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Sample records for a-type coriolis interaction

  1. The Coriolis Interaction between the ν 9 and ν 7 Fundamental Bands of Methylene Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, K. L.; Tan, T. L.; Ong, P. P.; Teo, H. H.

    2000-06-01

    The infrared spectrum of the ν7 and ν9 bands of methylene fluoride-d2 (CD2F2) has been recorded with an unapodized resolution of 0.0024 cm-1 in the frequency range of 940-1030 cm-1 using the Fourier transform technique. A weak b-type Coriolis interaction term was found to couple these two vibrational states with band centers about 42 cm-1 apart. By fitting a total of 1031 infrared transitions of both ν7 and ν9 with a standard deviation of 0.0011 cm-1 using a Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation with the inclusion of a b-type Coriolis resonance term, two sets of rovibrational constants for ν7 = 1 and ν9 = 1 states up to sextic order were derived. The ν7 band is C type, while the ν9 band is A type with band centers at 961.8958 ± 0.0005 and 1003.7421 ± 0.0001 cm-1, respectively.

  2. Vestibular coriolis effect differences modeled with three-dimensional linear-angular interactions.

    PubMed

    Holly, Jan E

    2004-01-01

    The vestibular coriolis (or "cross-coupling") effect is traditionally explained by cross-coupled angular vectors, which, however, do not explain the differences in perceptual disturbance under different acceleration conditions. For example, during head roll tilt in a rotating chair, the magnitude of perceptual disturbance is affected by a number of factors, including acceleration or deceleration of the chair rotation or a zero-g environment. Therefore, it has been suggested that linear-angular interactions play a role. The present research investigated whether these perceptual differences and others involving linear coriolis accelerations could be explained under one common framework: the laws of motion in three dimensions, which include all linear-angular interactions among all six components of motion (three angular and three linear). The results show that the three-dimensional laws of motion predict the differences in perceptual disturbance. No special properties of the vestibular system or nervous system are required. In addition, simulations were performed with angular, linear, and tilt time constants inserted into the model, giving the same predictions. Three-dimensional graphics were used to highlight the manner in which linear-angular interaction causes perceptual disturbance, and a crucial component is the Stretch Factor, which measures the "unexpected" linear component.

  3. Analysis of the coriolis interaction of the ν12 band with 2 ν10 of cis-d 2-ethylene by high-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, K. L.; Tan, T. L.; Ong, P. P.; Teo, H. H.

    2000-08-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of the ν12 band of cis-d 2-ethylene ( cis-C 2H 2D 2) has been recorded with an unapodized resolution of 0.0024 cm -1 in the frequency range of 1280-1400 cm -1. This band was found to be mutually coupled by Coriolis interaction with the unobserved 2 ν10 band situated approximately 10 cm -1 below ν12. By fitting a total of 771 infrared transitions of ν12 with a standard deviation of 0.00075 cm -1 using the Watson's Hamiltonian with the inclusion of a c-type Coriolis resonance term, a set of accurate rovibrational constants for V 12=1 state was derived. The ν12 band is A type with a band centre at 1341.1512±0.0001 cm -1. Accurate rovibrational constants for the V 10=2 state were also derived.

  4. Analysis of the Coriolis Interaction between ν 6 and ν 8 Bands of HCOOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. L.; Goh, K. L.; Ong, P. P.; Teo, H. H.

    2000-08-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of the ν6 band of formic acid (HCOOH) has been recorded with a resolution of 0.0024 cm-1 in the spectral range 1050-1160 cm-1. The ν6 band was found to be strongly perturbed by the nearby ν8 band centered at about 1033.5 cm-1. Using a Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation, and with the inclusion of a-type Coriolis coupling constant, a simultaneous fit of ν6 and ν8 was performed. A total of 2485 infrared transitions including about 700 perturbed transitions of ν6 and 19 transitions of ν8 was fitted with an rms uncertainty of 0.0006 cm-1. Accurate rovibrational constants up to sextic order for both ν6 and ν8 were obtained. The ν6 band was analyzed to be a type AB hybrid with a band center at 1104.852109 ± 0.000050 cm-1. The band center for ν8 was found to be 1033.4647 ± 0.0021 cm-1.

  5. High-resolution FTIR spectroscopy of the Coriolis interacting nu3 and nu9 fundamentals of methylene fluoride-d2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, K. L.; Tan, T. L.; Ong, P. P.; Chaw, K. H.; Teo, H. H.

    The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of the υ3 and υ9 bands of methylene fluoride-d2 (CD2F2) has been recorded with an unapodized resolution of 0.0024cm-1 in the frequency range 970-1080cm-1. These two bands with band centres approximately 26 cm-1 apart were mutually coupled by Coriolis interactions. By fitting a total of 1639 infrared transitions of both υ3 and υ9 with a standard deviation of 0.00084cm-1 S/S using a Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation with the inclusion of a first order c-type Coriolis resonance term, two sets of rovibrational constants for υ3 = 1 and υ9 = 1 states were derived. The υ3 band is B-type while the υ9 band is A-type with band centres at 1030.1573 ± 0.0003 and 1003.7435 ± 0.0001cm-1, respectively.

  6. Coordinated turn-and-reach movements. I. Anticipatory compensation for self-generated coriolis and interaction torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pigeon, Pascale; Bortolami, Simone B.; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2003-01-01

    When reaching movements involve simultaneous trunk rotation, additional interaction torques are generated on the arm that are absent when the trunk is stable. To explore whether the CNS compensates for such self-generated interaction torques, we recorded hand trajectories in reaching tasks involving various amplitudes and velocities of arm extension and trunk rotation. Subjects pointed to three targets on a surface slightly above waist level. Two of the target locations were chosen so that a similar arm configuration relative to the trunk would be required for reaching to them, one of these targets requiring substantial trunk rotation, the other very little. Significant trunk rotation was necessary to reach the third target, but the arm's radial distance to the body remained virtually unchanged. Subjects reached at two speeds-a natural pace (slow) and rapidly (fast)-under normal lighting and in total darkness. Trunk angular velocity and finger velocity relative to the trunk were higher in the fast conditions but were not affected by the presence or absence of vision. Peak trunk velocity increased with increasing trunk rotation up to a maximum of 200 degrees /s. In slow movements, peak finger velocity relative to the trunk was smaller when trunk rotation was necessary to reach the targets. In fast movements, peak finger velocity was approximately 1.7 m/s for all targets. Finger trajectories were more curved when reaching movements involved substantial trunk rotation; however, the terminal errors and the maximal deviation of the trajectory from a straight line were comparable in slow and fast movements. This pattern indicates that the larger Coriolis, centripetal, and inertial interaction torques generated during rapid reaches were compensated by additional joint torques. Trajectory characteristics did not vary with the presence or absence of vision, indicating that visual feedback was unnecessary for anticipatory compensations. In all reaches involving trunk

  7. Coordinated turn-and-reach movements. I. Anticipatory compensation for self-generated coriolis and interaction torques.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, Pascale; Bortolami, Simone B; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R

    2003-01-01

    When reaching movements involve simultaneous trunk rotation, additional interaction torques are generated on the arm that are absent when the trunk is stable. To explore whether the CNS compensates for such self-generated interaction torques, we recorded hand trajectories in reaching tasks involving various amplitudes and velocities of arm extension and trunk rotation. Subjects pointed to three targets on a surface slightly above waist level. Two of the target locations were chosen so that a similar arm configuration relative to the trunk would be required for reaching to them, one of these targets requiring substantial trunk rotation, the other very little. Significant trunk rotation was necessary to reach the third target, but the arm's radial distance to the body remained virtually unchanged. Subjects reached at two speeds-a natural pace (slow) and rapidly (fast)-under normal lighting and in total darkness. Trunk angular velocity and finger velocity relative to the trunk were higher in the fast conditions but were not affected by the presence or absence of vision. Peak trunk velocity increased with increasing trunk rotation up to a maximum of 200 degrees /s. In slow movements, peak finger velocity relative to the trunk was smaller when trunk rotation was necessary to reach the targets. In fast movements, peak finger velocity was approximately 1.7 m/s for all targets. Finger trajectories were more curved when reaching movements involved substantial trunk rotation; however, the terminal errors and the maximal deviation of the trajectory from a straight line were comparable in slow and fast movements. This pattern indicates that the larger Coriolis, centripetal, and inertial interaction torques generated during rapid reaches were compensated by additional joint torques. Trajectory characteristics did not vary with the presence or absence of vision, indicating that visual feedback was unnecessary for anticipatory compensations. In all reaches involving trunk

  8. The parity-adapted basis set in the formulation of the photofragment angular momentum polarization problem: The role of the Coriolis interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shternin, Peter S.; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    We present a theoretical framework for calculating the recoil-angle dependence of the photofragment angular momentum polarization taking into account both radial and Coriolis nonadiabatic interactions in the diatomic/linear photodissociating molecules. The parity-adapted representation of the total molecular wave function has been used throughout the paper. The obtained full quantum-mechanical expressions for the photofragment state multipoles have been simplified by using the semiclassical approximation in the high-J limit and then analyzed for the cases of direct photodissociation and slow predissociation in terms of the anisotropy parameters. In both cases, each anisotropy parameter can be presented as a linear combination of themore » generalized dynamical functions f{sub K}(q,q{sup '},q-tilde,q-tilde{sup '}) of the rank K representing contribution from different dissociation mechanisms including possible radial and Coriolis nonadiabatic transitions, coherent effects, and the rotation of the recoil axis. In the absence of the Coriolis interactions, the obtained results are equivalent to the earlier published ones. The angle-recoil dependence of the photofragment state multipoles for an arbitrary photolysis reaction is derived. As shown, the polarization of the photofragments in the photolysis of a diatomic or a polyatomic molecule can be described in terms of the anisotropy parameters irrespective of the photodissociation mechanism.« less

  9. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  10. The Coriolis Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lissaman, P. B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Detailed are the history, development, and future objectives of the Coriolis program, a project designed to place large turbine units in the Florida Current that would generate large amounts of electric power. (BT)

  11. The Coriolis field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, L. Filipe; Natário, José

    2016-05-01

    We present a pedagogical discussion of the Coriolis field, emphasizing its not-so-well-understood aspects. We show that this field satisfies the field equations of the so-called Newton-Cartan theory, a generalization of Newtonian gravity that is covariant under changes of arbitrarily rotating and accelerated frames. Examples of solutions of this theory are given, including the Newtonian analogue of the Gödel universe. We discuss how to detect the Coriolis field by its effect on gyroscopes, of which the gyrocompass is an example. Finally, using a similar framework, we discuss the Coriolis field generated by mass currents in general relativity, and its measurement by the gravity probe B and LAGEOS/LARES experiments.

  12. Observation of b 2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO 2C 1B 2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants

    DOE PAGES

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A.; ...

    2016-04-14

    Here, the C 1B 2 state of SO 2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b 2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X ~ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b 2 vibrational levels of the C state below 1600 cm –1 of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results frommore » the double-minimum potential. In addition, it allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a 1 and b 2 vibrational symmetry, and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C electronic state.« less

  13. Observation of b 2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO 2C 1B 2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants

    SciTech Connect

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A.

    Here, the C 1B 2 state of SO 2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b 2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X ~ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b 2 vibrational levels of the C state below 1600 cm –1 of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results frommore » the double-minimum potential. In addition, it allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a 1 and b 2 vibrational symmetry, and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C electronic state.« less

  14. A New Look for Coriolis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, F. A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of Coriolis acceleration. Discusses two different meanings of "Coriolis" and two causes of Coriolis acceleration. Gives a set-up method of the demonstration apparatus by using a rotary disk with rubber tubing for tap water, switches, lamps, battery, and counterweight. Provides two pictures with operating method.…

  15. Infrared and Microwave Spectra and Force Field of DBO: The Coriolis Interaction between the nu1 and nu2 + nu3 States.

    PubMed

    Kawashima; Colarusso; Zhang; Bernath; Hirota

    1998-11-01

    The nu1 and nu3 bands of D11BO and the nu1 band of D10BO were observed by using an infrared diode laser spectrometer. The DBO molecule was generated by an ac discharge in a mixture of BCl3, D2, O2, and He. As inferred previously, a strong Coriolis interaction was in fact found to take place between the nu1 and nu2 + nu3 states, and an analysis of the observed nu1 spectra, which explicitly took into account this Coriolis interaction, predicted the pure rotational transition frequencies of DBO in the nu1 state. Pure rotational lines were then detected by microwave spectroscopy, confirming the validity of the infrared assignment. In the microwave experiment DBO molecules were generated by a discharge in a mixture of B2D6 and O2. The three fundamental bands and a hot band of D11BO, as well as the nu1 and nu3 bands of D10BO, were subsequently recorded in emission with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. DBO molecules were generated by the reaction of D2 with HBO at temperatures above 800 degreesC in a ceramic tube furnace. All of the observed spectra were simultaneously subjected to a least-squares analysis to obtain molecular parameters in the ground, nu1, nu2, nu3, and nu2 + nu3 states. The results thus obtained improved the force field and molecular structure of the HBO/DBO molecules reported in a previous study (Y. Kawashima, Y. Endo, and E. Hirota, 1989, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 133, 116-127). Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  16. Infrared and Microwave Spectra and Force Field of DBO: The Coriolis Interaction between the ν 1and ν 2+ ν 3States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Colarusso, Pina; Zhang, K. Q.; Bernath, Peter; Hirota, Eizi

    1998-11-01

    The ν1and ν3bands of D11BO and the ν1band of D10BO were observed by using an infrared diode laser spectrometer. The DBO molecule was generated by an ac discharge in a mixture of BCl3, D2, O2, and He. As inferred previously, a strong Coriolis interaction was in fact found to take place between the ν1and ν2+ ν3states, and an analysis of the observed ν1spectra, which explicitly took into account this Coriolis interaction, predicted the pure rotational transition frequencies of DBO in the ν1state. Pure rotational lines were then detected by microwave spectroscopy, confirming the validity of the infrared assignment. In the microwave experiment DBO molecules were generated by a discharge in a mixture of B2D6and O2. The three fundamental bands and a hot band of D11BO, as well as the ν1and ν3bands of D10BO, were subsequently recorded in emission with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. DBO molecules were generated by the reaction of D2with HBO at temperatures above 800°C in a ceramic tube furnace. All of the observed spectra were simultaneously subjected to a least-squares analysis to obtain molecular parameters in the ground, ν1, ν2, ν3, and ν2+ ν3states. The results thus obtained improved the force field and molecular structure of the HBO/DBO molecules reported in a previous study (Y. Kawashima, Y. Endo, and E. Hirota, 1989,J. Mol. Spectrosc.133, 116-127).

  17. The ν8 band of C2HD3 by high-resolution synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy: Coriolis interactions between the v8 = 1 and v6 = 1 states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, L. L.; Tan, T. L.; Akasyah, Luqman; Wong, Andy; Appadoo, Dominique R. T.; McNaughton, Don

    2017-10-01

    The synchrotron Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of the ν8 band of ethylene-d3 (C2HD3) was measured at an unapodized resolution of 0.00096 cm-1 from 830 to 1010 cm-1. Rovibrational constants up to five quartic terms were derived with improved precision for the v8 = 1 state through the fitting of 1566 unperturbed infrared transitions using the Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation with a root-mean-square (rms) deviation of 0.00044 cm-1. For the first time, 446 perturbed IR transitions of the ν8 band were fitted together with the 1566 unperturbed infrared transitions to obtain the a- and b-Coriolis resonance parameters from its interaction with the v6 = 1 state, with an rms deviation of 0.00039 cm-1. The IR lines of the ν6 band were too weak for detection. Three rotational constants, a quartic constant and band center of the v6 = 1 state were also derived for the first time in this work. Ground state rovibrational constants of C2HD3 up to five quartic constants were also derived from a fit of 906 ground state combination differences with an rms deviation of 0.00030 cm-1 from infrared transitions of the present analysis. The ground state rotational constants are in close agreement with theoretically calculated values using the cc-pVTZ basis set at CCSD(T), MP2 and B3LYP levels of theory. Alpha constants determined from the rotational constants of the v8 = 1 state derived from the perturbed IR fit compared favourably with those from anharmonic calculations.

  18. The 2ν6/ν2 + ν3/ν3 + ν5 band system of CH3Br revisited: Modeling anharmonic and Coriolis interactions in a three-level system near 2000 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceausu-Velcescu, Adina; Kwabia Tchana, Fridolin; Landsheere, Xavier

    2018-06-01

    The 2ν6 (A1 + E)/ν2 + ν3 (A1)/ν3 + ν5 (E) band system of CH3Br, near 2000 cm-1, has been studied, for both 79Br and 81Br isotopologues, using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, with a resolution of 0.003 cm-1. This band system, revealing anharmonic (Δk = Δl = 0) and Coriolis (Δk = Δl = ± 1) interactions, has been analyzed through a least-squares fit of more than 3000 transitions, for each isotopologue. More than 600 transitions belonging to the very weak ν3 + ν5 combination band were assigned for the first time, for both CH379Br and CH381Br isotopologues. Assignments of the weak 2 ν60 parallel band, which is Fermi-interacting with ν2 + ν3, were also considerably extended with respect to a previous high-resolution study (Najib et al., 1985), thanks to a more accurate knowledge of the Fermi coupling parameters and of the relative positions of the interacting levels. The least-squares fits provided quantitative reproduction of all data belonging to the four above mentioned bands. Moreover, the Coriolis coupling parameters obtained for the ν2 + ν3/ν3 + ν5 interacting bands show a remarkable consistency with those obtained for the ν2/ν5 'fundamental' system (Kwabia Tchana et al., 2004).

  19. Measurement of Coriolis Acceleration with a Smartphone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaku, Asif; Kraft, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate physics laboratories seldom have experiments that measure the Coriolis acceleration. This has traditionally been the case owing to the inherent complexities of making such measurements. Articles on the experimental determination of the Coriolis acceleration are few and far between in the physics literature. However, because modern…

  20. Measurement of Coriolis Acceleration with a Smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif; Kraft, Jakob

    2016-05-01

    Undergraduate physics laboratories seldom have experiments that measure the Coriolis acceleration. This has traditionally been the case owing to the inherent complexities of making such measurements. Articles on the experimental determination of the Coriolis acceleration are few and far between in the physics literature. However, because modern smartphones come with a raft of built-in sensors, we have a unique opportunity to experimentally determine the Coriolis acceleration conveniently in a pedagogically enlightening environment at modest cost by using student-owned smartphones. Here we employ the gyroscope and accelerometer in a smartphone to verify the dependence of Coriolis acceleration on the angular velocity of a rotatingtrack and the speed of the sliding smartphone.

  1. Linear thermal circulator based on Coriolis forces.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanan; Kottos, Tsampikos

    2015-02-01

    We show that the presence of a Coriolis force in a rotating linear lattice imposes a nonreciprocal propagation of the phononic heat carriers. Using this effect we propose the concept of Coriolis linear thermal circulator which can control the circulation of a heat current. A simple model of three coupled harmonic masses on a rotating platform permits us to demonstrate giant circulating rectification effects for moderate values of the angular velocities of the platform.

  2. First analysis of the hybrid A/B-type 2ν8 band of C2HD3 and the Coriolis interactions with the ν3 + ν4 band by high-resolution FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, L. L.; Tan, T. L.; Chia, A. H.

    2018-02-01

    Using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, the spectrum of the 2ν8 band of ethylene-d3 (C2HD3) was measured between 1745 to 1905 cm-1 at an unapodized resolution of 0.0063 cm-1. For the first time, 1664 perturbed and unperturbed a- and b-type absorption lines of the band were recorded, assigned and fitted using the Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation to derive rovibrational constants up to four quartic terms for the v8 = 2 state. Three rotational constants of the v3 = v4 = 1 state were also derived for the first time in this work from the analysis of the a- and b-Coriolis resonances with the v8 = 2 state, together with a set of resonance parameters. The root-mean-square (rms) deviation of the FTIR fit was 0.0010 cm-1. The band centers of the 2ν8 and ν3 + ν4 bands were determined to be 1831.457508 ± 0.000071 cm-1 and 1812.629 ± 0.022 cm-1, respectively. A set of ground state rovibrational constants of C2HD3 up to five quartic constants was also derived with improved precision from a simultaneous fit of 377 ground state combination differences (GSCDs) from a-type infrared transitions of the present analysis and 906 GSCDs from the previous work on the C-type ν8 band, with an rms deviation of 0.00043 cm-1. The transition dipole moment ratio | μa/μb | was found to be 2.194 ± 0.072.

  3. Hyperfine-resolved 3.4-{mu}m spectroscopy of CH{sub 3}I with a widely tunable difference frequency generation source and a cavity-enhanced cell: A case study of a local Coriolis interaction between the v{sub 1}=1 and (v{sub 2},v{sub 6}{sup l})=(1,2{sup 2}) states

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, Sho; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Sasada, Hiroyuki

    Saturated absorption spectra of the {nu}{sub 1} fundamental band of CH{sub 3}I are recorded with a cavity-enhanced cell and a tunable difference frequency generation source having an 86-cm{sup -1} range. The recorded spectral lines are 250 kHz wide, and most of them are resolved into the individual hyperfine components. The Coriolis interaction between the v{sub 1}=1 and (v{sub 2},v{sub 6}{sup l})=(1,2{sup 2}) states locally perturbing the hyperfine structures is analyzed to yield the Coriolis and hyperfine coupling constants with uncertainties similar to those in typical microwave spectroscopy. The spectrometer has demonstrated the potential for precisely determining the energy structure inmore » the vibrational excited states.« less

  4. Estimation of Coriolis Force and Torque Acting on Ares-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan M.; Kulikov, Igor K.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Luchinsky, Dmitry; Orr, Jeb

    2011-01-01

    A document describes work on the origin of Coriolis force and estimating Coriolis force and torque applied to the Ares-1 vehicle during its ascent, based on an internal ballistics model for a multi-segmented solid rocket booster (SRB).

  5. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  6. The KP Approximation Under a Weak Coriolis Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melinand, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we study the asymptotic behavior of weakly transverse water-waves under a weak Coriolis forcing in the long wave regime. We derive the Boussinesq-Coriolis equations in this setting and we provide a rigorous justification of this model. Then, from these equations, we derive two other asymptotic models. When the Coriolis forcing is weak, we fully justify the rotation-modified Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation (also called Grimshaw-Melville equation). When the Coriolis forcing is very weak, we rigorously justify the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation. This work provides the first mathematical justification of the KP approximation under a Coriolis forcing.

  7. Error Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor Combing with Coriolis Effect at Low Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yue; Xu, Mengjie; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Tengfei; Tuo, Weixiao; Wu, Jun; Dong, Jiuzhi

    2018-06-13

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) angular rate sensor (ARS) with low noise level in ultra-wide bandwidth is developed in lasing and imaging applications, especially the line-of-sight (LOS) system. A modified MHD ARS combined with the Coriolis effect was studied in this paper to expand the sensor’s bandwidth at low frequency (<1 Hz), which is essential for precision LOS pointing and wide-bandwidth LOS jitter suppression. The model and the simulation method were constructed and a comprehensive solving method based on the magnetic and electric interaction methods was proposed. The numerical results on the Coriolis effect and the frequency response of the modified MHD ARS were detailed. In addition, according to the experimental results of the designed sensor consistent with the simulation results, an error analysis of model errors was discussed. Our study provides an error analysis method of MHD ARS combined with the Coriolis effect and offers a framework for future studies to minimize the error.

  8. High-resolution synchrotron FTIR spectroscopic analysis of the Coriolis interaction between the v10 = 1 and v8 = 1 states of ethylene-cis-1,2-d2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, L. L.; Tan, T. L.; Wong, Andy; Appadoo, Dominique R. T.; McNaughton, Don

    2016-10-01

    The synchrotron Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of the b-type ν10 band of ethylene-cis-1,2-d2 (cis-C2H2D2) was recorded at a resolution of 0.00096 cm-1 in the 550-750 cm-1 region. The measured FWHM of the lines was about 0.002 cm-1. The ν10 band, centred at 662.871885(27) cm-1 was found to be perturbed through a b-type Coriolis resonance with the infrared inactive ν8 at 759.9582(20) cm-1. In this work, 1989 infrared transitions of ν10 were assigned for the first time. These perturbed and unperturbed infrared transitions were fitted with an rms deviation of 0.00033 cm-1 using the Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation with three Coriolis terms to derive the rovibrational constants for v10 = 1 and v8 = 1 states. Ground state rovibrational constants up to two sextic terms were also derived from a fit of a total of 2532 ground state combination differences with arms deviation of 0.00030 cm-1 from the infrared transitions of the present analysis and those determined previously. The ground state constants compared favourably to the equilibrium state constants from harmonic cc-pVTZ basis set at CCSD(T), MP2 and B3LYP levels. The rotational constants of ν10 and ν8 from this work agree well with those from anharmonic calculations.

  9. Regimes of Coriolis-Centrifugal Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Susanne; Aurnou, Jonathan M.

    2018-05-01

    Centrifugal buoyancy affects all rotating turbulent convection phenomena, but is conventionally ignored in rotating convection studies. Here, we include centrifugal buoyancy to investigate what we call Coriolis-centrifugal convection (C3 ), characterizing two so far unexplored regimes, one where the flow is in quasicyclostrophic balance (QC regime) and another where the flow is in a triple balance between pressure gradient, Coriolis and centrifugal buoyancy forces (CC regime). The transition to centrifugally dominated dynamics occurs when the Froude number Fr equals the radius-to-height aspect ratio γ . Hence, turbulent convection experiments with small γ may encounter centrifugal effects at lower Fr than traditionally expected. Further, we show analytically that the direct effect of centrifugal buoyancy yields a reduction of the Nusselt number Nu. However, indirectly, it can cause a simultaneous increase of the viscous dissipation and thereby Nu through a change of the flow morphology. These direct and indirect effects yield a net Nu suppression in the CC regime and a net Nu enhancement in the QC regime. In addition, we demonstrate that C3 may provide a simplified, yet self-consistent, model system for tornadoes, hurricanes, and typhoons.

  10. Regimes of Coriolis-Centrifugal Convection.

    PubMed

    Horn, Susanne; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2018-05-18

    Centrifugal buoyancy affects all rotating turbulent convection phenomena, but is conventionally ignored in rotating convection studies. Here, we include centrifugal buoyancy to investigate what we call Coriolis-centrifugal convection (C^{3}), characterizing two so far unexplored regimes, one where the flow is in quasicyclostrophic balance (QC regime) and another where the flow is in a triple balance between pressure gradient, Coriolis and centrifugal buoyancy forces (CC regime). The transition to centrifugally dominated dynamics occurs when the Froude number Fr equals the radius-to-height aspect ratio γ. Hence, turbulent convection experiments with small γ may encounter centrifugal effects at lower Fr than traditionally expected. Further, we show analytically that the direct effect of centrifugal buoyancy yields a reduction of the Nusselt number Nu. However, indirectly, it can cause a simultaneous increase of the viscous dissipation and thereby Nu through a change of the flow morphology. These direct and indirect effects yield a net Nu suppression in the CC regime and a net Nu enhancement in the QC regime. In addition, we demonstrate that C^{3} may provide a simplified, yet self-consistent, model system for tornadoes, hurricanes, and typhoons.

  11. Acoustic nonreciprocity in Coriolis mean flow systems.

    PubMed

    Naghdi, Masoud; Farzbod, Farhad

    2018-01-01

    One way to break acoustic reciprocity is to have a moving wave propagation medium. If the acoustic wave vector and the moving fluid velocity are collinear, the wave vector shift caused by the fluid flow can be used to break. In this paper, an alternative approach is investigated in which the fluid velocity enters the differential equation of the system as a cross product term with the wave vector. A circular field where the fluid velocity increases radially has a Coriolis acceleration term. In such a system, the acoustic wave enters from the central wall and exits from the perimeter wall. In this paper, the differential equation is solved numerically and the effect of fluid velocity on the nonreciprocity factor is examined.

  12. Pendulum rides, rotations and the Coriolis effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Modig, Conny

    2018-07-01

    An amusement park is full of examples that can be made into challenging problems for students, combining mathematical modelling with video analysis, as well as measurements in the rides. Traditional amusement ride related textbook problems include free-fall, circular motion, pendula and energy conservation in roller coasters, where the moving bodies are typically considered point-like. However, an amusement park can offer many more examples that are useful in physics and engineering education, many of them with strong mathematical content. This paper analyses forces on riders in a large rotating pendulum ride, where the Coriolis effect is sufficiently large to be visible in accelerometer data from the rides and leads to different ride experiences in different positions.

  13. Coriolis effect and spin Hall effect of light in an inhomogeneous chiral medium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Shi, Lina; Xie, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin Hall effect of spinning light in an inhomogeneous chiral medium. The Hamiltonian equations of the photon are analytically obtained within eikonal approximation in the noninertial orthogonal frame. Besides the usual spin curvature coupling, the chiral parameter enters the Hamiltonian as a spin-torsion-like interaction. We reveal that both terms have parallel geometric origins as the Coriolis terms of Maxwell's equations in nontrivial frames.

  14. [Cumulative effect of Coriolis acceleration on coronary hemodynamics].

    PubMed

    Lapaev, E V; Bednenko, V S

    1985-01-01

    Time-course variations in coronary circulation and cardiac output were measured in 29 healthy test subjects who performed tests with a continuous cumulation of Coriolis accelerations and in 12 healthy test subjects who were exposed to Coriolis accelerations combined with acute hypoxia. Adaptive changes in coronary circulation were seen. It is recommended to monitor coronary circulation during vestibulometric tests as part of medical expertise of the flying personnel.

  15. Salient features of solitary waves in dusty plasma under the influence of Coriolis force

    SciTech Connect

    Das, G. C.; Nag, Apratim; Department of Physics, G. C. College, Silchar-788004

    The main interest is to study the nonlinear acoustic wave in rotating dusty plasma augmented through the derivation of a modified Sagdeev potential equation. Small rotation causes the interaction of Coriolis force in the dynamical system, and leads to the complexity in the derivation of the nonlinear wave equation. As a result, the finding of solitary wave propagation in dusty plasma ought to be of merit. However, the nonlinear wave equation has been successfully solved by the use of the hyperbolic method. Main emphasis has been given to the changes on the evolution and propagation of soliton, and the variationmore » caused by the dusty plasma constituents as well as by the Coriolis force have been highlighted. Some interesting nonlinear wave behavior has been found which can be elaborately studied for the interest of laboratory and space plasmas. Further, to support the theoretical investigations, numeric plasma parameters have been taken for finding the inherent features of solitons.« less

  16. Microwave spectrum, structure, dipole moment, and Coriolis coupling of 1,1-difluoroallene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durig, J. R.; Li, Y. S.; Tong, C. C.; Zens, A. P.; Ellis, P. D.

    1974-01-01

    Microwave spectra from 12.4 to 40.0 GHz were recorded for five isotopic species of 1,1-difluoroallene. A-type transitions were observed and R-branch assignments were made for the ground state and two vibrationally excited states. Several structural parameters of the compounds were determined. The dipole moment value obtained from Stark splitting was 2.07 plus or minus 0.03 D. A Coriolis coupling was observed between the two-low-frequency C = C = C bending modes.

  17. Effect of Coriolis coupling in chemical reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Han, Ke-Li

    2008-05-14

    It is essential to evaluate the role of Coriolis coupling effect in molecular reaction dynamics. Here we consider Coriolis coupling effect in quantum reactive scattering calculations in the context of both adiabaticity and nonadiabaticity, with particular emphasis on examining the role of Coriolis coupling effect in reaction dynamics of triatomic molecular systems. We present the results of our own calculations by the time-dependent quantum wave packet approach for H + D2 and F(2P3/2,2P1/2) + H2 as well as for the ion-molecule collisions of He + H2 +, D(-) + H2, H(-) + D2, and D+ + H2, after reviewing in detail other related research efforts on this issue.

  18. Coriolis coupling and nonadiabaticity in chemical reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Emilia L

    2010-12-01

    The nonadiabatic quantum dynamics and Coriolis coupling effect in chemical reaction have been reviewed, with emphasis on recent progress in using the time-dependent wave packet approach to study the Coriolis coupling and nonadiabatic effects, which was done by K. L. Han and his group. Several typical chemical reactions, for example, H+D(2), F+H(2)/D(2)/HD, D(+)+H(2), O+H(2), and He+H(2)(+), have been discussed. One can find that there is a significant role of Coriolis coupling in reaction dynamics for the ion-molecule collisions of D(+)+H(2), Ne+H(2)(+), and He+H(2)(+) in both adiabatic and nonadiabatic context. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Adaptation to vestibular disorientation. VIII, "Coriolis" vestibular stimulation and the influence of different visual surrounds.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1967-08-01

    Disorientation caused by 'Coriolis' vestibular reactions has been cited frequently as a significant factor in flying safety. In addition, personnel who maintain rotating radar towers may also be adversely affected by 'Coriolis' problems. In the study...

  20. Coriolis effects on nonlinear oscillations of rotating cylinders and rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.

    1976-01-01

    The effects which moderately large deflections have on the frequency spectrum of rotating rings and cylinders are considered. To develop the requisite solution, a variationally constrained version of the Lindstedt-Poincare procedure is employed. Based on the solution developed, in addition to considering the effects of displacement induced nonlinearity, the role of Coriolis forces is also given special consideration.

  1. The Coriolis Effect: A Model for Student Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exline, Joseph D.

    1977-01-01

    Lists materials and procedures for constructing a model that demonstrates certain aspects of the Coriolis effect. Materials include an electric drill motor, voltage control, toy dart gun and darts, wood blocks of varying dimensions. Includes description of an experiment illustrating relationship between speed of rotation and amount of apparent…

  2. An ectromelia virus profilin homolog interacts with cellular tropomyosin and viral A-type inclusion protein.

    PubMed

    Butler-Cole, Christine; Wagner, Mary J; Da Silva, Melissa; Brown, Gordon D; Burke, Robert D; Upton, Chris

    2007-07-24

    Profilins are critical to cytoskeletal dynamics in eukaryotes; however, little is known about their viral counterparts. In this study, a poxviral profilin homolog, ectromelia virus strain Moscow gene 141 (ECTV-PH), was investigated by a variety of experimental and bioinformatics techniques to characterize its interactions with cellular and viral proteins. Profilin-like proteins are encoded by all orthopoxviruses sequenced to date, and share over 90% amino acid (aa) identity. Sequence comparisons show highest similarity to mammalian type 1 profilins; however, a conserved 3 aa deletion in mammalian type 3 and poxviral profilins suggests that these homologs may be more closely related. Structural analysis shows that ECTV-PH can be successfully modelled onto both the profilin 1 crystal structure and profilin 3 homology model, though few of the surface residues thought to be required for binding actin, poly(L-proline), and PIP2 are conserved. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry identified two proteins that interact with ECTV-PH within infected cells: alpha-tropomyosin, a 38 kDa cellular actin-binding protein, and the 84 kDa product of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve (VACV-WR) 148, which is the truncated VACV counterpart of the orthopoxvirus A-type inclusion (ATI) protein. Western and far-western blots demonstrated that the interaction with alpha-tropomyosin is direct, and immunofluorescence experiments suggest that ECTV-PH and alpha-tropomyosin may colocalize to structures that resemble actin tails and cellular protrusions. Sequence comparisons of the poxviral ATI proteins show that although full-length orthologs are only present in cowpox and ectromelia viruses, an ~ 700 aa truncated ATI protein is conserved in over 90% of sequenced orthopoxviruses. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that ECTV-PH localizes to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies formed by both truncated and full-length versions of the viral ATI protein. Furthermore, colocalization of ECTV-PH and

  3. Hypoxia and Coriolis Illusion in Pilots During Simulated Flight.

    PubMed

    Kowalczuk, Krzysztof P; Gazdzinski, Stefan P; Janewicz, Michał; Gąsik, Marek; Lewkowicz, Rafał; Wyleżoł, Mariusz

    2016-02-01

    Pilots' vision and flight performance may be impeded by spatial disorientation and high altitude hypoxia. The Coriolis illusion affects both orientation and vision. However, the combined effect of simultaneous Coriolis illusion and hypoxia on saccadic eye movement has not been evaluated. A simulated flight was performed by 14 experienced pilots under 3 conditions: once under normal oxygen partial pressure and twice under reduced oxygen partial pressures, reflecting conditions at 5000 m and 6000 m (16,404 and 19,685 ft), respectively. Eye movements were evaluated with a saccadometer. At normal oxygen pressure, Coriolis illusion resulted in 55% and 31% increases in mean saccade amplitude and duration, respectively, but a 32% increase in mean saccade frequency was only noted for saccades smaller than the angular distance between cockpit instruments, suggesting an increase in the number of correction saccades. At lower oxygen pressures a pronounced increase in the standard deviation of all measures was noticed; however, the pattern of changes remained unchanged. Simple measures of saccadic movement are not affected by short-term hypoxia, most likely due to compensatory mechanisms.

  4. Exact solutions for a type of electron pairing model with spin-orbit interactions and Zeeman coupling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Han, Qiang; Shao, L B; Wang, Z D

    2011-07-08

    A type of electron pairing model with spin-orbit interactions or Zeeman coupling is solved exactly in the framework of the Richardson ansatz. Based on the exact solutions for the case with spin-orbit interactions, it is shown rigorously that the pairing symmetry is of the p + ip wave and the ground state possesses time-reversal symmetry, regardless of the strength of the pairing interaction. Intriguingly, how Majorana fermions can emerge in the system is also elaborated. Exact results are illustrated for two systems, respectively, with spin-orbit interactions and Zeeman coupling.

  5. Coriolis analysis of several high-resolution infrared bands of bicyclo[111]pentane-d0 and -d1

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, A.; Martin, M. A.; Nibler, J. W.

    High resolution infrared absorption spectra have been analyzed for two bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane isotopologues, C5H8 (-d0) and C5H7D (-d1), where in the latter the D-atom replaces a hydrogen on the C3 symmetry axis such that the molecular symmetry is reduced from D3h to C3v. Two (a2") parallel bands, ν17 and ν18, of bicyclopentane-d0 were studied and the former was found to be profoundly affected by Coriolis coupling with the nearby (e') perpendicular band, ν11. Weaker coupling was observed between the ν18 band and the nearby ν13(e') band, for which fewer transitions could be assigned. For bicyclopentane-d1, the ν5 parallel band was alsomore » studied along with the nearby ν15(e') band to which it is coupled through a similar type of Coriolis resonance. For both isotopologues, quantum calculations (B3LYP/cc-pVTZ) done at the anharmonic level were very helpful in unraveling the complexities caused by the Coriolis interactions, provided that care is taken in identifying the effect of any Coriolis resonances in the theoretical values of aB and q rovibrational parameters. The ground state B0 constants were found to be 0.2399412(2) and 0.2267506(11) cm-1 for the -d0 and -d1 isotopologues. The difference yields an Rs substitution value of 2.0309(2) Å for the position of the axial H atom relative to the -d0 center of mass, a result in good accord with a corresponding Ra value of 2.044(6) Å from electron diffraction data. For both isotopologues, the theoretical results from the quantum calculations are in good agreement with all corresponding values determined from the spectra.« less

  6. Effect of coriolis force on forced response magnification of intentionally mistuned bladed disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Xuanen; Xu, Zili; Zhao, Bo; Zhong, Jize

    2017-07-01

    Blade manufacturing tolerance and wear in operation may induce mistuning, and mistuning will lead to vibration localization which will result in destruction of bladed disk. Generally, intentional mistuning has been widely investigated to control the maximum forced response. On the other hand, it should be noted that the bladed disk with high rotational speed is obviously subjected to the Coriolis force. However, the Coriolis force is not included in intentionally mistuned bladed disk in previous studies. Therefore, this paper is to study the effect of the Coriolis force on forced response magnification of intentionally mistuned bladed disk. Finite element method is used to calculate the harmonic response of the intentionally mistuned bladed disk with and without the Coriolis force. The effects of intentional mistuning strength and different integer harmonic order on the response magnification factor with the Coriolis force are discussed. It should be pointed out that, when the integer harmonic order is 1, 3 and 5, the response magnification factor with the effect of the Coriolis force increase by 3.9%, 3.53% and 3.76% respectively compared to the system of non-Coriolis force. In addition, forced response magnification factor of intentionally mistuned bladed disk with and without the Coriolis force under different rotational speed is researched in contrast. It shows that, when the rotational speed is 3000 rpm, the response magnification factor with the Coriolis force increases by 0.65% compared to the system of non-Coriolis force, while the response magnification factor with the Coriolis force decreases by 6.28% compared to the system of non-Coriolis force when the rotational speed is 12000 rpm.

  7. Omega Design and FEA Based Coriolis Mass Flow Sensor (CMFS) Analysis Using Titanium Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Pravin P.; Kumar, Ashwani; Ahmad, Faraz

    2018-02-01

    The main highlight of this research work is evaluation of resonant frequency for titanium omega type coriolis mass flow sensor. Coriolis mass flow sensor is used for measuring direct mass flow in pipe useful for various industrial applications. It works on the principle of Coriolis effect. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) simulation of omega flow sensor was performed using Ansys 14.5 and Solid Edge, Pro-E was used for modelling of omega tube. Titanium was selected as omega tube material. Experimental setup was prepared for omega tube coriolis flow sensor for performing different test. Experimental setup was used for investigation of different parameters effect on CMFS and validation of simulation results.

  8. Coriolis effect in optics: unified geometric phase and spin-Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Gorodetski, Yuri; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2008-07-18

    We examine the spin-orbit coupling effects that appear when a wave carrying intrinsic angular momentum interacts with a medium. The Berry phase is shown to be a manifestation of the Coriolis effect in a noninertial reference frame attached to the wave. In the most general case, when both the direction of propagation and the state of the wave are varied, the phase is given by a simple expression that unifies the spin redirection Berry phase and the Pancharatnam-Berry phase. The theory is supported by the experiment demonstrating the spin-orbit coupling of electromagnetic waves via a surface plasmon nanostructure. The measurements verify the unified geometric phase, demonstrated by the observed polarization-dependent shift (spin-Hall effect) of the waves.

  9. Posturography of ataxia induced by Coriolis- and Purkinje-effects.

    PubMed

    Fitger, C; Brandt, T

    1982-02-01

    Vestibular Coriolis- and Purkinje-effect, which are known to induce vertigo, were investigated with respect to body posture. One aim of this investigation was to provide information concerning clinical vertigo symptoms. Standing on a rotatable stabilometer, 25 healthy subjects had to execute lateral head tilts during (Coriolis), or after (Purkinje), rotation varied with different constant velocities. The conditions were varied with respect to eyes open vs. eyes closed, head upright vs. head tilt to the right and left, direction of rotation clockwise vs. counterclockwise, active vs. passive head tilt, and active vs. passive body rotation. The results supported the expectation that destabilization was less severe with open than with closed eyes and that sway amplitudes were increased after head tilt as well as with a higher velocity of rotation. The direction of the induced body shift was, as expected, opposite to the initial vestibular stimulus. A forward shift after stop without head tilt was frequently found, being independent of the previous direction of rotation. Reported perceptions coincided mostly not with the initial vestibular signal but rather with the actual movement of compensation. Active instead of passive movements did not produce clearly different effects. The Purkinje experiment appeared to be equivalent to the situation when a patient with an acute lesion of a horizontal vestibular canal bends his head. The stabilogram under this condition may allow a prediction of the side of the lesion.

  10. On the origin of the angular momentum of galaxies: cosmological tidal torques supplemented by the Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casuso, E.; Beckman, J. E.

    2015-05-01

    We present here a theoretical model which can at least contribute to the observed relation between the specific angular momenta of galaxies and their masses. This study offers prima facie evidence that the origin of an angular momentum of galaxies could be somewhat more complex than previously proposed. The most recent observations point to a scenario in which, after recombination, matter was organized around bubbles (commonly termed voids), which acquired rotation by tidal torque interaction. Subsequently, a combination of the effects of the gravitational collapse of gas in protogalaxies and the Coriolis force due to the rotation of the voids could produce the rotation of spiral galaxies. Thereafter, the tidal interaction between the objects populating the quasi-spherical voids, in which the galaxies far away from the rotation axes (populating the sheet forming the surface of a void) interact with higher probability with others similarly situated in a neighbouring void, offers a mechanism for transforming some of the galaxies into ellipticals, breaking their spin and yielding galaxies with low net angular momentum, as observed. This model gives an explanation for those observations which suggest a tendency of galactic spins to align along the radius vectors pointing towards the centres of the voids for ellipticals/SO and parallel to filaments and sheets for the spirals. Furthermore, while in simple tidal torque theory the angular momentum supplied to galaxies diminishes drastically with the cosmic expansion, in our approximation for which the Coriolis force acts in addition to tidal torques, the Coriolis force due to void rotation ensures almost continuous angular momentum supply.

  11. Immediate compensation for variations in self-generated Coriolis torques related to body dynamics and carried objects

    PubMed Central

    DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the Coriolis torques that result when an arm movement is performed during torso rotation do not affect movement trajectory. Our purpose in the present study was to examine whether torso motion-induced Coriolis and other interaction torques are counteracted during a turn and reach (T&R) movement when the effective mass of the hand is augmented, and whether the dominant arm has an advantage in coordinating intersegmental dynamics as predicted by the dynamic dominance hypothesis (Sainburg RL. Exp Brain Res 142: 241–258, 2002). Subjects made slow and fast T&R movements in the dark to just extinguished targets with either arm, while holding or not holding a 454-g object. Movement endpoints were equally accurate at both speeds, with either hand, and in both weight conditions, but subjects tended to angularly undershoot and produce more variable endpoints for targets requiring greater torso rotation. There were no changes in endpoint accuracy or trajectory deviation over repeated movements. The dominant right arm was more stable in its control of trajectory direction across targets, whereas the nondominant left arm had an improved ability to stop accurately on the target for higher levels of interaction torques. The trajectories to more eccentric targets were straighter when performed at higher speeds but slightly more deviated when subjects held the weight. Subjects did not slow their torso velocity or change the timing of the arm and torso velocities when holding the weight, although there was a slight decrease in their hand velocity relative to the torso. The delay between the onsets of torso and finger movements was almost twice as large for the right arm than the left, suggesting the right arm was better able to account for torso rotation in the arm movement. Holding the weight increased the peak Coriolis torque by 40% at the shoulder and 45% at the elbow and, for the most eccentric target, increased the peak net torque by 12% at the

  12. Immediate compensation for variations in self-generated Coriolis torques related to body dynamics and carried objects.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, Pascale; Dizio, Paul; Lackner, James R

    2013-09-01

    We have previously shown that the Coriolis torques that result when an arm movement is performed during torso rotation do not affect movement trajectory. Our purpose in the present study was to examine whether torso motion-induced Coriolis and other interaction torques are counteracted during a turn and reach (T&R) movement when the effective mass of the hand is augmented, and whether the dominant arm has an advantage in coordinating intersegmental dynamics as predicted by the dynamic dominance hypothesis (Sainburg RL. Exp Brain Res 142: 241-258, 2002). Subjects made slow and fast T&R movements in the dark to just extinguished targets with either arm, while holding or not holding a 454-g object. Movement endpoints were equally accurate at both speeds, with either hand, and in both weight conditions, but subjects tended to angularly undershoot and produce more variable endpoints for targets requiring greater torso rotation. There were no changes in endpoint accuracy or trajectory deviation over repeated movements. The dominant right arm was more stable in its control of trajectory direction across targets, whereas the nondominant left arm had an improved ability to stop accurately on the target for higher levels of interaction torques. The trajectories to more eccentric targets were straighter when performed at higher speeds but slightly more deviated when subjects held the weight. Subjects did not slow their torso velocity or change the timing of the arm and torso velocities when holding the weight, although there was a slight decrease in their hand velocity relative to the torso. The delay between the onsets of torso and finger movements was almost twice as large for the right arm than the left, suggesting the right arm was better able to account for torso rotation in the arm movement. Holding the weight increased the peak Coriolis torque by 40% at the shoulder and 45% at the elbow and, for the most eccentric target, increased the peak net torque by 12% at the

  13. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  14. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  15. Coriolis-coupled wave packet dynamics of H + HLi reaction.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, R; Mahapatra, S

    2006-05-11

    We investigated the effect of Coriolis coupling (CC) on the initial state-selected dynamics of H+HLi reaction by a time-dependent wave packet (WP) approach. Exact quantum scattering calculations were obtained by a WP propagation method based on the Chebyshev polynomial scheme and ab initio potential energy surface of the reacting system. Partial wave contributions up to the total angular momentum J=30 were found to be necessary for the scattering of HLi in its vibrational and rotational ground state up to a collision energy approximately 0.75 eV. For each J value, the projection quantum number K was varied from 0 to min (J, K(max)), with K(max)=8 until J=20 and K(max)=4 for further higher J values. This is because further higher values of K do not have much effect on the dynamics and also because one wishes to maintain the large computational overhead for each calculation within the affordable limit. The initial state-selected integral reaction cross sections and thermal rate constants were calculated by summing up the contributions from all partial waves. These were compared with our previous results on the title system, obtained within the centrifugal sudden and J-shifting approximations, to demonstrate the impact of CC on the dynamics of this system.

  16. The menstrual cycle and susceptibility to coriolis-induced sickness.

    PubMed

    Cheung, B; Heskin, R; Hofer, K; Gagnon, M

    2001-01-01

    Survey studies on motion sickness susceptibility suggest that females tend to report greater severity in illness and higher incidence of vomiting than males. Menstruation is said to be a contributing factor. A recent study suggested that females were least susceptible to seasickness during ovulation in a "round the world" yacht race. Sixteen subjects (18-36 years old) were exposed to Coriolis cross-coupling stimulation in the laboratory. They were tested once during permenstruation (Day 1-5), ovulation (Day 12-15) and premenstruation (Day 24-28), based on a normalized 28-day cycle, in a randomised design. Physiological measurements of motion sickness included forearm and calf cutaneous blood flow. Subjective evaluation of sickness symptoms was based on Graybiel's diagnostic criteria and Golding's rating method. Our results indicated that under controlled laboratory conditions, different phases of the menstrual cycle appear to have no influence on subjective symptoms of motion sickness or on cutaneous blood flow increase in the forearm and calf. The lack of commonality between the types and levels of hormones that are released during motion sickness and those that are involved in different menstrual phases appears to support our findings.

  17. Structure and Function of Interacting IcmR-IcmQ Domains from a Type IVb Secretion System in Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Raychaudhury, S.; Farelli, J; Montminy, T

    2009-01-01

    During infection, Legionella pneumophila creates a replication vacuole within eukaryotic cells and this requires a Type IVb secretion system (T4bSS). IcmQ plays a critical role in the translocase and associates with IcmR. In this paper, we show that the N-terminal domain of IcmQ (Qn) mediates self-dimerization, whereas the C-terminal domain with a basic linker promotes membrane association. In addition, the binding of IcmR to IcmQ prevents self-dimerization and also blocks membrane permeabilization. However, IcmR does not completely block membrane binding by IcmQ. We then determined crystal structures of Qn with the interacting region of IcmR. In this complex, each proteinmore » forms an ?-helical hairpin within a parallel four-helix bundle. The amphipathic nature of helices in Qn suggests two possible models for membrane permeabilization by IcmQ. The Rm-Qn structure also suggests how IcmR-like proteins in other L. pneumophila species may interact with their IcmQ partners.« less

  18. Effect of direction of head movement on motion sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation.

    PubMed

    Woodman, P D; Griffin, M J

    1997-02-01

    During constant speed rotation of the body, head rotation about an axis other than the axis of rotation of the body (i.e., Coriolis is stimulation) induces motion sickness. The position of the body relative to the center of rotation will influence the sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation; the direction of head movement will not affect the sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation. There were 24 seated subjects (12 male, 12 female) who made 30 degrees pitch motions of the head every 30 s while rotating about a vertical axis at 10 r.p.m. on a turntable at two separate locations: a) at the center of rotation; and b) 0.75 m from the center of rotation. After each head movement the subjects gave ratings of motion illness. There was no significant difference between illness 0.75 m from the center of rotation and illness at the center of rotation, or between the illness ratings from male and female subjects. Moving the head up from the horizontal caused significantly fewer increases in ratings of motion illness than moving the head back down to the horizontal. Precise location of the body at the center of rotation is not critical during Coriolis stimulation, but the direction of head movement has a large effect on nausea. An influence of somatosensory information on sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation is suggested.

  19. Dynamically Consistent Shallow-Atmosphere Equations with a Complete Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tort, Marine; Dubos, Thomas; Bouchut, François; Zeitlin, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Dynamically Consistent Shallow-Atmosphere Equations with a Complete Coriolis force Marine Tort1, Thomas Dubos1, François Bouchut2 & Vladimir Zeitlin1,3 1 Laboratoire of Dynamical Meteorology, Univ. P. and M. Curie, Ecole Normale Supérieure, and Ecole Polytechnique, FRANCE 2 Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire d'Analyse et de Mathématiques Appliquées, FRANCE 3 Institut Universitaire de France Atmospheric and oceanic motion are usually modeled within the shallow-fluid approximation, which simplifies the 3D spherical geometry. For dynamical consistency, i.e. to ensure conservation laws for potential vorticity, energy and angular momentum, the horizontal component of the Coriolis force is neglected. Here new equation sets combining consistently a simplified shallow-fluid geometry with a complete Coriolis force is presented. The derivation invokes Hamilton's principle of least action with an approximate Lagrangian capturing the small increase with height of the solid-body entrainment velocity due to planetary rotation. A three-dimensional compressible model and a one-layer shallow-water model are obtained. The latter extends previous work done on the f-plane and β-plane. Preliminary numerical results confirm the accuracy of the 3D model within the range of parameters for which the equations are relevant. These new models could be useful to incorporate a full Coriolis force into existing numerical models and to disentangle the effects of the shallow-atmosphere approximation from those of the traditional approximation. Related papers: Tort M., Dubos T., Bouchut F. and Zeitlin V. Consistent shallow-water equations on the rotating sphere with complete Coriolis force and topography. J. Fluid Mech. (under revisions) Tort M. and Dubos T. Dynamically consistent shallow-atmosphere equations with a complete Coriolis force. Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc. (DOI: 10.1002/qj.2274)

  20. Nonlinear bending-torsional vibration and stability of rotating, pretwisted, preconed blades including Coriolis effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.; Brown, G. V.; Lawrence, C.

    1986-01-01

    The coupled bending-bending-torsional equations of dynamic motion of rotating, linearly pretwisted blades are derived including large precone, second degree geometric nonlinearities and Coriolis effects. The equations are solved by the Galerkin method and a linear perturbation technique. Accuracy of the present method is verified by comparisons of predicted frequencies and steady state deflections with those from MSC/NASTRAN and from experiments. Parametric results are generated to establish where inclusion of only the second degree geometric nonlinearities is adequate. The nonlinear terms causing torsional divergence in thin blades are identified. The effects of Coriolis terms and several other structurally nonlinear terms are studied, and their relative importance is examined.

  1. Nonlinear vibration and stability of rotating, pretwisted, preconed blades including Coriolis effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.; Brown, G. V.; Lawrence, C.

    1987-01-01

    The coupled bending-bending-torsional equations of dynamic motion of rotating, linearly pretwisted blades are derived including large precone, second degree geometric nonlinearities and Coriolis effects. The equations are solved by the Galerkin method and a linear perturbation technique. Accuracy of the present method is verified by conparisons of predicted frequencies and steady state deflections with those from MSC/NASTRAN and from experiments. Parametric results are generated to establish where inclusion of only the second degree geometric nonlinearities is adequate. The nonlinear terms causing torsional divergence in thin blades are identified. The effects of Coriolis terms and several other structurally nonlinear terms are studied, and their relative importance is examined.

  2. The effective intensity of Coriolis, cross-coupling stimulation is gravitoinertial force dependent - Implications for space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Graybiel, A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of gravity on the severity of the Coriolis-induced motion sickness was investigated in ten individuals subjected to high and low G-force phases of parabolic flight maneuvers using constant level Coriolis, cross-coupled angular acceleration stimulation. Using seven levels of severity in the diagnosis of motion sickness, it was found that the subjects were less susceptible at 0 G than at +2 Gz, and that the perceived intensity and provocativeness of Coriolis stimulation decreased in 0 G and increased in +2 Gz relative to the +1 Gz baseline values. The changes in the apparent intensity of Coriolis stimulation occur virtually immediately when the background gravitatioinertial force level is varied. These findings explain why the Skylab astronauts were refractory to motion sickness during Coriolis stimulation in-flight.

  3. A Type-2 fuzzy data fusion approach for building reliable weighted protein interaction networks with application in protein complex detection.

    PubMed

    Mehranfar, Adele; Ghadiri, Nasser; Kouhsar, Morteza; Golshani, Ashkan

    2017-09-01

    Detecting the protein complexes is an important task in analyzing the protein interaction networks. Although many algorithms predict protein complexes in different ways, surveys on the interaction networks indicate that about 50% of detected interactions are false positives. Consequently, the accuracy of existing methods needs to be improved. In this paper we propose a novel algorithm to detect the protein complexes in 'noisy' protein interaction data. First, we integrate several biological data sources to determine the reliability of each interaction and determine more accurate weights for the interactions. A data fusion component is used for this step, based on the interval type-2 fuzzy voter that provides an efficient combination of the information sources. This fusion component detects the errors and diminishes their effect on the detection protein complexes. So in the first step, the reliability scores have been assigned for every interaction in the network. In the second step, we have proposed a general protein complex detection algorithm by exploiting and adopting the strong points of other algorithms and existing hypotheses regarding real complexes. Finally, the proposed method has been applied for the yeast interaction datasets for predicting the interactions. The results show that our framework has a better performance regarding precision and F-measure than the existing approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonlinear flap-lag-extensional vibrations of rotating, pretwisted, preconed beams including Coriolis effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pretwist, precone, setting angle, Coriolis forces and second degree geometric nonlinearities on the natural frequencies, steady state deflections and mode shapes of rotating, torsionally rigid, cantilevered beams were studied. The governing coupled equations of flap lag extensional motion are derived including the effects of large precone and retaining geometric nonlinearities up to second degree. The Galerkin method, with nonrotating normal modes, is used for the solution of both steady state nonlinear equations and linear perturbation equations. Parametric indicating the individual and collective effects of pretwist, precone, Coriolis forces and second degree geometric nonlinearities on the steady state deflection, natural frequencies and mode shapes of rotating blades are presented. It is indicated that the second degree geometric nonlinear terms, which vanish for zero precone, can produce frequency changes of engineering significance. Further confirmation of the validity of including those generated by MSC NASTRAN. It is indicated that the linear and nonlinear Coriolis effects must be included in analyzing thick blades. The Coriolis effects are significant on the first flatwise and the first edgewise modes.

  5. The etiology and drug therapy of kinesia: investigations by means of the coriolis effect under cyclizine.

    PubMed

    Reicke, N

    1976-01-01

    The typical symptoms of kinesia were produced in 30 healthy test subjects by means of the Coriolis effect and the effect of cyclizine upon them was investigated in a single blind trial. The drug showed a clear effect on the autonomic symptoms (nausea) while there was no evidence of inhibition of the peripheral vestibular function.

