Science.gov

Sample records for a-train satellite constellation

  1. CloudSat Anomaly and Return to the A-Train: Lessons Learned for Satellite Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vane, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    In April 2011, CloudSat suffered a severe battery anomaly, leaving the space-craft in emergency mode without the ability to command or maneuver the spacecraft. Before the team was able to recover spacecraft operability, CloudSat passed close to the Aqua satellite in the A-Train and then exited the A-Train. A new mode of operations, termed Daylight Only Operations (DO-Op) mode was developed to enable CloudSat to resume science operations in an orbit under the A-Train by November 2011, and in July 2012 CloudSat re-entered the A-Train. This paper describes challenges and lessons-learned during the anomaly, the exit from the A-Train and the return to the A-Train. These lessons-learned may ap-ply to other current and future satellite constellations in Earth orbit.

  2. On satellite constellation selection

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-05-01

    Analytical estimates can be used to produce and discuss optimal constellations. They are in close agreement with phase-space estimates and exact solutions. They suggest that distributions of inclined orbits could reduce satellite numbers by factors of 2--3 while improving uniformity. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Top-of-the-Atmosphere Shortwave Flux Estimation from Satellite Observations: An Empirical Neural Network Approach Applied with Data from the A-Train Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pawan; Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, Alexander; Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2016-01-01

    Estimates of top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux are essential for the understanding of Earth's energy budget and climate system. Clouds, aerosols, water vapor, and ozone (O3) are among the most important atmospheric agents impacting the Earth's shortwave (SW) radiation budget. There are several sensors in orbit that provide independent information related to these parameters. Having coincident information from these sensors is important for understanding their potential contributions. The A-train constellation of satellites provides a unique opportunity to analyze data from several of these sensors. In this paper, retrievals of cloud/aerosol parameters and total column ozone (TCO) from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) have been collocated with the Aqua Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) estimates of total reflected TOA outgoing SW flux (SWF). We use these data to develop a variety of neural networks that estimate TOA SWF globally over ocean and land using only OMI data and other ancillary information as inputs and CERES TOA SWF as the output for training purposes. OMI-estimated TOA SWF from the trained neural networks reproduces independent CERES data with high fidelity. The global mean daily TOA SWF calculated from OMI is consistently within 1% of CERES throughout the year 2007. Application of our neural network method to other sensors that provide similar retrieved parameters, both past and future, can produce similar estimates TOA SWF. For example, the well-calibrated Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) series could provide estimates of TOA SWF dating back to late 1978.

  4. Adaptation in Multi-Satellite Constellation Cooperation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2014-0113 TR-2014-0113 ADAPTATION IN MULTI-SATELLITE CONSTELLATION COOPERATION Chengyu Cao University of Connecticut...Multi-Satellite Constellation Cooperation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-13-1-0287 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d... constellations . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Autonomous space systems, High fidelity satellite simulator, multi-objective optimization 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  5. Top-of-the-atmosphere shortwave flux estimation from satellite observations: an empirical neural network approach applied with data from the A-train constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Pawan; Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, Alexander; Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2016-07-01

    Estimates of top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux are essential for the understanding of Earth's energy budget and climate system. Clouds, aerosols, water vapor, and ozone (O3) are among the most important atmospheric agents impacting the Earth's shortwave (SW) radiation budget. There are several sensors in orbit that provide independent information related to these parameters. Having coincident information from these sensors is important for understanding their potential contributions. The A-train constellation of satellites provides a unique opportunity to analyze data from several of these sensors. In this paper, retrievals of cloud/aerosol parameters and total column ozone (TCO) from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) have been collocated with the Aqua Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) estimates of total reflected TOA outgoing SW flux (SWF). We use these data to develop a variety of neural networks that estimate TOA SWF globally over ocean and land using only OMI data and other ancillary information as inputs and CERES TOA SWF as the output for training purposes. OMI-estimated TOA SWF from the trained neural networks reproduces independent CERES data with high fidelity. The global mean daily TOA SWF calculated from OMI is consistently within ±1 % of CERES throughout the year 2007. Application of our neural network method to other sensors that provide similar retrieved parameters, both past and future, can produce similar estimates TOA SWF. For example, the well-calibrated Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) series could provide estimates of TOA SWF dating back to late 1978.

  6. Optimal Replacement Policies for Satellite Constellations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    satellite and booster inventory demands . The purpose of the Evaluate Launch Schedule function is to determine how many operational satellites will be... Markovian decision models . Operations Research, 13, 272-278. BIB-1 15. Ereau, J.-F. and M. Saleman (1996). Modeling & simulation of a satellite constel...2-1 2.1 Optimal Replacement Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2 Satellite Constellation Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6 3. Formal Model

  7. Best Practices for Operations of Satellite Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph; Oza, Dipak; Smith, Danford S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the best practices used by several commercial and government operators of satellite constellations. These best practices were identified through a series of seminars and discussions held at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The best practices are arrived through many years of experience and improvements made in the operations procedures and the operational systems with the primary drivers as mission safety and cost effectiveness. This paper discusses the operational aspects associated with how different organizations manage complexities of constellation operations. For the purposes of this paper, satellite constellations are groups of similar spacecraft with more than one spacecraft needed to fully accomplish the constellation's mission

  8. Time distributions in satellite constellation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnas, David; Casanova, Daniel; Tresaco, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the time distribution methodology presented in this paper is to generate constellations whose satellites share a set of relative trajectories in a given time, and maintain that property over time without orbit corrections. The model takes into account a series of orbital perturbations such as the gravitational potential of the Earth, the atmospheric drag, the Sun and the Moon as disturbing third bodies and the solar radiation pressure. These perturbations are included in the design process of the constellation. Moreover, the whole methodology allows to design constellations with multiple relative trajectories that can be distributed in a minimum number of inertial orbits.

  9. Time distributions in satellite constellation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnas, David; Casanova, Daniel; Tresaco, Eva

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the time distribution methodology presented in this paper is to generate constellations whose satellites share a set of relative trajectories in a given time, and maintain that property over time without orbit corrections. The model takes into account a series of orbital perturbations such as the gravitational potential of the Earth, the atmospheric drag, the Sun and the Moon as disturbing third bodies and the solar radiation pressure. These perturbations are included in the design process of the constellation. Moreover, the whole methodology allows to design constellations with multiple relative trajectories that can be distributed in a minimum number of inertial orbits.

  10. Optimizing space constellations for mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel, T.; Taisant, J.-P.

    1993-01-01

    Designing a mobile satellite system entails many complex trade-offs between a great number of parameters including: capacity, complexity of the payload, constellation geometry, number of satellites, quality of coverage, etc. This paper aims at defining a methodology which tries to split the variables to give rapidly some first results. The major input considered is the traffic assumption which would be offered by the system. A first key step is the choice of the best Rider or Walker constellation geometries - with different numbers of satellites - to insure a good quality of coverage over a selected service area. Another aspect to be addressed is the possible altitude location of the constellation, since it is limited by many constraints. The altitude ranges that seem appropriate considering the spatial environment, the launch and orbit keeping policy and the feasibility of the antenna allowing sufficient frequency reuse are briefly analyzed. To support these first considerations, some 'reference constellations' with similar coverage quality are chosen. The in-orbit capacity needed to support the assumed traffic is computed versus altitude. Finally, the exact number of satellite is determined. It comes as an optimum between a small number of satellites offering a high (and costly) power margin in bad propagation situation and a great number of less powerful satellites granting the same quality of service.

  11. Optimization of satellite constellation reconfiguration maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Leonid; Guelman, Moshe; Mishne, David

    2014-06-01

    Constellation satellites are required to perform orbital transfer maneuvers. Orbital transfer maneuvers, as opposed to orbital correction maneuvers, are seldom performed but require a substantial amount of propellant for each maneuver. The maneuvers are performed in order to obtain the desired constellation configuration that satisfies the coverage requirements. In most cases, the single-satellite position is immaterial; rather the relative position between constellation multiple-satellites is to be controlled. This work deals with the solution to the coupled optimization problem of multiple-satellite orbital transfer. The studied problem involves a coupled formulation of the terminal conditions of the satellites. The solution was achieved using functional optimization techniques by a combined algorithm. The combined algorithm is based on the First Order Gradient and Neighboring-Extremals Algorithms. An orbital transfer optimization tool was developed. This software has the ability to consider multiple satellites with coupled terminal conditions. A solution to the multiple-satellite orbital transfer optimization problem is presented. A comparison of this solution to the uncoupled case is presented in order to review the benefits of using this approach. It is concluded that the coupled transfer maneuver solution approach is more computationally efficient and more accurate. Numerical solutions for a number of representative cases are presented.

  12. Adaptive Resource Management Technology for Satellite Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Lonnie; Tjaden, Brett; Pfarr, Barbara B.; Hennessy, Joseph F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This manuscript describes the Sensor Web Adaptive Resource Manager (SWARM) project. The primary focus of the project is on the design and prototyping of middleware for managing computing and network resources in a way that enables the information systems of satellite constellations to provide realtime performance within dynamic environments. The middleware has been prototyped, and it has been evaluated by employing it to manage a pool of distributed resources for the ITOS (Integrated Test and Operations System) satellite command and control software system. The design of the middleware is discussed and a summary of the evaluation effort is provided.

  13. The power of inexpensive satellite constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrud, Lars P.; La Tour, Rose; Swartz, William H.; Nag, Sreeja; Lorentz, Steven R.; Hilker, Thomas; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Papadakis, Stergios J.

    2014-06-01

    Two thematic drivers are motivating the science community towards constellations of small satellites, the revelation that many next generation system science questions are uniquely addressed with sufficient numbers of simultaneous space based measurements, and the realization that space is historically expensive, and in an environment of constrained costs, we must innovate to ―do more with less‖. We present analysis that answers many of the key questions surrounding constellations of scientific satellites, including research that resulted from the GEOScan community based effort originally intended as hosted payloads on Iridium NEXT. We present analysis that answers the question how many satellites does global system science require? Perhaps serendipitously, the analyses show that many of the key science questions independently converge towards similar results, i.e. that approximately 60+ satellites are needed for transformative, as opposed to incremental capability in system science. The current challenge is how to effectively transition products from design to mass production for space based instruments and vehicles. Ideally, the lesson learned from past designs and builds of various space products should pave the way toward a better manufacturing plan that utilizes just a fraction of the prototype`s cost. Using the commercial products industry implementations of mass customization as an example, we will discuss about the benefits of standardization in design requirements for space instruments and vehicles. For example, the instruments (payloads) are designed to have standardized elements, components, or modules that interchangeably work together within a linkage system. We conclude with a discussion on implementation plans and the new paradigms for community and international cooperation enabled by small satellite constellations.

  14. How to Enter, Fly In, and Exit the A-Train Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The collaborative science obtained from the satellites in the A-Train is an unparalleled success. The constellation framework that has evolved is well-formulated and documented by its international members. Communication between teams is enhanced by a web-based Constellation Coordination System. Safety and correlated observations are ensured by defining independent control boxes with buffers in between. Each mission stays within its control box by regular drag makeup maneuvers. Annual inclination adjustments are coordinated by all missions to maintain their absolute and relative Mean Local Time of Ascending Node (MLTAN). Since the satellites are in different orbit planes their separation involves a three-dimensional triad made up of the along track separations, reference groundtracks and MLTAN's. For further safety, a Constellation Envelope has been defined to determine safe entry and exit orbits.

  15. Boundary layer regulation in the southeast Atlantic cloud microphysics during the biomass burning season as seen by the A-train satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painemal, David; Kato, Seiji; Minnis, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Solar radiation absorption by biomass burning aerosols has a strong warming effect over the southeast Atlantic. Interactions between the overlying smoke aerosols and low-level cloud microphysics and the subsequent albedo perturbation are, however, generally ignored in biomass burning radiative assessments. In this study, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) are combined with Aqua satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) to assess the effect of variations in the boundary layer height and the separation distance between the cloud and aerosol layers on the cloud microphysics. The merged data analyzed at a daily temporal resolution suggest that overlying smoke aerosols modify cloud properties by decreasing cloud droplet size despite an increase in the cloud liquid water as boundary layer deepens, north of 5°S. These changes are controlled by the proximity of the aerosol layer to the cloud top rather than increases in the column aerosol load. The correlations are unlikely driven by meteorological factors, as three predictors of cloud variability, lower tropospheric stability, surface winds, and mixing ratio suggest that cloud effective radius, cloud top height, and liquid water path should correlate positively. Because cloud effective radius anticorrelates with cloud liquid water over the region with large microphysical changes—north of 5°S—the overall radiative consequence at the top of the atmosphere is a strong albedo susceptibility, equivalent to a 3% albedo increase due to a 10% decrease in cloud effective radius. This albedo enhancement partially offsets the aerosol solar absorption. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of accounting for the indirect effect of smoke aerosols in the cloud microphysics when estimating the radiative impact of the biomass burning at the

  16. Mean Density Estimation derived from Satellite Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.; Close, S.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of nanosatellite constellations, we define here a new method to derive neutral densities of the lower thermosphere from multiple similar platforms travelling through same regions of space. Because of similar orbits, the satellites are expected to encounter similar mean neutral densities and hence experience similar drag if their drag coefficients are equivalent. Utilizing free molecular flow theory to bound the minimum possible drag coefficient possible and order statistics to give a statistical picture of the distribution, we are able to estimate the neutral density alongside its associated error bounds. Data sources for this methodology can either be from already established Two Line Elements (TLEs) or from raw data sources, in which an additional filtering step needs to be performed to estimate relevant parameters. The effects of error in the filtering step of the methodology are also discussed and can be removed if the error distribution is Gaussian in nature. This method does not depend on prior models of the atmosphere, but instead is based upon physics models of simple shapes in free molecular flow. With a constellation of 10 satellites, we can achieve a standard deviation of roughly 4% on the estimated mean neutral density. As additional satellites are included in the estimation scheme, the result converges towards the lower limit of the achievable drag coefficient, and accuracy becomes limited by the quality of the ranging measurements and the probability of the accommodation coefficient. Data is provided courtesy of Planet Labs and comparisons are made to existing atmospheric models such as NRLMSISE-00 and JB2006.

  17. Space Technology 5 - A Successful Micro-Satellite Constellation Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Candace; Webb, Evan H.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST5) constellation of three micro-satellites was launched March 22, 2006. During the three-month flight demonstration phase, the ST5 team validated key technologies that will make future low-cost micro-sat constellations possible, demonstrated operability concepts for future micro-sat science constellation missions, and demonstrated the utility of a micro-satellite constellation to perform research-quality science. The ST5 mission was successfully completed in June 2006, demonstrating high-quality science and technology validation results.

  18. Evaluation of a satellite constellation for active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahara, Hironori

    2014-12-01

    This paper analyzes an example of a three-dimensional constellation of debris removal satellites and proposes an effective constellation using a delta-V analysis that discusses the advisability of rendezvousing satellites with space debris. Lambert's Equation was used to establish a means of analysis to construct a constellation of debris removal satellites, which has a limit of delta-V injection by evaluating the amount of space debris that can be rendezvoused by a certain number of removal satellite. Consequently, we determine a constellation of up to 38 removal satellites for debris removal, where the number of space debris rendezvoused by a single removal satellite is not more than 25, removing up to 584 pieces of debris total. Even if we prepare 38 removal satellites in their respective orbits, it is impossible to remove all of the space debris. Although many removal satellites, over 100 for example, can remove most of the space debris, this method is economically disproportionate. However, we can also see the removal satellites are distributed nearly evenly. Accordingly, we propose a practical two-stage strategy. The first stage is to implement emergent debris removal with the 38 removal satellites. When we find a very high probability of collision between a working satellite and space debris, one of the removal satellites in the constellation previously constructed in orbit initiates a maneuver of emergent debris removal. The second stage is a long-term space debris removal strategy to suppress the increase of space debris derived from collisions among the pieces of space debris. The constellation analyzed in this paper, which consists of the first 38 removal satellites, can remove half of the over 1000 dangerous space debris among others, and then the constellation increases the number of the following removal satellites in steps. At any rate, an adequate orbital configuration and constellation form is very important for both space debris removal and

  19. Small Earth Observing Satellites Flying with Large Satellites in the A-Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Loverro, Adam; Case, Warren F.; Queruel, Nadege; Marechal, Chistophe; Barroso, Therese

    2009-01-01

    This paper/poster presents a real-life example of the benefits of flying small satellites with other satellites, large or small, and vice versa. Typically, most small satellites fly payloads consisting of one or two instruments and fly in orbits that are independent from that of other satellites. The science data from these satellites are either used in isolation or correlated with instrument data from other satellites. Data correlation with other satellites is greatly improved when the measurements of the same point or air mass are taken at approximately the same time. Scientists worldwide are beginning to take advantage of the opportunities for improved data correlation, or coincidental science, offered by the international Earth Observing Constellation known as the A-Train (sometimes referred to as the Afternoon Constellation). Most of the A-Train satellites are small - the A-Train is anchored by two large NASA satellites (EOS-Aqua and EOS-Aura), but consists also of 5 small satellites (CloudSat, CALIPSO, PARASOL, OCO and Glory these last two will join in 2009). By flying in a constellation, each mission benefits from coincidental observations from instruments on the other satellites in the constellation. Essentially, from a data point of view, the A-Train can be envisioned as a single, virtual science platform with multiple instruments. Satellites in the A-Train fly at 705 km in sun-synchronous orbits. Their mean local times at the equator are within seconds to a few minutes of each other. This paper describes the challenges of operating an international constellation of independent satellites from the U.S. and Europe to maximize the coincidental science opportunities while at the same time minimizing the level of operational interactions required between team members. The A-Train mission teams have been able to demonstrate that flying as members of an international constellation does not take away the flexibility to accommodate new requirements. Specific

  20. Small Earth Observing Satellites Flying with Large Satellites in the A-Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Loverro, Adam; Case, Warren F.; Queruel, Nadege; Marechal, Chistophe; Barroso, Therese

    2009-01-01

    This paper/poster presents a real-life example of the benefits of flying small satellites with other satellites, large or small, and vice versa. Typically, most small satellites fly payloads consisting of one or two instruments and fly in orbits that are independent from that of other satellites. The science data from these satellites are either used in isolation or correlated with instrument data from other satellites. Data correlation with other satellites is greatly improved when the measurements of the same point or air mass are taken at approximately the same time. Scientists worldwide are beginning to take advantage of the opportunities for improved data correlation, or coincidental science, offered by the international Earth Observing Constellation known as the A-Train (sometimes referred to as the Afternoon Constellation). Most of the A-Train satellites are small - the A-Train is anchored by two large NASA satellites (EOS-Aqua and EOS-Aura), but consists also of 5 small satellites (CloudSat, CALIPSO, PARASOL, OCO and Glory these last two will join in 2009). By flying in a constellation, each mission benefits from coincidental observations from instruments on the other satellites in the constellation. Essentially, from a data point of view, the A-Train can be envisioned as a single, virtual science platform with multiple instruments. Satellites in the A-Train fly at 705 km in sun-synchronous orbits. Their mean local times at the equator are within seconds to a few minutes of each other. This paper describes the challenges of operating an international constellation of independent satellites from the U.S. and Europe to maximize the coincidental science opportunities while at the same time minimizing the level of operational interactions required between team members. The A-Train mission teams have been able to demonstrate that flying as members of an international constellation does not take away the flexibility to accommodate new requirements. Specific

  1. Design of a micro-satellite constellation for communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Der-Ming; Hong, Zuu-Chang; Lee, Tzung-Hang; Chang, Bo-Jyun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a low Earth orbit constellation which provides a communication function over a region centered in Taiwan, with radii of 500 km, 1000 km, 1500 km, 2000 km and 2500 km, and orbit altitudes of 800 km and 1500 km. Several constellations are studied. Two constellations with satellite orbit altitudes of only 800 km or 1000 km are considered first. The results that are obtained show that 27 satellites are required for an orbit altitude of 800 km and 15 satellites for an orbit altitude of 1500 km. The asymmetrical nature of constellations is also presented. The first case presents the results when a single inclination angle is used. For example, covering the region with a radius of 2000 km, 20 satellites orbiting at altitudes of 1500 km and 10 satellites orbiting at altitudes of 800 km with inclinations of 35° are required. In the second case examining the asymmetrical nature of constellations, two inclinations angles are used. For example, covering the region with a radius of 2000 km, 20 satellites orbiting at altitudes of 1500 km with inclinations of 35° and 9 satellites orbiting at altitudes of 800 km with inclinations of 30° are required.

  2. Optimal Constellation Design for Satellite Based Augmentation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Isao

    Global Positioning System (GPS) is widely utilized in daily life, for instance car navigation. Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) and Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) are proposed so as to provide GPS better navigation accuracy and integrity capability. Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS) is a kind of WAAS and Multi-functional Transportation Satellite (MTSAT) has been developed in Japan. To improve navigation accuracy most efficiently, augmentation satellites should be so placed that minimize Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) of constellation. In this paper the result of optimal constellation design for SBAS is shown.

  3. Optimal design of the satellite constellation arrangement reconfiguration process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakoor, Mahdi; Bakhtiari, Majid; Soleymani, Mahshid

    2016-08-01

    In this article, a novel approach is introduced for the satellite constellation reconfiguration based on Lambert's theorem. Some critical problems are raised in reconfiguration phase, such as overall fuel cost minimization, collision avoidance between the satellites on the final orbital pattern, and necessary maneuvers for the satellites in order to be deployed in the desired position on the target constellation. To implement the reconfiguration phase of the satellite constellation arrangement at minimal cost, the hybrid Invasive Weed Optimization/Particle Swarm Optimization (IWO/PSO) algorithm is used to design sub-optimal transfer orbits for the satellites existing in the constellation. Also, the dynamic model of the problem will be modeled in such a way that, optimal assignment of the satellites to the initial and target orbits and optimal orbital transfer are combined in one step. Finally, we claim that our presented idea i.e. coupled non-simultaneous flight of satellites from the initial orbital pattern will lead to minimal cost. The obtained results show that by employing the presented method, the cost of reconfiguration process is reduced obviously.

  4. The GeoEye Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dial, Gene; Cole, Aaron; Lutes, James; McKune, John; Martinez, Mike; Rao, R. S.; Taylor, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The GeoEye Constellation consists of: a) IKONOS and OrbView-3 for high resolution; b) GeoEye with higher resolution 1Q2007; c) RESOUCESAT-1 for global crop assessment; d) OrbView-2 for ocean research and fish. IKONOS performance in 2005 included stable image quality, radiometry and geometric accuracy. reliability is 80% to 2008. Demonstrated capacity for high-volume, quick-response collection and production.

  5. Small Satellite Constellations: The Future for Operational Earth Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Nanosat, microsat and minisat are low-cost, rapid-response small-satellites built from advanced terrestrial technology. SSTL delivers the benefits of affordable access to space through low-cost, rapid response, small satellites designed and built with state-of-the-art COTS technologies by: a) reducing the cost of entry into space; b) Achieving more missions within fixed budgets; c) making constellations and formation flying financially viable; d) responding rapidly from initial concept to orbital operation; and e) bringing the latest industrial COTS component advances to space. Growth has been stimulated in constellations for high temporal revisit&persistent monitoring and military responsive space assets.

  6. Key issues in constellation design optimization for NGSO satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Arthur W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents various constellation design criteria for satellite systems in non-geostationary orbits (NGSO). Key design parameters, constraints, and tradeoffs are discussed for two classes of orbits: circular and non-circular. Circular orbits, such as the low earth orbits (LEO), the medium earth orbits (MEO), and the highly inclined geosynchronous orbits (IGSO), have equal coverage period for both north and south hemispheres while non-circular orbits such as the various type of elliptical orbits provide more focused coverage period at certain specific geographic locations. Different services require various constraints including delay, power economics, coverage region, frequency sharing, total capacity, satellite and launch-vehicle numbers. Detailed discussion of the relationship between these constraints and constellations are provided. A comparison between a proposed benchmark MEO system with other proposed broadband NGSO satellite systems is presented to demonstrate the importance of constellation design to enhance frequency-sharing capability. A potential ``satellite highway'' accommodating families of elliptical geosynchronous satellites is also presented. This is a novel approach to regulatory NGSO constellations which will facilitate sharing valuable resources of spectrum and useful spatial areas.

  7. Risk to space sustainability from large constellations of satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida Virgili, B.; Dolado, J. C.; Lewis, H. G.; Radtke, J.; Krag, H.; Revelin, B.; Cazaux, C.; Colombo, C.; Crowther, R.; Metz, M.

    2016-09-01

    The number of artificial objects in orbit continues to increase and, with it, a key threat to space sustainability. In response, space agencies have identified a set of mitigation guidelines aimed at enabling space users to reduce the generation of space debris by, for example, limiting the orbital lifetime of their spacecraft and launcher stages after the end of their mission. Planned, large constellations of satellites in low Earth orbit (LEO), though addressing the lack of basic internet coverage in some world regions, may disrupt the sustainability of the space environment enabled by these mitigation practices. We analyse the response of the space object population to the introduction of a large constellation conforming to the post-mission disposal guideline with differing levels of success and with different disposal orbit options. The results show that a high success rate of post-mission disposal by constellation satellites is a key driver for space sustainability.

  8. Our World: A-Train Satellites

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The A-Train consists of five satellites orbiting Earth that use the latest NASA technology to study the Earth's system. This segment introduces Aqua, one of the satellites that studies water on Earth.

  9. Satellite Constellation for Ocean Wind and Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Xie, X.

    2009-12-01

    A scatterometer sends microwave pulses to the earth's surface and measure the power backscattered from the surface roughness. The roughness is believed to be in equilibrium with the stress (turbulent transport of momentum). The backscatter depends not only on the magnitude of the stress but also the stress direction relative to the direction of the radar beam. Measuring both stress magnitude and direction is the major unique capability of the scatterometer. Although stress drives ocean circulation, we do not have any large-scale stress measurement except from the scatterometer; our concept of stress distribution is largely derived from our knowledge on wind. Stress is closely related to wind. The geophysical product of the scatterometer is the equivalent neutral wind. It is a fictitious quantity, which has an unambiguous relation with surface stress by definition, while the relation between actual wind and surface stress depends on atmospheric vertical density stratification. Over most of the ocean, the atmosphere is near neutral and the current is much smaller than wind and it is generally assumed that the equivalent neutral wind is the actual wind. QuikSCAT, a Ku-band scatterometer, was launched in 1999. The scientific contributions to natural disaster, energy, weather, climate, water, ecosystem, and agriculture from one decade of QuikSCAT measurements will be presented. A C-band scatterometer, ASCAT, was launched by European Space Agency in 2006. Ku-band scatterometers, similar in design with QuikSCAT, will be launched by India and China in 2010 and 2011. One polar orbiting scatterometer could only sample the earth at most two times a day. If the future scatterometers will produce similarly high quality data, the future constellation of scatterometers, with different overhead crossing time, will meet the six hourly revisit frequency required by the operational weather forecast community and the inertial frequency required by research oceanographers. The coverage

  10. Satellite Constellation Optimization for Turkish Armed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    for Low-Cost Small Satellites in Civil and Commercial Space.” 35 Andrew Petro, “Small Spacecraft Technology,” NASA Technology Days Presentation...Master’s thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, 2004. Petro, Andrew. “Small Spacecraft Technology.” NASA Technology Days Presentation. 2012. http

  11. Stochastic Capability Models for Degrading Satellite Constellations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    S1 S2 S3 S4 Figure 4.1 Sample path of a SMP . For this chapter, the probability mass function α(t) is defined as it was for Chapter 3. Recall that αj...distributions, or as a time-homogenous, semi-Markov process ( SMP ) if the function lifetime distributions are not exponen- tial. The satellite value... SMP ) Model . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 4.2 Instantaneous Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 4.2.1 Example 1

  12. Doppler characterization of laser inter-satellite links for optical LEO satellite constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qinglong; Tan, Liying; Ma, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Because of ensuring very low propagation delay between satellites, and providing global space-based broadband network services, low earth orbit (LEO) satellite constellations with laser inter-satellite links (ISLs) are considered to be the enabling technology to satisfy the increasing data traffic demand. However, significant Doppler can be observed by the onboard terminals on the ISLs, due to the high relative speed of the two communicating LEO satellites. This paper describes an analytic derivation of the Doppler wavelength shift measured by the terminal onboard a satellite on the signal transmitted through the ISLs. The Point-Ahead Mechanism of the optical ISLs is considered in the analytical expression of the Doppler wavelength shift. Then, in terms of the ISLs characteristics of the satellite constellations, the expression of Doppler wavelength shift is deduced into two aspects. First, for the full time accessing ISLs, it evolves as a function of the constellation parameters. Thus, the Doppler characterization for two kinds of interorbit full time accessing ISLs of LEO satellite constellations is analyzed. Second, for the intermittent accessing ISLs, the expression of Doppler wavelength shift is given as a function of the minimum ISL distance between two communicating satellites. And the visibility duration of the destination satellite at the source satellite is estimated for the intermittent ISLs. This work is helpful to evaluate the design of constellation networking.

  13. Determination of Earth outgoing radiation using a constellation of satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gristey, Jake; Chiu, Christine; Gurney, Robert; Han, Shin-Chan; Morcrette, Cyril

    2017-04-01

    The outgoing radiation fluxes at the top of the atmosphere, referred to as Earth outgoing radiation (EOR), constitute a vital component of the Earth's energy budget. This EOR exhibits strong diurnal signatures and is inherently connected to the rapidly evolving scene from which the radiation originates, so our ability to accurately monitor EOR with sufficient temporal resolution and spatial coverage is crucial for weather and climate studies. Despite vast improvements in satellite observations in recent decades, achieving these criteria remains challenging from current measurements. A technology revolution in small satellites and sensor miniaturisation has created a new and exciting opportunity for a novel, viable and sustainable observation strategy from a constellation of satellites, capable of providing both global coverage and high temporal resolution simultaneously. To explore the potential of a constellation approach for observing EOR we perform a series of theoretical simulation experiments. Using the results from these simulation experiments, we will demonstrate a baseline constellation configuration capable of accurately monitoring global EOR at unprecedented temporal resolution. We will also show whether it is possible to reveal synoptic scale, fast evolving phenomena by applying a deconvolution technique to the simulated measurements. The ability to observe and understand the relationship between these phenomena and changes in EOR is of fundamental importance in constraining future warming of our climate system.

  14. The NASA EV-2 CYGNSS Small Satellite Constellation Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, C. S.; Gleason, S.; Jelenak, Z.; Katzberg, S. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Rose, R.; Scherrer, J.; Zavorotny, V.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA EV-2 Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is a spaceborne mission focused on tropical cyclone (TC) inner core process studies. CYGNSS attempts to resolve the principle deficiencies with current TC intensity forecasts, which lies in inadequate observations and modeling of the inner core. The inadequacy in observations results from two causes: 1) Much of the inner core ocean surface is obscured from conventional remote sensing instruments by intense precipitation in the eye wall and inner rain bands. 2) The rapidly evolving (genesis and intensification) stages of the TC life cycle are poorly sampled in time by conventional polar-orbiting, wide-swath surface wind imagers. CYGNSS is specifically designed to address these two limitations by combining the all-weather performance of GNSS bistatic ocean surface scatterometry with the sampling properties of a constellation of satellites. The use of a dense constellation of nanosatellite results in spatial and temporal sampling properties that are markedly different from conventional imagers. Simulation studies will be presented which examine the sampling as functions of various orbit parameters of the constellation. Historical records of actual TC storm tracks are overlaid onto a simulated time series of the surface wind sampling enabled by the constellation. For comparison purposes, a similar analysis is conducted using the sampling properties of several past and present conventional spaceborne ocean wind scatterometers. Differences in the ability of the sensors to resolve the evolution of the TC inner core are examined. The spacecraft and constellation mission are described. The signal-to-noise ratio of the measured scattered signal and the resulting uncertainty in retrieved surface wind speed are also examined.

  15. Fundamentals of the route theory for satellite constellation design for Earth discontinuous coverage. Part 2: Synthesis of satellite orbits and constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razoumny, Yury N.

    2016-11-01

    The method for synthesis of satellite orbits and constellations, optimized by given criterion (minimum of required number of satellites in the constellation, or minimum revisit time, or minimum of the satellites' swath width required) for fixed parameters of on-board satellite equipment and constraints for unused criterion parameters of a list of mentioned above is presented. The numerical results demonstrate the possibilities of the method developed basing on analyzing the given satellite constellation revisit time values distributed on the Earth coverage area, and for synthesizing the satellite constellations to minimize revisit time in comparison with the traditional approaches based on constellation design in a priori fixed classes used for continuous coverage. Particularly, it is shown that the suggested synthesis method, basing on the simplest type of Route Constellations considered - Secure Route Constellations, directly leads, as result of high speed calculations for given Earth region coverage (seconds, or minutes as a worst case), to the optimized satellite constellations which provide consistently high performance and are better, or at least on the same level, in comparison with the best Walker constellations for discontinuous coverage. In order to have comprehensive coverage picture, both deterministic, and stochastic approaches are considered for estimation of the coverage characteristics of the given region of arbitrary shape, basing on the results of Earth coverage analytic emulation.

  16. Visibility and Geometry of Global Satellite Navigation Systems Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewski, Jacek

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays (November 2015) there are two global fully operational satellite navigation systems, American GPS and Russian GLONASS. Two next are under construction, Galileo in Europe and BeiDou in China. As the error of observer's position obtained from these systems depends on geometry factor DOP (Dilution Of Precision) among other things the knowledge of the number of satellites visible by this observer above given masking elevation angle Hmin and the distributions of DOP coefficient values, GDOP in particular, is very important. The lowest and the greatest number of satellites visible in open area by the observer at different latitudes for different Hmin, the percentage of satellites visible above angle H (9 intervals, each 10O wide), distributions (in per cent) of satellites azimuths (8 intervals, each 45O wide) and GDOP coefficient values (8 intervals) for Hmin = 5O for all these four systems at different observer's latitudes (9 intervals, each wide 10O wide) are presented in the paper. Additionally the lowest elevation for which the number of satellites visible at different latitudes by the observer in open area above this angle is equal 4 or 3 and the distributions (in per cent) of GDOP coefficient values for different Hmin at observer's latitudes 50-60O for the same four systems are showed. All calculations were made for constellation of GPS 27 satellites, GLONASS 24, Galileo 30 and BeiDou 27 MEO satellites.

  17. Global Observations from a Constellation of Small Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S. M.; Allen, D. R.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Fish, C. S.; Fromm, M. D.; Gordley, L. L.; Hoppel, K.; Marshall, B. T.; McHugh, M. J.; Nedoluha, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    The emergence of reliable, miniaturized spacecraft technology has enabled the use of constellations of small spacecraft to achieve global observations of the atmosphere and geospace environment. The need for the spacecraft to be spread globally can be met even with a single launch vehicle by deploying the spacecraft in orbits with slightly different precession rates. Within one year, the spacecraft can be in orbits spread uniformly around the Earth. As many as ten to one hundred satellites can be launched from a single, commonly used launch vehicle, depending on their mass and volume. In this talk we describe the concepts behind achieving global coverage through a constellation of small spacecraft. We describe a small rugged solar occultation instrument that is well suited to this approach and is capable of obtaining high vertical resolution observations of a variety of species important to atmospheric and geospace research. Specific applications regarding stratosphere troposphere exchange are also discussed.

  18. Guidance and Control System for a Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Jonathan Lamar; Cox, James; Mays, Paul Richard; Neidhoefer, James Christian; Ephrain, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A distributed guidance and control algorithm was developed for a constellation of satellites. The system repositions satellites as required, regulates satellites to desired orbits, and prevents collisions. 1. Optimal methods are used to compute nominal transfers from orbit to orbit. 2. Satellites are regulated to maintain the desired orbits once the transfers are complete. 3. A simulator is used to predict potential collisions or near-misses. 4. Each satellite computes perturbations to its controls so as to increase any unacceptable distances of nearest approach to other objects. a. The avoidance problem is recast in a distributed and locally-linear form to arrive at a tractable solution. b. Plant matrix values are approximated via simulation at each time step. c. The Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method is used to compute perturbations to the controls that will result in increased miss distances. 5. Once all danger is passed, the satellites return to their original orbits, all the while avoiding each other as above. 6. The delta-Vs are reasonable. The controller begins maneuvers as soon as practical to minimize delta-V. 7. Despite the inclusion of trajectory simulations within the control loop, the algorithm is sufficiently fast for available satellite computer hardware. 8. The required measurement accuracies are within the capabilities of modern inertial measurement devices and modern positioning devices.

  19. Efficient mission control for the 48-satellite Globalstar Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan

    1994-01-01

    The Globalstar system is being developed by Globalstar, Limited Partnership and will utilize 48 satellites in low earth orbit (See Figure 1) to create a world-wide mobile communications system consistent with Vice President Gore's vision of a Global Information Infrastructure. As a large long term commercial system developed by a newly formed organization, Globalstar provides an excellent opportunity to explore innovative solutions for highly efficient satellite command and control. Design and operational concepts being developed are unencumbered by existing physical and organizational infrastructures. This program really is 'starting with a clean sheet of paper'. Globalstar operations challenges can appear enormous. Clearly, assigning even a single person around the clock to monitor and control each satellite is excessive for Globalstar (it would require a staff of 200! . Even with only a single contact per orbit per satellite, data acquisitions will start or stop every 45 seconds! Although essentially identical, over time the satellites will develop their own 'personalities'and will re quire different data calibrations and levels of support. This paper discusses the Globalstar system and challenges and presents engineering concepts, system design decisions, and operations concepts which address the combined needs and concerns of satellite, ground system, and operations teams. Lessons from past missions have been applied, organizational barriers broken, partnerships formed across the mission segments, and new operations concepts developed for satellite constellation management. Control center requirements were then developed from the operations concepts.

  20. Micro-Satellite Constellation for Global Surface Water Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apperson, A. T.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    2011-12-01

    Alsdorf et al. [1] have proposed a Ka band interferometric radar system for global monitoring of surface waters from space. We explore the feasibility of a constellation of micro-satellites with optical sensors measuring the sun's specular reflection by surface waters. Our approach, which is complementary to that of Alsdorf et al., would provide weekly global coverage with a 10m ground spatial resolution if a six micro-satellite constellation used a 0.7° ground swath width and the ADEOS 1 orbital parameters. Optical sensing has three main obstacles; smoke, clouds and canopy structures. The sun's specular reflection provides a signal strength that, from observations, penetrates aerosols with an optical depth approaching 1.0 and provides detection down to perhaps 1/32 of a pixel, which would potentially allow detection of surface waters under many plant canopies. Our system would provide data to help answer Alsdorf's question, "What is the spatial and temporal variability in terrestrial surface water storage, and how can we predict these variations more accurately?" [1] In addition, modifying the arrangement of the satellites in the constellation could potentially provide data on the canopy structure. Including an additional instrument could provide estimates on atmospheric column methane and other estimates of other atmospheric trace gases concentration. [2] [1] D. E. Alsdorf, E. Rodríguez, and D. P. Lettenmaier, "Measuring surface water from space," Rev. Geophys, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 1-24, 2007. [2] North F. Larsen and Knut Stamnes, "Methane detection from space: use of sunglint", Opt. Eng. 45, 016202 (Feb 01, 2006); doi:10.1117/1.2150835

  1. Investigating GAIM-GM’s Capability to Sense Ionospheric Irregularities via Walker Satellite Constellations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    INVESTIGATING GAIM-GM’S CAPABILITY TO SENSE IONOSPHERIC IRREGULARITIES VIA WALKER SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS THESIS Brandon T. McClung, Captain, USAF...CAPABILITY TO SENSE IONOSPHERIC IRREGULARITIES VIA WALKER SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Engineering Physics...WALKER SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS THESIS Brandon T. McClung, B.S. Captain, USAF Committee Membership: Dr. William F. Bailey Chair Dr. Stephen T. Fiorino

  2. Monitoring of Arctic Conditions from a Virtual Constellation of Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Constellation of Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellites RSMAS – Department of Ocean Sciences Center for Southeastern Tropical Advanced Remote Sensing...fax: (305) 421-4696 email: pminnett@rsmas.miami.edu Award Number: N00014-12-1-0448 LONG-TERM GOALS Utilize a constellation of satellite...OBJECTIVES a) Provide daily Arctic situational awareness from the CSTARS SAR satellite constellation . b) Develop a Neural Network algorithm for ice-type

  3. Constellation design and performance analysis for regional satellite navigation system in China area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yuling; Zhang, Xuejun; Huang, Zhigang

    2005-11-01

    Based on the idea of covering China area, a novel constellation is proposed, consisting of one geostationary satellite and five inclined elliptic orbit geosynchronous satellites in this paper. Through a number of simulation tests, the orbital elements of each satellite are designed concretely. Moreover, its coverage performance is also evaluated under some factors, such as the geometric dilution of precision (GDOP), orbital perturbation, space transmission loss and eclipse. What's more, this constellation is compared with other constellations. Finally, Simulation results show, in this constellation, the number of satellites is small, and the navigation precision is relatively high. Therefore, this is a kind of high performance and economic regional navigation system for China.

  4. Leonardo-BRDF: A New Generation Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Neeck, Steven; Wiscombe, Warren; Ryschkewitsch, Michael; Andary, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Instantaneous net radiation flux at the top of the atmosphere is one of the primary drivers of climate and global change. Since the dawn of the satellite era, great efforts and expense have gone into measuring this flux from single satellites and even (for a several-year period) from a constellation of three satellites called ERBE. However, the reflected solar flux is an angular and spectral integral over the so-called "BRDF" or Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function, which is the angular distribution of reflected solar radiation for each solar zenith angle and each wavelength. Previous radiation flux satellites could not measure instantaneous BRDF, so scientists have had to fall back on models or composites. Because their range of observed solar zenith angles was very limited due to sunsynchronous orbits, the resultant flux maps are too inaccurate to see the dynamics of radiation flux or to reliably correlate it with specific phenomena (hurricanes, biomass fires, urban pollution, dust outbreaks, etc.). Accuracy only becomes acceptable after monthly averaging, but this washes out almost all cause-and-effect information, further exacerbated by the lack of spectral resolution. Leonardo-BRDF is a satellite system designed to measure the instantaneous spectral BRDF using a formation of highly coordinated satellites, all pointing at the same Earth targets at the same time. It will allow scientists for the first time to assess the radiative forcing of climate due to specific phenomena, which is bound to be important in the ongoing debate about global warming and what is causing it. The formation is composed of two satellite types having, as instrument payloads, single highly-integrated miniature imaging spectrometers or radiometers. Two nearby "keystone" satellites anchor the formation and fly in static orbits. They employ wide field of view imaging spectrometers that are extremely light and compact. The keystone satellites are identical and can operate in

  5. Precise science orbits for the Swarm satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den IJssel, Jose; Encarnação, João; Doornbos, Eelco; Visser, Pieter

    2015-09-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Swarm mission was launched on 22 November 2013 to study the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field and its interaction with the Earth system. The mission consists of three identical satellites, flying in carefully selected near polar orbits. Two satellites fly almost side-by-side at an initial altitude of about 480 km, and will descend due to drag to around 300 km during the mission lifetime. The third satellite was placed in a higher orbit of about 530 km altitude, and therefore descends much more slowly. To geolocate the Swarm observations, each satellite is equipped with an 8-channel, dual-frequency GPS receiver for Precise Orbit Determination (POD). Onboard laser retroreflectors provide the opportunity to validate the orbits computed from the GPS observations using Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data. Precise Science Orbits (PSOs) for the Swarm satellites are computed by the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering at Delft University of Technology in the framework of the Swarm Satellite Constellation Application and Research Facility (SCARF). The PSO product consists of both a reduced-dynamic and a kinematic orbit solution. After a short description of the Swarm GPS data characteristics, the adopted POD strategy for both orbit types is explained and first PSO results from more than one year of Swarm GPS data are presented. Independent SLR validation shows that the reduced-dynamic Swarm PSOs have an accuracy of better than 2 cm, while the kinematic orbits have a slightly reduced accuracy of about 4-5 cm. Orbit comparisons indicate that the consistency between the reduced-dynamic and kinematic Swarm PSO for most parts of the Earth is at the 4-5 cm level. Close to the geomagnetic poles and along the geomagnetic equator, however, the kinematic orbits show larger errors, which are probably due to ionospheric scintillations that affect the Swarm GPS receivers over these areas.

  6. LAMOST 1: A Disrupted Satellite in the Constellation Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, John J.; Smith, Martin C.; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Using Large Sky Area Multi-object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope spectroscopic data, we find a strong signal of a comoving group of stars in the constellation of Draco. The group, observed near the apocenter of its orbit, is 2.6 kpc from the Sun with a metallicity of -0.64 dex. The system is observed as a streaming population of unknown provenance with mass of about 2.1+/- 0.4\\cdot {10}4 {M}⊙ and brightness of about {M}V˜ -3.6. Its high metallicity, diffuse physical structure, and eccentric orbit may indicate that the progenitor satellite was a globular cluster rather than a dwarf galaxy or an open cluster.

  7. The NASA CYGNSS Satellite Constellation for Tropical Cyclone Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, C. S.; Provost, D.; Rose, R.; Scherrer, J.; Atlas, R. M.; Chang, P.; Clarizia, M. P.; Garrison, J. L.; Gleason, S.; Katzberg, S. J.; Jelenak, Z.; Johnson, J. T.; Majumdar, S.; O'Brien, A.; Posselt, D. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Said, F.; Soisuvarn, S.; Zavorotny, V. U.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is scheduled for launch in November 2016 to study the surface wind structure in and near the inner core of tropical cyclones. CYGNSS consists of a constellation of eight observatories carried into orbit on a single launch vehicle. Each observatory carries a 4-channel bistatic radar receiver tuned to receive GPS navigation signals scattered from the ocean surface. The eight satellites are spaced approximately twelve minutes apart in a common circular, low inclination orbit plane to provide frequent temporal sampling in the tropics. The 35deg orbit inclination results in coverage of the full globe between 38deg N and 38deg S latitude with a median(mean) revisit time of 3(7) hours The 32 CYGNSS radars operate in L-Band at a wavelength of 19 cm. This allows for adequate penetration to enable surface wind observations under all levels of precipitation, including those encountered in the inner core and eyewall of tropical cyclones. The combination of operation unaffected by heavy precipitation together with high temporal resolution throughout the life cycle of storms is expected to support significant improvements in the forecast skill of storm track and intensity, as well as better situational awareness of the extent and structure of storms in near real time. A summary of the properties of the CYGNSS science data products will be presented, together with an update on the results of ongoing Observation System Simulation Experiments performed by members of the CYGNSS science team over the past four years, in particular addressing the expected impact on storm track and intensity forecast skill. With launch scheduled for the month prior to AGU, the on orbit status of the constellation will also be presented.

  8. Establishing a Formation of Small Satellites in a Lunar Flower Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, Lauren; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2016-12-01

    The success of previous lunar science missions can be expanded upon by using a constellation of satellites to increase the lunar surface coverage. A constellation could also serve as a communications or GPS network for a lunar human base. Small-sats, deployed from a single mothercraft, are proposed to achieve a lunar constellation. The establishment of a single- and multi-petal constellation is investigated where the mothercraft does the primary deployment maneuvers. The constellation lifetime and closed-loop maintenance are addressed once higher order lunar gravity fields and Earth/solar perturbations are included.

  9. The Study and Applications of Satellite and Satellite Constellation Autonomous Orbit Determination Using Star Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Q. B.

    2012-07-01

    Autonomous satellite orbit determination is a key technique in autonomous satellite navigation. Many kinds of technologies have been proposed to realize the autonomous satellite navigation, such as the star sensor, the Earth magnetometer, the occultation time survey, and the phase measurement of X-ray pulsar signals. This dissertation studies a method of autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor. Moreover, the method is extended to the autonomous navigation of satellite constellation and the space-based surveillance. In chapters 1 and 2, some usual time and reference systems are introduced. Then the principles of several typical autonomous navigation methods, and their merits and shortcomings are analyzed. In chapter 3, the autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor and infrared Earth sensor (IRES) is specifically studied, which is based on the status movement simulation, the stellar background observation from star sensor, and the Earth center direction survey from IRES. By simulating the low Earth orbit satellites and pseudo Geostationary Earth orbit (PGEO) satellites, the precision of position and speed with autonomous orbit determination using star sensor is obtained. Besides, the autonomous orbit determination using star sensor with double detectors is studied. According to the observation equation's characters, an optimized type of star sensor and IRES initial assembly model is proposed. In the study of the PGEO autonomous orbit determination, an efficient sampling frequency of measurements is promoted. The simulation results confirm that the autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor is feasible for satellites with all kinds of altitudes. In chapter 4, the method of autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor is extended to the autonomous navigation of mini-satellite constellation. Combining with the high-accuracy inter satellite links data, the precision of the determined orbit and

  10. Earth's Radiation Imbalance from a Constellation of 66 Iridium Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI) at the top of the atmosphere is the primary driving force for climate change. If ERI is not zero, then Earth's temperature, both oceanic and atmospheric, will change gradually over time, tending toward a new steady state. The best estimates of current ERI from climate models range from 0.4 to 0.9 W/m2 (the imbalance being caused mainly by increasing CO2), but current satellite systems do not have the accuracy to measure ERI to even one significant digit. In this paper, we will describe a proposed constellation of 66 Earth radiation budget instruments, to be hosted on Iridium satellites. This system represents a quantum leap over current systems in several ways, in particular in providing ERI to at least one significant digit, thus enabling a crucial test of climate models. Because of its 24/7 coverage, the system will also provide ERI at three-hourly time scales without requiring extrapolations from narrowband geostationary instruments. This would allow studies of ERI's response to fast-evolving phenomena like dust storms and hurricanes. This offers a new, synoptic view of Earth radiation budget that will transform it from a monthly average into a dynamical variable alongside standard meteorological variables like temperature and pressure.

  11. Overview of A-Train Satellite Cloud Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maring, H.

    2007-12-01

    NASA satellites make a wide variety of cloud measurements for climate and meteorological research and prediction. The A-Train is a constellation of satellites in coordinated low earth orbits with an extensive array of sensors making a wide variety of complementary observations of the earth system. The satellite constellation provides synergistic measurements enabling data from several different satellites/sensors to be used together to obtain comprehensive information about various key components and processes of the earth system. The A-Train consists of the following satellites and sensors currently in operation: Aqua, launched 4 May 2002 carries: Atmospheric Infrared Sounder-high spectral resolution (2378 channels) grating spectrometer. Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-15 channel microwave radiometer. Humidity Sounder for Brazil is a 4 channel microwave radiometer, which provided data until February 2003. Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS-12 channel, 6 frequency microwave radiometer. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-36 band visible and infrared imaging spectroradiometer. Cloud's and the Earth's Radiant Energy System-3 channel scanning visible and infrared radiometers. Aura, launched 15 July 2004 carries: High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder-multi channel infrared radiometer. Microwave Limb Sounder-multi channel microwave radiometer. Ozone Monitoring Instrument-visible and ultra violet hyperspectral imaging spectrometers. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer-high-resolution, infrared Fourier transform spectrometer. Polarization & Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar-launched 18 December 2004 by the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and carries a polarimeter. CloudSat and CALIPSO launched together 28 April 2005. CloudSat-US/Canadian cooperative project carries a 94 GHz nadir cloud profiling radar. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite

  12. Fundamentals of the route theory for satellite constellation design for Earth discontinuous coverage. Part 4: Compound satellite structures on orbits with synchronized nodal regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razoumny, Yury N.

    2016-12-01

    Basing on the theory results considered in the previous papers of the series for traditional one-tiered constellation formed on the orbits with the same values of altitudes and inclinations for all the satellites of the constellation, the method for constellation design using compound satellite structures on orbits with different altitudes and inclinations and synchronized nodal regression is developed. Compound, multi-tiered, satellite structures (constellations) are based on orbits with different values of altitude and inclination providing nodal regression synchronization. It is shown that using compound satellite constellations for Earth periodic coverage makes it possible to sufficiently improve the Earth coverage, as compared to the traditional constellations based on the orbits with common altitude and inclination for all the satellites of the constellation, and, as a consequence, to get new opportunities for the satellite constellation design for different types of prospective space systems regarding increasing the quality of observations or minimization of the number of the satellites required.

  13. DSMS investment in support of satellite constellations and formation flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, J. I.

    2003-01-01

    Over the years, NASA has supported unmanned space missions, beyond earth orbit, through a Deep Space Mission System (DSMS) that is developed and operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and subcontractors. The DSMS capabilities have been incrementally upgraded since its establishment in the late '50s and are delivered primarily through three Deep Space Communications Complexes (DSCC 's) near Goldstone, California, Madrid, Spain, and Canberra, Australia and from facilities at JPL. Traditionally, mission support (tracking, command, telemetry, etc) is assigned on an individual-mission basis, between each mission and a ground-based asset, independent of other missions. As NASA, and its international partners, move toward flying fullconstellations and precision formations, the DSMS is developing plans and technologies to provide the requisite support. The key activities under way are: (1) integrated communications architecture for Mars exploration, including relays on science orbiters and dedicated relay satellites to provide continuous coverage for orbiters, landers and rovers. JPL is developing an architecture, as well as protocols and equipment, required for the cost-effective operations of such an infrastructure. (2) Internet-type protocols that will allow for efficient operations across the deep-space distances, accounting for and accommodating the long round-trip-light-time. JPL is working with the CCSDS to convert these protocols to an international standard and will deploy such protocol, the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP), on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and on the Deep Impact (01) missions. (3) Techniques to perform cross-navigation between spacecrafi that fly in a loose formation. Typical cases are cross-navigation between missions that approach Mars and missionsthat are at Mars, or the determination of a baseline for missions that fly in an earth-lead- lag configuration. (4) Techniques and devices that allow the precise metrology and

  14. DSMS investment in support of satellite constellations and formation flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, J. I.

    2003-01-01

    Over the years, NASA has supported unmanned space missions, beyond earth orbit, through a Deep Space Mission System (DSMS) that is developed and operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and subcontractors. The DSMS capabilities have been incrementally upgraded since its establishment in the late '50s and are delivered primarily through three Deep Space Communications Complexes (DSCC 's) near Goldstone, California, Madrid, Spain, and Canberra, Australia and from facilities at JPL. Traditionally, mission support (tracking, command, telemetry, etc) is assigned on an individual-mission basis, between each mission and a ground-based asset, independent of other missions. As NASA, and its international partners, move toward flying fullconstellations and precision formations, the DSMS is developing plans and technologies to provide the requisite support. The key activities under way are: (1) integrated communications architecture for Mars exploration, including relays on science orbiters and dedicated relay satellites to provide continuous coverage for orbiters, landers and rovers. JPL is developing an architecture, as well as protocols and equipment, required for the cost-effective operations of such an infrastructure. (2) Internet-type protocols that will allow for efficient operations across the deep-space distances, accounting for and accommodating the long round-trip-light-time. JPL is working with the CCSDS to convert these protocols to an international standard and will deploy such protocol, the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP), on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and on the Deep Impact (01) missions. (3) Techniques to perform cross-navigation between spacecrafi that fly in a loose formation. Typical cases are cross-navigation between missions that approach Mars and missionsthat are at Mars, or the determination of a baseline for missions that fly in an earth-lead- lag configuration. (4) Techniques and devices that allow the precise metrology and

  15. Laser satellite constellations for strategic defense - an analytic model

    SciTech Connect

    Parmentola, J.A.; Milton, A.F.

    1987-10-01

    Using mainly geometric reasoning, an analytic model is constructed that predicts the required characteristics of an orbiting constellation of laser battle stations, each of which is designed to destroy ballistic missiles during their boost phase. The geometry of the constellation configuration and some general aspects of the coverage problem are discussed. The determination of the absentee ratio falls into two main categories that depend upon whether the Soviet ICBM threat is concentrated at a single location or whether it is distributed as it is now. A point-threat model and a distributive threat model are considered, the determination of the respective kill rates for these models is discussed, and the scaling properties of the laser constellation with respect to a change in the quantitative nature of the two types of ICBM threats are considered.

  16. Toward an integrated data quality analysis and assessment system for HJ satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianbin; Hu, Jian; Li, Xiaohui; Tang, Lingli

    2009-10-01

    The small satellite constellation for environment protection and disaster monitoring (HJ satellite constellation) is facilitated to satisfy the country and surrounding countries or regions' need of dynamic monitoring and forecasting environment and disaster through the use of remote sensing. HJ-1A and HJ-1B will be launched in 2008 and the ground system of which is being developed in accordance with the technical demands of their owners. The quality of data acquired by onboard sensors is essential to effective application of the data, which is also a measure of the success of the engineering and science efforts of operational satellite program. To systematically monitor and measure the sensors' in flight performance and data quality, we designed an integrated Data Quality Analysis and Assessment System (DQAAS) for HJ satellite constellation's ground system, and are developing a demonstrating DQAAS system, which is also a part work of Sky-To-Earth System of Systems (STESS). This paper first analyzes the necessities to include a Data Quality Analysis and Assessment System in the ground system of HJ satellite constellation. Upon the analysis of the function requirements of DQAAS, the framework and structure of DQAAS is presented. The operation flow and interfaces definition is very important for an integrated system, which is also included in the paper. At last, the functions and algorithms of Data Quality Assessment Subsystem are introduced in detail. We expect to promote the quality and analysis and assessment technology in China through the development of DQAAS for HJ satellite constellation.

  17. Investigating GAIM-GM's Capability to Sense Ionospheric Irregularities via Walker Satellite Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClung, B.

    2015-12-01

    GAIM-GM is a modularized physics based data assimilation model, that ingests data from multiple data sources. One data source is slant total electron content (TEC) from a ground station network to satellites, and along the occultation path between multiple satellites. This study examines GAIM-GM's capability to sense a scintillation feature in the ionosphere, overlaid on an IFM electron density grid, from simulated satellite constellations ingesting the slant TEC values into GAIM-GM. Satellite constellations were developed in an extension of Matlab, called STK. A real ground station network generated from IGS was ingested into STK to calculate access times to the satellite constellation and use the access data to compute the slant TEC values on the perturbed IFM grid. It was discovered that a Walker constellation would give the most frequent revisit time to the scintillation feature, which co-rotates with the Earth, capturing both the day and nightside ionosphere throughout the evaluation period (96 hrs). The size of the feature was varied along with the number of satellites in the Walker constellation. 25 different scenarios with these parameters varied were created to determine the sensitivity of GAIM-GM to sense the feature. A simple heuristic algorithm was applied comparing the truth data, in this case the perturbed IFM grid, to the GAIM-GM output in each scenario across the entire grid, and for those grid points within the feature.

  18. Design and Implementation of Satellite Formations and Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Newman, Lauri Kraft; Quinn, David

    1998-01-01

    The direction to develop small low cost spacecraft has led many scientists to recognize the advantage of flying spacecraft in constellations and formations to achieve the correlated instrument measurements formerly possible only by flying many instruments on a single large platform. Yet, constellations and formation flying impose additional complications on orbit selection and orbit maintenance, especially when each spacecraft has its own orbit or science requirements. The purpose of this paper is to develop an operational control method for maintenance of these missions. Examples will be taken from the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) spacecraft that is part of the New Millennium Program (NMP) and from proposed Earth System Science Program Office (ESSPO) constellations. Results can be used to determine the appropriateness of constellations and formation flying for a particular case as well as the operational impacts. Applications to the ESSPO and NMP are highly considered in analysis and applications. After constellation and formation analysis is completed, implementation of a maneuver maintenance strategy becomes the driver. Advances in technology and automation by GSFC's Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center allow more of the burden of the orbit selection and maneuver maintenance to be automated and ultimately placed onboard the spacecraft, mitigating most of the associated operational concerns. This paper presents the GSFC closed-loop control method to fly in either constellations or formations through the use of an autonomous closed loop three-axis navigation control and innovative orbit maintenance support. Simulation results using AutoCon(Trademark) and FreeFlyer(Trademark) with various fidelity levels of modeling and algorithms are presented.

  19. Design and implementation of satellite formations and constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Newman, Lauri Kraft; Quinn, David

    1998-01-01

    The direction to develop small low cost spacecraft has led many scientists to recognize the advantage of flying spacecraft in constellations and formations to achieve the correlated instrument measurements formerly possible only by flying many instruments on a single large platform. Yet, constellations and formation flying impose additional complications on orbit selection and orbit maintenance, especially when each spacecraft has its own orbit or science requirements. The purpose of this paper is to develop an operational control method for maintenance of these missions. Examples will be taken from the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) spacecraft that is part of the New Millennium Program (NMP) and from proposed Earth System Science Program Office (ESSPO) constellations. Results can be used to determine the appropriateness of constellations and formation flying for a particular case as well as the operational impacts. Applications to the ESSPO and NMP are highly considered in analysis and applications. After constellation and formation analysis is completed, implementation of a maneuver maintenance strategy becomes the driver. Advances in technology and automation by GSFC's Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center allow more of the burden of the orbit selection and maneuver maintenance to be automated and ultimately placed onboard the spacecraft, mitigating most of the associated operational concerns. This paper presents the GSFC closed-loop control method to fly in either constellations or formations through the use of an autonomous closed loop three-axis navigation control and innovative orbit maintenance support. Simulation results using AutoCon(TM) and FreeFlyer(TM) with various fidelity levels of modeling and algorithms are presented.

