit substrate includes a device layer having semiconductor devices. The method also includes etching through-substrate via (TSV) openings through the integrated circuit substrate that have buried ends at or within the release layer including using the release layer as an etch stop. TSVs are formed by introducing one or more conductive materials into the TSV openings. A die singulation trench is etched at least substantially through the integrated circuit substrate around a perimeter of an integrated circuit die. The integrated circuit die is at least substantially released from the mechanical support substrate.

  20. Universal Common Communication Substrate (UCCS) Specification; Universal Common Communication Substrate (UCCS) Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Universal Common Communication Substrate (UCCS) is a low-level communication substrate that exposes high-performance communication primitives, while providing network interoperability. It is intended to support multiple upper layer protocol (ULPs) or programming models including SHMEM,UPC,Titanium,Co-Array Fortran,Global Arrays,MPI,GASNet, and File I/O. it provides various communication operations including one-sided and two-sided point-to-point, collectives, and remote atomic operations. In addition to operations for ULPs, it provides an out-of-band communication channel required typically required to wire-up communication libraries.

  1. Vertical-Substrate MPCVD Epitaxial Nanodiamond Growth

    DOE PAGES

    Tzeng, Yan-Kai; Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Lu, Haiyu; ...

    2017-02-09

    Color center-containing nanodiamonds have many applications in quantum technologies and biology. Diamondoids, molecular-sized diamonds have been used as seeds in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth. However, optimizing growth conditions to produce high crystal quality nanodiamonds with color centers requires varying growth conditions that often leads to ad-hoc and time-consuming, one-at-a-time testing of reaction conditions. In order to rapidly explore parameter space, we developed a microwave plasma CVD technique using a vertical, rather than horizontally oriented stage-substrate geometry. With this configuration, temperature, plasma density, and atomic hydrogen density vary continuously along the vertical axis of the substrate. Finally, this variation allowedmore » rapid identification of growth parameters that yield single crystal diamonds down to 10 nm in size and 75 nm diameter optically active center silicon-vacancy (Si-V) nanoparticles. Furthermore, this method may provide a means of incorporating a wide variety of dopants in nanodiamonds without ion irradiation damage.« less

  2. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, C D; Higgins, M J; Sullivan, R P; Jamali, S S; Moulton, S E; Wallace, G G

    2013-12-20

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

  3. Formation of surface nanobubbles on nanostructured substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xingya; Wang, Liansheng; Hu, Jun; Wang, Chun Lei; Zhao, Binyu; Zhang, Xuehua; Tai, Renzhong; He, Mengdong; Chen, Liqun; Zhang, Lijuan

    2017-01-19

    The nucleation and stability of nanoscale gas bubbles located at a solid/liquid interface are attracting significant research interest. It is known that the physical and chemical properties of the solid surface are crucial for the formation and properties of the surface nanobubbles. Herein, we experimentally and numerically investigated the formation of nanobubbles on nanostructured substrates. Two kinds of nanopatterned surfaces, namely, nanotrenches and nanopores, were fabricated using an electron beam lithography technique and used as substrates for the formation of nanobubbles. Atomic force microscopy images showed that all nanobubbles were selectively located on the hydrophobic domains but not on the hydrophilic domains. The sizes and contact angles of the nanobubbles became smaller with a decrease in the size of the hydrophobic domains. The results indicated that the formation and stability of the nanobubbles could be controlled by regulating the sizes and periods of confinement of the hydrophobic nanopatterns. The experimental results were also supported by molecular dynamics simulations. The present study will be very helpful for understanding the effects of surface features on the nucleation and stability of nanobubbles/nanodroplets at a solid/liquid interface.

  4. Substrate adaptation of Trichophyton rubrum secreted endoproteases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Yi, Jinling; Liu, Li; Yin, Songchao; Chen, Rongzhang; Li, Meirong; Ye, Congxiu; Zhang, Yu-qing; Lai, Wei

    2010-02-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is the most common pathogen caused the dermatophytosis of nail and skin in human. The secreted proteases were considered to be the most important virulence factors. However, the substrates adaptation of T. rubrum secreted proteases is largely unknown. For the first time, we use the keratins from human nail and skin stratum corneum as the growth medium to investigate the different expression patterns of T. rubrum secreted endoproteases genes. During grow in both keratin-containing media SUB7 and MEP2 were the highest expressed gene in each family. These results indicated that SUB7 and MEP2 may be the dominant endoproteases secreted by T. rubrum during host infection and the other proteases may play a supplementary role. The direct comparison of T. rubrum grown on skin and nail medium showed different substrate favorite of secreted endoproteases. The genes MEP2, SUB5, SUB2 and SUB3 were more active during growth in skin medium, possibly these proteases have a higher affinity for skin original keratins. While the structures of SUB1, SUB4, and MEP4 maybe more suitable for the degradation of nail original keratins. This work presents useful molecular details for further understanding the pathogenesis of secreted proteases and the wide adaptation of T. rubrum.

  5. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  6. Neural substrates of sublexical processing for spelling.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Andrew T; Wilson, Stephen M; Rising, Kindle; Rapcsak, Steven Z; Beeson, Pélagie M

    2017-01-01

    We used fMRI to examine the neural substrates of sublexical phoneme-grapheme conversion during spelling in a group of healthy young adults. Participants performed a writing-to-dictation task involving irregular words (e.g., choir), plausible nonwords (e.g., kroid), and a control task of drawing familiar geometric shapes (e.g., squares). Written production of both irregular words and nonwords engaged a left-hemisphere perisylvian network associated with reading/spelling and phonological processing skills. Effects of lexicality, manifested by increased activation during nonword relative to irregular word spelling, were noted in anterior perisylvian regions (posterior inferior frontal gyrus/operculum/precentral gyrus/insula), and in left ventral occipito-temporal cortex. In addition to enhanced neural responses within domain-specific components of the language network, the increased cognitive demands associated with spelling nonwords engaged domain-general frontoparietal cortical networks involved in selective attention and executive control. These results elucidate the neural substrates of sublexical processing during written language production and complement lesion-deficit correlation studies of phonological agraphia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Alloyed surfaces: New substrates for graphene growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresca, C.; Verbitskiy, N. I.; Fedorov, A.; Grüneis, A.; Profeta, G.

    2017-11-01

    We report a systematic ab-initio density functional theory investigation of Ni(111) surface alloyed with elements of group IV (Si, Ge and Sn), demonstrating the possibility to use it to grow high quality graphene. Ni(111) surface represents an ideal substrate for graphene, due to its catalytic properties and perfect matching with the graphene lattice constant. However, Dirac bands of graphene growth on Ni(111) are completely destroyed due to the strong hybridization between carbon pz and Ni d orbitals. Group IV atoms, namely Si, Ge and Sn, once deposited on Ni(111) surface, form an ordered alloyed surface with √{ 3} ×√{ 3} -R30° reconstruction. We demonstrate that, at variance with the pure Ni(111) surface, alloyed surfaces effectively decouple graphene from the substrate, resulting unstrained due to the nearly perfect lattice matching and preserves linear Dirac bands without the strong hybridization with Ni d states. The proposed surfaces can be prepared before graphene growth without resorting on post-growth processes which necessarily alter the electronic and structural properties of graphene.

  8. Neural Substrates of Sublexical Processing for Spelling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Stephen M.; Rising, Kindle; Rapcsak, Steven Z.; Beeson, Pélagie M.

    2016-01-01

    We used fMRI to examine the neural substrates of sublexical phoneme-grapheme conversion during spelling in a group of healthy young adults. Participants performed a writing-to-dictation task involving irregular words (e.g., choir), plausible nonwords (e.g., kroid), and a control task of drawing familiar geometric shapes (e.g., squares). Written production of both irregular words and nonwords engaged a left-hemisphere perisylvian network associated with reading/spelling and phonological processing skills. Effects of lexicality, manifested by increased activation during nonword relative to irregular word spelling, were noted in anterior perisylvian regions (posterior inferior frontal gyrus/operculum/precentral gyrus/insula), and in left ventral occipito-temporal cortex. In addition to enhanced neural responses within domain-specific components of the language network, the increased cognitive demands associated with spelling nonwords engaged domain-general frontoparietal cortical networks involved in selective attention and executive control. These results elucidate the neural substrates of sublexical processing during written language production and complement lesion-deficit correlation studies of phonological agraphia. PMID:27838547

  9. SOI MESFETs on high-resistivity, trap-rich substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehr, Payam; Zhang, Xiong; Lepkowski, William; Li, Chaojiang; Thornton, Trevor J.

    2018-04-01

    The DC and RF characteristics of metal-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MESFETs) on conventional CMOS silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates are compared to nominally identical devices on high-resistivity, trap-rich SOI substrates. While the DC transfer characteristics are statistically identical on either substrate, the maximum available gain at GHz frequencies is enhanced by ∼2 dB when using the trap-rich substrates, with maximum operating frequencies, fmax, that are approximately 5-10% higher. The increased fmax is explained by the reduced substrate conduction at GHz frequencies using a lumped-element, small-signal model.

  10. Method for removing semiconductor layers from salt substrates

    DOEpatents

    Shuskus, Alexander J.; Cowher, Melvyn E.

    1985-08-27

    A method is described for removing a CVD semiconductor layer from an alkali halide salt substrate following the deposition of the semiconductor layer. The semiconductor-substrate combination is supported on a material such as tungsten which is readily wet by the molten alkali halide. The temperature of the semiconductor-substrate combination is raised to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the substrate but less than the temperature of the semiconductor and the substrate is melted and removed from the semiconductor by capillary action of the wettable support.

  11. Electrospinning onto Insulating Substrates by Controlling Surface Wettability and Humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooSeok; Kim, Geon Hwee; Shin, Jung Hwal; Lim, Geunbae; An, Taechang

    2017-11-01

    We report a simple method for electrospinning polymers onto flexible, insulating substrates by controlling the wettability of the substrate surface. Water molecules were adsorbed onto the surface of a hydrophilic polymer substrate by increasing the local humidity around the substrate. The adsorbed water was used as the ground electrode for electrospinning. The electrospun fibers were deposited only onto hydrophilic areas of the substrate, allowing for patterning through wettability control. Direct writing of polymer fiber was also possible through near-field electrospinning onto a hydrophilic surface.

  12. Method and apparatus for coating substrates using a laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Metal substrates, preferably of titanium and titanium alloys, are coated by alloying or forming TiN on a substrate surface. A laser beam strikes the surface of a moving substrate in the presence of purified nitrogen gas. A small area of the substrate surface is quickly heated without melting. This heated area reacts with the nitrogen to form a solid solution. The alloying or formation of TiN occurs by diffusion of nitrogen into the titanium. Only the surface layer of the substrate is heated because of the high power density of the laser beam and short exposure time. The bulk of the substrate is not affected, and melting of the substrate is avoided because it would be detrimental.

  13. Nemesia Root Hair Response to Paper Pulp Substrate for Micropropagation

    PubMed Central

    Labrousse, Pascal; Delmail, David; Decou, Raphaël; Carlué, Michel; Lhernould, Sabine; Krausz, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Agar substrates for in vitro culture are well adapted to plant micropropagation, but not to plant rooting and acclimatization. Conversely, paper-pulp-based substrates appear as potentially well adapted for in vitro culture and functional root production. To reinforce this hypothesis, this study compares in vitro development of nemesia on several substrates. Strong differences between nemesia roots growing in agar or in paper-pulp substrates were evidenced through scanning electron microscopy. Roots developed in agar have shorter hairs, larger rhizodermal cells, and less organized root caps than those growing on paper pulp. In conclusion, it should be noted that in this study, in vitro microporous substrates such as paper pulp lead to the production of similar root hairs to those found in greenhouse peat substrates. Consequently, if agar could be used for micropropagation, rooting, and plant acclimatization, enhancement could be achieved if rooting stage was performed on micro-porous substrates such as paper pulp. PMID:22312323

  14. Nemesia root hair response to paper pulp substrate for micropropagation.

    PubMed

    Labrousse, Pascal; Delmail, David; Decou, Raphaël; Carlué, Michel; Lhernould, Sabine; Krausz, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Agar substrates for in vitro culture are well adapted to plant micropropagation, but not to plant rooting and acclimatization. Conversely, paper-pulp-based substrates appear as potentially well adapted for in vitro culture and functional root production. To reinforce this hypothesis, this study compares in vitro development of nemesia on several substrates. Strong differences between nemesia roots growing in agar or in paper-pulp substrates were evidenced through scanning electron microscopy. Roots developed in agar have shorter hairs, larger rhizodermal cells, and less organized root caps than those growing on paper pulp. In conclusion, it should be noted that in this study, in vitro microporous substrates such as paper pulp lead to the production of similar root hairs to those found in greenhouse peat substrates. Consequently, if agar could be used for micropropagation, rooting, and plant acclimatization, enhancement could be achieved if rooting stage was performed on micro-porous substrates such as paper pulp.

  15. Method of Making Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Proelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium: applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  16. Enzyme-substrate relationships in the ubiquitin system: approaches for identifying substrates of ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Hazel F; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2017-09-01

    Protein ubiquitylation is an important post-translational modification, regulating aspects of virtually every biochemical pathway in eukaryotic cells. Hundreds of enzymes participate in the conjugation and deconjugation of ubiquitin, as well as the recognition, signaling functions, and degradation of ubiquitylated proteins. Regulation of ubiquitylation is most commonly at the level of recognition of substrates by E3 ubiquitin ligases. Characterization of the network of E3-substrate relationships is a major goal and challenge in the field, as this expected to yield fundamental biological insights and opportunities for drug development. There has been remarkable success in identifying substrates for some E3 ligases, in many instances using the standard protein-protein interaction techniques (e.g., two-hybrid screens and co-immunoprecipitations paired with mass spectrometry). However, some E3s have remained refractory to characterization, while others have simply not yet been studied due to the sheer number and diversity of E3s. This review will discuss the range of tools and techniques that can be used for substrate profiling of E3 ligases.

  17. Automatic classification of blank substrate defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettiger, Tom; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Ronald, Rob; Rost, Dan; Samir, Bhamidipati

    2014-10-01

    Mask preparation stages are crucial in mask manufacturing, since this mask is to later act as a template for considerable number of dies on wafer. Defects on the initial blank substrate, and subsequent cleaned and coated substrates, can have a profound impact on the usability of the finished mask. This emphasizes the need for early and accurate identification of blank substrate defects and the risk they pose to the patterned reticle. While Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) is a well-developed technology for inspection and analysis of defects on patterned wafers and masks in the semiconductors industry, ADC for mask blanks is still in the early stages of adoption and development. Calibre ADC is a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of defects on mask blanks. Accurate, automated classification of mask blanks leads to better usability of blanks by enabling defect avoidance technologies during mask writing. Detailed information on blank defects can help to select appropriate job-decks to be written on the mask by defect avoidance tools [1][4][5]. Smart algorithms separate critical defects from the potentially large number of non-critical defects or false defects detected at various stages during mask blank preparation. Mechanisms used by Calibre ADC to identify and characterize defects include defect location and size, signal polarity (dark, bright) in both transmitted and reflected review images, distinguishing defect signals from background noise in defect images. The Calibre ADC engine then uses a decision tree to translate this information into a defect classification code. Using this automated process improves classification accuracy, repeatability and speed, while avoiding the subjectivity of human judgment compared to the alternative of manual defect classification by trained personnel [2]. This paper focuses on the results from the evaluation of Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) product at MP Mask

  18. Screening of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria for solid substrate cultivation on lignocellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Mari S; Nokes, Sue E; Strobel, Herbert J

    2006-01-01

    Interest in solid substrate cultivation (SSC) techniques is gaining for biochemical production from renewable resources; however, heat and mass transfer problems may limit application of this technique. The use of anaerobic thermophiles in SSC offers a unique solution to overcoming these challenges. The production potential of nine thermophilic anaerobic bacteria was examined on corn stover, sugar cane bagasse, paper pulp sludge, and wheat bran in submerged liquid cultivation (SmC) and SSC. Production of acetate, ethanol, and lactate was measured over a 10 day period, and total product concentrations were used to compare the performance of different organism-substrate combinations using the two cultivation methods. Overall microbial activity in SmC and SSC was dependent on the organism and growth substrate. Clostridium thermocellum strains JW20, LQRI, and 27405 performed significantly better in SSC when grown on sugar cane bagasse and paper pulp sludge, producing at least 70 and 170 mM of total products, respectively. Growth of C. thermocellum strains in SSC on paper pulp sludge proved to be most favorable, generating at least twice the concentration of total products produced in SmC (p-value < 0.05). Clostridium thermolacticum TC21 demonstrated growth on all substrates producing 30-80 and 60-116 mM of total product in SmC and SSC, respectively. Bacterial species with optimal growth temperatures of 70 degrees C grew best on wheat bran in SmC, producing total product concentrations of 45-75 mM. For some of the organism-substrate combinations total end product concentrations in SSC exceeded those in SmC, indicating that SSC may be a promising alternative for microbial activity and value-added biochemical production.

  19. Neural substrates of dynamic object occlusion.

    PubMed

    Shuwairi, Sarah M; Curtis, Clayton E; Johnson, Scott P

    2007-08-01

    In everyday environments, objects frequently go out of sight as they move and our view of them becomes obstructed by nearer objects, yet we perceive these objects as continuous and enduring entities. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging with an attentive tracking paradigm to clarify the nature of perceptual and cognitive mechanisms subserving this ability to fill in the gaps in perception of dynamic object occlusion. Imaging data revealed distinct regions of cortex showing increased activity during periods of occlusion relative to full visibility. These regions may support active maintenance of a representation of the target's spatiotemporal properties ensuring that the object is perceived as a persisting entity when occluded. Our findings may shed light on the neural substrates involved in object tracking that give rise to the phenomenon of object permanence.

  20. Influence of substrate micropatterning on biofilm growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Stephan; Li, Yiwei; Liu, Bi-Feng Liu; Weitz, David

    2015-11-01

    We culture triple reporter Bacillus Subtilis biofilm on micropatterned agar substrates. We track the biofilm development in terms of size, thickness, shape, and phenotype expression. For a tiling composed of elevated rectangles, we observe the biofilm develops an oval shape or triangular shape depending on the rectangle's aspect ratio and orientation. The motile cells are primarily located in the valleys between the rectangles and the matrix producing cells are mostly located on the rectangles. Wrinkles form at the edges of the elevated surfaces, and upon merging form channels centered on the elevated surface. After a few days, the spore-forming cells appear at the periphery. Since biofilms in nature grow on irregular surfaces, our work may provide insight into the complex patterns observed.

  1. The structural neural substrate of subjective happiness

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Uono, Shota; Kubota, Yasutaka; Sawada, Reiko; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Happiness is a subjective experience that is an ultimate goal for humans. Psychological studies have shown that subjective happiness can be measured reliably and consists of emotional and cognitive components. However, the neural substrates of subjective happiness remain unclear. To investigate this issue, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging and questionnaires that assessed subjective happiness, the intensity of positive and negative emotional experiences, and purpose in life. We found a positive relationship between the subjective happiness score and gray matter volume in the right precuneus. Moreover, the same region showed an association with the combined positive and negative emotional intensity and purpose in life scores. Our findings suggest that the precuneus mediates subjective happiness by integrating the emotional and cognitive components of happiness. PMID:26586449

  2. The structural neural substrate of subjective happiness.

    PubMed

    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Uono, Shota; Kubota, Yasutaka; Sawada, Reiko; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-11-20

    Happiness is a subjective experience that is an ultimate goal for humans. Psychological studies have shown that subjective happiness can be measured reliably and consists of emotional and cognitive components. However, the neural substrates of subjective happiness remain unclear. To investigate this issue, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging and questionnaires that assessed subjective happiness, the intensity of positive and negative emotional experiences, and purpose in life. We found a positive relationship between the subjective happiness score and gray matter volume in the right precuneus. Moreover, the same region showed an association with the combined positive and negative emotional intensity and purpose in life scores. Our findings suggest that the precuneus mediates subjective happiness by integrating the emotional and cognitive components of happiness.

  3. Dancing droplets: Chemical space, substrates, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cira, Nate; Benusiglio, Adrien; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    Previously we showed that droplets of propylene glycol and water display remarkable properties when placed on clean glass due to an interplay between surface tension and evaporation. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). We showed that these mechanisms apply to a range of two-component mixtures of miscible liquids where one component has both higher surface tension and higher vapor pressure on a variety of high energy surfaces. We now show how this rule can be cheated using a simple trick. We go on to demonstrate applications for cleaning, and show how this system works on substrates prepared only with sunlight. We finish by demonstrating active control of droplets, allowing access to a host of new possibilities.

  4. Graphene based strain sensor with LCP substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, M.; Yang, H. S.; Xia, Y. H.

    2018-02-01

    A flexible strain sensor constructed by an efficient, low-cost fabrication strategy is presented in this paper. It is assembled by adhering grid-like graphene on LCP substrate. Kinds of measurement setup have been designed to verify that the proposed flexible sensor device is suitable to be used in health monitoring system. From the experiment results, it can be proved that the sensor exhibits the following features: ultra-light, relatively good sensitivity, high reversibility, superior physical robustness, easy fabrication. With the great performance of this flexible strain sensor, it is considered to play an important role in body monitoring, structural health monitoring system, fatigue detection and healthcare systems in the near future.

  5. Vector assembly of colloids on monolayer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yang, Shenyu; Tsang, Boyce; Tu, Mei; Granick, Steve

    2017-06-01

    The key to spontaneous and directed assembly is to encode the desired assembly information to building blocks in a programmable and efficient way. In computer graphics, raster graphics encodes images on a single-pixel level, conferring fine details at the expense of large file sizes, whereas vector graphics encrypts shape information into vectors that allow small file sizes and operational transformations. Here, we adapt this raster/vector concept to a 2D colloidal system and realize `vector assembly' by manipulating particles on a colloidal monolayer substrate with optical tweezers. In contrast to raster assembly that assigns optical tweezers to each particle, vector assembly requires a minimal number of optical tweezers that allow operations like chain elongation and shortening. This vector approach enables simple uniform particles to form a vast collection of colloidal arenes and colloidenes, the spontaneous dissociation of which is achieved with precision and stage-by-stage complexity by simply removing the optical tweezers.

  6. The next generation of solar panel substrates?

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, K.M.; Boswell, R.L.; Paul, J.G.

    For over 25 years, satellite power system designers have used rigid honeycomb panels as solar array substrates. Those years have seen very little improvement in the performance of these rigid systems. A new technology under development at the Phillips Laboratory, however, may undo this stagnancy. Composite isogrid panel structures offer a number of potential advantages over honeycomb sandwich structures for solar array applications, including stiffness, weight, and cost improvements. Phillips Laboratory will be performing a series of evaluative tests on the isogrid structure to determine its suitability as a substitute for honeycomb sandwiches in solar panel applications. Testing will includemore » three-point bending, thermal vacuum, and thermal cycling.« less

  7. Highly Stretchable Electrodes on Wrinkled Polydimethylsiloxane Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Guo, Hao; Zhao, Miaomiao; Yang, Jiangtao; Tsoukalas, Dimitris; Zhang, Binzhen; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a fabrication technology of Ag wrinkled electrodes with application in highly stretchable wireless sensors. Ag wrinkled thin films that were formed by vacuum deposition on top of pre-strained and relaxed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates which have been treated using an O2 plasma and a surface chemical functionalization process can reach a strain limit up to 200%, while surface adhesion area can reach 95%. The electrical characteristics of components such as resistors, inductors and capacitors made from such Ag conductors have remained stable under stretching exhibiting low temperature and humidity coefficients. This technology was then demonstrated for wireless wearable electronics using compatible processing with established micro/nano fabrication technology. PMID:26585636

  8. Screen printed UHF antennas on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeczek, Kamil; Młożniak, Anna; Kozioł, Grażyna; Araźna, Aneta; Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Bajurko, Paweł

    2010-09-01

    Printed electronics belongs to the most important developing electronics technologies. It provides new possibilities to produce low cost and large area devices. In its range several applications can be distinguished like printed batteries, OLED, biosensors, photovoltaic cells or RFID tags. In the presented investigation, antennas working in UHF frequency range were elaborated. It can be applied in the future for flexible RFID tags. To produce these antennas polymer paste with silver flakes was used. It was deposited on two flexible substrates (foil and photo paper) with screen printing techniques. After printing process surface profile, electrical and microwave parameters of performed antennas were measured using digital multimeter and network analyzer, relatively. Furthermore, a thickness of printed layers was measured.

  9. Gaseous Viscous Peeling of Linearly Elastic Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaz, Shai; Jacob, Hila; Gat, Amir

    2017-11-01

    We study pressure-driven propagation of gas into a micron-scale gap between two linearly elastic substrates. Applying the lubrication approximation, the governing nonlinear evolution equation describes the interaction between elasticity and viscosity, as well as weak rarefaction and low-Mach-number compressibility, characteristic to gaseous microflows. Several physical limits allow simplification of the evolution equation and enable solution by self-similarity. During the peeling process the flow-field transitions between the different limits and the respective approximate solutions. The sequence of limits occurring during the propagation dynamics can be related to the thickness of the prewetting layer of the configuration at rest, yielding an approximate description of the entire peeling dynamics. The results are validated by numerical solutions of the evolution equation. Israel Science Foundation 818/13.

  10. Cell Proliferation on Planar and Curved Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, Michelle; Chang, Ya Wen; Cruz, Ricardo; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros; Garcia, Andres; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Aberrant epithelial collective cell growth is one of the major challenges to be addressed in order to treat diseases such as cancer and organ fibrosis. The conditions of the extracellular microenvironment, properties of the cells' cytoskeleton, and interfacial properties of the substratum (the surface in contact with epithelial cells) have a significant influence on the migratory behavior of epithelial cells, cell proliferation and migration. This work focuses on understanding the impact the substratum curvature has on cell behavior. We focus on cell proliferation first and study MDCK cells on both planar and curved hydrogel substrates. The curved hydrogels are based on polyacrylamide and have toroidal shape, with tube radius 200 um and an aspect ratio in the rage between 2 and 9. Proliferation is measured using the Click-it EDU assay (Invitrogen), which measures cells that are synthesizing DNA. Funding Source is Childrens Healthcare of Atlanta.

  11. A universal mammalian vaccine cell line substrate.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jackelyn; Todd, Kyle V; Bakre, Abhijeet; Orr-Burks, Nichole; Jones, Les; Wu, Weilin; Tripp, Ralph A

    2017-01-01

    Using genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens for poliovirus, influenza A virus and rotavirus, we validated the top 6 gene hits PV, RV or IAV to search for host genes that when knocked-down (KD) enhanced virus permissiveness and replication over wild type Vero cells or HEp-2 cells. The enhanced virus replication was tested for 12 viruses and ranged from 2-fold to >1000-fold. There were variations in virus-specific replication (strain differences) across the cell lines examined. Some host genes (CNTD2, COQ9, GCGR, NDUFA9, NEU2, PYCR1, SEC16G, SVOPL, ZFYVE9, and ZNF205) showed that KD resulted in enhanced virus replication. These findings advance platform-enabling vaccine technology, the creation of diagnostic cells substrates, and are informative about the host mechanisms that affect virus replication in mammalian cells.

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Biofunctionalized Inorganic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Dugger, Jason W; Webb, Lauren J

    2015-09-29

    Integrating the function of biological molecules into traditional inorganic materials and substrates couples biologically relevant function to synthetic devices and generates new materials and capabilities by combining biological and inorganic functions. At this so-called "bio/abio interface," basic biological functions such as ligand binding and catalysis can be co-opted to detect analytes with exceptional sensitivity or to generate useful molecules with chiral specificity under entirely benign reaction conditions. Proteins function in dynamic, complex, and crowded environments (the living cell) and are therefore appropriate for integrating into multistep, multiscale, multimaterial devices such as integrated circuits and heterogeneous catalysts. However, the goal of reproducing the highly specific activities of biomolecules in the perturbed chemical and electrostatic environment at an inorganic interface while maintaining their native conformations is challenging to achieve. Moreover, characterizing protein structure and function at a surface is often difficult, particularly if one wishes to compare the activity of the protein to that of the dilute, aqueous solution phase. Our laboratory has developed a general strategy to address this challenge by taking advantage of the structural and chemical properties of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold surfaces that are functionalized with covalently tethered peptides. These surface-bound peptides then act as the chemical recognition element for a target protein, generating a biomimetic surface in which protein orientation, structure, density, and function are controlled and variable. Herein we discuss current research and future directions related to generating a chemically tunable biofunctionalization strategy that has potential to successfully incorporate the highly specialized functions of proteins onto inorganic substrates.