  6. Geostrophic balance with a full Coriolis Force: implications for low latitutde studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, M. de la Torre

    2002-01-01

    In its standard form, geostrophic balance uses a partial representation of the Coriolis force. The resulting formation has a singularity at the equator, and violates mass and momentum conservation. When the horizontal projection of the planetary rotation vector is considered, the singularity at the equator disappears, continuity can be preserved, and quasigeostrophy can be formulated at planetary scale.

  7. Myths, Misconceptions, and Misunderstandings: A Different Spin on Coriolis--Applying Frame of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses misconceptions surrounding the Coriolis force and describes how it should be presented as a function within inertial and noninertial frames of reference. Not only does this demonstrate the nature of science as it strives to best interpret the natural world (and presents alternative explanations), but it offers a rich…

  8. Gravitoinertial force background level affects adaptation to coriolis force perturbations of reaching movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; Dizio, P.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the combined effects on reaching movements of the transient, movement-dependent Coriolis forces and the static centrifugal forces generated in a rotating environment. Specifically, we assessed the effects of comparable Coriolis force perturbations in different static force backgrounds. Two groups of subjects made reaching movements toward a just-extinguished visual target before rotation began, during 10 rpm counterclockwise rotation, and after rotation ceased. One group was seated on the axis of rotation, the other 2.23 m away. The resultant of gravity and centrifugal force on the hand was 1.0 g for the on-center group during 10 rpm rotation, and 1.031 g for the off-center group because of the 0.25 g centrifugal force present. For both groups, rightward Coriolis forces, approximately 0.2 g peak, were generated during voluntary arm movements. The endpoints and paths of the initial per-rotation movements were deviated rightward for both groups by comparable amounts. Within 10 subsequent reaches, the on-center group regained baseline accuracy and straight-line paths; however, even after 40 movements the off-center group had not resumed baseline endpoint accuracy. Mirror-image aftereffects occurred when rotation stopped. These findings demonstrate that manual control is disrupted by transient Coriolis force perturbations and that adaptation can occur even in the absence of visual feedback. An increase, even a small one, in background force level above normal gravity does not affect the size of the reaching errors induced by Coriolis forces nor does it affect the rate of reacquiring straight reaching paths; however, it does hinder restoration of reaching accuracy.

  9. Synergistic Interaction of Retigabine with Levetiracetam in the Mouse Maximal Electroshock-Induced Seizure Model: A Type II Isobolographic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Zagaja, Mirosław; Miziak, Barbara; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2015-01-01

    To assess interactions between retigabine and levetiracetam in suppressing maximal electroshock-induced tonic seizures in Albino Swiss mice, type II isobolographic analysis was used. Total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations were measured with high pressure liquid chromatography. The combinations of retigabine with levetiracetam at the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 were supra-additive (synergistic; p < 0.05) in terms of seizure suppression, while the combinations at the fixed-ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 were additive. No pharmacokinetic changes in total brain concentrations of levetiracetam and retigabine were documented, indicating the pharmacodynamic nature of interaction between these antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced tonic seizure model. The combination of retigabine with levetiracetam at the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 appears to be particularly beneficial combination exerting supra-additive interaction in suppressing maximal electroshock-induced tonic seizures. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. RR-MR transition of a Type V shock interaction in inviscid double-wedge flow with high-temperature gas effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, W.; Li, J.; Zhu, Y.; Luo, X.

    2018-07-01

    The transition between regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) of a Type V shock-shock interaction on a double-wedge geometry with non-equilibrium high-temperature gas effects is investigated theoretically and numerically. A modified shock polar method that involves thermochemical non-equilibrium processes is applied to calculate the theoretical critical angles of transition based on the detachment criterion and the von Neumann criterion. Two-dimensional inviscid numerical simulations are performed correspondingly to reveal the interactive wave patterns, the transition processes, and the critical transition angles. The theoretical and numerical results of the critical transition angles are compared, which shows evident disagreement, indicating that the transition mechanism between RR and MR of a Type V shock interaction is beyond the admissible scope of the classical theory. Numerical results show that the collisions of triple points of the Type V interaction cause the transition instead. Compared with the frozen counterpart, it is found that the high-temperature gas effects lead to a larger critical transition angle and a larger hysteresis interval.

  11. Flow shear stabilization of rotating plasmas due to the Coriolis effect.

    PubMed

    Haverkort, J W; de Blank, H J

    2012-07-01

    A radially decreasing toroidal rotation frequency can have a stabilizing effect on nonaxisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. We show that this is a consequence of the Coriolis effect that induces a restoring pressure gradient force when plasma is perturbed radially. In a rotating cylindrical plasma, this Coriolis-pressure effect is canceled by the centrifugal effect responsible for the magnetorotational instability. In a magnetically confined toroidal plasma, a large aspect ratio expansion shows that only half of the effect is canceled. This analytical result is confirmed by numerical computations. When the plasma rotates faster toroidally in the core than near the edge, the effect can contribute to the formation of transport barriers by stabilizing MHD instabilities.

  12. [Pharmacological correction of central nervous system function in exposure to Coriolis acceleration].

    PubMed

    Karkishchenko, N N; Dimitriadi, N A; Molchanovskiĭ, V V

    1986-01-01

    Healthy volunteers with a low vestibular tolerance were exposed to Coriolis acceleration. Potassium orotate, pyracetame and riboxine were used as prophylactic measures against disorders in the function of the vestibular apparatus and higher compartments of the higher nervous system. The central nervous function was assessed with respect to the spectral power of electroencephalograms, short-term memory and mental performance. Potassium orotate given at a dose of 40 mg/kg body weight/day during 12-14 days as well as pyracetame given at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight/day during 3 or 7 days increased significantly statokinetic tolerance and produced a protective effect on the central nervous function against Coriolis acceleration.

  13. The role of the complete Coriolis force in weakly stratified oceanic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tort, M.; Winters, K. B.; Ribstein, B.; Zeitlin, V.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean dynamics is usually described using the primitive equations based on the so-called traditional approximation (TA), where the Coriolis force associated with the horizontal component of the planetary rotation is neglected (also called non-traditional (NT) part proportional to cosΦ, see Fig 1.). However, recent studies have shown that the NT part of the Coriolis force plays a non-negligible dynamical role in some particular oceanic flows (see Gerkema et al., 2008 for an extensive review of NT effects for geophysical and astrophysical flows). Here we explore the relevance of including the NT component of the Coriolis force in ocean models, by presenting particular results regarding two different mid-latitude flow configurations after relaxing the TA: Propagation of wind-induced near-inertial waves (NIWs). Under the TA, NIWs propagate toward the equator, the inertially poleward propagation being internally reflected at a depth-independent critical latitude. The combined effects of the NT Coriolis force and weak stratification in the deep ocean leads to the existence of waveguides for sub-inertial waves, which get trapped and propagate further poleward (Winters et al., 2011). Here we consider storm-induced NIWs and their evolution in a non-linear Boussinesq model on the β-plane in the NT approximation. Preliminary results are presented concerning the behavior of the waves in a weakly stratified mixed-layer, where NT effects are expected to be significant. Inertial instability. A detailed linear stability analysis of the Bickley jet at large Rossby numbers in the NT approximation on the f-plane is performed for long waves in a continuously stratified Boussinesq model. For a sufficiently weak stratification, both symmetric and asymmetric inertial instabilities have substantially higher growth rates than in the TA while no discernible differences between the two approximations are observed for strong enough stratifications (Tort et al., 2015).

  14. Vibration and buckling of rotating, pretwisted, preconed beams including Coriolis effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pretwist, precone, setting angle and Coriolis forces on the vibration and buckling behavior of rotating, torsionally rigid, cantilevered beams were studied. The beam is considered to be clamped on the axis of rotation in one case, and off the axis of rotation in the other. Two methods are employed for the solution of the vibration problem: (1) one based upon a finite-difference approach using second order central differences for solution of the equations of motion, and (2) based upon the minimum of the total potential energy functional with a Ritz type of solution procedure making use of complex forms of shape functions for the dependent variables. The individual and collective effects of pretwist, precone, setting angle, thickness ratio and Coriolis forces on the natural frequencies and the buckling boundaries are presented. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis effects is necessary for blades of moderate to large thickness ratios while these effects are not so important for small thickness ratio blades. The possibility of buckling due to centrifugal softening terms for large values of precone and rotation is shown.

  15. Effect of Coriolis force on counter-current chromatographic separation by centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ikehata, Jun-Ichi; Shinomiya, Kazufusa; Kobayashi, Koji; Ohshima, Hisashi; Kitanaka, Susumu; Ito, Yoichiro

    2004-02-06

    The effect of Coriolis force on the counter-current chromatographic separation was studied using centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) with four different two-phase solvent systems including n-hexane-acetonitrile (ACN); tert-butyl methyl ether (MtBE)-aqueous 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) (1:1); MtBE-ACN-aqueous 0.1% TFA (2:2:3); and 12.5% (w/w) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 1000-12.5% (w/w) dibasic potassium phosphate. Each separation was performed by eluting either the upper phase in the ascending mode or the lower phase in the descending mode, each in clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise column rotation. Better partition efficiencies were attained by the CW rotation in both mobile phases in all the two-phase solvent systems examined. The mathematical analysis also revealed the Coriolis force works favorably under the CW column rotation for both mobile phases. The overall results demonstrated that the Coriolis force produces substantial effects on CPC separation in both organic-aqueous and aqueous-aqueous two-phase systems.

  16. Effect of microgravity on spatial orientation and posture regulation during Coriolis stimulation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Sekine, Motoki; Ikeda, Takuo; Watanuki, Koichi; Hakuta, Shuzo; Takeoka, Hajime

    2004-05-01

    To elucidate spatial orientation and posture regulation under conditions of microgravity. Coriolis stimulation was done with five normal subjects on the ground (1 g) and onboard an aircraft (under conditions of microgravity during parabolic flight). Subjects were asked to tilt their heads forward during rotation at speeds of 0, 50, 100 and 150 degrees/s on the ground and 100 degrees/s during flight. Body sway was recorded using a 3D linear accelerometer and eye movements using an infrared charge-coupled device video camera. Flight experiments were performed on 5 consecutive days, and 11-16 parabolic maneuvers were done during each flight. Two subjects boarded each flight and were examined alternately at least five times. Coriolis stimulation at 1 g caused body sway, nystagmus and a movement sensation in accordance with inertial inputs at 1 g. Neither body sway, excepting a minute sway due to the Coriolis force, nor a movement sensation occurred in microgravity, but nystagmus was recorded. Posture, eye movement and sensation at 1 g are controlled with reference to spatial coordinates that represent the external world in the brain. Normal spatial coordinates are not relevant in microgravity because there is no Z-axis, and the posture regulation and sensation that depend on them collapse. The discrepancy in responses between posture and eye movement under conditions of microgravity may be caused by a different constitution of the effectors which adjust posture and gaze.

  17. Congenitally blind individuals rapidly adapt to coriolis force perturbations of their reaching movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    Reaching movements made to visual targets in a rotating room are initially deviated in path and endpoint in the direction of transient Coriolis forces generated by the motion of the arm relative to the rotating environment. With additional reaches, movements become progressively straighter and more accurate. Such adaptation can occur even in the absence of visual feedback about movement progression or terminus. Here we examined whether congenitally blind and sighted subjects without visual feedback would demonstrate adaptation to Coriolis forces when they pointed to a haptically specified target location. Subjects were tested pre-, per-, and postrotation at 10 rpm counterclockwise. Reaching to straight ahead targets prerotation, both groups exhibited slightly curved paths. Per-rotation, both groups showed large initial deviations of movement path and curvature but within 12 reaches on average had returned to prerotation curvature levels and endpoints. Postrotation, both groups showed mirror image patterns of curvature and endpoint to the per-rotation pattern. The groups did not differ significantly on any of the performance measures. These results provide compelling evidence that motor adaptation to Coriolis perturbations can be achieved on the basis of proprioceptive, somatosensory, and motor information in the complete absence of visual experience.

  18. The influence of the self-consistent mode structure on the Coriolis pinch effect

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, A. G.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.

    This paper discusses the effect of the mode structure on the Coriolis pinch effect [A. G. Peeters, C. Angioni, and D. Strintzi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. It is shown that the Coriolis drift effect can be compensated for by a finite parallel wave vector, resulting in a reduced momentum pinch velocity. Gyrokinetic simulations in full toroidal geometry reveal that parallel dynamics effectively removes the Coriolis pinch for the case of adiabatic electrons, while the compensation due to the parallel dynamics is incomplete for the case of kinetic electrons, resulting in a finite pinch velocity. The finite flux inmore » the case of kinetic electrons is interpreted to be related to the electron trapping, which prevents a strong asymmetry in the electrostatic potential with respect to the low field side position. The physics picture developed here leads to the discovery and explanation of two unexpected effects: First the pinch velocity scales with the trapped particle fraction (root of the inverse aspect ratio), and second there is no strong collisionality dependence. The latter is related to the role of the trapped electrons, which retain some symmetry in the eigenmode, but play no role in the perturbed parallel velocity.« less

  19. Coriolis effect on dynamic stall in a vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsieh-Chen; Colonius, Tim

    2013-11-01

    The immersed boundary method is used to simulate the flow around a two-dimensional rotating NACA 0018 airfoil at moderate (sub-scale) Reynolds number in order to investigate separated flow occurring on a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The influence of dynamic stall on the forces is characterized as a function of tip-speed ratio. The influence of the Coriolis effect is also investigated by comparing the rotating airfoil to one undergoing a surging and pitching motion that produces an equivalent speed and angle-of-attack variation over the cycle. While the Coriolis force produces only small differences in the averaged forces, it plays an important role during dynamic stall. Due to the fact that the Coriolis force deflects the fluid and propagates the vortices differently, the wake-capturing phenomenon of the trailing edge vortex is observed in the flow around the rotating airfoil during a certain range of azimuthal angle. This wake-capturing of the trailing edge vortex leads to a large decrease in lift. However, because of the phase difference between each wake-capturing, there are only small differences in the average forces. The simulations are also compared to results from companion water-tunnel experiments at Caltech. This project is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  20. High-resolution Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy of the ν6 and Coriolis perturbation allowed ν10 modes of ketenimine.

    PubMed

    Bane, Michael K; Robertson, Evan G; Thompson, Christopher D; Appadoo, Dominique R T; McNaughton, Don

    2011-12-14

    High-resolution FTIR spectra of the short lived species ketenimine have been recorded in the region 700-1300 cm(-1) and over 1500 transitions of the ν(10) and ν(6) modes have been assigned. Effective rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters for the v(10) = 1 and v(6) = 1 (excluding K(a) = 5) states were determined by co-fitting transitions, and treating strong a- and c-axis Coriolis interactions between them. Other perturbations attributed to interactions with the v(8) = 2 and v(12) = 1 + v(8) = 1 dark-states were also observed and treated. The ν(10) transitions are predicted to be inherently very weak, but are enhanced by an intensity stealing effect with the highly IR active ν(6) mode. A mechanism for this intensity stealing in ketenimine is also detailed. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  1. Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch in NSTX

    DOE Data Explorer

    Guttenfelder, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kaye, S. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ren, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Solomon, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Candy, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Yuh, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch for low aspect-ratio NSTX H-modes where previous experimental measurements were focused. Local, linear calculations predict that in the region of interest (just outside the mid-radius) of these relatively high-beta plasmas, profiles are most unstable to microtearing modes that are only effective in transporting electron energy. However, sub-dominant electromagnetic and electrostatic ballooning modes are also unstable, which are effective at transporting energy, particles and momentum. The quasi-linear prediction of transport from these weaker ballooning modes, assuming they contribute transport in addition to that from microtearing modes in a nonlinear turbulent state, leads to a very small or outward convection of momentum, inconsistent with the experimentally measured inward pinch, and opposite to predictions in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Additional predictions of a low beta L-mode plasma, unstable to more traditional electrostatic ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode instability, show that the Coriolis pinch is inward but remains relatively weak and insensitive to many parameter variations. The weak or outward pinch predicted in NSTX plasmas appears to be at least partially correlated to changes in the parallel mode structure that occur at finite beta and low aspect ratio, as discussed in previous theories. The only conditions identified where a stronger inward pinch is predicted occur either in the purely electrostatic limit or if the aspect ratio is increased. As the Coriolis pinch cannot explain the measured momentum pinch, additional theoretical momentum transport mechanisms are discussed that may be potentially important.

  2. Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.

    This paper presents quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch for low aspect-ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-modes where previous experimental measurements were focused. Local, linear calculations predict that in the region of interest (just outside the mid-radius) of these relatively high-beta plasmas, profiles are most unstable to microtearing modes that are only effective in transporting electron energy. However, sub-dominant electromagnetic and electrostaticballooning modes are also unstable, which are effective at transporting energy, particles, and momentum. The quasi-linear prediction of transport from these weaker ballooning modes, assuming they contribute transport in addition to that from microtearing modes inmore » a nonlinear turbulent state, leads to a very small or outward convection of momentum, inconsistent with the experimentally measured inward pinch, and opposite to predictions in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Additional predictions of a low beta L-mode plasma, unstable to more traditional electrostatic ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode instability, show that the Coriolis pinch is inward but remains relatively weak and insensitive to many parameter variations. The weak or outward pinch predicted in NSTX plasmas appears to be at least partially correlated to changes in the parallel mode structure that occur at a finite beta and low aspect ratio, as discussed in previous theories. The only conditions identified where a stronger inward pinch is predicted occur either in the purely electrostatic limit or if the aspect ratio is increased. Lastly, as the Coriolis pinch cannot explain the measured momentum pinch, additional theoretical momentum transport mechanisms are discussed that may be potentially important.« less

  3. Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.; ...

    2016-05-11

    This paper presents quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch for low aspect-ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-modes where previous experimental measurements were focused. Local, linear calculations predict that in the region of interest (just outside the mid-radius) of these relatively high-beta plasmas, profiles are most unstable to microtearing modes that are only effective in transporting electron energy. However, sub-dominant electromagnetic and electrostaticballooning modes are also unstable, which are effective at transporting energy, particles, and momentum. The quasi-linear prediction of transport from these weaker ballooning modes, assuming they contribute transport in addition to that from microtearing modes inmore » a nonlinear turbulent state, leads to a very small or outward convection of momentum, inconsistent with the experimentally measured inward pinch, and opposite to predictions in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Additional predictions of a low beta L-mode plasma, unstable to more traditional electrostatic ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode instability, show that the Coriolis pinch is inward but remains relatively weak and insensitive to many parameter variations. The weak or outward pinch predicted in NSTX plasmas appears to be at least partially correlated to changes in the parallel mode structure that occur at a finite beta and low aspect ratio, as discussed in previous theories. The only conditions identified where a stronger inward pinch is predicted occur either in the purely electrostatic limit or if the aspect ratio is increased. Lastly, as the Coriolis pinch cannot explain the measured momentum pinch, additional theoretical momentum transport mechanisms are discussed that may be potentially important.« less

  4. On the restricted four-body problem with the effect of small perturbations in the Coriolis and centrifugal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suraj, Md Sanam; Aggarwal, Rajiv; Arora, Monika

    2017-09-01

    We have studied the restricted four-body problem (R4BP) with the effect of the small perturbation in the Coriolis and centrifugal forces on the libration points and zero velocity curves (ZVCs). Further, we have supposed that all the primaries are set in an equilateral triangle configuration, moving in the circular orbits around their common centre of mass. We have observed that the effect of the small perturbation in centrifugal force has a substantial effect on the location of libration points but a small perturbation in the Coriolis force has no impact on the location of libration points. But the stability of the libration points is highly influenced by the effect of the small perturbation in the Coriolis force. It is observed that as the Coriolis parameter increases, the libration points become stable. Further, it is found that the effect of the small perturbation in the centrifugal force has a substantial influence on the regions of possible motion. Also, when the effect of small perturbation in the centrifugal force increases the forbidden region decreases; here the motion is not possible for the infinitesimal mass. It is observed when the value of the Jacobian constant decreases, the regions of possible motion increase. In addition, we have also discussed how small perturbations in the Coriolis and centrifugal forces influence the Newton-Raphson basins of convergence.

  5. [Human tolerance to Coriolis acceleration during exertion of different muscle groups].

    PubMed

    Aĭzikov, G S; Emel'ianov, M D; Ovechkin, V G

    1975-01-01

    The effect of an arbitrary loading of different muscle groups (shoulder, back, legs) and motor acts on the tolerance to Coriolis accelerations was investigated in 140 experiments in which 40 test subjects participated. The accelerations were cumulated and simulated by the Bryanov scheme. Muscle tension was accompanied by a less expressed vestibulo-vegetative reaction and shortening of the recovery period after the development of motion sickness symptoms. The greatest changes were observed during the performance of complex motor acts and tension of shoulder muscles. Possible mechanisms of these effects are discussed.

  6. A simple microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter for operation at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Jundt, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter that is simple to assemble, operates at elevated temperature and pressure, and can be operated with a lock-in amplifier. The sensor has a flow rate sensitivity greater than 2° of phase shift per 1 g/min of mass flow and is benchmarked with flow rates ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 g/min. The internal volume is 15 μl and uses off-the-shelf optical components to measure the tube motion. We demonstrate that fluid density can be calculated from the frequency of the resonating element with proper calibration.

  7. Letter: Symmetric instability drastically changes upon inclusion of the full Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitlin, V.

    2018-06-01

    It is shown that the classical symmetric instability drastically changes, if the usually neglected vertical component of the Coriolis force and the contribution of the vertical velocity into its horizontal components are taken into account. The influence of these "non-traditional" terms is different for flows with positive and negative horizontal relative vorticities. A critical value of the Richardson number appears in the second case, with the instability changing its character across it. Major differences appear between hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic versions of the instability. All these features are absent in the traditional approximation.

  8. Early Cretaceous ( 140 Ma) aluminous A-type granites in the Tethyan Himalaya, Tibet: Products of crust-mantle interaction during lithospheric extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Kerr, Andrew C.; Wang, Qiang; Jiang, Zi-Qi; Hu, Wan-Long

    2018-02-01

    A-type granites have been the focus of considerable research due to their distinctive major- and trace-element signatures and tectonic significance. However, their petrogenesis, magmatic source and tectonic setting remain controversial, particularly for aluminous A-type granites. The earliest Cretaceous (ca. 140 Ma) Comei granite in the eastern Tethyan Himalaya is associated with coeval oceanic island basalt (OIB)-type mafic lava, and has A-type granite geochemical characteristics including high 10,000 × Ga/Al (up to 6), FeOtotal/MgO (4.6-6.1) and (Na2O + K2O)/Al2O3 (0.50-0.61) ratios but low CaO (0.6-1.6 wt%) and Na2O (1.8-2.6 wt%) contents. The Comei granite also has variable peraluminous compositions (A/CNK = 1.00-1.36) along with zircon δ18O, εNd(t) and initial 87Sr/86Sr values of 8.2‰ to 9.3‰, - 13.0 to - 12.4 and 0.7238 to 0.7295, respectively. This range of compositions can be interpreted as the interaction between high-temperature upwelling OIB type basaltic magmas and a shallow crustal (< 5 kbar) metapelitic source. The Comei granite and coeval OIB type basaltic rock could represent the earliest stage (145-140 Ma) of a large igneous event in eastern Tethyan Himalaya, which may well have been triggered by pre-breakup lithospheric extension prior to the arrival of the Kerguelen plume head.

  9. Wavelength dependence of eddy dissipation and Coriolis force in the dynamics of gravity wave driven fluctuations in the OH nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, M. P.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of inclusion of Coriolis force and eddy dissipation in the gravity wave dynamics theory of Walterscheid et al. (1987). It was found that the values of the ratio 'eta' (where eta is a complex quantity describing the ralationship between the intensity oscillation about the time-averaged intensity, and the temperature oscillation about the time-averaged temperature) strongly depend on the wave period and the horizontal wavelength; thus, if comparisons are to be made between observations and theory, horizontal wavelengths will need to be measured in conjunction with the OH nightglow measurements. For the waves with horizontal wavelengths up to 1000 km, the eddy dissipation was found to dominate over the Coriolis force in the gravity wave dynamics and also in the associated values of eta. However, for waves with horizontal wavelengths of 10,000 km or more, the Coriolis force cannot be neglected; it has to be taken into account along with the eddy dissipation.

  10. Physiological responses to the Coriolis illusion: effects of head position and vision.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, David; Krell, Robert W; Self, Brian P

    2007-10-01

    Changes in sympathetic outflow during Type II spatial disorientation are well documented. In this study we investigated the influences of head position and eye state (open or closed) on sympathetic activation. There were 11 naive subjects (6 men, 5 women) who were tested in a General Aviation Trainer that accelerated at a subthreshold rate for 60 s until a constant angular velocity of 90 degrees x s(-1) was reached. Approximately 40 s later, subjects were instructed to tilt their heads along either the pitch or roll axis, stimulating a Coriolis illusion. Subjects reported the perceived intensity and duration of disorientation. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and electrodermal responses were recorded before, during, and after the period of disorientation. Each subject completed four trials, which were crossed combinations of head position and eye state. There were significant increases in heart rate and the electrodermal response during disorientation, but no significant change in heart rate variability. Head position had no significant effect on any physiological parameters or on the perceived intensity of disorientation; subjects reported a shorter duration of disorientation when the head was tilted into the roll versus the pitch axis. Eye state had no effect on heart rate, heart rate variability, or the intensity of disorientation, but the electrodermal response was somewhat greater, and the duration of disorientation shorter when eyes were open. The results suggest that head position and eye state (open or closed) do not need to be included as factors when investigating sympathetic outflow during a mild Coriolis illusion.

  11. A modified variational method for nonlinear vibration analysis of rotating beams including Coriolis effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiajin; Su, Jinpeng; Zhou, Kai; Hua, Hongxing

    2018-07-01

    This paper presents a general formulation for nonlinear vibration analysis of rotating beams. A modified variational method combined with a multi-segment partitioning technique is employed to derive the free and transient vibration behaviors of the rotating beams. The strain energy and kinetic energy functional are formulated based on the order truncation principle of the fully geometrically nonlinear beam theory. The Coriolis effects as well as nonlinear effects due to the coupling of bending-stretching, bending-twist and twist-stretching are taken into account. The present method relaxes the need to explicitly meet the requirements of the boundary conditions for the admissible functions, and allows the use of any linearly independent, complete basis functions as admissible functions for rotating beams. Moreover, the method is readily used to deal with the nonlinear transient vibration problems for rotating beams subjected to dynamic loads. The accuracy, convergence and efficiency of the proposed method are examined by numerical examples. The influences of Coriolis and centrifugal forces on the vibration behaviors of the beams with various hub radiuses and slenderness ratios and rotating at different angular velocities are also investigated.

  12. Dependence of tropical cyclone development on coriolis parameter: A theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Liyuan; Li, Tim; Bi, Mingyu; Liu, Jia; Peng, Melinda

    2018-03-01

    A simple theoretical model was formulated to investigate how tropical cyclone (TC) intensification depends on the Coriolis parameter. The theoretical framework includes a two-layer free atmosphere and an Ekman boundary layer at the bottom. The linkage between the free atmosphere and the boundary layer is through the Ekman pumping vertical velocity in proportion to the vorticity at the top of the boundary layer. The closure of this linear system assumes a simple relationship between the free atmosphere diabatic heating and the boundary layer moisture convergence. Under a set of realistic atmospheric parameter values, the model suggests that the most preferred latitude for TC development is around 5° without considering other factors. The theoretical result is confirmed by high-resolution WRF model simulations in a zero-mean flow and a constant SST environment on an f -plane with different Coriolis parameters. Given an initially balanced weak vortex, the TC-like vortex intensifies most rapidly at the reference latitude of 5°. Thus, the WRF model simulations confirm the f-dependent characteristics of TC intensification rate as suggested by the theoretical model.

  13. Development of Coriolis mass flowmeter with digital drive and signal processing technology.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qi-Li; Xu, Ke-Jun; Fang, Min; Liu, Cui; Xiong, Wen-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Coriolis mass flowmeter (CMF) often suffers from two-phase flowrate which may cause flowtube stalling. To solve this problem, a digital drive method and a digital signal processing method of CMF is studied and implemented in this paper. A positive-negative step signal is used to initiate the flowtube oscillation without knowing the natural frequency of the flowtube. A digital zero-crossing detection method based on Lagrange interpolation is adopted to calculate the frequency and phase difference of the sensor output signals in order to synthesize the digital drive signal. The digital drive approach is implemented by a multiplying digital to analog converter (MDAC) and a direct digital synthesizer (DDS). A digital Coriolis mass flow transmitter is developed with a digital signal processor (DSP) to control the digital drive, and realize the signal processing. Water flow calibrations and gas-liquid two-phase flowrate experiments are conducted to examine the performance of the transmitter. The experimental results show that the transmitter shortens the start-up time and can maintain the oscillation of flowtube in two-phase flowrate condition. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Energy partition, scale by scale, in magnetic Archimedes Coriolis weak wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Baklouti, F S; Godeferd, F; Lehner, T; Cambon, C

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic Archimedes Coriolis (MAC) waves are omnipresent in several geophysical and astrophysical flows such as the solar tachocline. In the present study, we use linear spectral theory (LST) and investigate the energy partition, scale by scale, in MAC weak wave turbulence for a Boussinesq fluid. At the scale k^{-1}, the maximal frequencies of magnetic (Alfvén) waves, gravity (Archimedes) waves, and inertial (Coriolis) waves are, respectively, V_{A}k,N, and f. By using the induction potential scalar, which is a Lagrangian invariant for a diffusionless Boussinesq fluid [Salhi et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 026301 (2012)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.026301], we derive a dispersion relation for the three-dimensional MAC waves, generalizing previous ones including that of f-plane MHD "shallow water" waves [Schecter et al., Astrophys. J. 551, L185 (2001)AJLEEY0004-637X10.1086/320027]. A solution for the Fourier amplitude of perturbation fields (velocity, magnetic field, and density) is derived analytically considering a diffusive fluid for which both the magnetic and thermal Prandtl numbers are one. The radial spectrum of kinetic, S_{κ}(k,t), magnetic, S_{m}(k,t), and potential, S_{p}(k,t), energies is determined considering initial isotropic conditions. For magnetic Coriolis (MC) weak wave turbulence, it is shown that, at large scales such that V_{A}k/f≪1, the Alfvén ratio S_{κ}(k,t)/S_{m}(k,t) behaves like k^{-2} if the rotation axis is aligned with the magnetic field, in agreement with previous direct numerical simulations [Favier et al., Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. (2012)] and like k^{-1} if the rotation axis is perpendicular to the magnetic field. At small scales, such that V_{A}k/f≫1, there is an equipartition of energy between magnetic and kinetic components. For magnetic Archimedes weak wave turbulence, it is demonstrated that, at large scales, such that (V_{A}k/N≪1), there is an equipartition of energy between magnetic and potential components

  15. An improved coupled-states approximation including the nearest neighbor Coriolis couplings for diatom-diatom inelastic collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongzheng; Hu, Xixi; Zhang, Dong H.; Xie, Daiqian

    2018-02-01

    Solving the time-independent close coupling equations of a diatom-diatom inelastic collision system by using the rigorous close-coupling approach is numerically difficult because of its expensive matrix manipulation. The coupled-states approximation decouples the centrifugal matrix by neglecting the important Coriolis couplings completely. In this work, a new approximation method based on the coupled-states approximation is presented and applied to time-independent quantum dynamic calculations. This approach only considers the most important Coriolis coupling with the nearest neighbors and ignores weaker Coriolis couplings with farther K channels. As a result, it reduces the computational costs without a significant loss of accuracy. Numerical tests for para-H2+ortho-H2 and para-H2+HD inelastic collision were carried out and the results showed that the improved method dramatically reduces the errors due to the neglect of the Coriolis couplings in the coupled-states approximation. This strategy should be useful in quantum dynamics of other systems.

  16. Hydrodynamics of the VanA-type VanS histidine kinase: an extended solution conformation and first evidence for interactions with vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Jones, Mary K.; Channell, Guy; Kelsall, Claire J.; Hughes, Charlotte S.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Patching, Simon G.; Dinu, Vlad; Gillis, Richard B.; Adams, Gary G.; Harding, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    VanA-type resistance to glycopeptide antibiotics in clinical enterococci is regulated by the VanSARA two-component signal transduction system. The nature of the molecular ligand that is recognised by the VanSA sensory component has not hitherto been identified. Here we employ purified, intact and active VanSA membrane protein (henceforth referred to as VanS) in analytical ultracentrifugation experiments to study VanS oligomeric state and conformation in the absence and presence of vancomycin. A combination of sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium in the analytical ultracentrifuge (SEDFIT, SEDFIT-MSTAR and MULTISIG analysis) showed that VanS in the absence of the ligand is almost entirely monomeric (molar mass M = 45.7 kDa) in dilute aqueous solution with a trace amount of high molar mass material (M ~ 200 kDa). The sedimentation coefficient s suggests the monomer adopts an extended conformation in aqueous solution with an equivalent aspect ratio of ~(12 ± 2). In the presence of vancomycin over a 33% increase in the sedimentation coefficient is observed with the appearance of additional higher s components, demonstrating an interaction, an observation consistent with our circular dichroism measurements. The two possible causes of this increase in s – either a ligand induced dimerization and/or compaction of the monomer are considered. PMID:28397853

  17. Automated centrifugal-microfluidic platform for DNA purification using laser burst valve and coriolis effect.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min-Seong; Yoo, Jae-Chern

    2015-04-01

    We report a fully automated DNA purification platform with a micropored membrane in the channel utilizing centrifugal microfluidics on a lab-on-a-disc (LOD). The microfluidic flow in the LOD, into which the reagents are injected for DNA purification, is controlled by a single motor and laser burst valve. The sample and reagents pass successively through the micropored membrane in the channel when each laser burst valve is opened. The Coriolis effect is used by rotating the LOD bi-directionally to increase the purity of the DNA, thereby preventing the mixing of the waste and elution solutions. The total process from the lysed sample injection into the LOD to obtaining the purified DNA was finished within 7 min with only one manual step. The experimental result for Salmonella shows that the proposed microfluidic platform is comparable to the existing devices in terms of the purity and yield of DNA.

  18. Histaminergic response to Coriolis stimulation: implication for transdermal scopolamine therapy of motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Wang, E T; Zhou, D R; He, L H

    1992-07-01

    The blood levels of histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in 10 subjects, with or without administration of the transdermal therapeutic system of scopolamine (TTS-S), were measured following motion sickness (MS) induced by Coriolis stimulation. Histamine and 5-HT were assayed using the fluorometric method. The results demonstrated that the blood levels of histamine increased significantly following MS and were even higher in the subjects using TTS-S, but we found neither significant changes in the blood levels of 5-HT following MS nor any effect of TTS-S on it. The results suggest that histamine contributes to the development of MS, and scopolamine may exert its anti-MS action by affecting the histaminergic system as well as the acetylcholinergic system; there may not be a definite relation between 5-HT and the development of MS.

  19. Calculating intensities using effective Hamiltonians in terms of Coriolis-adapted normal modes.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, S; Krishnan, Mangala Sunder; Carrington, Tucker

    2005-01-15

    The calculation of rovibrational transition energies and intensities is often hampered by the fact that vibrational states are strongly coupled by Coriolis terms. Because it invalidates the use of perturbation theory for the purpose of decoupling these states, the coupling makes it difficult to analyze spectra and to extract information from them. One either ignores the problem and hopes that the effect of the coupling is minimal or one is forced to diagonalize effective rovibrational matrices (rather than diagonalizing effective rotational matrices). In this paper we apply a procedure, based on a quantum mechanical canonical transformation for deriving decoupled effective rotational Hamiltonians. In previous papers we have used this technique to compute energy levels. In this paper we show that it can also be applied to determine intensities. The ideas are applied to the ethylene molecule.

  20. Adaptation to Coriolis force perturbation of movement trajectory; role of proprioceptive and cutaneous somatosensory feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, James R.; DiZio, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Subjects exposed to constant velocity rotation in a large fully-enclosed room that rotates initially make large reaching errors in pointing to targets. The paths and endpoints of their reaches are deviated in the direction of the transient lateral Coriolis forces generated by the forward velocity of their reaches. With additional reaches, subjects soon reach in straighter paths and become more accurate at landing on target even in the absence of visual feedback about their movements. Two factors contribute to this adaptation: first, muscle spindle and golgi tendon organ feedback interpreted in relation to efferent commands provide information about movement trajectory, and second, somatosensory stimulation of the fingertip at the completion of a reach provides information about the location of the fingertip relative to the torso.

  1. Centrifugal and Coriolis Effects on Thermal Convection in a Rotating Vertical Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanjie; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    1997-11-01

    For a rotating vertical circular cylinder, we compute steady axisymmetric flows driven by heating from below, accounting for both centrifugal and Coriolis effects. We discuss the dependence of the flow and heat transfer on Rayleigh number and Ekman number for selected values of the Prandtl number and aspect ratio. For the case where the sidewall temperature varies linearly, the computed solutions include single- and multi-cell flows. We pay particular attention to deviations from rigid-body rotation, with emphasis on topological division of the flow by surfaces on which the azimuthal velocity is equal to the product of the angular velocity and the radius, or by surfaces on which the meridional flow vanishes.

  2. Adaptation to Coriolis perturbations of voluntary body sway transfers to preprogrammed fall-recovery behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Joel; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2013-01-01

    In a rotating environment, goal-oriented voluntary movements are initially disrupted in trajectory and endpoint, due to movement-contingent Coriolis forces, but accuracy is regained with additional movements. We studied whether adaptation acquired in a voluntary, goal-oriented postural swaying task performed during constant-velocity counterclockwise rotation (10 RPM) carries over to recovery from falling induced using a hold and release (H&R) paradigm. In H&R, standing subjects actively resist a force applied to their chest, which when suddenly released results in a forward fall and activation of an automatic postural correction. We tested H&R postural recovery in subjects (n = 11) before and after they made voluntary fore-aft swaying movements during 20 trials of 25 s each, in a counterclockwise rotating room. Their voluntary sway about their ankles generated Coriolis forces that initially induced clockwise deviations of the intended body sway paths, but fore-aft sway was gradually restored over successive per-rotation trials, and a counterclockwise aftereffect occurred during postrotation attempts to sway fore-aft. In H&R trials, we examined the initial 10- to 150-ms periods of movement after release from the hold force, when voluntary corrections of movement path are not possible. Prerotation subjects fell directly forward, whereas postrotation their forward motion was deviated significantly counterclockwise. The postrotation deviations were in a direction consistent with an aftereffect reflecting persistence of a compensation acquired per-rotation for voluntary swaying movements. These findings show that control and adaptation mechanisms adjusting voluntary postural sway to the demands of a new force environment also influence the automatic recovery of posture. PMID:24304863

  3. Gravity darkening in late-type stars. I. The Coriolis effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, R.; Rieutord, M.; Petitdemange, L.; Gastine, T.; Putigny, B.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Recent interferometric data have been used to constrain the brightness distribution at the surface of nearby stars, in particular the so-called gravity darkening that makes fast rotating stars brighter at their poles than at their equator. However, good models of gravity darkening are missing for stars that posses a convective envelope. Aim. In order to better understand how rotation affects the heat transfer in stellar convective envelopes, we focus on the heat flux distribution in latitude at the outer surface of numerical models. Methods: We carry out a systematic parameter study of three-dimensional, direct numerical simulations of anelastic convection in rotating spherical shells. As a first step, we neglect the centrifugal acceleration and retain only the Coriolis force. The fluid instability is driven by a fixed entropy drop between the inner and outer boundaries where stress-free boundary conditions are applied for the velocity field. Restricting our investigations to hydrodynamical models with a thermal Prandtl number fixed to unity, we consider both thick and thin (solar-like) shells, and vary the stratification over three orders of magnitude. We measure the heat transfer efficiency in terms of the Nusselt number, defined as the output luminosity normalised by the conductive state luminosity. Results: We report diverse Nusselt number profiles in latitude, ranging from brighter (usually at the onset of convection) to darker equator and uniform profiles. We find that the variations of the surface brightness are mainly controlled by the surface value of the local Rossby number: when the Coriolis force dominates the dynamics, the heat flux is weakened in the equatorial region by the zonal wind and enhanced at the poles by convective motions inside the tangent cylinder. In the presence of a strong background density stratification however, as expected in real stars, the increase of the local Rossby number in the outer layers leads to uniformisation of

  4. A study of the Coriolis effect on the fluid flow profile in a centrifugal bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Detzel, Christopher J; Thorson, Michael R; Van Wie, Bernard J; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2009-01-01

    Increasing demand for tissues, proteins, and antibodies derived from cell culture is necessitating the development and implementation of high cell density bioreactors. A system for studying high density culture is the centrifugal bioreactor (CCBR), which retains cells by increasing settling velocities through system rotation, thereby eliminating diffusional limitations associated with mechanical cell retention devices. This article focuses on the fluid mechanics of the CCBR system by considering Coriolis effects. Such considerations for centrifugal bioprocessing have heretofore been ignored; therefore, a simpler analysis of an empty chamber will be performed. Comparisons are made between numerical simulations and bromophenol blue dye injection experiments. For the non-rotating bioreactor with an inlet velocity of 4.3 cm/s, both the numerical and experimental results show the formation of a teardrop shaped plume of dye following streamlines through the reactor. However, as the reactor is rotated, the simulation predicts the development of vortices and a flow profile dominated by Coriolis forces resulting in the majority of flow up the leading wall of the reactor as dye initially enters the chamber, results are confirmed by experimental observations. As the reactor continues to fill with dye, the simulation predicts dye movement up both walls while experimental observations show the reactor fills with dye from the exit to the inlet. Differences between the simulation and experimental observations can be explained by excessive diffusion required for simulation convergence, and a slight density difference between dyed and un-dyed solutions. Implications of the results on practical bioreactor use are also discussed. (c) 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2009.

  5. A Study of the Coriolis Effect on the Fluid Flow Profile in a Centrifugal Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Detzel, Christopher J.; Thorson, Michael R.; Van Wie, Bernard J.; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing demand for tissues, proteins, and antibodies derived from cell culture is necessitating the development and implementation of high cell density bioreactors. A system for studying high density culture is the centrifugal bioreactor (CCBR) which retains cells by increasing settling velocities through system rotation, thereby eliminating diffusional limitations associated with mechanical cell retention devices. This paper focuses on the fluid mechanics of the CCBR system by considering Coriolis effects. Such considerations for centrifugal bioprocessing have heretofore been ignored; therefore a simpler analysis of an empty chamber will be performed. Comparisons are made between numerical simulations and bromophenol blue dye injection experiments. For the non-rotating bioreactor with an inlet velocity of 4.3 cm/s, both the numerical and experimental results show the formation of a teardrop shaped plume of dye following streamlines through the reactor. However, as the reactor is rotated the simulation predicts the development of vortices and a flow profile dominated by Coriolis forces resulting in the majority of flow up the leading wall of the reactor as dye initially enters the chamber, results confirmed by experimental observations. As the reactor continues to fill with dye, the simulation predicts dye movement up both walls while experimental observations show the reactor fills with dye from the exit to the inlet. Differences between the simulation and experimental observations can be explained by excessive diffusion required for simulation convergence, and a slight density difference between dyed and un-dyed solutions. Implications of the results on practical bioreactor use are also discussed. PMID:19455639

  6. Uncoupling VOR and vestibuloautonomic retention to Coriolis acceleration training in student pilots and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linjie; Cao, Yi; Tan, Cheng; Zhao, Qi; He, Siyang; Niu, Dongbin; Tang, Guohua; Zou, Peng; Xing, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Explore the different vestibular physiologic response retention patterns after Coriolis acceleration training in student pilots and extend the results for use with Chinese astronauts in the future. Twelve healthy control male subjects were screened from males familiar with vestibular training and who physically resembled the astronauts. Fourteen student pilots were selected from 23 participants by rotational vestibular function tests. All subjects were exposed to five-day continuous or intermittent Coriolis acceleration training. Subjective motion sickness (MS) symptom scores, electrocardiography, electrogastrography (EGG), post-rotatory nystagmus and renin-angiotensin system responses were measured before, during and after rotational vestibular function tests at different times after vestibular training. Subjects could tolerate 10 min or 15 min of vestibular with mild MS symptoms. Retention of vestibular autonomic responses (retention of MS symptom scores, heart rate variability, power density of EGG, variations in levels of arginine vasopressin) were approximately 1 week for control subjects and approximately 5 weeks for student pilots. Decreases in slow-phase velocity of post-rotatory nystagmus were maintained for 14 weeks for control subjects and 9 weeks for student pilots. Retention of the vestibulo-autonomic reaction after vestibular training was different for control subjects and student pilots. All parameters related to autonomic responses could be maintained at low levels after vestibular training for approximately 1 week for control subjects and approximately 5 weeks for student pilots. Uncoupling patterns between post-rotatory nystagmus and the vestibulo-autonomic reaction may be helpful in the design of clinical rehabilitation plans for balance-disorder patients and for exploration of artificial gravity in future space missions.

  7. Interaction of the scorpion toxin discrepin with Kv4.3 channels and A-type K(+) channels in cerebellum granular cells.

    PubMed

    Picco, Cristiana; Corzo, Gerardo; Possani, Lourival D; Prestipino, Gianfranco

    2014-09-01

    The peptide discrepin from the α-KTx15 subfamily of scorpion toxins preferentially affects transient A-type potassium currents, which regulate many aspects of neuronal function in the central nervous system. However, the specific Kv channel targeted by discrepin and the molecular mechanism of interaction are still unknown. Different variant peptides of discrepin were chemically synthesized and their effects were studied using patch clamp technique on rat cerebellum granular cells (CGC) and HEK cells transiently expressing Kv4.3 channels. Functional analysis indicated that nanomolar concentrations of native discrepin blocked Kv4.3 expressed channels, as previously observed in CGC. Similarly, the apparent affinities of all mutated peptides for Kv4.3 expressed channels were analogous to those found in CGC. In particular, in the double variant [V6K, D20K] the apparent affinity increased about 10-fold, whereas in variants carrying a deletion (ΔK13) or substitution (K13A) at position K13, the blockage was removed and the apparent affinity decreased more than 20-fold. These results indicate that Kv4.3 is likely the target of discrepin and highlight the importance of the basic residue K13, located in the α-helix of the toxin, for current blockage. We report the first example of a Kv4 subfamily potassium channel blocked by discrepin and identify the amino acid residues responsible for the blockage. The availability of discrepin variant peptides stimulates further research on the functions and pharmacology of neuronal Kv4 channels and on their possible roles in neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiscale Asymptotics for the Skeleton of the Madden-Julian Oscillation and Tropical-Extratropical Interactions (Open Access)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    equatorial baroclinic dynamics, and (iii) the interactive effects of moisture and convection. More specifically, the model integrates the dry...interactions 5 Par. Derivation Dim. val. Description β 2.3× 10−11 m−1s−1 Variation of Coriolis parameter with latitude θ0 300 K Potential temperature...tropical Coriolis force, and x and y denote the zonal and meridional coordinates. Without the moisture q and convection envelope a, system (1) is the two

  9. Determinants of Motion Sickness in Tilting Trains: Coriolis/Cross-Coupling Stimuli and Tilt Delay

    PubMed Central

    Bertolini, Giovanni; Durmaz, Meek Angela; Ferrari, Kim; Küffer, Alexander; Lambert, Charlotte; Straumann, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Faster trains require tilting of the cars to counterbalance the centrifugal forces during curves. Motion sensitive passengers, however, complain of discomfort and overt motion sickness. A recent study comparing different control systems in a tilting train, suggested that the delay of car tilts relative to the curve of the track contributes to motion sickness. Other aspects of the motion stimuli, like the lateral accelerations and the car jitters, differed between the tested conditions and prevented a final conclusion on the role of tilt delay. Nineteen subjects were tested on a motorized 3D turntable that simulated the roll tilts during yaw rotations experienced on a tilting train, isolating them from other motion components. Each session was composed of two consecutive series of 12 ideal curves that were defined on the bases of recordings during an actual train ride. The simulated car tilts started either at the beginning of the curve acceleration phase (no-delay condition) or with 3 s of delay (delay condition). Motion sickness was self-assessed by each subject at the end of each series using an analog motion sickness scale. All subjects were tested in both conditions. Significant increases of motion sickness occurred after the first sequence of 12 curves in the delay condition, but not in the no-delay condition. This increase correlated with the sensitivity of motion sickness, which was self-assessed by each subject before the experiment. The second sequence of curve did not lead to a significant further increase of motion sickness in any condition. Our results demonstrate that, even if the speed and amplitude are as low as those experienced on tilting trains, a series of roll tilts with a delay relative to the horizontal rotations, isolated from other motion stimuli occurring during a travel, generate Coriolis/cross-coupling stimulations sufficient to rapidly induce motion sickness in sensitive individuals. The strength and the rapid onset of the motion

  10. Sensitivities of Modeled Tropical Cyclones to Surface Friction and the Coriolis Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chen, Baode; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this investigation the sensitivities of a 2-D tropical cyclone (TC) model to surface frictional coefficient and the Coriolis parameter are studied and their implication is discussed. The model used is an axisymmetric version of the latest version of the Goddard cloud ensemble model. The model has stretched vertical grids with 33 levels varying from 30 m near the bottom to 1140 m near the top. The vertical domain is about 21 km. The horizontal domain covers a radius of 962 km (770 grids) with a grid size of 1.25 km. The time step is 10 seconds. An open lateral boundary condition is used. The sea surface temperature is specified at 29C. Unless specified otherwise, the Coriolis parameter is set at its value at 15 deg N. The Newtonian cooling is used with a time scale of 12 hours. The reference vertical temperature profile used in the Newtonian cooling is that of Jordan. The Newtonian cooling models not only the effect of radiative processes but also the effect of processes with scale larger than that of TC. Our experiments showed that if the Newtonian cooling is replaced by a radiation package, the simulated TC is much weaker. The initial condition has a temperature uniform in the radial direction and its vertical profile is that of Jordan. The initial winds are a weak Rankin vortex in the tangential winds superimposed on a resting atmosphere. The initial sea level pressure is set at 1015 hPa everywhere. Since there is no surface pressure perturbation, the initial condition is not in gradient balance. This initial condition is enough to lead to cyclogenesis, but the initial stage (say, the first 24 hrs) is not considered to resemble anything observed. The control experiment reaches quasi-equilibration after about 10 days with an eye wall extending from 15 to 25 km radius, reasonable comparing with the observations. The maximum surface wind of more than 70 m/s is located at about 18 km radius. The minimum sea level pressure on day 10 is about 886 hPa. Thus the

  11. Solar system constraints on planetary Coriolis-type effects induced by rotation of distant masses

    SciTech Connect

    Iorio, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.iorio@libero.it

    We phenomenologically put local constraints on the rotation of distant masses by using the planets of the solar system. First, we analytically compute the orbital secular precessions induced on the motion of a test particle about a massive primary by a Coriolis-like force, treated as a small perturbation, in the case of a constant angular velocity vector Ψ directed along a generic direction in space. The semimajor axis a and the eccentricity e of the test particle do not secularly change, contrary to the inclination I, the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the longitude of the pericenter varpi andmore » the mean anomaly M. Then, we compare our prediction for (dot varpi) with the corrections Δdot varpi to the usual perihelion precessions of the inner planets recently estimated by fitting long data sets with different versions of the EPM ephemerides. We obtain as preliminary upper bounds |Ψ{sub z}| ≤ 0.0006−0.013 arcsec cty{sup −1}, |Ψ{sub x}| ≤ 0.1−2.7 arcsec cty{sup −1}, |Ψ{sub y}| ≤ 0.3−2.3 arcsec cty{sup −1}. Interpreted in terms of models of space-time involving cosmic rotation, our results are able to yield constraints on cosmological parameters like the cosmological constant Λ and the Hubble parameter H{sub 0} not too far from their values determined with cosmological observations and, in some cases, several orders of magnitude better than the constraints usually obtained so far from space-time models not involving rotation. In the case of the rotation of the solar system throughout the Galaxy, occurring clockwise about the North Galactic Pole, our results for Ψ{sub z} are in disagreement with the expected value of it at more than 3−σ level. Modeling the Oort cloud as an Einstein-Thirring slowly rotating massive shell inducing Coriolis-type forces inside yields unphysical results for its putative rotation.« less

  12. Toroidal momentum pinch velocity due to the coriolis drift effect on small scale instabilities in a toroidal plasma.

    PubMed

    Peeters, A G; Angioni, C; Strintzi, D

    2007-06-29

    In this Letter, the influence of the "Coriolis drift" on small scale instabilities in toroidal plasmas is shown to generate a toroidal momentum pinch velocity. Such a pinch results because the Coriolis drift generates a coupling between the density and temperature perturbations on the one hand and the perturbed parallel flow velocity on the other. A simple fluid model is used to highlight the physics mechanism and gyro-kinetic calculations are performed to accurately assess the magnitude of the pinch. The derived pinch velocity leads to a radial gradient of the toroidal velocity profile even in the absence of a torque on the plasma and is predicted to generate a peaking of the toroidal velocity profile similar to the peaking of the density profile. Finally, the pinch also affects the interpretation of current experiments.

  13. Sensitivities of Tropical Cyclones to Surface Friction and the Coriolis Parameter in a 2-D Cloud-Resolving Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Chen, Baode; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivities to surface friction and the Coriolis parameter in tropical cyclogenesis are studied using an axisymmetric version of the Goddard cloud ensemble model. Our experiments demonstrate that tropical cyclogenesis can still occur without surface friction. However, the resulting tropical cyclone has very unrealistic structure. Surface friction plays an important role of giving the tropical cyclones their observed smaller size and diminished intensity. Sensitivity of the cyclogenesis process to surface friction. in terms of kinetic energy growth, has different signs in different phases of the tropical cyclone. Contrary to the notion of Ekman pumping efficiency, which implies a preference for the highest Coriolis parameter in the growth rate if all other parameters are unchanged, our experiments show no such preference.

  14. Toroidal Momentum Pinch Velocity due to the Coriolis Drift Effect on Small Scale Instabilities in a Toroidal Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, A. G.; Angioni, C.; Strintzi, D.

    In this Letter, the influence of the ''Coriolis drift'' on small scale instabilities in toroidal plasmas is shown to generate a toroidal momentum pinch velocity. Such a pinch results because the Coriolis drift generates a coupling between the density and temperature perturbations on the one hand and the perturbed parallel flow velocity on the other. A simple fluid model is used to highlight the physics mechanism and gyro-kinetic calculations are performed to accurately assess the magnitude of the pinch. The derived pinch velocity leads to a radial gradient of the toroidal velocity profile even in the absence of a torquemore » on the plasma and is predicted to generate a peaking of the toroidal velocity profile similar to the peaking of the density profile. Finally, the pinch also affects the interpretation of current experiment000.« less

  15. Motion of a Point Mass in a Rotating Disc: A Quantitative Analysis of the Coriolis and Centrifugal Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddout, Soufiane

    2016-06-01

    In Newtonian mechanics, the non-inertial reference frames is a generalization of Newton's laws to any reference frames. While this approach simplifies some problems, there is often little physical insight into the motion, in particular into the effects of the Coriolis force. The fictitious Coriolis force can be used by anyone in that frame of reference to explain why objects follow curved paths. In this paper, a mathematical solution based on differential equations in non-inertial reference is used to study different types of motion in rotating system. In addition, the experimental data measured on a turntable device, using a video camera in a mechanics laboratory was conducted to compare with mathematical solution in case of parabolically curved, solving non-linear least-squares problems, based on Levenberg-Marquardt's and Gauss-Newton algorithms.

  16. Detection of cerebral oxyhaemoglobin changes during vestibular Coriolis cross-coupling stimulation using near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Cheung, B

    2006-02-13

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been successful in monitoring cerebral haemodynamics when the subject is immobilized during surgery, and when there is a drastic depletion of blood from the cerebral cortex during positive acceleration. In this study, we monitored subtle changes of cerebral oxygen level using NIRS during vestibular stimulation. For the control conditions, cerebral oxygen status was monitored in six stationary subjects sitting upright, and while they executed head movements in the pitch axis with eyes opened and eyes closed. The experimental conditions involved the subjects making a head movement which required a 45 degrees pitch-down followed by a return to upright head movements 12 s later during yaw rotation (Coriolis cross coupling) at 10 and 20 rotations per minute (rpm) in a random order. Oxyhaemoglobin (O(2)Hb), deoxyhaemoglobin (HHb) and total haemoglobin levels were recorded every 0.5 s from both the parietal and the occipital lobe simultaneously. A significant rotation effect was observed in total Hb level changes from baseline in both regions. Occipital O(2)Hb increased significantly after the head movement with eyes opened at 20 rpm. Our findings appear to be consistent with previous vestibular studies that significant changes in brain blood flow occur during caloric stimulation. NIRS can be used to monitor discrete cortical blood flow changes resulting from vestibular and other forms of stimulation.

  17. Analysis of posture and eye movement responses to Coriolis stimulation under 1 G and microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Motoki; Takahashi, Masahiro; Iida, Masahiro

    2009-12-20

    To detect the effect of microgravity on vestibular responses, we conducted Coriolis stimulation experiments at 1 G and μ G. Five men with vision occluded were asked to tilt their head forward while rotating at 100 degrees/sec. Postural changes were recorded by a 3D linear accelerometer, and the distance of upper body movement was derived from recordings of linear acceleration. Eye movements were recorded by a CCD camera. For a second period after commencing head tilt, the upper body moved 10 cm in the direction of inertia input at 1 G, but it moved to the opposite direction at μ G, i.e., 4 cm in the direction of inertia force. Nystagmus peak slow-phase velocity immediately after head tilt and its attenuation process did not differ between 1 G and μ G. The strength of movement sensation and the severity of motion sickness were far weaker at μ G than at 1 G. It was concluded that inertia input is valid to induce postural and sensation responses only when the external reference is given Z axis by gravity. Vestibular ocular response may be maintained at μ G because the head reference is valid even after the external reference becomes arbitrary.

  18. Outer layer effects in wind-farm boundary layers: Coriolis forces and boundary layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In LES studies of wind-farm boundary layers, scale separation between the inner and outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is frequently assumed, i.e., wind turbines are presumed to fall within the inner layer and are not affected by outer layer effects. However, modern wind turbine and wind farm design tends towards larger rotor diameters and farm sizes, which means that outer layer effects will become more important. In a prior study, it was already shown for fully-developed wind farms that the ABL height influences the power performance. In this study, we use the in-house LES code SP-Wind to investigate the importance of outer layer effects on wind-farm boundary layers. In a suite of LES cases, the ABL height is varied by imposing a capping inversion with varying inversion strengths. Results indicate the growth of an internal boundary layer (IBL), which is limited in cases with low inversion layers. We further find that flow deceleration combined with Coriolis effects causes a change in wind direction throughout the farm. This effect increases with decreasing boundary layer height, and can result in considerable turbine wake deflection near the end of the farm. The authors are supported by the ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no: 306471). Computations were performed on VSC infrastructiure (Flemish Supercomputer Center), funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Government-department EWI.

  19. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: CAN CORIOLIS FORCE BREAK THE SYMMETRY OF THE GRAVITATIONAL CONFINED DETONATION EXPLOSION MECHANISM?