  20. Performance of Duplex Communication between a Leo Satellite and Terrestrial Location Using a Geo Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.; Konangi, Vijay K.; Wallett, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    A network comprised of a terrestrial site, a constellation of three GEO satellites and a LEO satellite is modeled and simulated. Continuous communication between the terrestrial site and the LEO satellite is facilitated by the GEO satellites. The LEO satellite has the orbital characteristics of the International Space Station. Communication in the network is based on TCP/IP over ATM, with the ABR service category providing the QoS, at OC-3 data rate. The OSPF protocol is used for routing. We simulate FTP file transfers, with the terrestrial site serving as the client and the LEO satellite being the server. The performance characteristics are presented.

  1. a Novel Proposal of GAOFEN-3 Satellite Constellation for Multi-Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, X.; Ding, C.; Lei, B.; Han, B.; Li, F.

    2017-09-01

    Gaofen-3 is the first C-band fully polarimetric SAR satellite in China, which is widely used in various fields such as ocean monitoring, disaster reduction and so on. In this paper, a new satellite constellation is proposed based on the orbit of Gaofen-3 satellite. The constellation includes Gaofen-3 and other two duplicates. It is able to do repeat-pass interferometry, repeat-pass differential interferometry, along-track interferometry and stereo measurement. With these abilities, it can generate the earth DEM without ground control points and have better performance in moving target identification and monitoring. The performance and the system requirements are analysed, which provides a good reference for the design of spaceborne SAR constellation.

  2. Leo Satellite Communication through a LEO Constellation using TCP/IP Over ATM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foore, Lawrence R.; Konangi, Vijay K.; Wallett, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    The simulated performance characteristics for communication between a terrestrial client and a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite server are presented. The client and server nodes consist of a Transmission Control Protocol /Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) over ATM configuration. The ATM cells from the client or the server are transmitted to a gateway, packaged with some header information and transferred to a commercial LEO satellite constellation. These cells are then routed through the constellation to a gateway on the globe that allows the client/server communication to take place. Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR) is specified as the quality of service (QoS). Various data rates are considered.

  3. Revisiting Elliptical Satellite Orbits to Enhance the O3b Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, L.; Lou, Yuxuan; Olusola, Opeoluwa

    Highly elliptical orbits can be used to provide targeted satellite coverage of locations at high latitudes. We review the history of use of these orbits for communication. How elliptical orbits can be used for broadband communication is outlined. We propose an addition of known elliptical orbits to the new equatorial O3b satellite constellation, extending O3b to cover high latitudes and the Earth's poles. We simulate the O3b constellation and compare this to recent measurement of the first real Internet traffic across the newly deployed O3b network.

  4. An Investigation into Establishing a Formation of Small Satellites in a Lunar Flower Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, Lauren

    Lunar science missions such as LADEE and GRAIL achieved unprecedented measurements of the Lunar exosphere and gravity field. These missions were performed with one (LADEE) or two (GRAIL) traditional satellites. The global coverage achieved by these missions could have been greatly enhanced with the use of a constellation of satellites. A constellation of communication satellites at the Moon would also be necessary if a Lunar human base were to be established. Constellations with many satellites are expensive with traditional technology, but have become feasible through the technological advancements and affordability of cubesats. Cubesat constellations allow for full surface coverage in science or communication missions at a reasonable mission cost. Repeat ground track orbits offer interesting options for science or communication constellations, since they provide repeat coverage of the surface at a fixed time between sequential visits. Flower constellations are a family of constellations being studied primarily by Daniele Mortari at Texas A&M; University that make use of repeat ground tracks. Orbital parameters are selected such that the nodal period of the orbit matches the nodal period of the primary body by a factor dependent on the number of days and the number of revolutions to repeat the ground track. All orbits in a flower constellation have identical orbital elements, with the exception of the right ascension of the ascending node (RAAN) and the initial mean anomaly, which are determined based on the desired phasing scheme desired. Flower constellations have thus far primarily been studied at Earth. A flower constellation at the Moon could be quite useful for science or communication purposes. In this scenario, the flower constellation satellites would be small satellites, which introduces many unique challenges. The cubesats would have limited propulsion capability and would need to be deployed from a mothercraft. Orbital maintenance would then be

  5. A satellite constellation optimization for a regional GNSS remote sensing mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavili Kilaneh, Narin; Mashhadi Hossainali, Masoud

    2017-04-01

    Due to the recent advances in the Global Navigation Satellite System Remote sensing (GNSS¬R) applications, optimization of a satellite orbit to investigate the Earth's properties seems significant. The comparison of the GNSS direct and reflected signals received by a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite introduces a new technique to remotely sense the Earth. Several GNSS¬R missions including Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) have been proposed for different applications such as the ocean wind speed and height monitoring. The geometric optimization of the satellite orbit before starting the mission is a key step for every space mission. Since satellite constellation design varies depending on the application, we have focused on the required geometric criteria for oceanography applications in a specified region. Here, the total number of specular points, their spatial distribution and the accuracy of their position are assumed to be sufficient for oceanography applications. Gleason's method is used to determine the position of specular points. We considered the 2-D lattice and 3-D lattice theory of flower constellation to survey whether a circular orbit or an elliptical one is suitable to improve the solution. Genetic algorithm is implemented to solve the problem. To check the visibility condition between the LEO and GPS satellites, the satellite initial state is propagated by a variable step size numerical integration method. Constellation orbit parameters achieved by optimization provide a better resolution and precession for the specular points in the study area of this research.

  6. Cross Calibration of the Afternoon Constellation's

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The name "A-Train" comes from the formation of international, Earth-observing satellites known as the Afternoon Constellation, which operate in a Sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 705 km. The...

  7. Constellation design for earth observation based on the characteristics of the satellite ground track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Wang, Maocai; Dai, Guangming; Song, Zhiming

    2017-04-01

    This paper responds to the increasing need for Earth observation missions and deals with the design of Repeating Sun-Synchronous Constellations (RSSCs) which takes into consideration of constellations composed of one or more orbital planes. Based on the mature design approach of Repeating Sun-synchronous orbits, a novel technique to design RSSCs is presented, which takes the second gravitational zonal harmonic into consideration. In order to obtain regular cycles of observation of the Earth by a single satellite, the orbital relationships have to be satisfied firstly are illustrated. Then, by making full analyses of the characteristics of the satellite ground track, orbital parameters are properly calculated to make other satellites pass on the same or different ground track of the single satellite. Last, single-plane or multi-plane constellations are used to improve the repetitions of the observation and the ground resolution. RSSCs allow observing the same region once at the same local time in a solar day and several times at the different local time in a solar day. Therefore, this kind of constellations meets all requirements for the remote sensing applications, which need to observe the same region under the same or different visible conditions. Through various case studies, the calculation technique is successfully demonstrated.

  8. Mission design and operations of a constellation of small satellites for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, Trevor C.; Pilger, Eric J.; Wood, Mark S.; Nunes, Miguel A.; Yoneshige, Lance K.

    2013-05-01

    The Hawaii Space Flight Laboratory (HSFL) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa is developing the capabilities to design, build, and operate constellations of small satellites than can be tailored to efficiently execute a variety of remote sensing missions. With the Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) Office, HSFL is developing the Super Strypi launch vehicle that on its initial mission in 2013 will launch the HSFL 55-kg HawaiiSat-1 into a near polar orbit, providing the first deployment of these technologies. This satellite will be carrying a miniature hyperspectral thermal imager developed by the Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP). HSFL has also developed a method to efficiently deploy a constellation of small satellites using a minimal number of launch vehicles. Under a three-year NASA grant, HSFL is developing a Comprehensive Open-architecture Space Mission Operations System (COSMOS) to support these types of missions. COSMOS is being designed as a System of Systems (SoS) software integrator, tying together existing elements from different technological domains. This system should be easily adaptable to new architectures and easily scalable. It will be provided as Open Source to qualified users, so will be adoptable by even universities with very restricted budgets. In this paper we present the use of COSMOS as a System of Systems integrator for satellite constellations of up to 100 satellites and numerous ground stations and/or contact nodes, including a fully automated "lights out" satellite contact capability.

  9. Linking Satellites Via Earth "Hot Spots" and the Internet to Form Ad Hoc Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stu; Grosvenor, Sandra; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix; Lee, Richard Q.; Romanofsky, Robert; Zaman, Afoz; Popovic, Zoya

    2004-01-01

    As more assets are placed in orbit, opportunities emerge to combine various sets of satellites in temporary constellations to perform collaborative image collections. Often, new operations concepts for a satellite or set of satellites emerge after launch. To the degree with which new space assets can be inexpensively and rapidly integrated into temporary or "ad hoc" constellations, will determine whether these new ideas will be implemented or not. On the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite, a New Millennium Program mission, a number of experiments were conducted and are being conducted to demonstrate various aspects of an architecture that, when taken as a whole, will enable progressive mission autonomy. In particular, the target architecture will use adaptive ground antenna arrays to form, as close as possible, the equivalent of wireless access points for low earth orbiting satellites. Coupled with various ground and flight software and the Internet. the architecture enables progressive mission autonomy. Thus, new collaborative sensing techniques can be implemented post-launch. This paper will outline the overall operations concept and highlight details of both the research effort being conducted in satellites. Keywords: collaborative remote sensing smart antennas, adaptive antenna arrays, sensor webs. ad hoc constellations, mission autonomy and

  10. Linking Satellites Via Earth "Hot Spots" and the Internet to Form Ad Hoc Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stu; Grosvenor, Sandra; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix; Lee, Richard Q.; Romanofsky, Robert; Zaman, Afoz; Popovic, Zoya

    2004-01-01

    As more assets are placed in orbit, opportunities emerge to combine various sets of satellites in temporary constellations to perform collaborative image collections. Often, new operations concepts for a satellite or set of satellites emerge after launch. To the degree with which new space assets can be inexpensively and rapidly integrated into temporary or "ad hoc" constellations, will determine whether these new ideas will be implemented or not. On the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite, a New Millennium Program mission, a number of experiments were conducted and are being conducted to demonstrate various aspects of an architecture that, when taken as a whole, will enable progressive mission autonomy. In particular, the target architecture will use adaptive ground antenna arrays to form, as close as possible, the equivalent of wireless access points for low earth orbiting satellites. Coupled with various ground and flight software and the Internet. the architecture enables progressive mission autonomy. Thus, new collaborative sensing techniques can be implemented post-launch. This paper will outline the overall operations concept and highlight details of both the research effort being conducted in satellites. Keywords: collaborative remote sensing smart antennas, adaptive antenna arrays, sensor webs. ad hoc constellations, mission autonomy and

  11. Characteristics of deep convection measured by using the A-train constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, S.; Shibata, T.; Nakamoto, J.; Okamoto, H.; Ishimoto, H.; Kubota, H.

    2010-03-01

    We show characteristics of a tropical deep convection observed in an experiment employing the A-train constellation, the spaceborne imager Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the sounder Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)-advanced microwave sounding unit (AMSU), the cloud radar CloudSat, and the lidar Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarisation (CALIOP). CloudSat and CALIOP measured a vertical cross section of a deep convection at 1.1 km from its center, where the center is defined as the local minimum of the brightness temperature TB (11 μm) measured by using MODIS. This deep convection should be overshooting since its cloud top height measured by using CALIOP was 840 m higher than that of 380 K potential temperature as estimated by using AIRS-AMSU data. The cloud morphology observed by using CALIOP indicates that deep convections raised the isentropic surface in the tropical tropopause layer and that there were downdrafts around the deep convection. The averaged mode radius of ice particles and ice water content (IWC) in the deep convection above 380 K are estimated as 23.0 ± 4.9 μm and 7.2 ± 8.0 mg/m3, respectively, by the use of CloudSat and CALIOP data. The volume of the deep convection above a height of 380 K and the averaged IWC, of which the particle size is less than 20 μm, are estimated and the deep convection has the potential to hydrate the stratosphere with about 1 × 102 t of water vapor. We also show deep convections above a height of 380 K are not rare phenomena over the tropical land and warm water pool.

  12. Micro-satellite constellations for monitoring cryospheric processes and related natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaeaeb, A.; Altena, B.; Mascaro, J.

    2016-12-01

    Currently, several micro-satellite constellations for earth-observation are planned or under build-up. Here, we assess the potential of the well-advanced Planet satellite constellation for investigating cryospheric processes. In its final stage, the Planet constellation will consist of 150 free-flying micro-satellites in near-polar and ISS orbits. The instruments carry RGB+NIR frame cameras that image the Earth surface in nadir direction with resolutions of 3-5 m, covering 20 x 13 km per image. In its final set-up, the constellation will be able to image the (almost) entire land surface at least once per day, under the limitation of cloud cover. Here, we explore new possibilities for insight into cryospheric processes that this very high repeat cycle combined with high image resolution offer. Based on repeat Planet imagery we derive repeat glacier velocity fields for example glaciers in the northern and southern hemispheres. We find it especially useful to monitor the ice velocities near calving fronts and simultaneously detect changes of the front, pointing to calving events. We also explore deformation fields over creeping mountain permafrost, so-called rockglaciers. As a second, very promising cryospheric application we suggest monitoring of glacier and permafrost related natural hazards. In cases such as temporary lakes, lake outbursts, landslides, rock avalanches, visual information over remote areas and at high frequencies are crucial for hazard assessment, early warning or disaster management. Based on several examples, we demonstrate that massive micro-satellite constellations such Planet's are exactly able to provide this type of information. As a third promising example, we show how such high-repeat optical satellite data are useful to monitor river ice and related jams and flooding. At certain latitudes, the repeat frequency of the data is even high enough to track river ice floes and thus water velocities.

  13. A vector method for synthesis of orbits and the structure of satellite constellations for multiswath periodic coverage of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulskiy, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    Single satellites and multisatellite constellations for the periodic coverage of the Earth are considered. The main feature is the use of several cameras with different swath widths. A vector method is proposed which makes it possible to find orbits minimizing the periodicities of coverage of a given area of Earth uniformly for all swaths. Their number is not limited, but the relative dimensions should satisfy the Fibonacci series or some new numerical sequences. The results apply to constellations of any number of satellites. Formulas were derived for calculating their structure, i.e., relative position in the constellation. Examples of orbits and the structure of constellations for the Earth's multiswath coverage are presented.

  14. A Model of the Earth's Magnetic Field From Two Years of Swarm Satellite Constellation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, N.; Finlay, C. C.; Kotsiaros, S.

    2015-12-01

    Two years of data from ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive a model of the Earth's magnetic field and its time variation (secular variation). The model describes contributions from the core and lithosphere as well as large-scale contributions from the magnetosphere (and its Earth-induced counterpart). We use data from geomagnetic quiet times and co-estimate the Euler angles describing the rotation between the vector magnetometer instrument frame and the North-East-Center (NEC) frame. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites and alongtrack first differences we include the East-west magnetic gradient information provided by the lower Swarm satellite pair, thereby explicitly taking advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm. We assess the spatial and temporal model resolution that can be obtained from two years of Swarm satellite data by comparison with other recent models that also include non-Swarm magnetic observations.

  15. The Availability of Space Service for Inter-Satellite Links in Navigation Constellations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yinyin; Wang, Yueke; Chen, Jianyun

    2016-08-19

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are widely used in low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite navigation; however, their availability is poor for users in medium Earth orbits (MEO), and high Earth orbits (HEO). With the increasing demand for navigation from MEO and HEO users, the inadequate coverage of GNSS has emerged. Inter-satellite links (ISLs) are used for ranging and communication between navigation satellites and can also serve space users that are outside the navigation constellation. This paper aims to summarize their application method and analyze their service performance. The mathematical model of visibility is proposed and then the availability of time division ISLs is analyzed based on global grid points. The BeiDou navigation constellation is used as an example for numerical simulation. Simulation results show that the availability can be enhanced by scheduling more satellites and larger beams, while the presence of more users lowers the availability. The availability of navigation signals will be strengthened when combined with the signals from the ISLs. ISLs can improve the space service volume (SSV) of navigation constellations, and are therefore a promising method for navigation in MEO/HEO spacecraft.

  16. The Availability of Space Service for Inter-Satellite Links in Navigation Constellations

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yinyin; Wang, Yueke; Chen, Jianyun

    2016-01-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are widely used in low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite navigation; however, their availability is poor for users in medium Earth orbits (MEO), and high Earth orbits (HEO). With the increasing demand for navigation from MEO and HEO users, the inadequate coverage of GNSS has emerged. Inter-satellite links (ISLs) are used for ranging and communication between navigation satellites and can also serve space users that are outside the navigation constellation. This paper aims to summarize their application method and analyze their service performance. The mathematical model of visibility is proposed and then the availability of time division ISLs is analyzed based on global grid points. The BeiDou navigation constellation is used as an example for numerical simulation. Simulation results show that the availability can be enhanced by scheduling more satellites and larger beams, while the presence of more users lowers the availability. The availability of navigation signals will be strengthened when combined with the signals from the ISLs. ISLs can improve the space service volume (SSV) of navigation constellations, and are therefore a promising method for navigation in MEO/HEO spacecraft. PMID:27548181

  17. NASA Now: A-Train: Monitoring the Earth System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The topic for this NASA Now is the Earth system and how NASA uses a constellation of satellites called the A-Train to monitor the Earth system. All five satellites in the A-Train fly over the same ...

  18. Iridium NEXT partnership for Earth observation: exploiting global satellite constellations for new remote sensing capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Om P.

    2008-08-01

    A unique opportunity exists to host up to 66 earth observation sensors on the Iridium NEXT LEO constellation in a manner that can revolutionize earth observation and weather predictions. A constellation approach to sensing, using the real-time communications backbone of Iridium, will enable unprecedented geospatial and temporal sampling for now-casting of weather on a global basis as well as global climate monitoring. The Iridium NEXT constellation, with 66 interconnected satellites in 6 near polar orbiting planes, provides a unique platform for hosting a variety of earth observation missions. The opportunity is proposed as a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) allowing for the sharing of infrastructure by government agencies. This has the potential to augment current and planned climate and weather observation programs in a very cost effective manner not achievable in any other way. Iridium, with the assistance of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), NASA, NOAA, and ESA, has evaluated a number of sensing missions that would be a good fit to the Iridium NEXT constellation. These include GPS radio occultation sensors, earth radiation budget measurements, radio altimetry, tropospheric and stratospheric winds measurements including polar winds measurements, and atmospheric chemistry. Iridium NEXT launches start in 2013 and constellation operational life will extend beyond 2030. Detailed feasibility studies on specific missions are planned to begin later this year.

  19. Earth Radiation Imbalance from a Constellation of 66 Iridium Satellites: Technological Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, W.; Chiu, C. J-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Communications Inc. is launching a new generation of polar orbiting communication satellites in 2015-2017. Iridium will provide a hosted payload bay on each of the 66 satellites (plus 6 in-space spares). This offers the potential for a paradigm shift in the way we measure Earth radiation imbalance from space, as well as massive cost savings. Because the constellation provides 24/7 global coverage, there is no need to account for diurnal cycle via extrapolations from uncalibrated narrowband geostationary imagers. And the spares can be rolled over to view the Sun and deep space, then transfer their calibration to the other members of the constellation during the frequent cross-overs. In part using simulations of the constellation viewing realistic Earth scenes, this presentation will address the technological aspects of such a constellation: (1) the calibration strategy; (2) the highly-accurate and stable radiometers for measuring outgoing flux; and (3) the GRACE-inspired algorithms for representing the outgoing flux field in spherical harmonics and thus achieving rv500-km spatial resolution and two-hour temporal resolution.

  20. End-of-Mission Planning Challenges for a Satellite in a Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boain, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of a mission, satellites embedded in a constellation must first perform propulsive maneuvers to safely exit the constellation before they can begin with the usual end-of-mission activities: deorbit, passivation, and decommissioning. The target orbit for these exit maneuvers must be sufficiently below the remaining constellation satellites such that, once achieved, there is no longer risk of close conjunctions. Yet, the exit maneuvers must be done based on the spacecraft's state of health and operational capability when the decision to end the mission is made. This paper focuses on the recently developed exit strategy for the CloudSat mission to highlight problems and issues, which forced the discarding of CloudSat's original EoM Plan and its replacement with a new plan consistent with changes to the spacecraft's original operational mode. The analyses behind and decisions made in formulating this new exit strategy will be of interest to other missions in a constellation currently preparing to update their End-of-Mission Plan.

  1. Determination of global Earth outgoing radiation at high temporal resolution using a theoretical constellation of satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gristey, Jake J.; Chiu, J. Christine; Gurney, Robert J.; Han, Shin-Chan; Morcrette, Cyril J.

    2017-01-01

    New, viable, and sustainable observation strategies from a constellation of satellites have attracted great attention across many scientific communities. Yet the potential for monitoring global Earth outgoing radiation using such a strategy has not been explored. To evaluate the potential of such a constellation concept and to investigate the configuration requirement for measuring radiation at a time resolution sufficient to resolve the diurnal cycle for weather and climate studies, we have developed a new recovery method and conducted a series of simulation experiments. Using idealized wide field-of-view broadband radiometers as an example, we find that a baseline constellation of 36 satellites can monitor global Earth outgoing radiation reliably to a spatial resolution of 1000 km at an hourly time scale. The error in recovered daily global mean irradiance is 0.16 W m-2 and -0.13 W m-2, and the estimated uncertainty in recovered hourly global mean irradiance from this day is 0.45 W m-2 and 0.15 W m-2, in the shortwave and longwave spectral regions, respectively. Sensitivity tests show that addressing instrument-related issues that lead to systematic measurement error remains of central importance to achieving similar accuracies in reality. The presented error statistics therefore likely represent the lower bounds of what could currently be achieved with the constellation approach, but this study demonstrates the promise of an unprecedented sampling capability for better observing the Earth's radiation budget.

  2. The CYGNSS ground segment; innovative mission operations concepts to support a micro-satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D.; Vincent, M.; Rose, R.; Ruf, C.

    Hurricane track forecasts have improved in accuracy by ~50% since 1990, while in that same period there has been essentially no improvement in the accuracy of intensity prediction. One of the main problems in addressing intensity occurs because the rapidly evolving stages of the tropical cyclone (TC) life cycle are poorly sampled in time by conventional polar-orbiting, wide-swath surface wind imagers. NASA's most recently awarded Earth science mission, the NASA EV-2 Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) has been designed to address this deficiency by using a constellation of micro-satellite-class Observatories designed to provide improved sampling of the TC during its life cycle. Managing a constellation of Observatories has classically resulted in an increased load on the ground operations team as they work to create and maintain schedules and command loads for multiple Observatories. Using modern tools and technologies at the Mission Operations Center (MOC) in conjunction with key components implemented in the flight system and an innovative strategy for pass execution coordinated with the ground network operator, the CYGNSS mission reduces the burden of constellation operations to a level commensurate with the low-cost mission concept. This paper focuses on the concept of operations for the CYGNSS constellation as planned for implementation at the CYGNSS MOC in conjunction with the selected ground network operator.

  3. End-of-Mission Planning Challenges for a Satellite in a Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boain, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of a mission, satellites embedded in a constellation must first perform propulsive maneuvers to safely exit the constellation before they can begin with the usual end-of-mission activities: deorbit, passivation, and decommissioning. The target orbit for these exit maneuvers must be sufficiently below the remaining constellation satellites such that, once achieved, there is no longer risk of close conjunctions. Yet, the exit maneuvers must be done based on the spacecraft's state of health and operational capability when the decision to end the mission is made. This paper focuses on the recently developed exit strategy for the CloudSat mission to highlight problems and issues, which forced the discarding of CloudSat's original EoM Plan and its replacement with a new plan consistent with changes to the spacecraft's original operational mode. The analyses behind and decisions made in formulating this new exit strategy will be of interest to other missions in a constellation currently preparing to update their End-of-Mission Plan.

  4. Constellations: A New Paradigm for Earth Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Volz, Stephen M.; Yuhas, Cheryl L.; Case, Warren F.

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen a significant increase in the number and the capabilities of remote sensing satellites launched by the international community. A relatively new approach has been the launching of satellites into heterogeneous constellations. Constellations provide the scientists a capability to acquire science data, not only from specific instruments on a single satellite, but also from instruments on other satellites that fly in the same orbit. Initial results from the A-Train (especially following the CALIPSO/CloudSat launch) attest to the tremendous scientific value of constellation flying. This paper provides a history of the constellations (particularly the A-Train) and how the A-Train mission design was driven by science requirements. The A-Train has presented operational challenges which had not previously been encountered. Operations planning had to address not only how the satellites of each constellation operate safely together, but also how the two constellations fly in the same orbits without interfering with each other when commands are uplinked or data are downlinked to their respective ground stations. This paper discusses the benefits of joining an on-orbit constellation. When compared to a single, large satellite, a constellation infrastructure offers more than just the opportunities for coincidental science observations. For example, constellations reduce risks by distributing observing instruments among numerous satellites; in contrast, a failed launch or a system failure in a single satellite would lead to loss of all observations. Constellations allow for more focused, less complex satellites. Constellations distribute the development, testing, and operations costs among various agencies and organizations for example, the Morning and Afternoon Constellations involve several agencies within the U.S. and in other countries. Lastly, this paper addresses the need to plan for the long-term evolution of a constellation. Agencies need to have

  5. Minimum of Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) for five satellites with dual-GNSS constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yunlong; Wang, Jinling; Huang, Qi

    2015-07-01

    The Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) is a term to specify multiplicative effect of the satellite geometry on positioning and timing precision. For positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) applications with multi-GNSS constellations, the lower the GDOP values are, the more accurate the PNT solution is, and thus, the minimum value of GDOP should be discussed. Firstly, this paper analyses the traditional method for calculating the minimum of GDOP for dual-GNSS constellations. Then, from the point of the practical constraints of a GNSS receiver on the earth surface, a new formula for the specific minimum of GDOP together with the design matrix is derived. The minimum of GDOP is expressed as a function with two satellite elevation angles as variables. The numerical experiments have demonstrated the validation of the new formula for the minimum of GDOP.

  6. Linking satellites via Earth hot spots and the Internet to form ad hoc constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stu; Grosvenor, Sandra; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix A.; Lee, Richard Q.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Zaman, Afroz; Popovic, Zoya; Sherwood, Robert L.; Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley

    2005-01-01

    As more assets are placed in orbit, opportunities emerge to combine various sets of satellites in temporary constellations to perform collaborative image collections. Often, new operations concepts for a satellite or set of satellites emerge after launch. To the degree with which new space assets can be inexpensively and rapidly integrated into temporary or "ad hoc" constellations, will determine whether these new ideas will be implemented or not. On the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite, a New Millennium Program mission, a number of experiments were conducted and are being conducted to demonstrate various aspects of an architecture that, when taken as a whole, will enable progressive mission autonomy. In particular, the target architecture will use adaptive ground antenna arrays to form, as close as possible, the equivalent of wireless access points for low earth orbiting satellites. Coupled with various ground and flight software and the Internet, the architecture enables progressive mission autonomy. Thus, new collaborative sensing techniques can be implemented post-launch. This paper will outline the overall operations concept and highlight details of both the research effort being conducted in the area of adaptive antenna arrays and some of the related successful autonomy software that has been implemented using EO-1 and other operational satellites.

  7. Lightweight high-data-rate laser communications terminal for low-earth-orbit satellite constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshalek, Robert G.; Begley, David L.

    1995-04-01

    An optical terminal is described that supports bi-directional communications among a constellation of low-Earth-orbit satellites. The concept uses AlGaAs semiconductor diode master oscillator/power amplifier laser transmitters, a silicon charge-coupled device array for acquisition and fine tracking, and a silicon avalanche photodiode for 1-Gbps communications over a 4000-km range. The 19-lb laser terminal consumes 31 watts of peak spacecraft power.

  8. Ice Velocity Mapping in Antarctica - Towards a Virtual Satellite Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuchl, B.; Mouginot, J.; Rignot, E. J.; Crevier, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Ice sheets are acknowledged by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV) needed to make significant progress in the generation of global climate products and derived information. Ice velocity is a crucial geophysical parameter that can be measured using spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. Here, we report on an update to available Earth System Data Records (ESDR) of ice velocity in Antarctica based on data from a suite of spaceborne (SAR) sensors and provide an overview on international coordination in an effort to best utilize the available SAR satellites. Building on the first complete mapping of the flow of ice surface over the Antarctic continent using data predominantly acquired during IPY, we are working on a series of regional studies analyzing data from several different epochs. The analysis of velocity changes between discrete measurements requires even more careful data processing in order to be able to accurately measure subtle changes. Examples for Larsen-C and the Amundsen Sea Embayment will be presented. Data continuity is a crucial aspect to this work, particularly in light of the fact that 4 SAR missions have ceased operations since IPY and all available missions have a primary mandate that is not scientific data collection. Following the successful internationally coordinated SAR data acquisitions over ice sheets during the International Polar Year 2007/2008, efforts are undertaken to continue data acquisitions in the spirit of collaboration. The Polar Space Task Group (PSTG) is succeeding the IPY coordinating body of international space agencies, Space Task Group (STG). The PSTG SAR Coordination Working Group was created to address the issue of SAR data acquisitions in the cryosphere. A review of ice sheet requirements was undertaken by the science community, presented to PSTG, and followed up with a set of sensor specific

  9. Radiometric and geometric assessment of data from the RapidEye constellation of satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, Gyanesh; Haque, Md. Obaidul; Sampath, Aparajithan; Brunn, A.; Trosset, G.; Hoffmann, D.; Roloff, S.; Thiele, M.; Anderson, C.

    2013-01-01

    To monitor land surface processes over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, it is critical to have coordinated observations of the Earth's surface using imagery acquired from multiple spaceborne imaging sensors. The RapidEye (RE) satellite constellation acquires high-resolution satellite images covering the entire globe within a very short period of time by sensors identical in construction and cross-calibrated to each other. To evaluate the RE high-resolution Multi-spectral Imager (MSI) sensor capabilities, a cross-comparison between the RE constellation of sensors was performed first using image statistics based on large common areas observed over pseudo-invariant calibration sites (PICS) by the sensors and, second, by comparing the on-orbit radiometric calibration temporal trending over a large number of calibration sites. For any spectral band, the individual responses measured by the five satellites of the RE constellation were found to differ <2–3% from the average constellation response depending on the method used for evaluation. Geometric assessment was also performed to study the positional accuracy and relative band-to-band (B2B) alignment of the image data sets. The position accuracy was assessed by comparing the RE imagery against high-resolution aerial imagery, while the B2B characterization was performed by registering each band against every other band to ensure that the proper band alignment is provided for an image product. The B2B results indicate that the internal alignments of these five RE bands are in agreement, with bands typically registered to within 0.25 pixels of each other or better.

  10. Small Satellite Constellations for LIDAR Monitoring Forest Ecosystems, Ice, and Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    LIDAR is proving to be a powerful, quantitative tool for characterizing global change. The ability to acquire ranging information with centimeter accuracy at meter and sub-meter scales is revolutionizing diverse fields such as ecology, glaciology, geomorphology, climatology, agriculture, hydrology and geography. Applications for LIDAR data within the geosciences are growing more rapidly than the availability of high quality LIDAR data. Only a small fraction of the Earth has been surveyed by LIDAR, and existing LIDAR coverage is insufficient to fully assess and monitor the impacts of human activities on the global environment on interannual timescales. Recent advances in laser and detector technology, combined with the availability of low-cost, high performance small satellites will soon make it possible to deploy constellations of LIDAR satellites in low Earth orbit to provide continuous, global monitoring of forest ecosystems, ice volume and land use. The designs of these constellations will involve a large number of tradeoffs regarding the capabilities of the satellites versus their costs. Central to this effort is a thorough understanding of the measurement and coverage requirements of the LIDAR systems as they apply to diverse fields. For instance, monitoring ice sheets and glaciers requires very high absolute elevation accuracy, whereas monitoring forests requires rich laser return information to assess canopy structure and carbon sequestration potential. We have developed a design tool that allows for parametric estimation and optimization of satellite payload capacity and coverage, as well as the performance of multi-sensor single photon orbital LIDAR instruments. The tool has the ability to input existing high-resolution airborne LIDAR data and create simulated real-world orbital datasets that can be evaluated by a diverse range of anticipated user communities. Examples of the simulated datasets and coverage for low, medium and high cost satellite

  11. A Challenging Trio in Space 'Routine' Operations of the Swarm Satellite Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diekmann, Frank-Jurgen; Clerigo, Ignacio; Albini, Giuseppe; Maleville, Laurent; Neto, Alessandro; Patterson, David; Nino, Ana Piris; Sieg, Detlef

    2016-08-01

    Swarm is the first ESA Earth Observation Mission with three satellites flying in a semi-controlled constellation. The trio is operated from ESA's satellite control centre ESOC in Darmstadt, Germany. The Swarm Flight Operations Segment consists of the typical elements of a satellite control system at ESOC, but had to be carefully tailored for this innovative mission. The main challenge was the multi-satellite system of Swarm, which necessitated the development of a Mission Control System with a multi-domain functionality, both in hardware and software and covering real-time and backup domains. This was driven by the need for extreme flexibility for constellation operations and parallel activities.The three months of commissioning in 2014 were characterized by a very tight and dynamically changing schedule of activities. All operational issues could be solved during that time, including the challenging orbit acquisition phase to achieve the final constellation.Although the formal spacecraft commissioning phase was concluded in spring 2014, the investigations for some payload instruments continue even today. The Electrical Field Instruments are for instance still being tested in order to characterize and improve science data quality. Various test phases also became necessary for the Accelerometers on the Swarm satellites. In order to improve the performance of the GPS Receivers for better scientific exploitation and to minimize the failures due to loss of synchronization, a number of parameter changes were commanded via on-board patches.Finally, to minimize the impact on operations, a new strategy had to be implemented to handle single/multi bit errors in the on-board mass Memories, defining when to ignore and when to restore the memory via a re-initialisation.The poster presentation summarizes the Swarm specific ground segment elements of the FOS and explains some of the extended payload commissioning operations, turning Swarm into a most demanding and challenging

  12. Optimizing the Attitude Control of Small Satellite Constellations for Rapid Response Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, S.; Li, A.

    2016-12-01

    Distributed Space Missions (DSMs) such as formation flight and constellations, are being recognized as important solutions to increase measurement samples over space and time. Given the increasingly accurate attitude control systems emerging in the commercial market, small spacecraft now have the ability to slew and point within few minutes of notice. In spite of hardware development in CubeSats at the payload (e.g. NASA InVEST) and subsystems (e.g. Blue Canyon Technologies), software development for tradespace analysis in constellation design (e.g. Goddard's TAT-C), planning and scheduling development in single spacecraft (e.g. GEO-CAPE) and aerial flight path optimizations for UAVs (e.g. NASA Sensor Web), there is a gap in open-source, open-access software tools for planning and scheduling distributed satellite operations in terms of pointing and observing targets. This paper will demonstrate results from a tool being developed for scheduling pointing operations of narrow field-of-view (FOV) sensors over mission lifetime to maximize metrics such as global coverage and revisit statistics. Past research has shown the need for at least fourteen satellites to cover the Earth globally everyday using a LandSat-like sensor. Increasing the FOV three times reduces the need to four satellites, however adds image distortion and BRDF complexities to the observed reflectance. If narrow FOV sensors on a small satellite constellation were commanded using robust algorithms to slew their sensor dynamically, they would be able to coordinately cover the global landmass much faster without compensating for spatial resolution or BRDF effects. Our algorithm to optimize constellation satellite pointing is based on a dynamic programming approach under the constraints of orbital mechanics and existing attitude control systems for small satellites. As a case study for our algorithm, we minimize the time required to cover the 17000 Landsat images with maximum signal to noise ratio fall

  13. Phase Compensation Sensor for Ranging Consistency in Inter-Satellite Links of Navigation Constellation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhijun; Yang, Jun; Guo, Xiye; Hu, Mei

    2017-01-01

    The performance of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) can be enhanced significantly by introducing the inter-satellite links (ISL) of a navigation constellation. In particular, the improvement of the position, velocity, and time accuracy, and the realization of autonomous functions require the ISL distance measurement data as the original input. For building a high-performance ISL, the ranging consistency between navigation satellites becomes a crucial problem to be addressed. Considering the frequency aging drift and the relativistic effect of the navigation satellite, the frequency and phase adjustment (FPA) instructions for the 10.23 MHz must be injected from the ground station to ensure the time synchronization of the navigation constellation. Moreover, the uncertainty of the initial phase each time the onboard clock equipment boots also results in a pseudo-range offset. In this Ref., we focus on the influence of the frequency and phase characteristics of the onboard clock equipment on the ranging consistency of the ISL and propose a phase compensation sensor design method for the phase offset. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method not only realized a phase compensation for the pseudo-range jitter, but, when the 1 PPS (1 pulse per second) falls in the 10.23 MHz skip area, also overcomes the problem of compensating the ambiguous phase by directly tracking the 10.23 MHz to ensure consistency in the ranging. PMID:28245572

  14. The design and networking of dynamic satellite constellations for global mobile communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, Cionaith J.; Benedicto, Xavier; Tafazolli, Rahim; Evans, Barry

    1993-01-01

    Various design factors for mobile satellite systems, whose aim is to provide worldwide voice and data communications to users with hand-held terminals, are examined. Two network segments are identified - the ground segment (GS) and the space segment (SS) - and are seen to be highly dependent on each other. The overall architecture must therefore be adapted to both of these segments, rather than each being optimized according to its own criteria. Terrestrial networks are grouped and called the terrestrial segment (TS). In the SS, of fundamental importance is the constellation altitude. The effect of the altitude on decisions such as constellation design choice and on network aspects like call handover statistics are fundamental. Orbit resonance is introduced and referred to throughout. It is specifically examined for its useful properties relating to GS/SS connectivities.

  15. EO/IR satellite constellations for the early detection and tracking of collision events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatezalo, A.; El-Fallah, A.; Mahler, R.; Mehra, R. K.; Pham, K.

    2010-04-01

    The detection and tracking of collision events involving existing Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Resident Space Objects (RSOs) is becoming increasingly important with the higher LEO space objects traffic volume which is anticipated to increase even further in the near future. Changes in velocity that can lead to a collision are hard to detect early on time, and before the collision happens. Several collision events can happen at the same time and continuous monitoring of the LEO orbit is necessary in order to determine and implement collision avoidance strategies. We present a simulation of a constellation system consisting of multiple platforms carrying EO/IR sensors for the detection of such collisions. The presented simulation encompasses the full complexity of LEO trajectories changes which can collide with currently operating satellites. Efficient multitarget filter with information-theoretic multisensor management is implemented and evaluated on different constellations.

  16. Small Satellites Constellation for Monitoring of Natural and Man-made Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarchuk, K.; Oraevsky, V.; Salikhov, R.; Danilkin, V.

    The possibility of creation a new conception of using the small satellites constellation arises today in connection with the development of the circuit technology for manufacturing real small space vehicles (SSV). Their low price allows to form the multi purpose satellite constellation. Such constellation is formed in frame of the Russian Federal space program till 2006. It is intended for monitoring of the natural (typhoons, hurricanes, eruptions of volcano etc.) and man-made (radioactive contamination etc.) catastrophes. The space segment will be designed and manufactured by Research Institute for Electromechanics Federal State Unitary Enterprise. The scientific instrumentation and program will be designed by IZMIRAN. Three types of SSV will be in the constellation: The high-altitude group is composed by 4 SV (200 kg each) and the low-altitude group consists of up to 12 SV (200 kg or 60 kg each). Parameters measured by the on-board information system are as follows: plasma composition, ionosphere altitude profile, UHF/VHF/HF noise factor, atmosphere glow, weather parameters, the Earth surface temperature, high-energy particles, magnetic field, electric field. The multi-spectrum instrumentation of remote sensing will be also mounted on vehicle. The first SV are scheduled to be launched to the sun-sinchronous orbit by ROCOT, STRELA or SHTEL launch- vehicles within 2005 - 2006. After realization of the first projects the system configuration can be changed.For example the multisatellite system can provide: - Short-term, intermediate term and long-term prognosis of earthquakes, typhoons, hurricanes, tsunami; - Monitoring of radioactive and other contaminations - Evaluation of extreme situations and consequences of catastrophes in regions; - Analysis of a condition of the equipment and pipelines of gas and oil complex, scattering of gas emissions in turbulent atmosphere, prediction of the probable man- made catastrophes; - Analysis of influence of solar activity on

  17. Satellite Constellations for Space Weather and Ionospheric Studies: Overview of the COSMIC and COSMIC-2 Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, W. S.; Yue, X.; Kuo, B.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements from constellations of low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites are proving extremely useful for ionospheric science and space weather studies. The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC), a joint US/Taiwan mission launched in April 2006, is a six micro-satellite constellation that is flying three scientific payloads on each spacecraft: 1) a Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) receiver, 2) a nadir-viewing Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP), and 3) a Coherent Electromagnetic Radio Tomography (CERTO) tri-band beacon transmitter. COSMIC has collected a large amount of useful data from these scientific payloads and is still currently collecting 1,500 RO measurement events per day on average. The GPS RO dual-frequency L-band phase and amplitude measurements can be used to observe absolute Total Electron Content (TEC) and scintillation on lines of sight between the LEO and GPS satellites, and electron density profiles (EDP) via the radio occultation (RO) method when GPS satellites are occulted by Earth's ionosphere. The large number and complete global and local time coverage of COSMIC data are allowing scientists to observe ionospheric and plasmaspheric phenomena that are difficult to see with other instruments. The success of COSMIC has prompted U.S. agencies to execute a COSMIC follow-on mission (called COSMIC-2) with Taiwan that will put twelve satellites with GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) RO payloads into orbit on two launches in the 2016-18 time frame. The first launch will place six satellites is in a near Equatorial orbit, which is ideal for hurricane prediction and space weather forecasting, and the second launch is in a polar orbit, which is good for global coverage and prediction of all storms. COSMIC-2 will also carry twelve space weather payloads that will fly on the first launch into low inclination orbits: six RF Beacon transmitters, and six Ion Velocity Meter instruments. COSMIC

  18. Satellite Constellations for Space Weather and Ionospheric Studies: Overview of the COSMIC and COSMIC-2 Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, W. S.; Pedatella, N. M.; Weiss, J.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements from constellations of low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites are proving highly useful for ionospheric science and space weather studies. The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC), a joint US/Taiwan mission launched in April 2006, is a six micro-satellite constellation carrying Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) receivers. COSMIC has collected a large amount of useful data from these scientific payloads and is still currently collecting up to 1,000 RO measurement events per day on average. The GPS RO dual-frequency L-band phase and amplitude measurements can be used to observe absolute Total Electron Content (TEC) and scintillation on lines of sight between the LEO and GPS satellites, and electron density profiles via the RO method. The large number and complete global and local time coverage of COSMIC data are allowing scientists to observe ionospheric and plasmaspheric phenomena that are difficult to see with other instruments. The success of COSMIC has prompted U.S. agencies and Taiwan to execute a COSMIC follow-on mission (called COSMIC-2) that will put twelve satellites with GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) RO payloads into orbit on two launches in the 2017-20 time frame. The first launch in 2017 will place six satellites in a 520-km altitude 24 deg inclination orbit, which is ideal for low latitude ionospheric research and space weather forecasting. The planned second launch (not currently funded) places six additional satellites in a 750 km 72 deg inclination orbit to provide global coverage and increased sampling density. COSMIC-2 will make use of an advanced radio occultation receiver with an innovative beam-forming antenna design, and is expected to produce at least 10,000 high-quality atmospheric and ionospheric profiles per day from GPS and GLONASS signals to support operational weather prediction, climate monitoring, and space weather forecasting. Each COSMIC-2 spacecraft

  19. Phase Compensation Sensor for Ranging Consistency in Inter-Satellite Links of Navigation Constellation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhijun; Yang, Jun; Guo, Xiye; Hu, Mei

    2017-02-24

    Theperformanceoftheglobalnavigationsatellitesystem(GNSS)canbeenhancedsignificantly by introducing the inter-satellite links (ISL) of a navigation constellation. In particular, the improvement of the position, velocity, and time accuracy, and the realization of autonomous functions require the ISL distance measurement data as the original input. For building a high-performance ISL, the ranging consistency between navigation satellites becomes a crucial problem to be addressed. Considering the frequency aging drift and the relativistic effect of the navigation satellite, the frequency and phase adjustment (FPA) instructions for the 10.23 MHz must be injected from the ground station to ensure the time synchronization of the navigation constellation. Moreover, the uncertainty of the initial phase each time the onboard clock equipment boots also results in a pseudo-range offset. In this Ref., we focus on the influence of the frequency and phase characteristics of the onboard clock equipment on the ranging consistency of the ISL and propose a phase compensation sensor design method for the phase offset. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method not only realized a phase compensation for the pseudo-range jitter, but, when the 1 PPS (1 pulse per second) falls in the 10.23 MHz skip area, also overcomes the problem of compensating the ambiguous phase by directly tracking the 10.23 MHz to ensure consistency in the ranging.

  20. Optimization of regional navigation satellite constellation by improved NSGA-II algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hui; Hu, Xiulin; Zhang, Yunyu; Zeng, Yujiang; Wang, Ying

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) based on the concept of Pareto optimal is improved. A new algorithm with lower O(MNlogN) computational complexity to construct non-dominated set replaces the NSGA-II original fast non-dominated sorting algorithm with O(MN2) com-putational complexity. The new algorithm improves operating efficiency of NSGA-II significantly. Based on the combination of the improved NSGA-II algorithm and regional navigation satellite constellation design, a new idea to design regional navigation satellite constellation is proposed in this paper. The new idea is implemented by Satellite Tool Kits (STK) and Matlab: the improved NSGA-II algorithm is implemented by Matlab and the calculation of the objective function values is implemented by STK. STK/Connect interface is used to integrate STK and Matlab into one simulation. Simulation results show that new idea has some advantages over the traditional methods, being more efficient, more flexible and more comprehensive.

  1. Lightweight laser communications terminal for low-Earth-orbit satellite constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshalek, Robert G.; Begley, David L.

    1994-08-01

    An optical terminal is described that supports bidirectional communications among a constellation of low-Earth-orbit satellites. The concept uses AlGaAs semiconductor diode laser transmitters, a silicon charge-coupled device (CCD) acquisition array, and a silicon-avalanche-quadrant detector for fine tracking and 10-Mbps communications over a 5000-km range. The 13-lb laser terminal consumes 13 watts of peak spacecraft power. Order-of-magnitude data rate increases can be supported with little terminal impact by incorporating diode- laser master oscillator/power amplifier (MOPA) transmitter enhancements into the design.

  2. Influence of signal constellation on the performance of 16-ary DEQAM transmission through a regenerative satellite link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, S. W.

    1990-04-01

    The paper presents the results of a series of computer-simulation tests to determine the effects of nonlinear distortion and adjacent channel interference (ACI), on the tolerance to additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) of a digital satellite modem. The modem transmits a 16-ary differentially encoded quadrature-amplitude-modulated (16-ary DEQAM) signal over a regenerative satellite link, where the high-power amplifier (HPA) at the transmitter may introduce AM-AM and AM-PM conversion effects into the 16-ary DEQAM signal. Three signal constellations are used at the transmitter, namely (1) a conventional 16-ary DEQAM signal constellation, (2) a predistorted 16-ary DEQAM signal constellation, and (3) a prerotated 16-ary DEQAM signal constellation. An equivalent baseband model of the transmission system is used to determine the performance of the modem under the various conditions studied, and the results are used to select the preferred modem design.

  3. Field-aligned currents distribution as derived from the Swarm satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhr, H.; Kervalishvili, G.; Rauberg, J.; Michaelis, I.

    2015-12-01

    The seminal studies of Iijima and Potemra have outlined the major distribution features of field-aligned currents (FACs) in a local time versus magnetic latitude frame. The related plot showing the Region 1 and 2 FAC belts has been the reference in many studies as the baseline configuration during the past decades. What did we learn more since then? ESA's constellation mission Swarm provides the opportunity to derive more reliable FAC estimates from multi-satellite magnetic field measurements. We make use of the Swarm A/C satellite pair, which flies side-by-side at a separation of 1.4° in longitude. By considering along-track differences over 5 s the four readings at the corners of an almost symmetrical quad are used for calculating the mean vertical current density flowing through the encircled area. FACs are estimated by mapping the vertical current component onto the field direction. Within the auroral oval current estimates from single and dual-satellite solutions agree generally well. Significant differences are frequently observed in the polar cap. Here underlying assumptions for single-satellite solutions are obviously not well satisfied. Another characteristic derived from the multi-satellite observations: FACs can be divided into two classes. For scale sizes up to some ten kilometers rapid temporal variations are observed. These FACs are related to kinetic Alfvén waves. The other class with scale lengths of more than 150 km can be regarded as stationary current systems lasting for more than a minute.

  4. Research on long-term autonomous orbit determination for navigation constellation using inter-satellite orientation observation information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Xu, Bo; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2009-12-01

    Long-term autonomous orbit determination is one of the key techniques of autonomous navigation for navigation constellation. Based only on cross-link range observation, which is not able to overcome the defect of entire constellation rotation and translation relative to inertial reference frame, the accuracy of autonomous orbit determination is reduced with time. In order to solve this problem, the approach of using inter-satellite orientation observation is put forward to estimate the constellation rotation and translation with the benefit of absolute position information provided by stars. In view of the fact that most navigation satellites moving in near circular orbits, and also in order to reduce the calculation burden of onboard computer, nonsingular orbital elements are chosen as state variables and analytical method is used to calculate the transition matrix in this paper. In addition, the extended Kalman filter is designed to fuse information of satellite dynamic model, cross-link range observation and inter-satellite orientation observation to determine the orbit. The simulation results based on the IGS Final Products of GPS constellation indicate that, at the certain error condition of range and orientation measurement, the URE of constellation is better than 2 meters within 120 days.

  5. Radiated EMC& EMI Management During Design Qualification and Test Phases on LEO Satellites Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondeaux, H.; Terral, M.; Gutierrez-Galvan, R.; Baud, C.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the proposed paper is to present the global radiated EMC/EMI approach applied by Thales Alenia Space in the frame of a telecommunication Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites constellation program. The paper will present this approach in term of analyses, of specific characterisation and of sub-system and satellite tests since first design reviews up-to satellite qualification tests on Prototype Flight Model (PFM) and to production tests on reduced FMs. The global aim is : 1 - to reduce risk and cost (units EMC delta qualification, EMC tests at satellite level for the 81 Space Vehicles (SV) through appropriated EMC analyses (in term of methodologies and contours) provided in the frame of design reviews.2 - to early anticipate potential critical case to reduce the impact in term of engineering/qualification/test extra cost and of schedule.3 - to secure/assure the payload and SV design/layout.4 - to define and optimize the EMC/EMI test campaigns to be performed on Prototype Flight Model (PFM) for complete qualification and on some FMs for industrial qualification/validation.The last part of the paper is dedicated to system Bite Error Rate (BER) functional test performed on PFM SV to demonstrate the final compatibility between the three on-board payloads and to the Internal EMC tests performed on PFM and some FMs to demonstrate the SV panel RF shielding efficiency before and after environmental tests and the Thales Alenia Space (TAS) and Orbital AKT (OATK) workmanships reproducibility.

  6. One of 50: Challenger, the University of Colorado Boulder QB50 Constellation Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, S. E.; Rainville, N.; Dahir, A.; Rouleau, C.; Stark, J.; Nell, N.; Fukushima, J.; Antunes de Sa, A.

    2015-12-01

    QB50 is a bold project lead by the Von Karman Institute of Fluid Dynamics as part of the European Union FP7 program to launch fifty cubesats from a single launch vehicle. With a planned deployment altitude of 380km, the QB50 constellation will stay below the space station and deorbit within 9-12 months, depending upon solar conditions. Forty of the QB50 satellites are flying specified scientific sensors which include an ion-neutral mass spectrometer, a Langmuir probe or a FIPEX oxygen sensor. This constellation of cubesats will yield an unprecedented set of distributed measurements of the lower-thermosphere. The University of Colorado Boulder was selected as part of a four team consortium of US cubesat providers to participate in the QB50 mission and is supported by the National Science Foundation. The Challenger cubesat, designed and built by a multidisciplinary team of students at the University of Colorado Boulder will carry the ion-neutral mass spectrometer as a science instrument and has heritage from the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) and Miniature X-Ray Spectrometer (MinXSS) cubesats. Many of the cubesat subsystems were designed, built and tested by students in the Space Technology Integration (STIg) lab. This paper will provide an overview and a status update of the QB50 program in addition to details of the Challenger cubesat.

  7. Characterizing the RF Quiescence of the Lunar Far Side Using a Constellation of Small Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, J. E. S.; Bridges, C.; Bruhn, F.; Gao, Y.; Lappas, V.; Liddle, D.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Nunes, M.; Sorensen, T.; Underwood, C.

    2014-04-01

    Observations of highly red-shifted 21-cm hydrogen signals have been suggested as the only means to probe the early Universe from recombination to reionization. During this era, called the Dark Ages, the Universe consisted of neutral hydrogen gas and was opaque to light. It did not become transparent, as we see it today, until reionization was completed. The Dark Ages was the time period when matter clumped together, the very first stars and black holes were born, and, eventually, the first galaxies were formed. To enable observations of the Dark Ages is therefore one of the top priorities in cosmology and astrophysics. Today, the cosmological 21-cm signals are highly red-shifted and should peak in the FM radio band. Observing the Dark Ages from Earth is therefore next to impossible, due to man-made radio frequency interference (RFI) and ionospheric disturbances. To efficiently block the RFI, which would otherwise overwhelm the weak cosmological signal; it has been proposed to use the Moon as a radio shield and either place a satellite equipped with an ultra-sensitive radio instrument in lunar orbit or to deploy a large low-frequency radio array on the far-side of the Moon. Such missions are technically challenging and expensive and have so far failed to gain support from any national or international space program. Our goal is therefore to use a constellation of small inexpensive satellites in lunar orbit to collect pathfinder data, which would demonstrate EPSC Abstracts Vol. 9, EPSC2014-798, 2014 European Planetary Science Congress 2014 c Author(s) 2014 EPSC European Planetary Science Congress the feasibility of using the Moon as a radio shield, and map out the spatial extent of this RF quiescent zone to support future missions to explore the cosmos. This paper examines the design and radio payload of this mission. Alternative orbits, constellation and payload designs are analyzed to optimize the mission for performance and cost.

  8. Comparison of magnetic perturbation data from LEO satellite constellations: Statistics of DMSP and AMPERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Matsuo, T.; Kilcommons, L.; Richmond, A.; Anderson, B.; Korth, H.; Redmon, R.; Mero, B.; Parrish, N.

    2014-01-01

    During the past decade engineering-grade magnetic field measurements from the low Earth orbiting (LEO) Iridium constellation of communication satellites have been available to the geospace science community as a tool to map field-aligned currents. The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) applied to Iridium measurements markedly improved the temporal and spatial resolution of these data. We developed new methods to compare data from the latest improvement to AMPERE with those from a constellation of four LEO Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft that carry high-resolution magnetometers. To perform the comparisons, we transformed all data to a common coordinate frame and altitude (110 km) and developed a means of computing spacecraft magnetic conjunctions. These conjunctions yield discrepancies in the magnetic field perturbations measured at each proximate spacecraft. During the geomagnetic disturbance of 29-30 May 2010, the vector differences in the horizontal perturbations at closest approach (typically a few tens of kilometers) had mean, median, and standard deviation values of 132 nT, 112 nT, and 90 nT, respectively. The DMSP spacecraft tend to report larger perturbations in the northern polar cap and cusp regions, especially during active intervals. We attribute some of the differences to limitations of spacecraft-attitude knowledge that propagate into AMPERE data. Overall, for the magnetic storm, we provide clear evidence that AMPERE data can provide high-resolution auroral zone data in good agreement with DMSP data for use in data assimilation algorithms. Such dual-use commercial data can provide important global augmentation to the nation's space weather monitoring capabilities.

  9. Precise orbit determination for quad-constellation satellites at Wuhan University: strategy, result validation, and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Xu, Xiaolong; Zhao, Qile; Liu, Jingnan

    2016-02-01

    This contribution summarizes the strategy used by Wuhan University (WHU) to determine precise orbit and clock products for Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). In particular, the satellite attitude, phase center corrections, solar radiation pressure model developed and used for BDS satellites are addressed. In addition, this contribution analyzes the orbit and clock quality of the quad-constellation products from MGEX Analysis Centers (ACs) for a common time period of 1 year (2014). With IGS final GPS and GLONASS products as the reference, Multi-GNSS products of WHU (indicated by WUM) show the best agreement among these products from all MGEX ACs in both accuracy and stability. 3D Day Boundary Discontinuities (DBDs) range from 8 to 27 cm for Galileo-IOV satellites among all ACs' products, whereas WUM ones are the largest (about 26.2 cm). Among three types of BDS satellites, MEOs show the smallest DBDs from 10 to 27 cm, whereas the DBDs for all ACs products are at decimeter to meter level for GEOs and one to three decimeter for IGSOs, respectively. As to the satellite laser ranging (SLR) validation for Galileo-IOV satellites, the accuracy evaluated by SLR residuals is at the one decimeter level with the well-known systematic bias of about -5 cm for all ACs. For BDS satellites, the accuracy could reach decimeter level, one decimeter level, and centimeter level for GEOs, IGSOs, and MEOs, respectively. However, there is a noticeable bias in GEO SLR residuals. In addition, systematic errors dependent on orbit angle related to mismodeled solar radiation pressure (SRP) are present for BDS GEOs and IGSOs. The results of Multi-GNSS combined kinematic PPP demonstrate that the best accuracy of position and fastest convergence speed have been achieved using WUM products, particularly in the Up direction. Furthermore, the accuracy of static BDS only PPP degrades when the BDS IGSO and MEO satellites switches to orbit-normal orientation

  10. Analysis of a Possible Future Degradation in the DORIS Geodetic Results Related to Changes in the Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the consequences of losing one or more of the 4 remaining Doppler & Ranging Information System (DORIS) satellites and any impact such a loss might have on geodesy. The goals of this program are to analyze the sensitivity of the current DORIS geodetic results (station position and polar motion) to the size of the DORIS constellation and to verify if some satellites are most important or less important than others. The conclusions of the study are summarized.

  11. Analysis of a Possible Future Degradation in the DORIS Geodetic Results Related to Changes in the Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the consequences of losing one or more of the 4 remaining Doppler & Ranging Information System (DORIS) satellites and any impact such a loss might have on geodesy. The goals of this program are to analyze the sensitivity of the current DORIS geodetic results (station position and polar motion) to the size of the DORIS constellation and to verify if some satellites are most important or less important than others. The conclusions of the study are summarized.

  12. Monitoring volcanic systems through cross-correlation of coincident A-Train satellite data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, V. J. B.; Carn, S. A.; Wright, R.