  13. Substrate Deformation Predicts Neuronal Growth Cone Advance

    PubMed Central

    Athamneh, Ahmad I.M.; Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.; Raman, Arvind; Suter, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Although pulling forces have been observed in axonal growth for several decades, their underlying mechanisms, absolute magnitudes, and exact roles are not well understood. In this study, using two different experimental approaches, we quantified retrograde traction force in Aplysia californica neuronal growth cones as they develop over time in response to a new adhesion substrate. In the first approach, we developed a novel method, to our knowledge, for measuring traction forces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a cantilever that was modified with an Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (apCAM)-coated microbead. In the second approach, we used force-calibrated glass microneedles coated with apCAM ligands to guide growth cone advance. The traction force exerted by the growth cone was measured by monitoring the microneedle deflection using an optical microscope. Both approaches showed that Aplysia growth cones can develop traction forces in the 100–102 nN range during adhesion-mediated advance. Moreover, our results suggest that the level of traction force is directly correlated to the stiffness of the microneedle, which is consistent with a reinforcement mechanism previously observed in other cell types. Interestingly, the absolute level of traction force did not correlate with growth cone advance toward the adhesion site, but the amount of microneedle deflection did. In cases of adhesion-mediated growth cone advance, the mean needle deflection was 1.05 ± 0.07 μm. By contrast, the mean deflection was significantly lower (0.48 ± 0.06 μm) when the growth cones did not advance. Our data support a hypothesis that adhesion complexes, which can undergo micron-scale elastic deformation, regulate the coupling between the retrogradely flowing actin cytoskeleton and apCAM substrates, stimulating growth cone advance if sufficiently abundant. PMID:26445437

  14. Effect of Substrate and Process Parameters on the Gas-Substrate Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient During Cold Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Amirhossein; McDonald, André

    2018-02-01

    The final quality of cold-sprayed coatings can be significantly influenced by gas-substrate heat exchange, due to the dependence of the deposition efficiency of the particles on the substrate temperature distribution. In this study, the effect of the air temperature and pressure, as process parameters, and surface roughness and thickness, as substrate parameters, on the convective heat transfer coefficient of the impinging air jet was investigated. A low-pressure cold spraying unit was used to generate a compressed air jet that impinged on a flat substrate. A comprehensive mathematical model was developed and coupled with experimental data to estimate the heat transfer coefficient and the surface temperature of the substrate. The effect of the air total temperature and pressure on the heat transfer coefficient was studied. It was found that increasing the total pressure would increase the Nusselt number of the impinging air jet, while total temperature of the air jet had negligible effect on the Nusslet number. It was further found that increasing the roughness of the substrate enhanced the heat exchange between the impinging air jet and the substrate. As a result, higher surface temperatures on the rough substrate were measured. The study of the effect of the substrate thickness on the heat transfer coefficient showed that the Nusselt number that was predicted by the model was independent of the thickness of the substrate. The surface temperature profile, however, decreased in increasing radial distances from the stagnation point of the impinging jet as the thickness of the substrate increased. The results of the current study were aimed to inform on the influence and effect of substrate and process parameters on the gas-substrate heat exchange and the surface temperature of the substrate on the final quality of cold-sprayed coatings.

  15. Assessment of Alternative Substrates for Culturing Lumbriculus variegatus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    The freshwater oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, is tank-cultured to provide organisms for aquatic-habitat assessments, regeneration research and as a clean source of live food for aquarium fishes. Shredded paper is the typical substrate in cultures used to rear L. variegatus for these purposes. However, the effort needed to separate large numbers from decomposing paper can be prohibitive. Burlap and nylon mesh material were compared to paper as potential alternatives that could reduce this effort. Oligochaete production and the amount of time needed to separate animals from substrate were compared for eight weeks among experimental cultures containing burlap, nylon mesh and paper. Cultures with paper substrate increased in number and weight two to three times faster than those with burlap or nylon mesh substrates. The time needed to separate animals from substrate was initially two to three times longer with paper substrate than with burlap or nylon mesh substrates, but this difference increased to between 10 and 40 times longer after six weeks as the paper substrate decomposed. Feeding rates varied by treatment and were based on average wet weight at the time of water replacement. Elevated ammonia and nitrite concentrations resulting from excess food may have reduced production in nylon mesh treatments and was lethal in paper treatments during the final phases of the study. The type of substrate recommended may depend on the desired production rate of oligochaetes, space available for cultures and the amount of effort available for substrate renewal and separating the animals from the cultures.

  16. Design and isolation of ribozyme-substrate pairs using RNase P-based ribozymes containing altered substrate binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, E M; Pan, T

    1999-01-01

    Substrate recognition and cleavage by the bacterial RNase P RNA requires two domains, a specificity domain, or S-domain, and a catalytic domain, or C-domain. The S-domain binds the T stem-loop region in a pre-tRNA substrate to confer specificity for tRNA substrates. In this work, the entire S-domain of the Bacillus subtilis RNase P RNA is replaced with an artificial substrate binding module. New RNA substrates are isolated by in vitro selection using two libraries containing random regions of 60 nt. At the end of the selection, the cleavage rates of the substrate library are approximately 0.7 min(-1)in 10 mM MgCl(2)at 37 degrees C, approximately 4-fold better than the cleavage of a pre-tRNA substrate by the wild-type RNase P RNA under the same conditions. The contribution of the S-domain replacement to the catalytic efficiency is from 6- to 22 000-fold. Chemical and nuclease mapping of two ribozyme-product complexes shows that this contribution correlates with direct interactions between the S-domain replacement and the selected substrate. These results demonstrate the feasibility of design and isolation of RNase P-based, matching ribozyme-substrate pairs without prior knowledge of the sequence or structure of the interactive modules in the ribozyme or substrate. PMID:10518624

  17. Microwave GaAs Integrated Circuits On Quartz Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter H.; Mehdi, Imran; Wilson, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    Integrated circuits for use in detecting electromagnetic radiation at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths constructed by bonding GaAs-based integrated circuits onto quartz-substrate-based stripline circuits. Approach offers combined advantages of high-speed semiconductor active devices made only on epitaxially deposited GaAs substrates with low-dielectric-loss, mechanically rugged quartz substrates. Other potential applications include integration of antenna elements with active devices, using carrier substrates other than quartz to meet particular requirements using lifted-off GaAs layer in membrane configuration with quartz substrate supporting edges only, and using lift-off technique to fabricate ultrathin discrete devices diced separately and inserted into predefined larger circuits. In different device concept, quartz substrate utilized as transparent support for GaAs devices excited from back side by optical radiation.

  18. Wafer scale BN on sapphire substrates for improved graphene transport.

    PubMed

    Vangala, Shivashankar; Siegel, Gene; Prusnick, Timothy; Snure, Michael

    2018-06-11

    Wafer scale (2") BN grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on sapphire was examined as a weakly interacting dielectric substrate for graphene, demonstrating improved transport properties over conventional sapphire and SiO 2 /Si substrates. Chemical vapor deposition grown graphene was transferred to BN/sapphire substrates for evaluation of more than 30 samples using Raman and Hall effects measurements. A more than 2x increase in Hall mobility and 10x reduction in sheet carrier density was measured for graphene on BN/sapphire compared to sapphire substrates. Through control of the MOCVD process, BN films with roughness ranging from <0.1 nm to >1 nm were grown and used to study the effects of substrate roughness on graphene transport. Arrays of graphene field effect transistors were fabricated on 2" BN/sapphire substrates demonstrating scalability and device performance enhancement.

  19. Experimental analysis of green roof substrate detention characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yio, Marcus H N; Stovin, Virginia; Werdin, Jörg; Vesuviano, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Green roofs may make an important contribution to urban stormwater management. Rainfall-runoff models are required to evaluate green roof responses to specific rainfall inputs. The roof's hydrological response is a function of its configuration, with the substrate - or growing media - providing both retention and detention of rainfall. The objective of the research described here is to quantify the detention effects due to green roof substrates, and to propose a suitable hydrological modelling approach. Laboratory results from experimental detention tests on green roof substrates are presented. It is shown that detention increases with substrate depth and as a result of increasing substrate organic content. Model structures based on reservoir routing are evaluated, and it is found that a one-parameter reservoir routing model coupled with a parameter that describes the delay to start of runoff best fits the observed data. Preliminary findings support the hypothesis that the reservoir routing parameter values can be defined from the substrate's physical characteristics.

  20. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    DOEpatents

    Aigeldinger, Georg [Livermore, CA; Skala, Dawn M [Fremont, CA; Griffiths, Stewart K [Livermore, CA; Talin, Albert Alec [Livermore, CA; Losey, Matthew W [Livermore, CA; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter [Dublin, CA

    2009-10-27

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  1. Substrate structures for InP-based devices

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.; Sheldon, Peter

    1990-01-01

    A substrate structure for an InP-based semiconductor device having an InP based film is disclosed. The substrate structure includes a substrate region having a lightweight bulk substrate and an upper GaAs layer. An interconnecting region is disposed between the substrate region and the InP-based device. The interconnecting region includes a compositionally graded intermediate layer substantially lattice-matched at one end to the GaAs layer and substantially lattice-matched at the opposite end to the InP-based film. The interconnecting region further includes a dislocation mechanism disposed between the GaAs layer and the InP-based film in cooperation with the graded intermediate layer, the buffer mechanism blocking and inhibiting propagation of threading dislocations between the substrate region, and the InP-based device.

  2. [Oxygen plasma-vulcanized deformable polydimethylsiloxane sheet culture substrates].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiyi; Tao, Zulai

    2003-06-01

    A method of preparing deformable polydimethylsiloxane sheet culture substrates by oxygen plasma vulcanization was developed. As compared with the traditional heating vulcanization method, the substrates prepared in this way have hydrophilic surfaces, the adhesion and spreading of cells both occur quickly, and the wrinkling deformation of substrates develops quickly, too. In addition, the changes of wrinkles during treatment of cytochalasin D were observed, and the result shows that this technique has high temporal resolution.

  3. Gallium phosphide nanowires as a substrate for cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Hällström, Waldemar; Mårtensson, Thomas; Prinz, Christelle; Gustavsson, Per; Montelius, Lars; Samuelson, Lars; Kanje, Martin

    2007-10-01

    Dissociated sensory neurons were cultured on epitaxial gallium phosphide (GaP) nanowires grown vertically from a gallium phosphide surface. Substrates covered by 2.5 microm long, 50 nm wide nanowires supported cell adhesion and axonal outgrowth. Cell survival was better on nanowire substrates than on planar control substrates. The cells interacted closely with the nanostructures, and cells penetrated by hundreds of wires were observed as well as wire bending due to forces exerted by the cells.

  4. Mogul-Patterned Elastomeric Substrate for Stretchable Electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Byeol; Bae, Chan-Wool; Duy, Le Thai; Sohn, Il-Yung; Kim, Do-Il; Song, You-Joon; Kim, Youn-Jea; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2016-04-01

    A mogul-patterned stretchable substrate with multidirectional stretchability and minimal fracture of layers under high stretching is fabricated by double photolithography and soft lithography. Au layers and a reduced graphene oxide chemiresistor on a mogul-patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrate are stable and durable under various stretching conditions. The newly designed mogul-patterned stretchable substrate shows great promise for stretchable electronics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Layered graphene-mica substrates induce melting of DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Nathaniel S.; Pham, Phi H. Q.; Crow, Daniel T.; Burke, Peter J.; Norton, Michael L.

    2018-04-01

    Monolayer graphene supported on mica substrates induce melting of cross-shaped DNA origami. This behavior can be contrasted with the case of origami on graphene on graphite, where an expansion or partially re-organized structure is observed. On mica, only well-formed structures are observed. Comparison of the morphological differences observed for these probes after adsorption on these substrates provides insights into the sensitivity of DNA based nanostructures to the properties of the graphene monolayer, as modified by its substrate.

  6. Method for producing high quality oxide films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ruckman, Mark W.; Strongin, Myron; Gao, Yong L.

    1993-01-01

    A method for providing an oxide film of a material on the surface of a substrate using a reactive deposition of the material onto the substrate surface in the presence of a solid or liquid layer of an oxidizing gas. The oxidizing gas is provided on the substrate surface in an amount sufficient to dissipate the latent heat of condensation occurring during deposition as well as creating a favorable oxidizing environment for the material.

  7. Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, M.; Ruckman, M.; Strongin, D.

    1994-04-26

    A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate. 4 figures.

  8. Method for producing high quality oxide films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Gao, Y.L.

    1993-11-23

    A method is described for providing an oxide film of a material on the surface of a substrate using a reactive deposition of the material onto the substrate surface in the presence of a solid or liquid layer of an oxidizing gas. The oxidizing gas is provided on the substrate surface in an amount sufficient to dissipate the latent heat of condensation occurring during deposition as well as creating a favorable oxidizing environment for the material. 4 figures.

  9. Method for electrostatic deposition of graphene on a substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumanasekera, Gamini (Inventor); Sidorov, Anton N. (Inventor); Ouseph, P. John (Inventor); Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M. (Inventor); Cohn, Robert W. (Inventor); Jalilian, Romaneh (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for electrostatic deposition of graphene on a substrate comprises the steps of securing a graphite sample to a first electrode; electrically connecting the first electrode to a positive terminal of a power source; electrically connecting a second electrode to a ground terminal of the power source; placing the substrate over the second electrode; and using the power source to apply a voltage, such that graphene is removed from the graphite sample and deposited on the substrate.

  10. Wetting Behavior in Colloid-Polymer Mixtures at Different Substrates.

    PubMed

    Wijting, Willem K; Besseling, Nicolaas A M; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2003-09-25

    We present experimental observations on wetting phenomena in depletion interaction driven, phase separated colloidal dispersions. The contact angle of the colloidal liquid-gas interface at a solid substrate was determined for a series of compositions. Upon approach to the critical point, a transition occurs from partial to complete wetting. The interaction with the substrate was manipulated by modifying the substrate with a polymer. In that case, a transition from partial to complete drying is observed upon approach to the critical point.

  11. Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, Myron; Ruckman, Mark; Strongin, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate.

  12. Counter Selection Substrate Library Strategy for Developing Specific Protease Substrates and Probes

    PubMed Central

    Poreba, Marcin; Solberg, Rigmor; Rut, Wioletta; Lunde, Ngoc Nguyen; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Snipas, Scott J.; Mihelic, Marko; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Salvesen, Guy S.; Drag, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    SUMMARY Legumain (AEP) is a lysosomal cysteine protease that is a lysosomal cysteine protease that was first characterized in leguminous seeds and later discovered in higher eukaryotes. AEP up-regulation is linked to a number of diseases including inflammation, arteriosclerosis and tumorigenesis. Thus legumain is an excellent molecular target for the development of new chemical markers. We deployed a hybrid combinatorial substrate library (HyCoSuL) approach to obtain P1-Asp fluorogenic substrates and biotin-labeled inhibitors that targeted legumain. Since this approach led to probes that were also recognized by caspases, we introduced a Counter Selection Substrate Library (CoSeSuL) approach that biases the peptidic scaffold against caspases, thus delivering highly selective legumain probes. The selectivity of these tools was validated using M38L and HEK293 cells. We also propose that the CoSeSuL methodology can be considered as a general principle in the design of selective probes for other protease families where selectivity is difficult to achieve by conventional sequence-based profiling. PMID:27478158

  13. Microstrip Antenna Arrays on Multilayer LCP Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dane; Bairavasubramanian, Ramanan; Wang, Guoan; Kingsley, Nickolas D.; Papapolymerou, Ioannis; Tenteris, Emmanouil M.; DeJean, Gerald; Li, RonglLin

    2007-01-01

    A research and development effort now underway is directed toward satisfying requirements for a new type of relatively inexpensive, lightweight, microwave antenna array and associated circuitry packaged in a thin, flexible sheet that can readily be mounted on a curved or flat rigid or semi-rigid surface. A representative package of this type consists of microwave antenna circuitry embedded in and/or on a multilayer liquid- crystal polymer (LCP) substrate. The circuitry typically includes an array of printed metal microstrip patch antenna elements and their feedlines on one or more of the LCP layer(s). The circuitry can also include such components as electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) switches for connecting and disconnecting antenna elements and feedlines. In addition, the circuitry can include switchable phase shifters described below. LCPs were chosen over other flexible substrate materials because they have properties that are especially attractive for high-performance microwave applications. These properties include low permittivity, low loss tangent, low water-absorption coefficient, and low cost. By means of heat treatments, their coefficients of thermal expansion can be tailored to make them more amenable to integration into packages that include other materials. The nature of the flexibility of LCPs is such that large LCP sheets containing antenna arrays can be rolled up, then later easily unrolled and deployed. Figure 1 depicts a prototype three- LCP-layer package containing two four-element, dual-polarization microstrip-patch arrays: one for a frequency of 14 GHz, the other for a frequency of 35 GHz. The 35-GHz patches are embedded on top surface of the middle [15-mil (approx.0.13-mm)-thick] LCP layer; the 14- GHz patches are placed on the top surface of the upper [9-mil (approx. 0.23-mm)-thick] LCP layer. The particular choice of LCP layer thicknesses was made on the basis of extensive analysis of the effects of the

  14. Fabrication of complex nanoscale structures on various substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kang-Soo; Hong, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Heon

    2007-09-01

    Polymer based complex nanoscale structures were fabricated and transferred to various substrates using reverse nanoimprint lithography. To facilitate the fabrication and transference of the large area of the nanostructured layer to the substrates, a water-soluble polyvinyl alcohol mold was used. After generation and transference of the nanostructured layer, the polyvinyl alcohol mold was removed by dissolving in water. A residue-free, UV-curable, glue layer was formulated and used to bond the nanostructured layer onto the substrates. As a result, nanometer scale patterned polymer layers were bonded to various substrates and three-dimensional nanostructures were also fabricated by stacking of the layers.

  15. Apparatus for thermally evolving chemical analytes from a removable substrate

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Hannum, David W.

    2003-06-03

    Method and apparatus suited to convenient field use for heating a porous metallic substrate swiped on the surface of an article possibly bearing residue of contraband or other target chemical substances. The preferred embodiment of the device includes means for holding the swiped substrate between electrodes bearing opposite electrical charges, thereby completing an electrical circuit in which current can flow through the porous metallic substrate. Resistance causes the substrate to heat, thus driving adherent target chemicals, if present, into a space from which they are carried via gas flow into a detector such as a portable IMS for analysis.

  16. Sol-gel derived ceramic electrolyte films on porous substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kueper, T.W.

    1992-05-01

    A process for the deposition of sol-gel derived thin films on porous substrates has been developed; such films should be useful for solid oxide fuel cells and related applications. Yttria-stabilized zirconia films have been formed from metal alkoxide starting solutions. Dense films have been deposited on metal substrates and ceramic substrates, both dense and porous, through dip-coating and spin-coating techniques, followed by a heat treatment in air. X-ray diffraction has been used to determine the crystalline phases formed and the extent of reactions with various substrates which may be encountered in gas/gas devices. Surface coatings have been successfully applied tomore » porous substrates through the control of substrate pore size and deposition parameters. Wetting of the substrate pores by the coating solution is discussed, and conditions are defined for which films can be deposited over the pores without filling the interiors of the pores. Shrinkage cracking was encountered in films thicker than a critical value, which depended on the sol-gel process parameters and on the substrate characteristics. Local discontinuities were also observed in films which were thinner than a critical value which depended on the substrate pore size. A theoretical discussion of cracking mechanisms is presented for both types of cracking, and the conditions necessary for successful thin formation are defined. The applicability of these film gas/gas devices is discussed.« less

  17. Facilitated release of substrate protein from prefoldin by chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Zako, Tamotsu; Iizuka, Ryo; Okochi, Mina; Nomura, Tomoko; Ueno, Taro; Tadakuma, Hisashi; Yohda, Masafumi; Funatsu, Takashi

    2005-07-04

    Prefoldin is a chaperone that captures a protein-folding intermediate and transfers it to the group II chaperonin for correct folding. However, kinetics of interactions between prefoldin and substrate proteins have not been investigated. In this study, dissociation constants and dissociation rate constants of unfolded proteins with prefoldin were firstly measured using fluorescence microscopy. Our results suggest that binding and release of prefoldin from hyperthermophilic archaea with substrate proteins were in a dynamic equilibrium. Interestingly, the release of substrate proteins from prefoldin was facilitated when chaperonin was present, supporting a handoff mechanism of substrate proteins from prefoldin to the chaperonin.

  18. Method For Making Selected Regions Of A Substrate

    DOEpatents

    Fusaro, Jr., Robert Anthony; Bethel, Timothy Francis

    2003-07-15

    Described herein is a method for providing a clean edge at the interface of a portion of a substrate coated with a coating system and an adjacent portion of the substrate which is uncoated. The method includes the step of forming a zone of non-adherence on the substrate portion which is to be uncoated, prior to application of the coating system. The zone of non-adherence is adjacent the interface, so that the coating system will not adhere to the zone of non-adherence, but will adhere to the portion of the substrate which is to be coated with the coating system.

  19. Quantitative proteome-based systematic identification of SIRT7 substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaohua; Zhai, Zichao; Tang, Ming; Cheng, Zhongyi; Li, Tingting; Wang, Haiying; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2017-07-01

    SIRT7 is a class III histone deacetylase that is involved in numerous cellular processes. Only six substrates of SIRT7 have been reported thus far, so we aimed to systematically identify SIRT7 substrates using stable-isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). Using SIRT7 +/+ and SIRT7 -/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts as our model system, we identified and quantified 1493 acetylation sites in 789 proteins, of which 261 acetylation sites in 176 proteins showed ≥2-fold change in acetylation state between SIRT7 -/- and SIRT7 +/+ cells. These proteins were considered putative SIRT7 substrates and were carried forward for further analysis. We then validated the predictive efficiency of the SILAC-MS experiment by assessing substrate acetylation status in vitro in six predicted proteins. We also performed a bioinformatic analysis of the MS data, which indicated that many of the putative protein substrates were involved in metabolic processes. Finally, we expanded our list of candidate substrates by performing a bioinformatics-based prediction analysis of putative SIRT7 substrates, using our list of putative substrates as a positive training set, and again validated a subset of the proteins in vitro. In summary, we have generated a comprehensive list of SIRT7 candidate substrates. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Method for masking selected regions of a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Fusaro, Jr., Robert Anthony; Bethel, Timothy Francis

    2010-05-04

    Described herein is a method for providing a clean edge at the interface of a portion of a substrate coated with a coating system and an adjacent portion of the substrate which is uncoated. The method includes the step of forming a zone of non-adherence on the substrate portion which is to be uncoated, prior to application of the coating system. The zone of non-adherence is adjacent the interface, so that the coating system will not adhere to the zone of non-adherence, but will adhere to the portion of the substrate which is to be coated with the coating system.

  1. MILSTAR's flexible substrate solar array: Lessons learned, addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibb, John

    1990-01-01

    MILSTAR's Flexible Substrate Solar Array (FSSA) is an evolutionary development of the lightweight, flexible substrate design pioneered at Lockheed during the seventies. Many of the features of the design are related to the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE), flown on STS-41D in 1984. FSSA development has created a substantial technology base for future flexible substrate solar arrays such as the array for the Space Station Freedom. Lessons learned during the development of the FSSA can and should be applied to the Freedom array and other future flexible substrate designs.

  2. Influence of substrate rocks on Fe Mn crust composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, James R.; Morgan, Charles L.

    1999-05-01

    Principal Component and other statistical analyses of chemical and mineralogical data of Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide crusts and their underlying rock substrates in the central Pacific indicate that substrate rocks do not influence crust composition. Two ridges near Johnston Atoll were dredged repetitively and up to seven substrate rock types were recovered from small areas of similar water depths. Crusts were analyzed mineralogically and chemically for 24 elements, and substrates were analyzed mineralogically and chemically for the 10 major oxides. Compositions of crusts on phosphatized substrates are distinctly different from crusts on substrates containing no phosphorite. However, that relationship only indicates that the episodes of phosphatization that mineralized the substrate rocks also mineralized the crusts that grew on them. A two-fold increase in copper contents in crusts that grew on phosphatized clastic substrate rocks, relative to crusts on other substrate rock types, is also associated with phosphatization and must have resulted from chemical reorganization during diagenesis. Phosphatized crusts show increases in Sr, Zn, Ca, Ba, Cu, Ce, V, and Mo contents and decreases in Fe, Si, and As contents relative to non-phosphatized crusts. Our statistical results support previous studies which show that crust compositions reflect predominantly direct precipitation from seawater (hydrogenetic), and to lesser extents reflect detrital input and diagenetic replacement of parts of the older crust generation by carbonate fluorapatite.

  3. Influence of substrate rocks on Fe-Mn crust composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Morgan, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    Principal Component and other statistical analyses of chemical and mineralogical data of Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide crusts and their underlying rock substrates in the central Pacific indicate that substrate rocks do not influence crust composition. Two ridges near Johnston Atoll were dredged repetitively and up to seven substrate rock types were recovered from small areas of similar water depths. Crusts were analyzed mineralogically and chemically for 24 elements, and substrates were analyzed mineralogically and chemically for the 10 major oxides. Compositions of crusts on phosphatized substrates are distinctly different from crusts on substrates containing no phosphorite. However, that relationship only indicates that the episodes of phosphatization that mineralized the substrate rocks also mineralized the crusts that grew on them. A two-fold increase in copper contents in crusts that grew on phosphatized clastic substrate rocks, relative to crusts on other substrate rock types, is also associated with phosphatization and must have resulted from chemical reorganization during diagenesis. Phosphatized crusts show increases in Sr, Zn, Ca, Ba, Cu, Ce, V, and Mo contents and decreases in Fe, Si, and As contents relative to non-phosphatized crusts. Our statistical results support previous studies which show that crust compositions reflect predominantly direct precipitation from seawater (hydrogenetic), and to lesser extents reflect detrital input and diagenetic replacement of parts of the older crust generation by carbonate fluorapatite.

  4. Substrate-dependent temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myachina, Olga; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Activity of extracellular enzymes responsible for decomposition of organics is substrate dependent. Quantity of the substrate is the main limiting factor for enzymatic or microbial heterotrophic activity in soils. Different mechanisms of enzymes response to temperature suggested for low and high substrate availability were never proved for real soil conditions. We compared the temperature responses of enzymes-catalyzed reactions in soils. Basing on Michaelis-Menten kinetics we determined the enzymes affinity to substrate (Km) and mineralization potential of heterotrophic microorganisms (Vmax) 1) for three hydrolytic enzymes: β-1,4-glucosidase, N-acetyl- β -D-glucosaminidase and phosphatase by the application of fluorogenically labeled substrates and 2) for mineralization of 14C-labeled glucose by substrate-dependent respiratory response. Here we show that the amount of available substrate is responsible for temperature sensitivity of hydrolysis of polymers in soil, whereas monomers oxidation to CO2 does not depend on substrate amount and is mainly temperature governed. We also found that substrate affinity of enzymes (which is usually decreases with the temperature) differently responded to warming for the process of depolymerisation versus monomers oxidation. We suggest the mechanism to temperature acclimation based on different temperature sensitivity of enzymes kinetics for hydrolysis of polymers and for monomers oxidation.

  5. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of D-Galactose-6-Phosphate Isomerase Complexed with Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26), which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD), catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi). Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays. PMID:24015281

  6. Neural substrates of trait ruminations in depression

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Darcy; Siegle, Greg; Shutt, Luann; Feldmiller, Josh; Thase, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Rumination in depression is a risk factor for longer, more intense, and harder-to-treat depressions. But there appear to be multiple types of depressive rumination – whether they all share these vulnerability mechanisms, and thus would benefit from the same types of clinical attention is unclear. In the current study, we examined neural correlates of empirically-derived dimensions of trait rumination in 35 depressed participants. These individuals and 29 never-depressed controls completed 17 self-report measures of rumination and an alternating emotion-processing/executive-control task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) assessment. We examined associations of regions of interest—the amygdala and other cortical regions subserving a potential role in deficient cognitive control and elaborative emotion-processing—with trait rumination. Rumination of all types was generally associated with increased sustained amygdala reactivity. When controlling for amygdala reactivity, distinct activity patterns in hippocampus were also associated with specific dimensions of rumination. We discuss the possibly utility of targeting more basic biological substrates of emotional reactivity in depressed patients who frequently ruminate. PMID:24661157

  7. Copper-doped waveguides in glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirkova-Hradilova, Jarmila; Tresnakova-Nebolova, Pavlina; Jirka, Ivan; Mach, Karel; Perina, Vratislav; Mackova, Anna; Kuncova, Gabriela

    2001-05-01

    We have studied fabrication and properties of copper ion- exchanged waveguides fabricated in various types of special soda-lime silicate glass as well as commercial optical glass substrates. The ion exchange was performed in melts containing either CuI or CuII at temperatures from 350 degrees C to 500 degrees C for times ranging from 5 minutes to 21 hrs. Optical properties of the fabricated waveguides were studied using mode spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy and composition of the waveguides was determined by SEM, RBS, EPR and ESCA. After the ion exchange the refractive index increased, according to fabrication conditions, up to (Delta) n equals +0.0693 and the guides supported up to 16 TE and TM modes. The CuI $ARLR CuII redox reaction during the fabrication depended strongly on the composition as well as the temperature of the reaction melts. In the Cu2Cl2ZnCl2 melts the oxidation of CuI to CuII was strongly hampered, so that CuI prevailed in the waveguiding region. These samples exhibited the most intensive blue-green luminescence, in spite of those fabricated using the CuII-based reaction melts, where practically no blue-green luminescence was observed. ESCA measurement revealed an easy charge transfer between the both oxidation states of copper in the very surface regions of the samples.

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase proteomics: substrates, targets, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Charlotte J; Butler, Georgina S; Rodríguez, David; Overall, Christopher M

    2009-10-01

    Proteomics encompasses powerful techniques termed 'degradomics' for unbiased high-throughput protease substrate discovery screens that have been applied to an important family of extracellular proteases, the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Together with the data generated from genetic deletion and transgenic mouse models and genomic profiling, these screens can uncover the diverse range of MMP functions, reveal which MMPs and MMP-mediated pathways exacerbate pathology, and which are involved in protection and the resolution of disease. This information can be used to identify and validate candidate drug targets and antitargets, and is critical for the development of new inhibitors of MMP function. Such inhibitors may target either the MMP directly in a specific manner or pathways upstream and downstream of MMP activity that are mediating deleterious effects in disease. Since MMPs do not operate alone but are part of the 'protease web', it is necessary to use system-wide approaches to understand MMP proteolysis in vivo, to discover new biological roles and their potential for therapeutic modification.

  9. Spreading of Emulsions on Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2012-11-01

    The wettability of emulsions is an important factor with explicit influence in an extensive variety of industrial applications ranging from the petroleum to food industries. Surprisingly, there is no comprehensive study of emulsion spreading to date; this is due to the complexity of the structure of the emulsions and non-homogeneity of the dispersed phase bubbles in size as well as distribution through the emulsion. The spreading of water/silicone oil emulsions on glass substrates was investigated. The emulsions were prepared with varying volume fractions of water dispersed in silicone oil, with addition of small amounts of surfactant to stabilize the emulsion structure. The time dependent variation of dynamic contact angle, base diameter, and the spreading rate of the droplets of an emulsion are different from a pure substance. The effect of water/silicone oil weight percentage as well as the droplet size and dispersed phase bubble size were also investigated. The weight percentage of water/silicone oil emulsion and droplet size did not have significant influence on the spreading dynamics; however the dispersed phase drop size affected the spreading dynamics substantially.