    SciTech Connect

    García-Senz, D.; Cabezón, R. M.; Thielemann, F. K.

    Currently the number of models aimed at explaining the phenomena of type Ia supernovae is high and distinguishing between them is a must. In this work we explore the influence of rotation on the evolution of the nuclear flame that drives the explosion in the so-called gravitational confined detonation models. Assuming that the flame starts in a pointlike region slightly above the center of the white dwarf (WD) and adding a moderate amount of angular velocity to the star we follow the evolution of the deflagration using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the results are very dependentmore » on the angle between the rotational axis and the line connecting the initial bubble of burned material with the center of the WD at the moment of ignition. The impact of rotation is larger for angles close to 90° because the Coriolis force on a floating element of fluid is maximum and its principal effect is to break the symmetry of the deflagration. Such symmetry breaking weakens the convergence of the nuclear flame at the antipodes of the initial ignition volume, changing the environmental conditions around the convergence region with respect to non-rotating models. These changes seem to disfavor the emergence of a detonation in the compressed volume at the antipodes and may compromise the viability of the so-called gravitational confined detonation mechanism.« less

  20. High-resolution rovibrational study of the Coriolis-coupled v 12 and v 15 modes of [1.1.1]propellane

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Robynne W; Masiello, Tony; Jariyasopit, Narumol

    Infrared spectra of the small strained cage molecule [1.1.1]propellane have been obtained at high resolution (0.0015 cm -1) and the J and K, l rovibrational structure has been resolved for the first time. We recently used combination-differences to obtain ground state parameters for propellane; over 4,100 differences from five fundamental and four combination bands were used in this process. The combination-difference approach eliminated errors due to localized perturbations in the upper state levels of the transitions and gave well-determined ground state parameters. In the current work, these ground state parameters were used in a determination of the upper state parametersmore » for the v 12(e') perpendicular and v 15(a 2") parallel bands. Over 4000 infrared transitions were fitted for each band, with J, K values ranging up to 71, 51 and 92, 90 respectively. While the transition frequencies for both bands can be fit nicely using separate analyses for each band, the strong intensity perturbations observed in the weaker v 12 band indicated that Coriolis coupling between the two modes was significant and should be included. Due to correlations with other parameters, the Coriolis coupling parameter ζ y 15,12a for the v 15 and v 12 interaction is poorly determined by a transition frequency fit alone. However, by combining the frequency fit with a fit of experimental intensities, a value of -0.42 was obtained, quite close to that predicted from the ab initio calculation (-0.44). This intensity fit also yielded a (∂μ z/∂Q 15)/(∂μ x/∂Q 12a) dipole derivative ratio of 36.5, in reasonable agreement with a value of 29.2 predicted by Gaussian ab initio density functional calculations using a cc-pVTZ basis. This ratio is unusually high due to large charge movement as the novel central Caxial-Caxial bond is displaced along the symmetry axis of the molecule for the v 15 mode.« less

  1. Turbulent flow in rib-roughened channel under the effect of Coriolis and rotational buoyancy forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Filippo; Jacono, David Lo; Cresci, Irene; Arts, Tony

    2014-04-01

    The turbulent flow inside a rotating channel provided with transverse ribs along one wall is studied by means of two-dimensional time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The measurement set-up is mounted on the same rotating disk with the test section, allowing to obtain the same accuracy and resolution as in a non-rotating rig. The Reynolds number is 15 000, and the rotation number is 0.38. As the ribbed wall is heated, both the Coriolis force and the centrifugal force play a role in the fluid dynamics. The mean velocity fields highlight the major impact of the rotational buoyancy (characterized by a buoyancy number of 0.31) on the flow along the leading side of the duct. In particular, since the flow is directed radially outward, the near-wall layers experience significant centripetal buoyancy. The recirculation area behind the obstacles is enlarged to the point of spanning the whole inter-rib space. Also the turbulent fluctuations are significantly altered, and overall augmented, with respect to the non-buoyant case, resulting in higher turbulence levels far from the rib. On the other hand the centrifugal force has little or no impact on the flow along the trailing wall. Vortex identification, proper orthogonal decomposition, and two-point correlations are used to highlight rotational effects, and in particular to determine the dominant scales of the turbulent unsteady flow, the time-dependent behavior of the shear layer and of the recirculation bubble behind the wall-mounted obstacles, the lifetime and advection velocity of the coherent structures.

  2. The influence of gravitoinertial force level on oculomotor and perceptual responses to Coriolis, cross-coupling stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dizio, Paul; Lackner, James R.; Evanoff, John N.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of the present experiment was to determine whether gravitoinertial force magnitude influences oculomotor and perceptual responses to Coriolis cross-coupling stimulation. Blindfolded subjects who were rotating at constant velocity were asked to make standardized head movements during the free-fall and high-force phases of parabolic flight, and the characteristics of their horizontal nystagmus and the magnitude of their experienced self-motion were measured. Both responses were less intense in the free-fall periods than in the high-force periods. These findings suggest that the response to semicircular canal stimulation depends on the background level of gravitoinertial force.

  3. In vivo pharmacological interactions between a type II positive allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic ACh receptors and nicotinic agonists in a murine tonic pain model

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, K; Negus, SS; Carroll, FI; Damaj, MI

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The α7 nicotinic ACh receptor subtype is abundantly expressed in the CNS and in the periphery. Recent evidence suggests that α7 nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) subtypes, which can be activated by an endogenous cholinergic tone comprising ACh and the α7 agonist choline, play an important role in chronic pain and inflammation. In this study, we evaluated whether type II α7 positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 induces antinociception on its own and in combination with choline in the formalin pain model. Experimental Approach We assessed the effects of PNU-120596 and choline and the nature of their interactions in the formalin test using an isobolographic analysis. In addition, we evaluated the interaction of PNU-120596 with PHA-54613, an exogenous selective α7 nAChR agonist, in the formalin test. Finally, we assessed the interaction between PNU-120596 and nicotine using acute thermal pain, locomotor activity, body temperature and convulsing activity tests in mice. Key Results We found that PNU-120596 dose-dependently attenuated nociceptive behaviour in the formalin test after systemic administration in mice. In addition, mixtures of PNU-120596 and choline synergistically reduced formalin-induced pain. PNU-120596 enhanced the effects of nicotine and α7 agonist PHA-543613 in the same test. In contrast, PNU-120596 failed to enhance nicotine-induced convulsions, hypomotility and antinociception in acute pain models. Surprisingly, it enhanced nicotine-induced hypothermia via activation of α7 nAChRs. Conclusions and Implications Our results demonstrate that type II α7 positive allosteric modulators produce antinociceptive effects in the formalin test through a synergistic interaction with the endogenous α7 agonist choline. PMID:23004024

  4. An assessment of the deflecting effect on human movement due to the Coriolis inertial forces in a space vehicle.

    PubMed

    Hennion, P Y; Mollard, R

    1993-01-01

    Under conditions of prolonged space flight, it may be feasible to restore gravity artificially using centrifugal inertial forces in a spinning vehicle. As a result, the motion of the passengers relative to the vehicle is affected by Coriolis forces. The aim of this study is to propose a theoretical method to evaluate the extent of these effects compared to other inertial or motor forces affecting movement. We investigated typical right upper limb movement in a numerical model with a two-solid-links mechanism, including a spherical joint for the shoulder and a hinge joint for the elbow. The inertial and dimensional characteristics of this model derive from measurements and computations obtained on laboratory subjects. The same is true for the movements assigned to the model. These were inferred from actual recordings of arm movement when the subject presses a button placed in front of him with his index finger. From these relative velocities, the resulting forces and moments applied to the elbow and the shoulder were computed for a 1 rad s-1 rotational speed of transport motion, using classical kinetic relations. The result is that the Coriolis moments are of the same order of magnitude as the corresponding inertial moments and one-tenth of the value of a typical elbow flexion moment. Thus, they should cause a significant disturbance in movement.

  5. Coriolis-force-induced trajectory and endpoint deviations in the reaching movements of labyrinthine-defective subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    When reaching movements are made during passive constant velocity body rotation, inertial Coriolis accelerations are generated that displace both movement paths and endpoints in their direction. These findings directly contradict equilibrium point theories of movement control. However, it has been argued that these movement errors relate to subjects sensing their body rotation through continuing vestibular activity and making corrective movements. In the present study, we evaluated the reaching movements of five labyrinthine-defective subjects (lacking both semicircular canal and otolith function) who cannot sense passive body rotation in the dark and five age-matched, normal control subjects. Each pointed 40 times in complete darkness to the location of a just extinguished visual target before, during, and after constant velocity rotation at 10 rpm in the center of a fully enclosed slow rotation room. All subjects, including the normal controls, always felt completely stationary when making their movements. During rotation, both groups initially showed large deviations of their movement paths and endpoints in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces generated by their movements. With additional per-rotation movements, both groups showed complete adaptation of movement curvature (restoration of straight-line reaches) during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects, however, failed to regain fully accurate movement endpoints after 40 reaches, unlike the control subjects who did so within 11 reaches. Postrotation, both groups' movements initially had mirror image curvatures to their initial per-rotation reaches; the endpoint aftereffects were significantly different from prerotation baseline for the control subjects but not for the labyrinthine-defective subjects reflecting the smaller amount of endpoint adaptation they achieved during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects' movements had significantly lower peak velocity, higher peak elevation

  6. The onset of convection in a binary fluid mixture with temperature dependent viscosity and Coriolis force with Soret presence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Nurul Hafizah Zainal; Mokhtar, Nor Fadzillah Mohd; Majid, Zanariah Abdul; Ghani, Siti Salwa Abd

    2017-11-01

    Temperature dependent viscosity and Coriolis force were applied to the steady Benard-Marangoni convection where the lower boundary of a horizontal layer of the binary mixture is heated from below and cooled from above. The purpose of this paper is to study in detail the onset of convection with these effects. Few cases of boundary conditions are studied which are rigid-rigid, rigid-free and free-free representing the lower-upper boundaries. A detailed numerical calculation of the marginal stability curves was performed by using the Galerkin method and it is showed that temperature dependent viscosity and Soret number destabilize the binary fluid layer system and Taylor number act oppositely.

  7. The growth of homogeneous semiconductor crystals in a centrifuge by the stabilizing influence of the Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, G.; Neumann, G.; Weber, W.

    1992-04-01

    Both experimental and numerical results on crystal growth and fluid flow studies carried out in a centrifuge are reported. It is shown that the formation of doping striations can be avoided in the vertical Bridgman and the horizontal zone melting growth of Te-doped InSb if the centrifugal acceleration is increased beyond a critical value depending on the thermal boundary conditions. Furthermore, the maximum rate for the growth of inclusion free GaSb crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) is increased by a factor of 10 if this method is carried out at an acceleration of 20 times earth gravity. Model experiments in the Bridgman configuration using a test cell with liquid Ga and a larger series of thermocouples are conducted by varying the thermal boundary conditions and the rotation rate of the centrifuge. A three-dimensional time dependent numerical simulation of the fluid flow under the experimental conditions was carried out using a finite difference numerical scheme. It follows clearly that the Coriolis force acting on the melt in the rotating centrifuge system significantly influences the buoyancy-driven convection with respect to the flow patterns as well as the stability. The Coriolis force causes two very different flow states (I and II), depending on whether the rotation sense of the flow is in the same or in the opposite direction to that of the centrifuge. Type I is very similar to that normally observed on earth. Type II is only observed on the centrifuge and has a very large stability range of steady convection which can be used to grow striation-free crystals. All results give excellent agreement between model experiments and numerical calculations, which finally leads to a fully satisfying explanation of the crystal growth results on our centrifuge.

  8. Changing theory, changing role of Coriolis effect - The East-West asymmetry of the Wadati-Benioff seismic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalera, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    It is a long history the tale of the recognized asymmetries of the Earth. In 1600 William Gilbert (1544-1603) published De Magnete in which the North and South geomagnetic pole are described. In 1620 Francis Bacon (1561-1628) in the XXVIIth aphorism of the Novum Organum (second part) describes the southern tips of the continents, and many other asymmetries were later described. In 1975 Samuel Warren Carey (1911-2002) stated: Neither north and south, nor east and west are tectonically equivalent. A non exhaustive list of asymmetries of the Earth is: The magnetic polarity; The land-hemisphere and the water-hemisphere; Southern tips of the continents; Larger extension of expanding mid-oceanic ridges on the southern hemisphere; South-eastward trend of younger ages in the long Pacific seafloor volcanic chains; A larger width of the seafloor isochrones bands on the Nazca region; A pear-shaped Earth; etc. It is a few decades that the different slopes of the Wadati-Benioff zones oriented towards the east and west has been enclosed in the list. Under the Americas they have angles of about 30 degrees, while under the Pacific east coasts (Asia, Japan) the angles are steeper (Luyendyk, 1970; Isacks & Barazangi, 1977; and many others). The cause of this difference has been identified in the tidal drag that would cause a global shift of the lithosphere towards west - the so called westward drift (Bostrom, 1971; Stevenson & Turner, 1977; among others). This solution has been many times criticized on the basis of the irrelevance of the tidal forces with respect to viscous friction (Jordan, 1974; Ranalli, 2000; Caputo & Caputo, 2012). Moreover, a simplistic evaluation of the regime of the convective motion in the mantle and of the order of magnitude of the involved forces (viscous, buoyancy, inertial) hastily judges as negligible the role of the Coriolis effect in producing the observed slope differences of the Wadati-Benioff regions. Instead, it is possible to show that changing

  9. Motor adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations of reaching movements: endpoint but not trajectory adaptation transfers to the nonexposed arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dizio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. Reaching movements made in a rotating room generate Coriolis forces that are directly proportional to the cross product of the room's angular velocity and the arm's linear velocity. Such Coriolis forces are inertial forces not involving mechanical contact with the arm. 2. We measured the trajectories of arm movements made in darkness to a visual target that was extinguished at the onset of each reach. Prerotation subjects pointed with both the right and left arms in alternating sets of eight movements. During rotation at 10 rpm, the subjects reached only with the right arm. Postrotation, the subjects pointed with the left and right arms, starting with the left, in alternating sets of eight movements. 3. The initial perrotary reaching movements of the right arm were highly deviated both in movement path and endpoint relative to the prerotation reaches of the right arm. With additional movements, subjects rapidly regained straight movement paths and accurate endpoints despite the absence of visual or tactile feedback about reaching accuracy. The initial postrotation reaches of the left arm followed straight paths to the wrong endpoint. The initial postrotation reaches of the right arm had paths with mirror image curvature to the initial perrotation reaches of the right arm but went to the correct endpoint. 4. These observations are inconsistent with current equilibrium point models of movement control. Such theories predict accurate reaches under our experimental conditions. Our observations further show independent implementation of movement and posture, as evidenced by transfer of endpoint adaptation to the nonexposed arm without transfer of path adaptation. Endpoint control may occur at a relatively central stage that represents general constraints such as gravitoinertial force background or egocentric direction relative to both arms, and control of path may occur at a more peripheral stage that represents moments of inertia and muscle dynamics unique to each

  10. The triaxiality and Coriolis effects on the fission barrier in isovolumic nuclei with mass number A = 256 based on multidimensional total Routhian surface calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Qing-Zhen; Zhao, Wei-Juan; Wang, Hua-Lei; Liu, Min-Liang; Xu, Fu-Rong

    2018-05-01

    The triaxiality and Coriolis effects on the first fission barrier in even-even nuclei with A=256 have been studied in terms of the approach of multidimensional total Routhian surface calculations. The present results are compared with available data and other theories, showing a good agreement. Based on the deformation energy or Routhian curves, the first fission barriers are analyzed, focusing on their shapes, heights, and evolution with rotation. It is found that, relative to the effect on the ground-state minimum, the saddle point, at least the first one, can be strongly affected by the triaxial deformation degree of freedom and Coriolis force. The evolution trends of the macroscopic and microscopic (shell and pairing) contributions as well as the triaxial fission barriers are briefly discussed.

  11. Effects of eddy viscosity and thermal conduction and Coriolis force in the dynamics of gravity wave driven fluctuations in the OH nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, M. P.

    1988-01-01

    The chemical-dynamical model of Walterscheid et al. (1987), which describes wave-driven fluctuations in OH nightglow, was modified to include the effects of both eddy thermal conduction and viscosity, as well as the Coriolis force (with the shallow atmosphere approximation). Using the new model, calculations were performed for the same nominal case as used by Walterscheid et al. but with only wave periods considered. For this case, the Coriolis force was found to be unimportant at any wave period. For wave periods greater than 2 or 3 hours, the inclusion of thermal conduction alone greatly modified the results (in terms of a complex ratio 'eta' which expresses the relationship between the intensity oscillation about the time-averaged intensity and the temperature oscillation about the time-averaged temperature); this effect was reduced with the further inclusion of the eddy viscosity.

  12. Body-force-driven multiplicity and stability of combined free and forced convection in rotating curved ducts: Coriolis force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Wang, L.

    A numerical study is made on the fully developed bifurcation structure and stability of forced convection in a rotating curved duct of square cross-section. Solution structure is determined as variation of a parameter that indicates the effect of rotation (Coriolis-force-driven multiplicity). Three solutions for the flows in a stationary curved duct obtained in the work of Yang and Wang [1] are used as initial solutions of continuation calculations to unfold the solution branches. Twenty-one solution branches are found comparing with five obtained by Selmi and Nandakumar [2]. Dynamic responses of the multiple solutions to finite random disturbances are examined by the direct transient computation. Results show that characteristics of physically realizable fully developed flows changes significantly with variation of effect of rotation. Fourteen sub-ranges are identified according to characteristics of physically realizable solutions. As rotation effect changes, possible physically realizable fully-developed flows can be stable steady 2-cell state, stable multi-cell state, temporal periodic oscillation between symmetric/asymmetric 2-cell/4-cell flows, temporal oscillation with intermittency, temporal chaotic oscillation and temporal oscillation with pseudo intermittency. Among these possible physically realizable fully developed flows, stable multi-cell state and stable steady 2-cell state exist as dual stable. And oscillation with pseudo intermittency is a new phenomenon. In addition to the temporal oscillation with intermittency, sudden shift from stationary stable solution to temporal chaotic oscillation is identified to be another way of onset of chaos.

  13. Input variable selection for data-driven models of Coriolis flowmeters for two-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijuan; Yan, Yong; Wang, Xue; Wang, Tao

    2017-03-01

    Input variable selection is an essential step in the development of data-driven models for environmental, biological and industrial applications. Through input variable selection to eliminate the irrelevant or redundant variables, a suitable subset of variables is identified as the input of a model. Meanwhile, through input variable selection the complexity of the model structure is simplified and the computational efficiency is improved. This paper describes the procedures of the input variable selection for the data-driven models for the measurement of liquid mass flowrate and gas volume fraction under two-phase flow conditions using Coriolis flowmeters. Three advanced input variable selection methods, including partial mutual information (PMI), genetic algorithm-artificial neural network (GA-ANN) and tree-based iterative input selection (IIS) are applied in this study. Typical data-driven models incorporating support vector machine (SVM) are established individually based on the input candidates resulting from the selection methods. The validity of the selection outcomes is assessed through an output performance comparison of the SVM based data-driven models and sensitivity analysis. The validation and analysis results suggest that the input variables selected from the PMI algorithm provide more effective information for the models to measure liquid mass flowrate while the IIS algorithm provides a fewer but more effective variables for the models to predict gas volume fraction.

  14. The impact of wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing on satellite-derived ocean surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhenli; Xu, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Ocean surface currents estimated from the satellite data consist of two terms: Ekman currents from the wind stress and geostrophic currents from the sea surface height (SSH). But the classical Ekman model does not consider the wave effects. By taking the wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing into account, the impact of waves (primarily the Stokes drift) on ocean surface currents is investigated and the wave-modified currents are formed. The products are validated by comparing with OSCAR currents and Lagrangian drifter velocity. The result shows that our products with the Stokes drift are better adapted to the in situ Lagrangian drifter currents. Especially in the Southern Ocean region (40°S-65°S), 90% (91%) of the zonal (meridional) currents have been improved compared with currents that do not include Stokes drift. The correlation (RMSE) in the Southern Ocean has also increased (decreased) from 0.78 (13) to 0.81 (10.99) for the zonal component and 0.76 (10.87) to 0.79 (10.09) for the meridional component. This finding provides the evidence that waves indeed play an important role in the ocean circulation, and need to be represented in numerical simulations of the global ocean circulation. This article was corrected on 10 FEB 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  15. Motion sickness adaptation to Coriolis-inducing head movements in a sustained G flight simulator.

    PubMed

    Newman, Michael C; McCarthy, Geoffrey W; Glaser, Scott T; Bonato, Frederick; Bubka, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    Technological advances have allowed centrifuges to become more than physiological testing and training devices; sustained G, fully interactive flight simulation is now possible. However, head movements under G can result in vestibular stimulation that can lead to motion sickness (MS) symptoms that are potentially distracting, nauseogenic, and unpleasant. In the current study an MS adaptation protocol was tested for head movements under +Gz. Experienced pilots made 14 predetermined head movements in a sustained G flight simulator (at 3 +Gz) on 5 consecutive days and 17 d after training. Symptoms were measured after each head turn using a subjective 0-10 MS scale. The Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) was also administered before and after each daily training session. After five daily training sessions, normalized mean MS scores were 58% lower than on Day 1. Mean total, nausea, and disorientation SSQ scores were 55%, 52%, and 78% lower, respectively. During retesting 17 d after training, nearly all scores indicated 90-100% retention of training benefits. The reduction of unpleasant effects associated with sustained G flight simulation using an adaptation training protocol may enhance the effectiveness of simulation. Practical use of sustained G simulators is also likely to be interspersed with other types of ground and in-flight training. Hence, it would be undesirable and unpleasant for trainees to lose adaptation benefits after a short gap in centrifuge use. However, current results suggest that training gaps in excess of 2 wk may be permissible with almost no loss of adaptation training benefits.

  16. The "RA" Expeditions: The Archaeological and Anthropological Background. The "RA" Expeditions: The Coriolis Effect. The "RA" Expeditions: The Papyrus Reed. Learning Experiences for Coastal and Oceanic Awareness Studies, Nos. 211, 212, 213. [Project COAST].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Coll. of Education.

    Included are three units related to coastal and oceanic awareness. These are: (1) The "RA" Expeditions: The Archaeological and Anthropological Background; (2) The "RA" Expeditions: The Coriolis Effect; and (3) The "RA" Expeditions: The Papyrus Reed. Each of the three units are designed for students in grades 6-12.…

  17. Plane waves in magneto-thermoelastic anisotropic medium based on (L-S) theory under the effect of Coriolis and centrifugal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesemi, Meshari

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this research is to illustrate the effectiveness of the thermal relaxation time based on the theory of Lord-Shulman (L-S), Coriolis and Centrifugal Forces on the reflection coefficients of plane waves in an anisotropic magneto-thermoelastic medium. Assuming the elastic medium is rotating with stable angular velocity and the imposed magnetic field is parallel to the boundary of the half-space. The basic equations of a transversely isotropic rotating magneto-thermoelastic medium are formulated according to thermoelasticity theory of Lord-Shulman (L-S). Next to that, getting the velocity equation which is illustrated to show existence of three quasi-plane waves propagating in the medium. The amplitude ratios coefficients of these plane waves have been given and then computed numerically and plotted graphically to demonstrate the influences of the rotation on the Zinc material.

  18. Time-dependent wave-packet quantum dynamics study of the Ne + D2(+) (v0 = 0-2, j0 = 0) → NeD(+) + D reaction: including the coriolis coupling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cui-Xia; Zhang, Pei-Yu

    2014-07-10

    The dynamics of the Ne + D2(+) (v0 = 0-2, j0 = 0) → NeD(+) + D reaction has been investigated in detail by using an accurate time-dependent wave-packet method on the ground 1(2)A' potential energy surface. Comparisons between the Coriolis coupling results and the centrifugal-sudden ones reveal that Coriolis coupling effect can influence reaction dynamics of the NeD2(+) system. Integral cross sections have been evaluated for the Ne + D2(+) reaction and its isotopic variant Ne + H2(+), and a considerable intermolecular isotopic effect has been found. Also obvious is the great enhancement of the reactivity due to the reagent vibrational excitation. Besides, a comparison with previous theoretical results is also presented and discussed.

  19. Effect of nonlinear electrostatic forces on the dynamic behaviour of a capacitive ring-based Coriolis Vibrating Gyroscope under severe shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouvion, B.; McWilliam, S.; Popov, A. A.

    2018-06-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic behaviour of capacitive ring-based Coriolis Vibrating Gyroscopes (CVGs) under severe shock conditions. A general analytical model is developed for a multi-supported ring resonator by describing the in-plane ring response as a finite sum of modes of a perfect ring and the electrostatic force as a Taylor series expansion. It is shown that the supports can induce mode coupling and that mode coupling occurs when the shock is severe and the electrostatic forces are nonlinear. The influence of electrostatic nonlinearity is investigated by numerically simulating the governing equations of motion. For the severe shock cases investigated, when the electrode gap reduces by ∼ 60 % , it is found that three ring modes of vibration (1 θ, 2 θ and 3 θ) and a 9th order force expansion are needed to obtain converged results for the global shock behaviour. Numerical results when the 2 θ mode is driven at resonance indicate that electrostatic nonlinearity introduces mode coupling which has potential to reduce sensor performance under operating conditions. Under some circumstances it is also found that severe shocks can cause the vibrating response to jump to another stable state with much lower vibration amplitude. This behaviour is mainly a function of shock amplitude and rigid-body motion damping.

  20. Multiple modes of a-type potassium current regulation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shi-Qing; Li, Wenchao; Sesti, Federico

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channels (Kv) regulate cell excitability by controlling the movement of K+ ions across the membrane in response to changes in the cell voltage. The Kv family, which includes A-type channels, constitute the largest group of K+ channel genes within the superfamily of Na+, Ca2+ and K+ voltage-gated channels. The name "A-type" stems from the typical profile of these currents that results form the opposing effects of fast activation and inactivation. In neuronal cells, A-type currents (I(A)), determine the interval between two consecutive action potentials during repetitive firing. In cardiac muscle, A-type currents (I(to)), control the initial repolarization of the myocardium. Structurally, A-type channels are tetramers of alpha-subunits each containing six putative transmembrane domains including a voltage-sensor. A-type channels can be modulated by means of protein-protein interactions with so-called beta-subunits that control inactivation voltage sensitivity and other properties, and by post-transcriptional modifications such as phosphorylation or oxidation. Recently a new mode of A-type regulation has been discovered in the form of a class of hybrid beta-subunits that posses their own enzymatic activity. Here, we review the biophysical and physiological properties of these multiple modes of A-type channel regulation.

  1. Intramolecular interactions in the polar headgroup of sphingosine: serinol† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Ab initio parameters for serinol conformers within 1000 cm–1, measured transition frequencies, typical a-type transition for conformer aa1, interconversion barriers and possible tunnelling pathways. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cc09423b Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Loru, Donatella; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular interactions in the lipid sphingosine have been elucidated through the investigation of the amino alcohol serinol which mimics its polar headgroup. Intricate networks of intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving the hydroxyl groups and the amino group contribute to the stabilisation of five different conformations observed in the broadband rotational spectrum. PMID:26727395

  2. Pendulum Rides, Rotations and the Coriolis Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Modig, Conny

    2018-01-01

    An amusement park is full of examples that can be made into challenging problems for students, combining mathematical modelling with video analysis, as well as measurements in the rides. Traditional amusement ride related textbook problems include free-fall, circular motion, pendula and energy conservation in roller coasters, where the moving…

  3. On the Coriolis effect in acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wegert, Henry; Reindl, Leonard M; Ruile, Werner; Mayer, Andreas P

    2012-05-01

    Rotation of an elastic medium gives rise to a shift of frequency of its acoustic modes, i.e., the time-period vibrations that exist in it. This frequency shift is investigated by applying perturbation theory in the regime of small ratios of the rotation velocity and the frequency of the acoustic mode. In an expansion of the relative frequency shift in powers of this ratio, upper bounds are derived for the first-order and the second-order terms. The derivation of the theoretical upper bounds of the first-order term is presented for linear vibration modes as well as for stable nonlinear vibrations with periodic time dependence that can be represented by a Fourier series.

  4. Modulation of A-type potassium channels by a family of calcium sensors.

    PubMed

    An, W F; Bowlby, M R; Betty, M; Cao, J; Ling, H P; Mendoza, G; Hinson, J W; Mattsson, K I; Strassle, B W; Trimmer, J S; Rhodes, K J

    2000-02-03

    In the brain and heart, rapidly inactivating (A-type) voltage-gated potassium (Kv) currents operate at subthreshold membrane potentials to control the excitability of neurons and cardiac myocytes. Although pore-forming alpha-subunits of the Kv4, or Shal-related, channel family form A-type currents in heterologous cells, these differ significantly from native A-type currents. Here we describe three Kv channel-interacting proteins (KChIPs) that bind to the cytoplasmic amino termini of Kv4 alpha-subunits. We find that expression of KChIP and Kv4 together reconstitutes several features of native A-type currents by modulating the density, inactivation kinetics and rate of recovery from inactivation of Kv4 channels in heterologous cells. All three KChIPs co-localize and co-immunoprecipitate with brain Kv4 alpha-subunits, and are thus integral components of native Kv4 channel complexes. The KChIPs have four EF-hand-like domains and bind calcium ions. As the activity and density of neuronal A-type currents tightly control responses to excitatory synaptic inputs, these KChIPs may regulate A-type currents, and hence neuronal excitability, in response to changes in intracellular calcium.

  5. A-type potassium currents in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Amberg, Gregory C; Koh, Sang Don; Imaizumi, Yuji; Ohya, Susumu; Sanders, Kenton M

    2003-03-01

    A-type currents are voltage-gated, calcium-independent potassium (Kv) currents that undergo rapid activation and inactivation. Commonly associated with neuronal and cardiac cell-types, A-type currents have also been identified and characterized in vascular, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells. This review examines the molecular identity, biophysical properties, pharmacology, regulation, and physiological function of smooth muscle A-type currents. In general, this review is intended to facilitate the comparison of A-type currents present in different smooth muscles by providing a comprehensive report of the literature to date. This approach should also aid in the identification of areas of research requiring further attention.

  6. FEATURE A, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, SOUTH SIDE, REST MOSTLY COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE A, TYPE 1 PILLBOX, SOUTH SIDE, REST MOSTLY COVERED BY VEGETATION AND SAND, VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Shore Pillbox Complex-Type 1 Pillbox, Along shoreline, seaward of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Studying the evolution of a type III radio from the Sun up to 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried; Breitling, Frank; Vocks, Christian; Fallows, Richard; Melnik, Valentin; Konovalenko, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    On March 16, 2016, a type III burst was observed with the ground-based radio telescopes LOFAR and URAN-2 as well as with the radiospectrometer aboard the spacecraft WIND.It started at 80 MHz at 06:37 UT and reached 50 kHz after 23 minutes. A type III burst are considered as the radio signature of an electron beam travelling from the corona into the interplanetary space. The energetic electrons carrying the beam excites Langmuir waves, which convert into radio waves by wave-particle interaction. The relationship between the drift rate and the frequency as derived from the dynamic radio spectra reveals that the velocity of the electrons generating the radio waves of the type III burst is increasing with increasing distance from the center of the Sun.

  8. Unraveling torsional bath interactions with the CO stretching state in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John C.; Daly, Adam M.; Lees, Ronald M.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum mechanical models describing the effects of a C3 internal rotor have been successful in modeling all the torsional manifolds of isolated vibrational states. However, modeling the coupling between nearly degenerate small amplitude vibrations in the C3 internal rotation case remains far from satisfactory and a variety of practical and fundamental questions persist on basis sets, the relative importance of effects and how the problem should be approached. The ν8 C-O stretching state of methanol has been well studied with infrared techniques and has the potential to serve as an experimental reference data set for the development of models for the coupled large and small amplitude motion case. A combined infrared-microwave study of the lowest K A-states of vt = 3, vt = 4 and ν8 has been performed to understand the nature of the interactions between ν8 the excited torsional states. The interaction between vt = 4 and ν8 at K = 0+ has been confirmed to be Fermi type with magnitude of 2.5 cm-1. Additionally, the fundamental a-symmetry and b-symmetry Coriolis interactions between vt = 3 and ν8 have been estimated to be 8900 MHz and -360 MHz, respectively. The magnitude of these interactions suggests that modeling the ν8 state, the vt = 3 state, and the vt = 4 states will have to carefully account for these interactions.

  9. Deregulation of focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal tension due to loss of A-type lamins.

    PubMed

    Corne, Tobias D J; Sieprath, Tom; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Mohammed, Danahe; Te Lindert, Mariska; Gevaert, Kris; Gabriele, Sylvain; Wolf, Katarina; De Vos, Winnok H

    2017-09-03

    The nuclear lamina mechanically integrates the nucleus with the cytoskeleton and extracellular environment and regulates gene expression. These functions are exerted through direct and indirect interactions with the lamina's major constituent proteins, the A-type lamins, which are encoded by the LMNA gene. Using quantitative stable isotope labeling-based shotgun proteomics we have analyzed the proteome of human dermal fibroblasts in which we have depleted A-type lamins by means of a sustained siRNA-mediated LMNA knockdown. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the largest fraction of differentially produced proteins was involved in actin cytoskeleton organization, in particular proteins involved in focal adhesion dynamics, such as actin-related protein 2 and 3 (ACTR2/3), subunits of the ARP2/3 complex, and fascin actin-bundling protein 1 (FSCN1). Functional validation using quantitative immunofluorescence showed a significant reduction in the size of focal adhesion points in A-type lamin depleted cells, which correlated with a reduction in early cell adhesion capacity and an increased cell motility. At the same time, loss of A-type lamins led to more pronounced stress fibers and higher traction forces. This phenotype could not be mimicked or reversed by experimental modulation of the STAT3-IL6 pathway, but it was partly recapitulated by chemical inhibition of the ARP2/3 complex. Thus, our data suggest that the loss of A-type lamins perturbs the balance between focal adhesions and cytoskeletal tension. This imbalance may contribute to mechanosensing defects observed in certain laminopathies.

  10. Test report dot7A type A liquid packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E. T.; Brandjes, C.; Benoit, T. J.

    2017-09-19

    This section presents a general description of the DOT Specification 7A Type A liquid content packaging (HVYTAL), the liquid content evaluated as its payload, acceptable payload shipping configurations and features special to its use. This test report documents compliance with the regulatory safety requirements of 49 CFR Parts 173.24, 173.24a, 173.27, 173.410, 173.412, 173.461 – 173.466 and 178.350.

  11. A-Type Lamins Maintain the Positional Stability of DNA Damage Repair Foci in Mammalian Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Mahen, Robert; Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Lee, Miyoung; Sharma, Pooja; Jeyasekharan, Anand D.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2013-01-01

    A-type lamins encoded by LMNA form a structural fibrillar meshwork within the mammalian nucleus. How this nuclear organization may influence the execution of biological processes involving DNA transactions remains unclear. Here, we characterize changes in the dynamics and biochemical interactions of lamin A/C after DNA damage. We find that DNA breakage reduces the mobility of nucleoplasmic GFP-lamin A throughout the nucleus as measured by dynamic fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy in living cells, suggestive of incorporation into stable macromolecular complexes, but does not induce the focal accumulation of GFP-lamin A at damage sites. Using a proximity ligation assay and biochemical analyses, we show that lamin A engages chromatin via histone H2AX and its phosphorylated form (γH2AX) induced by DNA damage, and that these interactions are enhanced after DNA damage. Finally, we use three-dimensional time-lapse imaging to show that LMNA inactivation significantly reduces the positional stability of DNA repair foci in living cells. This defect is partially rescued by the stable expression of GFP-lamin A. Thus collectively, our findings suggest that the dynamic structural meshwork formed by A-type lamins anchors sites of DNA repair in mammalian nuclei, providing fresh insight into the control of DNA transactions by nuclear structural organization. PMID:23658700

  12. Dendritic A-type potassium channel subunit expression in CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Menegola, M; Misonou, H; Vacher, H; Trimmer, J S

    2008-06-26

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are important and diverse determinants of neuronal excitability and exhibit specific expression patterns throughout the brain. Among Kv channels, Kv4 channels are major determinants of somatodendritic A-type current and are essential in controlling the amplitude of backpropagating action potentials (BAPs) into neuronal dendrites. BAPs have been well studied in a variety of neurons, and have been recently described in hippocampal and cortical interneurons, a heterogeneous population of GABAergic inhibitory cells that regulate activity of principal cells and neuronal networks. We used well-characterized mouse monoclonal antibodies against the Kv4.3 and potassium channel interacting protein (KChIP) 1 subunits of A-type Kv channels, and antibodies against different interneuron markers in single- and double-label immunohistochemistry experiments to analyze the expression patterns of Kv4.3 and KChIP1 in hippocampal Ammon's horn (CA1) neurons. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 40 mum rat brain sections using nickel-enhanced diaminobenzidine staining or multiple-label immunofluorescence. Our results show that Kv4.3 and KChIP1 component subunits of A-type channels are co-localized in the soma and dendrites of a large number of GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. These subunits co-localize extensively but not completely with markers defining the four major interneuron subpopulations tested (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and somatostatin). These results suggest that CA1 hippocampal interneurons can be divided in two groups according to the expression of Kv4.3/KChIP1 channel subunits. Antibodies against Kv4.3 and KChIP1 represent an important new tool for identifying a subpopulation of hippocampal interneurons with a unique dendritic A-type channel complement and ability to control BAPs.

  13. Interactive numerals

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although Arabic numerals (like ‘2016’ and ‘3.14’) are ubiquitous, we show that in interactive computer applications they are often misleading and surprisingly unreliable. We introduce interactive numerals as a new concept and show, like Roman numerals and Arabic numerals, interactive numerals introduce another way of using and thinking about numbers. Properly understanding interactive numerals is essential for all computer applications that involve numerical data entered by users, including finance, medicine, aviation and science. PMID:28484609

  14. Prospective Out-of-ecliptic White-light Imaging of Interplanetary Corotating Interaction Regions at Solar Maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ming; Yang, Liping; Liu, Ying D.

    Interplanetary corotating interaction regions (CIRs) can be remotely imaged in white light (WL), as demonstrated by the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) on board the Coriolis spacecraft and Heliospheric Imagers (HIs) on board the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory ( STEREO ) spacecraft. The interplanetary WL intensity, due to Thomson scattering of incident sunlight by free electrons, is jointly determined by the 3D distribution of electron number density and line-of-sight (LOS) weighting factors of the Thomson-scattering geometry. The 2D radiance patterns of CIRs in WL sky maps look very different from different 3D viewpoints. Because of the in-ecliptic locations ofmore » both the STEREO and Coriolis spacecraft, the longitudinal dimension of interplanetary CIRs has, up to now, always been integrated in WL imagery. To synthesize the WL radiance patterns of CIRs from an out-of-ecliptic (OOE) vantage point, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of the 3D inner heliosphere during Carrington Rotation CR1967 at solar maximum. The mixing effects associated with viewing 3D CIRs are significantly minimized from an OOE viewpoint. Our forward modeling results demonstrate that OOE WL imaging from a latitude greater than 60° can (1) enable the garden-hose spiral morphology of CIRs to be readily resolved, (2) enable multiple coexisting CIRs to be differentiated, and (3) enable the continuous tracing of any interplanetary CIR back toward its coronal source. In particular, an OOE view in WL can reveal where nascent CIRs are formed in the extended corona and how these CIRs develop in interplanetary space. Therefore, a panoramic view from a suite of wide-field WL imagers in a solar polar orbit would be invaluable in unambiguously resolving the large-scale longitudinal structure of CIRs in the 3D inner heliosphere.« less

  15. Prospective Out-of-ecliptic White-light Imaging of Interplanetary Corotating Interaction Regions at Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ming; Davies, Jackie A.; Li, Bo; Yang, Liping; Liu, Ying D.; Xia, Lidong; Harrison, Richard A.; Keiji, Hayashi; Li, Huichao

    2017-07-01

    Interplanetary corotating interaction regions (CIRs) can be remotely imaged in white light (WL), as demonstrated by the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) on board the Coriolis spacecraft and Heliospheric Imagers (HIs) on board the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. The interplanetary WL intensity, due to Thomson scattering of incident sunlight by free electrons, is jointly determined by the 3D distribution of electron number density and line-of-sight (LOS) weighting factors of the Thomson-scattering geometry. The 2D radiance patterns of CIRs in WL sky maps look very different from different 3D viewpoints. Because of the in-ecliptic locations of both the STEREO and Coriolis spacecraft, the longitudinal dimension of interplanetary CIRs has, up to now, always been integrated in WL imagery. To synthesize the WL radiance patterns of CIRs from an out-of-ecliptic (OOE) vantage point, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of the 3D inner heliosphere during Carrington Rotation CR1967 at solar maximum. The mixing effects associated with viewing 3D CIRs are significantly minimized from an OOE viewpoint. Our forward modeling results demonstrate that OOE WL imaging from a latitude greater than 60° can (1) enable the garden-hose spiral morphology of CIRs to be readily resolved, (2) enable multiple coexisting CIRs to be differentiated, and (3) enable the continuous tracing of any interplanetary CIR back toward its coronal source. In particular, an OOE view in WL can reveal where nascent CIRs are formed in the extended corona and how these CIRs develop in interplanetary space. Therefore, a panoramic view from a suite of wide-field WL imagers in a solar polar orbit would be invaluable in unambiguously resolving the large-scale longitudinal structure of CIRs in the 3D inner heliosphere.

  16. The VLT Measures the Shape of a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-08-01

    First Polarimetric Detection of Explosion Asymmetry has Cosmological Implications Summary An international team of astronomers [2] has performed new and very detailed observations of a supernova in a distant galaxy with the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). They show for the first time that a particular type of supernova, caused by the explosion of a "white dwarf", a dense star with a mass around that of the Sun, is asymmetric during the initial phases of expansion . The significance of this observation is much larger than may seem at a first glance . This particular kind of supernova, designated "Type Ia", plays a very important role in the current attempts to map the Universe. It has for long been assumed that Type Ia supernovae all have the same intrinsic brightness , earning them a nickname as "standard candles". If so, differences in the observed brightness between individual supernovae of this type simply reflect their different distances. This, and the fact that the peak brightness of these supernovae rivals that of their parent galaxy, has allowed to measure distances of even very remote galaxies . Some apparent discrepancies that were recently found have led to the discovery of cosmic acceleration . However, this first clearcut observation of explosion asymmetry in a Type Ia supernova means that the exact brightness of such an object will depend on the angle from which it is seen. Since this angle is unknown for any particular supernova, this obviously introduces an amount of uncertainty into this kind of basic distance measurements in the Universe which must be taken into account in the future. Fortunately, the VLT data also show that if you wait a little - which in observational terms makes it possible to look deeper into the expanding fireball - then it becomes more spherical. Distance determinations of supernovae that are performed at this later stage will therefore be more accurate. PR Photo 24a/03 : Spiral galaxy NGC

  17. Modulatory mechanisms and multiple functions of somatodendritic A-type K+ channel auxiliary subunits

    PubMed Central

    Jerng, Henry H.; Pfaffinger, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Auxiliary subunits are non-conducting, modulatory components of the multi-protein ion channel complexes that underlie normal neuronal signaling. They interact with the pore-forming α-subunits to modulate surface distribution, ion conductance, and channel gating properties. For the somatodendritic subthreshold A-type potassium (ISA) channel based on Kv4 α-subunits, two types of auxiliary subunits have been extensively studied: Kv channel-interacting proteins (KChIPs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-like proteins (DPLPs). KChIPs are cytoplasmic calcium-binding proteins that interact with intracellular portions of the Kv4 subunits, whereas DPLPs are type II transmembrane proteins that associate with the Kv4 channel core. Both KChIPs and DPLPs genes contain multiple start sites that are used by various neuronal populations to drive the differential expression of functionally distinct N-terminal variants. In turn, these N-terminal variants generate tremendous functional diversity across the nervous system. Here, we focus our review on (1) the molecular mechanism underlying the unique properties of different N-terminal variants, (2) the shaping of native ISA properties by the concerted actions of KChIPs and DPLP variants, and (3) the surprising ways that KChIPs and DPLPs coordinate the activity of multiple channels to fine-tune neuronal excitability. Unlocking the unique contributions of different auxiliary subunit N-terminal variants may provide an important opportunity to develop novel targeted therapeutics to treat numerous neurological disorders. PMID:24723849

  18. Modulatory mechanisms and multiple functions of somatodendritic A-type K (+) channel auxiliary subunits.

    PubMed

    Jerng, Henry H; Pfaffinger, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Auxiliary subunits are non-conducting, modulatory components of the multi-protein ion channel complexes that underlie normal neuronal signaling. They interact with the pore-forming α-subunits to modulate surface distribution, ion conductance, and channel gating properties. For the somatodendritic subthreshold A-type potassium (ISA) channel based on Kv4 α-subunits, two types of auxiliary subunits have been extensively studied: Kv channel-interacting proteins (KChIPs) and dipeptidyl peptidase-like proteins (DPLPs). KChIPs are cytoplasmic calcium-binding proteins that interact with intracellular portions of the Kv4 subunits, whereas DPLPs are type II transmembrane proteins that associate with the Kv4 channel core. Both KChIPs and DPLPs genes contain multiple start sites that are used by various neuronal populations to drive the differential expression of functionally distinct N-terminal variants. In turn, these N-terminal variants generate tremendous functional diversity across the nervous system. Here, we focus our review on (1) the molecular mechanism underlying the unique properties of different N-terminal variants, (2) the shaping of native ISA properties by the concerted actions of KChIPs and DPLP variants, and (3) the surprising ways that KChIPs and DPLPs coordinate the activity of multiple channels to fine-tune neuronal excitability. Unlocking the unique contributions of different auxiliary subunit N-terminal variants may provide an important opportunity to develop novel targeted therapeutics to treat numerous neurological disorders.

  19. Interacting faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Nixon, C. W.; Rotevatn, A.; Sanderson, D. J.; Zuluaga, L. F.

    2017-04-01

    The way that faults interact with each other controls fault geometries, displacements and strains. Faults rarely occur individually but as sets or networks, with the arrangement of these faults producing a variety of different fault interactions. Fault interactions are characterised in terms of the following: 1) Geometry - the spatial arrangement of the faults. Interacting faults may or may not be geometrically linked (i.e. physically connected), when fault planes share an intersection line. 2) Kinematics - the displacement distributions of the interacting faults and whether the displacement directions are parallel, perpendicular or oblique to the intersection line. Interacting faults may or may not be kinematically linked, where the displacements, stresses and strains of one fault influences those of the other. 3) Displacement and strain in the interaction zone - whether the faults have the same or opposite displacement directions, and if extension or contraction dominates in the acute bisector between the faults. 4) Chronology - the relative ages of the faults. This characterisation scheme is used to suggest a classification for interacting faults. Different types of interaction are illustrated using metre-scale faults from the Mesozoic rocks of Somerset and examples from the literature.

  20. Imagined Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeycutt, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Social scientists have been studying imagined interactions since the mid-1980s and have measured numerous physiological correlates (Honeycutt, 2010). In this commentary I assess the research reported in Crisp and Turner (May-June 2009) and highlight the underlying mechanisms of imagined interactions that have empirically been laid out across…

  1. Pseudomonas stutzeri N2O reductase contains CuA-type sites.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, R A; Zumft, W G; Coyle, C L; Dooley, D M

    1989-01-01

    N2O reductase (N2O----N2) is the terminal enzyme in the energy-conserving denitrification pathway of soil and marine denitrifying bacteria. The protein is composed of two identical subunits and contains eight copper ions per enzyme molecule. The magnetic circular dichroism spectrum of resting (oxidized) N2O reductase is strikingly similar to the magnetic circular dichroism spectrum of the CuA site in mammalian cytochrome c oxidase [Greenwood, C., Hull, B. C., Barber, D., Eglinton, D. G. & Thomson, A. J. (1983) Biochem. J. 215, 303-316] and is unlike the magnetic circular dichroism spectra of all other biological copper chromophores obtained to date. Sulfur (or chlorine) scatterers are required to fit the copper extended x-ray absorption fine structure data of both the oxidized and reduced forms of N2O reductase. Satisfactory fits require a Cu-N or Cu-O [denoted Cu-(N, O)] interaction at 2.0 A, a Cu-(S, Cl) interaction at 2.3 A and an additional Cu(S, Cl) interaction at approximately 2.6 A (oxidized) or approximately 2.7 A (reduced). Approximately eight sulfur ions (per eight copper ions) at approximately 2.3 A are required to fit the extended x-ray absorption fine structure data for both the oxidized and reduced N2O reductase. The 2.3-A Cu-(S, Cl) distance is nearly identical to that previously determined for the CuA site in cytochrome c oxidase. A 2.6-2.7 A Cu-(S, Cl) interaction is also present in resting and fully reduced cytochrome c oxidase. Comparison of the N2O reductase sequence, determined by translating the structural NosZ gene, with cytochrome c oxidase subunit II sequences from several sources indicates that a Gly-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Cys-Ser-Xaa-Xaa-Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-His stretch is highly conserved. This sequence contains three of the probable ligands (two cysteines and one histidine) in a CuA-type site. Collectively these data establish that Pseudomonas stutzeri N2O reductase contains CuA-type sites. PMID:2542963

  2. Monothiol glutaredoxins and A-type proteins: partners in Fe-S cluster trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mapolelo, Daphne T; Zhang, Bo; Randeniya, Sajini; Albetel, Angela-Nadia; Li, Haoran; Couturier, Jérémy; Outten, Caryn E; Rouhier, Nicolas; Johnson, Michael K

    2013-03-07

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (Grxs) are proposed to function in Fe-S cluster storage and delivery, based on their ability to exist as apo monomeric forms and dimeric forms containing a subunit-bridging [Fe(2)S(2)](2+) cluster, and to accept [Fe(2)S(2)](2+) clusters from primary scaffold proteins. In addition yeast cytosolic monothiol Grxs interact with Fra2 (Fe repressor of activation-2), to form a heterodimeric complex with a bound [Fe(2)S(2)](2+) cluster that plays a key role in iron sensing and regulation of iron homeostasis. In this work, we report on in vitro UV-visible CD studies of cluster transfer between homodimeric monothiol Grxs and members of the ubiquitous A-type class of Fe-S cluster carrier proteins ((Nif)IscA and SufA). The results reveal rapid, unidirectional, intact and quantitative cluster transfer from the [Fe(2)S(2)](2+) cluster-bound forms of A. thaliana GrxS14, S. cerevisiae Grx3, and A. vinelandii Grx-nif homodimers to A. vinelandii(Nif)IscA and from A. thaliana GrxS14 to A. thaliana SufA1. Coupled with in vivo evidence for interaction between monothiol Grxs and A-type Fe-S cluster carrier proteins, the results indicate that these two classes of proteins work together in cellular Fe-S cluster trafficking. However, cluster transfer is reversed in the presence of Fra2, since the [Fe(2)S(2)](2+) cluster-bound heterodimeric Grx3-Fra2 complex can be formed by intact [Fe(2)S(2)](2+) cluster transfer from (Nif)IscA. The significance of these results for Fe-S cluster biogenesis or repair and the cellular regulation of the Fe-S cluster status are discussed.

  3. Rovibrational Interactions in the Ground and Two Lowest Excited Vibrational States of Methoxy Isocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienkina, A.; Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2017-06-01

    Recent detection of methyl isocyanate (CH_3NCO) in the Orion, towards Sgr B2(N) and on the surface of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko motivated us to study another isocyanate, methoxy isocyanate (CH_3ONCO) as a possible candidate molecule for searches in the interstellar clouds. Neither identification or laboratory rotational spectra of CH_3ONCO has been reported up to now. Methoxy isocyanate was synthesized by the flash vacuum pyrolysis of N-Methoxycarbonyl-O-methyl-hydroxylamine (MeOC(O)NHOMe) at a temperature of 800 K. Experimental spectrum of CH_3ONCO was recorded in situ in the millimeter-wave range (75-105 GHz and 150-330 GHz) using Lille's fast-scan fully solid-state DDS spectrometer. The recorded spectrum is strongly perturbed due to the interaction between the overall rotation and the skeletal torsion. Perturbations affect even rotational transitions with low K_a levels of the ground vibrational state, appearing in shifting frequency predictions and intensities distortions of the lines. The interactions are significant due to the relatively small vibrational energy difference (≈50 \\wn) between the states and different representations of the C_s symmetry point group for the ground (A'), ν_{18}=1 (A'') and ν_{18}=2 (A') vibrational states, thus leading to a "ladder" of multiple resonances by means of a-, and b-type Coriolis coupling. The global fit analysis of the rotational spectrum of methoxy isocyanate using Coriolis coupling terms in the ground and two lowest vibrational states (ν_{18}=1 and ν_{18}=2) will be presented. J. Cernicharo, N. Marcelino, E. Roueff et al. 2012, ApJ, 759, L43 D. T. Halfen, V. V. Ilyushin, & L. M. Ziurys, 2015, ApJ, 812, L5 F. Goesmann, H. Rosenbauer, J. H. Bredehöft et al. 2015, Science, 349.6247, aab0689 This work was funded by the French ANR under the Contract No. ANR-13-BS05-0008-02 IMOLABS.

  4. Nonadiabatic dynamics of O(1D) + N2(X1Σg+) → O(3P) + N2(X1Σg+) on three coupled potential surfaces: symmetry, Coriolis, spin-orbit, and Renner-Teller effects.

    PubMed

    Defazio, Paolo; Gamallo, Pablo; Petrongolo, Carlo

    2012-02-07

    We present the spin-orbit (SO) and Renner-Teller (RT) quantum dynamics of the spin-forbidden quenching O((1)D) + N(2)(X(1)Σ(g)(+)) → O((3)P) + N(2)(X(1)Σ(g)(+)) on the N(2)O X(1)A', ã(3)A", and b(3)A' coupled PESs. We use the permutation-inversion symmetry, propagate coupled-channel (CC) real wavepackets, and compute initial-state-resolved probabilities and cross sections σ(j(0)) for the ground vibrational and the first two rotational states of N(2), j(0) = 0 and 1. Labeling symmetry angular states by j and K, we report selection rules for j and for the minimum K value associated with any electronic state, showing that ã(3)A" is uncoupled in the centrifugal-sudden (CS) approximation at j(0) = 0. The dynamics is resonance-dominated, the probabilities are larger at low K, σ(j(0)) decrease with the collision energy and increase with j(0), and the CS σ(0) is lower than the CC one. The nonadiabatic interactions play different roles on the quenching dynamics, because the X(1)A'-b(3)A' SO effects are those most important while the ã(3)A"-b(3)A' RT ones are negligible.

  5. Interacting parasites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitism is the most popular life-style on Earth, and many vertebrates host more than one kind of parasite at a time. A common assumption is that parasite species rarely interact, because they often exploit different tissues in a host, and this use of discrete resources limits competition (1). On page 243 of this issue, however, Telfer et al. (2) provide a convincing case of a highly interactive parasite community in voles, and show how infection with one parasite can affect susceptibility to others. If some human parasites are equally interactive, our current, disease-by-disease approach to modeling and treating infectious diseases is inadequate (3).

  6. Terminal ileum gangrene secondary to a type IV paraesophageal hernia.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching Tsai; Hsiao, Po Jen; Chiu, Chih Chien; Chan, Jenq Shyong; Lin, Yee Fung; Lo, Yuan Hung; Hsiao, Chia Jen

    2016-02-28

    Type IV paraesophageal hernia (PEH) is very rare, and is characterized by the intrathoracic herniation of the abdominal viscera other than the stomach into the chest. We describe a 78-year-old woman who presented at our emergency department because of epigastric pain that she had experienced over the past 24 h. On the day after admission, her pain became severe and was accompanied by right chest pain and dyspnea. Chest radiography revealed an intrathoracic intestinal gas bubble occupying the right lower lung field. Emergency explorative laparotomy identified a type IV PEH with herniation of only the terminal ileum through a hiatal defect into the right thoracic cavity. In this report, we also present a review of similar cases in the literature published between 1980 and 2015 in PubMed. There were four published cases of small bowel herniation into the thoracic cavity during this period. Our patient represents a rare case of an individual diagnosed with type IV PEH with incarceration of only the terminal ileum.

  7. Test report dot 7A type a liquid packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E. T.; Brandjes, C.; Benoit, T. J.

    This test report documents the performance of Savannah River National Laboratory’s (SRNL’s) U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A; General Packaging, Type A shielded liquid shipping packaging and compliance with the regulatory requirements of Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The primary use of this packaging design is for the transport of radioactive liquids of up to 1.3 liters in an unshielded configuration and up to 113 mL of radioactive liquids in a shielded configuration, with no more than an A2 quantity in either configuration, over public highways and/or commercial aircraft. The contents are liquid radioactive materialsmore » sufficiently shielded and within the activity limits specified in173.435 or 173.433 for A2 (normal form) materials, as well as within the analyzed thermal heat limits. Any contents must be compatibly packaged and must be compatible with the packaging. The basic packaging design is based on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Model 9979 Type A fissile shipping packaging designed and tested by SRNL. The shielded liquid configuration consists of the outer and inner drums of the 9979 package with additional low density polyethylene (LDPE) dunnage nesting a tungsten shielded cask assembly (WSCA) within the 30-gallon inner drum. The packaging model for the DOT Specification 7A, Type A liquids packaging is HVYTAL.« less

  8. Mineralogical characterization of A-type asteroid (1951) Lick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de León, J.; Duffard, R.; Licandro, J.; Lazzaro, D.

    2004-07-01

    We have obtained visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra of asteroid (1951) Lick. According to its spectral characteristics in the visible region, this object has been classified as an A-type asteroid by Bus & Binzel (\\cite{bus2002b}). Here we present a mineralogical analysis of the reflectance spectrum obtained for this object. We compute several parameters that are extracted from the spectrum of the asteroid and that give relevant information about its mineralogical composition, using the method defined by Gaffey et al. (\\cite{gaffey1993}). We also present results obtained through the fit to the absorption band associated to the pressence of olivine using the Modified Gaussian Model (MGM) method developed by Sunshine et al. (\\cite{sunshi1990}). Our results indicate that (1951) Lick is an almost pure olivine. The composition of olivine on the surface of Lick is estimated to be about Fo90±10 (low-iron content). Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, and on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Centro Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Instituto Nazionale di Astrofisica), both telescopes located at the Spanish ``Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos'' of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  9. Hot planetary winds near a star: dynamics, wind-wind interactions, and observational signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll-Nellenback, Jonathan; Frank, Adam; Liu, Baowei; Quillen, Alice C.; Blackman, Eric G.; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Signatures of 'evaporative' winds from exoplanets on short (hot) orbits around their host star have been observed in a number of systems. In this paper, we present global adaptive mesh refinement simulations that track the launching of the winds, their expansion through the circumstellar environment, and their interaction with a stellar wind. We focus on purely hydrodynamic flows including the anisotropy of the wind launching and explore the orbital/fluid dynamics of the resulting flows in detail. In particular, we find that a combination of the tidal and Coriolis forces strongly distorts the planetary 'Parker' wind creating 'up-orbit' and 'down-orbit' streams. We characterize the flows in terms of their orbital elements that change depending on their launch position on the planet. We find that the anisotropy in the atmospheric temperature leads to significant backflow on to the planet. The planetary wind interacts strongly with the stellar wind creating instabilities that may cause eventual deposition of planetary gas on to the star. We present synthetic observations of both transit and absorption line-structure for our simulations. For our initial conditions, we find that the orbiting wind material produces absorption signatures at significant distances from the planet and substantial orbit-to-orbit variability. Lyα absorption shows red- and blueshifted features out to 70 km s-1. Finally, using semi-analytic models we constrain the effect of radiation pressure, given the approximation of uniform stellar absorption.