    2014-12-01

    The remote location and inaccessibility of many active volcanic systems around the world hinders detailed investigation of their eruptive dynamics. One methodology for monitoring such locations is through the utilisation of multiple satellite datasets to elucidate underlying eruption dynamics and aid volcanic hazard mitigation. Whilst satellite datasets are often analysed individually, here we exploit the multi-platform NASA A-Train satellite constellation, including the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Aqua. OMI measures volcanic emissions (e.g. sulphur dioxide, ash) whilst MODIS enables monitoring of thermal anomalies (e.g. lava flows, lava lakes, pyroclastic deposits), allowing analysis of a more diverse range of volcanic unrest than is possible using a single measurement technique alone, and permitting cross-correlation between datasets for specific locations to assess cyclic activity. A Multi-taper (MTM) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis was implemented at an initial sample site (Soufriere Hills volcano [SHV], Montserrat) facilitating cycle identification and subsequent comparison with existing ground-based data. Corresponding cycles at intervals of 8, 12 and ~50 days were identified in both the satellite-based SO2 and thermal infrared signals and ground-based SO2 measurements (Nicholson et al. 2013), validating the methodology. Our analysis confirms the potential for identification of cyclical volcanic activity through synergistic analysis of satellite data, which would be of particular value at poorly monitored volcanic systems. Following our initial test at SHV, further sample sites have been selected in locations with varied eruption dynamics and monitoring capabilities including Ambrym (Vanuatu), Kilauea (Hawaii), Nyiragongo (DR Congo) and Etna (Italy) with the intention of identifying not only cyclic signals that can be attributed to volcanic systems but also those which are

  13. Earth Radiation Imbalance from a Constellation of 66 Iridium Satellites: Climate Science Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, W.; Chiu, CJ. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The "global warming hiatus" since the 1998 El Nino, highlighted by Meehl et al., and the resulting "missing energy" problem highlighted by Trenberth et al., has opened the door to a more fundamental view of climate change than mere surface air temperature. That new view is based on two variables which are strongly correlated: the rate of change of ocean heat content d(OHC)/dt; and Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI) at the top of the atmosphere, whose guesstimated range is 0.4 to 0.9 Watts per square meters (this imbalance being mainly due to increasing CO2). The Argo float array is making better and better measurements of OHC. But existing satellite systems cannot measure ERI to even one significant digit. So, climate model predictions of ERI are used in place of real measurements of it, and the satellite data are tuned to the climate model predictions. Some oceanographers say "just depend on Argo for understanding the global warming hiatus and the missing energy", but we don't think this is a good idea because d(OHC)/dt and ERI have different time scales and are never perfectly correlated. We think the ERB community needs to step up to measuring ERI correctly, just as oceanographers have deployed Argo to measure OHC correctly. This talk will overview a proposed constellation of 66 Earth radiation budget instruments, hosted on Iridium satellites, that will actually be able to measure ERI to at least one significant digit, thus enabling a crucial test of climate models. This constellation will also be able to provide ERI at two-hourly time scales and 500-km spatial scales without extrapolations from uncalibrated narrowband geostationary instruments, using the highly successful methods of GRACE to obtain spatial resolution. This high time resolution would make ERI a synoptic variable like temperature, and allow studies of ERI's response to fast-evolving phenomena like dust storms and hurricanes and even brief excursions of Total Solar Irradiance. Time permitting, we

  14. High Volume Pulsed EPC for T/R Modules in Satellite Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notarianni, Michael; Maynadier, Paul; Marin, Marc

    2014-08-01

    In the frame of Iridium Next business, a mobile satellite service, Thales Alenia Space (TAS) has to produce more than 2400 x 65W and 162 x 250W pulsed Electronic Power Conditioners (EPC) to supply the RF transmit/receive modules that compose the active antenna of the satellites.The company has to deal with mass production constraints where cost, volume and performances are crucial factors. Compared to previous constellations realized by TAS, the overall challenge is to make further improvements in a short time:- Predictable electrical models- Deeper design-to-cost approach- Streamlining improvements and test coverageAs the active antenna drives the consumption of the payload, accurate performances have been evaluated early owing to the use of simulation (based on average model) and breadboard tests at the same time.The necessary cost reduction has been done owing to large use of COTS (Components Off The Shelf). In order to secure cost and schedule, each manufacturing step has been optimized to maximize test coverage in order to guarantee high reliability.At this time, more than 200 flight models have already been manufactured, validating this approach.This paper is focused on the 65W EPC but the same activities have been led on the 250W EPC.

  15. Sattelite-Constellation Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, M.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of communications satellite constellations cannot be overstated. In one fell swoop, such a constellation can provide an under developed region without a modern communication infrastructure with an instant modern communications network.

  16. On the deployment and station keeping dynamics of N-body orbiting satellite constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Avaine

    This research explores the theory of relative motion to analyze formation flying, which is an orbital operations concept designed to maintain a predetermined trajectory of a spacecraft relative to a reference position or another reference spacecraft without making physical attachment (rendezvous). The trend to develop small, low-cost spacecraft has led many to recognize the advantage of flying multiple spacecraft in formation to achieve the correlated instrument measurements formerly possible only by flying many instruments on a single, large platform. This new requirement imposes additional complications on orbit maintenance, especially when each spacecraft has its own constraints. This research consists of two parts: (1) Constellation and Station Keeping in which the objective is to maintain the geometric configuration and to maintain approximately constant separation distances between spacecraft as they are moving in an elliptical orbit, about the Earth. (2) Deployment Stage in which spacecraft are deployed from an initial position (i.e. common location) to a final position of a predetermined geometric configuration, defined with respect to the original mother spacecraft. Constellation station keeping was investigated by implementing various propulsive maneuvers at different times based on Lagrange's planetary equations for impulsive (thrust) perturbations. Other constellation station keeping was based on the investigation of propulsive strategies that deliberately shifted the line of apsides by a predetermined (small) amount in order to maintain separation distances within certain bounds. And finally, a hybrid technique which consisted of a combination of shift in line of apsides and Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) feedback was investigated employing the Tschauner and Hempel equations of relative motion for elliptic orbits to minimize a secular relative drift cause by the gravitational perturbations(J2). Deployment of spacecraft is described by maneuvers from

  17. Determining polar ionospheric electrojet currents from Swarm satellite constellation magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aakjær, Cecilie Drost; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Christopher C.

    2016-08-01

    We determine the strength and location of the ionospheric currents responsible for the polar electrojets from magnetic data collected by the Swarm satellite constellation on an orbit-by-orbit basis. The ionospheric currents are modelled using a simple, yet robust, method by a series of line currents at 110 km altitude (corresponding to the ionospheric E-layer) perpendicular to the satellite orbit, separated by 1° (about 113 km). We assess the reliability of our method, with the aim of a possible near-real-time application. A study of the effect of different regularization methods is therefore carried out. An L_1 model regularization of the second-order spatial differences, and robust treatment of the data (to account for non-Gaussian error distributions), yields the most encouraging results. We apply our approach to two three-weekly data periods in March 2014 (geomagnetic quiet conditions) and March 2015 (more disturbed conditions), respectively. Our orbit-by-orbit approach also allows the temporal evolution of the polar electrojets to be investigated. We find remarkable agreement of the ionospheric activity in Northern and Southern polar regions, with correlation exceeding 0.9 for periods longer than two days. Reliability of the approach is shown by three key results: (1) a common regularization parameter for all orbits with enough data coverage, (2) 0.95 squared coherence with the Auroral Electrojet index, and (3) 0.97 squared coherence is found between the side-by-side flying satellites, Alpha and Charlie, indicating a method invariant to small changes in data input. All these results indicate a possible automated near-real-time application.

  18. Full time and full coverage global observation system for ecological monitoring base on MEO satellite grid constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Rui; Liu, Shuhao

    Human life more and more rely on earth environment and atmosphere, environmental information required by space based monitor is a crucial importance, although GEO and polar weather satellite in orbit by several countries, but it can’t monitor all zone of earth with real time. This paper present a conception proposal which can realize stable, continue and real time observation for any zone(include arctic and ant-arctic zone) of earth and its atmosphere, it base on walker constellation in 20000Km high medium orbit with 24 satellites, payloads configuration with infrared spectrometer, visible camera, ultraviolet ray camera, millimeter wave radiometer, leaser radar, spatial resolution are 1km@ infrared,0.5km@ visible optical. This satellite of grid constellation can monitor any zone of global with 1-3hours retrial observation cycles. Air pollution, ozone of atmosphere, earth surface pollution, desert storm, water pollution, vegetation change, natural disasters, man-made emergency situations, agriculture and climate change can monitor by this MEO satellite grid constellation. This system is a international space infrastructure, use of mature technologies and products, can build by co-operation with multi countries.

  19. Minimum of PDOP and its applications in inter-satellite links (ISL) establishment of Walker-δ constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Songhui; Gui, Qingming; Li, Guozhong; Du, Yuanlu

    2014-08-01

    Within the next decade, there will be a number of GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) available, i.e. modernized GPS, Galileo, restored GLONASS, BeiDou and many other regional GNSS augmentation systems. Thus, measurement redundancies and geometry of the satellites can be improved. GDOP (Geometric Dilution of Precision) and PDOP (Position Dilution of Precision) are associated with the constellation geometry of satellites, and they are the geometrically determined factors that describe the effect of geometry on the relationship between measurement error and position error. GDOP and PDOP are often used as standards for selecting good satellites to meet the desired positioning precision. In this paper, the related conclusions of minimum of GDOP which was discussed are given, and it is used to study the minimum of PDOP for two cases that the receiver is on the earth's surface and the receiver is on satellite. The corresponding theorem and constructive solutions of minimum of PDOP are given. Then, the rationality of the ISL (inter-satellite link) establishment criteria in Walker-δ constellation is discussed by using the theory of minimum of PDOP. Finally, the minimum of PDOP is calculated when the number of satellites is 4-10, and these results are verified by using Monte Carlo method.

  20. Model-based design and verification—State of the art from Galileo constellation down to small university satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickhoff, Jens; Falke, Albert; Röser, Hans-Peter

    2007-06-01

    Since 2001 EADS Astrium GmbH has implemented a model-based system simulation infrastructure for support of spacecraft development, onboard software verification and spacecraft design validation. Corresponding thereto an engineering process has been established, allowing development and full design validation of spacecrafts without necessity of engineering models on spacecraft level. This simulation infrastructure is called "model-based development and verification environment" (MDVE). Major benefit of model-based system development applying MDVE is the early possibility for simulated satellite mission operations, using real onboard software in the virtual satellite, even before availability of real hardware. This represents an outstanding support to system design qualification and performance verification. MDVE technology application, however, is not limited to commercial and large-scale spacecrafts. In a close partnership with Universität Stuttgart, EADS Astrium also sponsored an MDVE installation to the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) for the small-satellite program Flying Laptop, which is the first micro-satellite under development of IRS. This paper presents the span of benefits of model-based engineering with MDVE in application from small satellites up to spacecraft constellations like Galileo. The MDVE hardware and software concepts, typical testbench constellations and satellite design process characteristics are presented with application examples given both from the micro-satellite Flying Laptop as well as from the Galileo program.

  1. Precise positioning with current multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-02-09

    The world of satellite navigation is undergoing dramatic changes with the rapid development of multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). At the moment more than 70 satellites are already in view, and about 120 satellites will be available once all four systems (BeiDou + Galileo + GLONASS + GPS) are fully deployed in the next few years. This will bring great opportunities and challenges for both scientific and engineering applications. In this paper we develop a four-system positioning model to make full use of all available observations from different GNSSs. The significant improvement of satellite visibility, spatial geometry, dilution of precision, convergence, accuracy, continuity and reliability that a combining utilization of multi-GNSS brings to precise positioning are carefully analyzed and evaluated, especially in constrained environments.

  2. Precise positioning with current multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The world of satellite navigation is undergoing dramatic changes with the rapid development of multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). At the moment more than 70 satellites are already in view, and about 120 satellites will be available once all four systems (BeiDou + Galileo + GLONASS + GPS) are fully deployed in the next few years. This will bring great opportunities and challenges for both scientific and engineering applications. In this paper we develop a four-system positioning model to make full use of all available observations from different GNSSs. The significant improvement of satellite visibility, spatial geometry, dilution of precision, convergence, accuracy, continuity and reliability that a combining utilization of multi-GNSS brings to precise positioning are carefully analyzed and evaluated, especially in constrained environments. PMID:25659949

  3. Methodology of Evaluating the Science Benefit of Various Satellite/Sensor Constellation Orbital Parameters to an Assimilative Data Forecast Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-02

    and Aurora Spectrograph) inst1uments, and radio 129 occultation data from CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload), SAC-C (Satellite de 130...Aplicaciones Cientificas-C) [Hajj et al, 2004], IOX (Ionospheric Occultation Experiment) 131 [Straus et al, 2003], and the COSMIC (Constellation Observing...T. K. Meehan, L. 385 J. Romans, M. de la Torre Juarez. and T. P. Yunck (2004), CHAMP and SAC-C atmospheric 386 occultation results and

  4. A-Train Satellite Observations of Recent Explosive Eruptions in Iceland and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carn, S. A.; Yang, K.; Prata, A. J.

    2012-04-01

    The past few years have seen remarkable levels of explosive volcanic activity in Iceland and Chile, with four significant eruptions at Chaitén (May 2008), Eyjafjallajökull (April 2010), Grimsvötn (May 2011) and Cordón Caulle (June 2011 - ongoing). The tremendous disruption and economic impact of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption is well known, but each of these events had a significant impact on aviation, sometimes at great distances from the volcano. As of late 2011, volcanic ash from Cordón Caulle was still affecting airports in southern South America, highlighting the potential for extended disruption during long-lived eruptions. Serendipitously, this period of elevated volcanic activity has coincided with an era of unprecedented availability of satellite remote sensing data pertinent to volcanic cloud studies. In particular, NASA's A-Train satellite constellation (including the Aqua, CloudSat, CALIPSO, and Aura satellites) has been flying in formation since 2006, providing synergistic, multi- and hyper-spectral, passive and active observations. Measurements made by A-Train sensors include total column sulfur dioxide (SO2) by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura, upper tropospheric and stratospheric (UTLS) SO2 column by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on Aura, ash mass loading from AIRS and the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Aqua, UTLS HCl columns and ice water content (IWC) from MLS, aerosol vertical profiles from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument aboard CALIPSO, and hydrometeor profiles from the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on CloudSat. The active vertical profiling capability of CALIPSO, CloudSat and MLS sychronized with synoptic passive sensing of trace gases and aerosols by OMI, AIRS and MODIS provides a unique perspective on the structure and composition of volcanic clouds. A-Train observations during the first hours of atmospheric

  5. Fundamentals of the route theory for satellite constellation design for Earth discontinuous coverage. Part 3: Low-cost Earth observation with minimal satellite swath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razoumny, Yury N.

    2016-12-01

    Continuing the series of papers with description of the fundamentals of the Route Theory for satellite constellation design, the general method for minimization of the satellite swath width required under given constraint on the maximum revisit time (MRT), the main quality characteristic of the satellite constellation discontinuous coverage, is presented. The interrelation between MRT and multiplicity of the periodic coverage - the minimum number of the observation sessions realized for the points of observation region during the satellite tracks' repetition period - is revealed and described. In particular, it is shown that a change of MRT can occur only at points of coverage multiplicity changing. Basic elements of multifold Earth coverage theory are presented and used for obtaining analytical relations for the minimum swath width providing given multifold coverage. The satellite swath width calculation procedure for the multifold coverage of rotating Earth using the iterations on the sphere of stationary coverage is developed. The numerical results for discontinuous coverage with minimal satellite swath, including comparison with some known particular cases and implementations of the method, are presented.

  6. Ranging Consistency Based on Ranging-Compensated Temperature-Sensing Sensor for Inter-Satellite Link of Navigation Constellation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhijun; Yang, Jun; Guo, Xiye; Zhou, Yongbin

    2017-06-13

    Global Navigation Satellite System performance can be significantly enhanced by introducing inter-satellite links (ISLs) in navigation constellation. The improvement in position, velocity, and time accuracy as well as the realization of autonomous functions requires ISL distance measurement data as the original input. To build a high-performance ISL, the ranging consistency among navigation satellites is an urgent problem to be solved. In this study, we focus on the variation in the ranging delay caused by the sensitivity of the ISL payload equipment to the ambient temperature in space and propose a simple and low-power temperature-sensing ranging compensation sensor suitable for onboard equipment. The experimental results show that, after the temperature-sensing ranging compensation of the ISL payload equipment, the ranging consistency becomes less than 0.2 ns when the temperature change is 90 °C.

  7. Ranging Consistency Based on Ranging-Compensated Temperature-Sensing Sensor for Inter-Satellite Link of Navigation Constellation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhijun; Yang, Jun; Guo, Xiye; Zhou, Yongbin

    2017-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System performance can be significantly enhanced by introducing inter-satellite links (ISLs) in navigation constellation. The improvement in position, velocity, and time accuracy as well as the realization of autonomous functions requires ISL distance measurement data as the original input. To build a high-performance ISL, the ranging consistency among navigation satellites is an urgent problem to be solved. In this study, we focus on the variation in the ranging delay caused by the sensitivity of the ISL payload equipment to the ambient temperature in space and propose a simple and low-power temperature-sensing ranging compensation sensor suitable for onboard equipment. The experimental results show that, after the temperature-sensing ranging compensation of the ISL payload equipment, the ranging consistency becomes less than 0.2 ns when the temperature change is 90 °C. PMID:28608809

  8. Development of U.S. Government General Technical Requirements for UAS Flight Safety Systems Utilizing the Iridium Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Jennifer; Birr, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of technical requirements for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) utilization of the Iridium Satellite Constellation to provide flight safety. The Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) required an over-the-horizon communication standard to guarantee flight safety before permitting widespread UAS flights in the National Air Space (NAS). This is important to ensure reliable control of UASs during loss-link and over-the-horizon scenarios. The core requirement was to utilize a satellite system to send GPS tracking data and other telemetry from a flight vehicle down to the ground. Iridium was chosen as the system because it is one of the only true satellite systems that has world wide coverage, and the service has a highly reliable link margin. The Iridium system, the flight modems, and the test flight are described.

  9. 3-Dimensional Necklace Flower Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnas, David; Casanova, Daniel; Tresaco, Eva; Mortari, Daniele

    2017-09-01

    A new approach in satellite constellation design is presented in this paper, taking as a base the 3D Lattice Flower Constellation Theory and introducing the necklace problem in its formulation. This creates a further generalization of the Flower Constellation Theory, increasing the possibilities of constellation distribution while maintaining the characteristic symmetries of the original theory in the design.

  10. Synergistic Use of Passive and Active Data for Cloud Process Studies: Examples from the A-Train Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Z. J.

    2013-05-01

    Clouds play a critical role in regulating the energy budget and water cycle of our planet. Developing a global observation and understanding of clouds requires space-borne remote sensing systems. Through internationally coordinated efforts, various observation systems and cloud products have been developed over the past 30 years. An especially fruitful area involves the synergy between passive and active sensing. Since a number of textbooks and review articles have been published on the remote sensing techniques of these systems, we do not intend to repeat them. Rather, the focus of this paper is on the application side, that is, we illustrate how synergistic use of passive and active observations can be employed to study cloud microphysical and dynamical processes using examples from recent studies that utilized the A-Train data, including a short study of warm cloud droplet growth mechanisms using CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E, and a series of studies of tropical convective dynamics using CloudSat and MODIS. Compared to cloud retrieval algorithm development, synergistic use of passive and active data for cloud process studies is a relatively new area. Strictly speaking, it may not be proper to classify it as an "area" because there is no clear roadmap to guide its development, nor any well defined envelop to contain it. Most such studies appear ad hoc in nature and almost always have a certain innovative touch that defies any rigid a priori framework. Yet, it is through these novel studies that cloud processes are systematically investigated from a global perspective. Conclusions drawn from them can thus be generalized that will help evaluate and improve cloud parameterizations in global climate models. It is our hope that more of this kind of studies will blossom out in the future. Finally, from a satellite mission development perspective, these applications will feed back to the design of the observation systems so that guidance can be provided to help define the

  11. Fundamentals of the route theory for satellite constellation design for Earth discontinuous coverage. Part 1: Analytic emulation of the Earth coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razoumny, Yury N.

    2016-11-01

    This paper opens a series of articles expounding the fundamentals of the route theory for satellite constellation design for Earth discontinuous coverage. In Part 1 of the series the analytical model for Earth coverage by satellites' swath conforming to the essential of discontinuous coverage, in contrast to continuous coverage, is presented. The analytic relations are consecutively derived for calculation of single- and multi-satellite Earth surface latitude coverage as well as for generating full set of typical satellite visibility zone time streams realized in the repeating latitude coverage pattern for given arbitrary satellite constellation. The analytic relations mentioned are used for developing the method for analysis of discontinuous coverage of fixed arbitrary Earth region for given satellite constellation using both deterministic and stochastic approaches. The method provides analysis of the revisit time for given satellite constellation, as a result of high speed (fractions of a second or seconds) computer calculations in a wide range of possible revisit time variations for different practical purposes with high accuracy which is at least on par with that provided by known numerical simulating methods based on direct modeling of the satellite observation mission, or in a number of cases is even superior to it.

  12. Revisiting the collision risk with cataloged objects for the Iridium and COSMO-SkyMed satellite constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano

    2017-05-01

    After two decades of slightly declining growth rate, the population of cataloged objects around the Earth increased by more than 56% in just a couple of years, from January 2007 to February 2009, due to two collisions in space involving the catastrophic destruction of three intact satellites (Fengyun 1C, Cosmos 2251 and Iridium 33) in high inclination orbits. Both events had occurred in the altitude range already most affected by previous launch activity and breakups. In 2011 a detailed analysis had been carried out to analyze the consequences of these fragmentations, in particular concerning the evolution of the collision risk for the Iridium and COSMO-SkyMed satellite constellations. Five years after such first assessment, the cataloged objects environment affecting the two constellations was revisited to evaluate how the situation had evolved due to the varying contribution of the above mentioned breakup fragments and the space activities carried out in the meantime. Being distributed, at 778 km, over six nearly polar orbit planes separated by just 30° at the equator, the Iridium satellites represent a very good gauge for checking the evolution of the environment in the most critical low Earth region. In approximately five years, from May 2011 to June 2016, the average flux of cataloged objects on the Iridium satellites increased by about 14%, to 1.59×10-5 m-2 per year. The cataloged fragments of Fengyun 1C, Cosmos 2251 and Iridium 33 still accounted for, on average, 54% of the total flux. More than 39% of the latter was associated with the Fengyun 1C fragments, about 11% with the Cosmos 2251 fragments and less than 4% with the Iridium 33 fragments. Specifically concerning the mutual interaction among the Iridium 33 debris and the parent constellation, the progressive dispersion and rather fast decay of the fragments below the Iridium operational altitude, coupled with a slow differential plane precession and low average relative velocities with respect to

  13. Monitoring of Arctic Conditions from a Virtual Constellation of Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    numerical ice-ocean forecast models . OBJECTIVES a) To create daily Arctic SAR images from the CSTARS SAR constellation. b) To test and develop...images estimate global spatial rate of melting during the summer months and freezing during the winter months. g) Monitoring of icebergs and breakage...CSTARS. Furthermore, the data will lead to considerable improvement of the Navy’s ice prediction model . RELATED PROJECTS Radar Remote Sensing of

  14. Data Analysis of GPM Constellation Satellites-IMERG and ERA-Interim precipitation products over West of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Ehsan; Steinacker, Reinhold; Saghafian, Bahram

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation is a critical component of the Earth's hydrological cycle. The primary requirement in precipitation measurement is to know where and how much precipitation is falling at any given time. Especially in data sparse regions with insufficient radar coverage, satellite information can provide a spatial and temporal context. Nonetheless, evaluation of satellite precipitation is essential prior to operational use. This is why many previous studies are devoted to the validation of satellite estimation. Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation over mountainous basins is of great importance because of their susceptibility to hazards. In situ observations over mountainous areas are mostly limited, but currently available satellite precipitation products can potentially provide the precipitation estimation needed for meteorological and hydrological applications. One of the newest and blended methods that use multi-satellites and multi-sensors has been developed for estimating global precipitation. The considered data set known as Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals (IMERG) for GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement) is routinely produced by the GPM constellation satellites. Moreover, recent efforts have been put into the improvement of the precipitation products derived from reanalysis systems, which has led to significant progress. One of the best and a worldwide used model is developed by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). They have produced global reanalysis daily precipitation, known as ERA-Interim. This study has evaluated one year of precipitation data from the GPM-IMERG and ERA-Interim reanalysis daily time series over West of Iran. IMERG and ERA-Interim yield underestimate the observed values while IMERG underestimated slightly and performed better when precipitation is greater than 10mm. Furthermore, with respect to evaluation of probability of detection (POD), threat score (TS), false alarm ratio (FAR) and probability

  15. The atmospheric composition geostationary satellite constellation for air quality and climate science: Evaluating performance with Observation System Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, D. P.; Barre, J.; Worden, H. M.; Arellano, A. F.; Gaubert, B.; Anderson, J. L.; Mizzi, A. P.; Lahoz, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Current satellite observations of tropospheric composition made from low Earth orbit provide at best one or two measurements each day at any given location. Coverage is global but sparse, often with large uncertainties in individual measurements that limit examination of local and regional atmospheric composition over short time periods. This has hindered the operational uptake of these data for monitoring air quality and population exposure, and for initializing and evaluating chemical weather forecasts. By the end of the current decade there are planned geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite missions for atmospheric composition over North America, East Asia and Europe with additional missions proposed. Together, these present the possibility of a constellation of GEO platforms to achieve continuous time-resolved high-density observations of continental domains for mapping pollutant sources and variability on diurnal and local scales. We describe Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) to evaluate the contributions of these GEO missions to improve knowledge of near-surface air pollution due to intercontinental long-range transport and quantify chemical precursor emissions. We discuss the requirements on measurement simulation, chemical transport modeling, and data assimilation for a successful OSSE infrastructure. Our approach uses an efficient computational method to sample a high-resolution global GEOS-5 chemistry Nature Run over each geographical region of the GEO constellation. The demonstration carbon monoxide (CO) observation simulator, which is being expanded to other chemical pollutants, currently produces multispectral retrievals and captures realistic scene-dependent variation in measurement vertical sensitivity and cloud cover. We use the DART Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter to assimilate the simulated observations in a CAM-Chem global chemistry-climate model Control Run. The impact of observing over each region is evaluated using data

  16. A miniature, low-power scientific fluxgate magnetometer: A stepping-stone to cube-satellite constellation missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, D. M.; Mann, I. R.; Ciurzynski, M.; Barona, D.; Narod, B. B.; Bennest, J. R.; Pakhotin, I. P.; Kale, A.; Bruner, B.; Nokes, C. D. A.; Cupido, C.; Haluza-DeLay, T.; Elliott, D. G.; Milling, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Difficulty in making low noise magnetic measurements is a significant challenge to the use of cube-satellite (CubeSat) platforms for scientific constellation class missions to study the magnetosphere. Sufficient resolution is required to resolve three-dimensional spatiotemporal structures of the magnetic field variations accompanying both waves and current systems of the nonuniform plasmas controlling dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. This paper describes the design, validation, and test of a flight-ready, miniature, low-mass, low-power, and low-magnetic noise boom-mounted fluxgate magnetometer for CubeSat applications. The miniature instrument achieves a magnetic noise floor of 150-200 pT/√Hz at 1 Hz, consumes 400 mW of power, has a mass of 121 g (sensor and boom), stows on the hull, and deploys on a 60 cm boom from a three-unit CubeSat reducing the noise from the onboard reaction wheel to less than 1.5 nT at the sensor. The instrument's capabilities will be demonstrated and validated in space in late 2016 following the launch of the University of Alberta Ex-Alta 1 CubeSat, part of the QB50 constellation mission. We illustrate the potential scientific returns and utility of using a CubeSats carrying such fluxgate magnetometers to constitute a magnetospheric constellation using example data from the low-Earth orbit European Space Agency Swarm mission. Swarm data reveal significant changes in the spatiotemporal characteristics of the magnetic fields in the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system, even when the spacecraft are separated by only approximately 10 s along track and approximately 1.4° in longitude.

  17. GPM Constellation with Clock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In this animation the orbit paths of the NASA partner satellites of the GPM constellation fill in blue as the instruments pass over Earth. Rainfall appears light blue for light rain, yellow for mod...

  18. Near-real-time global biomass burning emissions product from geostationary satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyang; Kondragunta, Shobha; Ram, Jessica; Schmidt, Christopher; Huang, Ho-Chun

    2012-07-01

    Near-real-time estimates of biomass burning emissions are crucial for air quality monitoring and forecasting. We present here the first near-real-time global biomass burning emission product from geostationary satellites (GBBEP-Geo) produced from satellite-derived fire radiative power (FRP) for individual fire pixels. Specifically, the FRP is retrieved using WF_ABBA V65 (wildfire automated biomass burning algorithm) from a network of multiple geostationary satellites. The network consists of two Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) which are operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Meteosat second-generation satellites (Meteosat-09) operated by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, and the Multifunctional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency. These satellites observe wildfires at an interval of 15-30 min. Because of the impacts from sensor saturation, cloud cover, and background surface, the FRP values are generally not continuously observed. The missing observations are simulated by combining the available instantaneous FRP observations within a day and a set of representative climatological diurnal patterns of FRP for various ecosystems. Finally, the simulated diurnal variation in FRP is applied to quantify biomass combustion and emissions in individual fire pixels with a latency of 1 day. By analyzing global patterns in hourly biomass burning emissions in 2010, we find that peak fire season varied greatly and that annual wildfires burned 1.33 × 1012 kg dry mass, released 1.27 × 1010 kg of PM2.5 (particulate mass for particles with diameter <2.5 μm) and 1.18 × 1011kg of CO globally (excluding most parts of boreal Asia, the Middle East, and India because of no coverage from geostationary satellites). The biomass burning emissions were mostly released from forest and savanna fires in Africa, South America, and North America. Evaluation of

  19. Satellite observations support to disaster monitoring: the operational use of COSMO-SkyMed constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Laura; Cardaci, Chiara; Coletta, Alessandro; Corina, Angela; Di Bucci, Daniela; Giuliani, Roberta; Pagliara, Paola; Zoffoli, Simona; Boni, Giorgio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to show some experiences recently made by ASI and DPC, with the collaboration of Italian research institutes and academies, in using satellite observations to monitor different steps of emergency management in Italy: the 2012 Emilia earthquakes and the 2012 seismic sequence in the Mt. Pollino area, the volcano Stromboli eruption, the floods occurred in Tuscany and Lazio. The effectiveness of the satellite observations contribution to the disaster management is to day in phase of demonstration, and the encouraging results obtained up to now rely not only on the maturity of the data processing and interpretation techniques (more exploited), but also on the coordination in accessing and programming satellites systems. During the past year, COSMO-SkyMed has been successfully used to acquire, in very short times, high quality images of disaster areas. When the emergency evolution made it necessary, after the set up the monitoring service went on several months. Our experience confirmed how important is the availability of consistent series of satellite data, acquired on disaster prone areas in order to enable and facilitate post-disaster activities. Moreover, some results have been made possible thanks to science oriented initiatives sponsored by ASI and to the long-lasting cooperation among DPC and the national research institutions. In general, to meet civil protection needs after a disaster, typical activities based on earth observation techniques, as rapid mapping, recovery and first evaluation of damage, require the following observation capabilities: • medium-to-high spatial resolution • high revisit time, coupled with large spatial and spectral coverage • night/daylight and all-weather observations • capability of very short response time and frequent revisit opportunities for the study area • availability of a good reference archive • access and provision of satellite data for operational purposes, based on well defined rules

  20. A closed-form method for single-point positioning with six satellites in dual-GNSS constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yunlong; Huang, Qi; Ao, Yongcai; Li, Yun

    2016-12-01

    With the impact of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), dual-GNSS constellations are playing an increasingly significant role in positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) applications. Aiming at improving from the existing method, i.e., linearization, of solving the single-point positioning problem under a dual-GNSS, this paper develops a closed-form method for solving PNT problems in the case of six satellites. This method reduces the positioning problem to a simple mathematical problem of finding solutions to a quadratic equation, thereby needing only one receiver clock bias (RCB) as variable. By solving the RCB, the positioning information in three dimensions is obtained by utilizing a linear equation. Compared with the existing method, the closed-form method requires no initial position or iterations. This method thus provides a direct solution to single-point positioning. Further, how to check the uniqueness and the validity of the solutions is also derived. Experimental results verify the validity, applicability and efficiency of the proposed method.

  1. Performance analysis of satellite constellations for the next generation of gravity missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondo, J.; Flechtner, F.; Löcher, A.; Kusche, J.

    2011-12-01

    The GOCE and GRACE gravity missions have dramatically improved the knowledge of the Earth's static and time-variable gravity field due to their highly precise on-board instrumentation. This resulted in new information about the mass distribution and transport within or around the Earth system to be used in solid Earth geophysics, oceanography and sea level studies, hydrology, ice mass budget investigations and geodesy. GFZ Potsdam and IGG Bonn, with partners from German industry and universities, have conducted several studies in order to develop a concept for a future gravity mission based on low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking, but realized with laser metrology. In our poster we summarize the performance of different mission scenarios through full-scale simulations and their capacity to reach the science objectives.

  2. An architecture and protocol for communications satellite constellations regarded as multi-agent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindley, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for satellites regarded as intercommunicating agents. The architecture is based upon a postmodern paradigm of artificial intelligence in which represented knowledge is regarded as text, inference procedures are regarded as social discourse and decision making conventions and the semantics of representations are grounded in the situated behaviour and activity of agents. A particular protocol is described for agent participation in distributed search and retrieval operations conducted as joint activities.

  3. An architecture and protocol for communications satellite constellations regarded as multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindley, Craig A.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents an architecture for satellites regarded as intercommunicating agents. The architecture is based upon a postmodern paradigm of artificial intelligence in which represented knowledge is regarded as text, inference procedures are regarded as social discourse and decision making conventions and the semantics of representations are grounded in the situated behaviour and activity of agents. A particular protocol is described for agent participation in distributed search and retrieval operations conducted as joint activities.

  4. Invited Talk: Photometry of Bright Variable Stars with the BRITE Constellation Nano-Satellites: Opportunities for Amateur Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, E. F.

    2014-06-01

    (Abstract only) The BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE) is a joint Austrian-Canadian-Polish Astronomy mission to carry out high precision photometry of bright (mv < 4 mag.) variable stars. BRITE consists of a "Constellation" of 20 × 20 × 20-cm nano-satellite cubes equipped with wide field (20 × 24 deg.) CCD cameras, control systems, solar panels, onboard computers, and so on. The first two (of up to six) satellites were successfully launched during February 2013. After post-launch commissioning, science operations commenced during October 2013. The primary goals are to carry out continuous multi-color (currently blue and red filters) high-precision millimag (mmag) photometry in particular locations in the sky. Typically these pointings will last for two to four months and secure simultaneous blue/red photometry of bright variable stars within the field. The first science pointing is centered on the Orion region. Since most bright stars are intrinsically luminous, hot O/B stars, giants, and supergiants will be the most common targets. However, some bright eclipsing binaries (such as Algol, b Lyr, e Aur) and a few chromospherically-active RS CVn stars (such as Capella) may be eventually be monitored. The BRITE-Constellation program of high precision, two color photometry of bright stars offers a great opportunity to study a wide range of stellar astrophysical problems. Bright stars offer convenient laboratories to study many current and important problems in stellar astrophysics. These include probing stellar interiors and pulsation in pulsating stars, tests of stellar evolution and structure for Cepheids and other luminous stars. To scientifically enhance the BRITE science returns, the BRITE investigators are very interested in securing contemporaneous ground-based spectroscopy and standardized photometry of target stars. The BRITE Ground Based Observations Team is coordinating ground-based observing efforts for BRITE targets. The team helps coordinate collaborations

  5. Far and proximity maneuvers of a constellation of service satellites and autonomous pose estimation of customer satellite using machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantes, Gilberto, Jr.; Marconi Rocco, Evandro; da Fonseca, Ijar M.; Theil, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    Space robotics has a substantial interest in achieving on-orbit satellite servicing operations autonomously, e.g. rendezvous and docking/berthing (RVD) with customer and malfunctioning satellites. An on-orbit servicing vehicle requires the ability to estimate the position and attitude in situations whenever the targets are uncooperative. Such situation comes up when the target is damaged. In this context, this work presents a robust autonomous pose system applied to RVD missions. Our approach is based on computer vision, using a single camera and some previous knowledge of the target, i.e. the customer spacecraft. A rendezvous analysis mission tool for autonomous service satellite has been developed and presented, for far maneuvers, e.g. distance above 1 km from the target, and close maneuvers. The far operations consist of orbit transfer using the Lambert formulation. The close operations include the inspection phase (during which the pose estimation is computed) and the final approach phase. Our approach is based on the Lambert problem for far maneuvers and the Hill equations are used to simulate and analyze the approaching and final trajectory between target and chase during the last phase of the rendezvous operation. A method for optimally estimating the relative orientation and position between camera system and target is presented in detail. The target is modelled as an assembly of points. The pose of the target is represented by dual quaternion in order to develop a simple quadratic error function in such a way that the pose estimation task becomes a least square minimization problem. The problem of pose is solved and some methods of non-linear square optimization (Newton, Newton-Gauss, and Levenberg-Marquard) are compared and discussed in terms of accuracy and computational cost.

  6. Avionics of the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) microsat constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, John R.; Alvarez, Jennifer L.; Rose, Randall J.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Walls, Buddy J.

    The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS), which was recently selected as the Earth Venture-2 investigation by NASA's Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) Program, measures the ocean surface wind field with unprecedented temporal resolution and spatial coverage, under all precipitating conditions, and over the full dynamic range of wind speeds experienced in a tropical cyclone (TC). The CYGNSS flight segment consists of 8 microsatellite-class observatories, which represent SwRI's first spacecraft bus design, installed on a Deployment Module for launch. They are identical in design but provide their own individual contribution to the CYGNSS science data set. Subsystems include the Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS), the Communication and Data Subsystem (CDS), the Electrical Power Supply (EPS), and the Structure, Mechanisms, and Thermal Subsystem (SMT). This paper will present an overview of the mission and the avionics, including the ADCS, CDS, and EPS, in detail. Specifically, we will detail how off-the-shelf components can be utilized to do ADCS and will highlight how SwRI's existing avionics solutions will be adapted to meet the requirements and cost constraints of microsat applications. Avionics electronics provided by SwRI include a command and data handling computer, a transceiver radio, a low voltage power supply (LVPS), and a peak power tracker (PPT).

  7. On the Feasibility of Monitoring Carbon Monoxide in the Lower Troposphere from a Constellation of Northern Hemisphere Geostationary Satellites: Global Scale Assimilation Experiments (Part II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barre, Jerome; Edwards, David; Worden, Helen; Arellano, Avelino; Gaubert, Benjamin; Da Silva, Arlindo; Lahoz, William; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the second phase of an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) that utilizes the synthetic measurements from a constellation of satellites measuring atmospheric composition from geostationary (GEO) Earth orbit presented in part I of the study. Our OSSE is focused on carbon monoxide observations over North America, East Asia and Europe where most of the anthropogenic sources are located. Here we assess the impact of a potential GEO constellation on constraining northern hemisphere (NH) carbon monoxide (CO) using data assimilation. We show how cloud cover affects the GEO constellation data density with the largest cloud cover (i.e., lowest data density) occurring during Asian summer. We compare the modeled state of the atmosphere (Control Run), before CO data assimilation, with the known 'true' state of the atmosphere (Nature Run) and show that our setup provides realistic atmospheric CO fields and emission budgets. Overall, the Control Run underestimates CO concentrations in the northern hemisphere, especially in areas close to CO sources. Assimilation experiments show that constraining CO close to the main anthropogenic sources significantly reduces errors in NH CO compared to the Control Run. We assess the changes in error reduction when only single satellite instruments are available as compared to the full constellation. We find large differences in how measurements for each continental scale observation system affect the hemispherical improvement in long-range transport patterns, especially due to seasonal cloud cover. A GEO constellation will provide the most efficient constraint on NH CO during winter when CO lifetime is longer and increments from data assimilation associated with source regions are advected further around the globe.

  8. On the feasibility of monitoring carbon monoxide in the lower troposphere from a constellation of northern hemisphere geostationary satellites: Global scale assimilation experiments (Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barré, Jérôme; Edwards, David; Worden, Helen; Arellano, Avelino; Gaubert, Benjamin; Da Silva, Arlindo; Lahoz, William; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the second phase of an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) that utilizes the synthetic measurements from a constellation of satellites measuring atmospheric composition from geostationary (GEO) Earth orbit presented in part I of the study. Our OSSE is focused on carbon monoxide observations over North America, East Asia and Europe where most of the anthropogenic sources are located. Here we assess the impact of a potential GEO constellation on constraining northern hemisphere (NH) carbon monoxide (CO) using data assimilation. We show how cloud cover affects the GEO constellation data density with the largest cloud cover (i.e., lowest data density) occurring during Asian summer. We compare the modeled state of the atmosphere (Control Run), before CO data assimilation, with the known "true" state of the atmosphere (Nature Run) and show that our setup provides realistic atmospheric CO fields and emission budgets. Overall, the Control Run underestimates CO concentrations in the northern hemisphere, especially in areas close to CO sources. Assimilation experiments show that constraining CO close to the main anthropogenic sources significantly reduces errors in NH CO compared to the Control Run. We assess the changes in error reduction when only single satellite instruments are available as compared to the full constellation. We find large differences in how measurements for each continental scale observation system affect the hemispherical improvement in long-range transport patterns, especially due to seasonal cloud cover. A GEO constellation will provide the most efficient constraint on NH CO during winter when CO lifetime is longer and increments from data assimilation associated with source regions are advected further around the globe.

  9. The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) for the GOES-R Series Next Generation Operational Environmental Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard; Koshak, William; Petersen, Walter; Carey, Larry; Mach, Douglas; Buechler, Dennis; Bateman, Monte; McCaul, Eugene; Bruning, Eric; Albrecht, Rachel; MacGorman, Donald

    2010-01-01

    The next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series with a planned launch in 2015 is a follow on to the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. The system will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency. The system provides products including lightning, cloud properties, rainfall rate, volcanic ash, air quality, hurricane intensity, and fire/hot spot characterization. Advancements over current GOES include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the 16-channel Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), an optical transient detector will map total (in-cloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning flashes continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions, from the west coast of Africa (GOES-E) to New Zealand (GOES-W) when the constellation is fully operational. In parallel with the instrument development, a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the higher level algorithms and applications using the GLM alone and decision aids incorporating information from the ABI, ground-based weather radar, and numerical models. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional lightning networks are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. Real time total lightning mapping data are also being provided in an experimental mode to selected National Weather Service (NWS) national centers and forecast offices via

  10. The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) for the GOES-R Series Next Generation Operational Environmental Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Blakeslee, Richard; Koshak, William; Petersen, Walter; Carey, Larry; Mach, Douglas; Buechler, Dennis; Bateman, Monte; McCaul, Eugene; Bruning, Eric; hide

    2010-01-01

    The next generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R) series with a planned launch in 2015 is a follow on to the existing GOES system currently operating over the Western Hemisphere. The system will aid in forecasting severe storms and tornado activity, and convective weather impacts on aviation safety and efficiency. The system provides products including lightning, cloud properties, rainfall rate, volcanic ash, air quality, hurricane intensity, and fire/hot spot characterization. Advancements over current GOES include a new capability for total lightning detection (cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes) from the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), and improved spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the 16-channel Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), an optical transient detector will map total (in-cloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning flashes continuously day and night with near-uniform spatial resolution of 8 km with a product refresh rate of less than 20 sec over the Americas and adjacent oceanic regions, from the west coast of Africa (GOES-E) to New Zealand (GOES-W) when the constellation is fully operational. In parallel with the instrument development, a GOES-R Risk Reduction Team and Algorithm Working Group Lightning Applications Team have begun to develop the higher level algorithms and applications using the GLM alone and decision aids incorporating information from the ABI, ground-based weather radar, and numerical models. Proxy total lightning data from the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and regional lightning networks are being used to develop the pre-launch algorithms and applications, and also improve our knowledge of thunderstorm initiation and evolution. Real time total lightning mapping data are also being provided in an experimental mode to selected National Weather Service (NWS) national centers and forecast offices via

  11. Improved Ozone and Carbon Monoxide Profile Retrievals Using Multispectral Measurements from NASA "A Train", NPP, and TROPOMI Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Bowman, K. W.; Kulawik, S. S.; Miyazaki, K.; Worden, J. R.; Worden, H. M.; Livesey, N. J.; Payne, V.; Luo, M.; Natraj, V.; Veefkind, P.; Aben, I.; Landgraf, J.; Flynn, L. E.; Han, Y.; Liu, X.; Strow, L. L.; Kuai, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is at the juncture of air quality and climate. Ozone directly impacts human and plant health, and directly forces the climate system through absorption of thermal radiation. Carbon monoxide is a chemical precursor of greenhouse gases CO2 and tropospheric O3, and is also an ideal tracer of transport processes due to its medium life time (weeks to months). The Aqua-AIRS and Aura-OMI instruments in the NASA "A-Train", CrIS and OMPS instruments on the NOAA Suomi-NPP, IASI and GOME-2 on METOP and TROPOMI aboard the Sentinel 5 precursor (S5p) have the potential to provide the synoptic chemical and dynamical context for ozone necessary to quantify long-range transport at global scales and to provide an anchor to the near-term constellation of geostationary sounders: NASA TEMPO, ESA Sentinel 4, and the Korean GEMS. We introduce the JPL MUlti-SpEctral, MUlti-SpEcies, MUlti-SatEllite (MUSES) retrieval algorithm, which ingests panspectral observations across multiple platforms in a non-linear optimal estimation framework. MUSES incorporates advances in remote sensing science developed during the EOS-Aura era including rigorous error analysis diagnostics and observation operators needed for trend analysis, climate model evaluation, and data assimilation. Its performance has been demonstrated through prototype studies for multi-satellite missions (AIRS, CrIS, TROPOMI, TES, OMI, and OMPS). We present joint tropospheric ozone retrievals from AIRS/OMI and CrIS/OMPS over global scales, and demonstrate the potential of joint carbon monoxide profiles from TROPOMI/CrIS. These results indicate that ozone can be retrieved with ~2 degrees of freedom for signal (dofs) in the troposphere, which is similar to TES. Joint CO profiles have dofs similar to the MOPITT multispectral retrieval but with higher spatial resolution and coverage. Consequently, multispectral retrievals show promise in providing continuity with NASA EOS observations and pave the way towards a new

  12. The NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS): A Constellation of Bi-static Ocean Scatterometer Microsatellites to Probe the Inner Core of Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, C. S.; Clarizia, M. P.; Ridley, A. J.; Gleason, S.; O'Brien, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) is the first NASA Earth Ventures spaceborne mission. CYGNSS consists of a constellation of eight small observatories carried into orbit on a single launch vehicle. The eight satellites comprise a constellation that flies closely together to measure the ocean surface wind field with unprecedented temporal resolution and spatial coverage, under all precipitating conditions, and over the full dynamic range of wind speeds experienced in a TC. The 8 CYGNSS observatories will fly in 500 km circular orbits at a common inclination of ~35°. Each observatory includes a Delay Doppler Mapping Instrument (DDMI) consisting of a modified GPS receiver capable of measuring surface scattering, a low gain zenith antenna for measurement of the direct GPS signal, and two high gain nadir antennas for measurement of the weaker scattered signal. Each DDMI is capable of measuring 4 simultaneous bi-static reflections, resulting in a total of 32 wind measurements per second across the globe by the full constellation. Simulation studies will be presented which examine the sampling as functions of various orbit parameters of the constellation. For comparison purposes, a similar analysis is conducted using the sampling of several past and present conventional spaceborne ocean wind scatterometers. Differences in the ability of the sensors to resolve the evolution of the TC inner core will be examined. The CYGNSS observatories are currently in Phase C development. An update on the current status of the mission will be presented, including the expected precision, accuracy and spatial and temporal sampling properties of the retrieved winds.

  13. ExoDyn: A Cube-Satellite Constellation for the In-situ Measurement of Upper Atmospheric Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, D.; Nossal, S. M.; Waldrop, L.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Jones, S.; Paschalidis, N.; Bellardo, J.; Nonaka, A.; Hickey, M. P.; Kerr, R. B.; Noto, J.

    2016-12-01

    Based on the recent performance success of the ion/neutral mass spectrometer (INMS) in orbit, onboard the NSF Exocube mission, we present a new mission concept - ExoDyn - to address the long-standing lack of empirical knowledge of neutral dynamics in the topside ionosphere and exosphere. The ExoDyn mission leverages the advance in technical readiness of the INMS sensor with the increasingly cost-efficient potential for small satellite deployment in a constellation formation. Current understanding of the transport of neutrals in the topside ionosphere or exosphere is limited. MSIS modeled neutral exospheric temperatures and densities rely on (among other things) thermospheric (O) thermalization and (O-H) charge exchange continuity assumptions, almost certainly invalid in a collision-less exosphere. We also do not model well the neutral H(z) profiles above the F2 peak, the associated H flux at the exobase, or how these vary with location or geomagnetic storms. The lack of neutral density knowledge at these altitudes conflates peripheral research that relies on (incorrect) model assumptions; e.g., plasmasphere refilling rates are quite sensitive to LEO H and O densities. But observed filling rates do not appear to agree with empirical model predictions. Further, since the neutral hydrogen distribution also controls the loss of H+ and O+, the neutral dynamics also can alter ring current topology, build up and decay rates. While absolute, global, exospheric H density profiles can be obtained by GOES Ly-a absorption profile inversions, the limited temporal coverage gives only approximate bi-annual density profile estimates. Ground-based forward-modelling of Hydrogen fluorescence can give diurnal average H density profiles and exobase flux estimates, but also must be tied to empirical (or model) density measurements to obtain the unique solution (or validate model atmospheric parameters). In-situ measurements of light neutral and ion species densities at LEO, in high

  14. Deep convective cross-tropopause transport in the tropics and evidence by A-Train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Su, S.,; Charvat, Z.; Setvak, M.; Cheng, K.

    2012-04-01

    Cross-tropopause transport by deep convective clouds can be an (and perhaps the most) important source of water vapor in the stratosphere. Our previous studies have verified that deep convective cross-tropopause transport does occur rather regularly in midlatitudes. This transport is demonstrated by the presence of cloud top features of above anvil cirrus plumes and jumping cirrus phenomenon that have been observed by aircraft, satellite and ground-based observations. The present paper will demonstrate that the same mechanism occurs in the tropics. Because the tropics typically have weaker wind shear at the tropopause level, previous observation did not show clear evidence of the presence of such cross-tropopause features. But the recent NSAS A-Train satellites, especially CloudSat, CALIPSO and MODIS, provide both horizontal cloud top and vertical cross-sectional views of the cloud structure and making the identification of such features much less unambiguous. In this study, we will first use cloud resolving model simulations of tropical deep connective storms to show that the gravity wave breaking mechanism and instability will cause moisture (condensed water and vapor) to be transported through the tropopause even in this weaker wind shear environment. Model animations will be shown in the conference. We will then show that the modeled storm top features match well with many recent observations by A-Train satellites. The model results and satellite observations agree not only in morphological similarity but also in the spatial extent and structure in both horizontal and vertical structure. Thus, both the model results and satellite observations demonstrate unambiguously that cross-tropopause transport of water vapor by deep convective clouds in the tropics does occur, and it should be assessed carefully for its global climatic impact.

  15. Tethered constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1986-01-01

    The studies that have been carried out on Tethered Constellations are briefly addressed. A definition of a tethered constellation is any number of masses/platforms greater that two connected by tethers in a stable configuration. Configurations and stability constraints are reviewed. Conclusions reached are: (1) The 1-D, horizontal, passively stabilized constellations have been ruled out; (2) Fishbone constellations have been also ruled out; (3) Alternative stable 2-D configurations have been devised such as the quadrangular configuration stabilized by electrodynamic forces (ESC), the quadrangular configuration stabilized by differential air drag (DSC), and the pseudo elliptical configuration stabilized by electrodynamic forces (PEC). Typical dimensions for these constellations are 10 km (horizontal) by 20 km (vertical) with balloon diameters around 100 m in the case of a DSC and a power consumption around 7 KW for an ESC or PEC.

  16. On the Feasibility of Monitoring Carbon Monoxide in the Lower Troposphere from a Constellation of Northern Hemisphere Geostationary Satellites (PART 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barre, Jerome; Edwards, David; Worden, Helen; Da Silva, Arlindo; Lahoz, William

    2015-01-01

    By the end of the current decade, there are plans to deploy several geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite missions for atmospheric composition over North America, East Asia and Europe with additional missions proposed. Together, these present the possibility of a constellation of geostationary platforms to achieve continuous time-resolved high-density observations over continental domains for mapping pollutant sources and variability at diurnal and local scales. In this paper, we use a novel approach to sample a very high global resolution model (GEOS-5 at 7 km horizontal resolution) to produce a dataset of synthetic carbon monoxide pollution observations representative of those potentially obtainable from a GEO satellite constellation with predicted measurement sensitivities based on current remote sensing capabilities. Part 1 of this study focuses on the production of simulated synthetic measurements for air quality OSSEs (Observing System Simulation Experiments). We simulate carbon monoxide nadir retrievals using a technique that provides realistic measurements with very low computational cost. We discuss the sampling methodology: the projection of footprints and areas of regard for geostationary geometries over each of the North America, East Asia and Europe regions; the regression method to simulate measurement sensitivity; and the measurement error simulation. A detailed analysis of the simulated observation sensitivity is performed, and limitations of the method are discussed. We also describe impacts from clouds, showing that the efficiency of an instrument making atmospheric composition measurements on a geostationary platform is dependent on the dominant weather regime over a given region and the pixel size resolution. These results demonstrate the viability of the "instrument simulator" step for an OSSE to assess the performance of a constellation of geostationary satellites for air quality measurements.

  17. Monitoring of the outer radiation belt with GLONASS - the mid-altitude earth-symmetric multi-satellite constellation: experience and findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Nikolai; Tulupov, Vladimir

    The project consists in the use of several satellites from the 24-birds GLONASS constellation for routine radiation monitoring in the orbit. Rather simple and almost identical particle sensors are used. Lowest reachable L is 4; presented period - 6.5 recent years. Time profiles with pure relativistic-electron component and solar protons are shown and identified. Very low fluxes of all types were observed in 2009. Besides 2009, only slight-to-moderate deviations from the model AE8 we saw in the entire period. Remarkable precision of the satellite positioning in orbit and symmetry of the orbit allow us easily keep watch of the (a)symmetry of the outer radiation belt and thereby, maybe, of this property of geomagnetic field; quasi-static spatial and sometimes even temporal variations are shown and discussed. Also we compare our data with those from GOES, RBSP/VAP and with the field models. High-intensity electron fluxes were found on the declining phase of the solar-activity cycle; similar GOES data are known to have a wide peak at the same phase too. We analyze the situation and investigate if GLONASS electrons behave like the GOES ones or they tend to shift their peak closer to the sunspot numbers' one. General pros and cons of the use of the GLONASS orbit/constellation for the magnetospheric research/monitoring are discussed.

  18. CarbonSat Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Tobehn, Carsten; Ernst, Robert; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John P.; Notholt, John

    1 Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are the most important manmade greenhouse gases (GHGs) which are driving global climate change. Currently, the CO2 measurements from the ground observing network are still the main sources of information but due to the limited number of measurement stations the coverage is limited. In addition, CO2 monitoring and trading is often based mainly on bottom-up calculations and an independent top down verification is limited due to the lack of global measurement data with local resolution. The first CO2 and CH4 mapping from SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT shows that satellites add important missing global information. Current GHG measurement satellites (GOSAT)are limited either in spatial or temporal resolution and coverage. These systems have to collect data over a year or even longer to produce global regional fluxes products. Conse-quently global, timely, higher spatial resolution and high accuracy measurement are required for: 1. A good understanding of the CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks for reliable climate predic-tion; and 2. Independent and transparent verification of accountable sources and sinks in supporting Kyoto and upcoming protocols The CarbonSat constellation idea comes out the trade off of resolution and swath width during CarbonSat mission definition studies. In response to the urgent need to support the Kyoto and upcoming protocols, a feasibility study has been carried out. The proposed solution is a constellation of five CarbonSat satellites in 614km LTAN 13:00, which is able to provide global, daily CO2 and CH4 measurement everywhere on the Earth with high spatial resolution 2 × 2 km and low uncertainty lt;2ppm (CO2) and lt;8ppb (CH4). The unique global daily measurement capability significantly increases the number of cloud free measurements, which enables more reliable services associated with reduced uncertainty, e.g. to 0.15ppm (CO2) per month in 10km and even more timely products. The CarbonSat Constellation in

  19. Investigating cirrus cloud behavior using A-Train and geostationary satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Elizabeth

    Knowledge of how the large-scale dynamics are coupled with microphysical properties is necessary for parameterizing cirrus in climate models. In this study, the synergy of the CloudSat and CALIPSO instruments is exploited for identifying cirrus. Mesoscale-size cirrus events are defined using a combined CloudSat-CALIPSO cloud mask and temperature data for one year in the Atlantic basin. In order to characterize the tendencies of cirrus, the instantaneous view of A-Train satellites is augmented with the temporal view from a geostationary satellite. Cirrus events are tracked using an algorithm, which follows patterns of 6.2μm brightness temperature in consecutive water vapor images. NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data is used to determine the environments in which the cirrus events exist. The cirrus events are sorted based on pressure- radar reflectivity patterns using a k-means cluster algorithm. The six clusters that are identified include Single-Layer Cirrus, Thick Cirrus and Low Cloud, High Cirrus, Deep Cirrus, Mixed Cloud and Thin Cirrus, and Low Cloud. A cluster algorithm is also applied to the large-scale dynamics to determine the basic synoptic states for cirrus. This analysis results in six dynamic clusters including Deep Wave Cirrus, Developing Tropical Cirrus, Subtropical Jet Cirrus, Zonal Jet/Stationary Front Cirrus, Dissipating Tropical Cirrus, and Ridge Crest Cirrus. We find that large-scale dynamic types do not necessarily predetermine the cirrus cloud properties.

  20. Evaluation of radiative heating rate profiles in eight GCMs using A-train satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesana, Gregory; Waliser, D. E.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Jiang, X.; Li, J.-L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we take advantage of two modeling experiments and A-train satellite observations to characterize the impact of cloud biases in the vertical distribution of radiative heating rates in eight general circulation models General Circulation Models (GCMs). We compare the modeled vertical distribution of clouds against the GCM-Oriented Cloud-Aerosols Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations Cloud Product (CALIPSO-GOCCP) using a simulator approach. Although the overall pattern of modeled zonal cloud frequency profiles is relatively good (r=0.92 for the multi-model mean), we show two main systematic biases in the cloud frequency profiles: a positive bias above 7km (up to 10%), particularly in the tropics; and a negative bias below 3km (up to -10%), which reaches a maximum over the stratocumulus cloud regions. Using radiative heating rate profiles calculated with constraints from CloudSat, CALIPSO and other satellite observations, we show that the excess of clouds in the upper troposphere (>7km) results in excess infrared and solar heating in the vicinity of the clouds as well as more infrared heating for the entire column below the cloud. On the other hand, the lack of clouds in the lower troposphere reduces the infrared cooling near the missing cloud levels and increases the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor below. The global radiative heating rate between 50°S and 50°N is too warm in the models (-0.81K/day vs. -1.01K/day). The representation of clouds in GCMs remains challenging, but reducing the cloud biases would lead to an improvement of the heating rate profiles, which in turn would help in improving other aspects of models' simulations such as the dynamics, cloud feedbacks and surface-atmosphere interactions.

  1. Rapid Transpacific Transport in Autumn Observed by the A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li. Can; Hsu, N. Christina; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Liang, Qing; Yang, Kai; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    Transpacific transport of dust and pollutants is well documented for spring, but less so for other seasons. Here we investigate rapid transpacific transport in autumn utilizing the A-train satellites. In three episodes studied as examples, SO2 plumes over East Asia were detected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aboard the Aura satellite, and found to reach North America in 5-6 days. They were likely derived from anthropogenic sources, given that identical transport patterns of CO, a tracer for incomplete combustion, were simultaneously observed by the Aqua satellite. Trajectory analysis and meteorological data were employed to explore the meteorological circumstances surrounding these events: like many of their counterparts in spring, all three plumes were lifted to the free troposphere in warm conveyor belt associated with mid-latitude wave cyclones, and their migration to downwind region was regulated by the meteorology over the East Pacific. These cases provide further evidence that a fraction of S02 could escape wet scavenging, and be transported at much greater efficiency than NOx (NO + N02). An analysis of the S02 and CO data from September to November during 2005-2008 found 16 S02 long-range transport episodes, out of 62 Asian outflow events. While the counts are sensitive to the choice of criteria, they suggest that the long-range transport of Asian sulfur species occurs quite frequently, and could exert strong impacts on large downstream areas. This study also highlights the importance of transpacific transport in autumn, which has thus far been rarely studied and deserves more attention from the community.

  2. Crater Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Cup; abbrev. Crt, gen. Crateris; area 282 sq. deg.) A southern constellation which lies to the south-west of Virgo, and culminates at midnight in mid-March. It represents the cup of the god Apollo in Greek mythology (see Corvus). Its brightest stars were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) in the Almagest....

