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Sample records for a-type granitic rocks

  1. Late Carboniferous bimodal volcanic rocks and coeval A-type granite in the Suman Khad area, Southwest Mongolia: Implications for the tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mingshuai; Zhang, Fochin; Fan, Jingjing; Miao, Laicheng; Baatar, Munkhtsengel; Anaad, Chimedtseren; Yang, Shunhu; Li, Xingbo; Ganbat, Ariuntsetseg

    2017-08-01

    The volcanic rocks in the Suman Khad area in Southwest Mongolia form a bimodal suite consisting mainly of peralkaline rhyolites with subordinate basalts. The rhyolite sample collected from the bimodal suite yielded a SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age of 314 ± 5 Ma (MSWD = 1.41, n = 12), which was interpreted to represent formation time of the bimodal volcanic suite. The basalts were characterized by enrichment in LILE and LREE, and depletion in HFSE, indicating their formation was related to subduction processes. These features, together with their positive εNd (t) values (6.3-6.7), suggest that the basalts were likely derived from a depleted mantle source metasomatized by subduction-related fluids. In various tectonic discrimination diagrams, the basalts exhibited a transition from true arc basalts to intraplate basalts and thus were suggested to from in a back-arc tectonic setting. The rhyolites show a close affinity to A-type granites with enrichment in LILE and LREE, depletion in Nb, Ta and Ti and positive εNd (t) values (6.0-6.4). Considering the observed distinct compositional gap between the endmembers of the bimodal suite, the rhyolites are proposed to originate from partial melting of juvenile basaltic crustal rocks rather than fractional crystallization of basaltic melt. The granite associated with the bimodal volcanic rocks yielded a SHRIMP zircon U-Pb ages of 312 ± 5 Ma (MSWD = 0.75, n = 13), indicating that the granite is contemporaneous with the bimodal volcanic suite. The granite samples showed typical A-type granitic geochemical affinities and are considered to have been formed by partial melting of crustal rocks in a within-plate tectonic setting. Based on a combination of the available data, we suggest that the Late Carboniferous bimodal volcanic suite together with the coeval A-type granites in the Suman Khad region probably document a back-arc basin extensional environment, which probably related to the roll-back of the Paleo-Asian oceanic plate during

  2. Natural polish in granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman-Tov, S.; Brodsky, E. E.; Stock, G. M.; White, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Fault mirrors are highly smooth and reflective rock surfaces that are found in many shear zones around the world. Recent studies suggest that fault mirrors are formed during high velocity slip on faults and therefore may serve as an indicator for seismic slip. In contrast, other studies suggest that fault mirrors may form under high normal stress at sub-seismic velocities and at room temperature. Fault mirrors are observed within the fault core of many rock type environments including limestone, dolomite, chert and rhyolite. However, to the best of our knowledge, they are missing in faults hosted in granite. Moreover, mirror-like surfaces form during high velocity rotary shear experiments in many types of rock but not in sheared granite blocks. The absence of fault mirrors in granite is surprising, particularly since there exists extensive glacial polish on granitic bedrock. Glacial polish describes the smooth and reflective rock surfaces formed at the base of glaciers that carved the underlying bedrock. In addition to their import for studies of glacial dynamics and geomorphology, glacially polished surfaces may hold some significance for fault mechanics. Glacial polish and fault mirrors share many similarities. At field exposures they both present highly smooth surfaces and striations that clearly point in the slip direction. Studies on carbonate fault mirrors showed that individual highly reflective surfaces are composed of a thin nanograin layer. Preliminary SEM observations on samples collected from granitic rocks at Yosemite National Park suggest that these polished surfaces are also coated by an ultrathin cohesive layer composed of nanograins. Although there are clear differences between glacial and fault-zone environments, the similarity between these textures, and the fact that both are formed during shear, suggest that a similar mechanism is responsible for their formation. The comparison raises questions about the importance of high fluid contents and

  3. Geochronology and geochemistry of the Triassic bimodal volcanic rocks and coeval A-type granites of the Olzit area, Middle Mongolia: Implications for the tectonic evolution of Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mingshuai; Zhang, Fochin; Miao, Laicheng; Baatar, Munkhtsengel; Anaad, Chimedtseren; Yang, Shunhu; Li, Xingbo

    2016-05-01

    The Olzit volcanism in Middle Mongolia comprises a bimodal suite of basalts and peralkaline rhyolites adjacent to the Main Mongolia Lineament. The basalts are characterized by enrichment in LILE and LREE, and depletion in HFSE with typical Sr-Nd isotopic signatures (εNd(t) = -2.50 to -0.38 and (87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7058-0.7063), indicating they were likely derived from partial melting of an enriched lithospheric mantle, modified by subducted slab-derived fluids. The rhyolites show a close affinity to A-type granites with enrichment in LILE and LREE, and depletion in Nb, Ta and Ti. They also show a significant negative Eu anomaly, and have εNd(t) values ranging from 0.50 to 1.38 and initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.7022 to 0.7200, suggesting the rhyolites stem from partial melting of crustal rocks rather than fractional crystallization of the basaltic melt. The rhyolite porphyry yields a SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age of 207 ± 2 Ma (MSWD = 1.42), indicating the bimodal volcanic suite formed in the Late Triassic. The miarolitic per-alkaline granite and biotite-bearing granite, which are associated with the bimodal volcanic rocks, show typical A-type granitic geochemical affinity with εNd(t) = 0.89-0.91 and (87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7021-0.7043, indicating they are likely generated by partial melting of crustal rocks similar to the rhyolitic end-member of bimodal suite. The miarolitic per-alkaline granite and biotite-bearing granite yielded SHRIMP zircon U-Pb ages of 209 ± 2 Ma (MSWD = 0.91) and 213 ± 3 Ma (MSWD = 1.65) respectively, which are nearly coeval with the age of the bimodal volcanic suites. In view of the new geochemical and chronological data in this study, we suggest the Olzit Late Triassic bimodal volcanic rocks together with the coeval A-type granites represent a back-arc basin extensional environment, which probably related to the roll-back of Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate during the southward subduction under the Central Mongolia microcontinent.

  4. Magnetic Properties of Hydrothermalized A-type Red Granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, R. I. F.; Nédélec, A.; Peschler, A.; Archanjo, C. J.; Poitrasson, F.; Bouchez, J. L.

    Hydrothermalized A-type granites are commonly identified by their pink to red-brick colour attributed to tiny flakes of hematite in the alkali feldspars. These inclusions can be of interest in magnetic studies, but their timing and process of formation are still unclear. Formation of chlorite after biotite is the commonest effect of hydrother- malization and may occur quite early after crystallization due to late-magmatic or externally-derived fluids. The reddish colour appears at a later stage. Five cases of A-type granites were investigated for their magnetic mineralogy and properties. The selected cases range from nearly unmodified granites (Panafrican stratoid granites of Madagascar) to strongly hydrothermalized ones (Meruoca, Brazil; Tana, Corsica); in- termediate cases are : Mount Scott (Oklahoma), Bushveld (granitic core kindly pro- vided by R.G. Cawthorn) and. Hydrothermal alteration is often associated to a de- crease of the magnetic susceptibility magnitude (K) and of the anisotropy degree (P). It also strongly affects the rockt's bulk coercivity parameters, since alteration changes the relative amounts of coarse-grained primary magnetite, fine-grained PSD to SD sec- ondary magnetite, and hematite. Correspondingly, most samples plot away from the magnetite trend in the Dayt's diagram, but the different groups identified after coer- civity parameters do not directly correlate with whole-rock colour. In addition, IRM- acquisition curves and thermal demagnetization of tri-axial IRM show that hematite occurs in almost all analysed samples despite their colour. Various hematite coercivity ranges are also evidenced. In fact, hematite can be formed either in feldspar crys- tals or after magnetite. Tiny hematite within feldspars can appear either by exsolu- tion process or, more likely, by precipitation from a fluid phase. For these reasons, hematite inclusions may carry a remanence acquired shortly after granite crystalliza- tion or, conversely, a recent

  5. Landslides and the weathering of granitic rocks

    Treesearch

    Philip B. Durgin

    1977-01-01

    Abstract - Granitic batholiths around the Pacific Ocean basin provide examples of landslide types that characterize progressive stages of weathering. The stages include (1) fresh rock, (2) corestones, (3) decomposed granitoid, and (4) saprolite. Fresh granitoid is subject to rockfalls, rockslides, and block glides. They are all controlled by factors related to...

  6. The origin of granites and related rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Michael; Piccoli, Philip M.

    1995-01-01

    This Circular is a compilation of abstracts for posters and oral presentations given at the third Hutton symposium on the Origin of granites and related rocks. The symposium was co-sponsored by the Department of Geology, University of Maryland at College Park; the U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia; and the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism and Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington.

  7. A-type granite and the Red Sea opening

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, R.G.; DeBari, S.; Peterman, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Miocene-Oligocene A-type granite intrudes the eastern side of the Red Sea margin within the zone of extension from Jiddah, Saudi Arabia south to Yemen. The intrusions developed in the early stages of continental extension as Arabia began to move slowly away from Africa (around 30-20 Ma). Within the narrow zone of extension silicic magmas formed dikes, sills, small plutons and extrusive equivalents. In the Jabal Tirf area of Saudi Arabia these rocks occur in an elongate zone consisting of late Precambrian basement to the east, which is gradually invaded by mafic dikes. The number of dikes increases westward until an igneous complex is produced parallel to the present Red Sea axis. The Jabal Tirf igneous complex consists of diabase and rhyolite-granophyre sills (20-24 Ma). Although these are intrusine intrusive rocks their textures indicate shallow depths of intrusion (< 1 km). To the south, in the Yemen, contemporaneous with alkali basaltic eruptions (26-30 Ma) and later silicic eruptions, small plutons, dikes, and stocks of alkali granite invaded thick (1500 m) volcanic series, at various levels and times. Erosion within the uplifted margin of Yemen suggests that the maximum depth of intrusion was less than 1-2 km. Granophyric intrusions (20-30 Ma) within mafic dike swarms similar to the Jabal Tirf complex are present along the western edge of the Yemen volcanic plateau, marking a north-south zone of continental extension. The alkali granites of Yemen consist primarily of perthitic feldspar and quartz with some minor alkali amphiboles and acmite. These granites represent water-poor, hypersolvus magmas generated from parent alkali basalt magmas. The granophyric, two-feldspar granites associated with the mafic dike swarms and layered gabbros formed by fractional crystallization from tholeiitic basalt parent developed in the early stages of extension. Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of these rocks and their bulk chemistry indicate that production of peralkaline and

  8. A-type granite and the Red Sea opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Robert G.; DeBari, Susan; Peterman, Zell

    1992-03-01

    Miocene-Oligocene A-type granite intrudes the eastern side of the Red Sea margin within the zone of extension from Jiddah, Saudi Arabia south to Yemen. The intrusions developed in the early stages of continental extension as Arabia began to move slowly away from Africa (around 30-20 Ma). Within the narrow zone of extension silicic magmas formed dikes, sills, small plutons and extrusive equivalents. In the Jabal Tirf area of Saudi Arabia these rocks occur in an elongate zone consisting of late Precambrian basement to the east, which is gradually invaded by mafic dikes. The number of dikes increases westward until an igneous complex is produced parallel to the present Red Sea axis. The Jabal Tirf igneous complex consists of diabase and rhyolite-granophyre sills (20-24 Ma). Although these are intrusine intrusive rocks their textures indicate shallow depths of intrusion (< 1 km). To the south, in the Yemen, contemporaneous with alkali basaltic eruptions (26-30 Ma) and later silicic eruptions, small plutons, dikes, and stocks of alkali granite invaded thick (1500 m) volcanic series, at various levels and times. Erosion within the uplifted margin of Yemen suggests that the maximum depth of intrusion was less than 1-2 km. Granophyric intrusions (20-30 Ma) within mafic dike swarms similar to the Jabal Tirf complex are present along the western edge of the Yemen volcanic plateau, marking a north-south zone of continental extension. The alkali granites of Yemen consist primarily of perthitic feldspar and quartz with some minor alkali amphiboles and acmite. These granites represent water-poor, hypersolvus magmas generated from parent alkali basalt magmas. The granophyric, two-feldspar granites associated with the mafic dike swarms and layered gabbros formed by fractional crystallization from tholeiitic basalt parent developed in the early stages of extension. Initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of these rocks and their bulk chemistry indicate that production of peralkaline and

  9. A Global compilation of Heat Production in Granitic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Kiki; Sørensen, Nanna K.; Nielsen, Louise S. K.; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina M.

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the heat production in the crust is important for understanding the energy balance in Earth. It is assumed that the crust produces a substantial part of the heat in Earth, but its proportion in comparison to the mantle and the contribution from core solidification is not well known. Knowledge of the crustal heat production is required for assessing the mantle heat flow at the crust-mantle interface. Granites probably are the main heat producing rock types in the crust, and therefore their heat production is of crucial importance for understanding Earth heat balance. As part of a B.Sc. thesis study we have compiled a new database based on published values of heat production in various types of granites. The database has about 500 entries for concentrations of U, Th, and K and the total heat generation in different continental regions. The database also includes information on crustal age and the emplacement age of granites, where available. Some of the main conclusions that may be drawn from analyses of this new database are: • Distribution of heat production values is narrow in Archean-early Proterozoic granites but very broad in middle-late Proterozoic granites. • We observe no correlation between granite type and heat production. • Some correlation may be inferred between age and heat production - heat production is relatively low in Archaean-early Proterozoic granites. • Proterozoic granites are dominated by A-type which have high heat production; the I-type Archean granitic rocks seem to have the highest Th/U ratio. • The Th/U ratio is supposed to be 3.7-4.0 based on relative time constants. This is in general correct with a global average value of 3.7. However, it is ca. 3.8 for Phanerozoic and Archaean-early Proterozoic granites and 3.3 for middle-late Proterozoic granites. We speculate if this variation may be caused by major plate reorganization or perhaps by change in global plate tectonic style?

  10. Index of granitic rock masses in the state of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maldonado, Florian; Spengler, Richard W.; Hanna, W.F.; Dixon, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    A compilation of 205 areas of exposed granitic rock in Nevada was undertaken for the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose was to obtain data for evaluating granitic rock masses as potential underground nuclear waste repositories. Information, compiled by county for areas of granitic rock exposure, includes general location, coordinates, land classification, areal extent, accessibility, composition, age, rocks intruded, aeromagnetic expression, mining activity, and selected references.

  11. Riftogenic A-type granites of the Polar Urals, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udoratina, Oksana; Kulikova, Ksenia; Shuysky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    There are granitoids-markers of the riftogenic geodynamic setting in the Polar Urals. Isotope-geochronological and petrographic-petrogeochemical data on granitoids indicate the post-collisional conditions of their formation. Granitoids along with other alkaline massifs North Urals mark rifting in this part of the Urals. These granitoids formed after the collision peak of Timanides formation, after 520 Ma in the absolute chronology, when the intensity of magmatism fell sharply and only small volumes of rhyolite and A-type granites were formed. Granitoid massifs occur within the Northern Urals fragment of the Central Ural uplift composed of preuralide complexes. According to the recent data (U-Pb, SIMS) for single zircon the granitoids of the massifs (hereinafter Ma): Syadatayakhinsky (516±2, 503±6.3), Ochetinsky (500±5), Ingilorsky (487.3±6.9, 503±5), the northern part of Gerdizsky (496.2±7.1), Marunkeu Ridge (495±2.4) and part of massifs of kharbeysky complex of Laptayugansky and Evyugansky domes (497±3 and 487.1±2.1) were formed in the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician time. Within rare metal ore deposits of Taykeyusky ore unit, except for older granitoids with ages 600-560-540 Ma, the granitoids occur with the following ages: Longotyugansky (512±8, 482±8, 511±11), Taykeusky (513±3.4, 518.6±3.9, 477±12), Ust-Mramorny (516±16). There are the following situation localization of granites in the area of the Central Urals uplift: 1) in Ochetinsky and Syadatayakhinsky blocks without significant tectonic deformations among greenschist metamorphites; 2) in the areas of intense tectonic transformations (Longotyugansky, Taykeusky, Ust-Mramorny), but also among greenschist metamorphites; 3) in highly metamorphized rocks (Marunkeu Ridge, Ingilorsky, Gerdizsky, small bodies of Kharbeysky complex). Granitoids differ by the material and structural-textural features of the rocks. Some are massive with preserved granite fabric (1), the other have clearly expressed

  12. Chemical characteristics of zircon from A-type granites and comparison to zircon of S-type granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Karel; Lamarão, Claudio Nery; Borges, Régis Munhoz Krás; Dall'Agnol, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    The trace element content in zircons from A-type granites and rhyolites was investigated by using back-scattered electron images and electron microprobe analyses. The studied Proterozoic (Wiborg batholith, Finland and Pará, Amazonas and Goiás states, Brazil) and Variscan (Krušné Hory/Erzgebirge, Czech Republic and Germany) plutons cover a wide range of rocks, from large rapakivi-textured geochemically primitive plutons to small intrusions of F-, Li-, Sn-, Nb-, Ta-, and U-enriched rare-metal granites. While zircon is one of the first crystallized minerals in less fractionated metaluminous and peraluminous granites, it is a late-crystallized phase in peralkaline granites and in evolved granites that may crystallize during the whole process of magma solidification. The early crystals are included in mica, quartz, and feldspar; the late grains are included in fluorite or cryolite or are interstitial. The zircon in hornblende-biotite and biotite granites from the non-mineralized plutons is poor in minor and trace elements; the zircon in moderately fractionated granite varieties is slightly enriched in Hf, Th, U, Y, and HREEs; whereas the zircon in highly fractionated ore-bearing granites may be strongly enriched in Hf (up to 10 wt.% HfO2), Th (up to 10 wt.% ThO2), U (up to 10 wt.% UO2), Y (up to 12 wt.% Y2O3), Sc (up to 3 wt.% Sc2O3), Nb (up to 5 wt.% Nb2O5), Ta (up to 1 wt.% Ta2O5), W (up to 3 wt.% WO3), F (up to 2.5 wt.% F), P (up to 11 wt.% P2O5), and As (up to 1 wt.% As2O5). Metamictized zircons may also be enriched in Bi, Ca, Fe, and Al. The increase in the Hf content coupled with the decrease in the Zr/Hf value in zircon is one of the most reliable indicators of granitic magma evolution. In the zircon of A-type granites, the Zr/Hf value decreases from 41-67 (porphyritic granite) to 16-19 (equigranular granite) in the Kymi stock, Finland, and from 49-52 (biotite granite) to 18-36 (leucogranite) in the Pedra Branca pluton, Brazil. In the in situ strongly

  13. In-situ zircon U-Pb age and Hf-O isotopic constraints on the origin of the Hasan-Robat A-type granite from Sanandaj-Sirjan zone, Iran: implications for reworking of Cadomian arc igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarmand, Maryam; Li, Xian-Hua; Nabatian, Ghasem; Neubauer, Franz

    2017-01-01

    The Lower Permian Hasan-Robat syenogranite occurs as a single pluton and intruded the Upper Carboniferous-Lower Permian sandstones and dolomitic limestones in the central part of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone. This syenogranitic intrusion shows A-type granitic affinity and is a good representative of Early Permian igneous activity in Iran. SIMS U-Pb zircon analyses indicate a crystallization age of 294.2 ± 2.5 Ma for the Hasan-Robat A-type granite. In-situ Lu-Hf and oxygen isotope analyses of magmatic zircons were carried out to infer the magma sources and evolution of the Hasan-Robat A-type syenogranite. The Hf-O zircon isotopic compositions are relatively homogeneous, with nearly chondritic ɛHf(t) values of -0.8 to +2.4 corresponding to two-stage zircon Hf model ages of 1.15-1.36 Ga. The δ18O values of zircon range from +7.6 to +8.6‰. The Hf model ages of the Hasan-Robat zircons is within the range of those reported from the Cadomian granitoids in Iran. The isotopic features of the Hasan-Robat syenogranite are in good agreement with Hf isotopic values and Hf and Nd model ages reported from the Cadomian arc magmatic suites in Iran. Thus, partial melting of these Cadomian igneous rocks would be the favorite source for the Hasan-Robat syenogranitic magma during the opening of the Neotethys Ocean and separation of Iranian terranes from the northern margin of Gondwana.

  14. Origin of Mesoproterozoic A-type granites in Laurentia: Hf isotope evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodge, John W.; Vervoort, Jeffrey D.

    2006-03-01

    Granitic rocks are commonly used as a means to study chemical evolution of continental crust. In particular, their isotopic compositions reflect the relative contributions of mantle and crustal sources in their genesis. In Laurentia, a distinctive belt of Mesoproterozoic A-type or "anorogenic" granites of ˜ 1.4 Ga age was emplaced within composite, heterogeneous Proterozoic crust. Zircons are an ideal mineral to constrain the granite petrogenetic history because they are repositories of both age (U-Pb geochronology) and tracer (Lu-Hf isotopic) information. We measured the Hf isotope composition of zircons from 31 previously dated A-type granites intruding Proterozoic basement provinces from the southwest U.S. to the upper mid-continent. Isotopic compositions for all granites are broadly similar, with average 176Hf/ 177Hf(i) ratios of 0.281871-0.282153. Averages for granites within different crustal provinces yield present-day ɛHf values between - 31.9 and - 21.9. Initial ɛHf values discriminate the granites by age of the 2.0-1.6 Ga crust which they intrude, but are independent of intrusion age, as follows (basement formation ages in parentheses): southern Granite-Rhyolite (1.5-1.3 Ga), + 7.0 ± 0.9; central Yavapai (1.8-1.7 Ga), + 5.4 ± 0.9; western Yavapai (1.8-1.7 Ga), + 3.3 ± 1.1; Granite-Rhyolite (1.5-1.3 Ga), + 1.4 ± 0.6; Mojave (1.8-1.7 Ga), + 0.2 ± 0.8; and Penokean (1.9-1.8 Ga), - 0.1 ± n/d. The narrow ranges of Hf isotopic signatures within these regional groupings of granites reflect the age and isotopic composition of the basement provinces they intrude. Granites in the southern Granite-Rhyolite and central Yavapai provinces have the highest initial ɛHf, reflecting their more juvenile sources, whereas Mojave and Penokean granites show contributions from more evolved crustal sources. Simple calculations indicate that all the granites represent dominantly crustal melts; although a mantle contribution cannot be ruled out, if present it must be

  15. Petrogenesis of selected A-type granitic intrusions from Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Tharwat; Asran, Asran; Amron, Taha; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The Pan-African orogeny in the Arabian-Nubian Shield was terminated by intrusion of A-type granites (~ 595 Ma; Greenberg, 1981) and its volcanic equivalents. Subsequent to the intrusions of these granitic bodies the shield was exhumed. Eroded A-type granite pebbles were found in the molasse sediments that were deposited in intermountain basins. Therefore the A-type granites provide information about the last stage of the Pan-African geochemical system. Preliminary whole-rock geochemical data of three granitic intrusions (Kadabora, Um Naggat and El shiekh Salem) from the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt; indicate that all of them are peraluminous and with A-type characteristics. These intrusions show low CaO content (average 0.43 %wt), high FeOT/MgO ratio (10.46-121.88), high Na2O+K2O (average 8.04 %wt), marked enrichment of high field strength elements (Y, Nb and Ga except Zr), depletion in MgO (0.01-0.11 %wt) and with low concentration of Sr and Ba. The studied granitoids were emplaced in within plate tectonic regime. References: Greenberg, J.K. (1981): Characteristic and origin of Egyptian younger granites. Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. Part 1, v.92: 224-232.

  16. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Proterozoic granitic rocks from northern margin of the Chotanagpur Gneissic Complex (CGC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Bhupendra S.; Wanjari, Nishchal; Ahmad, Talat; Chaturvedi, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    This study presents the geochemical characteristics of granitic rocks located on the northern margin of Chotanagpur Gneissic Complex (CGC), exposed in parts of Gaya district, Bihar and discusses the possible petrogenetic process and source characteristics. These granites are associated with Barabar Anorthosite Complex and Neo-proterozoic Munger-Rajgir group of rocks. The granitic litho-units identified in the field are grey, pink and porphyritic granites. On the basis of geochemical and petrographic characteristics, the grey and pink granites were grouped together as GPG while the porphyritic granites were named as PG. Both GPG and PG are enriched in SiO2, K2O, Na2O, REE (except Eu), Rb, Ba, HFSE (Nb, Y, Zr), depleted in MgO, CaO, Sr and are characterised by high Fe* values, Ga/Al ratios and high Zr saturation temperatures (GPGavg˜ 861 ∘C and PGavg˜ 835 ∘C). The REE patterns for GPG are moderately fractionated with an average (La/Yb)N˜ 4.55 and Eu/Eu* ˜ 0.58, than PG which are strongly fractionated with an average (La/Yb)N˜ 31.86 and Eu/Eu* ˜ 0.75. These features indicate that the granites have an A-type character. On the basis of geochemical data, we conclude that the granites are probably derived from a predominant crustal source with variable mantle involvement in a post-collisional setting.

  17. Magnetic Properties of the Precambrian Granitic Rocks in Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, N.; Jackson, M.; Kogiso, T.; Sato, M.; Seita, K.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2008-12-01

    It has been known that granitic rocks have stable components of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) as well as unstable NRM. It is noted that remanent magnetization of plagioclase crystals in granitic and basaltic rocks can yield reliable paleomagnetic data (e.g. Wu et al., 1974; Geissman et al., 1988; Tarduno et al., 2001; Wakabayashi et al., 2006). The acquisition process of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) of granitic rocks is not well-understood because the size of magnetic grains varies from less than a few μm to hundreds of μm and parts of them are included in each crystal of granitic rocks. Thus we have made rock-magnetic studies and microscopic observations on granitic rocks and their separated crystals. Samples used in this study are collected from multiple sites of the Sacred Heart Granite (2.6 Ga U-Pb zircon ages) and the St. Cloud Granite and Granodiorite (1.8 Ga U-Pb zircon age) in Minnesota. For most of the bulk samples from granitic rocks, the Verwey transition at 120 K is clearly recognized. Susceptibility- temperature (χ-T) curves show an abrupt drop at about 580°C. Hysteresis parameters of bulk samples are distributed along a mixing line between the multi-domain (MD) and pseudo-single-domain (PSD) areas on the Day plot. Saturation isothermal remanence (SIRM) cooling and warming curves indicate that low-temperature memories range in a few to several tens % of the initial SIRM. These results indicate the MD magnetite grains dominate the magnetic properties but more or less PSD (or single-domain (SD)) magnetite grains are present in the granitic rocks. The separated crystals of feldspar and quartz show the Verwey transition at 120 K and the Curie temperature of about 580°C. Hysteresis properties of them are similar to those of bulk samples. These suggest that the MD and PSD (or SD) magnetite are included in both feldspar and quartz, suggesting that those magnetite grains primarily formed during the initial formation of the granitic rocks. We

  18. Charnockites and granites of the western Adirondacks, New York, USA: a differentiated A-type suite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    Granitic rocks in the west-central Adirondack Highlands of New York State include both relatively homogeneous charnockitic and hornblende granitic gneisses (CG), that occur in thick stratiform bodies and elliptical domes, and heterogeneous leucogneisses (LG), that commonly are interlayered with metasedimentary rocks. Major- and trace-element geochemical analyses were obtained for 115 samples, including both types of granitoids. Data for CG fail to show the presence of more than one distinct group based on composition. Most of the variance within the CG sample population is consistent with magmatic differentiation combined with incomplete separation of early crystals of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, and pyroxenes or amphibole from the residual liquid. Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca, P, Sr, Ba, and Zr decrease with increasing silica, while Rb and K increase. Within CG, the distinction between charnockitic (orthopyroxene-bearing) and granitic gneisses is correlated with bulk chemistry. The charnockites are consistently more mafic than the hornblende granitic gneisses, although forming a continuum with them. The leucogneisses, while generally more felsic than the charnockites and granitic gneisses, are otherwise geochemically similar to them. The data are consistent with the LG suite being an evolved extrusive equivalent of the intrusive CG suite. Both CG and LG suites are metaluminous to mildly peraluminous and display an A-type geochemical signature, enriched in Fe, K, Ce, Y, Nb, Zr, and Ga and depleted in Ca, Mg, and Sr relative to I- and S-type granites. Rare earth element patterns show moderate LREE enrichment and a negative Eu anomaly throughout the suite. The geochemical data suggest an origin by partial melting of biotite- and plagioclase-rich crustal rocks. Emplacement occurred in an anorogenic or post-collisional tectonic setting, probably at relatively shallow depths. Deformation and granulite-facies metamorphism with some partial melting followed during the Ottawan phase

  19. Magmatic Enclaves in Granitic Rocks: Paragons or Parasites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, John; Stevens, Gary; Elburg, Marlina

    2017-04-01

    Granitic rocks form the fundamental building blocks of Earth's continents and provide us with a wide range of resources, so their formation is worth trying to understand. Fine-grained, igneous-textured microgranular enclaves of tonalitic to monzogranitic composition (ME) are common in granitic rocks and their origins have been hotly debated, with some workers suggesting that ME are not igneous. These ME have been studied intensively enough that we are now certain that they are of igneous origin - globules of mingled and quenched magma. Although a mantle connection is evident in many cases, their ultimate origin (including where in the lithosphere they originate) is still debated. This contribution explores the systematics of chemical variation in ME and their host granites, with the aim of uncovering any systematics in their behaviour and modelling the processes that have led to the variations that we measure, comparing host-rock series to their respective ME series. As always, the hope is that the study of ME may lead to improved understanding and modelling of the processes that are responsible for the formation of the host granitic magmas. Using variations between the molecular quantities Ti and M (Fe+Mn+Mg), we demonstrate that the petrogenetic processes that operated within a diverse group of S- and I-type granitic host magmas and their ME suites are dissimilar. Variations within the granitic series result from a variety of what might be called 'orderly' processes, resulting in linear or curvilinear trends in chemical variation diagrams. In contrast, processes that affected the ME series commonly resulted in scattered, chaotic variations. Even in cases in which an ME series displays more orderly variation, it can be shown that the hypothesis of simple mixing between a parent enclave magma and its host granitic magma, to produce the overall variations, cannot be supported. ME magmas had vastly smaller volumes compared with their host granitic magmas. Thus, they

  20. Flow Chart for Mineral Separation from Granitic Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mursky, Gregory

    1987-01-01

    Provided is a flow chart for the separation and purification of major, minor, and accessory minerals from granitic rocks. With careful use of heavy liquids, and a Franz Isodynamic Magnetic Separator, it is possible to obtain mineral concentrates with a purity of 95 percent or better. (Author/RH)

  1. Flow Chart for Mineral Separation from Granitic Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mursky, Gregory

    1987-01-01

    Provided is a flow chart for the separation and purification of major, minor, and accessory minerals from granitic rocks. With careful use of heavy liquids, and a Franz Isodynamic Magnetic Separator, it is possible to obtain mineral concentrates with a purity of 95 percent or better. (Author/RH)

  2. Petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the Devonian Xiqin A-type granite in the northeastern Cathaysia Block, SE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Da-wei; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Lv, Zheng-Hang; Liu, Yun-long

    2017-06-01

    Most Silurian-Devonian granites in South China are S- or I-type granites, which are suggested to be petrogenetically related to the Wuyi-Yunkai orogeny. In this paper, we present the detailed LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating, major and trace element geochemical, and Nd-Hf isotopic data for Xiqin A-type granites in the northeastern Cathaysia Block, SE China. Zircon U-Pb dating results show that the Xiqin granites were emplaced at about 410 Ma, indicating that they were generated at the end of Wuyi-Yunkai orogeny. These granites are high in K2O + Na2O (6.31-8.79 wt%), high field strength elements (Zr + Nb + Ce + Y = 427-699 ppm), rare earth elements (total REE = 221-361 ppm) as well as high Ga/Al ratios (10,000 Ga/Al = 2.50-3.10), and show characteristics typical of A-type granites. εHf(t) values of the Xiqin granites mainly vary from -0.4 to -3.1 and yield Mesoproterozoic T2DM(Hf) (mainly ranging from 1.29 to 1.45 Ga). The εNd(t) values are from -1.23 to -2.11 and T2DM(Nd) vary from 1.25 to 1.32 Ga. These isotopic data suggest that the Xiqin granites were generated by partial melting of metavolcanic rocks with minor metasedimentary rocks in the lower crust. Our data on the Xiqin granites, coupled with previous studies of Silurian-Devonian magmatism, suggest that the tectonic regime had changed to a strongly post-collisional extension environment in the Wuyi-Yunkai orogen at least since 410 Ma, and that delamination, which accounts for the change in stress from the compression to extension and asthenospheric upwelling during the early Paleozoic, plays a significant role in the generation of Xiqin A-type granites.