  10. Regulation of substrate use during the marathon.

    PubMed

    Spriet, Lawrence L

    2007-01-01

    The energy required to run a marathon is mainly provided through oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria of the active muscles. Small amounts of energy from substrate phosphorylation are also required during transitions and short periods when running speed is increased. The three inputs for adenosine triphosphate production in the mitochondria include oxygen, free adenosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate, and reducing equivalents. The reducing equivalents are derived from the metabolism of fat and carbohydrate (CHO), which are mobilised from intramuscular stores and also delivered from adipose tissue and liver, respectively. The metabolism of fat and CHO is tightly controlled at several regulatory sites during marathon running. Slower, recreational runners run at 60-65% maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) for approximately 3:45:00 and faster athletes run at 70-75% for approximately 2:45:00. Both groups rely heavily on fat and CHO fuels. However, elite athletes run marathons at speeds requiring between 80% and 90% VO(2max), and finish in times between 2:05:00 and 2:20:00. They are highly adapted to oxidise fat and must do so during training. However, they compete at such high running speeds, that CHO oxidation (also highly adapted) may be the exclusive source of energy while racing. Further work with elite athletes is needed to examine this possibility.

  11. Hydrological performance of dual-substrate-layer green roofs using porous inert substrates with high sorption capacities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoou; Tian, Yimei; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Chenrui

    2017-06-01

    Given that the common medium in existing green roofs is a single layer composed of organic and inorganic substrates, seven pilot-scale dual-substrate-layer extensive green roofs (G1-G7), which include nutrition and adsorption substrate layers, were constructed in this study. The effectiveness of porous inert substrates (activated charcoal, zeolite, pumice, lava, vermiculite and expanded perlite) used as the adsorption substrate for stormwater retention was investigated. A single-substrate-layer green roof (G8) was built for comparison with G1-G7. Despite the larger total rainfall depth (mm) of six types of simulated rains (43.2, 54.6, 76.2, 87.0, 85.2 and 86.4, respectively), the total percent retention of G1-G7 varied between 14% and 82% with an average of 43%, exhibiting better runoff-retaining capacity than G8 based on the maximum potential rainfall storage depth per unit height of adsorption substrate. Regression analysis showed that there was a logarithmic relationship between cumulative rainfall depth with non-zero runoff and stormwater retention for G1-G4 and a linear relationship for G5-G8. To enhance the water retention capacity and extend the service life of dual-substrate-layer extensive green roofs, the mixture of activated charcoal and/or pumice with expanded perlite and/or vermiculite is more suitable as the adsorption substrate than the mixture containing lava and/or zeolite.

  12. Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and substrates.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Furukawa, Keiko; Serizawa, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2009-06-02

    Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals and surface-modified substrates were investigated by measuring adsorption behavior and adhesion strength with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and a contact-mode atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively. The goal was to develop better control of HAp-nanocrystal coatings on biomedical materials. HAp nanocrystals with rodlike or spherical morphology were prepared by a wet chemical process followed by calcination at 800 degrees C with an antisintering agent to prevent the formation of sintered polycrystals. The substrate surface was modified by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, or graft polymerization with a functional monomer. QCM measurement showed that the rodlike HAp nanocrystals adsorbed preferentially onto anionic COOH-modified substrates compared to cationic NH2- or hydrophobic CH3-modified substrates. On the other hand, the spherical nanocrystals adsorbed onto NH2- and COOH-modified substrates, which indicates that the surface properties of the HAp nanocrystals determined their adsorption behavior. The adhesion strength, which was estimated from the force required to move the nanocrystal in contact-mode AFM, on a COOH-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was almost 9 times larger than that on a COOH-modified substrate prepared by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, indicating that the long-chain polymer grafted on the substrate mitigated the surface roughness mismatch between the nanocrystal and the substrate. The adhesion strength of the nanocrystal bonded covalently by the coupling reaction to a Si(OCH3)-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was approximately 1.5 times larger than that when adsorbed on the COOH-grafted substrate.

  13. Oviposition Substrate of the Mountain Fly Drosophila nigrosparsa (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tratter, Magdalena; Bächli, Gerhard; Kirchmair, Martin; Kaufmann, Rüdiger; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C.; Steiner, Florian M.

    2016-01-01

    The survival of insect larvae often depends on the mother’s choice of oviposition substrate, and thus, this choice is an essential part of an insect species’ ecology. Especially species with narrow substrate preferences may suffer from changes in substrate availability triggered by, for example, climate change. Recent climate warming is affecting species directly (e.g., physiology) but also indirectly (e.g., biological interactions) leading to mismatching phenologies and distributions. However, the preferred oviposition substrate is still unknown for many drosophilid species, especially for those at higher elevations. In this study, we investigated the oviposition-substrate preference of the montane-alpine fly Drosophila nigrosparsa in rearing and multiple-choice experiments using natural substrates in the laboratory. Insect emergence from field-collected substrates was tested. More than 650 insects were reared from natural substrates, among them 152 drosophilids but no individual of D. nigrosparsa. In the multiple-choice experiments, D. nigrosparsa preferred ovipositing on mushrooms (> 93% of eggs); additionally, a few eggs were laid on berries but none on other substrates such as cow faeces, rotten plant material, and soil. The flies laid 24 times more eggs per day when mushrooms were included in the substrates than when they were excluded. We infer that D. nigrosparsa is a mushroom breeder with some variation in oviposition choice. The flies favoured some mushrooms over others, but they were not specialised on a single fungal taxon. Although it is unclear if and how climate change will affect D. nigrosparsa, our results indicate that this species will not be threatened by oviposition-substrate limitations in the near future because of the broad altitudinal distribution of the mushrooms considered here, even if the flies will have to shift upwards to withstand increasing temperatures. PMID:27788257

  14. Method of making carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei; Liu, Jun

    2006-03-14

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  15. An evaluation of potential dustbathing substrates for commercial broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Baxter, M; Bailie, C L; O'Connell, N E

    2017-12-22

    Provision of an appropriate dustbathing substrate may allow broiler chickens to satisfy a natural motivation and give them an opportunity to exercise. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which different substrates promote dustbathing behaviour in broilers. The trial was replicated over three production cycles in one commercial broiler house, with ~22 000 Ross broilers housed per cycle. The birds were provided with access to five experimental substrates from day 10 of the 6-week production cycle. The substrates included the following: (1) peat (P), (2) oat hulls (OH), (3) straw pellets (SP), (4) clean wood shavings (WS), and (5) litter control (C). The substrates were provided in 15 steel rings (1.1 m in diameter, three rings per substrate) dispersed throughout the house. The level of occupancy of the rings, behaviours performed in each substrate, and the effect of ring position (central or edge of house) were assessed in weeks 3, 4, 5 and 6 using scan sampling from video footage. Where substrates successfully promoted dustbathing, the length and components of the bouts (including number of vertical wing shakes and ground pecks) were also assessed. Results showed that birds used P significantly more than the remaining substrates for dustbathing (P0.05). The use of OH is likely to be more environmentally sustainable than that of P, and our results suggest that this substrate is relatively successful in promoting dustbathing. However, a preference was still observed for P and further work should investigate whether other suitable substrates could better reflect its qualities.

  16. Substrate Material for Holographic Emulsions Utilizing Fluorinated Polyimide Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gierow, Paul A. (Inventor); Clayton, William R. (Inventor); St.Clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A new holographic substrate utilizing flexible. optically transparent fluorinated polyimides. Said substrates have 0 extremely low birefringence which results in a high signal to noise ratio in subsequent holograms. Specific examples of said fluorinated polyimides include 6FDA+APB and 6FDA+4BDAF.

  17. Homogeneous catalytic hydrogenations of complex carbonaceous substrates. [16 references

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J L; Wilcox, W A; Roberts, G L

    1976-11-05

    Results of homogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of complex unsaturated substrates including coal and coal-derived materials are reported, with organic soluble molecular complexes as catalysts. Among the substrates used were Hvab coal, solvent-refined coal, and COED pyrolysate. The hydrogenations were carried out in an autoclave. The results are summarized in tables.

  18. Method for fabricating a substrate having spaced apart microcapillaries thereon

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.

    1995-01-01

    Methods for manufacturing a self-supporting substrate having a plurality of spaced-apart needles (spikes or microcapillaries) projecting upwardly from a major surface of the substrate. In a preferred method, metal is deposited onto a porous membrane such that the metal extends into the pores, after which the membrane is dissolved.

  19. Reactive ion etched substrates and methods of making and using

    DOEpatents

    Rucker, Victor C [San Francisco, CA; Shediac, Rene [Oakland, CA; Simmons, Blake A [San Francisco, CA; Havenstrite, Karen L [New York, NY

    2007-08-07

    Disclosed herein are substrates comprising reactive ion etched surfaces and specific binding agents immobilized thereon. The substrates may be used in methods and devices for assaying or isolating analytes in a sample. Also disclosed are methods of making the reactive ion etched surfaces.

  20. Method of deposition of silicon carbide layers on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Angelini, P.; DeVore, C.E.; Lackey, W.J.; Blanco, R.E.; Stinton, D.P.

    1982-03-19

    A method for direct chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide to substrates, especially nuclear waste particles, is provided by the thermal decomposition of methylsilane at 800 to 1050/sup 0/C when the substrates have been confined within a suitable coating environment.

  1. Rooting Rose Cuttings in Whole Pine Tree Substrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increased demand for alternatives to pine bark (PB) and peat moss (P) has led to extensive research on wood-based substrates, such as processed whole pine trees (WPT), for nursery and greenhouse crop production. Limited information is available on how WPT may perform as a rooting substrate for cutti...

  2. Development of the Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Linenberger, Kimberly J.

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme function is central to student understanding of multiple topics within the biochemistry curriculum. In particular, students must understand how enzymes and substrates interact with one another. This manuscript describes the development of a 15-item Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory (ESICI) that measures student understanding…

  3. Thin film with oriented cracks on a flexible substrate

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Bao; McGilvray, Andrew; Shi, Bo

    2010-07-27

    A thermoelectric film is disclosed. The thermoelectric film includes a substrate that is substantially electrically non-conductive and flexible and a thermoelectric material that is deposited on at least one surface of the substrate. The thermoelectric film also includes multiple cracks oriented in a predetermined direction.

  4. Influence of substrate physical properties on container weed germination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Container nursery substrates in the central and eastern U.S. are composed primarily of pine bark with lesser percentages of other amendments, including sphagnum peatmoss. Peatmoss is often amended from 0% to 40% (by vol.) to increase the water holding capacity of the substrate. The objective of th...

  5. Substrate comprising a nanometer-scale projection array

    DOEpatents

    Cui, Yi; Zhu, Jia; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Connor, Stephen T; Yu, Zongfu; Fan, Shanhui; Burkhard, George

    2012-11-27

    A method for forming a substrate comprising nanometer-scale pillars or cones that project from the surface of the substrate is disclosed. The method enables control over physical characteristics of the projections including diameter, sidewall angle, and tip shape. The method further enables control over the arrangement of the projections including characteristics such as center-to-center spacing and separation distance.

  6. SPAWNING SUCCESS OF FATHEAD MINNOWS ON SELECTED ARTIFICIAL SUBSTRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spawning success of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) on six different substrates was tested and evaluated. Egg adhesiveness was equally good on cement-asbestos tile and sand-coated stainless steel substrates, but was poor on unaltered stainless steel, shot-peened stainless s...

  7. Second generation engineering of transketolase for polar aromatic aldehyde substrates.

    PubMed

    Payongsri, Panwajee; Steadman, David; Hailes, Helen C; Dalby, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    Transketolase has significant industrial potential for the asymmetric synthesis of carboncarbon bonds with new chiral centres. Variants evolved on propanal were found previously with nascent activity on polar aromatic aldehydes 3-formylbenzoic acid (3-FBA), 4-formylbenzoic acid (4-FBA), and 3-hydroxybenzaldehyde (3-HBA), suggesting a potential novel route to analogues of chloramphenicol. Here we evolved improved transketolase activities towards aromatic aldehydes, by saturation mutagenesis of two active-site residues (R358 and S385), predicted to interact with the aromatic substituents. S385 variants selectively controlled the aromatic substrate preference, with up to 13-fold enhanced activities, and KM values comparable to those of natural substrates with wild-type transketolase. S385E even completely removed the substrate inhibition for 3-FBA, observed in all previous variants. The mechanisms of catalytic improvement were both mutation type and substrate dependent. S385E improved 3-FBA activity via kcat, but reduced 4-FBA activity via KM. Conversely, S385Y/T improved 3-FBA activity via KM and 4-FBA activity via kcat. This suggested that both substrate proximity and active-site orientation are very sensitive to mutation. Comparison of all variant activities on each substrate indicated different binding modes for the three aromatic substrates, supported by computational docking. This highlights a potential divergence in the evolution of different substrate specificities, with implications for enzyme engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Microwave flexible transistors on cellulose nanofibrillated fiber substrates

    Treesearch

    Jung-Hun Seo; Tzu-Hsuan Chang; Jaeseong Lee; Ronald Sabo; Weidong Zhou; Zhiyong Cai; Shaoqin Gong; Zhenqiang Ma

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate microwave flexible thin-film transistors (TFTs) on biodegradable substrates towards potential green portable devices. The combination of cellulose nanofibrillated fiber (CNF) substrate, which is a biobased and biodegradable platform, with transferrable single crystalline Si nanomembrane (Si NM), enables the realization of truly...

  9. Constructed wetland using corncob charcoal substrate: pollutants removal and intensification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mao; Li, Boyuan; Xue, Yingwen; Wang, Hongyu; Yang, Kai

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using corncob charcoal substrate in constructed wetlands, four laboratory-scale vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) were built. Effluent pollutant (chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH 4 + -N, total phosphorus (TP)) concentrations during the experiment were determined to reveal pollutant removal mechanisms and efficiencies at different stages. In the stable stage, a VFCW using clay ceramisite substrate under aeration attained higher COD (95.1%), and NH 4 + -N (95.1%) removal efficiencies than a VFCW using corncob charcoal substrate (91.5% COD, 91.3% NH 4 + -N) under aeration, but lower TP removal efficiency (clay ceramisite 32.0% and corncob charcoal 40.0%). The VFCW with raw corncob substrate showed stronger COD emissions (maximum concentration 3,108 mg/L) than the corncob charcoal substrate (COD was lower than influent). The VFCW using corncob charcoal substrate performed much better than the VFCW using clay ceramisite substrate under aeration when the C/N ratio was low (C/N = 1.5, TN removal efficiency 36.89%, 4.1% respectively). These results suggest that corncob charcoal is a potential substrate in VFCWs under aeration with a unique self -supplying carbon source property in the denitrification process.

  10. Strawberry Production in Soilless Substrate Troughs – Plant Growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soilless substrates made of peat moss, coconut coir, perlite, rockwool or bark are pathogen free and they have been used in strawberry production in Europe in troughs or containers. Open field strawberry production in soilless substrate is new to California growers. The objective of this study was t...

  11. Design of a cylindrical LED substrate without radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fan; Guo, Zhenning

    2017-12-01

    To reduce the weight and production costs of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, we applied the principle of the chimney effect to design a cylindrical LED substrate without a radiator. We built a 3D model by using Solidworks software and applied the flow simulation plug-in to conduct model simulation, thereby optimizing the heat source distribution and substrate thickness. The results indicate that the design achieved optimal cooling with a substrate with an upper extension length of 35 mm, a lower extension length of 8 mm, and a thickness of 1 mm. For a substrate of those dimensions, the highest LED chip temperature was 64.78 °C, the weight of the substrate was 35.09 g, and R jb = 7.00 K/W. If the substrate is powered at 8, 10, and 12 W, its temperature meets LED safety requirements. In physical tests, the highest temperature for a physical 8 W cylindrical LED substrate was 66 °C, which differed by only 1.22 °C from the simulation results, verifying the validity of the simulation. The designed cylindrical LED substrate can be used in high-power LED lamps that do not require radiators. This design is not only excellent for heat dissipation, but also for its low weight, low cost, and simplicity of manufacture.

  12. Strontium-90 concentration factors of lake plankton, macrophytes, and substrates.

    PubMed

    Kalnina, Z; Polikarpov, G

    1969-06-27

    The ratio of concentration of strontium-90 in living and inert lake components to that in lake water (concentration factors) was determined for plankton, macrophytes, and substrates in eutrophic, mesotropric-eutrophic, and dystrophic Latgalian lakes. Concentration factors of strontium-90 in aquatic organisms and substrates are higher in a dystrophic lake than in the other types.

  13. Method for fabricating a substrate having spaced apart microcapillaries thereon

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.

    1995-01-24

    Methods are disclosed for manufacturing a self-supporting substrate having a plurality of spaced-apart needles (spikes or microcapillaries) projecting upwardly from a major surface of the substrate. In a preferred method, metal is deposited onto a porous membrane such that the metal extends into the pores, after which the membrane is dissolved. 9 figures.

  14. Liquid-Vapor Coexistence at a Mesoporous Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kityk, A. V.; Hofmann, T.; Knorr, K.

    2008-01-01

    The condensation of hexane vapor onto a mesoporous Si substrate with a pore radius of 3.5 nm has been studied by means of volumetry and ellipsometry. The filling fraction of the pores and the coverage of the substrate have been determined. The coverage of the regime after the completion of capillary condensation has been compared to recent theoretical work.

  15. Pharmaceutical-grade oral films as substrates for printed medicine.

    PubMed

    Wimmer-Teubenbacher, M; Planchette, C; Pichler, H; Markl, D; Hsiao, W K; Paudel, A; Stegemann, S

    2018-05-18

    In contact-less printing, such as piezo-electric drop on demand printing used in the study, the drop formation process is independent of the substrate. This means that having developed a printable formulation, printed pharmaceutical dosage forms can be obtained on any pharmaceutical grade substrate, such as polymer-based films. In this work we evaluated eight different oral films based on their suitability as printing substrates for sodium picosulfate. The different polymer films were compared regarding printed spot morphology, chemical stability and dissolution profile. The morphology of printed sodium picosulfate was investigated with scanning electron microscopy and optical coherence tomography. The spreading of the deposited drops was found to be governed by the contact angle of the ink with the substrate. The form of the sodium picosulfate drops changed on microcrystalline cellulose films at ambient conditions over 8 weeks and stayed unchanged on other tested substrates. Sodium picosulfate remained amorphous on all substrates according to small and wide angle X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry and polarized light microscopy measurements. The absence of chemical interactions between the drug and substrates, as indicated by infrared spectroscopy, makes all tested substrates suitable for printing sodium picosulfate onto them. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Visible-blind ultraviolet photodetectors on porous silicon carbide substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Naderi, N.; Hashim, M.R., E-mail: roslan@usm.my

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: • Highly reliable UV detectors are fabricated on porous silicon carbide substrates. • The optical properties of samples are enhanced by increasing the current density. • The optimized sample exhibits enhanced sensitivity to the incident UV radiation. - Abstract: Highly reliable visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors were successfully fabricated on porous silicon carbide (PSC) substrates. High responsivity and high photoconductive gain were observed in a metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetector that was fabricated on an optimized PSC substrate. The PSC samples were prepared via the UV-assisted photo-electrochemical etching of an n-type hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) substrate using different etching current densities. Themore » optical results showed that the current density is an outstanding etching parameter that controls the porosity and uniformity of PSC substrates. A highly porous substrate was synthesized using a suitable etching current density to enhance its light absorption, thereby improving the sensitivity of UV detector with this substrate. The electrical characteristics of fabricated devices on optimized PSC substrates exhibited enhanced sensitivity and responsivity to the incident radiation.« less

  17. Shared neural substrates of apraxia and aphasia.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Georg; Randerath, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    Apraxia is regularly associated with aphasia, but there is controversy whether their co-occurrence is the expression of a common basic deficit or results from anatomical proximity of their neural substrates. However, neither aphasia nor apraxia is an indivisible entity. Both diagnoses embrace diverse manifestations that may occur more or less independently from each other. Thus, the question whether apraxia is always accompanied by aphasia may lead to conflicting answers depending on which of their manifestations are considered. We used voxel based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) for exploring communalities between lesion sites associated with aphasia and with apraxia. Linguistic impairment was assessed by the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT) subtests naming, comprehension, repetition, written language, and Token Test. Apraxia was examined for imitation of meaningless hand and finger postures and for pantomime of tool use. There were two areas of overlap between aphasia and apraxia. Lesions in the anterior temporal lobe interfered with pantomime of tool use and with all linguistic tests. In the left inferior parietal lobe there was a large area where lesions were associated with defective imitation of hand postures and with poor scores on written language and the Token Test. Within this large area there were also two spots in supramarginal and angular gyrus where lesions were also associated with defective pantomime. We speculate that the coincidence of language impairment and defective pantomime after anterior temporal lesions is due to impaired access to semantic memory. The combination of defective imitation of hand postures with poor scores on Token Test and written language is not easily compatible with a crucial role of parietal regions for the conversion of concepts of intended actions into motor commands. It accords better with a role of left inferior parietal lobe regions for the categorical perception of spatial relationships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. Psychoanatomical substrates of Bálint's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, M; Vecera, S

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: From a series of glimpses, we perceive a seamless and richly detailed visual world. Cerebral damage, however, can destroy this illusion. In the case of Bálint's syndrome, the visual world is perceived erratically, as a series of single objects. The goal of this review is to explore a range of psychological and anatomical explanations for this striking visual disorder and to propose new directions for interpreting the findings in Bálint's syndrome and related cerebral disorders of visual processing. Methods: Bálint's syndrome is reviewed in the light of current concepts and methodologies of vision research. Results: The syndrome affects visual perception (causing simultanagnosia/visual disorientation) and visual control of eye and hand movement (causing ocular apraxia and optic ataxia). Although it has been generally construed as a biparietal syndrome causing an inability to see more than one object at a time, other lesions and mechanisms are also possible. Key syndrome components are dissociable and comprise a range of disturbances that overlap the hemineglect syndrome. Inouye's observations in similar cases, beginning in 1900, antedated Bálint's initial report. Because Bálint's syndrome is not common and is difficult to assess with standard clinical tools, the literature is dominated by case reports and confounded by case selection bias, non-uniform application of operational definitions, inadequate study of basic vision, poor lesion localisation, and failure to distinguish between deficits in the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Conclusions: Studies of Bálint's syndrome have provided unique evidence on neural substrates for attention, perception, and visuomotor control. Future studies should address possible underlying psychoanatomical mechanisms at "bottom up" and "top down" levels, and should specifically consider visual working memory and attention (including object based attention) as well as systems for identification of object

  19. Zeta potential orientation dependence of sapphire substrates.

    PubMed

    Kershner, Ryan J; Bullard, Joseph W; Cima, Michael J

    2004-05-11

    The zeta potential of planar sapphire substrates for three different crystallographic orientations was measured by a streaming potential technique in the presence of KCl and (CH3)4NCl electrolytes. The streaming potential was measured for large single crystalline C-plane (0001), A-plane (1120), and R-plane (1102) wafers over a full pH range at three or more ionic strengths ranging from 1 to 100 mM. The roughness of the epi-polished wafers was verified using atomic force microscopy to be on the order of atomic scale, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to ensure that the samples were free of silica and other contaminants. The results reveal a shift in the isoelectric point (iep) of the three samples by as much as two pH units, with the R-plane surface exhibiting the most acidic behavior and the C-plane samples having the highest iep. The iep at all ionic strengths was tightly centered around a single pH for each wafer. These values of iep are substantially different from the range of pH 8-10 consistently reported in the literature for alpha-Al2O3 particles. Particle zeta potential measurements were performed on a model powder using phase analysis light scattering, and the iep was confirmed to occur at pH 8. Modified Auger parameters (MAP) were calculated from XPS spectra of a monolayer of iridium metal deposited on the sapphire by electron beam deposition. A shift in MAP consistent with the observed differences in iep of the surfaces confirms the effect of surface structure on the transfer of charge between the Ir and sapphire, hence accounting for the changes in acidity as a function of crystallographic orientation.

  20. Neural substrates of time perception and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Marc; Simmons, Alan N.; Flagan, Taru; Lane, Scott D.; Wackermann, Jiří; Paulus, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies provide empirical evidence for the association between impulsivity and time perception. However, little is known about the neural substrates underlying this function. This investigation examined the influence of impulsivity on neural activation patterns during the encoding and reproduction of intervals with durations of 3, 9 and 18 seconds using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty-seven subjects participated in this study, including 15 high impulsive subjects that were classified based on their self-rating. FMRI activation during the duration reproduction task was correlated with measures of two self-report questionnaires related to the concept of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, BIS; Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, ZTPI). Behaviorally, those individuals who under-reproduced temporal intervals also showed lower scores on the ZTPI future perspective subscale and higher scores on the BIS. FMRI activation revealed an accumulating pattern of neural activity peaking at the end of the 9- and 18-s interval within right posterior insula. Activations of brain regions during the reproduction phase of the timing task, such as those related to motor execution as well as to the ‘core control network’ – encompassing the inferior frontal and medial frontal cortex, the anterior insula as well as the inferior parietal cortex – were significantly correlated with reproduced duration, as well as with BIS and ZTPI subscales. In particular, the greater activation in these regions the shorter were the reproduced intervals, the more impulsive was an individual and the less pronounced the future perspective. Activation in the core control network, thus, may form a biological marker for cognitive time management and for impulsiveness. PMID:21763642

  1. Wrinkling of graphene membranes supported by silica nanoparticles on substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mahito; Cullen, William; Fuhrer, Michael; Einstein, Theodore; Department of Physics, University of Maryland Team

    2011-03-01

    The challenging endeavor of modulating the morphology of graphene via a patterned substrate to produce a controlled deformation has great potential importance for strain engineering the electronic properties of graphene. An essential step in this direction is to understand the response of graphene to substrate features of known geometry. Here we employ silica nanoparticles with a diameter of 10-100 nm to uniformly decorate Si O2 and mica substrates before depositing graphene, to promote nanoscale modulation of graphene geometry. The morphology of graphene on this modified substrate is then characterized by atomic force spectroscopy. We find that graphene on the substrate is locally raised by the supporting nanoparticles, and wrinkling propagates radially from the protrusions to form a ridge network which links the protrusions. We discuss the dependence of the wrinkled morphology on nanoparticle diameter and graphene thickness in terms of graphene elasticity and adhesion energy. Supported by NSF-MRSEC, Grant DMR 05-20471

  2. Low-cost passive UHF RFID tags on paper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajal, Sayeed Zebaul Haque

    To reduce the significant cost in the widespread deployment of UHF radio frequency identification (RFID) systems, an UHF RFID tag design is presented on paper substrates. The design is based on meander-line miniaturization techniques and open complementary split ring resonator (OCSRR) elements that reduce required conducting materials by 30%. Another passive UHF RFID tag is designed to sense the moisture based on the antenna's polarization. An inexpensive paper substrate and copper layer are used for flexibility and low-cost. The key characteristic of this design is the sensitivity of the antenna's polarization on the passive RFID tag to the moisture content in the paper substrate. In simulations, the antenna is circularly-polarized when the substrate is dry and is linearly-polarized when the substrate is wet. It was shown that the expected read-ranges and desired performance could be achieved reducing the over-all cost of the both designs.

  3. What Are the bona fide GSK3 Substrates?

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Calum

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 100 proteins are proposed to be substrates for GSK3, suggesting that this enzyme is a fundamental regulator of almost every process in the cell, in every tissue in the body. However, it is not certain how many of these proposed substrates are regulated by GSK3 in vivo. Clearly, the identification of the physiological functions of GSK3 will be greatly aided by the identification of its bona fide substrates, and the development of GSK3 as a therapeutic target will be highly influenced by this range of actions, hence the need to accurately establish true GSK3 substrates in cells. In this paper the evidence that proposed GSK3 substrates are likely to be physiological targets is assessed, highlighting the key cellular processes that could be modulated by GSK3 activity and inhibition.

  4. Smart substrates: Making multi-chip modules smarter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunsch, T. F.; Treece, R. K.

    1995-05-01

    A novel multi-chip module (MCM) design and manufacturing methodology which utilizes active CMOS circuits in what is normally a passive substrate realizes the 'smart substrate' for use in highly testable, high reliability MCMS. The active devices are used to test the bare substrate, diagnose assembly errors or integrated circuit (IC) failures that require rework, and improve the testability of the final MCM assembly. A static random access memory (SRAM) MCM has been designed and fabricated in Sandia Microelectronics Development Laboratory in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this concept and to examine design and manufacturing issues which will ultimately determine the economic viability of this approach. The smart substrate memory MCM represents a first in MCM packaging. At the time the first modules were fabricated, no other company or MCM vendor had incorporated active devices in the substrate to improve manufacturability and testability, and thereby improve MCM reliability and reduce cost.