  3. Dynamic Constellation Tasking and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    constellation of satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) be used by tactical warfighters to collect images of battle space targets for near real-time decision...Constellations James Wertz (2005) provides an overview of five types of responsive orbits (Cobra, Magic, Sun Synchronous , Fast Access, and Repeat Coverage... Orbits ) and their uses. The most important qualities that make a responsive orbit useful are: low cost, good coverage, tactical applications, and

  4. A Numerical Testbed for Remote Sensing of Aerosols, and its Demonstration for Evaluating Retrieval Synergy from a Geostationary Satellite Constellation of GEO-CAPE and GOES-R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Ding, Shouguo; Zeng, Jing; Spurr, Robert; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical testbed for remote sensing of aerosols, together with a demonstration for evaluating retrieval synergy from a geostationary satellite constellation. The testbed combines inverse (optimal-estimation) software with a forward model containing linearized code for computing particle scattering (for both spherical and non-spherical particles), a kernel-based (land and ocean) surface bi-directional reflectance facility, and a linearized radiative transfer model for polarized radiance. Calculation of gas absorption spectra uses the HITRAN (HIgh-resolution TRANsmission molecular absorption) database of spectroscopic line parameters and other trace species cross-sections. The outputs of the testbed include not only the Stokes 4-vector elements and their sensitivities (Jacobians) with respect to the aerosol single scattering and physical parameters (such as size and shape parameters, refractive index, and plume height), but also DFS (Degree of Freedom for Signal) values for retrieval of these parameters. This testbed can be used as a tool to provide an objective assessment of aerosol information content that can be retrieved for any constellation of (planned or real) satellite sensors and for any combination of algorithm design factors (in terms of wavelengths, viewing angles, radiance and/or polarization to be measured or used). We summarize the components of the testbed, including the derivation and validation of analytical formulae for Jacobian calculations. Benchmark calculations from the forward model are documented. In the context of NASA's Decadal Survey Mission GEOCAPE (GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events), we demonstrate the use of the testbed to conduct a feasibility study of using polarization measurements in and around the O2 A band for the retrieval of aerosol height information from space, as well as an to assess potential improvement in the retrieval of aerosol fine and coarse mode aerosol optical depth (AOD) through the

  5. West Antarctic Ice Sheet cloud cover and surface radiation budget from NASA A-Train satellites

    DOE PAGES

    Scott, Ryan C.; Lubin, Dan; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; ...

    2017-04-26

    Clouds are an essential parameter of the surface energy budget influencing the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) response to atmospheric warming and net contribution to global sea-level rise. A four-year record of NASA A-Train cloud observations is combined with surface radiation measurements to quantify the WAIS radiation budget and constrain the three-dimensional occurrence frequency, thermodynamic phase partitioning, and surface radiative effect of clouds over West Antarctica (WA). The skill of satellite-modeled radiative fluxes is confirmed through evaluation against measurements at four Antarctic sites (WAIS Divide Ice Camp, Neumayer, Syowa, and Concordia Stations). And due to perennial high-albedo snow and icemore » cover, cloud infrared emission dominates over cloud solar reflection/absorption leading to a positive net all-wave cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface, with all monthly means and 99.15% of instantaneous CRE values exceeding zero. The annual-mean CRE at theWAIS surface is 34 W m-2, representing a significant cloud-induced warming of the ice sheet. Low-level liquid-containing clouds, including thin liquid water clouds implicated in radiative contributions to surface melting, are widespread and most frequent in WA during the austral summer. Clouds warm the WAIS by 26 W m-2, in summer, on average, despite maximum offsetting shortwave CRE. Glaciated cloud systems are strongly linked to orographic forcing, with maximum incidence on the WAIS continuing downstream along the Transantarctic Mountains.« less

  6. Quantifying Above-Cloud Aerosols through Integrating Multi-Sensor Measurements from A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying above-cloud aerosols can help improve the assessment of aerosol intercontinental transport and climate impacts. Large-scale measurements of aerosol above low-level clouds had been generally unexplored until very recently when CALIPSO lidar started to acquire aerosol and cloud profiles in June 2006. Despite CALIPSO s unique capability of measuring above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD), such observations are substantially limited in spatial coverage because of the lidar s near-zero swath. We developed an approach that integrates measurements from A-Train satellite sensors (including CALIPSO lidar, OMI, and MODIS) to extend CALIPSO above-cloud AOD observations to substantially larger areas. We first examine relationships between collocated CALIPSO above-cloud AOD and OMI absorbing aerosol index (AI, a qualitative measure of AOD for elevated dust and smoke aerosol) as a function of MODIS cloud optical depth (COD) by using 8-month data in the Saharan dust outflow and southwest African smoke outflow regions. The analysis shows that for a given cloud albedo, above-cloud AOD correlates positively with AI in a linear manner. We then apply the derived relationships with MODIS COD and OMI AI measurements to derive above-cloud AOD over the whole outflow regions. In this talk, we will present spatial and day-to-day variations of the above-cloud AOD and the estimated direct radiative forcing by the above-cloud aerosols.

  7. Constellation Design of Geosynchronous Navigation Satellites Which Maximizes Availability and Accuracy Over a Specified Region of the Earth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    01 Abstract Currently, there are four Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) either being developed or in existence- GPS , GLONASS, Compass, and...126 viii List of Figures Figure Page 1.1. The candidate region for the navigation service . . . . . . . . . 7 2.1. Nominal GPS ...50 Cf Cost Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 WGDOP GDOP Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

  8. The CEOS Atmospheric Composition Constellation (ACC), an Integrated Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Langen, J.; Zehner, C.

    2008-05-01

    participating space agencies. These include 1) Time of day changes in NO2 using Aura/OMI and Metop/GOME-2. 2) Near-real-time fire detection and smoke forecasts using multiple satellites (A-Train, GOES, GOME-2, MSG, etc) and trajectory model, and 3) Improved volcanic ash alerts for aviation hazard avoidance from satellite SO2 and ash data from SCIAMACHY, OMI, GOME-2, AIRS and SEVIRI. Each of the three projects will address the GEO SBAs with consideration to discovery and interoperability of their data products. The status of the ACC studies will be reviewed with a progress report on the above three projects.

  9. WorldView-2 and the evolution of the DigitalGlobe remote sensing satellite constellation: introductory paper for the special session on WorldView-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Neal T.; Marchisio, Giovanni B.

    2012-06-01

    Over the last decade DigitalGlobe (DG) has built and launched a series of remote sensing satellites with steadily increasing capabilities: QuickBird, WorldView-1 (WV-1), and WorldView-2 (WV-2). Today, this constellation acquires over 2.5 million km2 of imagery on a daily basis. This paper presents the configuration and performance capabilities of each of these satellites, with emphasis on the unique spatial and spectral capabilities of WV-2. WV-2 employs high-precision star tracker and inertial measurement units to achieve a geolocation accuracy of 5 m Circular Error, 90% confidence (CE90). The native resolution of WV-2 is 0.5 m GSD in the panchromatic band and 2 m GSD in 8 multispectral bands. Four of the multispectral bands match those of the Landsat series of satellites; four new bands enable novel and expanded applications. We are rapidly establishing and refreshing a global database of very high resolution (VHR) 8-band multispectral imagery. Control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) on both WV-1 and WV-2 improve collection capacity and provide the agility to capture multi-angle sequences in rapid succession. These capabilities result in a rich combination of image features that can be exploited to develop enhanced monitoring solutions. Algorithms for interpretation and analysis can leverage: 1) broader and more continuous spectral coverage at 2 m resolution; 2) textural and morphological information from the 0.5 m panchromatic band; 3) ancillary information from stereo and multi-angle collects, including high precision digital elevation models; 4) frequent revisits and time-series collects; and 5) the global reference image archives. We introduce the topic of creative fusion of image attributes, as this provides a unifying theme for many of the papers in this WV-2 Special Session.

  10. Multi-CubeSat Deployment Strategies: How Different Satellite Deployment Schemes Affect Satellite Separation and Detection for Various Types of Constellations and Missions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    are composed of one or more ten-centimeter cubes combined together to form the structure of a satellite.4,5 CubeSats are popular because, when...provide context on the problems that current deployments are facing . Chapter 2 also provides information on the history of astrodynamics and the...different deployment schemes and their effects on both near and long term satellite dynamics must be well understood. CubeSats are a rapidly growing

  11. Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from A-Train Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Jian; Houze, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropics produce extensive anvil clouds, which significantly affect the transfer of radiation. This study develops an objective method to identify MCSs and their anvils by combining data from three A-train satellite instruments: Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for cloud-top size and coldness, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) for rain area size and intensity, and CloudSat for horizontal and vertical dimensions of anvils. The authors distinguish three types of MCSs: small and large separated MCSs and connected MCSs. The latter are MCSs sharing a contiguous rain area. Mapping of the objectively identified MCSs shows patterns of MCSs that are consistent with previous studies of tropical convection, with separated MCSs dominant over Africa and the Amazon regions and connected MCSs favored over the warm pool of the Indian and west Pacific Oceans. By separating the anvil from the raining regions of MCSs, this study leads to quantitative global maps of anvil coverage. These maps are consistent with the MCS analysis, and they lay the foundation for estimating the global radiative effects of anvil clouds. CloudSat radar data show that the modal thickness of MCS anvils is about 4-5 km. Anvils are mostly confined to within 1.5-2 times the equivalent radii of the primary rain areas of the MCSs. Over the warm pool, they may extend out to about 5 times the rain area radii. The warm ocean MCSs tend to have thicker non-raining and lightly raining anvils near the edges

  12. Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from A-Train Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Jian; Houze, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropics produce extensive anvil clouds, which significantly affect the transfer of radiation. This study develops an objective method to identify MCSs and their anvils by combining data from three A-train satellite instruments: Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for cloud-top size and coldness, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) for rain area size and intensity, and CloudSat for horizontal and vertical dimensions of anvils. The authors distinguish three types of MCSs: small and large separated MCSs and connected MCSs. The latter are MCSs sharing a contiguous rain area. Mapping of the objectively identified MCSs shows patterns of MCSs that are consistent with previous studies of tropical convection, with separated MCSs dominant over Africa and the Amazon regions and connected MCSs favored over the warm pool of the Indian and west Pacific Oceans. By separating the anvil from the raining regions of MCSs, this study leads to quantitative global maps of anvil coverage. These maps are consistent with the MCS analysis, and they lay the foundation for estimating the global radiative effects of anvil clouds. CloudSat radar data show that the modal thickness of MCS anvils is about 4-5 km. Anvils are mostly confined to within 1.5-2 times the equivalent radii of the primary rain areas of the MCSs. Over the warm pool, they may extend out to about 5 times the rain area radii. The warm ocean MCSs tend to have thicker non-raining and lightly raining anvils near the edges

  13. Post-disposal orbital evolution of satellites and upper stages used by the GPS and GLONASS navigation constellations: The long-term impact on the Medium Earth Orbit environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano

    2012-08-01

    The long-term evolution and environmental impact in MEO of all the abandoned spacecraft and upper stages associated with the GPS and GLONASS navigation constellations were analyzed. The orbits of the disposed objects, as of 1 May 2011, were propagated for 200 years and snapshots of their evolving distribution were obtained, together with an estimation of the changing collision probability with the spacecraft of the operational navigation systems existing or planned in MEO, i.e., GLONASS, GPS, Beidou and Galileo. The probability that the abandoned objects considered will collide with the operational spacecraft of the navigation constellations is very low, even taking into account the intrinsic eccentricity instability of the disposal orbits. Assuming the present or envisaged configuration of the constellations in MEO, the probability of collision, integrated over 200 years, would be <1/300 with a GLONASS spacecraft, <1/15,000 with a GPS or Beidou spacecraft, and <1/250,000 with a Galileo spacecraft. The worst disposal strategy consists in abandoning satellites and upper stages close to the altitude of the operational constellation (GLONASS), while a re-orbiting a few hundred km away (GPS) is able to guarantee an effective long-term dilution of the collision risk, irrespective of the eccentricity instability due to geopotential and luni-solar perturbations. The disposal strategies applied so far to the GPS satellites should be able to guarantee for at least a few centuries a sustainable MEO environment free of collisions among intact objects. Consequently, there would be no need to adopt disposal schemes targeting also the optimal value of the eccentricity vector. However, it should be pointed out that the GPS disposal strategy was devised well in advance of the Beidou constellation announcement, so most of the abandoned satellites were re-orbited fairly close to the altitude of the new Chinese system. A new re-orbiting approach will be therefore needed in the future.

  14. Egyptian Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lull, José; Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    The ancient Egyptians had a wide range of constellations, which populated the skies of ancient Egypt (see Chap. 133, "Orientation of Egyptian Temples: An Overview", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_146) for more than three millennia, whose knowledge has come to us through lists of stars and other representations which have mainly appeared in a dozen of coffins, a few clepsydrae, and a good set of astronomical ceilings. Hence, by making very simple assumptions and using the information provided by the ancient Egyptian sky-watchers, it is possible to uncover a great part of the ancient Egyptian firmament. This celestial tapestry was populated by the images of animals, symbols, and divinities that were most significant in understanding the Egyptian interpretation of the cosmos.

  15. MISTiC Winds, a Micro-Satellite Constellation Approach to High Resolution Observations of the Atmosphere using Infrared Sounding and 3D Winds Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Susskind, J.; Aumann, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    MISTiCTM Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiC's extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sun-synchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenas-at much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  16. MISTiC Winds: A micro-satellite constellation approach to high resolution observations of the atmosphere using infrared sounding and 3D winds measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Aumann, H. H.; Susskind, J.

    2016-09-01

    MISTiCTM Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiC's extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sunsynchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's AIRS that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenas-at much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key remaining technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  17. MISTiC Winds, a Micro-Satellite Constellation Approach to High Resolution Observations of the Atmosphere Using Infrared Sounding and 3D Winds Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maschhoff, K. R.; Polizotti, J. J.; Aumann, H. H.; Susskind, J.

    2016-01-01

    MISTiC(TM) Winds is an approach to improve short-term weather forecasting based on a miniature high resolution, wide field, thermal emission spectrometry instrument that will provide global tropospheric vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and humidity at high (3-4 km) horizontal and vertical ( 1 km) spatial resolution. MISTiCs extraordinarily small size, payload mass of less than 15 kg, and minimal cooling requirements can be accommodated aboard a 27U-class CubeSat or an ESPA-Class micro-satellite. Low fabrication and launch costs enable a LEO sunsynchronous sounding constellation that would collectively provide frequent IR vertical profiles and vertically resolved atmospheric motion vector wind observations in the troposphere. These observations are highly complementary to present and emerging environmental observing systems, and would provide a combination of high vertical and horizontal resolution not provided by any other environmental observing system currently in operation. The spectral measurements that would be provided by MISTiC Winds are similar to those of NASA's AIRS that was built by BAE Systems and operates aboard the AQUA satellite. These new observations, when assimilated into high resolution numerical weather models, would revolutionize short-term and severe weather forecasting, save lives, and support key economic decisions in the energy, air transport, and agriculture arenasat much lower cost than providing these observations from geostationary orbit. In addition, this observation capability would be a critical tool for the study of transport processes for water vapor, clouds, pollution, and aerosols. Key remaining technical risks are being reduced through laboratory and airborne testing under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program.

  18. Flying the Earth Observing Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Case, Warren F.

    2004-01-01

    Prior to the launch of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Landsat-7 satellites in 1999, the Project Scientists for the two missions and the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center signed an inter-project agreement document describing their plan to fly in loose formation, approximately 20 minutes within each other. In November 2000, a technology demonstration satellite, Earth Observer-1 (EO-1), was launched into the same orbit as that of Landsat-7 and Terra, with a goal of flying within a minute from Landsat-7. The SAC-C satellite, developed and operated by the government of Argentina, was launched along with EO-1, with a goal of flying near both Terra and Landsat-7. This formation enables the scientists to make use of the scientific synergy among the instruments on the different spacecraft. This group of satellites constitutes the morning constellation, which is led by the Landsat-7, which has a mean local time (MLT) at 10:00 a.m. In May 2002, the EOS Aqua satellite was launched into an orbit with an altitude of 705 km. and a 1:30 p.m. MLT. Two smaller satellites, CALIPSO (a joint U.S./French mission), and CloudSat (a joint NASA/Colorado State University/Air Force mission), plan to fly in tight formation, within 15 seconds of each other. In addition, CALIPSO and CloudSat also plan to be within 30 to 60 seconds of the Aqua satellite. A third satellite, PARASOL, managed by the French Space Agency, CNES, will be placed within a minute of the CALIPSO satellite. In 2004, the Aura satellite will be launched and phased in relation to the Aqua satellite, such that the instruments on Aura will be able to view the same mass of air no later than 8 minutes after the instruments on Aqua have observed it. Representatives from each mission are currently documenting a plan on how they will coordinate on-orbit operations. Why are all these satellites planning to fly as a constellation? The answer is that as a

  19. The role of satellite observations through the whole disaster monitoring cycle: the impact of new satellite constellations and of collaborative approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzi, Stefano; Candela, Laura

    2013-04-01

    The contribution of satellite observations to the complete disaster monitoring cycle is to day not fully demonstrated. Several isolated examples exist for the monitoring of the various phases of a disaster cycle. None of them is showing the full capability of satellite observations to contribute to the whole cycle. Recent more open-minded approaches, based on a collaborative use of satellite resources and observation capabilities, show a promise of an improved availability of satellite observations to support the whole disaster monitoring cycle. Several initiatives pave the way towards a more effective and enlarged use of satellite observations in this domain. The International Charter for disaster monitoring, created in 1998 by CNES and ESA, has been extremely effective in demonstrating the interest of satellite observations in the post-event activities but, by itself, it falls short of demonstrating an operational, long term and sustainable contribution of satellite data to the complete disaster monitoring cycle. CEOS has since long attempted a system approach to disaster monitoring, and its recent "Consensus Report" of the ad hoc disaster team shows clearly how a collaborative approach, organizing the potential contributions of different missions and actors, may well provide a more consistent and sustained response to the requirements expressed by stakeholders and actors. GEO has sponsored some important activities, also supported by CEOS and a plethora of actors in the field: the science oriented GEO-hazards supersites initiative is undoubtedly one of the most promising efforts of coordination in the domain. The paper will introduce the opportunities offered by the GMES Collaborative Ground Segment to develop sustainable EO-based services to be operated at national level. These initiatives show the importance of coordination and of the need for a sustained access to several data sources, in order to meet the requirements of the disaster monitoring cycle. The

  20. Global Coverage from Ad-Hoc Constellations in Rideshare Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Armin; Mercury, Michael; Brown, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    A promising area of small satellite development is in providing higher temporal resolution than larger satellites. Traditional constellations have required specific orbits and dedicated launch vehicles. In this paper we discuss an alternative architecture in which the individual elements of the constellation are launched as rideshare opportunities. We compare the coverage of such an ad-hoc constellation with more traditional constellations. Coverage analysis is based on actual historical data from rideshare opportunities. Our analysis includes ground coverage and temporal revisits for Polar, Tropics, Temperate, and Global regions, comparing ad-hoc and Walker constellation.

  1. Global Coverage from Ad-Hoc Constellations in Rideshare Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Armin; Mercury, Michael; Brown, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    A promising area of small satellite development is in providing higher temporal resolution than larger satellites. Traditional constellations have required specific orbits and dedicated launch vehicles. In this paper we discuss an alternative architecture in which the individual elements of the constellation are launched as rideshare opportunities. We compare the coverage of such an ad-hoc constellation with more traditional constellations. Coverage analysis is based on actual historical data from rideshare opportunities. Our analysis includes ground coverage and temporal revisits for Polar, Tropics, Temperate, and Global regions, comparing ad-hoc and Walker constellation.

  2. The 3-D lattice theory of Flower Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jeremy J.; Avendaño, Martín E.; Mortari, Daniele

    2013-08-01

    Flower Constellations (FCs) have been extensively studied for use in optimal constellation design. The Harmonic FCs (HFCs) subset, representing the symmetric configurations, have recently been reformulated into 2-D Lattice Flower Constellations (2D-LFCs), encompassing the complete set of HFCs. Elliptic orbits are generally avoided due to the deleterious effects of Earth's oblateness on the constellation, but here we present a novel concept for avoiding this problem and enabling more effective global coverage utilizing elliptic orbits. This new 3D Lattice Flower Constellations (3D-LFCs) framework generalizes the 2D-LFCs, Walker constellations, elliptical Walker constellations, and many of Draim's global coverage constellations. Previous studies have shown FCs can provide improved performance in global navigation over existing Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). We found a 3D-LFC design that improved the average positioning accuracy by 3.5 % while reducing launch \\varDelta v requirements when compared to the existing Galileo GNSS constellation.

  3. Interactions of the space debris environment with mega constellations-Using the example of the OneWeb constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, Jonas; Kebschull, Christopher; Stoll, Enrico

    2017-02-01

    Recently, several announcements have been published to deploy satellite constellations into Low Earth Orbit (LEO) containing several hundred to thousands of rather small sized objects. The purpose of these constellations is to provide a worldwide internet coverage, even to the remotest areas. Examples of these mega-constellations are one from SpaceX, which is announced to comprise of about 4000 satellites, the Norwegian STEAM network, which is told to contain 4257 satellites, and the OneWeb constellation, which forms one of the smaller constellations with 720 satellites. As example constellation, OneWeb has been chosen. From all announced constellation, OneWeb by far delivered most information, both in regards to constellation design and their plans to encounter space debris issues, which is the reason why it has been chosen for these analyses. In this paper, at first an overview of the planned OneWeb constellation setup is given. From this description, a mission life-cycle is deduced, splitting the complete orbital lifetime of the satellites into four phases. Following, using ESA-MASTER, for each of the mission phases the flux on both single constellations satellites and the complete constellation are performed and the collision probabilities are derived. The focus in this analysis is set on catastrophic collisions. This analysis is then varied parametrically for different operational altitudes of the constellation as well as different lifetimes with different assumptions for the success of post mission disposal (PMD). Following the to-be-expected mean number of collision avoidance manoeuvres during all active mission phases is performed using ARES from ESA's DRAMA tool suite. The same variations as during the flux analysis are considered. Lastly the characteristics of hypothetical OneWeb satellite fragmentation clouds, calculated using the NASA Breakup model, are described and the impact of collision clouds from OneWeb satellites on the constellation itself is

  4. The BRITE Nanosatellite Constellation Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Alexander; Weiss, Werner; Moffat, Anthony; Zee, Robert E.; Rucinski, Slavek; Mochnacki, Stefan; Matthews, Jaymie; Breger, Michel; Kuschnig, Rainer; Koudelka, Otto; Orleanski, Piotr; Pamyatnykh, Alexei; Pigulski, Andrzej; Grant, Cordell

    BRITE Constellation, short for "BRIght Target Explorer Constellation," is a group of six seven-kilogram nanosatellites from Austria, Poland and Canada carrying three-centimeter aperture optical telescopes. The purpose of the mission is to photometrically measure low-level oscilla-tions and temperature variations in the sky's 286 stars brighter than visual magnitude 3.5, with unprecedented precision and time sampling not achievable through terrestrial-based methods. These stars turn out, for the most part, to be among the most luminous -either massive stars during their whole lifetimes or medium-mass stars at the very end of their nuclear burning phases. Such stars dominate the ecology of the Universe and the current massive ones are believed to represent the lower mass-range of the first stars ever formed (although long gone from the local Universe). Astronomers are eager to measure the variable behavior of lumi-nous stars in order to explore their inner workings in a unique way. BRITE Constellation will investigate the role that stellar winds play in setting up future stellar life cycles, and will measure pulsations to probe the histories and ages of luminous stars through asteroseismology. The three-axis pointing performance (1 arcminute RMS stability) of each BRITE satellite is a significant advancement by the University of Toronto's Space Flight Laboratory over any-thing that has ever flown before on a nanosatellite, and is a critical element that enables the high precision photometry mission. The University of Vienna and FFG/ALR (Austria's space agency) are financing the development of two satellites and development is nearing completion. The Polish Academy of Sciences is preparing two additional satellites. The Canadian Space Agency is also expected to fund two satellites in the constellation. This paper will summarize the science objectives of the mission and describe the progress to date.

  5. Debris environment interactions with low Earth orbit constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Robert; Bade, Anette; Siebold, Karl; Johnson, Nicholas

    1997-01-01

    Several low earth orbit communication satellite constellations are planned. Due to their size and complexity, these constellations potentially contribute to the orbital debris environment. The results of a parametric assessment of the impact of low earth orbit constellations on the orbital debris environment are presented. The increase in loss rate of non constellation spacecraft is considered, as well as the increase in the loss rate or replacement rate of constellation satellites as a result of debris impact. Primary parameters in the analysis are the number, size and altitude of the constellation. Parameters are defined for the vulnerable area of loss of spacecraft and the disposition of constellation spacecraft at the end of its life.

  6. The CEOS constellation for land surface imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, G.B.; Berger, M.; Jeanjean, H.; Gallo, K.P.

    2007-01-01

    A constellation of satellites that routinely and frequently images the Earth's land surface in consistently calibrated wavelengths from the visible through the microwave and in spatial detail that ranges from sub-meter to hundreds of meters would offer enormous potential benefits to society. A well-designed and effectively operated land surface imaging satellite constellation could have great positive impact not only on the quality of life for citizens of all nations, but also on mankind's very ability to sustain life as we know it on this planet long into the future. The primary objective of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellation is to define standards (or guidelines) that describe optimal future LSI Constellation capabilities, characteristics, and practices. Standards defined for a LSI Constellation will be based on a thorough understanding of user requirements, and they will address at least three fundamental areas of the systems comprising a Land Surface Imaging Constellation: the space segments, the ground segments, and relevant policies and plans. Studies conducted by the LSI Constellation Study Team also will address current and shorter-term problems and issues facing the land remote sensing community today, such as seeking ways to work more cooperatively in the operation of existing land surface imaging systems and helping to accomplish tangible benefits to society through application of land surface image data acquired by existing systems. 2007 LSI Constellation studies are designed to establish initial international agreements, develop preliminary standards for a mid-resolution land surface imaging constellation, and contribute data to a global forest assessment.

  7. Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ecuyer, Tristan L.; Zhang, Kai; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.; Marchand, Roger; Chand, Duli; Qian, Yun; Penner, Joyce E.

    2012-08-15

    Aerosol indirect effects have remained the largest uncertainty in estimates of the radiative forcing of past and future climate change. Observational constraints on cloud lifetime effects are particularly challenging since it is difficult to separate aerosol effects from meteorological influences. Here we use three global climate models, including a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF, to show that the dependence of the probability of precipitation on aerosol loading, termed the precipitation frequency susceptibility (S{sub pop}), is a good measure of the liquid water path response to aerosol perturbation ({lambda}), as both Spop and {lambda} strongly depend on the magnitude of autoconversion, a model representation of precipitation formation via collisions among cloud droplets. This provides a method to use satellite observations to constrain cloud lifetime effects in global climate models. S{sub pop} in marine clouds estimated from CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E observations is substantially lower than that from global climate models and suggests a liquid water path increase of less than 5% from doubled cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. This implies a substantially smaller impact on shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF) over ocean due to aerosol indirect effects than simulated by current global climate models (a reduction by one-third for one of the conventional aerosol-climate models). Further work is needed to quantify the uncertainties in satellite-derived estimates of S{sub pop} and to examine S{sub pop} in high-resolution models.

  8. Marine boundary layer structure as observed by A-train satellites

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Tao; Wang, Zhien; Zhang, Damao; ...

    2016-05-13

    The marine boundary layer (MBL) structure is important to the marine low cloud processes, and the exchange of heat, momentum, and moisture between oceans and the low atmosphere. This study examines the MBL structure over the eastern Pacific region and further explores the controlling factors of MBL structure over the global oceans with a new 4-year satellite-based data set. The MBL top (boundary layer height, BLH) and the mixing layer height (MLH) were identified using the MBL aerosol lidar backscattering from the CALIPSO (Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations). Results showed that the MBL is generally decoupled with MLH ∕ BLHmore » ratio ranging from  ∼  0.5 to  ∼  0.8 over the eastern Pacific Ocean region. The MBL decoupling magnitude is mainly controlled by estimated inversion strength (EIS), which in turn controls the cloud top entrainment process. The systematic differences between drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus tops also show dependence on EIS. This may be related to the meso-scale circulations or gravity wave in the MBL. Further analysis indicates that the MBL shows a similar decoupled structure for clear-sky and cumulus-cloud-topped conditions, but is better mixed under stratiform cloud breakup and overcast conditions.« less

  9. Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven; Liu, Xiaohong; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Zhang, Kai; Morrison, Hugh; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard; Marchand, Roger; Chand, Duli; Qian, Yun; Penner, Joyce E.

    2012-08-01

    Aerosol indirect effects have remained the largest uncertainty in estimates of the radiative forcing of past and future climate change. Observational constraints on cloud lifetime effects are particularly challenging since it is difficult to separate aerosol effects from meteorological influences. Here we use three global climate models, including a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF, to show that the dependence of the probability of precipitation on aerosol loading, termed the precipitation frequency susceptibility (Spop), is a good measure of the liquid water path response to aerosol perturbation (λ), as both Spop and λ strongly depend on the magnitude of autoconversion, a model representation of precipitation formation via collisions among cloud droplets. This provides a method to use satellite observations to constrain cloud lifetime effects in global climate models. Spop in marine clouds estimated from CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E observations is substantially lower than that from global climate models and suggests a liquid water path increase of less than 5% from doubled cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. This implies a substantially smaller impact on shortwave cloud radiative forcing over ocean due to aerosol indirect effects than simulated by current global climate models (a reduction by one-third for one of the conventional aerosol-climate models). Further work is needed to quantify the uncertainties in satellite-derived estimates of Spop and to examine Spop in high-resolution models.

  10. Marine boundary layer structure as observed by A-train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao; Wang, Zhien; Zhang, Damao; Chen, Bing

    2016-05-01

    The marine boundary layer (MBL) structure is important to the marine low cloud processes, and the exchange of heat, momentum, and moisture between oceans and the low atmosphere. This study examines the MBL structure over the eastern Pacific region and further explores the controlling factors of MBL structure over the global oceans with a new 4-year satellite-based data set. The MBL top (boundary layer height, BLH) and the mixing layer height (MLH) were identified using the MBL aerosol lidar backscattering from the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations). Results showed that the MBL is generally decoupled with MLH / BLH ratio ranging from ˜ 0.5 to ˜ 0.8 over the eastern Pacific Ocean region. The MBL decoupling magnitude is mainly controlled by estimated inversion strength (EIS), which in turn controls the cloud top entrainment process. The systematic differences between drizzling and non-drizzling stratocumulus tops also show dependence on EIS. This may be related to the meso-scale circulations or gravity wave in the MBL. Further analysis indicates that the MBL shows a similar decoupled structure for clear-sky and cumulus-cloud-topped conditions, but is better mixed under stratiform cloud breakup and overcast conditions.

  11. Global Carbon Monoxide Products from Combined AIRS, TES and MLS Measurements on A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Juying X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attie, J. L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background modelbased field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  12. Global carbon monoxide products from combined AIRS, TES and MLS measurements on A-train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J. X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attié, J.-L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2013-06-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite datasets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background model-based field is replaced by a satellite dataset, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these datasets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS/TES and AIRS/MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only retrievals, and improved coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  13. Global carbon monoxide products from combined AIRS, TES and MLS measurements on A-train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J. X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attié, J.-L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background model-based field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  14. Flower Constellations as rigid objects in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortari, Daniele

    2006-08-01

    This paper summarizes the findings and the research status on Flower Constellations, a novel and revolutionary way to design satellite constellations that has been discovered and proposed at Texas A&M University. The theory of Flower Constellations is a natural consequence of the theory of compatible (or resonant) orbits. The most surprising aspect of the Flower Constellations is that the satellite distribution identifies the edges of rotating figures whose shapes are time invariant. The complex synchronized dynamics of the satellites preserves the shape of a space object. The whole Flower Constellation is an axial-symmetric rigid object in space that is spinning with prescribed angular velocity. The shape of this object can be deformed by playing with the Flower Constellation design parameters, and the object's axis of symmetry can be set to point to any inertial direction. In particular, when the axis of symmetry is aligned with the Earth's spin axis, the J2 linear-dominant effect is identical for all the orbits. In this case, the J2 effect deforms the object shape while preserving the axial-symmetry.

  15. Climatology of cloud water content associated with different cloud types observed by A-Train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wang, Zhien; Su, Hui; Deng, Min; Massie, Steven

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the climatology of vertical distributions of cloud liquid water content, ice water content, and cloud fraction (CFR) associated with eight different cloud types, by utilizing the combined CloudSat radar and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations lidar measurements. The geographical and seasonal variations of these cloud properties for each cloud type are also analyzed. The cloud water content (CWC) of each cloud type is sorted by three parameters obtained from colocated satellite observations to investigate the relationships between large-scale conditions and the vertical structure of clouds. Results show that different cloud types have different altitudes of CWC and CFR peaks, and the altitude of CFR peak does not always overlap with that of CWC peak. Each type of cloud shows a clear asymmetric pattern of spatial distribution between Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH). Stratocumulus and stratus clouds make the greatest contribution to the liquid water path, while the ice water path is mostly contributed by deep convective cloud over the tropics and nimbostratus over the middle and high latitudes. Over both middle and high latitudes, clouds have larger seasonal variation in the NH than in the SH. Over ocean, large CWCs of deep convective cloud, cirrus, and altostratus are above 7 km, and are associated with high convective available potential energy (>2000 J/kg), warm sea surface temperature (>303 K), and relatively high precipitation (>1 mm/h). Over land, most of the middle and high clouds have similar CWC distributions compared to those over ocean, but altocumulus and low clouds are quite different from those over ocean.

  16. Improved Ozone Profile Retrievals Using Multispectral Measurements from NASA 'A Train' Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Worden, J.; Livesey, N. J.; Irion, F. W.; Schwartz, M. J.; Bowman, K. W.; Pawson, S.; Wargan, K.

    2013-12-01

    Ozone, a radiatively and chemically important trace gas, plays various roles in different altitude ranges in the atmosphere. In the stratosphere, it absorbs the solar UV radiation from the Sun and protects us from sunburn and skin cancers. In the upper troposphere, ozone acts as greenhouse gas. Ozone in the middle troposphere reacts with many anthropogenic pollutants and cleans up the atmosphere. Near surface ozone is harmful to human health and plant life. Accurate monitoring of ozone vertical distributions is crucial for a better understanding of air quality and climate change. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are both in orbit on the Earth Observing System Aura satellite and are providing ozone concentration profile measurements. MLS observes limb signals from 118 GHz to 2.5 THz, and measures upper tropospheric and stratospheric ozone concentration (among many other species) with a vertical resolution of about 3 km. OMI is a nadir-viewing pushbroom ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) imaging spectrograph that measures backscattered radiances covering the 270-500 nm wavelength range. AIRS is a grating spectrometer, on EOS Aqua satellite, that measures the thermal infrared (TIR) radiances emitted by Earth's surface and by gases and particles in the spectral range 650 - 2665 cm-1. We present an approach to combine simultaneously measured UV and TIR radiances together with the retrieved MLS ozone fields, to improve the ozone sounding. This approach has the potential to provide a decadal record of ozone profiles with an improved spatial coverage and vertical resolution from space missions. For evaluating the quality of retrieved profiles, we selected a set of AIRS and OMI measurements, whose ground pixels were collocated with ozonesonde launch sites. The results from combination of these measurements are presented and discussed. The improvements on vertical resolution of tropospheric ozone profiles from the MLS/AIRS/OMI joint

  17. Revisiting the iris effect of tropical cirrus clouds with TRMM and A-Train satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Sang; Kim, WonMoo; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Masunaga, Hirohiko; Kwon, Min-Jae; Jo, Hyun-Su; Huang, Lei

    2017-06-01

    Just as the iris of human eye controls the light influx (iris effect), tropical anvil cirrus clouds may regulate the Earth's surface warming by controlling outgoing longwave radiation. This study examines this possible effect with monthly satellite observations such as Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer cirrus fraction, and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System top-of-the-atmosphere radiative fluxes averaged over different tropical domains from March 2000 to October 2014. To confirm that high-level cirrus is relevant to this study, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization high cloud observations were also analyzed from June 2006 to December 2015. Our analysis revealed that the increase in sea surface temperature in the tropical western Pacific tends to concentrate convective cloud systems. This concentration effect very likely induces the significant reduction of both stratiform rain rate and cirrus fraction, without appreciable change in the convective rain rate. This reduction of stratiform rain rate and cirrus fraction cannot be found over its subregion or the tropical eastern Pacific, where the concentration effect of anvil cirrus is weak. Consistently, over the tropical western Pacific, the higher ratio of convective rain rate to total rain rate (i.e., precipitation efficiency) significantly correlates with warmer sea surface temperature and lower cirrus fraction. The reduced cirrus eventually increased outgoing longwave radiation to a greater degree than absorbed solar radiation. Finally, the negative relationship between precipitation efficiency and cirrus fraction tends to correspond to a low global equilibrium climate sensitivity in the models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5. This suggests that tropical anvil cirrus clouds exert a negative climate feedback in strong association with precipitation efficiency.

  18. Optimizing Spacecraft Placement for Liaison Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, C. Channing; Villac, Benjamin F.; Lo, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    A navigation and communications network is proposed to support an anticipated need for infrastructure in the Earth-Moon system. Periodic orbits will host the constellations while a novel, autonomous navigation strategy will guide the spacecraft along their path strictly based on satellite-to-satellite telemetry. In particular, this paper investigates the second stage of a larger constellation optimization scheme for multi-spacecraft systems. That is, following an initial orbit down-selection process, this analysis provides insights into the ancillary problem of spacecraft placement. Two case studies are presented that consider configurations of up to four spacecraft for a halo orbit and a cycler trajectory.

  19. Optimizing Spacecraft Placement for Liaison Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, C. Channing; Villac, Benjamin F.; Lo, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    A navigation and communications network is proposed to support an anticipated need for infrastructure in the Earth-Moon system. Periodic orbits will host the constellations while a novel, autonomous navigation strategy will guide the spacecraft along their path strictly based on satellite-to-satellite telemetry. In particular, this paper investigates the second stage of a larger constellation optimization scheme for multi-spacecraft systems. That is, following an initial orbit down-selection process, this analysis provides insights into the ancillary problem of spacecraft placement. Two case studies are presented that consider configurations of up to four spacecraft for a halo orbit and a cycler trajectory.

  20. BRITE-Constellation: Science Operations Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuschnig, R.

    2008-01-01

    The BRITE-Constellation currently consists of two nano-satellites: BRITE-AUSTRIA and Uni-BRITE. Both are in principle of identical build with one exception, the respective telescopes will be designed for two different bandpasses one constrained to RED (555-690nm) and the other to BLUE (400-450nm) wavelengths. In general both satellites will collect data from the same stars during any particular observing run. A proposal to build and launch an additional pair of spacecrafts to complement the constellation is currently under review. This article describes the organization structure, the main operations tasks and the software tools to conduct the mission.

  1. Capacity Maximizing Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged; Jones, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Some non-traditional signal constellations have been proposed for transmission of data over the Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) channel using such channel-capacity-approaching codes as low-density parity-check (LDPC) or turbo codes. Computational simulations have shown performance gains of more than 1 dB over traditional constellations. These gains could be translated to bandwidth- efficient communications, variously, over longer distances, using less power, or using smaller antennas. The proposed constellations have been used in a bit-interleaved coded modulation system employing state-ofthe-art LDPC codes. In computational simulations, these constellations were shown to afford performance gains over traditional constellations as predicted by the gap between the parallel decoding capacity of the constellations and the Gaussian capacity

  2. Multiple Autonomous Discrete Event Controllers for Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, Timothy C.

    2003-01-01

    The Multiple Autonomous Discrete Event Controllers for Constellations (MADECC) project is an effort within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Information Systems Division to develop autonomous positioning and attitude control for constellation satellites. It will be accomplished using traditional control theory and advanced coordination algorithms developed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). This capability will be demonstrated in the discrete event control test-bed located at JHU/APL. This project will be modeled for the Leonardo constellation mission, but is intended to be adaptable to any constellation mission. To develop a common software architecture. the controllers will only model very high-level responses. For instance, after determining that a maneuver must be made. the MADECC system will output B (Delta)V (velocity change) value. Lower level systems must then decide which thrusters to fire and for how long to achieve that (Delta)V.

  3. International Earth Science Constellation (ESC) Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, William J.; Machado, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This is the Welcome and Introduction presentation for the International Earth Science Constellation (ESC) Mission Operations Working Group (MOWG) meeting held in Albuquerque NM from September 27-29. It contains an org chart, charter, history, significant topics to be discussed, AquaAura 2017 inclination adjust maneuver calendar, a-train long range plans, upcoming events, and action items.

  4. SATCOM constellation power simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Capulli, J.; Badke, B.; Davis, G.

    1995-12-31

    Three basic variables directly impact the power and energy generated by the SATCOM satellite constellation and its individual Space Vehicles (SVs). They are (1) telecommunications traffic patterns, (2) network resource management controllables, and (3) system hardware and software performance. This power simulation has verified the robustness of the telecommunications architecture. It has validated the onboard resource allocation process from an SV and network level power and energy perspective. The analyses have led to development of operational procedures that prevent SV node outages, and maximize network telecommunication traffic capacity. The program objective is to optimize overall system operation, availability and quality of service. Achieving this goal requires a thorough understanding of the Electrical Power Subsystem and its interfaces. The EPS simulation model analyzes network level performance by evaluating requirement compliance in the expected operating environments. Specifically, the simulation tool evaluates different design approaches and network operational strategies from a power and energy perspective. As a result, optimal load management solutions will be implemented both on-board the SV and via ground station directed resource allocation strategies.

  5. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, center, speaks as Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, looks on during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-05

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, and Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems announce to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, listens to a question during a NASA Update outlining responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, moderates a press conference with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, looks on as Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, announce to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, announces to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Members of the media listen during a press conference with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. A Lunar Mission to Create a Constellation of Space Solar Power Satellites as a Precursor to Industrial Establishment, Resource Extraction, and Colonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsrud, C. M.; Straub, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of a system of space solar power satellites (SSPSs) to service lunar science, mining and manufacturing operations. The SSPS system will provide power to enable a new paradigm of lunar and Moon-based exploration.

  17. Error analysis of upper tropospheric water vapor in CMIP5 models using "A-Train" satellite observations and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hanii; Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan H.

    2016-05-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) plays a critical role in amplifying global warming caused by increasing greenhouse gases, yet it is one of the most poorly simulated quantities in climate models. It is not clear what physical processes play a central role in controlling the model errors in UTWV. We diagnose the UTWV simulation errors from AMIP models submitted to the CMIP5 project by using "A-Train" satellite observation and reanalysis data. We identify the relative contributions of errors in relative humidity (RH), temperature, and large-scale circulation (represented by vertical pressure velocity at 500 hPa, ω500) to the modeled UTWV errors over the tropics (30°N-30°S). It is found that models generally have positive biases in UTWV, except over the continental convective regions where negative biases predominate. The errors in the patterns and amplitudes of climatological UTWV are highly correlated with those in RH and ω500. The fractional UTWV errors show large positive errors over the large-scale descending regimes (0 < ω500 < 40 hPa/day) where large model spreads also exist. The seasonal cycle of hemispherically averaged UTWV closely resembles that of ω500. The errors for UTWV interannual anomalies are abundant over the climatologically deep convective regions (SST > 300 K or ω500 < -30 hPa/day) and these errors are positive (negative) where anomalous descent (ascent) occurs during El Niño. We find that the water vapor errors are dominated by the errors in RH rather than in temperature throughout the troposphere, while temperature errors play an important role for water vapor errors near the tropopause.

  18. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, announces to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. He is joined by Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, announce to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, seated left, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, far left, moderates the program. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, announces to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Hanley is joined by Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, center, announces to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Horowitz was joined by NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Macedonian Folk Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenev, G.

    2008-10-01

    Ethno-astronomical researches started to be performed on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia in 1982 and since then they are constantly carried out. Information gathered directly from the elderly inhabitants of around 130 villages all over the country, enlighten the folk presentation of sky, division of the stars and constellations, but also provided a vast scope of myths, beliefs and rituals linked to the sky, stars, and constellations. More in-depth analyses of the gathered data lead to the reconstruction of the ancient stars map of the Macedonian people. Due to the fact that in the past people recognized only two seasons, most of the stars and constellations are presented on the so-called winter and summer sky. People were also familiar with the part of the sky around the Polaris and knew about the constellations that did not rise and set, but are special part of the folk sky map. The mentioned study provides a comparative analysis of the folk constellations known among the Macedonian people and folk constellations know among the others, mos tly neighbouring people living on the Balkan Peninsula.

  4. Future Nanosatellite Constellation for Radio Occultation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallet, C.; Mahfouf, J. F.; Hauchechrne, A.; Mathieu, R.; Martin, T.; Capet, N.; Mandea, M.

    2016-08-01

    The future nanosatellite constellation for radio occultation measurements aims to provide 10000 occultations per day (horizon 2020). The radio occultation technique based on the refraction of an electromagnetic signal between a GNSS satellite (Global Navigation Satellite System) and a receiver satellite located o a low orbit provides a way to observe the Earth's atmosphere, especially its temperature, pressure and water vapor, but also the ionosphere. This technique is now considered a mature concept, the benefits clearly recognized by the communities of weather prediction, climatology and space weather. Activities are underway at CNES to define a low cost system and instrumental concept to satisfy the specifications of the different communities.

  5. Electric Propulsion for Low Earth Orbit Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Sankovic, John M.

    1998-01-01

    Hall Effect electric propulsion was evaluated for orbit insertion, satellite repositioning, orbit maintenance and de-orbit applications for a sample low earth orbit satellite constellation. Since the low masses of these satellites enable multiple spacecraft per launch, the ability to add spacecraft to a given launch was used as a figure of merit. When compared to chemical propulsion, the Hall thruster system can add additional spacecraft per launch using planned payload power levels. One satellite can be added to the assumed four satellite baseline chemical launch without additional mission times. Two or three satellites may be added by providing part of the orbit insertion with the Hall system. In these cases orbit insertion times were found to be 35 and 62 days. Depending on the electric propulsion scenario, the resulting launch vehicle savings is nearly two, three or four Delta 7920 launch vehicles out of the chemical baseline scenarios eight Delta 7920 launch vehicles.

  6. Electric Propulsion for Low Earth Orbit Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Sankovic, John M.

    1998-01-01

    Hall effect electric propulsion was evaluated for orbit insertion, satellite repositioning, orbit maintenance and de-orbit applications for a sample low earth orbit satellite constellation. Since the low masses of these satellites enable multiple spacecraft per launch, the ability to add spacecraft to a given launch was used as a figure of merit. When compared to chemical propulsion, the Hall thruster system can add additional spacecraft per launch using planned payload power levels. One satellite can be added to the assumed four satellite baseline chemical launch without additional mission times. Two or three satellites may be added by providing part of the orbit insertion with the Hall system. In these cases orbit insertion times were found to be 35 and 62 days. Depending, on the electric propulsion scenario, the resulting launch vehicle savings is nearly two, three or four Delta 7920 launch vehicles out of the chemical baseline scenario's eight Delta 7920 launch vehicles.

  7. Multisatellite constellation configuration selection for multiregional highly elliptical orbit constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matossian, Mark G.

    1994-01-01

    The Archimedes Project is a joint effort of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). The primary goal of the Archimedes project is to perform a technical feasibility analysis and preliminary design of a highly inclined multisatellite constellation for direct broadcast and mobile communications services for Europe, Japan and much of North America. This report addresses one aspect of this project, specifically an analysis of continuous satellite coverage using multiregional highly elliptical orbits (M-HEO's). The analysis methodology and ensuing software tool, named SPIFF, were developed specifically for this project by the author during the summer of 1992 under the STA/NSF Summer Institute in Japan Program at Tsukuba Space Center.

  8. On the Spatio-Temporal Variability of Field-Aligned Currents Observed with the Swarm Satellite Constellation: Implications for the Energetics of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhotin, I.; Mann, I. R.; Forsyth, C.; Rae, J.; Burchill, J. K.; Knudsen, D. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Ozeke, L.; Balasis, G.; Daglis, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    With the advent of the Swarm mission with its multi-satellite capacity, it became possible for the first time to make systematic close separation multi-satellite measurements of the magnetic fields associated with field-aligned currents (FACs) at a 50 Hz cadence using fluxgate magnetometers. Initial studies have revealed an even greater level of detail and complexity and spatio-temporal non-stationarity than previously understood. On inter-satellite separation scales of 10 seconds along-track and <120 km cross-track, the peak-to-peak magnitudes of the small scale and poorly correlated inter-spacecraft magnetic field fluctuations can reach tens to hundreds of nanoteslas. These magnitudes are directly comparable to those associated with larger scale magnetic perturbations such as the global scale Region 1 and 2 FAC systems characterised by Iijima and Potemra 40 years ago. We evaluate the impact of these smaller scale magnetic perturbations relative to the larger scale FAC systems statistically as a function of the total number of FAC crossings observed, and as a function of geomagnetic indices, spatial location, and season. Further case studies incorporating Swarm electric field measurements enable estimates of the Poynting flux associated with the small scale and non-stationary magnetic fields. We interpret the small scale structures as Alfvenic, suggesting that Alfven waves play a much larger and more energetically significant role in magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling than previously thought. We further examine what causes such high variability among low-Earth orbit FAC systems to be observed under some conditions but not in others.

  9. Modelling of Picosatellite Constellation-Based Network and Effects on Quality of Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    PICOSATELLITE CONSTELLATION - BASED NETWORK AND EFFECTS ON QUALITY OF SERVICE by Jingyi Chiew March 2015 Thesis Advisor: Alex Bordetsky Second...COVERED March 2015 Master ’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS MODELLING OF PICOSATELLITE CONSTELLATION -BASED NETWORK AND EFFECTS ON...minia.tw-ized satellites is known as the pi co satellite. In order to evaluate the performance of the picosatellite constellation -based network, a

  10. Ancient Chinese constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junjun

    2011-06-01

    China, a country with a long history and a specific culture, has also a long and specific astronomy. Ancient Chinese astronomers observed the stars, named and distributed them into constellations in a very specific way, which is quite different from the current one. Around the Zodiac, stars are divided into four big regions corresponding with the four orientations, and each is related to a totem, either the Azure Dragon, the Vermilion Bird, the White Tiger or the Murky Warrior. We present a general pattern of the ancient Chinese constellations, including the four totems, their stars and their names.

  11. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin is seen through a television camera at a NASA Update announcing to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Griffin was joined by Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right. Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, far left, moderates the program. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. A-Train Observations of Deep Convective Storm Tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setvak, Martin; Bedka, Kristopher; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Sokol, Alois; Charvat, Zdenek; Stastka, Jindrich; Wang, Pao K.

    2013-01-01

    The paper highlights simultaneous observations of tops of deep convective clouds from several space-borne instruments including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) of the Aqua satellite, Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) of the CloudSat satellite, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flown on the CALIPSO satellite. These satellites share very close orbits, thus together with several other satellites they are referred to as the "A-Train" constellation. Though the primary responsibility of these satellites and their instrumentation is much broader than observations of fine-scale processes atop convective storms, in this study we document how data from the A-Train can contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of various storm-top features, such as overshooting tops, cold-U/V and cold ring features with their coupled embedded warm areas, above anvil ice plumes and jumping cirrus. The relationships between MODIS multi-spectral brightness temperature difference (BTD) fields and cloud top signatures observed by the CPR and CALIOP are also examined in detail to highlight the variability in BTD signals across convective storm events.

  13. A-Train Observations of Deep Convective Storm Tops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setvak, Martin; Bedka, Kristopher; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Sokol, Alois; Charvat, Zdenek; Stastka, Jindrich; Wang, Pao K.

    2013-01-01

    The paper highlights simultaneous observations of tops of deep convective clouds from several space-borne instruments including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) of the Aqua satellite, Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) of the CloudSat satellite, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flown on the CALIPSO satellite. These satellites share very close orbits, thus together with several other satellites they are referred to as the "A-Train" constellation. Though the primary responsibility of these satellites and their instrumentation is much broader than observations of fine-scale processes atop convective storms, in this study we document how data from the A-Train can contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of various storm-top features, such as overshooting tops, cold-U/V and cold ring features with their coupled embedded warm areas, above anvil ice plumes and jumping cirrus. The relationships between MODIS multi-spectral brightness temperature difference (BTD) fields and cloud top signatures observed by the CPR and CALIOP are also examined in detail to highlight the variability in BTD signals across convective storm events.

  14. Low Earth orbit constellations: Orbit control or not

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzik, Jose; Maral, Gerard

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the study is to list the arguments for and against the adoption of orbit control. The first section is a semi-analytical calculation of the probability of visibility with minimum elevation angle of a single satellite, to be used for altitudes less than 2000 km. Section two evaluates the number of noncontrolled satellites needed to guarantee a given probability of visibility for the whole constellation. Section three gives a comparison between noncontrolled and controlled constellations in the case of very low altitudes (less than 800 km). The main problem is the effect of atmospheric drag which reduces significantly the coverage performance of the satellite at its end of life. Evaluating the semi-major-axis contraction and eccentricity evolution with time allows us to define the noncontrolled satellite constellations.

  15. The Family Constellation Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemire, David

    The Family Constellation Scale (FC Scale) is an instrument that assesses perceived birth order in families. It can be used in counseling to help initiate conversations about various traits and assumptions that tend to characterize first-born, middle-born children, youngest-born, and only children. It provides both counselors and clients insights…

  16. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, announces to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, and Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, announce to NASA employees and members of the media the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, left, moderates a NASA Update with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, second from left, Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, looks on as Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, left, moderates a NASA Update with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, Scott J. Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Constellation Program Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin addresses NASA employees and members of the media about the responsibilities of the NASA centers associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration during a NASA Update on Wednesday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. The New Millenium Program ST-5 Mission: Nanosatellite Constellation Trailblazer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium Program has recently selected the Nanosatellite Constellation Trailblazer (NCT) as its fifth mission (ST-5). NCT will consist of 3 small, very capable and highly autonomous satellites which will be operated as a single "constellation" with minimal ground operations support. Each spacecraft will be approximately 40 cm in diameter by 20 cm in height and weigh only 20 kg. These small satellites will incorporate 8 new technologies essential to the further miniaturization of space science spacecraft which need space flight validation. In this talk we will describe in greater detail the NCT mission concept and goals, the exciting new technologies it will validate, and the role of miniaturized particles and fields sensors in this project. Finally, NCT's pathfinder function for such future NASA missions as Magnetotail Constellation and Inner Magnetosphere Constellation will be discussed.

  4. The New Millenium Program ST-5 Mission: Nanosatellite Constellation Trailblazer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium Program has recently selected the Nanosatellite Constellation Trailblazer (NCT) as its fifth mission (ST-5). NCT will consist of 3 small, very capable and highly autonomous satellites which will be operated as a single "constellation" with minimal ground operations support. Each spacecraft will be approximately 40 cm in diameter by 20 cm in height and weigh only 20 kg. These small satellites will incorporate 8 new technologies essential to the further miniaturization of space science spacecraft which need space flight validation. In this talk we will describe in greater detail the NCT mission concept and goals, the exciting new technologies it will validate, and the role of miniaturized particles and fields sensors in this project. Finally, NCT's pathfinder function for such future NASA missions as Magnetotail Constellation and Inner Magnetosphere Constellation will be discussed.

  5. Improving the recovery of monthly regional water storage using one year simulated observations of two pairs of GRACE-type satellite gravimetry constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaka, Basem; Forootan, Ehsan; Alothman, Abdulaziz

    2014-10-01

    Increasing the spatial sampling isotropy is a major issue in designing future missions dedicated to continue the task of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. From various possible future satellite gravimetry scenarios, the two-pair multi-orbit satellite configuration (Bender-type in the sequence), consisting of a coupled semi-polar pair (the same as GRACE) and an inclined pair of satellites seems to be an optimal mission choice. This contribution examines the performance of a Bender-type scenario at altitudes of 335 km and 352 km and inclinations of 89° and 63°, respectively, for improving the regional recovery of hydrological signals. To this end, we created one full year of simulated observations of the GRACE and Bender-type configurations. Our investigations include: 1) evaluating the feasible spatial resolution for the recovery of terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes in the presence of realistic instrumental noise and errors in the background models; 2) assessing the influence of aliasing errors in the TWS recovery and its separation from instrumental noise and introduced hydrological signals; and 3) analyzing the regional quality of the gravity-derived TWS results by assessing water storage changes over the 33 world major river basins. From our simulations, the Bender-derived spectral error curves indicate that, in spite of the instrumental noise, aliasing errors still contaminate the gravity fields above geopotential spherical harmonic coefficient (SHC) degree and order (d/o) 80 till 100. Regarding to the TWS recovery, we found notable improvements for the Bender-type configuration results in medium and small-scale basins, such as the Brahmaputra, Euphrates, Ganges, Indus, Mekong basins in Asia and the Yellow and Orange basins in South Africa. These results were achieved without applying post-processing, which was unachievable using simulations of one pair of GRACE-like configuration. Comparing the magnitudes of errors in the

  6. GPM Constellation Reconfiguration and Mission Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2006-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission that uses combined active and passive remote sensing techniques to improve global precipitation measurements derived from dedicated and operational passive microwave sensors. GPM is a science mission with integrated applications goals to (1) advance the knowledge of precipitation physics and the global water cycle variability, and (2) improve weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation and innovative application methods. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional domestic and international partners in satellite constellation buildup and ground validation activities. The GPM concept is centered on employing a dualfrequency precipitation radar and a microwave radiometer with high-frequency capabilities on a core satellite to serve as a physics observatory and calibration standard to provide a consistent framework for unifying precipitation measurements from a heterogeneous constellation of passive microwave sensors. Building on the siccess of TRMM, GPM extends combined radadradiometer precipitation measurements into the mid and high latitudes, with new science foci on improved capabilities for light-rain and snowfall measurements, as well as more accurate precipitation retrievals over land. With recent studies indicating that AMSU-B rainfall estimates are comparable in quality to those derived from conically-scanning radiometers over land, it is envisioned that cross-track microwave sounders with high-frequency channels on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS), NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP), NOAA-N', and MetOp satellites can play a significant role in augmenting conically-scanning microwave radiometers to achieve better

  7. Measuring Earth's Radiation Imbalance using Cubesat Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W. D.; Courtade, S.; Immel, T. J.; Feldman, D.; Lorentz, S. R.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2016-12-01

    At present, the global annual-mean Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI) is estimated to be of order 1 W/m2, although the uncertainty in ERI is much larger than this estimate. The best current satellite-only observational determinations of ERI range from -2 to +7 W/m2 unless major adjustments are made using ocean observations. Since measurements of ERI accurate to better than 0.5 W/m2 are essential for understanding and predicting changes in our climate, new missions to determine ERI in conjunction with ongoing ocean observations are urgently needed. These missions should reliably determine Earth's radiation balance at the temporal and spatial scales sufficient for relating ERI to the physical processes responsible for variability. The compelling objective of measuring ERI can be met using a constellation of satellites making global, high-frequency radiation measurements of the solar energy reflected and infrared energy radiated back to space with sufficient accuracy to determine the ERI to within 0.5 W/m2. In this presentation, we discuss the reasons and prospects for deploying a Cubesat constellation to realize this objective, simulations of the data that could be produced by this constellation, and the advantages of the spatial coverage and high temporal frequency afforded by the constellation. These advantages apply both to estimating long-term ERI and to quantifying the radiation budgets of individual synoptic-scale weather systems. The innovations in this system involve both the use of Cubesats and of compact, continuously calibrated wide-field-of-view radiometers. We demonstrate the feasibility of such a constellation using the ongoing proof-of-concept deployment of the target radiometers onboard the upcoming NASA RAVAN (Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes) mission.

  8. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  9. Armenian Names of Sky Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.; Mikayelyan, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    The work is devoted to the correction and recovery of the Armenian names of the sky constellations, as they were forgotten or distorted during the Soviet years, mainly due to the translation from Russian. A total of 34 constellation names have been corrected. A brief overview of the history of the division of the sky into constellations and their naming is also given. At the end, the list of all 88 constellations is given with the names in Latin, English, Russian and Armenian.

  10. 3D Online Visualization and Synergy of NASA A-Train Data Using Google Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Aijun; Kempler, Steven; Leptoukh, Gregory; Smith, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This poster presentation reviews the use of Google Earth to assist in three dimensional online visualization of NASA Earth science and geospatial data. The NASA A-Train satellite constellation is a succession of seven sun-synchronous orbit satellites: (1) OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory) (will launch in Feb. 2013), (2) GCOM-W1 (Global Change Observation Mission), (3) Aqua, (4) CloudSat, (5) CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar & Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations), (6) Glory, (7) Aura. The A-Train makes possible synergy of information from multiple resources, so more information about earth condition is obtained from the combined observations than would be possible from the sum of the observations taken independently

  11. Odyssey, a constellation for personal communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusch, Roger J.; Cress, Peter; Horstein, Michael; Huang, Robert; Wiswell, Eric

    1992-03-01

    The Odyssey, designed to provide economical high-quality personal communication services from medium-altitude-orbit satellites, is described. Odyssey's services are to include: voice, data, paging, radio determination, and messaging. A constellation of 12 satellites will be orbited in three 55-deg inclined planes at an altitude of 10,354 km to provide continuous coverage of designated regions. Two satellites will be visible anywhere in the world at all times. This dual visiblity leads to high line-of-sight elevation angles, thereby minimizing obstructions by terrain, trees, and buildings. Each satellite generates a multibeam antenna pattern that divides its coverage area into a set of contiguous cells. The communications system architecture employs spread spectrum CDMA on both the uplinks and downlinks. This signaling method permits band sharing with other systems and applications. The lower power Odyssey handset will be cellular compatible. Multipath fade protection will be provided in the handset.