  3. A-type stratoid granites of Madagascar: evidence of Rodinia rifting at ca 790 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelec, Anne; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Bouchez, Jean-Luc

    2015-04-01

    The so-called stratoid granites are sheet-like granites emplaced as conformable sills in the Precambrian basement of central Madagascar. Most of them have A-type affinities (Nédélec et al. 1995). They are everywhere characterized by the same structural pattern evidencing two stages of deformation. The first one (foliations mildly dipping to the west and lineations trending WSW) is regarded as the consequence of synkinematic magma emplacement. The second stage, characterized by interference folds, steeply dipping foliations and subhorizontal lineations trending to the north, corresponds to a more or less pronounced reworking in ductile conditions, regarded as the result of Late Pan-African transcurrent tectonics. To the north of Antananarivo, the stratoid granites are associated with comagmatic quartz-syenites. New U-Pb zircons ages obtained by in situ analyses reveal two group of ages: upper intercept ages of ca 790 Ma, and younger ages of ca 550 Ma corresponding to crystal rims. These new data question the geological significance of former TIMS ages of ca 630 Ma formerly obtained from the same rocks (Paquette & Nédélec 1998). It is suggested that the stratoid granites and syenites were emplaced during a crustal thinning event corresponding to an early Rodinia rifting stage. The Pan-African imprint on these rocks is therefore limited to reheating, tectonic reworking and deep fluid transfer in the vicinity of Late-Neoproterozoic shear zones at ca 550 Ma (Nédélec et al. 2014).

  4. Geology of the Andover Granite and surrounding rocks, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, Robert O.

    1964-01-01

    Field and petrographic studies of the Andover Granite and surrounding rocks have afforded an opportunity for an explanation of its emplacement and crystallization. The investigation has contributed secondarily to an understanding of the geologic history of southeastern New England, particularly as it is revealed in the Lawrence, Wilmington, South Groveland, and Reading quadrangles of Massachusetts. The Andover Granite and Sharpners Pond Tonalite together comprise up to 90 percent of the Acadian(?) subalkaline intrusive series cropping out within the area of study. The subalkaline series locally invades a sequence of early to middle Paleozoic and possibly Precambrian metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. Much of the subalkaline series and most of the Andover Granite is confined between two prominent east-northeast trending faults or fault systems. The northern fault separates the mildly metamorphosed Middle Silurian(?) Merrimack Group on the north from a highly metamorphosed and thoroughly intruded Ordovician(?) sequence on the south. The southern 'boundary '' fault is a major structural discontinuity characterized by penetrative, diffuse shearing over a zone one-half mile or more in width. The magmatic nature of the Andover Granite is demonstrated by: (1) sharply crosscutting relationships with surrounding rocks; (2) the occurrence of tabular-shaped xenoliths whose long directions parallel the foliation within the granite and whose internal foliation trends at a high angle to that of the granite; (3) continuity with the clearly intrusive Sharpners Pond Tonalite; (4) the compositional uniformity of the granite as contrasted with the compositional diversity of the rocks it invades; (5) its modal and normative correspondence with (a) calculated norms of salic extrusives and (b) that of the ternary (granite) minimum for the system NaAlSi3O8-KAlSi3O8-SiO2. Orogenic granites, as represented by the Andover, contrast with post-orogenic granites, represented locally by

  5. Archaean greenstone belts and associated granitic rocks - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhaeusser, Carl R.

    2014-12-01

    Archaean greenstone belts and associated granitic rocks comprise some of the most diverse rock types on the Earth's surface and were formed during the early stages of the development of the planet from Eoarchaean to Neoarchaean times - a period extending back from about 4000 to 2500 million years ago. Because of their great age, these rocks have received unprecedented attention from a wide spectrum of Earth scientists striving to learn more about the evolution of the Earth, including its crust, hydrosphere, atmosphere, the commencement of life, and the nature and distribution of mineral deposits. The knowledge gained thus far has accumulated incrementally, beginning with solid field-based studies, the latter being supplemented with increasingly advanced technological developments that have enabled scientists to probe fundamental questions of Earth history. Archaean granite-greenstone terranes display considerable variability of lithologies and geotectonic events, yet there are unifying characteristics that distinguish them from other geological environments. Most greenstone belts consist of a wide variety of volcanic and sedimentary rocks that reflect different evolutionary conditions of formation and all have invariably been influenced by subsequent geotectonic factors, including the intrusion of ultramafic, mafic and granitic complexes, resulting in widespread deformation, metamorphism, metasomatism, as well as mineralization. Geochemical and isotopic age determinations have shown how complex these ancient rocks are and efforts at understanding the nature and evolution of the hydrosphere, atmosphere and primitive life have made Archaean terranes exciting environments in which to study. Conflicting views as to the nature, history and origin of many of the rock types and events in Archaean terranes has been ongoing and stimulating. This review attempts to describe the main lithotypes and other characteristics of granite-greenstone belt geology and points to some

  6. REE enrichment in granite-derived regolith deposits of the southeast United States: Prospective source rocks and accumulation processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora K.; Ayuso, Robert A.; Simandl, G.J.; Neetz, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Southeastern United States contains numerous anorogenic, or A-type, granites, which constitute promising source rocks for REE-enriched ion adsorption clay deposits due to their inherently high concentrations of REE. These granites have undergone a long history of chemical weathering, resulting in thick granite-derived regoliths, akin to those of South China, which supply virtually all heavy REE and Y, and a significant portion of light REE to global markets. Detailed comparisons of granite regolith profiles formed on the Stewartsville and Striped Rock plutons, and the Robertson River batholith (Virginia) indicate that REE are mobile and can attain grades comparable to those of deposits currently mined in China. A REE-enriched parent, either A-type or I-type (highly fractionated igneous type) granite, is thought to be critical for generating the high concentrations of REE in regolith profiles. One prominent feature we recognize in many granites and mineralized regoliths is the tetrad behaviour displayed in REE chondrite-normalized patterns. Tetrad patterns in granite and regolith result from processes that promote the redistribution, enrichment, and fractionation of REE, such as late- to post- magmatic alteration of granite and silicate hydrolysis in the regolith. Thus, REE patterns showing tetrad effects may be a key for discriminating highly prospective source rocks and regoliths with potential for REE ion adsorption clay deposits.

  7. Lead-alpha age determinations of granitic rocks from Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, John J.; Jaffe, H.W.; Waring, C.L.

    1957-01-01

    Lead-alpha activity age determinations were made on zircon from seven granitic rocks of central and southeastern Alaska. The results of the age determinations indicate two periods of igneous intrusion, one about 95 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period, and another about 53 million years ago, during the early part of the Tertiary. The individual ages determined on zircon from 2 rocks from southeastern Alaska and 1 from east-central Alaska gave results of 90, 100, and 96 million years; those determined on 4 rocks from central Alaska gave results of 47, 56, 58, and 51 million years.

  8. Geochemistry, geochronology, and origin of the Neoarchean Planalto Granite suite, Carajás, Amazonian craton: A-type or hydrated charnockitic granites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feio, G. R. L.; Dall'Agnol, R.; Dantas, E. L.; Macambira, M. J. B.; Gomes, A. C. B.; Sardinha, A. S.; Oliveira, D. C.; Santos, R. D.; Santos, P. A.

    2012-10-01

    New whole-rock geochemistry and LA-MC-ICPMS and Pb-evaporation geochronological data were obtained on zircon from the Neoarchean Planalto suite granites and associated charnockitic rocks of the Canaã area of the Carajás province, eastern Amazonian craton, Brazil. The Pb-evaporation ages of three samples from the Planalto suite are around 2730 Ma (2733 ± 2 Ma, 2731 ± 1 Ma and 2736 ± 4 Ma), whereas U-Pb LA-MC-ICPMS concordia ages obtained for these samples are 2729 ± 17 Ma, 2710 ± 10 Ma, and 2706 ± 5 Ma, respectively. An orthopyroxene quartz gabbro associated with the Pium complex and Planalto suite yielded a U-Pb concordia age of 2735 ± 5 Ma, interpreted as its crystallization age. The Planalto suite granites and the charnockitic rocks associated with the Mesoarchean Pium complex were probably crystallized at 2730 ± 10 Ma. The Planalto granites have ferroan character and are similar geochemically to reduced A-type granites. In previous studies, they have been classified as such, despite the fact that they are syntectonic. The tectonic setting and the association between the Planalto suite and charnockitic series led us to classify these biotite-hornblende granites as hydrated granites of the charnockitic series. The Planalto suite and the Neoarchean charnockitic magmas were more probably derived by partial melting of mafic to intermediate tholeiitic orthopyroxene-bearing rocks similar to those of the Pium complex. At 2.76 Ga, upwelling of asthenospheric mantle in an extensional setting propitiated the formation of the Carajás basin. Later on, at ca. 2.73 Ga, heat input associated with underplate of mafic magma induced partial melting of mafic to intermediate lower crustal rocks, originating the Planalto and charnockitic magmas. The emplacement of these magmas occurred under active regional stress and resultant major shear zones found in the Canaã dos Carajás area. The close association between the Planalto suite and charnockitic rocks suggests that they

  9. Inelastic deformations of fault and shear zones in granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, D.G.

    1986-02-01

    Deformations during heating and cooling of three drifts in granitic rock were influenced by the presence of faults and shear zones. Thermal deformations were significantly larger in sheared and faulted zones than where the rock was jointed, but neither sheared nor faulted. Furthermore, thermal deformations in faulted or sheared rock were not significantly recovered during subsequent cooling, thus a permanent deformation remained. This inelastic response is in contrast with elastic behavior identified in unfaulted and unsheared rock segments. A companion paper indicates that deformations in unsheared or unfaulted rock were effectively modeled as an elastic response. We conclude that permanent deformations occurred in fractures with crushed minerals and fracture filling or gouge materials. Potential mechanisms for this permanent deformation are asperity readjustments during thermal deformations, micro-shearing, asperity crushing and crushing of the secondary fracture filling minerals. Additionally, modulus differences in sheared or faulted rock as compared to more intact rock would result in greater deformations in response to the same thermal loads.

  10. Uranium-lead isotope systematics and apparent ages of zircons and other minerals in precambrian granitic rocks, Granite Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Stuckless, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Zircon suites from the two main types of granite in the Granite Mountains, Wyoming, yielded concordia-intercept ages of 2,640??20 m.y. for a red, foliated granite (granite of Long Creek Mountain) and 2,595??40 m.y. for the much larger mass of the granite of Lankin Dome. These ages are statistically distinct (40??20 m.y. difference) and are consistent with observed chemical and textural differences. The lower intercepts of the zircon chords of 50??40 and 100+ 75 m.y. for the granite of Long Creek Mountain and granite of Lankin Dome, respectively, are not consistent with reasonable continuous diffusion lead-loss curves but do correspond well with the known (Laramide) time of uplift of the rocks. Epidote, zircon, and apatite from silicified and epidotized zones in the granites all record at least one postcrystallization disturbance in addition to the Laramide event and do not define a unique age of silicification and epidotization. The lower limit of ???2,500 m.y. provided by the least disturbed epidote, however, suggests that these rocks were probably formed by deuteric processes shortly after emplacement of the granite of the Lankin Dome. The earlier of the two disturbances that affected the minerals of the silicified-epidotized rock can be bracketed between 1,350 and 2,240 m.y. ago and is probably the same event that lowered mineral K-Ar and ages in the region. Zircon suites from both types of granite show well-defined linear correlations among U content, common-Pb content, and degree of discordance. One of the zircon suites has an extremely high common-Pb content (up to 180 ppm) and exhibits a component of radiogenic-Pb loss that is apparently unrelated to radiation damage. ?? 1978 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Cause of large negative Eu anomaly in the highly evolved A-type granites with REE tetrad pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Asahara, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Lee, M.; Lee, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    REE tetrad pattern with strongly large negative Eu anomaly is one of the specific geochemical phenomena observed in the highly evolved, fractionated granite or A-type granite. The large negative Eu anomaly from the highly evolved or fractionated granites related with REE tetrad effect was discussed in a lot of literatures (e.g. [1] Muecke and Clarke, 1981; [2] Irber, 1999; [3] Jahn et al., 2001). Recently, Lee et al.[4] also suggested that Eu anomalies and REE tetrad pattern from the highly fractionated A-type Muamsa and Weolaksan granites in the Okcheon Metamorphic Belt, Korea, might be associated with a fractionation between the residual melt and a coexisting aqueous high temperature fluid. Their origin and geochemical significance are ongoing yet. In order to clarify cause of large negative Eu anomaly in the granite with REE tetrad effect more clearly, we reanalyzed REE abundance of the Muamsa and Weolaksan granites using MC-ICP-MS at the origins laboratory of the University of Chicago. We also measured REE abundances of the constituent minerals using quadruple ICP-MS at the Korea Polar Research Institute. In this report, we show the re-analyzed REE data from the whole rock as well as new REE data from constituent minerals of the granite with REE tetrad effect. Then, we discuss the cause of large negative Eu anomaly in the highly evolved granite with REE tetrad effect. Especially, the granites with very large negative Eu anomaly also show large negative Ce anomaly. Lee et al. [4] mentioned that negative Ce anomalies were formed after granite emplacement. However, our new data indicate that negative Ce anomaly might be formed during the same geochemical process with very large negative Eu anomaly. This suggests that the REE tetrad effect may be related with a change of oxidation state during a magma evolution. Therefore, we will discuss REE tetrad effect, negative Eu and Ce anomaly as an indicator for the change of oxidation state of magma during the emplacement

  12. A-type and I-type granitoids and mylonitic granites of Hassan Salaran area of SE Saqqez, Kurdistan, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Fakhraddin Mohammad; Saeed Ahmad, Sheler

    2014-05-01

    The Hassan Salarn area is located 20km to southeast of Saqqez city in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. In this area there are two distinct granitic rock suites consisting A-type and I-type granites and also mylonitic granites. These A-type and I-type granites have various petrological and geochemical characteristics. They also have different origins and petrogenesis. A-type granitoids comprise alkali feldspar granite, syenogranite and quartz alkali feldspar syenite, whereas I-type granitoids are composed of monzogranite, granodiorite and tonalite. Geochemically, A-type granitoids are peralkaline and acmite-normative but I-type granitoids are subalkaline (calc-alkaline), metaluminous and diopside-normative. A-type granitoids are also ferroan alkali and ferroan alkali-calcic whereas I-type granitoids are magnesian and calcic. A-type granitoids resemble to within plate granites and post-orogenic granites whereas I-type granitoids resemble to volcanic arc granites. A-type granitoids contain higher concentrations of alkalies, Zr, Rb, Nb, Y, Th, Ce, high FeO/MgO ratios and lower concentrations of Mg, Ca and Sr, resembling post-orogenic A-type granites. It is possible that heat from a mantle-derived magma which intruded into the lower crust, and/or rapid crustal extension have been essential generation of approriate melts producing A-type granitoids. Thus we can conclude that A-type granitoids were generated from a mixed mantle-crust source. Negative Nb anomalies and low contents of Ti and P probably indicate a subduction-related origin for protolith of I-type granitoids. Negative Nb anomalies and enrichment in Ce relative to its adjacent elements can be related to involvement of continental crust in magmatic processes. I-type granitoids are also enriched in Rb, Ba, K, Th, Ce and depleted in Nb, Zr and Y, indicating that they have had interacted with crust. I-type granitoids may result from contamination of mantle-derived magmas by continental crust during a subduction

  13. Petrochemical evolution of the White Mfolozi Granite pluton: Evidence for a late Palaeoarchaean A-type granite from the SE Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Saumitra; Reinhardt, Jürgen; Wilson, Allan H.

    2017-08-01

    One of the major limitations in understanding the geochemical evolution of the Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa, is the scarcity of whole rock trace element data of the granitoid and other rocks compared to the vastness of this cratonic block. Here we present new XRF major oxide and ICP-MS trace element analyses of the White Mfolozi Granitoid (WMG) pluton, SE Kaapvaal Craton, which suggest that the 3.25 Ga (U-Pb zircon age) old WMG pluton is a peraluminous A-type granite and could be equivalent to the intrusive potassic granite phase of the Anhalt Granitoid suite, occurring to the North of the WMG pluton. The pluton was generated by batch partial melting of a pre-existing TTG source in two major phases under relatively anhydrous conditions, and the heat of partial melting could have been provided by a voluminous mantle-derived mafic magma, which intruded into mid-crustal levels (c. 17 km), perhaps during a period of crustal extension. The estimated pressure and temperature of generation of the WMG parent magma with average molar [or/(or + ab)] 0.48 could be 500 MPa and close to 1000 °C, respectively, when compared with the results of experimental petrology. Interstitial occurrence of relatively iron-rich biotite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) 0.41-0.45] suggests that the final temperature of crystallization of the pluton was close to 800 °C. An important magmatic event following the main phase of partial melting was limited mixing between the intrusive mafic magma and co-existing newly generated granitic melt. This magma mixing resulted in distinct variations in SiO2 and a low initial Sr isotopic ratio (0.7013) of the WMG pluton. Although both the models of partial melting of quartzo-feldspathic sources and fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas with or without crustal assimilation have been proposed for the origin of A-type granites, the model of magmatic evolution of the WMG pluton presented here can also be an alternative model for the generation of A-type granites. In

  14. Th-REE- and Nb-Ta-accessory minerals in post-collisional Ediacaran felsic rocks from the Katerina Ring Complex (S. Sinai, Egypt): An assessment for the fractionation of Y/Nb, Th/Nb, La/Nb and Ce/Pb in highly evolved A-type granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, J. A.; Molina, J. F.; Bea, F.; Abu Anbar, M.; Montero, P.

    2016-08-01

    The relationships of Y/Nb, Th/Nb, La/Nb and Ce/Pb ratios in A-type felsic rocks from the Ediacaran Katerina Ring Complex, northernmost Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS; S. Sinai, Egypt), are investigated in this work to understand their behavior during generation of highly evolved granitic magmas and to explore the nature of magma sources. Textural and compositional relationships of cognate Th-REE- and Nb-Ta-accessory minerals in Katerina felsic rocks show that chevkinite-group minerals (CGM), monazite, thorite, allanite and xenotime formed from residual liquids in quartz syenite porphyries, quartz monzonites and peralkaline granites, whereas in aluminous granites, allanite and monazite crystallized early, and thorite and columbite formed from residual liquids. Relationships of Y/Nb, Th/Nb, La/Nb and Ce/Pb ratios with Zr/Hf ratios in the aluminous granites and with Be abundances in the peralkaline granites suggest a decrease in La/Nb and Ce/Pb ratios in the former, and in Y/Nb and La/Nb ratios in the latter with crystallization progress. This contrasts with absence of systematic variations of Th/Nb and Ce/Pb ratios in the peralkaline compositions and of Y/Nb ratio in the aluminous ones. In this latter, Th/Nb ratio can present a significant decrease only in highly evolved compositions. An analysis of Y/Nb, Th/Nb, La/Nb and Ce/Pb relationships in worldwide OIB and subduction-related magmatic suites reveals that A-type felsic rocks with (Th/Nb)N < 1.3, (La/Nb)N < 1.3, and (Ce/Pb)N > 1 may have A1-type affinity, and those with (Th/Nb)N > 2, (La/Nb)N > 2, and (Ce/Pb)N < 1 tend to present A2-type affinity. The crystal fractionation of Th-LREE- and Nb-Ta-accessory minerals and mixing of components derived from the two granite groups may cause deviations from these compositional limits that can be evaluated using constraints imposed by Th/Nb-La/Nb, Ce/Pb-Th/Nb and Ce/Pb-La/Nb relationships in OIB and subduction-related magmatic suites. Three mantle sources might have been

  15. Bioweathering and biotransformation of granitic rock minerals by actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Hesham

    2009-11-01

    Actinomycetes inhabiting granitic rocks at St. Katherine, Egypt were investigated for their bioweathering potential. Actinomycete counts ranged between 174 and 360 colony forming units per gram. Counts were positively correlated to rock porosity (r = 0.65) and negatively correlated to rock salinity (r = -0.56). Sixty-six actinomycete isolates originating from rocks could be assigned into eight genera, with a high frequency of Nocardioides and Streptomyces. Organic acids were produced by 97% of the isolates. Strains belonging to Actinopolyspora, Actinomadura, Kitasatospora, Nocardioides, and Kibdelosporangium showed the highest acid production indices. Representatives from all eight genera could precipitate metals Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd, and Ag up to concentrations of 2.5 mM each. An actinomycete consortium of two Nocardioides strains and one Kibdelosporangium strain was studied for its potential to cause rock weathering in batch experiments. Results indicated a high ability of the consortium to leach the metals Cu, Zn, and Fe up to 2.6-, 2.1-, and 1.3-fold, respectively, compared to the control after 4 weeks. The pH significantly decreased after 1 week, which was parallel to an increased release of phosphate and sulfate reaching a 2.2- and 2.5-fold increase, respectively, compared to control. Highly significant weight loss (p = 0.005) was achieved by the consortium, indicating a potential multiple role of actinomycetes in weathering by acid production, metal leaching, and solubilization of phosphate and sulfate. This study emphasizes the diverse and unique abilities of actinomycetes inhabiting rock surfaces which could be of potential biotechnological applications, such as in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments and metal biorecovery.

  16. The vernon supersuite: Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoid rocks in the New Jersey highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkert, R.A.; Drake, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abundant Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoid rocks of two intrusive suites underlie approximately 50 percent of the New Jersey Highlands. These rocks, the Byram Intrusive and Lake Hopatcong Intrusive Suites, consist of granite, alaskite, quartz monzonite, monzonite, and minor pegmatite. Byram and Lake Hopatcong rocks, although different mineralogically, are similar geochemically and contain overlapping abundances of most major and trace elements. Petrographic relationships, geochronology, field relationships, and geochemical similarities support a comagmatic origin for both suites. They constitute the here named Vernon Supersuite.

  17. Oxygen isotope studies of early Precambrian granitic rocks from the Giants Range batholith, northeastern Minnesota, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viswanathan, S.

    1974-01-01

    Oxygen isotope studies of granitic rocks from the 2.7 b.y.-old composite Giants Range batholith show that: (1) ??(O18)quartz values of 9 to 10 permil characterize relatively uncontaminated Lower Precambrian, magmatic granodiorites and granites; (2) granitic rocks thought to have formed by static granitization have ??(O18)quartz values that are 1 to 2 permil higher than magmatic granitic rocks; (3) satellite leucogranite bodies have values nearly identical to those of the main intrusive phases even where they transect O18-rich metasedimentary wall rocks; (4) oxygen isotopic interaction between the granitic melts and their O18-rich wall rocks was minimal; and (5) O18/O18 ratios of quartz grains in a metasomatic granite are largely inherited from the precursor rock, but during the progression - sedimentary parent ??? partially granitized parent ??? metasomatic granite ??? there is gradual decrease in ??(O18)quartz by 1 to 2 permil. ?? 1974.

  18. Magmatic and crustal differentiation history of granitic rocks from Hf-O isotopes in zircon.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A I S; Hawkesworth, C J; Foster, G L; Paterson, B A; Woodhead, J D; Hergt, J M; Gray, C M; Whitehouse, M J

    2007-02-16

    Granitic plutonism is the principal agent of crustal differentiation, but linking granite emplacement to crust formation requires knowledge of the magmatic evolution, which is notoriously difficult to reconstruct from bulk rock compositions. We unlocked the plutonic archive through hafnium (Hf) and oxygen (O) isotope analysis of zoned zircon crystals from the classic hornblende-bearing (I-type) granites of eastern Australia. This granite type forms by the reworking of sedimentary materials by mantle-like magmas instead of by remelting ancient metamorphosed igneous rocks as widely believed. I-type magmatism thus drives the coupled growth and differentiation of continental crust.

  19. A-type granites from the Guéra Massif, Central Chad: Petrology, geochemistry, geochronology, and petrogenesis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Ngoc Ha T.; Shellnutt, J. Gregory; Yeh, Meng-Wan; Lee, Tung-Yi

    2017-04-01

    The poorly studied Saharan Metacraton of North-Central Africa is located between the Arabian-Nubian Shield in the east, the Tuareg Shield in the west and the Central African Orogenic Belt in the south. The Saharan Metacraton is composed of Neoproterozoic juvenile crust and the relics of pre-Neoproterozoic components reactivated during the Pan-African Orogeny. The Republic of Chad, constrained within the Saharan Metacraton, comprises a Phanerozoic cover overlying Precambrian basement outcroppings in four distinct massifs: the Mayo Kebbi, Tibesti, Ouaddaï, and the Guéra. The Guéra massif is the least studied of the four massifs but it likely preserves structures that were formed during the collision between Congo Craton and Saharan Metacraton. The Guéra Massif is composed of mostly granitic rocks. The granitoids have petrologic features that are consistent with A-type granite, such as micrographic intergrowth of sodic and potassic feldspar, the presence of sodic- and iron-rich amphibole, and iron-rich biotite. Compositionally, the granitic rocks of the Guéra Massif have high silica (SiO2 ≥ 68.9 wt.%) content and are metaluminous to marginally peraluminous. The rocks are classified as ferroan calc-alkalic to alkali-calcic with moderately high to very high Fe* ratios. The first zircon U/Pb geochronology of the silicic rocks from the Guéra Massif yielded three main age groups: 590 Ma, 570 Ma, 560 Ma, while a single gabbro yielded an intermediate age ( 580 Ma). A weakly foliated biotite granite yielded two populations, in which the emplacement age is interpreted to be 590 ± 10 Ma, whereas the younger age (550 ± 11 Ma) is considered to be a deformation age. Furthermore, inherited Meso- to Paleoproterozoic zircons are found in this sample. The geochemical and geochronology data indicate that there is a temporal evolution in the composition of rocks with the old, high Mg# granitoids shifting to young, low Mg# granitoids. This reveals that the A-type granites in

  20. Petrogenesis and tectonic implications of Late Carboniferous A-type granites and gabbronorites in NW Iran: Geochronological and geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Hadi Shafaii; Li, Xian-Hua; Ling, Xiao-Xiao; Stern, Robert J.; Santos, Jose F.; Meinhold, Guido; Ghorbani, Ghasem; Shahabi, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Carboniferous igneous rocks constitute volumetrically minor components of Iranian crust but preserve important information about the magmatic and tectonic history of SW Asia. Ghushchi granites and gabbronorites in NW Iran comprise a bimodal magmatic suite that intruded Ediacaran-Cambrian gneiss and are good representatives of carboniferous igneous activity. Precise SIMS U-Pb zircon ages indicate that the gabbronorites and granites were emplaced synchronously at ~ 320 Ma. Ghushchi granites show A-type magmatic affinities, with typical enrichments in alkalis, Ga, Zr, Nb and Y, depletion in Sr and P and fractionated REE patterns showing strong negative Eu anomalies. The gabbronorites are enriched in LREEs, Nb, Ta and other incompatible trace elements, and are similar in geochemistry to OIB-type rocks. Granites and gabbronorites have similar εNd(t) (+ 1.3 to + 3.4 and - 0.1 to + 4.4, respectively) and zircon εHf(t) (+ 1.7 to + 6.2 and + 0.94 to + 6.5, respectively). The similar variation in bulk rock εNd(t) and zircon εHf(t) values and radiometric ages for the granites and gabbronorites indicate a genetic relationship between mafic and felsic magmas, either a crystal fractionation or silicate liquid immiscibility process; further work is needed to resolve petrogenetic details. The compositional characteristics of the bimodal Ghushchi complex are most consistent with magmatic activity in an extensional tectonic environment. This extension may have occurred during rifting of Cadomian fragments away from northern Gondwana during early phases of Neotethys opening.

  1. Increase vs. decrease in the strength of granitic rocks subjected to heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, Anita; Török, Ákos

    2015-04-01

    Accidental fire generally causes catastrophic loss in granitic structures or tunnels excavated in granitic rocks. It is necessary to measure strength of materials at various degrees to understand the mechanical behaviour of such stone structures or tunnels. Our laboratory experiments were aimed to detect indirect tensile strength and uniaxial compressive strength of granitic rocks that were subjected to temperatures of up to 600°C. For control measurements ultrasonic pulse velocity was also recorded. The studied rocks included three granites: a Hungarian dark pink granite (Mórágy), an Austrian greyish granite (Mauthausen) and a common pinkish Spanish granite (Rosa Beta). Cylindrical tests specimens of the three granites were subjected to 300°C and 600°C, respectively. Compressive strength test and tensile strength test results were compared to strength values obtained at room temperature. Our test results show that two of the studied granites (Hungarian and the Spanish one) have higher strength at 300°C that at room temperature. To the contrary ultrasonic pulse velocity decreased for all the three granites from room temperature to 300°C. The tensile strength of the granites did not show such a clear trend, however Hungarian granite has a slightly increased tensile strength at 300°C than at room temperature. At 600°C the compressive strength, tensile strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity dropped but not at the same rate. Our experiments showed that a given and limited temperature increase can have a positive effect on strength of granites rather than an adverse effect on a short-term.

  2. The bowing potential of granitic rocks: rock fabrics, thermal properties and residual strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegesmund, S.; Mosch, S.; Scheffzük, Ch.; Nikolayev, D. I.

    2008-10-01

    The bowing of natural stone panels is especially known for marble slabs. The bowing of granite is mainly known from tombstones in subtropical humid climate. Field inspections in combination with laboratory investigations with respect to the thermal expansion and the bowing potential was performed on two different granitoids (Cezlak granodiorite and Flossenbürg granite) which differ in the composition and rock fabrics. In addition, to describe and explain the effect of bowing of granitoid facade panels, neutron time-of-flight diffraction was applied to determine residual macro- and microstrain. The measurements were combined with investigations of the crystallographic preferred orientation of quartz and biotite. Both samples show a significant bowing as a function of panel thickness and destination temperature. In comparison to marbles the effect of bowing is more pronounced in granitoids at temperatures of 120°C. The bowing as well as the thermal expansion of the Cezlak sample is also anisotropic with respect to the rock fabrics. A quantitative estimate was performed based on the observed textures. The effect of the locked-in stresses may also have a control on the bowing together with the thermal stresses related to the different volume expansion of the rock-forming minerals.

  3. U-Pb-Nd-Hf isotope geochemistry of the Mesoproterozoic A-type granites in Mannefallknausane, western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramo, O. T.; Kurhila, M.; Luttinen, A. V.; Andersen, T.