  5. Summary of Research: Study of Substrates in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, Gail E.; Yendler, Boris S.; Kliss, Mark

    1996-01-01

    An upcoming series of joint US-Russian plant experiments will use the granular Substrate Nutrient Delivery System (NDS) equipment developed by Russian and Bulgarian scientists for the Mir Space Station's Svet greenhouse. The purpose of this study was to develop a better understanding of granular substrate water relations and to provide the ability to document water distribution in the Svet NDS during the space experiments. To this end, we conducted a study to expanded our understanding of substrate water behavior in granular substrates in microgravity. This report documents the results of our experiments with the Svet substrate water content sensor, explains the results observed in the Svet NDS during the 1990 Greenhouse experiment; describes the development of a miniature version of the Svet type (heat pulse) sensor that has been used to measure the distribution of water content inside the Svet NDS in space, and documents the calibration of these sensors and measurements conducted in both ground and space experiments,

  6. Method for forming a nano-textured substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Sangmoo; Hu, Liangbing; Cui, Yi

    A method for forming a nano-textured surface on a substrate is disclosed. An illustrative embodiment of the present invention comprises dispensing of a nanoparticle ink of nanoparticles and solvent onto the surface of a substrate, distributing the ink to form substantially uniform, liquid nascent layer of the ink, and enabling the solvent to evaporate from the nanoparticle ink thereby inducing the nanoparticles to assemble into an texture layer. Methods in accordance with the present invention enable rapid formation of large-area substrates having a nano-textured surface. Embodiments of the present invention are well suited for texturing substrates using high-speed, large scale,more » roll-to-roll coating equipment, such as that used in office product, film coating, and flexible packaging applications. Further, embodiments of the present invention are well suited for use with rigid or flexible substrates.« less

  7. The effect of grooves in amorphous substrates on the orientation of metal deposits. I - Carbon substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, R.; Poppa, H.; Flanders, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The graphoepitaxial alignment of vapor-deposited discrete metal crystallites is investigated in the nucleation and growth stages and during annealing by in situ UHV/TEM techniques. Various stages of nucleation, growth and coalescence of vapor deposits of Au, Ag, Pb, Sn, and Bi on amorphous, topographically structured C substrates are analyzed by advanced dark-field techniques to detect preferred local orientations. It is found that the topography-induced orientation of metal crystallites depends strongly on their mobility and their respective tendency to develop pronounced crystallographic shapes. Lowering of the average surface free energies and increasing the crystallographic surface energy anisotropies cause generally improved graphoepitaxial alignments.

  8. Reassessing SERS enhancement factors: using thermodynamics to drive substrate design.

    PubMed

    Guicheteau, J A; Tripathi, A; Emmons, E D; Christesen, S D; Fountain, Augustus W

    2017-12-04

    Over the past 40 years fundamental and application research into Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) has been explored by academia, industry, and government laboratories. To date however, SERS has achieved little commercial success as an analytical technique. Researchers are tackling a variety of paths to help break through the commercial barrier by addressing the reproducibility in both the SERS substrates and SERS signals as well as continuing to explore the underlying mechanisms. To this end, investigators use a variety of methodologies, typically studying strongly binding analytes such as aromatic thiols and azarenes, and report SERS enhancement factor calculations. However a drawback of the traditional SERS enhancement factor calculation is that it does not yield enough information to understand substrate reproducibility, application potential with another analyte, or the driving factors behind the molecule-metal interaction. Our work at the US Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center has focused on these questions and we have shown that thermodynamic principles play a key role in the SERS response and are an essential factor in future designs of substrates and applications. This work will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various experimental techniques used to report SERS enhancement with planar SERS substrates and present our alternative SERS enhancement value. We will report on three types of analysis scenarios that all yield different information concerning the effectiveness of the SERS substrate, practical application of the substrate, and finally the thermodynamic properties of the substrate. We believe that through this work a greater understanding for designing substrates will be achieved, one that is based on both thermodynamic and plasmonic properties as opposed to just plasmonic properties. This new understanding and potential change in substrate design will enable more applications for SERS based methodologies including targeting

  9. High performance and reusable SERS substrates using Ag/ZnO heterostructure on periodic silicon nanotube substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yi-Chen; Ho, Hsin-Chia; Shih, Bo-Wei; Tsai, Feng-Yu; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2018-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate with a higher surface area, enhanced light harvesting, multiple hot spots and strong electromagnetic field enhancements would exhibit enhanced Raman signals. Herein, the Ag nanoparticle/ZnO nanowire heterostructure decorated periodic silicon nanotube (Ag@ZnO@SiNT) substrate was proposed and fabricated. The proposed structure employed as SERS-active substrate was examined, and the results showed both the high performance in terms of high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Furthermore, the Ag@ZnO@SiNT substrate demonstrated the self-cleaning performance through the photocatalytic degradation of probed molecules upon UV-irradiation. The results showed that the proposed nanostructure had high performance, good reproducibility and reusability, and it is a promising SERS-active substrate for molecular sensing and cleaning.

  10. Aptamer Recognition of Multiplexed Small-Molecule-Functionalized Substrates.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Nako; Cao, Huan H; Deshayes, Stephanie; Melkonian, Arin Lucy; Kasko, Andrea M; Weiss, Paul S; Andrews, Anne M

    2018-05-31

    Aptamers are chemically synthesized oligonucleotides or peptides with molecular recognition capabilities. We investigated recognition of substrate-tethered small-molecule targets, using neurotransmitters as examples, and fluorescently labeled DNA aptamers. Substrate regions patterned via microfluidic channels with dopamine or L-tryptophan were selectively recognized by previously identified dopamine or L-tryptophan aptamers, respectively. The on-substrate dissociation constant determined for the dopamine aptamer was comparable to, though slightly greater than the previously determined solution dissociation constant. Using pre-functionalized neurotransmitter-conjugated oligo(ethylene glycol) alkanethiols and microfluidics patterning, we produced multiplexed substrates to capture and to sort aptamers. Substrates patterned with L-DOPA, L-DOPS, and L-5-HTP enabled comparison of the selectivity of the dopamine aptamer for different targets via simultaneous determination of in situ binding constants. Thus, beyond our previous demonstrations of recognition by protein binding partners (i.e., antibodies and G-protein-coupled receptors), strategically optimized small-molecule-functionalized substrates show selective recognition of nucleic acid binding partners. These substrates are useful for side-by-side target comparisons, and future identification and characterization of novel aptamers targeting neurotransmitters or other important small-molecules.

  11. Flexible and mechanical strain resistant large area SERS active substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. P.; Chu, Hsiaoyun; Abell, Justin; Tripp, Ralph A.; Zhao, Yiping

    2012-05-01

    We report a cost effective and facile way to synthesize flexible, uniform, and large area surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates using an oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique. The flexible SERS substrates consist of 1 μm long, tilted silver nanocolumnar films deposited on flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets using OAD. The SERS enhancement activity of these flexible substrates was determined using 10-5 M trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl) ethylene (BPE) Raman probe molecules. The in situ SERS measurements on these flexible substrates under mechanical (tensile/bending) strain conditions were performed. Our results show that flexible SERS substrates can withstand a tensile strain (ε) value as high as 30% without losing SERS performance, whereas the similar bending strain decreases the SERS performance by about 13%. A cyclic tensile loading test on flexible PDMS SERS substrates at a pre-specified tensile strain (ε) value of 10% shows that the SERS intensity remains almost constant for more than 100 cycles. These disposable and flexible SERS substrates can be integrated with biological substances and offer a novel and practical method to facilitate biosensing applications.

  12. Substrates of Peltigera Lichens as a Potential Source of Cyanobionts.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Catalina; Leiva, Diego; Carú, Margarita; Orlando, Julieta

    2017-10-01

    Photobiont availability is one of the main factors determining the success of the lichenization process. Although multiple sources of photobionts have been proposed, there is no substantial evidence confirming that the substrates on which lichens grow are one of them. In this work, we obtained cyanobacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences from the substrates underlying 186 terricolous Peltigera cyanolichens from localities in Southern Chile and maritime Antarctica and compared them with the sequences of the cyanobionts of these lichens, in order to determine if cyanobacteria potentially available for lichenization were present in the substrates. A phylogenetic analysis of the sequences showed that Nostoc phylotypes dominated the cyanobacterial communities of the substrates in all sites. Among them, an overlap was observed between the phylotypes of the lichen cyanobionts and those of the cyanobacteria present in their substrates, suggesting that they could be a possible source of lichen photobionts. Also, in most cases, higher Nostoc diversity was observed in the lichens than in the substrates from each site. A better understanding of cyanobacterial diversity in lichen substrates and their relatives in the lichens would bring insights into mycobiont selection and the distribution patterns of lichens, providing a background for hypothesis testing and theory development for future studies of the lichenization process.

  13. Substrate independent approach for synthesis of graphene platelet networks.

    PubMed

    Shashurin, A; Fang, X; Zemlyanov, D; Keidar, M

    2017-06-23

    Graphene platelet networks (GPNs) comprised of randomly oriented graphene flakes two to three atomic layers thick are synthesized using a novel plasma-based approach. The approach uses a substrate capable of withstanding synthesis temperatures around 800 °C, but is fully independent of the substrate material. The synthesis occurs directly on the substrate surface without the necessity of any additional steps. GPNs were synthesized on various substrate materials including silicon (Si), thermally oxidized Si (SiO 2 ), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu), nickel-chromium (NiCr) alloy and alumina ceramics (Al 2 O 3 ). The mismatch between the atomic structures of sp 2 honeycomb carbon networks and the substrate material is fully eliminated shortly after the synthesis initiation, namely when about 100 nm thick deposits are formed on the substrate. GPN structures synthesized on a substrate at a temperature of about 800 °C are significantly more porous in comparison to the much denser packed amorphous carbon deposits synthesized at lower temperatures. The method proposed here can potentially revolutionize the area of electrochemical energy storage by offering a single-step direct approach for the manufacture of graphene-based electrodes for non-Faradaic supercapacitors. Mass production can be achieved using this method if a roll-to-roll system is utilized.

  14. Substrate independent approach for synthesis of graphene platelet networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, A.; Fang, X.; Zemlyanov, D.; Keidar, M.

    2017-06-01

    Graphene platelet networks (GPNs) comprised of randomly oriented graphene flakes two to three atomic layers thick are synthesized using a novel plasma-based approach. The approach uses a substrate capable of withstanding synthesis temperatures around 800 °C, but is fully independent of the substrate material. The synthesis occurs directly on the substrate surface without the necessity of any additional steps. GPNs were synthesized on various substrate materials including silicon (Si), thermally oxidized Si (SiO2), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu), nickel-chromium (NiCr) alloy and alumina ceramics (Al2O3). The mismatch between the atomic structures of sp2 honeycomb carbon networks and the substrate material is fully eliminated shortly after the synthesis initiation, namely when about 100 nm thick deposits are formed on the substrate. GPN structures synthesized on a substrate at a temperature of about 800 °C are significantly more porous in comparison to the much denser packed amorphous carbon deposits synthesized at lower temperatures. The method proposed here can potentially revolutionize the area of electrochemical energy storage by offering a single-step direct approach for the manufacture of graphene-based electrodes for non-Faradaic supercapacitors. Mass production can be achieved using this method if a roll-to-roll system is utilized.

  15. Next Generation Ceramic Substrate Fabricated at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuna; Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Kim, Jong-Woo; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Park, Dong-Soo; Yoon, Seog-Young; Ma, Byungjin; Hahn, Byung-Dong

    2017-07-26

    A ceramic substrate must not only have an excellent thermal performance but also be thin, since the electronic devices have to become thin and small in the electronics industry of the next generation. In this manuscript, a thin ceramic substrate (thickness: 30-70 µm) is reported for the next generation ceramic substrate. It is fabricated by a new process [granule spray in vacuum (GSV)] which is a room temperature process. For the thin ceramic substrates, AlN GSV films are deposited on Al substrates and their electric/thermal properties are compared to those of the commercial ceramic substrates. The thermal resistance is significantly reduced by using AlN GSV films instead of AlN bulk-ceramics in thermal management systems. It is due to the removal of a thermal interface material which has low thermal conductivity. In particular, the dielectric strengths of AlN GSV films are much higher than those of AlN bulk-ceramics which are commercialized, approximately 5 times. Therefore, it can be expected that this GSV film is a next generation substrate in thermal management systems for the high power application.

  16. Substrate binding stoichiometry and kinetics of the norepinephrine transporter.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joel W; Novarino, Gaia; Piston, David W; DeFelice, Louis J

    2005-05-13

    The human norepinephrine (NE) transporter (hNET) attenuates neuronal signaling by rapid NE clearance from the synaptic cleft, and NET is a target for cocaine and amphetamines as well as therapeutics for depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. In spite of its central importance in the nervous system, little is known about how NET substrates, such as NE, 1-methyl-4-tetrahydropyridinium (MPP+), or amphetamine, interact with NET at the molecular level. Nor do we understand the mechanisms behind the transport rate. Previously we introduced a fluorescent substrate similar to MPP+, which allowed separate and simultaneous binding and transport measurement (Schwartz, J. W., Blakely, R. D., and DeFelice, L. J. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 9768-9777). Here we use this substrate, 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styrl)-N-methyl-pyridinium (ASP+), in combination with green fluorescent protein-tagged hNETs to measure substrate-transporter stoichiometry and substrate binding kinetics. Calibrated confocal microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy reveal that hNETs, which are homomultimers, bind one substrate molecule per transporter subunit. Substrate residence at the transporter, obtained from rapid on-off kinetics revealed in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, is 526 micros. Substrate residence obtained by infinite dilution is 1000 times slower. This novel examination of substrate-transporter kinetics indicates that a single ASP+ molecule binds and unbinds thousands of times before being transported or ultimately dissociated from hNET. Calibrated fluorescent images combined with mass spectroscopy give a transport rate of 0.06 ASP+/hNET-protein/s, thus 36,000 on-off binding events (and 36 actual departures) occur for one transport event. Therefore binding has a low probability of resulting in transport. We interpret these data to mean that inefficient binding could contribute to slow transport rates.

  17. Surface Modification of Plastic Substrates Using Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heya, Akira; Matsuo, Naoto

    The surface properties of a plastic substrate were changed by a novel surface treatment called atomic hydrogen annealing (AHA). In this method, a plastic substrate was exposed to atomic hydrogen generated by cracking of hydrogen molecules on heated tungsten wire. Surface roughness was increased and halogen elements (F and Cl) were selectively etched by AHA. In addition, plastic surface was reduced by AHA. The surface can be modified by the recombination reaction of atomic hydrogen, the reduction reaction and selective etching of halogen atom. It is concluded that this method is a promising technique for improvement of adhesion between inorganic films and plastic substrates at low temperatures.

  18. Adsorbates in a Box: Titration of Substrate Electronic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhihai; Wyrick, Jonathan; Luo, Miaomiao; Sun, Dezheng; Kim, Daeho; Zhu, Yeming; Lu, Wenhao; Kim, Kwangmoo; Einstein, T. L.; Bartels, Ludwig

    2010-08-01

    Nanoscale confinement of adsorbed CO molecules in an anthraquinone network on Cu(111) with a pore size of ≈4nm arranges the CO molecules in a shell structure that coincides with the distribution of substrate confined electronic states. Molecules occupy the states approximately in the sequence of rising electron energy. Despite the sixfold symmetry of the pore boundary itself, the adsorbate distribution adopts the threefold symmetry of the network-substrate system, highlighting the importance of the substrate even for such quasi-free-electron systems.

  19. Bioenabled SERS Substrates for Food Safety and Drinking Water Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Rorrer, Gregory L; Wang, Alan X

    2015-04-20

    We present low-cost bioenabled surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates that can be massively produced in sustainable and eco-friendly methods with significant commercial potentials for the detection of food contamination and drinking water pollution. The sensors are based on diatom frustules with integrated plasmonic nanoparticles. The ultra-high sensitivity of the SERS substrates comes from the coupling between the diatom frustules and Ag nanoparticles to achieve dramatically increased local optical field to enhance the light-matter interactions for SERS sensing. We successfully applied the bioenabled SERS substrates to detect melamine in milk and aromatic compounds in water with sensitivity down to 1μg/L.

  20. Method of Forming Textured Silicon Substrate by Maskless Cryogenic Etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor); Homyk, Andrew P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a textured substrate comprising a base comprising silicon, the base having a plurality of needle like structures depending away from the base, wherein at least one of the needle like structures has a depth of greater than or equal to about 50 micrometers determined perpendicular to the base, and wherein at least one of the needle like structures has a width of less than or equal to about 50 micrometers determined parallel to the base. An anode and a lithium ion battery comprising the textured substrate, and a method of producing the textured substrate are also disclosed.

  1. Role of substrate quality on IC performance and yields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The development of silicon and gallium arsenide crystal growth for the production of large diameter substrates are discussed. Large area substrates of significantly improved compositional purity, dopant distribution and structural perfection on a microscopic as well as macroscopic scale are important requirements. The exploratory use of magnetic fields to suppress convection effects in Czochralski crystal growth is addressed. The growth of large crystals in space appears impractical at present however the efforts to improve substrate quality could benefit from the experiences gained in smaller scale growth experiments conducted in the zero gravity environment of space.

  2. Strain Multiplexed Metasurface Holograms on a Stretchable Substrate.

    PubMed

    Malek, Stephanie C; Ee, Ho-Seok; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-06-14

    We demonstrate reconfigurable phase-only computer-generated metasurface holograms with up to three image planes operating in the visible regime fabricated with gold nanorods on a stretchable polydimethylsiloxane substrate. Stretching the substrate enlarges the hologram image and changes the location of the image plane. Upon stretching, these devices can switch the displayed holographic image between multiple distinct images. This work opens up the possibilities for stretchable metasurface holograms as flat devices for dynamically reconfigurable optical communication and display. It also confirms that metasurfaces on stretchable substrates can serve as platform for a variety of reconfigurable optical devices.

  3. Process for radiation grafting hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates

    DOEpatents

    Ratner, Buddy D.; Hoffman, Allan S.

    1976-01-01

    An improved process for radiation grafting of hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates is provided comprising the steps of incorporating an effective amount of cupric or ferric ions in an aqueous graft solution consisting of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone or mixture of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone and other monomers, e.g., 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, propylene glycol acrylate, acrylamide, methacrylic acid and methacrylamide, immersing an organic polymeric substrate in the aqueous graft solution and thereafter subjecting the contacted substrate with ionizing radiation.

  4. Lattice matched semiconductor growth on crystalline metallic substrates

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G; Ptak, Aaron J; McMahon, William E

    2013-11-05

    Methods of fabricating a semiconductor layer or device and said devices are disclosed. The methods include but are not limited to providing a metal or metal alloy substrate having a crystalline surface with a known lattice parameter (a). The methods further include growing a crystalline semiconductor alloy layer on the crystalline substrate surface by coincident site lattice matched epitaxy. The semiconductor layer may be grown without any buffer layer between the alloy and the crystalline surface of the substrate. The semiconductor alloy may be prepared to have a lattice parameter (a') that is related to the lattice parameter (a). The semiconductor alloy may further be prepared to have a selected band gap.

  5. Charge-free method of forming nanostructures on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Hoffbauer; Mark , Akhadov; Elshan

    2010-07-20

    A charge-free method of forming a nanostructure at low temperatures on a substrate. A substrate that is reactive with one of atomic oxygen and nitrogen is provided. A flux of neutral atoms of least one of oxygen and nitrogen is generated within a laser-sustained-discharge plasma source and a collimated beam of energetic neutral atoms and molecules is directed from the plasma source onto a surface of the substrate to form the nanostructure. The energetic neutral atoms and molecules in the beam have an average kinetic energy in a range from about 1 eV to about 5 eV.

  6. Metal substrates with nanometer scale surface roughness for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Lam; Kim, Kisoo

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we present a novel way in fabricating a metal substrate with nanometer scale in surface roughness (Ra < 1 nm) using a surface roughness transfer method without any polishing or planarization process. Ag film (8 inch, Ra = 0.57 nm) and an INVAR (Invariable alloy) one (20 cm × 20 cm, Ra = 1.40 nm) were demonstrated. The INVAR film was used as a substrate for fabricating organic light emitting diodes (OLED) and organic photovoltaic (OPV). The optical and electrical characteristics of OLEDs and OPVs using the INVAR were comparable to those using a conventional ITO glass substrate.

  7. Method and apparatus for laser scribing glass sheet substrate coatings

    DOEpatents

    Borgeson, Frank A.; Hanak, Joseph J.; Harju, Ricky S.; Helman, Norman L.; Hecht, Kenneth R.

    2003-05-06

    A method and apparatus (42) for laser scribing coatings on glass sheet substrates by conveying the substrate adjacent a laser source (83) that provides a pulsed laser beam (84) with a wavelength at a near-infrared fundamental frequency and having a frequency in the range of 50 to 100 kilohertz and a pulse duration in the range of 8 to 70 nanoseconds, and by reflecting the beam by an XYZ galvanometer controlled mirror system (90) toward an uncoated surface of the substrate for passage therethrough to the coating on the other surface to provide overlapping ablations through the coating and scribing at a speed of at least 1000 millimeters per second.

  8. Method and apparatus for laser scribing glass sheet substrate coatings

    DOEpatents

    Borgeson, Frank A.; Hanak, Joseph J.; Harju, Ricky S.; Harju, Karen M.; Helman, Norman L.; Hecht, Kenneth R.

    2005-07-19

    A method and apparatus (42) for laser scribing coatings on glass sheet substrates by conveying the substrate adjacent a laser source (83) that provides a pulsed laser beam (84) with a wavelength at a near-infrared fundamental frequency and having a frequency in the range of 50 to 100 kilohertz and a pulse duration in the range of 8 to 70 nanoseconds, and by reflecting the beam by an XYZ galvanometer controlled mirror system (90) toward an uncoated surface of the substrate for passage therethrough to the coating on the other surface to provide overlapping ablations through the coating and scribing at a speed of at least 1000 millimeters per second.

  9. Bioenabled SERS substrates for food safety and drinking water monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Wang, Alan X.

    2015-05-01

    We present low-cost bioenabled surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates that can be massively produced in sustainable and eco-friendly methods with significant commercial potentials for the detection of food contamination and drinking water pollution. The sensors are based on diatom frustules with integrated plasmonic nanoparticles. The ultra-high sensitivity of the SERS substrates comes from the coupling between the diatom frustules and Ag nanoparticles to achieve dramatically increased local optical field to enhance the light-matter interactions for SERS sensing. We successfully applied the bioenabled SERS substrates to detect melamine in milk and aromatic compounds in water with sensitivity down to 1μg/L.

  10. Micro and nanocrystalline diamond formation on reticulated vitreous carbon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, A. V.; Trava-Airoldi, V. J.; Corat, E. J.; Ferreira, N. G.

    2005-10-01

    High diamond nucleation and a three-dimensional growth on reticulated vitreous carbon substrate are obtained by chemical vapor deposition. Scanning electron microscopy images show continuous films covering the whole substrate including the center of 3.5 mm thick porous samples. It is evident the nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) film formation on deeper substrate regions. The grain size can vary from nano to micro scale for deposition time of 20 h. Raman spectra of sample regions closer to filaments exhibit well-defined diamond line. For central regions of sample (depth between 1.0 and 2.0 mm) Raman spectra also confirm NCD film.

  11. Reel-to-reel substrate tape polishing system

    DOEpatents

    Selvamanickam, Venkat; Gardner, Michael T.; Judd, Raymond D.; Weloth, Martin; Qiao, Yunfei

    2005-06-21

    Disclosed is a reel-to-reel single-pass mechanical polishing system (100) suitable for polishing long lengths of metal substrate tape (124) used in the manufacture of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) coated tape, including multiple instantiations of a polishing station (114) in combination with a subsequent rinsing station (116) arranged along the axis of the metal substrate tape (124) that is translating between a payout spool (110a) and a take-up spool (110b). The metal substrate tape obtains a surface smoothness that is suitable for the subsequent deposition of a buffer layer.

  12. Recovery of Mo/Si multilayer coated optical substrates

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Sherry L.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Stearns, Daniel G.

    1997-12-16

    Mo/Si multilayers are removed from superpolished ZERODUR and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. The two step dry etching process removes SiO.sub.2 overlayer with a fluroine-containing gas and then moves molybdenum and silicon multilayers with a chlorine-containing gas. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates.

  13. Recovery of Mo/Si multilayer coated optical substrates

    DOEpatents

    Baker, S.L.; Vernon, S.P.; Stearns, D.G.

    1997-12-16

    Mo/Si multilayers are removed from superpolished ZERODUR and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. The two step dry etching process removes SiO{sub 2} overlayer with a fluroine-containing gas and then moves molybdenum and silicon multilayers with a chlorine-containing gas. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates. 5 figs.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Microarrays Grown on Nanoflake Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Howard K.; Hauge, Robert H.; Pint, Cary; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a new composition of matter where single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown in aligned arrays from nanostructured flakes that are coated in Fe catalyst. This method of growth of aligned SWNTs, which can yield well over 400 percent SWNT mass per unit substrate mass, exceeds current yields for entangled SWNT growth. In addition, processing can be performed with minimal wet etching treatments, leaving aligned SWNTs with superior properties over those that exist in entangled mats. The alignment of the nanotubes is similar to that achieved in vertically aligned nanotubes, which are called "carpets. " Because these flakes are grown in a state where they are airborne in a reactor, these flakes, after growing SWNTs, are termed "flying carpets. " These flakes are created in a roll-to-roll evaporator system, where three subsequent evaporations are performed on a 100-ft (approx. =30-m) roll of Mylar. The first layer is composed of a water-soluble "release layer, " which can be a material such as NaCl. After depositing NaCl, the second layer involves 40 nm of supporting layer material . either Al2O3 or MgO. The thickness of the layer can be tuned to synthesize flakes that are larger or smaller than those obtained with a 40-nm deposition. Finally, the third layer consists of a thin Fe catalyst layer with a thickness of 0.5 nm. The thickness of this layer ultimately determines the diameter of SWNT growth, and a layer that is too thick will result in the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes instead of single-wall nanotubes. However, between a thickness of 0.5 nm to 1 nm, single-walled carbon nanotubes are known to be the primary constituent. After this three-layer deposition process, the Mylar is rolled through a bath of water, which allows catalyst-coated flakes to detach from the Mylar. The flakes are then collected and dried. The method described here for making such flakes is analogous to that which is used to make birefringent ink that is

  15. Assessing Posidonia oceanica seedling substrate preference: an experimental determination of seedling anchorage success in rocky vs. sandy substrates.

    PubMed

    Alagna, Adriana; Fernández, Tomás Vega; Anna, Giovanni D; Magliola, Carlo; Mazzola, Salvatore; Badalamenti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades the growing awareness of the ecological importance of seagrass meadows has prompted increasing efforts to protect existing beds and restore degraded habitats. An in-depth knowledge of factors acting as major drivers of propagule settlement and recruitment is required in order to understand patterns of seagrass colonization and recovery and to inform appropriate management and conservation strategies. In this work Posidonia oceanica seedlings were reared for five months in a land-based culture facility under simulated natural hydrodynamic conditions to identify suitable substrates for seedling anchorage. Two main substrate features were investigated: firmness (i.e., sand vs. rock) and complexity (i.e., size of interstitial spaces between rocks). Seedlings were successfully grown in culture tanks, obtaining overall seedling survival of 93%. Anchorage was strongly influenced by substrate firmness and took place only on rocks, where it was as high as 89%. Anchorage occurred through adhesion by sticky root hairs. The minimum force required to dislodge plantlets attached to rocky substrates reached 23.830 N (equivalent to 2.43 kg), which would potentially allow many plantlets to overcome winter storms in the field. The ability of rocky substrates to retain seedlings increased with their complexity. The interstitial spaces between rocks provided appropriate microsites for seedling settlement, as seeds were successfully retained, and a suitable substrate for anchorage was available. In conclusion P. oceanica juveniles showed a clear-cut preference for hard substrates over the sandy one, due to the root system adhesive properties. In particular, firm and complex substrates allowed for propagule early and strong anchorage, enhancing persistence and establishment probabilities. Seedling substrate preference documented here leads to expect a more successful sexual recruitment on hard bottoms compared with soft ones. This feature could have influenced P

  16. Extensive peptide and natural protein substrate screens reveal that mouse caspase-11 has much narrower substrate specificity than caspase-1

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Monica L. Gonzalez; Poreba, Marcin; Snipas, Scott J.; Groborz, Katarzyna; Drag, Marcin; Salvesen, Guy S.

    2018-01-01

    Inflammatory cell death, or pyroptosis, is triggered by pathogenic infections or events. It is executed by caspase-1 (in the canonical pyroptosis pathway) or caspase-11 (noncanonical pathway), each via production of a cell-lytic domain from the pyroptosis effector protein gasdermin D through specific and limited proteolysis. Pyroptosis is accompanied by the release of inflammatory mediators, including the proteolytically processed forms of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. Given the similar inflammatory outcomes of the canonical and noncanonical pyroptosis pathways, we hypothesized that caspase-1 and -11 should have very similar activities and substrate specificities. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant murine caspases and analyzed their primary specificities by massive hybrid combinatorial substrate library (HyCoSuL) screens. We correlated the substrate preferences of each caspase with their activities on the recombinant natural substrates IL-1β, IL-18, and gasdermin D. Although we identified highly selective and robust peptidyl substrates for caspase-1, we were unable to do so for caspase-11, because caspase-1 cleaved even the best caspase-11 substrates equally well. Caspase-1 rapidly processed pro-IL-1β and -18, but caspase-11 processed these two pro-ILs extremely poorly. However, both caspase-1 and -11 efficiently produced the cell-lytic domain from the gasdermin D precursor. We hypothesize that caspase-11 may have evolved a specific exosite to selectively engage pyroptosis without directly activating pro-IL-1β or -18. In summary, comparing the activities of caspase-1 and -11 in HyCoSuL screens and with three endogenous protein substrates, we conclude that caspase-11 has highly restricted substrate specificity, preferring gasdermin D over all other substrates examined. PMID:29414788

  17. Extensive peptide and natural protein substrate screens reveal that mouse caspase-11 has much narrower substrate specificity than caspase-1.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Monica L Gonzalez; Poreba, Marcin; Snipas, Scott J; Groborz, Katarzyna; Drag, Marcin; Salvesen, Guy S

    2018-05-04

    Inflammatory cell death, or pyroptosis, is triggered by pathogenic infections or events. It is executed by caspase-1 (in the canonical pyroptosis pathway) or caspase-11 (noncanonical pathway), each via production of a cell-lytic domain from the pyroptosis effector protein gasdermin D through specific and limited proteolysis. Pyroptosis is accompanied by the release of inflammatory mediators, including the proteolytically processed forms of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. Given the similar inflammatory outcomes of the canonical and noncanonical pyroptosis pathways, we hypothesized that caspase-1 and -11 should have very similar activities and substrate specificities. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant murine caspases and analyzed their primary specificities by massive hybrid combinatorial substrate library (HyCoSuL) screens. We correlated the substrate preferences of each caspase with their activities on the recombinant natural substrates IL-1β, IL-18, and gasdermin D. Although we identified highly selective and robust peptidyl substrates for caspase-1, we were unable to do so for caspase-11, because caspase-1 cleaved even the best caspase-11 substrates equally well. Caspase-1 rapidly processed pro-IL-1β and -18, but caspase-11 processed these two pro-ILs extremely poorly. However, both caspase-1 and -11 efficiently produced the cell-lytic domain from the gasdermin D precursor. We hypothesize that caspase-11 may have evolved a specific exosite to selectively engage pyroptosis without directly activating pro-IL-1β or -18. In summary, comparing the activities of caspase-1 and -11 in HyCoSuL screens and with three endogenous protein substrates, we conclude that caspase-11 has highly restricted substrate specificity, preferring gasdermin D over all other substrates examined. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Silicon based substrate with calcium aluminosilicate/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Miller, Robert Alden (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Nagaraj, Bangalore A. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a calcium alumino silicate.