  10. Development of a Type I gluten-free sourdough.

    PubMed

    Picozzi, C; Mariotti, M; Cappa, C; Tedesco, B; Vigentini, I; Foschino, R; Lucisano, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was the setting up of a gluten-free sourdough from selected lactobacilli and yeasts isolated from a traditional wheat-based Type I sourdough. A gluten-free matrix was inoculated with Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and Candida humilis, fermented to pH 4·0, and constantly propagated for ten times. A stable association between micro-organisms was observed from the second refreshment with mean values of 9·08 ± 0·25 log CFU g(-1) for lactobacilli and 7·81 ± 0·07 log CFU g(-1) for yeasts. In order to have a good workability of the dough, a 230 BU consistency was considered. Rheofermentographic indices remained constant over the ten refreshments, showing an average value of 23·2 mm dough height in about 7·5 h. The CO2 production and retention volumes reached average values of 1430 and 1238 ml respectively. The microbiological and technological data obtained highlighted that a GF sourdough was effectively developed. Type I sourdough has a long tradition as a leavening agent of baked goods as its use results in an improved texture, flavour, taste and extended shelf-life of the final products. In this study a Type I gluten-free sourdough was obtained. After few refreshments in controlled conditions, the sourdough presented a stable association between Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and Candida humilis, constant fermentation times and technological properties (in terms of dough consistency, dough maximum height, CO2 production and retention). The results showed that the gluten-free sourdough developed in this study can improve the overall quality of gluten-free baked products. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. EVIDENCE FOR GRANULATION IN EARLY A-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinger, Thomas; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2010-03-01

    Stars with spectral types earlier than about F0 on (or close) to the main sequence have long been believed to lack observable surface convection, although evolutionary models of A-type stars do predict very thin surface convective zones. We present evidence for granulation in two {delta} Scuti stars of spectral type A2: HD 174936 and HD 50844. Recent analyses of space-based CoRoT data revealed up to some 1000 frequencies in the photometry of these stars. The frequencies were interpreted as individual pulsation modes. If true, there must be large numbers of nonradial modes of very high degree l which should suffermore » cancellation effects in disk-integrated photometry (even of high space-based precision). The p-mode interpretation of all the frequencies in HD 174936 and HD 50844 depends on the assumption of white (frequency-independent) noise. Our independent analyses of the data provide an alternative explanation: most of the peaks in the Fourier spectra are the signature of non-white granulation background noise, and less than about 100 of the frequencies are actual stellar p-modes in each star. We find granulation timescales which are consistent with scaling relations that describe cooler stars with known surface convection. If the granulation interpretation is correct, the hundreds of low-amplitude Fourier peaks reported in recent studies are falsely interpreted as independent pulsation modes and a significantly lower number of frequencies are associated with pulsation, consistent with only modes of low degree.« less

  12. A-type granite and the Red Sea opening

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, R.G.; DeBari, S.; Peterman, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Miocene-Oligocene A-type granite intrudes the eastern side of the Red Sea margin within the zone of extension from Jiddah, Saudi Arabia south to Yemen. The intrusions developed in the early stages of continental extension as Arabia began to move slowly away from Africa (around 30-20 Ma). Within the narrow zone of extension silicic magmas formed dikes, sills, small plutons and extrusive equivalents. In the Jabal Tirf area of Saudi Arabia these rocks occur in an elongate zone consisting of late Precambrian basement to the east, which is gradually invaded by mafic dikes. The number of dikes increases westward until an igneous complex is produced parallel to the present Red Sea axis. The Jabal Tirf igneous complex consists of diabase and rhyolite-granophyre sills (20-24 Ma). Although these are intrusine intrusive rocks their textures indicate shallow depths of intrusion (< 1 km). To the south, in the Yemen, contemporaneous with alkali basaltic eruptions (26-30 Ma) and later silicic eruptions, small plutons, dikes, and stocks of alkali granite invaded thick (1500 m) volcanic series, at various levels and times. Erosion within the uplifted margin of Yemen suggests that the maximum depth of intrusion was less than 1-2 km. Granophyric intrusions (20-30 Ma) within mafic dike swarms similar to the Jabal Tirf complex are present along the western edge of the Yemen volcanic plateau, marking a north-south zone of continental extension. The alkali granites of Yemen consist primarily of perthitic feldspar and quartz with some minor alkali amphiboles and acmite. These granites represent water-poor, hypersolvus magmas generated from parent alkali basalt magmas. The granophyric, two-feldspar granites associated with the mafic dike swarms and layered gabbros formed by fractional crystallization from tholeiitic basalt parent developed in the early stages of extension. Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of these rocks and their bulk chemistry indicate that production of peralkaline and

  13. Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.

    1957-06-01

    Experimental results on the non-conservation of parity and charge conservation in weak interactions are reviewed. The two-component theory of the neutrino is discussed. Lepton reactions are examined under the assumption of the law of conservation of leptons and that the neutrino is described by a two- component theory. From the results of this examination, the universal Fermi interactions are analyzed. Although reactions involving the neutrino can be described, the same is not true of reactions which do not involve the lepton, as the discussion of the decay of K mesons and hyperons shows. The question of the invariance of time reversal is next examined. (J.S.R.)

  14. Interactive Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jean K.

    1997-01-01

    Presents guiding principles for developing interactive lessons for the World Wide Web. Describes "Amazing Space: Education Online from the Hubble Space Telescope", a program where students study spectacular Hubble Space Telescope images of stars and star-forming regions to learn about the life cycle of stars and the creation of atoms. (JRH)

  15. Interactive Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Carol

    1992-01-01

    A workshop on interactive video was designed for fourth and fifth grade students, with the goals of familiarizing students with laser disc technology, developing a cadre of trained students to train other students and staff, and challenging able learners to utilize higher level thinking skills while conducting a research project. (JDD)

  16. Constructive Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyake, Naomi

    To identify conditions that make a conversational interaction constructive--in the sense that the participants can find the way toward the success of what they wanted to accomplish--two situations were examined. In one, a professional researcher explained her data to a statistician. In the other, three groups of two people cooperated with each…

  17. Interacting Compasses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, Hector G.; Betancourt, Julian

    2009-01-01

    The use of multiple compasses to map and visualize magnetic fields is well-known. The magnetic field exerts a torque on the compasses aligning them along the lines of force. Some science museums show the field of a magnet using a table with many compasses in a closely packed arrangement. However, the very interesting interactions that occur…

  18. A-type Lamins Form Distinct Filamentous Networks with Differential Nuclear Pore Complex Associations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Chojnowski, Alexandre; Boudier, Thomas; Lim, John S Y; Ahmed, Sohail; Ser, Zheng; Stewart, Colin; Burke, Brian

    2016-10-10

    The nuclear lamina is a universal feature of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs) [1]. In mammalian cells, it appears as a 10-30 nm filamentous layer at the nuclear face of the inner nuclear membrane (INM) and is composed primarily of A- and B-type lamins, members of the intermediate filament family [2]. While providing structural integrity to the NE, the lamina also represents an important signaling and regulatory platform [3]. Two A-type lamin isoforms, lamins A and C (LaA and LaC), are expressed in most adult human cells. Encoded by a single gene, these proteins are largely identical, diverging only in their C-terminal tail domains. By contrast with that of LaC, the unique LaA tail undergoes extensive processing, including farnesylation and endo-proteolysis [4, 5]. However, functional differences between LaA and LaC are still unclear. Compounding this uncertainty, the structure of the lamina remains ill defined. In this study, we used BioID, an in vivo proximity-labeling method to identify differential interactors of A-type lamins [6]. One of these, Tpr, a nuclear pore complex (NPC) protein, is highlighted by its selective association with LaC. By employing superresolution microscopy, we demonstrate that this Tpr association is mirrored in enhanced interaction of LaC with NPCs. Further superresolution studies visualizing both endogenous A- and B-type lamins have allowed us to construct a nanometer-scale model of the mammalian nuclear lamina. Our data indicate that different A- and B-type lamin species assemble into separate filament networks that together form an extended composite structure at the nuclear periphery providing attachment sites for NPCs, thereby regulating their distribution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of female steroid hormones on A-type K+ currents in murine colon.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Elizabeth A H; McCloskey, Conor; O'Kane, Neil; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2006-06-01

    Idiopathic constipation is higher in women of reproductive age than postmenopausal women or men, suggesting that female steroid hormones influence gastrointestinal motility. How female hormones affect motility is unclear. Colonic motility is regulated by ion channels in colonic myocytes. Voltage-dependent K(+) channels serve to set the excitability of colonic muscles. We investigated regulation of Kv 4.3 channel expression in response to acute or chronic changes in female hormones. Patch clamp experiments and quantitative PCR were used to compare outward currents and transcript expression in colonic myocytes from male, non-pregnant, pregnant and ovariectomized mice. Groups of ovariectomized mice received injections of oestrogen or progesterone to investigate the effects of hormone replacement. The capacitance of colonic myocytes from non-pregnant females was larger than in males. Net outward current density in male and ovariectomized mice was higher than in non-pregnant females and oestrogen-treated ovariectomized mice. Current densities in late pregnancy were lower than in female controls. Progesterone had no effect on outward currents. A-type currents were decreased in non-pregnant females compared with ovariectomized mice, and were further decreased by pregnancy or oestrogen replacement. Kv 4.3 transcripts did not differ significantly between groups; however, expression of the potassium channel interacting protein KChIP1 was elevated in ovariectomized mice compared with female controls and oestrogen-treated ovariectomized mice. Delayed rectifier currents were not affected by oestrogen. In the mouse colon, oestrogen suppresses A-type currents, which are important for regulating excitability. These observations suggest a possible link between female hormones and altered colonic motility associated with menses, pregnancy and menopause.

  20. Role of NSO compounds during primary cracking of a Type II kerogen and a Type III lignite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behar, F.; Lorant, F.; Lewan, M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to follow the generation of NSO compounds during the artificial maturation of an immature Type II kerogen and a Type III lignite in order to determine the different sources of the petroleum potential during primary cracking. Experiments were carried out in closed system pyrolysis in the temperature range from 225 to 350 ??C. Two types of NSOs were recovered: one is soluble in n-pentane and the second in dichloromethane. A kinetic scheme was optimised including both kerogen and NSO cracking. It was validated by complementary experiments carried out on isolated asphaltenes generated from the Type II kerogen and on the total n-pentane and DCM extracts generated from the Type III lignite. Results show that kerogen and lignite first decompose into DCM NSOs with minor generation of hydrocarbons. Then, the main source of petroleum potential originates from secondary cracking of both DCM and n-pentane NSOs through successive decomposition reactions. These results confirm the model proposed by Tissot [Tissot, B., 1969. Premie??res donne??es sur les me??canismes et la cine??tique de la formation du pe??trole dans les bassins se??dimentaires. Simulation d'un sche??ma re??actionnel sur ordinateur. Oil and Gas Science and Technology 24, 470-501] in which the main source of hydrocarbons is not the insoluble organic matter, but the NSO fraction. As secondary cracking of the NSOs largely overlaps that of the kerogen, it was demonstrated that bulk kinetics in open system is a result of both kerogen and NSO cracking. Thus, another kinetic scheme for primary cracking in open system was built as a combination of kerogen and NSO cracking. This new kinetic scheme accounts for both the rate and amounts of hydrocarbons generated in a closed pyrolysis system. Thus, the concept of successive steps for hydrocarbon generation is valid for the two types of pyrolysis system and, for the first time, a common kinetic scheme is available for extrapolating results to natural

  1. SN 2017dio: A Type-Ic Supernova Exploding in a Hydrogen-rich Circumstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Maeda, Keiichi; Ashall, Christopher J.; Prentice, Simon J.; Mattila, Seppo; Kankare, Erkki; Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter; Pastorello, Andrea; Leloudas, Giorgos; Anderson, Joseph P.; Benetti, Stefano; Bersten, Melina C.; Cappellaro, Enrico; Cartier, Régis; Denneau, Larry; Della Valle, Massimo; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Folatelli, Gastón; Fraser, Morgan; Galbany, Lluís; Gall, Christa; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Hamanowicz, Aleksandra; Heinze, Ari; Inserra, Cosimo; Kangas, Tuomas; Mazzali, Paolo; Melandri, Andrea; Pignata, Giuliano; Rest, Armin; Reynolds, Thomas; Roy, Rupak; Smartt, Stephen J.; Smith, Ken W.; Sollerman, Jesper; Somero, Auni; Stalder, Brian; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Taddia, Francesco; Tomasella, Lina; Tonry, John; Weiland, Henry; Young, David R.

    2018-02-01

    SN 2017dio shows both spectral characteristics of a type-Ic supernova (SN) and signs of a hydrogen-rich circumstellar medium (CSM). Prominent, narrow emission lines of H and He are superposed on the continuum. Subsequent evolution revealed that the SN ejecta are interacting with the CSM. The initial SN Ic identification was confirmed by removing the CSM interaction component from the spectrum and comparing with known SNe Ic and, reversely, adding a CSM interaction component to the spectra of known SNe Ic and comparing them to SN 2017dio. Excellent agreement was obtained with both procedures, reinforcing the SN Ic classification. The light curve constrains the pre-interaction SN Ic peak absolute magnitude to be around {M}g=-17.6 mag. No evidence of significant extinction is found, ruling out a brighter luminosity required by an SN Ia classification. These pieces of evidence support the view that SN 2017dio is an SN Ic, and therefore the first firm case of an SN Ic with signatures of hydrogen-rich CSM in the early spectrum. The CSM is unlikely to have been shaped by steady-state stellar winds. The mass loss of the progenitor star must have been intense, \\dot{M}∼ 0.02{({ε }{{H}α }/0.01)}-1 ({v}{wind}/500 km s‑1) ({v}{shock}/10,000 km s‑1)‑3 M ⊙ yr‑1, peaking at a few decades before the SN. Such a high mass-loss rate might have been experienced by the progenitor through eruptions or binary stripping. Based on observations made with the NOT, operated by the Nordic Optical Telescope Scientific Association at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain, of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. This work is based (in part) on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile as part of PESSTO, (the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey for Transient Objects Survey) ESO program 188.D-3003, 191.D-0935, 197.D-1075. Based on observations made with the Liverpool Telescope operated on the

  2. Interactive Macroeconomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Guilmi, Corrado; Gallegati, Mauro; Landini, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Preface; List of tables; List of figures, 1. Introduction; Part I. Methodological Notes and Tools: 2. The state space notion; 3. The master equation; Part II. Applications to HIA Based Models: 4. Financial fragility and macroeconomic dynamics I: heterogeneity and interaction; 5. Financial fragility and macroeconomic Dynamics II: learning; Part III. Conclusions: 6. Conclusive remarks; Part IV. Appendices and Complements: Appendix A: Complements to Chapter 3; Appendix B: Solving the ME to solve the ABM; Appendix C: Specifying transition rates; Index.

  3. Similarity theory of the buoyantly interactive planetary boundary layer with entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffert, M. I.; Sud, Y. C.

    1976-01-01

    A similarity model is developed for the vertical profiles of turbulent flow variables in an entraining turbulent boundary layer of arbitrary buoyant stability. In the general formulation the vertical profiles, internal rotation of the velocity vector, discontinuities or jumps at a capping inversion and bulk aerodynamic coefficients of the boundary layer are given by solutions to a system of ordinary differential equations in the similarity variable. To close the system, a formulation for buoyantly interactive eddy diffusivity in the boundary layer is introduced which recovers Monin-Obukhov similarity near the surface and incorporates a hypothesis accounting for the observed variation of mixing length throughout the boundary layer. The model is tested in simplified versions which depend only on roughness, surface buoyancy, and Coriolis effects by comparison with planetary-boundary-layer wind- and temperature-profile observations, measurements of flat-plate boundary layers in a thermally stratified wind tunnel and observations of profiles of terms in the turbulent kinetic-energy budget of convective planetary boundary layers. On balance, the simplified model reproduced the trend of these various observations and experiments reasonably well, suggesting that the full similarity formulation be pursued further.

  4. A-type and I-type granitoids and mylonitic granites of Hassan Salaran area of SE Saqqez, Kurdistan, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Fakhraddin Mohammad; Saeed Ahmad, Sheler

    2014-05-01

    The Hassan Salarn area is located 20km to southeast of Saqqez city in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. In this area there are two distinct granitic rock suites consisting A-type and I-type granites and also mylonitic granites. These A-type and I-type granites have various petrological and geochemical characteristics. They also have different origins and petrogenesis. A-type granitoids comprise alkali feldspar granite, syenogranite and quartz alkali feldspar syenite, whereas I-type granitoids are composed of monzogranite, granodiorite and tonalite. Geochemically, A-type granitoids are peralkaline and acmite-normative but I-type granitoids are subalkaline (calc-alkaline), metaluminous and diopside-normative. A-type granitoids are also ferroan alkali and ferroan alkali-calcic whereas I-type granitoids are magnesian and calcic. A-type granitoids resemble to within plate granites and post-orogenic granites whereas I-type granitoids resemble to volcanic arc granites. A-type granitoids contain higher concentrations of alkalies, Zr, Rb, Nb, Y, Th, Ce, high FeO/MgO ratios and lower concentrations of Mg, Ca and Sr, resembling post-orogenic A-type granites. It is possible that heat from a mantle-derived magma which intruded into the lower crust, and/or rapid crustal extension have been essential generation of approriate melts producing A-type granitoids. Thus we can conclude that A-type granitoids were generated from a mixed mantle-crust source. Negative Nb anomalies and low contents of Ti and P probably indicate a subduction-related origin for protolith of I-type granitoids. Negative Nb anomalies and enrichment in Ce relative to its adjacent elements can be related to involvement of continental crust in magmatic processes. I-type granitoids are also enriched in Rb, Ba, K, Th, Ce and depleted in Nb, Zr and Y, indicating that they have had interacted with crust. I-type granitoids may result from contamination of mantle-derived magmas by continental crust during a subduction

  5. On Periodic Water Waves with Coriolis Effects and Isobaric Streamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matioc, Anca-Voichita; Matioc, Bogdan-Vasile

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we prove that solutions of the f-plane approximation for equatorial geophysical deep water waves, which have the property that the pressure is constant along the streamlines and do not possess stagnation points, are Gerstner-type waves. Furthermore, for waves traveling over a flat bed, we prove that there are only laminar flow solutions with these properties.

  6. Vibration-rotation interactions and ring-puckering in 3,3-dimethyl oxetane by microwave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Juan C.; Lesarri, Alberto G.; Villamañán, Rosa M.; Alonso, Josél.

    1990-06-01

    Ring puckering in 3,3-dimethyl oxetane has been investigated using microwave spectroscopy. Microwave spectra of the ground state, the first six ring-puckering excited states, and nine excited states of the methyl groups' deformation vibrations have been observed. The μa electric dipole moment component has been determined as 2.03(3) D from Stark-effect measurements. The vibrational dependence of the rotational constants is consistent with the ring-puckering potential function derived by Duckett et al. ( J. Mol. Spectrosc.69, 159-165 (1978)). Coriolis coupling interactions have been observed and are satisfactorily accounted for with a quartic centrifugal distortion Hamiltonian. The vibrational dependence of the centrifugal distortion constants has been analyzed using the theory developed by Creswell and Mills. In order to reproduce the experimental value of the vibration-rotation interaction parameter, {δμ ab}/{δQ}, a dynamical model allowing the rocking of the CH 3CCH 3 group should be used. The equilibrium ring puckering angle calculated with this model and the ring-puckering potential function is 17.5°.

  7. Roles of endothelial A-type lamins in migration of T cells on and under endothelial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Jaehyun; Park, Hyoungjun; Kim, Hye Mi; Park, Jeehun; Kwon, Keon Woo; Doh, Junsang

    2016-03-01

    Stiff nuclei in cell-dense microenvironments may serve as distinct biomechanical cues for cell migration, but such a possibility has not been tested experimentally. As a first step addressing this question, we altered nuclear stiffness of endothelial cells (ECs) by reducing the expression of A-type lamins using siRNA, and investigated the migration of T cells on and under EC layers. While most T cells crawling on control EC layers avoided crossing over EC nuclei, a significantly higher fraction of T cells on EC layers with reduced expression of A-type lamins crossed over EC nuclei. This result suggests that stiff EC nuclei underlying T cells may serve as “duro-repulsive” cues to direct T cell migration toward less stiff EC cytoplasm. During subendothelial migration under EC layers with reduced expression of A-type lamins, T cells made prolonged contact and substantially deformed EC nuclei, resulting in reduced speed and directional persistence. This result suggests that EC nuclear stiffness promotes fast and directionally persistent subendothelial migration of T cells by allowing minimum interaction between T cells and EC nuclei.

  8. Preparation of A-type proanthocyanidin dimers from peanut skins and persimmon pulp and comparison of the antioxidant activity of A-type and B-type dimers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-qian; Zou, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Ge, Zhen-zhen; Du, Jing; Li, Chun-mei

    2013-12-01

    We have established a simple method for preparing large quantities of A-type dimers from peanut skin and persimmon for further structure-activity relationship study. Peanut skins were defatted with hexane and oligomeric proanthocyanidins were extracted from it with 20% of methanol, and the extract was fractionated with ethyl acetate. Persimmon tannin was extracted from persimmon with methanol acidified with 1% hydrochloric acid, after removing the sugar and small phenols, the high molecular weight persimmon tannin was partially cleaved with 6.25% hydrochloric acid in methanol. The ethyl acetate fraction from peanut skins and persimmon tannin cleaved products was chromatographed on AB-8 macroporous resin followed by Toyopearl HW-50F resin to yield about 378.3mg of A-type (epi)catechin (EC) dimer from 1 kg dry peanut skins and 34.3mg of A-type (epi)catechin-3-O-gallate (ECG) dimer and 37.7 mg of A-type (epi)gallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) dimer from 1 kg fresh persimmon fruit. The antioxidant properties of the A-type and B-type dimers were compared in five different assays, namely, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, 2,2-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical, hydroxyl radical, lipid peroxidation in mice liver homogenate and erythrocyte hemolysis in rat blood. Our results showed that both A-type and B-type dimers showed high antioxidant potency in a dose-dependent manner. In general, B-type dimers showed higher radical scavenging potency than A-type ones with the same subunits in aqueous systems. But in tissue or lipid systems, A-type dimers showed similar or even higher antioxidant potency than B-type ones. © 2013.

  9. Cosmic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    An image based on data taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope reveals a triplet of galaxies intertwined in a cosmic dance. ESO PR Photo 02/08 ESO PR Photo 02/08 NGC 7173, 7174, and 7176 The three galaxies, catalogued as NGC 7173 (top), 7174 (bottom right) and 7176 (bottom left), are located 106 million light-years away towards the constellation of Piscis Austrinus (the 'Southern Fish'). NGC 7173 and 7176 are elliptical galaxies, while NGC 7174 is a spiral galaxy with quite disturbed dust lanes and a long, twisted tail. This seems to indicate that the two bottom galaxies - whose combined shape bears some resemblance to that of a sleeping baby - are currently interacting, with NGC 7176 providing fresh material to NGC 7174. Matter present in great quantity around the triplet's members also points to the fact that NGC 7176 and NGC 7173 have interacted in the past. Astronomers have suggested that the three galaxies will finally merge into a giant 'island universe', tens to hundreds of times as massive as our own Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 02/08 ESO PR Photo 02b/08 NGC 7173, 7174, and 7176 The triplet is part of a so-called 'Compact Group', as compiled by Canadian astronomer Paul Hickson in the early 1980s. The group, which is the 90th entry in the catalogue and is therefore known as HCG 90, actually contains four major members. One of them - NGC 7192 - lies above the trio, outside of this image, and is another peculiar spiral galaxy. Compact groups are small, relatively isolated, systems of typically four to ten galaxies in close proximity to one another. Another striking example is Robert's Quartet. Compact groups are excellent laboratories for the study of galaxy interactions and their effects, in particular the formation of stars. As the striking image reveals, there are many other galaxies in the field. Some are distant ones, while others seem to be part of the family. Studies made with other telescopes have indeed revealed that the HCG 90 group contains 16 members

  10. Three-wave and four-wave interactions in gravity wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Campagne, Antoine; Peureux, Charles; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Sommeria, Joel; Viboud, Samuel; Mordant, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    Weak-turbulence theory is a statistical framework to describe a large ensemble of nonlinearly interacting waves. The archetypal example of such system is the ocean surface that is made of interacting surface gravity waves. Here we describe a laboratory experiment dedicated to probe the statistical properties of turbulent gravity waves. We set up an isotropic state of interacting gravity waves in the Coriolis facility (13-m-diam circular wave tank) by exciting waves at 1 Hz by wedge wave makers. We implement a stereoscopic technique to obtain a measurement of the surface elevation that is resolved in both space and time. Fourier analysis shows that the laboratory spectra are systematically steeper than the theoretical predictions and the field observations in the Black Sea by Leckler et al. [F. Leckler et al., J. Phys. Oceanogr. 45, 2484 (2015), 10.1175/JPO-D-14-0237.1]. We identify a strong impact of surface dissipation on the scaling of the Fourier spectrum at the scales that are accessible in the experiments. We use bicoherence and tricoherence statistical tools in frequency and/or wave-vector space to identify the active nonlinear coupling. These analyses are also performed on the field data by Leckler et al. for comparison with the laboratory data. Three-wave coupling is characterized by and shown to involve mostly quasiresonances of waves with second- or higher-order harmonics. Four-wave coupling is not observed in the laboratory but is evidenced in the field data. We discuss temporal scale separation to explain our observations.

  11. Designing "Interaction": How Do Interaction Design Students Address Interaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlgren, Klas; Ramberg, Robert; Artman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Interaction design is usually described as being concerned with interactions with and through artifacts but independent of a specific implementation. Design work has been characterized as a conversation between the designer and the situation and this conversation poses a particular challenge for interaction design as interactions can be elusive…

  12. Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 1 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 258.8 East (101.2 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration

  13. Dust in a Type Ia Supernova Progenitor: Spitzer Spectroscopy of Kepler's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the relatively poorly-understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 micron IR spectra of the remnant, obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 micron, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength IRS and IRAC data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally-heated dust emission from fast shocks (> 1000 km/s) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are approx 80-100 K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km/s) into moderate density material (n(sub o) approx 50-100 / cubic cm) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.

  14. A type III effector antagonizes death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Ong, Sze Ying; Kennedy, Catherine L; Kelly, Michelle; Robinson, Keith S; Lung, Tania Wong Fok; Mansell, Ashley; Riedmaier, Patrice; Oates, Clare V L; Zaid, Ali; Mühlen, Sabrina; Crepin, Valerie F; Marches, Olivier; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Nachbur, Ueli; Infusini, Giuseppe; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-09-12

    Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonize the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic (EPEC and EHEC, respectively) Escherichia coli use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonization and interfere with antimicrobial host responses. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death-domain-containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1 as binding partners of NleB1. NleB1 expressed ectopically or injected by the bacterial T3SS prevented Fas ligand or TNF-induced formation of the canonical death-inducing signalling complex (DISC) and proteolytic activation of caspase-8, an essential step in death-receptor-induced apoptosis. This inhibition depended on the N-acetylglucosamine transferase activity of NleB1, which specifically modified Arg 117 in the death domain of FADD. The importance of the death receptor apoptotic pathway to host defence was demonstrated using mice deficient in the FAS signalling pathway, which showed delayed clearance of the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium and reversion to virulence of an nleB mutant. The activity of NleB suggests that EPEC and other attaching and effacing pathogens antagonize death-receptor-induced apoptosis of infected cells, thereby blocking a major antimicrobial host response.

  15. A type III effector antagonises death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Ong, Sze Ying; Kennedy, Catherine L; Kelly, Michelle; Robinson, Keith S; Wong, Tania; Mansell, Ashley; Riedmaier, Patrice; Oates, Clare VL; Zaid, Ali; Mühlen, Sabrina; Crepin, Valerie F; Marches, Olivier; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A; O’Reilly, Lorraine A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Nachbur, Ueli; Infusini, Giuseppe; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonise the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC), utilise a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonisation and interfere with antimicrobial host responses 1-3. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death domain containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1 as binding partners of NleB1. NleB1 expressed ectopically or injected by the bacterial T3SS prevented Fas ligand or TNF-induced formation of the canonical death inducing signalling complex (DISC) and proteolytic activation of caspase-8, an essential step in death receptor induced apoptosis. This inhibition depended on the N-GlcNAc transferase activity of NleB1, which specifically modified Arg117 in the death domain of FADD. The importance of the death receptor apoptotic pathway to host defence was demonstrated using mice deficient in the FAS signalling pathway, which showed delayed clearance of the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium and reversion to virulence of an nleB mutant. The activity of NleB suggests that EPEC and other attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens antagonise death receptor induced apoptosis of infected cells, thereby blocking a major antimicrobial host response. PMID:24025841

  16. Redox modulation of A-type K+ currents in pain-sensing dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-Pan

    2008-06-06

    Redox modulation of fast inactivation has been described in certain cloned A-type voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels in expressing systems, but the effects remain to be demonstrated in native neurons. In this study, we examined the effects of cysteine-specific redox agents on the A-type K(+) currents in acutely dissociated small diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from rats. The fast inactivation of most A-type currents was markedly removed or slowed by the oxidizing agents 2,2'-dithio-bis(5-nitropyridine) (DTBNP) and chloramine-T. Dithiothreitol, a reducing agent for the disulfide bond, restored the inactivation. These results demonstrated that native A-type K(+) channels, probably Kv1.4, could switch the roles between inactivating and non-inactivating K(+) channels via redox regulation in pain-sensing DRG neurons. The A-type channels may play a role in adjusting pain sensitivity in response to peripheral redox conditions.

  17. A novel DPP6 isoform (DPP6-E) can account for differences between neuronal and reconstituted A-type K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Maffie, Jonathon; Blenkinsop, Timothy; Rudy, Bernardo

    2009-01-16

    The channels mediating most of the somatodendritic A-type K(+) current in neurons are thought to be ternary complexes of Kv4 pore-forming subunits and two types of auxiliary subunits, the K(+) channel interacting proteins (KChIPs) and dipeptidyl-peptidase-like (DPPL) proteins. The channels expressed in heterologous expression systems by mixtures of Kv4.2, KChIP1 and DPP6-S resemble in many properties the A-type current in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and cerebellar granule cells, neurons with prominent A-type K(+) currents. However, the native currents have faster kinetics. Moreover, the A-type currents in neurons in intermediary layers of the superior colliculus have even faster inactivating rates. We have characterized a new DPP6 spliced isoform, DPP6-E, that produces in heterologous cells ternary Kv4 channels with very fast kinetics. DPP6-E is selectively expressed in a few neuronal populations in brain including cerebellar granule neurons, hippocampal pyramidal cells and neurons in intermediary layers of the superior colliculus. The effects of DPP6-E explain past discrepancies between reconstituted and native Kv4 channels in some neurons, and contributes to the diversity of A-type K(+) currents in neurons.

  18. Numerical simulation of wave-current interaction under strong wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrañaga, Marco; Osuna, Pedro; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco Javier

    2017-04-01

    Although ocean surface waves are known to play an important role in the momentum and other scalar transfer between the atmosphere and the ocean, most operational numerical models do not explicitly include the terms of wave-current interaction. In this work, a numerical analysis about the relative importance of the processes associated with the wave-current interaction under strong off-shore wind conditions in Gulf of Tehuantepec (the southern Mexican Pacific) was carried out. The numerical system includes the spectral wave model WAM and the 3D hydrodynamic model POLCOMS, with the vertical turbulent mixing parametrized by the kappa-epsilon closure model. The coupling methodology is based on the vortex-force formalism. The hydrodynamic model was forced at the open boundaries using the HYCOM database and the wave model was forced at the open boundaries by remote waves from the southern Pacific. The atmospheric forcing for both models was provided by a local implementation of the WRF model, forced at the open boundaries using the CFSR database. The preliminary analysis of the model results indicates an effect of currents on the propagation of the swell throughout the study area. The Stokes-Coriolis term have an impact on the transient Ekman transport by modifying the Ekman spiral, while the Stokes drift has an effect on the momentum advection and the production of TKE, where the later induces a deepening of the mixing layer. This study is carried out in the framework of the project CONACYT CB-2015-01 255377 and RugDiSMar Project (CONACYT 155793).

  19. KChIP1 modulation of Kv4.3-mediated A-type K(+) currents and repetitive firing in hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Bourdeau, M L; Laplante, I; Laurent, C E; Lacaille, J-C

    2011-03-10

    Neuronal A-type K(+) channels regulate action potential waveform, back-propagation and firing frequency. In hippocampal CA1 interneurons located at the stratum lacunosum-moleculare/radiatum junction (LM/RAD), Kv4.3 mediates A-type K(+) currents and a Kv4 β-subunit of the Kv channel interacting protein (KChIP) family, KChIP1, appears specifically expressed in these cells. However, the functional role of this accessory subunit in A-type K(+) currents and interneuron excitability remains largely unknown. Thus, first we studied KChIP1 and Kv4.3 channel interactions in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and determined that KChIP1 coexpression modulated the biophysical properties of Kv4.3 A-type currents (faster recovery from inactivation, leftward shift of activation curve, faster rise time and slower decay) and this modulation was selectively prevented by KChIP1 short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown. Next, we evaluated the effects of KChIP1 down-regulation by siRNA on A-type K(+) currents in LM/RAD interneurons in slice cultures. Recovery from inactivation of A-type K(+) currents was slower after KChIP1 down-regulation but other properties were unchanged. In addition, down-regulation of KChIP1 levels did not affect action potential waveform and firing, but increased firing frequency during suprathreshold depolarizations, indicating that KChIP1 regulates interneuron excitability. The effects of KChIP1 down-regulation were cell-specific since CA1 pyramidal cells that do not express KChIP1 were unaffected. Overall, our findings suggest that KChIP1 interacts with Kv4.3 in LM/RAD interneurons, enabling faster recovery from inactivation of A-type currents and thus promoting stronger inhibitory control of firing during sustained activity. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The many sides of RCW 86: a Type Ia supernova remnant evolving in its progenitor's wind bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broersen, Sjors; Chiotellis, Alexandros; Vink, Jacco; Bamba, Aya

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of a detailed investigation of the Galactic supernova remnant RCW 86 using the XMM-Newton X-ray telescope. RCW 86 is the probable remnant of SN 185 A.D., a supernova that likely exploded inside a wind-blown cavity. We use the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer to derive precise temperatures and ionization ages of the plasma, which are an indication of the interaction history of the remnant with the presumed cavity. We find that the spectra are well fitted by two non-equilibrium ionization models, which enables us to constrain the properties of the ejecta and interstellar matter plasma. Furthermore, we performed a principal component analysis on EPIC MOS and pn data to find regions with particular spectral properties. We present evidence that the shocked ejecta, emitting Fe K and Si line emission, are confined to a shell of approximately 2 pc width with an oblate spheroidal morphology. Using detailed hydrodynamical simulations, we show that general dynamical and emission properties at different portions of the remnant can be well reproduced by a Type Ia supernova that exploded in a non-spherically symmetric wind-blown cavity. We also show that this cavity can be created using general wind properties for a single degenerate system. Our data and simulations provide further evidence that RCW 86 is indeed the remnant of SN 185, and is the likely result of a Type Ia explosion of single degenerate origin.

  1. A-type granites and related rocks: Evolution of a concept, problems and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Bernard

    2007-08-01

    Although A-type granites have long been recognized as a distinct group of granites, the term A-type was coined first less than thirty years ago. A-type suites occur in geodynamic contexts ranging from within-plate settings to plate boundaries, locations and times of emplacement are not random. Rare in the lower crust, as some charnockite suites, they are fairly common at shallower depths, especially at the subvolcanic level where they form ring complexes rooting caldera volcanoes. Characteristic features include hypersolvus to transsolvus to subsolvus alkali feldspar textures, iron-rich mafic mineralogy, bulk-rock compositions yielding ferroan, alkali-calcic to alkaline affinities, high LILE+HFSE abundances, and pronounced anomalies due to high degrees of mineral fractionation. Isotopic features evidence sources containing a large mantle input. Experimental data show that A-type magmas contain dissolved OH F-bearing fluids, crystallised under reduced and oxidized conditions, and yield high-temperature liquidus, favouring early crystallisation of anhydrous iron minerals, such as fayalite. Though many petrogenetic models imply solely crustal derivation, no convincing A-type liquids were produced experimentally from crustal materials, nor have any leucosomes of A-type composition been detected within migmatitic terranes. As it occurs in association with mafic igneous rocks in continents as well as on the ocean floor, A-type granite is likely to come from mantle-derived transitional to alkaline mafic to intermediate magmas. Rare felsic materials found in the meteoritic and lunar record yield dominantly A-type features. Contrary to the more common types of granite, A-type granite is, therefore, not typical of Earth and was produced in planetary environments differing from those prevailing on Earth.

  2. The Transition of a Type IIL Supernova into a Supernova Remnant: Late-time Observations of SN 2013by

    SciTech Connect

    Black, C. S.; Fesen, R. A.; Milisavljevic, D.

    2017-10-10

    We present early-time Swift and Chandra X-ray data along with late-time optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2013by, a Type IIL supernova (SN) that occurred in the nearby spiral galaxy ESO 138−G10 ( D ∼ 14.8 Mpc). Optical and NIR photometry and spectroscopy follow the late-time evolution of the SN from days +89 to +457 post maximum brightness. The optical spectra and X-ray light curves are consistent with the picture of an SN having prolonged interaction with circumstellar material (CSM) that accelerates the transition from SN to supernova remnant (SNR). Specifically, we find SN 2013by’s H α profile exhibits significantmore » broadening (∼10,000 km s{sup −1}) on day +457, the likely consequence of high-velocity, H-rich material being excited by a reverse shock. A relatively flat X-ray light curve is observed that cannot be modeled using Inverse Compton scattering processes alone, but requires an additional energy source most likely originating from the SN-CSM interaction. In addition, we see the first overtone of CO emission near 2.3 μ m on day +152, signaling the formation of molecules and dust in the SN ejecta and is the first time CO has been detected in a Type IIL SN. We compare SN 2013by with Type IIP SNe, whose spectra show the rarely observed SN-to-SNR transition in varying degrees and conclude that Type IIL SNe may enter the remnant phase at earlier epochs than their Type IIP counterparts.« less

  3. PKA modulation of Kv4.2-encoded A-type potassium channels requires formation of a supramolecular complex.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Laura A; Anderson, Anne E; Mayne, Amber; Pfaffinger, Paul J; Sweatt, John David

    2002-12-01

    A-type channels, encoded by the pore-forming alpha-subunits of the Kv4.x family, are particularly important in regulating membrane excitability in the CNS and the heart. Given the key role of modulation of A currents by kinases, we sought to investigate the protein structure-function relationships underlying the regulation of these currents by PKA. We have previously shown the existence of two PKA phosphorylation sites in the Kv4.2 sequence; therefore, we focused this study on the Kv4.2 primary subunit. In the present studies we made the surprising finding that PKA phosphorylation of the Kv4.2 alpha-subunit is necessary but not sufficient for channel modulation; channel modulation by PKA required the presence of an ancillary subunit, the K+ channel interacting protein (KChIP3). Therefore, these findings indicate a surprising complexity to kinase regulation of A currents, in that an interaction of two separate molecular events, alpha-subunit phosphorylation and the association of an ancillary subunit (KChIP3), are necessary for phosphorylation-dependent regulation of Kv4.2-encoded A channels by PKA. Overall, our studies indicate that PKA must of necessity act on a supramolecular complex of pore-forming alpha-subunits plus ancillary subunits to alter channel properties.

  4. A New Species of Science Education: Harnessing the Power of Interactive Technology to Teach Laboratory Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Interactive television is a type of distance education that uses streaming audio and video technology for real-time student-teacher interaction. Here, I discuss the design and logistics for developing a high school laboratory-based science course taught to students at a distance using interactive technologies. The goal is to share a successful…

  5. They Work Together to Roar: Kindergartners' Understanding of an Interactive Causal Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis, S. Lynneth; Grotzer, Tina A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate kindergartners' exploration of interactive causality during their play with a pair of toy sound blocks. Interactive causality refers to a type of causal pattern in which two entities interact to produce a causal force, as in particle attraction and symbiotic relationships. Despite being prevalent in nature,…

  6. Rovibrational Constants for the ν 6 and 2ν 9 Bands of HCOOD by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. L.; Goh, K. L.; Ong, P. P.; Teo, H. H.

    1999-11-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of the ν6 and 2ν9 bands of deuterated formic acid (HCOOD) was recorded with an apodized resolution of 0.004 cm-1 in the frequency range of 930-1040 cm-1. These two bands with band centers 40 cm-1 apart were mutually coupled by Coriolis and Fermi interactions. By fitting a total of 1076 infrared transitions of both ν6 and 2ν9 with a standard deviation of 0.00075 cm-1 using a Watson's A-reduced Hamiltonian in the Ir representation with the inclusion of c-type Coriolis and a Fermi-resonance term, two sets of rovibrational constants for v6 = 1, and v9 = 2 states were derived for the first time. Both ν6 and 2ν9 bands are A type with band centers at 972.8520 ± 0.0001 and 1011.6766 ± 0.0001 cm-1, respectively.

  7. FLARES ON A-TYPE STARS: EVIDENCE FOR HEATING OF SOLAR CORONA BY NANOFLARES?

    SciTech Connect

    Švanda, Michal; Karlický, Marian, E-mail: michal@astronomie.cz

    We analyzed the occurrence rates of flares on stars of spectral types K, G, F, and A, observed by Kepler . We found that the histogram of occurrence frequencies of stellar flares is systematically shifted toward a high-energy tail for A-type stars compared to stars of cooler spectral types. We extrapolated the fitted power laws toward flares with smaller energies (nanoflares) and made estimates for total energy flux to stellar atmospheres by flares. We found that, for A-type stars, the total energy flux density was at least four-times smaller than for G stars. We speculate that this deficit in energymore » supply may explain the lack of hot coronae on A-type stars. Our results indicate the importance of nanoflares for heating and formation of the solar corona.« less

  8. Functional conversion between A-type and delayed rectifier K+ channels by membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Dominik; Lien, Cheng-Chang; Soom, Malle; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Jonas, Peter; Fakler, Bernd

    2004-04-09

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels control action potential repolarization, interspike membrane potential, and action potential frequency in excitable cells. It is thought that the combinatorial association between distinct alpha and beta subunits determines whether Kv channels function as non-inactivating delayed rectifiers or as rapidly inactivating A-type channels. We show that membrane lipids can convert A-type channels into delayed rectifiers and vice versa. Phosphoinositides remove N-type inactivation from A-type channels by immobilizing the inactivation domains. Conversely, arachidonic acid and its amide anandamide endow delayed rectifiers with rapid voltage-dependent inactivation. The bidirectional control of Kv channel gating by lipids may provide a mechanism for the dynamic regulation of electrical signaling in the nervous system.

  9. Stability of monomeric Cro variants: Isoenergetic transformation of a type I' to a type II' beta-hairpin by single amino acid replacements.

    PubMed

    Mollah, A K M M; Stennis, Rhonda L; Mossing, Michael C

    2003-05-01

    The thermodynamic stabilities of three monomeric variants of the bacteriophage lambda Cro repressor that differ only in the sequence of two amino acids at the apex of an engineered beta-hairpin have been determined. The sequences of the turns are EVK-XX-EVK, where the two central residues are DG, GG, and GT, respectively. Standard-state unfolding free energies, determined from circular dichroism measurements as a function of urea concentration, range from 2.4 to 2.7 kcal/mole, while those determined from guanidine hydrochloride range from 2.8 to 3.3 kcal/mole for the three proteins. Thermal denaturation yields van't Hoff unfolding enthalpies of 36 to 40 kcal /mole at midpoint temperatures in the range of 53 to 58 degrees C. Extrapolation of the thermal denaturation free energies with heat capacities of 400 to 600 cal/mole deg gives good agreement with the parameters determined in denaturant titrations. As predicted from statistical surveys of amino acid replacements in beta-hairpins, energetic barriers to transformation from a type I' turn (DG) to a type II' turn (GT) can be quite small.

  10. KChIPs and Kv4 alpha subunits as integral components of A-type potassium channels in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Kenneth J; Carroll, Karen I; Sung, M Amy; Doliveira, Lisa C; Monaghan, Michael M; Burke, Sharon L; Strassle, Brian W; Buchwalder, Lynn; Menegola, Milena; Cao, Jie; An, W Frank; Trimmer, James S

    2004-09-08

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels from the Kv4, or Shal-related, gene family underlie a major component of the A-type potassium current in mammalian central neurons. We recently identified a family of calcium-binding proteins, termed KChIPs (Kv channel interacting proteins), that bind to the cytoplasmic N termini of Kv4 family alpha subunits and modulate their surface density, inactivation kinetics, and rate of recovery from inactivation (An et al., 2000). Here, we used single and double-label immunohistochemistry, together with circumscribed lesions and coimmunoprecipitation analyses, to examine the regional and subcellular distribution of KChIPs1-4 and Kv4 family alpha subunits in adult rat brain. Immunohistochemical staining using KChIP-specific monoclonal antibodies revealed that the KChIP polypeptides are concentrated in neuronal somata and dendrites where their cellular and subcellular distribution overlaps, in an isoform-specific manner, with that of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3. For example, immunoreactivity for KChIP1 and Kv4.3 is concentrated in the somata and dendrites of hippocampal, striatal, and neocortical interneurons. Immunoreactivity for KChIP2, KChIP4, and Kv4.2 is concentrated in the apical and basal dendrites of hippocampal and neocortical pyramidal cells. Double-label immunofluorescence labeling revealed that throughout the forebrain, KChIP2 and KChIP4 are frequently colocalized with Kv4.2, whereas in cortical, hippocampal, and striatal interneurons, KChIP1 is frequently colocalized with Kv4.3. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses confirmed that all KChIPs coassociate with Kv4 alpha subunits in brain membranes, indicating that KChIPs 1-4 are integral components of native A-type Kv channel complexes and are likely to play a major role as modulators of somatodendritic excitability.

  11. Elimination of fast inactivation in Kv4 A-type potassium channels by an auxiliary subunit domain.

    PubMed

    Holmqvist, Mats H; Cao, Jie; Hernandez-Pineda, Ricardo; Jacobson, Michael D; Carroll, Karen I; Sung, M Amy; Betty, Maria; Ge, Pei; Gilbride, Kevin J; Brown, Melissa E; Jurman, Mark E; Lawson, Deborah; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Xie, Yu; Covarrubias, Manuel; Rhodes, Kenneth J; Distefano, Peter S; An, W Frank

    2002-01-22

    The Kv4 A-type potassium currents contribute to controlling the frequency of slow repetitive firing and back-propagation of action potentials in neurons and shape the action potential in heart. Kv4 currents exhibit rapid activation and inactivation and are specifically modulated by K-channel interacting proteins (KChIPs). Here we report the discovery and functional characterization of a modular K-channel inactivation suppressor (KIS) domain located in the first 34 aa of an additional KChIP (KChIP4a). Coexpression of KChIP4a with Kv4 alpha-subunits abolishes fast inactivation of the Kv4 currents in various cell types, including cerebellar granule neurons. Kinetic analysis shows that the KIS domain delays Kv4.3 opening, but once the channel is open, it disrupts rapid inactivation and slows Kv4.3 closing. Accordingly, KChIP4a increases the open probability of single Kv4.3 channels. The net effects of KChIP4a and KChIP1-3 on Kv4 gating are quite different. When both KChIP4a and KChIP1 are present, the Kv4.3 current shows mixed inactivation profiles dependent on KChIP4a/KChIP1 ratios. The KIS domain effectively converts the A-type Kv4 current to a slowly inactivating delayed rectifier-type potassium current. This conversion is opposite to that mediated by the Kv1-specific "ball" domain of the Kv beta 1 subunit. Together, these results demonstrate that specific auxiliary subunits with distinct functions actively modulate gating of potassium channels that govern membrane excitability.

  12. Pseudomonas fluorescens lipopolysaccharide inhibits both delayed rectifier and transient A-type K+ channels of cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Mezghani-Abdelmoula, Sana; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Cazin, Lionel

    2003-09-05

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative bacillus closely related to the pathogen P. aeruginosa known to provoke infectious disorders in the central nervous system (CNS). The endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) expressed by the bacteria is the first infectious factor that can interact with the plasma membrane of host cells. In the present study, LPS extracted from P. fluorescens MF37 was examined for its actions on delayed rectifier and A-type K(+) channels, two of the main types of voltage-activated K(+) channels involved in the action potential firing. Current recordings were performed in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons at days 7 or 8, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. A 3-h incubation with LPS (200 ng/ml) markedly depressed both the delayed rectifier (I(KV)) and transient A-type (I(A)) K(+) currents evoked by depolarizations above 0 and -40 mV, respectively. The percent decrease of I(KV) and I(A) ( approximately 30%) did not vary with membrane potential, suggesting that inhibition of both types of K(+) channels by LPS was voltage-insensitive. The endotoxin did neither modify the steady-state voltage-dependent activation properties of I(KV) and I(A) nor the steady-state inactivation of I(A). The present results suggest that, by inhibiting I(KV) and I(A), LPS applied extracellulary increases the action potential firing in cerebellar granule neurons. It is concluded that P. fluorescens MF37 may provoke in the CNS disorders associated with sever alterations of membrane ionic channel functions.

  13. Melorheostosis may originate as a type 2 segmental manifestation of osteopoikilosis.

    PubMed

    Happle, Rudolf

    2004-03-15

    Melorheostosis is a non-hereditary disorder involving the bones in a segmental pattern, whereas osteopoikilosis is a rather mild disseminated bone disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Interestingly, melorheostosis and osteopoikilosis may sometimes occur together. In analogy to various autosomal dominant skin disorders for which a type 2 segmental manifestation has been postulated, melorheostosis may be best explained in such cases as a type 2 segmental osteopoikilosis, resulting from early loss of the corresponding wild type allele at the gene locus of this autosomal dominant bone disorder. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Are greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping a type of marine pollution?

    PubMed

    Shi, Yubing

    2016-12-15

    Whether greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping are a type of marine pollution is a controversial issue and is currently open to debate. This article examines the current treaty definitions of marine pollution, and applies them to greenhouse gas emissions from ships. Based on the legal analysis of treaty definitions and relevant international and national regulation on this issue, this article asserts that greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping are a type of 'conditional' marine pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A type IV burst associated with a coronal streamer disruption event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    A type IV burst was observed on February 17, 1985 with the Clark Lake Radio Observatory multifrequency radioheliograph operating in the frequency range 20-125 MHz. This burst was associated with a coronal streamer disruption event. From two-dimensional images produced at 50 MHz, evidence of a type II burst and a slow moving type IV burst are shown. The observations of the moving type IV burst suggests that a plasmoid containing energetic electrons can result from the disruption of a coronal streamer.

  16. Petrogenesis of selected A-type granitic intrusions from Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Tharwat; Asran, Asran; Amron, Taha; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The Pan-African orogeny in the Arabian-Nubian Shield was terminated by intrusion of A-type granites (~ 595 Ma; Greenberg, 1981) and its volcanic equivalents. Subsequent to the intrusions of these granitic bodies the shield was exhumed. Eroded A-type granite pebbles were found in the molasse sediments that were deposited in intermountain basins. Therefore the A-type granites provide information about the last stage of the Pan-African geochemical system. Preliminary whole-rock geochemical data of three granitic intrusions (Kadabora, Um Naggat and El shiekh Salem) from the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt; indicate that all of them are peraluminous and with A-type characteristics. These intrusions show low CaO content (average 0.43 %wt), high FeOT/MgO ratio (10.46-121.88), high Na2O+K2O (average 8.04 %wt), marked enrichment of high field strength elements (Y, Nb and Ga except Zr), depletion in MgO (0.01-0.11 %wt) and with low concentration of Sr and Ba. The studied granitoids were emplaced in within plate tectonic regime. References: Greenberg, J.K. (1981): Characteristic and origin of Egyptian younger granites. Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. Part 1, v.92: 224-232.

  17. Permian ultrafelsic A-type granite from Besar Islands group, Johor, peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Azman A.; Hazad, Fatin Izzani; Jamil, Azmiah; Xiang, Quek Long; Atiqah Wan Ismail, Wan Nur; Chung, Sun-Lin; Lai, Yu-Ming; Roselee, Muhammad Hatta; Islami, Nur; Nyein, Kyaw Kyaw; Amir Hassan, Meor Hakif; Abu Bakar, Mohd Farid; Umor, Mohd Rozi

    2014-12-01

    The granitic rocks of the peninsula have traditionally been divided into two provinces, i.e., Western and Eastern provinces, corresponding to S- and I-type granite respectively. The Western Province granite is characterised by megacrystic and coarse-grained biotite, tin-mineralised, continental collision granite, whereas, the Eastern Province granite is bimodal I-type dominated by granodiorite and associated gabbroic of arc type granite. This paper reports the occurrence of an A-type granite from peninsular Malaysia. The rocks occur in the Besar, Tengah, and Hujung islands located in the southeastern part of the peninsula. The granite is highly felsic with SiO2 ranging from 75.70% to 77.90% (differentiation index = 94.2-97.04). It is weakly peraluminous (average ACNK =1.02), has normative hypersthene (0.09-2.19%) and high alkali content (8.32-8.60%). The granites have many A-type characteristics, among them are shallow level of emplacement, high Ga, FeT/MgO and low P, Sr, Ti, CaO and Nb. Calculated zircon saturation temperatures for the Besar magma ranging from 793 ∘ to 806 ∘C is consistent with high temperature partial melting of a felsic infracrustal source which is taken as one of the mechanisms to produce A-type magma. The occurrence of the A-type granite can be related to the extensional back arc basin in the Indo-China terrane during the earliest Permian.

  18. Murine Intracisternal A Type Particles Fail to Separate from the Membrane of the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Perk, Kalman; Dahlberg, John E.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of serial sections of murine cells containing intracisternal A particles revealed that over 99% of all A particles remain in a budding configuration. This indicates that these particles fail to detach from the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. This observation explains how, despite their intracellular abundance in certain murine tumors, no extracellular A-type particles can be found. Images PMID:4431082

  19. 43 CFR 11.34 - When may the authorized official use a type A procedure?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When may the authorized official use a type A procedure? 11.34 Section 11.34 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Assessment Plan Phase § 11.34 When may the authorized official use a...

  20. Within-Trial Contrast: When Is a Failure to Replicate Not a Type I Error?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zentall, Thomas R.; Singer, Rebecca A.

    2007-01-01

    Vasconcelos, Urcuioli, and Lionello-DeNolf (2007) report the results of five experiments that fail to replicate the results of our within-trial contrast study (Clement, Feltus, Kaiser, & Zentall, 2000) and suggest that our results may represent a Type I Error. We believe that this conclusion is not warranted because (a) there is considerable…

  1. When Is a Failure to Replicate Not a Type II Error?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasconcelos, Marco; Urcuioli, Peter J.; Lionello-DeNolf, Karen M.

    2007-01-01

    Zentall and Singer (2007) challenge our conclusion that the work-ethic effect reported by Clement, Feltus, Kaiser, and Zentall (2000) may have been a Type I error by arguing that (a) the effect has been extensively replicated and (b) the amount of overtraining our pigeons received may not have been sufficient to produce it. We believe that our…

  2. Arthroscopic repair of a type II SLAP lesion using a single corkscrew anchor.

    PubMed

    Kartus, Jüri; Perko, Mark

    2002-03-01

    The use of a double-looped 5-mm Corkscrew anchor (Arthrex, Naples, FL) enables the surgeon to use a single anchor to perform a secure fixation of both the anterior labrum as well as the biceps insertion in a type II SLAP lesion. The technique involves tying 1 knot through the anterior portal and a second knot through the posterior portal.

  3. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  4. HTTM - Design and Implementation of a Type-2 Hypervisor for MIPS64 Based Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain, Qurrat ul; Anwar, Usama; Mehmood, Muhammad Amir; Waheed, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Virtualization has emerged as an attractive software solution for many problems in server domain. Recently, it has started to enrich embedded systems domain by offering features such as hardware consolidation, security, and isolation. Our objective is to bring virtualization to high-end MIPS64 based systems, such as network routers, switches, wireless base station, etc. For this purpose a Type-2 hypervisor is a viable software solution which is easy to deploy and requires no changes in host system. In this paper we present the internal design HTTM -A Type-2 hypervisor for MIPS64 based systems and demonstrate its functional correctness by using Linux Testing Project (LTP) tests. Finally, we performed LMbench tests for performance evaluation.

  5. The vernon supersuite: Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoid rocks in the New Jersey highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkert, R.A.; Drake, Avery A.

    1998-01-01

    Abundant Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoid rocks of two intrusive suites underlie approximately 50 percent of the New Jersey Highlands. These rocks, the Byram Intrusive and Lake Hopatcong Intrusive Suites, consist of granite, alaskite, quartz monzonite, monzonite, and minor pegmatite. Byram and Lake Hopatcong rocks, although different mineralogically, are similar geochemically and contain overlapping abundances of most major and trace elements. Petrographic relationships, geochronology, field relationships, and geochemical similarities support a comagmatic origin for both suites. They constitute the here named Vernon Supersuite.

  6. Chlorhexidine Induces VanA-Type Vancomycin Resistance Genes in Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Ziegler, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Chlorhexidine is a bisbiguanide antiseptic used for infection control. Vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (VREfm) is among the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections. VREfm may be exposed to chlorhexidine at supra- and subinhibitory concentrations as a result of chlorhexidine bathing and chlorhexidine-impregnated central venous catheter use. We used RNA sequencing to investigate how VREfm responds to chlorhexidine gluconate exposure. Among the 35 genes upregulated ≥10-fold after 15 min of exposure to the MIC of chlorhexidine gluconate were those encoding VanA-type vancomycin resistance (vanHAX) and those associated with reduced daptomycin susceptibility (liaXYZ). We confirmed that vanA upregulation was not strain or species specific by querying other VanA-type VRE. VanB-type genes were not induced. The vanH promoter was found to be responsive to subinhibitory chlorhexidine gluconate in VREfm, as was production of the VanX protein. Using vanH reporter experiments with Bacillus subtilis and deletion analysis in VREfm, we found that this phenomenon is VanR dependent. Deletion of vanR did not result in increased chlorhexidine susceptibility, demonstrating that vanHAX induction is not protective against chlorhexidine. As expected, VanA-type VRE is more susceptible to ceftriaxone in the presence of sub-MIC chlorhexidine. Unexpectedly, VREfm is also more susceptible to vancomycin in the presence of subinhibitory chlorhexidine, suggesting that chlorhexidine-induced gene expression changes lead to additional alterations in cell wall synthesis. We conclude that chlorhexidine induces expression of VanA-type vancomycin resistance genes and genes associated with daptomycin nonsusceptibility. Overall, our results indicate that the impacts of subinhibitory chlorhexidine exposure on hospital-associated pathogens should be further investigated in laboratory studies. PMID:26810654

  7. Spectroscopic classification of AT 2017byx as a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, J.; Wheeler, J. C.; Sarneczky, K.; Szakats, R.; Szalai, T.; Szekely, P.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    During the commissioning phase of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) survey we observed AT 2017byx (ATLAS17bla, PS17bve) at R.A.=14:17:48.36 Dec.=+52:41:54.6 with the Visible Integral-field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) at McDonald Observatory on 2017-04-28.2 UT. The spectrum (range between 3500 and 5500 Angstroms) indicates that AT 2017byx is a Type Ia supernova.