    2009-12-01

    The bedrock of western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica records several stages of anorogenic magmatism. The Grenvillean-age metamorphic basement gneisses of Heimefrontfjella and Mannefallknausane were intruded by mafic dikes (Bauer et al., 2003) and A-type granite plutons (Jacobs, 1991) at circa 1 Ga. A 590 Ma suite of mafic dikes manifests a subsequent episode of Proterozoic anorogenic magmatism (Bauer et al., 2003). Jurassic (180 Ma) continental flood basalts (CFBs), their intrusive equivalents, and associated alkaline mafic rocks represent the third and youngest episode of anorogenic magmatism (Luttinen et al., 1998; Romu and Luttinen, 2007). The crystalline bedrock in western Dronning Maud Land is composed of the Archean Grunehogna craton and the Mesoproterozoic Maud mobile belt. About 100 km south of Archean-Proterozoic transition, in the Proterozoic realm, nunataks of Mannefallknausane (74.5oS, 15oW) are dominated by Precambrian granitoid rocks and rare paragneisses. Three principal granites can be identified: a white, garnet-bearing K-feldspar-megacrystic biotite granite; a red biotite-hornblende±clinopyroxene granite with or without plagioclase-mantled K-feldspar-megacrysts (rapakivi texture); and a dark green porphyritic charnockite with orthopyroxene and hornblende. The presence of rapakivi texture, the mode of occurrence, and geochemical composition of the granites of Mannefallknausane imply A typology. For two varieties of the red granite (wiborgite and pyterlite), our new U-Pb data imply crystallization ages of 1073 ± 6 Ma and 1084 ± 8 Ma, respectively. These are compatible with a U-Pb zircon upper intercept age of 1073 ± 8 Ma of the charnockite (Arndt et al., 1991). The initial Nd isotope composition of these rocks is relatively radiogenic [epsilon-Nd (1075 Ma) value of the biotite granite -0.5; red granite +0.3, +0.5; charnockite +1.4], as is that of a country-rock gneiss from the surrounding bedrock (+1.0). Initial zircon epsilon-Hf values of the

  4. Sorption and diffusion of selenium oxyanions in granitic rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonen, Jussi; Voutilainen, Mikko; Söderlund, Mervi; Jokelainen, Lalli; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Martin, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    The processes controlling diffusion and sorption of radionuclides have been studied extensively in the laboratory, whereas, only a few in-situ experiments have been carried out in order to study in-situ diffusion over the long-term (several years). This is largely due to the fact that in-situ experiments are typically time consuming and cost intensive, and it is commonly accepted that laboratory scale tests are well-established approaches to characterizing the properties of geological media. In order to assess the relevance of laboratory experiments, the Swiss National Cooperative for Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) have been conducting extensive experiments in the Underground Rock Laboratory (URL) at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in order to study radionuclide transport and retention in-situ. One of the elements used in these experiments is non-radioactive selenium, as an analog for the radiotoxic isotope Se-79, which is present in radioactive waste. In this work, two laboratory through-diffusion experiments using selenium as a tracer were carried out in block (decimeter) scale rock specimens to support one of the ongoing radionuclide transport and retention in-situ experiment at the GTS mentioned above. The though-diffusion tests of selenium were performed under atmospheric conditions in both Kuru grey granite (KGG) and Grimsel granodiorite (GG). The decrease of selenium concentration in an inlet hole drilled into each of the rock samples and the breakthrough of selenium into sampling holes drilled around the inlet were analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The effective diffusion (De) and distribution coefficients (Kd) of selenium were then determined from the changes of selenium concentration in the inlet and sampling holes using a Time-Domain Diffusion (TDD) simulations. In addition, Kd of selenium was measured by batch sorption experiments as a function of pH and Se concentration in atmospheric conditions and nitrogen

  5. Sorption and diffusion of selenium oxyanions in granitic rock.

    PubMed

    Ikonen, Jussi; Voutilainen, Mikko; Söderlund, Mervi; Jokelainen, Lalli; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Martin, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    The processes controlling diffusion and sorption of radionuclides have been studied extensively in the laboratory, whereas, only a few in-situ experiments have been carried out in order to study in-situ diffusion over the long-term (several years). This is largely due to the fact that in-situ experiments are typically time consuming and cost intensive, and it is commonly accepted that laboratory scale tests are well-established approaches to characterizing the properties of geological media. In order to assess the relevance of laboratory experiments, the Swiss National Cooperative for Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) have been conducting extensive experiments in the Underground Rock Laboratory (URL) at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in order to study radionuclide transport and retention in-situ. One of the elements used in these experiments is non-radioactive selenium, as an analog for the radiotoxic isotope Se-79, which is present in radioactive waste. In this work, two laboratory through-diffusion experiments using selenium as a tracer were carried out in block (decimeter) scale rock specimens to support one of the ongoing radionuclide transport and retention in-situ experiment at the GTS mentioned above. The though-diffusion tests of selenium were performed under atmospheric conditions in both Kuru grey granite (KGG) and Grimsel granodiorite (GG). The decrease of selenium concentration in an inlet hole drilled into each of the rock samples and the breakthrough of selenium into sampling holes drilled around the inlet were analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The effective diffusion (De) and distribution coefficients (Kd) of selenium were then determined from the changes of selenium concentration in the inlet and sampling holes using a Time-Domain Diffusion (TDD) simulations. In addition, Kd of selenium was measured by batch sorption experiments as a function of pH and Se concentration in atmospheric conditions and nitrogen

  6. The geochemical characteristics of Haiyang A-type granite complex in Shandong, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Ling, Ming-xing; Ding, Xing; Zhang, Hong; Li, Cong-ying; Liu, Dun-yi; Sun, Wei-dong

    2014-07-01

    Haiyang granite complex consists of K-feldspar granite and syenite, with a total exposure area of ~ 600 km2. The K-feldspar granite is metaluminous (A/CNK = 0.70 to 0.99) and the syenite is slightly peraluminous (A/CNK = 1.01 to 1.10), both of which have typical characteristics of A-type granite with high total alkali contents and FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) ratios. Zircon U-Pb age are 116.8 ± 1.7 Ma and 115.8 ± 2.2 Ma, for the K-feldspar granite and the syenite, respectively. This is consistent with field observation that the syenite intruded into the K-feldspar granite. Varied zircon O isotope (5.65-7.78‰ for K-feldspar granite and 4.68-7.08‰ for syenite) with peak values that are marginally higher than those of mantle zircon reflects important mantle contributions. These together with large variation of zircon εHf(t) values of K-feldspar granite (- 22.4 to - 15.6) and syenite (- 24.6 to - 13.5), can best be explained by the involvement of at least two components, e.g., enriched lithospheric mantle +/- subducted materials, and upwelling asthenosphere. Apatite has right decline REE pattern. The apatite from K-feldspar granite has higher Cl contents than those of syenite, implying more influence from a subduction released fluid in K-feldspar granite source. This distinction is supported by the systematically higher oxygen fugacity of K-feldspar granite as indicated by zircon Ce4 +/Ce3 + ratios. In the Yb/Ta-Y/Nb, Ce/Nb-Y/Nb diagrams, both K-feldspar granite and syenite plot in A1-type, with K-feldspar granite plotting closer to A2. In the Nb-Y-3Ga and Nb-Y-Ce charts, syenite plots near the boundary between A1 and A2, whereas some K-feldspar granite samples plot in A2 field, indicating a tendency of transition originally from A2 to A1. In general A1 granites form in intraplate settings, whereas A2 granite forms in post-collision. It is likely that mantle components metasomatized by subduction released fluids are easier to be partially melted, forming K-feldspar granite

  7. Petrogenetic modeling of a potential uranium source rock, Granite Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.; Miesch, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies of the granite of Lankin Dome have led to the conclusion that this granite was a source for the sandstone-type uranium deposits in the basins that surround the Granite Mountains, Wyo. Q-mode factor analysis of 29 samples of this granite shows that five bulk compositions are required to explain the observed variances of 33 constituents in these samples. Models presented in this paper show that the origin of the granite can be accounted for by the mixing of a starting liquid with two ranges of solid compositions such that all five compositions are granitic. There are several features of the granite of Lankin Dome that suggest derivation by partial melting and, because the proposed source region was inhomogeneous, that more than one of the five end members may have been a liquid. Data for the granite are compatible with derivation from rocks similar to those of the metamorphic complex that the granite intrudes. Evidence for crustal derivation by partial melting includes a strongly peraluminous nature, extremely high differentiation indices, high contents of incompatible elements, generally large negative Eu anomalies, and high initial lead and strontium isotopic ratios. If the granite of Lankin Dome originated by partial melting of a heterogeneous metamorphic complex, the initial magma could reasonably have been composed of a range of granitic liquids. Five variables were not well accounted for by a five-end-member model. Water, CO 2 , and U0 2 contents and the oxidation state of iron are all subject to variations caused by near-surface processes. The Q-mode factor analysis suggests that these four variables have a distribution determined by postmagmatic processes. The reason for failure of Cs0 2 to vary systematically with the other 33 variables is not known. Other granites that have lost large amounts of uranium possibly can be identified by Q-mode factor analysis.

  8. REE and Lu-Hf systematics of zircons from rapakivi granites and associated rocks of supercontinent Nuna (Columbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronkin, Yu. L.; Gerdes, A.; Maslov, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    The last of the rifting events at 1.37-1.45 Ga that is considered to have led to the final breakup of Nuna was recorded in most of its building blocks (Laurentia, Baltica, and Siberian craton). At the type locality for the Riphean on the western slope of the South Urals, this event was recognized as the Mashak igneous event (˜1380 Ma) and can be classified as a LIP based on the volumes of magma generated (total igneous volumes >0.05 × 106 km3). The emplacement of large volumes of A-type granitic plutons in Laurentia and northwestern Baltica (in the present coordinates) was almost synchronous with this event. In the South Urals, within the Bashkirian meganticlinorium, the processes of granite generation and emplacement during this time took place on a much smaller scale. Anorogenic granites of this region are represented by rapakivi granites of the Berdyaush massif. The first REE and Lu-Hf isotope data for zircons from rapakivi granites and associated rocks of the Berdyaush massif reveal almost identical Lu-Hf isotope ages (˜1383 Ma) of rapakivi granites, quartz syenitic diorites, and nepheline syenites. It was shown that these rocks, which were emplaced into the heterogeneous Proterozoic crust between the Early and Middle Riphean, have the Hf isotopic compositions and Lu-Hf model ages reflecting the contribution from crustal sources with ages of 2013-2219 Ma, whereas the associated gabbros indicate derivation from a source with the Lu-Hf ages of 1658 ± 1685 Ma and moderately depleted ɛHf(1383) of (4.1 ± 0.7-4.9 ± 0.6). The REE characteristics (ΣREE, Eu/Eu*, Ce/Ce*, Pr/Pr*, La/Lu) and Lu-Hf isotope systematics of zircons can be used to constrain the history and genetic evolution of supercontinents, e.g., supercontinent Nuna (Columbia) in particular.

  9. The two-component model for the genesis of granitic rocks in southeastern Australia — Nature of the metasedimentary-derived and basaltic end members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, C. M.; Kemp, A. I. S.

    2009-08-01

    Granitic magmas in three areas of southeastern Australia are the product of melting of quartzofeldspathic metasedimentary rock (high-silica end member) combined with varying degrees of incorporation of mafic (dominantly basaltic) magma (low-silica end member). The link between granitic magma and local metasedimentary rock is established by identifying shared geochemical signatures in Sr, Na 2O and K 2O contents. High-silica end members have compositions formed in a genetic spectrum from total source mobilisation to partial melt segregation from metasedimentary rock. The position of a granitic end member in this spectrum is monitored by titanium contents varying from normal metasedimentary to the strongly depleted induced by partial melting. The titanium signature of partial melting is established in a type area with unequivocal links between migmatite mesosomes and leucosomes and the high-silica end members of granitic variation systems that extend to lower silica. The low-silica end members approximate high-alumina basalts on the basis of observed gabbros and projection of granitic variation lines to equivalent gabbroic compositions. High-alumina basalt is postulated to be a fundamental ingredient in the petrogenesis of orogenic granitic rocks.

  10. Geochemistry and origin of granitic rocks, Scourian Complex, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pride, C.; Muecke, G. K.

    1982-11-01

    Concordant granite sheets from the granulite facies Scourian Complex, N.W. Scotland exhibit the following features: 1) a common planar fabric with their host pyroxene granulites; 2) the presence of an exsolved ternary feldspar phase; 3) a low-pressure, water-saturated minimum composition; 4) K/Rb ratios (450 1,350) distinctly higher than most upper crustal granites but similar to the surrounding granulites; 5) low absolute concentrations of the rare earth elements (REEs), light REE enrichment, and large positive Eu anomalies. It is proposed that the granite sheets have originated by anatexis of gneisses undergoing granulite facies metamorphism — gneisses that were already essentially dry and depleted in incompatible elements. Their unusual trace element chemistry may be explained by either disequilibrium melting and/or sub-solidus reequilibration of the granite sheets with the surrounding gneisses. Isotopic and trace element data suggest that cross-cutting, potash-rich pegmatites represent reworking of the granite sheets during a later amphibolitization.

  11. On the Eighth Hutton Symposium on Granites and Related Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fátima Bitencourt, Maria; de Assis Janasi, Valdecir; Sawyer, Edward

    2017-04-01

    The Eighth Hutton Symposium was held on September 20-25, in the coastal city of Florianópolis, south Brazil, situated on the Neoproterozoic Florianópolis Batholith. During the mid-symposium field trip shallow-level granites, rhyolites and mafic dikes were visited in several large exposures along the shore. A 4-day pre-meeting field trip took place to see the Quadrilátero Ferrífero Province Archaean basement in Minas Gerais (southeast Brazil). After the meeting, another field trip took participants to the southern Brazilian coast to see Neoproterozoic, syntectonic granite magmatism within a transpressive orogen and to discuss crust and mantle contribution to granite generation.

  12. The Late Cretaceous I- and A-type granite association of southeast China: Implications for the origin and evolution of post-collisional extensional magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiao-Long; Qiu, Jian-Sheng; Liu, Liang; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We present new geochronological, mineralogical, and geochemical data for granitic plutons that crop out within the Zhoushan archipelago, northeastern coastal Zhejiang Province, in order to constrain their origin, and the genetic relationship between the I- and A-type granites. These granites can be divided into two groups: (1) the northern I-type Putuoshan (PTS) and Dadong'ao (DDA) plutons; and (2) the southern A-type Daqingshan (DQS), Taohuadao (THD), and Xiazhidao (XZD) plutons. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating yielded ages of 98-96 Ma for the northern I-type plutons and 89-86 Ma for the southern A-type plutons. All of these granites are highly siliceous, K-rich, and have similar total alkali and total rare earth element (REE) abundances. However, there are also geochemical differences between the I-type and the A-type granites. The northern I-type alkali-feldspar granites are high-K calc-alkaline, metaluminous to mildly peraluminous, contain low concentrations of the high field strength elements (HFSE; e.g., Nb, Ta, Zr, and Hf), and have low Ga/Al ratios (2.04-2.44). In contrast, the southern A-type granites are peralkaline and F-rich, and have lower CaO and Al2O3 concentrations, and higher Fe2O3T and HFSE concentrations and Ga/Al ratios (3.25-3.86). Meanwhile, they have slightly higher heavy REE (HREE) concentrations, and are more depleted in Ba, Sr, P, Ti, and Eu than the northern I-type granites. Both the I- and A-type granites have homogeneous whole-rock Nd and highly variable zircon Hf isotopic compositions. Of note, the southern peralkaline A-type granites appear to have more radiogenic Nd and Hf isotope compositions than the northern I-type granites. The present data, together with the results of a previous study on mafic enclaves within the PTS pluton, suggest that the northern I-type alkali-feldspar granites were generated by mixing of mantle-derived material with crustal-derived magmas that formed by dehydration melting of mica-bearing basaltic rocks

  13. Geochemical and zircon U-Pb geochronological study of the Yangshan A-type granite: Insights into the geological evolution in south Anhui, eastern Jiangnan Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Huangling; Yang, Xiaoyong; Deng, Jianghong; Duan, Liuan; Liu, Lei

    2017-07-01

    The Early Cretaceous Yangshan granite is an A-type granitic intrusion that was emplaced along the eastern Jiangnan Orogen in southern Anhui Province, South China. The Yangshan intrusion mainly consists of syenite porphyry (127.0 ± 0.6 Ma) and alkali-feldspar granite porphyry (126.0 ± 1.0 Ma). As a part of Qingyang-Jiuhuashan complex intrusion, the Yangshan A-type granites have lower MgO, CaO, Co, Sr, and higher Rb, Nb, Th and HREE contents, with enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE), and slightly negative Eu anomalies. However, the syenite porphyry and the alkali-feldspar granite porphyry differ in terms of zircon εHf(t) values: small variations in the syenite porphyry from - 5.5 to - 3.7, corresponding to Hf model ages (tDMC) between 1.42 Ga and 1.53 Ga, and large variations in the alkali-feldspar granite porphyry from - 6.4 to + 4.4, yielding tDMC of 0.90-1.59 Ga. While both rocks also have similar εNd(t) values ranging from - 7.02 to - 5.47, corresponding Nd model ages (TDMC) are 1.37-1.49 Ga, falling within the Hf model ages. We take these features to indicate that the Qingyang I-type granites, which are isotopically similar, and Yangshan A-type granites were originated from partial melting of Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic crust, with minor juvenile crust input for the alkali-feldspar granite porphyry, followed by fractional crystallization. In combination with previous studies, we propose that the Cretaceous A-type granitic rocks formed between 135 Ma and 122 Ma, implying an important Mesozoic extensional event in eastern Jiangnan Orogen, which facilitated underplating of mantle-derived magma and crustal heating. This may have occurred in a back-arc extension in response to the drift of subduction direction of the Paleo-Pacific plate, which started as early as 135 Ma ago.

  14. Experimental melts from crustal rocks: A lithochemical constraint on granite petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2016-12-01

    Many studies of experimental petrology have devoted to partial melting of crustal rocks. In order to provide lithochemical constraints on granite petrogenesis, this paper presents a compilation and synthesis of available experimental data for the major element compositions of felsic melts derived from partial melting of natural or synthetic materials in the compositional range of crustal rocks. The experimental melts are categorized into four types according to the species of hydrous minerals in starting materials: (I) amphibole-bearing; (II) amphibole- and biotite-bearing; (III) biotite-bearing; and (IV) biotite- and muscovite-bearing. If dehydration melting takes place at normal crustal conditions (P = 5-10 kbar, T ≤ 1000 °C), experimental melts are rich in SiO2 but poor in MgO + FeOT except those from amphibole-bearing sources. A comprehensive comparison of compositions between experimental melts and starting materials indicates that geochemical fractionation is variable for different major elements and their ratios. Source composition and melting temperature exert stronger controls on the compositional variations of experimental melts than pressure and fluid. By comparing the experimental melts with natural granites, the following insights into granite petrogenesis can be got: (1) while peritectic assemblage entrainment may be the dominant mechanism for the compositional variations of garnet/cordierite-rich S-type granites, fractional crystallization of diverse melts from heterogeneous metasedimentary precursors probably governs the compositional variations of garnet/cordierite-poor S-type granites; (2) relatively K2O-rich mafic to intermediate rocks are appropriate sources for calc-alkaline I-type granites. The compositional variations of calc-alkaline granites are jointly controlled by peritectic assemblage entrainment and subsequent fractional crystallization; (3) while dehydration melting at T > 950 °C is appropriate for the production of ferroan and

  15. Two Late Cretaceous A-type granites related to the Yingwuling W-Sn polymetallic mineralization in Guangdong province, South China: Implications for petrogenesis, geodynamic setting, and mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Mao, Jingwen; Zhao, Haijie; Zhao, Caisheng; Yu, Xiaofei

    2017-03-01

    Major and trace elements, whole rock Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes, LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon dating, zircon trace elements and Hf isotope data are reported for a suite of A-type granites from Yingwuling pluton in western Guangdong province, South China. Zircon U-Pb ages obtained by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) show that biotite granite and alkali feldspar granite were emplaced in 81.3 ± 0.6 Ma and 80.6 ± 0.5 Ma, respectively. Both of the two suites have the petrographic and geochemical characteristics of A-type granite. These granitic rocks are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous and have pronounced contents of total alkalis (Na2O + K2O = 7.80-8.84%), Fe2O3T/MgO and Ga/Al ratios. They exhibit low MgO, CaO and TiO2 contents, enrichment in some LILEs and HFSEs (except for Zr, Eu and Y), depletion in Ba, Sr, P and Ti. They show A2 subtype affinity and were probably formed a temperature of 800 °C. The Yingwuling biotite granite has relatively high (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios of 0.70655 to 0.70928, low εNd(t) values of - 5.8 to - 4.2 and zircon εHf(t) values (- 5.70-1.37). Whole-rock Nd isotopic and zircon Hf isotopic two-stages model ages mostly vary from 1057 to 1506 Ma. The alkali feldspar granite display bulk rock εNd(t) values and (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios in the range of - 6.6 to - 6.1 and 0.70640 to 0.71077, respectively, and zircon εHf(t) values from - 5.44 to 0.54, with Mesoproterozoic T2DM for both Nd and Hf isotopes. Geochemical and isotopic data indicate the Yingwuling A-type granitic magmas were drived from mantle-crust interaction. Zircon grains of Yingwuling granites have relatively low Eu/Eu* and Ce4 +/Ce3 + ratios, indicating low oxygen fugacity. The visible tetrad effect in the Yingwuling granites indicates that it experienced strong fractionation and is close relationship to the W-Sn mineralization. Our new data together with previous published data indicate that Late Mesozoic A-type granitiods or alkaline intrusive rocks in South

  16. Petrography and Physicomechanical Properties of Rocks from the Ambela Granitic Complex, NW Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Mohammad; Bukhari, S. Wajid Hanif; Muhammad, Noor; Sajid, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Petrography and physicomechanical properties of alkali granites, alkali quartz syenite, and nepheline syenite from Ambela, NW Pakistan, have been investigated. Whereas the alkali quartz syenite and most of the alkali granites are megaporphyritic, the nepheline syenite and some of the alkali granites are microporphyritic. Their phenocryst shape and size and abundance of groundmass are also different. The values of unconfined compressive strength (UCS) are the lowest and highest for megaporphyritic alkali granite and alkali quartz syenite, respectively. However, all the four rock types are moderately strong. Correspondingly, their specific gravity and water absorption values are within the permissible range for use as construction material. The UCS for the alkali quartz syenite is the highest, most probably because (i) it has roughly equal amounts of phenocryst and groundmass, (ii) it displays maximum size contrast between phenocryst and groundmass, (iii) its phenocrysts are highly irregular, and (iv) it contains substantial amounts of quartz. PMID:23861654

  17. Petrography and physicomechanical properties of rocks from the Ambela granitic complex, NW Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Arif, Mohammad; Bukhari, S Wajid Hanif; Muhammad, Noor; Sajid, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Petrography and physicomechanical properties of alkali granites, alkali quartz syenite, and nepheline syenite from Ambela, NW Pakistan, have been investigated. Whereas the alkali quartz syenite and most of the alkali granites are megaporphyritic, the nepheline syenite and some of the alkali granites are microporphyritic. Their phenocryst shape and size and abundance of groundmass are also different. The values of unconfined compressive strength (UCS) are the lowest and highest for megaporphyritic alkali granite and alkali quartz syenite, respectively. However, all the four rock types are moderately strong. Correspondingly, their specific gravity and water absorption values are within the permissible range for use as construction material. The UCS for the alkali quartz syenite is the highest, most probably because (i) it has roughly equal amounts of phenocryst and groundmass, (ii) it displays maximum size contrast between phenocryst and groundmass, (iii) its phenocrysts are highly irregular, and (iv) it contains substantial amounts of quartz.

  18. The molybdenum isotopic compositions of I-, S- and A-type granitic suites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Barling, Jane; Siebert, Christopher; Fietzke, Jan; Stephens, Ed; Halliday, Alex N.

    2017-05-01

    This study reports Mo isotopic compositions for fifty-two Palaeozoic granitic rocks with contrasting source affinities (A-, I- and S-type) from the Lachlan Fold Belt (LFB) and the New England Batholith (NEB), both in SE Australia, and three compositionally zoned plutons (Loch Doon, Criffell, and Fleet) located in the Southern Uplands of Scotland. The results show relatively large variations in δ98Mo for igneous rocks ranging from -1.73‰ to 0.59‰ with significant overlaps between different types. No relationships between δ98Mo and δ18O or ASI (Alumina Saturation Index) are observed, indicating that Mo isotopes do not clearly distinguish igneous vs. sedimentary source types. Instead, effects of igneous processes, source mixing, regional geology, as well as hydrothermal activity control the Mo isotope compositions in these granites. It is found that Mo is mainly accommodated in biotite and to a lesser extent in hornblende. Hornblende and Fe3+-rich minerals may preferentially incorporate light isotopes, as reflected by negative correlations between δ98Mo and K/Rb and [Fe2O3]. There is a positive correlation between initial 87Sr/86Sr and δ98Mo in I-type granitic rocks, reflecting the admixing of material from isotopically distinct sources. Granitic rocks from Scotland and Australia display strikingly similar curvilinear trends in δ98Mo vs. initial 87Sr/86Sr despite the differing regional geology. Localized hydrothermal effects can result in low δ98Mo in granite, as seen in three samples from Loch Doon and Criffell which have anomalously light δ98Mo of <-1‰. Based on this study, an estimate of δ98Mo = 0.14 ± 0.07‰ (95% s.e.) for the Phanerozoic upper crust is proposed. This is slightly heavier than basalts indicating an isotopically light lower crust and/or a systematic change to the crust resulting from subduction of isotopically light dehydrated slab and/or pelagic sediment over time.

  19. Igneous petrogenesis and tectonic setting of granitic rocks from the eastern Blue Ridge, Alabama Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, M.S. . Geology Dept.); Allison, D.T. . Geology Dept.); Tull, J.F. . Geology Dept.); Bieler, D.B. . Geology Dept.)

    1994-03-01

    A span of 150 my of orogenic activity is recorded within the granitic rocks of the eastern Blue Ridge of Alabama (EBR). Four discrete episodes of plutonism can be differentiated, each event exhibiting distinct field relations and geochemical signatures. (1) Penobscotian stage: this initial stage of plutonic activity is represented by the Elkahatchee Quartz Diorite (EQD), a premetamorphic (495 Ma) batholith and the largest intrusive complex (880 km[sup 2]) exposed in the Blue Ridge. Calc-alkaline I-type tonalite-granodiorite are the principal lithologies, with subordinate cumulate hbl-bt diorite, metadacite, granite and trondhjemite. The parental tonalitic magmas are interpreted to have been derived from a subducted MORB source under eclogite to get amphibolite conditions. (2) Taconic stage: the Kowaliga augen gneiss (KAG) and the Zana granite gneiss (ZG) are 460 Ma granitic bodies that reside in the SE extremity and structurally highest portion of the EBR. Both of these bodies are pre-metamorphic with strongly elongate sill- and pod-like shapes concordant with S[sub 1] foliation. Granite and granodiorite comprise the bulk of the KAG. (3) Acadian stage: Rockford Granite (RG), Bluff springs Granite (BSG, 366 Ma), and Almond Trondhjemite represent a suite of pre- to syn-metamorphic granitic intrusions. (4) late-Acadian stage: The Blakes Ferry pluton (BFP) is a post-kinematic pluton displaying spectacular by schlieren igneous flow structures, but no metamorphic fabric. The pluton's age can be bracketed between a 366 Ma age on the BSG and a 324 Ma K-Ar muscovite age on the BFP. BFP's petrogenesis has involved partial melting a MORB source followed by assimilation of metasedimentary host rock.

  20. Determination of geochemical affinities of granitic rocks from the Aue-Schwarzenberg zone (Erzgebirge, Germany) by multivariate statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forster, H.-J.; Davis, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Variscan granites of the Erzgebirge region can be effectively classified into five genetically distinct major groups by canonical analysis of geochemical variables. The same classification procedure, when applied to small plutons in the Aue-Schwarzenberg granite zone (ASGZ), shows that all ASGZ granites have compositional affinities to low-F biotite or low-F two-mica granite groups. This suggests that the ASGZ granites were emplaced during the first, late-collisional stage of silicic magmatism in the region, which occurred between about 325 and 318 Ma. The numerous biotite granite bodies in the zone are geochemically distinct from both the neighboring Kirchberg granite pluton and the spatially displaced Niederbobritzsch biotite granite massif. Instead, these bodies seem to constitute a third sub-group within the low-F biotite granite class. The ASGZ biotite granites represent three or more genetically distinct bodies, thus highlighting the enormous compositional variability within this group of granites. Least evolved samples of two-mica granites from the ASGZ apparently reflect the assimilation of low-grade metamorphic country rocks during emplacement, altering the original composition of the melts by enhancing primary Al content. The same genesis is implied for the rare "cordierite granite" facies of the Bergen massif, the type pluton for the low-F two-mica granite group in the Erzgebirge.

  1. Vapor phase exsolution as a controlling factor in hydrogen isotope variation in granitic rocks: the Notch Peak granitic stock, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nabelek, P.I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Papike, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Notch Peak granitic stock, western Utah, is comprised of three concentric sequentially intruded rock types, from granite at the rim, to quartz monzonite I, to quartz monzonite II at the core. The ??18O values of whole rocks vary about an average of 9.4 (SMOW), irrespective of the rock type and position relative to contact, suggesting that the three magmas had the same parent. The whole rock ??D values in the stock range from -100 to -55. ??D values increase toward the cores of both quartz monzonite I and quartz monzonite II, resulting in concentric contours. The ??D contours of quartz monzonite II cross-cut those of quartz monzonite I, suggesting little isotopic interaction between these bodies and the absence of a late pervasive fluid phase. There is a positive correlation between ??D values and water content of the samples, where samples from each body define a distinct field. The positive correlation is explained by isotopic fractionation attendant on vapor exsolution from the crystallizing magma. An observed increase in ??D with the degree of chloritization, a trend opposite to that observed in systems where participation of meteoric water has been demonstrated, is the result of subsolidus interaction with the exsolved fluids. These results show that large variations in the hydrogen isotope ratios of a granitoid can arise by exsolution of a vapor phase from the melt on crystallization. In general, magmas with larger modal amount of primary hydrous phases will tend to have higher ??D values than those with small amounts of hydrous phases. Furthermore, the relatively high ??D values of chlorites at Notch Peak confirm the applicability of classical concepts of closed-system deuteric alteration to some granitoid bodies. Thus, meteoric water interaction need not be always invoked to explain hydrogen isotope variation and deuteric alteration in granitoids. ?? 1983.

  2. Emplacement and deformation of the A-type Madeira granite (Amazonian Craton, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siachoque, Astrid; Salazar, Carlos Alejandro; Trindade, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    The Madeira granite is one of the Paleoproterozoic (1.82 Ga) A-type granite intrusions in the Amazonian Craton. It is elongated in the NE-SW direction and is composed of four facies. Classical structural techniques and the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) method were applied to the study of its internal fabric. Magnetic susceptibility measurements, thermomagnetic curves, remanent coercivity spectra, optical microscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy) analyses were carried out on the earlier and later facies of the Madeira granite: the rapakivi granite (RG) and the albite granite (AG) respectively. The last one is subdivided into the border albite granite (BAG) and the core albite granite (CAG) subfacies. AMS fabric pattern is controlled by pure magnetite in all facies, despite significant amounts of hematite in the BAG subfacies. Microstructural observations show that in almost all sites, magnetic fabric correlates to magmatic state fabrics that are defined by a weak NE-SW orientation of mafic and felsic silicates. However, strain mechanisms in both subfacies of AG also exhibit evidence for solid-state deformation at high to moderate temperatures. Pegmatite dyke, strike slip fault (SFA-B-C), hydrothermal vein, normal fault (F1-2) and joint (J) structures were observed and their orientation and kinematics is consistent with the magmatic and solid-state structures. Dykes, SFA-C and F1, are usually orientated along the N70°E/40°N plane, which is nearly parallel to the strike of AMS and magmatic foliations. In contrast, veins, SFB, F2 and some J are oriented perpendicular to the N70°E trend. Kinematic analysis in these structures shows evidence for a dextral sense of movement in the system in the brittle regime. The coherent structural pattern for the three facies of Madeira granite suggests that the different facies form a nested pluton. The coherence in orientation and kinematics from magmatic to high-temperature solid-state, and into the brittle

  3. Late Paleozoic granitic rocks of the Chukchi Peninsula: Composition and location in the structure of the Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchitskaya, M. V.; Sokolov, S. D.; Kotov, A. B.; Natapov, L. M.; Belousova, E. A.; Katkov, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    An Early Carboniferous (352-359 Ma) U-Pb (TIMS, SIMS) age is established for granitic rocks of the Kibera pluton, quartz sienites of the Kuekvun pluton, and granites from the pebbles in the basement of Carboniferous rocks of the Kuul and Kuekvun uplifts in the Central Chukotka region. These data support the suggestion of granitic magmatism to occur in the region in the Late Paleozoic. The petrogeochemistry of most granitic rocks of the Kibera and Kuekvun plutons is similar to that of I-type granites, and their age coincides with tectonic events of Ellesmerian Orogeny in the Arctic region at the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous boundary. The Devonian-Early Carboniferous granitic complexes extend to the territories of the Arctic Alaska, Yukon, and Arctic Canada, which indicates a common geological evolution within the Chukotka-Arctic Alaska block, which experienced a motion away from Arctic Canada.