  19. Method for adhering a coating to a substrate structure

    DOEpatents

    Taxacher, Glenn Curtis; Crespo, Andres Garcia; Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey

    2015-02-17

    A method for adhering a coating to a substrate structure comprises selecting a substrate structure having an outer surface oriented substantially parallel to a direction of radial stress, modifying the outer surface to provide a textured region having steps to adhere a coating thereto, and applying a coating to extend over at least a portion of the textured region, wherein the steps are oriented substantially perpendicular to the direction of radial stress to resist deformation of the coating relative to the substrate structure. A rotating component comprises a substrate structure having an outer surface oriented substantially parallel to a direction of radial stress. The outer surface defines a textured region having steps to adhere a coating thereto, and a coating extends over at least a portion of the textured region. The steps are oriented substantially perpendicular to the direction of radial stress to resist creep.

  20. Improved process for epitaxial deposition of silicon on prediffused substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. G.; Halsor, J. L.; Word, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    Process for fabricating integrated circuits uniformly deposits silicon epitaxially on prediffused substrates without affecting the sublayer diffusion pattern. Two silicon deposits from different sources, and deposited at different temperatures, protect the sublayer pattern from the silicon tetrachloride reaction.

  1. Salbutamol intake and substrate oxidation during submaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Arlettaz, A; Le Panse, B; Portier, H; Lecoq, A-M; Thomasson, R; De Ceaurriz, J; Collomp, K

    2009-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that salbutamol would change substrate oxidation during submaximal exercise, eight recreationally trained men twice performed 1 h at 60% VO(2) peak after ingestion of placebo or 4 mg of salbutamol. Gas exchange was monitored and blood samples were collected during exercise for GH, ACTH, insulin, and blood glucose and lactate determination. With salbutamol versus placebo, there was no significant difference in total energy expenditure and substrate oxidation, but the substrate oxidation balance was significantly modified after 40 min of exercise. ACTH was significantly decreased with salbutamol during the last 10 min of exercise, whereas no difference was found between the two treatments in the other hormonal and metabolic parameters. The theory that the ergogenic effect of salbutamol results from a change in substrate oxidation has little support during relatively short term endurance exercise, but it is conceivable that longer exercise duration can generate positive findings.

  2. Identifying 8-hydroxynaringenin as a suicide substrate of mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Te-Sheng; Lin, Meng-Yi; Lin, Hsuan-Jung

    2010-01-01

    A biotransformed metabolite of naringenin was isolated from the fermentation broth of Aspergillus oryzae, fed with naringenin, and identified as 8-hydroxynaringenin based on the mass and (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectral data. The compound showed characteristics of both an irreversible inhibitor and a substrate of mushroom tyrosinase in preincubation and HPLC analysis. These results demonstrate that 8-hydroxynaringenin belongs to a suicide substrate of mushroom tyrosinase. The partition ratio between the compound's molecules in the formation of product and in the inactivation of the enzyme was determined to be 283 +/- 21. The present study's results, together with our previous findings, which proved that both 8-hydroxydaidzein and 8-hydroxygenistein are suicide substrates of mushroom tyrosinase, show that 7,8,4'-trihydroxyl functional groups on flavonoids' skeletons play important roles in producing suicide substrate properties toward mushroom tyrosinase.

  3. Near-field polarization distribution of Si nanoparticles near substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetov, S. A.; Vladimirova, Yu. V.; Gevorkian, L. P.; Zadkov, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    Structure of the near-field intensity and polarization distributions, the latter is described with the generalized 3D Stokes parameters, of a spherical Si subwavelength nanoparticle in a non-magnetic and non-absorbing media near a dielectric substrate has been studied in detail with the help of the Mie theory and an extension of the Weyl's method for the calculation of the reflection of dipole radiation by a flat surface. It is shown that for the nanoparticle near the substrate the interference effects due to the scattering by the nanoparticle and interaction with the substrate play an essential role. We also demonstrate how these effects depend on the dielectric properties of the nanoparticle, its size, distance to the substrate as well as on the polarization, wavelength and incident angle of the external light field.

  4. Interfacial nanobubbles on atomically flat substrates with different hydrophobicities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingya; Zhao, Binyu; Ma, Wangguo; Wang, Ying; Gao, Xingyu; Tai, Renzhong; Zhou, Xingfei; Zhang, Lijuan

    2015-04-07

    The dependence of the morphology of interfacial nanobubbles on atomically flat substrates with different wettability ranges was investigated by using PeakForce quantitative nanomechanics. Interfacial nanobubbles were formed and imaged on silicon nitride (Si3N4), mica, and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates that were partly covered by reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The contact angles and sizes of those nanobubbles were measured under the same conditions. Nanobubbles with the same lateral width exhibited different heights on the different substrates, with the order Si3N4≈mica>rGO>HOPG, which is consistent with the trend of the hydrophobicity of the substrates. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Selective modulation of cell response on engineered fractal silicon substrates

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Francesco; Medda, Rebecca; Cheng, Ling; Battista, Edmondo; Scopelliti, Pasquale E.; Milani, Paolo; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta A.; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of work has been dedicated to the analysis of cell behavior on substrates with ordered topographical features. However, the natural cell microenvironment is characterized by biomechanical cues organized over multiple scales. Here, randomly rough, self-affinefractal surfaces are generated out of silicon,where roughness Ra and fractal dimension Df are independently controlled. The proliferation rates, the formation of adhesion structures, and the morphology of 3T3 murine fibroblasts are monitored over six different substrates. The proliferation rate is maximized on surfaces with moderate roughness (Ra ~ 40 nm) and large fractal dimension (Df ~ 2.4); whereas adhesion structures are wider and more stable on substrates with higher roughness (Ra ~ 50 nm) and lower fractal dimension (Df ~ 2.2). Higher proliferation occurson substrates exhibiting densely packed and sharp peaks, whereas more regular ridges favor adhesion. These results suggest that randomly roughtopographies can selectively modulate cell behavior. PMID:23492898

  6. Method for formation of thin film transistors on plastic substrates

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Sigmon, Thomas W.; Aceves, Randy C.

    1998-10-06

    A process for formation of thin film transistors (TFTs) on plastic substrates replaces standard thin film transistor fabrication techniques, and uses sufficiently lower processing temperatures so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The process relies on techniques for depositing semiconductors, dielectrics, and metals at low temperatures; crystallizing and doping semiconductor layers in the TFT with a pulsed energy source; and creating top-gate self-aligned as well as back-gate TFT structures. The process enables the fabrication of amorphous and polycrystalline channel silicon TFTs at temperatures sufficiently low to prevent damage to plastic substrates. The process has use in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics.

  7. Method for formation of thin film transistors on plastic substrates

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Smith, P.M.; Sigmon, T.W.; Aceves, R.C.

    1998-10-06

    A process for formation of thin film transistors (TFTs) on plastic substrates replaces standard thin film transistor fabrication techniques, and uses sufficiently lower processing temperatures so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The process relies on techniques for depositing semiconductors, dielectrics, and metals at low temperatures; crystallizing and doping semiconductor layers in the TFT with a pulsed energy source; and creating top-gate self-aligned as well as back-gate TFT structures. The process enables the fabrication of amorphous and polycrystalline channel silicon TFTs at temperatures sufficiently low to prevent damage to plastic substrates. The process has use in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics. 5 figs.

  8. Uncoupling binding of substrate CO from turnover by vanadium nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Chung; Fay, Aaron W; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Krest, Courtney M; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2015-11-10

    Biocatalysis by nitrogenase, particularly the reduction of N2 and CO by this enzyme, has tremendous significance in environment- and energy-related areas. Elucidation of the detailed mechanism of nitrogenase has been hampered by the inability to trap substrates or intermediates in a well-defined state. Here, we report the capture of substrate CO on the resting-state vanadium-nitrogenase in a catalytically competent conformation. The close resemblance of this active CO-bound conformation to the recently described structure of CO-inhibited molybdenum-nitrogenase points to the mechanistic relevance of sulfur displacement to the activation of iron sites in the cofactor for CO binding. Moreover, the ability of vanadium-nitrogenase to bind substrate in the resting-state uncouples substrate binding from subsequent turnover, providing a platform for generation of defined intermediate(s) of both CO and N2 reduction.

  9. Accelerating oxygen reduction on Pt monolayer via substrate compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xilin; Chen, Yue; Yang, Zongxian; Lu, Zhansheng

    2017-11-01

    Many methods have been proposed to accelerate the oxygen reduction and save the dosage of Pt. Here, we report a promising way in fulfilling these purposes by applying substrate strain on the supported Pt monolayer. The compressive strain would modify the geometric and electronic structures of tungsten carbide (WC) substrate, changing the interaction nature between substrate and Pt monolayer and resulting in a downward shift of the d-band center of surface Pt atoms. The activity of Pt monolayer on the compressed WC is further evaluated from the kinetics of the dissociation and protonation of O2. The dissociation barrier of O2 is increased and the hydrogenation barrier of O atom is decreased, indicating that the recovery of the catalytically active sites is accelerated and the deactivation by oxygen poison is alleviated. The present study provides an effective way in tuning the activity of Pt-based catalysts by applying the substrate strain.

  10. Design and modeling of Faraday cages for substrate noise isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Joyce H.; del Alamo, Jesús A.

    2013-07-01

    A Faraday cage structure using through-substrate vias is an effective strategy to suppress substrate crosstalk, particularly at high frequencies. Faraday cages can reduce substrate noise by 32 dB at 10 GHz, and 26 dB at 50 GHz. We have developed lumped-element, equivalent circuit models of the Faraday cages and test structures to better understand the performance of the Faraday cages. These models compare well to measured results and show that the vias of the Faraday cage act as an RLC shunt to ground that draws substrate current. Designing a Faraday cage to achieve optimum isolation requires low via impedance and mitigation of via sidewall capacitance. The Faraday cage inductance is correlated to the number of vias and via spacing of the cage and can be optimized for the frequency of operation.

  11. Substrate specificity of the ubiquitin and Ubl proteases

    PubMed Central

    Ronau, Judith A; Beckmann, John F; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Conjugation and deconjugation of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls) to cellular proteins are highly regulated processes integral to cellular homeostasis. Most often, the C-termini of these small polypeptides are attached to lysine side chains of target proteins by an amide (isopeptide) linkage. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and Ubl-specific proteases (ULPs) comprise a diverse group of proteases that recognize and remove ubiquitin and Ubls from their substrates. How DUBs and ULPs distinguish among different modifiers, or different polymeric forms of these modifiers, remains poorly understood. The specificity of ubiquitin/Ubl-deconjugating enzymes for particular substrates depends on multiple factors, ranging from the topography of specific substrate features, as in different polyubiquitin chain types, to structural elements unique to each enzyme. Here we summarize recent structural and biochemical studies that provide insights into mechanisms of substrate specificity among various DUBs and ULPs. We also discuss the unexpected specificities of non-eukaryotic proteases in these families. PMID:27012468

  12. Numerical simulations of sessile droplet evaporating on heated substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Paul G.; Ouazzani, Jalil; Liu, Qiusheng

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by the space project EFILE, a 2D axisymmetric numerical model in the framework of ALE method is developed to investigate the coupled physical mechanism during the evaporation of a pinned drop that partially wets on a heated substrate. The model accounts for mass transport in surrounding air, Marangoni convection inside the drop and heat conduction in the substrate as well as moving interface. Numerical results predict simple scaling laws for the evaporation rate which scales linearly with drop radius but follows a power-law with substrate temperature. It is highlighted that thermal effect of the substrate has a great impact on the temperature profile at the drop surface, which leads to a multicellular thermocapillary flow pattern. In particular, the structure of the multicellular flow behavior induced within a heated drop is mainly controlled by a geometric parameter (aspect ratio). A relationship between the number of thermal cells and the aspect ratio is proposed.

  13. Modeling of substrate and inhibitor binding to phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Sessions, R B; Dauber-Osguthorpe, P; Campbell, M M; Osguthorpe, D J

    1992-09-01

    Molecular graphics and molecular mechanics techniques have been used to study the mode of ligand binding and mechanism of action of the enzyme phospholipase A2. A substrate-enzyme complex was constructed based on the crystal structure of the apoenzyme. The complex was minimized to relieve initial strain, and the structural and energetic features of the resultant complex analyzed in detail, at the molecular and residue level. The minimized complex was then used as a basis for examining the action of the enzyme on modified substrates, binding of inhibitors to the enzyme, and possible reaction intermediate complexes. The model is compatible with the suggested mechanism of hydrolysis and with experimental data about stereoselectivity, efficiency of hydrolysis of modified substrates, and inhibitor potency. In conclusion, the model can be used as a tool in evaluating new ligands as possible substrates and in the rational design of inhibitors, for the therapeutic treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and asthma.

  14. Mitigation of substrate defects in reticles using multilayer buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Bajt, Sasa; Stearns, Daniel G.

    2001-01-01

    A multilayer film is used as a buffer layer to minimize the size of defects on a reticle substrate prior to deposition of a reflective coating on the substrate. The multilayer buffer layer deposited intermediate the reticle substrate and the reflective coating produces a smoothing of small particles and other defects on the reticle substrate. The reduction in defect size is controlled by surface relaxation during the buffer layer growth process and by the degree of intermixing and volume contraction of the materials at the multilayer interfaces. The buffer layers are deposited at near-normal incidence via a low particulate ion beam sputtering process. The growth surface of the buffer layer may also be heated by a secondary ion source to increase the degree of intermixing and improve the mitigation of defects.

  15. Silicon based substrate with environmental/thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  16. Silicon based substrate with environmental/ thermal barrier layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Jr., Harry Edwin (Inventor); Allen, William Patrick (Inventor); Jacobson, Nathan S. (Inventor); Bansal, Nanottam P. (Inventor); Opila, Elizabeth J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor); Meschter, Peter Joel (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A barrier layer for a silicon containing substrate which inhibits the formation of gaseous species of silicon when exposed to a high temperature aqueous environment comprises a barium-strontium alumino silicate.

  17. Chemically Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes as Substrates for Neuronal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hui; Ni, Yingchun; Montana, Vedrana; Haddon, Robert C.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    We report the use of chemically modified carbon nanotubes as a substrate for cultured neurons. The morphological features of neurons that directly reflect their potential capability in synaptic transmission are characterized. The chemical properties of carbon nanotubes are systematically varied by attaching different functional groups that confer known characteristics to the substrate. By manipulating the charge carried by functionalized carbon nanotubes we are able to control the outgrowth and branching pattern of neuronal processes. PMID:21394241

  18. Substrates coated with silver nanoparticles as a neuronal regenerative material

    PubMed Central

    Alon, Noa; Miroshnikov, Yana; Perkas, Nina; Nissan, Ifat; Gedanken, Aharon; Shefi, Orit

    2014-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the design of effective biomaterials for nerve regeneration. Here, we report the novel use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as regenerative agents to promote neuronal growth. We grew neuroblastoma cells on surfaces coated with AgNPs and studied the effect on the development of the neurites during the initiation and the elongation growth phases. We find that the AgNPs function as favorable anchoring sites, and the growth on the AgNP-coated substrates leads to a significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Cells grown on substrates coated with AgNPs have initiated three times more neurites than cells grown on uncoated substrates, and two times more than cells grown on substrates sputtered with a plain homogenous layer of silver. The growth of neurites on AgNPs in the elongation phase was enhanced as well. A comparison with substrates coated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) demonstrated a clear silver material-driven promoting effect, in addition to the nanotopography. The growth on substrates coated with AgNPs has led to a significantly higher number of initiating neurites when compared to substrates coated with AuNPs or ZnONPs. All nanoparticle-coated substrates affected and promoted the elongation of neurites, with a significant positive maximal effect for the AgNPs. Our results, combined with the well-known antibacterial effect of AgNPs, suggest the use of AgNPs as an attractive nanomaterial – with dual activity – for neuronal repair studies. PMID:24872701

  19. Fabrication of polycrystalline solar cells on low-cost substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A new method of producing p-n junction semiconductors for solar cells was described; the principal objective of this investigation is to reduce production costs significantly by depositing polycrystalline silicon on a relatively cheap substrate such as metallurgical-grade silicon, graphite, or steel. The silicon layer contains appropriate dopants, and the substrates are coated with a diffusion barrier of silica, borosilicate, phosphosilicate, or mixtures of these compounds.

  20. Substrates suitable for deposition of superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Feenstra, Roeland; Boatner, Lynn A.

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting system for the lossless transmission of electrical current comprising a thin film of superconducting material Y.sub.1 Ba.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x epitaxially deposited upon a KTaO.sub.3 substrate. The KTaO.sub.3 is an improved substrate over those of the prior art since the it exhibits small lattice constant mismatch and does not chemically react with the superconducting film.

  1. [Myocardial substrate support before and after mitral commissurotomy].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, I V; Guliamov, D S; Andres, Iu P; Amanov, A A; Khodzhaev, M M

    1981-07-01

    The utilization by the myocardium of 8 substrates of the carboxydrate-lipid metabolism was assessed in 44 patients with the 3d and 4th stages of mitral stenosis before and after mitral commissurotomy by the method of the arterio-venous difference. The character of the myocardium supply with substrates with different energetic value was established to depend and to be a sufficiently objective criterium of prognosis of cardiac insufficiency in the early postoperative period.

  2. Piezoelectric biosensor with a ladder polymer substrate coating

    DOEpatents

    Renschler, Clifford L.; White, Christine A.; Carter, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    A piezoelectric biosensor substrate useful for immobilizing biomolecules in an oriented manner on the surface of a piezoelectric sensor has a ladder polymer of polyacrylonitrile. To make the substrate, a solution of an organic polymer, preferably polyacrylonitrile, is applied to the surface of a piezoelectric sensor. The organic polymer is modifying by heating the polymer in a controlled fashion in air such that a ladder polymer is produced which, in turn, forms the attachment point for the biomolecules comprising the piezoelectric biosensor.

  3. Preparation of surface enhanced Raman substrate and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, J. Y.; Wang, J. Q.

    2017-10-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a fast, convenient and highly sensitive detection technique, and preparing the good effect and repeatable substrate is the key to realize the trace amount and quantitative detection in the field of food safety detection. In this paper, a surface enhanced Raman substrate based on submicrometer silver particles structure was prepared by chemical deposition method, and characterized its structure and optical properties.

  4. System Configured For Applying Multiple Modifying Agents To A Substrate.

    DOEpatents

    Propp, W. Alan; Argyle, Mark D.; Janikowski, Stuart K.; Fox, Robert V.; Toth, William J.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Allen, Charles A.; Miller, David L.

    2005-11-08

    The present invention is related to the modifying of substrates with multiple modifying agents in a single continuous system. At least two processing chambers are configured for modifying the substrate in a continuous feed system. The processing chambers can be substantially isolated from one another by interstitial seals. Additionally, the two processing chambers can be substantially isolated from the surrounding atmosphere by end seals. Optionally, expansion chambers can be used to separate the seals from the processing chambers.

  5. System configured for applying multiple modifying agents to a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Propp, W. Alan; Argyle, Mark D.; Janikowski, Stuart K.; Fox, Robert V.; Toth, William J.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Allen, Charles A.; Miller, David L.

    2003-11-25

    The present invention is related to the modifying of substrates with multiple modifying agents in a single continuous system. At least two processing chambers are configured for modifying the substrate in a continuous feed system. The processing chambers can be substantially isolated from one another by interstitial seals. Additionally, the two processing chambers can be substantially isolated from the surrounding atmosphere by end seals. Optionally, expansion chambers can be used to separate the seals from the processing chambers.

  6. Direct Observation of Asphaltene Nanoparticles on Model Mineral Substrates.

    PubMed

    Raj, Gijo; Lesimple, Alain; Whelan, Jamie; Naumov, Panče

    2017-06-27

    The propensity for adherence to solid surfaces of asphaltenes, a complex solubility class of heteropolycyclic aromatic compounds from the heavy fraction of crude oil, has long been the root cause of scale deposition and remains an intractable problem in the petroleum industry. Although the adhesion is essential to understanding the process of asphaltene deposition, the relationship between the conformation of asphaltene molecules on mineral substrates and its impact on adhesion and mechanical properties of the deposits is not completely understood. To rationalize the primary processes in the process of organic scale deposition, here we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the morphology of petroleum asphaltenes deposited on model mineral substrates. High imaging contrast was achieved by the differential adhesion of the tip between asphaltenes and the mineral substrate. While asphaltenes form smooth continuous films on all substrates at higher concentrations, they deposit as individual nanoparticles at lower concentrations. The size, shape, and spatial distribution of the nanoaggregates are strongly affected by the nature of the substrate; while uniformly distributed spherical particles are formed on highly polar and hydrophilic substrates (mica), irregular islands and thicker patches are observed with substrates of lower polarity (silica and calcite). Asphaltene nanoparticles flatten when adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite due to π-π interactions with the polycyclic core. Force-distance profiles provide direct evidence of the conformational changes of asphaltene molecules on hydrophilic/hydrophobic substrates that result in dramatic changes in adhesion and mechanical properties of asphaltene deposits. Such an understanding of the nature of adhesion and mechanical properties tuned by surface properties, on the level of asphaltene nanoaggregates, would contribute to the design of efficient asphaltene inhibitors for preventing asphaltene

  7. Mode structure of planar optical antennas on dielectric substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Word, Robert C.; Konenkamp, Rolf

    2016-08-08

    Here, we report a numerical study, supported by photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), of sub-micron planar optical antennas on transparent substrate. We find these antennas generate intricate near-field spatial field distributions with odd and even numbers of nodes. We show that the field distributions are primarily superpositions of planar surface plasmon polariton modes confined to the metal/substrate interface. The mode structure provides opportunities for coherent switching and optical control in sub-micron volumes.

  8. Adhesive interactions of geckos with wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Alyssa Y.; Dryden, Daniel M.; Olderman, Jeffrey; Peterson, Kelly A.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; French, Roger H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Fluorinated substrates like Teflon® (poly(tetrafluoroethylene); PTFE) are well known for their role in creating non-stick surfaces. We showed previously that even geckos, which can stick to most surfaces under a wide variety of conditions, slip on PTFE. Surprisingly, however, geckos can stick reasonably well to PTFE if it is wet. In an effort to explain this effect, we have turned our attention to the role of substrate surface energy and roughness when shear adhesion occurs in media other than air. In this study, we removed the roughness component inherent to commercially available PTFE and tested geckos on relatively smooth wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates. We found that roughness had very little effect on shear adhesion in air or in water and that the level of fluorination was most important for shear adhesion, particularly in air. Surface energy calculations of the two fluorinated substrates and one control substrate using the Tabor–Winterton approximation and the Young–Dupré equation were used to determine the interfacial energy of the substrates. Using these interfacial energies we estimated the ratio of wet and dry normal adhesion for geckos clinging to the three substrates. Consistent with the results for rough PTFE, our predictions show a qualitative trend in shear adhesion based on fluorination, and the quantitative experimental differences highlight the unusually low shear adhesion of geckos on dry smooth fluorinated substrates, which is not captured by surface energy calculations. Our work has implications for bioinspired design of synthetics that can preferentially stick in water but not in air. PMID:26109635

  9. Alternative substrates for culturing the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    The freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus is tank cultured to provide organisms for aquatic habitat assessments and regeneration research and to produce a clean source of live food for aquarium fishes. Shredded paper is the typical substrate in small-scale culture of L variegants, however, the effort needed to separate large numbers of individuals from decomposing paper can be prohibitive. Burlap and nylon mesh materials were compared with paper as potential alternatives for reducing this effort. Production and the time needed to separate L. variegatus from substrate were compared for 8 weeks among cultures with burlap, mesh, and paper substrates. Cultures with paper increased in number and weight faster than those with burlap or mesh, but cultures using the alternative substrates also expanded their populations quickly. The time required to separate oligochaetes from substrate was initially longer with paper and became significantly longer at 6 weeks as the paper decomposed. Burlap frayed, but mesh exhibited no degradation. Elevated ammonia and nitrite concentrations may have suppressed production in mesh treatments throughout the study, and ammonia was lethal in paper treatments during the final 2 weeks. Slow initial production in burlap treatments may have been due 10 chemical applications to the fabric, which may limit the utility of burlap as a substrate. Culture systems that maintain adequate water quality could increase production from burlap and mesh substrates to levels observed with paper substrate. Mesh is recommended because it is nontoxic and nonbiodegradable and can significantly reduce the effort required to obtain oligochaetes and to maintain and monitor the cultures.

  10. Substrate mass transfer: analytical approach for immobilized enzyme reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthamarai, R.; Saibavani, T. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the boundary value problem in immobilized enzyme reactions is formulated and approximate expression for substrate concentration without external mass transfer resistance is presented. He’s variational iteration method is used to give approximate and analytical solutions of non-linear differential equation containing a non linear term related to enzymatic reaction. The relevant analytical solution for the dimensionless substrate concentration profile is discussed in terms of dimensionless reaction parameters α and β.

  11. Formation of thin-film resistors on silicon substrates

    DOEpatents

    Schnable, George L.; Wu, Chung P.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of thin-film resistors by the ion implantation of a metallic conductive layer in the surface of a layer of phosphosilicate glass or borophosphosilicate glass which is deposited on a silicon substrate. The metallic conductive layer materials comprise one of the group consisting of tantalum, ruthenium, rhodium, platinum and chromium silicide. The resistor is formed and annealed prior to deposition of metal, e.g. aluminum, on the substrate.

  12. Foldable graphene electronic circuits based on paper substrates.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Park, O Ok; Chin, Byung Doo

    2013-09-14

    Graphene electronic circuits are prepared on paper substrates by using graphene nanoplates and applied to foldable paper-based electronics. The graphene circuits show a small change in conductance under various folding angles and maintain an electronic path on paper substrates after repetition of folding and unfolding. Foldable paper-based applications with graphene circuits exhibit excellent folding stability. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Variable substrate preference among phospholipase D toxins from sicariid spiders

    SciTech Connect

    Lajoie, Daniel M.; Roberts, Sue A.; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A.

    Venoms of the sicariid spiders contain phospholipase D enzyme toxins that can cause severe dermonecrosis and even death in humans. These enzymes convert sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates to cyclic phosphates by activating a hydroxyl nucleophile present in both classes of lipid. The most medically relevant substrates are thought to be sphingomyelin and/or lysophosphatidylcholine. To better understand the substrate preference of these toxins, we used 31P NMR to compare the activity of three related but phylogenetically diverse sicariid toxins against a diverse panel of sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates. Two of the three showed significantly faster turnover of sphingolipids over lysolipids, andmore » all three showed a strong preference for positively charged (choline and/or ethanolamine) over neutral (glycerol and serine) headgroups. Strikingly, however, the enzymes vary widely in their preference for choline, the headgroup of both sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine, versus ethanolamine. An enzyme from Sicarius terrosus showed a strong preference for ethanolamine over choline, whereas two paralogous enzymes from Loxosceles arizonica either preferred choline or showed no significant preference. Intrigued by the novel substrate preference of the Sicarius enzyme, we solved its crystal structure at 2.1 Å resolution. Lastly, the evolution of variable substrate specificity may help explain the reduced dermonecrotic potential of some natural toxin variants, because mammalian sphingolipids use primarily choline as a positively charged headgroup; it may also be relevant for sicariid predatory behavior, because ethanolamine-containing sphingolipids are common in insect prey.« less

  14. Aerobic microbial mineralization of dichloroethene as sole carbon substrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2000-01-01

    Microorganisms indigenous to the bed sediments of a black- water stream utilized 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) as a sole carbon substrate for aerobic metabolism. Although no evidence of growth was observed in the minimal salts culture media used in this study, efficient aerobic microbial mineralization of 1,2-DCE as sole carbon substrate was maintained through three sequential transfers (107 final dilution) of the original environmental innoculum. These results indicate that 1,2-DCE can be utilized as a primary substrate to support microbial metabolism under aerobic conditions.Microorganisms indigenous to the bed sediments of a black-water stream utilized 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) as a sole carbon substrate for aerobic metabolism. Although no evidence of growth was observed in the minimal salts culture media used in this study, efficient aerobic microbial mineralization of 1,2-DCE as sole carbon substrate was maintained through three sequential transfers (107 final dilution) of the original environmental innoculum. These results indicate that 1,2-DCE can be utilized as a primary substrate to support microbial metabolism under aerobic conditions.

  15. Variable substrate preference among phospholipase D toxins from sicariid spiders

    DOE PAGES

    Lajoie, Daniel M.; Roberts, Sue A.; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A.; ...