  8. Endovascular closure of ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm with a type II Amplatzer vascular plug.

    PubMed

    De Boo, Diederick W; Mott, Nigel; Kavnoudias, Helen; Walton, Antony; Lyon, Stuart M

    2014-05-01

    A 71-year-old man initially presented with an asymptomatic, incidentally detected ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm 25 years following aortic root repair with mechanical aortic valve replacement. This pseudoaneurysm was previously treated with coil embolization but due to coil impaction it reopened 8 years later. Endovascular closure of the pseudoaneurysm was achieved with the off-label use of a type II Amplatzer vascular plug.

  9. Osteomyelitis and Discitis Following Translumbar Repair of a Type II Endoleak

    SciTech Connect

    Sella, David M., E-mail: Sella.david@mayo.edu; Frey, Gregory T., E-mail: Frey.gregory@mayo.edu; Giesbrandt, Kirk, E-mail: giesbrandt.kirk@mayo.edu

    2016-03-15

    Here we present the case of an 80-year-old man who developed a type II endoleak following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Initial attempts at treating the endoleak via a transarterial approach were unsuccessful; therefore the patient underwent percutaneous translumbar endoleak embolization. Approximately 1 month following the translumbar procedure, he developed back pain, with subsequent workup revealing osteomyelitis and discitis as a complication following repair via the translumbar approach.

  10. Spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-17je (=AT 2017ffq) as a Type II Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Osmar; Prieto, J. L.

    2017-07-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (450-760nm) of ASASSN-17je/AT2017ffq (ATel #10571) on 2017 July 15.19 UT with GMOS, mounted on Gemini-South. Using the SNID code (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) we find a good match with a Type II supernova at z=0.014, consistent with the redshift of its host galaxy 2MASX J17401447-5825586.

  11. Effects of Imagined Interactions and Rehearsal on Speaking Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Charles W.; Honeycutt, James M.; Bodie, Graham D.

    2015-01-01

    Imagined interactions (IIs) constitute a type of social cognition that can reduce fear of communication. Through the mental preparation enabled by IIs, an individual can reduce disfluencies and mitigate the anxiety that arises from a speech. Study 1 indicated that rehearsal influences the reduction of silent pauses but not vocalized pauses. In…

  12. A naturally occurring cowpox virus with an ectromelia virus A-type inclusion protein gene displays atypical A-type inclusions.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Malachy Ifeanyi; Hansen, Hilde; Traavik, Terje

    2012-01-01

    Human orthopoxvirus (OPV) infections in Europe are usually caused by cowpox virus (CPXV). The genetic heterogeneity of CPXVs may in part be due to recombination with other OPV species. We describe the characterization of an atypical CPXV (CPXV-No-H2) isolated from a human patient in Norway. CPXV-No-H2 was characterized on the basis of A-type inclusion (ATI) phenotype as well as the DNA region containing the p4c and atip open reading frames. CPXV-No-H2 produced atypical V(+/) ATI, in which virions are on the surface of ATI but not within the ATI matrix. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the atip gene of CPXV-No-H2 clustered closely with that of ectromelia virus (ECTV) with a bootstrap support of 100% whereas its p4c gene is diverged compared to homologues in other OPV species. By recombination analysis we identified a putative crossover event at nucleotide 147, downstream the start of the atip gene. Our results suggest that CPXV-No-H2 originated from a recombination between CPXV and ECTV. Our findings are relevant to the evolution of OPVs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Managing Professional Interpersonal Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Specht, Harry

    1985-01-01

    Presents a theoretical framework for understanding the interpersonal interactions of social workers in their professional capacity. The major elements are a typology of others with whom professionals interact, the qualities of interpersonal interactions, the professional's needs, and the resources exchanged. (Author/JAC)

  14. Dynamic Interactive Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabry, Khaled; Barker, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the notions of interactivity and dynamicity of learning systems in relation to information technologies and design principles that can contribute to interactive and dynamic learning. It explores the concept of dynamic interactive learning systems based on the emerging generation of information as part of a…

  15. Spectroscopic evidence for a type II Weyl semimetallic state in MoTe 2

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Lunan; McCormick, Timothy M.; Ochi, Masayuki; ...

    2016-07-11

    In a type I Dirac or Weyl semimetal, the low-energy states are squeezed to a single point in momentum space when the chemical potential μ is tuned precisely to the Dirac/Weyl point. Recently, a type II Weyl semimetal was predicted to exist, where the Weyl states connect hole and electron bands, separated by an indirect gap. This leads to unusual energy states, where hole and electron pockets touch at the Weyl point. Here we present the discovery of a type II topological Weyl semimetal state in pure MoTe 2, where two sets of Weyl points ( W±2 , W±3) existmore » at the touching points of electron and hole pockets and are located at different binding energies above E F. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, modelling, density functional theory and calculations of Berry curvature, we identify the Weyl points and demonstrate that they are connected by different sets of Fermi arcs for each of the two surface terminations. We also find new surface ‘track states’ that form closed loops and are unique to type II Weyl semimetals. Lastly, this material provides an exciting, new platform to study the properties of Weyl fermions.« less

  16. Starch-Branching Enzymes Preferentially Associated with A-Type Starch Granules in Wheat Endosperm1

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Mingsheng; Gao, Ming; Båga, Monica; Hucl, Pierre; Chibbar, Ravindra N.

    2000-01-01

    Two starch granule-bound proteins (SGP), SGP-140 and SGP-145, were preferentially associated with A-type starch granules (>10 μm) in developing and mature wheat (Triticum aestivum) kernels. Immunoblotting and N-terminal sequencing suggested that the two proteins were different variants of SBEIc, a 152-kD isoform of wheat starch-branching enzyme. Both SGP-140 and SGP-145 were localized to the endosperm starch granules but were not found in the endosperm soluble fraction or pericarp starch granules younger than 15 d post anthesis (DPA). Small-size starch granules (<10 μm) initiated before 15 DPA incorporated SGP-140 and SGP-145 throughout endosperm development and grew into full-size A-type starch granules (>10 μm). In contrast, small-size starch granules harvested after 15 DPA contained only low amounts of SGP-140 and SGP-145 and developed mainly into B-type starch granules (<10 μm). Polypeptides of similar mass and immunologically related to SGP-140 and/or SGP-145 were also preferentially incorporated into A-type starch granules of barley (Hordeum vulgare), rye (Secale cereale), and triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack) endosperm, which like wheat endosperm have a bimodal starch granule size distribution. PMID:10982441

  17. An asymptotic-giant-branch star in the progenitor system of a type Ia supernova.

    PubMed

    Hamuy, Mario; Phillips, M M; Suntzeff, Nicholas B; Maza, José; González, L E; Roth, Miguel; Krisciunas, Kevin; Morrell, Nidia; Green, E M; Persson, S E; McCarthy, P J

    2003-08-07

    Stars that explode as supernovae come in two main classes. A type Ia supernova is recognized by the absence of hydrogen and the presence of elements such as silicon and sulphur in its spectrum; this class of supernova is thought to produce the majority of iron-peak elements in the Universe. They are also used as precise 'standard candles' to measure the distances to galaxies. While there is general agreement that a type Ia supernova is produced by an exploding white dwarf star, no progenitor system has ever been directly observed. Significant effort has gone into searching for circumstellar material to help discriminate between the possible kinds of progenitor systems, but no such material has hitherto been found associated with a type Ia supernova. Here we report the presence of strong hydrogen emission associated with the type Ia supernova SN2002ic, indicating the presence of large amounts of circumstellar material. We infer from this that the progenitor system contained a massive asymptotic-giant-branch star that lost several solar masses of hydrogen-rich gas before the supernova explosion.

  18. A New Chemical Pathway Yielding A-Type Vitisins in Red Wines

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Paula; Fernandes, Ana; de Freitas, Victor; Oliveira, Joana

    2017-01-01

    A new chemical pathway yielding A-type vitisins in red wines is proposed herein from the reaction between anthocyanins and oxaloacetic acid (OAA). This new chemical path is thought to occur in the first stages of the wine production even during the fermentation process. This is due to the revealed high reactivity of OAA with anthocyanins compared with the already known precursor (pyruvic acid, PA). In model solutions at wine pH (3.5), when malvidin-3-O-glucoside (mv-3-glc) is in contact with OAA and PA a decrease in the OAA concentration is observed along with the formation of A-type vitisin. Moreover, part of the OAA is also chemically converted into PA in model solutions. The reaction yields were also determined for OAA and PA using different mv-3-glc:organic acid molar ratios (1:0.5, 1:1, 1:5, 1:10; 1:50, and 1:100) and these values were always higher for OAA when compared to PA, even at the lowest molar ratio (1:0.5). The reaction yields were higher at pH 2.6 in comparison to pH 1.5 and 3.5, being less affected at pH 3.5 for OAA. These results support the idea that OAA can be at the origin of A-type vitisins in the first stages of wine production and PA in the subsequent ageing process. PMID:28375190

  19. A New Chemical Pathway Yielding A-Type Vitisins in Red Wines.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Paula; Fernandes, Ana; de Freitas, Victor; Oliveira, Joana

    2017-04-04

    A new chemical pathway yielding A-type vitisins in red wines is proposed herein from the reaction between anthocyanins and oxaloacetic acid (OAA). This new chemical path is thought to occur in the first stages of the wine production even during the fermentation process. This is due to the revealed high reactivity of OAA with anthocyanins compared with the already known precursor (pyruvic acid, PA). In model solutions at wine pH (3.5), when malvidin-3- O -glucoside (mv-3-glc) is in contact with OAA and PA a decrease in the OAA concentration is observed along with the formation of A-type vitisin. Moreover, part of the OAA is also chemically converted into PA in model solutions. The reaction yields were also determined for OAA and PA using different mv-3-glc:organic acid molar ratios (1:0.5, 1:1, 1:5, 1:10; 1:50, and 1:100) and these values were always higher for OAA when compared to PA, even at the lowest molar ratio (1:0.5). The reaction yields were higher at pH 2.6 in comparison to pH 1.5 and 3.5, being less affected at pH 3.5 for OAA. These results support the idea that OAA can be at the origin of A-type vitisins in the first stages of wine production and PA in the subsequent ageing process.

  20. Spectroscopic evidence for a type II Weyl semimetallic state in MoTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lunan; McCormick, Timothy M.; Ochi, Masayuki; Zhao, Zhiying; Suzuki, Michi-To; Arita, Ryotaro; Wu, Yun; Mou, Daixiang; Cao, Huibo; Yan, Jiaqiang; Trivedi, Nandini; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-11-01

    In a type I Dirac or Weyl semimetal, the low-energy states are squeezed to a single point in momentum space when the chemical potential μ is tuned precisely to the Dirac/Weyl point. Recently, a type II Weyl semimetal was predicted to exist, where the Weyl states connect hole and electron bands, separated by an indirect gap. This leads to unusual energy states, where hole and electron pockets touch at the Weyl point. Here we present the discovery of a type II topological Weyl semimetal state in pure MoTe2, where two sets of Weyl points (, ) exist at the touching points of electron and hole pockets and are located at different binding energies above EF. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, modelling, density functional theory and calculations of Berry curvature, we identify the Weyl points and demonstrate that they are connected by different sets of Fermi arcs for each of the two surface terminations. We also find new surface `track states' that form closed loops and are unique to type II Weyl semimetals. This material provides an exciting, new platform to study the properties of Weyl fermions.

  1. Convergence in Multispecies Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bittleston, Leonora S; Pierce, Naomi E; Ellison, Aaron M; Pringle, Anne

    2016-04-01

    The concepts of convergent evolution and community convergence highlight how selective pressures can shape unrelated organisms or communities in similar ways. We propose a related concept, convergent interactions, to describe the independent evolution of multispecies interactions with similar physiological or ecological functions. A focus on convergent interactions clarifies how natural selection repeatedly favors particular kinds of associations among species. Characterizing convergent interactions in a comparative context is likely to facilitate prediction of the ecological roles of organisms (including microbes) in multispecies interactions and selective pressures acting in poorly understood or newly discovered multispecies systems. We illustrate the concept of convergent interactions with examples: vertebrates and their gut bacteria; ectomycorrhizae; insect-fungal-bacterial interactions; pitcher-plant food webs; and ants and ant-plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Hippocampal A-type current and Kv4.2 channel modulation by the sulfonylurea compound NS5806.

    PubMed

    Witzel, Katrin; Fischer, Paul; Bähring, Robert

    2012-12-01

    We examined the effects of the sulfonylurea compound NS5806 on neuronal A-type channel function. Using whole-cell patch-clamp we studied the effects of NS5806 on the somatodendritic A-type current (I(SA)) in cultured hippocampal neurons and the currents mediated by Kv4.2 channels coexpressed with different auxiliary β-subunits, including both Kv channel interacting proteins (KChIPs) and dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-related proteins (DPPs), in HEK 293 cells. The amplitude of the I(SA) component in hippocampal neurons was reduced in the presence of 20 μM NS5806. I(SA) decay kinetics were slowed and the recovery kinetics accelerated, but the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation was shifted to more negative potentials by NS5806. The peak amplitudes of currents mediated by ternary Kv4.2 channel complexes, associated with DPP6-S (short splice-variant) and either KChIP2, KChIP3 or KChIP4, were potentiated and their macroscopic inactivation slowed by NS5806, whereas the currents mediated by binary Kv4.2 channels, associated only with DPP6-S, were suppressed, and the NS5806-mediated slowing of macroscopic inactivation was less pronounced. Neither potentiation nor suppression and no effect on current decay kinetics in the presence of NS5806 were observed for Kv4.2 channels associated with KChIP3 and the N-type inactivation-conferring DPP6a splice-variant. For all recombinant channel complexes, NS5806 slowed the recovery from inactivation and shifted the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation to more negative potentials. Our results demonstrate the activity of NS5806 on native I(SA) and possible molecular correlates in the form of recombinant Kv4.2 channels complexed with different KChIPs and DPPs, and they shed some light on the mechanism of NS5806 action. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Drug-drug interactions: interactions between xenobiotics].

    PubMed

    Haen, E

    2014-04-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDI) are a major topic in programs for continuous medical education (CME). Many physicians are afraid of being trapped into charges of malpractice; however, DDI cannot be avoided in many cases. They belong to routine medical practice and it is often impossible to avoid them. Moreover, they do not just occur between drugs but between any kind of foreign substance (xenobiotica), such as food (e.g. grapefruit juice, broccoli, barbecue) as well as legal (e.g. tobacco smoke, caffeine and alcohol) and illegal drugs. Therefore, the medical challenge is not just to avoid any interaction. Instead the physician faces the question of how to proceed with drug treatment in the presence of such interactions. Based on the medical education a physician has to judge first of all whether there is a risk for interactions in the prescription being planned for an individual patient. The classification of interactions proposed in this article (PD1-PD4, PK1-PK3) might help as a sort of check list. For more detailed information the physician can then consult one of the many databases available on the internet, such as PSIAConline (http://www.psiac.de) and MediQ (http://www.mediq.ch). Pharmacokinetic interactions can be easily assessed, monitored and controlled by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Besides these tools it is important to keep in mind that nobody knows everything; even physicians do not know everything. So take pride in asking someone who might help and for this purpose AGATE offers a drug information service AID (http://www.amuep-agate.de). Just good for nothing, without being based on any kind of medical approach are computer programs that judge prescriptions without taking into account a patient's individual peculiarities. In case these types of programs produce red exclamation marks or traffic lights to underline their judgment, they might even work in a contrapuntal way by just eliciting insecurity and fear.

  4. Cryogenic-coolant He-4-superconductor interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspi, S.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Allen, R. J.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1978-01-01

    The thermodynamic and thermal interaction between a type 2 composite alloy and cryo-coolant He4 was studied with emphasis on post quench phenomena of formvar coated conductors. The latter were investigated using a heater simulation technique. Overall heat transfer coefficients were evaluated for the quench onset point. Heat flux densities were determined for phenomena of thermal switching between a peak and a recovery value. The study covered near saturated liquid, pressurized He4, both above and below the lambda transition, and above and below the thermodynamic critical pressure. In addition, friction coefficients for relative motion between formvar insulated conductors were determined.

  5. Amyloid beta peptide as a physiological modulator of neuronal 'A'-type K+ current.

    PubMed

    Plant, Leigh D; Webster, Nicola J; Boyle, John P; Ramsden, Martin; Freir, Darragh B; Peers, Chris; Pearson, Hugh A

    2006-11-01

    Control of neuronal spiking patterns resides, in part, in the type and degree of expression of voltage-gated K(+) channel subunits. Previous studies have revealed that soluble forms of the Alzheimer's disease associated amyloid beta protein (Abeta) can increase the 'A'-type current in neurones. In this study, we define the molecular basis for this increase and show that endogenous production of Abeta is important in the modulation of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 subunit expression in central neurones. A-type K(+) currents, and Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 subunit expression, were transiently increased in cerebellar granule neurones by the 1-40 and 1-42 forms of Abeta (100nM, 2-24h). Currents through recombinant Kv4.2 channels expressed in HEK293 cells were increased in a similar fashion to those through the native channels. Increases in 'A'-type current could be prevented by the use of cycloheximide and brefeldin A, indicating that protein expression and trafficking processes were altered by Abeta, rather than protein degredation. Endogenous Abeta production in cerebellar granule neurones was blocked using inhibitors of either gamma- or beta-secretase and resulted in decreased K(+) current. Crucially this could be prevented by co-application of exogenous Abeta (1nM), however, no change in Kv4.2 or Kv4.3 subunit expression occurred. These data show that Abeta is a modulator of Kv4 subunit expression in neurones at both the functional and the molecular level. Thus Abeta is not only involved in Alzheimer pathology, but is also an important physiological regulator of ion channel expression and hence neuronal excitability.

  6. Statistics of SU(5) D-brane models on a type II orientifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmeiner, Florian; Stein, Maren

    2006-06-01

    We perform a statistical analysis of models with SU(5) and flipped SU(5) gauge group in a type II orientifold setup. We investigate the distribution and correlation of properties of these models, including the number of generations and the hidden sector gauge group. Compared to the recent analysis [F. Gmeiner, R. Blumenhagen, G. Honecker, D. Lüst, and T. Weigand, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 01 (2006) 004; F. Gmeiner, Fortschr. Phys.FPYKA60015-8208 54, 391 (2006).10.1088/1126-6708/2006/01/004] of models with a standard model-like gauge group, we find very similar results.

  7. [Traumatic separation of a type I patella bipartite in a sportsman].

    PubMed

    Ottesen, Casper Smedegaard; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Holck, Kim

    2014-05-12

    This is a case report of a 44-year-old sportsman who experi-enced acute onset of strong pain and loss of ability to extend his right knee during a game of beach volley. X-ray imaging showed a patella in two parts with rounded edges and with a diastasis of more than 2 cm. Intra-operatively atrophic fibrocartilage was found on both parts of the patella. Asymptomatic patella bi-partite was found on X-ray imaging of the patient's left knee, and he was diagnosed to have traumatic separation of a type I patella bipartite. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgical and radiological findings.

  8. Reminder about potentially serious problems with a type of blocked ANOVA analysis

    Treesearch

    Steve Verrill; David E. Kretschmann

    2017-01-01

    A type of blocked experiment has the potential of being poorly designed and/or analyzed. Verrill (1993, 1999) and Verrill et al. (2004) referred to such an experiment as a “predictor sort” experiment. David and Gunnink (1997) described the procedure as “artificial pairing.” In textbooks it is sometimes referred to as a “matched pair” or a “matched...

  9. VLA radio upper limit on a Type IIn SN 2008B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Poonam; Soderberg, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    Poonam Chandra and Alicia Soderberg report on behalf of a larger collaboration: We observed a Type IIn supernova SN 2008B (CBET 1194) with the Very Large Array (VLA) in the 8.46 GHz band on 2008, January 23.5 UT. The observations were taken for total duration of one hour in the VLA B-configuration. We do not detect any radio emission at the supernova position (CBET 1194). The flux density at the supernova position is 60 ± 28 uJy.

  10. When is a failure to replicate not a type II error?

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Marco; Urcuioli, Peter J; Lionello-DeNolf, Karen M

    2007-05-01

    Zentall and Singer (2007) challenge our conclusion that the work-ethic effect reported by Clement, Feltus, Kaiser, and Zentall (2000) may have been a Type I error by arguing that (a) the effect has been extensively replicated and (b) the amount of overtraining our pigeons received may not have been sufficient to produce it. We believe that our conclusion is warranted because (a) the original effect has not been replicated despite multiple attempts to do so and (b) the statement that more extended overtraining may be needed itself suggests that the original effect is not reliable.

  11. Within-trial contrast: when is a failure to replicate not a type I error?

    PubMed

    Zentall, Thomas R; Singer, Rebecca A

    2007-05-01

    Vasconcelos, Urcuioli, and Lionello-DeNolf (2007) report the results of five experiments that fail to replicate the results of our within-trial contrast study (Clement, Feltus, Kaiser, & Zentall, 2000) and suggest that our results may represent a Type I Error. We believe that this conclusion is not warranted because (a) there is considerable evidence in support of the effect and (b) the amount of training that they gave to their pigeons prior to test may not have been sufficient to observe the effect reliably. We suggest that when sufficient training is provided, reliable contrast can be found.

  12. A survey for pulsations in A-type stars using SuperWASP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, Daniel L.

    2015-12-01

    "It is sound judgement to hope that in the not too distant future we shall be competent to understand so simple a thing as a star." - Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington, The Internal Constitution of Stars, 1926 A survey of A-type stars is conducted with the SuperWASP archive in the search for pulsationally variable stars. Over 1.5 million stars are selected based on their (J-H) colour. Periodograms are calculated for light curves which have been extracted from the archive and cleaned of spurious points. Peaks which have amplitudes greater than 0.5 millimagnitude are identified in the periodograms. In total, 202 656 stars are identified to show variability in the range 5-300 c/d. Spectroscopic follow-up was obtained for 38 stars which showed high-frequency pulsations between 60 and 235 c/d, and a further object with variability at 636 c/d. In this sample, 13 were identified to be normal A-type δ Sct stars, 14 to be pulsating metallic-lined Am stars, 11 to be rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars, and one to be a subdwarf B variable star. The spectra were used not only to classify the stars, but to determine an effective temperature through Balmer line fitting. Hybrid stars have been identified in this study, which show pulsations in both the high- and low-overtone domains; an observation not predicted by theory. These stars are prime targets to perform follow-up observations, as a confirmed detection of this phenomenon will have significant impact on the theory of pulsations in A-type stars. The detected number of roAp stars has expanded the known number of this pulsator class by 22 per cent. Within these results both the hottest and coolest roAp star have been identified. Further to this, one object, KIC 7582608, was observed by the Kepler telescope for 4 yr, enabling a detailed frequency analysis. This analysis has identified significant frequency variations in this star, leading to the hypothesis that this is the first close binary star of its type. The observational

  13. When Is a Failure to Replicate Not a Type II Error?

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Marco; Urcuioli, Peter J; Lionello-DeNolf, Karen M

    2007-01-01

    Zentall and Singer (2007) challenge our conclusion that the work-ethic effect reported by Clement, Feltus, Kaiser, and Zentall (2000) may have been a Type I error by arguing that (a) the effect has been extensively replicated and (b) the amount of overtraining our pigeons received may not have been sufficient to produce it. We believe that our conclusion is warranted because (a) the original effect has not been replicated despite multiple attempts to do so and (b) the statement that more extended overtraining may be needed itself suggests that the original effect is not reliable. PMID:17575905

  14. Spectroscopic classification of AT 2018adg as a Type Ic supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. C.; Nordin, J.; Hook, I. M.

    2018-03-01

    We obtained a spectrum of the transient AT 2018adg (see TNS) with the SPRAT spectrograph (resolution R 350; Piascik et al. 2014) on the 2-m Liverpool Telescope (LT; Steele et al. 2004) on 2018 Mar 11.13 UT. The spectrum is consistent with AT 2018adg being a Type Ic supernova around peak brightness, at a redshift of z 0.02 to 0.03, in agreement with the host galaxy redshift of z = 0.022 (da Costa et al. 1998).

  15. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  16. Atomic-Scale Visualization of Quasiparticle Interference on a Type-II Weyl Semimetal Surface.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Bian, Guang; Chang, Guoqing; Lu, Hong; Xu, Su-Yang; Wang, Guangqiang; Chang, Tay-Rong; Zhang, Songtian; Belopolski, Ilya; Alidoust, Nasser; Sanchez, Daniel S; Song, Fengqi; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Yao, Nan; Bansil, Arun; Jia, Shuang; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2016-12-23

    We combine quasiparticle interference simulation (theory) and atomic resolution scanning tunneling spectromicroscopy (experiment) to visualize the interference patterns on a type-II Weyl semimetal Mo_{x}W_{1-x}Te_{2} for the first time. Our simulation based on first-principles band topology theoretically reveals the surface electron scattering behavior. We identify the topological Fermi arc states and reveal the scattering properties of the surface states in Mo_{0.66}W_{0.34}Te_{2}. In addition, our result reveals an experimental signature of the topology via the interconnectivity of bulk and surface states, which is essential for understanding the unusual nature of this material.

  17. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D; Ritter, David M; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    A-type voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na(+) channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  18. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels

    PubMed Central

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D.; Ritter, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A-type voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na+ channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  19. Drug-nutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Trovato, A; Nuhlicek, D N; Midtling, J E

    1991-11-01

    Drug-nutrient interactions are a commonly overlooked aspect of the prescribing practices of physicians. As more pharmaceutical agents become available, attention should be focused on interactions of drugs with foods and nutrients. Although drug-nutrient interactions are not as common as drug-drug interactions, they can have an impact on therapeutic outcome. Drugs can affect nutritional status by altering nutrient absorption, metabolism, utilization or excretion. Food, beverages and mineral or vitamin supplements can affect the absorption and effectiveness of drugs. Knowledge of drug-nutrient interactions can help reduce the incidence of these effects. Physicians should question patients about their dietary habits so that patients can be informed about possible interactions between a prescribed drug and foods and nutrients.

  20. How Interactive Is the Interactive Whiteboard?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quashie, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    An interactive whiteboard (IWB) is simply a surface onto which a computer screen can be displayed, via a projector. It is touch-sensitive and lets one use a pen like a mouse, controlling the computer from the board itself. Everything that can be displayed on a computer can be displayed onto the whiteboard and, if the computer is linked to speakers…

  1. Food-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-01-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:22043389

  2. Warfarin interaction with erythromycin.

    PubMed

    Sato, R I; Gray, D R; Brown, S E

    1984-12-01

    The drug interaction between warfarin and erythromycin is not well known. We report a case in which erythromycin was observed to markedly potentiate warfarin anticoagulation, resulting in hemorrhage in a patient treated for Legionella pneumonia. The morbidity of this drug interaction is enhanced in elderly patients who have infection accompanied by anorexia and/or fever and who are receiving intravenous erythromycin. The well-documented, temporal relationship established erythromycin as the interacting drug.

  3. Gender interactions and success.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Carla; Peterson, Teri

    2004-01-01

    Does gender by itself, or does gender's interaction with career variables, better explain the difference between women and men's careers in healthcare management? US healthcare managers were surveyed regarding career and personal experiences. Gender was statistically interacted with explanatory variables. Multiple regression with backwards selection systematically removed non-significant variables. All gender interaction variables were non-significant. Much of the literature proposes that work and career factors impact working women differently than working men. We find that while gender alone is a significant predictor of income, it does not significantly interact with other career variables.

  4. Two interacting Hofstadter butterflies

    SciTech Connect

    Barelli, A.; Bellissard, J.; Jacquod, P.

    1997-04-01

    The problem of two interacting particles in a quasiperiodic potential is addressed. Using analytical and numerical methods, we explore the spectral properties and eigenstates structure from the weak to the strong interaction case. More precisely, a semiclassical approach based on noncommutative geometry techniques is used to understand the intricate structure of such a spectrum. An interaction induced localization effect is furthermore emphasized. We discuss the application of our results on a two-dimensional model of two particles in a uniform magnetic field with on-site interaction. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Hydrothermally-induced changes in mineralogy and magnetic properties of oxidized A-type granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nédélec, Anne; Trindade, Ricardo; Peschler, Anne; Archanjo, Carlos; Macouin, Mélina; Poitrasson, Franck; Bouchez, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The changes in magnetic mineralogy due to the hydrothermal alteration of A-type granitic rocks have been thoroughly investigated in samples from the granite of Tana (Corsica, France), and compared with other A-type granites: Meruoca (NE Brazil), Bushveld (South Africa), Mount Scott (Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma, USA) and the stratoid hypersolvus granites of Madagascar. The altered red-colored samples and their non-altered equivalents were magnetically characterized by means of magnetic susceptibility measurements, hysteresis loops, remanent coercivity spectra, and Lowrie test. It is shown that hydrothermalization in magnetite-bearing granites is related to the formation of fine-grained magnetite and hematite, and to coeval depletion in the content of primary low-coercive coarse-grained magnetite. These mineralogical changes give typical rock magnetic signatures, namely lower susceptibility magnitudes and anisotropy degrees, prolate AMS (anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) fabrics and increased coercivities. Optical microscopy and SEM (scanning electronic microscopy) images suggest that the orientation of the secondary magnetic minerals is related to fluid-pathways and micro-fractures formed during the hydrothermal event and therefore may be unrelated to magma emplacement and crystallization fabrics. Changes in magnetic mineralogy and grain-size distribution have also to be considered for any paleomagnetic and iron isotope studies in granites.

  6. Non-Native Speaker Interaction Management Strategies in a Network-Based Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the dyad-based communication of two groups of non-native speakers (NNSs) of English involved in real time interaction in a type of text-based computer-mediated communication (CMC) tool known as a MOO. The object of this semester long study was to examine the ways in which the subjects managed their L2 interaction during…

  7. Petrogenesis and magmatic evolution of ∼130 Ma A-type granites in Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fajun; Xu, Xisheng; Zou, Haibo; Xia, Yan

    2015-02-01

    A number of Late Mesozoic (∼130 Ma) A-type granitic plutons have been identified in Southeast China. Here we investigate the petrogenesis of one of these granitic plutons in Southeast China, the Sanqingshan-Damaoshan (SD) granites in northeastern Jiangxi Province, using zircon U-Pb geochronology, Hf isotopic analyses, and major and trace element analyses. The SD granites are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous and show typical A-type affinity, which is characterized by high SiO2, Na2O + K2O, rare earth element (REE), high field strength element (HFSE) contents, Ga/Al and Fe# [FeOt/(FeOt + MgO)] values. Zircon grains from the SD granites and some other ∼130 Ma A-type granites commonly contain oscillatory zoning ;cores; surrounded by unzoned to weakly zoned ;rims;. Detailed studies of zircons from the SD granites show that ;rims; are enriched in LREE, Th and U compared with ;cores;. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns of the ;cores; increase steeply from La to Lu and show pronounced Ce and Eu anomalies, while REE patterns of the ;rims; display higher REE abundances with flatter LREE patterns and moderate Ce anomalies. Nevertheless, Lu-Hf isotopic analyses and Ti-in zircon thermometer show similar characteristics between ;rims; and ;cores;, indicating that the ;rims; may crystallize under the effect of internal magmatic hydrothermal fluids. U-rich ;rims; are more susceptible to Pb loss caused by self-irradiation, which may lead to significant younger U-Pb ages. As a result, U-Pb ages of zircon ;cores; (∼130 Ma) represent crystallization ages of the SD granites. εHf(t) values of zircon grains from the SD granites are between -6.4 and -0.4 with Mesoproterozoic model ages (T2DM) ranging from 1.22 to 1.59 Ga, suggesting that the granites may be formed by partial melting of Proterozoic basement. Compared with other adjacent ∼130 Ma A-type granitic plutons in SE China, the SD granites have similar geochemical characteristics and Hf isotopic compositions to those of

  8. Reconceptualizing sex, brain and psychopathology: interaction, interaction, interaction

    PubMed Central

    Joel, D; Yankelevitch-Yahav, R

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing recognition of the influence of sex on brain structure and function, and in relation, on the susceptibility, prevalence and response to treatment of psychiatric disorders. Most theories and descriptions of the effects of sex on the brain are dominated by an analogy to the current interpretation of the effects of sex on the reproductive system, according to which sex is a divergence system that exerts a unitary, overriding and serial effect on the form of other systems. We shortly summarize different lines of evidence that contradict aspects of this analogy. The new view that emerges from these data is of sex as a complex system whose different components interact with one another and with other systems to affect body and brain. The paradigm shift that this understanding calls for is from thinking of sex in terms of sexual dimorphism and sex differences, to thinking of sex in terms of its interactions with other factors and processes. Our review of data obtained from animal models of psychopathology clearly reveals the need for such a paradigmatic shift, because in the field of animal behaviour whether a sex difference exists and its direction depend on the interaction of many factors including, species, strain, age, specific test employed and a multitude of environmental factors. We conclude by explaining how the new conceptualization can account for sex differences in psychopathology. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Animal Models in Psychiatry Research. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-20 PMID:24758640

  9. Drug-nutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander

    2013-07-01

    Drug-nutrient interactions are defined as physical, chemical, physiologic, or pathophysiologic relationships between a drug and a nutrient. The causes of most clinically significant drug-nutrient interactions are usually multifactorial. Failure to identify and properly manage drug-nutrient interactions can lead to very serious consequences and have a negative impact on patient outcomes. Nevertheless, with thorough review and assessment of the patient's history and treatment regimens and a carefully executed management strategy, adverse events associated with drug-nutrient interactions can be prevented. Based on the physiologic sequence of events after a drug or a nutrient has entered the body and the mechanism of interactions, drug-nutrient interactions can be categorized into 4 main types. Each type of interaction can be managed using similar strategies. The existing data that guide the clinical management of most drug-nutrient interactions are mostly anecdotal experience, uncontrolled observations, and opinions, whereas the science in understanding the mechanism of drug-nutrient interactions remains limited. The challenge for researchers and clinicians is to increase both basic and higher level clinical research in this field to bridge the gap between the science and practice. The research should aim to establish a better understanding of the function, regulation, and substrate specificity of the nutrient-related enzymes and transport proteins present in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as assess how the incidence and management of drug-nutrient interactions can be affected by sex, ethnicity, environmental factors, and genetic polymorphisms. This knowledge can help us develop a true personalized medicine approach in the prevention and management of drug-nutrient interactions.

  10. Storyboarding Multimedia Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Linda C.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how to include interactivity when designing multimedia-based training (MBT) storyboards is a major key for a successful MBT. Discusses the basic formats of interactions and when to use each format. Describes how to storyboard and areas to address, including: the display area, prompts, branching, programming and graphics notes,…

  11. Interactive Videodisc Learning Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currier, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of capabilities of interactive videodisc, which combines video images recorded on disc and random-access, highlights interactivity; teaching techniques with videodiscs (including masking, disassembly, movie maps, tactical maps, action code, and simulation); costs; and games. Illustrative material is provided. (High Technology, P. O. Box…

  12. Interactive Presentation of Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdin, Martin; Turcáni, Milan; Vrábel, Marek

    2009-01-01

    In the paper we discus about design of universal environment for solution of creating effective multimedia applications with accent on the implementation of interactive elements with the possibility of using the adaptive systems (AS). We also discuss about possibilities of offline presentation of this interactive multimedia adaptive animations…

  13. Interactive Visualization of Dependencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Camilo Arango; Bischof, Walter F.; Hoover, H. James

    2012-01-01

    We present an interactive tool for browsing course requisites as a case study of dependency visualization. This tool uses multiple interactive visualizations to allow the user to explore the dependencies between courses. A usability study revealed that the proposed browser provides significant advantages over traditional methods, in terms of…

  14. University-industry interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    It is posited that university industry interaction is highly desirable from the viewpoint of the long term economic development of the country as well as being desirable for the Space Grant Programs. The present and future possible interactions are reviewed for the three university levels namely, undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research.

  15. Interaction Analysis in MANOVA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, M. Austin

    Simultaneous test procedures (STPS for short) in the context of the unrestricted full rank general linear multivariate model for population cell means are introduced and utilized to analyze interactions in factorial designs. By appropriate choice of an implying hypothesis, it is shown how to test overall main effects, interactions, simple main,…

  16. Let Social Interaction Flourish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Anny Fritzen

    2016-01-01

    The author describes lessons learned--through a high school project that grouped English language learners with native speakers to create a video--about ways to foster respectful, productive interaction among English learners and peers who are native speakers. The potential benefits of students who are just learning English interacting socially…

  17. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  18. What Is Interactivity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smuts, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author attempts to develop a definition of "interactivity" that meets two sometimes incompatible goals: the definition should be in accord with the best intuitions on how the term should be used, and it should usefully differentiate interactivity from related but incompatible concepts with which it is often confused. The…

  19. Media Embedded Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David

    A review of literature and two surveys, one of college students and one of a random sample of adults, were used to examine four aspects of media embedded interactions (social behavior in front of a TV or radio): their functions, their environment, their effects, and the reactions of the interactants to them. Television is seen as performing a…

  20. Interactive grid adaption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abolhassani, Jamshid S.; Everton, Eric L.

    1990-01-01

    An interactive grid adaption method is developed, discussed and applied to the unsteady flow about an oscillating airfoil. The user is allowed to have direct interaction with the adaption of the grid as well as the solution procedure. Grid points are allowed to adapt simultaneously to several variables. In addition to the theory and results, the hardware and software requirements are discussed.

  1. 10 CFR 33.13 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.13 Section 33.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.13 Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type A specific license of broad...

  2. 10 CFR 33.13 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.13 Section 33.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.13 Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type A specific license of broad...

  3. 10 CFR 33.14 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.14 Section 33.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.14 Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type B specific license of broad...

  4. 10 CFR 33.13 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.13 Section 33.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.13 Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type A specific license of broad...

  5. 10 CFR 33.14 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.14 Section 33.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.14 Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type B specific license of broad...

  6. 10 CFR 33.14 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.14 Section 33.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.14 Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type B specific license of broad...

  7. 10 CFR 33.14 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.14 Section 33.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.14 Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type B specific license of broad...

  8. 10 CFR 33.14 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.14 Section 33.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.14 Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type B specific license of broad...

  9. 10 CFR 33.15 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type C specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.15 Section 33.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.15 Requirements for the issuance of a Type C specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type C specific license of broad...

  10. 10 CFR 33.13 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.13 Section 33.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.13 Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type A specific license of broad...

  11. 10 CFR 33.15 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type C specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.15 Section 33.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.15 Requirements for the issuance of a Type C specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type C specific license of broad...

  12. 10 CFR 33.15 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type C specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.15 Section 33.15 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.15 Requirements for the issuance of a Type C specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type C specific license of broad...

  13. 10 CFR 33.13 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of broad scope. 33.13 Section 33.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specific Licenses of Broad Scope § 33.13 Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope. An application for a Type A specific license of broad...

  14. 78 FR 67015 - Airworthiness Directives; Agusta S.p.A. (Type Certificate Currently Held by Agusta Westland...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Agusta S.p.A. (Type Certificate Currently Held by Agusta Westland) Helicopters AGENCY... Sec. 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): 2013-22-16 Agusta S.P.A. (Type... new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Agusta S.p.A. (Agusta) Model AW139 helicopters. This AD...

  15. Spacelab user interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The results of the third and final phase of a study undertaken to define means of optimizing the Spacelab experiment data system by interactively manipulating the flow of data were presented. A number of payload applicable interactive techniques and an integrated interaction system for each of two possible payloads are described. These interaction systems have been functionally defined and are accompanied with block diagrams, hardware specifications, software sizing and speed requirements, operational procedures and cost/benefits analysis data for both onboard and ground based system elements. It is shown that accrued benefits are attributable to a reduction in data processing costs obtained by, generally, a considerable reduction in the quantity of data that might otherwise be generated without interaction. One other additional anticipated benefit includes the increased scientific value obtained by the quicker return of all useful data.

  16. AKAP79/150 impacts intrinsic excitability of hippocampal neurons through phospho-regulation of A-type K+ channel trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Sun, Wei; Kung, Faith; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Hoffman, Dax A

    2011-01-26

    Kv4.2, as the primary α-subunit of rapidly inactivating, A-type voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels expressed in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal dendrites, plays a critical role in regulating their excitability. Activity-dependent trafficking of Kv4.2 relies on C-terminal protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) target PKA to glutamate receptor and ion channel complexes to allow for discrete, local signaling. As part of a previous study, we showed that AKAP79/150 interacts with Kv4.2 complexes and that the two proteins colocalize in hippocampal neurons. However, the nature and functional consequence of their interaction has not been previously explored. Here, we report that the C-terminal domain of Kv4.2 interacts with an internal region of AKAP79/150 that overlaps with its MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase)-binding domain. We show that AKAP79/150-anchored PKA activity controls Kv4.2 surface expression in heterologous cells and hippocampal neurons. Consistent with these findings, disrupting PKA anchoring led to a decrease in neuronal excitability, while preventing dephosphorylation by the phosphatase calcineurin resulted in increased excitability. These results demonstrate that AKAP79/150 provides a platform for dynamic PKA regulation of Kv4.2 expression, fundamentally impacting CA1 excitability.

  17. Theory and simulent design of a type of auto-self-protecting optical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binhong; Peng, Songcun

    1990-06-01

    As the use of lasers in the military and in the civilian economy increases with each passing day, it is often necessary for the human eye or sensitive instruments to observe weak lasers, such as the return waves of laser radar and laser communications signals; but it is also necessary to provide protection against damage to the eye from the strong lasers of enemy laser weapons. For this reason, it is necessary to have a kind of automatic optical self-protecting switch. Based upon a study of the transmitting and scattering characteristics of multilayer dielectric optical waveguides, a practical computer program is set up for designing a type of auto-self-protecting optical switch with a computer model by using the nonlinear property of dielectric layers and the plasma behavior of metal substrates. This technique can be used to protect the human eye and sensitive detectors from damage caused by strong laser beams.

  18. A Type of Low-Latency Data Gathering Method with Multi-Sink for Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Chao; Qiu, Jian-mei; Li, Shu-yan; Qiang, Meng-ye; Wang, Ru-chuan

    2016-01-01

    To balance energy consumption and reduce latency on data transmission in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), a type of low-latency data gathering method with multi-Sink (LDGM for short) is proposed in this paper. The network is divided into several virtual regions consisting of three or less data gathering units and the leader of each region is selected according to its residual energy as well as distance to all of the other nodes. Only the leaders in each region need to communicate with the mobile Sinks which have effectively reduced energy consumption and the end-to-end delay. Moreover, with the help of the sleep scheduling and the sensing radius adjustment strategies, redundancy in network coverage could also be effectively reduced. Simulation results show that LDGM is energy efficient in comparison with MST as well as MWST and its time efficiency on data collection is higher than one Sink based data gathering methods. PMID:27338401

  19. Direct observations of low-energy solar electrons associated with a type 3 solar radio burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    On 6 April 1971 a solar X-ray flare and a type 3 solar radio noise burst were observed with instrumentation on the eccentric-orbiting satellite IMP 6. The type 3 solar radio noise burst was detected down to a frequency of 31 kHz. A highly anisotropic packet of low-energy solar electron intensities arrived at the satellite approximately 6000 seconds after the onset of the solar flare. This packet of solar electron intensities was observed for 4200 seconds. Maximum differential intensities of the solar electrons were in the energy range of one to several keV. The frequency drift rate of the type 3 radio noise at frequencies below 178 kHz also indicated an average particle speed corresponding to that of a 3-keV electron. The simultaneous observations of these solar electron intensities and of the type 3 solar radio burst are presented, and their interrelationships are explored.

  20. Magnetic levitation on a type-I superconductor as a practical demonstration experiment for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, M. R.; Lahera, D. E.; Suderow, H.

    2012-09-01

    We describe and discuss an experimental set-up which allows undergraduate and graduate students to view and study magnetic levitation on a type-I superconductor. The demonstration can be repeated many times using one readily available 25 l liquid helium dewar. We study the equilibrium position of a magnet that levitates over a lead bowl immersed in a liquid hand-held helium cryostat. We combine the measurement of the position of the magnet with simple analytical calculations. This provides a vivid visualization of magnetic levitation from the balance between pure flux expulsion and gravitation. The experiment contrasts and illustrates the case of magnetic levitation with high temperature type-II superconductors using liquid nitrogen, where levitation results from partial flux expulsion and vortex physics.

  1. An overview of the toxicology and toxicokinetics of fusarenon-X, a type B trichothecene mycotoxin.

    PubMed

    Aupanun, Sawinee; Poapolathep, Saranya; Giorgi, Mario; Imsilp, Kanjana; Poapolathep, Amnart

    2017-01-20

    Fusarenon-X (FX) is a type B trichothecene mycotoxin that is frequently observed along with deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) in agricultural commodities. This review aims to give an overview of the literature concerning the toxicology and toxicokinetics of FX. FX is primarily found in cereals grown in temperate regions, but it can also be found worldwide because of the global transport of products. The major toxicity of FX occurs through inhibition of protein synthesis, followed by the disruption of DNA synthesis. Moreover, FX has also been shown to induce apoptosis in in vitro and in vivo studies. The targets of FX are organs containing actively proliferating cells, such as the thymus, spleen, skin, small intestine, testes and bone marrow. FX causes immunosuppression, intestinal malabsorption, developmental toxicity and genotoxicity. In addition, sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals is currently lacking, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies it as a group 3 carcinogen.

  2. Molecular physiology and modulation of somatodendritic A-type potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Jerng, Henry H; Pfaffinger, Paul J; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2004-12-01

    The somatodendritic subthreshold A-type K+ current (ISA) in nerve cells is a critical component of the ensemble of voltage-gated ionic currents that determine somatodendritic signal integration. The underlying K+ channel belongs to the Shal subfamily of voltage-gated K+ channels. Most Shal channels across the animal kingdom share a high degree of structural conservation, operate in the subthreshold range of membrane potentials, and exhibit relatively fast inactivation and recovery from inactivation. Mammalian Shal K+ channels (Kv4) undergo preferential closed-state inactivation with features that are generally inconsistent with the classical mechanisms of inactivation typical of Shaker K+ channels. Here, we review (1) the physiological and genetic properties of ISA, 2 the molecular mechanisms of Kv4 inactivation and its remodeling by a family of soluble calcium-binding proteins (KChIPs) and a membrane-bound dipeptidase-like protein (DPPX), and (3) the modulation of Kv4 channels by protein phosphorylation.

  3. Roles of somatic A-type K(+) channels in the synaptic plasticity of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoon-Sil; Kim, Kyeong-Deok; Eun, Su-Yong; Jung, Sung-Cherl

    2014-06-01

    In the mammalian brain, information encoding and storage have been explained by revealing the cellular and molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity at various levels in the central nervous system, including the hippocampus and the cerebral cortices. The modulatory mechanisms of synaptic excitability that are correlated with neuronal tasks are fundamental factors for synaptic plasticity, and they are dependent on intracellular Ca(2+)-mediated signaling. In the present review, the A-type K(+) (IA) channel, one of the voltage-dependent cation channels, is considered as a key player in the modulation of Ca(2+) influx through synaptic NMDA receptors and their correlated signaling pathways. The cellular functions of IA channels indicate that they possibly play as integral parts of synaptic and somatic complexes, completing the initiation and stabilization of memory.

  4. A Type III Protein Arginine Methyltransferase from the Protozoan Parasite Trypanosoma brucei*

    PubMed Central

    Fisk, John C.; Sayegh, Joyce; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia; Menon, Sarita; Presnyak, Vladimir; Clarke, Steven G.; Read, Laurie K.

    2009-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a widespread post-translational modification of proteins catalyzed by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). The ancient protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, possesses five putative PRMTs, a relatively large number for a single-celled eukaryote. Trypanosomatids lack gene regulation at the level of transcription, instead relying on post-transcriptional control mechanisms that act at the levels of RNA turnover, translation, and editing, all processes that likely involve multiple RNA-binding proteins, which are common targets of arginine methylation. Here, we report the characterization of a trypanosome PRMT, TbPRMT7, which is homologous to human PRMT7. Interestingly, trypanosomatids are the only single-celled eukaryotes known to harbor a PRMT7 homologue. TbPRMT7 differs dramatically from all known metazoan PRMT7 homologues in lacking the second AdoMet binding-like domain that is required for activity of the human enzyme. Nevertheless, bacterially expressed TbPRMT7 exhibits robust methyltransferase activity toward multiple targets in vitro. High resolution ion exchange chromatography analysis of methylated substrates reveals that TbPRMT7 is a type III PRMT, catalyzing the formation of only monomethylarginine, thereby representing the only exclusively type III PRMT identified to date. TbPRMT7 is expressed in both mammalian and insect stage T. brucei and is apparently dispensable for growth in both life cycle stages. The enzyme is cytoplasmically localized and is a component of several higher order complexes in vivo. Together, our studies indicate that TbPRMT7 is a Type III PRMT, and its robust activity and presence in numerous complexes suggest it plays multiple roles during the complex T. brucei life cycle. PMID:19254949

  5. A type III protein arginine methyltransferase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Fisk, John C; Sayegh, Joyce; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia; Menon, Sarita; Presnyak, Vladimir; Clarke, Steven G; Read, Laurie K

    2009-04-24

    Arginine methylation is a widespread post-translational modification of proteins catalyzed by a family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). The ancient protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, possesses five putative PRMTs, a relatively large number for a single-celled eukaryote. Trypanosomatids lack gene regulation at the level of transcription, instead relying on post-transcriptional control mechanisms that act at the levels of RNA turnover, translation, and editing, all processes that likely involve multiple RNA-binding proteins, which are common targets of arginine methylation. Here, we report the characterization of a trypanosome PRMT, TbPRMT7, which is homologous to human PRMT7. Interestingly, trypanosomatids are the only single-celled eukaryotes known to harbor a PRMT7 homologue. TbPRMT7 differs dramatically from all known metazoan PRMT7 homologues in lacking the second AdoMet binding-like domain that is required for activity of the human enzyme. Nevertheless, bacterially expressed TbPRMT7 exhibits robust methyltransferase activity toward multiple targets in vitro. High resolution ion exchange chromatography analysis of methylated substrates reveals that TbPRMT7 is a type III PRMT, catalyzing the formation of only monomethylarginine, thereby representing the only exclusively type III PRMT identified to date. TbPRMT7 is expressed in both mammalian and insect stage T. brucei and is apparently dispensable for growth in both life cycle stages. The enzyme is cytoplasmically localized and is a component of several higher order complexes in vivo. Together, our studies indicate that TbPRMT7 is a Type III PRMT, and its robust activity and presence in numerous complexes suggest it plays multiple roles during the complex T. brucei life cycle.

  6. A discussion on the tectonic implications of Ediacaran late- to post-orogenic A-type granite in the northeastern Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, F. A.; Bonin, B.; Pease, V.; Anderson, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    The transition from late-orogenic to post-orogenic magmatism following major orogenic episodes such as the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian East African Orogen (EAO) is an important, yet not well-understood geological event marking the cessation of subduction-controlled magmatism between buoyant lithospheric fragments. Forming the northern part of the EAO in the Arabian-Nubian Shield are three granitic suites that successively intruded the same northeastern area and post-date the 640 Ma major orogenic episode: (1) 620-600 Ma alkali feldspar (hypersolvous) granite with alkaline/ferroan/A-type geochemistry, (2) 599 Ma granite cumulates (some garnet-bearing) with calc-alkaline/magnesian affinities, and (3) 584-566 Ma alkali feldspar (hypersolvous) granite (aegirine-bearing) with a distinctive peralkaline/ferroan/A-type signature. Combining whole-rock geochemistry from the southern and northern Arabian Shield, suites 1 and 2 are suggested to be products of late-orogenic slab tear/rollback inducing asthenospheric mantle injection and lower crustal melting/fractionation toward A-type/ferroan geochemistry. Suite 3, however, is suggested to be produced by post-orogenic lithospheric delamination, which replaced the older mantle with new asthenospheric (rare earth element-enriched) mantle that ultimately becomes the thermal boundary layer of the new lithosphere. Major shear zones, such as the 620-540 Ma Najd Fault System (NFS), are some of the last tectonic events recorded across the Arabian Shield. Data presented here suggest that the NFS is directly related to the late-orogenic (620-600 Ma) slab tear/rollback in the northeastern Shield as it met with opposing subduction polarity in the southern Shield. Furthermore, this study infers that east and west Gondwana amalgamation interacted with opposing convergence reflected by the NFS.

  7. The ADAMS interactive interpreter

    SciTech Connect

    Rietscha, E.R.

    1990-12-17

    The ADAMS (Advanced DAta Management System) project is exploring next generation database technology. Database management does not follow the usual programming paradigm. Instead, the database dictionary provides an additional name space environment that should be interactively created and tested before writing application code. This document describes the implementation and operation of the ADAMS Interpreter, an interactive interface to the ADAMS data dictionary and runtime system. The Interpreter executes individual statements of the ADAMS Interface Language, providing a fast, interactive mechanism to define and access persistent databases. 5 refs.

  8. Interactive Office user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E.; Lowers, Benjamin; Nabors, Terri L.

    1990-01-01

    Given here is a user's manual for Interactive Office (IO), an executive office tool for organization and planning, written specifically for Macintosh. IO is a paperless management tool to automate a related group of individuals into one productive system.

  9. Unexpected weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-08-01

    Stéphane Coen and Miro Erkintalo from the University of Auckland in New Zealand talk to Nature Photonics about their surprising findings regarding a weak long-range interaction they serendipitously stumbled upon while researching temporal cavity solitons.

  10. Drug-Food Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Drugs, Procedures & Devices, Prescription Medicines, Your Health ResourcesTags: adverse reactions, Food-Drug Interactions, patient education, patient information September 1, ...

  11. Air-Sea Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csanady, G. T.

    2001-03-01

    In recent years air-sea interaction has emerged as a subject in its own right, encompassing small-scale and large-scale processes in both air and sea. Air-Sea Interaction: Laws and Mechanisms is a comprehensive account of how the atmosphere and the ocean interact to control the global climate, what physical laws govern this interaction, and its prominent mechanisms. The topics covered range from evaporation in the oceans, to hurricanes, and on to poleward heat transport by the oceans. By developing the subject from basic physical (thermodynamic) principles, the book is accessible to graduate students and research scientists in meteorology, oceanography, and environmental engineering. It will also be of interest to the broader physics community involved in the treatment of transfer laws, and thermodynamics of the atmosphere and ocean.

  12. Flank solar wind interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Stewart L.; Greenstadt, Eugene W.; Coroniti, Ferdinand V.

    1994-01-01

    In this report we will summarize the results of the work performed under the 'Flank Solar Wind Interaction' investigation in support of NASA's Space Physics Guest Investigator Program. While this investigation was focused on the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind as observed by instruments on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 3 spacecraft, it also represents the culmination of decades of research performed by scientists at TRW on the rich phenomenology of collisionless shocks in space.

  13. Towards interactive narrative medicine.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, Marc; Charles, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Interactive Storytelling technologies have attracted significant interest in the field of simulation and serious gaming for their potential to provide a principled approach to improve user engagement in training scenarios. In this paper, we explore the use of Interactive Storytelling to support Narrative Medicine as a reflective practice. We describe a workflow for the generation of virtual narratives from high-level descriptions of patients' experiences as perceived by physicians, which can help to objectivize such perceptions and support various forms of analysis.

  14. Food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those associated with a high risk of treatment failure arising from a significantly reduced bioavailability in the fed state. Such interactions are frequently caused by chelation with components in food (as occurs with alendronic acid, clodronic acid, didanosine, etidronic acid, penicillamine and tetracycline) or dairy products (ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin), or by other direct interactions between the drug and certain food components (avitriptan, indinavir, itraconazole solution, levodopa, melphalan, mercaptopurine and perindopril). In addition, the physiological response to food intake, in particular gastric acid secretion, may reduce the bioavailability of certain drugs (ampicillin, azithromycin capsules, didanosine, erythromycin stearate or enteric coated, and isoniazid). For other drugs, concomitant food intake may result in an increase in drug bioavailability either because of a food-induced increase in drug solubility (albendazole, atovaquone, griseofulvin, isotretinoin, lovastatin, mefloquine, saquinavir and tacrolimus) or because of the secretion of

  15. Human-machine interactions

    DOEpatents

    Forsythe, J Chris [Sandia Park, NM; Xavier, Patrick G [Albuquerque, NM; Abbott, Robert G [Albuquerque, NM; Brannon, Nathan G [Albuquerque, NM; Bernard, Michael L [Tijeras, NM; Speed, Ann E [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  16. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  17. Interaction: Additivity plus Nonlinearity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    Whether or not there is an interaction between two factors in their effects on a dependent variable is often a central question. This paper proposes a general mechanism by which an interaction may arise: (a) the two factors are the same thing--or, at least, have a dimension in common--in the sense that it is meaningful to add (or subtract) them;…

  18. Rotational velocities of A-type stars. IV. Evolution of rotational velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorec, J.; Royer, F.