  12. Visibility and Geometry of Glonass Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewski, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays there are two worldwide satellite navigation systems - American GPS, fully operational and Russian GLONASS, no fully operational. The number of GLONASS satellites is less than nominal 24; in June 2009 spatial segment consists of 20 satellites, 18 operational and 2 in maintenance. The number of GLONASS satellites visible in open and restricted area, the distributions (in per cent) of the Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) coefficient values and No Fix (without 3D position) for different numbers of GLONASS satellites (interval [18, 24]), for different masking elevation angles (interval [0°, 25°]) at different observer's latitudes (9 zones, each 10° wide), latitude of Poland (zone 50°-60°), in particular, are demonstrated in the paper. Additionally the detailed distributions of satellite azimuths (8 intervals, each 45° wide) and the percentage of satellite visible in open area above given angle at different latitudes for different numbers of satellites are showed. The knowledge of all these distributions are very important, especially after the publication of the U. S. Government report in which we can read that in 2010 the overall GPS constellation will fall below the number of satellites required the actual level of GPS position fix accuracy.

  13. Anthropometric Requirements for Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raulu, Sudhakar; Margerum, Sarah; Dory, Jonathan; Rochlis, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the requirement from an Anthropometric standpoint for the development of the Constellation's programs hardware, specifically the Orion crew exploration vehicle. The NASA JSC Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) provides anthropometry, strength, mobility, and mass properties requirements; gathers, interprets, manages and maintains the flight crew anthropometry database; and participates and provides input during crew selection. This is used to assist in requirements for vehicle and space suit design and for crew selection.

  14. Constellation Commodities Studies Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dirschka, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Constellation program was NASA's long-term program for space exploration. The goal of the commodities studies was to solicit industry expertise in production, storage, and transportation required for future use and to improve efficiency and life cycle cost over legacy methods. Objectives were to consolidate KSC, CCAFS and other requirements; extract available industry expertise; identify commercial opportunities; and establish synergy with State of Florida partnerships. Study results are reviewed.

  15. A-1 to Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The A-1 Test Stand at NASA Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss., was the focus of a ceremony held Thursday to transition the storied facility to a new program of work: testing the J-2X engines that will power the agency's next generation spacecraft, Ares I & V. Standing before the historic structure, with a plaque commemorating the change, are (from left) SSC Center Director Richard Gilbrech; NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems Scott Horowitz; and NASA Space Operations Deputy Associate Administrator for Program Integration Michael Hawes. Ares vehicles are the crew and cargo launch vehicles being developed under NASA's Constellation Program.

  16. Constellation Training Facility Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing the next set of vehicles that will take men back to the moon under the Constellation Program. The Constellation Training Facility (CxTF) is a project in development that will be used to train astronauts, instructors, and flight controllers on the operation of Constellation Program vehicles. It will also be used for procedure verification and validation of flight software and console tools. The CxTF will have simulations for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Crew Module (CM), CEV Service Module (SM), Launch Abort System (LAS), Spacecraft Adapter (SA), Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), Pressurized Cargo Variant CM, Pressurized Cargo Variant SM, Cargo Launch Vehicle, Earth Departure Stage (EDS), and the Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The Facility will consist of part-task and full-task trainers, each with a specific set of mission training capabilities. Part task trainers will be used for focused training on a single vehicle system or set of related systems. Full task trainers will be used for training on complete vehicles and all of its subsystems. Support was provided in both software development and project planning areas of the CxTF project. Simulation software was developed for the hydraulic system of the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) of the ARES I launch vehicle. The TVC system is in charge of the actuation of the nozzle gimbals for navigation control of the upper stage of the ARES I rocket. Also, software was developed using C standards to send and receive data to and from hand controllers to be used in CxTF cockpit simulations. The hand controllers provided movement in all six rotational and translational axes. Under Project Planning & Control, support was provided to the development and maintenance of integrated schedules for both the Constellation Training Facility and Missions Operations Facilities Division. These schedules maintain communication between projects in different levels. The Cx

  17. A-1 to Constellation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-11-09

    The A-1 Test Stand at NASA Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss., was the focus of a ceremony held Thursday to transition the storied facility to a new program of work: testing the J-2X engines that will power the agency's next generation spacecraft, Ares I & V. Standing before the historic structure, with a plaque commemorating the change, are (from left) SSC Center Director Richard Gilbrech; NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems Scott Horowitz; and NASA Space Operations Deputy Associate Administrator for Program Integration Michael Hawes. Ares vehicles are the crew and cargo launch vehicles being developed under NASA's Constellation Program.

  18. Simulating the Liaison Navigation Concept in a Geo + Earth-Moon Halo Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Leonard, J. M.; McGranaghan, R. M.; Parker, J. S.; Anderson, R. L.; Born, G. H.

    2012-01-01

    Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation, or LiAISON, is a novel satellite navigation technique where relative radiometric measurements between two or more spacecraft in a constellation are processed to obtain the absolute state of all spacecraft. The method leverages the asymmetry of the gravity field that the constellation exists in. This paper takes a step forward in developing a high fidelity navigation simulation for the LiAISON concept in an Earth-Moon constellation. In particular, we aim to process two-way Doppler measurements between a satellite in GEO orbit and another in a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L1 point.

  19. Simulating the Liaison Navigation Concept in a Geo + Earth-Moon Halo Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Leonard, J. M.; McGranaghan, R. M.; Parker, J. S.; Anderson, R. L.; Born, G. H.

    2012-01-01

    Linked Autonomous Interplanetary Satellite Orbit Navigation, or LiAISON, is a novel satellite navigation technique where relative radiometric measurements between two or more spacecraft in a constellation are processed to obtain the absolute state of all spacecraft. The method leverages the asymmetry of the gravity field that the constellation exists in. This paper takes a step forward in developing a high fidelity navigation simulation for the LiAISON concept in an Earth-Moon constellation. In particular, we aim to process two-way Doppler measurements between a satellite in GEO orbit and another in a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L1 point.

  20. Streamlining the Design Tradespace for Earth Imaging Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nag, Sreeja; Hughes, Steven P.; Le Moigne, Jacqueline J.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite constellations and Distributed Spacecraft Mission (DSM) architectures offer unique benefits to Earth observation scientists and unique challenges to cost estimators. The Cost and Risk (CR) module of the Tradespace Analysis Tool for Constellations (TAT-C) being developed by NASA Goddard seeks to address some of these challenges by providing a new approach to cost modeling, which aggregates existing Cost Estimating Relationships (CER) from respected sources, cost estimating best practices, and data from existing and proposed satellite designs. Cost estimation through this tool is approached from two perspectives: parametric cost estimating relationships and analogous cost estimation techniques. The dual approach utilized within the TAT-C CR module is intended to address prevailing concerns regarding early design stage cost estimates, and offer increased transparency and fidelity by offering two preliminary perspectives on mission cost. This work outlines the existing cost model, details assumptions built into the model, and explains what measures have been taken to address the particular challenges of constellation cost estimating. The risk estimation portion of the TAT-C CR module is still in development and will be presented in future work. The cost estimate produced by the CR module is not intended to be an exact mission valuation, but rather a comparative tool to assist in the exploration of the constellation design tradespace. Previous work has noted that estimating the cost of satellite constellations is difficult given that no comprehensive model for constellation cost estimation has yet been developed, and as such, quantitative assessment of multiple spacecraft missions has many remaining areas of uncertainty. By incorporating well-established CERs with preliminary approaches to approaching these uncertainties, the CR module offers more complete approach to constellation costing than has previously been available to mission architects or Earth

  1. Realistic Covariance Prediction for the Earth Science Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Matthew; Long, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Routine satellite operations for the Earth Science Constellation (ESC) include collision risk assessment between members of the constellation and other orbiting space objects. One component of the risk assessment process is computing the collision probability between two space objects. The collision probability is computed using Monte Carlo techniques as well as by numerically integrating relative state probability density functions. Each algorithm takes as inputs state vector and state vector uncertainty information for both objects. The state vector uncertainty information is expressed in terms of a covariance matrix. The collision probability computation is only as good as the inputs. Therefore, to obtain a collision calculation that is a useful decision-making metric, realistic covariance matrices must be used as inputs to the calculation. This paper describes the process used by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Earth Science Mission Operations Project to generate realistic covariance predictions for three of the Earth Science Constellation satellites: Aqua, Aura and Terra.

  2. Mega-constellations Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida Virgili, Benjamin; Krag, Holger

    2016-07-01

    Space traffic has always been subject to considerable fluctuations. In the past, these fluctuations have been mainly driven by geopolitical and economic factors. During the last years there has been a considerable increase due to the use of cubesats by non-traditional space operators, and due to a significant change of mission scopes and mission orbits in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). In the near future, however, many indications point to a further increase in the space traffic in LEO. This increase is mainly driven by a cheaper access to space, also triggered by the miniaturisation of spacecraft systems. An acceleration of this trend is expressed by the announcement of large constellations in LEO with the purpose to provide broadband internet communication, allowing to minimise the required infrastructure on Earth. The number of artificial objects in orbit continues to increase and, with it, a key threat to space sustainability. In response, space agencies have identified a set of mitigation guidelines aimed at enabling space users to reduce the generation of space debris by, for example, limiting the orbital lifetime of their spacecraft and of launcher stages after the end of their mission to 25 years in LEO. However, several recent studies have shown that, today, current guidelines for the LEO protected zone are insufficiently applied by space systems of all sizes. Under these conditions, a step increase in the launch rate is a potential concern for the environment, in particular if the current End of Life (EOL) behaviour prevails in the future. Even in a perfect behaviour w.r.t. the 25 year lifetime rule, the new traffic might lead to unrecoverable environment trends. Furthermore, the requirement for reliability of the disposal function is of 90%, however, weighted with the reliability of the entire system. A failure rate of 10%, in general, was found to be acceptable under current space traffic conditions. This might not be sustainable when the LEO launch rates

  3. CubeSat constellation design for air traffic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Sreeja; Rios, Joseph L.; Gerhardt, David; Pham, Camvu

    2016-11-01

    Suitably equipped global and local air traffic can be tracked. The tracking information may then be used for control from ground-based stations by receiving the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) signal. In this paper, we describe a tool for designing a constellation of small satellites which demonstrates, through high-fidelity modeling based on simulated air traffic data, the value of space-based ADS-B monitoring. It thereby provides recommendations for cost-efficient deployment of a constellation of small satellites to increase safety and situational awareness in the currently poorly-served surveillance area of Alaska. Air traffic data were obtained from NASA's Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool, for the Alaskan airspace over one day. The results presented were driven by MATLAB and the satellites propagated and coverage calculated using AGI's Satellite Tool. While Ad-hoc and precession spread constellations have been quantitatively evaluated, Walker constellations show the best performance in simulation. Sixteen satellites in two perpendicular orbital planes are shown to provide more than 99% coverage over representative Alaskan airspace and the maximum time gap where any airplane in Alaska is not covered is six minutes, therefore meeting the standard set by the International Civil Aviation Organization to monitor every airplane at least once every fifteen minutes. In spite of the risk of signal collision when multiple packets arrive at the satellite receiver, the proposed constellation shows 99% cumulative probability of reception within four minutes when the airplanes are transmitting every minute, and at 100% reception probability if transmitting every second. Data downlink can be performed using any of the three ground stations of NASA Earth Network in Alaska.

  4. The autonomous sciencecraft constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, R. L.; Chien, S.; Castano, R.; Rabideau, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) will fly onboard the Air Force TechSat 21 constellation of three spacecraft scheduled for launch in 2006. ASE uses onboard continuous planning, robust task and goal-based execution, model-based mode identification and reconfiguration, and onboard machine learning and pattern recognition to radically increase science return by enabling intelligent downlink selection and autonomous retargeting. In this paper we discuss how these AI technologies are synergistically integrated in a hybrid multi-layer control architecture to enable a virtual spacecraft science agent. Demonstration of these capabilities in a flight environment will open up tremendous new opportunities in planetary science, space physics, and earth science that would be unreachable without this technology.

  5. The Magentospheric Multiscale Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooley, C. R.; Black, R. K.; Robertson, B. P.; Stone, J. M.; Pope, S. E.; Davis, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is the fourth mission of the Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The MMS mission was launched on March 12, 2015. The MMS mission consists of four identically instrumented spin-stabilized observatories which are flown in formation to perform the first definitive study of magnetic reconnection in space. The MMS mission was presented with numerous technical challenges, including the simultaneous construction and launch of four identical large spacecraft with 100 instruments total, stringent electromagnetic cleanliness requirements, closed-loop precision maneuvering and pointing of spinning flexible spacecraft, on-board GPS based orbit determination far above the GPS constellation, and a flight dynamics design that enables formation flying with separation distances as small as 10 km. This paper describes the overall mission design and presents an overview of the design, testing, and early on-orbit operation of the spacecraft systems and instrument suite.

  6. The Magnetospheric Multiscale Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooley, C. R.; Black, R. K.; Robertson, B. P.; Stone, J. M.; Pope, S. E.; Davis, G. T.

    2016-03-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is the fourth mission of the Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The MMS mission was launched on March 12, 2015. The MMS mission consists of four identically instrumented spin-stabilized observatories which are flown in formation to perform the first definitive study of magnetic reconnection in space. The MMS mission was presented with numerous technical challenges, including the simultaneous construction and launch of four identical large spacecraft with 100 instruments total, stringent electromagnetic cleanliness requirements, closed-loop precision maneuvering and pointing of spinning flexible spacecraft, on-board GPS based orbit determination far above the GPS constellation, and a flight dynamics design that enables formation flying with separation distances as small as 10 km. This paper describes the overall mission design and presents an overview of the design, testing, and early on-orbit operation of the spacecraft systems and instrument suite.

  7. The Magentospheric Multiscale Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooley, C. R.; Black, R. K.; Robertson, B. P.; Stone, J. M.; Pope, S. E.; Davis, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is the fourth mission of the Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The MMS mission was launched on March 12, 2015. The MMS mission consists of four identically instrumented spin-stabilized observatories which are flown in formation to perform the first definitive study of magnetic reconnection in space. The MMS mission was presented with numerous technical challenges, including the simultaneous construction and launch of four identical large spacecraft with 100 instruments total, stringent electromagnetic cleanliness requirements, closed-loop precision maneuvering and pointing of spinning flexible spacecraft, on-board GPS based orbit determination far above the GPS constellation, and a flight dynamics design that enables formation flying with separation distances as small as 10 km. This paper describes the overall mission design and presents an overview of the design, testing, and early on-orbit operation of the spacecraft systems and instrument suite.

  8. The autonomous sciencecraft constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, R. L.; Chien, S.; Castano, R.; Rabideau, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) will fly onboard the Air Force TechSat 21 constellation of three spacecraft scheduled for launch in 2006. ASE uses onboard continuous planning, robust task and goal-based execution, model-based mode identification and reconfiguration, and onboard machine learning and pattern recognition to radically increase science return by enabling intelligent downlink selection and autonomous retargeting. In this paper we discuss how these AI technologies are synergistically integrated in a hybrid multi-layer control architecture to enable a virtual spacecraft science agent. Demonstration of these capabilities in a flight environment will open up tremendous new opportunities in planetary science, space physics, and earth science that would be unreachable without this technology.

  9. The Magnetospheric Multiscale Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tooley, C. R.; Black, R. K.; Robertson, B. P.; Stone, J. M.; Pope, S. E.; Davis, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is the fourth mission of the Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The MMS mission was launched on March 12, 2015. The MMS mission consists of four identically instrumented spin-stabilized observatories which are flown in formation to perform the first definitive study of magnetic reconnection in space. The MMS mission was presented with numerous technical challenges, including the simultaneous construction and launch of four identical large spacecraft with 100 instruments total, stringent electromagnetic cleanliness requirements, closed-loop precision maneuvering and pointing of spinning flexible spacecraft, on-board GPS based orbit determination far above the GPS constellation, and a flight dynamics design that enables formation flying with separation distances as small as 10 km. This paper describes the overall mission design and presents an overview of the design, testing, and early on-orbit operation of the spacecraft systems and instrument suite.

  10. Global aerosol typing from a combination of A-Train satellite observations in clear-sky and above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Russell, P. B.; Vaughan, M.; Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Livingston, J. M.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    According to the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the model estimates of Radiative Forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions (RFari) for individual aerosol types are less certain than the total RFari [Boucher et al., 2013]. For example, the RFari specific to Black Carbon (BC) is uncertain due to an underestimation of its mass concentration near source regions [Koch et al., 2009]. Several recent studies have evaluated chemical transport model (CTM) predictions using observations of aerosol optical properties such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) or Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) from satellite or ground-based instruments (e.g., Huneeus et al., [2010]). However, most passive remote sensing instruments fail to provide a comprehensive assessment of the particle type without further analysis and combination of measurements. To improve the predictions of aerosol composition in CTMs, we have developed an aerosol classification algorithm (called Specified Clustering and Mahalanobis Classification, SCMC) that assigns an aerosol type to multi-parameter retrievals by spaceborne, airborne or ground based passive remote sensing instruments [Russell et al., 2014]. The aerosol types identified by our scheme are pure dust, polluted dust, urban-industrial/developed economy, urban-industrial/developing economy, dark biomass smoke, light biomass smoke and pure marine. First, we apply the SCMC method to five years of clear-sky space-borne POLDER observations over Greece. We then use the aerosol extinction and SSA spectra retrieved from a combination of MODIS, OMI and CALIOP clear-sky observations to infer the aerosol type over the globe in 2007. Finally, we will extend the spaceborne aerosol classification from clear-sky to above low opaque water clouds using a combination of CALIOP AOD and backscatter observations and OMI absorption AOD values from near-by clear-sky pixels.

  11. Ad hoc CubeSat constellations: Secondary launch coverage and distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinan, A.; Nicholas, A.; Cahoy, K.

    The primary purpose of a constellation is to obtain global measurements with improved spatial and temporal resolution. The small size, low cost, standardized form factor, and increasing availability of commercial parts for CubeSats make them ideal for use in constellations. However, without taking advantage of secondary payload opportunities, it would be costly to launch and distribute a CubeSat constellation into a specific configuration. A cost-effective way to launch a constellation of CubeSats is via consecutive secondary payload launch opportunities, but the resulting constellation would be an ad hoc mix of orbit parameters. We focus on the feasibility of cobbling together constellation-like functionality from multiple secondary payload opportunities. Each participating CubeSat (or set of CubeSats) per launch could have completely different orbital parameters, even without propulsion onboard the CubeSats or intermediate transfer carriers. We look at the ground coverages that could be obtained for a constellation of five to six orbital planes with one to six satellites in each plane. We analyze past and announced future launch opportunities for CubeSats, including launch platforms supported by the NASA Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa). We consider combinations of possible launch locations and temporal spacings over the course of one year and simulate the resulting ground coverage patterns and revisit times for an ad hoc constellation using these launch opportunities. We perform this analysis for two separate case studies - one with only US launches and one with both US and non-US opportunities - and vary the number of satellites per orbital plane. Typical CubeSat mission lifetimes and deorbit times for low-altitude orbits are included in these analyses. The ad hoc constellation results are compared to coverage from uniformly-placed LEO constellations and are quantified in terms of revisit time, time to 100% global coverage, and response time. For mu

  12. A-Train Datalist - A New GES DISC Service to Allow One-Stop Shopping for A-Train Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jennifer; Li, Angela; Savtchenko, Andrey; Alfred, Jerome; Shen, Suhung; Petrenko, Maksym

    2017-01-01

    The currently available services at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC) only allow users to select variables from a single data set at a time. Because entire variables from a data set are often displayed, user selection of variables of interest can be overwhelming. At the American Geophysical Union (AGU) 2016 Fall Meeting, GES DISC unveiled a new service called Datalist: a collection of predefined or user-defined data variables from one or more archived data sets. Our science support team has been curating Datalists and providing added value to the user community.Originally known as Afternoon Constellation, A-Train includes six currently on polar-orbiting Earth observation satellites: OCO-2, GCOM-W1, Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat, and Aura, which travel a few minutes apart from each other. This constellation arrangement has enabled coordinated science observations further forming comprehensive pictures of Earth weather and climate that are readily for use in crucial studies such as climate change.GES DISC Datalists are based on the software architecture of the new GES DISC website (also unveiled at the AGU 2016 Fall Meeting). The GES DISC science support team has created a Datalist to support the A-Train Data Depot (ATDD). Using pre-defined Datalist should hopefully save users significant effort in their data searches.

  13. Hyperspectral Cubesat Constellation for Natural Hazard Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Crum, Gary; Ly, Vuong; Handy, Matthew; Huemmrich, Karl F.; Ong, Lawrence; Holt, Ben; Maharaja, Rishabh

    2016-01-01

    The authors on this paper are team members of the Earth Observing 1 (E0-1) mission which has flown an imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) instrument called Hyperion for the past 15+ years. The satellite is able to image any spot on Earth in the nadir looking direction every 16 days and with slewing, of the satellite for up to a 23 degree view angle, any spot on the Earth can be imaged approximately every 2 to 3 days. EO-1 has been used to track many natural hazards such as wildfires, volcanoes and floods. An enhanced capability that has been sought is the ability to image natural hazards in a daily time series for space-based imaging spectrometers. The Hyperion cannot provide this capability on EO-1 with the present polar orbit. However, a constellation of cubesats, each with the same imaging spectrometer, positioned strategically can be used to provide daily coverage or even diurnal coverage, cost-effectively. This paper sought to design a cubesat constellation mission that would accomplish this goal and then to articulate the key tradeoffs.

  14. Cubesat Constellation Design for Air Traffic Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nag, Sreeja; Rios, Joseph Lucio; Gerhardt, David; Pham, Camvu

    2015-01-01

    Suitably equipped global and local air traffic can be tracked. The tracking information may then be used for control from ground-based stations by receiving the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) signal. The ADS-B signal, emitted from the aircraft's Mode-S transponder, is currently tracked by terrestrial based receivers but not over remote oceans or sparsely populated regions such as Alaska or the Pacific Ocean. Lack of real-time aircraft time/location information in remote areas significantly hinders optimal planning and control because bigger "safety bubbles" (lateral and vertical separation) are required around the aircraft until they reach radar-controlled airspace. Moreover, it presents a search-and-rescue bottleneck. Aircraft in distress, e.g. Air France AF449 that crashed in 2009, take days to be located or cannot be located at all, e.g. Malaysia Airlines MH370 in 2014. In this paper, we describe a tool for designing a constellation of small satellites which demonstrates, through high-fidelity modeling based on simulated air traffic data, the value of space-based ADS-B monitoring and provides recommendations for cost-efficient deployment of a constellation of small satellites to increase safety and situational awareness in the currently poorly-served surveillance area of Alaska. Air traffic data has been obtained from the Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool (FACET), developed at NASA Ames Research Center, simulated over the Alaskan airspace over a period of one day. The simulation is driven by MATLAB with satellites propagated and coverage calculated using AGI's Satellite ToolKit(STK10).

  15. Automating Trend Analysis for Spacecraft Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George; Cooter, Miranda; Updike, Clark; Carey, Everett; Mackey, Jennifer; Rykowski, Timothy; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft trend analysis is a vital mission operations function performed by satellite controllers and engineers, who perform detailed analyses of engineering telemetry data to diagnose subsystem faults and to detect trends that may potentially lead to degraded subsystem performance or failure in the future. It is this latter function that is of greatest importance, for careful trending can often predict or detect events that may lead to a spacecraft's entry into safe-hold. Early prediction and detection of such events could result in the avoidance of, or rapid return to service from, spacecraft safing, which not only results in reduced recovery costs but also in a higher overall level of service for the satellite system. Contemporary spacecraft trending activities are manually intensive and are primarily performed diagnostically after a fault occurs, rather than proactively to predict its occurrence. They also tend to rely on information systems and software that are oudated when compared to current technologies. When coupled with the fact that flight operations teams often have limited resources, proactive trending opportunities are limited, and detailed trend analysis is often reserved for critical responses to safe holds or other on-orbit events such as maneuvers. While the contemporary trend analysis approach has sufficed for current single-spacecraft operations, it will be unfeasible for NASA's planned and proposed space science constellations. Missions such as the Dynamics, Reconnection and Configuration Observatory (DRACO), for example, are planning to launch as many as 100 'nanospacecraft' to form a homogenous constellation. A simple extrapolation of resources and manpower based on single-spacecraft operations suggests that trending for such a large spacecraft fleet will be unmanageable, unwieldy, and cost-prohibitive. It is therefore imperative that an approach to automating the spacecraft trend analysis function be studied, developed, and applied to

  16. Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite (AEHF)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    a mission control segment. The space segment consists of a cross-linked constellation of satellites to provide worldwide coverage. The terminal...2014. AEHF-3 is fully integrated into the Milstar constellation and performing well, operating from 120 deg West. Satellite Control Authority of...support a four satellite constellation from FY 2015 through FY 2030. The estimates assume that AEHF and Milstar will be operated in parallel by the 4th

  17. Our Pittsburgh Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnshek, Diane

    2015-08-01

    Riding on the Pittsburgh mayor’s keen interest in astronomy and the ongoing change of 40,000 city lights from mercury and sodium vapor to shielded LEDs, we organized a series of city-wide celestial art projects to bring attention to the skies over Pittsburgh. Light pollution public talks were held at the University of Pittsburgh’s Allegheny Observatory and other colleges. Earth Hour celebrations kicked off an intensive year of astronomy outreach in the city. Lights went out on March 28, 2015 from 8:30 to 9:30 pm in over fifty buildings downtown and in Oakland (the “Eds and Meds” center, where many Pittsburgh universities and hospitals are located). Our art contest was announced at the De-Light Pittsburgh celebration at the Carnegie Science Center during Astronomy Weekend. “Our Pittsburgh Constellation” is an interactive Google map of all things astronomical in the city. Different colored stars mark locations of planetariums, star parties, classes, observatories, lecture series, museums, telescope manufacturers and participating art galleries. Contest entrants submitted artwork depicting their vision of the constellation figure that incorporates and connects all the “stars” in our custom city map. Throughout the year, over a dozen artists ran workshops on painting star clusters, galaxies, nebulae, comets, planets and aurorae with discussions of light pollution solutions and scientific explanations of what the patrons were painting, including demonstrations with emission tubes and diffraction grating glasses. We will display the celestial art created in this International Year of Light at an art gallery as part of the City’s Department of Innovation & Performance March 2016 Earth Hour gala. We are thankful for the Astronomical Footprint grant from the Heinz Endowments, which allowed us to bring the worlds of science and art together to enact social change.

  18. Visibility and geometry of Galileo constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewski, Jacek

    Nowadays there are two worldwide satellite navigation systems - American GPS and Russian GLONASS. A new system - Galileo will be constructed in Europe. The most probable numbers of visible satellites above a certain limit, a masking elevation angle Hmin for Galileo system at different latitude of the observer and relevant distributions of GDOP (Geometric Dilution Of Precision) coefficient values (in per cent, over 8 intervals), were calculated and presented in this paper. The calculations were realized for the two most possible Galileo constellations (MEO only) of 27 or 30 satellites distributed in three planes. Elevation Hmin was assumed to 0°, 5°, 10° and 15°. The interval of latitude of the observer from 0° to 90° was divided into 9 zones, each 10° wide. As the number of satellites used for pseudorange measurements can be less than the number of satellites visible at a given moment and certain point on the Earth (for many reasons), additional calculations were realized for assumption of 1, 2 or 3 non operational satellites. All calculations, based upon the reference ellipsoid WGS-84, were made with the use of the author's simulating program. Random-number generator with uniform distribution generated the geographic and time coordinates of the observer. As the possibility of fix position depends on the relative position of the satellites in the orbits the calculations were made for different combinations. As the results we can say the position of observer in mode "3D" can be obtained for Hmin ≤ 15° in each zone.

  19. A Commercial Architecture for Satellite Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    amount of risk as well as production time. A constellation of commercial satellites that are reconstituted on a monthly or quarterly cycle could also...potential limitations with geolocation accuracy and data rate downlink transmission capability. This thesis evaluates constellation design factors...a commercial system would be able to fulfill national imagery collection requirements. Eight different constellation types were created, ranging

  20. Dependency of geodynamic parameters on the GNSS constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaramuzza, Stefano; Dach, Rolf; Beutler, Gerhard; Arnold, Daniel; Sušnik, Andreja; Jäggi, Adrian

    2017-07-01

    Significant differences in time series of geodynamic parameters determined with different Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) exist and are only partially explained. We study whether the different number of orbital planes within a particular GNSS contributes to the observed differences by analyzing time series of geocenter coordinates (GCCs) and pole coordinates estimated from several real and virtual GNSS constellations: GPS, GLONASS, a combined GPS/GLONASS constellation, and two virtual GPS sub-systems, which are obtained by splitting up the original GPS constellation into two groups of three orbital planes each. The computed constellation-specific GCCs and pole coordinates are analyzed for systematic differences, and their spectral behavior and formal errors are inspected. We show that the number of orbital planes barely influences the geocenter estimates. GLONASS' larger inclination and formal errors of the orbits seem to be the main reason for the initially observed differences. A smaller number of orbital planes may lead, however, to degradations in the estimates of the pole coordinates. A clear signal at three cycles per year is visible in the spectra of the differences between our estimates of the pole coordinates and the corresponding IERS 08 C04 values. Combinations of two 3-plane systems, even with similar ascending nodes, reduce this signal. The understanding of the relation between the satellite constellations and the resulting geodynamic parameters is important, because the GNSS currently under development, such as the European Galileo and the medium Earth orbit constellation of the Chinese BeiDou system, also consist of only three orbital planes.

  1. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, S.; Henderson, M. G.; Woodroffe, J. R.; Brito, T. V.

    2016-12-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites are distributed across six orbital planes and follow near-circular orbits, with a 12 hour period, at an altitude of approximately 20200 km. The six orbital planes are distributed around the Earth and are nominally inclined at 55 degrees. Energetic particle detectors have been flown on the GPS constellation for more than two decades; by February 2016 there were 23 GPS satellites equipped with energetic particle instrumentation. The Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), which is flown on 21 GPS satellites, has recently been cross-calibrated against electron data from the Van Allen Probes mission, demonstrating its utility for scientific research and radiation environment specification. Recently electron and proton flux data from these instruments, for the month of January 2014, have been publicly released. We will describe the GPS constellation from the perspective of its use as a monitor for space weather, review some of the key scientific results enabled by these instruments and show some recent observations from the constellation, including the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm. Using data from multiple satellite missions we describe the dynamics of this storm in detail.

  2. Trade-space Analysis for Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moigne, J.; Dabney, P.; de Weck, O. L.; Foreman, V.; Grogan, P.; Holland, M. P.; Hughes, S. P.; Nag, S.

    2016-12-01

    Traditionally, space missions have relied on relatively large and monolithic satellites, but in the past few years, under a changing technological and economic environment, including instrument and spacecraft miniaturization, scalable launchers, secondary launches as well as hosted payloads, there is growing interest in implementing future NASA missions as Distributed Spacecraft Missions (DSM). The objective of our project is to provide a framework that facilitates DSM Pre-Phase A investigations and optimizes DSM designs with respect to a-priori Science goals. In this first version of our Trade-space Analysis Tool for Constellations (TAT-C), we are investigating questions such as: "How many spacecraft should be included in the constellation? Which design has the best cost/risk value?" The main goals of TAT-C are to: Handle multiple spacecraft sharing a mission objective, from SmallSats up through flagships, Explore the variables trade space for pre-defined science, cost and risk goals, and pre-defined metrics Optimize cost and performance across multiple instruments and platforms vs. one at a time. This paper describes the overall architecture of TAT-C including: a User Interface (UI) interacting with multiple users - scientists, missions designers or program managers; an Executive Driver gathering requirements from UI, then formulating Trade-space Search Requests for the Trade-space Search Iterator first with inputs from the Knowledge Base, then, in collaboration with the Orbit & Coverage, Reduction & Metrics, and Cost& Risk modules, generating multiple potential architectures and their associated characteristics. TAT-C leverages the use of the Goddard Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) to compute coverage and ancillary data, streamlining the computations by modeling orbits in a way that balances accuracy and performance. TAT-C current version includes uniform Walker constellations as well as Ad-Hoc constellations, and its cost model represents an aggregate model

  3. Polar constellations design for discontinuous coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno, Salvatore; Graziano, Maria Daniela; D'Errico, Marco

    2016-10-01

    A novel constellation design method is developed for discontinuous coverage of the globe and polar caps. It integrates and extends the applicability of the coverage regions and mitigates the limitations of the existing techniques based on streets-of-coverage (SOC) theory. In particular, the visibility conditions of the targets are mapped in the (Ω, u)-domain to identify the number of satellites per plane and the distance between successive orbits, whereas the planes are arranged around the equator exploiting satellites both in ascending and descending phase. The proposed approach is applied to design potential space segments in polar LEO supporting the existing maritime surveillance services over the globe and on the future polar routes. Results show they require a smaller total number of satellites with respect to the SOC-based configurations for revisit times less than one hour and wide range of swaths. In details, it is observed a reduction between 6% and 22% for global coverage and between 24% and 33% for the coverage of polar caps.

  4. Realistic Covariance Prediction For the Earth Science Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Matthew; Long, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Routine satellite operations for the Earth Science Constellations (ESC) include collision risk assessment between members of the constellations and other orbiting space objects. One component of the risk assessment process is computing the collision probability between two space objects. The collision probability is computed via Monte Carlo techniques as well as numerically integrating relative probability density functions. Each algorithm takes as inputs state vector and state vector uncertainty information for both objects. The state vector uncertainty information is expressed in terms of a covariance matrix. The collision probability computation is only as good as the inputs. Therefore, to obtain a collision calculation that is a useful decision-making metric, realistic covariance matrices must be used as inputs to the calculation. This paper describes the process used by NASA Goddard's Earth Science Mission Operations Project to generate realistic covariance predictions for three of the ESC satellites: Aqua, Aura, and Terra

  5. Realistic Covariance Prediction For the Earth Science Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Matthew; Long, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Routine satellite operations for the Earth Science Constellations (ESC) include collision risk assessment between members of the constellations and other orbiting space objects. One component of the risk assessment process is computing the collision probability between two space objects. The collision probability is computed via Monte Carlo techniques as well as numerically integrating relative probability density functions. Each algorithm takes as inputs state vector and state vector uncertainty information for both objects. The state vector uncertainty information is expressed in terms of a covariance matrix. The collision probability computation is only as good as the inputs. Therefore, to obtain a collision calculation that is a useful decision-making metric, realistic covariance matrices must be used as inputs to the calculation. This paper describes the process used by NASA Goddard's Earth Science Mission Operations Project to generate realistic covariance predictions for three of the ESC satellites: Aqua, Aura, and Terra

  6. Radio occultation constellation deployment via impulses along the geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Michael Yu.; Trofimov, Sergey P.; Chang, Hao-Chi

    2013-01-01

    The problem of radio occultation (RO) constellation deployment is examined. Of particular interest here is to study the feasibility of using passively stabilized small satellites. We consider a pair of satellites supplied with a passive magnetic attitude control system. The capsule containing two satellites is launched into a parking orbit and stabilized along the geomagnetic field direction. Then the satellites are pushed apart by a separation spring at some point of orbit. If necessary for braking, one or two thrusters may be placed along the stabilized axis of each satellite. Optimization of the separation point and velocity along with the ΔV required for possible braking thrust is carried out in accordance with some specific demands of RO missions. Atmospheric drag and Earth oblateness are taken into account as perturbations. It is shown that, depending on a mission scenario, the separation with either one braking thrust or no thrusts at all is preferable.

  7. Constellation Lessons Learned Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Neubek, Deb

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the lessons learned from the Constellation Program (CxP) and identified several factors that contributed to the inability of the CxP to meet the cost and schedule commitments. The review includes a significant section on the context in which the CxP operated since new programs are likely to experience the same constraints.

  8. Flying the ST-5 Constellation with "Plug and Play" Autonomy Components and the GMSEC Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shendock, Bob; Witt, Ken; Stanley, Jason; Mandl, Dan; Coyle, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST5) Project, part of NASA's New Millennium Program, will consist of a constellation of three micro-satellites. This viewgraph document presents the components that will allow it to operate in an autonomous mode. The ST-5 constellation will use the GSFC Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) architecture to enable cost effective model based operations. The ST-5 mission will demonstrate several principles of self managing software components.

  9. Modeling Navigation System Performance of a Satellite-Observing Star Tracker Tightly Integrated with an Inertial Measurement Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    requirements were calculated for a satellite signal operating in imaging bands, such that a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) orbiting satellite constellation ...System . . . . . . 31 2.10.1 Observer Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 2.10.2 Satellite and Constellation Properties . . . . . . 33 2.11...56 3.4 Constellation Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 3.5 Navigation Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 3.5.1

  10. The Constellation-X Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly

    2003-01-01

    The Constellation X-ray mission will revolutionize X-ray spectroscopy and will provide a key component of NASA's '!Beyond Einstein" program. Over the past 35 years, X-ray astronomy has grown from infancy to near-maturity and is now an indispensable astrophysical tool. Constellation-X will transform this field from the exploratory spectroscopic era of Chandra and XMM to an era of fully comprehensive spectroscopic studies. The mission will consist of four 1.6-meter X-ray telescopes orbiting the Earth/Sun system. By providing a factor of 100 increase in throughput over previous missions, as well as high spectral resolution and a broad energy bandpass, Constellation-X will obtain high quality spectra for all classes of X-ray sources over a wide range of luminosity and redshift. It will study the warping of space and time near black holes, determine the distribution of ordinary matter, dark matter and dark energy, and probe detailed physical processes that occur at temperatures, densities and pressures far beyond those achievable in Earth-bound laboratories.

  11. Science with Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann (Editor); Garcia, Michael (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's upcoming Constellation-X mission, one of two flagship missions in the Beyond Einstein program, will have more than 100 times the collecting area of any previous spectroscopic mission operating in the 0.25-40 keV bandpass and will enable high-throughput, high spectral resolution studies of sources ranging from the most luminous accreting supermassive black holes in the Universe to the disks around young stars where planets form. This booklet, which was assembled during early 2005 using the contributions of a large team of Astrophysicists, outlines the important scientific questions for the decade following this one and describes the areas where Constellation-X is going to have a major impact. These areas include the exploration of the space-time geometry of black holes spanning nine orders of magnitude in mass and the nature of the dark energy and dark matter which govern the expansion and ultimate fate of the Universe. Constellation-X will also explore processes referred to as "cosmic feedback" whereby mechanical energy, radiation, and chemical elements from star formation and black holes are returned to interstellar and intergalactic medium, profoundly affecting the development of structure in the Universe, and will also probe all the important life cycles of matter, from stellar and planetary birth to stellar death via supernova to stellar endpoints in the form of accreting binaries and supernova remnants.

  12. 47 CFR 25.143 - Licensing provisions for the 1.6/2.4 GHz Mobile-Satellite Service and 2 GHz Mobile-Satellite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... a proposed system in the 1.6/2.4 GHz MSS frequency bands employs a non-geostationary constellation or constellations of satellites; (ii) That a system proposed to operate using non-geostationary...

  13. Mathematical minimum of Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) for dual-GNSS constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yunlong; Wang, Jinling; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Selecting optimal satellites for positioning calculation is a basic problem for the positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) applications with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) is a key index to handle this problem. In general, the lower the GDOP values are, the more accurate the PNT solution is. Therefore, the minimum value of GDOP should be pursued. In this paper, we focused on the five-satellite as at least five satellites are required for dual-GNSS constellations. Utilizing the characteristics of matrix partial orders, the mathematical minimum of GDOP in the five-satellite case together with the optimal distribution of the five satellites has been theoretically derived. Furthermore, from a theoretical point of view, the detailed expressions of the impact of different constellational combinations of these satellites on the GDOP have been obtained. The results demonstrated that, for dual-GNSS, even if the geometric distribution of the five satellites is fixed, different constellational combinations of these satellites lead to different values of GDOP. This is different from the single-GNSS case.

  14. Constellation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-02-15

    SHOWN IS A CONCEPT IMAGE OF THE ARES V EARTH DEPARTURE STAGE AND LUNAR SURFACE ACCESS MODULE DOCKED WITH THE ORION CREW EXPLORATION VEHICLE IN EARTH ORBIT. THE DEPARTURE STAGE, POWERED BY A J-2X ENGINE, IS NEEDED TO ESCAPE EARTH'S GRAVITY AND SEND THE CREW VEHICLE AND LUNAR MODULE ON THEIR JOURNEY TO THE MOON.

  15. NASAs EDSN Aims to Overcome the Operational Challenges of CubeSat Constellations and Demonstrate an Economical Swarm of 8 CubeSats Useful for Space Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Harrison Brodsky; Hu, Steven Hung Kee; Cockrell, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Operators of a constellation of CubeSats have to confront a number of daunting challenges that can be cost prohibitive, or operationally prohibitive, to missions that could otherwise be enabled by a satellite constellation. Challenges including operations complexity, intersatellite communication, intersatellite navigation, and time sharing tasks between satellites are all complicated by operating with the usual CubeSat size, power, and budget constraints. EDSN pioneers innovative solutions to these problems as they are presented on the nano-scale satellite platform.

  16. On constellation design of multi-GNSS radio occultation mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juang, Jyh-Ching; Tsai, Yung-Fu; Chu, Chung-Huei

    2013-01-01

    The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC mission which is a joint Taiwan-US mission for meteorological, climatological, ionospheric, and geodetic studies has successfully provided a significant amount of GPS radio occultation (RO) data for better modeling of climate model, forecasting of weather, and monitoring of ionosphere. Owing to the success of the FORMOSAT-3 program, the follow-on FORMOSAT-7 mission is being planned. In the perceivable future, sources for RO mission can be originated from multiple global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) including GPS, Galileo, GLONASS, and Beidou as well as several regional navigation satellite systems (RNSSs) and space-based augmentation systems (SBASs). To facilitate the operational capability for weather forecast and space weather monitoring, the FORMOSAT-7 constellation must be designed to ensure a sufficient and uniform distribution in space and time for GNSS/RNSS/SBAS RO events. In addition, it is desired that the RO events in certain region can be maximized to account for severe weather. As the distribution of RO events due to GNSS, RNSS, and SBAS are distinct and the requirements appear to be multi-objective, the constellation design becomes very complicated. The paper applies genetic algorithm (GA) to design constellation parameters. It is shown that the adopted approach can be used to account for non-uniform distribution of RO events due to RNSSs and SBASs. The GA-based design approach is demonstrated to result in constellations that are superior in both global distribution and regional emphasis of RO events to those of the existing baseline design.

  17. Intercalibration of High Frequency Channels on GPM Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, H.; Datta, S.; Jones, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) mission is an international effort to measure precipitation worldwide every three hours. The research objective is to reduce errors in global rainfall estimates associated with temporal/spatial sampling by using a constellation of satellites. Inter-calibration of microwave radiometer channels using the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) is a challenging task. In GPM constellation we have a combination of cross track and conical scanner sensors, the goal is to make a consistent measurement between all the sensors in this constellation. GMI is a conical scanner and is going to be a reference for the calibration of all the other sensors in the constellation., almost all the sensors with channels lower than 89 GHz are conical scanners, the inter-calibration between conical scanners have been done successfully over years, But for frequencies equal and higher than 89GHz, there is SSMIS on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) which is a conical scanner, other sensors such as ATMS on AMSU, MHS on NOAA 18, NOAA 19, METOP A and METOP B and SAPHIR on Megha -Tropique , are cross track sensors. For these sensors each Instantaneous Field of View (IFOV) has different Earth incidence angles (EIA) and different slant paths through the atmosphere while conical scanner has constant earth incidence angle for all IFOVs. Here the double difference (DD) technique, which has been successfully applied for imager channel calibration before, has been applied to sounder channels, also the effect of using different surface emissivity models such as Elsasser's and RSS model and atmosphere models such as Rosenkranz and MonoRTM models, in these frequencies has been investigated.

  18. Computation of Solar Radiative Fluxes by 1D and 3D Methods Using Cloudy Atmospheres Inferred from A-train Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Howard W.; Kato, Serji; Wehr, T.

    2012-01-01

    The main point of this study was to use realistic representations of cloudy atmospheres to assess errors in solar flux estimates associated with 1D radiative transfer models. A scene construction algorithm, developed for the EarthCARE satellite mission, was applied to CloudSat, CALIPSO, and MODIS satellite data thus producing 3D cloudy atmospheres measuring 60 km wide by 13,000 km long at 1 km grid-spacing. Broadband solar fluxes and radiances for each (1 km)2 column where then produced by a Monte Carlo photon transfer model run in both full 3D and independent column approximation mode (i.e., a 1D model).

  19. 77 FR 25150 - GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... constellation simulators utilized by the federal government on 15 May 2012 from 0730-1600 (Pacific Standard Time... manufacturer of GPS constellation satellite simulators who supply products to the Department of Defense....

  20. Satellite Data Simulator Unit: A Multisensor, Multispectral Satellite Simulator Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masunaga, Hirohiko; Matsui, Toshihisa; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Hou, Arthur Y.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Bauer, Peter; Olson, William S.; Sekiguchi, Miho; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2010-01-01

    Several multisensor simulator packages are being developed by different research groups across the world. Such simulator packages [e.g., COSP , CRTM, ECSIM, RTTO, ISSARS (under development), and SDSU (this article), among others] share overall aims, although some are targeted more on particular satellite programs or specific applications (for research purposes or for operational use) than others. The SDSU or Satellite Data Simulator Unit is a general-purpose simulator composed of Fortran 90 codes and applicable to spaceborne microwave radiometer, radar, and visible/infrared imagers including, but not limited to, the sensors listed in a table. That shows satellite programs particularly suitable for multisensor data analysis: some are single satellite missions carrying two or more instruments, while others are constellations of satellites flying in formation. The TRMM and A-Train are ongoing satellite missions carrying diverse sensors that observe clouds and precipitation, and will be continued or augmented within the decade to come by future multisensor missions such as the GPM and Earth-CARE. The ultimate goals of these present and proposed satellite programs are not restricted to clouds and precipitation but are to better understand their interactions with atmospheric dynamics/chemistry and feedback to climate. The SDSU's applicability is not technically limited to hydrometeor measurements either, but may be extended to air temperature and humidity observations by tuning the SDSU to sounding channels. As such, the SDSU and other multisensor simulators would potentially contribute to a broad area of climate and atmospheric sciences. The SDSU is not optimized to any particular orbital geometry of satellites. The SDSU is applicable not only to low-Earth orbiting platforms as listed in Table 1, but also to geostationary meteorological satellites. Although no geosynchronous satellite carries microwave instruments at present or in the near future, the SDSU would be

  1. Satellite Data Simulator Unit: A Multisensor, Multispectral Satellite Simulator Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masunaga, Hirohiko; Matsui, Toshihisa; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Hou, Arthur Y.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Bauer, Peter; Olson, William S.; Sekiguchi, Miho; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2010-01-01

    Several multisensor simulator packages are being developed by different research groups across the world. Such simulator packages [e.g., COSP , CRTM, ECSIM, RTTO, ISSARS (under development), and SDSU (this article), among others] share overall aims, although some are targeted more on particular satellite programs or specific applications (for research purposes or for operational use) than others. The SDSU or Satellite Data Simulator Unit is a general-purpose simulator composed of Fortran 90 codes and applicable to spaceborne microwave radiometer, radar, and visible/infrared imagers including, but not limited to, the sensors listed in a table. That shows satellite programs particularly suitable for multisensor data analysis: some are single satellite missions carrying two or more instruments, while others are constellations of satellites flying in formation. The TRMM and A-Train are ongoing satellite missions carrying diverse sensors that observe clouds and precipitation, and will be continued or augmented within the decade to come by future multisensor missions such as the GPM and Earth-CARE. The ultimate goals of these present and proposed satellite programs are not restricted to clouds and precipitation but are to better understand their interactions with atmospheric dynamics/chemistry and feedback to climate. The SDSU's applicability is not technically limited to hydrometeor measurements either, but may be extended to air temperature and humidity observations by tuning the SDSU to sounding channels. As such, the SDSU and other multisensor simulators would potentially contribute to a broad area of climate and atmospheric sciences. The SDSU is not optimized to any particular orbital geometry of satellites. The SDSU is applicable not only to low-Earth orbiting platforms as listed in Table 1, but also to geostationary meteorological satellites. Although no geosynchronous satellite carries microwave instruments at present or in the near future, the SDSU would be

  2. Uplink Scheduling of Navigation Constellation Based on Immune Genetic Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yinyin; Wang, Yueke; Chen, Jianyun; Li, Xianbin

    2016-01-01

    The uplink of navigation data as satellite ephemeris is a complex satellite range scheduling problem. Large-scale optimal problems cannot be tackled using traditional heuristic methods, and the efficiency of standard genetic algorithm is unsatisfactory. We propose a multi-objective immune genetic algorithm (IGA) for uplink scheduling of navigation constellation. The method focuses on balance traffic and maximum task objects based on satellite-ground index encoding method, individual diversity evaluation and memory library. Numerical results show that the multi-hierarchical encoding method can improve the computation efficiency, the fuzzy deviation toleration method can speed up convergence, and the method can achieve the balance target with a negligible loss in task number (approximately 2.98%). The proposed algorithm is a general method and thus can be used in similar problems.

  3. Hyperspectral Cubesat Constellation for Rapid Natural Hazard Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Huemmrich, Karl; Crum, Gary; Ly, Vuong; Handy, Matthew; Ong, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Earth Observing 1 (E0-1) satellite has an imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) instrument called Hyperion. The satellite is able to image any spot on Earth in the nadir looking direction every 16 days. With slewing of the satellite and allowing for up to a 23 degree view angle, any spot on the Earth can be imaged approximately every 2 to 3 days. EO-1 has been used to track many natural hazards such as wildfires, volcanoes and floods. An enhanced capability that is sought is the ability to image natural hazards in a daily time series for space based imaging spectrometers. The Hyperion can not provide this capability on EO-1 with the present polar orbit. However, a constellation of cubesats, each with the same imaging spectrometer, positioned strategically in the same orbit, can be used to provide daily coverage, cost-effectively.

  4. Uplink Scheduling of Navigation Constellation Based on Immune Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yinyin; Wang, Yueke; Chen, Jianyun; Li, Xianbin

    2016-01-01

    The uplink of navigation data as satellite ephemeris is a complex satellite range scheduling problem. Large–scale optimal problems cannot be tackled using traditional heuristic methods, and the efficiency of standard genetic algorithm is unsatisfactory. We propose a multi-objective immune genetic algorithm (IGA) for uplink scheduling of navigation constellation. The method focuses on balance traffic and maximum task objects based on satellite-ground index encoding method, individual diversity evaluation and memory library. Numerical results show that the multi–hierarchical encoding method can improve the computation efficiency, the fuzzy deviation toleration method can speed up convergence, and the method can achieve the balance target with a negligible loss in task number (approximately 2.98%). The proposed algorithm is a general method and thus can be used in similar problems. PMID:27736986

  5. Expected Position Error for an Onboard Satellite GPS Receiver

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation provides ranging information that delivers inexpensive, high precision positioning for terrestrial...altitude approaches that of the GPS constellation . Above the GPS constellation , the available GPS signals for ranging will originate from satellites on the...Concerns about the GPS coverage environment increase when the receiver’s altitude approaches or surpasses the orbital altitude of the GPS constellation

  6. Applications of the Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    34* per Taurus : $10.9 million " per PANSAT: $1.9 million (10 PANSATs per Taurus ) *per constellation : $10.9 million (10 satellites per constellation ...lightsat unlike any which has been built before or will be built in the foreseeable future. A single PANSAT (or an entire constellation ) can be lofted into...designing a lightsat unlike any which has been built before or will be built in the foreseeable future. A single PANSAT (or an entire constellation ) can be

  7. Global Positioning System Constellation Clock Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    of the Global Positioning System ( GPS ) constellation with respect to the lifetimes of space vehicles and space vehicle clocks, both active and...ABSTRACT An overview of the Global Positioning System ( GPS ) constellation with respect to the lifetimes of space vehicles and space vehicle clocks, both...34th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 77 GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM CONSTELLATION CLOCK PERFORMANCE Jay Oaks and Marie

  8. BRITE Constellation: data processing and photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popowicz, A.; Pigulski, A.; Bernacki, K.; Kuschnig, R.; Pablo, H.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Zocłońska, E.; Baade, D.; Handler, G.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Wade, G. A.; Neiner, C.; Rucinski, S. M.; Weiss, W. W.; Koudelka, O.; Orleański, P.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Zwintz, K.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE) mission is a pioneering space project aimed at the long-term photometric monitoring of the brightest stars in the sky by means of a constellation of nanosatellites. Its main advantage is high photometric accuracy and time coverage which are inaccessible from the ground. Its main drawback is the lack of cooling of the CCD detectors and the absence of good shielding that would protect them from energetic particles. Aims: The main aim of this paper is the presentation of procedures used to obtain high-precision photometry from a series of images acquired by the BRITE satellites in two modes of observing, stare and chopping. The other aim is a comparison of the photometry obtained with two different pipelines and a comparison of the real scatter with expectations. Methods: We developed two pipelines corresponding to the two modes of observing. They are based on aperture photometry with a constant aperture, circular for stare mode of observing and thresholded for chopping mode. Impulsive noise is a serious problem for observations made in the stare mode of observing and therefore in the pipeline developed for observations made in this mode, hot pixels are replaced using the information from shifted images in a series obtained during a single orbit of a satellite. In the other pipeline, the hot pixel replacement is not required because the photometry is made in difference images. Results: The assessment of the performance of both pipelines is presented. It is based on two comparisons, which use data from six runs of the UniBRITE satellite: (i) comparison of photometry obtained by both pipelines on the same data, which were partly affected by charge transfer inefficiency (CTI), (ii) comparison of real scatter with theoretical expectations. It is shown that for CTI-affected observations, the chopping pipeline provides much better photometry than the other pipeline. For other observations, the results are comparable only for data

  9. Inter-calibrating Brightness Temperatures of a Constellation of Radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Berg, Wesley; Kummerow, Christian; Stout, John

    2006-01-01

    In 2010, the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) of the U.S.A. and the Japanese Exploration Agency (JAXA) of Japan in cooperation with other U.S. and international partners will launch the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. The mission center-piece is a core U.S. provided satellite holding a scanning microwave imager provided by the U.S. A. and a dual-frequency precipitation radar provided by Japan. The core satellite is in a 65 deg inclination (the current Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission -TRMM is in a 35 deg inclination). Joining the core satellite are a constellation of approximately 8 satellites containing scanning radiometers. The purpose of the constellation is to increase the global sampling capability of the mission. One constellation satellite will be provided by NASA. Some of the constellation radiometers will provided by other U.S. agencies with existing (e.g. SSMI/S) or planned (NPOESS) radiometer assets. International groups have also expressed interest in contributing to the GPM mission including providing radiometer data for the GPM constellation. The use of a heterogeneous group of scanning radiometers each with its own unique purpose, characteristics and calibration offers a significant challenge for combining brightness temperatures or rain retrievals to create meaningful combined global radiometer products. However, the availability of active dual precipitation radar on the GPM core in combination with a well-calibrated radiometer on the same platform offers the possibility of inter-calibrating the constellation radiometers using the core satellite as a calibrator. This paper describes a joint NASA/GSFC and Colorado State University prototype effort at inter-calibrating existing radiometers using such a core calibrator approach. In the prototype, existing radiometers (i.e. SSM/I and AMSR-E) are intercalibrated, as required, using the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) as the calibration core

  10. Precipitation from the GPM Microwave Imager and Constellation Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite precipitation retrievals are fundamentally underconstrained requiring either implicit or explicit a-prior information to constrain the solutions. The radiometer algorithm being designed for the GPM core and constellation satellites makes this a-priori information explicit in the form of an a-priori database of possible rain structures and a Bayesian retrieval scheme. The a-priori database has its heritage in the TRMM satellite which ushered in an era of active/passive microwave retrievals. Because the output from such retrievals is physically consistent with the rainfall seen by the radar and the brightness temperatures seen by the radiometer, they are ideally suited for the a-priori database. This approach will be repeated for the Global Precipitation Mission, now scheduled for launch in February 2014. Its core satellite will carry a dual frequency radar and state of the art microwave radiometer. This combination of sensors, and the accompanying multi-sensor algorithm will provide a basis for creating the a-priori database for the radiometer only retrievals that is applicable not only to the wider swath of the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), but to all the constellation radiometers. This talk will present the pre-launch synthesis of various satellite systems to simulate the core satellite retrieval necessary to have a reasonably robust database in place for the launch of the GPM core satellite. The talk will then focus on the implementation of the algorithm itself. This algorithm has a number of advances over previous versions. Most importantly, is the absence of screening routines that previously identified pixels as being raining or non-raining. This was particularly important over land where the surface could easily be mistaken for ice scattering in raining clouds. By having much better controls over the land surface and land surface emissivities, along with robust a-priori databases, the new algorithm relies completely on the Tb signature to determine

  11. The Afternoon Constellation: A Formation of Earth Observing Systems for the Atmosphere and Hydrosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    Two of the large EOS observatories, Aqua (formerly EOS-PM) and Aura (formerly EOS-CHEM) will fly is nearly the same inclination with 1:30 PM -15 min ascending node equatorial crossing times. Between Aura and Aqua a series of smaller satellites will be stationed: Cloudsat, CALYPSO (formerly PICASSO-CENA), and PARASOL. This constellation of low earth orbit satellites will provide an unprecedented opportunity to make near simultaneous atmospheric cloud and aerosol observations. This paper will provide details of the science opportunity and describe the sensor types for the afternoon constellation. This constellation by accretion provides a prototype for the Earth Science Vision sensor web and represent the building books for a future web structure.

  12. Future Satellite Technology. The Role of Nanoelectronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    also be achieved at the architecture level by using a low-earth orbit (LEO) constellation . An example might be an array of nanosatellites in random LEO...of network has demonstrated that a network of 400 satellites could provide 95% global coverage. [Ref 2] 5 Figure 1 - Constellation of nanosatellites...is their small size which makes them nearly impossible to track. 3. Utility Due to their reduced weight and volume, a small constellation of

  13. Sea State and Weather Assessment Capability for NASA's Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, B. J.; Keller, V. W.

    2008-01-01

    Marine weather and related parameters such as wind, ocean wave height and period, air temperature, sea surface temperature, visibility, and potential for icing are critical to the design, operation, and safety of crewed space vehicles. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Constellation Program requires detailed assessment of marine weather related parameters that may be encountered during launch, abort, landing, and crew rescue operations for the crewed Ares/Orion space vehicles. This information is required for both space vehicle design and operational purposes. The space vehicles must be designed such that they can withstand the environment they are likely to encounter. The crewed Ares/Orion space vehicles will launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida for both International Space Station (ISS) missions with 51.6 o inclination orbits and lunar missions with approximately 28 inclination orbits. Since both missions will fly over the Atlantic Ocean on ascent to orbit and will fly over the Pacific Ocean on descent from orbit, an unlikely but possible emergency abort could require parachuting the Orion capsule and crew into the ocean. This situation could potentially put the crew in an isolated and hazardous environment for several hours while they await rescue. Therefore, abort, landing, and crew rescue elements of the Constellation Program must address weather related parameters on a global scale. This paper describes buoy measurement data, sea surface temperature satellite data, and sea state computer model data that are being utilized by the Constellation Program to address these design and operational issues.

  14. Sea State and Weather Capability for NASA's Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, R. E.; Keller, V. W.