    2015-03-09

    Venoms of the sicariid spiders contain phospholipase D enzyme toxins that can cause severe dermonecrosis and even death in humans. These enzymes convert sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates to cyclic phosphates by activating a hydroxyl nucleophile present in both classes of lipid. The most medically relevant substrates are thought to be sphingomyelin and/or lysophosphatidylcholine. To better understand the substrate preference of these toxins, we used 31P NMR to compare the activity of three related but phylogenetically diverse sicariid toxins against a diverse panel of sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates. Two of the three showed significantly faster turnover of sphingolipids over lysolipids, andmore » all three showed a strong preference for positively charged (choline and/or ethanolamine) over neutral (glycerol and serine) headgroups. Strikingly, however, the enzymes vary widely in their preference for choline, the headgroup of both sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine, versus ethanolamine. An enzyme from Sicarius terrosus showed a strong preference for ethanolamine over choline, whereas two paralogous enzymes from Loxosceles arizonica either preferred choline or showed no significant preference. Intrigued by the novel substrate preference of the Sicarius enzyme, we solved its crystal structure at 2.1 Å resolution. Lastly, the evolution of variable substrate specificity may help explain the reduced dermonecrotic potential of some natural toxin variants, because mammalian sphingolipids use primarily choline as a positively charged headgroup; it may also be relevant for sicariid predatory behavior, because ethanolamine-containing sphingolipids are common in insect prey.« less

  16. Substrate effect on the growth of Sn thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Suvankar; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.

    2018-05-01

    Growth of tin (Sn) on Ag(001), Ag(111) and W(110) substrate has been studied at elevated temperatures (473 K) using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). For Sn growth on silver substrates, it is noticed that both Sn 3d and Ag 3d core-level spectra shift in the higher binding energy direction due to the formation of surface alloy with the substrate. In both cases, surface alloy finally transforms into bulk alloy finally reaching bulk Sn value. For Sn growth on W(110) only Sn 3d core-level spectra shift in the higher binding energy direction due to surface core-level effect whereas no shift for tungsten core-level was noticed confirming no alloy formation. Sn is incorporated into the surface of substrate silver layer by removing every alternate or every third silver atoms to relieve the surface tensile stress as confirmed by LEED. On the other hand, tungsten being hard, Sn forms an overlayer structure by sitting in different energetically available positions rather than forming an alloy as energetically also it is not possible. Sn forms alloy with soft substrate silver and form overlayer films with tungsten. These studies are important in understanding the growth mechanism of Sn films on metal substrates.

  17. Deformation of Surface Nanobubbles Induced by Substrate Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiachen; Zhang, Xianren; Song, Fan

    2016-12-13

    Recent experimental measurements have shown that there exists a population of nanobubbles with different curvature radii, whereas both computer simulations and theoretical analysis indicated that the curvature radii of different nanobubbles should be the same at a given supersaturation. To resolve such inconsistency, we perform molecular dynamics simulations on surface nanobubbles that are stabilized by heterogeneous substrates either in the geometrical heterogeneity model (GHM) or in the chemical heterogeneity model (CHM) and propose that the inconsistency could be ascribed to the substrate-induced nanobubble deformation. We find that, as expected from theory and computer simulation, for either the GHM or the CHM, there exists a universal upper limit of contact angle for the nanobubbles, which is determined by the degree of supersaturation alone. By analyzing the evolution of the shape of nanobubbles as a function of substrate hydrophobicity that is controlled here by the liquid-solid interaction, two different origins of nanobubble deformation are identified. For substrates in the GHM, where the contact line is pinned by surface roughness, variation in the liquid-solid interaction changes only the location of the contact line and the measured contact angle, without causing a change in the nanobubble curvature. For substrates in the CHM, however, the liquid-solid interaction exerted by the bottom substrate can deform the vapor-liquid interface, resulting in variations in both the curvature of the vapor-liquid interface and the contact angle.

  18. Properties of GaN grown on sapphire substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Debnam, W. J.; Fripp, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Epitaxial growth of GaN on sapphire substrates using an open-tube growth furnace has been carried out to study the effects of substrate orientation and transfer gas upon the properties of the layers. It has been found that for the (0001) substrates, surface appearance was virtually independent of carrier gas and of doping levels. For the (1(-1)02) substrates surface faceting was greatly reduced when He was used as a transfer gas as opposed to H2. Faceting was also reduced when the GaN was doped with Zn, and the best surfaces for the (1(-1)02) substrates were obtained in a Zn-doped run using He as the transfer gas. The best sample in terms of electrical properties for the (1(-1)02) substrate had a mobility greater than 400 sq cm/V per sec and a carrier concentration of about 10 to the 17th per cu cm. This sample was undoped and used He as the transfer gas. The best (0001) sample was also grown undoped with He as the transfer gas and had a mobility of 300 sq cm/V per sec and a carrier concentration of 1 x 10 to the 18th per cu cm.

  19. Rectification of Ion Current in Nanopipettes by External Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenqing; Baker, Lane A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe ion distribution and the current-voltage (i-V) response of nanopipettes at different probe-to-substrate distances (Dps) as simulated by finite-element methods. Results suggest electrostatic interactions between a charged substrate and the nanopipette dominate electrophoretic ion transport through the nanopipette when Dps is within one order of magnitude of the Debye length (~10 nm for a 1 mM solution as employed in the simulation). Ion current rectification (ICR) and permselectivity associated with a neutral or charged nanopipette can be reversibly enhanced or reduced dependent on Dps, charge polarity and charge density (σ) of the substrate. Regulation of nanopipette current is a consequence of the enrichment or depletion of ions within the nanopipette interior which influences conductivity of the nanopipette. When the external substrate is less negatively charged than the nanopipette, the substrate first reduces, and then enhances the ICR as Dps decreases. Surprisingly, both experimental and simulated data show that a neutral substrate was also able to reduce and reverse the ICR of a slightly negatively charged nanopipette. Simulated results ascribe such effects to the elimination of ion depletion within the nanopipette at positive potentials. PMID:24200344

  20. Rectification of ion current in nanopipettes by external substrates.

    PubMed

    Sa, Niya; Lan, Wen-Jie; Shi, Wenqing; Baker, Lane A

    2013-12-23

    We describe ion distribution and the current-voltage (i-V) response of nanopipettes at different probe-to-substrate distances (Dps) as simulated by finite-element methods. Results suggest electrostatic interactions between a charged substrate and the nanopipette dominate electrophoretic ion transport through the nanopipette when Dps is within 1 order of magnitude of the Debye length (∼10 nm for a 1 mM solution as employed in the simulation). Ion current rectification (ICR) and permselectivity associated with a neutral or charged nanopipette can be reversibly enhanced or reduced dependent on Dps, charge polarity, and charge density (σ) of the substrate. Regulation of nanopipette current is a consequence of the enrichment or depletion of ions within the nanopipette interior, which influences conductivity of the nanopipette. When the external substrate is less negatively charged than the nanopipette, the substrate first reduces, and then enhances the ICR as Dps decreases. Surprisingly, both experimental and simulated data show that a neutral substrate was also able to reduce and reverse the ICR of a slightly negatively charged nanopipette. Simulated results ascribe such effects to the elimination of ion depletion within the nanopipette at positive potentials.

  1. Substrate viscosity enhances correlation in epithelial sheet movement.

    PubMed

    Murrell, Michael; Kamm, Roger; Matsudaira, Paul

    2011-07-20

    The movement of the epithelium plays vital roles in the development and renewal of complex tissues, from the separation of tissues in the early embryo, to turnover in the homeostasis of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Yet, despite its importance, a clear interpretation of the mechanism for collective motion in epithelial sheets remains elusive. This interpretation is prohibited by the lack of understanding of the relationship between motion and cell-cell contact, and their mediation by the mechanical properties of the underlying substrate. To better mimic physiological substrates that have inherent viscosity, we probe this relationship using polydimethylsiloxane, a substrate whose mechanical properties can be tuned from predominantly elastic to viscous by altering its cross-linking content. We therefore characterize the comparative spatiotemporal correlations in cell velocity during the movement of an epithelial monolayer as a function of the viscoelasticity of the substrate. Our results show that high correlation in cell velocity is achieved when the substrate G''(ω) is ~0.4 × G'(ω). This correlation is driven by a balance between cell-cell contact and the adhesion and contraction of the extracellular matrix. For G'(ω) > G'(ω), this balance shifts, and contraction of the tissue drives the substrate to flow, further elevating the correlation in movement. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Substrate channel in nitrogenase revealed by a molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dayle; Danyal, Karamatullah; Raugei, Simone; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2014-04-15

    Mo-dependent nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N2 to two NH3 molecules at FeMo-cofactor buried deep inside the MoFe protein. Access of substrates, such as N2, to the active site is likely restricted by the surrounding protein, requiring substrate channels that lead from the surface to the active site. Earlier studies on crystallographic structures of the MoFe protein have suggested three putative substrate channels. Here, we have utilized submicrosecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to allow the nitrogenase MoFe protein to explore its conformational space in an aqueous solution at physiological ionic strength, revealing a putative substrate channel. The viability of this observed channel was tested by examining the free energy of passage of N2 from the surface through the channel to FeMo-cofactor, resulting in the discovery of a very low energy barrier. These studies point to a viable substrate channel in nitrogenase that appears during thermal motions of the protein in an aqueous environment and that approaches a face of FeMo-cofactor earlier implicated in substrate binding.

  3. Variable Substrate Preference among Phospholipase D Toxins from Sicariid Spiders*

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Daniel M.; Roberts, Sue A.; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A.; Delahaye, Jared L.; Bandarian, Vahe; Binford, Greta J.; Cordes, Matthew H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Venoms of the sicariid spiders contain phospholipase D enzyme toxins that can cause severe dermonecrosis and even death in humans. These enzymes convert sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates to cyclic phosphates by activating a hydroxyl nucleophile present in both classes of lipid. The most medically relevant substrates are thought to be sphingomyelin and/or lysophosphatidylcholine. To better understand the substrate preference of these toxins, we used 31P NMR to compare the activity of three related but phylogenetically diverse sicariid toxins against a diverse panel of sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates. Two of the three showed significantly faster turnover of sphingolipids over lysolipids, and all three showed a strong preference for positively charged (choline and/or ethanolamine) over neutral (glycerol and serine) headgroups. Strikingly, however, the enzymes vary widely in their preference for choline, the headgroup of both sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine, versus ethanolamine. An enzyme from Sicarius terrosus showed a strong preference for ethanolamine over choline, whereas two paralogous enzymes from Loxosceles arizonica either preferred choline or showed no significant preference. Intrigued by the novel substrate preference of the Sicarius enzyme, we solved its crystal structure at 2.1 Å resolution. The evolution of variable substrate specificity may help explain the reduced dermonecrotic potential of some natural toxin variants, because mammalian sphingolipids use primarily choline as a positively charged headgroup; it may also be relevant for sicariid predatory behavior, because ethanolamine-containing sphingolipids are common in insect prey. PMID:25752604

  4. Apparatus and method for depositing coating onto porous substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1986-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for forming a chemically vapor deposited coating on a porous substrate where oxygen from a first gaseous reactant containing a source of oxygen permeates through the pores of the substrate to react with a second gaseous reactant that is present on the other side of the substrate. The apparatus includes means for controlling the pressure and flow rate of each gaseous reactant, a manometer for measuring the difference in pressure between the gaseous reactants on each side of the substrate, and means for changing the difference in pressure between the gaseous reactants. Also disclosed is a method of detecting and closing cracks in the coating by reducing the pressure difference between the two gaseous reactants whenever the pressure difference falls suddenly after gradually rising, then again increasing the pressure difference on the two gases. The attack by the by-products of the reaction on the substrate are reduced by maintaining the flow rate of the first reactant through the pores of the substrate.

  5. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

    PubMed Central

    Schauperl, Michael; Fuchs, Julian E.; Waldner, Birgit J.; Huber, Roland G.; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2015-01-01

    Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points). Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4’) with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design. PMID:26559682

  6. The Effect of Molybdenum Substrate Oxidation on Molybdenum Splat Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2018-01-01

    Disk splats are usually observed when the deposition temperature exceeds the transition temperature, whereas thick oxide layer will reduce the adhesion resulting from high deposition temperature. In present study, single molybdenum splats were deposited onto polished molybdenum substrates with different preheating processes to clarify the effect of surface oxidation on the splat formation. Three substrate samples experienced three different preheating processes in an argon atmosphere. Two samples were preheated to 350 and 550 °C, and another sample was cooled to 350 °C after it was preheated to 550 °C. The chemistry and compositions of substrate surface were examined by XPS. The cross sections of splats were prepared by focus ion beam (FIB) and then characterized by SEM. Nearly disk-shaped splat with small fingers in the periphery was observed on the sample preheated to 350 °C. A perfect disk-shape splat was deposited at 550 °C. With the sample on the substrate preheated to 350 °C (cooling down from 550 °C), flower-shaped splat exhibited a central core and discrete periphery detached by some voids. The results of peeling off splats by carbon tape and the morphology of FIB sampled cross sections indicated that no effective bonding formed at the splat-substrate interface for the substrate ever heated to 550 °C, due to the increasing content of MoO3 on the preheated molybdenum surface.

  7. Caged Protein Prenyltransferase Substrates: Tools for Understanding Protein Prenylation

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Hast, Michael A.; Xu, Juhua

    Originally designed to block the prenylation of oncogenic Ras, inhibitors of protein farnesyltransferase currently in preclinical and clinical trials are showing efficacy in cancers with normal Ras. Blocking protein prenylation has also shown promise in the treatment of malaria, Chagas disease and progeria syndrome. A better understanding of the mechanism, targets and in vivo consequences of protein prenylation are needed to elucidate the mode of action of current PFTase (Protein Farnesyltransferase) inhibitors and to create more potent and selective compounds. Caged enzyme substrates are useful tools for understanding enzyme mechanism and biological function. Reported here is the synthesis and characterizationmore » of caged substrates of PFTase. The caged isoprenoid diphosphates are poor substrates prior to photolysis. The caged CAAX peptide is a true catalytically caged substrate of PFTase in that it is to not a substrate, yet is able to bind to the enzyme as established by inhibition studies and X-ray crystallography. Irradiation of the caged molecules with 350 nm light readily releases their cognate substrate and their photolysis products are benign. These properties highlight the utility of those analogs towards a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications.« less

  8. Identification of putative substrates for cynomolgus monkey cytochrome P450 2C8 by substrate depletion assays with 22 human P450 substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Shinya; Murayama, Norie; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Shimizu, Makiko; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in drug developmental stages as non-human primate models. Previous studies used 89 compounds to investigate species differences associated with cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) function that reported monkey specific CYP2C76 cleared 19 chemicals, and homologous CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 metabolized 17 and 30 human CYP2C9 and/or CYP2C19 substrates/inhibitors, respectively. In the present study, 22 compounds selected from viewpoints of global drug interaction guidances and guidelines were further evaluated to seek potential substrates for monkey CYP2C8, which is highly homologous to human CYP2C8 (92%). Amodiaquine, montelukast, quercetin and rosiglitazone, known as substrates or competitive inhibitors of human CYP2C8, were metabolically depleted by recombinant monkey CYP2C8 at relatively high rates. Taken together with our reported findings of the slow eliminations of amodiaquine and montelukast by monkey CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2C76, the present results suggest that these at least four chemicals may be good marker substrates for monkey CYP2C8. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Real-time sensing of epithelial cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions by impedance spectroscopy on porous substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, D.; RoyChaudhuri, C., E-mail: chirosreepram@yahoo.com; Pal, D.

    2015-07-28

    Oxidized porous silicon (PS) is a common topographical biocompatible substrate that potentially provides a distinct in vitro environment for better understanding of in vivo behavior. But in the reported studies on oxidized PS, cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions have been detected only by fluorescent labeling. This paper is the first attempt to investigate real-time sensing of these interactions on HaCaT cells by label-free impedance spectroscopy on oxidized PS of two pore diameters (50 and 500 nm). One of the major requirements for successful impedance spectroscopy measurement is to restrict the channeling of electric field lines through the pores. To satisfy this criterion,more » we have designed the pore depths after analyzing the penetration of the medium by using computational fluid dynamics simulation. A distributed electrical model was also developed for estimating the various cellular attributes by considering a pseudorandom distribution of pores. It is observed from the impedance measurements and from the model that the proliferation rate increases for 50 nm pores but decreases for 500 nm pores compared to that for planar substrates. The rate of decrease in cell substrate separation (h) in the initial stage is more than the rate of increase in cell-cell junction resistance (R{sub b}) corresponding to the initial adhesion phase of cells. It is observed that R{sub b} and h are higher for 50 nm pores than those for planar substrates, corresponding to the fact that substrates more conducive toward cell adhesion encourage cell-cell interactions than direct cell-substrate interactions. Thus, the impedance spectroscopy coupled with the proposed theoretical framework for PS substrates can sense and quantify the cellular interactions.« less

  10. Interactions between Casein Kinase Iε (CKIε) and Two Substrates from Disparate Signaling Pathways Reveal Mechanisms for Substrate-Kinase Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Caroline Lund; Nguyen, Elizabeth Z.; Goodlett, David; Kimelman, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of the Casein Kinase I (CKI) family of serine/threonine kinases regulate diverse biological pathways. The seven mammalian CKI isoforms contain a highly conserved kinase domain and divergent amino- and carboxy-termini. Although they share a preferred target recognition sequence and have overlapping expression patterns, individual isoforms often have specific substrates. In an effort to determine how substrates recognize differences between CKI isoforms, we have examined the interaction between CKIε and two substrates from different signaling pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings CKIε, but not CKIα, binds to and phosphorylates two proteins: Period, a transcriptional regulator of the circadian rhythms pathway, and Disheveled, an activator of the planar cell polarity pathway. We use GST-pull-down assays data to show that two key residues in CKIα's kinase domain prevent Disheveled and Period from binding. We also show that the unique C-terminus of CKIε does not determine Dishevelled's and Period's preference for CKIε nor is it essential for binding, but instead plays an auxillary role in stabilizing the interactions of CKIε with its substrates. We demonstrate that autophosphorylation of CKIε's C-terminal tail prevents substrate binding, and use mass spectrometry and chemical crosslinking to reveal how a phosphorylation-dependent interaction between the C-terminal tail and the kinase domain prevents substrate phosphorylation and binding. Conclusions/Significance The biochemical interactions between CKIε and Disheveled, Period, and its own C-terminus lead to models that explain CKIε's specificity and regulation. PMID:19274088

  11. Process for metallization of a substrate by irradiative curing of a catalyst applied thereto

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ken S.; Morgan, William P.; Zich, John L.

    1999-01-01

    An improved additive process for metallization of substrates is described whereby a catalyst solution is applied to a surface of a substrate. Metallic catalytic clusters can be formed in the catalyst solution on the substrate surface by irradiating the substrate. Electroless plating can then deposit metal onto the portion of the substrate surface having metallic clusters. Additional metallization thickness can be obtained by electrolytically plating the substrate surface after the electroless plating step.

  12. Process for metallization of a substrate by curing a catalyst applied thereto

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ken S.; Morgan, William P.; Zich, John L.

    2002-10-08

    An improved additive process for metallization of substrates is described whereby a catalyst solution is applied to a surface of a substrate. Metallic catalytic clusters can be formed in the catalyst solution on the substrate surface by heating the substrate. Electroless plating can then deposit metal onto the portion of the substrate surface coated with catalyst solution. Additional metallization thickness can be obtained by electrolytically plating the substrate surface after the electroless plating step.

  13. Stability of perovskite solar cells on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Ho Won; Chen, Wei; Liu, Fangzhou; He, Yanling; Leung, Tik Lun; Wang, Yushu; Wong, Man Kwong; Djurišić, Aleksandra B.; Ng, Alan Man Ching; He, Zhubing; Chan, Wai Kin; Tang, Jinyao

    2018-02-01

    Perovskite solar cells are emerging photovoltaic technology with potential for low cost, high efficiency devices. Currently, flexible devices efficiencies over 15% have been achieved. Flexible devices are of significant interest for achieving very low production cost via roll-to-roll processing. However, the stability of perovskite devices remains a significant challenge. Unlike glass substrate which has negligible water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), polymeric flexible film substrates suffer from high moisture permeability. As PET and PEN flexible substrates exhibit higher water permeability then glass, transparent flexible backside encapsulation should be used to maximize light harvesting in perovskite layer while WVTR should be low enough. Wide band gap materials are transparent in the visible spectral range low temperature processable and can be a moisture barrier. For flexible substrates, approaches like atomic layer deposition (ALD) and low temperature solution processing could be used for metal oxide deposition. In this work, ALD SnO2, TiO2, Al2O3 and solution processed spin-on-glass was used as the barrier layer on the polymeric side of indium tin oxide (ITO) coated PEN substrates. The UV-Vis transmission spectra of the prepared substrates were investigated. Perovskite solar cells will be fabricated and stability of the devices were encapsulated with copolymer films on the top side and tested under standard ISOS-L-1 protocol and then compared to the commercial unmodified ITO/PET or ITO/PEN substrates. In addition, devices with copolymer films laminated on both sides successfully surviving more than 300 hours upon continuous AM1.5G illumination were demonstrated.

  14. Tribology of bio-inspired nanowrinkled films on ultrasoft substrates.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Juergen M; Waldhauser, Wolfgang; Major, Lukasz; Teichert, Christian; Hartmann, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic design of new materials uses nature as antetype, learning from billions of years of evolution. This work emphasizes the mechanical and tribological properties of skin, combining both hardness and wear resistance of its surface (the stratum corneum) with high elasticity of the bulk (epidermis, dermis, hypodermis). The key for combination of such opposite properties is wrinkling, being consequence of intrinsic stresses in the bulk (soft tissue): Tribological contact to counterparts below the stress threshold for tissue trauma occurs on the thick hard stratum corneum layer pads, while tensile loads smooth out wrinkles in between these pads. Similar mechanism offers high tribological resistance to hard films on soft, flexible polymers, which is shown for diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium nitride thin films on ultrasoft polyurethane and harder polycarbonate substrates. The choice of these two compared substrate materials will show that ultra-soft substrate materials are decisive for the distinct tribological material. Hierarchical wrinkled structures of films on these substrates are due to high intrinsic compressive stress, which evolves during high energetic film growth. Incremental relaxation of these stresses occurs by compound deformation of film and elastic substrate surface, appearing in hierarchical nano-wrinkles. Nano-wrinkled topographies enable high elastic deformability of thin hard films, while overstressing results in zigzag film fracture along larger hierarchical wrinkle structures. Tribologically, these fracture mechanisms are highly important for ploughing and sliding of sharp and flat counterparts on hard-coated ultra-soft substrates like polyurethane. Concentration of polyurethane deformation under the applied normal loads occurs below these zigzag cracks. Unloading closes these cracks again. Even cyclic testing do not lead to film delamination and retain low friction behavior, if the adhesion to the substrate is high and the initial

  15. HIV-1 protease-substrate coevolution in nelfinavir resistance.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Madhavi; Ozen, Ayşegül; Kurt-Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2014-07-01

    Resistance to various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) challenges the effectiveness of therapies in treating HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients. The virus accumulates mutations within the protease (PR) that render the PIs less potent. Occasionally, Gag sequences also coevolve with mutations at PR cleavage sites contributing to drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the structural basis of coevolution of the p1-p6 cleavage site with the nelfinavir (NFV) resistance D30N/N88D protease mutations by determining crystal structures of wild-type and NFV-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with p1-p6 substrate peptide variants with L449F and/or S451N. Alterations of residue 30's interaction with the substrate are compensated by the coevolving L449F and S451N cleavage site mutations. This interdependency in the PR-p1-p6 interactions enhances intermolecular contacts and reinforces the overall fit of the substrate within the substrate envelope, likely enabling coevolution to sustain substrate recognition and cleavage in the presence of PR resistance mutations. Resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors challenges the effectiveness of therapies in treating HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients. Mutations in HIV-1 protease selected under the pressure of protease inhibitors render the inhibitors less potent. Occasionally, Gag sequences also mutate and coevolve with protease, contributing to maintenance of viral fitness and to drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the structural basis of coevolution at the Gag p1-p6 cleavage site with the nelfinavir (NFV) resistance D30N/N88D protease mutations. Our structural analysis reveals the interdependency of protease-substrate interactions and how coevolution may restore substrate recognition and cleavage in the presence of protease drug resistance mutations. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Tribology of bio-inspired nanowrinkled films on ultrasoft substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Juergen M.; Waldhauser, Wolfgang; Major, Lukasz; Teichert, Christian; Hartmann, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic design of new materials uses nature as antetype, learning from billions of years of evolution. This work emphasizes the mechanical and tribological properties of skin, combining both hardness and wear resistance of its surface (the stratum corneum) with high elasticity of the bulk (epidermis, dermis, hypodermis). The key for combination of such opposite properties is wrinkling, being consequence of intrinsic stresses in the bulk (soft tissue): Tribological contact to counterparts below the stress threshold for tissue trauma occurs on the thick hard stratum corneum layer pads, while tensile loads smooth out wrinkles in between these pads. Similar mechanism offers high tribological resistance to hard films on soft, flexible polymers, which is shown for diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium nitride thin films on ultrasoft polyurethane and harder polycarbonate substrates. The choice of these two compared substrate materials will show that ultra-soft substrate materials are decisive for the distinct tribological material. Hierarchical wrinkled structures of films on these substrates are due to high intrinsic compressive stress, which evolves during high energetic film growth. Incremental relaxation of these stresses occurs by compound deformation of film and elastic substrate surface, appearing in hierarchical nano-wrinkles. Nano-wrinkled topographies enable high elastic deformability of thin hard films, while overstressing results in zigzag film fracture along larger hierarchical wrinkle structures. Tribologically, these fracture mechanisms are highly important for ploughing and sliding of sharp and flat counterparts on hard-coated ultra-soft substrates like polyurethane. Concentration of polyurethane deformation under the applied normal loads occurs below these zigzag cracks. Unloading closes these cracks again. Even cyclic testing do not lead to film delamination and retain low friction behavior, if the adhesion to the substrate is high and the initial

  17. Evaporation of liquid droplets on solid substrates. I. Flat substrate with pinned or moving contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Amirhossein; Homsy, G. M.

    2017-04-01

    We study the evolution of the profile of a two-dimensional volatile liquid droplet that is evaporating on a flat heated substrate. We adopt a one-sided model with thermal control that, together with the lubrication approximation, results in an evolution equation for the local height of the droplet. Without requiring any presumption for the shape of the drop, the problem is formulated for the two modes of evaporation: a pinned contact line and a moving contact line with fixed contact angle. Numerical solutions are provided for each case. For the pinned contact line case, we observe that after a time interval the contact angle dynamics become nonlinear and, interestingly, the local contact angle goes to zero in advance of total evaporation of the drop. For the case of a moving contact line, in which the singularity at the contact line is treated by a numerical slip model, we find that the droplet nearly keeps its initial circular shape and that the contact line recedes with constant speed.

  18. A new buckwheat dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), with a unique substrate binding structure, has altered substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Rintaro; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Inagaki, Noritoshi; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Hisano, Tomomi; Yasui, Yasuo; Komori, Toshiyuki; Koshio, Motoyuki; Kubota, Seiji; Walker, Amanda R; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Matsui, Katsuhiro

    2017-12-11

    Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) is the key enzyme committed to anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. DFR proteins can catalyse mainly the three substrates (dihydrokaempferol, dihydroquercetin, and dihydromyricetin), and show different substrate preferences. Although relationships between the substrate preference and amino acids in the region responsible for substrate specificity have been investigated in several plant species, the molecular basis of the substrate preference of DFR is not yet fully understood. By using degenerate primers in a PCR, we isolated two cDNA clones that encoded DFR in buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum). Based on sequence similarity, one cDNA clone (FeDFR1a) was identical to the FeDFR in DNA databases (DDBJ/Gen Bank/EMBL). The other cDNA clone, FeDFR2, had a similar sequence to FeDFR1a, but a different exon-intron structure. Linkage analysis in an F 2 segregating population showed that the two loci were linked. Unlike common DFR proteins in other plant species, FeDFR2 contained a valine instead of the typical asparagine at the third position and an extra glycine between sites 6 and 7 in the region that determines substrate specificity, and showed less activity against dihydrokaempferol than did FeDFR1a with an asparagine at the third position. Our 3D model suggested that the third residue and its neighbouring residues contribute to substrate specificity. FeDFR1a was expressed in all organs that we investigated, whereas FeDFR2 was preferentially expressed in roots and seeds. We isolated two buckwheat cDNA clones of DFR genes. FeDFR2 has unique structural and functional features that differ from those of previously reported DFRs in other plants. The 3D model suggested that not only the amino acid at the third position but also its neighbouring residues that are involved in the formation of the substrate-binding pocket play important roles in determining substrate preferences. The unique

  19. Infrared photothermal imaging of trace explosives on relevant substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendziora, Christopher A.; Furstenberg, Robert; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; Borchert, James; Byers, Jeff; McGill, R. Andrew

    2013-06-01

    We are developing a technique for the stand-off detection of trace explosives on relevant substrate surfaces using photo-thermal infrared (IR) imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). This approach leverages one or more compact IR quantum cascade lasers, tuned to strong absorption bands in the analytes and directed to illuminate an area on a surface of interest. An IR focal plane array is used to image the surface and detect small increases in thermal emission upon laser illumination. The PT-IRIS signal is processed as a hyperspectral image cube comprised of spatial, spectral and temporal dimensions as vectors within a detection algorithm. The ability to detect trace analytes on relevant substrates is critical for stand-off applications, but is complicated by the optical and thermal analyte/substrate interactions. This manuscript describes recent PT-IRIS experimental results and analysis for traces of RDX, TNT, ammonium nitrate (AN) and sucrose on relevant substrates (steel, polyethylene, glass and painted steel panels). We demonstrate that these analytes can be detected on these substrates at relevant surface mass loadings (10 μg/cm2 to 100 μg/cm2) even at the single pixel level.