  4. Geochronological, geochemical and Nd-Hf isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of Late Cretaceous A-type granites from the southeastern coast of Fujian Province, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiao-Long; Qiu, Jian-Sheng; Liu, Liang; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2015-06-01

    We present comprehensive petrological, geochronological, major and trace element, and Nd-Hf isotopic data for the Baishishan, Jingangshan, and Wushan granitic plutons on the southeastern coast of Fujian Province, South China, with the aims of elucidating their origin and gaining new insights into the petrogenesis of aluminous A-type granites. Zircon U-Pb ages obtained by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry show that the three investigated plutons were emplaced at 92-86 Ma, indicating that they were generated during a Late Cretaceous magmatic event. The granites from the three plutons are composed mainly of perthite, quartz, plagioclase, and minor biotite; they have high SiO2 contents, and low CaO, MnO, Fe2O3tot, and MgO contents, and show a metaluminous to slightly peraluminous signature. The granites are enriched in some large ion lithophile elements (e.g., Rb, Th, and U) and high field strength elements (e.g., Nb and Ta) with elevated Ga/Al ratios, and spidergrams show strong depletions in Ba, Sr, Ti, and P. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns show relative enrichments in light rare earth elements, flat heavy rare earth element profiles, and strongly negative Eu anomalies. These mineralogical and geochemical characteristics suggest that all three plutons can be classified as aluminous A-type granites. The plutons exhibit nearly identical whole-rock Nd and zircon Hf isotopic compositions, and yield Mesoproterozoic two-stage model ages (1.4-1.1 Ga) for both Nd and Hf isotopes. Based on a synthesis of the geochemical and isotopic data and petrogenetic modelling, we suggest that these A-type granitic rocks were most likely formed by variable degrees of fractional crystallization of magmas produced by the partial melting of a tonalitic to granodioritic source, with plagioclase-rich residual phases in the middle to lower crust, and emplaced at shallow crustal levels along the Changle-Nan'ao Fault. Our data on the Baishishan, Jingangshan, and

  5. Magnetic evidence revealing frictional heating from fault rocks in granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Junling; Zhou, Zaizheng; Dong, Shuguo; Tang, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Fault rocks share certain characteristics of melt-origin pseudotachylyte due to elevated temperature caused by coseismic frictional heating. However, there is no broadly accepted quantitative evidence to identify signatures of coseismic frictional heating in fault rocks. We report systematic magnetic studies on a brown ultracataclasite layer in the rocks from Longmen Shan thrust belt, at the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau in Sichuan Province, China. The brown ultracataclasite has: (1) the highest magnetic susceptibility, (2) significant characteristics of magnetite neoformation and (3) similar demagnetization behavior of natural remanent magnetization and anhysteretic remanent magnetization. The principal mechanism responsible for the high magnetic susceptibility of the brown ultracataclasite is most likely caused by the production of new magnetites from iron-bearing paramagnetic minerals. These new magnetites can be formed by frictional heating on slip planes along a seismic fault. The study shows that magnetic analysis can help to recognize frictional heating events in specific fault rocks.

  6. Alteration and arenization processes of granitic waste rock piles from former uranium Mines in Limousin, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzari, Aisha; Boekhout, Flora; Gérard, Martine; Galoisy, Laurence; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2014-05-01

    France counts approximately 200 former uranium mines, 50 of which are located in the Limousin region. Mining activities between 1945 and 2001 have generated close to 200 000 tons of waste rocks in the Limousin, with uranium levels corresponding essentially to the geological background. Waste rock piles from three former mining sites in this region, were selected according to their age, uranium content and petrological signature. These sites are part of the two-mica granitic complex of St Sylvestre massif, formed 324 million years ago. Granitic blocks that build up the waste rock piles have experienced different processes and intensities of alteration before their emplacement at the surface. These processes are responsible for the petrological heterogeneity throughout the waste rock pile at the time of construction. It is important to make a distinction within waste rocks between natural-cut-off waste rocks and economic-cut-off waste rocks. The latter represents a minority and is linked to stock prices. Natural-cut-off waste rocks contain about 20 ppm of uranium; economic-cut-off waste rocks contain about 100 to 300 ppm of uranium. The aims of this study are to 1) assess the neo-formation of U-bearing minerals hosted by these rocks, and 2) to characterize the weathering processes since the construction of the rock piles, including both mechanical and chemical processes. The structure of the waste rocks piles, from metric blocks to boulders of tens centimeters, induces an enhanced weathering rate, compared to a granitic massif. Mechanical fracturing and chemical leaching by rainwater (arenization) of the waste rocks produce a sandy-silty alteration phase. Silty-clay weathering aureoles of submetric-granitic blocks evolving into technic soil are mainly located below growing birch trees. Sampling on the rock piles was restricted to surface rocks. Samples collected consist mainly of granites, and rare lamprophyres with a high radiometric signal, thereby especially

  7. Geochronological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of Late Cretaceous A-type granites from the Sibumasu Block, Southern Myanmar, SE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hai; Li, Wen-Qian; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Wang, He; Wei, Xiao-Peng

    2017-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous to Paleogene granitoids occur widespread in the Sibumasu block within Myanmar (SE Asia), which show a close association with tin-tungsten mineralization. However, the precise timing, petrogenesis and tectonic significance of these granitoids are poorly constrained so far. In this study, we present a detailed study on geochronology, elemental and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic geochemistry for the Hermyingyi and Taungphila granites in southern Myanmar, with the aim of determining their petrogenesis and tectonic implications. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating of zircon grains from the two granites yield ages of 69-70 Ma, indicating a Late Cretaceous magmatic event. These granitic rocks are weakly peraluminous and belong to the high-K calc-alkaline series. They are both characterized by high SiO2, K2O + Na2O, FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) and Ga/Al ratios and low Al2O3, CaO, MgO, P2O5 and TiO2 contents, enriched in Rb, Th, U and Y, but depleted in Ba, Sr, P, and Eu, suggesting an A-type granite affinity. Moreover, they display prominent tetrad REE patterns and non-CHARAC trace element behavior, which are common in late magmatic differentiates with strong hydrothermal interaction or deuteric alteration. The granites belong to A2-type and probably formed at a high temperature and anhydrous condition. They have zircon εHf(t) values from - 12.4 to - 10.0 and whole-rock εNd(t) values from - 11.3 to - 10.6, with Paleoproterozoic TDM2 ages (1741-1922 Ma) for both Hf and Nd isotopes. Geochemical and isotopic data suggest that these A-type granites were derived from partial melting of the Paleoproterozoic continental crust dominated by metaigneous rocks with tonalitic to granodioritic compositions, without significant input of mantle-derived magma and followed by subsequent fractional crystallization. By integrating all available data for the regional tectonic evolution in SE Asia and adjacent regions, we attribute the formation of the Late Cretaceous A-type granites to a back-arc extension

  8. Petrogenesis of the Yangzhuang Nb- and Ta-rich A-type granite porphyry in West Junggar, Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wei; Li, Xiaofeng; Wang, Guo; Xiao, Rong; Wang, Mou; Li, Yanlong; Ren, Manchuan; Bai, Yanping; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-01

    West Junggar is featured with a wide spread of Late Carboniferous-Early Permian A-type granites. Systematic comparison of the Yangzhuang granite porphyry and the regional coeval A-type granites (RCAG) shows that: (1) all the Late Carboniferous-Early Permian A-type granites are of the A2 group except the Yangzhuang granite porphyry; (2) the Nb and Ta contents of the Yangzhuang granite porphyry are nearly 10 times that of the RCAG while Ti content is more depleted; (3) εNd (t) of the Yangzhuang granite porphyry is slightly lower and the Sr isotope has a wider range relative to the RCAG. Previous research revealed that highly incompatible elements including Nb and Ta can be transferred into the mantle wedge by precipitation of amphibole from the ascending fluids generated by dehydration of subducted slab. It is inferred that enhanced heat flux brought by the Late Carboniferous ridge subduction decomposed amphibole in the mantle wedge to generate Nb and Ta-rich melt and finally produced the Yangzhuang granite porphyry.

  9. Rapid discrimination of granitic rock compositions by low-resolution near-infrared reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    The slopes of near-infrared spectra between approximately 1 and 2 microns from quartz-bearing plutonic rocks are strongly correlated with rock chemistry determined by X-ray spectrometry. The empirically derived predictive equations provide compositional data of adequate precision and resolution to discern patterns of regional geochemical variation in granitic batholithic rocks of southern California. As an analytical method, infrared spectrometry is rapid and inexpensive, and the method has potential in applications to direct field measurements and to data from aircraft and spacecraft scanner systems of relatively low spectral and spatial resolution, provided vegetative cover and surface alteration are not prohibitively masking.

  10. Chemical and isotopic studies of granitic Archean rocks, Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming: Geochronology of an Archean granite, Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hedge, C.E.; Simmons, K.R.; Stuckless, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rubidium-strontium analyses of whole-rock samples of an Archean granite from the Owl Creek Mountains, Wyo., indicate an intrusive age of 2640 {plus minus} 125 Ma. Muscovite-bearing samples give results suggesting that these samples were altered about 2300 Ma. This event may have caused extensive strontium loss from the rocks as potassium feldspar was altered to muscovite. Alteration was highly localized in nature as evidence by unaffected rubidium-strontium mineral ages in the Owl Creek Mountains area. Furthermore, the event probably involved a small volume of fluid relative to the volume of rock because whole-rock {delta}{sup 18}O values of altered rocks are not distinct from those of unaltered rocks. In contrast to the rubidium-strontium whole-rock system, zircons from the granite have been so severely affected by the alteration event, and possibly by a late-Precambrian uplift event, that the zircon system yields little usable age information. The average initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr (0.7033 {plus minus} 0.0042) calculated from the isochron intercept varies significantly. Calculated initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios for nine apparently unaltered samples yield a range of 0.7025 to 0.7047. These calculated initial ratios correlate positively with whole-rock {delta}{sup 18}O values; and, therefore, the granite was probably derived from an isotopically heterogeneous source. The highest initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio is lower than the lowest reported for the metamorphic rocks intruded by the granite as it would have existed at 2640 Ma. Thus, the metamorphic sequence, at its current level of exposure, can represent no more than a part of the protolith for the granite.

  11. The role of the microfissuration of the rock matrix in the abrasion resistance of ornamental granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rey, Angel; Sanchez-Delgado, Nuria; Camino, Clara; Calleja, Lope; Ruiz de Argandoña, Vicente G.; Setien, Alexia

    2015-04-01

    The microcrack density and the abrasion resistance of five ornamental granites (Albero, Gris Alba, Mondariz, Rosa Porriño and Traspieles) from Galicia (NW Spain) have been quantified as part of a research aimed to interpret the cuttability of the rocks in relation to the petrophysical properties of the rock matrix. Large blocks from the quarries have been cut with an industrial saw and the microcrack density and the abrasion resistance have been measured in two surfaces: H, parallel to the cut surface; T, perpendicular both to the cut surface and the cutting direction. Both planes are perpendicular to the rift plane, as it is known in quarry works. The microcrack density has been quantified following an stereological procedure applied to polished sections imaged under scanning electron microscopy. The magnification of the images allowed the study of microcracks as narrow as 2 microns in aperture. The density has been quantified in terms of length of microcrack traces per surface unit so possible anisotropies of the microcrack network could be detected. The obtained values are in the typical range for this type of rocks although the Traspieles granite shows a higher value due to its weathering degree (H: 5.11, T: 5.37 mm/mm2). The values measured in the two surfaces (H and T) are quite similar in four of the rocks; only the Albero granite shows a marked anisotropy (H: 2.76 T: 3.53 mm/mm2). The abrasion resistance of the rocks has been measured following the european standard EN 14157:2004 using the capon method. The rocks can be classified in two groups according to their abrasion resistance. Rosa Porriño, Gris Alba and Mondariz granites are the more resistant to abrasion with values around 16-17 mm. Albero and Traspieles granites are less resistant with values higher than 19 mm. The results show a good correlation between the microcrack density and the abrasion resistance. As can be expected the rocks with high microcrack density show low abrasion resistance. The

  12. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Granitic rocks within Lichen Hills, Outback Nunatak, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, T.; KIM, Y.; Lee, I.; Lee, J.; Woo, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study areas, Lichen Hills and Outback Nunatak are located in the Northern Victoria Land which is close to Pacific Ocean side of Transantarctic Mountain (TAM), Antarctica. According to the study of Zeller and Dreschoff (1990), the radioactivity values of Lichen hills and Frontier Mt. area in the Victoria Land were very high. To identify the geochemical characteristics of granitic rocks in these areas, 13 samples of Lichen Hills rocks and 4 samples of Outback Nunatak rocks are analyzed. For mineralogical study, samples were observed in macroscale as well as microscale including microscope electron probe analysis. Rock samples of Lichen Hills, Outback Nunatak are mainly leucogranite and granitic pegmatite. These rock samples are composed of quartz, k-feldspar, plagioclase, muscovite, garnet, tourmaline like granite. In SEM-EDS analysis, the observed light colored minerals show relatively high Th, U, Dy, Ce, Nb concentration. This suggests that rock samples may contain minerals such as fergusonite, monazite, thorite, allanite, karnasurtite which are considered to be REE-bearing minerals. Samples of related rocks have been analyzed in terms of major, trace and rare earth element (REE) concentrations using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). As concentration of SiO2 increase, Al2O3, TiO2, Fe2O3, MgO, P2O5 concentration decrease and Na2O, K2O, MnO concentration increase. Analyzed trace elements and REE are normalized using CI Chondrite, Primitive mantle. The normalized data show that LREE are enriched compared to HREE. The distinct negative anomalies of Eu, Sr are observed, indicating that rock-forming melts are fairly processed state of fractional crystallization. It means that Th, U, Nb, Ta are much enriched in the melts.

  13. Granite rock outcrops: an extreme environment for soil nematodes?

    PubMed

    Austin, Erin; Semmens, Katharine; Parsons, Charles; Treonis, Amy

    2009-03-01

    We studied soil nematode communities from the surface of granite flatrock outcrops in the eastern Piedmont region of the United States. The thin soils that develop here experience high light intensity and extreme fluctuations in temperature and moisture and host unique plant communities. We collected soils from outcrop microsites in Virginia (VA) and North Carolina (NC) in various stages of succession (Primitive, Minimal, and Mature) and compared soil properties and nematode communities to those of adjacent forest soils. Nematodes were present in most outcrop soils, with densities comparable to forest soils (P > 0.05). Nematode communities in Mature and Minimal soils had lower species richness than forest soils (P < 0.05) and contained more bacterial-feeders and fewer fungal-feeders (P < 0.05). Primitive soils contained either no nematodes (NC) or only a single species (Mesodorylaimus sp., VA). Nematode communities were similar between Mature and Minimal soils, according to trophic group representation, MI, PPI, EI, SI, and CI (P > 0.05). Forest soils had a higher PPI value (P < 0.05), but otherwise community indices were similar to outcrop soils (P > 0.05). Outcrop nematode communities failed to group together in a Bray-Curtis cluster analysis, indicating higher variability in community structure than the Forest soils, which did cluster together. A high proportion of the nematodes were extracted from outcrop soils in coiled form (33-89%), indicating that they used anhydrobiosis to persist in this unique environment.

  14. The Landforms of Granitic Rocks: An Annotated Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    Massive granular disintegration with accompanying kaolinization , which decreases with depth, is the norm in the Aswan region. The main type of present...with no filling. Flakes are no more altered than solid rock, but sulphur and chlorine are more abundant in flakes. Halite and gypsum are probably the...joints, dikes and veins, 2) hydrothermal alteration includ- ing kaolinization , accompanied by de-stressing and development of sheeting joints, 3) chemi

  15. Hydrothermal alteration of granite rock cores: experiments and kinetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, T.; Mueller, T.; Renner, J.

    2016-12-01

    The kinetics of water-rock interactions at elevated temperatures is key for understanding the dynamic evolution of porosity and permeability in natural and industrial systems. The implementation of rate data in numerical models simulating reactive transport is crucial to reliably predict subsurface fluid flow. The vast majority of data are constrained by single phase powder experiments inhering unrealistically high surface areas and hampering consideration of microstructural effects on reaction progress. We present experimental results of batch experiments conducted at 200 °C for up to 60 days on a quartz-monzodiorite and pure water that bridge the gap between powder experiments and complex natural systems. The effect of reactive surface area was modelled by using bulk-rock powders, intact, and thermally cracked rock cubes. Fluid composition was monitored (ICP-MS) and solid products were analysed after each experiment (SEM, EMPA). The evolution of fluid and solid compositions was compared to a self-coded geochemical transport model accounting for dissolution, nucleation, growth and reactive surface area. Experimental and modelling results indicate a fast increase of Na, Ca, K and Si in the fluid related to kinetically controlled dissolution of feldspar (plg and kfs) and quartz. Maximum concentrations of Al, Mg, and Fe are reached within two days followed by a rapid decrease induced by secondary mineral precipitation. The amount and type of secondary phases strongly depend on the host substrate indicating that local fluid composition and substrate surface are the controlling parameters. Observed reaction rates differ strongly between powder and rock cube experiments due to differences in reactive surface area. Combining kinetic data, gained by modelling the experimental results, with new information on substrate-precipitate relationship will aid large scale-transport models to realistically predict chemo-mechanical changes and fluid flow in subsurface systems.

  16. Experimental investigations on the thermal conductivity characteristics of Beishan granitic rocks for China's HLW disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. G.; Wang, J.; Chen, F.; Li, P. F.; Ma, L. K.; Xie, J. L.; Liu, Y. M.

    2016-06-01

    Crystalline rocks are potential host rock types for the construction of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories. A better understanding of thermal conductivity of rocks is essential to safe evaluation and engineering optimization of a HLW disposal system in the rock at depth. In the present study, experimental investigations on the thermal conductivity characteristics of 47 pairs of granitic rock specimens were conducted using the Transient Plane Source (TPS) method. The specimens were collected from borehole cores in the Beishan area, which is being considered as the most potential candidate area for China's HLW repository. To evaluate geological nature of the rocks, mineralogical compositions of the rocks were identified, and porosity of the specimens was measured. The thermal conductivities of the specimens under dry and water-saturated conditions were determined, and the effect of water saturation on the thermal conductivity was investigated. In addition, the influence of temperature and axial compression stress on the thermal conductivity of dry specimens was studied. The results revealed that the thermal conductivity of tested rocks was dependent on water saturation, temperature and compression stress. Based on the obtained data, some models considering porosity were established for describing the thermal conductivity characteristics of the tested rocks. Furthermore, when the rocks have a similar porosity, the quartz content dominates the thermal conductivity, and there exists an obvious increase of the thermal conductivity with increasing quartz content. The test results constitute the first systematic measurements on the Beishan granitic rocks and can further be used for the development of thermal models for predicting thermal response near the underground excavations for HLW disposal.

  17. The relationship between hydraulic conductivity and diffusion in granitic rock matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najser, J.; Gvozdik, L.; Havlova, V.; Sosna, K.; Vecernik, P.; Zaruba, J.

    2012-12-01

    In the Czech Republic, granite is being considered as the host rock for a radioactive waste repository. The aim of the current research project is to study of the hydraulic properties of the low-permeable rock matrix. 45 granitic samples from ten sites have been subjected to hydraulic conductivity (K) and diffusivity (De) tests. Hydraulic conductivity was measured in pressure cells. A constant pressure difference of Δ = 50 kPa was applied by pressure controllers and the volume of water that passed through the sample was recorded. The effective diffusion coefficient De was measured using 3H tracer in through-diffusion experiments. The activities in both input and output reservoirs were regularly monitored using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The hydraulic conductivities of fresh granite varied from 1.65 x 10-10 to 1 x 10-14 m.s-1 while the effective diffusion coefficient ranged from 7.4 x 10-12 to 4 x 10-13 m2.s-1. Comparison of measured "K" and "De" values reveals significant scatter, despite clear trends. Numerical simulation of both hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity was undertaken using finite-element code NAPSAC. The results show that reduced microcrack length influences the connectivity of the microcrack network, increases diffusivity, and decreases hydraulic conductivity. The imperfect correlation between experimental "K" and "De" is explained by the different geometries of the microcrack networks within the studied granites.

  18. Prediction of the Cut Depth of Granitic Rocks Machined by Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Gokhan; Karakurt, Izzet; Aydiner, Kerim

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an experimental study on the cut depth, which is an important cutting performance indicator in the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting of rock, was presented. Taguchi experimental design of an orthogonal array was employed to conduct the experiments. A variety of nine types of granitic rocks were used in the cutting experiments. The experimental data were used to assess the influence of AWJ operating variables on the cut depth. Using regression analysis, models for prediction of the cut depth from the operating variables and rock properties in AWJ machining of granitic rocks were then developed and verified. The results indicated that the cut depths decreased with increasing traverse speed and decreasing abrasive size. On the other hand, increase of the abrasive mass flow rate and water pressure led to increases in the cut depths. Additionally, it was observed that the standoff distance had no discernible effects on the cut depths. Furthermore, from the statistical analysis, it was found that the predictive models developed for the rock types had potential for practical applications. Verification of the models for using them as a practical guideline revealed a high applicability of the models within the experimental range used.

  19. Influence of the properties of granitic rocks on their bioreceptivity to subaerial phototrophic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Nion, Daniel; Silva, Benita; Prieto, Beatriz

    2018-01-01

    As any stone substrate is susceptible to biological colonisation, the choice of lithotype used for construction is a key strategy for preventing biodeterioration. For this purpose, a comprehensive evaluation of the primary bioreceptivity to phototrophic biofilms of eleven varieties of granitic rocks, commonly used as building material, was carried out. Blocks were inoculated with a multi-species phototrophic culture and subjected to standardised growth conditions for three months. Biofilm formation was assessed by chlorophyll (chl) fluorescence, colour measurements and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) quantification. Relationships between the biofilm growth indicators and the properties of the different rocks studied were then analysed. Results showed that the bioreceptivity of the granites is more strongly affected by the physical characteristics of the stones than by their chemical and mineralogical properties, possibly because of the similar composition of the rocks studied. Growth of phototrophic biofilms was enhanced by high open porosity, capillary water content and surface roughness, and the bioreceptivity of weathered granites was higher than that of sound granites. The results obtained can therefore help in the selection of appropriate lithotypes for building purposes. The amounts of EPS produced by subaerial biofilms primarily depended on the requirements and/or characteristics of the biofilm-forming microorganisms, rather than on the bioreceptivity of the substratum, and microorganisms produce the amounts of EPS required at the initial stage of establishment on the stone surface, independently of the subsequent biomass development. These findings are especially important from the point of view of biodeterioration, in which the EPS matrix plays a central role. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sources of Paleozoic granitic rocks and isotopic heterogeneity of the continental crust of the Aktau-Dzhungar microcontinent, Central Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, K. E.; Shatagin, K. N.; Tret'yakov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Several generations of Paleozoic granitic rocks are studied with Sm-Nd isotopic methods in the northwestern part of the Aktau-Dzhungar microcontinent of Central Kazakhstan (Atasu-Mointy divide). The initial Nd isotopic composition of the granitic rocks varies in a relatively narrow range from-0.1 to-3.5ɛ; the Nd model ages are also similar (1.11-1.46 Ga). These results indicate that the crustal source of all the Paleozoic granitic rocks of the region had similar composition and, probably, age. It is shown that the t Nd(DM) values of the Paleozoic granites reflect different proportions between ancient and juvenile material in the crustal source.

  1. RADIOACTIVITY DOSAGE OF ORNAMENTAL GRANITIC ROCKS BASED ON CHEMICAL, MINERALOGICAL AND LITHOLOGICAL DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, H.T.; Nalini, H.A. Jr.; Mendes, J.C.

    2004-10-03

    One hundred samples of granitic rock were collected from granite traders in Belo Horizonte. Autoradiography, optical microscopy, diffractometry, and chemical analysis (X-ray spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, gravimetry and electron probe microanalysis) were used to determine the mineral assemblages and lithotypes. Autoradiographic results for several samples showed the presence of monazite, allanite and zircon. Chemical analysis revealed concentrations of uranium of {le} 30ppm, and thorium {le} 130ppm. Higher concentrations generally correlated with high concentrations of light rare earths in silica-rich rocks of granitic composition. Calculations were made of radioactive doses for floor tiles in a standard room for samples with total concentration of uranium and thorium greater than 60ppm. On the basis of calculations of {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 226}Ra from Th, K and U analysis, the doses calculated were between 0.11 and 0.34 mSv/year, which are much lower than the acceptable international exposure standard of 1.0 mSv/year.

  2. Uranium and thorium in weathering and pedogenetic profiles developed on granitic rocks from NW Spain.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Teresa; Martínez Cortizas, Antonio; García, Carlota; García-Rodeja, Eduardo

    2006-03-01

    Uranium and thorium were analyzed in seven weathering and pedogenetic soil profiles developed on granitic rocks from NW Spain. Concentrations were measured by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and the U- and Th-bearing minerals were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). Both elements were determined in rock, bulk soil and in different grain-size fractions (sand: 2000-50 microm, silt: 50-2 microm, and clay: <2 microm). U concentrations in the rock varied between 5.3 and 27.7 mg kg(-1) and Th concentrations from 5.5 to 50.7 mg kg(-1). The most alkalic rocks can be considered as U-rich granites. Bulk soil U and Th concentrations are similar to those of the rocks (4.8-29.2 and 7.4-56.7 mg kg(-1), respectively), but in the grain-size fractions both elements show the lowest concentrations in the sand and the highest in the clay. In the latter, concentrations are always higher than those of the rocks, particularly in the C horizons with enrichments up to 4 times for U and 5 times for Th. The concentration profiles and the ratios to the parent rock suggest that U and Th are leached from the surface soil and accumulate in the deeper horizons. Mass balance calculations, using Ti as a reference immobile element, also support U and Th leaching in the solum and supergene enrichment in bottom horizons. Leaching seems to be more intense on horizons with gravel content higher than 20%. The leaching of U and Th in the topmost horizons and the accumulation in the bottom soil horizons can be considered as a natural attenuation of the impact of these radiogenic elements in the environment. But their enrichment in the potentially airborne fraction poses some risk of redistribution in the ecosystems.

  3. Overview of granitic rocks in the Bradfield Canal area, southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Granitic rocks in the Bradfield Canal area of southeastern Alaska are part of the Coast plutonic-metamorphic complex and include rocks representing several different periods of magmatic activity. Units belonging to the previously named Admiralty-Revillagigedo, great tonalite sill, Coast Mountains, and Groundhog Basin-Cone Mountain belts are present. The Texas Creek Granodiorite is located in the southeastern part of the area and is probably 212 Ma or somewhat older. It consists mainly of locally deformed and altered calc-alkalic biotite-hornblende granodiorite and is closely associated with important mineral deposits. Distinguishing features include primary epidote, accessory garnet, and locally a distinctive plagioclase-porphyritic texture. Northeast of the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt lies the northwest-trending great tonalite sill belt. These rocks are 58--55 Ma and consist of calc-alkalic, generally well-foliated and locally lineated biotite-hornblende and hornblende tonalite, quartz diorite, and granodiorite. The Coast Mountains belt granitic rocks are the most extensive in the area. The granite has been explored for U, Th, and REE deposits. The Coast plutonic-metamorphic complex records dynamothermal and regional contact metamorphic events related to the regional plutonism. Most of the lengthy and complicated magmatic and metamorphic history of the complex is related to Late Cretaceous collision of the Alexander and Wrangellia terranes and juxtaposition of the Gravina overlap assemblage to the west (Superterrane II) against the Yukon prong and Stikine terrane to the east (Superterrane I). An exception is the Texas Creek Granodiorite, which is related to a pre-accretionary Jurassic arc in the Stikine terrane.

  4. Pb isotopes in Ascension Island rocks: oceanic origin for the gabbroic to granitic plutonic xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, D.

    1983-02-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions and U and Pb concentrations of the lava series (alkali basalt to comendite) and of their plutonic xenoliths (gabbro to alkaline granite) of Ascension Island are reported. The data are used to evaluate the source of the xenoliths which formed two differentiation suites: the acidic and intermediate xenoliths together with most of the lavas on the one hand, and the gabbroic xenoliths and a basaltic tuff on the other hand. The Pb isotopic compositions imply a mantle origin for the source magmas of the xenoliths and confirm the possibility of generating granitic rocks in an oceanic environment by fractional crystallization of a mantle-derived magma whose geochemical and isotopic characteristics are comparable to the source magmas of oceanic island basalts.

  5. Greenhouse Gases and Energy Intensity of Granite Rock Mining Operations in Thailand: A Case of Industrial Rock-Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittipongvises, Suthirat; Chavalparit, Orathai; Sutthirat, Chakkaphan

    2016-12-01

    This paper is aimed to systematically assess greenhouse gases (GHGs) and energy intensity of the granite rock mining operations in Thailand and also identify a range of feasible options to minimize their GHG emissions. Mining factories A, B and C, located in the Eastern region of Thailand, were selected as research case studies. The results indicated that the 3-year average of GHGs emissions from factories A to C was 3387 718 kgCO2e per year with approximately 2.92 kgCO2e per ton of granite rock produced over 2012 to 2014. Of this, the carbon intensity of grid-electricity consumption for the crushed rock production was 1.84 kgCO2/kWh. Diesel fuel combustion for transport activities in the mining factories was the greatest contributor to GHGs emissions (68 %) compared to the purchased electricity and explosion process, with 31 % and 1 %, respectively. In-Pit Crushing and Conveying (IPCC) installation, haul truck payload optimization and management, and reduction in tire rolling resistance have shown potential to reduce carbon emissions accounted for 20 % to 70 %.

  6. Extra-terrestrial igneous granites and related rocks: A review of their occurrence and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    vast majority of granitic materials recognised so far in the extra-terrestrial record are characterised by ferroan A-type compositions, characterised by high to very high K2O and medium CaO contents, sodic varieties being exceedingly rare. Textural evidence of graphic quartz-alkali feldspar intergrowths within crystallised products suggests that they are igneous in origin and crystallised quickly from a liquid. In water-depleted to water-free environments, fluorine and chlorine can play significant roles, as their effects on liquidus temperatures and crystallising assemblages are nearly identical to those of water. The distribution of alkalis and alkaline earths cannot be related only to extensive crystal fractionation, but is likely induced by supplementary silicate liquid immiscibility. Medium-temperature silicate liquid immiscibility is well known as a mode of differentiation in experimental petrology studies at very low pressures on systems dominated by Fe, Ti, K, and P as major elements. The ultimate question is, therefore, not whether granite (s.l.) occurs in any given planetary body, but if sufficient volumes of granitic materials could have been produced to constitute stable continental nuclei.

  7. Granitic rocks and metasediments in Archean crust, Rainy Lake area, Ontario: ND isotope evidence for mantle-like SM/ND sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirey, S. B.; Hanson, G. N.

    1983-01-01

    Granitoids, felsic volcanic rocks and clastic metasediments are typical rocks in Archean granite-greenstone belts that could have formed from preexisting continentasl crust. The petrogenesis of such rocks is assessed to determine the relative roles of new crust formation or old crust formation or old crust recycling in the formation of granite-greenstone belts.

  8. Zircon and whole-rock Zr/Hf ratios as markers of the evolution of granitic magmas: Examples from the Teplice caldera (Czech Republic/Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Karel; Škoda, Radek

    2017-09-01

    Hafnium contents and Zr/Hf ratios were studied in zircons and their parent rocks from three magmatic suites associated with the Teplice caldera, Eastern Erzgebirge: rhyolite and dacite from the peraluminous Schönfeld Unit, relatively younger A-type Teplice rhyolite, and post-caldera A-type biotite and zinnwaldite granite and greisen. New data suggest that zircon crystallizing from a geochemically less evolved volatile- and water-poor melt is, compared to the host rock, relatively Hf-depleted, while zircon crystallizing from an evolved volatile- and water-rich melt has a Zr/Hf value approximately identical to that of the parental melt. Zr/Hf values in zircon did not change substantially either during greisenization, or during low-temperature alteration after metamictization. Zr/Hf values in the whole rock may serve as a sensitive indicator of magmatic fractionation of evolved granitic melts, as they are only negligibly influenced by the following hydrothermal processes. Zr/Hf values in individual cogenetic zircon grains are scattered but their general evolution trend in the rock series is consistent with the evolution of the whole-rock Zr/Hf values.