    2012-01-01

    Context. In previous works of this series, we have shown that late B- and early A-type stars have genuine bimodal distributions of rotational velocities and that late A-type stars lack slow rotators. The distributions of the surface angular velocity ratio Ω/Ωcrit (Ωcrit is the critical angular velocity) have peculiar shapes according to spectral type groups, which can be caused by evolutionary properties. Aims: We aim to review the properties of these rotational velocity distributions in some detail as a function of stellar mass and age. Methods: We have gathered vsini for a sample of 2014 B6- to F2-type stars. We have determined the masses and ages for these objects with stellar evolution models. The (Teff,log L/L⊙)-parameters were determined from the uvby-β photometry and the HIPPARCOS parallaxes. Results: The velocity distributions show two regimes that depend on the stellar mass. Stars less massive than 2.5 M⊙ have a unimodal equatorial velocity distribution and show a monotonical acceleration with age on the main sequence (MS). Stars more massive have a bimodal equatorial velocity distribution. Contrarily to theoretical predictions, the equatorial velocities of stars from about 1.7 M⊙ to 3.2 M⊙ undergo a strong acceleration in the first third of the MS evolutionary phase, while in the last third of the MS they evolve roughly as if there were no angular momentum redistribution in the external stellar layers. The studied stars might start in the ZAMS not necessarily as rigid rotators, but with a total angular momentum lower than the critical one of rigid rotators. The stars seem to evolve as differential rotators all the way of their MS life span and the variation of the observed rotational velocities proceeds with characteristic time scales δt ≈ 0.2 tMS, where tMS is the time spent by a star in the MS. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  19. Interaction with Machine Improvisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assayag, Gerard; Bloch, George; Cont, Arshia; Dubnov, Shlomo

    We describe two multi-agent architectures for an improvisation oriented musician-machine interaction systems that learn in real time from human performers. The improvisation kernel is based on sequence modeling and statistical learning. We present two frameworks of interaction with this kernel. In the first, the stylistic interaction is guided by a human operator in front of an interactive computer environment. In the second framework, the stylistic interaction is delegated to machine intelligence and therefore, knowledge propagation and decision are taken care of by the computer alone. The first framework involves a hybrid architecture using two popular composition/performance environments, Max and OpenMusic, that are put to work and communicate together, each one handling the process at a different time/memory scale. The second framework shares the same representational schemes with the first but uses an Active Learning architecture based on collaborative, competitive and memory-based learning to handle stylistic interactions. Both systems are capable of processing real-time audio/video as well as MIDI. After discussing the general cognitive background of improvisation practices, the statistical modelling tools and the concurrent agent architecture are presented. Then, an Active Learning scheme is described and considered in terms of using different improvisation regimes for improvisation planning. Finally, we provide more details about the different system implementations and describe several performances with the system.

  20. Conducting interactive experiments online.

    PubMed

    Arechar, Antonio A; Gächter, Simon; Molleman, Lucas

    2018-01-01

    Online labor markets provide new opportunities for behavioral research, but conducting economic experiments online raises important methodological challenges. This particularly holds for interactive designs. In this paper, we provide a methodological discussion of the similarities and differences between interactive experiments conducted in the laboratory and online. To this end, we conduct a repeated public goods experiment with and without punishment using samples from the laboratory and the online platform Amazon Mechanical Turk. We chose to replicate this experiment because it is long and logistically complex. It therefore provides a good case study for discussing the methodological and practical challenges of online interactive experimentation. We find that basic behavioral patterns of cooperation and punishment in the laboratory are replicable online. The most important challenge of online interactive experiments is participant dropout. We discuss measures for reducing dropout and show that, for our case study, dropouts are exogenous to the experiment. We conclude that data quality for interactive experiments via the Internet is adequate and reliable, making online interactive experimentation a potentially valuable complement to laboratory studies.

  1. PTF11kx: A Type Ia Supernova with Hydrogen Emission Persisting after 3.5 Years

    DOE PAGES

    Graham, M. L.; Harris, C. E.; Fox, O. D.; ...

    2017-07-11

    The optical transient PTF11kx exhibited both the characteristic spectral features of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and the signature of ejecta interacting with circumstellar material (CSM) containing hydrogen, indicating the presence of a nondegenerate companion. In this paper, we present an optical spectrum at 1342 days after peak from Keck Observatory, in which the broad component of Hα emission persists with a similar profile as in early-time observations. We also present Spitzer IRAC detections obtained 1237 and 1818 days after peak, and an upper limit from Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet imaging at 2133 days. We interpret our late-time observations inmore » the context of published results—and reinterpret the early-time observations—in order to constrain the CSM's physical parameters and to compare to theoretical predictions for recurrent-nova systems. We find that the CSM's radial extent may be several times the distance between the star and the CSM's inner edge, and that the CSM column density may be two orders of magnitude lower than previous estimates. We show that the Hα luminosity decline is similar to other SNe with CSM interaction and demonstrate how our infrared photometry is evidence for newly formed, collisionally heated dust. We create a model for PTF11kx's late-time CSM interaction and find that X-ray reprocessing by photoionization and recombination cannot reproduce the observed Hα luminosity, suggesting that the X-rays are thermalized and that Hα radiates from collisional excitation. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of our results regarding the progenitor scenario and the geometric properties of the CSM for the PTF11kx system.« less

  2. PTF11kx: A Type Ia Supernova with Hydrogen Emission Persisting after 3.5 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, M. L.; Harris, C. E.; Fox, O. D.

    The optical transient PTF11kx exhibited both the characteristic spectral features of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and the signature of ejecta interacting with circumstellar material (CSM) containing hydrogen, indicating the presence of a nondegenerate companion. In this paper, we present an optical spectrum at 1342 days after peak from Keck Observatory, in which the broad component of Hα emission persists with a similar profile as in early-time observations. We also present Spitzer IRAC detections obtained 1237 and 1818 days after peak, and an upper limit from Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet imaging at 2133 days. We interpret our late-time observations inmore » the context of published results—and reinterpret the early-time observations—in order to constrain the CSM's physical parameters and to compare to theoretical predictions for recurrent-nova systems. We find that the CSM's radial extent may be several times the distance between the star and the CSM's inner edge, and that the CSM column density may be two orders of magnitude lower than previous estimates. We show that the Hα luminosity decline is similar to other SNe with CSM interaction and demonstrate how our infrared photometry is evidence for newly formed, collisionally heated dust. We create a model for PTF11kx's late-time CSM interaction and find that X-ray reprocessing by photoionization and recombination cannot reproduce the observed Hα luminosity, suggesting that the X-rays are thermalized and that Hα radiates from collisional excitation. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of our results regarding the progenitor scenario and the geometric properties of the CSM for the PTF11kx system.« less

  3. Simulation of dynamic vehicle-track interaction on small radius curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torstensson, Peter T.; Nielsen, Jens C. O.

    2011-11-01

    A time-domain method for the simulation of general three-dimensional dynamic interaction between a vehicle and a curved railway track, accounting for a prescribed relative wheel-rail displacement excitation in a wide frequency range (up to several hundred Hz), is presented. The simulation model is able to capture the low-frequency vehicle dynamics simultaneously due to curving and the high-frequency track dynamics due to the excitation by, for example, the short-pitch corrugation on the low rail. The adopted multibody dynamics formulation considers inertia forces, such as centrifugal and Coriolis forces, as well as the structural flexibility of vehicle and track components. To represent a wheel/rail surface irregularity, isoparametric two-dimensional elements able to describe generally curved surface shapes are used. The computational effort is reduced by including only one bogie in the vehicle model. The influence of the low-frequency vehicle dynamics of the remaining parts of the vehicle is considered by pre-calculated look-up tables of forces and moments acting in the secondary suspension. For a track model taken as rigid, good agreement is observed between the results calculated with the presented model and a commercial software. The features of the model are demonstrated by a number of numerical examples. The influence of the structural flexibility of the wheelset and track on wheel-rail contact forces is investigated. For a discrete rail irregularity excitation, it is shown that the longitudinal creep force is significantly influenced by the wheelset eigenmodes. The introduction of a velocity-dependent friction law is found to induce an oscillation in the tangential contact force on the low rail with a frequency corresponding to the first anti-symmetric torsional mode of the wheelset. Further, under the application of driving moments on the two wheelsets and excitation by a discrete irregularity on the high rail, the frequency content of the tangential

  4. Characterization of a type-A response regulator differentially expressed during adventitious caulogenesis in Pinus pinaster.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, José M; Cortizo, Millán; Ordás, Ricardo J

    2012-12-15

    The molecular cloning and characterization of PipsRR1, a type-A response regulator in Pinus pinaster, is reported here. Type-A response regulators mediate downstream responses to cytokinin and act as negative feedback regulators of the signal transduction pathway. Some type-A response regulators in Arabidopsis have been related to de novo meristem formation. However, little information exists in Pinus spp. The PipsRR1 gene contains 5 exons, as do all type-A response regulators in Arabidopsis, and the deduced protein contains a receiver domain with the conserved DDK residues and a short C terminal extension. Expression analysis showed that the PipsRR1 gene is differentially expressed during the first phases of adventitious caulogenesis induced by benzyladenine in P. pinaster cotyledons, suggesting that PipsRR1 plays a role in caulogenesis in conifers. Additionally, a binary vector carrying the PipsRR1 promoter driving GFP:GUS expression was constructed to analyze the promoter activity in P. pinaster somatic embryos. The results of genetic transformation showed GUS activity during somatic embryo mass proliferation and embryo maturation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. [Indirect ELISA for simultaneous detection of antibodies against duck hepatitis A type 1 and 3 viruses].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyao; Ma, Xiuli; Huang, Bing; Li, Yufeng; Yu, Kexiang; Li, Jianliang; Liu, Cunxia; Han, Hongyu; Cui, Yanshun

    2015-04-04

    To simultaneously detect antibodies against Duck hepatitis A type 1 (DHAV-1) and type 3 (DHAV-3) viruses, we developed an indirect enzyme-linked immunosobent assay (ELISA) with bacterially expressed recombinant viral protein as antigen in Escherichia coli. We amplified the full-length VP3 gene of DHAV-1 and the full-length VP1 gene of DHAV-3 through reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and then cloned them into pET-32a expression vector, designated as pET-1VP3-3VP1. The fusion protein DHAV-1VP3-3VP1 expressed correctly and was subsequently used to develop an indirect ELISA assay. DHAV-1VP3-3VP1 fusion protein expressed in BL21 (DE3) cells following induction by Isopropyl-beta-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The expressed protein was very antigenic and reactive to virus-specific antibodies in western blot assay. The optimal working concentration for coating antigen was 1.0 microg per well and the working concentration of serum samples was 1:200 dilution and the cut-off value that distinguished the positive from negative serum samples was OD650 > OR = 0.38. The ELISA method based on the prokaryotic expression of VP3 (DHAV-1) and VP1 proteins (DHAV-3) can be used effectively for the clinical detection antibodies against DHAV-1 and DHAV-3.

  6. Hepatitis E virus persists in the presence of a type III interferon response.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xin; Li, Xinlei; Ambardekar, Charuta; Hu, Zhimin; Lhomme, Sébastien; Feng, Zongdi

    2017-05-01

    The RIG-I-like RNA helicase (RLR)-mediated interferon (IFN) response plays a pivotal role in the hepatic antiviral immunity. The hepatitis A virus (HAV) and the hepatitis C virus (HCV) counter this response by encoding a viral protease that cleaves the mitochondria antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), a common signaling adaptor for RLRs. However, a third hepatotropic RNA virus, the hepatitis E virus (HEV), does not appear to encode a functional protease yet persists in infected cells. We investigated HEV-induced IFN responses in human hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. HEV infection resulted in persistent virus replication despite poor spread. This was companied by a type III IFN response that upregulated multiple IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), but type I IFNs were barely detected. Blocking type III IFN production or signaling resulted in reduced ISG expression and enhanced HEV replication. Unlike HAV and HCV, HEV did not cleave MAVS; MAVS protein size, mitochondrial localization, and function remained unaltered in HEV-replicating cells. Depletion of MAVS or MDA5, and to a less extent RIG-I, also diminished IFN production and increased HEV replication. Furthermore, persistent activation of the JAK/STAT signaling rendered infected cells refractory to exogenous IFN treatment, and depletion of MAVS or the receptor for type III IFNs restored the IFN responsiveness. Collectively, these results indicate that unlike other hepatotropic RNA viruses, HEV does not target MAVS and its persistence is associated with continuous production of type III IFNs.

  7. Altering lamina assembly reveals lamina-dependent and -independent functions for A-type lamins.

    PubMed

    Zwerger, Monika; Roschitzki-Voser, Heidi; Zbinden, Reto; Denais, Celine; Herrmann, Harald; Lammerding, Jan; Grütter, Markus G; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-10-01

    Lamins are intermediate filament proteins that form a fibrous meshwork, called the nuclear lamina, between the inner nuclear membrane and peripheral heterochromatin of metazoan cells. The assembly and incorporation of lamin A/C into the lamina, as well as their various functions, are still not well understood. Here, we employed designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) as new experimental tools for lamin research. We screened for DARPins that specifically bound to lamin A/C, and interfered with lamin assembly in vitro and with incorporation of lamin A/C into the native lamina in living cells. The selected DARPins inhibited lamin assembly and delocalized A-type lamins to the nucleoplasm without modifying lamin expression levels or the amino acid sequence. Using these lamin binders, we demonstrate the importance of proper integration of lamin A/C into the lamina for nuclear mechanical properties and nuclear envelope integrity. Finally, our study provides evidence for cell-type-specific differences in lamin functions. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Altering lamina assembly reveals lamina-dependent and -independent functions for A-type lamins

    PubMed Central

    Zwerger, Monika; Roschitzki-Voser, Heidi; Zbinden, Reto; Denais, Celine; Herrmann, Harald; Lammerding, Jan; Grütter, Markus G.; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lamins are intermediate filament proteins that form a fibrous meshwork, called the nuclear lamina, between the inner nuclear membrane and peripheral heterochromatin of metazoan cells. The assembly and incorporation of lamin A/C into the lamina, as well as their various functions, are still not well understood. Here, we employed designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) as new experimental tools for lamin research. We screened for DARPins that specifically bound to lamin A/C, and interfered with lamin assembly in vitro and with incorporation of lamin A/C into the native lamina in living cells. The selected DARPins inhibited lamin assembly and delocalized A-type lamins to the nucleoplasm without modifying lamin expression levels or the amino acid sequence. Using these lamin binders, we demonstrate the importance of proper integration of lamin A/C into the lamina for nuclear mechanical properties and nuclear envelope integrity. Finally, our study provides evidence for cell-type-specific differences in lamin functions. PMID:26275827

  9. A type of cylindrical Hall thruster with a magnetically insulated anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongjie, Ding; Yu, Xu; Wuji, Peng; Liqiu, Wei; Hongbo, Su; Hezhi, Sun; Peng, Li; Hong, Li; Daren, Yu

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a type of magnetically insulated anode structure is proposed for the design of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster. The magnetic field distribution in the channel is guided by the magnetically insulated anode, altering the intersection status of the magnetic field line passing through the anode and wall. Experimental and simulation results show that a high potential is formed near the wall by the magnetically insulated anode. As the ionization moves towards the outlet, the energy and flux of the ions bombarding the channel wall can be reduced effectively. Due to the reduction in the bombardment of the wall from high-energy ions, the thrust and specific impulse greatly increase compared with those of the non-magnetically insulated anode. For anode mass flow rates of 0.3 and 0.35 mg s-1 and discharge voltages in the 100-200 V range, the thrust can be increased by more than 33% and the anode efficiency can be improved by more than 7%. Meanwhile, the length of the sputtering area is clearly reduced. The starting position of the sputtering area is in front of the magnetic pole, which can effectively prolong the service life of the thruster.

  10. An unbiased study of debris discs around A-type stars with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thureau, N. D.; Greaves, J. S.; Matthews, B. C.; Kennedy, G.; Phillips, N.; Booth, M.; Duchêne, G.; Horner, J.; Rodriguez, D. R.; Sibthorpe, B.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Herschel DEBRIS (Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre) survey brings us a unique perspective on the study of debris discs around main-sequence A-type stars. Bias-free by design, the survey offers a remarkable data set with which to investigate the cold disc properties. The statistical analysis of the 100 and 160 μm data for 86 main-sequence A stars yields a lower than previously found debris disc rate. Considering better than 3σ excess sources, we find a detection rate ≥24 ± 5 per cent at 100 μm which is similar to the debris disc rate around main-sequence F/G/K-spectral type stars. While the 100 and 160 μm excesses slowly decline with time, debris discs with large excesses are found around some of the oldest A stars in our sample, evidence that the debris phenomenon can survive throughout the length of the main sequence (˜1 Gyr). Debris discs are predominantly detected around the youngest and hottest stars in our sample. Stellar properties such as metallicity are found to have no effect on the debris disc incidence. Debris discs are found around A stars in single systems and multiple systems at similar rates. While tight and wide binaries (<1 and >100 au, respectively) host debris discs with a similar frequency and global properties, no intermediate separation debris systems were detected in our sample.

  11. SDE decomposition and A-type stochastic interpretation in nonequilibrium processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ruoshi; Tang, Ying; Ao, Ping

    2017-12-01

    An innovative theoretical framework for stochastic dynamics based on the decomposition of a stochastic differential equation (SDE) into a dissipative component, a detailed-balance-breaking component, and a dual-role potential landscape has been developed, which has fruitful applications in physics, engineering, chemistry, and biology. It introduces the A-type stochastic interpretation of the SDE beyond the traditional Ito or Stratonovich interpretation or even the α-type interpretation for multidimensional systems. The potential landscape serves as a Hamiltonian-like function in nonequilibrium processes without detailed balance, which extends this important concept from equilibrium statistical physics to the nonequilibrium region. A question on the uniqueness of the SDE decomposition was recently raised. Our review of both the mathematical and physical aspects shows that uniqueness is guaranteed. The demonstration leads to a better understanding of the robustness of the novel framework. In addition, we discuss related issues including the limitations of an approach to obtaining the potential function from a steady-state distribution.

  12. Antioxidant potential of Xylopia aethiopica fruit acetone fraction in a type 2 diabetes model of rats.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Aminu; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-12-01

    The fruit decoction of Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Rich. is widely used for the treatment of diseases associated with oxidative stress such as diabetes, particularly in Africa. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of X. aethiopica fruit acetone (XAFA) fraction in ameliorating oxidative stress in a type 2 diabetes (T2D) model of rats. The crude X. aethiopica fruit ethanolic extract was fractionated using solvents with increasing polarity and acetone fraction showed significantly (p<0.05) higher in vitro antioxidant potentials which were measured by (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), hydroxyl radical (HRS) and nitric oxide (NO) assays compared to other fractions. It was then subjected to in vivo antioxidant study in a T2D rat model. Acetone fraction depicted potent in vitro antioxidant actions (IC 50 : DPPH: 19.82±0.73μg/mL; HRS: 25.34±6.19μg/mL; NO: 14.45±2.44μg/mL) compared to other fractions. Additionally, a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent improvement on the in vivo antioxidant status was observed in the animals in diabetic treated groups (DXAL, DXAH) compared to the diabetic control (DBC) group. The results of our study suggest that XAFA possesses potent antioxidant potential and could be used to ameliorate oxidative stress associated metabolic complications such as T2D. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence and activity of a type II CRISPR-Cas system in Lactobacillus gasseri.

    PubMed

    Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Selle, Kurt; O'Flaherty, Sarah; Klaenhammer, Todd; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2015-09-01

    Bacteria encode clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas), which collectively form an RNA-guided adaptive immune system against invasive genetic elements. In silico surveys have revealed that lactic acid bacteria harbour a prolific and diverse set of CRISPR-Cas systems. Thus, the natural evolutionary role of CRISPR-Cas systems may be investigated in these ecologically, industrially, scientifically and medically important microbes. In this study, 17 Lactobacillus gasseri strains were investigated and 6 harboured a type II-A CRISPR-Cas system, with considerable diversity in array size and spacer content. Several of the spacers showed similarity to phage and plasmid sequences, which are typical targets of CRISPR-Cas immune systems. Aligning the protospacers facilitated inference of the protospacer adjacent motif sequence, determined to be 5'-NTAA-3' flanking the 3' end of the protospacer. The system in L. gasseri JV-V03 and NCK 1342 interfered with transforming plasmids containing sequences matching the most recently acquired CRISPR spacers in each strain. We report the distribution and function of a native type II-A CRISPR-Cas system in the commensal species L. gasseri. Collectively, these results open avenues for applications for bacteriophage protection and genome modification in L. gasseri, and contribute to the fundamental understanding of CRISPR-Cas systems in bacteria.

  14. Characterisation of a type 1 Avian Paramyxovirus belonging to a divergent group.

    PubMed

    Briand, François-Xavier; Massin, Pascale; Jestin, Véronique

    2014-01-10

    Newcastle disease, induced by a type 1 Avian Paramyxovirus (APMV-1), is one of the most serious poultry diseases. APMV-1 are divided into two classes based on genetic analysis: class II strains have been recovered from wild or domestic birds and include virulent and avirulent isolates whereas class I strains have been mainly isolated from wild birds and are avirulent. Within class I, a new proposed genotype has recently been reported. The only full genome strain of this group is presently characterised from the point of view of codon usage with reference to class I and class II specificities. Class-specific residues were identified on HN and F proteins that are the two major proteins involved in cell attachment and pathogenicity. Comparison of protein patterns and codon usage for this newly identified APMV-1 strain indicates it is similar to class I viruses but contains a few characteristics close to the viruses of class II. Transmission of viruses from this recently identified divergent group from wild birds to domestic birds could have a major impact on the domestic poultry industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Peculiar Subclass of Type Ia Supernovae a.k.a. Type Iax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mridweeka; Misra, Kuntal; Sahu, Devendra Kumar; Dastidar, Raya; Gangopadhyay, Anjasha; Bose, Subhash; Srivastav, Shubham; Anapuma, Gadiyara Chakrapani; Chakradhari, Nand Kumar; Kumar, Brajesh; Kumar, Brijesh; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan

    2018-04-01

    We present optical photometric (upto ˜ 410 days since Bmax) and spectroscopic (upto ˜ 235 days since Bmax) observations of a type Iax supernova SN 2014dt located in M61. The broad band light curves follow a linear decline up to ˜ 100 days after which a significant flattening is seen in the late-time (beyond 150 days) light curves of SN 2014dt. SN 2014dt best matches the light curve evolution of SN 2005hk and reaches a peak magnitude of MB˜ -18.12±0.04 with ?m15˜ 1.35±0.06 mag. The earliest spectrum at ˜ 23 days is dominated by FeII and CoII lines with the absence of the Si II 6150 Å line. Using the peak bolometric luminosity we estimate a 56Ni mass of 0.14 M⊙ in the case of SN 2005hk and the striking similarity between SN 2014dt and SN 2005hk implies that a comparable amount of 56Ni would have been synthesized in the explosion of SN 2014dt. There are several explosion scenarios proposed for these peculiar events. Being one of the brightest and closest SN! , SN 2014dt is an ideal candidate for long term monitoring. Late phase observations are very essential to understand the progenitor system and the actual explosion scenario for these events.

  16. A type 2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase accelerates the triacylglycerol biosynthesis in heterokont oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Wei; Cen, Shi-Ying; Liu, Yu-Hong; Balamurugan, Srinivasan; Zheng, Xin-Yan; Alimujiang, Adili; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2016-07-10

    Oleaginous microalgae have received a considerable attention as potential biofuel feedstock. However, lack of industry-suitable strain with lipid rich biomass limits its commercial applications. Targeted engineering of lipogenic pathways represents a promising strategy to enhance the efficacy of microalgal oil production. In this study, a type 2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), a rate-limiting enzyme in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis, was identified and overexpressed in heterokont oleaginous microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica for the first time. Overexpression of DGAT2 in Nannochloropsis increased the relative transcript abundance by 3.48-fold in engineered microalgae cells. TAG biosynthesis was subsequently accelerated by DGAT2 overexpression and neutral lipid content was significantly elevated by 69% in engineered microalgae. The fatty acid profile determined by GC-MS revealed that fatty acid composition was altered in engineered microalgae. Saturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids were found to be increased whereas monounsaturated fatty acids content decreased. Furthermore, DGAT2 overexpression did not show negative impact on algal growth parameters. The present investigation showed that the identified DGAT2 would be a potential candidate for enhancing TAG biosynthesis and might facilitate the development of promising oleaginous strains with industrial potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring the optical behaviour of a Type Iax supernova SN 2014dt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mridweeka; Misra, Kuntal; Sahu, D. K.; Dastidar, Raya; Gangopadhyay, Anjasha; Bose, Subhash; Srivastav, Shubham; Anupama, G. C.; Chakradhari, N. K.; Kumar, Brajesh; Kumar, Brijesh; Pandey, S. B.

    2018-02-01

    We present optical photometric (up to ˜410 d since Bmax) and spectroscopic (up to ˜157 d since Bmax) observations of a Type Iax supernova (SN) 2014dt located in M61. SN 2014dt is one of the brightest and closest (D ˜ 20 Mpc) discovered Type Iax SN. It best matches the light-curve evolution of SN 2005hk and reaches a peak magnitude of MB ˜ -18.13 ± 0.04 mag with Δm15 ˜ 1.35 ± 0.06 mag. The early spectra of SN 2014dt are similar to other Type Iax SNe, whereas the nebular spectrum at 157 d is dominated by narrow emission features with less blending as compared to SNe 2008ge and 2012Z. The ejecta velocities are between 5000 and 1000 km s-1, which also confirms the low-energy budget of Type Iax SN 2014dt compared to normal Type Ia SNe. Using the peak bolometric luminosity of SN 2005hk, we estimate the 56Ni mass of ˜0.14 M⊙. The striking similarity between SN 2014dt and SN 2005hk implies that a comparable amount of 56Ni would have been synthesized in the explosion of SN 2014dt.

  18. Rhynchophylline from Uncaria rhynchophylla functionally turns delayed rectifiers into A-Type K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chun-Hsiao; Gong, Chi-Li; Chao, Chia-Chia; Lin, Chia-Huei; Kwan, Chiu-Yin; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Leung, Yuk-Man

    2009-05-22

    Rhynchophylline (1), a neuroprotective agent isolated from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Uncaria rhynchophylla, was shown to affect voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channel slow inactivation in mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells. Extracellular 1 (30 microM) accelerated the slow decay of Kv currents and shifted the steady-state inactivation curve to the left. Intracellular dialysis of 1 did not accelerate the slow current decay, suggesting that this compound acts extracellularly. In addition, the percent blockage of Kv currents by this substance was independent of the degree of depolarization and the intracellular K(+) concentration. Therefore, 1 did not appear to directly block the outer channel pore, with the results obtained suggesting that it drastically accelerated Kv channel slow inactivation. Interestingly, 1 also shifted the activation curve to the left. This alkaloid also strongly accelerated slow inactivation and caused a left shift of the activation curve of Kv1.2 channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Thus, this compound functionally turned delayed rectifiers into A-type K(+) channels.

  19. Localization of A-type K+ channel subunit Kv4.2 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tsaur, M L; Wu, Y L; Huang, F L; Shih, Y H

    2001-09-30

    Kv4.2, a voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel subunit, has been suggested to be the key component of the subthreshold A-type K+ currents (I(SA)s) recorded from the specific subcellular compartments of certain CNS neurons. To correlate Kv4.2 localization with the I(SA)s detected, immunohistochemistry will be useful. Although the Kv4.2 immunostaining pattern in the hippocampus and cerebellum has been reported, the Kv4.2 antibody used was not specific. Furthermore, Kv4.2 localization in other brain regions remains unclear. In this report, we first demonstrated the specificity of a new Kv4.2 antibody, and then used it to examine Kv4.2 localization throughout adult rat brain by immunohistochemistry. At the cellular level, Kv4.2 was found in neurons but not glias. At the subcellular level, Kv4.2 was localized in the somatodendritic compartment of most neurons examined. Nevertheless, our preliminary data indicated that Kv4.2 might be also present in the axon/terminal compartment. At the functional level, our data indicates that Kv4.2 localization and I(SA) correlate quite well in some CNS neurons, supporting that Kv4.2 is the key component of some I(SA)s recorded in vivo.

  20. Solution structure for Pandinus toxin K-alpha (PiTX-K alpha), a selective blocker of A-type potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Tenenholz, T C; Rogowski, R S; Collins, J H; Blaustein, M P; Weber, D J

    1997-03-11

    PiTX-K alpha, a 35-residue peptide recently isolated from the venom of Pandinus imperator, blocks the rapidly inactivating (A-type) K+ channel(s) in rat brain synaptosomes and the cloned Kv 1.2 potassium channel at very low toxin concentrations (6 nM and 32 pM, respectively) [Rogowski, R. S., Collins, J. H., O'Neil, T. J., Gustafson, T. A., Werkman, T. A., Rogawski, M. A., Tenenholz, T. C., Weber, D. J., & Blaustein, M. P. (1996) Mol. Pharmacol. 50, 1167-1177]. The three-dimensional structure of PiTX-K alpha was determined using NMR spectroscopy in order to understand its selectivity and affinity toward K+ channels. PiTX-K alpha was found to have an alpha-helix from residues 10 to 21 and two beta-strands (betaI, 26-28; betaII, 33-35) connected by a type II beta-turn to form a small antiparallel beta-sheet. Three disulfide bonds, which are conserved in all members of the charybdotoxin family (alpha-K toxins), anchor one face of the alpha-helix to the beta-sheet. The N-terminal portion of PiTX-K alpha has three fewer residues than other alpha-K toxins such as charybdotoxin. Rather than forming a third beta-strand as found for other alpha-K toxins, the N-terminal region of PiTX-K alpha adopts an extended conformation. This structural difference in PiTX-K alpha together with differences in sequence at Pro-10, Tyr-14, and Asn-25 (versus Ser-10, Trp-14, and Arg-25 in CTX) may explain why PiTX-K alpha does not block maxi-K+ channels. Differences in three-dimensional structure between PiTX-K alpha and charybdotoxin are also observed in both the tight turn and the loop that connects the first beta-strand to the alpha-helix. As a result, side chains of two residues (Tyr-23 and Arg-31) are in regions of PiTX-K alpha that probably interact with rapidly inactivating A-type K+ channels. The analogous residues in charybdotoxin are positioned differently on the toxin surface. Thus, the locations of Tyr-23 and Arg-31 side chains in PiTX-K alpha could explain why this toxin blocks A-type

  1. Electromagnetic cellular interactions.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, Jeremy Z; Farhadi, Ashkan

    2011-05-01

    Chemical and electrical interaction within and between cells is well established. Just the opposite is true about cellular interactions via other physical fields. The most probable candidate for an other form of cellular interaction is the electromagnetic field. We review theories and experiments on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields generally, and if the cell-generated electromagnetic field can mediate cellular interactions. We do not limit here ourselves to specialized electro-excitable cells. Rather we describe physical processes that are of a more general nature and probably present in almost every type of living cell. The spectral range included is broad; from kHz to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. We show that there is a rather large number of theories on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields and discuss experimental evidence on electromagnetic cellular interactions in the modern scientific literature. Although small, it is continuously accumulating. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Work integration of impaired workers in a type-B social cooperative].

    PubMed

    Taino, G; Gazzoldi, T; Marandola, P; Fabris, F; Ferrari, M; Imbriani, M

    2008-01-01

    This research aims to evaluate job occupation results of impaired workers in a type-B social cooperative, taking into consideration not only specific occupational risks' analysis and assessment, but also organisational, relational and psycho-social matters essential for their stable job occupation. The impaired workers involved were all those hired by a type-B social cooperative from Jan 1999 until Dec 2007, ie. 16 workers (M 8, F 8), equal to 40% of employees' total number. Every impaired worker has been submitted to preventive health surveillance in order to evaluate the degree of disability and residual job ability in relation to the job tasks suitable for him/her. In order to find available tasks which can be performed by disadvantaged workers, the personnel chart has been analyzed, and 10 of the 16 workers (equal to 62.5%) have been considered fit for the specific task without limitations. The other 6 (37.5%) have been considered capable of the specific task with limitations and/or prescriptions, and for 2 of them (12.5%) a tutorial supervision prescription was also necessary. Among those 6 workers with limitations and/or prescriptions, 4 were psychologically impaired (67%) and 2 were physically impaired (37%). The situation of these 16 impaired workers has been periodically verified and followed up for 8 years. Not only have the fifteen workers continued to perform the task initially considered suitable for their health status, but for some of them (5 workers), an increase in job performance, in both complexity and shift duration, has been observed. Moreover, with the only exception of a psychologically impaired worker who did alternate between good comfort times and occasional disease acute phases, all other workers have shown good and stable gains in psychological and physical health conditions, performing requested tasks not only with efficiency, but also with commitment and motivation. All workers have shown a remarkable improvement in their ability to

  3. Bridge effects on light harvesting of a DBfA type polymer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sam-Shajing; Hasib, Muhammad; Gavrilenko, Alexander V.; Devan, Joshua; Gavrilenko, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Plastic optoelectronic materials and thin film devices are very attractive in future optical sensor and solar energy applications due to their lightweight, flexible shape, high photon absorption coefficients, low cost, and environmental benefits. In this study, optoelectronic properties of D, D/fA blend, DfA, and a series of DBfA type of conjugated block copolymers has been investigated, where D is a donor type PPV conjugated block, B is a non-conjugated and flexible aliphatic hydrocarbon bridge chain containing different number of aliphatic methylene units, and fA is a fluorinated acceptor type PPV conjugated block. The optical absorptions of the D/fA blend, DfA, and DBfAs are typical overlaps of individual absorptions of D and fA blocks, while the solution steady state photoluminescence (PL) emission of D were quenched to different levels in blends and block copolymers, with DBfAs containing one methylene unit bridge (DB1fA) quenched most. This could be attributed to an intra-molecular photo induced electron transfer or charge separation in DBfA systems. Theoretical first principles study of the equilibrium atomic configuration of DfA reveals the existence of twisting angles between the D and fA blocks in DfA stable states which may account for a less PL quenching of DfA as compared to DB1fA. These results are important for designing and developing high efficiency polymer based optoelectronic systems.

  4. Charnockites and granites of the western Adirondacks, New York, USA: a differentiated A-type suite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    Granitic rocks in the west-central Adirondack Highlands of New York State include both relatively homogeneous charnockitic and hornblende granitic gneisses (CG), that occur in thick stratiform bodies and elliptical domes, and heterogeneous leucogneisses (LG), that commonly are interlayered with metasedimentary rocks. Major- and trace-element geochemical analyses were obtained for 115 samples, including both types of granitoids. Data for CG fail to show the presence of more than one distinct group based on composition. Most of the variance within the CG sample population is consistent with magmatic differentiation combined with incomplete separation of early crystals of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, and pyroxenes or amphibole from the residual liquid. Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca, P, Sr, Ba, and Zr decrease with increasing silica, while Rb and K increase. Within CG, the distinction between charnockitic (orthopyroxene-bearing) and granitic gneisses is correlated with bulk chemistry. The charnockites are consistently more mafic than the hornblende granitic gneisses, although forming a continuum with them. The leucogneisses, while generally more felsic than the charnockites and granitic gneisses, are otherwise geochemically similar to them. The data are consistent with the LG suite being an evolved extrusive equivalent of the intrusive CG suite. Both CG and LG suites are metaluminous to mildly peraluminous and display an A-type geochemical signature, enriched in Fe, K, Ce, Y, Nb, Zr, and Ga and depleted in Ca, Mg, and Sr relative to I- and S-type granites. Rare earth element patterns show moderate LREE enrichment and a negative Eu anomaly throughout the suite. The geochemical data suggest an origin by partial melting of biotite- and plagioclase-rich crustal rocks. Emplacement occurred in an anorogenic or post-collisional tectonic setting, probably at relatively shallow depths. Deformation and granulite-facies metamorphism with some partial melting followed during the Ottawan phase

  5. B- and A-Type Stars in the Taurus-Auriga Star-Forming Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooley, Kunal; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Rebull, Luisa; Padgett, Deborah; Knapp, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of a search for early-type stars associated with the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud complex, a diffuse nearby star-forming region noted as lacking young stars of intermediate and high mass. We investigate several sets of possible O, B, and early A spectral class members. The first is a group of stars for which mid-infrared images show bright nebulae, all of which can be associated with stars of spectral-type B. The second group consists of early-type stars compiled from (1) literature listings in SIMBAD, (2) B stars with infrared excesses selected from the Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the Taurus cloud, (3) magnitude- and color-selected point sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, and (4) spectroscopically identified early-type stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey coverage of the Taurus region. We evaluated stars for membership in the Taurus-Auriga star formation region based on criteria involving: spectroscopic and parallactic distances, proper motions and radial velocities, and infrared excesses or line emission indicative of stellar youth. For selected objects, we also model the scattered and emitted radiation from reflection nebulosity and compare the results with the observed spectral energy distributions to further test the plausibility of physical association of the B stars with the Taurus cloud. This investigation newly identifies as probable Taurus members three B-type stars: HR 1445 (HD 28929), t Tau (HD 29763), 72 Tau (HD 28149), and two A-type stars: HD 31305 and HD 26212, thus doubling the number of stars A5 or earlier associated with the Taurus clouds. Several additional early-type sources including HD 29659 and HD 283815 meet some, but not all, of the membership criteria and therefore are plausible, though not secure, members.

  6. Siblings Promote a Type 1/Type 17-oriented immune response in the airways of asymptomatic neonates.

    PubMed

    Wolsk, H M; Chawes, B L; Følsgaard, N V; Rasmussen, M A; Brix, S; Bisgaard, H

    2016-06-01

    Siblings have been shown to reduce the risk of childhood asthma and allergy, but the mechanism driving this association is unknown. The objective was to study whether siblings affect the airway immune response in healthy neonates, which could represent an underlying immune modulatory pathway. We measured 20 immune mediators related to the Type 1, Type 2, Type 17, or regulatory immune pathways in the airway mucosa of 571 one-month-old asymptomatic neonates from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2010 birth cohort (COPSAC2010 ). The association between airway mediator levels and presence of siblings was investigated using conventional statistics and principle component analysis (PCA). Neonates with siblings had an upregulated level of airway immune mediators, with predominance of Type 1- and Type 17-related mediators. This was supported by the PCA showing a highly significant difference between children with vs without siblings: P < 10(-10) , which persisted after adjustment for potential confounders including pathogenic airway bacteria and viruses: P < 0.0001. The immune priming effect was inversely associated with time since last childbirth: P = 0.0015. Siblings mediate a Type 1/Type 17-related immune-stimulatory effect in the airways of asymptomatic neonates, also after adjustment for pathogenic bacteria and viruses, indicating that siblings exert a transferable early immune modulatory effect. These findings may represent an in utero immune priming effect of the fetal immune system caused by previous pregnancies as the effect was attenuated with time since last childbirth, or it could relate to the presence of unidentified microbes, but further studies are needed to confirm our findings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A type-specific serological test to distinguish antibodies to equine herpesviruses 4 and 1.

    PubMed

    Crabb, B S; MacPherson, C M; Reubel, G H; Browning, G F; Studdert, M J; Drummer, H E

    1995-01-01

    We describe a type-specific ELISA, which distinguishes antibody to equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV4; equine rhinopneumonitis) and EHV1 (equine abortion virus) thereby identifying horses that have been infected with either or both of these antigenically related viruses. The antigens used are parts of the EHV4 and EHV1 glycoprotein G (gG) homologues expressed in E. coli as fusion proteins [Crabb and Studdert, 1993: J Virol 67: 6332-6338). The expressed proteins comprise corresponding regions of the gG molecules that are highly divergent and encompass strong, typespecific epitopes. Plasma samples from 97 Thoroughbred and 174 Standardbred horses were tested, all of which were unvaccinated. All horses were strongly EHV4 ELISA positive while 30% were EHV1 ELISA positive. The type-specificity of the EHV1 gG antigen was tested in cross-absorption experiments and it was found that 96% (66 of 69) of EHV1 ELISA positive horses were true EHV1 antibody positives. It was also shown that 100% (26 of 26) horses known to have been exposed to EHV1, either by infection or immunisation with EHV1, had significant levels of antibody against the EHV1 gG antigen (i.e., all horses recognised the EHV1 epitope(s) contained within this molecule). Maintenance of EHV1 gG antibody was examined by testing sera obtained from mares four years after confirmed EHV1 abortion. Seven out of 10 of these mares remained EHV1 ELISA positive. In summary, the ELISA is highly specific and is sufficiently sensitive to detect all horses previously infected with EHV4 and most previously infected with EHV1.

  8. Depot-Specific Changes in Fat Metabolism with Aging in a Type 2 Diabetic Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Eun; Park, Cheol-Young; Choi, Jung Mook; Chang, Eugene; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Kang, Eun Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul; Cha, Bong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Visceral fat accretion is a hallmark of aging and is associated with aging-induced metabolic dysfunction. PPARγ agonist was reported to improve insulin sensitivity by redistributing fat from visceral fat to subcutaneous fat. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms by which aging affects adipose tissue remodeling in a type 2 diabetic animal model and through which PPARγ activation modulates aging-related fat tissue distribution. At the ages of 21, 31 and 43 weeks, OLETF rats as an animal model of type 2 diabetes were evaluated for aging-related effects on adipose tissue metabolism in subcutaneous and visceral fat depots. During aging, the ratio of visceral fat weight to subcutaneous fat weight (V/S ratio) increased. Aging significantly increased the mRNA expression of genes involved in lipogenesis such as lipoprotein lipase, fatty acid binding protein aP2, lipin 1, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1, which were more prominent in visceral fat than subcutaneous fat. The mRNA expression of adipose triglyceride lipase, which is involved in basal lipolysis and fatty acid recycling, was also increased, more in visceral fat compared to subcutaneous fat during aging. The mRNA levels of the genes associated with lipid oxidation were increased, whereas the mRNA levels of genes associated with energy expenditure showed no significant change during aging. PPARγ agonist treatment in OLETF rats resulted in fat redistribution with a decreasing V/S ratio and improved glucose intolerance. The genes involved in lipogenesis decreased in visceral fat of the PPARγ agonist-treated rats. During aging, fat distribution was changed by stimulating lipid uptake and esterification in visceral fat rather than subcutaneous fat, and by altering the lipid oxidation.

  9. Isoflurane depolarizes bronchopulmonary C neurons by inhibiting transient A-type and delayed rectifier potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenxiong; Zhuang, Jianguo; Zhang, Cancan; Xu, Fadi

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of isoflurane (ISO), a widely used volatile anesthetic, can produce clinical tachypnea. In dogs, this response is reportedly mediated by bronchopulmonary C-fibers (PCFs), but the relevant mechanisms remain unclear. Activation of transient A-type potassium current (IA) channels and delayed rectifier potassium current (IK) channels hyperpolarizes neurons, and inhibition of both channels by ISO increases neural firing. Due to the presence of these channels in the cell bodies of rat PCFs, we determined whether ISO could stimulate PCFs to produce tachypnea in anesthetized rats, and, if so, whether this response resulted from ISO-induced depolarization of the pulmonary C neurons via the inhibition of IA and IK. We recorded ventilatory responses to 5% ISO exposure in anesthetized rats before and after blocking PCF conduction and the responses of pulmonary C neurons (extracellularly recorded) to ISO exposure. ISO-induced (1mM) changes in pulmonary C neuron membrane potential and IA/IK were tested using the perforated patch clamp technique. We found that: (1) ISO inhalation evoked a brief tachypnea (∼7s) and that this response disappeared after blocking PCF conduction; (2) the ISO significantly elevated (by 138%) the firing rate of most pulmonary C neurons (17 out of 21) in the nodose ganglion; and (3) ISO perfusion depolarized the pulmonary C neurons in the vitro and inhibited both IA and IK, and this evoked-depolarization was largely diminished after blocking both IA and IK. Our results suggest that ISO is able to stimulate PCFs to elicit tachypnea in rats, at least partly, via inhibiting IA and IK, thereby depolarizing the pulmonary C neurons. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Role of A-type potassium currents in excitability, network synchronicity and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fransén, Erik; Tigerholm, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    A range of ionic currents have been suggested to be involved in distinct aspects of epileptogenesis. Based on pharmacological and genetic studies, potassium currents have been implicated, in particular the transient A-type potassium current (KA). Epileptogenic activity comprises a rich repertoire of characteristics, one of which is synchronized activity of principal cells as revealed by occurrences of for instance fast ripples. Synchronized activity of this kind is particularly efficient in driving target cells into spiking. In the recipient cell, this synchronized input generates large brief compound EPSPs. The fast activation and inactivation of KA lead us to hypothesize a potential role in suppression of such EPSPs. In this work, using computational modeling, we have studied the activation of KA by synaptic inputs of different levels of synchronicity. We find that KA participates particularly in suppressing inputs of high synchronicity. We also show that the selective suppression stems from the current's ability to become activated by potentials with high slopes. We further show that KA suppresses input mimicing the activity of a fast ripple. Finally, we show that the degree of selectivity of KA can be modified by changes to its kinetic parameters, changes of the type that are produced by the modulatory action of KChIPs and DPPs. We suggest that the wealth of modulators affecting KA might be explained by a need to control cellular excitability in general and suppression of responses to synchronicity in particular. We also suggest that compounds changing KA-kinetics may be used to pharmacologically improve epileptic status. PMID:19777555

  11. Weighing the evidence for a ternary protein complex mediating A-type K+ currents in neurons.

    PubMed

    Maffie, Jonathon; Rudy, Bernardo

    2008-12-01

    The subthreshold-operating A-type K(+) current in neurons (I(SA)) has important roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability, the timing of action potential firing and synaptic integration and plasticity. The channels mediating this current (Kv4 channels) have been implicated in epilepsy, the control of dopamine release, and the regulation of pain plasticity. It has been proposed that Kv4 channels in neurons are ternary complexes of three types of protein: pore forming subunits of the Kv4 subfamily and two types of auxiliary subunits, the Ca(2+) binding proteins KChIPs and the dipeptidyl peptidase-like proteins (DPPLs) DPP6 (also known as DPPX) and DPP10 (4 molecules of each per channel for a total of 12 proteins in the complex). Here we consider the evidence supporting this hypothesis. Kv4 channels in many neurons are likely to be ternary complexes of these three types of protein. KChIPs and DPPLs are required to efficiently traffic Kv4 channels to the plasma membrane and regulate the functional properties of the channels. These proteins may also be important in determining the localization of the channels to specific neuronal compartments, their dynamics, and their response to neuromodulators. A surprisingly large number of additional proteins have been shown to modify Kv4 channels in heterologous expression systems, but their association with native Kv4 channels in neurons has not been properly validated. A critical consideration of the evidence suggests that it is unlikely that association of Kv4 channels with these additional proteins is widespread in the CNS. However, we cannot exclude that some of these proteins may associate with the channels transiently or in specific neurons or neuronal compartments, or that they may associate with the channels in other tissues.

  12. Making an Interactive Calculus Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a case study of the design and production of "Interactive Calculus," an interactive multimedia textbook. Discusses reasons for using multimedia textbooks; what an interactive textbook is; content, organization, graphic design, authoring and composition; and work flow. (AEF)

  13. Nonadiabatic dynamics of O({sup 1}D) + N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields}O({sup 3}P) + N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}) on three coupled potential surfaces: Symmetry, Coriolis, spin-orbit, and Renner-Teller effects

    SciTech Connect

    Defazio, Paolo; Gamallo, Pablo; Petrongolo, Carlo

    2012-02-07

    We present the spin-orbit (SO) and Renner-Teller (RT) quantum dynamics of the spin-forbidden quenching O({sup 1}D) + N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}){yields}O({sup 3}P) + N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}) on the N{sub 2}O X-tilde{sup 1}A{sup '}, a-tilde{sup 3}A', and b-tilde{sup 3}A{sup '} coupled PESs. We use the permutation-inversion symmetry, propagate coupled-channel (CC) real wavepackets, and compute initial-state-resolved probabilities and cross sections {sigma}{sub j0} for the ground vibrational and the first two rotational states of N{sub 2}, j{sub 0}= 0 and 1. Labeling symmetry angular states by j and K, we report selection rules for j and for the minimum Kmore » value associated with any electronic state, showing that a-tilde{sup 3}A' is uncoupled in the centrifugal-sudden (CS) approximation at j{sub 0}= 0. The dynamics is resonance-dominated, the probabilities are larger at low K, {sigma}{sub j0} decrease with the collision energy and increase with j{sub 0}, and the CS {sigma}{sub 0} is lower than the CC one. The nonadiabatic interactions play different roles on the quenching dynamics, because the X-tilde{sup 1}A{sup '}-b-tilde{sup 3}A{sup '} SO effects are those most important while the a-tilde{sup 3}A'-b-tilde{sup 3}A{sup '} RT ones are negligible.« less

  14. Dike/Drift Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses ofmore » the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).« less

  15. History of Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  16. Microengineering of cellular interactions.

    PubMed

    Folch, A; Toner, M

    2000-01-01

    Tissue function is modulated by an intricate architecture of cells and biomolecules on a micrometer scale. Until now, in vitro cellular interactions were mainly studied by random seeding over homogeneous substrates. Although this strategy has led to important discoveries, it is clearly a nonoptimal analog of the in vivo scenario. With the incorporation--and adaptation--of microfabrication technology into biology, it is now possible to design surfaces that reproduce some of the aspects of that architecture. This article reviews past research on the engineering of cell-substrate, cell-cell, and cell-medium interactions on the micrometer scale.

  17. The new interactive CESAR

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.B.; Yatabe, M.

    1987-01-01

    In this report the Nuclear Criticality Safety Analytical Methods Resource Center describes a new interactive version of CESAR, a critical experiments storage and retrieval program available on the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) database at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The original version of CESAR did not include interactive search capabilities. The CESAR database was developed to provide a convenient, readily accessible means of storing and retrieving code input data for the SCALE Criticality Safety Analytical Sequences and the codes comprising those sequences. The database includes data for both cross section preparation and criticality safety calculations. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  18. New interactive CESAR

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.B.; Yatabe, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Analytical Methods Resource Center announces the availability of a new interactive version of CESAR, a critical experiments storage and retrieval program available on the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) data base at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The original version of CESAR did not include interactive search capabilities. The CESAR data base was developed to provide a convenient, readily accessible means of storing and retrieving code input data for the SCALE criticality safety analytical sequences and the codes comprising those sequences. The data base includes data for both cross-section preparation and criticality safety calculations.

  19. Fundamentals of Filament Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-19

    MRI was very specific. Based in on our other studies we focused this MRI program in two very important areas –filament interaction with gases, and...shown in the figure adjacent. The focus of this MRI was very specific. Based in on our other studies we focused this MRI program in two very important...PROJECT. 2.0.0 Program on Interaction with Gases 2.1.0 Molecular alignment studies Following the observations by Béjot et al. [Optics Express 16

  20. Solitary water wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, W.; Guyenne, P.; Hammack, J.; Henderson, D.; Sulem, C.

    2006-05-01

    This article concerns the pairwise nonlinear interaction of solitary waves in the free surface of a body of water lying over a horizontal bottom. Unlike solitary waves in many completely integrable model systems, solitary waves for the full Euler equations do not collide elastically; after interactions, there is a nonzero residual wave that trails the post-collision solitary waves. In this report on new numerical and experimental studies of such solitary wave interactions, we verify that this is the case, both in head-on collisions (the counterpropagating case) and overtaking collisions (the copropagating case), quantifying the degree to which interactions are inelastic. In the situation in which two identical solitary waves undergo a head-on collision, we compare the asymptotic predictions of Su and Mirie [J. Fluid Mech. 98, 509 (1980)] and Byatt-Smith [J. Fluid Mech. 49, 625 (1971)], the wavetank experiments of Maxworthy [J. Fluid Mech. 76, 177 (1976)], and the numerical results of Cooker, Weidman, and Bale [J. Fluid Mech. 342, 141 (1997)] with independent numerical simulations, in which we quantify the phase change, the run-up, and the form of the residual wave and its Fourier signature in both small- and large-amplitude interactions. This updates the prior numerical observations of inelastic interactions in Fenton and Rienecker [J. Fluid Mech. 118, 411 (1982)]. In the case of two nonidentical solitary waves, our precision wavetank experiments are compared with numerical simulations, again observing the run-up, phase lag, and generation of a residual from the interaction. Considering overtaking solitary wave interactions, we compare our experimental observations, numerical simulations, and the asymptotic predictions of Zou and Su [Phys. Fluids 29, 2113 (1986)], and again we quantify the inelastic residual after collisions in the simulations. Geometrically, our numerical simulations of overtaking interactions fit into the three categories of Korteweg-deVries two

  1. Evolution of A-Type Macrosegregation in Large Size Steel Ingot After Multistep Forging and Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loucif, Abdelhalim; Ben Fredj, Emna; Harris, Nathan; Shahriari, Davood; Jahazi, Mohammad; Lapierre-Boire, Louis-Philippe

    2018-06-01

    A-type macrosegregation refers to the channel chemical heterogeneities that can be formed during solidification in large size steel ingots. In this research, a combination of experiment and simulation was used to study the influence of open die forging parameters on the evolution of A-type macrosegregation patterns during a multistep forging of a 40 metric ton (MT) cast, high-strength steel ingot. Macrosegregation patterns were determined experimentally by macroetch along the longitudinal axis of the forged and heat-treated ingot. Mass spectroscopy, on more than 900 samples, was used to determine the chemical composition map of the entire longitudinal sectioned surface. FORGE NxT 1.1 finite element modeling code was used to predict the effect of forging sequences on the morphology evolution of A-type macrosegregation patterns. For this purpose, grain flow variables were defined and implemented in a large scale finite element modeling code to describe oriented grains and A-type segregation patterns. Examination of the A-type macrosegregation showed four to five parallel continuous channels located nearly symmetrical to the axis of the forged ingot. In some regions, the A-type patterns became curved or obtained a wavy form in contrast to their straight shape in the as-cast state. Mass spectrometry analysis of the main alloying elements (C, Mn, Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, P, and S) revealed that carbon, manganese, and chromium were the most segregated alloying elements in A-type macrosegregation patterns. The observed differences were analyzed using thermodynamic calculations, which indicated that changes in the chemical composition of the liquid metal can affect the primary solidification mode and the segregation intensity of the alloying elements. Finite element modeling simulation results showed very good agreement with the experimental observations, thereby allowing for the quantification of the influence of temperature and deformation on the evolution of the shape of the

  2. Evolution of A-Type Macrosegregation in Large Size Steel Ingot After Multistep Forging and Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loucif, Abdelhalim; Ben Fredj, Emna; Harris, Nathan; Shahriari, Davood; Jahazi, Mohammad; Lapierre-Boire, Louis-Philippe

    2018-03-01

    A-type macrosegregation refers to the channel chemical heterogeneities that can be formed during solidification in large size steel ingots. In this research, a combination of experiment and simulation was used to study the influence of open die forging parameters on the evolution of A-type macrosegregation patterns during a multistep forging of a 40 metric ton (MT) cast, high-strength steel ingot. Macrosegregation patterns were determined experimentally by macroetch along the longitudinal axis of the forged and heat-treated ingot. Mass spectroscopy, on more than 900 samples, was used to determine the chemical composition map of the entire longitudinal sectioned surface. FORGE NxT 1.1 finite element modeling code was used to predict the effect of forging sequences on the morphology evolution of A-type macrosegregation patterns. For this purpose, grain flow variables were defined and implemented in a large scale finite element modeling code to describe oriented grains and A-type segregation patterns. Examination of the A-type macrosegregation showed four to five parallel continuous channels located nearly symmetrical to the axis of the forged ingot. In some regions, the A-type patterns became curved or obtained a wavy form in contrast to their straight shape in the as-cast state. Mass spectrometry analysis of the main alloying elements (C, Mn, Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, P, and S) revealed that carbon, manganese, and chromium were the most segregated alloying elements in A-type macrosegregation patterns. The observed differences were analyzed using thermodynamic calculations, which indicated that changes in the chemical composition of the liquid metal can affect the primary solidification mode and the segregation intensity of the alloying elements. Finite element modeling simulation results showed very good agreement with the experimental observations, thereby allowing for the quantification of the influence of temperature and deformation on the evolution of the shape of the

  3. Data Interactive Publications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domenico, B.; Weber, J.

    2012-04-01

    For some years now, the authors have developed examples of online documents that allowed the reader to interact directly with datasets, but there were limitations that restricted the interaction to specific desktop analysis and display tools that were not generally available to all readers of the documents. Recent advances in web service technology and related standards are making it possible to develop systems for publishing online documents that enable readers to access, analyze, and display the data discussed in the publication from the perspective and in the manner from which the author wants it to be represented. By clicking on embedded links, the reader accesses not only the usual textual information in a publication, but also data residing on a local or remote web server as well as a set of processing tools for analyzing and displaying the data. With the option of having the analysis and display processing provided on the server (or in the cloud), there are now a broader set of possibilities on the client side where the reader can interact with the data via a thin web client, a rich desktop application, or a mobile platform "app." The presentation will outline the architecture of data interactive publications along with illustrative examples.

  4. Data Interactive Publications Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domenico, B.; Weber, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    A few years back, the authors presented examples of online documents that allowed the reader to interact directly with datasets, but there were limitations that restricted the interaction to specific desktop analysis and display tools that were not generally available to all readers of the documents. Recent advances in web service technology and related standards are making it possible to develop systems for publishing online documents that enable readers to access, analyze, and display the data discussed in the publication from the perspective and in the manner from which the author wants it to be represented. By clicking on embedded links, the reader accesses not only the usual textual information in a publication, but also data residing on a local or remote web server as well as a set of processing tools for analyzing and displaying the data. With the option of having the analysis and display processing provided on the server, there are now a broader set of possibilities on the client side where the reader can interact with the data via a thin web client, a rich desktop application, or a mobile platform "app." The presentation will outline the architecture of data interactive publications along with illustrative examples.

  5. Adhesive interactions with wood

    Treesearch

    Charles R. Frihart

    2004-01-01

    While the chemistry for the polymerization of wood adhesives has been studied systematically and extensively, the critical aspects of the interaction of adhesives with wood are less clearly understood. General theories of bond formation need to be modified to take into account the porosity of wood and the ability of chemicals to be absorbed into the cell wall....

  6. Electronically Enhanced Classroom Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Stephen; Cargill, Julie; Cutts, Quintin

    A design rationale for introducing electronic equipment (a group response system) for student interaction in lecture theaters is presented, linking the instructional design to theory. The effectiveness of the equipment for learning depends mostly on what pedagogic method is employed. Various alternative types are introduced, including: assessment;…

  7. Interactive Tabletops in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillenbourg, Pierre; Evans, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Interactive tabletops are gaining increased attention from CSCL researchers. This paper analyses the relation between this technology and teaching and learning processes. At a global level, one could argue that tabletops convey a socio-constructivist flavor: they support small teams that solve problems by exploring multiple solutions. The…

  8. Standardizing Interaction Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomassen, Aukje; Ozcan, Oguzhan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to which extend the didactic format of studio-based group-work is applicable for creating a common-ground for Interaction Design Education in European Perspective. The current debate on design education shows us a landscape of different initiatives. So far difficulties have arisen in the area of accreditation and…

  9. Designing Interactive Learning Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip

    1990-01-01

    Describes multimedia, computer-based interactive learning systems that support various forms of individualized study. Highlights include design models; user interfaces; design guidelines; media utilization paradigms, including hypermedia and learner-controlled models; metaphors and myths; authoring tools; optical media; workstations; four case…

  10. Laser interaction with tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Berns, M.W.

    These proceedings collect papers on laser biomedicine. Topics include: light distributions on tissue; chemical byproducts of laser/tissue interactions; laser applications in ophthalmology; phododynamic therapy; diode pumped solid state lasers at two and three micrometers; and applications of excimer lasers to peripheral nerve repair.

  11. Connectionist Interaction Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominich, Sandor

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of connectionist views for adaptive clustering in information retrieval focuses on a connectionist clustering technique and activation spreading-based information retrieval model using the interaction information retrieval method. Presents theoretical as well as simulation results as regards computational complexity and includes…

  12. Interactive Digital Signal Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mish, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    Interactive Digital Signal Processor, IDSP, consists of set of time series analysis "operators" based on various algorithms commonly used for digital signal analysis. Processing of digital signal time series to extract information usually achieved by applications of number of fairly standard operations. IDSP excellent teaching tool for demonstrating application for time series operators to artificially generated signals.