  20. Effects of different substrates on the sprint performance of lizards.

    PubMed

    Tulli, Maria Jose; Abdala, Virginia; Cruz, Felix B

    2012-03-01

    The variation in substrate structure is one of the most important determinants of the locomotor abilities of lizards. Lizards are found across a range of habitats, from large rocks to loose sand, each of them with conflicting mechanical demands on locomotion. We examined the relationships among sprint speed, morphology and different types of substrate surfaces in species of lizards that exploit different structural habitats (arboreal, saxicolous, terrestrial and arenicolous) in a phylogenetic context. Our main goals were to assess which processes drive variability in morphology (i.e. phylogeny or adaptation to habitat) in order to understand how substrate structure affects sprint speed in species occupying different habitats and to determine the relationship between morphology and performance. Liolaemini lizards show that most morphological traits are constrained by phylogeny, particularly toe 3, the femur and foot. All ecological groups showed significant differences on rocky surfaces. Surprisingly, no ecological group performed better on the surface resembling its own habitat. Moreover, all groups exhibited significant differences in sprint speed among the three different types of experimental substrates and showed the best performance on sand, with the exception of the arboreal group. Despite the fact that species use different types of habitats, the highly conservative morphology of Liolaemini species and the similar levels of performance on different types of substrates suggest that they confer to the 'jack of all trades and master of none' principle.

  1. LWIR HgCdTe Detectors Grown on Ge Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilela, M. F.; Lofgreen, D. D.; Smith, E. P. G.; Newton, M. D.; Venzor, G. M.; Peterson, J. M.; Franklin, J. J.; Reddy, M.; Thai, Y.; Patten, E. A.; Johnson, S. M.; Tidrow, M. Z.

    2008-09-01

    Long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe p-on- n double-layer heterojunctions (DLHJs) for infrared detector applications have been grown on 100 mm Ge (112) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The objective of this current work was to grow our baseline p-on- n DLHJ detector structure (used earlier on Si substrates) on 100 mm Ge substrates in the 10 μm to 11 μm LWIR spectral region, evaluate the material properties, and obtain some preliminary detector performance data. Material characterization techniques included are X-ray rocking curves, etch pit density (EPD) measurements, compositional uniformity determined from Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) transmission, and doping concentrations determined from secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Detector properties include resistance-area product (RoA), spectral response, and quantum efficiency. Results of LWIR HgCdTe detectors and test structure arrays (TSA) fabricated on both Ge and silicon (Si) substrates are presented and compared. Material properties demonstrated include X-ray full-width of half-maximum (FWHM) as low as 77 arcsec, typical etch pit densities in mid 106 cm-2 and wavelength cutoff maximum/minimum variation <2% across the full wafer. Detector characteristics were found to be nearly identical for HgCdTe grown on either Ge or Si substrates.

  2. Precise micropatterning of silver nanoparticles on plastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammosova, Lena; Jiang, Yu; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2017-04-01

    Conventional fabrication methods to obtain metal patterns on polymer substrates are restricted by high operating temperature and complex preparation steps. The present study demonstrates a simple yet versatile method for preparation of silver nanoparticle micropatterns on polymer substrates with various surface geometry. With the microworking robot technique, we were able not only to directly structure the surface, but also precisely deposit silver nanoparticle ink on the desired surface location with the minimum usage of ink material. The prepared silver nanoparticle ink, containing silver cations and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a reducing agent, yields silver nanoparticle micropatterns on plastic substrates at low sintering temperature without any contamination. The influence of the ink behaviour was studied, such as substrate wettability, ink volume, and sintering temperature. The ultraviolet visible (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurements revealed the formation of micropatterns with uniformly distributed silver nanoparticles. The prepared patterns are expected to have a broad range of applications in optics, medicine, and sensor devices owing to the unique properties of silver. Furthermore, the deposition of a chemical compound, which is different from the substrate material, not only adds a fourth dimension to the prestructured three-dimensional (3D) surfaces, but also opens new application areas to the conventional surface structures.

  3. Crystal structure of substrate free form of glycerol dehydratase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Der-Ing; Dotson, Garry; Turner, Jr., Ivan

    2010-03-08

    Glycerol dehydratase (GDH) and diol dehydratase (DDH) are highly homologous isofunctional enzymes that catalyze the elimination of water from glycerol and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) to the corresponding aldehyde via a coenzyme B{sub 12}-dependent radical mechanism. The crystal structure of substrate free form of GDH in complex with cobalamin and K{sup +} has been determined at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. Its overall fold and the subunit assembly closely resemble those of DDH. Comparison of this structure and the DDH structure, available only in substrate bound form, shows the expected change of the coordination of the essential K{sup +} from hexacoordinate to heptacoordinate withmore » the displacement of a single coordinated water by the substrate diol. In addition, there appears to be an increase in the rigidity of the K{sup +} coordination (as measured by lower B values) upon the binding of the substrate. Structural analysis of the locations of conserved residues among various GDH and DDH sequences has aided in identification of residues potentially important for substrate preference or specificity of protein-protein interactions.« less

  4. Development of coated conductors by inclined substrate deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, U.; Ma, B.; Li, M.; Fisher, B. L.; Koritala, R. E.; Miller, D. J.; Dorris, S. E.

    2003-10-01

    Inclined substrate deposition (ISD) offers the potential for rapid production of high-quality biaxially textured buffer layers suitable for YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO)-coated conductors. We have grown biaxially textured magnesium oxide (MgO) films on Hastelloy C276 (HC) substrates by ISD at deposition rates of 20-100 Å/s. Scanning electron microscopy of the ISD MgO films showed columnar grain structures with a roof-tile-shaped surface. X-ray pole figure analysis revealed that the c-axis of the ISD MgO films is titled at an angle ≈32° from the substrate normal. A small full-width at half maximum of ≈9° was observed for the φ-scan of MgO films. YBCO films were grown on ISD MgO buffered HC substrates by pulsed laser deposition and were determined to be biaxially aligned with the c-axis parallel to the substrate normal. The orientation relationship between the ISD template and the top YBCO film was investigated by X-ray pole figure analysis and transmission electron microscopy. A transport critical current density of Jc=5.5×10 5 A/cm 2 at 77 K in self-field was measured on a YBCO film that was 0.46-μm thick, 4-mm wide, 10-mm long.

  5. The substrate matters in the Raman spectroscopy analysis of cells

    PubMed Central

    Mikoliunaite, Lina; Rodriguez, Raul D.; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Kolchuzhin, Vladimir; Mehner, Jan; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Zahn, Dietrich R.T.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method that allows deposited and/or immobilized cells to be evaluated without complex sample preparation or labeling. However, a main limitation of Raman spectroscopy in cell analysis is the extremely weak Raman intensity that results in low signal to noise ratios. Therefore, it is important to seize any opportunity that increases the intensity of the Raman signal and to understand whether and how the signal enhancement changes with respect to the substrate used. Our experimental results show clear differences in the spectroscopic response from cells on different surfaces. This result is partly due to the difference in spatial distribution of electric field at the substrate/cell interface as shown by numerical simulations. We found that the substrate also changes the spatial location of maximum field enhancement around the cells. Moreover, beyond conventional flat surfaces, we introduce an efficient nanostructured silver substrate that largely enhances the Raman signal intensity from a single yeast cell. This work contributes to the field of vibrational spectroscopy analysis by providing a fresh look at the significance of the substrate for Raman investigations in cell research. PMID:26310910

  6. The substrate matters in the Raman spectroscopy analysis of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikoliunaite, Lina; Rodriguez, Raul D.; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Kolchuzhin, Vladimir; Mehner, Jan; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method that allows deposited and/or immobilized cells to be evaluated without complex sample preparation or labeling. However, a main limitation of Raman spectroscopy in cell analysis is the extremely weak Raman intensity that results in low signal to noise ratios. Therefore, it is important to seize any opportunity that increases the intensity of the Raman signal and to understand whether and how the signal enhancement changes with respect to the substrate used. Our experimental results show clear differences in the spectroscopic response from cells on different surfaces. This result is partly due to the difference in spatial distribution of electric field at the substrate/cell interface as shown by numerical simulations. We found that the substrate also changes the spatial location of maximum field enhancement around the cells. Moreover, beyond conventional flat surfaces, we introduce an efficient nanostructured silver substrate that largely enhances the Raman signal intensity from a single yeast cell. This work contributes to the field of vibrational spectroscopy analysis by providing a fresh look at the significance of the substrate for Raman investigations in cell research.

  7. Computational Approach for Epitaxial Polymorph Stabilization through Substrate Selection.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Dwaraknath, Shyam S; Garten, Lauren; Ndione, Paul; Ginley, David; Persson, Kristin A

    2016-05-25

    With the ultimate goal of finding new polymorphs through targeted synthesis conditions and techniques, we outline a computational framework to select optimal substrates for epitaxial growth using first principle calculations of formation energies, elastic strain energy, and topological information. To demonstrate the approach, we study the stabilization of metastable VO2 compounds which provides a rich chemical and structural polymorph space. We find that common polymorph statistics, lattice matching, and energy above hull considerations recommends homostructural growth on TiO2 substrates, where the VO2 brookite phase would be preferentially grown on the a-c TiO2 brookite plane while the columbite and anatase structures favor the a-b plane on the respective TiO2 phases. Overall, we find that a model which incorporates a geometric unit cell area matching between the substrate and the target film as well as the resulting strain energy density of the film provide qualitative agreement with experimental observations for the heterostructural growth of known VO2 polymorphs: rutile, A and B phases. The minimal interfacial geometry matching and estimated strain energy criteria provide several suggestions for substrates and substrate-film orientations for the heterostructural growth of the hitherto hypothetical anatase, brookite, and columbite polymorphs. These criteria serve as a preliminary guidance for the experimental efforts stabilizing new materials and/or polymorphs through epitaxy. The current screening algorithm is being integrated within the Materials Project online framework and data and hence publicly available.

  8. Enhanced Light Extraction from OLEDs Fabricated on Patterned Plastic Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hippola, Chamika; Kaudal, Rajiv; Manna, Eeshita

    A key scientific and technological challenge in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is enhancing the light outcoupling factor η out, which is typically <20%. This paper reports experimental and modeling results of a promising approach to strongly increase η out by fabricating OLEDs on novel flexible nanopatterned substrates that result in a >2× enhancement in green phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs) fabricated on corrugated polycarbonate (PC). The external quantum efficiency (EQE) reaches 50% (meaning ηout ≥50%); it increases 2.6x relative to a glass/ITO device and 2× relative to devices on glass/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) or flat PC/PEDOT:PSS. A significant enhancement is also observed formore » blue PhOLEDs with EQE 1.7× relative to flat PC. The corrugated PC substrates are fabricated efficiently and cost-effectively by direct room-temperature molding. These substrates successfully reduce photon losses due to trapping/waveguiding in the organic+anode layers and possibly substrate, and losses to plasmons at the metal cathode. Focused ion beam gauged the conformality of the OLEDs. Dome-shaped convex nanopatterns with height of ~280–400 nm and pitch ~750–800 nm were found to be optimal. Lastly, substrate design and layer thickness simulations, reported first for patterned devices, agree with the experimental results that present a promising method to mitigate photon loss paths in OLEDs.« less

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorogenic triglycerides as lipase assay substrates.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rokhsana J; Brask, Jesper

    2016-06-01

    Three racemic fluorogenic triglycerides are synthesized and evaluated as lipase assay substrates. The presented synthesis route goes through a key triglyceride intermediate which can be chemoselectively functionalized with a wide range of different probes. Hence the substrate can be tailor-made for a specific assay, or focus can be on low cost in larger scale for applications in high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. In the specific examples, TG-ED, TG-FD and TG-F2 are assembled with the Edans-Dabcyl or the fluorescein-Dabcyl FRET pair, or relying on fluorescein self-quenching, respectively. Proof-of-concept assays allowed determination of 1st order kinetic parameters (kcat/KM) of 460s(-1)M(-1), 59s(-1)M(-1) and 346s(-1)M(-1), respectively, for the three substrates. Commercially available EnzChek lipase substrate provided 204s(-1)M(-1). Substrate concentration was identified as a critical parameter, with measured reaction rates decreasing at higher concentrations when intermolecular quenching becomes significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Computational Approach for Epitaxial Polymorph Stabilization through Substrate Selection

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, Hong; Dwaraknath, Shyam S.; Garten, Lauren; ...

    2016-05-04

    With the ultimate goal of finding new polymorphs through targeted synthesis conditions and techniques, we outline a computational framework to select optimal substrates for epitaxial growth using first principle calculations of formation energies, elastic strain energy, and topological information. To demonstrate the approach, we study the stabilization of metastable VO 2 compounds which provides a rich chemical and structural polymorph space. Here, we find that common polymorph statistics, lattice matching, and energy above hull considerations recommends homostructural growth on TiO 2 substrates, where the VO 2 brookite phase would be preferentially grown on the a-c TiO 2 brookite plane whilemore » the columbite and anatase structures favor the a-b plane on the respective TiO 2 phases. Overall, we find that a model which incorporates a geometric unit cell area matching between the substrate and the target film as well as the resulting strain energy density of the film provide qualitative agreement with experimental observations for the heterostructural growth of known VO 2 polymorphs: rutile, A and B phases. The minimal interfacial geometry matching and estimated strain energy criteria provide several suggestions for substrates and substrate-film orientations for the heterostructural growth of the hitherto hypothetical anatase, brookite, and columbite polymorphs. Our criteria serve as a preliminary guidance for the experimental efforts stabilizing new materials and/or polymorphs through epitaxy. The current screening algorithm is being integrated within the Materials Project online framework and data and hence publicly available.« less

  11. Nanocrystal-based complementary inverters constructed on flexible plastic substrates.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jaewon; Cho, Kyoungah; Yun, Junggwon; Kim, Sangsig

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate a nanocrystal (NC)-based complementary inverter constructed on a flexible plastic substrate. The NC-based complementary inverter consists of n-type HgSe NC- and p-type HgTe NC-based thin-film transistors (TFTs). Solid films on a plastic substrate obtained from HgSe and HgTe nanocrystals by thermal transformation are utilized as the n- and p-channel layers in these TFTs, respectively. The electrical properties of these component TFTs on unstrained and strained substrates are characterized and the performance of the inverter on the flexible substrate is investigated. The inverter on the unstrained substrate exhibits a logic gain of about 8, a logic swing of 90%, and a noise margin of 2.0 V. The characteristics of the inverter are changed under tensile and compressive strains, but not very significantly. Moreover, a comparison of the electrical characteristics of the n- and p-channel TFTs and the inverter is made in this paper.

  12. Enhanced Light Extraction from OLEDs Fabricated on Patterned Plastic Substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Hippola, Chamika; Kaudal, Rajiv; Manna, Eeshita; ...

    2018-02-19

    A key scientific and technological challenge in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is enhancing the light outcoupling factor η out, which is typically <20%. This paper reports experimental and modeling results of a promising approach to strongly increase η out by fabricating OLEDs on novel flexible nanopatterned substrates that result in a >2× enhancement in green phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs) fabricated on corrugated polycarbonate (PC). The external quantum efficiency (EQE) reaches 50% (meaning ηout ≥50%); it increases 2.6x relative to a glass/ITO device and 2× relative to devices on glass/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) or flat PC/PEDOT:PSS. A significant enhancement is also observed formore » blue PhOLEDs with EQE 1.7× relative to flat PC. The corrugated PC substrates are fabricated efficiently and cost-effectively by direct room-temperature molding. These substrates successfully reduce photon losses due to trapping/waveguiding in the organic+anode layers and possibly substrate, and losses to plasmons at the metal cathode. Focused ion beam gauged the conformality of the OLEDs. Dome-shaped convex nanopatterns with height of ~280–400 nm and pitch ~750–800 nm were found to be optimal. Lastly, substrate design and layer thickness simulations, reported first for patterned devices, agree with the experimental results that present a promising method to mitigate photon loss paths in OLEDs.« less

  13. Effect of Substrate Mechanics on Cardiomyocyte Maturation and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tallawi, Marwa; Rai, Ranjana; Boccaccini, Aldo. R.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering constructs are a promising therapeutic treatment for myocardial infarction, which is one of the leading causes of death. In order to further advance the development and regeneration of engineered cardiac tissues using biomaterial platforms, it is important to have a complete overview of the effects that substrates have on cardiomyocyte (CM) morphology and function. This article summarizes recent studies that investigate the effect of mechanical cues on the CM differentiation, maturation, and growth. In these studies, CMs derived from embryos, neonates, and mesenchymal stem cells were seeded on different substrates of various elastic modulus. Measuring the contractile function by force production, work output, and calcium handling, it was seen that cell behavior on substrates was optimized when the substrate stiffness mimicked that of the native tissue. The contractile function reflected changes in the sarcomeric protein confirmation and organization that promoted the contractile ability. The analysis of the literature also revealed that, in addition to matrix stiffness, mechanical stimulation, such as stretching the substrate during cell seeding, also played an important role during cell maturation and tissue development. PMID:25148904

  14. Hot Films on Ceramic Substrates for Measuring Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Greg; Leiser, Daniel; Bartlett, Jim; Lavine, Adrienne

    2003-01-01

    Hot-film sensors, consisting of a metallic film on an electrically nonconductive substrate, have been used to measure skin friction as far back as 1931. A hot film is maintained at an elevated temperature relative to the local flow by passing an electrical current through it. The power required to maintain the specified temperature depends on the rate at which heat is transferred to the flow. The heat transfer rate correlates to the velocity gradient at the surface, and hence, with skin friction. The hot-film skin friction measurement method is most thoroughly developed for steady-state conditions, but additional issues arise under transient conditions. Fabricating hot-film substrates using low-thermal-conductivity ceramics can offer advantages over traditional quartz or polyester-film substrates. First, a low conductivity substrate increases the fraction of heat convected away by the fluid, thus increasing sensitivity to changes in flow conditions. Furthermore, the two-part, composite nature of the substrate allows the installation of thermocouple junctions just below the hot film, which can provide an estimate of the conduction heat loss.

  15. Substrate Specificity of Human Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, You; Hadjikyriacou, Andrea; Clarke, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) methylates arginine residues on various protein substrates and is involved in DNA transcription, RNA splicing, DNA repair, cell differentiation, and metastasis. The substrate sequences it recognizes in vivo and the enzymatic mechanism behind it, however, remain to be explored. Here we characterize methylation catalyzed by a bacterially expressed GST-tagged human PRMT7 fusion protein with a broad range of peptide and protein substrates. After confirming its type III activity generating only ω-NG-monomethylarginine and its distinct substrate specificity for RXR motifs surrounded by basic residues, we performed site-directed mutagenesis studies on this enzyme, revealing that two acidic residues within the double E loop, Asp-147 and Glu-149, modulate the substrate preference. Furthermore, altering a single acidic residue, Glu-478, on the C-terminal domain to glutamine nearly abolished the activity of the enzyme. Additionally, we demonstrate that PRMT7 has unusual temperature dependence and salt tolerance. These results provide a biochemical foundation to understanding the broad biological functions of PRMT7 in health and disease. PMID:25294873

  16. Computational Approach for Epitaxial Polymorph Stabilization through Substrate Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Hong; Dwaraknath, Shyam S.; Garten, Lauren

    With the ultimate goal of finding new polymorphs through targeted synthesis conditions and techniques, we outline a computational framework to select optimal substrates for epitaxial growth using first principle calculations of formation energies, elastic strain energy, and topological information. To demonstrate the approach, we study the stabilization of metastable VO2 compounds which provides a rich chemical and structural polymorph space. We find that common polymorph statistics, lattice matching, and energy above hull considerations recommends homostructural growth on TiO2 substrates, where the VO2 brookite phase would be preferentially grown on the a-c TiO2 brookite plane while the columbite and anatase structuresmore » favor the a-b plane on the respective TiO2 phases. Overall, we find that a model which incorporates a geometric unit cell area matching between the substrate and the target film as well as the resulting strain energy density of the film provide qualitative agreement with experimental observations for the heterostructural growth of known VO2 polymorphs: rutile, A and B phases. The minimal interfacial geometry matching and estimated strain energy criteria provide several suggestions for substrates and substrate-film orientations for the heterostructural growth of the hitherto hypothetical anatase, brookite, and columbite polymorphs. These criteria serve as a preliminary guidance for the experimental efforts stabilizing new materials and/or polymorphs through epitaxy. The current screening algorithm is being integrated within the Materials Project online framework and data and hence publicly available.« less

  17. Computational Approach for Epitaxial Polymorph Stabilization through Substrate Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Hong; Dwaraknath, Shyam S.; Garten, Lauren

    With the ultimate goal of finding new polymorphs through targeted synthesis conditions and techniques, we outline a computational framework to select optimal substrates for epitaxial growth using first principle calculations of formation energies, elastic strain energy, and topological information. To demonstrate the approach, we study the stabilization of metastable VO 2 compounds which provides a rich chemical and structural polymorph space. Here, we find that common polymorph statistics, lattice matching, and energy above hull considerations recommends homostructural growth on TiO 2 substrates, where the VO 2 brookite phase would be preferentially grown on the a-c TiO 2 brookite plane whilemore » the columbite and anatase structures favor the a-b plane on the respective TiO 2 phases. Overall, we find that a model which incorporates a geometric unit cell area matching between the substrate and the target film as well as the resulting strain energy density of the film provide qualitative agreement with experimental observations for the heterostructural growth of known VO 2 polymorphs: rutile, A and B phases. The minimal interfacial geometry matching and estimated strain energy criteria provide several suggestions for substrates and substrate-film orientations for the heterostructural growth of the hitherto hypothetical anatase, brookite, and columbite polymorphs. Our criteria serve as a preliminary guidance for the experimental efforts stabilizing new materials and/or polymorphs through epitaxy. The current screening algorithm is being integrated within the Materials Project online framework and data and hence publicly available.« less

  18. Effects of Different Substrates on Lignocellulosic Enzyme Expression, Enzyme Activity, Substrate Utilization and Biological Efficiency of Pleurotus Eryngii.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunliang; Yan, Li; Gong, Wenbing; Zhu, Zuohua; Tan, Senwei; Chen, Du; Hu, Zhenxiu; Peng, Yuande

    2016-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii is one of the most valued and delicious mushrooms which are commercially cultivated on various agro-wastes. How different substrates affect lignocellulosic biomass degradation, lignocellulosic enzyme production and biological efficiency in Pleurotus eryngii was unclear. In this report, Pleurotus eryngii was cultivated in substrates including ramie stalks, kenaf stalks, cottonseed hulls and bulrush stalks. The results showed that ramie stalks and kenaf stalks were found to best suitable to cultivate Pleurotus eryngii with the biological efficiency achieved at 55% and 57%, respectively. In order to establish correlations between different substrates and lignocellulosic enzymes expression, the extracellular proteins from four substrates were profiled with high throughput TMT-based quantitative proteomic approach. 241 non-redundant proteins were identified and 74 high confidence lignocellulosic enzymes were quantified. Most of the cellulases, hemicellulases and lignin depolymerization enzymes were highly up-regulated when ramie stalks and kenaf stalks were used as carbon sources. The enzyme activities results suggested cellulases, hemicellulases and lignin depolymerization enzymes were significantly induced by ramie stalks and kenaf stalks. The lignocelluloses degradation, most of the lignocellulosic enzymes expressions and activities of Pleurotus eryngii had positive correlation with the biological efficiency, which depend on the nature of lignocellulosic substrates. In addition, the lignocellulosic enzymes expression profiles during Pleurotus eryngii growth in different substrates were obtained. The present study suggested that most of the lignocellulosic enzymes expressions and activities can be used as tools for selecting better performing substrates for commercial mushroom cultivation. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Separating semiconductor devices from substrate by etching graded composition release layer disposed between semiconductor devices and substrate including forming protuberances that reduce stiction

    DOEpatents

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Nielson, Gregory N; Cederberg, Jeffrey G; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2015-05-12

    A method includes etching a release layer that is coupled between a plurality of semiconductor devices and a substrate with an etch. The etching includes etching the release layer between the semiconductor devices and the substrate until the semiconductor devices are at least substantially released from the substrate. The etching also includes etching a protuberance in the release layer between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The etch is stopped while the protuberances remain between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The method also includes separating the semiconductor devices from the substrate. Other methods and apparatus are also disclosed.

  20. Thermal and Electrical Characterization of Alumina Substrate for Microelectronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Ibrahim, A.; Alias, R.; Shapee, S. M.; Ambak, Z.; Zakaria, S. Z.; Yahya, M. R.; Mat, A. F. A.

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports the effect of sintering temperature on thermal and electrical properties of alumina material as substrate for microelectronic devices. Alumina materials in the form of green sheet with 1 mm thickness were sintered at 1100° C, 1300° C and 1500° C for about 20 hours using heating and cooling rates of 2° C/min. The densities were measured using densitometer and the microstructures of the samples were analyzed using SEM micrographs. Meanwhile thermal and electrical properties of the samples were measured using flash method and impedance analyzer respectively. It was found that thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the substrate increases as sintering temperature increases. It was found also that the dielectric constant of alumina substrate increases as the sintering temperature increases.

  1. Nanofabrication on unconventional substrates using transferred hard masks

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Luozhou; Bayn, Igal; Lu, Ming; ...

    2015-01-15

    Here, a major challenge in nanofabrication is to pattern unconventional substrates that cannot be processed for a variety of reasons, such as incompatibility with spin coating, electron beam lithography, optical lithography, or wet chemical steps. Here, we present a versatile nanofabrication method based on re-usable silicon membrane hard masks, patterned using standard lithography and mature silicon processing technology. These masks, transferred precisely onto targeted regions, can be in the millimetre scale. They allow for fabrication on a wide range of substrates, including rough, soft, and non-conductive materials, enabling feature linewidths down to 10 nm. Plasma etching, lift-off, and ion implantationmore » are realized without the need for scanning electron/ion beam processing, UV exposure, or wet etching on target substrates.« less

  2. Process for forming a metal compound coating on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, D.J.; Vernon, M.E.; Wright, S.A.

    1988-06-29

    A method of coating a substrate with a thin layer of a metal compound by forming a dispersion of an electrophoretically active organic colloid and a precursor of the metal compound in an electrolytic cell in which the substrate is an electrode. Upon application of an electric potential, the electrode is coated with a mixture of the organic colloid and the precursor to the metal compound, and the coated substrate is then heated in the presence of an atmosphere or vacuum to decompose the organic colloid and form a coating of either a combination of metal compound and carbon, or optionally forming a porous metal compound coating by heating to a temperature high enough to chemically react the carbon.

  3. Aligned Silver Nanorod Array as SERS Substrates for Viral Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiping; Shanmukh, Saratchandra; Chaney, Stephen B.; Jones, Les; Dluhy, Richard A.; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2006-03-01

    The aligned silver nanorod array substrates prepared by the oblique angle deposition method are capable of providing extremely high enhancement factors (˜10^9) at near-infrared wavelengths (785 nm) for a standard reporter molecule 1,2 trans-(bis)pyridyl-ethene (BPE). The enhancement factor depends strongly on the length of the Ag nanorods, the substrate coating, as well as the polarization of the excitation laser beam. With the current optimum structure, we demonstrate that the detection limit for BPE can be lower than 0.1 fM. The applicability of this substrate to the detection of bioagents has been investigated by looking several viruses, such as Adenovirus, HIV, Rhinovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), at low quantities (˜0.5uL). Different viruses have different fingerprint Raman spectrum. The detection of virus presented in infected cells has also been demonstrated.

  4. K-Band Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) Coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, N.; Ibrahim, S. Z.; Hoon, W. F.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a designed coupler by using substrate Roger RO4003. The four port network coupler operates at (18-26 GHz) and designed by using substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) method. Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) are high performance broadband interconnects with excellent immunity to electromagnetic interference and suitable in microwave and millimetre-wave electronics applications, as well as wideband systems. The designs of the coupler are investigated using CST Microwave Studio simulation tool. These proposed couplers are capable of covering the frequency range and provide better performance of scattering parameter (S-parameter). This technology is successfully approached for millimetre-wave and microwave applications. Designs and results are presented and discussed in this paper. The overall simulated percentage bandwidth of the proposed coupler is covered from 18 to 26 GHz with percentage bandwidth of 36.36%.

  5. Recyclable organic solar cells on cellulose nanocrystal substrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yinhua; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M.; Liu, Jen-Chieh; Hsu, James; Shim, Jae Won; Dindar, Amir; Youngblood, Jeffrey P.; Moon, Robert J.; Kippelen, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is potentially the largest source of renewable energy at our disposal, but significant advances are required to make photovoltaic technologies economically viable and, from a life-cycle perspective, environmentally friendly, and consequently scalable. Cellulose nanomaterials are emerging high-value nanoparticles extracted from plants that are abundant, renewable, and sustainable. Here, we report on the first demonstration of efficient polymer solar cells fabricated on optically transparent cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) substrates. The solar cells fabricated on the CNC substrates display good rectification in the dark and reach a power conversion efficiency of 2.7%. In addition, we demonstrate that these solar cells can be easily separated and recycled into their major components using low-energy processes at room temperature, opening the door for a truly recyclable solar cell technology. Efficient and easily recyclable organic solar cells on CNC substrates are expected to be an attractive technology for sustainable, scalable, and environmentally-friendly energy production. PMID:23524333

  6. Better Back Contacts for Solar Cells on Flexible Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Lawrence M.; Ribelin, Rosine M.

    2006-01-01

    Improved low-resistance, semitransparent back contacts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed for solar photovoltaic cells that are made from thin films of I-III-VI2 semiconductor materials on flexible, high-temperatureresistant polyimide substrates or superstrates. The innovative aspect of the present development lies in the extension, to polyimide substrates or superstrates, of a similar prior development of improved low-resistance, semitransparent back contacts for I-III-VI2 solar cells on glass substrates or superstrates. A cell incorporating this innovation can be used either as a stand-alone photovoltaic device or as part of a monolithic stack containing another photovoltaic device that utilizes light of longer wavelengths.