  9. Resistor network as a model of fractures in granitic rocks - model for ERT interpretation in crystalline rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Jirků, Jaroslav; Janeček, Josef; Slavík, Lubomír; Bárta, Jaroslav

    2017-04-01

    Recently we have developed and tested system for long-term monitoring of underground excavation stability in granitic rocks. It is based on repeated ultrasonic time-of-flight measurement and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) measurement. The ERT measurement is performed directly on the rock wall using 48 electrodes. The spacing between electrodes was selected 20 centimeters. Based on sensitivity function it can be expected that maximum penetration depth of ERT is about 1.5 m. The observed time changes in apparent resistivity are expected to be mainly result of changes in fracture water saturation. To get some basic knowledge about relation between electrical resistivity in the rock fracture zone and its saturation a series of laboratory tests with rock samples with different porosity and different saturation was performed. The model of crystalline rock with sparse net of fractures is highly inhomogeneous medium and can be hardly considered as 2D layered model, which is usually used in ERT inversion. Therefore, we prepared resistor-network model for the qualitative/quantitative interpretation of observed apparent resistivity changes. Some preliminary results of our experience with this new type of resistivity model are presented. The results can be used for underground storage monitoring projects. Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, project No. TA 0302408

  10. Capillary Rise in Granitic Rocks: Interpretation of Kinetics on the Basis of Pore Structure.

    PubMed

    Mosquera; Rivas; Prieto; Silva

    2000-02-01

    The capillary transport of water into granitic rocks has been interpreted on the basis of the structure of its porous network. An effective pore radius has been calculated from a three-sized single-pore model proposed by F. A. L. Dullien, El-Sayed, and V. K. Batra (J. Colloid Interface Sci. 60, 497, 1977) Considering the porous network of granites as consisting of fissures grouped in two size types, macro- and microfissures, an effective radius was found from the characteristic radii for each type and the average of these two values. Good agreement between the effective radius calculated and the radius estimated using a capillary rate value measured experimentally provides a suitable basis for identifying interrelationships between the pore structure and moisture capillary rise. In fact, it is possible to predict the process rate from only two characteristic pore sizes, corresponding to the radii of macrofissures and microfissures. The abnormally low rate of capillary rise observed in one of the granites studied could be easily interpreted as due to the involvement exclusively of the macrofissures of its porous network in capillary transport. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Relations of zoned pegmatites to other pegmatites, granite, and metamorphic rocks in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, J.J.; Redden, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The pegmatite field and the Harney Peak Granite of the southern Black Hills, South Dakota, form an igneous system that progresses from slightly biotitic muscovite granite through layered pegmatitic granite, with alternating sodic and potassic rocks, to simple plagioclase-quartz-perthite pegmatites, and on to zoned pegmatites. Most of the country rocks are Lower Proterozoic mica schists. At 1700 Ga, intrusion of the Harney Peak Granite created a large dome in these rocks, a thermal aureole with a staurolite, a first sillimanite isograd, and a small area of metamorphism above the second sillimanite isograd. The zoned pegmatites have a strong tendency to occur in clusters, and the types of pegmatites are different in different clusters. A less obvious tendency is a regional zonation in which rare-mineral pegmatites become more abundant and muscovite pegmatites less abundant toward the outskirts of the region. The composition of the granite indicates that its magma originated by partial melting of metasedimentary mica schists similar to those at the present surface. The pegmatitic nature of most of the granite probably reflects exsolution of an aqueous phase. -from Authors

  12. 3D surface roughness recreation and data processing of granitic rocks and claystones, potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buocz, Ildikó; Török, Ákos; Rozgonyi-Boissinot, Nikoletta

    2015-04-01

    The determination and modelling of the stability of rock slopes, tunnels, or underground spaces, i.e. radioactive waste disposal facilities, is an important task in engineering. The appropriate estimation of the mechanical parameters for a realistic description of the behaviour of rocks results in higher safety and more economic design. The failure of stability is primarily due to the shear failure of the rock masses along fractures and joints: therefore the correct determination of the shear strength is crucial. One of the most important parameters influencing the shear strength along rock joints is their surface roughness. Although the quantification of surface roughness has been an open question during the past century, several attempts have been made, starting with 2D and continuing with 3D measurements, to provide engineers with a method for determining shear strength numerically. As technology evolved, the 3D methods became more popular and several scientists started to investigate the surface properties through laser scanning and different photogrammetrical methods. This paper shows a photogrammetric method for the 3D digital recreation of joint surfaces of granitic rock and claystone, both potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. The rocks derived from Bátaapáti (South Hungary) and Mont Terri (North Switzerland) respectively. The samples are laboratory scaled specimens with an areal size of 50x50 mm. The software used is called ShapeMetrix3D, developed by 3GSM GmbH in Austria. The major steps of the creation of the 3D picture are presented, as well as the following data processing which leads to the quantification of the 3D surface roughness.

  13. A Late-Stage Origin for Alkali Feldspar in Granitic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farner, M.; Lee, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    The timing of alkali feldspar crystallization in granitic rocks has been debated extensively with no consensus on whether crystallization occurs early or late in the thermal history of the parent magma. Studies of K-feldspar crystallization have resulted in an apparent paradox with phase equilibria studies showing that K-feldspar saturates late, while field observations of megacrysts suggest early saturation and long growth times. Here, we resolve this paradox with textural and geochemical systematics of silicic, incompatible-enriched granitoids and incompatible-poor granitic rocks from the Bernasconi Hills pluton, in the Peninsular Ranges Batholith in southern California. We show, using whole rock geochemistry, micro x-ray fluorescence compositional maps and petrographic observations that K-feldspar only appears in samples with > 1.5 wt % K2O, while samples with < 1.5 wt % K2O contain interstitial biotite in a plagioclase-quartz matrix. The appearance of alkali feldspar coincides with an increase in slope on a K2O versus SiO2 variation diagram, indicating crystallization from K-rich residual liquids. Assuming perfectly incompatible behavior for potassium, we estimate that alkali feldspar crystallization begins when 10-16 % melt remains, relative to a gabbroic parental composition, and appears late during crystallization of granitic magma. Textural observations indicate that residual, K-rich, liquids segregate from plagioclase-quartz cumulates and subsequently crystallize K-feldspar. Our observations further suggest that K-feldspar crystallizes early in the cooling history of the segregated residual liquid and geochemical trends show that the liquid and K-feldspar do not fractionate from each other as K2O does not decrease with respect to increasing SiO2. Based upon textural and geochemical systematics presented here, we suggest that K-feldspar crystallization occurs late in the cooling history of granitic magma and is driven by segregation of K-rich residual

  14. Exploring rock fissures: does a specialized root morphology explain endemism on granite outcrops?

    PubMed Central

    Poot, Pieter; Hopper, Stephen D.; van Diggelen, Josepha M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Worldwide, many plant species are confined to open, shallow-soil, rocky habitats. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this habitat specificity, none has been convincing. We suggest that the high level of endemism on shallow soils is related to the edaphic specialization needed to survive in these often extremely drought-prone habitats. Previous research has shown that species endemic to ironstone communities in SW Australia have a specialized root morphology that enhances their chance to access fissures in the underlying rock. Here we test the generality of these findings for species that are confined to a shallow-soil habitat that is of much greater global significance: granite outcrops. Methods We compared temporal and spatial root growth and allocation of three endemic woody perennials of SW Australian granite outcrop communities with those of congeners occurring on nearby deeper soils. Seedlings of all species were grown in 1·2 m long custom-made containers with a transparent bottom that allowed monitoring of root growth over time. Key Results The granite outcrop endemics mostly differed in a predictable way from their congeners from deeper soils. They generally invested a larger portion of their biomass in roots, distributed their roots faster and more evenly over the container and had a lower specific root length. In different species pairs the outcrop endemics achieved their apparent advantage by a different combination of the aforementioned traits. Conclusions Our results are consistent with earlier work, indicating that species restricted to different types of drought-prone shallow-soil communities have undergone similar selection pressures. Although adaptive in their own habitat in terms of obtaining access to fissures in the underlying rock, these root system traits are likely to be maladaptive in deeper soil habitats. Therefore, our results may provide an explanation for the narrow endemism of many shallow

  15. Exploring rock fissures: does a specialized root morphology explain endemism on granite outcrops?

    PubMed

    Poot, Pieter; Hopper, Stephen D; van Diggelen, Josepha M H

    2012-07-01

    Worldwide, many plant species are confined to open, shallow-soil, rocky habitats. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this habitat specificity, none has been convincing. We suggest that the high level of endemism on shallow soils is related to the edaphic specialization needed to survive in these often extremely drought-prone habitats. Previous research has shown that species endemic to ironstone communities in SW Australia have a specialized root morphology that enhances their chance to access fissures in the underlying rock. Here we test the generality of these findings for species that are confined to a shallow-soil habitat that is of much greater global significance: granite outcrops. We compared temporal and spatial root growth and allocation of three endemic woody perennials of SW Australian granite outcrop communities with those of congeners occurring on nearby deeper soils. Seedlings of all species were grown in 1·2 m long custom-made containers with a transparent bottom that allowed monitoring of root growth over time. The granite outcrop endemics mostly differed in a predictable way from their congeners from deeper soils. They generally invested a larger portion of their biomass in roots, distributed their roots faster and more evenly over the container and had a lower specific root length. In different species pairs the outcrop endemics achieved their apparent advantage by a different combination of the aforementioned traits. Our results are consistent with earlier work, indicating that species restricted to different types of drought-prone shallow-soil communities have undergone similar selection pressures. Although adaptive in their own habitat in terms of obtaining access to fissures in the underlying rock, these root system traits are likely to be maladaptive in deeper soil habitats. Therefore, our results may provide an explanation for the narrow endemism of many shallow-soil endemics.

  16. Natural radioactivity measurements in the granite rock of quarry sites, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnour, I. A.; Wagiran, H.; Ibrahim, N.; Laili, Z.; Omar, M.; Hamzah, S.; Idi, Bello. Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides in the granite rocks of selected quarry sites in Johor state, Malaysia and their possible radiological effects. The activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th and 40K in the areas of study indicated varying values of 238U, 232Th and 40K. The highest values of 238U and 232Th concentrations (67±1 and 85±2 Bq kg-1, respectively) were observed at Kamad Quarry (IJM), whereas the highest value of 40K concentration (722±18 Bq kg-1) was detected in Kim Seng Quarry, while the values of activity concentration are lower in Hanson Quarry Products (Kulai) (25±0.5 for 238U, 24±0.5 for 232Th and 429±11 for 40K). Overall, 40K has the highest concentration in the granite rocks of the quarry sites, followed by 232Th and the least for 238U. The radium equivalent activity concentration was found in the range between 94 and 239 Bq kg-1, the absorbed dose rate was found to be in the range between 47 and 112 nGy h-1, and effective dose ranged from 58 to 137 μSv h-1. Moreover, the internal and external hazard index values were given in results lower than unity.

  17. Rhyacian A-type tholeiitic granites in southern Brazil: Geochemistry, U-Pb zircon ages and Nd model ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Maria José; Bitencourt, Maria de Fátima; Nardi, Lauro Stoll; Picanço, Jefferson; Chemale, Farid, Jr.; Pimenta, Vanessa de Almeida

    2017-04-01

    In the southern South American platform, 2.5 to 2.0 Ga terranes, probably related to the Atlantica supercontinent, occur mainly as minor reworked inliers within Neoproterozoic, Brasiliano/Pan-African orogenic belts, as the Ribeira Belt in southern Brazil. The dispersion of such fragments has generated uncertainties about their geotectonic reconstruction, and their study has been supported mainly by elemental and isotope geochemistry. The southern Ribeira Belt lies between the Paranapanema and Luiz Alves cratons and contains reworked Neoarquean and Paleoproterozoic terranes which outcrop as basement nuclei in supracrustal sequences, as the Setuva Complex. The Água Comprida Suite, situated in the northern part of the Setuva Complex, consists of Amphibole-Biotite Syenogranite (ABS), Porphyritic Biotite Syenogranite (PBS), and Equigranular Biotite Syenogranite (EBS). All granites are foliated and intensively deformed. The oldest foliation (Sn) is marked by augen feldspars set in a recrystallized matrix, followed by a crenulation cleavage (Sn+1) which evolves to discrete shear zones. ABS is a metaluminous, reduced A-type granite with FeOt / (FeOt + MgO) > 0.9, with high HFSE and REE contents, corresponding to magmas related to continental medium to high-K tholeiitic series. PBS and specially EBS are highly differentiated, metaluminous to peraluminous (EBS), oxidized granites. The increase of Al2O3 and Rb, and decrease of HFS and RE elements relative to ABS indicate their evolution from tholeiitic magmas. The Água Comprida Suite granites are cogenetic rocks evolved from a within-plate mantle source, marked by high Nb, Ta, and Y. The influence of previously metasomatised mantle sources is evidenced by negative Nb, Ti, and P anomalies. The age of ABS is 2187 ± 26 Ma, and that of PBS is between 2180 ± 13 to 2186 ± 22 Ma. The Nd model age of 2.4 Ga, and ɛNd(2.18 Ga) between - 0.23 and - 0.27 support the interpretation of ABS being formed from juvenile material with a

  18. Temporal and compositional variation within the Early Paleogene Silhouette/North Island A-type Granite Complex, Seychelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, G.; Lee, T. Y.; Yeh, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Main Islands of the Seychelles are primarily composed of Neoproterozoic ( 750 Ma to 800 Ma) granites that were formed at an Andean-type margin. The Early Paleogene Silhouette/North Island volcano-plutonic complex is located to the NW of the Main Islands and is attributed to magmatism associated with the eruption of the Deccan Traps and rifting of the Seychelles microcontinent from India. The zircon 206Pb/238U ages show that the silicic volcanic and plutonic rocks from Silhouette are generally older (i.e. 64.9 ± 1.6 Ma to 62.3 ± 0.8 Ma) than the rocks from North Island (i.e. 61.0 ± 0.8 Ma to 60.6 ± 0.7 Ma). The Danian-Selandian age of the Silhouette/North Island complex is younger than the peak eruption time of the Deccan Traps (i.e. 65 ± 1 Ma) suggesting that it was emplaced during the continental rifting/sea-floor spreading transition. The granitic rocks from both islands are compositionally ferroan and alkalic (ACNK < 1; Na+K/Al = 0.8 to 1.1) and correspond to within-plate granites. The whole rock Sr and Nd and zircon Hf isotopes reveal that there are subtle differences between the islands with Silhouette generally have higher 87Sr/86Sri (0.7035 to 0.7061) ratios, and lower ɛNd(t) (+0.5 to +2.9) and ɛHf(t) (+3.8 to +5.2) values than North Island (87Sr/86Sri = 0.7036 to 0.7041; ɛNd(t) = +1.4 to +3.8; ɛHf(t) = +4.6 to +6.2). The granitic rocks were likely derived by fractional crystallization of parental magmas similar to the composition of the volumetrically minor mafic intrusive rocks found on each island. The modeling conditions that produce the best results are hydrous (H2O ≤ 1.5 wt%), slightly reducing (FMQ ≤ 0) and shallow pressure (≤ 0.3 GPa). Crustal contamination is documented within the rocks from Silhouette but appears to be negligible or absent within the North Island rocks. The spatial and temporal differences between the two islands can be explained by the movement of the plate over the magma source as the Seychelles microcontinent

  19. Chemical and isotopic studies of granitic Archean rocks, Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming: Uranium-thorium-lead systematics of an Archean granite from the Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Stuckless, J.S.; Nkomo, I.T.; Butt, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Isotopic analyses of apparently unaltered whole-rock samples of a granite from the Owl Creek Mountains, Wyo., yield a lead-lead isochron age of 2730 {plus minus} 35 Ma, which is somewhat older than the age obtained by the rubidium-strontium whole-rock method. Thorium-lead data for the same samples deviate markedly from an isochronal relation; however, calculated initial {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ratios correlate with whole-rock {delta}{sup 18}O values and lead to the conclusion that the {sup 232}Th-{sup 208}Pb data are not colinear because of an originally heterogeneous granitic magma. Relationships in the {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U-{sup 206}Pb/{sup 238}U system show that uranium was mobilized during early Laramide time or shortly before, such that most surface and shallow drill-core samples lost 60-80 percent of their uranium, and some fractured, deeper drill-core samples gained from 50 to 10,000 percent uranium. Fission-track maps show that much uranium is located along edges and cleavages of biotite and magnetic where it is readily accessible to oxidizing ground water. Furthermore, qualitative comparisons of uranium distribution in samples with excess radiogenic lead and in samples with approximately equilibrium amounts of uranium and lead suggest that the latter contain more uranium in these readily accessible sites. Unlike other granites that have uranium distributions and isotopic systematics similar to those observed in this study, the granite of the Owl Creek Mountains is not associated with economic uranium deposits.

  20. Reconstruction of crustal blocks of California on the basis of initial strontium isotopic compositions of Mesozoic granitic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, Ronald Wayne; Peterman, Zell E.

    1978-01-01

    Initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr was determined for samples of Mesozoic granitic rocks in the vicinity of the Garlock fault zone in California. These data along with similar data from the Sierra Nevada and along the San Andreas fault system permit a reconstruction of basement rocks offset by the Cenozoic lateral faulting along both the San Andreas and Garlock fault systems. The location of the line of initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr = 0.7060 can be related to the edge of the Precambrian continental crust in the western United States. Our model explains the present configuration of the edge of Precambrian continental crust as the result of two stages of rifting that occurred about 1,250 to 800 m.y. ago, during Belt sedimentation, and about 600 to 350 m.y. ago, prior to and during the development of the Cordilleran geosyncline and to left-lateral translation along a locus of disturbance identified in the central Mojave Desert. The variations in Rb, Sr, and initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr of the Mesozoic granitic rocks are interpreted as due to variations in composition and age of the source materials of the granitic rocks. The variations of Rb, Sr, and initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr in Mesozoic granitic rocks, the sedimentation history during the late Precambrian and Paleozoic, and the geographic position of loci of Mesozoic magmatism in the western United States are related to the development of the continental margin and different types of lithosphere during rifting.

  1. Characterization of weathering profile in granites and volcanosedimentary rocks in West Africa under humid tropical climate conditions. Case of the Dimbokro Catchment (Ivory Coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koita, M.; Jourde, H.; Koffi, K. J. P.; da Silveira, K. S.; Biaou, A.

    2013-06-01

    In granitic rocks, various models of weathering profile have been proposed, but never for the hard rocks of West Africa. Besides, in the literature there is no description of the weathering profile in volcanosedimentrary rocks. Therefore, we propose three models describing the weathering profiles in granites, metasediments, and volcanic rocks for hard rock formations located in West Africa. For each of these models proposed for granitic and volcanosedimentary rocks of the Dimbokro catchment, vertical layered weathering profiles are described, according to the various weathering and erosion cycles (specific to West Africa) that the geological formations of the Dimbokro catchment experienced from the Eocene to the recent Quaternary period. The characterization of weathering profiles is based on: i) bedrocks and weathering profile observations at outcrop, and ii) interpretation and synthesis of geophysical data and lithologs from different boreholes. For each of the geological formations (granites, metasediments, and volcanic rocks), their related weathering profile model depicted from top to bottom comprises four separate layers: alloterite, isalterite, fissured layer, and fractured fresh basement. These weathering profiles are systematically covered by a soil layer. Though granites, metasediments and volcanic rocks of the Dimbokro catchment experience the same weathering and erosion cycles during the palaeoclimatic fluctuations from Eocene to recent Quaternary period, they exhibit differences in thickness. In granites, the weathering profile is relatively thin due to the absence of iron crust which protects weathering products against dismantling. In metasediments and volcanic rocks iron crusts develop better than in granites; in these rocks the alterite are more resistant to dismantling.

  2. In situ and laboratory measurements of hydraulic conductivity in granitic rock matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaruba, J.; Najser, J.; Rukavickova, L.; Sosna, K.

    2012-12-01

    In the Czech Republic, granitic massifs are considered to provide the most suitable hosts for a radioactive waste repository. The aim of the current research project is to study the hydraulic properties of low-permeable rrock matrix. Field measurements of hydraulic conductivity were taken in boreholes while laboratory tests were undertaken on samples from the borehole cores. In the field, two boreholes with depths of 100 m were tested. The intergranular hydraulic conductivity was measured in 0.5 m long sections sealed by packers while the rock quality and position of cracks was determined by geophysical logging. In the laboratory, intergranular hydraulic conductivity was measured on homogenous samples in pressurised cells. A constant pressure gradient of Δ = 50 kPa was kept between upper and lower bases and from this the average effective stress corresponded to the in situ effective stress. The use of field and laboratory methods allowed the results to be interpreted in detail. These have provided new information about microcrack networks and the intergranular hydraulic conductivity of granite matrix. The obtained data also revealed a significant scale effect that influences the hydraulic conductivities determined by the in situ and laboratory tests.

  3. Strength and permeability of an ultra-large specimen of granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Thorpe, R.K.; Watkins, D.J.; Ralph, W.E.

    1983-03-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to measure the mechanical and transport properties of a 1-m-diameter by 2-m-high specimen of jointed granitic rock. Uniaxial loading was applied and radial permeability tests were made at various stress levels. Ultimate strength of the specimen was estimated prior to loading by testing small 52 mm diameter cores with similar fracture patterns. It was found that deformabilities of the large and small specimens were similar; however, the uniaxial strength of the large core was about 10% of that predicted. Although the large core contained a complex joint system, its overall permeability was dominated by a single open fracture normal to the axis. Using a simple parallel-plate analog, changes in the equivalent single-fracture aperture under load were significantly less than closures measured by means of linear variable differential transformers situated across the main fracture. 11 references.

  4. Numerical modeling of mullions in the Taili high deformation zone, North China: Implications for the rheology of granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiyong; Zeng, Zuoxun; Mohammed, Adil S.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a combined field measurement and finite element modeling analysis of the mullions occurring on the contact of two granitic rocks with different grain size in the Taili High-Strain Deformation Zone (THDZ), West Liaoning of North China. All of the field data are located in the plot zone of the modeling results. Numerical modeling results indicate that: (1) The inter-angle between the tangent lines cross the cusp point and the ratio R of amplitude and width of mullions are the most effective parameters to describe the geometric shape and evolution of mullions, as well as useful indicators of the rheology of rocks. (2) The competence contrast controls the growth rate of mullions under shortening. It determines the possible ratio R of final mullions. Moreover, decreasing of the cusp angle in high competence contrast materials is faster than that in low competence contrast model. (3) The initial disturbance is an essential factor for the generation of mullions. Those contacts with higher initial disturbance will develop into mullions more easily and have a high growth rate during the same shortening deformation regime. (4) The rheology and deformation behavior of the granitic rocks in the study area are primarily controlled by the grain sizes of quartz and feldspar. The effective viscosity ratio of biotite adamellite and granitic gneisses is about 0.01-0.5. The deformation mechanisms of these granitic rocks should be dominated by a grain-size-sensitive diffusion creep.

  5. Heterogeneous in situ stress magnitudes due to the presence of weak natural discontinuities in granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chandong; Jo, Yeonguk

    2015-11-01

    Two field examples of hydraulic fracturing stress measurements are reported, in which the determined stress magnitudes exhibit severe variations with depth. The stress measurements were conducted in vertical boreholes drilled in granites in two different locations in South Korea. Several isolated intervals of intact rocks in the boreholes were vertically fractured by injecting water. The magnitudes of the minimum horizontal principal compressive stress (Shmin) were determined from shut-in pressures. The magnitudes of the maximum horizontal principal compressive stress (SHmax) were estimated based on the Kirsch equation using tensile strengths determined from hollow cylinder tests and Brazilian tests, in which pressurization-rate effects on tensile strength were taken into account. The stress states in both locations are in reverse-faulting stress regimes. The magnitudes of SHmax are generally within a stress range defined by frictional limits of favorably oriented fractures having frictional coefficients of 0.6 and 1.0. However, SHmax magnitudes do not increase linearly with depth, but rather scatter quite severely. It is noted that near the depths where the measured stresses are relatively low, natural discontinuities with wide apertures containing weak filling material exist, whereas near the depths of high stress, such wide discontinuities are scarce. Wide aperture discontinuities are predominantly oriented such that their slip tendency is high under the given stress conditions, meaning that if excessive shear stress is exerted, the weak discontinuities would slip to release the excessive stress. Such local processes would restrict SHmax magnitudes within values that can only be sustained by the shear strengths of the discontinuities, leading to severe variations of SHmax with depth. This result suggests that stress magnitudes are controlled quite locally by the frictional property of natural discontinuities, and that the stress state in granitic rock might be

  6. Distinction between S-type and peraluminous I-type granites: Zircon versus whole-rock geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Zhao, Zi-Fu

    2016-08-01

    Biotite and two-mica granites are common in continental crust. Although they are generally peraluminous in lithochemistry, their petrogenesis has been controversial. Because they often show a negative correlation between P2O5 and SiO2 and a positive correlation between A/CNK and SiO2, they are commonly considered as the I-type granites of metaigneous origin. However, such lithochemical consideration is not certain in view of their other geochemical characteristics. To constrain the source nature of peraluminous granites, we performed a combined study of in situ U-Pb age, O isotope, and trace element for synmagmatic and relict zircons from Triassic biotite and two-mica granites in the Nanling Range, South China. Zircon U-Pb dating yields concordant ages of 230 ± 3 to 237 ± 3 Ma for synmagmatic zircons, and 335-2379 Ma for relict zircons with two clusters at ca. 440 Ma and ca. 800 Ma, respectively. Both the synmagmatic zircons and the ~ 440 Ma relict zircons are characterized by high δ18O values of 8.8-11.4‰ and 8.6-10.3‰, respectively. In contrast, the majority of the other relict zircons show relatively low δ18O values of 5.1-7.9‰. The high δ18O values for synmagmatic zircons indicate that the Triassic granites were originated from metasedimentary sources. The two age clusters for relict zircons overlap with two episodes of granitic magmatism, respectively, in the early Paleozoic and the middle Neoproterozoic in South China, suggesting their inheritance from the metasedimentary sources. Thus, these Triassic granites were derived from partial melting of metasedimentary rocks rather than metaigneous rocks; they belong to S-type granite although their lithochemical relationships are akin to common I-type granites. As such, the zircon in situ geochemical analyses have the capacity to unravel the source nature of controversial granites. Our data indicate that fractional crystallization of heterogeneous magmas is the possible mechanism for the decoupling

  7. Zircon U-Pb ages and geochemistry of Devonian A-type granites in the Iraqi Zagros Suture Zone (Damamna area): New evidence for magmatic activity related to the Hercynian orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulzahra, Imad Kadhim; Hadi, Ayten; Asahara, Yoshihiro; Azizi, Hossein; Yamamoto, Koshi

    2016-11-01

    The Damamna granite (DG) is located in the Shalair Valley area in northeast Iraq within the Sanandaj Sirjan Zone (SSZ). The zircon U-Pb ages for the DG rocks are 364-372 Ma, indicating crystallization of the granitic body. The DG rocks are A-type granites, hypersolvus and peraluminous. They are enriched in SiO2, alkalis, Ga/Al, Ga, Zr and Rb/Sr and depleted in CaO, MgO, Sr, P, and Ti. These rocks show steep REE patterns, with LREE enrichment relative to HREE ((La/Yb)N = 5.7-42.5) and pronounced negative Eu anomalies reflecting feldspar fractionation. The geochemical characteristics and relationships suggest that the DG rocks are anorogenic and were emplaced in an extensional tectonic regime having an OIB-like magma affinity. The DG rocks are characterized by low Y/Nb ratios (0.2-1.5) and positive εNd (371 Ma) values (+ 1.6 to + 4.2), which indicate a mantle origin. In the Y/Nb-Yb/Ta diagram, the DG rocks plot in the A1-type granite field, with slightly higher Y/Nb values and a tendency of transitioning from A1 to the nearby A2 field, which possibly indicates a slight crustal contamination effect. The isotopic and geochemical data suggest that a combination of enriched mantle source magma with crustal contamination and fractional crystallization contributed to the generation of the magma for the DG. The geochemical and geochronological results for the DG rocks in the SSZ suggest an extensional zone that probably represents an early stage of Neo-Tethys opening during the Late Devonian or earlier, and this was associated with the Hercynian orogeny and tectono-magmatic activity in northern Arabia and northwestern Iran.

  8. The influence of hydraulic conductivity, open porosity, and formation factor on P-wave velocities in granitic rock matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosna, K.; Najser, J.; Havlova, V.; Vecernik, P.; Zaruba, J.

    2012-12-01

    This laboratory study of the hydraulic and physical properties of granite rocks focuses on granitic rock matrix. The investigation specifically relates to the planned disposal of radioactive waste in the Czech Republic. 118 samples from nine granitic rock massifs were subjected to hydraulic conductivity, open porosity, and P-wave velocity measurements. Hydraulic conductivity was measured in pressure cells. The constant hydraulic head was applied by pressure controllers and the volume of water that passed through the specimen was recorded. Open porosity was obtained by weighing saturated and dry specimens. P-wave velocities were measured in oven dried specimens using an apparatus that consisted of two pairs of piezosensors (Olympus V103 and V153) used as transmitter and receiver, a precise impulse generator, and an oscilloscope. The formation factor was calculated from forty-five through-diffusion experiments, measured using 3H tracers. The activities in both input and output reservoirs were regularly monitored using liquid scintillation spectrometry. Hydraulic conductivities of different granitic rocks varied from 2.29×10-9 to 1×10-14 m.s-1. Open porosities were determined between 11.89 and 0.23%. Formation factors were calculated between 1.14×10-2 and 1.65×10-4 while the P-wave velocities ranged from 2.26 to 5.91 km.s-1. The tests results show that increasing hydraulic conductivity, open porosity, and formation factor correlates with decreasing P-wave velocities in the laboratory specimens. Ultrasonic measurements of the oven dried laboratory specimens are able to predict anomalies in the hydraulic and physical parameters of the granitic rock.

  9. The chemical and isotopic record of rock-water interaction in the Sherman Granite, Wyoming and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zielinski, R.A.; Peterman, Z.E.; Stuckless, J.S.; Rosholt, J.N.; Nkomo, I.T.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical, isotopic, radiographic, and rock-leaching data are combined to describe the effects of rock-water interactions in core samples of petrographically fresh, 1.43 b.y.-old Sherman Granite. The data serve to identify sensitive indicators of incipient alteration and to estimate the degree, pathways, and timing of element mobilization. Unfractured core samples of Sherman Granite are remarkably fresh by most chemical or isotopic criteria, but incipient alteration is indicated by the abundance and distribution of uranium and the degree of radioactive equilibration of uranium with its decay products. Uranium abundances which are out of equilibrium with lead decay products indicate remobilization of a portion (3 to 60 percent) of original uranium in late Phanerozoic time. Association of uranium with minor but pervasive secondary alteration products also indicates some remobilization. The amount of apparent uranium mobility in unfractured Sherman Granite (3 to 60 percent) is small compared to the results of similar studies of Archean granites from nearby localities. Chemical and isotopic data evaluated as a function of core-sample depth suggest a uranium migrational pathway involving near-surface leaching and reconcentration at depth. Movement of solutions through the upper 200 ft (60 m) of Sherman Granite is fracture controlled, and brecciated granite shows more obvious petrographic, chemical, and isotopic evidence of alteration and multi-element redistribution. Laboratory experiments using freshly crushed Sherman Granite confirm that uranium is leached in preference to elements such as Si, Mg, Ca, and K, and that leachable uranium is situated close to the solid-liquid interface; perhaps as uranium along grain boundaries, in crystal defects, or on cleavage traces of minerals that exclude uranium from their structure. ?? 1981 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Matrix diffusion of some alkali- and alkaline earth-metals in granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, H.; Byegaard, J.; Skarnemark, G.; Skaalberg, M.

    1997-12-31

    Static through-diffusion experiments were performed to study the diffusion of alkali- and alkaline earth-metals in fine-grained granite and medium-grained Aespoe-diorite. Tritiated water was used as an inert reference tracer. Radionuclides of the alkali- and alkaline earth-metals (mono- and divalent elements which are not influenced by hydrolysis in the pH-range studied) were used as tracers, i.e., {sup 22}Na{sup +}, {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} and {sup 85}Sr{sup 2+}. The effective diffusivity and the rock capacity factor were calculated by fitting the breakthrough curve to the one-dimensional solution of the diffusion equation. Sorption coefficients, K{sub d}, that were derived from the rock capacity factor (diffusion experiments) were compared with K{sub d} determined in batch experiments using crushed material of different size fractions. The results show that the tracers were retarded in the same order as was expected from the measured batch K{sub d}. Furthermore, the largest size fraction was the most representative when comparing batch K{sub d} with K{sub d} evaluated from the diffusion experiments. The observed effective diffusivities tended to decrease with increasing cell lengths, indicating that the transport porosity decreases with increasing sample lengths used in the diffusion experiments.

  11. Ultrastructural and genetic characteristics of endolithic cyanobacterial biofilms colonizing Antarctic granite rocks.

    PubMed

    de los Ríos, Asunción; Grube, Martin; Sancho, Leopoldo G; Ascaso, Carmen

    2007-02-01

    The precise identification of the cyanobacteria that comprise an endolithic biofilm is hindered by difficulties in culturing the organisms found in these biofilms and a lack of previous molecular and ultrastructural data. This study characterizes, both at the ultrastructural and molecular level, two different cyanobacterial biofilms found in fissures of granite from continental Antarctica. Electron microscopy revealed structural differences between the two biofilms. One was only loosely adhered to the substrate, while the other biofilm showed a closer association between cells and rock minerals and was tightly attached to the substrate. Cells from both biofilms where ultrastructurally distinct, displaying, for instance, clear differences in their sheaths. The amounts of EPS and their organization associated with the cyanobacteria may determine the differences in adhesion and effects on the lithic substrate observed in the biofilms. By sequencing part of the 16S rRNA gene, the two cyanobacteria were also genetically characterized. The gene sequence of the cells comprising the biofilm that was tightly attached to the lithic substrate showed most homology with that of an endolithic cyanobacterium from Switzerland (AY153458), and the cyanobacterial type loosely adhered to the rock, clustered with Acaryochloris marina, the only organism unequivocally known to contain chlorophyll d. This study reveals the presence of at least two different types of endolithic biofilm, dominated each by a single type of cyanobacterium, able to withstand the harsh conditions of the Antarctic climate.