  13. Interactive Mold House Tour

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Get a quick glimpse of some of the most important ways to protect your home from mold by this interactive tour of the Mold House. Room-by-room, you'll learn about common mold issues and how to address them.

  14. Interaction with William Carnall

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Brian R.

    2005-02-15

    A personal account is given of interaction with William T. Carnall during the period 1977-1988, when I made regular visits to the Argonne National Laboratory to discuss the theoretical background to the spectroscopic work he was carrying out on the lanthanides and actinides.

  15. Interactive shape metamorphosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, David T.; State, Andrei; Banks, David

    1994-01-01

    A technique for controlled metamorphosis between surfaces in 3-space is described. Well-understood techniques to produce shape metamorphosis between models in a 2D parametric space is applied. The user selects morphable features interactively, and the morphing process executes in real time on a high-performance graphics multicomputer.

  16. Teaching with Interactive Multimedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Tim

    Based on the idea that anyone who is interested in making entertaining and informative presentations in educational settings is interested in multimedia, this practical guide offers tips for communication (and other) teachers who want to integrate and program interactive multimedia into their courses. The guide suggests that teachers on limited…

  17. Weak Interactions Group

    Science.gov Websites

    Weak Interactions Group UC Berkeley UC Berkeley Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab Nuclear Science Division at LBL Physics Division at LBL Phonebook A-Z Index Navigation Home Members Research Projects CUORE Design Concept Berkeley Projects People Publications Contact Links KamLAND Physics Impact Neutrino

  18. Training Interactive Videodisc Designers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Brockenbrough S.; Erickson, Debra M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a model for training instructional designers who will work as members of videodisc development teams. This model develops and integrates competencies relating to instructional design, project management, interpersonal skills, storyboarding and flowcharting, programming, video production, and interactive video system knowledge. Three…

  19. [Culture in initial interactions].

    PubMed

    Bossuroy, Muriel; Moro, Marie Rose

    2014-01-01

    Communication between infants and their parents is established through the initial interactions which begin at birth. These are unique to each parent-infant dyad and are structured both on the basis of the reactions, behaviour and characteristics specific to the babies as well as on the images, sensations, projections and representations of the parents. Culture and language are important elements in this context.

  20. Computers for Interactive Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Barbara; Aggen, William

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes features of computer-based interactive video including sophisticated answer judging, diagnostic feedback, simulation, animation, audible tones, touch sensitive screen, function keys, and video enhancements, and matches these to the characteristics and pedagogical styles of learners. The learner characteristics discussed include internal…

  1. Electron interaction in matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dance, W. E.; Rainwater, W. J.; Rester, D. H.

    1969-01-01

    Data on the scattering of 1-MeV electrons in aluminum for the case of non-normal incidence, electron-bremsstrahlung cross-sections in thin targets, and the production of bremstrahlung by electron interaction in thick targets, are presented both in tabular and graphic form. These results may interest physicists and radiologists.

  2. Interaction, 1996-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajdu-Vaughn, Susan, Ed.; Coyle, Barbara, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This collection includes four quarterly issues of "Interaction," a publication of the Canadian Child Care Federation. Each issue addresses several topics and is arranged in four sections: opinions, practice/pratique, focus/a propos, and news/nouvelles. The opinions section includes letters and editorial/review columns, the practice…

  3. Budgeted Interactive Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-15

    the methodology of reducing the online-algorithm-selecting problem as a contextual bandit problem, which is yet another interactive learning...KH2016a] Kuan-Hao Huang and Hsuan-Tien Lin. Linear upper confidence bound algorithm for contextual bandit problem with piled rewards. In Proceedings

  4. Emplacement and deformation of the A-type Madeira granite (Amazonian Craton, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siachoque, Astrid; Salazar, Carlos Alejandro; Trindade, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    The Madeira granite is one of the Paleoproterozoic (1.82 Ga) A-type granite intrusions in the Amazonian Craton. It is elongated in the NE-SW direction and is composed of four facies. Classical structural techniques and the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) method were applied to the study of its internal fabric. Magnetic susceptibility measurements, thermomagnetic curves, remanent coercivity spectra, optical microscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) analyses were carried out on the earlier and later facies of the Madeira granite: the rapakivi granite (RG) and the albite granite (AG) respectively. The last one is subdivided into the border albite granite (BAG) and the core albite granite (CAG) subfacies. AMS fabric pattern is controlled by pure magnetite in all facies, despite significant amounts of hematite in the BAG subfacies. Microstructural observations show that in almost all sites, magnetic fabric correlates to magmatic state fabrics that are defined by a weak NE-SW orientation of mafic and felsic silicates. However, strain mechanisms in both subfacies of AG also exhibit evidence for solid-state deformation at high to moderate temperatures. Pegmatite dyke, strike slip fault (SFA-B-C), hydrothermal vein, normal fault (F1-2) and joint (J) structures were observed and their orientation and kinematics is consistent with the magmatic and solid-state structures. Dykes, SFA-C and F1, are usually orientated along the N70°E/40°N plane, which is nearly parallel to the strike of AMS and magmatic foliations. In contrast, veins, SFB, F2 and some J are oriented perpendicular to the N70°E trend. Kinematic analysis in these structures shows evidence for a dextral sense of movement in the system in the brittle regime. The coherent structural pattern for the three facies of Madeira granite suggests that the different facies form a nested pluton. The coherence in orientation and kinematics from magmatic to high-temperature solid-state, and into the brittle

  5. SN 2015ba: a Type IIP supernova with a long plateau.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dastidar, Raya; Misra, Kuntal; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Pastorello, A.; Pumo, M. L.; Valenti, S.; McCully, C.; Tomasella, L.; Arcavi, I.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Singh, Mridweeka; Gangopadhyay, Anjasha; Howell, D. A.; Morales-Garoffolo, Antonia; Zampieri, L.; Kumar, Brijesh; Turatto, M.; Benetti, S.; Tartaglia, L.; Ochner, P.; Sahu, D. K.; Anupama, G. C.; Pandey, S. B.

    2018-06-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy from about a week after explosion to ˜272 d of an atypical Type IIP supernova, SN 2015ba, which exploded in the edge-on galaxy IC 1029. SN 2015ba is a luminous event with an absolute V-band magnitude of -17.1 ± 0.2 mag at 50 d since explosion and has a long plateau lasting for ˜123 d. The distance to the SN is estimated to be 34.8 ± 0.7 Mpc using the expanding photosphere and standard candle methods. High-velocity H Balmer components constant with time are observed in the late-plateau phase spectra of SN 2015ba, which suggests a possible role of circumstellar interaction at these phases. Both hydrodynamical and analytical modelling suggest a massive progenitor of SN 2015ba with a pre-explosion mass of 24-26 M⊙. However, the nebular spectra of SN 2015ba exhibit insignificant levels of oxygen, which is otherwise expected from a massive progenitor. This might be suggestive of the non-monotonical link between O-core masses and the zero-age main-sequence mass of pre-supernova stars and/or uncertainties in the mixing scenario in the ejecta of supernovae.

  6. A Swift Look at SN 2011fe: The Earliest Ultraviolet Observations of a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oates, Samantha; Holland, Stephen; Immler, Stefan; Brown, Peter J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; DePasquale, Massimiliano; Gronwall, Caryl; Kuin, Paul; Mazzali, Paolo; Miline, Peter; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the earliest ultraviolet (UV) observations of the bright Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe/PTF11kly in the nearby galaxy M101 at a distance of only 6.4 Mpc. It was discovered shortly after explosion by the Palomar Transient Factory and first observed by Swift/UVOT about a day after explosion. The early UV light is well-defined, with approx. 20 data points per filter in the 5 days after explosion. With these early UV observations, we extend the near-UV template of SNe Ia to earlier times for comparison with observations at low and high redshift and report fits from semiempirical models of the explosion. We find the early UV count rates to be well fit by the superposition of two parabolic curves. Finally, we use the early UV flux measurements to examine a possible shock interaction with a non-degenerate companion. We find that even a solar mass companion at a distance of a few solar radii is unlikely at more than 95% confidence.

  7. Reactive oxygen species explicit dosimetry (ROSED) of a type 1 photosensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Yi Hong; Kim, Michele M.; Huang, Zheng; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2018-02-01

    Type I photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the use of photochemical reactions mediated through an interaction between a tumor-selective photosensitizer, photoexcitation with a specific wavelength of light, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The goal of this study is to develop a model to calculate reactive oxygen species concentration ([ROS]rx) after Tookad®-mediated vascular PDT. Mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were treated with different light fluence and fluence rate conditions. Explicit measurements of photosensitizer drug concentration were made via diffuse reflective absorption spectrum using a contact probe before and after PDT. Blood flow and tissue oxygen concentration over time were measured during PDT as a mean to validate the photochemical parameters for the ROSED calculation. Cure index was computed from the rate of tumor regrowth after treatment and was compared against three calculated dose metrics: total light fluence, PDT dose, reacted [ROS]rx. The tumor growth study demonstrates that [ROS]rx serves as a better dosimetric quantity for predicting treatment outcome, as a clinically relevant tumor growth endpoint.

  8. Geochemical, modal, and geochronologic data for 1.4 Ga A-type granitoid intrusions of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; Holm-Denoma, Christopher S.; San Juan, Carma A.; Lund, Karen; Premo, Wayne R.; DeWitt, Ed

    2015-08-10

    In addition, Kisvarsanyi (1972) suggests that iron-copper deposits in the St. Francois Mountains of southeastern Missouri are petrogenetically associated with 1.4 Ga A-type granitoids that occur in that region. Similarly, Dall’Agnol and others (2012) summarize important global associations between A-type granitoid rocks and a variety of important ore deposit types, particularly tin, high-field-strength elements (Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta), rare-earth elements, and iron oxide-copper-gold deposits. Consequently, the need to better understand relations between A-type granitoid rocks, tectonic setting, and magma petrogenesis, as well as their genetic associations with important types of ore deposits, suggests that developing a definitive geochemical, modal, and geochronologic database for these rocks in the conterminous United States is of considerable value.

  9. Calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II modulates Kv4.2 channel expression and upregulates neuronal A-type potassium currents.

    PubMed

    Varga, Andrew W; Yuan, Li-Lian; Anderson, Anne E; Schrader, Laura A; Wu, Gang-Yi; Gatchel, Jennifer R; Johnston, Daniel; Sweatt, J David

    2004-04-07

    Calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) has a long history of involvement in synaptic plasticity, yet little focus has been given to potassium channels as CaMKII targets despite their importance in repolarizing EPSPs and action potentials and regulating neuronal membrane excitability. We now show that Kv4.2 acts as a substrate for CaMKII in vitro and have identified CaMKII phosphorylation sites as Ser438 and Ser459. To test whether CaMKII phosphorylation of Kv4.2 affects channel biophysics, we expressed wild-type or mutant Kv4.2 and the K(+) channel interacting protein, KChIP3, with or without a constitutively active form of CaMKII in Xenopus oocytes and measured the voltage dependence of activation and inactivation in each of these conditions. CaMKII phosphorylation had no effect on channel biophysical properties. However, we found that levels of Kv4.2 protein are increased with CaMKII phosphorylation in transfected COS cells, an effect attributable to direct channel phosphorylation based on site-directed mutagenesis studies. We also obtained corroborating physiological data showing increased surface A-type channel expression as revealed by increases in peak K(+) current amplitudes with CaMKII phosphorylation. Furthermore, endogenous A-currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons were increased in amplitude after introduction of constitutively active CaMKII, which results in a decrease in neuronal excitability in response to current injections. Thus CaMKII can directly modulate neuronal excitability by increasing cell-surface expression of A-type K(+) channels.

  10. Diabetes Interactive Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Nilka R.; Geiss, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    The Diabetes Interactive Atlas is a recently released Web-based collection of maps that allows users to view geographic patterns and examine trends in diabetes and its risk factors over time across the United States and within states. The atlas provides maps, tables, graphs, and motion charts that depict national, state, and county data. Large amounts of data can be viewed in various ways simultaneously. In this article, we describe the design and technical issues for developing the atlas and provide an overview of the atlas’ maps and graphs. The Diabetes Interactive Atlas improves visualization of geographic patterns, highlights observation of trends, and demonstrates the concomitant geographic and temporal growth of diabetes and obesity. PMID:24503340

  11. Interactive optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

  12. Volcanism-Climate Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Louis S. (Editor); Desilva, Shanaka (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The range of disciplines in the study of volcanism-climate interactions includes paleoclimate, volcanology, petrology, tectonics, cloud physics and chemistry, and climate and radiation modeling. Questions encountered in understanding the interactions include: the source and evolution of sulfur and sulfur-gaseous species in magmas; their entrainment in volcanic plumes and injection into the stratosphere; their dissipation rates; and their radiative effects. Other issues include modeling and measuring regional and global effects of such large, dense clouds. A broad-range plan of research designed to answer these questions was defined. The plan includes observations of volcanoes, rocks, trees, and ice cores, as well as satellite and aircraft observations of erupting volcanoes and resulting lumes and clouds.

  13. Interacting Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieles, M.

    2013-06-01

    The early evolution of star cluster formation is a complicated phase in which several astrophysical processes with different time-scales operate simultaneously. From kinematical data of the young massive cluster R136 it was recently found that the cluster is in virial equilibrium; despite its young age it has already settled in a dynamical equilibrium. Somewhat surprisigly, about a quarter of the (kinetic) energy is in a rotational component. From HST observations of R136 a small clump of stars to the North-East of R136 was found, with indications that this clump is interacting/merging with R136. In this talk I will discuss whether these two observational results should be connected, i.e. whether the rotation signal is due to an ongoing "dry" interaction. The results are illustrated with a suite of N-body simulations of R136 like systems.

  14. Interactive digital signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mish, W. H.; Wenger, R. M.; Behannon, K. W.; Byrnes, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Interactive Digital Signal Processor (IDSP) is examined. It consists of a set of time series analysis Operators each of which operates on an input file to produce an output file. The operators can be executed in any order that makes sense and recursively, if desired. The operators are the various algorithms used in digital time series analysis work. User written operators can be easily interfaced to the sysatem. The system can be operated both interactively and in batch mode. In IDSP a file can consist of up to n (currently n=8) simultaneous time series. IDSP currently includes over thirty standard operators that range from Fourier transform operations, design and application of digital filters, eigenvalue analysis, to operators that provide graphical output, allow batch operation, editing and display information.

  15. Interacting adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, Anton; Kusminskiy, Silvia Viola; Refael, Gil; von Oppen, Felix

    2018-05-01

    We present a field-theoretic treatment of an adiabatic quantum motor. We explicitly discuss a motor called the Thouless motor which is based on a Thouless pump operating in reverse. When a sliding periodic potential is considered to be the motor degree of freedom, a bias voltage applied to the electron channel sets the motor in motion. We investigate a Thouless motor whose electron channel is modeled as a Luttinger liquid. Interactions increase the gap opened by the periodic potential. For an infinite Luttinger liquid the coupling-induced friction is enhanced by electron-electron interactions. When the Luttinger liquid is ultimately coupled to Fermi liquid reservoirs, the dissipation reduces to its value for a noninteracting electron system for a constant motor velocity. Our results can also be applied to a motor based on a nanomagnet coupled to a quantum spin Hall edge.

  16. Interactive optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly includes an optical panel having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces. A light source provides an image beam to the panel first face for being channeled through the waveguides and emitted from the panel second face in the form of a viewable light image. A remote device produces a response beam over a discrete selection area of the panel second face for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides toward the panel first face. A light sensor is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides for detecting the response beam therein for providing interactive capability. 10 figs.

  17. Mineralogy and Temperature-induced Spectral Investigations of A-type Asteroids 246 Asporina and 446 Aeternitas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, V.; Hardersen, P. S.; Gaffey, M. J.; Abell, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    A-type asteroids are a relatively rare taxonomic class with no more than 17 known objects. They were first identified as a separate group of R-type asteroids based on broadband spectrophotometry by, and were later classified based on ECAS data by Tholen (1984). These asteroids have moderately high albedos (0.13-0.39), extremely reddish slopes shortward of 0.7 m and a strong absorption feature centered at approx. 1.05 m. More recent surveys like the Small Main-Belt Asteroid Spectroscopic Survey (SMASS) and SMASS II have expanded the taxonomic classes including the A-type, adding 12 new asteroids to the original five.

  18. A type IV translocated Legionella cysteine phytase counteracts intracellular growth restriction by phytate.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen; Stirnimann, Christian U; Wieser, Mara; Frey, Daniel; Meier, Roger; Engelhardt, Sabrina; Li, Xiaodan; Capitani, Guido; Kammerer, Richard A; Hilbi, Hubert

    2014-12-05

    The causative agent of Legionnaires' pneumonia, Legionella pneumophila, colonizes diverse environmental niches, including biofilms, plant material, and protozoa. In these habitats, myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) is prevalent and used as a phosphate storage compound or as a siderophore. L. pneumophila replicates in protozoa and mammalian phagocytes within a unique "Legionella-containing vacuole." The bacteria govern host cell interactions through the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system (T4SS) and ∼300 different "effector" proteins. Here we characterize a hitherto unrecognized Icm/Dot substrate, LppA, as a phytate phosphatase (phytase). Phytase activity of recombinant LppA required catalytically essential cysteine (Cys(231)) and arginine (Arg(237)) residues. The structure of LppA at 1.4 Å resolution revealed a mainly α-helical globular protein stabilized by four antiparallel β-sheets that binds two phosphate moieties. The phosphates localize to a P-loop active site characteristic of dual specificity phosphatases or to a non-catalytic site, respectively. Phytate reversibly abolished growth of L. pneumophila in broth, and growth inhibition was relieved by overproduction of LppA or by metal ion titration. L. pneumophila lacking lppA replicated less efficiently in phytate-loaded Acanthamoeba castellanii or Dictyostelium discoideum, and the intracellular growth defect was complemented by the phytase gene. These findings identify the chelator phytate as an intracellular bacteriostatic component of cell-autonomous host immunity and reveal a T4SS-translocated L. pneumophila phytase that counteracts intracellular bacterial growth restriction by phytate. Thus, bacterial phytases might represent therapeutic targets to combat intracellular pathogens. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Suzaku spectra of a Type-II supernova remnant, Kes 79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tamotsu; Koyama, Katsuji; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on results of a Suzaku observation of the supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 79 (G33.6+0.1). The X-ray spectrum is best fitted by a two-temperature model: a non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma and a collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma. The NEI plasma is spatially confined within the inner radio shell with kT ˜ 0.8 keV, while the CIE plasma is found in more spatially extended regions associated with the outer radio shell with kT ˜0.2 keV and solar abundance. Therefore, the NEI plasma is attributable to the SN ejecta, and the CIE plasma is the forward shocked interstellar medium. In the NEI plasma, we discovered K-shell lines of Al, Ar, and Ca for the first time. The abundance pattern and estimated mass of the ejecta are consistent with a core-collapse supernova explosion of a ˜30-40M⊙ progenitor star. An Fe line with a center energy of ˜6.4 keV is also found in the southeast (SE) portion of the SNR, a close peripheral region around dense molecular clouds. One possibility is that the line is associated with the ejecta. However, the centroid energy of ˜6.4 keV and the spatial distribution of enhancement near the SE peripheral do not favor this scenario. Since the ˜6.4 keV emitting region coincides with the molecular clouds, we propose another possibility, that the Fe line is due to K-shell ionization of neutral Fe by the interaction of locally accelerated protons (LECRp) with the surrounding molecular cloud. Both of these possibilities, heated ejecta or LECRp origin, are discussed based on the observational facts.

  20. Two Late Cretaceous A-type granites related to the Yingwuling W-Sn polymetallic mineralization in Guangdong province, South China: Implications for petrogenesis, geodynamic setting, and mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Mao, Jingwen; Zhao, Haijie; Zhao, Caisheng; Yu, Xiaofei

    2017-03-01

    Major and trace elements, whole rock Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon dating, zircon trace elements and Hf isotope data are reported for a suite of A-type granites from Yingwuling pluton in western Guangdong province, South China. Zircon U-Pb ages obtained by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) show that biotite granite and alkali feldspar granite were emplaced in 81.3 ± 0.6 Ma and 80.6 ± 0.5 Ma, respectively. Both of the two suites have the petrographic and geochemical characteristics of A-type granite. These granitic rocks are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous and have pronounced contents of total alkalis (Na2O + K2O = 7.80-8.84%), Fe2O3T/MgO and Ga/Al ratios. They exhibit low MgO, CaO and TiO2 contents, enrichment in some LILEs and HFSEs (except for Zr, Eu and Y), depletion in Ba, Sr, P and Ti. They show A2 subtype affinity and were probably formed a temperature of 800 °C. The Yingwuling biotite granite has relatively high (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios of 0.70655 to 0.70928, low εNd(t) values of - 5.8 to - 4.2 and zircon εHf(t) values (- 5.70-1.37). Whole-rock Nd isotopic and zircon Hf isotopic two-stages model ages mostly vary from 1057 to 1506 Ma. The alkali feldspar granite display bulk rock εNd(t) values and (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios in the range of - 6.6 to - 6.1 and 0.70640 to 0.71077, respectively, and zircon εHf(t) values from - 5.44 to 0.54, with Mesoproterozoic T2DM for both Nd and Hf isotopes. Geochemical and isotopic data indicate the Yingwuling A-type granitic magmas were drived from mantle-crust interaction. Zircon grains of Yingwuling granites have relatively low Eu/Eu* and Ce4 +/Ce3 + ratios, indicating low oxygen fugacity. The visible tetrad effect in the Yingwuling granites indicates that it experienced strong fractionation and is close relationship to the W-Sn mineralization. Our new data together with previous published data indicate that Late Mesozoic A-type granitiods or alkaline intrusive rocks in South

  1. Acousto-Optic Interactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The document reports the results of the experimental and theoretical investigation of acousto - optic interactions in guided wave structure for optical...waves and acoustic surface waves and experimental results of isotropic and anisotropic diffraction in LiNbO3 and quartz. A simple acousto - optic plate...CVD ZnO films on sapphire, which may be needed for the acousto - optic devices in thin films are also included. (Author)

  2. Environmental Interactions Technology Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    4 1 - 3 - - 3 - High-Voltage Interactions 4 4 1 3 3 1 3 3 1 HIGH ENERGY RADIATION: - Radiation Damage to: - Electronics - 4 4 - 4 4 - 4 4 - Solar ...3), High Energy Radiation Environments (Section 4), Neutral Environments (Section 5), Particle Environments (Section 6), Solar Radiation Environments...secondary mirror, and light collector surrounding the small solar cell. No cover glass is required. Only recently has a study been undertaken to evaluate the

  3. Modulation by clamping: Kv4 and KChIP interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kewei

    2008-10-01

    The rapidly inactivating (A-type) potassium channels regulate membrane excitability that defines the fundamental mechanism of neuronal functions such as pain signaling. Cytosolic Kv channel-interacting proteins KChIPs that belong to neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) family of calcium binding EF-hand proteins co-assemble with Kv4 (Shal) alpha subunits to form a native complex that encodes major components of neuronal somatodendritic A-type K+ current, I(SA), in neurons and transient outward current, I(TO), in cardiac myocytes. The specific binding of auxiliary KChIPs to the Kv4 N-terminus results in modulation of gating properties, surface expression and subunit assembly of Kv4 channels. Here, I attempt to emphasize the interaction between KChIPs and Kv4 based on recent progress made in understanding the structure complex in which a single KChIP1 molecule laterally clamps two neighboring Kv4.3 N-termini in a 4:4 manner. Greater insights into molecular mechanism between KChIPs and Kv4 interaction may provide therapeutic potentials of designing compounds aimed at disrupting the protein-protein interaction for treatment of membrane excitability-related disorders.

  4. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  5. Transactional interactive multimedia banner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shae, Zon-Yin; Wang, Xiping; von Kaenel, Juerg

    2000-05-01

    Advertising in TV broadcasting has shown that multimedia is a very effective means to present merchandise and attract shoppers. This has been applied to the Web by including animated multimedia banner ads on web pages. However, the issues of coupling interactive browsing, shopping, and secure transactions e.g. from inside a multimedia banner, have only recently started to being explored. Currently there is an explosively growing amount of back-end services available (e.g., business to business commerce (B2B), business to consumer (B2C) commerce, and infomercial services) in the Internet. These services are mostly accessible through static HTML web pages at a few specific web portals. In this paper, we will investigate the feasibility of using interactive multimedia banners as pervasive access point for the B2C, B2B, and infomercial services. We present a system architecture that involves a layer of middleware agents functioning as the bridge between the interactive multimedia banners and back-end services.

  6. Rhyacian A-type tholeiitic granites in southern Brazil: Geochemistry, U-Pb zircon ages and Nd model ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Maria José; Bitencourt, Maria de Fátima; Nardi, Lauro Stoll; Picanço, Jefferson; Chemale, Farid, Jr.; Pimenta, Vanessa de Almeida

    2017-04-01

    In the southern South American platform, 2.5 to 2.0 Ga terranes, probably related to the Atlantica supercontinent, occur mainly as minor reworked inliers within Neoproterozoic, Brasiliano/Pan-African orogenic belts, as the Ribeira Belt in southern Brazil. The dispersion of such fragments has generated uncertainties about their geotectonic reconstruction, and their study has been supported mainly by elemental and isotope geochemistry. The southern Ribeira Belt lies between the Paranapanema and Luiz Alves cratons and contains reworked Neoarquean and Paleoproterozoic terranes which outcrop as basement nuclei in supracrustal sequences, as the Setuva Complex. The Água Comprida Suite, situated in the northern part of the Setuva Complex, consists of Amphibole-Biotite Syenogranite (ABS), Porphyritic Biotite Syenogranite (PBS), and Equigranular Biotite Syenogranite (EBS). All granites are foliated and intensively deformed. The oldest foliation (Sn) is marked by augen feldspars set in a recrystallized matrix, followed by a crenulation cleavage (Sn + 1) which evolves to discrete shear zones. ABS is a metaluminous, reduced A-type granite with FeOt / (FeOt + MgO) > 0.9, with high HFSE and REE contents, corresponding to magmas related to continental medium to high-K tholeiitic series. PBS and specially EBS are highly differentiated, metaluminous to peraluminous (EBS), oxidized granites. The increase of Al2O3 and Rb, and decrease of HFS and RE elements relative to ABS indicate their evolution from tholeiitic magmas. The Água Comprida Suite granites are cogenetic rocks evolved from a within-plate mantle source, marked by high Nb, Ta, and Y. The influence of previously metasomatised mantle sources is evidenced by negative Nb, Ti, and P anomalies. The age of ABS is 2187 ± 26 Ma, and that of PBS is between 2180 ± 13 to 2186 ± 22 Ma. The Nd model age of 2.4 Ga, and εNd(2.18 Ga) between - 0.23 and - 0.27 support the interpretation of ABS being formed from juvenile material with a

  7. Mechanisms and implications of a type IV functional response for short-term intake rate of dry matter in large mammalian herbivores.

    PubMed

    Mezzalira, Jean C; Bonnet, Olivier J F; Carvalho, Paulo C de F; Fonseca, Lidiane; Bremm, Carolina; Mezzalira, Carlos C; Laca, Emilio A

    2017-09-01

    The functional response (i.e. the relationship between consumers' intake rate and resource density) is central in plant-herbivore interactions. Its shape and the biological processes leading to it have significant implications for both foraging theory and ecology of grazing systems. A type IV functional response (i.e. dome-shaped relationship) of short-term intake rate of dry matter (intake while grazing) has rarely been reported for large herbivores and the conditions that can lead to it are poorly understood. We report a type IV functional response observed in heifers grazing monocultures of Cynodon sp. and Avena strigosa. The mechanisms and consequences of this type of functional response for grazed system dynamics are discussed. Intake rate was higher at intermediate than at short or tall sward heights in both grass species. The type IV functional response resulted from changes in bite mass instead of a longer time needed to encounter and process bites. Thus, the decrease of intake rate of dry matter in tall swards is not explained by a shift from process 3 (potential bites are concentrated and apparent) to process 2 (potential bites are apparent but dispersed, Spalinger & Hobbs 1992). Bite mass was smaller in tall than in intermediate swards due to a reduction of bite volume possibly caused by the greater proportion of stem and sheath acting as a physical barrier to bite formation. It is generally accepted that potential bites are abundant and apparent in most grassland and meadow systems, as they were in the present experiments. Therefore, a type IV response of intake rate not directly related to digestive constraints may determine the dynamics of intake and defoliation under a much larger set of conditions than previously thought. These results have implications for foraging theory and stability of grazing systems. For example, if animals prefer patches of intermediate stature that yield the highest intake rate, grazing should lead to the widely observed

  8. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  9. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide reduces A-type K+ currents and caspase activity in cultured adult mouse olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Han, P; Lucero, M T

    2005-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide has been shown to reduce apoptosis in neonatal cerebellar and olfactory receptor neurons, however the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide have not been examined in adult tissues. To study the effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide on neurons in apoptosis, we measured caspase activation in adult olfactory receptor neurons in vitro. Interestingly, we found that the protective effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide were related to the absence of a 4-aminopyridine (IC50=144 microM) sensitive rapidly inactivating potassium current often referred to as A-type current. In the presence of 40 nM pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide 38, both A-type current and activated caspases were significantly reduced. A-type current reduction by pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide was blocked by inhibiting the phospholipase C pathway, but not the adenylyl cyclase pathway. Our observation that 5 mM 4-aminopyridine mimicked the caspase inhibiting effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide indicates that A-type current is involved in apoptosis. This work contributes to our growing understanding that potassium currents are involved with the activation of caspases to affect the balance between cell life and death.

  10. Biphasic Somatic A-Type K+ Channel Downregulation Mediates Intrinsic Plasticity in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung-Cherl; Hoffman, Dax A.

    2009-01-01

    Since its original description, the induction of synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) has been known to be accompanied by a lasting increase in the intrinsic excitability (intrinsic plasticity) of hippocampal neurons. Recent evidence shows that dendritic excitability can be enhanced by an activity-dependent decrease in the activity of A-type K+ channels. In the present manuscript, we examined the role of A-type K+ channels in regulating intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus after synapse-specific LTP induction. In electrophysiological recordings we found that LTP induced a potentiation of excitability which was accompanied by a two-phased change in A-type K+ channel activity recorded in nucleated patches from organotypic slices of rat hippocampus. Induction of LTP resulted in an immediate but short lasting hyperpolarization of the voltage-dependence of steady-state A-type K+ channel inactivation along with a progressive, long-lasting decrease in peak A-current density. Blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis prevented the A-current decrease and most measures of intrinsic plasticity. These results suggest that two temporally distinct but overlapping mechanisms of A-channel downregulation together contribute to the plasticity of intrinsic excitability. Finally we show that intrinsic plasticity resulted in a global enhancement of EPSP-spike coupling. PMID:19662093

  11. SALT spectroscopic classification of SN 2017erp as a type-Ia supernova well before maximum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, S. W.; Camacho, Y.; Dettman, K.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.; Skelton, R.

    2017-06-01

    We obtained SALT (+RSS) spectroscopy of SN 2017erp (discovered by K. Itagaki) on 2017 Jun 13.9 UT, covering the wavelength range 350-940 nm. Cross-correlation of the supernova spectrum with a template library using SNID (Blondin & Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) shows SN 2017erp is a type-Ia supernova before maximum light.

  12. Geochemical constraints on genesis of Paleoproterozoic A-type granite in the south margin of North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuo; Xu, Yang; Ling, Ming-Xing; Kang, Qing-Qing; Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Sai-Jun; Wu, Kai; Zhang, Zhe-Kun; Luo, Ze-Bin; Liu, Yu-Long; Sun, Weidong

    2018-04-01

    Paleoproterozoic A-type granites are widely outcropped in the North China Craton (NCC), particularly in the Trans-North China Orogen. However, their genesis and tectonic significance remain obscure. Here we report systematic studies on geochronology and geochemical characteristics of A-type granite in Huayangchuan, south margin of the NCC. The samples are enriched in total alkali (K2O + Na2O > 8.97 wt%), and depleted in MgO (0.84-0.93 wt%), CaO (1.28-1.90 wt%) and P2O5 (0.18-0.20 wt%), with high FeOT/MgO (5.69-6.67). They are characterized by high Zr + Y + Nb + Ce values (1293-1392 ppm) and 10,000 × Ga/Al ratios (3.14-3.35), which are typical characteristics of A-type granite. The Huayangchuan A-type granite can be further classified as A1-type subgroup based on particular geochemical features, e.g., low Y/Nb (0.87-1.00) and Yb/Ta (0.88-1.10). High precision zircon U-Pb dating of the A-type granite by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) yields Paleoproterozoic 207Pb/206Pb ages of 1829.5 ± 2.5 Ma. The low zircon ɛHf(t) values (-6.97 to -10.45), along with zircon Hf model age of 2.7-2.9 Ga, indicate that the Huayangchuan A-type granite was derived from partial melting of the ancient continental crust with contribution of enriched mantle components. The low zircon δ18O composition (4.00 to 6.78‰) indicates that the zircons were crystallized from low δ18O magmas, which derived from the crust metasomatized by low δ18O mantle fluids or melts. The E-W trend A1-type granitic plutons in the NCC are generally outcropped in a rift tectonic regime, which is consistent with the development of the mantle plume in the Xiong'er district. The large volume of basaltic magmas, generated by mantle plume head, underplated the lower continental crust and formed the Huayangchuan A-type granite.

  13. [Decreased A-type potassium current mediates the hyperexcitability of nociceptive neurons in the chronically compressed dorsal root ganglia].

    PubMed

    Yan, Ni; Li, Xiao-Han; Cheng, Qi; Yan, Jin; Ni, Xin; Sun, Ji-Hu

    2007-04-25

    The excitability of nociceptive neurons increases in the intact dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after a chronic compression, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the ionic mechanisms underlying the hyperexcitability of nociceptive neurons in the compressed ganglion. Chronic compression of DRG (CCD) was produced in adult rats by inserting two rods through the intervertebral foramina to compress the L4 DRG and the ipsilateral L5 DRG. After 5-7 d, DRG somata were dissociated and placed in culture for 12-18 h. In sharp electrode recording model, the lower current threshold and the depolarized membrane potential in the acutely dissociated CCD neurons were detected, indicating that hyperexcitability is intrinsic to the soma. Since voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels in the primary sensory neurons are important for the regulation of excitability, we hypothesized that CCD would alter K(+) current properties in the primary sensory neurons. We examined the effects of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a specific antagonist of A-type potassium channel, on the excitability of the control DRG neurons. With 4-AP in the external solution, the control DRG neurons depolarized (with discharges in some cells) and their current threshold decreased as the CCD neurons demonstrated, indicating the involvement of decreased A-type potassium current in the hyperexcitability of the injured neurons. Furthermore, the alteration of A-type potassium current in nociceptive neurons in the compressed ganglion was investigated with the whole-cell patch-clamp recording model. CCD significantly decreased A-type potassium current density in nociceptive DRG neurons. These data suggest that a reduction in A-type potassium current contributes, at least in part, to the increase in neuron excitability that may lead to the development of pain and hyperalgesia associated with CCD.

  14. Interactive Learning and "Clickers"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander

    2006-12-01

    A growing body of evidence demonstrates that student understanding and retention of key concepts in science can be dramatically improved by using “Interactive Learning” techniques. Interactive learning is a way to get students more actively involved in their own learning than by simple lecture alone. I will focus on one type of interactive learning activity, known as “Think-Pair-Share”. After a brief (10-20 minute) lecture on a topic, students are asked a conceptually challenging multiple-choice question. After they answer, if there is sufficient disagreement, the students discuss the question in small groups after which they answer the same question again. Frequently, the percentage of correct answers goes up, indicating that the active role of speaking and listening, together with peer instruction, has helped students better grasp the concept being tested. If disagreement persists, or if students continue to have questions, a short, class-wide discussion can be held. Clickers provide an excellent means to collect students’ answers to “Think-Pair-Share” questions in real time. Although clickers are not essential, they do provide some advantages over alternatives such as flash cards: answers are completely anonymous (though you as instructor can record individual responses); you can display a histogram of results immediately, either before or after group discussion, providing immediate feedback; by recording the results, you can give students credit for their participation in class. In this talk, I will model “Think-Pair-Share” with the audience using clickers, show results from my classes before and after group discussions, share results of a student survey on “Think-Pair-Share” and clickers, describe other uses of clickers (e.g., taking attendance, surveys, test administration) and highlight some of the pros and cons of clickers v. flashcards.

  15. Intelligently interactive combat simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, Lawrence J.; Porto, Vincent W.; Alexander, Steven M.

    2001-09-01

    To be fully effective, combat simulation must include an intelligently interactive enemy... one that can be calibrated. But human operated combat simulations are uncalibratable, for we learn during the engagement, there's no average enemy, and we cannot replicate their culture/personality. Rule-based combat simulations (expert systems) are not interactive. They do not take advantage of unexpected mistakes, learn, innovate, and reflect the changing mission/situation. And it is presumed that the enemy does not have a copy of the rules, that the available experts are good enough, that they know why they did what they did, that their combat experience provides a sufficient sample and that we know how to combine the rules offered by differing experts. Indeed, expert systems become increasingly complex, costly to develop, and brittle. They have face validity but may be misleading. In contrast, intelligently interactive combat simulation is purpose- driven. Each player is given a well-defined mission, reference to the available weapons/platforms, their dynamics, and the sensed environment. Optimal tactics are discovered online and in real-time by simulating phenotypic evolution in fast time. The initial behaviors are generated randomly or include hints. The process then learns without instruction. The Valuated State Space Approach provides a convenient way to represent any purpose/mission. Evolutionary programming searches the domain of possible tactics in a highly efficient manner. Coupled together, these provide a basis for cruise missile mission planning, and for driving tank warfare simulation. This approach is now being explored to benefit Air Force simulations by a shell that can enhance the original simulation.

  16. A type 2 diabetes prevention website for african americans, Caucasians, and mexican americans: formative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Reininger, Belinda; Mecca, Laurel Person; Stine, Kendra M; Schultz, Kevan; Ling, Luke; Halpern, David

    2013-07-11

    The majority of Americans now access the Internet, thereby expanding prospects for Web-based health-related education and intervention. However, there remains a digital divide among those with lower income and education, and among Spanish-speaking populations in the United States. Additional concerns are the low eHealth literacy rate among these populations and their interest in Internet-delivered interventions with these components. Given these factors, combined with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes among low socioeconomic status and Spanish-speaking Americans, strides need to be taken to reach these populations with online tools for diabetes prevention and management that are at once accessible and efficacious. Using a formative evaluation of an eHealth diabetes prevention and control website, we tested the extent to which African Americans, Caucasians, and Mexican Americans at risk for type 2 diabetes gained knowledge and intended to modify their dietary intake and physical activity subsequent to viewing the website. We also examined their general Internet use patterns related to type 2 diabetes. A mixed methods approach was undertaken. The diabetes prevention and control website provided educational and behavioral change information in English and Spanish. For this study, eligible participants (1) completed a prequantitative survey, (2) interacted with the website, (3) completed a qualitative interview, and (4) completed a postquantitative survey. After finding a significant differences in posttest diabetes knowledge scores (P<.001), a regression analysis controlling for pretest score, health literacy, ethnicity, Transtheoretical Model Stage for exercise and fruit and vegetable consumption, and Internet literacy was conducted. Internet literacy score (P=.04) and fruit and vegetable consumption stage (P<.001) were significantly associated with posttest scores indicating that those in precontemplation stage and with low Internet literacy scores were less likely

  17. Lipid interactions in breadmaking.

    PubMed

    Carr, N O; Daniels, N W; Frazier, P J

    1992-01-01

    Both the natural lipids of flour and added fats are known to play an important role during the production of bread. In this review, the chemical and physical interactions of fat have been assessed in an attempt to explain these technological functions. Particular emphasis has been placed on the "binding" or complexing of lipid by flour proteins during the development of dough. While publications in this field have frequently been contradictory, evidence now indicates that observed lipid binding may involve lipid mesophase transformation and the nonspecific occlusion of lipid phases within the gluten network. The significance of these suggested events has been compared with current theories of lipid function in the breadmaking process.

  18. Interact with your CPA!

    PubMed

    Miller, Rita J

    2014-01-01

    Communication between physicians and their financial advisors is critical. Often, physicians are reluctant to discuss financial matters, but in today's environment, communication is important. Practice management, revenue generation, and personal taxes are areas that require year-long interaction between the parties. Practice management is an area where the CPA can assist with suggestions of best practices. Revenue generation is maximized by a physician who knows and understands his or her office. Personal taxes are important, not only on April 15! How can a physician work with a CPA in terms they both understand? A few guidelines will enable a smooth communication process.

  19. Detection of molecular interactions

    DOEpatents

    Groves, John T [Berkeley, CA; Baksh, Michael M [Fremont, CA; Jaros, Michal [Brno, CH

    2012-02-14

    A method and assay are described for measuring the interaction between a ligand and an analyte. The assay can include a suspension of colloidal particles that are associated with a ligand of interest. The colloidal particles are maintained in the suspension at or near a phase transition state from a condensed phase to a dispersed phase. An analyte to be tested is then added to the suspension. If the analyte binds to the ligand, a phase change occurs to indicate that the binding was successful.

  20. Interactive virtual optical laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Yang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    Laboratory experiences are essential for optics education. However, college students have limited access to advanced optical equipment that is generally expensive and complicated. Hence there is a need for innovative solutions to expose students to advanced optics laboratories. Here we describe a novel approach, interactive virtual optical laboratory (IVOL) that allows unlimited number of students to participate the lab session remotely through internet, to improve laboratory education in photonics. Although students are not physically conducting the experiment, IVOL is designed to engage students, by actively involving students in the decision making process throughout the experiment.

  1. Interactive Particle Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribble, Christiaan P.

    Particle-based simulation methods are used to model a wide range of complex phenomena and to solve time-dependent problems of various scales. Effective visualizations of the resulting state will communicate subtle changes in the three-dimensional structure, spatial organization, and qualitative trends within a simulation as it evolves. This chapter discusses two approaches to interactive particle visualization that satisfy these goals: one targeting desktop systems equipped with programmable graphics hardware, and the other targeting moderately sized multicore systems using packet-based ray tracing.

  2. Interactive Classification Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBessonet, Cary

    2000-01-01

    The investigators upgraded a knowledge representation language called SL (Symbolic Language) and an automated reasoning system called SMS (Symbolic Manipulation System) to enable the more effective use of the technologies in automated reasoning and interactive classification systems. The overall goals of the project were: 1) the enhancement of the representation language SL to accommodate a wider range of meaning; 2) the development of a default inference scheme to operate over SL notation as it is encoded; and 3) the development of an interpreter for SL that would handle representations of some basic cognitive acts and perspectives.

  3. Visuo-Vestibular Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA3 includes short reports covering: (1) Vestibulo-Oculomotor Interaction in Long-Term Microgravity; (2) Effects of Weightlessness on the Spatial Orientation of Visually Induced Eye Movements; (3) Adaptive Modification of the Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Prolonged Microgravity; (4) The Dynamic Change of Brain Potential Related to Selective Attention to Visual Signals from Left and Right Visual Fields; (5) Locomotor Errors Caused by Vestibular Suppression; and (6) A Novel, Image-Based Technique for Three-Dimensional Eye Measurement.

  4. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  5. Twisting Plasma Interactions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-19

    Several short stalks of cooler, darker plasma spun and twisted as they interacted with each other at the sun's edge (June 14-15, 2017). The row of strands, which together form a prominence, were being pulled back and forth by magnetic forces. The dynamic action was observed for just over one day. Also noteworthy is the rapid development of a bright active region in the upper right about halfway through the clip. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21761

  6. Interactive electromagnetic launcher simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, F. J.; Howland, H. R.; Hughes, W. F.; Fikse, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mathematical model, usage, and documentation of an interactive computer simulation for an electromagnetic launcher is presented. The launcher is modeled as an electrical circuit. Three slight variations of the program permit studies of a launcher with (1) rail skin effects, (2) rail skin effects and approximated storage coil skin effects, or (3) neither of these effects. Usage of the program as currently implemented on the Westinghouse R&D Univac 1106 is described, with a sample session shown. The implementation of the program permits rapid scoping of the effects of parameter changes.

  7. Imitation, Interaction and Dialogue Using Intensive Interaction: Tea Party Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Intensive Interaction has become widely used when building up communication with children with profound learning difficulties. Often practitioners understand Intensive Interaction to be primarily about imitation and Mark Barber shows how this can be a "mis"understanding that limits the kinds of interactions that can be enjoyed by conversation…

  8. Ticking Stellar Time Bomb Identified - Astronomers find prime suspect for a Type Ia supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope and its ability to obtain images as sharp as if taken from space, astronomers have made the first time-lapse movie of a rather unusual shell ejected by a "vampire star", which in November 2000 underwent an outburst after gulping down part of its companion's matter. This enabled astronomers to determine the distance and intrinsic brightness of the outbursting object. It appears that this double star system is a prime candidate to be one of the long-sought progenitors of the exploding stars known as Type Ia supernovae, critical for studies of dark energy. "One of the major problems in modern astrophysics is the fact that we still do not know exactly what kinds of stellar system explode as a Type Ia supernova," says Patrick Woudt, from the University of Cape Town and lead author of the paper reporting the results. "As these supernovae play a crucial role in showing that the Universe's expansion is currently accelerating, pushed by a mysterious dark energy, it is rather embarrassing." The astronomers studied the object known as V445 in the constellation of Puppis ("the Stern") in great detail. V445 Puppis is the first, and so far only, nova showing no evidence at all for hydrogen. It provides the first evidence for an outburst on the surface of a white dwarf [1] dominated by helium. "This is critical, as we know that Type Ia supernovae lack hydrogen," says co-author Danny Steeghs, from the University of Warwick, UK, "and the companion star in V445 Pup fits this nicely by also lacking hydrogen, instead dumping mainly helium gas onto the white dwarf." In November 2000, this system underwent a nova outburst, becoming 250 times brighter than before and ejecting a large quantity of matter into space. The team of astronomers used the NACO adaptive optics instrument [2] on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) to obtain very sharp images of V445 Puppis over a time span of two years. The images show a bipolar shell, initially with a very narrow

  9. Herb-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Fugh-Berman, A

    2000-01-08

    Concurrent use of herbs may mimic, magnify, or oppose the effect of drugs. Plausible cases of herb-drug interactions include: bleeding when warfarin is combined with ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), garlic (Allium sativum), dong quai (Angelica sinensis), or danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza); mild serotonin syndrome in patients who mix St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) with serotonin-reuptake inhibitors; decreased bioavailability of digoxin, theophylline, cyclosporin, and phenprocoumon when these drugs are combined with St John's wort; induction of mania in depressed patients who mix antidepressants and Panax ginseng; exacerbation of extrapyramidal effects with neuroleptic drugs and betel nut (Areca catechu); increased risk of hypertension when tricyclic antidepressants are combined with yohimbine (Pausinystalia yohimbe); potentiation of oral and topical corticosteroids by liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra); decreased blood concentrations of prednisolone when taken with the Chinese herbal product xaio chai hu tang (sho-salko-to); and decreased concentrations of phenytoin when combined with the Ayurvedic syrup shankhapushpi. Anthranoid-containing plants (including senna [Cassia senna] and cascara [Rhamnus purshiana]) and soluble fibres (including guar gum and psyllium) can decrease the absorption of drugs. Many reports of herb-drug interactions are sketchy and lack laboratory analysis of suspect preparations. Health-care practitioners should caution patients against mixing herbs and pharmaceutical drugs.

  10. Metal-dielectric interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Metal direlectric surface interactions and dielectric films on metal substrates were investigated. Since interfacial interaction depends so heavily on the nature of the surfaces, analytical surface tools such as Auger emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field ion microscopy were used to assist in surface and interfacial characterization. The results indicate that with metals contacting certain glasses in the clean state interfacial, bonding produces fractures in the glasses while when a film such as water is present, fractures occur in the metal near the interface. Friction forces were used to measure the interfacial bond strengths. Studies with metals contacting polymers using field ion microscopy revealed that strong bonding forces could develop being between a metal and polymer surface with polymer transferring to the metal surface in various ways depending upon the forces applied to the surface in contact. With the deposition of refractory carbides, silicides and borides onto metal and alloy substrates the presence of oxides at the interface or active gases in the deposition plasma were shown to alter interfacial properties and chemistry. Auger ion depth profile analysis indicated the chemical composition at the interface and this could be related to the mechanical, friction, and wear behavior of the coating.

  11. Interactive Terascale Particle Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Moran, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce an interactive visualization of a 2 TB computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data set using particle tracing (streaklines). We use the method introduced by Bruckschen et al. [2001] that pre-computes a large number of particles, stores them on disk using a space-filling curve ordering that minimizes seeks, and then retrieves and displays the particles according to the user's command. We describe how the particle computation can be performed using a PC cluster, how the algorithm can be adapted to work with a multi-block curvilinear mesh, and how the out-of-core visualization can be scaled to 296 billion particles while still achieving interactive performance on PG hardware. Compared to the earlier work, our data set size and total number of particles are an order of magnitude larger. We also describe a new compression technique that allows the lossless compression of the particles by 41% and speeds the particle retrieval by about 30%.

  12. Titan's Variable Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini observations have found that the plasma and magnetic field conditions upstream of Titan are far more complex than they were thought to be after the Voyager encounter. Rymer et al., (2009) used the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) electron observations to classify the plasma conditions along Titan's orbit into 5 types (Plasma Sheet, Lobe, Mixed, Magnetosheath and Misc.). Nemeth et al., (2011) found that the CAPS ion observations could also be separated into the same plasma regions as defined by Rymer et al. Additionally the T-96 encounter found Titan in the solar wind adding a sixth classification. Understanding the effects of the variable upstream plasma conditions on Titan's plasma interaction and the evolution of Titan's ionosphere/atmosphere is one of the main objectives of the Cassini mission. To compliment the mission we perform hybrid simulations of Titan's plasma interaction to examine the effects of the incident plasma distribution function and the flow velocity. We closely examine the results on Titan's induced magnetosphere and the resulting pickup ion properties.

  13. Cotton and Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Edwards, J. V.; Rayburn, Alfred R.

    The adsorbent properties of important wound fluid proteins and cotton cellulose are reviewed. This review focuses on the adsorption of albumin to cotton-based wound dressings and some chemically modified derivatives targeted for chronic wounds. Adsorption of elastase in the presence of albumin was examined as a model to understand the interactive properties of these wound fluid components with cotton fibers. In the chronic non-healing wound, elastase appears to be over-expressed, and it digests tissue and growth factors, interfering with the normal healing process. Albumin is the most prevalent protein in wound fluid, and in highly to moderately exudative wounds, itmore » may bind significantly to the fibers of wound dressings. Thus, the relative binding properties of both elastase and albumin to wound dressing fibers are of interest in the design of more effective wound dressings. The present work examines the binding of albumin to two different derivatives of cotton, and quantifies the elastase binding to the same derivatives following exposure of albumin to the fiber surface. An HPLC adsorption technique was employed coupled with a colorimetric enzyme assay to quantify the relative binding properties of albumin and elastase to cotton. The results of wound protein binding are discussed in relation to the porosity and surface chemistry interactions of cotton and wound proteins. Studies are directed to understanding the implications of protein adsorption phenomena in terms of fiber-protein models that have implications for rationally designing dressings for chronic wounds.« less

  14. XEphem: Interactive Astronomical Ephemeris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, Elwood Charles

    2011-12-01

    XEphem is a scientific-grade interactive astronomical ephemeris package for UNIX-like systems. Written in C, X11 and Motif, it is easily ported to systems. Among other things, XEphem: computes heliocentric, geocentric and topocentric information for all objects; has built-in support for all planets; the moons of Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Earth; central meridian longitude of Mars and Jupiter; Saturn's rings; and Jupiter's Great Red Spot; allows user-defined objects including stars, deepsky objects, asteroids, comets and Earth satellites; provides special efficient handling of large catalogs including Tycho, Hipparcos, GSC; displays data in configurable tabular formats in conjunction with several interactive graphical views; displays a night-at-a-glance 24 hour graphic showing when any selected objects are up; displays 3-D stereo Solar System views that are particularly well suited for visualizing comet trajectories; quickly finds all close pairs of objects in the sky; and sorts and prints all catalogs with very flexible criteria for creating custom observing lists. Its capabilities are listed more fully in the user manual introduction.

  15. Vehicle track interaction safety standards

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-04-02

    Vehicle/Track Interaction (VTI) Safety Standards aim to : reduce the risk of derailments and other accidents attributable : to the dynamic interaction between moving vehicles and the : track over which they operate. On March 13, 2013, the Federal : R...

  16. Auxiliary KChIP4a Suppresses A-type K+ Current through Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Retention and Promoting Closed-state Inactivation of Kv4 Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yi-Quan; Liang, Ping; Zhou, Jingheng; Lu, Yanxin; Lei, Lei; Bian, Xiling; Wang, KeWei

    2013-01-01

    In the brain and heart, auxiliary Kv channel-interacting proteins (KChIPs) co-assemble with pore-forming Kv4 α-subunits to form a native K+ channel complex and regulate the expression and gating properties of Kv4 currents. Among the KChIP1–4 members, KChIP4a exhibits a unique N terminus that is known to suppress Kv4 function, but the underlying mechanism of Kv4 inhibition remains unknown. Using a combination of confocal imaging, surface biotinylation, and electrophysiological recordings, we identified a novel endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention motif, consisting of six hydrophobic and aliphatic residues, 12–17 (LIVIVL), within the KChIP4a N-terminal KID, that functions to reduce surface expression of Kv4-KChIP complexes. This ER retention capacity is transferable and depends on its flanking location. In addition, adjacent to the ER retention motif, the residues 19–21 (VKL motif) directly promote closed-state inactivation of Kv4.3, thus leading to an inhibition of channel current. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that KChIP4a suppresses A-type Kv4 current via ER retention and enhancement of Kv4 closed-state inactivation. PMID:23576435

  17. Charge Transfer Enhancement in the D-π-A Type Porphyrin Dyes: A Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guo-Jun; Song, Chao; Ren, Xue-Feng

    2016-11-25

    The electronic geometries and optical properties of two D-π-A type zinc porphyrin dyes (NCH₃-YD2 and TPhe-YD) were systematically investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to reveal the origin of significantly altered charge transfer enhancement by changing the electron donor of the famous porphyrin-based sensitizer YD2-o-C8. The molecular geometries and photophysical properties of dyes before and after binding to the TiO₂ cluster were fully investigated. From the analyses of natural bond orbital (NBO), extended charge decomposition analysis (ECDA), and electron density variations (Δρ) between the excited state and ground state, it was found that the introduction of N(CH₃)₂ and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups enhanced the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) character compared to YD2-o-C8. The absorption wavelength and transition possess character were significantly influenced by N(CH₃)₂ and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups. NCH₃-YD2 with N(CH₃)₂ groups in the donor part is an effective way to improve the interactions between the dyes and TiO₂ surface, light having efficiency (LHE), and free energy change (ΔG inject ), which is expected to be an efficient dye for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs).

  18. Auxiliary KChIP4a suppresses A-type K+ current through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention and promoting closed-state inactivation of Kv4 channels.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi-Quan; Liang, Ping; Zhou, Jingheng; Lu, Yanxin; Lei, Lei; Bian, Xiling; Wang, KeWei

    2013-05-24

    In the brain and heart, auxiliary Kv channel-interacting proteins (KChIPs) co-assemble with pore-forming Kv4 α-subunits to form a native K(+) channel complex and regulate the expression and gating properties of Kv4 currents. Among the KChIP1-4 members, KChIP4a exhibits a unique N terminus that is known to suppress Kv4 function, but the underlying mechanism of Kv4 inhibition remains unknown. Using a combination of confocal imaging, surface biotinylation, and electrophysiological recordings, we identified a novel endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention motif, consisting of six hydrophobic and aliphatic residues, 12-17 (LIVIVL), within the KChIP4a N-terminal KID, that functions to reduce surface expression of Kv4-KChIP complexes. This ER retention capacity is transferable and depends on its flanking location. In addition, adjacent to the ER retention motif, the residues 19-21 (VKL motif) directly promote closed-state inactivation of Kv4.3, thus leading to an inhibition of channel current. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that KChIP4a suppresses A-type Kv4 current via ER retention and enhancement of Kv4 closed-state inactivation.