  7. Glycyl radical activating enzymes: Structure, mechanism, and substrate interactions☆

    PubMed Central

    Shisler, Krista A.; Broderick, Joan B.

    2014-01-01

    The glycyl radical enzyme activating enzymes (GRE–AEs) are a group of enzymes that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily and utilize a [4Fe–4S] cluster and SAM to catalyze H-atom abstraction from their substrate proteins. GRE–AEs activate homodimeric proteins known as glycyl radical enzymes (GREs) through the production of a glycyl radical. After activation, these GREs catalyze diverse reactions through the production of their own substrate radicals. The GRE–AE pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is extensively characterized and has provided insights into the active site structure of radical SAM enzymes including GRE–AEs, illustrating the nature of the interactions with their corresponding substrate GREs and external electron donors. This review will highlight research on PFL-AE and will also discuss a few GREs and their respective activating enzymes. PMID:24486374

  8. Low dielectric polyimide aerogels as substrates for lightweight patch antennas.

    PubMed

    Meador, Mary Ann B; Wright, Sarah; Sandberg, Anna; Nguyen, Baochau N; Van Keuls, Frederick W; Mueller, Carl H; Rodríguez-Solís, Rafael; Miranda, Félix A

    2012-11-01

    The dielectric properties and loss tangents of low-density polyimide aerogels have been characterized at various frequencies. Relative dielectric constants as low as 1.16 were measured for polyimide aerogels made from 2,2'-dimethylbenzidine (DMBZ) and biphenyl 3,3',4,4'-tetracarbozylic dianhydride (BPDA) cross-linked with 1,3,5-triaminophenoxybenzene (TAB). This formulation was used as the substrate to fabricate and test prototype microstrip patch antennas and benchmark against state of practice commercial antenna substrates. The polyimide aerogel antennas exhibited broader bandwidth, higher gain, and lower mass than the antennas made using commercial substrates. These are very encouraging results, which support the potential advantages of the polyimide aerogel-based antennas for aerospace applications.

  9. Bioenabled SERS Substrates for Food Safety and Drinking Water Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Wang, Alan X.

    2016-01-01

    We present low-cost bioenabled surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates that can be massively produced in sustainable and eco-friendly methods with significant commercial potentials for the detection of food contamination and drinking water pollution. The sensors are based on diatom frustules with integrated plasmonic nanoparticles. The ultra-high sensitivity of the SERS substrates comes from the coupling between the diatom frustules and Ag nanoparticles to achieve dramatically increased local optical field to enhance the light-matter interactions for SERS sensing. We successfully applied the bioenabled SERS substrates to detect melamine in milk and aromatic compounds in water with sensitivity down to 1μg/L. PMID:26900205

  10. Starbursts and Wispy Drops : Surfactants Spreading on Gel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Daniels, Karen; Behringer, Robert

    2005-11-01

    We report a phase diagram for a novel instability seen in drops of nonionic surfactant solution (Triton X-305) spreading on viscoelastic agar gel substrate . This system allows us to examine the effect of varying the effective fluidity/stiffness of aqueous substrates. The morphology is strongly affected by the substrate fluidity, ranging from spreading starbursts of arms on weak gels, to wispy drops on intermediate strength gels, to circular drops on stiff gels. We analyze the dynamics of spreading in the starburst phase, where the arm length grows as t ^3/4 at early times, independent of the gel strength and surfactant concentration. The number of arms is proportional to the surfactant concentration and inversely proportional to the gel strength. Ongoing work is exploring the effects of changing the drop volume.

  11. Effects of substrate network topologies on competition dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hawoong

    2006-08-01

    We study a competition dynamics, based on the minority game, endowed with various substrate network structures. We observe the effects of the network topologies by investigating the volatility of the system and the structure of follower networks. The topology of substrate structures significantly influences the system efficiency represented by the volatility and such substrate networks are shown to amplify the herding effect and cause inefficiency in most cases. The follower networks emerging from the leadership structure show a power-law incoming degree distribution. This study shows the emergence of scale-free structures of leadership in the minority game and the effects of the interaction among players on the networked version of the game.

  12. Interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and organic material substrates.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations are widespread and form between ca. two-thirds of all land plants and fungi in the phylum Glomeromycota. The association is a mutualistic symbiosis with the fungi enhancing nutrient capture for the plant while obtaining carbon in return. Although arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) lack any substantial saprophytic capability they do preferentially associate with various organic substrates and respond by hyphal proliferation, indicating the fungus derives a benefit from the organic substrate. AMF may also enhance decomposition of the organic material. The benefit to the host plant of this hyphal proliferation is not always apparent, particularly regarding nitrogen (N) transfer, and there may be circumstances under which both symbionts compete for the N released given both have a large demand for N. The results of various studies examining AMF responses to organic substrates and the interactions with other members of the soil community will be discussed. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A pentacene monolayer trapped between graphene and a substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qicheng; Peng, Boyu; Chan, Paddy Kwok Leung; Luo, Zhengtang

    2015-09-21

    A self-assembled pentacene monolayer can be fabricated between the solid-solid interface of few-layered graphene (FLG) and the mica substrate, through a diffusion-spreading method. By utilizing a transfer method that allows us to sandwich pentacene between graphene and mica, followed by controlled annealing, we enabled the diffused pentacene to be trapped in the interfaces and led to the formation of a stable monolayer. We found that the formation of a monolayer is kinetically favored by using a 2D Ising lattice gas model for pentacene trapped between the graphene-substrate interfaces. This kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results indicate that, due to the graphene substrate enclosure, the spreading of the first layer proceeds faster than the second layer, as the kinetics favors the filling of voids by molecules from the second layer. This graphene assisted monolayer assembly method provides a new avenue for the fabrication of two-dimensional monolayer structures.

  14. Curvature and bow of bulk GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Young, Erin C.; Robertson, Christian A.

    2016-07-21

    We investigate the bow of free standing (0001) oriented hydride vapor phase epitaxy grown GaN substrates and demonstrate that their curvature is consistent with a compressive to tensile stress gradient (bottom to top) present in the substrates. The origin of the stress gradient and the curvature is attributed to the correlated inclination of edge threading dislocation (TD) lines away from the [0001] direction. A model is proposed and a relation is derived for bulk GaN substrate curvature dependence on the inclination angle and the density of TDs. The model is used to analyze the curvature for commercially available GaN substratesmore » as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction. The results show a close correlation between the experimentally determined parameters and those predicted from theoretical model.« less

  15. [Biogas production from cellulose-containing substrates: a review].

    PubMed

    Tsavkelova, E A; Netrusov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic microbial conversion of organic substrates to various biofuels is one of the alternative energy sources attracting the greatest attention of scientists. The advantages of biogas production over other technologies are the ability of methanogenic communities to degrade a broad range of substrates and concomitant benefits: neutralization of organic waste, reduction of greenhouse gas emission, and fertilizer production. Cellulose-containing materials are a good substrate, but their full-scale utilization encounters a number of problems, including improvement of the quality and amount ofbiogas produced and maintenance of the stability and high efficiency of microbial communities. We review data on microorganisms that form methanogenic cellulolytic communities, enzyme complexes of anaerobes essential for cellulose fiber degradation, and feedstock pretreatment, as biodegradation is hindered in the presence of lignin. Methods for improving biogas production by optimization of microbial growth conditions are considered on the examples of biogas formation from various types of plant and paper materials: writing paper and cardboard.

  16. Tuning Fluorescence Direction with Plasmonic Metal–Dielectric– Metal Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Badugu, Ramachandram; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Ray, Krishanu; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the emission properties of fluorophores is essential for improving the performance of fluorescence-based techniques in modern biochemical research, medical diagnosis, and sensing. Fluorescence emission is isotropic in nature, which makes it difficult to capture more than a small fraction of the total emission. Metal– dielectric–metal (MDM) substrates, discussed in this Letter, convert isotropic fluorescence into beaming emission normal to the substrate. This improves fluorescence collection efficiency and also opens up new avenues for a wide range of fluorescence-based applications. We suggest that MDM substrates can be readily adapted for multiple uses, such as in microarray formats, for directional fluorescence studies of multiple probes or for molecule-specific sensing with a high degree of spatial control over the fluorescence emission. SECTION: Physical Processes in Nanomaterials and Nanostructures PMID:24013521

  17. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana; Coto, Borja; Rodríguez, Jorge; Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Knez, Mato

    2015-08-01

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  18. Recyclable organic solar cells on cellulose nanocrystal substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yinhua; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M; Liu, Jen-Chieh; Hsu, James; Shim, Jae Won; Dindar, Amir; Youngblood, Jeffrey P; Moon, Robert J; Kippelen, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is potentially the largest source of renewable energy at our disposal, but significant advances are required to make photovoltaic technologies economically viable and, from a life-cycle perspective, environmentally friendly, and consequently scalable. Cellulose nanomaterials are emerging high-value nanoparticles extracted from plants that are abundant, renewable, and sustainable. Here, we report on the first demonstration of efficient polymer solar cells fabricated on optically transparent cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) substrates. The solar cells fabricated on the CNC substrates display good rectification in the dark and reach a power conversion efficiency of 2.7%. In addition, we demonstrate that these solar cells can be easily separated and recycled into their major components using low-energy processes at room temperature, opening the door for a truly recyclable solar cell technology. Efficient and easily recyclable organic solar cells on CNC substrates are expected to be an attractive technology for sustainable, scalable, and environmentally-friendly energy production.

  19. Glycyl radical activating enzymes: structure, mechanism, and substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Shisler, Krista A; Broderick, Joan B

    2014-03-15

    The glycyl radical enzyme activating enzymes (GRE-AEs) are a group of enzymes that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily and utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster and SAM to catalyze H-atom abstraction from their substrate proteins. GRE-AEs activate homodimeric proteins known as glycyl radical enzymes (GREs) through the production of a glycyl radical. After activation, these GREs catalyze diverse reactions through the production of their own substrate radicals. The GRE-AE pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is extensively characterized and has provided insights into the active site structure of radical SAM enzymes including GRE-AEs, illustrating the nature of the interactions with their corresponding substrate GREs and external electron donors. This review will highlight research on PFL-AE and will also discuss a few GREs and their respective activating enzymes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Substrate-induced reduction of graphene thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koniakhin, S. V.; Utesov, O. I.; Terterov, I. N.; Nalitov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    We develop a theory of heat conductivity in supported graphene, accounting for coherent phonon scattering on disorder induced by an amorphous substrate. We derive spectra for in-plane and out-of-plane phonons in the framework of Green's function approach. The energy parameters of the theory are obtained using molecular dynamics simulations for graphene on a SiO2 substrate. The heat conductivity is calculated by the Boltzmann transport equation. We find that the interaction with the substrate drastically reduces the phonon lifetime and completely suppresses the contribution of flexural (ZA) phonons to the heat conductivity. As a result, the total heat conductivity is reduced by several times, which matches with the tendency observed in the available experimental data. The considered effect is important for managing the thermal properties of graphene-based electronic devices.

  1. Multi-wavelength emissivity measurement of stainless steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. F. F.; Dai, J. M. M.; Zhang, L.; Pan, W. D. D.

    2013-01-01

    The emissivity is a key parameter to measure the surface temperature of materials in the radiation thermometry. In this paper, the surface emissivity of metallic substrates is measured by the multi-wavelength emissivity measurement apparatus developed by the Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT). The measuring principle of this apparatus is based on the energy comparison. Several radiation thermometers, whose emissivity coefficients corrected by the measured emissivity from this apparatus, are used to measure the surface temperature of stainless steel substrates. The temperature values measured by means of radiation thermometry are compared to those measured by means of contact thermometry. The relative error between the two means is less than 2% at temperatures from 700K to 1300K, it suggests that the emissivity of stainless steel substrate measured by the multi-wavelength emissivity measurement apparatus are accurate and reliable. Emissivity measurements performed with this apparatus present an uncertainty of 5.9% (cover factor=2).

  2. Hybridized boron-carbon nitride fibrous nanostructures on Ni substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Yoke Khin; Yoshimura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2002-04-01

    Stoichiometric BC2N films can be deposited on Si (100) at 800 °C, however, they are phase separated as pure carbon and BN phases. Likewise, hybridized boron-carbon nitride (BCN) films can be synthesized on Ni substrates. On Ni, the carbon and BN phases are hybridized through carbon nitride and boron carbide bonds. These films appeared as fibrous nanostructures. Evidence indicates that the Ni substrate acts as a sink for the carbon and forces the carbon composites to grow on top of the B and N atoms. However, as these films are grown thicker, phase separation occurs again. These results indicate that hybridized BCN phases should now be regarded as semiconducting or superhard nanostructures. High-temperature deposition on Ni substrates might be a solution to the obstacle of preparing hybridized BCN phases.

  3. Peptidomics methods for the identification of peptidase-substrate interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Anna Mari; Kim, Yun-Gon; Saghatelian, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Peptidases have important roles in controlling physiological signaling through their regulation of bioactive peptides. Understanding and controlling bioactive peptide regulation is of great biomedical interest and approaches that elucidate the interplay between peptidases and their substrates are vital for achieving this goal. Here, we highlight the utility of recent peptidomics approaches in identifying endogenous substrates of peptidases. These approaches reveal bioactive substrates and help characterize the biochemical functions of the enzyme. Most recently, peptidomics approaches have been applied to address the challenging question of identifying the peptidases responsible for regulating specific bioactive peptides. Since peptidases are of great biomedical interest, these approaches will begin to impact our ability to identify new drug targets that regulate important bioactive peptides. PMID:23332665

  4. System and method for floating-substrate passive voltage contrast

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, Mark W [Albuquerque, NM; Cole, Jr., Edward I.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon [Albuquerque, NM; Soden, Jerry M [Placitas, NM; Walraven, Jeremy A [Albuquerque, NM; Pimentel, Alejandro A [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-04-28

    A passive voltage contrast (PVC) system and method are disclosed for analyzing ICs to locate defects and failure mechanisms. During analysis a device side of a semiconductor die containing the IC is maintained in an electrically-floating condition without any ground electrical connection while a charged particle beam is scanned over the device side. Secondary particle emission from the device side of the IC is detected to form an image of device features, including electrical vias connected to transistor gates or to other structures in the IC. A difference in image contrast allows the defects or failure mechanisms be pinpointed. Varying the scan rate can, in some instances, produce an image reversal to facilitate precisely locating the defects or failure mechanisms in the IC. The system and method are useful for failure analysis of ICs formed on substrates (e.g. bulk semiconductor substrates and SOI substrates) and other types of structures.

  5. Optically transparent frequency selective surfaces on flexible thin plastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewani, Aliya A.; O'Keefe, Steven G.; Thiel, David V.; Galehdar, Amir

    2015-02-01

    A novel 2D simple low cost frequency selective surface was screen printed on thin (0.21 mm), flexible transparent plastic substrate (relative permittivity 3.2). It was designed, fabricated and tested in the frequency range 10-20 GHz. The plane wave transmission and reflection coefficients agreed with numerical modelling. The effective permittivity and thickness of the backing sheet has a significant effect on the frequency characteristics. The stop band frequency reduced from 15GHz (no backing) to 12.5GHz with polycarbonate. The plastic substrate thickness beyond 1.8mm has minimal effect on the resonant frequency. While the inner element spacing controls the stop-band frequency, the substrate thickness controls the bandwidth. The screen printing technique provided a simple, low cost FSS fabrication method to produce flexible, conformal, optically transparent and bio-degradable FSS structures which can find their use in electromagnetic shielding and filtering applications in radomes, reflector antennas, beam splitters and polarizers.

  6. Silicon thin-film transistor backplanes on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattamis, Alexis Z.

    Flexible large area electronics, especially for displays, is a rapidly growing field. Since hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-film transistors (a-Si:H TFTs) have become the industry standard for liquid crystal displays, it makes sense that they be used in any transition from glass substrates to flexible substrates. The goal of this thesis work was to implement a-Si:H backplane technology on stainless steel and clear plastic substrates, with minimal recipe changes to ensure high device quality. When fabricating TFTs on flexible substrates many new issues arise, from thin-film fracture to overlay alignment errors. Our approach was to maintain elevated deposition temperatures (˜300°C) and engineer methods to minimize these problems, rather than reducing deposition temperatures. The resulting TFTs exhibit more stable operation than their low temperature counterparts and are therefore similar to the TFTs produced on glass. Two display projects using a-Si:H TFTs will be discussed in detail. They are an active-matrix organic light emitting display (AMOLED) on stainless steel and an active-matrix electrophoretic display (AMEPD) on clear plastic, with TFTs deposited at 250°C-280°C. Achieving quality a-Si:H TFTs on these substrates required addressing a host of technical challenges, including surface roughness and feature misalignment. Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) was also implemented on a clear plastic substrate as a possible alternative to a-Si:H. nc-Si:H TFTs can be deposited using the same techniques as a-Si:H but yield carrier mobilities one order of magnitude greater. Their large mobilities could enable high resolution OLED displays and system-on-panel electronics.

  7. Arabidopsis ATG4 cysteine proteases specificity toward ATG8 substrates

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunsook; Woo, Jongchan; Dinesh-Kumar, SP

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is a regulated intracellular process during which cytoplasmic cargo engulfed by double-membrane autophagosomes is delivered to the vacuole or lysosome for degradation and recycling. Atg8 that is conjugated to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) during autophagy plays an important role not only in autophagosome biogenesis but also in cargo recruitment. Conjugation of PE to Atg8 requires processing of the C-terminal conserved glycine residue in Atg8 by the Atg4 cysteine protease. The Arabidopsis plant genome contains 9 Atg8 (AtATG8a to AtATG8i) and 2 Atg4 (AtATG4a and AtATG4b) family members. To understand AtATG4’s specificity toward different AtATG8 substrates, we generated a unique synthetic substrate C-AtATG8-ShR (citrine-AtATG8-Renilla luciferase SuperhRLUC). In vitro analyses indicated that AtATG4a is catalytically more active and has broad AtATG8 substrate specificity compared with AtATG4b. Arabidopsis transgenic plants expressing the synthetic substrate C-AtAtg8a-ShR is efficiently processed by endogenous AtATG4s and targeted to the vacuole during nitrogen starvation. These results indicate that the synthetic substrate mimics endogenous AtATG8, and its processing can be monitored in vivo by a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay. The synthetic Atg8 substrates provide an easy and versatile method to study plant autophagy during different biological processes. PMID:24658121

  8. Excavated substrate modulates growth instability during nest building in ants

    PubMed Central

    Toffin, Etienne; Kindekens, Jonathan; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    In social insects, the nests of the same species can show a large difference in size and shape. Despite these large variations, the nests share the same substructures, some appearing during nest growth. In ants, the interplay between nest size and digging activity leads to two successive morphological transitions from circular to branched shapes (budding along the perimeter of the circular cavity and tunnelling of the galleries). Like several other self-organized collective behaviours, this phenomenon, as well as the entire nest-digging process, is thought to be modulated by environmental properties. The present study investigates the effect of excavated substrate on the nest morphogenesis and the morphological transitions by using two materials with different cohesions. Here, we show that the two morphological transitions occur more frequently with a cohesive substrate than with a granular one: 96 per cent of cohesive experiments showed both transitions, whereas only 50 per cent did in granular experiments. We found that transitions and excavation cessation follow area–response thresholds: the shape transitions take place and the digging activity stops when the dug area reaches the corresponding threshold values. The shape transition thresholds are lower with the cohesive substrate and that of stopping digging is independent of nest shape and material. According to simulations, the experimental frequencies of transitions found their origin in the competition between transitions and activity cessation and in the difference between the transition threshold values of each substrate. Our results demonstrate how the substrate properties modulate the collective response and lead to various patterns. Considering the non-specific mechanisms at work, such effects of substrate coarseness have their counterparts in various collective behaviours, generating alternative patterns to colonize and exploit the environment. PMID:20410036

  9. Superhydrophobic SERS substrates based on silicon hierarchical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuexian; Wen, Jinxiu; Zhou, Jianhua; Zheng, Zebo; An, Di; Wang, Hao; Xie, Weiguang; Zhan, Runze; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Chen, Huanjun; Deng, Shaozhi

    2018-02-01

    Silicon nanostructures have been cultivated as promising surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates in terms of their low-loss optical resonance modes, facile functionalization, and compatibility with today’s state-of-the-art CMOS techniques. However, unlike their plasmonic counterparts, the electromagnetic field enhancements induced by silicon nanostructures are relatively small, which restrict their SERS sensing limit to around 10-7 M. To tackle this problem, we propose here a strategy for improving the SERS performance of silicon nanostructures by constructing silicon hierarchical nanostructures with a superhydrophobic surface. The hierarchical nanostructures are binary structures consisted of silicon nanowires (NWs) grown on micropyramids (MPs). After being modified with perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PFOT), the nanostructure surface shows a stable superhydrophobicity with a high contact angle of ˜160°. The substrate can allow for concentrating diluted analyte solutions into a specific area during the evaporation of the liquid droplet, whereby the analytes are aggregated into a small volume and can be easily detected by the silicon nanostructure SERS substrate. The analyte molecules (methylene blue: MB) enriched from an aqueous solution lower than 10-8 M can be readily detected. Such a detection limit is ˜100-fold lower than the conventional SERS substrates made of silicon nanostructures. Additionally, the detection limit can be further improved by functionalizing gold nanoparticles onto silicon hierarchical nanostructures, whereby the superhydrophobic characteristics and plasmonic field enhancements can be combined synergistically to give a detection limit down to ˜10-11 M. A gold nanoparticle-functionalized superhydrophobic substrate was employed to detect the spiked melamine in liquid milk. The results showed that the detection limit can be as low as 10-5 M, highlighting the potential of the proposed superhydrophobic SERS substrate in

  10. Basis for substrate recognition and distinction by matrix metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Ratnikov, Boris I.; Cieplak, Piotr; Gramatikoff, Kosi; Pierce, James; Eroshkin, Alexey; Igarashi, Yoshinobu; Kazanov, Marat; Sun, Qing; Godzik, Adam; Osterman, Andrei; Stec, Boguslaw; Strongin, Alex; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic sequencing and structural genomics produced a vast amount of sequence and structural data, creating an opportunity for structure–function analysis in silico [Radivojac P, et al. (2013) Nat Methods 10(3):221–227]. Unfortunately, only a few large experimental datasets exist to serve as benchmarks for function-related predictions. Furthermore, currently there are no reliable means to predict the extent of functional similarity among proteins. Here, we quantify structure–function relationships among three phylogenetic branches of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family by comparing their cleavage efficiencies toward an extended set of phage peptide substrates that were selected from ∼64 million peptide sequences (i.e., a large unbiased representation of substrate space). The observed second-order rate constants [k(obs)] across the substrate space provide a distance measure of functional similarity among the MMPs. These functional distances directly correlate with MMP phylogenetic distance. There is also a remarkable and near-perfect correlation between the MMP substrate preference and sequence identity of 50–57 discontinuous residues surrounding the catalytic groove. We conclude that these residues represent the specificity-determining positions (SDPs) that allowed for the expansion of MMP proteolytic function during evolution. A transmutation of only a few selected SDPs proximal to the bound substrate peptide, and contributing the most to selectivity among the MMPs, is sufficient to enact a global change in the substrate preference of one MMP to that of another, indicating the potential for the rational and focused redesign of cleavage specificity in MMPs. PMID:25246591

  11. Lignocellulolytic enzyme activity, substrate utilization, and mushroom yield by Pleurotus ostreatus cultivated on substrate containing anaerobic digester solids.

    PubMed

    Isikhuemhen, Omoanghe S; Mikiashvilli, Nona A

    2009-11-01

    Solid waste from anaerobic digestion of litter from the commercial production of broiler chickens has limited use as fertilizer. Its disposal is a major problem for digester operators who are seeking alternative use for anaerobic digester solids, also referred to as solid waste (SW). The use of SW as substrates for the cultivation of Pleurotus ostreatus strain MBFBL400 was investigated. Lignocellulolytic enzymes activity, substrate utilization, and mushroom yield were evaluated in ten different substrate combinations (SCs) containing varying amounts of solid waste, wheat straw, and millet. Nutritional content of mushrooms produced on the different substrates was also determined. Substrates containing 70-80% wheat straw, 10-20% SW, and 10-20% millet were found to produce the highest mushroom yield (874.8-958.3 g/kg). Loss of organic matter in all SCs tested varied from 45.8% to 56.2%, which had positive correlation with the biological efficiency. Laccase, peroxidase, and carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) activities were higher before fruiting, whereas xylanase showed higher activities after mushroom fruiting. SW increased the nutritional content in mushrooms harvested, and the combination of wheat straw and SW with millet significantly improved mushroom yield. Our findings demonstrated the possibility of utilizing anaerobic digester solids in mushroom cultivation. The application of SW as such could improve the financial gains in the overall economy of anaerobic digester plants.

  12. Ductile film delamination from compliant substrates using hard overlayers

    PubMed Central

    Cordill, M.J.; Marx, V.M.; Kirchlechner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible electronic devices call for copper and gold metal films to adhere well to polymer substrates. Measuring the interfacial adhesion of these material systems is often challenging, requiring the formulation of different techniques and models. Presented here is a strategy to induce well defined areas of delamination to measure the adhesion of copper films on polyimide substrates. The technique utilizes a stressed overlayer and tensile straining to cause buckle formation. The described method allows one to examine the effects of thin adhesion layers used to improve the adhesion of flexible systems. PMID:25641995

  13. Ductile film delamination from compliant substrates using hard overlayers.

    PubMed

    Cordill, M J; Marx, V M; Kirchlechner, C

    2014-11-28

    Flexible electronic devices call for copper and gold metal films to adhere well to polymer substrates. Measuring the interfacial adhesion of these material systems is often challenging, requiring the formulation of different techniques and models. Presented here is a strategy to induce well defined areas of delamination to measure the adhesion of copper films on polyimide substrates. The technique utilizes a stressed overlayer and tensile straining to cause buckle formation. The described method allows one to examine the effects of thin adhesion layers used to improve the adhesion of flexible systems.

  14. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sankar, Sambasivan; Goyal, Amit; Barnett, Scott A.; Kim, Ilwon; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-08-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metal and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layers. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may be super conducting properties.

  15. Using ALD To Bond CNTs to Substrates and Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Eric W.; Bronikowski, Michael J.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) has been shown to be effective as a means of coating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with layers of Al2O3 that form strong bonds between the CNTs and the substrates on which the CNTs are grown. ALD is a previously developed vaporphase thin-film-growth technique. ALD differs from conventional chemical vapor deposition, in which material is deposited continually by thermal decomposition of a precursor gas. In ALD, material is deposited one layer of atoms at a time because the deposition process is self-limiting and driven by chemical reactions between the precursor gas and the surface of the substrate or the previously deposited layer.

  16. System and process for aluminization of metal-containing substrates

    DOEpatents

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2017-12-12

    A system and method are detailed for aluminizing surfaces of metallic substrates, parts, and components with a protective alumina layer in-situ. Aluminum (Al) foil sandwiched between the metallic components and a refractory material when heated in an oxidizing gas under a compression load at a selected temperature forms the protective alumina coating on the surface of the metallic components. The alumina coating minimizes evaporation of volatile metals from the metallic substrates, parts, and components in assembled devices that can degrade performance during operation at high temperature.

  17. System and process for aluminization of metal-containing substrates

    DOEpatents

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W

    2015-11-03

    A system and method are detailed for aluminizing surfaces of metallic substrates, parts, and components with a protective alumina layer in-situ. Aluminum (Al) foil sandwiched between the metallic components and a refractory material when heated in an oxidizing gas under a compression load at a selected temperature forms the protective alumina coating on the surface of the metallic components. The alumina coating minimizes evaporation of volatile metals from the metallic substrates, parts, and components in assembled devices during operation at high temperature that can degrade performance.

  18. Piezoelectric biosensor with a ladder polymer substrate coating

    DOEpatents

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.; Carter, R.M.

    1998-09-29

    A piezoelectric biosensor substrate useful for immobilizing biomolecules in an oriented manner on the surface of a piezoelectric sensor has a ladder polymer of polyacrylonitrile. To make the substrate, a solution of an organic polymer, preferably polyacrylonitrile, is applied to the surface of a piezoelectric sensor. The organic polymer is modifying by heating the polymer in a controlled fashion in air such that a ladder polymer is produced which, in turn, forms the attachment point for the biomolecules comprising the piezoelectric biosensor. 3 figs.

  19. RFID and Memory Devices Fabricated Integrally on Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.

    2004-01-01

    Electronic identification devices containing radio-frequency identification (RFID) circuits and antennas would be fabricated integrally with the objects to be identified, according to a proposal. That is to say, the objects to be identified would serve as substrates for the deposition and patterning of the materials of the devices used to identify them, and each identification device would be bonded to the identified object at the molecular level. Vacuum arc vapor deposition (VAVD) is the NASA derived process for depositing layers of material on the substrate. This proposal stands in contrast to the current practice of fabricating RFID and/or memory devices as wafer-based, self-contained integrated-circuit chips that are subsequently embedded in or attached to plastic cards to make smart account-information cards and identification badges. If one relies on such a chip to store data on the history of an object to be tracked and the chip falls off or out of the object, then one loses both the historical data and the means to track the object and verify its identity electronically. Also, in contrast is the manufacturing philosophy in use today to make many memory devices. Today s methods involve many subtractive processes such as etching. This proposal only uses additive methods, building RFID and memory devices from the substrate up in thin layers. VAVD is capable of spraying silicon, copper, and other materials commonly used in electronic devices. The VAVD process sprays most metals and some ceramics. The material being sprayed has a very strong bond with the substrate, whether that substrate is metal, ceramic, or even wood, rock, glass, PVC, or paper. An object to be tagged with an identification device according to the proposal must be compatible with a vacuum deposition process. Temperature is seldom an issue as the substrate rarely reaches 150 F (66 C) during the deposition process. A portion of the surface of the object would be designated as a substrate for

  20. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.