  12. Gamma radiation measurements and dose rates in commercially-used natural tiling rocks (granites).

    PubMed

    Tzortzis, Michalis; Tsertos, Haralabos; Christofides, Stelios; Christodoulides, George

    2003-01-01

    The gamma radiation in samples of a variety of natural tiling rocks (granites) imported in Cyprus for use in the building industry was measured, employing high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The rock samples were pulverised, sealed in 1-l plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory with an accumulating time between 10 and 14 h each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined for (232)Th (range from 1 to 906 Bq kg(-1)), (238)U (from 1 to 588 Bq kg(-1)) and (40)K (from 50 to 1606 Bq kg(-1)). The total absorbed dose rates in air calculated from the concentrations of the three radionuclides ranged from 7 to 1209 nGy h(-1) for full utilization of the materials, from 4 to 605 nGy h(-1) for half utilization and from 2 to 302 nGy h(-1) for one quarter utilization. The total effective dose rates per person indoors were determined to be between 0.02 and 2.97 mSv y(-1) for half utilization of the materials. Applying dose criteria recently recommended by the EU for superficial materials, 25 of the samples meet the exemption dose limit of 0.3 mSv y(-1), two of them meet the upper dose limit of 1 mSv y(-1) and only one clearly exceeds this limit.

  13. Characterization and origin of the Taishanmiao aluminous A-type granites: implications for Early Cretaceous lithospheric thinning at the southern margin of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changming; Chen, Liang; Bagas, Leon; Lu, Yongjun; He, Xinyu; Lai, Xiangru

    2016-07-01

    Late Mesozoic magmatic rocks from the Taishanmiao Batholith were collected for LA-ICP-MS dating, Sr-Nd-Hf isotope systematics, and whole-rock major and trace element geochemistry to help understand the nature of collisional and extensional events along the southern margin of the North China Craton. The batholith consists of three texturally distinguishable phases of a 125 ± 1 Ma medium- to coarse-grained syenogranite, a 121 ± 1 Ma fine- to medium-grained syenogranite, and a 113 ± 1 Ma porphyritic monzogranite. Most of the units in the batholith are syenogranitic in composition with high levels of silica (70-78 wt% SiO2), alkalis (8.0-8.6 wt% Na2O + K2O), Fe* (FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) = 0.76-0.90), and depletion in CaO (0.34-1.37 wt%), MgO (0.12-0.52 wt%), TiO2 (0.09-0.40 wt%), and A/CNK (Al2O3/(Na2O + K2O + CaO)) molar ratios of 1.00-1.11. All samples have high proportions of Ga, Nb, Zr, Ga/Al, and REE, and depletions in Ba, Sr, Eu, and compatible elements, indicating that the batholith consists of A-type granites. The zircon saturation temperature for these units yields a mean value of 890 °C, and zircons with Early Cretaceous magmatic ages have ɛNd( t) values of -14.0 to -12.0, ɛHf( t) values ranging from -18.7 to -2.1, and corresponding Hf model ages of 2339-1282 Ma. These geochemical and isotopic characteristics allowed us to conclude that the primary magma for the Taishanmiao Batholith originated from partial melting of Precambrian crustal rocks in the medium-lower crust. However, the high Nb and Ta contents and low normalized Nb/Ta values for the Taishanmiao granites are due to fractionation in Nb- and Ta-rich amphibole (or biotite). It is further proposed that these aluminous A-type granites were generated in an extensional tectonic setting during the Early Cretaceous, which was induced by lithospheric thinning and asthenospheric upwelling beneath eastern China toward the Paleo-Pacific Plate.

  14. Role of magma pressure, tectonic stress and crystallization progress in the emplacement of syntectonic granites. The A-type Estrela Granite Complex (Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, C. E. M.; Barbey, P.; Boullier, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    The Archaean, syntectonic, A-type Estrela Granite Complex (Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil) consists of three plutons emplaced in a greenstone sequence under low-pressure conditions (180< P<310 MPa). It is composed mainly of annite-, ferropargasite (±hedenbergite)- and ilmenite-bearing monzogranites. The contact aureole is affected by a subvertical penetrative schistosity conformable with the limits of the plutons. Meso- to microstructures and mineral reactions in the granites indicate that deformation occurred in a continuum from above-solidus to low- T subsolidus conditions. Two distinct planar structures are observed: (i) a concentrical primary foliation (S 0) corresponding to rhythmic, isomodal, phase layering associated with a faint grain shape fabric; it is horizontal in the centre and vertical towards the edges of the plutons; and (ii) a steep to subvertical foliation (S 1) associated with the deformation of S 0 and accompanied with emplacement of synplutonic dykes and veins of leucocratic granites and pegmatites. Emplacement, differentiation and consolidation of the Estrela Granite Complex are considered to result from a continuous evolution under decreasing temperatures in a single-stage strained crust (transpression), with two main periods. (1) The first period is controlled by body forces, and it corresponds to inflation with magma ponding. As long as the rheology is melt dominated, magma pressure is the critical parameter and almost no strain is recorded. With decreasing T, magmas crystallize and differentiate leading to a concentrical magmatic phase layering. The growing magmatic bodies are mechanically decoupled from the country rocks and their evolution depends on internal magma chamber processes. (2) For higher amount of crystallization (residual melt fraction F<0.5), the role of magma pressure becomes insignificant. Establishment of a continuous crystal framework leads to the coupling of plutons with their surroundings, and deformation in

  15. Geochemical and zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic study of the Baijuhuajian metaluminous A-type granite: Extension at 125-100 Ma and its tectonic significance for South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jean; Sun, Min; Xing, Guangfu; Li, Xian-hua; Zhao, Guochun; Wong, Kenny; Yuan, Chao; Xia, Xiaoping; Li, Longming; Wu, Fuyuan

    2009-10-01

    The Early Cretaceous Baijuhuajian pluton is an A-type granitic intrusion, emplaced along the Jiangshan-Shaoxing (JSSX) fault zone in western Zhejiang Province, SE South China. It intruded into a Late Jurassic volcanic basin bounded by Proterozoic sandstone and siltstone. The granite has a coarse-grained, porphyritic texture and is composed of alkali feldspar phenocrysts in a matrix of K-feldspar, quartz, plagioclase and biotite. The pluton has a clear A-type geochemical signature, e.g. it is metaluminous (A/CNK ~ 1.0) and has high SiO 2 (75 to 78 wt.%), total alkalis (Na 2O + K 2O = 4.8 to 8.5 wt.%), rare earth elements (total REE = 228 to 438 ppm), HFSE and Fe* [FeO t/(FeO t + MgO) = 0.87 to 0.97]. On the other hand, it is characterized by low CaO (0.51 to 1.01 wt.%), TiO 2 (0.06 to 0.13 wt.%), P 2O 5 (below detection) and Sr (7.0 to 9.5 ppm). The hypersolvus texture and fine-grained groundmass indicate emplacement at a shallow-depth. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating yielded a weighted mean 206Pb/ 238U age of 126 ± 3 Ma and zircons from this pluton give ɛHf( T) values between - 0.52 and + 4.24, suggesting the importance of juvenile material in the magma source. Most of the plutonic rocks in southeast China are calc-alkaline, subduction-related intrusions of Jurassic and Cretaceous age. Previous studies suggested that the sparse A-type granites in South China were emplaced in two episodes: 190-155 Ma in the inland area and ~ 100 Ma along the coastal area in SE South China. Our study of the Baijuhuajian granite, together with the coeval Suzhou A-type granite (123 Ma) in Jiangsu Province, defines an important extensional event between 125 and 100 Ma. Considering the available data for the Mesozoic igneous rocks in South China, we suggest that subduction of the Pacific plate in the Mesozoic produced voluminous calc-alkaline granitoids and volcanic rocks with a younging trend from west to east. The A-type granites were generated during periods of local extension at 190

  16. Alteration and breakdown of xenotime-(Y) and monazite-(Ce) in granitic rocks of the Western Carpathians, Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broska, Igor; Williams, C. Terry; Janák, Marian; Nagy, Géza

    2005-05-01

    In the granitic rocks of the Western Carpathians, xenotime-(Y) occurs both as a late-stage magmatic mineral, and as a secondary post-magmatic phase. Magmatic xenotime occurs with monazite and displays minor compositional zonation involving Si, Th and U. The source of elements for the formation of secondary xenotime-(Y) in the granitic rocks results from leaching of P and (Y+REE), mainly from zircon and apatite. Both xenotime-(Y) and monazite-(Ce) are unstable during fluid-activated overprinting. Low temperature alteration of monazite in S-type granites leads to the formation of apatite enriched in the britholite component, but low to medium grades of metamorphism result in the formation of apatite and LREE enriched epidote (partly allanite) as a corona enclosing the monazite-(Ce) core. Xenotime-(Y) shows a similar alteration pattern, but with different REE distributions within the products. At greenschist/amphibolite facies, rims of secondary Y-rich apatite and Y-rich epidote form around xenotime-(Y). In low-Ca granites however, apatite is missing from this alteration assemblage as xenotime-(Y) breaks down directly to Y-enriched epidote. The relative mobilities of the heavy and light REE are different during breakdown of monazite and xenotime. The fluid responsible for the breakdown of monazite and xenotime contains elements released from alteration of anorthite (Ca) and biotite (Si, Al and F).

  17. K-Ar age constrains on chemically weathered granitic basement rocks (saprolites) in Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margreth, Annina; Fredin, Ola; Viola, Giulio; Knies, Jochen; Sørlie, Ronald; Lie, Jan-Erik; Margrethe Grandal, Else; Zwingmann, Horst; Vogt, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Remnants of in-situ weathered bedrock, saprolite, are found in several locations in Scandinavia. Saprolites contain important information about past climate conditions and landscape evolution, although their age and genesis are commonly difficult to constrain. It is generally thought that clay-poor, coarse-grained (arêne) saprolites, mostly occurring as thin regolith blankets or in larger outcrops, formed in temperate climate during the Cenozoic, whereas clay-rich (argillic) saprolites, commonly restricted to small, fracture-bounded outcrops, formed in (sub-)tropical climate during the Mesozoic. Recent methodological and conceptual advances in K-Ar dating of illite-bearing fault rocks have been applied to date clay-rich saprolites. To test the K-Ar dating technique for saprolites, we first selected an offshore site in the Viking Graben of the North Sea, where weathered and fractured granitic basement highs have been drilled during petroleum exploration, and an abandoned kaolin mine in Southern Sweden. Both targets provide independent age control through the presence of overlying Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. Clay-rich saprolites occurring in fractured basement rocks were additionally sampled in a joint valley landscape on the southwestern coast of Norway, which can be regarded as the possible onland correlative to the offshore basement high. In order to offer a sound interpretation of the obtained K-Ar ages, the mineralogical and chemical composition of the saprolites requires a thorough characterization. Scanning electron microscopy of thin sections, integrated by XRD and XRF analysis, reveals the progressive transformation of primary granitic rock minerals into secondary clay minerals. The authigenesis of illite is particularly important to understand, since it is the only K-bearing clay mineral that can be dated by the K-Ar method. K-feldspars and mica are the common primary K-bearing minerals, from which illite can be formed. While progressive leaching of

  18. Minerals Associated with Biofilms Occurring on Exposed Rock in a Granitic Underground Research Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. Ann; Kamineni, D. Choudari; Sawicki, Jerzy A.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites. Images PMID:16349374

  19. Minerals associated with biofilms occurring on exposed rock in a granitic underground research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Kamineni, D C; Sawicki, J A; Beveridge, T J

    1994-09-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites.

  20. Thermophilic fermentative bacteria from a deep borehole in granitic rock in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewzyk, Ulrich; Szewzyk, Regine; Stenstroem, Thor-Axel

    1997-07-01

    A borehole drilled to a final depth of 6779 m in granitic rock in Gravberg, Sweden, was sampled and examined for the presence and activity of anaerobic bacteria. The application of anaerobic enrichment and isolation techniques resulted in pure cultures of various fermenting bacteria. Growth in enrichment cultures was observed only in those cultures inoculated from water samples from a depth of 3500 m. Pure cultures of anaerobic, fermenting bacteria were obtained with the following substrates: glucose, starch, xylane, ethanol, and lactate. All isolated bacteria were so far undiscribed bacteria by means of their physiological properties. One strain of the glucose fermenting bacteria was further characterized concerning its phylogenetic position and was found to be closest related to Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum. However, by means of its characteristic metabolism, it was clearly separated from C. thermohydrosulfuricum. No sulfate-reducing or methanogenic bacteria were found in any of the samples. Fermentative bacteria growing in the presence of hematite often reduced the iron and induced the formation and deposition of insoluble iron sulfides.

  1. Application of drastic model and GIS: for assessing vulnerability in hard rock granitic aquifer.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ranjeet Kumar; Singh, V S; Krishnamacharyulu, S K G; Banerjee, Pallavi

    2011-05-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) has become one of the leading tools in the field of hydrogeological science that helps in assessing, monitoring, and conserving groundwater resources. Groundwater is a finite resource, which is being overexploited due to increase in demand over the years leading to decrease in its potentiality. In the present study, DRASTIC model has been used to prepare groundwater vulnerable zone in hard rock aquifer of granitic terrain. The main objective is to determine susceptible zone for groundwater pollution by integrating hydrogeological layers in GIS environment. The layers such as depth of aquifer, recharge, aquifer yield, soil type, topography, vadose zone, and transmissivity are incorporated in the DRASTIC model. The final output of the map shows that around 60% of the area falls under low to no risk of pollution zone. The high risk of pollution zones are mostly present towards the margin of southeastern periphery. The lower part of the basin as well as small area on northern side falls under moderate risk of pollution zone. For the assessment of groundwater pollution zone, 24 groundwater samples have been collected from different vulnerable zones. The chemical analysis of sample shows that the southeastern margin of basin has relatively high concentration of nitrate as compared to other parts of the basin. It is present in high pollution zone as well as moderate pollution zone. The present model can be used for assessment and management of groundwater.

  2. Stimulation of a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir in the Cornubian Granite, England

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A hot dry rock geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2000 m in granite. The stimulation was carried out using 40,000 m/sup 3/ (10 million US gal) from a 350 m open hole section that had been treated with a purpose-designed explosive tool. On-line seismic mapping has shown that the reservoir has developed in the direction of the maximum principal stress despite the fact tht the joint directions are not orientated in that direction. Photographic and television inspection has been used to correlate acoustic seisviewer and conventional wire logging results including observations of fracture width at the wellbore during pressurization. Downward growth of the reservoir has been observed despite the fact that the stimulation fluid was fresh water. This has been explained tentatively as predominantly shear growth because the shear stress gradient is sub-hydrostatic due to the highly anisotropic stress field. Preliminary calculations have shown that the reservoir structure has a volume of 100 to 200 million m/sup 3/ but there is no direct, low resistance flow path between the wells and the residence time is in excess of 5 days.

  3. Pb and O isotopic constraints on the source of granitic rocks from Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, R.A.; Barr, S.M.; Longstaffe, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Pb isotopic compositions of leached feldspars from twenty-three plutons in Cape Breton Island can be divided into two groups: anorthosite, syenite, and granite in the Blair River Complex, which have the least radiogenic compositions on the Island, and granitic rocks from terranes (Aspy, Bras d'Or, and Mira) to the south. Pb isotopic data for the Blair River Complex (206Pb/204Pb = 17.399-18.107; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.505-15.560; 208Pb/204Pb = 36.689-37.733) are consistent with an old source region ultimately derived from the mantle and contaminated by sialic crust. Oxygen isotopic compositions of syenite in the Blair River Complex (??18O = +8.0 to +8.5 permil) are slightly higher than anorthosite (+7.0 to +8.3 permil); a Silurian granite in the Blair River Complex has ??18O = +7.5 permil. Cambrian to Devonian plutons in the Aspy, Bras d'Or, and Mira terranes are more radiogenic (206Pb/204Pb = 18.192-18.981; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.574-15.712; 208Pb/ 204Pb =37.815-38.936) than the Blair River Complex and were generated from source regions having a predominant crustal Pb signature (high ??). The ??18O values of granites and granodiorites in the Aspy terrane (+7.5 to +9.2 permil; avg = +8.6 permil) and Bras d'Or (+3.7 to +11.3 permil; avg = +9.4 permil) are also consistent with involvement of sialic crust. Many Late Proterozoic granites from the Mira terrane have anomalously low ??18O values (+0.2 to +5.9 permil), perhaps produced from protoliths that had undergone hydrothermal alteration prior to melting. Paleozoic granitic rocks from the Aspy, Bras d'Or, and Mira terranes cannot be uniquely distinguished on the basis of their Pb and O isotopic compositions. The granitic rocks could have been generated during terrane amalgamation from combinations of unradiogenic (Grenville-like) and more radiogenic (Avalon-like) sources.

  4. Zircon Geochemistry of Granitic Rocks from Ong Valley and Moraine Canyon in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Morgan, D. J.; Claiborne, L. L.; Padilla, A. J.; Edwards, K. L.; Putkonen, J.; Bibby, T.; Cribb, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    A number of granitic rocks exposed throughout the Central Transantarctic Mountains (CTAM) are thought to have been generated during and following the Ross Orogeny (late Cambrian to early Ordovician). Understanding the origin of these rocks can help improve our understanding of the tectonic events responsible for the suturing of Gondwana. In this study, we use zircon as a tool to investigate the magmatic origins and evolution of CTAM granites. Zircon has a low solubility in almost all melt and fluid compositions, is stable and resistant to alteration at Earth's surface, and is physically durable during transport. These features enable it to survive many crustal processes during which most other minerals are destroyed, thus preserving an important geochemical record of its crystallizing environments. We collected granitic samples from two sites in the CTAM: Ong Valley (157.5°E, 83.25°S), where the Hope Granite is exposed intruded into pre-Cambrian gneisses, and Moraine Canyon (157.55°W, 86.1°S), where bedrock exposure is dominated by a silicic porphyry of the Wyatt Formation. Our zircon U-Pb data, collected in-situ by laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS, suggests that the Hope Granite has a mean weighted crystallization age of 582 ± 23 Ma (2σ; n=26), older than the published age (510 ± 9 Ma, 1σ; whole-rock Rb-Sr isochrons; Faure & Mensing, 2010). The spread in individual zircon ages is consistent with previous estimates for the duration of intrusion (~20 Myr) of the Hope Granite. Published ages for Wyatt Fm rocks range from ~525 to ~800 Ma, but their origin is uncertain. We will analyze zircons from the Wyatt porphyry for U-Pb isotopes (by LA-ICP-MS) to better constrain its age. In addition, we will obtain trace element compositions of zircons from both intrusions to investigate their magmatic origins. This will allow us to explore potential geochemical connections between the intrusions, and may yield additional insight into the tectonic events involved in the Ross

  5. Petrogenesis of A-type granites and origin of vertical zoning in the Katharina pluton, Gebel Mussa (Mt. Moses) area, Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzir, Y.; Eyal, M.; Litvinovsky, B. A.; Jahn, B. M.; Zanvilevich, A. N.; Valley, J. W.; Beeri, Y.; Pelly, I.; Shimshilashvili, E.

    2007-05-01

    The central pluton within the Neoproterozoic Katharina Ring Complex (area of Gebel Mussa, traditionally believed to be the biblical Mt. Sinai) shows a vertical compositional zoning: syenogranite makes up the bulk of the pluton and grades upwards to alkali-feldspar granites. The latters form two horizontal subzones, an albite-alkali feldspar (Ab-Afs) granite and an uppermost perthite granite. These two varieties are chemically indistinguishable. Syenogranite, as compared with alkali-feldspar granites, is richer in Ca, Sr, K, Ba and contains less SiO 2, Rb, Y, Nb and U; Eu/Eu* values are 0.22-0.33 for syenogranite and 0.08-0.02 for alkali-feldspar granites. The δ18O (Qtz) is rather homogeneous throughout the pluton, 8.03-8.55‰. The δ18O (Afs) values in the syenogranite are appreciably lower relative to those in the alkali-feldspar granites: 7.59-8.75‰ vs. 8.31-9.12‰. A Rb-Sr isochron ( n = 9) yields an age of 593 ± 16 Ma for the Katharina Ring Complex (granite pluton and ring dikes). The alkali-feldspar granites were generated mainly by fractional crystallization of syenogranite magma. The model for residual melt extraction and accumulation is based on the estimated extent of crystallization (˜ 50 wt.%), which approximates the rigid percolation threshold for silicic melts. The fluid-rich residual melt could be separated efficiently by its upward flow through the rigid clusters of crystal phase. Crystallization of the evolved melt started with formation of hypersolvus granite immediately under the roof. Fluid influx from the inner part of the pluton to its apical zone persisted and caused increase of PH2O in the magma below the perthite granite zone. Owing to the presence of F and Ca in the melt, PH2O of only slightly more than 1 kbar allows crystallization of subsolvus Ab-Afs granite. Abundance of turbid alkali feldspars and their 18O/ 16O enrichment suggest that crystallization of alkali-feldspar granites was followed by subsolvus fluid-rock interaction

  6. Early Permian East-Ujimqin mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks from the Xing'an-Mongolian Orogenic Belt, North China: Origin, chronology, and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yinhang; Teng, Xuejian; Li, Yanfeng; Li, Min; Zhang, Tianfu

    2014-12-01

    The East-Ujimqin complex, located north of the Erenhot-Hegenshan fault, North China, is composed of mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks including peridotite, gabbro, alkali granite, and syenite. We investigated the tectonic setting, age, and anorogenic characteristics of the Xing'an-Mongolian Orogenic Belt (XMOB) through field investigation and microscopic and geochemical analyses of samples from the East-Ujimqin complex and LA-MC-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating of gabbro and alkali granite. Petrographic and geochemical studies of the complex indicate that this multiphase plutonic suite developed through a combination of fractional crystallization, assimilation processes, and magma mixing. The mafic-ultramafic rocks are alkaline and have within-plate geochemical characteristics, indicating anorogenic magmatism in an extensional setting and derivation from a mantle source. The mafic-ultramafic magmas triggered partial melting of the crust and generated the granitic rocks. The granitic rocks are alkali and metaluminous and have high Fe/(Fe + Mg) characteristics, all of which are common features of within-plate plutons. Zircon U-Pb geochronological dating of two samples of gabbro and alkali granite yielded ages of 280.8 ± 1.5 and 276.4 ± 0.7 Ma, placing them within the Early Permian. The zircon Hf isotopic data give inhomogeneous εHf(t) values of 8.2-14.7 for gabbroic zircons and extraordinary high εHf(t) values (8.9-12.5) for the alkali granite in magmatic zircons. Thus, we consider the East-Ujimqin mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks to have been formed in an extensional tectonic setting caused by asthenospheric upwelling and lithospheric thinning. The sources of mafic-ultramafic and granitic rocks could be depleted garnet lherzolite mantle and juvenile continental lower crust, respectively. All the above indicate that an anorogenic magma event may have occurred in part of the XMOB during 280-276 Ma.

  7. Connectivity of pores and electrical conductivity in a brine-saturated granitic rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makimura, M.; Watanabe, T.; Desbois, G.; Yoneda, A.

    2016-12-01

    Electrical conductivity in fluid-saturated rocks, as well as permeability, is highly sensitive to the connectivity of pores. In their pioneering work, Brace et al. (1965) showed that electrical conductivity of brine-saturated rocks largely decreased with increasing confining pressure. The decrease rate was quite high at low pressure (<50 MPa) and decreased at high pressure. The conductivity drop must be caused by the closure of cracks under confining pressure. Later, Johnson and Manning (1986) reasonably reproduced the observed conductivity change with a network of compliant cracks and stiff pores. Stiff pores maintained the electrical conduction at high pressures. However, the relationship between the conductivity and the amount of cracks has not been investigated. The nature of stiff pores has been poorly understood. We thus conducted simultaneous measurements of elastic wave velocities and electrical conductivity in a brine-saturated granitic rock under confining pressures. In order to study the relationship between the conductivity and the amount of cracks, the crack density parameter was estimated from measured velocities. Pores in a sample were examined with XCT and BIB-SEM. The confining pressure was increased to 150 MPa, keeping the pore-fluid pressure of 0.1 MPa. We observed large decreases in conductivity, which were quite similar to the results of Brace et al. (1965). Conductivity decreased by one order of magnitude below the confining pressure of 20 MPa, and showed a small decrease at higher pressures. XCT images showed that open grain boundaries were the dominant pores. The large decrease in conductivity occurred around the crack density parameter of 0.1, suggesting that the large decrease be related to the percolation of open grain boundaries. BIB-SEM images revealed microstructures of open grain boundaries. There are two types of open grain boundaries: smooth boundaries and serrated boundaries. Smooth open grain boundaries are closed at low pressures

  8. Hydrothermal modification of host rock geochemistry within Mo-Cu porphyry deposits in the Galway Granite, western Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolometti, Gavin; McCarthy, Will

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal alteration of host rock is a process inherent to the formation of porphyry deposits and the required geochemical modification of these rocks is regularly used to indicate proximity to an economic target. The study involves examining the changes in major, minor and trace elements to understand how the quartz vein structures have influenced the chemistry within the Murvey Granite that forms part of the 380-425Ma Galway Granite Complex in western Ireland. Molybdenite mineralisation within the Galway Granite Complex occurred in close association with protracted magmatism at 423Ma, 410Ma, 407Ma, 397Ma and 383Ma and this continues to be of interest to active exploration. The aim of the project is to characterize hydrothermal alteration associated with Mo-Cu mineralisation and identify geochemical indicators that can guide future exploration work. The Murvey Granite intrudes metagabbros and gneiss that form part of the Connemara Metamorphic complex. The intrusion is composed of albite-rich pink granite, garnetiferous granite and phenocrytic orthoclase granite. Minor doleritic dykes post-date the Murvey Granite, found commonly along its margins. Field mapping shows that the granite is truncated to the east by a regional NW-SE fault and that several small subparallel structures host Mo-Cu bearing quartz veins. Petrographic observations show heavily sericitized feldspars and plagioclase and biotite which have undergone kaolinization and chloritisation. Chalcopyrite minerals are fine grained, heavily fractured found crystallized along the margins of the feldspars and 2mm pyrite crystals. Molybdenite are also seen along the margins of the feldspars, crystallized whilst the Murvey Granite cooled. Field and petrographic observations indicate that mineralisation is structurally controlled by NW-SE faults from the selected mineralization zones and conjugate NE-SW cross cutting the Murvey Granite. Both fault orientations exhibit quartz and disseminated molybdenite

  9. A microfluidic approach to water-rock interactions using thin rock sections: Pb and U sorption onto thin shale and granite sections.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youn Soo; Jo, Ho Young; Ryu, Ji-Hun; Kim, Geon-Young

    2017-02-15

    The feasibility of using microfluidic tests to investigate water-rock (mineral) interactions in fractures regarding sorption onto thin rock sections (i.e., shale and granite) of lead (Pb) and uranium (U) was evaluated using a synthetic PbCl2 solution and uranium-containing natural groundwater as fluids. Effluent composition and element distribution on the thin rock sections before and after microfluidic testing were analyzed. Most Pb removal (9.8mg/cm(2)) occurred within 3.5h (140 PVF), which was 74% of the total Pb removal (13.2mg/cm(2)) at the end of testing (14.5h, 560 PVF). Element composition on the thin shale sections determined by μ-XRF analysis indicated that Pb removal was related primarily to Fe-containing minerals (e.g., pyrite). Two thin granite sections (biotite rich, Bt-R and biotite poor, Bt-P) exhibited no marked difference in uranium removal capacity, but a slightly higher amount of uranium was removed onto the thin Bt-R section (266μg/cm(2)) than the thin Bt-P section (240μg/cm(2)) within 120h (4800 PVF). However, uranium could not be detected by micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) analysis, likely due to the detection limit. These results suggest that microfluidic testing on thin rock sections enables quantitative evaluation of rock (mineral)-water interactions at the micro-fracture or pore scale.

  10. Geochemistry and geochronology of the rapakivi granites and associated rocks in the midwest portion of the Serra da Providência composite batholith, SW of Amazonian craton, Rondônia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manoel Augusto Corrêa da; Sousa, Maria Zélia Aguiar de; Dall'Agnol, Roberto; Scandolara, Jaime E.; Ruiz, Amarildo Salina

    2016-08-01

    The Serra da Providência batholith includes the type area of the homonymous suite, the oldest rapakivi magmatic assemblage in the SW of the Amazonian craton (1.60-1.53 Ga). In the midwest portion of this massif, besides wiborgites/pyterlites and granophyric syenogranites, a leucosyenogranite facies and porphyritic rhyolites constitute new rock varieties recently described in that area. Usbnd Pb LA-MC-ICP-MS zircon ages of 1574 ± 9 Ma and 1604 ± 3 Ma, respectively, were obtained for these new varieties and confirm their link with the Serra da Providência magmatism, whereas the subvolcanic rocks are older than the main rock varieties and were formed in a precursor event. These granitic facies are metaluminous to peraluminous, alkali-calcic, A2-type, ferroan granites. Their FeOt/(FeOt + MgO) ratios vary from 0.83 to 0.98 and suggest that these rocks were crystallized from oxidized-to reduced-A-type magmas, where the leucosyenogranites and granophyric sienogranites tend to be formed under more reduced conditions. They show fractionated REE patterns with very pronounced to weak negative Eu anomalies. The presence of granophyric textures and miarolitic cavities in equigranular syenogranitic facies suggests that these rocks were formed at shallow crustal depths, lower than 3 km. Three samples of leucosyenogranite have silica contents higher than 75% and low K/Rb ratios (<150), similarly to the tin specialized granites described in the Amazonian craton. Two distinctive groups of mafic rocks were recognized in the study area: porphyritic and equigranular gabbronorites. They correspond to tholeiitic basalts, with #Mg varying from 37 to 41 in porphyritic gabbronorites and 51 to 65 in equigranular gabbronorites. The low to moderate #Mg suggests that these rocks were crystallized from more evolved basaltic magmas. The porphyritic gabbronorites are enriched in TiO2, FeOt, K2O, P2O5 and REE compared to the equigranular gabbronorites that are enriched in MgO and CaO. The

  11. Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

    2011-01-01

    Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer

  12. SilMush: A procedure for modeling of the geochemical evolution of silicic magmas and granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertogen, Jan; Mareels, Joyce

    2016-07-01

    A boundary layer crystallization modeling program is presented that specifically addresses the chemical fractionation in silicic magma systems and the solidification of plutonic bodies. The model is a Langmuir (1989) type approach and does not invoke crystal settling in high-viscosity silicic melts. The primary aim is to model a granitic rock as a congealed crystal-liquid mush, and to integrate major element and trace element modeling. The procedure allows for some exploratory investigation of the exsolution of H2O-fluids and of the fluid/melt partitioning of trace elements. The procedure is implemented as a collection of subroutines for the MS Excel spreadsheet environment and is coded in the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) language. To increase the flexibility of the modeling, the procedure is based on discrete numeric process simulation rather than on solution of continuous differential equations. The program is applied to a study of the geochemical variation within and among three granitic units (Senones, Natzwiller, Kagenfels) from the Variscan Northern Vosges Massif, France. The three units cover the compositional range from monzogranite, over syenogranite to alkali-feldspar granite. An extensive set of new major element and trace element data is presented. Special attention is paid to the essential role of accessory minerals in the fractionation of the Rare Earth Elements. The crystallization model is able to reproduce the essential major and trace element variation trends in the data sets of the three separate granitic plutons. The Kagenfels alkali-feldspar leucogranite couples very limited variation in major element composition to a considerable and complex variation of trace elements. The modeling results can serve as a guide for the reconstruction of the emplacement sequence of petrographically distinct units. Although the modeling procedure essentially deals with geochemical fractionation within a single pluton, the modeling results bring up a

  13. Radon emanation from fresh, altered and disturbed granitic rock characterized by (14)C-PMMA impregnation and autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Hellmuth, Karl-Heinz; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Arvela, Hannu; Lindberg, Antero; Fonteneau, Lionel; Sardini, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Radon emanation from intact samples of fresh ("BG"), altered ("Fract") and disturbed ("EDZ") Finnish granitic rock from Kuru (Finland) and its dependence on humidity and rock structural factors was studied. The pore network of the rock was characterized by microscopy and impregnation with (14)C-PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) resin and autoradiography. The radon emanation factor was increasing linearly with the relative humidity. (14)C-PMMA autoradiography of the altered zones and the EDZ indicated significant, mineral-specific increase of porosity and porosity gradients towards the fracture surfaces (Fract) and microcracks within the EDZ. For small samples in the cm-scale emanation was not diffusion, but source term controlled. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tourmaline occurrences within the Penamacor-Monsanto granitic pluton and host-rocks (Central Portugal): genetic implications of crystal-chemical and isotopic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, I. Ribeiro; Mourão, C.; Récio, C.; Guimarães, F.; Antunes, I. M.; Ramos, J. Farinha; Barriga, F. J. A. S.; Palmer, M. R.; Milton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Tourmalinization associated with peraluminous granitic intrusions in metapelitic host-rocks has been widely recorded in the Iberian Peninsula, given the importance of tourmaline as a tracer of granite magma evolution and potential indicator of Sn-W mineralizations. In the Penamacor-Monsanto granite pluton (Central Eastern Portugal, Central Iberian Zone), tourmaline occurs: (1) as accessory phase in two-mica granitic rocks, muscovite-granites and aplites, (2) in quartz (±mica)-tourmaline rocks (tourmalinites) in several exocontact locations, and (3) as a rare detrital phase in contact zone hornfels and metapelitic host-rocks. Electron microprobe and stable isotope (δ18O, δD, δ11B) data provide clear distinctions between tourmaline populations from these different settings: (a) schorl-oxyschorl tourmalines from granitic rocks have variable foititic component (X□ = 17-57 %) and Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratios (0.19-0.50 in two-mica granitic rocks, and 0.05-0.19 in the more differentiated muscovite-granite and aplites); granitic tourmalines have constant δ18O values (12.1 ± 0.1 ‰), with wider-ranging δD (-78.2 ± 4.7 ‰) and δ11B (-10.7 to -9.0 ‰) values; (b) vein/breccia oxyschorl [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.31-0.44] results from late, B- and Fe-enriched magma-derived fluids and is characterized by δ18O = 12.4 ‰, δD = -29.5 ‰, and δ11B = -9.3 ‰, while replacement tourmalines have more dravitic compositions [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.26-0.64], close to that of detrital tourmaline in the surrounding metapelitic rocks, and yield relatively constant δ18O values (13.1-13.3 ‰), though wider-ranging δD (-58.5 to -36.5 ‰) and δ11B (-10.2 to -8.8 ‰) values; and (c) detrital tourmaline in contact rocks and regional host metasediments is mainly dravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.35-0.78] and oxydravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.51-0.58], respectively. Boron contents of the granitic rocks are low (<650 ppm) compared to the minimum B contents normally required for tourmaline saturation in

  15. Mineral chemistry and geochemistry of the Late Neoproterozoic Gabal Abu Diab granitoids, Central Eastern Dessert, Egypt: Implications for the origin of rare metal post-orogenic A-type granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, Mabrouk; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Farahat, Esam S.; Ahmed, Awaad F.; Mohamed, Haroun A.