    2008-01-01

    Marine weather and related parameters such as wind, ocean wave height and period, air temperature, sea surface temperature, visibility, and potential for icing are critical to the design, operation, and safety of crewed space vehicles. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Constellation Program requires detailed assessment of marine weather related parameters that may be encountered during launch, abort, landing, and crew rescue operations for the crewed Axes/Orion space vehicles. This information is required for both space vehicle design and operational purposes. The space vehicles must be designed such that they cam withstand the environment they are likely to encounter. The crewed Axes/Orion space vehicles will launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida for both International Space Station (ISS) missions with 51.6deg inclination orbits and lunar missions with approximately 280 inclination orbits. Since both missions will fly ever the Atlantic Ocean on ascent to orbit and will fly over the Pacific Ocean on descent from orbit, an unlikely but possible emergency abort could require parachuting the Orion capsule and crew into the ocean. This situation could potentially put the crew in an isolated and hazardous environment for severn hours while they await rescue. Therefore, abort, landing, and crew rescue elements of the Constellation Program must address weather related parameters on a global scale. This paper describes buoy measurement data, sea surface temperature satellite data, and sea state computer model data that are being utilized by the Constellation Program to address these design and operational issues.

  15. ISHM Implementation for Constellation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Holland, Randy; Schmalzel, John; Duncavage, Dan; Crocker, Alan; Alena, Rick

    2006-01-01

    Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is a capability that focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex System (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, prognosis of future anomalies), and provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) "not just data" to control systems for safe and effective operation. This capability is currently done by large teams of people, primarily from ground, but needs to be embedded on-board systems to a higher degree to enable NASA's new Exploration Mission (long term travel and stay in space), while increasing safety and decreasing life cycle costs of systems (vehicles; platforms; bases or outposts; and ground test, launch, and processing operations). This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of ISHM for the Constellation system.

  16. The Solar system.Stars and constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horia Minda, Octavian

    2017-04-01

    It is important for students to understand what is in our Solar System. The Students need to know that there are other things besides the Earth, Sun and Moon in the solar sky. The students will learn about the other eight planets and a few other celestial objects like stars and constellations. Constellations are useful because they can help people to recognize stars in the sky. By looking for patterns, the stars and locations can be much easier to spot. The constellations had uses in ancient times. They were used to help keep track of the calendar. This was very important so that people knew when to plant and harvest crops. Another important use for constellations was navigation. By finding Ursa Minor it is fairly easy to spot the North Star (Polaris). Using the height of the North Star in the sky, navigators could figure out their latitude helping ships to travel across the oceans. Objective: 1. The students will be introduced to the origin of the stars they see at night. 2. They will learn that there are groups of stars called constellations. The students will individually create their own constellations. They will be given the chance to tell the class a small story explaining their constellation. Evaluation of Children: The children will be evaluated through the creation of their constellations and ability to work in groups on the computers.

  17. Ocean altimetry and wind applications of a GNSS nanosatellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Randall; Ruf, Christopher S.; Seki, Haruo

    2012-11-01

    Recent developments in electronics and nanosatellite technologies combined with modeling techniques developed over the past 20 years have enabled a new class of altimetry and wind remote sensing capabilities that offer markedly improved performance over existing observatories while opening avenues to new applications. Most existing spaceborne ocean altimetry and wind observatories are in polar low Earth orbits that maximize global coverage but result in either large gaps at the tropics or long time intervals between geolocation measurement revisits. This, combined with their use of radar systems operating in the C and Ku-bands, obscures key information about the ocean and the global climate. Using GNSS-based bi-static scatterometry performed by a constellation of nanosatellites in a non-polar low Earth orbit could provide ocean altimetry and wind data with unprecedented temporal resolution and spatial coverage across the full dynamic range of ocean wind speeds in all precipitating conditions - all with a system cost substantially less than existing and planned systems. This paper contrasts the performance of a GNSS nanosatellite constellation with the existing monolithic remote sensing observatories while identifying synergies of the systems that can be exploited to achieve a more complete understanding of both ocean current and wind phenomena. Two specific applications are reviewed; ocean winds and ocean wave altimetry. The recently awarded Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission will be used for the ocean wind comparison while a notional GNSS constellation will be used for comparison of the ocean wave altimetry application. Design requirements, applications, and system implementation are presented for the GNSS nanosatellite constellation.

  18. Constellation X-Ray Observatory Unlocking the Mysteries of Black Holes, Dark Matter and Life Cycles of Matter in the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kim; Wanjek, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    This document provides an overview of the Contellation X-Ray Observatory and its mission. The observatory consists of four x-ray telescopes borne on a satellite constellation at the Earth-Sun L2 point.

  19. Constellation X-Ray Observatory Unlocking the Mysteries of Black Holes, Dark Matter and Life Cycles of Matter in the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kim; Wanjek, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    This document provides an overview of the Contellation X-Ray Observatory and its mission. The observatory consists of four x-ray telescopes borne on a satellite constellation at the Earth-Sun L2 point.

  20. Beta Pic observations requested for BRITE-Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2017-01-01

    The AAVSO is part of the BRITE-Constellation Ground Based Observations Team (GBOT), supporting cutting-edge science from the BRITE-Constellation satellites and coordinating with BRITE-Constellation scientist Dr. Konstanze Zwintz (Universitaet Innsbruck) and her team. The delta Scuti star beta Pic (NSV 16683) (3.80-3.86V) is one of the BRITE stars being focused on during this season. Bet Pic is particularly interesting now because a transit of the star's planet's Hill sphere (the region around a planet in which it dominates the attraction of satellites) is predicted to occur during 2017-2018. Ongoing observations beginning now are valuable to establish a baseline prior to the transit. The AAVSO's webpage on the BRITE target stars was updated in November with information on bet Pic from Dr. Zwintz. AAVSO observers with appropriate equipment and located at a southern enough latitude are encouraged to observe bet Pic. Its brightness makes bet Pic well suited to PEP and DSLR photometry; CCD photometry is also possible. However, great care must be taken by all observers, especially those using CCD, to avoid saturation. As the amplitude of this star is very small, visual observations are very difficult, but they are welcome. Multicolor (BVR) photometry better than 0.01 magnitude and time-series observations with a cadence of a few minutes (less than 10 minutes) are requested beginning now and continuing at least through 2017 and likely through 2018. The precision and cadence required are essential in order for the data to be most useful for studying the transit. Spectroscopists wishing to participate should submit their spectra directly to Dr. Konstanze Zwintz (konstanze.zwintz@uibk.ac.at). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  1. Impact of Eccentricity Build-Up and Graveyard Disposal Strategies on Meo Navigation Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, Jonas; Flegel, Sven Kevin; Sanchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Raul; Merz, Klaus

    With currently two constellations being in or close to the build-up phase, in a few years the Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) region will be populated with four complete navigation systems in relatively close orbital altitudes: The American GPS, Russian GLONASS, European Galileo and Chinese Beidou. To guarantee an appropriate visibility of constellation satellites from Earth, these constellations rely on certain defined orbits. For these, both the repeat pattern, which is basically defined by the semi-major axis and inclination, as well as the orbital planes, which are defined by the right ascension of ascending node, are important. To avoid an overcrowding of the region of interest, the disposal of satellites after their end-of-life is recommended. Because of their distances to Earth, ordinary disposal manoeuvers leading to a direct or delayed re-entry due to atmospheric drag are not feasible: The needed fuel masses for such manoeuvers are by far above the reasonable limits and available fuel budgets. Thus, additional approaches have to be applied. For this, in general two options do exist: Disposal to graveyard orbits or the disposal to eccentricity build-up orbits. For the graveyard strategy, the key criterium for the disposed spacecraft is that they must keep a safe minimum distance to altitude of the active constellation on a long-term time scale of up to 200 years. This constraint imposes stringent requirements on the stability of the graveyard orbit. Similar disposals are also performed for high LEO satellites. The eccentricity build-up strategy on the other hand uses an effect that is characteristic for the orbital regime of MEO navigation constellations: Due to resonant effects between the Earth's geopotential, the Sun and the Moon, depending on the initial conditions, a large eccentricity build-up takes place, which can lead to a re-entry of the satellite. In this paper, the effects of applying either the first or the second disposal strategy on all payloads

  2. Precipitation from the GPM Microwave Imager and Constellation Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Randel, David; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Kulie, Mark; Wang, Nai-Yu

    2014-05-01

    Satellite precipitation retrievals from microwave sensors are fundamentally underconstrained requiring either implicit or explicit a-priori information to constrain solutions. The radiometer algorithm designed for the GPM core and constellation satellites makes this a-priori information explicit in the form of a database of possible rain structures from the GPM core satellite and a Bayesian retrieval scheme. The a-priori database will eventually come from the GPM core satellite's combined radar/radiometer retrieval algorithm. That product is physically constrained to ensure radiometric consistency between the radars and radiometers and is thus ideally suited to create the a-priori databases for all radiometers in the GPM constellation. Until a robust product exists, however, the a-priori databases are being generated from the combination of existing sources over land and oceans. Over oceans, the Day-1 GPM radiometer algorithm uses the TRMM PR/TMI physically derived hydrometer profiles that are available from the tropics through sea surface temperatures of approximately 285K. For colder sea surface temperatures, the existing profiles are used with lower hydrometeor layers removed to correspond to colder conditions. While not ideal, the results appear to be reasonable placeholders until the full GPM database can be constructed. It is more difficult to construct physically consistent profiles over land due to ambiguities in surface emissivities as well as details of the ice scattering that dominates brightness temperature signatures over land. Over land, the a-priori databases have therefore been constructed by matching satellite overpasses to surface radar data derived from the WSR-88 network over the continental United States through the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ) initiative. Databases are generated as a function of land type (4 categories of increasing vegetation cover as well as 4 categories of increasing snow depth), land surface temperature and

  3. Scale analysis of equatorial plasma irregularities derived from Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Stolle, Claudia; Lühr, Hermann; Park, Jaeheung; Fejer, Bela G.; Kervalishvili, Guram N.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the scale sizes of equatorial plasma irregularities (EPIs) using measurements from the Swarm satellites during its early mission and final constellation phases. We found that with longitudinal separation between Swarm satellites larger than 0.4°, no significant correlation was found any more. This result suggests that EPI structures include plasma density scale sizes less than 44 km in the zonal direction. During the Swarm earlier mission phase, clearly better EPI correlations are obtained in the northern hemisphere, implying more fragmented irregularities in the southern hemisphere where the ambient magnetic field is low. The previously reported inverted-C shell structure of EPIs is generally confirmed by the Swarm observations in the northern hemisphere, but with various tilt angles. From the Swarm spacecrafts with zonal separations of about 150 km, we conclude that larger zonal scale sizes of irregularities exist during the early evening hours (around 1900 LT).

  4. The BRITE Constellation Nanosatellite Mission: Testing, Commissioning, and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablo, H.; Whittaker, G. N.; Popowicz, A.; Mochnacki, S. M.; Kuschnig, R.; Grant, C. C.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Matthews, J. M.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Handler, G.; Weiss, W. W.; Baade, D.; Wade, G. A.; Zocłońska, E.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Unterberger, M.; Zwintz, K.; Pigulski, A.; Rowe, J.; Koudelka, O.; Orleański, P.; Pamyatnykh, A.; Neiner, C.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Marciniszyn, G.; Romano, P.; Woźniak, G.; Zawistowski, T.; Zee, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE) Constellation, the first nanosatellite mission applied to astrophysical research, is a collaboration among Austria, Canada and Poland. The fleet of satellites (6 launched; 5 functioning) performs precise optical photometry of the brightest stars in the night sky. A pioneering mission like BRITE—with optics and instruments restricted to small volume, mass and power in several nanosatellites, whose measurements must be coordinated in orbit—poses many unique challenges. We discuss the technical issues, including problems encountered during on-orbit commissioning (especially higher-than-expected sensitivity of the CCDs to particle radiation). We describe in detail how the BRITE team has mitigated these problems, and provide a complete overview of mission operations. This paper serves as a template for how to effectively plan, build and operate future low-cost niche-driven space astronomy missions. Based on data collected by the BRITE Constellation satellite mission, designed, built, launched, operated and supported by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG), the University of Vienna, the Technical University of Graz, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS), the Foundation for Polish Science & Technology (FNiTP MNiSW), and National Science Centre (NCN).

  5. Multifeature distortion-insensitive constellation detection.

    PubMed

    Casey, Charles; Hassebrook, Laurence G; Crane, Eli; Davidson, Aaron

    2011-04-20

    Many applications require detection of multiple features that locally remain consistent in shape and intensity characteristics, but may globally change position with respect to one another over time or under different circumstances. We refer to these feature sets, defined by their characteristic relative positioning, as multifeature constellations. We introduce a method of processing in which multiple levels of correlation, using specially designed composite feature detection filters, are used to first detect local features, and then to detect constellations of these local features. We include experimental procedures and results indicating how the use of multifeature constellation detection may be utilized in applications such as sign language recognition and fingerprint matching.

  6. Distortion-insensitive correlation constellation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Charles; Hassebrook, Laurence G.; Crane, Eli; Davidson, Aaron

    2011-04-01

    There are applications that require detection of multiple features which remain consistent in shape locally, but may change position with respect to one another globally. We refer to these feature sets as multi-feature constellations. We introduce a multi-level correlation filter design which uses composite feature detection filters, which on one level detect local features, and then on the next level detect constellations of these local feature responses. We demonstrate the constellation filter method with sign language recognition and fingerprint matching.

  7. The 50 Constellation Priority Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S.; Joosten, K.; Eppler, D.; Gruener, J.; Mendell, W.; French, R.; Plescia, J.; Spudis, P.; Wargo, M.; Robinson, M.; Lucey, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Constellation program (CxP) has developed a list of 50 sites of interest on the Moon which will be targeted by the LRO narrow angle camera. The list has also been provided to the M team to supplement their targeting list. This list does not represent a "site selection" process; rather the goal was to find "representative" sites and terrains to understand the range of possible surface conditions for human lunar exploration to aid engineering design and operational planning. The list compilers leveraged heavily on past site selection work (e.g. Geoscience and a Lunar Base Workshop - 1988, Site Selection Strategy for a Lunar Outpost - 1990, Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) - 2005). Considerations included scientific, resource utilization, and operational merits, and a desire to span lunar terrain types. The targets have been organized into two "tiers" of 25 sites each to provide a relative priority ranking in the event of mutual interference. A LEAG SAT (special action team) was established to validate and recommend modifications to the list. This SAT was chaired by Dr. Paul Lucey. They provided their final results to CxP in May. Dr. Wendell Mendell will organize an on-going analysis of the data as they come down to ensure data quality and determine if and when a site has sufficient data to be retired from the list. The list was compiled using the best available data, however, it is understood that with the flood of new lunar data, minor modifications or adjustments may be required.

  8. Crystal beginnings: constellations of holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Martin; Brown, Stephen

    2005-04-01

    In January 2004 at the SPIE Photonics West conference held in San Jose, an exhibition of the late Steve Benton"s work was held in a corridor leading of the conferencing rooms. The exhibition contained most, if not all of his finest works including one of his most spectacular, 'Crystal Beginnings'. It was during an interval in the programme that I found myself standing in front of this hologram, discussing its practical makings with fellow holographer Fred Unterseher. Since no notes were available regarding its design or indeed the holographic camera, Fred and I began to try and decipher how Benton had made it. During the discussion we seemed to attract a small crowd, and it soon became apparent that we were not alone in our fascination. One of those in the crowd turned out to be Oliver Cossairt, one of Benton"s ex-students at MIT. He contributed to our argument by informing us that he had asked Benton how the hologram was made. Benton"s answer was "all the clues are there!" The more I looked at the mass of reference points in space, the more it appeared as some form of 3D map or constellation! This paper explores that idea, and asks for reader"s participation in the completion of a questionnaire. Its answers will be used as reference points in a holographic map.

  9. A mars communication constellation for human exploration and network science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, Francesco; Simonetto, Andrea; Martini, Roberto; Lavagna, Michèle

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses the possibility of exploiting a small spacecrafts constellation around Mars to ensure a complete and continuous coverage of the planet, for the purpose of supporting future human and robotic operations and taking advantage of optical transmission techniques. The study foresees such a communications mission to be implemented at least after 2020 and a high data-rate requirement is imposed for the return of huge scientific data from massive robotic exploration or to allow video transmissions from a possible human outpost. In addition, the set-up of a communication constellation around Mars would give the opportunity of exploiting this multi-platform infrastructure to perform network science, that would largely increase our knowledge of the planet. The paper covers all technical aspects of a feasibility study performed for the primary communications mission. Results are presented for the system trade-offs, including communication architecture, constellation configuration and transfer strategy, and the mission analysis optimization, performed through the application of a multi-objective genetic algorithm to two models of increasing difficulty for the low-thrust trajectory definition. The resulting communication architecture is quite complex and includes six 530 kg spacecrafts on two different orbital planes, plus one redundant unit per plane, that ensure complete coverage of the planet’s surface; communications between the satellites and Earth are achieved through optical links, that allow lower mass and power consumption with respect to traditional radio-frequency technology, while inter-satellite links and spacecrafts-to-Mars connections are ensured by radio transmissions. The resulting data-rates for Earth-Mars uplink and downlink, satellite-to-satellite and satellite-to-surface are respectively 13.7 Mbps, 10.2 Mbps, 4.8 Mbps and 4.3 Mbps, in worst-case. Two electric propulsion modules are foreseen, to be placed on a C3˜0 escape orbit with two

  10. SAC-C Mission and the Morning Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomb, F. R.; Alonso, C.; Hofmann, C.; Frulla, L.; Nollmann, I.; Milovich, J.; Kuba, J.; Ares, F.; Kalemkarian, M.

    2002-01-01

    components (ICARE), provided by CNES will permit improvement of risk estimation models for radiation effect on last generation integrated circuit technology. . On June 14th, 2000 CONAE and NASA signed an amendment to the Memorandum of Understanding for the SAC-C mission in order that the SAC-C satellite, were included in a constellation - named "Morning Constellation". It is integrated by USA satellites Landsat 7, EO 1, Terra, and Argentine SAC-C that feature on-board instruments from the United States, Argentina, Denmark, Italy, France, and Japan. The four satellite tracks on the Earth's surface are the same, their orbital height being 705 km and their inclination, 98.21 degrees. They cross the Equator at 10:00, 10:01, 10:15, and 10:30 hours, respectively (local time). Satellites comply with the World Wide Reference System. The Constellation has been working since March 2001 as a single mission and several cooperative activities have been undertaken and will be presented in this paper. Several jointly sponsored technical workshops have been held, and also collaborative spacecraft navigation experiments have been made. One of the objectives of the AM Constellation is the collaboration in the case of emergencies, NASA and CONAE agreed to give preference in those situation in the planification of their satellite acquisitions. From all the possible hazardous events, the most important for the country are fire and floods. In relation to fires, CONAE is presently adapting and developing the algorithms for using MODIS data to generate a fire map product. Additionally research on fire detection is carried out using the data from the HSTC camera. In relation to flooding, CONAE works in cooperation to national institutions providing the data and, in some cases, producing flood extent maps. In particular MMRS data is demonstrating to be very effective due to its spectral and radiometric resolutions, and its large swath which is well suited for extended countries like Argentina.

  11. Constellation Space Suit System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Aitchison, Lindsay; Daniel, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The Constellation Program has initiated the first new flight suit development project since the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed for the Space Shuttle Program in the 1970s. The Constellation suit system represents a significant challenge to designers in that the system is required to address all space suit functions needed through all missions and mission phases. This is in marked contrast to the EMU, which was designed specifically for micro-gravity space walks. The Constellation suit system must serve in all of the following scenarios: launch, entry and abort crew survival; micro-gravity extravehicular activity (EVA); and lunar (1/6th-gravity) surface EVA. This paper discusses technical efforts performed from May 2006 through February 2007 for the Constellation space suit system pressure garment.

  12. EOS Terra: Mission Status Constellation MOWG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantziaras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    This EOS Terra Mission Status Constellation MOWG will discuss mission summary; spacecraft subsystems summary, recent and planned activities; inclination adjust maneuvers, conjunction history, propellant usage and lifetime estimate; and end of mission plan.

  13. Deploying a single-launch nanosatellite constellation to several orbital planes using drag maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppinen, Hannu

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a method for deploying a nanosatellite constellation to several orbital planes from a single launch vehicle. The method is based on commercially available deorbit devices that are used to lower the initial orbit, and that are discarded after the correct altitude has been reached. Nodal precession of the right ascension of the ascending node at different altitudes results in spreading the orbital planes of the satellites. Maneuvering all satellites to a similar final altitude freezes the relative separation of the orbital planes. Calculations and simulations of the method are presented, and the results indicate that with a launch of 6 satellites to an initial 800 km sun-synchronous orbit, orbital plane separation of approximately 30° between each satellite can be achieved within 5 years, with each satellite in its own final 600 km orbital plane. Such a constellation could provide continuous global coverage, while requiring only one launch vehicle. Due to the timescales required by the method, it is best suited for nanosatellite missions designed for long lifetimes. Possible applications of such constellations are also discussed.

  14. Precise Point Positioning Using Triple GNSS Constellations in Various Modes.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-05-28

    This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) model, which combines the observations from three different global navigation satellite system (GNSS) constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou. Combining measurements from different GNSS systems introduces additional biases, including inter-system bias and hardware delays, which require rigorous modelling. Our model is based on the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) linear combinations. BSSD linear combination cancels out some receiver-related biases, including receiver clock error and non-zero initial phase bias of the receiver oscillator. Forming the BSSD linear combination requires a reference satellite, which can be selected from any of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou systems. In this paper three BSSD scenarios are tested; each considers a reference satellite from a different GNSS constellation. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets collected at four different IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment (IGS-MGEX) network are used to correct the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou measurements in the post-processing PPP mode. A real-time PPP solution is also obtained, which is referred to as RT-PPP in the sequel, through the use of the IGS real-time service (RTS) for satellite orbit and clock corrections. However, only GPS and Galileo observations are used for the RT-PPP solution, as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not presently available for BeiDou system. All post-processed and real-time PPP solutions are compared with the traditional un-differenced GPS-only counterparts. It is shown that combining the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou observations in the post-processing mode improves the PPP convergence

  15. Precise Point Positioning Using Triple GNSS Constellations in Various Modes

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) model, which combines the observations from three different global navigation satellite system (GNSS) constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou. Combining measurements from different GNSS systems introduces additional biases, including inter-system bias and hardware delays, which require rigorous modelling. Our model is based on the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) linear combinations. BSSD linear combination cancels out some receiver-related biases, including receiver clock error and non-zero initial phase bias of the receiver oscillator. Forming the BSSD linear combination requires a reference satellite, which can be selected from any of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou systems. In this paper three BSSD scenarios are tested; each considers a reference satellite from a different GNSS constellation. Natural Resources Canada’s GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets collected at four different IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment (IGS-MGEX) network are used to correct the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou measurements in the post-processing PPP mode. A real-time PPP solution is also obtained, which is referred to as RT-PPP in the sequel, through the use of the IGS real-time service (RTS) for satellite orbit and clock corrections. However, only GPS and Galileo observations are used for the RT-PPP solution, as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not presently available for BeiDou system. All post-processed and real-time PPP solutions are compared with the traditional un-differenced GPS-only counterparts. It is shown that combining the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou observations in the post-processing mode improves the PPP convergence

  16. Impact of eccentricity build-up and graveyard disposal Strategies on MEO navigation constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, Jonas; Domínguez-González, Raúl; Flegel, Sven K.; Sánchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Merz, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    With currently two constellations being in or close to the build-up phase, in a few years the Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) region will be populated with four complete navigation systems in relatively close orbital altitudes: The American GPS, Russian GLONASS, European Galileo, and Chinese BeiDou. To guarantee an appropriate visibility of constellation satellites from Earth, these constellations rely on certain defined orbits. For this, both the repeat pattern, which is basically defined by the semimajor axis and inclination, as well as the orbital planes, which are defined by the right ascension of ascending node, are determining values. To avoid an overcrowding of the region of interest, the disposal of satellites after their end-of-life is recommended. However, for the MEO region, no internationally agreed mitigation guidelines exist. Because of their distances to Earth, ordinary disposal manoeuvres leading to a direct or delayed re-entry due to atmospheric drag are not feasible: The needed fuel masses for such manoeuvres are by far above the reasonable limits and available fuel budgets. Thus, additional approaches have to be applied. For this, in general two options exist: disposal to graveyard orbits or the disposal to eccentricity build-up orbits. In the study performed, the key criterion for the graveyard strategy is that the disposed spacecraft must keep a safe minimum distance to the altitude of the active constellation on a long-term time scale of up to 200 years. This constraint imposes stringent requirements on the stability of the graveyard orbit. Similar disposals are also performed for high LEO satellites and disposed GEO payloads. The eccentricity build-up strategy on the other hand uses resonant effects between the Earth's geopotential, the Sun and the Moon. Depending on the initial conditions, these can cause a large eccentricity build-up, which finally can lead to a re-entry of the satellite. In this paper, the effects of applying either the first or

  17. Effect of orbit inclination on the performance of FORMOSAT-3/-7 type constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng-Shing Chern, Rock; Huang, Chieh-Ming

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of orbit inclination angle on the performance of the Formosa satellite number 3 (FORMOSAT-3 or FS3) and FORMOSAT-7 (FS7) type constellations. The FS3 developed by National Space Organization (NSPO) of Taiwan was launched on 15 April 2006. It is a constellation consisting of 6 microsatellites at 72° orbit inclination and 800 km altitude for the acquisition of the global positioning system (GPS) signal occultation data. The international space community has given very positive comments on the contribution of FS3. Therefore, NSPO is planning the future program and designates FS7 to be the follow-up of FS3. There are two major indexes to assess the performance of FS3/7 type constellations: maximization of daily data acquisition and evenness in global data distribution. From system simulation, the number of data acquisition of FS3 is 2415. However, the number can be increased to 3050 by changing the orbit inclination to 154°. The drawback is that there is no data beyond 45° latitude north/south. After trade-off, it has been found that the optimal configuration is a 3-2-1 combination with 3 satellites deployed at 154° inclination, 2 satellites at 108° and 1 satellite at 90°. Daily data acquisition is 2924 using this configuration. For readers' information, the 3-2-1 configuration could probably be called the "hybrid constellation" because it is not a standard one like the "Walker" or "Draim" or "Ballard" constellations.

  18. FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 GNSS radio occultation constellation mission for global weather monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K.; Fong, Chen-Joe; Wenkel, M. J.; Wilczynski, P.; Yen, N.; Chang, G. S.

    The United States and Taiwan, through an Agreement signed in May 2010, have begun to jointly develop a satellite program to deliver next-generation global navigation satellite system (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) data to users around the world. This Program, known as FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2, is the follow-on to the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC mission, which was a joint US-Taiwan 6-satellite constellation demonstration mission launched in April 2006. The COSMIC mission was the world's first operational GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) mission for global weather forecast; climate monitoring; atmospheric, ionospheric, and geodetic research. The GPS-RO data from COSMIC has been extremely valuable to the climate, meteorology, and space weather communities, including real-time forecasting users as well as U.S. and international research communities. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC reached the end of its design life in 2011. The constellation satellites have exhibited some unrecoverable anomalies and consequently the critical real-time satellite observing capability is degrading and may go offline with uncertainty in the coming few years. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Taiwan's National Space Organization (NSPO) have recognized the potential GPS-RO data gap due to the degrading COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 constellation and agreed to implement the follow-on COSMIC-2/FORMOSAT-7 mission in 2010. Both experienced programmatic difficulties in the past two years in the course of implementing the COSMIC-2/FORMOSAT-7 Program; however, significant progress over the past six months has occurred. This paper will provide an overview of the COSMIC2/FORMOSAT-7 Program including the Program goals and objectives. It will also discuss the status of the Program including current satellite and constellation configuration, activities to determine the optimal and minimal ground system architecture to meet data latency requirements, and other discussions on the mission and scientific payload technol

  19. 78 FR 32385 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; CER Generation II, LLC; Constellation Mystic Power, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Exelon Generation Company, LLC; CER Generation II, LLC; Constellation Mystic Power, LLC; Constellation NewEnergy, Inc.; Constellation Power Source Generation, Inc.; Criterion Power..., CER Generation II, LLC, Constellation Mystic Power, LLC, Constellation NewEnergy, Inc.,...

  20. Computation of Solar Radiative Fluxes by 1D and 3D Methods Using Cloudy Atmospheres Inferred from A-train Satellite Data.

    PubMed

    Barker, H W; Kato, S; Wehr, T

    This study used realistic representations of cloudy atmospheres to assess errors in solar flux estimates associated with 1D radiative transfer models. A scene construction algorithm, developed for the EarthCARE mission, was applied to CloudSat, CALIPSO and MODIS satellite data thus producing 3D cloudy atmospheres measuring 61 km wide by 14,000 km long at 1 km grid-spacing. Broadband solar fluxes and radiances were then computed by a Monte Carlo photon transfer model run in both full 3D and 1D independent column approximation modes. Results were averaged into 1,303 (50 km)(2) domains. For domains with total cloud fractions Ac  < 0.7 top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedos tend to be largest for 3D transfer with differences increasing with solar zenith angle. Differences are largest for Ac  > 0.7 and characterized by small bias yet large random errors. Regardless of Ac , differences between 3D and 1D transfer rarely exceed ±30 W m(-2) for net TOA and surface fluxes and ±10 W m(-2) for atmospheric absorption. Horizontal fluxes through domain sides depend on Ac with ∼20% of cases exceeding ±30 W m(-2); the largest values occur for Ac  > 0.7. Conversely, heating rate differences rarely exceed ±20%. As a cursory test of TOA radiative closure, fluxes produced by the 3D model were averaged up to (20 km)(2) and compared to values measured by CERES. While relatively little attention was paid to optical properties of ice crystals and surfaces, and aerosols were neglected entirely, ∼30% of the differences between 3D model estimates and measurements fall within ±10 W m(-2); this is the target agreement set for EarthCARE. This, coupled with the aforementioned comparison between 3D and 1D transfer, leads to the recommendation that EarthCARE employ a 3D transport model when attempting TOA radiative closure.

  1. Electric Propulsion System for Constellation Deployment and Orbit Control of Minisats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, P.; de Rocco, L.; Lovera, M.

    1999-09-01

    The late technology developments and the demand for low-cost space missions have raised the interest in small satellites and in their potential use as parts of satellite formations as well as building units of satellite constellations. Formation flying of small satellites can be used to bring in-orbit spares for failed payloads on larger satellites as well as to replace large satellites at all by flying the mission on more small satellites, each carrying a single payload. Small satellites can be used in constellations for scientific missions (e.g. remote sensing) as well as for commercial purposes (e.g. data relay). Yet, "small satellite" doesn't necessarily mean "cheap satellite": cost reduction must be enforced into the space mission design since the very beginning of it, at system level. This usually implies seeking for trade-offs on most expensive system items for a small sat. Among these, we surely have the launch and the onboard propulsion system for orbital manoeuvres and station keeping: the stricter the requirements, the higher the costs. And, when dealing with satellite constellations or formations, orbital requirements can be quite challenging. The system designer is faced with the dilemma on whether to buy a relatively expensive dedicated launch or to have a highly cost-impactive autonomous onboard propulsion system that should perform orbit transfers as well. The present paper, which is an up-to-date version of the one presented at IAF-99, introduces a system based on FEEP (Field Emission Electric Propulsion) technology, featuring low thrust plug-on propulsion units. Thanks to the self-contained concept of FEEP thrusters and to the plug-on feature of the whole system, a very low cost-impactive onboard propulsion system can be implemented in order to serve for both orbital manoeuvres (constellation / formation deployment, orbit rising) and orbit maintenance (drag compensation, station keeping relative to other satellites). Most convenient strategies to

  2. Retrievals of Effective Aerosol Layer Height and Single Scattering Albedo for Biomass-Burning Smoke and Mineral Dust Aerosols from A-Train Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M.; Hsu, C.

    2010-12-01

    Launches of state-of-the-art satellite sensors dedicated to aerosol remote sensing in recent years marked the beginning of a new era in aerosol-related studies by virtue of the well-coordinated observing system consisting of an array of satellites flown in formation, so called A-Train (Afternoon satellites constellation). The capabilities of the individual sensors aboard the A-Train satellites are complementary and overlapping in terms of retrievable aerosol parameters, sensitivity, spatial resolution and coverage. Thus, there is a great potential to gain value-added information about aerosols by merging observations from the A-Train sensors. In this study, we introduce a new algorithm, which can be utilized to derive aerosol layer height (ALH) and single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass-burning smoke and airborne mineral dust aerosols by synthesizing observations from three A-Train satellite sensors: CALIOP, MODIS, and OMI. By using this algorithm, it is presented that ALH and SSA of biomass-burning smoke aerosols over North America, Southeast Asia, and Europe can be derived successfully. We show the retrieved values of SSA bear reasonable agreements with those from AERONET. The results of this study also reveal that the algorithm has a basic skill to estimate ALH by combining only MODIS and OMI observations, allowing us to separate smoke aerosols residing within the boundary layer from those elevated in the free troposphere. Currently, another version of the algorithm to be applicable for mineral dust aerosols is under development, and earlier results will be presented. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of transport and radiative effects of biomass-burning smoke and mineral dust aerosols.

  3. One Web Satellites Ground Breaking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-16

    A model of a OneWeb satellite like those the company will build to will connect all areas of the world to the Internet wirelessly. The company plans to launch 2,000 of the satellites as part of its constellation. The satellites will be built at a new factory at Exploration Park at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The company held a groundbreaking ceremony for the factory. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  4. GPS radio occultation constellation design with the optimal performance in Asia Pacific region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgarimehr, Milad; Hossainali, Masoud Mashhadi

    2015-06-01

    The growing desire for better spatial and also temporal distribution of radio occultation data is a motivation for extensive researches considering either number of GNSS/receiver satellites or better optimization tools resulting in better distributions. This paper addresses the problem of designing a global positioning system-only radio occultation mission with the optimal performance in Asia Pacific region. Constellation Patterns are discussed and 2D-lattice and 3D-lattice flower constellations are adopted to develop a system with circular and elliptical orbits, respectively. A perturbed orbit propagation model leading to significantly more accurate pre-analysis is used. Emphasizing on the spatial and also temporal distribution of radio occultation events for the first time, distribution norm is provided as a volumetric distribution measure using Voronoi diagram concept in a 3D space consisting temporal and spatial intervals. Optimizations are performed using genetic algorithm to determine optimal constellation design parameters by the suitable fitness function and constraints devised. The resulted constellation has been evaluated by a regional comparison to the globally distributed FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC in terms of the distribution norm, number of radio occultation events and also coverage as an additional point-to-point distribution measure. Although it is demonstrated that the optimal 3D-lattice enjoys better performance than FORMOSAT-3, the design approach results in a 2D-lattice flower constellation which is superior to other constellations in regional emphasis of radio occultation events. Its global performance is discussed and it is demonstrated that using multi-GNSS receiver to increase satellites may not guarantee a good distribution of radio occultation data in some aspects.

  5. New interpretation of the ancient constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementev, M. S.

    New method of study of the ancient constellations and mythes is discussed. It is based on the comparison of two maps - the sky and the Earth. The Stellar map is built in an equatorial system of coordinates, the geografic map - in the Mercator's projection and of the same scale. The former map is put on the laster one. The constellation of Pleiades (seven daughter of Atlant) is placed on the meridian of Atlant (Western coast of Africa). If the Stellar map is constructed for a epoch J-3000 (3000 years up to B.C.) then we could found the following. The constellations Andromeda (the daughter of the Ethiopian tsar), Cetus, Perseus and Cassiopeia (mother of Andromeda) are projected on the centre, south and west of Ancient Ethiopia and Mediterranean Sea, respectively. That is all the constellations fall to the places, where events described in mythes occured. A constellation Cepheus (Arabian name is "Burning") covers the Caucasus. Possibly, before a epoch J-1000 this group of stars was connected with Prometheus. It is known Prometheus was chained to the Caucasian rock because of stealing of a fire. Ancient Chineses divided the sky in other way. They called "The Heavenly Town" the area of sky consisting of stars in Herculis, Aquilae and Ophiuchi. Parts of the mentioned constellation were called as a provinces in Ancient China. If the Heavenly Town locate near the Ancient China then the Greek constellations (Andromeda, Perseus and Cetus) will appear over Africa. Three important conclusions follow from this: (i) the geography of the Earth is reflected on the sky; (ii) the ancient astronomers were investigating a connection between the sky and Earth; (iii) the ancient peoples exchanged by the information about a construction of the world.

  6. The DUBAISAT-2/DEIMOS-2 constellation: public-private cooperation between Emirates and Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirondini, Fabrizio; Al Marri, Salem

    2014-10-01

    The Emirates Institution for Advanced Science and Technology (EIAST) was established by the Dubai Government in 2006 with the goal of promoting a culture of advanced scientific research and technology innovation in Dubai and the UAE, and enhancing technology innovation and scientific skills among UAE nationals. EIAST launched in November 2013 the DubaiSat-2, its second Earth Observation satellite, and the first to provide VHR multispectral imagery. The satellite has successfully completed its in-orbit commissioning and it is now fully operational. ELECNOR DEIMOS is a private Spanish company, part of the Elecnor industrial group, which owns and operates DEIMOS-1, the first Spanish Earth Observation satellite, launched in 2009. ELECNOR DEIMOS launched in June 2014 its second satellite, DEIMOS-2, a VHR, agile satellite capable of providing 4-bands multispectral imagery. The whole end-to-end DEIMOS- 2 system has been designed to provide a cost-effective and highly responsive service to cope with the increasing need of fast access to VHR imagery. The two satellites, with a mass of 300 kg each, were developed in cooperation with Satrec-I (South Korea), and are based on the SpaceEye-1 platform. The two satellites have an identical payload, and produce 75- cm resolution pan-sharpened imagery across a 12-km swath. Together, they have a combined collection capacity of more than 300,000 sqkm per day. EIAST and ELECNOR DEIMOS have set up a unique, trans-national public-private partnership to operate the two satellites as a constellation, jointly commercialize the imagery of both satellites, and interchange technical and operational information to increase the efficiency of both systems. The operations of the constellation are based on four ground stations: Al Khawaneej (Dubai), Puertollano (Spain), Kiruna (Sweden) and Inuvik (Canada), which assure at least a contact per orbit with each satellite. The constellation functionalities of the ground segment were developed by EIAST

  7. Cost Effective Persistent Regional Surveillance with Reconfigurable Satellite Constellations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-24

    routine that builds on -NSGA-II [27,28] by adding several additional features from the -MOEA [29] and Borg -MOEA [30] optimization routines. The added...mitigates deterioration. - NSGA-II uses the -Archive to seed a new population after restart while -MOEA and Borg -MOEA use the -Archive to generate one...the approach taken in Borg -MOEA, but we chose not to implement the adaptive scheme where the probability of selecting different operators is adjusted

  8. Coverage Predictions and Selection Criteria for Satellite Constellations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    However, as is well known, there are only five regular (Platonic) polyhedra, namely the tetrahedron, octahedron, cube, icosahedron and dodecahedron ...for the dodecahedron ), the semi-regular polyhedra each have either two or three different types of regular polygons forming their faces. However, we... Dodecahedron : latitudes 52.62260 and 10.81230 at longitudes 00, 720, 1440, 2160 and 2880; latitudes -10.81230 and -52.6226O at longitudes 360, 1080, 1800

  9. Optimal orbits for space constellations of Mars navigation satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, T. A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent scientific discoveries at Mars have heralded an unprecedented commitment and focus by NASA and its international partners toward further exploration of Mars. As part of this effort NASA has an on-going project, called the Mars Network, to examine communication and navigation infrastructure requirements needed to support Mars exploration.

  10. Space Technology 5: Enabling Future Micro-Sat Constellation Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Candace C.; Webb, Evan H.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Project is part of NASA s New Millennium Program. ST-5 will consist of a constellation of three micro-satellites, each approximately 25 kg in mass. The mission goals are to demonstrate the research-quality science capability of the ST-5 spacecraft; to operate the three spacecraft as a constellation; and to design, develop and flight-validate three capable micro-satellites with new technologies. ST-5 is designed to measurably raise the utility of small satellites by providing high functionality in a low mass, low power, and low volume package. The whole of ST-5 is greater than the sum of its parts: the collection of components into the ST-5 spacecraft allows it to perform the functionality of a larger scientific spacecraft on a micro-satellite platform. The ST-5 mission was originally designed to be launched as a secondary payload into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). Recently, the mission has been replanned for a Pegasus XL dedicated launch into an elliptical polar orbit. A three-month flight demonstration phase, beginning in March 2006, will validate the ability to perform science measurements, as well as the technologies and constellation operations. ST- 5 s technologies and concepts will then be transferred to future micro-sat science missions.

  11. Space Technology 5: Enabling Future Micro-Sat Constellation Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Candace C.; Webb, Evan H.; Slavin, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Project is part of NASA s New Millennium Program. ST-5 will consist of a constellation of three micro-satellites, each approximately 25 kg in mass. The mission goals are to demonstrate the research-quality science capability of the ST-5 spacecraft, to operate the three spacecraft as a constellation; and to design, develop and flight-validate three capable micro-satellites with new technologies. ST-5 is designed to measurably raise the utility of small satellites by providing high functionality in a low mass, low power, and low volume package. The whole of ST-5 is greater than the sum of its parts: the collection of components into the ST-5 spacecraft allows it to perform the functionality of a larger scientific spacecraft on a micro-satellite platform. The ST-5 mission was originally designed to be launched as a secondary payload into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). Recently, the mission has been replanned for a Pegasus XL dedicated launch into an elliptical polar orbit. A three-month flight demonstration phase, beginning in March 2006, will validate the ability to perform science measurements, as well as the technologies and constellation operations. ST- 5 s technologies and concepts will then be transferred to future micro-sat science missions.

  12. Space Technology 5: Enabling Future Micro-Sat Constellation Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Candace C.; Webb, Evan H.; Slavin, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Project is part of NASA s New Millennium Program. ST-5 will consist of a constellation of three micro-satellites, each approximately 25 kg in mass. The mission goals are to demonstrate the research-quality science capability of the ST-5 spacecraft, to operate the three spacecraft as a constellation; and to design, develop and flight-validate three capable micro-satellites with new technologies. ST-5 is designed to measurably raise the utility of small satellites by providing high functionality in a low mass, low power, and low volume package. The whole of ST-5 is greater than the sum of its parts: the collection of components into the ST-5 spacecraft allows it to perform the functionality of a larger scientific spacecraft on a micro-satellite platform. The ST-5 mission was originally designed to be launched as a secondary payload into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). Recently, the mission has been replanned for a Pegasus XL dedicated launch into an elliptical polar orbit. A three-month flight demonstration phase, beginning in March 2006, will validate the ability to perform science measurements, as well as the technologies and constellation operations. ST- 5 s technologies and concepts will then be transferred to future micro-sat science missions.

  13. RapidEye constellation relative radiometric accuracy measurement using lunar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn, Joe; Tyc, George; Beckett, Keith; Hashida, Yoshi

    2009-09-01

    The RapidEye constellation includes five identical satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Each satellite has a 5-band (blue, green, red, red-edge and near infrared (NIR)) multispectral imager at 6.5m GSD. A three-axes attitude control system allows pointing the imager of each satellite at the Moon during lunations. It is therefore possible to image the Moon from near identical viewing geometry within a span of 80 minutes with each one of the imagers. Comparing the radiometrically corrected images obtained from each band and each satellite allows a near instantaneous relative radiometric accuracy measurement and determination of relative gain changes between the five imagers. A more traditional terrestrial vicarious radiometric calibration program has also been completed by MDA on RapidEye. The two components of this program provide for spatial radiometric calibration ensuring that detector-to-detector response remains flat, while a temporal radiometric calibration approach has accumulated images of specific dry dessert calibration sites. These images are used to measure the constellation relative radiometric response and make on-ground gain and offset adjustments in order to maintain the relative accuracy of the constellation within +/-2.5%. A quantitative comparison between the gain changes measured by the lunar method and the terrestrial temporal radiometric calibration method is performed and will be presented.

  14. Precise orbit determination of BeiDou constellation based on BETS and MGEX network.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yidong; Liu, Yang; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Xiuguang; Zheng, Fu

    2014-04-15

    Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System is officially operational as a regional constellation with five Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, five Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Observations from the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) and the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) network from 1 January to 31 March 2013 are processed for orbit determination of the BeiDou constellation. Various arc lengths and solar radiation pressure parameters are investigated. The reduced set of ECOM five-parameter model produces better performance than the full set of ECOM nine-parameter model for BeiDou IGSO and MEO. The orbit overlap for the middle days of 3-day arc solutions is better than 20 cm and 14 cm for IGSO and MEO in RMS, respectively. Satellite laser ranging residuals are better than 10 cm for both IGSO and MEO. For BeiDou GEO, the orbit overlap of several meters and satellite laser ranging residuals of several decimetres can be achieved.

  15. Precise orbit determination of BeiDou constellation based on BETS and MGEX network

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yidong; Liu, Yang; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Xiuguang; Zheng, Fu

    2014-01-01

    Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System is officially operational as a regional constellation with five Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, five Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Observations from the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) and the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) network from 1 January to 31 March 2013 are processed for orbit determination of the BeiDou constellation. Various arc lengths and solar radiation pressure parameters are investigated. The reduced set of ECOM five-parameter model produces better performance than the full set of ECOM nine-parameter model for BeiDou IGSO and MEO. The orbit overlap for the middle days of 3-day arc solutions is better than 20 cm and 14 cm for IGSO and MEO in RMS, respectively. Satellite laser ranging residuals are better than 10 cm for both IGSO and MEO. For BeiDou GEO, the orbit overlap of several meters and satellite laser ranging residuals of several decimetres can be achieved. PMID:24733025

  16. Constellation based DORIS receiver network for ionospheric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainwater, D.; Gaussiran, T.; Barnum, B.

    2011-12-01

    Study of the upper and lower atmosphere has advanced to the point where a compelling need has emerged for global real-time specification of the most important observations as inputs to climate models. For the ionosphere, plasmasphere and magnetosphere this is the local free electron density (ED); for the troposphere it is the local water vapor content (WVC). We describe a proposal made to the GEOScan geoscience collaboration for a DORIS receiver to be flown on the Iridium-NEXT constellation that would provide precise, real-time measurements of both bulk ED WVC, as well as ionospheric scintillation; and precise orbit determination to the 1-3 cm level, thus valuable to the Earth gravity science community. Iridium-NEXT is a constellation of 66 satellites in six polar orbit planes, to be deployed starting in 2015. We describe how the DORIS frequency lever arm is superior to that of GPS for ionospheric purposes, and how DORIS data is currently being used to generate TWV data sets of comparable precision to GPS and VLBI data. GEOScan data would be persistent, global and real-time. Its data would be made available publicly in near-real-time.

  17. The NASA Constellation Program Procedure System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert G.; Wang, Lui

    2010-01-01

    NASA has used procedures to describe activities to be performed onboard vehicles by astronaut crew and on the ground by flight controllers since Apollo. Starting with later Space Shuttle missions and the International Space Station, NASA moved forward to electronic presentation of procedures. For the Constellation Program, another large step forward is being taken - to make procedures more interactive with the vehicle and to assist the crew in controlling the vehicle more efficiently and with less error. The overall name for the project is the Constellation Procedure Applications Software System (CxPASS). This paper describes some of the history behind this effort, the key concepts and operational paradigms that the work is based upon, and the actual products being developed to implement procedures for Constellation

  18. Science with the constellation-X observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Valinia, Azita; White, Nicholas; Tananbaum, Harvey

    1999-04-27

    The Constellation X-ray Mission is a high throughput X-ray facility emphasizing observations at high spectral resolution (E/{delta}E{approx}300-3000), and broad energy bandpass (0.25-40 keV). Constellation-X will provide a factor of nearly 100 increase in sensitivity over current high resolution X-ray spectroscopy missions. It is the X-ray astronomy equivalent of large ground-based optical telescopes such as the Keck Observatory and the ESO Very Large Telescope. When observations commence toward the end of next decade, Constellation-X will address many fundamental astrophysics questions such as: the formation and evolution of clusters of galaxies; constraining the baryon content of the Universe; determining the spin and mass of supermassive black holes in AGN; and probing strong gravity in the vicinity of black holes.

  19. The Earth Science Afternoon Constellation Contingency Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Warren F.; Richon, Karen

    2005-01-01

    The Earth Science Afternoon Constellation comprises NASA missions Aqua, Aura, CloudSat and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), the joint NASA/CNES mission CALIPSO and the CNES mission PARASOL. Both NASA and CNES offices are responsible for ensuring that contingency plans or other arrangements exist to cope with contingencies within their respective jurisdictions until the conclusion of all Afternoon Constellation operations. The Mission Operations Working Group, comprised of members from each of the missions, has developed the high-level procedures for maintaining the safety of this constellation. Each contingency situation requires detailed analyses before any decisions are made. This paper describes these procedures, and includes defining what constitutes a contingency situation, the pertinent parameters involved in the contingency analysis and guidelines for the actions required, based on the results of the contingency analyses.

  20. Motherhood constellation and representational change in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Innamorati, Marco; Sarracino, Diego; Dazzi, Nino

    2010-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and development of the motherhood constellation in pregnant women. The participants of the study were 162 pregnant women who were divided into three subgroups according to their gestation period (<6 months, 6-7 months, >7 months). The women were assessed using the Breakfast Interview, a microanalytic method devised by D.N. Stern (1995, 2004a). Two judges coded the transcripts of the interviews for the presence of the motherhood constellation themes using three-level rating scales. Results showed that the Life/Growth theme was the most frequent theme during pregnancy, and supported the hypothesis of a "peak" of the motherhood constellation themes around Month 6 to Month 7. Copyright © 2010 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  1. Trade-Space Analysis Tool for Constellations (TAT-C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Moigne, Jacqueline; Dabney, Philip; de Weck, Olivier; Foreman, Veronica; Grogan, Paul; Holland, Matthew; Hughes, Steven; Nag, Sreeja

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, space missions have relied on relatively large and monolithic satellites, but in the past few years, under a changing technological and economic environment, including instrument and spacecraft miniaturization, scalable launchers, secondary launches as well as hosted payloads, there is growing interest in implementing future NASA missions as Distributed Spacecraft Missions (DSM). The objective of our project is to provide a framework that facilitates DSM Pre-Phase A investigations and optimizes DSM designs with respect to a-priori Science goals. In this first version of our Trade-space Analysis Tool for Constellations (TAT-C), we are investigating questions such as: How many spacecraft should be included in the constellation? Which design has the best costrisk value? The main goals of TAT-C are to: Handle multiple spacecraft sharing a mission objective, from SmallSats up through flagships, Explore the variables trade space for pre-defined science, cost and risk goals, and pre-defined metrics Optimize cost and performance across multiple instruments and platforms vs. one at a time.This paper describes the overall architecture of TAT-C including: a User Interface (UI) interacting with multiple users - scientists, missions designers or program managers; an Executive Driver gathering requirements from UI, then formulating Trade-space Search Requests for the Trade-space Search Iterator first with inputs from the Knowledge Base, then, in collaboration with the Orbit Coverage, Reduction Metrics, and Cost Risk modules, generating multiple potential architectures and their associated characteristics. TAT-C leverages the use of the Goddard Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) to compute coverage and ancillary data, streamlining the computations by modeling orbits in a way that balances accuracy and performance.TAT-C current version includes uniform Walker constellations as well as Ad-Hoc constellations, and its cost model represents an aggregate model consisting of

  2. Machines and cutters: Constellation®.

    PubMed

    Witmer, Matthew T; Dugel, Pravin U

    2014-01-01

    The Alcon Constellation® provides state-of-the-art technology for vitrectomy surgery. Its innovative features include utilization of high-speed and small-gauge vitrectomy systems, surgeon-controlled duty cycle, fine intraocular pressure control, and integrated laser and intraocular gas mixing capabilities. The goal of vitrectomy surgery is the safe and efficient removal of vitreous while avoiding iatrogenic retinal tears or iatrogenic incarceration of retinal tissue. This requires the removal of vitreous in a controlled manner while maintaining safe levels of intraocular pressure. The Alcon Constellation contains improvements in technology that allow a surgeon to consistently accomplish these goals.

  3. Design of observation / telecommunication constellations : Synergy through a simulation platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainjonneau, S.; Gaertner, S.; Froment, F.; Raffier, B.

    2002-07-01

    Some new world-wide telecommunication or observation systems are based on LEO or MEO satellite constellations, used as relay between terminals or imaging target and gateways or ground stations, in order to provide telephony, high data rate or ground imaging to the end user. Such complex systems are characterized by several system constraints, due to the huge number of users or requests, and the movement of the satellites with regards to the Earth. The design of such whole system can be also considered as a complex problem. It has to be realized thanks to simulators, taking into account a part more or less important of the system constraints. This article presents a complete set of simulation tools, developed by Alcatel Space Industries, in the framework of different telecommunication and observation projects. These tools are regrouped inside a common workshop and based on a generic representation of new telecommunication and observation systems. Two major key points can be highlighted in this approach : two phases correspond to 0/A and A/B project phases and for each phase, five generic steps are followed to conduct to the system design. Such a complete tool chain allows to define and analyze the constellation behavior during the first project levels, when an important system engineering activity is required, in order to support system trade-offs and to determine the best system architecture to guarantee the largest coverage and capacity over the targeted countries. Hence these tools can be considered as very interesting prototypes for operational mission planning services too. The paper will illustrate all these principles by presenting the workshop architecture and by delivering several outputs and visualizations issued from the different tools. The use cases will be chosen among potential or fictitious architectures.

  4. Methods and apparatuses for signaling with geometric constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged F. (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Communication systems are described that use signal constellations, which have unequally spaced (i.e. geometrically shaped) points. In many embodiments, the communication systems use specific geometric constellations that are capacity optimized at a specific SNR. In addition, ranges within which the constellation points of a capacity optimized constellation can be perturbed and are still likely to achieve a given percentage of the optimal capacity increase compared to a constellation that maximizes d.sub.min, are also described. Capacity measures that are used in the selection of the location of constellation points include, but are not limited to, parallel decode (PD) capacity and joint capacity.

  5. The Role of Cloud and Precipitation Radars in Convoys and Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Durden, Stephen L.; Im, Eastwood; Sadowy, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    We provide an overview of which benefits a radar, and only a radar, can provide to any constellation of satellites monitoring Earth's atmosphere; which aspects instead are most useful to complement a radar instrument to provide accurate and complete description of the state of the troposphere; and finally which goals can be given a lower priority assuming that other types of sensors will be flying in formation with a radar.

  6. Swarm, 2 years of operations: update on constellation, instrument status and data quality.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottavianelli, G.; Coco, I.; Diekmann, F.; Floberghagen, R.; Kornberg, M.; Mackenzie, R.; Mecozzi, R.; Piris Nino, A.; Hoyos-Ortega, B.; Qamili, E.; Sieg, D.; Siemes, C.; Vogel, P.

    2015-12-01

    Swarm is a three-satellite ESA Earth Explorer mission with the key objectives of studying the geomagnetic field with unprecedented accuracy and the electrodynamics of the Earth's ionosphere. The three spacecraft have been launched in November 2013. Following two years of operations, this presentation provides an update on the constellation, instruments status, L1b data processors, the products quality. It also presents an outlook of the upcoming activities with regards to mission operations.

  7. The Role of Cloud and Precipitation Radars in Convoys and Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Durden, Stephen L.; Im, Eastwood; Sadowy, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    We provide an overview of which benefits a radar, and only a radar, can provide to any constellation of satellites monitoring Earth's atmosphere; which aspects instead are most useful to complement a radar instrument to provide accurate and complete description of the state of the troposphere; and finally which goals can be given a lower priority assuming that other types of sensors will be flying in formation with a radar.

  8. TORMES: A Multi-Constellation GNSS-R Experiment on BEXUS 17 and 19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreno-Luengo, H.; Amezaga, A.; Bolet, A.; Vidal, D.; Jane, J.; Munoz, J. F.; Olive, R.; Camps, A.

    2015-09-01

    Scientific evaluation of the 3Cat-2 payload (PYCARO reflectometer) has been performed from the BEXUS 19 stratospheric balloon flight with an apogee of ~27,000m over boreal forests and lakes. The payload was configured in closed-loop mode during this flight. Results show the first-ever multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems Reflectometry (GNSS-R) measurements at dual-band and dual-polarization.

  9. Human Rating Requirements for NASA's Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdich, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the human system integration (HSI) process in achieving human ratings for NASA Constellation Program (CxP). The NASA Procedural Requirements (NPR) document that defines the Human Ratings Requirements is NPR 8705.2B. An example of the human rating requirements flow down is given in the handling qualities for space craft control.

  10. Connect the Dots and Pinhole Constellations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kominski, John

    1991-01-01

    Identifies a variety of methods to introduce constellations and asterisms to students in the classroom and planetarium prior to their study of the night sky. Materials used include transparencies, oatmeal boxes, photographic slides, and tracing paper. Exercises incorporate storytelling and prediction of location, movement, and seasonal patterns of…

  11. Low Cost Constellations to Assist the Warfighter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Low Cost Constellations to Assist the Warfighter Stuart Eves (SSTL), David Carter (EADS- Astrium ), David Beard (Dstl) Email: s.eves@sstl.co.uk Tel... Astrium Ltd Earth Observation & Science Anchorage Road Portsmouth, Hampshire PO3 5PU UK davidj.carter@astrium.eads.net David Beard DSTL

  12. Space Technology 5: Pathfinder for Future Micro-Sat Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Candace; Finnegan, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Project, currently in the implementation phase, is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) s New Millennium Program (NMP). ST-5 will consist of a constellation of three miniature satellites, each with mass less than 25 kg and size approximately 60 cm by 30 cm. ST-5 addresses technology challenges, as well as fabrication, assembly, test and operations strategies for future micro-satellite missions. ST-5 will be deployed into a highly eccentric, geo-transfer orbit (GTO). This will expose the spacecraft to a high radiation environment as well as provide a low level magnetic background. A three-month flight demonstration phase is planned to validate the technologies and demonstrate concepts for future missions. Each ST-5 spacecraft incorporates NMP competitively-selected breakthrough technologies. These include Cold Gas Micro-Thrusters for propulsion and attitude control, miniature X-band transponder for space-ground communications, Variable Emittance Coatings for dynamic thermal control, and CULPRiT ultra low power logic chip used for Reed-Solomon encoding. The ST-5 spacecraft itself is a technology that can be infused into future missions. It is a fully functional micro-spacecraft built within tight volume and mass constraints. It is built to withstand a high radiation environment, large thermal variations, and high launch loads. The spacecraft power system is low-power and low-voltage, and is designed to turn on after separation &om the launch vehicle. Some of the innovations that are included in the ST-5 design are a custom spacecraft deployment structure, magnetometer deployment boom, nutation damper, X-band antenna, miniature spinning sun sensor, solar array with triple junction solar cells, integral card cage assembly containing single card Command and Data Handling and Power System Electronics, miniature magnetometer, and lithium ion battery. ST-5 will demonstrate the ability of a micro satellite to perform

  13. Space Technology 5: Pathfinder for Future Micro-Sat Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Candace; Finnegan, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Project, currently in the implementation phase, is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) s New Millennium Program (NMP). ST-5 will consist of a constellation of three miniature satellites, each with mass less than 25 kg and size approximately 60 cm by 30 cm. ST-5 addresses technology challenges, as well as fabrication, assembly, test and operations strategies for future micro-satellite missions. ST-5 will be deployed into a highly eccentric, geo-transfer orbit (GTO). This will expose the spacecraft to a high radiation environment as well as provide a low level magnetic background. A three-month flight demonstration phase is planned to validate the technologies and demonstrate concepts for future missions. Each ST-5 spacecraft incorporates NMP competitively-selected breakthrough technologies. These include Cold Gas Micro-Thrusters for propulsion and attitude control, miniature X-band transponder for space-ground communications, Variable Emittance Coatings for dynamic thermal control, and CULPRiT ultra low power logic chip used for Reed-Solomon encoding. The ST-5 spacecraft itself is a technology that can be infused into future missions. It is a fully functional micro-spacecraft built within tight volume and mass constraints. It is built to withstand a high radiation environment, large thermal variations, and high launch loads. The spacecraft power system is low-power and low-voltage, and is designed to turn on after separation &om the launch vehicle. Some of the innovations that are included in the ST-5 design are a custom spacecraft deployment structure, magnetometer deployment boom, nutation damper, X-band antenna, miniature spinning sun sensor, solar array with triple junction solar cells, integral card cage assembly containing single card Command and Data Handling and Power System Electronics, miniature magnetometer, and lithium ion battery. ST-5 will demonstrate the ability of a micro satellite to perform

  14. Aquarius-Pisces Constellation Boundary Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, Steve

    2017-06-01

    Observation, mapping and study of Galaxy Stars has provided humanity direction, foundation, clarity and understanding through the ages.Human civilization advances itself using increasing intelligence and knowledge to develop tools and know how, the science of constellation star maps included: All that has been created by humanity, is to serve humanity.When people continue to use constellation star maps that no longer serve people effectively, the maps are updated, as is now the Aquarius-Pisces Constellation Boundary Update (APCBU), which marks 2000 as the year the Sun is in Aquarius at the vernal equinox.The 21st Century APCBU accounts for and incorporates science factors of precession, relativity and galacticity for professional astronomers, and social imperatives of increasing freedom, liberation and egalitarian culture for the 7.5 billion people of Earth.Twenty years into this first century of a new millennium and a new age is an effective time for an APCBU of such elegant simplicity that it changes less than 0.1% of the area of the IAU 1930 official constellation map, which marks 2597 about the year the Sun is in Aquarius at the time of the vernal equinox.The 21st Century APCBU results provide clarity and direction for humanity's next 2,000 years, if not 10,000 or 12,000 years, and advance the official astronomy / science start of the Aquarius Age -- long anticipated, desired, and imperative, especially in America -- by some 600 years.How much attention is increasingly focused on this region of the sky -- such as the recent discovery of 7 Earth-like worlds orbiting the Trappist-1 star in the Aquarius constellation -- will be an epochal 21st Century phenomenon of human science, society, and starlife.