  19. Collaborative Scaffolding in Online Task-Based Voice Interactions between Advanced Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenning, Marie-Madeleine

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports some of the findings of a distinctive innovative use of audio-conferencing involving a population (campus-based advanced learners) and a type of application (task-based language learning) that have received little attention to date: the use of Wimba Voice Tools to provide additional opportunities for spoken interactions between…

  20. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are…

  1. Mesenchymal-epithelial interaction techniques

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the importance of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in development and gives detailed technical protocols for investigating these interactions. Successful analysis of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions requires knowing the ages in which embryonic, neonatal and adult organs can be separated into mesenchymal and epithelial tissues. Methods for separation of mesenchymal and epithelial and preparation of tissue recombinants are described. PMID:26610327

  2. Interactional Psychology and Organizational Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    effect and then argue, per- suasively, that situations control behavior. The fact that actual experimental treatments are typically non -representative of...Interactional psychology organizational design organization theory person x situation interaction work socialization person-environment interaction...and methodological underpinnings of situ- ationism, and (2) the presentation of the interactionist perspective. For purposes of the present paper

  3. Online Learners' Preferences for Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northrup, Pamela T.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated types of interaction that graduate students perceived to be important for elearning (electronic learning). Discusses content interaction, conversation and collaboration, interpersonal and metacognitive skills, and need for support; explains the Online Learning Interaction Inventory; and reports that flexibility…

  4. Species interactions and plant polyploidy.

    PubMed

    Segraves, Kari A; Anneberg, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Polyploidy is a common mode of speciation that can have far-reaching consequences for plant ecology and evolution. Because polyploidy can induce an array of phenotypic changes, there can be cascading effects on interactions with other species. These interactions, in turn, can have reciprocal effects on polyploid plants, potentially impacting their establishment and persistence. Although there is a wealth of information on the genetic and phenotypic effects of polyploidy, the study of species interactions in polyploid plants remains a comparatively young field. Here we reviewed the available evidence for how polyploidy may impact many types of species interactions that range from mutualism to antagonism. Specifically, we focused on three main questions: (1) Does polyploidy directly cause the formation of novel interactions not experienced by diploids, or does it create an opportunity for natural selection to then form novel interactions? (2) Does polyploidy cause consistent, predictable changes in species interactions vs. the evolution of idiosyncratic differences? (3) Does polyploidy lead to greater evolvability in species interactions? From the scarce evidence available, we found that novel interactions are rare but that polyploidy can induce changes in pollinator, herbivore, and pathogen interactions. Although further tests are needed, it is likely that selection following whole-genome duplication is important in all types of species interaction and that there are circumstances in which polyploidy can enhance the evolvability of interactions with other species. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  5. Learner Perceptions of Online Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northrup, Pam; Lee, Russell; Burgess, Vance

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the types of interactions that students perceived to be important for online learning. The interaction attributes investigated included content interaction, conversation and collaboration, intrapersonal/metacognitive skills, and need for support. Also investigated were reasons why learners were taking…

  6. Expanding the Interaction Equivalency Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Brenda Cecilia Padilla; Armellini, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Although interaction is recognised as a key element for learning, its incorporation in online courses can be challenging. The interaction equivalency theorem provides guidelines: Meaningful learning can be supported as long as one of three types of interactions (learner-content, learner-teacher and learner-learner) is present at a high level. This…

  7. IDG - INTERACTIVE DIF GENERATOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preheim, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive DIF Generator (IDG) utility is a tool used to generate and manipulate Directory Interchange Format files (DIF). Its purpose as a specialized text editor is to create and update DIF files which can be sent to NASA's Master Directory, also referred to as the International Global Change Directory at Goddard. Many government and university data systems use the Master Directory to advertise the availability of research data. The IDG interface consists of a set of four windows: (1) the IDG main window; (2) a text editing window; (3) a text formatting and validation window; and (4) a file viewing window. The IDG main window starts up the other windows and contains a list of valid keywords. The keywords are loaded from a user-designated file and selected keywords can be copied into any active editing window. Once activated, the editing window designates the file to be edited. Upon switching from the editing window to the formatting and validation window, the user has options for making simple changes to one or more files such as inserting tabs, aligning fields, and indenting groups. The viewing window is a scrollable read-only window that allows fast viewing of any text file. IDG is an interactive tool and requires a mouse or a trackball to operate. IDG uses the X Window System to build and manage its interactive forms, and also uses the Motif widget set and runs under Sun UNIX. IDG is written in C-language for Sun computers running SunOS. This package requires the X Window System, Version 11 Revision 4, with OSF/Motif 1.1. IDG requires 1.8Mb of hard disk space. The standard distribution medium for IDG is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. It is also available on a 3.5 inch diskette in UNIX tar format. The program was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. SunOS is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc. X Window System is a trademark of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. OSF/Motif is a

  8. Human-Robot Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, E. Vincent, II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2015-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces affect the human's ability to perform tasks effectively and efficiently when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. For efficient and effective remote navigation of a rover, a human operator needs to be aware of the robot's environment. However, during teleoperation, operators may get information about the environment only through a robot's front-mounted camera causing a keyhole effect. The keyhole effect reduces situation awareness which may manifest in navigation issues such as higher number of collisions, missing critical aspects of the environment, or reduced speed. One way to compensate for the keyhole effect and the ambiguities operators experience when they teleoperate a robot is adding multiple cameras and including the robot chassis in the camera view. Augmented reality, such as overlays, can also enhance the way a person sees objects in the environment or in camera views by making them more visible. Scenes can be augmented with integrated telemetry, procedures, or map information. Furthermore, the addition of an exocentric (i.e., third-person) field of view from a camera placed in the robot's environment may provide operators with the additional information needed to gain spatial awareness of the robot. Two research studies investigated possible mitigation approaches to address the keyhole effect: 1) combining the inclusion of the robot chassis in the camera view with augmented reality overlays, and 2) modifying the camera

  9. Quadratic spatial soliton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Ladislav

    Quadratic spatial soliton interactions were investigated in this Dissertation. The first part deals with characterizing the principal features of multi-soliton generation and soliton self-reflection. The second deals with two beam processes leading to soliton interactions and collisions. These subjects were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experiments were performed by using potassium niobate (KNBO 3) and periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystals. These particular crystals were desirable for these experiments because of their large nonlinear coefficients and, more importantly, because the experiments could be performed under non-critical-phase-matching (NCPM) conditions. The single soliton generation measurements, performed on KNBO3 by launching the fundamental component only, showed a broad angular acceptance bandwidth which was important for the soliton collisions performed later. Furthermore, at high input intensities multi-soliton generation was observed for the first time. The influence on the multi-soliton patterns generated of the input intensity and beam symmetry was investigated. The combined experimental and theoretical efforts indicated that spatial and temporal noise on the input laser beam induced multi-soliton patterns. Another research direction pursued was intensity dependent soliton routing by using of a specially engineered quadratically nonlinear interface within a periodically poled KTP sample. This was the first time demonstration of the self-reflection phenomenon in a system with a quadratic nonlinearity. The feature investigated is believed to have a great potential for soliton routing and manipulation by engineered structures. A detailed investigation was conducted on two soliton interaction and collision processes. Birth of an additional soliton resulting from a two soliton collision was observed and characterized for the special case of a non-planar geometry. A small amount of spiraling, up to 30

  10. Repeatability of measurements: Non-Hermitian observables and quantum Coriolis force

    DOE PAGES

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-08-26

    A noncommuting measurement transfers, via the apparatus, information encoded in a system's state to the external “observer.” Classical measurements determine properties of physical objects. In the quantum realm, the very same notion restricts the recording process to orthogonal states as only those are distinguishable by measurements. Thus, even a possibility to describe physical reality by means of non-Hermitian operators should volens nolens be excluded as their eigenstates are not orthogonal. We show that non-Hermitian operators with real spectra can be treated within the standard framework of quantum mechanics. Further, we propose a quantum canonical transformation that maps Hermitian systems ontomore » non-Hermitian ones. Similar to classical inertial forces this map is accompanied by an energetic cost, pinning the system on the unitary path.« less

  11. Repeatability of measurements: Non-Hermitian observables and quantum Coriolis force

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh

    A noncommuting measurement transfers, via the apparatus, information encoded in a system's state to the external “observer.” Classical measurements determine properties of physical objects. In the quantum realm, the very same notion restricts the recording process to orthogonal states as only those are distinguishable by measurements. Thus, even a possibility to describe physical reality by means of non-Hermitian operators should volens nolens be excluded as their eigenstates are not orthogonal. We show that non-Hermitian operators with real spectra can be treated within the standard framework of quantum mechanics. Further, we propose a quantum canonical transformation that maps Hermitian systems ontomore » non-Hermitian ones. Similar to classical inertial forces this map is accompanied by an energetic cost, pinning the system on the unitary path.« less

  12. Gravitomagnetic Field of the Universe and Coriolis Force on the Rotating Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veto, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Machian effect of distant masses of the universe in the frame of reference of the rotating Earth is demonstrated using the gravitomagnetic approach of general relativity. This effect appears in the form of a gravitomagnetic Lorentz force acting on moving bodies on the Earth. The gravitomagnetic field of the universe--deduced from a simple…

  13. Vortex/surface interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodstein, G. C. R.; George, A. R.; Hui, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a vortex generated upstream in a flow field with a downstream aerodynamic surface that possesses a large chord. The flow is assumed to be steady, incompressible, inviscid and irrotational, and the surface to be semiinfinite. The vortex is considered to be a straight vortex filament. To lowest order the problem is modeled using potential theory, where the 3D Laplace's equation for the velocity potential on the surface is solved exactly. The closed-form equation for pressure distribution obtained from this theory is found to have a square root singularity at the leading-edge. It also converges, as x goes to infinity, to the solution of the 2D point-vortex/infinite plane problem. The pressure coefficient presents an anti-symmetric behavior, near the leading-edge and a symmetric behavior as x goes to infinity.

  14. Interacting neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, R.; Kinzel, W.; Kanter, I.

    2000-08-01

    Several scenarios of interacting neural networks which are trained either in an identical or in a competitive way are solved analytically. In the case of identical training each perceptron receives the output of its neighbor. The symmetry of the stationary state as well as the sensitivity to the used training algorithm are investigated. Two competitive perceptrons trained on mutually exclusive learning aims and a perceptron which is trained on the opposite of its own output are examined analytically. An ensemble of competitive perceptrons is used as decision-making algorithms in a model of a closed market (El Farol Bar problem or the Minority Game. In this game, a set of agents who have to make a binary decision is considered.); each network is trained on the history of minority decisions. This ensemble of perceptrons relaxes to a stationary state whose performance can be better than random.

  15. Interlayer interactions in graphites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaobin; Tian, Fuyang; Persson, Clas; Duan, Wenhui; Chen, Nan-xian

    2013-11-06

    Based on ab initio calculations of both the ABC- and AB-stacked graphites, interlayer potentials (i.e., graphene-graphene interaction) are obtained as a function of the interlayer spacing using a modified Möbius inversion method, and are used to calculate basic physical properties of graphite. Excellent consistency is observed between the calculated and experimental phonon dispersions of AB-stacked graphite, showing the validity of the interlayer potentials. More importantly, layer-related properties for nonideal structures (e.g., the exfoliation energy, cleave energy, stacking fault energy, surface energy, etc.) can be easily predicted from the interlayer potentials, which promise to be extremely efficient and helpful in studying van der Waals structures.

  16. Transient complex peroxisomal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, Nina A.; Schrader, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria and peroxisomes are ubiquitous subcellular organelles that fulfill essential metabolic functions, rendering them indispensable for human development and health. Both are highly dynamic organelles that can undergo remarkable changes in morphology and number to accomplish cellular needs. While mitochondrial dynamics are also regulated by frequent fusion events, the fusion of mature peroxisomes in mammalian cells remained a matter of debate. In our recent study, we clarified systematically that there is no complete fusion of mature peroxisomes analogous to mitochondria. Moreover, in contrast to key division components such as DLP1, Fis1 or Mff, mitochondrial fusion proteins were not localized to peroxisomes. However, we discovered and characterized novel transient, complex interactions between individual peroxisomes which may contribute to the homogenization of the often heterogeneous peroxisomal compartment, e.g., by distribution of metabolites, signals or other “molecular information” via interperoxisomal contact sites. PMID:23336019

  17. Interactive communication channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, R. H.; Mann, M. R.; Ciarrocchi, J. A.

    1985-10-01

    Discussed is an interactive communications channel (ICC) for providing a digital computer with high-performance multi-channel interfaces. Sixteen full duplex channels can be serviced in the ICC with the sequence or scan pattern being programmable and dependent upon the number or channels and their speed. A channel buffer system is used for line interface, and character exchange. The channel buffer system is on a byte basis. The ICC performs frame start and frame end functions, bit stripping and bit stuffing. Data is stored in a memory in block format (256 bytes maximum) by a program control and the ICC maintains byte address information and a block byte count. Data exchange with a memory is made by cycle steals. Error detection is also provided for using a cyclic redundancy check technique.

  18. Interacting neural networks.

    PubMed

    Metzler, R; Kinzel, W; Kanter, I

    2000-08-01

    Several scenarios of interacting neural networks which are trained either in an identical or in a competitive way are solved analytically. In the case of identical training each perceptron receives the output of its neighbor. The symmetry of the stationary state as well as the sensitivity to the used training algorithm are investigated. Two competitive perceptrons trained on mutually exclusive learning aims and a perceptron which is trained on the opposite of its own output are examined analytically. An ensemble of competitive perceptrons is used as decision-making algorithms in a model of a closed market (El Farol Bar problem or the Minority Game. In this game, a set of agents who have to make a binary decision is considered.); each network is trained on the history of minority decisions. This ensemble of perceptrons relaxes to a stationary state whose performance can be better than random.

  19. Interactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  20. Drug-nutrient interaction.

    PubMed

    Matsui, M S; Rozovski, S J

    1982-01-01

    The effect of certain drugs on nutrient metabolism is discussed. Antituberculotic drugs such as INH and cycloserine interfere with vitamin B6 metabolism and may produce a secondary niacin deficiency. Oral contraceptives interfere with the metabolism of folic acid and ascorbic acid, and in cases of deficient nutrition, they also seem to interfere with riboflavin. Anticonvulsants can act as folate antagonists and precipitate folic acid deficiency. Therefore, in some cases, supplementation with folate has been recommended simultaneously with anticonvulsant therapy. Cholestyramine therapy has been associated with malabsorption of vitamins; several reports suggest that cholestyramine affects absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins K and D and, in addition, may alter water-soluble vitamins, including folic acid. The study of the interaction of drugs and nutrients is an area that deserves a greater attention in the future, especially in groups where nutrient deficiencies may be prevalent.

  1. Interactive TV Narrativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursu, Marian F.

    Looking back over the past 25 years, the impressive developments in information and communication technologies generated a booming popularity of the new forms of media consumption that allow for interactivity and mobility, such as Web information and entertainment and games. This was and still is particularly evident within the younger generation, who are the most avid adopters of both new technologies and new forms of media consumption (Schadler 2006; KPMG 2007). When asked, in 2006, which device they could not live without, 37% mentioned their PC, 26% their mobile phone, whereas only 17% mentioned their TVs (Schadler 2006); and all these were before the launch of products such as the iPhone, which offer increasing flexibility and mobility of the media experiences.

  2. Drug Interactions with Clinafloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Randinitis, Edward J.; Alvey, Christine W.; Koup, Jeffery R.; Rausch, George; Abel, Robert; Bron, Nicola J.; Hounslow, Neil J.; Vassos, Artemios B.; Sedman, Allen J.

    2001-01-01

    Many fluoroquinolone antibiotics are inhibitors of cytochrome P450 enzyme systems and may produce potentially important drug interactions when administered with other drugs. Studies were conducted to determine the effect of clinafloxacin on the pharmacokinetics of theophylline, caffeine, warfarin, and phenytoin, as well as the effect of phenytoin on the pharmacokinetics of clinafloxacin. Concomitant administration of 200 or 400 mg of clinafloxacin reduces mean theophylline clearance by approximately 50 and 70%, respectively, and reduces mean caffeine clearance by 84%. (R)-Warfarin concentrations in plasma during clinafloxacin administration are 32% higher and (S)-warfarin concentrations do not change during clinafloxacin treatment. An observed late pharmacodynamic effect was most likely due to gut flora changes. Phenytoin has no effect on clinafloxacin pharmacokinetics, while phenytoin clearance is 15% lower during clinafloxacin administration. PMID:11502527

  3. Nekton Interaction Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    2017-03-15

    The software provides a real-time processing system for sonar to detect and track animals, and to extract water column biomass statistics in order to facilitate continuous monitoring of an underwater environment. The Nekton Interaction Monitoring System (NIMS) extracts and archives tracking and backscatter statistics data from a real-time stream of data from a sonar device. NIMS also sends real-time tracking messages over the network that can be used by other systems to generate other metrics or to trigger instruments such as an optical video camera. A web-based user interface provides remote monitoring and control. NIMS currently supports three popular sonarmore » devices: M3 multi-beam sonar (Kongsberg), EK60 split-beam echo-sounder (Simrad) and BlueView acoustic camera (Teledyne).« less

  4. Three dimensional interactive display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) interactive display and method of forming the same, includes a transparent capaciflector (TC) camera formed on a transparent shield layer on the screen surface. A first dielectric layer is formed on the shield layer. A first wire layer is formed on the first dielectric layer. A second dielectric layer is formed on the first wire layer. A second wire layer is formed on the second dielectric layer. Wires on the first wire layer and second wire layer are grouped into groups of parallel wires with a turnaround at one end of each group and a sensor pad at the opposite end. An operational amplifier is connected to each of the sensor pads and the shield pad biases the pads and receives a signal from connected sensor pads in response to intrusion of a probe. The signal is proportional to probe location with respect to the monitor screen.

  5. High expression of A-type lamin in the leading front is required for Drosophila thorax closure.

    PubMed

    Kosakamoto, Hina; Fujisawa, Yuya; Obata, Fumiaki; Miura, Masayuki

    2018-05-05

    Tissue closure involves the coordinated unidirectional movement of a group of cells without loss of cell-cell contact. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling the tissue closure are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Lamin C, the sole A-type lamin in Drosophila, contributes to the process of thorax closure in pupa. High expression of Lamin C was observed at the leading front of the migrating wing imaginal discs. Live imaging analysis revealed that knockdown of Lamin C in the thorax region affected the coordinated movement of the leading front, resulting in incomplete tissue fusion required for formation of the adult thorax. The closure defect due to knockdown of Lamin C correlated with insufficient accumulation of F-actin at the front. Our study indicates a link between A-type lamin and the cell migration behavior during tissue closure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Making public displays interactive everywhere.

    PubMed

    Boring, Sebastian; Baur, Dominikus

    2013-01-01

    As the number of large public displays increases, the need for interaction techniques to control them is emerging. One promising way to provide such interaction is through personal mobile devices. However, although much research has covered this topic, it hasn't yet brought those technologies fully into the public that is, by allowing for interactions in a variety of public spaces. A proposed tracking technology has led to several prototype applications that employ mobile devices to interact with large public displays. In turn, these prototypes have led to an overarching interaction concept that allows for public deployment regardless of the space's characteristics (for example, layout and technologies).

  7. Synthesis and Evaluation of Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Properties of A-Type Procyanidin Analogues against Resistant Bacteria in Food.

    PubMed

    Alejo-Armijo, Alfonso; Glibota, Nicolás; Frías, María P; Altarejos, Joaquín; Gálvez, Antonio; Salido, Sofía; Ortega-Morente, Elena

    2018-03-07

    Natural A-type procyanidins have shown very interesting biological activities, such as their proven antiadherence properties against pathogenic bacteria. In order to find the structural features responsible for their activities, we describe herein the design and synthesis of six A-type procyanidin analogues and the evaluation of their antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties against 12 resistant bacteria, both Gram positive and Gram negative, isolated from organic foods. The natural A-type procyanidin A-2, which had known antiadherence activity, was also tested as a reference compound for the comparative studies. Within the series, analogue 4, which had a NO 2 group on ring A, showed the highest antimicrobial activity (MIC of 10 μg/mL) and was one of the best molecules at preventing biofilm formation (up to 40% decreases at 100 μg/mL) and disrupting preformed biofilms (up to 40% reductions at 0.1 μg/mL). Structure-activity relationships are also analyzed.

  8. Spatiotemporal Characteristics of QRS Complexes Enable the Diagnosis of Brugada Syndrome Regardless of the Appearance of a Type 1 ECG.

    PubMed

    Guillem, Maria S; Climent, Andreu M; Millet, José; Berne, Paola; Ramos, Rafael; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    The diagnosis of Brugada syndrome based on the ECG is hampered by the dynamic nature of its ECG manifestations. Brugada syndrome patients are only 25% likely to present a type 1 ECG. The objective of this study is to provide an ECG diagnostic criterion for Brugada syndrome patients that can be applied consistently even in the absence of a type 1 ECG. We recorded 67-lead body surface potential maps from 94 Brugada syndrome patients and 82 controls (including right bundle branch block patients and healthy individuals). The spatial propagation direction during the last r' wave and the slope at the end of the QRS complex were measured and compared between patients groups. Receiver-operating characteristic curves were constructed for half of the database to identify optimal cutoff values; sensitivity and specificity for these cutoff values were measured in the other half of the database. A spontaneous type 1 ECG was present in only 30% of BrS patients. An orientation in the sagittal plane < 101º during the last r' wave and a descending slope < 9.65 mV/s enables the diagnosis of the syndrome with a sensitivity of 69% and a specificity of 97% in non-type 1 Brugada syndrome patients. Spatiotemporal characteristics of surface ECG recordings can enable a robust identification of BrS even without the presence of a type 1 ECG. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Interactive Projector as an Interactive Teaching Tool in the Classroom: Evaluating Teaching Efficiency and Interactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Li-Ying; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on a measurement that is used to investigate interactivity in the classrooms and examines the impact of integrating the interactive projector into middle school science classes on classroom interactivity and students' biology learning. A total of 126 7th grade Taiwanese students were involved in the study and quasi-experimental…

  10. Magnetospheric plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faelthammar, Carl-Gunne

    1994-04-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere (including the ionosphere) is our nearest cosmical plasma system and the only one accessible to mankind for extensive empirical study by in situ measurements. As virtually all matter in the universe is in the plasma state, the magnetosphere provides an invaluable sample of cosmical plasma from which we can learn to better understand the behavior of matter in this state, which is so much more complex than that of unionized matter. It is therefore fortunate that the magnetosphere contains a wide range of different plasma populations, which vary in density over more than six powers of ten and even more in equivalent temperature. Still more important is the fact that its dual interaction with the solar wind above and the atmosphere below make the magnetopshere the site of a large number of plasma phenomena that are of fundamental interest in plasma physics as well as in astrophysics and cosmology. The interaction of the rapidly streaming solar wind plasma with the magnetosphere feeds energy and momentum, as well as matter, into the magnetosphere. Injection from the solar wind is a source of plasma populations in the outer magnetosphere, although much less dominating than previously thought. We now know that the Earth's own atmosphere is the ultimate source of much of the plasma in large regions of the magnetosphere. The input of energy and momentum drives large scale convection of magnetospheric plasma and establishes a magnetospheric electric field and large scale electric current systems that car ry millions of ampere between the ionosphere and outer space. These electric fields and currents play a crucial role in generating one of the the most spectacular among natural phenomena, the aurora, as well as magnetic storms that can disturb man-made systems on ground and in orbit. The remarkable capability of accelerating charged particles, which is so typical of cosmical plasmas, is well represented in the magnetosphere, where mechanisms of such

  11. Interacting With Robots to Investigate the Bases of Social Interaction.

    PubMed

    Sciutti, Alessandra; Sandini, Giulio

    2017-12-01

    Humans show a great natural ability at interacting with each other. Such efficiency in joint actions depends on a synergy between planned collaboration and emergent coordination, a subconscious mechanism based on a tight link between action execution and perception. This link supports phenomena as mutual adaptation, synchronization, and anticipation, which cut drastically the delays in the interaction and the need of complex verbal instructions and result in the establishment of joint intentions, the backbone of social interaction. From a neurophysiological perspective, this is possible, because the same neural system supporting action execution is responsible of the understanding and the anticipation of the observed action of others. Defining which human motion features allow for such emergent coordination with another agent would be crucial to establish more natural and efficient interaction paradigms with artificial devices, ranging from assistive and rehabilitative technology to companion robots. However, investigating the behavioral and neural mechanisms supporting natural interaction poses substantial problems. In particular, the unconscious processes at the basis of emergent coordination (e.g., unintentional movements or gazing) are very difficult-if not impossible-to restrain or control in a quantitative way for a human agent. Moreover, during an interaction, participants influence each other continuously in a complex way, resulting in behaviors that go beyond experimental control. In this paper, we propose robotics technology as a potential solution to this methodological problem. Robots indeed can establish an interaction with a human partner, contingently reacting to his actions without losing the controllability of the experiment or the naturalness of the interactive scenario. A robot could represent an "interactive probe" to assess the sensory and motor mechanisms underlying human-human interaction. We discuss this proposal with examples from our

  12. Ternary Kv4.2 channels recapitulate voltage-dependent inactivation kinetics of A-type K+ channels in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Amarillo, Yimy; De Santiago-Castillo, Jose A; Dougherty, Kevin; Maffie, Jonathon; Kwon, Elaine; Covarrubias, Manuel; Rudy, Bernardo

    2008-04-15

    Kv4 channels mediate most of the somatodendritic subthreshold operating A-type current (I(SA)) in neurons. This current plays essential roles in the regulation of spike timing, repetitive firing, dendritic integration and plasticity. Neuronal Kv4 channels are thought to be ternary complexes of Kv4 pore-forming subunits and two types of accessory proteins, Kv channel interacting proteins (KChIPs) and the dipeptidyl-peptidase-like proteins (DPPLs) DPPX (DPP6) and DPP10. In heterologous cells, ternary Kv4 channels exhibit inactivation that slows down with increasing depolarization. Here, we compared the voltage dependence of the inactivation rate of channels expressed in heterologous mammalian cells by Kv4.2 proteins with that of channels containing Kv4.2 and KChIP1, Kv4.2 and DPPX-S, or Kv4.2, KChIP1 and DPPX-S, and found that the relation between inactivation rate and membrane potential is distinct for these four conditions. Moreover, recordings from native neurons showed that the inactivation kinetics of the I(SA) in cerebellar granule neurons has voltage dependence that is remarkably similar to that of ternary Kv4 channels containing KChIP1 and DPPX-S proteins in heterologous cells. The fact that this complex and unique behaviour (among A-type K(+) currents) is observed in both the native current and the current expressed in heterologous cells by the ternary complex containing Kv4, DPPX and KChIP proteins supports the hypothesis that somatically recorded native Kv4 channels in neurons include both types of accessory protein. Furthermore, quantitative global kinetic modelling showed that preferential closed-state inactivation and a weakly voltage-dependent opening step can explain the slowing of the inactivation rate with increasing depolarization. Therefore, it is likely that preferential closed-state inactivation is the physiological mechanism that regulates the activity of both ternary Kv4 channel complexes and native I(SA)-mediating channels.

  13. Hydrogen interactions with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Harkins, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    Review of the literature on the nature and extent of hydrogen interactions with metals and the role of hydrogen in metal failure. The classification of hydrogen-containing systems is discussed, including such categories as covalent hydrides, volatile hydrides, polymeric hydrides, and transition metal hydride complexes. The use of electronegativity as a correlating parameter in determining hydride type is evaluated. A detailed study is made of the thermodynamics of metal-hydrogen systems, touching upon such aspects as hydrogen solubility, the positions occupied by hydrogen atoms within the solvent metal lattice, the derivation of thermodynamic functions of solid solutions from solubility data, and the construction of statistical models for hydrogen-metal solutions. A number of theories of hydrogen-metal bonding are reviewed, including the rigid-band model, the screened-proton model, and an approach employing the augmented plane wave method to solve the one-electron energy band problem. Finally, the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement is investigated on the basis of literature data concerning stress effects and the kinetics of hydrogen transport to critical sites.

  14. Influenza-Sediment Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusiak, A.; Block, K. A.; Katz, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Alimova, A.; Galarza, J.; Wei, H.; Steiner, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A typical water fowl can secrete 1012 influenza virions per day. Therefore it is not unexpected that influenza virions interact with sediments in the water column. The influence of sediments on avian influenza virions is not known. With the threat of avian influenza emerging into the human population, it is crucial to understand virus survivability and residence time in a body of water. Influenza and clay sediments are colloidal particles and thus aggregate as explained by DLVO (Derjaguin & Landau, Verwey & Overbeek) theory. Of great importance is an understanding of the types of particulate or macromolecular components that bind the virus particles, and whether the virus remains biologically active. We present results of hetero-aggregation and transmission electron microscopy experiments performed with influenza A/PR8/38. Influenza particles are suspended with sediment and minimal nutrients for several days, after which the components are evaluated to determine influenza concentration and survivability. Transmission electron microscopy results are reported on the influenza-sediment aggregates to elucidate structure and morphology of the components.

  15. Platelet interactions in thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robert K; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Shen, Yang; Berndt, Michael C

    2004-01-01

    Patho/physiological platelet aggregate (thrombus) formation is initiated by engagement of platelet surface receptors, glycoprotein (GP)Ib-IX-V and GPVI that bind von Willebrand factor or collagen. Although beneficial in response to vascular injury by preventing blood loss (haemostasis), platelet aggregation in a sclerotic coronary artery or other diseased blood vessel (thrombosis) can cause thrombotic diseases like heart attack and stroke. At the molecular level, ligand interactions with GPIb-IX-V or GPVI trigger signalling responses, including elevation of cytosolic Ca2+, dissociation of calmodulin from their cytoplasmic domains, cytoskeletal actin-filament rearrangements, activation of src-family kinases or PI 3-kinase, and 'inside-out' activation of the integrin, alphaIIbbeta3 (GPIIb-llla), that binds von Willebrand factor or fibrinogen and mediates platelet aggregation. Furthermore, emerging evidence supports a topographical co-association of these receptors of the leucine-rich repeat family (GPIb-IX-V) and immunoglobulin superfamily (GPVI) in an adhesive cluster or 'adhesosome'. This arrangement may underlie common mechanisms of initiating thrombus formation in haemostasis or thrombotic disease.

  16. "Interactive Classification Technology"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deBessonet, Cary

    1999-01-01

    The investigators are upgrading a knowledge representation language called SL (Symbolic Language) and an automated reasoning system called SMS (Symbolic Manipulation System) to enable the technologies to be used in automated reasoning and interactive classification systems. The overall goals of the project are: a) the enhancement of the representation language SL to accommodate multiple perspectives and a wider range of meaning; b) the development of a sufficient set of operators to enable the interpreter of SL to handle representations of basic cognitive acts; and c) the development of a default inference scheme to operate over SL notation as it is encoded. As to particular goals the first-year work plan focused on inferencing and.representation issues, including: 1) the development of higher level cognitive/ classification functions and conceptual models for use in inferencing and decision making; 2) the specification of a more detailed scheme of defaults and the enrichment of SL notation to accommodate the scheme; and 3) the adoption of additional perspectives for inferencing.

  17. Interaction Models for Functional Regression.

    PubMed

    Usset, Joseph; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Maity, Arnab

    2016-02-01

    A functional regression model with a scalar response and multiple functional predictors is proposed that accommodates two-way interactions in addition to their main effects. The proposed estimation procedure models the main effects using penalized regression splines, and the interaction effect by a tensor product basis. Extensions to generalized linear models and data observed on sparse grids or with measurement error are presented. A hypothesis testing procedure for the functional interaction effect is described. The proposed method can be easily implemented through existing software. Numerical studies show that fitting an additive model in the presence of interaction leads to both poor estimation performance and lost prediction power, while fitting an interaction model where there is in fact no interaction leads to negligible losses. The methodology is illustrated on the AneuRisk65 study data.

  18. The repair of a type Ia endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair using a stented elephant trunk procedure.

    PubMed

    Qi, Rui-Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Liu, Yong-Min; Chen, Lei; Li, Cheng-Nan; Xing, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Type Ia endoleaks are not uncommon complications that occur after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Because aortic arch vessels prevent extension of the landing zone, it is very difficult to manipulate a type Ia endoleak using an extension cuff or stent-graft, especially when the aortic arch is involved. Here, we retrospectively review our experience of surgical treatment of type Ia endoleak after TEVAR using a stented elephant trunk procedure. From July 2010 to August 2016, we treated 17 patients diagnosed with a type Ia endoleak following TEVAR using stented elephant trunk procedure. The mean age of our patients was 52 ± 8 years. The mean interval between TEVAR and the open surgical repair was 38 ± 43 months. All cases of type Ia endoleak (100%) were repaired successfully. There were no in-hospital deaths. One case required reintubation and continuous renal replacement therapy due to renal failure; this patient recovered smoothly before discharge. One other patient suffered a stroke and renal failure and did not fully recover following discharge, or follow-up. During follow-up, there were 3 deaths. Acceptable results were obtained using a stented elephant trunk procedure in patients with a type Ia endoleak after TEVAR. This technique allowed us to repair the proximal aortic arch lesions, surgically correct the type Ia endoleak, and promote false lumen thrombosis in the distal aorta. Implantation of a stented elephant trunk, with or without a concomitant aortic arch procedure, is an alternative approach for this type of lesion. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) is a type III enzyme forming ω-NG-monomethylated arginine residues.

    PubMed

    Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I; Sandberg, Troy; Kelly, Ryan; Clarke, Steven G

    2012-03-09

    Full-length human protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli was initially found to generate only ω-N(G)-monomethylated arginine residues in small peptides, suggesting that it is a type III enzyme. A later study, however, characterized fusion proteins of PRMT7 expressed in bacterial and mammalian cells as a type II/type I enzyme, capable of producing symmetrically dimethylated arginine (type II activity) as well as small amounts of asymmetric dimethylarginine (type I activity). We have sought to clarify the enzymatic activity of human PRMT7. We analyzed the in vitro methylation products of a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-PRMT7 fusion protein with robust activity using a variety of arginine-containing synthetic peptides and protein substrates, including a GST fusion with the N-terminal domain of fibrillarin (GST-GAR), myelin basic protein, and recombinant human histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Regardless of the methylation reaction conditions (incubation time, reaction volume, and substrate concentration), we found that PRMT7 only produces ω-N(G)-monomethylarginine with these substrates. In control experiments, we showed that mammalian GST-PRMT1 and Myc-PRMT5 were, unlike PRMT7, able to dimethylate both peptide P-SmD3 and SmB/D3 to give the expected asymmetric and symmetric products, respectively. These experiments show that PRMT7 is indeed a type III human methyltransferase capable of forming only ω-N(G)-monomethylarginine, not asymmetric ω-N(G),N(G)-dimethylarginine or symmetric ω-N(G),N(G')-dimethylarginine, under the conditions tested.

  20. Human Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) Is a Type III Enzyme Forming ω-NG-Monomethylated Arginine Residues*

    PubMed Central

    Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I.; Sandberg, Troy; Kelly, Ryan; Clarke, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Full-length human protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli was initially found to generate only ω-NG-monomethylated arginine residues in small peptides, suggesting that it is a type III enzyme. A later study, however, characterized fusion proteins of PRMT7 expressed in bacterial and mammalian cells as a type II/type I enzyme, capable of producing symmetrically dimethylated arginine (type II activity) as well as small amounts of asymmetric dimethylarginine (type I activity). We have sought to clarify the enzymatic activity of human PRMT7. We analyzed the in vitro methylation products of a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-PRMT7 fusion protein with robust activity using a variety of arginine-containing synthetic peptides and protein substrates, including a GST fusion with the N-terminal domain of fibrillarin (GST-GAR), myelin basic protein, and recombinant human histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Regardless of the methylation reaction conditions (incubation time, reaction volume, and substrate concentration), we found that PRMT7 only produces ω-NG-monomethylarginine with these substrates. In control experiments, we showed that mammalian GST-PRMT1 and Myc-PRMT5 were, unlike PRMT7, able to dimethylate both peptide P-SmD3 and SmB/D3 to give the expected asymmetric and symmetric products, respectively. These experiments show that PRMT7 is indeed a type III human methyltransferase capable of forming only ω-NG-monomethylarginine, not asymmetric ω-NG,NG-dimethylarginine or symmetric ω-NG,NG′-dimethylarginine, under the conditions tested. PMID:22241471

  1. Petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the Devonian Xiqin A-type granite in the northeastern Cathaysia Block, SE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Da-wei; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Lv, Zheng-Hang; Liu, Yun-long

    2017-06-01

    Most Silurian-Devonian granites in South China are S- or I-type granites, which are suggested to be petrogenetically related to the Wuyi-Yunkai orogeny. In this paper, we present the detailed LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating, major and trace element geochemical, and Nd-Hf isotopic data for Xiqin A-type granites in the northeastern Cathaysia Block, SE China. Zircon U-Pb dating results show that the Xiqin granites were emplaced at about 410 Ma, indicating that they were generated at the end of Wuyi-Yunkai orogeny. These granites are high in K2O + Na2O (6.31-8.79 wt%), high field strength elements (Zr + Nb + Ce + Y = 427-699 ppm), rare earth elements (total REE = 221-361 ppm) as well as high Ga/Al ratios (10,000 Ga/Al = 2.50-3.10), and show characteristics typical of A-type granites. εHf(t) values of the Xiqin granites mainly vary from -0.4 to -3.1 and yield Mesoproterozoic T2DM(Hf) (mainly ranging from 1.29 to 1.45 Ga). The εNd(t) values are from -1.23 to -2.11 and T2DM(Nd) vary from 1.25 to 1.32 Ga. These isotopic data suggest that the Xiqin granites were generated by partial melting of metavolcanic rocks with minor metasedimentary rocks in the lower crust. Our data on the Xiqin granites, coupled with previous studies of Silurian-Devonian magmatism, suggest that the tectonic regime had changed to a strongly post-collisional extension environment in the Wuyi-Yunkai orogen at least since 410 Ma, and that delamination, which accounts for the change in stress from the compression to extension and asthenospheric upwelling during the early Paleozoic, plays a significant role in the generation of Xiqin A-type granites.

  2. Postnatal development of A-type and Kv1- and Kv2-mediated potassium channel currents in neocortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongxu; Horton, Leslie R.; Armstrong, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate numerous aspects of neuronal excitability, and several voltage-gated K+ channel subunits have been identified in pyramidal neurons of rat neocortex. Previous studies have either considered the development of outward current as a whole or divided currents into transient, A-type and persistent, delayed rectifier components but did not differentiate between current components defined by α-subunit type. To facilitate comparisons of studies reporting K+ currents from animals of different ages and to understand the functional roles of specific current components, we characterized the postnatal development of identified Kv channel-mediated currents in pyramidal neurons from layers II/III from rat somatosensory cortex. Both the persistent/slowly inactivating and transient components of the total K+ current increased in density with postnatal age. We used specific pharmacological agents to test the relative contributions of putative Kv1- and Kv2-mediated currents (100 nM α-dendrotoxin and 600 nM stromatoxin, respectively). A combination of voltage protocol, pharmacology, and curve fitting was used to isolate the rapidly inactivating A-type current. We found that the density of all identified current components increased with postnatal age, approaching a plateau at 3–5 wk. We found no significant changes in the relative proportions or kinetics of any component between postnatal weeks 1 and 5, except that the activation time constant for A-type current was longer at 1 wk. The putative Kv2-mediated component was the largest at all ages. Immunocytochemistry indicated that protein expression for Kv4.2, Kv4.3, Kv1.4, and Kv2.1 increased between 1 wk and 4–5 wk of age. PMID:21451062

  3. Postnatal development of A-type and Kv1- and Kv2-mediated potassium channel currents in neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Guan, Dongxu; Horton, Leslie R; Armstrong, William E; Foehring, Robert C

    2011-06-01

    Potassium channels regulate numerous aspects of neuronal excitability, and several voltage-gated K(+) channel subunits have been identified in pyramidal neurons of rat neocortex. Previous studies have either considered the development of outward current as a whole or divided currents into transient, A-type and persistent, delayed rectifier components but did not differentiate between current components defined by α-subunit type. To facilitate comparisons of studies reporting K(+) currents from animals of different ages and to understand the functional roles of specific current components, we characterized the postnatal development of identified Kv channel-mediated currents in pyramidal neurons from layers II/III from rat somatosensory cortex. Both the persistent/slowly inactivating and transient components of the total K(+) current increased in density with postnatal age. We used specific pharmacological agents to test the relative contributions of putative Kv1- and Kv2-mediated currents (100 nM α-dendrotoxin and 600 nM stromatoxin, respectively). A combination of voltage protocol, pharmacology, and curve fitting was used to isolate the rapidly inactivating A-type current. We found that the density of all identified current components increased with postnatal age, approaching a plateau at 3-5 wk. We found no significant changes in the relative proportions or kinetics of any component between postnatal weeks 1 and 5, except that the activation time constant for A-type current was longer at 1 wk. The putative Kv2-mediated component was the largest at all ages. Immunocytochemistry indicated that protein expression for Kv4.2, Kv4.3, Kv1.4, and Kv2.1 increased between 1 wk and 4-5 wk of age.

  4. INCA- INTERACTIVE CONTROLS ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F. H.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed to provide a user friendly environment for the design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control systems. INCA is designed for use with both small and large order systems. Using the interactive graphics capability, the INCA user can quickly plot a root locus, frequency response, or time response of either a continuous time system or a sampled data system. The system configuration and parameters can be easily changed, allowing the INCA user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analysis in a very convenient manner. A journal file capability is included. This stores an entire sequence of commands, generated during an INCA session into a file which can be accessed later. Also included in INCA are a context-sensitive help library, a screen editor, and plot windows. INCA is robust to VAX-specific overflow problems. The transfer function is the basic unit of INCA. Transfer functions are automatically saved and are available to the INCA user at any time. A powerful, user friendly transfer function manipulation and editing capability is built into the INCA program. The user can do all transfer function manipulations and plotting without leaving INCA, although provisions are made to input transfer functions from data files. By using a small set of commands, the user may compute and edit transfer functions, and then examine these functions by using the ROOT_LOCUS, FREQUENCY_RESPONSE, and TIME_RESPONSE capabilities. Basic input data, including gains, are handled as single-input single-output transfer functions. These functions can be developed using the function editor or by using FORTRAN- like arithmetic expressions. In addition to the arithmetic functions, special functions are available to 1) compute step, ramp, and sinusoid functions, 2) compute closed loop transfer functions, 3) convert from S plane to Z plane with optional advanced Z transform, and 4) convert from Z

  5. Plasma interactions with large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagalyn, Rita C.; Maynard, Nelson C.

    1986-01-01

    Space is playing a rapidly expanding role in the conduct of the Air Force mission. Larger, more complex, high-power space platforms are planned and military astronauts will provide a new capability in spacecraft servicing. Interactions of operational satellites with the environment have been shown to degrade space sensors and electronics and to constrain systems operations. The environmental interaction effects grow nonlinearly with increasing size and power. Quantification of the interactions and development of mitigation techniques for systems-limiting interactions is essential to the success of future Air Force space operations.

  6. On topological RNA interaction structures.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Reidys, Christian M

    2013-07-01

    Recently a folding algorithm of topological RNA pseudoknot structures was presented in Reidys et al. (2011). This algorithm folds single-stranded γ-structures, that is, RNA structures composed by distinct motifs of bounded topological genus. In this article, we set the theoretical foundations for the folding of the two backbone analogues of γ structures: the RNA γ-interaction structures. These are RNA-RNA interaction structures that are constructed by a finite number of building blocks over two backbones having genus at most γ. Combinatorial properties of γ-interaction structures are of practical interest since they have direct implications for the folding of topological interaction structures. We compute the generating function of γ-interaction structures and show that it is algebraic, which implies that the numbers of interaction structures can be computed recursively. We obtain simple asymptotic formulas for 0- and 1-interaction structures. The simplest class of interaction structures are the 0-interaction structures, which represent the two backbone analogues of secondary structures.

  7. An Overview of the Origin of A-type Silicic Magmatism Along the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Hotspot Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, E. H.; Bindeman, I. N.; Leishman, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Disparate models have been proposed for the origin of A-type rhyolites--a volumetrically minor part of modern terrestrial magmatism. But understanding the origin of A-type granites and rhyolites has significance for understanding the formation of the Earth's first silicic crust and for planetary magmatism--small volumes of such granitic materials have been found in lunar rocks, martian and asteroidal meteorites, and have been speculated to have formed on Venus. On other planets, vertical tectonics and plume-like mantle convection dominate, not the recycling of wet, oxidized plates of lithosphere as on Earth. Thus, understanding the origins of A-type silicic magma is important on multiple levels. Voluminous A-type rhyolite were produced on the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone hotspot track and provide the opportunity to better understand these important silicic magmas. Detailed petrologic studies suggest that most Snake River Plain rhyolites ultimately formed by partially melting of previously emplaced basaltic intrusions rather than by fractional crystallization of basalt or melting of Archean crust. This hypothesis is favored because of the bimodal association of rhyolite and basalt without linking intermediate compositions. In addition, incompatible element ratios (e.g., La/Nb, Pb/Ce), a lack of old zircon antecrysts, low-U inherited zircon, high ɛNd and ɛHf values, high eruption temperatures (1050°C to 850°C), low fO2 (near QFM), and H2O (as low as 1.5%), link the rhyolites to a plume-derived basaltic parent through partial melting with lesser incorporation of the Archean to Mesozoic crust that underlies the plain. Moreover, the contrast with wetter, lower temperature rhyolites that must have formed by direct crustal melting (e.g., Arbon Valley Tuff) strengthens this interpretation. Many of the rhyolites also have low δ18O values that must be produced in two stages: first by partial melting of already hydrothermally altered basalt, and subsequently in single

  8. Petrogenesis of two Triassic A-type intrusions in the interior of South China and their implications for tectonic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li-Qiang; Ling, Hong-Fei; Shen, Wei-Zhou; Wang, Kai-Xing; Huang, Guo-Long

    2017-07-01

    The evolution of the tectonic regime that was responsible for the Indosinian granitoids in the South China Block (SCB) is still controversial. Investigations on A-type granites can provide important information regarding this tectonic evolution. A detailed study that utilizes whole-rock elemental, Sr-Nd isotopic, in situ zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic geochemistry is conducted on the Miantuwo biotite granite in northern Guangdong Province and the Pingtian biotite monzogranite in southern Jiangxi Province, South China. The new data indicate that both the Miantuwo and Pingtian granites were emplaced at 233 ± 2 Ma and show metaluminous to slightly peraluminous A-type granite affinity. The two granites are characterized by high amounts of rare earth elements (total REEs = 247 ppm-557 ppm and 251 ppm-342 ppm) and high field strength elements (Zr + Nb + Ce + Y = 325 ppm-605 ppm and 343 ppm-496 ppm) and high Ga/Al ratios (10,000 × Ga/Al = 2.50-2.98 and 2.62-2.70). Calculations from a zircon saturation thermometer and apatite saturation thermometer indicate that the magmatic temperatures were 800 °C-980 °C for both granites. Both the Miantuwo and Pingtian granites show relatively high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7151-0.7185 and 0.7170-0.7189), low εNd(t) values (- 9.8 to - 8.6 and - 9.7 to - 9.1) and low to moderate zircon εHf(t) values (- 10.4 to - 6.6 and - 9.5 to - 4.6). Based on these data, we suggest that these two A-type granites were derived from the partial melting of existing mafic to intermediate rocks in the lower crust in response to the underplating and/or intraplating of mantle-derived magma. Our study on the Miantuwo and Pingtian granites, alongside previous studies on other Triassic A-type granites in South China, indicates an extensional tectonic environment during the Late Triassic in the interior of the Cathaysia Block. Alongside existing geological observations and the tectonic evolution in the SCB, we suggest that the interior of the SCB was

  9. PSN J11290437+1714095 is a Type Ia supernova (91T-like) near maximum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, M.; Owen, C.; Scalzo, R.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B.; Tucker, B.

    2013-12-01

    We report spectroscopic classification of PSN J11290437+1714095 with the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS - Dopita et al., 2007, ApSS, 310, 255) on the ANU 2.3m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, NSW Australia, using the B3000/R3000 gratings (3500-9800 A, 1 A resolution). PSN J11290437+1714095 was discovered by TAROT on 2013 Dec 11.09 at mag 15.9 in UGC 6483. A 20 minute spectrum of the SN on 2013 Dec 12.72 shows this to be a Type Ia supernova of the SN 1991T subclass near maximum light.

  10. Spontaneous uterine laceration in labor: a type of intrapartum uterine injury different from the classical uterine rupture.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Watanabe, Remi; Onuma, Kazuya; Kusaka, Takeshi; Fukuda, Takanori; Kohata, Yutaka; Inoue, Hiromi

    2018-02-01

    Uterine rupture, a complete disruption of uterine wall, is synonymously used of intrapartum uterine corpus injuries. However, uterine laceration, partial and minor myometrial tear, is not well characterized. A 35-year-old Japanese woman with unscarred uterus was delivered of a baby at 38 gestational weeks. Shortly after delivering the placenta, she complained of severe lower abdominal pain with shock vitals. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a partial and shallow myometrial and serosal tear with massive hemoperitoneum. Despite its shallow and minor nature of the injury, uterine laceration can cause a catastrophic massive hemoperitoneum and should be noted as a type of intrapartum uterine injury in clinical practice.

  11. Interactive Television: The Influence of User Control and Interactive Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Diana; And Others

    A series of studies underway at the Audience Research Facility at MIT (the Massachusetts Institute of Technology) are examining the influence of interactive video on learning and entertainment television viewing. The first study compared the learning of spatial content from interactive (user controlled video games) versus observational…

  12. Geochronological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of Late Cretaceous A-type granites from the Sibumasu Block, Southern Myanmar, SE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hai; Li, Wen-Qian; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Wang, He; Wei, Xiao-Peng

    2017-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous to Paleogene granitoids occur widespread in the Sibumasu block within Myanmar (SE Asia), which show a close association with tin-tungsten mineralization. However, the precise timing, petrogenesis and tectonic significance of these granitoids are poorly constrained so far. In this study, we present a detailed study on geochronology, elemental and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic geochemistry for the Hermyingyi and Taungphila granites in southern Myanmar, with the aim of determining their petrogenesis and tectonic implications. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating of zircon grains from the two granites yield ages of 69-70 Ma, indicating a Late Cretaceous magmatic event. These granitic rocks are weakly peraluminous and belong to the high-K calc-alkaline series. They are both characterized by high SiO2, K2O + Na2O, FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) and Ga/Al ratios and low Al2O3, CaO, MgO, P2O5 and TiO2 contents, enriched in Rb, Th, U and Y, but depleted in Ba, Sr, P, and Eu, suggesting an A-type granite affinity. Moreover, they display prominent tetrad REE patterns and non-CHARAC trace element behavior, which are common in late magmatic differentiates with strong hydrothermal interaction or deuteric alteration. The granites belong to A2-type and probably formed at a high temperature and anhydrous condition. They have zircon εHf(t) values from - 12.4 to - 10.0 and whole-rock εNd(t) values from - 11.3 to - 10.6, with Paleoproterozoic TDM2 ages (1741-1922 Ma) for both Hf and Nd isotopes. Geochemical and isotopic data suggest that these A-type granites were derived from partial melting of the Paleoproterozoic continental crust dominated by metaigneous rocks with tonalitic to granodioritic compositions, without significant input of mantle-derived magma and followed by subsequent fractional crystallization. By integrating all available data for the regional tectonic evolution in SE Asia and adjacent regions, we attribute the formation of the Late Cretaceous A-type granites to a back-arc extension

  13. Evaluation of drug interaction microcomputer software: Dambro's Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Poirier, T I; Giudici, R A

    1990-01-01

    Dambro's Drug Interactions was evaluated using general and specific criteria. The installation process, ease of learning and use were rated excellent. The user documentation and quality of the technical support were good. The scope of coverage, clinical documentation, frequency of updates, and overall clinical performance were fair. The primary advantages of the program are the quick searching and detection of drug interactions, and the attempt to provide useful interaction data, i.e., significance and reference. The disadvantages are the lack of current drug interaction information, outdated references, lack of evaluative drug interaction information, and the inability to save or print patient profiles. The program is not a good value for the pharmacist but has limited use as a quick screening tool.

  14. Spatial interactions reveal inhibitory cortical networks in human amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Erwin H; Levi, Dennis M; McGraw, Paul V

    2005-10-01

    Humans with amblyopia have a well-documented loss of sensitivity for first-order, or luminance defined, visual information. Recent studies show that they also display a specific loss of sensitivity for second-order, or contrast defined, visual information; a type of image structure encoded by neurons found predominantly in visual area A18/V2. In the present study, we investigate whether amblyopia disrupts the normal architecture of spatial interactions in V2 by determining the contrast detection threshold of a second-order target in the presence of second-order flanking stimuli. Adjacent flanks facilitated second-order detectability in normal observers. However, in marked contrast, they suppressed detection in each eye of the majority of amblyopic observers. Furthermore, strabismic observers with no loss of visual acuity show a similar pattern of detection suppression. We speculate that amblyopia results in predominantly inhibitory cortical interactions between second-order neurons.

  15. The Cation-π Interaction

    PubMed Central

    DOUGHERTY, DENNIS A.

    2014-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The chemistry community now recognizes the cation-π interaction as a major force for molecular recognition, joining the hydrophobic effect, the hydrogen bond, and the ion pair in determining macromolecular structure and drug-receptor interactions. This Account provides the author’s perspective on the intellectual origins and fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. Early studies on cyclophanes established that water-soluble, cationic molecules would forgo aqueous solvation to enter a hydrophobic cavity if that cavity was lined with π systems. Important gas phase studies established the fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. The strength of the cation-π interaction – Li+ binds to benzene with 38 kcal/mol of binding energy; NH4+ with 19 kcal/mol– distinguishes it from the weaker polar-π interactions observed in the benzene dimer or water-benzene complexes. In addition to the substantial intrinsic strength of the cation-π interaction in gas phase studies, the cation-π interaction remains energetically significant in aqueous media and under biological conditions. Many studies have shown that cation-π interactions can enhance binding energies by 2 – 5 kcal/mol, making them competitive with hydrogen bonds and ion pairs in drug-receptor and protein-protein interactions. As with other noncovalent interactions involving aromatic systems, the cation-π interaction includes a substantial electrostatic component. The six (four) Cδ−–Hδ+ bond dipoles of a molecule like benzene (ethylene) combine to produce a region of negative electrostatic potential on the face of the π system. Simple electrostatics facilitate a natural attraction of cations to the surface. The trend for (gas phase) binding energies is Li+>Na+>K+>Rb+: as the ion gets larger the charge is dispersed over a larger sphere and binding interactions weaken, a classical electrostatic effect. On other hand, polarizability does not define these interactions. Cyclohexane

  16. The cation-π interaction.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Dennis A

    2013-04-16

    The chemistry community now recognizes the cation-π interaction as a major force for molecular recognition, joining the hydrophobic effect, the hydrogen bond, and the ion pair in determining macromolecular structure and drug-receptor interactions. This Account provides the author's perspective on the intellectual origins and fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. Early studies on cyclophanes established that water-soluble, cationic molecules would forego aqueous solvation to enter a hydrophobic cavity if that cavity was lined with π systems. Important gas phase studies established the fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. The strength of the cation-π interaction (Li(+) binds to benzene with 38 kcal/mol of binding energy; NH4(+) with 19 kcal/mol) distinguishes it from the weaker polar-π interactions observed in the benzene dimer or water-benzene complexes. In addition to the substantial intrinsic strength of the cation-π interaction in gas phase studies, the cation-π interaction remains energetically significant in aqueous media and under biological conditions. Many studies have shown that cation-π interactions can enhance binding energies by 2-5 kcal/mol, making them competitive with hydrogen bonds and ion pairs in drug-receptor and protein-protein interactions. As with other noncovalent interactions involving aromatic systems, the cation-π interaction includes a substantial electrostatic component. The six (four) C(δ-)-H(δ+) bond dipoles of a molecule like benzene (ethylene) combine to produce a region of negative electrostatic potential on the face of the π system. Simple electrostatics facilitate a natural attraction of cations to the surface. The trend for (gas phase) binding energies is Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+): as the ion gets larger the charge is dispersed over a larger sphere and binding interactions weaken, a classical electrostatic effect. On other hand, polarizability does not define these interactions. Cyclohexane is

  17. Macrolide drug interactions: an update.

    PubMed

    Pai, M P; Graci, D M; Amsden, G W

    2000-04-01

    To describe the current drug interaction profiles for the commonly used macrolides in the US and Europe, and to comment on the clinical impact of these interactions. A MEDLINE search (1975-1998) was performed to identify all pertinent studies, review articles, and case reports. When appropriate information was not available in the literature, data were obtained from the product manufacturers. All available data were reviewed to provide an unbiased account of possible drug interactions. Data for some of the interactions were not available from the literature, but were available from abstracts or company-supplied materials. Although the data were not always explicit, the best attempt was made to deliver pertinent information that clinical practitioners would need to formulate practice opinions. When more in-depth information was supplied in the form of a review or study report, a thorough explanation of pertinent methodology was supplied. Several clinically significant drug interactions have been identified since the approval of erythromycin. These interactions usually were related to the inhibition of the cytochrome P450 enzyme systems, which are responsible for the metabolism of many drugs. The decreased metabolism by the macrolides has in some instances resulted in potentially severe adverse events. The development and marketing of newer macrolides are hoped to improve the drug interaction profile associated with this class. However, this has produced variable success. Some of the newer macrolides demonstrated an interaction profile similar to that of erythromycin; others have improved profiles. The most success in avoiding drug interactions related to the inhibition of cytochrome P450 has been through the development of the azalide subclass, of which azithromycin is the first and only to be marketed. Azithromycin has not been demonstrated to inhibit the cytochrome P450 system in studies using a human liver microsome model, and to date has produced none of the

  18. Interact - Access to the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, M.; Callaghan, T. V.

    2013-12-01

    INTERACT is currently a network of 50 terrestrial research stations from all Arctic countries, but is still growing. The network was inaugurated in January 2011 when it received an EU 7th Framework award. INTERACT's main objective is to build capacity for identifying, understanding, predicting and responding to diverse environmental changes throughout the wide environmental and land-use envelopes of the Arctic. Implicit in this objective is the task to build capacity for monitoring, research, education and outreach. INTERACT is increasing access to the Arctic: 20 INTERACT research stations in Europe and Russia are offering Transnational Access and so far, 5600 person-days of access have been granted from the total of 10,000 offered. An INTERACT Station Managers' Forum facilitates a dialogue among station managers on subjects such as best practice in station management and standardised monitoring. The Station Managers' Forum has produced a unique 'one-stop-shop' for information from 45 research stations in an informative and attractive Station Catalogue that is available in hard copy and on the INTERACT web site (www.eu-interact.org). INTERACT also includes three joint research activities that are improving monitoring in remote, harsh environments and are making data capture and dissemination more efficient. Already, new equipment for measuring feedbacks from the land surface to the climate system has been installed at several locations, while best practices for sensor networking have been established. INTERACT networks with most of the high-level Arctic organisations: it includes AMAP and WWF as partners, is endorsed by IASC and CBMP, has signed MoUs with ISAC and the University of the Arctic, is a task within SAON, and contributes to the Cold Region community within GEO/GEOSS. INTERACT welcomes other interactions.

  19. An Alternative Approach for Treating a Type Ia Endoleak after Conventional EVAR Using the Nellix Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Ombretta; Fresilli, Mauro; Irace, Luigi; Venosi, Salvatore; Jabbour, Jihad; Picone, Veronica; Maruca, Debora; Di Girolamo, Alessia; Gossetti, Bruno

    2018-05-01

    To report the use of a Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) device, to successfully treat a type Ia endoleak (EL) after an endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). A 70-year-old man was diagnosed with a 90-mm aortic aneurysm, suspicious for being inflammatory. It was initially treated successfully, with a Medtronic Endurant (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA). Five years after the index endovascular repair, an asymptomatic type Ia EL was detected on duplex ultrasound and computed tomographic angiogram. Other endovascular solutions in the form of proximal cuff, chimney was considered difficult to execute due to challenges in planning, manipulation, and renal cannulation caused by the short proximal sealing zone above the existing stent graft and the constraints of the previous endograft. Thus, a relining of the previous endoprothesis was performed using the Nellix system (Endologix, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA). One-year follow-up imaging demonstrated successful resolution of the EL and persistent sealing of the Nellix device. Nellix EVAS system can be an alternative and safe option for relining a stent graft with a type Ia EL. Nellix platform can be added to the clinician's armamentarium for treating type Ia EL after conventional EVAR of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Differentiation of influenza (Flu) type A, type B, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV].

    PubMed

    Kohiyama, Risa; Miyazawa, Takashi; Shibano, Nobuko; Inano, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Because it is not easy to differentiate Influenza virus (Flu) from RS virus (RSV) just by clinical symptoms, to accurately diagnose those viruses in conjunction with patient's clinical symptoms, rapid diagnostic kits has been used separately for each of those viruses. In our new study, we have developed a new rapid diagnostic kit, QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV. The kit can detect Flu A, Flu B, and RSV antigens with a single sample collection and an assay. Total of 2,873 cases (including nasopharyngeal swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates specimens) in 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 seasons were evaluated with QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV and a commercially available kit. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Flu type A, type B, and RSV were above 95% when compared to commercially available kits (QuickNavi™-Flu and QuickNavi™-RSV) and considered to be equivalent to the commercially available kits. In 2011/2012 season, RSV infections increased prior to Flu season and continued during the peak of the Flu season. The kit can contribute to accurate diagnosis of Flu and RSV infections since co-infection cases have also been reported during the 2011/2012 season. QuickNavi™-Flu+RSV is useful for differential diagnosis of respiratory infectious diseases since it can detect Flu type A, type B, and RSV virus antigens with a single sample collection.