    2015-04-01

    within A-type granite worldwide. According to Zhang et al., 2012, the garnet crystallized at the expense of biotite from the MnO-rich evolved melt after fractionation of biotite, plagioclase, K-feldspar, zircon, apatite, and ilmenite. The granitoids are alkali feldspar granites showing distinct geochemical features and most likely, belong to the post-orogenic younger Egyptian granitoids. They are peraluminous A-type alkaline rocks but they have lower Fe2O3, MgO, MnO, CaO, TiO2, P2O5, Sr, Ba, V, and higher SiO2, Na2O, K2O, Nb, Ta, U, Zr, Th, Ga/Al and Rb than the typical rocks of this type. The positive correlation between Ba and Sr, and the negative correlation between Rb and K/Rb reveal fractional crystallization of alkali feldspar. The similarity in most geochemical characteristics suggests that Abu Diab granitoids are genetically related to each other and extremely enrichment in incompatible elements such as Nb and Ta, indicating that they crystallized from extremely differentiated magmas. References: Zhang, J., Ma, C. and She, Z., 2012. An Early Cretaceous garnet-bearing metaluminous A-type granite intrusion in the East Qinling Orogen, central China: Petrological, mineralogical and geochemical constraints. Geoscience Frontiers 3 (5), 635-646.

  16. Uranium and thorium in granitic rocks of northeastern Washington and northern Idaho, with comments on uranium resource potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1979-01-01

    Northeastern Washington and northern Idaho is a uranium province in which many Cretaceous and Tertiary granitic plutons contain abnormal amounts of uranium. Mean uranium content of 108 samples of granitic rock is 8.8 parts per million (ppm), more than twice normal for rocks of this composition. The mean thorium content, 20.3 ppm, and mean Th/U, 3.19, are normal. The most uraniferous and fertile rocks are the peraluminous two-mica granitic suite, although not all two-mica plutons are enriched in uranium. The muscovite-bearing suite has mean uranium content of 22.3 ppm, mean thorium content of 22.8 ppm, and mean Th/U of 2.82. Porphyritic quartz monzonite of the Midnite mine, which I interpret to be a two-mica granitic rock, is especially radioactive with mean U of 14.7 ppm, mean Th of 32.1 ppm, and mean Th/U of 2.72. Mean uranium and thorium contents of the two-mica granitic plutons are significantly different from those of the calcalkaline hornblende granitic suite, which are mean U, 5.0 ppm; mean Th, 17.6; and mean Th/U, 3.78. Biotite granitic rocks containing no hornblende or muscovite appear to be an intermediate suite in terms of U and Th, or possibly are variants of both hornblende and muscovite type; mean U is 3.88 ppm, mean Th is 14.4 ppm, and mean Th/U is 3.03 as calculated from the more abundant data of Castor and others (1978). occurrence of uranium and thorium in the muscovite and hornblende suites is systematically different. Many muscovite-bearing rocks are much more enriched in uranium (>15 ppm) than they are in thorium, and have a relatively low Th:U correlation coefficient of +0.409. Many of the uraniferous muscovite-bearing rocks contain less than 20 ppm Th, probably a consequence of forming by anatexis of thorium deficient sedimentary rocks. Uranium and thorium variation is much more regular in the hornblende suite, which has a Th:U correlation coefficient of +0.780. Uranium in the muscovite suite is held primarily in magnetite and biotite, and

  17. Vertical zonality of fractionated granite plutons reflected in zircon chemistry: the Cínovec A-type versus the Beauvoir S-type suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Karel; Škoda, Radek

    2012-11-01

    We studied vertical changes in the chemical composition of zircon from two contrasting Variscan granite systems. The Beauvoir system (Massif Central, France) composed of three successive intrusions (B1, B2, B3) represents typical peraluminous S-type granite extremely enriched in P, F, Li, Rb, Cs, Be, Sn, Nb, Ta, and poor in Zr, Th, REE and Y. The Cínovec system (Krušné hory Mts/Erzgebirge, Czech Republic/Germany) composed of two successive intrusions (protolithionite granite, zinnwaldite granite) is only slightly peraluminous, P-poor, F, Li, Rb, Cs, U, Th, REE, Y, Sc, Sn, W, Nb, Ta-rich granite, which may be classified as A-type. In both localities, the most fractionated intrusions are located on the top of the system. Samples from borehole GPF-1 (Beauvoir) represent an 800 m long vertical section through the entire granite stock, while CS-1 borehole (Cínovec) reached a depth of 1600 m. Chemical compositions of zircons from both granite systems show distinct vertical zonality, but their shape and elemental speciation is highly contrasting. At Beauvoir, zircon shows a remarkable increase in Hf-content from 2-4 wt. % HfO2 (~0.03 apfu Hf) in the deepest B3-unit to 15-19 wt. % HfO2 (up to 0.18 apfu Hf) in the uppermost B1-unit. The highest contents of F, P, and U were detected in the intermediate unit B2 at a depth of 400-600 m. At Cínovec, Hf shows only moderate enrichment from ca. 2 wt. % HfO2 in the deeper protolithionite granite to 5-10 wt. % HfO2 in the uppermost part of the zinnwaldite granite. High contents of Th (3-8 wt. % ThO2) are entirely bound in the uppermost section of the granite copula to a depth of 200 m, but below this level the contents only sporadically exceed 1 wt. % ThO2. Concentrations of U, Y, HREE, Sc and Bi also reach their highest values in the uppermost parts of the zinnwaldite granite, but their decrease downward is much gentler. Extreme enrichment of outer zones of zircon crystals from some granites with Hf or high contents of Th, U

  18. Determination of the amount of Peroxy in granite rock using the Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregloan-Reed, J. J.; Tarnas, J.; Plante, Z.; Freund, F. T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a series of laboratory experiments which provide evidence for peroxy defects in granite, coupled with a determination of the peroxy defect concentration. When peroxy defects are activated they become defect electrons (positive holes) in the oxygen anion sub-lattice. This in essence converts the granite sample to a p-type semiconductor. Our preliminary results of the thermoelectric (Seebeck) effect for granite show that positive charge carriers are being generated (positive gradient: see Figure) in the granite sample and that the concentration of peroxy defects in the granite sample is 1137 ± 20 ppm. The Seebeck coefficient (α) is the gradient between the voltage (V) and the temperature (T), such that α = V /T . One end of the granite sample was placed in a furnace and heated. At 300ºC the peroxy defect spins decouple, while at 430ºC the peroxy defects dissociate, producing positive holes. When the positive holes are activated their mobility increases and they move towards the cool end of the granite sample through diffusion. This induces a potential difference linked to a thermal gradient between the two ends of the sample. We then fitted the coefficients of two first order polynomials and a point of inflection using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. This was done to statistically estimate the uncertainties in the coefficients from a Bayesian statistical analysis. The best fit and corresponding standarderror of the reflection point was found to be 426 ± 5ºC. This is in excellent agreement to values, around 430ºC, found in the literature. We then find α = 18.50 ± 0.18 μV K-1 above 426 ± 5ºC, which equates to a carrier concentration of 1.16 × 1020 cm-3 compared to the carrier concentrations of heavily doped semiconductors, which are on the order of 1021 cm-3. This then gives a peroxy defect concentration of 1137 ± 20 ppm.

  19. An investigation of cathodoluminescence in albite from the A-type Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect

    Dalby, Kim N.; Anderson, Alan J.; Mariano, Anthony N.; Gordon, Robert A.; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Wirth, Richard

    2009-12-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals red and blue colors within single, non-turbid albite (Ab{sub 98-99}) grains from the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia. A 720 nm X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) peak characterizes red CL regions, while a 280 nm XEOL feature dominates blue CL regions. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence results indicate that red CL and the 720 nm XEOL peak intensities relate to total Fe concentrations. The relationship between red CL and Fe content is confirmed by electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The XEOL technique is used to exclude the Fe K-edge as the cause of red CL. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that Fe in both the red and blue CL regions is Fe{sup 3+}, and that red CL activation may relate to the Si-Al order of the feldspar and to the distribution of Fe on tetrahedral sites. The CL textures, combined with EMPA and LA-ICPMS analyses, indicate that blue CL albite (Ab98) regions contain higher concentrations of Ca, Ti, Pb and rare earth elements, and were replaced, in part, by a more Fe-rich, trace element depleted albite (Ab99) which displays red CL. Complex diffraction contrasts and amorphous deposits identified in transmission electron microscope images suggest that aqueous fluids have reacted with both red and blue CL regions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures of up to 430 C provide a lower estimate of the fluid temperature.

  20. Geochronology and geochemistry of late Carboniferous-middle Permian I- and A-type granites and gabbro-diorites in the eastern Jiamusi Massif, NE China: Implications for petrogenesis and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Jun-Hui; Ge, Wen-Chun; Yang, Hao; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Xu, Wen-Liang; Yang, Jin-Hui; Xing, De-He; Chen, Hui-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Late Carboniferous-middle Permian magmatism in the Jiamusi Massif of northeast China, in the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), provides critical evidence regarding the tectonic history and geodynamic processes in the region. The gabbro-diorites of the Longtouqiao pluton and two groups of coeval granite in the study area comprise a bimodal magmatic suite. Precise LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon ages indicate that the granitoids and gabbro-diorites were emplaced in the late Carboniferous-middle Permian (302-267 Ma). Group I granites have high SiO2 (70.75-77.04 wt.%) and K2O (3.65-5.89 wt.%) contents, are enriched in LILEs (e.g., Rb, Th, and U) relative to HFSEs and LREEs, and have negative Nb, Ta, P, and Ti anomalies, which collectively indicate affinities with subduction-related magmas. Group II granites are weakly peraluminous (A/CNK = 1.03-1.07) and are characterized by enrichment in alkalis (Na2O + K2O = 8.22-8.90 wt.%), low MgO (0.04-0.09 wt.%) and P2O5 (0.01-0.04 wt.%) contents, high Zr and Nb contents, high 10,000 × Ga/Al ratios, and they are geochemically similar to aluminous A-type granites. All the magmatic zircons in these granitoids have great variations of εHf(t) (+ 7.89 to - 5.60) and two-stage Hf model ages (TDM2) of 0.8-1.7 Ga, which suggest that the precursor magmas originated from a heterogeneous source that involved juvenile components derived from a depleted mantle source during magma generation. The aluminous A-type granite magmas were probably derived by high-temperature partial melting of a felsic crustal source, whereas the other granite magmas probably resulted from partial melting of a mafic lower crust. The gabbro-diorites of the Longtouqiao pluton are depleted in Nb, Ta, P, and Ti, and show flat distributions of most LILEs and HFSEs, except for large positive anomalies in Ba, K, and Pb. These features reflect a limited degree of crustal contamination associated with the subduction-related magmatic processes. These data

  1. Zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes, and whole-rock Sr-Nd isotopes of the Bozhushan granite, Yunnan province, SW China: Constraints on petrogenesis and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Cui; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Bi, Xian-Wu; Zhong, Hong; Lan, Jiang-Bo; Zhao, Cheng-Hai; Zhu, Jing-Jing

    2015-03-01

    The Bainiuchang silver-polymetallic ore deposit is a super-large deposit in the western part of the South China tungsten-tin province (or the Nanling tungsten-tin province). The deposit is spatially and temporally associated with the Bozhushan granite pluton. Our new data indicate that the Bozhushan granitoids formed at 86-87 Ma. The granitoids are geochemically consistent with A-type granite. The Bozhushan pluton consists predominantly of biotite granite that is characterized by weakly peraluminous to metaluminous compositions and high alkali contents (Na2O + K2O = 7.51-9.06 wt.%). The granitic rocks are enriched in large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) Rb, Th, U, and K, but relatively depleted in Ba and Sr. In addition, they have high Zr + Nb + Ce + Y contents (310-478 ppm) and high 10,000× Ga/Al ratios (2.7-3.1). The temperatures of the parental magmas for the Bozhushan granites are estimated to be 790-842 °C based on the zircon saturation thermometer. Isotopically, the Bozhushan granites are characterized by elevated initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7126-0.7257) and low εNd values (-11.2 to -12.4), and high δ18O values (7.91-9.58‰) and low εHf values (-9.5 to -6.1) for zircon crystals, which indicate a dominant continental crustal source. The two-stage Hf model ages vary from 1.53 to 1.86 Ga. The isotopic compositions support the interpretation that the granitic rocks formed by melting of the Meso- and Neoproterozoic metasedimentary basements of the Cathaysia block. These results, together with geological records in the other parts of the western Cathaysia block, suggest that the formation of the Bozhushan A-type granites is related to lithospheric extension and asthenospheric upwelling that are associated with the change of plate motion in Late-Cretaceous.

  2. Thermal history of Apollo 12 granite and KREEP-rich rock: Clues from Pb/Pb ages of zircon in lunar breccia 12013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-Cheng; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Wang, Ru-Cheng; Li, Qiu-Li; Li, Xian-Hua; Patchen, Allan D.; Liu, Yang

    2012-10-01

    With the mafic to ultramafic petrology of the Moon, the presence of granite appears anomalous. However, fragments of rocks with a definite granitic textures and mineralogy have been recovered from the maria, where their ages point to an ultimate origin in the highlands. Apollo 12 mare breccia 12013 is one of these unique lunar rocks, containing abundant granitic components. It consists of a black portion, composed mainly of fragments of plagioclase and noritic rock, with minor fragments of granitic rock, and a gray portion that is dominated by an overall granitic component. Zircon grains from this breccia were studied by combining cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and micron-scale, ion-microprobe dating techniques. Zircon grains from the black portion have a large age variation (4.0-4.3 Ga). A few of them exhibit complex age zoning within individual grains, corresponding to CL zoning. Zircon grains from the gray portion show no CL zoning features but also have a large age variation between different grains (4.2-4.3 Ga). In this study, we suggest that the large age variations of zircon in 12013, among different grains and within individual grains were caused by post-crystallization impact events, and most of them are not original crystallization ages. The 4.3-Ga zircon age probably represents the minimum crystallization age of the granitic component in 12013, similar to lunar granites from the Apollo 14 and 17 landing sites. This old crystallization age also implies that various REE patterns of lunar granites might not be entirely related to their crystallization ages. Based on comparison with the 207Pb/206Pb ages for zircon from the Apollo 12, 14, and 17 landing sites, we suggest that there was at least one pre-3.9 Ga major impact event on the Moon, at ˜4.2 Ga.

  3. Quantifying elemental compositions of primary minerals from granitic rocks and saprolite within the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybrand, R. A.; Rasmussen, C.

    2011-12-01

    Granitic terrain comprises a significant area of the earth's land surface (>15%). Quantifying weathering processes involved in the transformation of granitic rock to saprolite and soil is central to understanding landscape evolution in these systems. The quantification of primary mineral composition is important for assessing subsequent mineral transformations and soil production. This study focuses on coupling detailed analysis of primary mineral composition to soil development across an array of field sites sampled from the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone observatory (SCM-CZO) environmental gradient. The gradient spans substantial climate-driven shifts in vegetation, ranging from desert scrub to mixed conifer forests. The parent material is a combination of Precambrian and Tertiary aged granites and quartz diorite. Primary mineral type and composition are known to vary among the various aged granitic materials and this variability is hypothesized to manifest as significant variation in regolith forming processes across the SCM-CZO. To address this variability, the mineral composition and mineral formulae of rock and saprolite samples were determined by electron microprobe chemical analyses. The rocks were pre-dominantly quartz, biotite, muscovite, orthoclase and calcium/sodium-rich plagioclase feldspars. Trace minerals observed in the samples included sphene, rutile, zircon, garnet, ilmenite, and apatite. Mineral formulae from electron microprobe analyses were combined with quantitative x-ray diffraction (QXRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data to quantify both primary and secondary mineralogical components in soil profiles from each of the field sites. Further, electron microprobe analyses of <2mm mixed conifer saprolite revealed weathered plagioclase grains coated with clay-sized particles enriched in silica and aluminum (~25% and 15%, respectively), suggesting kaolin as the secondary phase. The coatings were interspersed within each plagioclase grain, a

  4. Visible and infrared properties of unaltered to weathered rocks from Precambrian granite-greenstone terrains of the West African Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelka, Václav; Baratoux, Lenka; Jessell, Mark W.; Naba, Séta

    2015-12-01

    In situ and laboratory 0.35 μm-2.5 μm spectra of rocks from a Paleoproterozoic granite-greenstone terrain along with its Neoproterozoic sedimentary cover and derived regolith materials were examined in western Burkina Faso. The reflectance spectra show the influence of typical arid to semi-arid weathering with the formation of desert varnish, iron films, and dust coatings. Fe and Mg-OH absorption features related to chlorite, amphibole, pyroxene, epidote, and biotite are observable in the mafic and intermediate meta-volcanic rocks as well as in the granodiorites and tonalites. Al-OH absorption caused by kaolinite, smectite, illite/muscovite are typical for meta-volcano-sedimentary schists, Tarkwaian-type detrital meta-sediments, sandstones of the Taoudeni basin, all of the weathered surfaces and regolith materials. Ferric and ferrous iron absorptions related to both primary rock-forming minerals and secondary weathering minerals (goethite, hematite) were observed in most of the sampled materials. The results show that although weathering alters the spectral signature of the fresh rock, indicative absorption features located in the short wave infrared region remain detectable. In addition, spectra of soils partially reflect the mineral composition of the weathered rock surfaces. The analysis of the hyperspectral data shows the potential of differentiating between the sampled surfaces. The library presents a primary database for the geological and regolith analysis of remote sensing data in West Africa.

  5. The distribution of uranium and thorium in granitic rocks of the basin and range province, Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNeal, J.M.; Lee, D.E.; Millard, H.T.

    1981-01-01

    Some secondary uranium deposits are thought to have formed from uranium derived by the weathering of silicic igneous rocks such as granites, rhyolites, and tuffs. A regional geochemical survey was made to determine the distribution of uranium and thorium in granitic rocks of the Basin and Range province in order to evaluate the potential for secondary uranium occurrences in the area. The resulting geochemical maps of uranium, thorium, and the Th:U ratio may be useful in locating target areas for uranium exploration. The granites were sampled according to a five-level, nested, analysis-of-variance design, permitting estimates to be made of the variance due to differences between:(1) two-degree cells; (2) one-degree cells; (3) plutons; (4) samples; and (5) analyses. The cells are areas described in units of degrees of latitude and longitude. The results show that individual plutons tend to differ in uranium and thorium concentrations, but that each pluton tends to be relatively homogeneous. Only small amounts of variance occur at the two degree and the between-analyses levels. The three geochemical maps that were prepared are based on one-degree cell means. The reproducibility of the maps is U > Th ??? Th:U. These geochemical maps may be used in three methods of locating target areas for uranium exploration. The first method uses the concept that plutons containing the greatest amounts of uranium may supply the greatest amounts of uranium for the formation of secondary uranium occurrences. The second method is to examine areas with high thorium contents, because thorium and uranium are initially highly correlated but much uranium could be lost by weathering. The third method is to locate areas in which the plutons have particularly high Th:U ratios. Because uranium, but not thorium, is leached by chemical weathering, high Th:U ratios suggest a possible loss of uranium and possibly a greater potential for secondary uranium occurrences to be found in the area. ?? 1981.

  6. Igneous phenocrystic origin of K-feldspar megacrysts in granitic rocks from the Sierra Nevada batholith

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Sisson, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    Study of four K-feldspar megacrystic granitic plutons and related dikes in the Sierra Nevada composite batholith indicates that the megacrysts are phenocrysts that grew in contact with granitic melt. Growth to megacrystic sizes was due to repeated replenishment of the magma bodies by fresh granitic melt that maintained temperatures above the solidus for extended time periods and that provided components necessary for K-feldspar growth. These intrusions cooled 89-83 Ma, are the youngest in the range, and represent the culminating magmatic phase of the Sierra Nevada batholith. They are the granodiorite of Topaz Lake, the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, the Mono Creek Granite, the Whitney Granodiorite, the Johnson Granite Porphyry, and the Golden Bear Dike. Megacrysts in these igneous bodies attain 4-10 cm in length. All have sawtooth oscillatory zoning marked by varying concentration of BaO ranging generally from 3.5 to 0.5 wt%. Some of the more pronounced zones begin with resorption and channeling of the underlying zone. Layers of mineral inclusions, principally plagioclase, but also biotite, quartz, hornblende, titanite, and accessory minerals, are parallel to the BaO-delineated zones, are sorted by size along the boundaries, and have their long axes preferentially aligned parallel to the boundaries. These features indicate that the K-feldspar megacrysts grew while surrounded by melt, allowing the inclusion minerals to periodically attach themselves to the faces of the growing crystals. The temperature of growth of titanite included within the K-feldspar megacrysts is estimated by use of a Zr-in-titanite geothermometer. Megacryst-hosted titanite grains all yield temperatures typical of felsic magmas, mainly 735-760 ??C. Titanite grains in the granodiorite hosts marginal to the megacrysts range to lower growth temperatures, in some instances into the subsolidus. The limited range and igneous values of growth temperatures for megacryst-hosted titanite grains support the

  7. Laser ablation ICP-MS analysis on nano-powder pellets and applications to granite bulk rock analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shitou; Karius, Volker; Wörner, Gerhard

    2017-04-01

    Granites are a ubiquitous component of the continental crust and knowing their precise trace element signatures is essential in understanding the origins and evolution of the continental crust. ICP-MS bulk analysis of granite is generally conducted on solution after acid-digestion. However this technique has several deficiencies related to the difficulty of completely dissolving accessary minerals such as zircon and the instability/adsorption of high valence trace elements (Nb, Ta et al.) in acid solutions. The development of a nano-powder pellet technique by using wet milling procedure, and its combination with laser ablation ICP-MS has been proposed to overcome these problems. In this study, we produced nano-powders from a series of granite rock standards by wet milling in agate using a high power planetary ball mill instrument. The procedure was tested and optimized by modifying parameters (ball to powder ratio, water to powder ratio, milling power etc.). Characterization of nano-powders was conducted by various techniques including electron microprobe (EMP), secondary electron imaging, polarizing microscope, and laser particle size analyzer (LPSA) and laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). Particle sizes range from a few nm to 5 μm with a small secondary mode at around 10 to 20 μm that probably represent particle aggregates rather than remaining crystal grains after milling. Pellets of 5 mm in diameter were pressed into molds of cellulose at 1.75 *103 N/cm2. Surface roughness of the pellets was measured by LSCM and gave a Ra of 0.494 μm, which is an order higher than the surface of polished ATGH-G reference glass surface (Ra: 0.048 μm), but sufficient for laser ablation. Sources of contamination either from abrading agate balls or from ultrapure water were evaluated and quantified. The homogeneity of powder pellets down to less than 5 μm size was documented based on EMPA element mapping and statistical analyses of LA-ICP-MS in discrete spot and line

  8. Pliocene obducted, rotated and migrated ultramafic rocks and obduction-induced anatectic granite, SW Seram and Ambon, Eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linthout, Kees; Helmers, Hendrik

    Geochemistry, petrography and thermobarometry of the ultramafic and associated rocks of SW Seram and Ambon indicate that they were obducted as weakly depleted oceanic lithosphere which was formed about 10 Ma prior to obduction. Occurrences of cordierite-bearing granite are closely associated with the ultramafic rocks. Petrography and geochemical analysis based on major, RE and other trace elements, indicate that the granite is of the S-type, containing a significant restite component; a VAG signal is interpreted as inherited from the partly melted and included Palaeozoic metasediments. The granite magma was formed as a consequence of the obduction of very hot mantle peridotite inflicting high-grade metamorphism and partial anatexis on the Palaeozoic continental substratum. The oldest age in the literature for cordierite-bearing dacite, connected to this partial anatexis, sets the minimum age of the obduction event at 4.4 Ma. The obduction took place at the eastern end of the Banda Arc, near the NE margin of the Weber Deep, where SW Seram must have been at that time. The ophiolite as part of the Buru-Seram Microplate, rotated and migrated about 400 km westward to its present position. Since the Early Pliocene, the rate of upheaval in Kaibobo (SW Seram) has averaged about 260 cm Ka -1, but may well have been over 1000 cm Ka -1 in the early period immediately after the formation of the granite melt. As the average uplift rate over the same period for Central Seram was previously estimated at 110 cm Ka -1, strongly differential upheaval prevailed in Seram in the Early Pliocene. It is postulated that young oceanic lithosphere has been created by transtensional pull-apart in the easternmost part of the Banda Sea Plate due to oblique convergence of the northward moving Australian Plate, of which fragments gradually became incorporated in the regime of the westbound SW Pacific Plates. Obduction was effected during the strong Pliocene rotation of the Buru-Seram Microplate

  9. Wear Performance of Saw Blades in Processing of Granitic Rocks and Development of Models for Wear Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Gokhan; Karakurt, Izzet; Aydiner, Kerim

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the wear performance of diamond circular saw blades in cutting of granitic rocks. An alternative wear measuring method is developed to measure the reduced blade radius without taking the blade off the machine. The effect on and contribution to the specific wear rate (SWR) of each operating variable are determined, and the SWR is correlated with rock properties. Morphologies of wearing surfaces of segments and rocks are also evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Depending on both operating variables and rock properties, prediction models are developed for estimation of the SWR. Results show that the SWR increases with an increase in the peripheral speed and the traverse speed, while it decreases with an increase in the cutting depth and the flow rate of the cooling fluid. The peripheral speed, and the microhardness and proportions of minerals such as quartz, plagioclase, and feldspar are statistically determined as the significant variables affecting the SWR. Finally, it is disclosed that models developed for estimation of SWR have great potential for practical applications.

  10. The Northeast Kingdom batholith, Vermont: magmatic evolution and geochemical constraints on the origin of Acadian granitic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, R.A.; Arth, Joseph G.

    1992-01-01

    Five Devonian plutons (West Charleston, Echo Pond, Nulhegan, Derby, and Willoughby) that constitute the Northeast Kingdom batholith in Vermont show wide ranges in elemental abundances and ratios consistent with major crustal contributions during their evolution. The batholith consists of metaluminous quartz gabbro, diorite and quartz monzodiorite, peraluminous granodiorite and granite, and strongly peraluminous leucogranite. Contents of major elements vary systematically with increasingSiO40) and have small negative Eu anomalies. The strongly peraluminous Willoughby leucogranite has unique trace-element abundances and ratios relative to the rest of the batholith, including low contents of Hf, Zr, Sr, and Ba, low values of K/Rb (80-164), Th/Ta (<9), Rb/Cs (7-40), K/Cs (0.1-0.5), Ce/Pb (0.5-4), high values of Rb/Sr (1-18) low to moderate REE contents and light-REE enriched patterns (with small negative Eu anomalies). Flat REE patterns (with large negative Eu anomalies) are found in a small, hydrothermally-altered area characterized by high abundances of Sn (up to 26 ppm), Rb (up to 670 ppm), Li (up to 310 ppm), Ta (up to 13.1 ppm), and U (up to 10 ppm). There is no single mixing trend, fractional crystallization assemblage, or assimilationscheme that accounts for all trace elementvariations from quartz gabbro to granite in the Northeast Kingdom batholith. The plutons originated by mixing mantle-derived components and crustal melts generated at different levels in the heterogeneous lithosphere in a continental collisional environment. Hybrid rocks in the batholith evolved by fractional crystallization and assimilation of country rocks (<50% by mass), and some of the leucogranitic rocks were subsequently disturbed by a mild hydrothermal event that resulted in the deposition of small amounts of sulfide minerals. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Water-rock interaction processes in the Triassic sandstone and the granitic basement of the Rhine Graben: Geochemical investigation of a geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilina, L.; Pauwels, H.; Genter, A.; Fouillac, C.

    1997-10-01

    Saline fluids have been collected in the Rhine Graben over the last two decades, both from the Triassic sandstone aquifer and the granitic basement down to a depth of 3500m. Their salinities and location are compared in order to distinguish the respective influences of temperature and host-rock mineralogy in the water-rock interaction processes. The comparison shows that sulphates in the sedimentary formations were dissolved by the fluids, which also led to Br enrichment. Mica dissolution has strongly increased the Rb and Cs contents, which then provide an indication of the degree of water-rock interaction. The Sr isotopic ratios are used to compare the fluids with the granite minerals. Two relationships are revealed for the fluids in the sandstone and the granite, one related to widespread mica dissolution, which could have affected both the Buntsandstein and the granite, and the other to subsequent plagioclase dissolution, which is observed only in the granite. Computations showed that 12.5g of mica and 1.658 of plagioclase per liter of fluid have been dissolved. The nature of these two relationships suggests two different evolutions for the fluids and the individualization of the two reservoirs during the graben's history. The cation concentrations are mainly controlled by temperature, and are independent of the type of host rock. Equilibrium with the rock mainly caused Ca and K concentration variations, which has induced clear CaK and Ca-δ 18O, K-δ 18O correlations. Geothermometric computations indicate that with increasing depth, the cations, the silica and the δ 18O(SO 4) geothermometers evolve towards a value close to 230δC. This demonstrates the existence of a hot reservoir in the granite of the graben, at a depth estimated at 4.5-5 km.

  12. Water-rock interaction processes in the Triassic sandstone and the granitic basement of the Rhine Graben: Geochemical investigation of a geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Aquilina, L.; Pauwels, H.; Genter, A.; Fouillac, C.