  15. Measuring Earth Radiation Imbalance from a Massive Constellation of Flux Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiscombe, W. J.; Chiu, J.; Ardanuy, P. E.; Barker, H.; Han, S.; Lorentz, S. R.; Schwartz, S. E.; Trenberth, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    The most important climate variable that is not now measured from space with sufficient accuracy (not even one significant digit on any time scale) is Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI), a subject of much discussion lately in relation to the "global warming hiatus". The greatest temporal challenges for ERI measurements are very long (decadal) and very short (diurnal) time scales. The decadal challenge is mainly one of calibration and continuity, whereas the diurnal challenge is mainly one of temporal coverage. ERI measurements must meet both challenges. We discuss here a massive constellation of flux radiometers in Low Earth Orbit that is capable of meeting both challenges. At least 30-40 satellites are required for diurnal coverage, an order of magnitude more than in any previous Earth science mission. This same diurnal coverage would make possible, for the first time, the use of ERI measurements in data assimilation, as well as providing a much more temporally resolved dataset for tuning and evaluating climate models. Although a large number of instruments on many satellites might seem to pose a gargantuan calibration challenge, actually, the more satellites, the better the intercalibration: satellites can not only follow each other closely in the same orbit plane, viewing exactly the same scene a few minutes apart, but they can engage in a spider web of crossovers in the polar regions, allowing many further such intercalibrations. Furthermore, keystone satellites can roll over to obtain an absolute calibration from the Sun and deep space, which can then be transferred to the other satellites. Simulations of ERI from such a constellation will be shown, along with the tradeoffs necessary to create an optimal configuration and to mitigate the problems experienced by previous generations of Earth radiation budget radiometers. A tentative instrument design will also be described.Constellation of flux radiometers for measuring Earth Radiation Imbalance

  16. Life Support Technology Challenges for NASA's Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert; Ewert, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The presentation is for the ECLSS session of the Constellation Technology Exchange Conference and is to describe what new technology challenges the Constellation mission presents for the ECLSS, in order to communicate these needs with industry.

  17. HyperCube: a hyperspectral CubeSat constellation for measurements of 3D winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glumb, Ronald; Lapsley, Michael; Luce, Scott; Déry, Jean-Philippe; Scott, Deron; Nielsen, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Global measurements of vertically resolved atmospheric wind profiles offer the potential for improved weather forecasts and superior predictions of atmospheric wind patterns. Harris' HyperCube constellation of twelve 6U hyperspectral CubeSats can provide measurements of global tropospheric wind profiles from space at very low cost. It is a commercially funded enterprise in which the data from the satellites is provided to users on a subscription basis. This requires that the design of each satellite be optimized for minimum cost, yet with a reasonably long service life. This paper will focus on the design, operations, and projected performance of the HyperCube system.

  18. Barometric altimetry system as virtual constellation applied in CAPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Guoxiang; Sheng, Peixuan; Du, Jinlin; Zheng, Yongguang; Cai, Xiande; Wu, Haitao; Hu, Yonghui; Hua, Yu; Li, Xiaohui

    2009-03-01

    This work describes the barometric altimetry as virtual constellation applied to the Chinese Area Positioning System (CAPS), which uses the transponders of communication satellites to transfer navigation messages to users. Barometric altimetry depends on the relationship of air pressure varying with altitude in the Earth’s atmosphere. Once the air pressure at a location is measured the site altitude can be found. This method is able to enhance and improve the availability of three-dimensional positioning. The difficulty is that the relation between barometric pressure and altitude is variable in different areas and under various weather conditions. Hence, in order to obtain higher accuracy, we need to acquire the real-time air pressure corresponding to an altimetric region’s reference height. On the other hand, the altimetry method will be applied to satellite navigation system, but the greatest difficulty lies in how to get the real-time air pressure value at the reference height in the broad areas overlaid by satellite navigation. We propose an innovational method to solve this problem. It is to collect the real-time air pressures and temperatures of the 1860 known-altitude weather observatories over China and around via satellite communication and to carry out time extrapolation forecast uniformly. To reduce data quantity, we first partition the data and encode them and then broadcast these information via navigation message to CAPS users’ receivers. Upon the interpolations being done in receivers, the reference air pressure and temperature at the receiver’s nearby place is derived. Lastly, combing with the receiver-observed real air pressure and temperature, the site’s altitude can be determined. The work is presented in the following aspects: the calculation principle, formulae, data collection, encoding, prediction, interpolation method, navigation message transmission together with errors causes and analyses. The advantages and shortcomings of the

  19. Navigation Constellation Design Using a Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    NAVIGATION CONSTELLATION DESIGN USING A MULTI-OBJECTIVE GENETIC ALGORITHM THESIS MARCH 2015...the United States. AFIT-ENY-MS-15-M-245 NAVIGATION CONSTELLATION DESIGN USING A MULTI-OBJECTIVE GENETIC ALGORITHM THESIS Presented to...DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENY-MS-15-M-245 NAVIGATION CONSTELLATION DESIGN USING A MULTI-OBJECTIVE GENETIC ALGORITHM Heather C. Diniz

  20. Personal communications satellite service system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporicci, L.; Digirolamo, S.; Luongo, M.; Soddu, C.

    1992-07-01

    The main features of the Personal Communications System (PCS) are outlined. The PCS is composed of the following: a constellation of Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites; and a ground segment made of a variety of user terminals, the gateway stations, the network management, and satellite control centers. A general overview of the system is provided, together with the definition of a satellite constellation suitable for PCS services. The adoption of LEO satellites sensibly reduces the power requirement of user terminals and allows users to share the system capacity among a large number of spacecraft. Results of a comparative analysis of access modes is presented together with the expected spacecraft complexity, which derives by the alternative adoption of two types of onboard antennas, with 7 and 19 spot beams. An overall dimensioning of the payload and general outline of the spacecraft are given.

  1. Precise orbit determination of Multi-GNSS constellation including GPS GLONASS BDS and GALIEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaolei

    2014-05-01

    In addition to the existing American global positioning system (GPS) and the Russian global navigation satellite system (GLONASS), the new generation of GNSS is emerging and developing, such as the Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system (BDS) and the European GALILEO system. Multi-constellation is expected to contribute to more accurate and reliable positioning and navigation service. However, the application of multi-constellation challenges the traditional precise orbit determination (POD) strategy that was designed usually for single constellation. In this contribution, we exploit a more rigorous multi-constellation POD strategy for the ongoing IGS multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) where the common parameters are identical for each system, and the frequency- and system-specified parameters are employed to account for the inter-frequency and inter-system biases. Since the authorized BDS attitude model is not yet released, different BDS attitude model are implemented and their impact on orbit accuracy are studied. The proposed POD strategy was implemented in the PANDA (Position and Navigation Data Analyst) software and can process observations from GPS, GLONASS, BDS and GALILEO together. The strategy is evaluated with the multi-constellation observations from about 90 MGEX stations and BDS observations from the BeiDou experimental tracking network (BETN) of Wuhan University (WHU). Of all the MGEX stations, 28 stations record BDS observation, and about 80 stations record GALILEO observations. All these data were processed together in our software, resulting in the multi-constellation POD solutions. We assessed the orbit accuracy for GPS and GLONASS by comparing our solutions with the IGS final orbit, and for BDS and GALILEO by overlapping our daily orbit solution. The stability of inter-frequency bias of GLONASS and inter-system biases w.r.t. GPS for GLONASS, BDS and GALILEO were investigated. At last, we carried out precise point positioning (PPP) using the multi-constellation

  2. An Analysis of the Impact of AN Improved Gnss Constellation on Precise Point Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Carlos; Leandro, Rodrigo; Santos, Marcelo; Langley, Richard

    During the past few years there have been an increasing number of GNSS research studies on the predicted impact on positioning due to the implementation and use of Galileo and GLONASS alongside GPS. It is expected that some years from now these other two satellite constellations will be complete and therefore there would be around about three times more GNSS satellites in the sky compared to those provided by GPS alone, which would bring a considerable improvement in terms of satellite geometry at any location on the globe. Most of the research studies on the simultaneous use GPS and Galileo measurements, for example, have been carried out through signal simulation, by means of either software or hardware simulators. In order to analyze the impact of the larger number of available satellites, but using actual satellite signals, we have used a different technique in which the current GPS constellation is virtually doubled. This means that we are simulating a second GNSS system with the same orbital characteristics as GPS (but not considering any improved signal characteristics it may have) in different geometry condition - in effect, a doubling of the GPS constellation. The exact procedure is explained in this paper. The main advantages of this technique are that it does not require the use of a simulator; it is based on real satellite signals; and it is reasonably simple to perform if the appropriate positioning engine is available. Using this technique, we are able to analyze the possible impact of a second GNSS constellation. Although it is not possible to derive immutable numbers to quantify this improvement (a shared limitation of any other simulation analysis), due to the nature of the analysis technique, it is possible to have a reasonably clear idea of what the positioning performance will actually look like. Precise point positioning (PPP) is one of the existing techniques for determining point coordinates using a GPS receiver. In this technique

  3. Inter-comparison of precipitation retrievals from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission constellation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Chris; Matsui, Toshihisa; Randel, Dave; Stocker, Erich; Kummerow, Chris

    2015-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM) is an international satellite mission that brings together a number of different component satellites and sensors, each contributing observations capable of providing information on precipitation. The joint US-Japan core observatory, launched on 27 February 2014, carries the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The core observatory serves as a standard against which other sensors in the constellation are calibrated, providing a consistent observational dataset to ensure the highest quality precipitation retrievals to be made. Precipitation retrievals from the constellation of partner satellites are generated through the common framework of the Goddard-PROFiling (GPROF) scheme, and is applied to both the conically-scanning sensors and the cross-track sensors; the provision of precipitation estimates from all the constellation sensors contributing to the better-than 3-hour average temporal sampling. This study focuses upon the inter-comparison of the products from the different sensors during the first year of GPM operations; March 2014-February 2015. The two regions chosen for the inter-comparison, are the United States and Western Europe, and utilize the extensive radar networks of these regions. Statistical results were generated for instantaneous precipitation retrievals for each of the constellation sensors. Results show that overall the retrievals from the cross-track observations produce higher correlations with the surface radar data sets than the retrievals from the conically-scanning observations, although they tend to have higher root-mean squared errors. Some variation in performance between the individual types of sensors is also noted, which may be attributed to assumptions within the retrieval scheme (e.g. resolution, background fields, etc); other differences require further investigation.

  4. The Magnetospheric Constellation Mission (MC-DRACO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.

    2003-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Constellation Mission Dynamic Response and Coupling Observatory (MC-DRACO), the logical outgrowth of a sequence of STP missions, will explore plasma transport and energy conversion processes over a broad range of spatial sizes. Designed to be a meso-/macroscope for the magnetotail, it will resolve persistent controversies and yield a new understanding on which to build a predictive science of next generation magnetospheric meteorology.

  5. The Magnetospheric Constellation Mission (MC-DRACO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.

    2003-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Constellation Mission Dynamic Response and Coupling Observatory (MC-DRACO), the logical outgrowth of a sequence of STP missions, will explore plasma transport and energy conversion processes over a broad range of spatial sizes. Designed to be a meso-/macroscope for the magnetotail, it will resolve persistent controversies and yield a new understanding on which to build a predictive science of next generation magnetospheric meteorology.

  6. Fouled Anchors: The CONSTELLATION Question Answered

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    designs ............................... 175 21. Shaded image of 1795 design ................... .................... 176 22. Shaded image of 1853...some time before he would detect the underlying trouble. NAVY ASSISTANCE The Constellation ha : a good ally in the Navy and in Admiral Eller who...trance, Leek " detected " three ghosts: Commodore Truxtun, Seaman Neal Harvey who had been executed on board in 1799 during battle with L’Jnsurgente

  7. Autonomy Architectures for a Constellation of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes three autonomy architectures for a system that continuously plans to control a fleet of spacecraft using collective mission goals instead of goals of command sequences for each spacecraft. A fleet of self-commanding spacecraft would autonomously coordinate itself to satisfy high level science and engineering goals in a changing partially-understood environment-making feasible the operation of tens of even a hundred spacecraft (such as for interferometer or magnetospheric constellation missions).

  8. On the origin of the zodiacal constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurshtein, Alex A.

    A reconstruction of the evolution of the zodiacal constellations is made, based on the Indoeuropean and Sumero-Akkadian religio-cultural data, including artifacts such as cult statuettes, cuneiform tablets, cylinder seals and boundary stones. It is argued that the development of the twelve houses of the zodiac in three groups of four over some six millennia was dictated by the changes made by precession in the positions of the vernal and autumnal equinoxes and the winter and summer solstices.

  9. Constellation X-Ray Mission and Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Jean (Technical Monitor); Tananbaum, H.

    2002-01-01

    This Fourth Annual Report summarizes work performed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) under Cooperative Agreement NCC5-368. The Agreement is entitled Constellation X-ray Mission Study and SAO continues to perform work under the overall direction of Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, the SAO Principal Investigator for the program. Mr. Robert Rasche is the SAO Program Manager and is responsible for day-to-day program management at SAO and coordination with GSFC. The report summarizes the main areas of SAO activity. Most of the work has been done jointly with personnel from GSFC and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). We describe SAO participation in these efforts. As is appropriate to a Cooperative Agreement, SAO continued to work with GSFC in an integrated team mode. SAO was involved in the overall mission management, technology development, scientific direction, and mission definition. While formal overall management responsibility resides with GSFC, scientific lead and subordinate responsibilities continue to be shared by GSFC and SAO. The work performed by SAO is consistent with the SAO proposal 'Constellation X-ray Mission Study and Optics Development' dated September 1997, which was the basis for establishing the Cooperative Agreement under which SAO is currently funded. Over time, the scope of the effort has expanded somewhat to accommodate the needs of the project. Work, except for meeting support and high priority program tasks, has been at a level of effort. Priorities and work progress have been closely coordinated with the Constellation-X Project Formulation Manager at GSFC. Funding limitations constrained the work accomplished during this period. Nonetheless, a significant amount of work was accomplished. Under the Agreement, SAO performed work in seven major areas of activity. These areas related to: Constellation X-ray Mission Facility Definition Team and Study Management; Science Support; Spectroscopy X

  10. A Mars Communication Constellation For Human Exploration and Network Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, Francesco; Lavagna, Michèle; Simonetto, Andrea

    Mars is perhaps the primary target of all space exploration programs, and a massive robotic and human exploration will ask for a suitable communication link between Earth and the Red planet. The paper analyses the possibility of exploiting a small spacecrafts constellation around Mars to offer a complete and continuous coverage of possible elements on the planet, taking advantage of optical transmission techniques. Since the first human expedition will most likely not be launched in the next 15-20 years, the study foresees such a communications mission to be implemented after 2020, and in light of the future presence of explorers on the surface a high data rate requirement is imposed, in order to allow video transmissions. In addition, the set-up of a communication constellation around Mars would give the opportunity of exploiting this multi-platform infrastructure to perform network science, that would largely increase our knowledge of the planet. The paper covers all technical aspects of the feasibility study for the primary communications mission, and secondary scientific opportunities are suggested. The proposed communication architecture is quite complex and includes six 530kg spacecrafts on two different orbital planes, plus one redundant unit per plane, that ensure complete coverage of the planet's surface; communications between the satellites and Earth are achieved through optical links, that allow high data rates with lower mass and power consumption with respect to traditional radio-frequency technology (1) (2), while inter-satellite links and spacecrafts-to- Mars connections are ensured by radio transmissions. The worst-case optical link data rate varies from 10.2 Mbps in downlink to 13.7 Mbps in uplink. Inter-satellites data rate stays the 4.3-7.8 Mbps range on Ka-band, while spacecraft-Mars surface communications occur on the X band offering a 4.3 Mbps data rate. A complete trade-off analysis has been performed in terms of on board subsystems design

  11. Constellation X-Ray Mission and Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tananbaum, H.

    2002-01-01

    This report is a supplement to the Third Annual Report summarizing work performed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) under Cooperative Agreement NCC5-3681. The Agreement is entitled 'Constellation X-ray Mission Study and Support.' This supplementary report covers the period from October 1, 2001 through January 10, 2002. The report has been prepared and submitted to ensure that the Constellation-X Project Office at GSFC has current performance information needed to evaluate a proposed modified budget for FY02. That proposed budget is being submitted separately. SAO continues to perform work under the overall direction of Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, the SAO Principal Investigator for the program. Mr. Robert Rasche is the SAO Program Manager and is responsible for day-to-day program management at SAO and coordination with GSFC. The report summarizes the main areas of SAO activity. Most of the work has been done jointly with personnel from GSFC and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). We describe SAO participation in these efforts. Under the Agreement, SAO performed work in seven major areas of activity. These areas related to: (1) Constellation X-ray Mission Facility Definition Team and Study Management; (2) Science Support; (3) Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope (SXT); (4) Systems Engineering; (5) Travel in Support of the Work Effort; and (6) In-house Management and Coordination.

  12. Constellation X-Ray Mission and Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.; Grady, Jean (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report is a supplement to the Third Annual Report summarizing work performed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) under Cooperative Agreement NCC5-3681. The Agreement is entitled 'Constellation X-ray Mission Study and Support.' This supplementary report covers the period from October 1, 2001 through January 10, 2002. The report has been prepared and submitted to ensure that the Constellation-X Project Office at GSFC has current performance information needed to evaluate a proposed modified budget for FY02. That proposed budget is being submitted separately. SAO continues to perform work under the overall direction of Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, the SAO Principal Investigator for the program. Mr. Robert Rasche is the SAO Program Manager and is responsible for day-to-day program management at SAO and coordination with GSFC. The report summarizes the main areas of SAO activity. Most of the work has been done jointly with personnel from GSFC and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). We describe SAO participation in these efforts. Under the Agreement, SAO performed work in seven major areas of activity. These areas related to: (1) Constellation X-ray Mission Facility Definition Team and Study Management; (2) Science Support; (3) Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope (SXT); (4) Systems Engineering; (5) Travel in Support of the Work Effort; and (6) In-house Management and Coordination.

  13. Satellite Telemetry and Command using Big LEO Mobile Telecommunications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huegel, Fred

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with satellite telemetry and command using Big LEO mobile telecommunications systems are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Commercial Satellite system overviews: Globalstar, ICO, and Iridium; 2) System capabilities and cost reduction; 3) Satellite constellations and contact limitations; 4) Capabilities of Globalstar, ICO and Iridium with emphasis on Globalstar; and 5) Flight transceiver issues and security.

  14. Characterization of properties and spatiotemporal fields of mineral aerosol and its radiative impact using calipso data in conjunction with A-train satellite and ground-based observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyung Jin

    Atmospheric mineral aerosol (or dust) plays an important role in the Earth.s system. However, quantification of dust impacts has long been associated with large uncertainties because of the complex nature of mineral aerosol. A better understanding of the properties and spatiotemporal distribution of atmospheric dust on the regional and global scales is needed to improve predictions of the impact that dust radiative forcing and heating/cooling rates have on the weather and climate. The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission provides unique measurements of vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds and their properties during day and nighttime over all types of surfaces. This information has the potential to significantly improve our understanding of the properties and effects of aerosol and clouds. This dissertation presents the results of a comprehensive analysis of CALIPSO lidar (version 2 and version 3.01) data in conjunction with A-Train satellite and ground-based observations aimed at characterizing mineral aerosol in East Asia and other major dust sources. The specific objectives were to characterize the spatial distribution and properties of atmospheric dust in the dust source regions using new CALIOP (version 3.01) data in conjunction with satellite MODIS, OMI, and CloudSat data and ground-based meteorological and lidar data; investigate changes in the vertical distribution and properties of dust during mid- and long-range transport; perform a modeling of the optical properties of nonspherical dust particles, and assess the radiative forcing and heating/cooling rates of atmospheric dust by performing radiative transfer modeling constrained by satellite data in major dust source regions. Our research revealed significant biases in CALIPSO version 2 data, especially in the presence of dense dust plumes and dust-cloud mixed scenes. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from CALIOP backscatter profiles was

  15. The Cloudsat Mission and the EOS Constellation: A New Dimension of Space-Based Observation of Clouds and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Vane, Deborah G.; Boain, Ronald; Mace, Gerald; Sassen, Kenneth; Wang, Zhien; Illingworth, Anthony; OConnor, Ewan; Rossow, William; Durden, Stephen L.; hide

    2001-01-01

    CloudSat is a satellite experiment designed to measure the vertical structure of clouds from space. The expected launch of CloudSat is planned for 2004 and, once launched, CloudSat will orbit in formation as part of a constellation of satellites including NASA's Aqua and Aura satellites, a NASA-CNES lidar satellite (P-C) and a CNES satellite carrying a polarimeter (PARASOL). A unique feature that CloudSat brings to this constellation is the ability to fly a precise orbit enabling the fields of view of the CloudSat radar to be overlapped with the P-C lidar footprint and the other measurements of the EOS constellation. The precision of this overlap creates a unique multi-satellite observing system for studying the atmospheric processes essential to the hydrological cycle. The vertical profile of cloud properties provided by CloudSat fills a critical gap in the investigation of feedback mechanisms linking clouds to climate. Measuring the vertical profile of cloud properties requires a combination of active and passive instruments, and this will be achieved by combining the radar data of CloudSat with active and passive data from other sensors of the constellation. This paper describes the underpinning science, and gives an overview of the mission, and provides some idea of the expected products and anticipated application of these products. Notably, the CloudSat mission is expected to provide new knowledge about global cloudiness, stimulating new areas of research on clouds including data assimilation and cloud parameterization. The mission also provides an important opportunity to demonstrate active sensor technology for future scientific and tactical applications. The CloudSat mission is a partnership between NASA/JPL, the Canadian Space Agency, Colorado State University, the US Air Force, and the US Department of Energy.

  16. Coverage and control of constellations of elliptical inclined frozen lunar orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.

    2005-01-01

    A great deal of scientific interest exists regarding the permanently shadowed craters near the poles of the Moon where there may be frozen volatiles. These regions, particularly the Moon's South Pole, have been proposed for extensive robotic and human exploration. Unfortunately, they are typically not in view of Earth, and would require some form of communication relay to facilitate exploration via robotic and/or human missions. One solution for such a relay is a long-lived constellation of lunar telecommunication orbiters providing focused coverage at the pole of interest. Robust support requires this coverage to be continuous, redundant, and, in order to minimize costs, this constellation should consist of 3 satellites or fewer.

  17. The CEOS Atmospheric Composition Constellation: Enhancing the Value of Space-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckman, Richard; Zehner, Claus; Al-Saadi, Jay

    2015-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) coordinates civil space-borne observations of the Earth. Participating agencies strive to enhance international coordination and data exchange and to optimize societal benefit. In recent years, CEOS has collaborated closely with the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) in implementing the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS) space-based objectives. The goal of the CEOS Atmospheric Composition Constellation (ACC) is to collect and deliver data to improve monitoring, assessment and predictive capabilities for changes in the ozone layer, air quality and climate forcing associated with changes in the environment through coordination of existing and future international space assets. A project to coordinate and enhance the science value of a future constellation of geostationary sensors measuring parameters relevant to air quality supports the forthcoming European Sentinel-4, Korean GEMS, and US TEMPO missions. Recommendations have been developed for harmonization to mutually improve data quality and facilitate widespread use of the data products.

  18. Constellation modulation - an approach to increase spectral efficiency.

    PubMed

    Dash, Soumya Sunder; Pythoud, Frederic; Hillerkuss, David; Baeuerle, Benedikt; Josten, Arne; Leuchtmann, Pascal; Leuthold, Juerg

    2017-07-10

    Constellation modulation (CM) is introduced as a new degree of freedom to increase the spectral efficiency and to further approach the Shannon limit. Constellation modulation is the art of encoding information not only in the symbols within a constellation but also by encoding information by selecting a constellation from a set of constellations that are switched from time to time. The set of constellations is not limited to sets of partitions from a given constellation but can e.g., be obtained from an existing constellation by applying geometrical transformations such as rotations, translations, scaling, or even more abstract transformations. The architecture of the transmitter and the receiver allows for constellation modulation to be used on top of existing modulations with little penalties on the bit-error ratio (BER) or on the required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The spectral bandwidth used by this modulation scheme is identical to the original modulation. Simulations demonstrate a particular advantage of the scheme for low SNR situations. So, for instance, it is demonstrated by simulation that a spectral efficiency increases by up to 33% and 20% can be obtained at a BER of 10(-3) and 2×10(-2) for a regular BPSK modulation format, respectively. Applying constellation modulation, we derive a most power efficient 4D-CM-BPSK modulation format that provides a spectral efficiency of 0.7 bit/s/Hz for an SNR of 0.2 dB at a BER of 2 × 10(-2).

  19. Understanding Geospace on a Grand Scale: The Global Ionoshphere/Thermosphere Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert; Pesnell, Dean

    2011-01-01

    We present the concept of a constellation of polar orbiting satellites equally spaced in longitude (local time) to systematically sample both the neutral and ionzed gas components of the Earth in circular orbits near 350 km, including their density, temperature, and velocities. The instrumentation would include techniques to measure the height of the ionospheric "F-peak" and its variations along the orbit. The number of satellites (l2? 24? 48?) and their configuration would be determined from modeling analysis and expected geophysical phenomena, including their drivers and characteristic time scales. Together with imaging data from separate satellites, the array of satellites with in situ probes would be expected to provide a new picture of (1) high latitude electrodynamics and atmospheric processes and associated coupling with magnetospheric mass and momentum input, (2) the response of the global ionosphere and thermosphere to magnetic storms, and (3) global neutral wind circulation patterns, neutral density structure, tides, planetary waves, and gravity waves. The comprehensive measurements gathered by the IT-Constellation envisioned here would provide a major leap forward in each of these areas, addressing global physical processes and providing fundamental, new knowledge of Geospace. In particular, by its very nature, the constellation addresses "system science", revealing how the ionosphere-thermosphere connects globally to the magnetosphere above and the troposphere below. We present this concept as the next logical step in observing the "whole" space environment using in situ probes in conjunction with imagers. We invite modelers to not only comment on this concept but also to become actively engaged in helping to define it.

  20. Design and analysis of the satellite laser communications network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Pei-an; Qian, Fengchen; Liu, Qiang; Jin, Linlin

    2015-02-01

    A satellite laser communications network structure with two layers and multiple domains has been proposed, which performance has been simulated by OPENT. To simulation, we design several OPNET models of the network's components based on a satellite constellation with two layers and multiple domains, as network model, node model, MAC layer protocol and optical antenna model. The network model consists of core layer and access layer. The core network consists of four geostationary orbit (GEO) satellites which are uniformly distributed in the geostationary orbit. The access network consists of 6 low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites which is the walker delta (walk-δ) constellation with three orbit planes. In access layer, each plane has two satellites, and the constellation is stably. The satellite constellation presented for space laser network can meet the demand of coverage in the middle and low latitude by a few satellites. Also several terminal device models such as the space laser transmitter, receiver, protocol layer module and optical antenna have been designed according to the inter-satellite links in different orbits t from GEO to LEO or GEO to ground. The influence to network of different transmitting throughput, receiving throughput, network protocol and average time delay are simulated. Simulation results of network coverage, connectivity and traffic load performance in different scenes show that the satellite laser network presented by the paper can be fit for high-speed satellite communications. Such analysis can provide effective reference for the research of satellite laser networking and communication protocol.

  1. CONSTELLATION Images from other centers - February 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-03

    JSC2010-E-018585 (3 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Michael Fincke, STS-134 mission specialist, dons a training version of his shuttle launch and entry suit in preparation for a training session in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA?s Johnson Space Center. United Space Alliance suit technician Toni Cost-Davis assisted Fincke.

  2. CONSTELLATION Images from other centers - February 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-03

    JSC2010-E-018584 (3 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Michael Fincke, STS-134 mission specialist, dons a training version of his shuttle launch and entry suit in preparation for a training session in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA?s Johnson Space Center. United Space Alliance suit technician Toni Cost-Davis assisted Fincke.

  3. GNSS satellite geometry and attitude models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenbruck, O.; Schmid, R.; Mercier, F.; Steigenberger, P.; Noll, C.; Fatkulin, R.; Kogure, S.; Ganeshan, A. S.

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the attitude modes employed by present Global (and Regional) Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) and the models used to describe them along with definitions of the constellation-specific spacecraft body frames. A uniform convention for the labeling of the principal spacecraft axes is proposed by the International GNSS Service (IGS), which results in a common formulation of the nominal attitude of all GNSS satellites in yaw-steering mode irrespective of their specific orbit and constellation. The conventions defined within this document provide the basis for the specification of antenna phase center offsets and variations in a multi-GNSS version of the IGS absolute phase center model in the ANTEX (antenna exchange) format. To facilitate the joint analysis of GNSS observations and satellite laser ranging measurements, laser retroreflector array coordinates consistent with the IGS-specific spacecraft frame conventions are provided in addition to representative antenna offset values for all GNSS constellations.

  4. Extrapolating the Results of DICE to Constellation CubeSat Missions for Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C.; Fish, C. S.; Crowley, G.; Gunther, J.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most promising observation strategies still to be developed to advance space science is the capability to conduct simultaneous multipoint observations of the Earth system from space. These types of observations are required to understand the "big picture" of coupling between disparate regions: solar-wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, thermosphere, mesosphere, atmosphere, land, ocean on a planetary scale. Affordable large constellations of scientific "space-buoys" can only be achieved through miniature spacecraft such as CubeSats due to the high cost of launching larger spacecraft. What has not yet been explored is how constellations of such satellites can be made effective for multipoint scientific studies. To be effective the architecture must: 1) Allow large amounts, Gigabits of data per day, of scientific data to be retrieved from the constellation and, 2) Address the orbital configuration and control of the constellation. The communications architecture, in which a constellation of "space-buoys" that are size, weight and power constrained addresses these needs, is lacking. The "Dynamic Ionosphere CubeSat Experiment" or "DICE" mission was selected and funded by the National Science Foundation in October 2009 in response to a cooperative proposal from ASTRA LLC, Utah State University's Space Dynamics Laboratory (USU/SDL), and Embry Riddle University. DICE consists of two identical "CubeSats" launched on October 27, 2011 as secondary payloads from a Delta II rocket and released into an 809 to 457 km at 102° inclination with one satellite chasing the other. The DICE mission is not using traditional CubeSat communications systems, but is instead using government radio bands and high speed downlink rates that are consistent with a NSF funded mission. A half-duplex UHF modem developed for DICE provides a 3 Mbit/s downlink and a 19.2 kbit/s uplink. The ground stations are located at Wallops Island on the east coast and/or at SRI on the west coast. In this

  5. Electrical Arc Ignition Testing for Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Kyle; Gallus, Timothy; Smith, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Materials and Processes Branch requested that NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) perform testing for the Constellation Program to evaluate the hazard of electrical arc ignition of materials that could be in close proximity to batteries. Specifically, WSTF was requested to perform wire-break electrical arc tests to determine the current threshold for ignition of generic cotton woven fabric samples with a fixed voltage of 3.7 V, a common voltage for hand-held electrical devices. The wire-break test was developed during a previous test program to evaluate the hazard of electrical arc ignition inside the Extravehicular Mobility Unit [1].

  6. The Constellation-X Reflection Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jean C.

    2006-01-01

    The Reflection Grating Spectrometer on the Constellation-X mission will provide high sensitivity, high-resolution spectra in the soft x-ray band. The RGS performance requirements are specified as a resolving power of greater than 300 and an effective area of greater than 1000 sq cm across most of the 0.25 to 2.0 keV band. These requirements are driven by the science goals of the mission. We will describe the performance requirements and goals, the reference design of the spectrometer, and examples of science cases where we expect data from the RGS to significantly advance our current understanding of the universe.

  7. The Constellation-X Reflection Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jean C.

    2006-01-01

    The Reflection Grating Spectrometer on the Constellation-X mission will provide high sensitivity, high-resolution spectra in the soft x-ray band. The RGS performance requirements are specified as a resolving power of greater than 300 and an effective area of greater than 1000 sq cm across most of the 0.25 to 2.0 keV band. These requirements are driven by the science goals of the mission. We will describe the performance requirements and goals, the reference design of the spectrometer, and examples of science cases where we expect data from the RGS to significantly advance our current understanding of the universe.

  8. NASA Constellation Distributed Simulation Middleware Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, David; Bowman, James D.; Fisher, Nancy; Cutts, Dannie; Cures, Edwin Z.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a trade study designed to assess three distributed simulation middleware technologies for support of the NASA Constellation Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES) project and Test and Verification Distributed System Integration Laboratory (DSIL). The technologies are the High Level Architecture (HLA), the Test and Training Enabling Architecture (TENA), and an XML-based variant of Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS-XML) coupled with the Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP). According to the criteria and weights determined in this study, HLA scores better than the other two for DSES as well as the DSIL.

  9. Short-term GNSS satellite clock stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griggs, E.; Kursinski, E. R.; Akos, D.

    2015-08-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) clock stability is characterized via the modified Allan deviation using active hydrogen masers as the receiver frequency reference. The high stability of the maser reference allows the GNSS clock contribution to the GNSS carrier phase variance to be determined quite accurately. Satellite clock stability for four different GNSS constellations are presented, highlighting the similarities and differences between the constellations as well as satellite blocks and clock types. Impact on high-rate applications, such as GNSS radio occultation (RO), is assessed through the calculation of the maximum carrier phase error due to clock instability. White phase noise appears to dominate at subsecond time scales. However, while we derived the theoretical contribution of white phase modulation to the modified Allan deviation, our analysis of the GNSS satellite clocks was limited to 1-200 s time scales because of inconsistencies between the subsecond results from the commercial and software-defined receivers. The rubidium frequency standards on board the Global Positioning System (GPS) Block IIF, BeiDou, and Galileo satellites show improved stability results in comparison to previous GPS blocks for time scales relevant to RO. The Globalnaya Navigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema (GLONASS) satellites are the least stable of the GNSS constellations in the short term and will need high-rate corrections to produce RO results comparable to those from the other GNSS constellations.

  10. Constellation pharmacology: a new paradigm for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Russell W; Schmidt, Eric W; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2015-01-01

    Constellation pharmacology is a cell-based high-content phenotypic-screening platform that utilizes subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate the cell-specific combinations (constellations) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types. Heterogeneous populations of native cells, in which the different individual cell types have been identified and characterized, are the foundation for this screening platform. Constellation pharmacology is useful for screening small molecules or for deconvoluting complex mixtures of biologically active natural products. This platform has been used to purify natural products and discover their molecular mechanisms. In the ongoing development of constellation pharmacology, there is a positive feedback loop between the pharmacological characterization of cell types and screening for new drug candidates. As constellation pharmacology is used to discover compounds with novel targeting-selectivity profiles, those new compounds then further help to elucidate the constellations of specific cell types, thereby increasing the content of this high-content platform.

  11. A discussion on mobile satellite system and the myths of CDMA and diversity revealed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Nicholas; Goerke, Thomas; Jahn, Axel

    1995-01-01

    The paper explores the myths and facts surrounding: link margins and constellation designs; the use of satellite diversity in a mobile satellite channel; trade-offs in multiple access technique. Different satellite constellations are presented, which are comparable with those used by the big LEO proponents, with the associated trade-offs in the system design. Propagation data and results from various narrowband and wideband measurement campaigns are used to illustrate the expected differences in service performance.

  12. System and antenna design considerations for highly elliptical orbits as applied to the proposed Archimedes Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paynter, C.; Cuchanski, M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses various aspects of the system design for a satellite in a highly elliptical inclined orbit, and presents a number of antenna design options for the proposed Archimedes mission. A satellite constellation was studied for the provision of multi media communication services in the L and S Band for northern latitudes. The inclined elliptical orbit would allow coverage of Europe, America, and East Asia. Using Canada and North America as the baseline coverage area, this paper addresses system considerations such as the satellite configuration and pointing, beam configuration, and requirements for antennas. A trade-off is performed among several antenna candidates including a direct radiating array, a focal-fed reflector, and a single reflector imaging system. Antenna geometry, performance, and beam forming methods are described. The impact of the designs on the antenna deployment is discussed.

  13. System and antenna design considerations for highly elliptical orbits as applied to the proposed Archimedes Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paynter, C.; Cuchanski, M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper discusses various aspects of the system design for a satellite in a highly elliptical inclined orbit, and presents a number of antenna design options for the proposed Archimedes mission. A satellite constellation was studied for the provision of multi media communication services in the L and S Band for northern latitudes. The inclined elliptical orbit would allow coverage of Europe, America, and East Asia. Using Canada and North America as the baseline coverage area, this paper addresses system considerations such as the satellite configuration and pointing, beam configuration, and requirements for antennas. A trade-off is performed among several antenna candidates including a direct radiating array, a focal-fed reflector, and a single reflector imaging system. Antenna geometry, performance, and beam forming methods are described. The impact of the designs on the antenna deployment is discussed.

  14. A virtual reference satellite differential method for relative correction of satellite ephemeris errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chenglin; Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Haitao

    2010-12-01

    In order to solve the problems that the novel wide area differential method on the satellite clock and ephemeris relative correction (CERC) in the non-geostationary orbit satellite constellation, a virtual reference satellite (VRS) differential principle using relative correction of satellite ephemeris errors is proposed. It is referred to be as the VRS differential principle, and the elaboration is focused on the construction of pseudo-range errors of VRS. Through qualitative analysis, it can be found that the impact of the satellite's clock and ephemeris errors on positioning can basically be removed and the users' positioning errors are near zero. Through simulation analysis of the differential performance, it is verified that the differential method is universal in all kinds of satellite navigation systems with geostationary orbit (GEO) constellation, Medium orbit (MEO) constellation or hybrid orbit constellation, and it has insensitivity to abnormal aspects of a satellite ephemeris and clock. Moreover, the real time positioning accuracy of differential users can be maintained within several decimeters after the pseudo-range measurement noise is effectively weakened or eliminated.

  15. NASA Project Constellation Systems Engineering Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Office of Exploration Systems (OExS) is organized to empower the Vision for Space Exploration with transportation systems that result in achievable, affordable, and sustainable human and robotic journeys to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. In the process of delivering these capabilities, the systems engineering function is key to implementing policies, managing mission requirements, and ensuring technical integration and verification of hardware and support systems in a timely, cost-effective manner. The OExS Development Programs Division includes three main areas: (1) human and robotic technology, (2) Project Prometheus for nuclear propulsion development, and (3) Constellation Systems for space transportation systems development, including a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Constellation Systems include Earth-to-orbit, in-space, and surface transportation systems; maintenance and science instrumentation; and robotic investigators and assistants. In parallel with development of the CEV, robotic explorers will serve as trailblazers to reduce the risk and costs of future human operations on the Moon, as well as missions to other destinations, including Mars. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  16. Constellation X-Ray Mission and Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Jean (Technical Monitor); Tananbaum, H.

    2004-01-01

    This Fifth Annual Report summarizes work performed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) under Cooperative Agreement NCC5-368. The Agreement is entitled 'Constellation X-ray Mission Study and Support.' This report covers the period from October 1, 2002 through September 30,2003. The report summarizes the main areas of SAO activity. Most of the work has been done jointly with personnel from GSFC and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). We describe SAO participation in these efforts. In spite of the work being mainly a level of effort, a significant amount of work was accomplished. Under the Agreement, SAO performed work in eight major areas of activity. These areas related to: 1) Constellation X-ray Mission Facility Definition Team and Study Management; 2) Science Support; 3) Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope (SXT); 4) Systems Engineering; 5) Travel in Support of the Work Effort; 6) In-house Management and Coordination; 7) Technical Readiness and Implementation Plan (TRIP) Report and Follow-up; 8) Industry Liaison and Study Preparation.

  17. Development of Mirror Segments for the Constellation-X Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, W.; Content, David; Henderson, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Saha, Timo

    2003-01-01

    As NASA's next major X-ray observatory, Constellation-X will have a photon collection area of 30,000 sq cm at 1 keV, which, after folding other instrumental responses, translates into an effective area of 15,000 sq cm. The observatory consists of four identical satellites each of which carries a spectroscopic X-ray telescope mirror assembly (SXT) that is 1.6 m in diameter and has a focal length of 10 m and a collection area of 7,500 sq cm at 1 keV and an angular resolution of 15 sec. HPD (half-power diameter) at the system level. Each mirror assembly consists of a large number of mirror segments precisely assembled together. Our development of the mirror segments is divided into two steps. The first one is to develop the basic approach and fabricate segments within the constraints of existing infrastructure to meet the angular resolution requirement, but not mirror segment size requirement. We have all but successfully completed this part of the development. We are now on the verge of going into the second step, that is to fabricate mirror segments of larger sizes to reduce the number of segments that have to be aligned and integrated. In this paper, we report on the requirements and the development status of the mirror segments. These assembly and other requirements of the SXT are reported elsewhere.

  18. Architecture analysis of the simplified libration point satellite navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Xu, Bo

    2016-10-01

    The libration point satellite navigation system is a novel navigation architecture that consists of satellites located in periodic orbits around the Earth-Moon libration points. Superiorities of the proposed system lie in its autonomy and extended navigation capability, which have been proved in our previous works. Based on the candidate architectures obtained before, a detailed analysis of the simplified libration point satellite navigation system, i.e. the Earth-Moon L1,2 two-satellite constellation, is conducted in this work. Firstly, relation between orbits amplitude is derived for the candidate two-satellite constellations to ensure continuous crosslink measurements between libration point satellites. Then, with the use of a reference lunar exploration mission scenario, navigation performances of different constellation configurations are evaluated by Monte-Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the amplitude and initial phase combinations of libration point orbits have direct effect on the performance of the two-satellite constellations. By using a cooperative evolutionary algorithm for configuration parameter optimization, some optimal constellations are finally obtained for the simplified navigation architecture. The results obtained in this paper may be a reference for future system design.

  19. Hyperspectral Cubesat Constellation for Rapid Natural Hazard Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandl, D.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Ly, V. T.; Handy, M.; Ong, L.; Crum, G.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of high performance space networks that provide total coverage for Cubesats, the paradigm for low cost, high temporal coverage with hyperspectral instruments becomes more feasible. The combination of ground cloud computing resources, high performance with low power consumption onboard processing, total coverage for the cubesats and social media provide an opprotunity for an architecture that provides cost-effective hyperspectral data products for natural hazard response and decision support. This paper provides a series of pathfinder efforts to create a scalable Intelligent Payload Module(IPM) that has flown on a variety of airborne vehicles including Cessna airplanes, Citation jets and a helicopter and will fly on an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) hexacopter to monitor natural phenomena. The IPM's developed thus far were developed on platforms that emulate a satellite environment which use real satellite flight software, real ground software. In addition, science processing software has been developed that perform hyperspectral processing onboard using various parallel processing techniques to enable creation of onboard hyperspectral data products while consuming low power. A cubesat design was developed that is low cost and that is scalable to larger consteallations and thus can provide daily hyperspectral observations for any spot on earth. The design was based on the existing IPM prototypes and metrics that were developed over the past few years and a shrunken IPM that can perform up to 800 Mbps throughput. Thus this constellation of hyperspectral cubesats could be constantly monitoring spectra with spectral angle mappers after Level 0, Level 1 Radiometric Correction, Atmospheric Correction processing. This provides the opportunity daily monitoring of any spot on earth on a daily basis at 30 meter resolution which is not available today.

  20. Close Approach Prediction Analysis of the Earth Science Constellation with the Fengyun-1C Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Matthew; Rand, David K.

    2008-01-01

    Routine satellite operations for the Earth Science Constellation (ESC) include collision risk assessment between members of the constellation and other orbiting space objects. Each day, close approach predictions are generated by a U.S. Department of Defense Joint Space Operations Center Orbital Safety Analyst using the high accuracy Space Object Catalog maintained by the Air Force's 1" Space Control Squadron. Prediction results and other ancillary data such as state vector information are sent to NASAJGoddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) Collision Risk Assessment analysis team for review. Collision analysis is performed and the GSFC team works with the ESC member missions to develop risk reduction strategies as necessary. This paper presents various close approach statistics for the ESC. The ESC missions have been affected by debris from the recent anti-satellite test which destroyed the Chinese Fengyun- 1 C satellite. The paper also presents the percentage of close approach events induced by the Fengyun-1C debris, and presents analysis results which predict the future effects on the ESC caused by this event. Specifically, the Fengyun-1C debris is propagated for twenty years using high-performance computing technology and close approach predictions are generated for the ESC. The percent increase in the total number of conjunction events is considered to be an estimate of the collision risk due to the Fengyun-1C break- UP.

  1. RaInCube: a proposed constellation of atmospheric profiling radars in cubesat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Ziad S.; Peral, Eva; Tanelli, Simone; Sy, Ousmane; Stephens, Graeme

    2016-05-01

    Numerical climate and weather models depend on measurements from space-borne satellites to complete model validation and improvements. Precipitation profiling capabilities are currently limited to a few instruments deployed in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), which cannot provide the temporal resolution necessary to observe the evo- lution of short time-scale weather phenomena and improve numerical weather prediction models. A constellation of cloud- and precipitation-profiling instruments in LEO would provide this essential capability, but the cost and timeframe of typical satellite platforms and instruments constitute a possibly prohibitive challenge. A new radar instrument architecture that is compatible with low-cost satellite platforms, such as CubeSats and SmallSats, has been designed at JPL. Its small size, moderate mass and low power requirement enable constellation missions, which will vastly expand our ability to observe weather systems and their dynamics and thermodynamics at sub-diurnal time scales down to the temporal resolutions required to observe developing convection. In turn, this expanded observational ability can revolutionize weather now-casting and medium-range forecasting, and enable crucial model improvements to improve climate predictions.

  2. Development of Constellation's Launch Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lougheed, Kirk D.; Peaden, Cary J.

    2010-01-01

    The paper focuses on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Constellation Program's Launch Control System (LCS) development effort at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). It provides a brief history of some preceding efforts to provide launch control and ground processing systems for other NASA programs, and some lessons learned from those experiences. It then provides high level descriptions of the LCS mission, objectives, organization, architecture, and progress. It discusses some of our development tenets, including our use of standards based design and use of off-the-shelf products whenever possible, incremental development cycles, and highly reliable, available, and supportable enterprise class system servers. It concludes with some new lessons learned and our plans for the future.

  3. Launching the Future... Constellation Program at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denson, Erik C.

    2010-01-01

    With the Constellation Program, NASA is entering a new age of space exploration that will take us back to the Moon, to Mars, and beyond, and NASA is developing the new technology and vehicles to take us there. At the forefront are the Orion spacecraft and the Ares I launch vehicle. As NASA's gateway to space, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) will process and launch the new vehicles. This will require new systems and extensive changes to existing infrastructure. KSC is designing a new mobile launcher, a new launch control system, and new ground support equipment; modifying the Vehicle Assembly Building, one of the launch pads, and other facilities; and launching the Ares I-X flight test. It is an exciting and challenging time to be an engineer at KSC.

  4. 2014_11_05_uss_constellation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA’s Operation IceBridge collected some rare images on a flight out of Punta Arenas, Chile on Nov. 5, 2014, on a science flight over western Antarctica dubbed Ferrigno-Alison-Abbott 01. Following a routine calibration pass over Punta Arenas airport, the NASA DC-8 overflew the USS Constellation which is being towed for demolition after 53 yeas of service. The crew then snapped a few shots of a calving front of the Antarctic ice sheet. This particular flight plan was designed to collect data on changes in ice elevation along the coast near the Ferrigno and Alison ice streams, on the Abbot Ice Shelf, and grounded ice along the Eights Coast.

  5. Autonomy Architectures for a Constellation of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    Until the past few years, missions typically involved fairly large expensive spacecraft. Such missions have primarily favored using older proven technologies over more recently developed ones, and humans controlled spacecraft by manually generating detailed command sequences with low-level tools and then transmitting the sequences for subsequent execution on a spacecraft controller. This approach toward controlling a spacecraft has worked spectacularly on previous missions, but it has limitations deriving from communications restrictions - scheduling time to communicate with a particular spacecraft involves competing with other projects due to the limited number of deep space network antennae. This implies that a spacecraft can spend a long time just waiting whenever a command sequence fails. This is one reason why the New Millennium program has an objective to migrate parts of mission control tasks onboard a spacecraft to reduce wait time by making spacecraft more robust. The migrated software is called a "remote agent" and has 4 components: a mission manager to generate the high level goals, a planner/scheduler to turn goals into activities while reasoning about future expected situations, an executive/diagnostics engine to initiate and maintain activities while interpreting sensed events by reasoning about past and present situations, and a conventional real-time subsystem to interface with the spacecraft to implement an activity's primitive actions. In addition to needing remote planning and execution for isolated spacecraft, a trend toward multiple-spacecraft missions points to the need for remote distributed planning and execution. The past few years have seen missions with growing numbers of probes. Pathfinder has its rover (Sojourner), Cassini has its lander (Huygens), and the New Millenium Deep Space 3 (DS3) proposal involves a constellation of 3 spacecraft for interferometric mapping. This trend is expected to continue to progressively larger fleets. For

  6. Constellation X-Ray Mission and Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.; Grady, Jean (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    This Final Report summarizes work performed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) under Cooperative Agreement NCC5-368. The Agreement is entitled "Constellation X-ray Mission Study and Support." The report covers the full duration of the Agreement which ran from October 1,1998 to October 14,2004. Included in the report is a description of previously unreported work that was performed between October 2003 and the end of the Agreement. For convenience, the previously unreported work is covered first in Section 2.0. Then, an overall summary of all work performed under the Agreement is presented in Section 3. Section 4.0 contains a list of all formal reports that SAO has submitted to GSFC along with publications and presentations at various conferences.

  7. Constellation X-Ray Mission and Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H.; Grady, Jean (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is the Third Annual Report of work performed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) under Cooperative Agreement NCC5-3681. The Agreement is entitled 'Constellation X-ray Mission Study and Support.' Work performed through January 31, 2001 was reported in a supplement to the Second Annual Report. That supplemental report was submitted in order to obtain funding subsequent to March 2001 which has, as the result of prior funding actions, become the de facto beginning of the funding year under the Agreement. This report covers the balance of the third year of the Agreement from February 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The Agreement as currently configured runs for two more years. When funding is significantly different from the originally approved amounts, SAO submits a revised budget. One such revision was submitted last year and was the basis for funding a portion of the work reported here. This report summarizes the main areas of SAO activity. Most of the work has been performed jointly with personnel from GSFC and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Consequently, we do not claim that such activities were carried out exclusively by SAO. Rather, we describe SAO participation in these efforts. Under the Agreement, SAO performed work in seven major areas of activity. These areas related to: (1) Constellation X-ray Mission Facility Definition Team and Study Management; (2) Science Support; (3) Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope (SXT); (4) Systems Engineering; (5) Travel; and (6) In-house Management and Coordination.

  8. Autonomy Architectures for a Constellation of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    Until the past few years, missions typically involved fairly large expensive spacecraft. Such missions have primarily favored using older proven technologies over more recently developed ones, and humans controlled spacecraft by manually generating detailed command sequences with low-level tools and then transmitting the sequences for subsequent execution on a spacecraft controller. This approach toward controlling a spacecraft has worked spectacularly on previous missions, but it has limitations deriving from communications restrictions - scheduling time to communicate with a particular spacecraft involves competing with other projects due to the limited number of deep space network antennae. This implies that a spacecraft can spend a long time just waiting whenever a command sequence fails. This is one reason why the New Millennium program has an objective to migrate parts of mission control tasks onboard a spacecraft to reduce wait time by making spacecraft more robust. The migrated software is called a "remote agent" and has 4 components: a mission manager to generate the high level goals, a planner/scheduler to turn goals into activities while reasoning about future expected situations, an executive/diagnostics engine to initiate and maintain activities while interpreting sensed events by reasoning about past and present situations, and a conventional real-time subsystem to interface with the spacecraft to implement an activity's primitive actions. In addition to needing remote planning and execution for isolated spacecraft, a trend toward multiple-spacecraft missions points to the need for remote distributed planning and execution. The past few years have seen missions with growing numbers of probes. Pathfinder has its rover (Sojourner), Cassini has its lander (Huygens), and the New Millenium Deep Space 3 (DS3) proposal involves a constellation of 3 spacecraft for interferometric mapping. This trend is expected to continue to progressively larger fleets. For

  9. Iridium Satellite Signal Exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Peter

    2010-03-01

    The Iridium Satellite constellation is unique to satellite communication networks in that it allows for transmission of data between satellites instead of relying on transmission by the bent pipe methodology. As such, this network is far more secure than other satellite communication networks, and forces interception to occur within the locale of the transmission from modem to satellite or within the locale of the downlink from the satellite other modem. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the security weaknesses within the Iridium protocol, showing that it was possible to track one of these satellites with a high gain antenna, resulting in the ability to anticipate transmission, to acquire the location of that transmission, and to uncover the content of that transmission. This project was completed as part of the summer student program at the Southwest Research Institute. The presentation will demonstrate the thought process used in chronological order, essentially demonstrating how I achieved the result from my point of view as the summer progressed.

  10. Small satellite space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, Keith

    1994-01-01

    recorder validation; global store-and-forward data communications for both scientific and military purposes such as Desert Storm; UHF transponder services for both digital data and voice using a constellation; remote sensor monitoring of weather and oceanographic conditions; classified payloads; and UHF spectrum surveillance. Ground processing has been accomplished by automatic unattended or manual operation. Management of multiple assets highlights the relative ease with which two constellations totaling nine satellites were controlled from one system including constellation station keeping. Our experience in small end-to-end systems including concurrent design, development, and testing of the flight and operational ground systems offers low cost approaches to NASA scientific satellite operations of the 1990's.

  11. CONSTELLATION Images from other centers - February 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-29

    JSC2010-E-017719 (29 Jan. 2010) --- NASA astronaut James P. Dutton Jr., STS-131 pilot, attired in a training version of his shuttle launch and entry suit, prepares for an ingress/egress training session in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center. United Space Alliance suit technician Toni Cost-Davis assisted Dutton.

  12. CONSTELLATION Images from other centers - February 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-29

    JSC2010-E-017726 (29 Jan. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clay Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, dons a training version of his shuttle launch and entry suit in preparation for an ingress/egress training session in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center. United Space Alliance suit technicians Raymond Cuevas and John Hazelhurst assisted Anderson.

  13. Science and the Constellation Systems Program Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendell, Wendell

    2007-01-01

    An underlying tension has existed throughout the history of NASA between the human spaceflight programs and the external scientific constituencies of the robotic exploration programs. The large human space projects have been perceived as squandering resources that might otherwise be utilized for scientific discoveries. In particular, the history of the relationship of science to the International Space Station Program has not been a happy one. The leadership of the Constellation Program Office, created in NASA in October, 2005, asked me to serve on the Program Manager s staff as a liaison to the science community. Through the creation of my position, the Program Manager wanted to communicate and elucidate decisions inside the program to the scientific community and, conversely, ensure that the community had a voice at the highest levels within the program. Almost all of my technical contributions at NASA, dating back to the Apollo Program, has been within the auspices of what is now known as the Science Mission Directorate. However, working at the Johnson Space Center, where human spaceflight is the principal activity, has given me a good deal of incidental contact and some more direct exposure through management positions to the structures and culture of human spaceflight programs. I entered the Constellation family somewhat naive but not uninformed. In addition to my background in NASA science, I have also written extensively over the past 25 years on the topic of human exploration of the Moon and Mars. (See, for example, Mendell, 1985). I have found that my scientific colleagues generally have little understanding of the structure and processes of a NASA program office; and many of them do not recognize the name, Constellation. In many respects, the international ILEWG community is better informed. Nevertheless, some NASA decision processes on the role of science, particularly with respect to the formulation of a lunar surface architecture, are not well known

  14. Science and the Constellation Systems Program Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendell, Wendell

    2007-01-01

    An underlying tension has existed throughout the history of NASA between the human spaceflight programs and the external scientific constituencies of the robotic exploration programs. The large human space projects have been perceived as squandering resources that might otherwise be utilized for scientific discoveries. In particular, the history of the relationship of science to the International Space Station Program has not been a happy one. The leadership of the Constellation Program Office, created in NASA in October, 2005, asked me to serve on the Program Manager s staff as a liaison to the science community. Through the creation of my position, the Program Manager wanted to communicate and elucidate decisions inside the program to the scientific community and, conversely, ensure that the community had a voice at the highest levels within the program. Almost all of my technical contributions at NASA, dating back to the Apollo Program, has been within the auspices of what is now known as the Science Mission Directorate. However, working at the Johnson Space Center, where human spaceflight is the principal activity, has given me a good deal of incidental contact and some more direct exposure through management positions to the structures and culture of human spaceflight programs. I entered the Constellation family somewhat naive but not uninformed. In addition to my background in NASA science, I have also written extensively over the past 25 years on the topic of human exploration of the Moon and Mars. (See, for example, Mendell, 1985). I have found that my scientific colleagues generally have little understanding of the structure and processes of a NASA program office; and many of them do not recognize the name, Constellation. In many respects, the international ILEWG community is better informed. Nevertheless, some NASA decision processes on the role of science, particularly with respect to the formulation of a lunar surface architecture, are not well known

  15. Standards for Responsive Small Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    tactical commander. Second, small sized tactical satellites can achieve large increases in mission utility if used in constellations to improve...electrical interfaces, and performance requirements v options were considered: Space-X Falcon I & V; Orbital Sciences Corporation Pegasus XL, Taurus , and... Taurus launch vehicles. Requirement Area Bus Provided Support Mass 175 kg Volume Per mission launch vehicle less 1.6m3 for spacecraft bus (See

  16. Emissivity Model Sensitivity on Radiometric Inter-calibration between the GMI and Its Constellation Imager Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.

    2015-12-01

    The inter-satellite radiometric calibration technique (also known as XCAL) has been applied with great success between the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) -calibration transfer standard- and its constellation imagers, namely, WindSat, AMSR2 and SSMIS. However, while the TRMM mission has now ended, it is now time to change the radiometric transfer standard from the previous TMI to the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI). In this paper, we conduct the inter-calibration between GMI and other imager instruments in its constellation using two different radiative transfer models (RTM), namely XCAL RTM which has been used by XCAL group over the past 10 years, and RSS RTM developed by Remote Sensing Systems (RSS). The main difference between these two RTMs lies in calculating the ocean surface emissivity which is crucial for the measurement of spaceborne microwave radiometers. By comparing the simulated Tb's from two RTMs applied on 9 microwave channels ranging from 10 to 90 GHz, we are able to evaluate the robustness of our XCAL RTM, especially the Elsaesser Ocean Surface Emissivity model that has been used within this model. Besides discussing the reliability of these two RTMs, an XCAL approach known as Double Difference (DD) that has been developed and successfully validated by the Central Florida Remote Sensing Lab will be performed between GMI and its constellation imagers, from which the results will enable us to prescreen the consistency of GMI as the new radiometric transfer standard for imager radiometers as well as assessing the impact of the ocean surface emissivity on radiometric inter-calibration of radiometers at imager channels. Index: Inter-satellite calibration, ocean surface emissivity, radiative transfer model, microwave radiometry

  17. Origins of the ancient constellations: II. The Mediterranean traditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. H.

    1998-04-01

    The classical map of the sky, with the 48 Greek constellations, was derived from at least two different pre-Greek traditions. One tradition comprised the 12 signs of the zodiac, with several associated animal constellations, all of which developed over ~3200-500 BC in Mesopotamia in a religious or ritual tradition. These were taken over by the Greeks around 500 BC. However the other Babylonian constellations, their farming-calendar tradition, were not adopted. The other tradition was not Mesopotamian; it comprised large constellations which appear to date from ~2800 BC, probably from the Mediterranean region, devised for the navigators of ships. They include huge bears and serpents which marked the celestial pole and equator at that time, and probably the four anonymous giants which we know as Hercules, Ophiuchus, Bootes, and Auriga, as well as some of the large southern 'marine' constellations. The origins of some other constellations, including the Perseus tableau and various animals, are unknown; they may have been new creations of the Greeks. The Greeks assembled the classical sky-map from these different sources between 540-370 BC, but many of the familiar legends were only applied to the constellations later.

  18. A Constellation of Microsatellites Promises to Help in a Range of Geoscience Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Y. H.; Chao, B. F.; Lee, L. C.

    1999-01-01

    An octet of microsatellites to be launched in 2003 promises to deliver a large amount of useful data for meteorological, climatic, ionospheric, and geodetic research as well as for operational weather forecasting and space weather monitoring. Known as the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC), the joint Taiwan-U.S. scientific satellite project makes use of Global Positioning System (GPS) occultation and tracking signals. COSMIC's final operational configuration is depicted in Figure 1. Each of the eight microsatellites in low-Earth-orbit (LEO, shown relative to the high-altitude GPS satellite orbits) will carry in particular an advanced limb-sounding GPS receiver, a Tiny Ionospheric Photometer, and a triband beacon transmitter.

  19. Accurate Satellite-Derived Estimates of Tropospheric Ozone Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the radiative forcing due to anthropogenically-produced tropospheric O3 are derived primarily from models. Here, we use tropospheric ozone and cloud data from several instruments in the A-train constellation of satellites as well as information from the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System to accurately estimate the instantaneous radiative forcing from tropospheric O3 for January and July 2005. We improve upon previous estimates of tropospheric ozone mixing ratios from a residual approach using the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) by incorporating cloud pressure information from OMI. Since we cannot distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources with the satellite data, our estimates reflect the total forcing due to tropospheric O3. We focus specifically on the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud effect on both the shortand long-wave radiative forcing. The estimates presented here can be used to validate present day O3 radiative forcing produced by models.

  20. Investigate the Upflow Ions with a Constellation: An introduction to a Future Chinese Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Xu, J.; Klecker, B.

    2014-12-01

    The ions upflowing from the ionosphere into the magnetosphere are vital for the coupling of Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere because they play a very important role in the initiation and development of the geospace storm caused by solar disturbance.The Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere Coupling Small-Satellite Constellation Mission (MIT) is a Chinese mission targeting at the coupling processes of the earth's magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system. The mission's science objectives focus on the acceleration mechanism and the origin of outflow ions and other related outstanding scientific questions. The mission plans a constellation composed of four satellites orbiting the earth at three different altitudes. The proposed payloads include particles detectors, field detectors, aurora and neutral imaging system. These payloads will measure the plasma compositions and the electromagnetic waves, therefore determine the key acceleration mechanisms for the oxygen ions. This mission is selected as a background model supported by the strategy pioneer program of Chinese Academy of Science. The proposed lunch date is between 2019 to 2020.

  1. Characterization of satellite based proxies for estimating nucleation mode particles over South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundström, A.-M.; Nikandrova, A.; Atlaskina, K.; Nieminen, T.; Vakkari, V.; Laakso, L.; Beukes, J. P.; Arola, A.; van Zyl, P. G.; Josipovic, M.; Venter, A. D.; Jaars, K.; Pienaar, J. J.; Piketh, S.; Wiedensohler, A.; Chiloane, E. K.; de Leeuw, G.; Kulmala, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work satellite observations from the NASA's A-Train constellation were used to derive the values of primary emission and regional nucleation proxies over South Africa to estimate the potential for new particle formation. As derived in Kulmala et al. (2011), the satellite based proxies consist of source terms (NO2, SO2 and UV-B radiation), and a sink term describing the pre-existing aerosols. The first goal of this work was to study in detail the use of satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) as a substitute to the in situ based condensation sink (CS). One of the major factors affecting the agreement of CS and AOD was the elevated aerosol layers that increased the value of column integrated AOD but not affected the in situ CS. However, when the AOD in the proxy sink was replaced by an estimate from linear bivariate fit between AOD and CS, the agreement with the actual nucleation mode number concentration improved somewhat. The second goal of the work was to estimate how well the satellite based proxies can predict the potential for new particle formation. For each proxy the highest potential for new particle formation were observed over the Highveld industrial area, where the emissions were high but the sink due to pre-existing aerosols was relatively low. Best agreement between the satellite and in situ based proxies were obtained for NO2/AOD and UV-B/AOD2, whereas proxies including SO2 in the source term had lower correlation. Even though the OMI SO2 boundary layer product showed reasonable spatial pattern and detected the major sources over the study area, some of the known minor point sources were not detected. When defining the satellite proxies only for days when new particle formation event was observed, it was seen that for all the satellite based proxies the event day medians were higher than the entire measurement period median.

  2. Towards Simpler Custom and OpenSearch Services for Voluminous NEWS Merged A-Train Data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, H.; Fetzer, E.; Braverman, A. J.; Lewis, S.; Henderson, M. L.; Guillaume, A.; Lee, S.; de La Torre Juarez, M.; Dang, H. T.

    2010-12-01

    To simplify access to large and complex satellite data sets for climate analysis and model verification, we developed web services that is used to study long-term and global-scale trends in climate, water and energy cycle, and weather variability. A related NASA Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) task has created a merged NEWS Level 2 data from multiple instruments in NASA’s A-Train constellation of satellites. We used this data to enable creation of climatologies that include correlation between observed temperature, water vapor and cloud properties from the A-Train sensors. Instead of imposing on the user an often rigid and limiting web-based analysis environment, we recognize the need for simple and well-designed services so that users can perform analysis in their own familiar computing environments. Custom on-demand services were developed to improve data accessibility of voluminous multi-sensor data. Services enabling geospatial, geographical, and multi-sensor parameter subsets of the data, as well a custom time-averaged Level 3 service will be presented. We will also show how a Level 3Q data reduction approach can be used to help “browse” the voluminous multi-sensor Level 2 data. An OpenSearch capability with full text + space + time search of data products will also be presented as an approach to facilitated interoperability with other data systems. We will present our experiences for improving user usability as well as strategies for facilitating interoperability with other data systems.

  3. NASA A-Train and Terra Observations of the 2010 Russian Wildfires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, J. C.; Douglass, A. R.; DaSilva, A.; Torres, O.; Levy, R.; Duncan, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    Wildfires raged throughout western Russia and parts of Eastern Europe during a persistent heat wave in the summer of 2010. Anomalously high surface temperatures (35 - 41 C) and low relative humidity (9 - 25 %) from mid- June to mid-August 2010 shown by analysis of radiosonde data from multiple sites in western Russia were ideal conditions for the wildfires to thrive. Measurements of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) over western Russian indicate persistent subsidence during the heat wave. Daily three-day back-trajectories initiated over Moscow reveal a persistent anticyclonic circulation for 18 days in August, coincident with the most intense period of fire activity observed by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). This unfortunate meteorological coincidence allowed transport of polluted air from the region of intense fires to Moscow and the surrounding area. We demonstrate that the 2010 Russian wildfires are unique in the record of observations obtained by remote-sensing instruments on-board NASA satellites: Aura and Aqua (part of the A-Train Constellation) and Terra. Analysis of the distribution of MODIS fire products and aerosol optical thickness (AOT), UV aerosol index (AI) and single-scattering albedo (SSA) from Aura's Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and total column carbon monoxide (CO) from Aqua s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) show that the region in the center of western Russia surrounding Moscow (52-58 deg N, 33 -43 deg E) is most severely impacted by wildfire emissions. Over this area, AIRS CO, OMI AI, and MODIS AOT are significantly enhanced relative to the historical satellite record during the first 18 days in August when the anti-cyclonic circulation persisted. By mid-August, the anti-cyclonic circulation was replaced with westerly transport over Moscow and vicinity. The heat wave

  4. Probing Dark Energy with Constellation-X

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-09-08

    Constellation-X (Con-X) will carry out two powerful and independent sets of tests of dark energy based on X-ray observations of galaxy clusters, providing comparable accuracy to other leading dark energy probes. The first group of tests will measure the absolute distances to clusters, primarily using measurements of the X-ray gas mass fraction in the largest, dynamically relaxed clusters, but with additional constraining power provided by follow-up observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. As with supernovae studies, such data determine the transformation between redshift and true distance, d(z), allowing cosmic acceleration to be measured directly. The second, independent group of tests will use the exquisite spectroscopic capabilities of Con-X to determine scaling relations between X-ray observables and mass. Together with forthcoming X-ray and SZ cluster surveys, these data will help to constrain the growth of structure, which is also a strong function of cosmological parameters.

  5. Array of Neutral Density Relative Observations MEasuring Divergence in the Atmosphere (ANDROMEDA), A Constellation Concept for Studying Thermospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, S. E.; Pilinski, M.; Forbes, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to being critical to the prediction of satellite orbits, total mass density is a fundamental property of the thermosphere. Density measurements from accelerometers on the CHAMP satellite have revealed quasi-steady state distributions of density structures around the globe, density responses to changing solar and geomagnetic activity, and spatial structures of wave-like phenomena along the orbit. However, a basic limitation on the time scale of any observable phenomenon is the ~90-minute orbital period. Thus, single-satellite missions like CHAMP are unable to measure the time derivative of density or the mass flux divergence (MFD) at a single point in the atmosphere. While the two accelerometer-carrying GRACE satellites could theoretically measure the density time derivative, in practice this measurement is hampered by the very low-signal levels in the tenuous atmosphere at the ~500-km GRACE orbits, as well as inter-satellite biases and drifts. The Array of Neutral Density Relative Observations Measuring Divergence in the Atmosphere (ANDROMEDA) is a constellation of CubeSats aimed at improving our understanding of atmospheric dynamics by measuring and interpreting the characteristics of traveling atmospheric disturbances as well as the distribution of MFD in the thermosphere. The ANDROMEDA constellation consists of two to three identical CubeSats spaced approximately 300 km apart and making multi-point measurements of total mass density with an accuracy of <2%. The mass density measurements will be made using a novel torque balance technique enabled by an extremely accurate attitude determination and control system (ADCS) that actively compensates for atmospheric disturbance torques. The benefit of the torque-balance technique is the high level of inter-satellite accuracy. The constellation will be deployed from the ISS and will make observations between 400 km and 250 km altitude as the satellite orbits decay. Distance between the spacecraft will be

  6. Origins of the ancient constellations: I. The Mesopotamian traditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. H.

    1998-02-01

    In the sky-map of ancient Babylon, constellations had two different roles, and thus developed into two overlapping traditions. One set of constellations represented the gods and their symbols; the other set represented rustic activities and provided a farming calendar. Many constellations were shared by the two traditions, but in some regions of sky there were alternative divine and rustic figures. These figures developed in stages from ~3200 BC to ~500 BC. Of the divine set, the most important (although the last to be finalised) were the twelve zodiacal signs, plus several associated animals (the serpent, crow, eagle, and fish), which were all transmitted to the classical Greek sky-map that we still use today. Conversely, the rustic constellations of workers and tools and animals were not transmitted to the West. However, a few of them may have survived in Bedouin Arab sky-maps of the first millennium AD.

  7. Constellation-masked secure communication technique for OFDM-PON.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun; Yu, Jianjun

    2012-10-22

    This paper proposes a novel secure communication technique using constellation masking for applications in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing passive optical network (OFDM-PON). The constellation masking is applied both on each subcarrier and among different subcarriers. The Arnold mapping is utilized as the parameter function for the mask factors. A interleave length is employed to provide a scalable masking granularity for different ONUs. A 15.54 Gb/s constellation-masked 32QAM-OFDM signal has been successfully transmitted over 25-km single mode fiber in the experiment. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can effectively protect the system from illegal ONU without wasting the bandwidth. The constellation-masked technique suggests an effective solution for the physical secure communication in future OFDM access network.

  8. Analysis For Monitoring the Earth Science Afternoon Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, Peter; Richon, Karen V.; Wright, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The Earth Science Afternoon Constellation consists of Aqua, Aura, PARASOL, CALIPSO, Cloudsat, and the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO). The coordination of flight dynamics activities between these missions is critical to the safety and success of the Afternoon Constellation. This coordination is based on two main concepts, the control box and the zone-of-exclusion. This paper describes how these two concepts are implemented in the Constellation Coordination System (CCS). The CCS is a collection of tools that enables the collection and distribution of flight dynamics products among the missions, allows cross-mission analyses to be performed through a web-based interface, performs automated analyses to monitor the overall constellation, and notifies the missions of changes in the status of the other missions.

  9. Dynamics and control of spacecraft formation flying and constellation station keeping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaodong

    2005-11-01

    Formation flying and constellation station keeping, the innovative concept of distributing the functionality of monolithic satellites among less expensive, smaller, cooperative satellites, enables faster ground track repeats, provides higher degrees of system redundancy and, in the end, reduces the cost of the whole mission. However, the practical implementation of this concept is associated with the need to tightly design, measure, control and maintain the formation or relative distance, phasing and orientations among the participating satellites. Implementing, maintaining, and reconfiguring the cluster of satellites is so critical and complex, that it would be a big burden on the traditional ground-based orbital determination, navigation and command systems, and it also may impose stringent requirements on current control systems in terms of the energy consumption, precision, and the overall budget. The research work in this dissertation addresses the problems in two parts: the first part, which discusses mainly how to design the relative orbits for formation flying and constellation station keeping; and the second part, which is about the exploitation of possible control algorithms for maintaining the formation and constellation. Orbits are investigated for which there are no relative secular precessions or drifts due to the Earth's perturbations between the spacecraft. In this case the energy consumption could be largely decreased. A general method is introduced to establish the relationship between a given orbit relative to a reference orbit. By analyzing a set of differential equations, relationships between the orbit design and all possible relative secular drifts due to perturbations in the Earth's gravitational field, can be derived. Mathematical singularities encountered at specific orbital inclination angles, such as polar inclinations, are discussed. By using the general approach, a solution for polar inclinations is found. Two solution sets are found

  10. SLR tracking of GNSS constellations for improved future ITRF realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, Erricos C.; Koenig, Daniel; Kuzmicz-Cieslak, Magdalena

    improve the tracking yield of the two ETALON satellites in orbit. Furthermore, there are efforts to launch a second LARES-type satellite in the near future. However, it is already possible to increase the number of the available targets, even if not as optimal in design as the cannonball satellites may be, by including all or some of the GNSS spacecraft that carry Laser Retroreflector Arrays—LRAs. With the planned outfitting of current and future GNSS constellations with LRAs, there is an opportunity to dramatically improve the sky-coverage, the chances that a SLR station has a target to track at any time, and the geometry of available data over each station per day. In the case of future launches, careful planning and calibration of the LRA location with respect to the radiometric phase center and the center of gravity of the s/c, these targets can become a very significant contribution in the development of the future ITRF realizations, imposing a strong tie between the two techniques in space. With the number of such targets reaching well over a hundred over the next decade, we need to define minimum requirements and a concept of operations in order to avoid undue burdening of the SLR network and a waste of resources. Using simulations of SLR data to GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, etc., we examine the utility of bringing the two techniques together in orbit and the tangible benefits that we expect to reap on the ground in realizing the ITRF. We present here the results of simulation studies aimed at designing optimal combinations of the number of required sites versus the number of targets and the temporal schedule required to achieve the nominal GGOS accuracy goals.

  11. Imaging Sensor Constellation for Tomographic Chemical Cloud Mapping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-30

    a chemical cloud parallels the approach used in X-ray based medical imaging and can be an important tool in understanding chemical cloud dynamics...SR-1345 PSI-1505 Imaging Sensor Constellation for Tomographic Chemical Cloud Mapping Bogdan R. Cosofret,1,* Daisei Konno,1 Aram Faghfouri...00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Imaging Sensor Constellation for Tomographic Chemical Cloud Mapping 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  12. Human Rating Requirements for NASA's Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdich, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Constellation Program (CxP) will conduct a series of human space expeditions of increasing scope, starting with missions supporting the International Space Station and expanding to encompass the Moon and Mars. Although human-rating is an integral part of all CxP activities throughout their life cycle, NASA Procedural Requirements document NPR 8705.2B, Human-Rating Requirements (HRR) for Space Flight Systems, defines the additional processes, procedures, and requirements necessary to produce human-rated space systems that protect the safety of crew members and passengers on these NASA missions. In order to be in compliance with 8705.2B the CxP must show appropriate implementation or progression toward the HRR, or justification for an exception. Compliance includes an explanation of how the CxP intends to meet the HRR, analyses to be performed to determine implementation; and a matrix to trace the HRR to CxP requirements. The HRR requires the CxP to establish a human system integration team (HSIT), consisting of astronauts, mission operations personnel, training personnel, ground processing personnel, human factors personnel, and human engineering experts, with clearly defined authority, responsibility, and accountability to lead the human-system integration. For example, per the HRR the HSIT is involved in the evaluation of crew workload, human-in-the-loop usability evaluations, determining associated criteria, and in assessment of how these activities influenced system design. In essence, the HSIT is invaluable in CxP s ability to meet the three fundamental tenets of human rating: the process of designing, evaluating, and assuring that the total system can safely conduct the required human missions; the incorporation of design features and capabilities that accommodate human interaction with the system to enhance overall safety and mission success; and the incorporation of design features and capabilities to enable safe recovery of the crew from hazardous

  13. Human Rating Requirements for NASA's Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdich, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Constellation Program (CxP) will conduct a series of human space expeditions of increasing scope, starting with missions supporting the International Space Station and expanding to encompass the Moon and Mars. Although human-rating is an integral part of all CxP activities throughout their life cycle, NASA Procedural Requirements document NPR 8705.2B, Human-Rating Requirements (HRR) for Space Flight Systems, defines the additional processes, procedures, and requirements necessary to produce human-rated space systems that protect the safety of crew members and passengers on these NASA missions. In order to be in compliance with 8705.2B the CxP must show appropriate implementation or progression toward the HRR, or justification for an exception. Compliance includes an explanation of how the CxP intends to meet the HRR, analyses to be performed to determine implementation; and a matrix to trace the HRR to CxP requirements. The HRR requires the CxP to establish a human system integration team (HSIT), consisting of astronauts, mission operations personnel, training personnel, ground processing personnel, human factors personnel, and human engineering experts, with clearly defined authority, responsibility, and accountability to lead the human-system integration. For example, per the HRR the HSIT is involved in the evaluation of crew workload, human-in-the-loop usability evaluations, determining associated criteria, and in assessment of how these activities influenced system design. In essence, the HSIT is invaluable in CxP s ability to meet the three fundamental tenets of human rating: the process of designing, evaluating, and assuring that the total system can safely conduct the required human missions; the incorporation of design features and capabilities that accommodate human interaction with the system to enhance overall safety and mission success; and the incorporation of design features and capabilities to enable safe recovery of the crew from hazardous

  14. Magnetospheric Constellation and Tomography Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ergun, R. E.; Larson, D. E.; Phan, T.; McFadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.; Roth, I.; Delory, G. T.; Bale, S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Strangeway, R. J.; hide

    1998-01-01

    We describe the basic principles, instrumentation, and feasibility of a multi-satellite mission that combines in situ observations of plasma and electromagnetic fields with radio tomography imaging. We show that a 16-satellite radio tomography experiment can produce two-dimensional images of plasma density in the earth's magnetosphere at sufficient spatial (1/2 R(sub E)) and temporal (approximately 10s) resolution to address key problems of magnetospheric physics. The same mission can incorporate electron and ion analyzers, magnetometers, and electric field instruments on the same spacecraft. We suggest that the large-scale images are more valuable when combined with in situ observations, supporting an unambiguous interpretation of the in situ data and an investigation of the interdependence of small- and large-scale plasma processes.

  15. Test and Verification Approach for the NASA Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Edward

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is a test and verification approach for the NASA Constellation Program. The contents include: 1) The Vision for Space Exploration: Foundations for Exploration; 2) Constellation Program Fleet of Vehicles; 3) Exploration Roadmap; 4) Constellation Vehicle Approximate Size Comparison; 5) Ares I Elements; 6) Orion Elements; 7) Ares V Elements; 8) Lunar Lander; 9) Map of Constellation content across NASA; 10) CxP T&V Implementation; 11) Challenges in CxP T&V Program; 12) T&V Strategic Emphasis and Key Tenets; 13) CxP T&V Mission & Vision; 14) Constellation Program Organization; 15) Test and Evaluation Organization; 16) CxP Requirements Flowdown; 17) CxP Model Based Systems Engineering Approach; 18) CxP Verification Planning Documents; 19) Environmental Testing; 20) Scope of CxP Verification; 21) CxP Verification - General Process Flow; 22) Avionics and Software Integrated Testing Approach; 23) A-3 Test Stand; 24) Space Power Facility; 25) MEIT and FEIT; 26) Flight Element Integrated Test (FEIT); 27) Multi-Element Integrated Testing (MEIT); 28) Flight Test Driving Principles; and 29) Constellation s Integrated Flight Test Strategy Low Earth Orbit Servicing Capability.

  16. The HUMSAT System: a CubeSat-based Constellation for In-situ and Inexpensive Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubío-Pardavila, R.; Vigil, S. A.; Puig-Suari, J.; Aguado Agelet, F.

    2014-12-01

    There is a requirement for low cost in-situ measurements of environmental parameters such as air quality, meteorological data, and water quality in remote areas. Currently available solutions for such measurements include remote sensing from satellite and aircraft platforms, and in-situ measurements from mobile and aircraft platforms. Fixed systems such as eddy covariance networks, tall towers, and the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) are providing precision greenhouse gas measurements. Within this context, the HUMSAT system designed by the University of Vigo (Spain) will complement existing high-precision measurement systems with low cost in-situ ground based sensors in remote locations using a constellation of CubeSats as a communications relay. The HUMSAT system standardizes radio communications in between deployed sensors and the CubeSats of the constellation, which act as store and forward satellites to ground stations for uploading to the internet. Current ground stations have been established at the University of Vigo (Spain) and California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly). Users of the system may deploy their own environmental sensors to meet local requirements. The sensors will be linked to a low-cost satellite data transceiver using a standard HUMSAT protocol. The transceiver is capable of receiving data from the HUMSAT constellation to remotely reconfigure sensors without the need of physically going to the sensor location. This transceiver uses a UHF channel around 437 MHz to exchange short data messages with the sensors. These data messages can contain up to 32 bytes of useful information and are transmitted at a speed around 300 bps. The protocol designed for this system handles the access to the channel by all these elements and guarantees a correct transmission of the information in such an scenario. The University of Vigo has launched the first satellite of the constellation, the HUMSAT-D CubeSat in November 2013 and has

  17. University Nanosatellite Program ION-F Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Charles; Fullmer, Rees; Redd, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The Space Engineering program at Utah State University has developed a small satellite, known as USUSat, under funding from AFOSR, AFRL, NASA and Utah State University's Space Dynamics Laboratory. This satellite was designed and significantly manufactured by students in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Departments within the College of Engineering. USUSat is one of three spacecraft being designed for the Ionospheric Observation Nanosatellite Formation (ION- F). This formation comprises three 15 kg. spacecraft designed and built in cooperation by Utah State University, University of Washington, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute. The ION-F satellites are being designed and built by students at the three universities, with close coordination to insure compatibility for launch, deployment, and the formation flying mission. The JON-F mission is part of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) University Nanosatellite Program, which provides technology development and demonstrations for the TechSat2l Program. The University Nanosatellite Program involves 10 universities building nanosatellites for a launch in 2004 on two separate space shuttle missions. Additional support for the formation flying demonstration has been provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

  18. University Nanosatellite Program ION-F Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Charles; Fullmer, Rees; Redd, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The Space Engineering program at Utah State University has developed a small satellite, known as USUSat, under funding from AFOSR, AFRL, NASA and Utah State University's Space Dynamics Laboratory. This satellite was designed and significantly manufactured by students in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Departments within the College of Engineering. USUSat is one of three spacecraft being designed for the Ionospheric Observation Nanosatellite Formation (ION- F). This formation comprises three 15 kg. spacecraft designed and built in cooperation by Utah State University, University of Washington, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute. The ION-F satellites are being designed and built by students at the three universities, with close coordination to insure compatibility for launch, deployment, and the formation flying mission. The JON-F mission is part of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) University Nanosatellite Program, which provides technology development and demonstrations for the TechSat2l Program. The University Nanosatellite Program involves 10 universities building nanosatellites for a launch in 2004 on two separate space shuttle missions. Additional support for the formation flying demonstration has been provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

  19. The influence of different types of satellite exiting in system RAIM performance in BeiDou Satellite Navigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-tai; Peng, Jun-huan

    2015-12-01

    The space constellation of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System(BDS)has three main components, Geostationary Earth Orbits (GEOs), Medium Earth Orbits (MEOs) and Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbits(IGSOs).This paper selected 6 satellite respectively in three types to simulate their exiting service, and used the statistical methods to assess receiver autonomous integrity monitoring RAIM availability and fault detection FD capability of BeiDou14 Phase with 14 satellites under the circumstances. This paper assessed RAIM availability performance from satellites and constellation geometry configuration by the number of visible satellites (NVS, NVS>~5) and position dilution of precision (PDOP, PDOP<=6) together. The FD capability of RAIM is assessed by the maximum minimal detectable bias (MDB) and the maximum minimal detectable effect (MDE). The analyses of simulation results testify that the exiting of single MEO or IGSO satellite have no obvious effect on RAIM availability and error detection ability. However GEO satellite's exiting can make the number of points in where the constellation geometry is not available and maximum minimum detectable deviation and maximum minimum detectable influence significantly increase. Relative to other two satellites, GEO satellites' health have a significant impact on the RAIM performance of BDS.

  20. 75 FR 2163 - Constellation Energy; Notice of Docketing of Special Nuclear Material License SNM-2505 Amendment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... COMMISSION Constellation Energy; Notice of Docketing of Special Nuclear Material License SNM-2505 Amendment... June 15, 2009, from Constellation Energy (Constellation) to amend its Special Nuclear Material License... will remain the same for this action. An NRC review, documented in a letter to Constellation dated...

  1. Taos: A low cost satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, P.

    Aerospatiale, under contract to CNES, has studied a new satellite based system with the double mission of mobile tracking and paging. This is called Taos. A constellation of five Taos satellites will allow positioning with an accuracy of 1 km, as well as small message transmission with a maximum time delay of 2 hours. Using a low earth orbit, Taos will have a small power budget, with the attendant gains in dimensions, mass, and eventually cost. The emergence of such class of lightsats has been fostered by the progress of electronics, as well as the new small launchers now being offered. Furthermore, the market is clearly hungry for ever more worldwide data collection. This paper describes the Taos system of satellite and ground segment, for which a primary goal will be a significant reduction of the recurring price. Weighing 152 kg, each satellite will have a power of 270 W.

  2. New Insight into Polar Stratospheric Cloud Processes from A-Train Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.

    2016-12-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play essential roles in the chemical depletion of stratospheric ozone at high latitudes. Heterogeneous reactions occurring on PSC particles, primarily supercooled ternary (H2SO4-H2O-HNO3) solution (STS) droplets, convert stable chlorine reservoir species to highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Also, sedimentation and evaporation of large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles irreversibly redistributes odd nitrogen and prolongs ozone depletion by slowing the reformation of stable chlorine reservoirs. Even after three decades of research, significant gaps in our understanding of PSC processes still exist, particularly concerning NAT nucleation and the extent to which chlorine is activated on cold background aerosol prior to PSC formation. These uncertainties limit our ability to represent PSCs accurately in global models and call into question predictions of ozone recovery in a changing climate. PSC observations from the A-Train satellite constellation have stimulated a number of new research activities that have both extended and challenged our knowledge of PSC processes and modeling capabilities. Specifically, the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite is providing information on PSC morphology and composition in unprecedented detail, while the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite is providing nearly coincident measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and H2O, the major constituents of all PSC particles. The combined analyses of these datasets enable better PSC composition discrimination and provide valuable new insight into processes such as PSC-catalyzed chlorine activation and PSC particle growth kinetics. The more than ten years of CALIOP and MLS measurements have uniquely captured the primary aspects of the seasonal and multi-year variability of PSCs in the Arctic and Antarctic and are enabling the

  3. Trends in mobile satellite communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannsen, Klaus G.; Bowles, Mike W.; Milliken, Samuel; Cherrette, Alan R.; Busche, Gregory C.

    1993-01-01

    Ever since the U.S. Federal Communication Commission opened the discussion on spectrum usage for personal handheld communication, the community of satellite manufacturers has been searching for an economically viable and technically feasible satellite mobile communication system. Hughes Aircraft Company and others have joined in providing proposals for such systems, ranging from low to medium to geosynchronous orbits. These proposals make it clear that the trend in mobile satellite communication is toward more sophisticated satellites with a large number of spot beams and onboard processing, providing worldwide interconnectivity. Recent Hughes studies indicate that from a cost standpoint the geosynchronous satellite (GEOS) is most economical, followed by the medium earth orbit satellite (MEOS) and then by the low earth orbit satellite (LEOS). From a system performance standpoint, this evaluation may be in reverse order, depending on how the public will react to speech delay and collision. This paper discusses the trends and various mobile satellite constellations in satellite communication under investigation. It considers the effect of orbital altitude and modulation/multiple access on the link and spacecraft design.

  4. Trends in mobile satellite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannsen, Klaus G.; Bowles, Mike W.; Milliken, Samuel; Cherrette, Alan R.; Busche, Gregory C.

    Ever since the U.S. Federal Communication Commission opened the discussion on spectrum usage for personal handheld communication, the community of satellite manufacturers has been searching for an economically viable and technically feasible satellite mobile communication system. Hughes Aircraft Company and others have joined in providing proposals for such systems, ranging from low to medium to geosynchronous orbits. These proposals make it clear that the trend in mobile satellite communication is toward more sophisticated satellites with a large number of spot beams and onboard processing, providing worldwide interconnectivity. Recent Hughes studies indicate that from a cost standpoint the geosynchronous satellite (GEOS) is most economical, followed by the medium earth orbit satellite (MEOS) and then by the low earth orbit satellite (LEOS). From a system performance standpoint, this evaluation may be in reverse order, depending on how the public will react to speech delay and collision. This paper discusses the trends and various mobile satellite constellations in satellite communication under investigation. It considers the effect of orbital altitude and modulation/multiple access on the link and spacecraft design.

  5. Internet-Protocol-Based Satellite Bus Architecture Designed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slywczak, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA is designing future complex satellite missions ranging from single satellites and constellations to space networks and sensor webs. These missions require more interoperability, autonomy, and coordination than previous missions; in addition, a desire exists to have scientists retrieve data directly from the satellite rather than a central distribution source. To meet these goals, NASA has been studying the possibility of extending the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) suite for spacebased applications.

  6. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor. Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, Steven K.; Sullivan, John P.; Henderson, Michael G.; Blake, J. Bernard; Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-02-06

    Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse, and multipoint studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross calibration into two parts—one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation and one that compares the energy spectra—we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra, we use a combination of four distributions that together capture a wide range of observed spectral shapes. Moreover, our two-step approach allowed us to identify, and correct for, small systematic offsets between block IIR and IIF satellites. Using the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope on Van Allen Probes as a “gold standard,” here we demonstrate that the CXD instruments are well understood. A robust statistical analysis shows that CXD and Van Allen Probes fluxes are similar and the measured fluxes from CXD are typically within a factor of 2 of Van Allen Probes at energies inline image4 MeV. Our team present data from 17 CXD-equipped GPS satellites covering the 2015 “St. Patrick's Day” geomagnetic storm to illustrate the scientific applications of such a high data density satellite constellation and therefore demonstrate that the GPS constellation is positioned to enable new insights in inner magnetospheric physics and space weather forecasting.

  7. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor. Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data

    DOE PAGES

    Morley, Steven K.; Sullivan, John P.; Henderson, Michael G.; ...

    2016-02-06

    Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse, and multipoint studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross calibration into two parts—one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation and one that compares the energy spectra—we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra, wemore » use a combination of four distributions that together capture a wide range of observed spectral shapes. Moreover, our two-step approach allowed us to identify, and correct for, small systematic offsets between block IIR and IIF satellites. Using the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope on Van Allen Probes as a “gold standard,” here we demonstrate that the CXD instruments are well understood. A robust statistical analysis shows that CXD and Van Allen Probes fluxes are similar and the measured fluxes from CXD are typically within a factor of 2 of Van Allen Probes at energies inline image4 MeV. Our team present data from 17 CXD-equipped GPS satellites covering the 2015 “St. Patrick's Day” geomagnetic storm to illustrate the scientific applications of such a high data density satellite constellation and therefore demonstrate that the GPS constellation is positioned to enable new insights in inner magnetospheric physics and space weather forecasting.« less

  8. Global tracking and inventory of military hardware via LEO satellite: A system approach and likely scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, David; Estabrook, Polly; Romer, Richard

    1995-01-01

    A system for global inventory control of electronically tagged military hardware is achievable using a LEO satellite constellation. An equipment Tag can communicate directly to the satellite with a power of 5 watts or less at a data rate of 2400 to 50,000 bps. As examples, two proposed commercial LEO systems, IRIDIUM and ORBCOMM, are both capable of providing global coverage but with dramatically different telecom capacities. Investigation of these two LEO systems as applied to the Tag scenario provides insight into satellite design trade-offs, constellation trade-offs and signal dynamics that effect the performance of a satellite-based global inventory control system.

  9. Global tracking and inventory of military hardware via LEO satellite: A system approach and likely scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, David; Estabrook, Polly; Romer, Richard

    1995-01-01

    A system for global inventory control of electronically tagged military hardware is achievable using a LEO satellite constellation. An equipment Tag can communicate directly to the satellite with a power of 5 watts or less at a data rate of 2400 to 50,000 bps. As examples, two proposed commercial LEO systems, IRIDIUM and ORBCOMM, are both capable of providing global coverage but with dramatically different telecom capacities. Investigation of these two LEO systems as applied to the Tag scenario provides insight into satellite design trade-offs, constellation trade-offs and signal dynamics that effect the performance of a satellite-based global inventory control system.

  10. Advances in Satellite Observations of Earth's Radiation Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.; Rose, F. G.; Rutan, D. A.

    2013-05-01

    The first observation of Earth's radiation budget from satellite dates back to the beginning of the satellite era in late 1950s, when the first satellite images of the planet were recorded. With each passing decade since then, the science community has made advances in instrument technology that has led to a wealth of new information about the sunlight reaching Earth, Earth's albedo, and the emission of thermal radiation to space. Until recently, however, most of the observational breakthroughs were limited to Earth's top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation budget. The recent arrival of instruments flown under the Earth Observing System (EOS) and the A-Train constellation of satellites has dramatically changed this situation, providing new opportunities to synergistically combine an array of diverse passive and active satellite instruments to more accurately determine Earth's surface radiation budget. The new data have led to renewed discussions about our basic understanding of Earth's water and energy cycles. The goal of this presentation is to discuss how the new satellite instrument capabilities are being used by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy (CERES) science team to provide improved observations of the TOA, surface and within-atmosphere radiation budgets and the role clouds play in modulating the energy flows. We focus on the CERES TOA and surface Energy Balanced and Filled (EBAF) product, which combines information from CERES, MODIS, CALIPSO, Cloudsat, AIRS, and geostationary observations all integrated in a consistent manner, and demonstrate how synergistic use of these datasets leads to improved radiative fluxes when compared with surface radiation measurements from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), NOAA SURFRAD, and ARM. We find that EBAF-SFC reduces the bias in surface SW downward flux by a factor of 2 compared to other satellite-based surface radiation budget datasets, show marked reductions in surface downward longwave radiation biases

  11. Characterising volcanic cycles at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat: Time series analysis of multi-parameter satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, Verity J. B.; Carn, Simon A.

    2015-10-01

    The identification of cyclic volcanic activity can elucidate underlying eruption dynamics and aid volcanic hazard mitigation. Whilst satellite datasets are often analysed individually, here we exploit the multi-platform NASA A-Train satellite constellation to cross-correlate cyclical signals identified using complementary measurement techniques at Soufriere Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat. In this paper we present a Multi-taper (MTM) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of coincident SO2 and thermal infrared (TIR) satellite measurements at SHV facilitating the identification of cyclical volcanic behaviour. These measurements were collected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (respectively) in the A-Train. We identify a correlating cycle in both the OMI and MODIS data (54-58 days), with this multi-week feature attributable to episodes of dome growth. The 50 day cycles were also identified in ground-based SO2 data at SHV, confirming the validity of our analysis and further corroborating the presence of this cycle at the volcano. In addition a 12 day cycle was identified in the OMI data, previously attributed to variable lava effusion rates on shorter timescales. OMI data also display a one week (7-8 days) cycle attributable to cyclical variations in viewing angle resulting from the orbital characteristics of the Aura satellite. Longer period cycles possibly relating to magma intrusion were identified in the OMI record (102-, 121-, and 159 days); in addition to a 238-day cycle identified in the MODIS data corresponding to periodic destabilisation of the lava dome. Through the analysis of reconstructions generated from cycles identified in the OMI and MODIS data, periods of unrest were identified, including the major dome collapse of 20th May 2006 and significant explosive event of 3rd January 2009. Our analysis confirms the potential for identification of cyclical volcanic activity through combined

  12. The CEOS-Land Surface Imaging Constellation Portal for GEOSS: A resource for land surface imaging system information and data access

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holm, Thomas; Gallo, Kevin P.; Bailey, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites is an international group that coordinates civil space-borne observations of the Earth, and provides the space component of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). The CEOS Virtual Constellations concept was implemented in an effort to engage and coordinate disparate Earth observing programs of CEOS member agencies and ultimately facilitate their contribution in supplying the space-based observations required to satisfy the requirements of the GEOSS. The CEOS initially established Study Teams for four prototype constellations that included precipitation, land surface imaging, ocean surface topography, and atmospheric composition. The basic mission of the Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellation [1] is to promote the efficient, effective, and comprehensive collection, distribution, and application of space-acquired image data of the global land surface, especially to meet societal needs of the global population, such as those addressed by the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) of agriculture, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy, health, water, and weather. The LSI Constellation Portal is the result of an effort to address important goals within the LSI Constellation mission and provide resources to assist in planning for future space missions that might further contribute to meeting those goals.

  13. The CEOS-Land Surface Imaging Constellation Portal for GEOSS: A resource for land surface imaging system information and data access

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holm, Thomas; Gallo, Kevin P.; Bailey, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites is an international group that coordinates civil space-borne observations of the Earth, and provides the space component of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). The CEOS Virtual Constellations concept was implemented in an effort to engage and coordinate disparate Earth observing programs of CEOS member agencies and ultimately facilitate their contribution in supplying the space-based observations required to satisfy the requirements of the GEOSS. The CEOS initially established Study Teams for four prototype constellations that included precipitation, land surface imaging, ocean surface topography, and atmospheric composition. The basic mission of the Land Surface Imaging (LSI) Constellation [1] is to promote the efficient, effective, and comprehensive collection, distribution, and application of space-acquired image data of the global land surface, especially to meet societal needs of the global population, such as those addressed by the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) of agriculture, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy, health, water, and weather. The LSI Constellation Portal is the result of an effort to address important goals within the LSI Constellation mission and provide resources to assist in planning for future space missions that might further contribute to meeting those goals.

  14. A New Synthesis for the Origin of the Greek Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. E.

    2005-08-01

    The Greek constellations constitute one of the longest enduring intellectual properties of humanity. While various papers attribute the origin of the constellations to many diverse possibilities, main stream historians view the origin as largely being in Mesopotamia after around 1350 BC with transmission to the Greeks around 500 BC or so. The evidence for this synthesis is cuneiform and iconographic records that first mention constellations from roughly 1350-500 BC. My recent research on precessional dating has added much detail to this old synthesis. The earliest surviving written description of the Greek constellations is Aratus' Phaenomenon, which is a copy of Eudoxus' lost book of the same name. Hipparchus' Commentary also extensively quotes from Eudoxus. With 172 observations from Eudoxus, I derive a precessional date of 1130 ± 80 BC and a latitude of 36.0 ± 0.9 degrees north. Further, the positioning of the southern void amongst the Greek constellations yields a date of 690 BC (with an uncertainty of 2-4 centuries) and a latitude of 33 degrees (with an uncertainty of 1-3 degrees) for the six southernmost constellations. The earliest surviving description of the Mesopotamian constellations is the MUL.APIN tablet series, with the oldest dated example from the 8th century BC. My precessional calculation gives a date of 1100 BC and a latitude of 33 north. I also see that Eudoxus and MUL.APIN share a substantial number of observations. In all, some Assyrian observer(s) between 33-36 degrees north latitude around the time of 1300-1000 BC apparently invented many of the constellations adopted by the Greeks and made a database of observations later repeated by MUL.APIN, Eudoxus, Aratus, and Hipparchus. But this is not the whole story, as this only accounts for 19 Greek constellations which are identical in stars and representation with the Mesopotamian sky. An additional 12 Greek constellations have the same star groups as the Babylonians yet have completely

  15. Dark Energy, Dark Matter and Science with Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Ann Hornschemeier

    2005-01-01

    Constellation-X, with more than 100 times the collecting area of any previous spectroscopic mission operating in the 0.25-40 keV bandpass, will enable highthroughput, high spectral resolution studies of sources ranging from the most luminous accreting supermassive black holes in the Universe to the disks around young stars where planets form. This talk will review the updated Constellation-X science case, released in booklet form during summer 2005. The science areas where Constellation-X will have major impact include the exploration of the space-time geometry of black holes spanning nine orders of magnitude in mass and the nature of the dark energy and dark matter which govern the expansion and ultimate fate of the Universe. Constellation-X will also explore processes referred to as "cosmic feedback" whereby mechanical energy, radiation, and chemical elements from star formation and black holes are returned to interstellar and intergalactic medium, profoundly affecting the development of structure in the Universe, and will also probe all the important life cycles of matter, from stellar and planetary birth to stellar death via supernova to stellar endpoints in the form of accreting binaries and supernova remnants. This talk will touch upon all these areas, with particular emphasis on Constellation-X's role in the study of Dark Energy.

  16. Dark Energy, Dark Matter and Science with Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Ann Hornschemeier

    2005-01-01

    Constellation-X, with more than 100 times the collecting area of any previous spectroscopic mission operating in the 0.25-40 keV bandpass, will enable highthroughput, high spectral resolution studies of sources ranging from the most luminous accreting supermassive black holes in the Universe to the disks around young stars where planets form. This talk will review the updated Constellation-X science case, released in booklet form during summer 2005. The science areas where Constellation-X will have major impact include the exploration of the space-time geometry of black holes spanning nine orders of magnitude in mass and the nature of the dark energy and dark matter which govern the expansion and ultimate fate of the Universe. Constellation-X will also explore processes referred to as "cosmic feedback" whereby mechanical energy, radiation, and chemical elements from star formation and black holes are returned to interstellar and intergalactic medium, profoundly affecting the development of structure in the Universe, and will also probe all the important life cycles of matter, from stellar and planetary birth to stellar death via supernova to stellar endpoints in the form of accreting binaries and supernova remnants. This talk will touch upon all these areas, with particular emphasis on Constellation-X's role in the study of Dark Energy.

  17. Constellation Pharmacology: A new paradigm for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric W.; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2015-01-01

    Constellation Pharmacology is a cell-based high-content phenotypic-screening platform that utilizes subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate the cell-specific combinations (“constellations”) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types. Heterogeneous populations of native cells, in which the different individual cell types have been identified and characterized, are the foundation for this screening platform. Constellation Pharmacology is useful for screening small molecules or for deconvoluting complex mixtures of biologically-active natural products. This platform has been used to purify natural products and discover their molecular mechanisms. In the on-going development of Constellation Pharmacology, there is a positive-feedback loop between the pharmacological characterization of cell types and screening for new drug candidates. As Constellation Pharmacology is used to discover compounds with novel targeting-selectivity profiles, those new compounds then further help to elucidate the constellations of specific cell types, thereby increasing the content of this high-content platform. PMID:25562646

  18. Prehistory of Zodiac Dating: Three Strata of Upper Paleolithic Constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurshtein, Alex A.

    A pattern of archaic proto-constellations is extracted from Aratus' "The Phaenomena" didactic poem list according to a size criterion elaborated earlier, and their symbolism is analyzed. As a result of this approach three celestial symbolical strata are discovered to be probably a reflection of the symbols for the Lower, the Middle and the Upper Worlds; the Under-World creatures have a water character, the Middle World ones are mostly anthropomorphic and flying beings are for the Upper World. The strata excerpted from Aratus' sky seems to be in agreement with the well-known Babylonian division into three god pathways for Ea (Enki), Anu and Enlil. There is a possibility of dating the pattern discovered because of precession's strong influence as far back as 16 thousand years, the result being supported by the comparison of different star group mean sizes. The archaic constellation pattern under consideration is a reasonable background of symbolical meanings for the first Zodiacal generation quartet (7.5 thousand years old) examined by the author previously. The enormous size of the Argo constellation (Ship of Argo and his Argonauts) as well as the large sizes of other southern constellations are explained as due to the existence of an accumulation zone near the South celestial pole. Some extra correlations between the reconstruction proposed and cultural data available are discussed. The paper is the second part of the investigation "On the Origin of the Zodiacal constellations" published in Vistas in Astronomy, vol.36, pp.171-190, 1993.

  19. An Autonomous Orbit Determination System for Earth Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is another variation on the beacon idea. When completed, GPS is to consist of a constellation of 18 satellites...considered vulnerable; destroying a significant portion of the GPS constellation would render the system useless. In addition, the GPS satellites...0.20857 e X y z A A 9 a Virgo -0.91550 e - 0.35341 e - 0.19228 e X y z A A A 10 a Bootes -0.78497 e - 0.52445 e + 0.32982 e x y z A A A11 a Scorpios

  20. Comparison between multi-constellation ambiguity-fixed PPP and RTK for maritime precise navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegedor, Javier; Liu, Xianglin; Ørpen, Ole; Treffers, Niels; Goode, Matthew; Øvstedal, Ola

    2015-06-01

    In order to achieve high-accuracy positioning, either Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) or Precise Point Positioning (PPP) techniques can be used. While RTK normally delivers higher accuracy with shorter convergence times, PPP has been an attractive technology for maritime applications, as it delivers uniform positioning performance without the direct need of a nearby reference station. Traditional PPP has been based on ambiguity-­float solutions using GPS and Glonass constellations. However, the addition of new satellite systems, such as Galileo and BeiDou, and the possibility of fixing integer carrier-phase ambiguities (PPP-AR) allow to increase PPP accuracy. In this article, a performance assessment has been done between RTK, PPP and PPP-AR, using GNSS data collected from two antennas installed on a ferry navigating in Oslo (Norway). RTK solutions have been generated using short, medium and long baselines (up to 290 km). For the generation of PPP-AR solutions, Uncalibrated Hardware Delays (UHDs) for GPS, Galileo and BeiDou have been estimated using reference stations in Oslo and Onsala. The performance of RTK and multi-­constellation PPP and PPP-AR are presented.

  1. Suitability of COSMO-SkyMed constellation for radargrammetric DEM generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Domenico; Bovenga, Fabio; Refice, Alberto; Nitti, Davide O.; Nutricato, Raffaele; Chiaradia, Maria T.

    2014-10-01

    The COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) constellation acquires data from its four SAR X-band satellites in several imaging modes, providing in particular different view angles. The present work investigates the potential of CSK constellation for ground elevation measurement through SAR radargrammetry. We selected an area around Parkfield (California), where several CSK acquisitions are available. We used for radargrammetric processing 2 CSK spotlight image pairs acquired at 1 day of separation, in Same Side Viewing configuration, with baselines of 350 km. Furthermore, a dataset of 33 spotlight images were selected to derive height measurements through both persistent scatterers interferometry(PSI) and interferometric processing of 5 1-day separated pairs included in the dataset. We first predict how the errors in the geometrical parameters and the correlation level between the images impact on the height accuracy. Then, two DEMs were derived by processing the radargrammetric CSK pairs. According to the outcomes of the feasibility analysis, processing parameters were chosen in order to guarantee nominal values of height accuracy within the HRTI Level 3 specifications. The products have a final resolution of 3 m. In order to assess the accuracy of these radargrammetric DEMs, we used the height values provided by the PSI, and an interferometric DEM derived from the CSK tandem-like pairs.

  2. Measuring Bi-Directional Reflectance for Gross Primary Productivity with a Constellation of SmallSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, S.; Gatebe, C. K.; Hilker, T.; Hall, F. G.; de Weck, O. L.

    2014-12-01

    The "missing carbon" problem has plagued the carbon cycle field for over 30 years. A newly proposed constellation of satellites promises to finally close the gap and find the missing carbon. This constellation would measure vegetation from multiple angles at solar wavelengths, essentially measuring the bidirectional reflectance (BRDF), and from this retrieve the Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), something that has eluded space remote sensing community up until now, showing up to 40% uncertainty. The science value of such a BRDF retrieval approach has been demonstrated using multi-angle, multi-spectral measurements from various deployments of the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) as the "gold standard" data for BRDF estimation. CAR is an airborne instrument operated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Initial observing system simulations (OSSE) with four satellites launched as secondary payloads and operating in different imaging modes show BRDF error estimates of less than 12% when compared to CAR measurements, a 50% improvement to the worst case BRDF error produced by corresponding monoliths. However, GPP products require estimating the BRDF of photochemical reflectance index (PRI), which needs angular measurements at the xanthophyll sensitive band (533nm) - unavailable in CAR. The satellite OSSEs will be repeated using AMPSEC tower measurements. AMPSEC is a Unispec-DC (PP Systems, Amesbury,MA, USA) spectroradiometer with 256 contiguous bands with a nominal band spacing of 3 nm and a nominal range of operation between 350 and 1200 nm. The data will be used to estimate parameters of the widely-used Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete (RPV) and RossThin-LiSparseReciprocal (RTnLS) BRDF models. Since AMPSEC reflectance data is obtained at 360 view-azimuth directions and 90 view-zenith directions, satellite clusters will be able to sample only a part of this angular space. To make best use of the satellite-cluster BRDF data, a heuristic optimization method is used to find the

  3. Small optical inter-satellite communication system for small and micro satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Kyohei; Nakao, Takashi; Ito, Taiji; Sano, Takeshi; Ishii, Tamotsu; Shibata, Keiichi; Ueno, Mitsuhiro; Ohta, Shinji; Komatsu, Hiromitsu; Araki, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Yuta; Sawada, Hirotaka

    2017-02-01

    Small optical inter-satellite communication system to be installed into small and micro satellites flying on LEO are designed and experimentally verified of its fundamental functions. Small, light weighted, power efficient as well as usable data transmission rate optical inter-satellite communication system is one of promising approach to provide realtime data handling and operation capabilities for micro and small satellite constellations which have limited conditions of payload. Proposed system is designed to connect satellites with 4500 (km) long maximum to be able to talk with ground station continuously by relaying LEO satellites even when they are in their own maneuvers. Connecting satellites with 4500 (km) long with keeping steady data rate, accurate pointing and tracking method will be one of a crucial issue. In this paper, we propose a precious pointing and tracking method and system with a miniature optics and experimentally verified almost 10 (μrad) of pointing accuracy with more than 500 (mrad) of angular coverage.

  4. Operational Exploitation of Satellite-Based Sounding Data and Numerical Weather Prediction Models for Directed Energy Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    The wealth of available scientific data collected by the modern constellation of meteorological satellites can be exploited in new and innovative...derive optical turbulence strength, as modeled by index of the refraction structure function Cn 2, are applied to integrated meteorological satellite...9 2.3 Additional Meteorological Satellite Instruments Investigated ..........................11 2.3.1 Advanced

  5. Measurements of Ionospheric Density, Temperature, and Spacecraft Charging in a Space Weather Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balthazor, R. L.; McHarg, M. G.; Wilson, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Integrated Miniaturized Electrostatic Analyzer (IMESA) is a space weather sensor developed by the United States Air Force Academy and integrated and flown by the DoD's Space Test Program. IMESA records plasma spectrograms from which can be derived plasma density, temperature, and spacecraft frame charging. Results from IMESA currently orbiting on STPSat-3 are presented, showing frame charging effects dependent on a complex function of the number of solar panel cell strings switched in, solar panel current, and plasma density. IMESA will fly on four more satellites launching in the next two calendar years, enabling an undergraduate DoD space weather constellation in Low Earth Orbit that has the ability to significantly improve space weather forecasting capabilities using assimilative forecast models.

  6. Global Ocean Surveillance With Electronic Intelligence Based Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatramanan, Haritha

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this proposal is to design our own ELINT based satellite system to detect and locate the target by using satellite Trilateration Principle. The target position can be found by measuring the radio signals arrived at three satellites using Time Difference of Arrival(TDOA) technique. To locate a target it is necessary to determine the satellite position. The satellite motion and its position is obtained by using Simplified General Perturbation Model(SGP4) in MATLAB. This SGP4 accepts satellite Two Line Element(TLE) data and returns the position in the form of state vectors. These state vectors are then converted into observable parameters and then propagated in space. This calculations can be done for satellite constellation and non - visibility periods can be calculated. Satellite Trilateration consists of three satellites flying in formation with each other. The satellite constellation design consists of three satellites with an inclination of 61.3° maintained at equal distances between each other. The design is performed using MATLAB and simulated to obtain the necessary results. The target's position can be obtained using the three satellites ECEF Coordinate system and its position and velocity can be calculated in terms of Latitude and Longitude. The target's motion is simulated to obtain the Speed and Direction of Travel.

  7. The role of unconscious homosexuality in the paranoid constellation.

    PubMed

    Frosch, J

    1981-10-01

    The literature dealing with Freud's original concept of unconscious homosexuality in the paranoid constellation is reviewed. Many of the more recent contributions view unconscious homosexual features as secondary to others; as such, they are pseudophenomena. This communication suggests that unconscious homosexuality in the male is denied, rejected, and projected because the passive, anal, sadomasochistic aspects are felt as degrading and humiliating. In the female, unconscious homosexuality is also felt as degrading and humiliating. In both sexes, the feeling of humiliation derives from real experiences in childhood. Unconscious homosexuality is viewed as the organizing principle in the paranoid constellation.

  8. Electric propulsion for constellation deployment and spacecraft maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, W. D.; Vondra, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines the near-term (1990s) advantages of electric propulsion for two SDI missions: (1) the launch of a constellation of spacecraft, and (2) continual spacecraft defensive maneuvering. Ammonia arcjet and Xe-ion electric propulsion systems are compared to advanced chemical propulsion for each of these missions. The number of launch vehicles required for constellation deployment can be reduced by up to a factor of 2 when electric propulsion upper stages are used in place of advanced upper stages. Electric propulsion can provide significant benefits when used for continuous defensive maneuvering by enabling a large reduction in the initial spacecraft mass.

  9. Low Earth Orbit satellite traffic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelzel, John

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a significant tool for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) capacity analysis, needed to support marketing, economic, and design analysis, known as a Satellite Traffic Simulator (STS). LEO satellites typically use multiple beams to help achieve the desired communication capacity, but the traffic demand in these beams in usually not uniform. Simulations of dynamic, average, and peak expected demand per beam is a very critical part of the marketing, economic, and design analysis necessary to field a viable LEO system. An STS is described in this paper which can simulate voice, data and FAX traffic carried by LEO satellite beams and Earth Station Gateways. It is applicable world-wide for any LEO satellite constellations operating over any regions. For aeronautical applications to LEO satellites. the anticipates aeronautical traffic (Erlangs for each hour of the day to be simulated) is prepared for geographically defined 'area targets' (each major operational region for the respective aircraft), and used as input to the STS. The STS was designed by Constellations Communications Inc. (CCI) and E-Systems for usage in Brazil in accordance with an ESCA/INPE Statement Of Work, and developed by Analytical Graphics Inc. (AGI) to execute on top of its Satellite Tool Kit (STK) commercial software. The STS simulates constellations of LEO satellite orbits, with input of traffic intensity (Erlangs) for each hour of the day generated from area targets (such as Brazilian States). accumulated in custom LEO satellite beams, and then accumulated in Earth Station Gateways. The STS is a very general simulator which can accommodate: many forms of orbital element and Walker Constellation input; simple beams or any user defined custom beams; and any location of Gateways. The paper describes some of these features, including Manual Mode dynamic graphical display of communication links, to illustrate which Gateway links are accessible and which links are not, at each 'step' of the

  10. Low Earth Orbit satellite traffic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelzel, John

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a significant tool for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) capacity analysis, needed to support marketing, economic, and design analysis, known as a Satellite Traffic Simulator (STS). LEO satellites typically use multiple beams to help achieve the desired communication capacity, but the traffic demand in these beams in usually not uniform. Simulations of dynamic, average, and peak expected demand per beam is a very critical part of the marketing, economic, and design analysis necessary to field a viable LEO system. An STS is described in this paper which can simulate voice, data and FAX traffic carried by LEO satellite beams and Earth Station Gateways. It is applicable world-wide for any LEO satellite constellations operating over any regions. For aeronautical applications to LEO satellites. the anticipates aeronautical traffic (Erlangs for each hour of the day to be simulated) is prepared for geographically defined 'area targets' (each major operational region for the respective aircraft), and used as input to the STS. The STS was designed by Constellations Communications Inc. (CCI) and E-Systems for usage in Brazil in accordance with an ESCA/INPE Statement Of Work, and developed by Analytical Graphics Inc. (AGI) to execute on top of its Satellite Tool Kit (STK) commercial software. The STS simulates constellations of LEO satellite orbits, with input of traffic intensity (Erlangs) for each hour of the day generated from area targets (such as Brazilian States). accumulated in custom LEO satellite beams, and then accumulated in Earth Station Gateways. The STS is a very general simulator which can accommodate: many forms of orbital element and Walker Constellation input; simple beams or any user defined custom beams; and any location of Gateways. The paper describes some of these features, including Manual Mode dynamic graphical display of communication links, to illustrate which Gateway links are accessible and which links are not, at each 'step' of the

  11. Analysis of dual polarization images of precipitating clouds collected by the COSMO SkyMed constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Luca; Roberto, Nicoletta; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Fritz, Jason; Chandrasekar, V.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, several satellite missions are employing X-band synthetic aperture radars (SAR) with polarimetric capabilities. In images collected over land by X-band SAR, precipitation results mainly in evident attenuation of the surface returns. Effects of precipitation in polarimetric SAR images and how to exploit them for precipitation studies are emerging topics of interest. This paper investigates polarimetric signatures of precipitation in images collected by the X-band SARs of the Italian Space Agency COSMO SkyMed constellation using the HH-VV alternate polarimetric mode. Analyzed images were collected in 2010 when the constellation was composed of three satellites and operated in the “tandem like” interferometric configuration, which allowed acquisition of the same scene with the same viewing geometry and a minimum decorrelation time of one day. Observations collected in Piedmont (Italy) and Tampa Bay (Florida, US) have been analyzed along with coincident observations collected by operational weather radars, used to reconstruct the component of SAR returns due to precipitation at horizontal and vertical polarization states. Different techniques are used depending on the different characteristics of terrestrial radars. SAR observations reconstructed from terrestrial measurements are in fairly good agreement with actual SAR observations. Results confirm that the attenuation signature in SAR images collected over land is particularly pronounced in the presence of precipitation cells and can be related to the radar reflectivity integrated along the same path. The difference between copolar HH and VV power measurements reveals a differential attenuation due to anisotropy of precipitation, whose range is limited when the SAR incidence angle is low. A specific feature observed in the CosmoSkyMed alternate polarization implementation is the presence of the scalloping effect, a periodic effect along the azimuth direction that cannot always be removed by standard de

  12. Air Quality Study Using Satellites - Current Capability and Future Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.; Joiner, Joanna; Gleason, James; Liu, Xiong; Torres, Omar; Krotkov, Nickolay; Ziemke, Jerry; Chandra, Sushil

    2008-01-01

    Satellite instruments have had great success in monitoring the stratospheric ozone and in understanding the processes that control its daily to decadal scale variations. This field is now reaching its zenith with a number of satellite instruments from the US, Europe and Canada capping several decades of active research in this field. The primary public policy imperative of this research was to make reliable prediction of increases in biologically active surface UV radiation due to human activity. By contrast retrieval from satellite data of atmospheric constituents and photo-chemically active radiation that affect air quality is a new and growing field that is presenting us with unique challenges in measurement and data interpretation. A key distinction compared to stratospheric sensors is the greatly enhanced role of clouds, aerosols, and surfaces (CAS) in determining the quality and quantity of useful data that is available for air quality research. In our presentation we will use data from several sensors that are currently flying on the A-train satellite constellation, including OMI, MODIS, CLOUDSAT, and CALIPSO, to highlight that CAS can have both positive and negative effects on the