    1997-10-01

    Saline fluids have been collected in the Rhine Graben over the last two decades, both from the Triassic sandstone aquifer and the granitic basement down to a depth of 3500m. Their salinities and location are compared in order to distinguish the respective influences of temperature and host-rock mineralogy in the water-rock interaction processes. The comparison shows that sulphates in the sedimentary formations were dissolved by the fluids, which also led to Br enrichment. Mica dissolution has strongly increased the Rb and Cs contents, which then provide an indication of the degree of water-rock interaction. The Sr isotopic ratios are used to compare the fluids with the granite minerals. Two relationships are revealed for the fluids in the sandstone and the granite, one related to widespread mica dissolution, which could have affected both the Buntsandstein and the granite, and the other to subsequent plagioclase dissolution, which is observed only in the granite. Computations showed that 12.5g of mica and 1.65g of plagioclase per liter of fluid have been dissolved. The nature of these two relationships suggests two different evolutions for the fluids and the individualization of the two reservoirs during the graben`s history. The cation concentrations are mainly controlled by temperature, and are independent of the type of host rock. Equilibrium with the rock mainly caused Ca and K concentration variations, which has induced clear Ca-K and Ca-{delta}{sup 18}O, K-{delta}{sup 18}O correlations. Geothermometric computations indicate that with increasing depth, the cations, the silica and the {delta}{sup 18}O (SO{sub 4}) geothermometers evolve towards a value close to 230{degrees}C. This demonstrates the existence of a hot reservoir in the granite of the graben, at a depth estimated at 4.5-5 km. 59 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Petrogenesis of the Nanling Mountains granites from South China: Constraints from systematic apatite geochemistry and whole-rock geochemical and Sr Nd isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Pei-Shan; Chen, Cheng-Hong; Yang, Huai-Jen; Lee, Chi-Yu

    2008-08-01

    The widespread Mesozoic granitoids in South China (˜135,300 km 2) were emplaced in three main periods: Triassic (16% of the total surface area of Mesozoic granitoids), Jurassic (47%), and Cretaceous (37%). Though much study has been conducted on the most abundant Jurassic Nanling Mountains (NLM) granites, their rock affinities relative to the Triassic Darongshan (DRS) and Cretaceous Fuzhou-Zhangzhou Complex (FZC) granites which are typical S- and I-type, respectively, and the issue of their petrogenetic evolution is still the subject of much debate. In this study, we discuss the petrogenesis of NLM granites using apatite geochemistry combined with whole-rock geochemical and Sr-Nd isotope compositions. Sixteen apatite samples from six granite batholiths, one gabbro, and three syenite bodies in the NLM area were analyzed for their major and trace element abundances and compared with those collected from DRS ( n = 7) and FZC ( n = 6) granites. The apatite geochemistry reveals that Na, Si, S, Mn, Sr, U, Th concentrations and REE distribution patterns for apatites from DRS and FZC granites basically are similar to the S and I granite types of the Lachlan Fold Belt (Australia), whereas those from NLM granites have intermediate properties and cannot be correlated directly with these granite types. According to some indications set by the apatite geochemistry (e.g., lower U and higher Eu abundances), NLM apatites appear to have formed under oxidizing conditions. In addition, we further found that their REE distribution patterns are closely related to aluminum saturation index (ASI) and Nd isotope composition, rather than SiO 2 content or degree of differentiation, of the host rock. The majority of apatites from NLM granites (ASI = 0.97-1.08 and ɛNd( T) = -8.8 to -11.6) display slightly right-inclined apatite REE patterns distinguishable from the typical S- and I-type. However, those from few granites with ASI > 1.1 and ɛNd( T) < -11.6 have REE distribution patterns

  14. Geochemistry of the Palaeoproterozoic volcanic and associated potassic granitic rocks of the Ngualla area of the Ubendian Belt, SW Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulibonywa, Tulibako; Manya, Shukrani; Torssander, Peter; Maboko, Makenya A. H.

    2017-05-01

    The Ngualla area of the Lupa terrane in the Ubendian Belt of SW Tanzania is underlain by well-preserved greenschist facies calc-alkaline volcanic rocks which have been intruded by low-Sr, peraluminous K-rich granites. The Ngualla volcanic rocks are subdivided into four groups: the basaltic andesites-trachyandesites, Group I porphyritic dacites-trachytes, Group II porphyritic dacites-trachytes, and rhyolites. The basaltic andesites-trachyandesites were emplaced at ∼1943 Ma and their most primitive members are characterized by MgO contents of up to 7.43 wt % at a SiO2 content of 54.0 wt %, Ni contents of up to 170 ppm and Mg# of up to 62. They show fractionated REE patterns (La/YbCN = 11.5-36.5), sub-chondritic Zr/Hf (37.8-43.9) and Nb/Ta (7.14-20.0) ratios, εNd (1943 Ma) values of -3.33 to -6.24 and TDM ages of 2521-2883 Ma. These geochemical features are consistent with derivation of the basaltic andesites-trachyandesites by at least 0.1% partial melting of garnet peridotite mantle, followed by 50-80% fractional crystallization involving the removal of 61% clinopyroxene, 20% hornblende, 4% plagioclase and 15% orthopyroxene. The magmas were contaminated by Neoarchaean crustal materials incorporated in the Ubendian Belt during their ascent to the surface. The evolution of these magmas led to the formation of Group I porphyritic dacites-trachytes and rhyolites in a Palaeoproterozoic continental arc setting. The Group II porphyritic dacites-trachytes (1871 ± 5 Ma) were coevally emplaced with the low-Sr, peraluminous K-granites (1878 ± 15 Ma) forming a felsic plutonic-volcanic suite. Despite some differences, these rocks share geochemical features including negative Eu anomalies (mean Eu/Eu* = 0.19 for the dacites and 0.5 for the granites) and εNd (1871 Ma) values of -5.72 for the dacites and εNd (1878 Ma) values of -6.00 to -11.2 for the granites. These geochemical features are consistent with the generation of the ∼1.87 Ga Ngualla felsic plutonic

  15. A fast method for apatite selective leaching from granitic rocks followed through rare earth elements and phosphorus determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gásquez, José A; DeLima, Edmilson; Olsina, Roberto A; Martinez, Luis D; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2005-10-15

    Rare earth elements (REE) and phosphorus (P) in apatite were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after partial dissolution of the granitic rocks and pure apatite. The dissolution was performed with nitric acid in an open system and the matrix elements were separated by a cation exchange procedure. Samples of pure apatite from granitic rocks were dissolved with, 0.14 mol L(-1) nitric acid. The results showed that the release of REE is due to apatite leaching because it could be assessed by comparing the chondrite-normalised pattern corresponding to the rocks and the pure apatite. Similar results were found for absolute REE abundance from the partial dissolution of the rocks and pure apatite. This simple and rapid method can be applied for the determination of REE in apatite as an indicator for mineral exploration, although its use in petrology could be possible.

  16. Geophysical well log analysis of fractured granitic rocks at Atikokan, Ontario, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hess, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two boreholes, drilled to approximate depths of 750 and 1,260 m in a granitic intrusion located near Atikokan, Ontario, were studied by obtaining a full suite of conventional borehole geophysical logs. In addition, selected intervals in these boreholes were logged with a borehole acoustic televiewer that produces a high-resolution image of the borehole wall, an acoustic waveform-logging system using 34-kiloHertz magnetostrictive and 5-kiloHertz sparker sources, and a highly sensitive heat-pulse flowmeter. Emphasis was on identifying and characterizing fracture zones that represent groundwater conduits in deeper portions of the granite, and on characterizing the properties of the largest intervals of unfractured granite. Major fracture zones were indicated by correlating geophysical log anomalies detected on the suite of conventional logs (unpublished data from Atomic Energy of Canada). However, several other anomalies, were identified as mafic intrusions of approximately the same thickness as major fracture zones. Geophysical log anomalies were compared for all major fracture zones that could serve as significant groundwater conduits, and fracture zone permeability is estimated on the basis of acoustic tube-wave attenuation in these intervals. Acoustic televiewer logs obtained at depths below 1,000 m in the deeper well indicate that most of the few fractures identified on core at these depths do not remain open enough under in situ conditions to produce detectable anomalies in acoustic refraction. Flowmeter data indicate that some groundwater circulation occurs in the upper portion of both boreholes. Water in the shallower of the two holes was observed to flow at 2.0 L/min; most of this flow entered the borehole at a depth < 25 m, and no flow occurred below a depth of 100 m. Downflow at rates < 0.5 L/min was determined to enter the deeper borehole within 20 m of the surface, and to exist at various fractures down to a depth of 250 m. (Author 's abstract)

  17. Petrographic and physical factors controlling thermal conductivity of granitic rocks in Illinois deep holes UPH 1, 2, AND 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Y.; Dahl, P. S.; Vitaliano, C. J.

    1983-09-01

    Twenty-four granitic core samples from the Illinois deep drill holes yield thermal conductivity values in the range 29.3-37.6 mW/cm °C, wet bulk densities in the range 2.608-2.960 g/cm3, and water accessible porosity in the range 0.12-0.78%. Thermal conductivity values vary with modal quartz content of the rocks at all depths, and both parameters decrease linearly with depth between 673 and 1016 m in drill hole UPH 3. Below 1070 m there is no systematic variation in modal quartz content with depth and hence no systematic variation in thermal conductivity. Similarly, no systematic variations in modal quartz or physical properties with depth are observed in drill hole UPH 2.

  18. Element mobility during metasomatism of granitic rocks in the Saint-Chély d'Apcher area (Lozère, France).

    PubMed

    El Maghraoui, M; Joron, J L; Raimbault, L; Treuil, M

    2002-11-01

    This paper summarises the behaviour of major and trace elements during hydrothermal alteration processes in the Vareilles albite deposit, Saint-Chély d' Apcher area (Lozère, France). Sampling focused mainly on fine- to medium-grained two-mica granite facies surrounding albitite veins in two open pits. The primary chemical variability inherent in sampling parent rock and analytical uncertainties can seriously affect element mobility calculations. Here we present a simple model that allows to discriminate between magmatic and alteration effects and to make a proper evaluation of the chemical changes that have caused the alteration. For this reason, a range of unaltered granites and albitites were sampled to evaluate the degree of parent rock heterogeneity. Duplicate measurements were performed by epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) to obtain a reliable mean concentration for trace elements and to evaluate results reproducibility. ENAA measurements are completed by analysis of major elements by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The enrichment or depletion of an element during alteration, relative to its concentration in fresh parent rock, can be calculated on the basis of the assumed immobility of some elements during the process. In this study, we have assumed Ta as immobile element on the basis for his inert behaviour. The distinct differences in chemical change between altered and unaltered granite suggest the need to consider alteration event as an important parameter in evaluating granitic rocks for nuclear waste disposal.

  19. Planning and drilling geothermal energy extraction hole EE-2: a precisely oriented and deviated hole in hot granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Helmick, C.; Koczan, S.; Pettitt, R.

    1982-04-01

    During the preceding work (Phase I) of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Project at Fenton Hill, two holes were drilled to a depth of nearly 3048 m (10,000 ft) and connected by a vertical hydraulic fracture. In this phase, water was pumped through the underground reservoir for approximately 417 days, producing an energy equivalent of 3 to 5 MW(t). Energy Extraction Hole No. 2 (EE-2) is the first of two deep holes that will be used in the Engineering-Resource Development System (Phase II) of the ongoing HDR Project of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This phase of the work consists of drilling two parallel boreholes, inclined in their lower, open-hole sections at 35/sup 0/ to the vertical and separated by a vertical distance of 366 m (1200 ft) between the inclined parts of the drill holes. The holes will be connected by a series of vertical, hydraulically produced fractures in the Precambrian granitic rock complex. EE-2 was drilled to a depth of 4660 m (15,289 ft), where the bottom-hole temperature is approximately 320/sup 0/C (608/sup 0/F). Directional drilling techniques were used to control the azimuth and deviation of the hole. Upgrading of the temperature capability of existing hardware, and development of new equipment was necessary to complete the drilling of the hole in the extremely hot, hard, and abrasive granitic formation. The drilling history and the problems with bits, directional tools, tubular goods, cementing, and logging are described. A discussion of the problems and recommendations for overcoming them are also presented.

  20. Geochemistry, mineralogy, and zircon U-Pb-Hf isotopes in peraluminous A-type granite xenoliths in Pliocene-Pleistocene basalts of northern Pannonian Basin (Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huraiová, Monika; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Konečný, Patrik; Gannoun, Abdel-Mouhcine; Hurai, Vratislav

    2017-08-01

    Anorogenic granite xenoliths occur in alkali basalts coeval with the Pliocene-Pleistocene continental rifting of the Pannonian Basin. Observed granite varieties include peraluminous, calcic to peralkalic, magnesian to ferroan types. Quartz and feldspars are dominant rock-forming minerals, accompanied by minor early ilmenite and late magnetite-ulvöspinel. Zircon and Nb-U-REE minerals (oxycalciopyrochlore, fergusonite, columbite) are locally abundant accessory phases in calc-alkalic types. Absence of OH-bearing Fe, Mg-silicates and presence of single homogeneous feldspars (plagioclase in calcic types, anorthoclase in calc-alkalic types, ferrian Na-sanidine to anorthoclase in alkalic types) indicate water-deficient, hypersolvus crystallization conditions. Variable volumes of interstitial glass, absence of exsolutions, and lacking deuteric hydrothermal alteration and/or metamorphic/metasomatic overprint are diagnostic of rapid quenching from hypersolidus temperatures. U-Pb zircon ages determined in calcic and calc-alkalic granite xenoliths correspond to a time interval between 5.7 and 5.2 Ma. Positive ɛHf values (14.2 ± 3.9) in zircons from a 5.2-Ma-old calc-alkalic granite xenolith indicate mantle-derived magmas largely unaffected by the assimilation of crustal material. This is in accordance with abundances of diagnostic trace elements (Rb, Y, Nb, Ta), indicating A1-type, OIB-like source magmas. Increased accumulations of Nb-U-REE minerals in these granites indicate higher degree of the magmatic differentiation reflected in Rb-enrichment, contrasting with Ba-enrichment in barren xenoliths. Incipient charnockitization, i.e. orthopyroxene and ilmenite crystallization from interstitial silicate melt, was observed in many granite xenoliths. Thermodynamic modeling using pseudosections showed that the orthopyroxene growth may have been triggered by water exsolution from the melt during ascent of xenoliths in basaltic magma. Euhedral-to-skeletal orthopyroxene growth

  1. Retardation of mobile radionuclides in granitic rock fractures by matrix diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölttä, P.; Poteri, A.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Huittinen, N.

    Transport of iodide and sodium has been studied by means of block fracture and core column experiments to evaluate the simplified radionuclide transport concept. The objectives were to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport, especially matrix diffusion, and to estimate their importance during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Block experiments were performed using a Kuru Grey granite block having a horizontally planar natural fracture. Core columns were constructed from cores drilled orthogonal to the fracture of the granite block. Several tracer tests were performed using uranine, 131I and 22Na as tracers at water flow rates 0.7-50 μL min -1. Transport of tracers was modelled by applying the advection-dispersion model based on the generalized Taylor dispersion added with matrix diffusion. Scoping calculations were combined with experiments to test the model concepts. Two different experimental configurations could be modelled applying consistent transport processes and parameters. The processes, advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion, were conceptualized with sufficient accuracy to replicate the experimental results. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly sorbing sodium and mobile iodine breakthrough curves.

  2. Deformation and fluid flow during fault zone development in granitic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, D.D.; Buergmann, R.; Christiansen, P.P. . Geology Dept.); Martel, S.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Fault zone development in crystalline rock of the Lake Edison granodiorite, Sierra Nevada, California, is characterized by five stages with distinct physical mechanisms, each identified by outcrop mapping, and understood through mechanical analysis. Because fluid flow through the developing fault system can influence the rock properties and loading, and because rock fracturing can influence the fluid pathways, the phenomena of deformation and fluid flow are closely coupled. Both the faulting mechanisms and the evolution of permeability in crystalline rocks are demonstrably different from fault zones in porous sedimentary rocks. The paper describes the five stages of fault development. Deformation of the adjacent granodiorite at each stage of growth for a particular fault zone depended on the distribution of slip. This distribution is a function of the remote stress state, the constitutive rock properties, the geometry of the fault surfaces, and their frictional properties. Simple forward models, using elasticity theory, illustrate how the displacement distributions can vary with remote loading, friction, and geometry. Inverse methods provide the analytical tools to deduce these variables from outcrop data, but their implementation awaits a credible model that couples the fluid flow and rock deformation.

  3. Implications of Late Cretaceous U-Pb zircon ages of granitic intrusions cutting ophiolitic and volcanogenic rocks for the assembly of the Tauride allochthon in SE Anatolia (Helete area, Kahramanmaraş Region, SE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurlu, Nusret; Parlak, Osman; Robertson, Alastair; von Quadt, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    An assemblage of NE-SW-trending, imbricate thrust slices (c. 26 km E-W long × 6.3 km N-S) of granitic rocks, basic-felsic volcanogenic rocks (Helete volcanics), ophiolitic rocks (Meydan ophiolite) and melange (Meydan melange) is exposed near the Tauride thrust front in SE Anatolia. The volcanogenic rocks were previously assumed to be Eocene because of associated Nummulitic limestones. However, ion probe U-Pb dating of zircons extracted from the intrusive granitic rocks yielded ages of 92.9 ± 2.2-83.1 ± 1.5 Ma (Cenomanian-Campanian). The Helete volcanic unit and the overlying Meydan ophiolitic rocks both are intruded by granitic rocks of similar age and composition. Structurally underlying ophiolite-related melange includes similar-aged, but fragmented granitic intrusions. Major, trace element and rare earth element analyses coupled with electron microprobe analysis of the granitic rocks show that they are metaluminus to peraluminus and calc-alkaline in composition. A magmatic arc setting is inferred from a combination of tectonomagmatic discrimination, ocean ridge granite-normalized multi-element patterns and biotite geochemistry. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data further suggest that the granitoid rocks were derived from variably mixed mantle and crustal sources. Granitic rocks cutting the intrusive rocks are inferred to have crystallized at ~5-16 km depth. The volcanogenic rocks and granitic rocks originated in a supra-subduction zone setting that was widely developed throughout SE Anatolia. Initial tectonic assembly took place during the Late Cretaceous probably related to northward subduction and accretion beneath the Tauride continent (Keban and Malatya platforms). Initial tectonic assembly was followed by exhumation and then transgression by shelf-depth Nummulitic limestones during Mid-Eocene, as documented in several key outcrops. Final emplacement onto the Arabian continental margin took place during the Early Miocene.

  4. Fluid-rock interactions in CO2-saturated, granite-hosted geothermal systems: Implications for natural and engineered systems from geochemical experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Ré, Caroline; Kaszuba, John P.; Moore, Joseph N.; McPherson, Brian J.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrothermal experiments were conducted and geochemical models constructed to evaluate the geochemical and mineralogical response of fractured granite and granite + epidote in contact with thermal water, with and without supercritical CO2, at 250 °C and 25-45 MPa. Illite ± smectite ± zeolite(?) precipitate as secondary minerals at the expense of K-feldspar, oligoclase, and epidote. Illite precipitates in experiments reacting granite and granite + epidote with water; metastable smectite forms in the experiments injected with supercritical CO2. Waters are supersaturated with respect to quartz and saturated with respect to chalcedony in CO2-charged experiments, but neither mineral formed. Carbonate formation is predicted for experiments injected with supercritical CO2, but carbonate only formed during cooling and degassing of the granite + epidote + CO2 experiment. Experimental results provide insight into the buffering capacity of granites as well as the drivers of clay formation. Metastable smectite in the experiments is attributed to high water-rock ratios, high silica activities, and high CO2 and magnesium-iron concentrations. Smectite precipitation in supercritical CO2-bearing geothermal systems may affect reservoir permeability. Silicate formation may create or thicken caps within or on the edges of geothermal reservoirs. Carbonate formation, as desired for carbon sequestration projects coinciding with geothermal systems, may require extended periods of time; cooling and degassing of CO2-saturated waters leads to carbonate precipitation, potentially plugging near-surface production pathways.

  5. Geochronology- and Geochemistry of Late Carboniferous-Middle Permian I- and A-Type Granites and Gabro-Diorites in the Eastern Jimausi Massif, NE, China: Implications for a Tectonic Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Junhui; Ge, Wenchun

    2016-04-01

    The late Paleozoic magmatism in the Jiamusi Massif of northeast China, located in the eastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), was dominated by an active continental margin environment due to subduction of the paleo-oceanic plate. Nevertheless, what deep geodynamic processes controlled the late Paleozoic evolution of the Jiamusi Massif are still poorly constrained. In this contribution, we present zircon U-Pb ages and geochemical data of late Carboniferous-middle Permian magmatism in the Jiamusi Massif, aiming to provide constraints on the question. Precise LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon ages indicate that the granitoids and gabbro-diorites were emplaced in the late Carboniferous-middle Permian (302-267 Ma). The granites belong to a high-potassium calc-alkaline series, are weakly peraluminous I- and A-type granites, and show high SiO2 and K2O contents; they are depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs), enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), show weakly to mildly fractionated REE patterns, and on spidergrams show arc-type affinities with strong depletions in Nb, Ta, and Ti. The combination of heterogeneous values of ɛHf(t) for magmatic zircons in all granitoids (ranging from +7.9 to -5.6) and two-stage Hf model ages (TDM2) of 0.8-1.7 Ga suggests that the granites originated from partial melting of a predominantly "old" Meso-Neoproterozoic crustal source. The gabbro-diorites of the Longtouqiao pluton are depleted in Nb, Ta, P, and Ti, and show flat distributions of most LILEs and HFSEs, except for marked large positive anomalies in Ba, K, and Pb. These features reflect limited degrees of crustal contamination associated with subduction-related magma processes. These data, together with previously reported data and the occurrence of arc magmatic rocks along the eastern part of the Jiamusi Massif, suggest that the intrusive rocks formed during westward subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Ocean lithosphere

  6. Thermal and tectonic evolution of the central and southern Appalachians: evidence from distribution, age, and origin of granitic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A.K.; Guy, R.; Hund, E.; Tamburro, E.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution and resolution of thermal events and associated igneous activity can discriminate between tectonic processes that form orogenic terrains, i.e., accretion of terranes, overthrusting of terranes versus thrust stacking within terranes. Reinterpretation of regional tectonics (Higgins et al., 1984) coupled with the authors interpretation of the age, origin, and distribution of granitic rocks suggest a very different mechanism for the evolution of the central and southern Appalachian orogenic belt. The Cambro-Ordovician magmatic arc (weakly bimodal) separated from the North American Margin by a Back arc basin, was thrust over the North American plate margin during the middle Ordovician. The Avalon terrane (Little River allochthon of Higgins et al., 1984) arrived during the late Silurian - but unlike earlier models that require subduction zone related with its arrival, the authors postulate strike-slip tectonics. The gabbro-diorite-syenite association in the Charlotte belt (Macon melange of Higgins) is probably related to grabens associated with the strike-slip accretion. Rocks of similar age (Siluro-Devonian) in the present day Blue Ridge and Inner Piedmont blocks are related to decompressional melting after the Ordovician thrusting. The high pressure metamorphism and associated melting show a range in ages indicating variations in uplift rates or thickness of the crust caused by the initial overthrusting, and do not require a discrete subduction or orogenic event. The Permo-Carboniferous igneous activity, and associated uplift and thrusting with a strike-slip component are related to oblique subduction and post-subduction collision processes.

  7. Thermal infrared analysis of weathered granitic rock compositions in the Sacaton Mountains, Arizona: Implications for petrologic classifications from thermal infrared remote-sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Joseph R.; Reynolds, Stephen J.; Sharp, Thomas G.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2004-03-01

    Critical to spectral interpretations of geologic surfaces on the Earth and Mars is an understanding of the relationship between the composition of weathered rock surfaces and whole-rock mineralogy. In this study, thermal infrared spectroscopic and remote-sensing analyses were used to determine the composition of weathered granitoid rock surfaces in the Sacaton Mountains, Arizona. A linear spectral deconvolution approach was employed to determine the mineralogies of naturally exposed, weathered surfaces and artificially exposed, fresh rock surfaces. Deconvolution results from fresh rock surfaces yield similar bulk mineralogy to results from point counting of rock slabs and thin sections. Deconvolution of weathered rock spectra indicate that compared to fresh samples, weathered surfaces are deficient in plagioclase feldspar and are enriched in clay minerals. The differential weathering of feldspar minerals impacts the interpretation of whole-rock mineralogy and the spectral classification of bedrock geology, which, for plutonic rocks, is dependent on the relative proportions of different feldspars. Deconvolutions of multispectral remote-sensing or laboratory data show a deficiency of total feldspar in the weathered rock units but lack sufficient spectral resolution for the discrimination between different feldspars. These results demonstrate that the differential breakdown and removal of primary minerals in rock surfaces due to weathering can affect the interpreted rock petrology from remote-sensing studies. The relationships observed in our granitic samples could be applied to any rock type and may be important to consider for remote sensing of Mars.

  8. Geochemical constraints on the evolution of mafic and felsic rocks in the Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence of Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Ashima; Gogoi, Bibhuti; Ahmad, Mansoor; Ahmad, Talat

    2014-06-01

    The Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary (BVS) sequence is a volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence, best exposed near Bathani village in Gaya district of Bihar. It is located in the northern fringe of the Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss Complex (CGGC). The volcano-sedimentary unit comprises of garnet-mica schist, rhyolite, tuff, banded iron formation (BIF) and chert bands with carbonate rocks as enclaves within the rhyolite and the differentiated volcanic sequence comprises of rhyolite, andesite, pillow basalt, massive basalt, tuff and mafic pyroclasts. Emplacement of diverse felsic and mafic rocks together testifies for a multi-stage and multi-source magmatism for the area. The presence of pillow basalt marks the eruption of these rocks in a subaqueous environment. Intermittent eruption of mafic and felsic magmas resulted in the formation of rhyolite, mafic pyroclasts, and tuff. Mixing and mingling of the felsic and mafic magmas resulted in the hybrid rock andesite. Granites are emplaced later, cross-cutting the volcanic sequence and are probably products of fractional crystallization of basaltic magma. The present work characterizes the geochemical characteristics of the magmatic rocks comprising of basalt, andesite, rhyolite, tuff, and granite of the area. Tholeiitic trend for basalt and calc-alkaline affinities of andesite, rhyolite and granite is consistent with their generation in an island arc, subduction related setting. The rocks of the BVS sequence probably mark the collision of the northern and southern Indian blocks during Proterozoic period. The explosive submarine volcanism may be related to culmination of the collision of the aforementioned blocks during the Neoproterozoic (1.0 Ga) as the Grenvillian metamorphism is well established in various parts of CGGC.

  9. Strontium isotopes as tracers of water-rocks interactions, mixing processes and residence time indicator of groundwater within the granite-carbonate coastal aquifer of Bonifacio (Corsica, France).

    PubMed

    Santoni, S; Huneau, F; Garel, E; Aquilina, L; Vergnaud-Ayraud, V; Labasque, T; Celle-Jeanton, H

    2016-12-15

    This study aims at identifying the water-rock interactions and mixing rates within a complex granite-carbonate coastal aquifer under high touristic pressure. Investigations have been carried out within the coastal aquifer of Bonifacio (southern Corsica, France) mainly composed of continental granitic weathering products and marine calcarenite sediments filling a granitic depression. A multi-tracer approach combining physico-chemical parameters, major ions, selected trace elements, stable isotopes of the water molecule and (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios measurements is undertaken for 20 groundwater samples during the low water period in November 2014. 5 rock samples of the sedimentary deposits and surrounding granites are also analysed. First, the water-rock interactions processes governing the groundwater mineralization are described in order to fix the hydrogeochemical background. Secondly, the flow conditions are refined through the quantification of inter aquifer levels mixing, and thirdly, the kinetics of water-rock interaction based on groundwater residence time from a previous study using CFCs and SF6 are quantified for the two main flow lines. A regional contrast in the groundwater recharge altitude allowed the oxygene-18 to be useful combined with the (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios to differentiate the groundwater origins and to compute the mixing rates, revealing the real extension of the watershed and the availability of the resource. The results also highlight a very good correlation between the groundwater residence time and the spatial evolution of (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios, allowing water-rock interaction kinetics to be defined empirically for the two main flow lines through the calcarenites. These results demonstrate the efficiency of strontium isotopes as tracers of water-rock interaction kinetics and by extension their relevance as a proxy of groundwater residence time, fundamental parameter documenting the long term sustainability of the hydrosystem. Copyright © 2016

  10. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in some eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks and their bearing on the origin of granitic magma in orogenic belts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Z.E.; Hedge, C.E.; Coleman, R.G.; Snavely, P.D.

    1967-01-01

    Rb and Sr contents and 87Sr/86Sr values were determined for samples of eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks, mostly graywackes, from Oregon and California. These data are compatible with the theory of anataxis of eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks in orogenic belts to produce granitic magmas provided that the melting occurs within several hundreds of m.y. after sedimentation. The low (87Sr/86Sr)0 values of the eugeosynclinal sedimentary rocks are related to the significant amounts of volcanogenic detritus present which probably were originally derived from the mantle. ?? 1967.

  11. Water-rock interaction on the development of granite gneissic weathered profiles in Garhwal Lesser Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyshnavi, S.; Islam, R.

    2015-07-01

    The development and sustainability of weathered profiles are very difficult in the Himalaya due to its complex lithology, tectonic history and fast erosion. Despite this, two weathered profiles namely WPa (weathered profile a) and WPb (weathered profile b) which have sustained erosion are developed on porphyry granite gneiss and granite gneissic lithology in Alaknanda valley of the Garhwal Lesser Himalaya. Systematic sampling of these two weathered profiles was done from bottom to top and they were chemically analysed to understand the elemental mobility in each profile. Major, trace and rare earth element studies show dissimilar behaviour with the advancement of weathering. In WPa profile, the CIA value of LAR (LAR) is 50 which reveals that the rock has not suffered any alteration but in WPb profile, the CIA value of LAR is 64 which indicates significant amount of chemical alteration. A-CN-K projection also exhibits similar behaviour. Further, the relative mobility of all the major and trace elements show variable elemental distribution in both the profiles. Enrichment of Mg, Fe, Ti, Al, Co, Ni, Zr, LREE and depletion of Na, K, P, Ca, Si, LILE and HFSE are observed in WPa profile; while the depletion of Na, K, Ca, P, Si, HREE and enhancement of Fe, Mn, Ti, Sc, Co, Zr, LREE are noticed in WPb profile. The rare earth elements also show a dissimilar mobilization pattern in both the profiles due to their strong dependency on lithology, and corresponding climate and tectonic interaction. Contrasting elemental mobility in both the profiles depict the major role in disparity of lithological characters and subsequent development of fractures produced by the major thrust system (Ramgarh thrust) which made an easy passage for rain water, thus causing the development of a chemically altered profile in the Lesser Himalayan region. Further, the present study infers the climate and tectonic milieu which is responsible for the development of such weathered profiles in Himalayan

  12. Nature and origin of Proterozoic A-type granitic magmatism in the southwestern United States of America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. Lawford; Bender, E. Erik

    1989-06-01

    The mountain ranges of Arizona and adjacent California and Nevada contain large areas underlain by Proterozoic anorogenic granites comprising the southwesternmost portion of a transcontinental belt of 1.4-1.5-Ga-old anorogenic complexes that extends across North America northeast into Labrador. Of these, a two-mica, monazite-bearing granitic suite resides in central and southeastern Arizona as part of a peraluminous subprovince that is bordered on the south (southern Arizona to Sonora) and west (western Arizona and adjacent portions of California and Nevada) by marginally metaluminous granites bearing biotite-sphene ± hornblende and fluorite. All of these 1.4-Ga granites are distinctly more potassic, iron-enriched (relative to Mg), and depleted in Ca, Mg and Sr in contrast to typical orogenic granitoids. In general, the large-ion lithophile-element enriched composition is a consequence of limited melting of a water-deficient crustal source at depths greater than 25-37 km. For the peraluminous granites, this contrast is less extreme, perhaps resulting from a larger degree of melting as a consequence of a greater metasedimentary component and water in its crustal source. The anorogenic granitic magmas intruded into the upper crust at depths of 8-17 km or shallower at temperatures up to 790°C. The most dramatic variation in the crystallization-intensive parameters resides in the oxygen fugacity, which spans three orders of magnitude. Relative to other anorogenic suites, all of the magmas crystallized at elevated levels of ƒ O 2 as reflected in their assignment to the anorogenic magnetite series. Yet a regionally significant rise in primary ƒ O 2 levels, unmatched elsewhere in the transcontinental belt, occurs for plutons in western Arizona, including the Holy Moses and Hualapai granites. The most extreme case is the Hualapai granite whose biotite {Fe}/{( Fe + Mg)} ratios drop (due to high ƒ O 2) to a low of 0.27, down from more typical levels of 0.54 to 0

  13. Structural geology and geophysics as a support to build a hydrogeologic model of granite rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Gómez, Paloma; Bajos, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    A method developed for low-permeability fractured media was applied to understand the hydrogeology of a mine excavated in a granitic pluton. This method includes (1) identifying the main groundwater-conducting features of the medium, such as the mine, dykes, and large fractures, (2) implementing this factors as discrete elements into a three-dimensional numerical model, and (3) calibrating these factors against hydraulic data . A key question is how to identify preferential flow paths in the first step. Here, we propose a combination of several techniques. Structural geology, together with borehole sampling, geophysics, hydrogeochemistry, and local hydraulic tests aided in locating all structures. Integration of these data yielded a conceptual model of the site. A preliminary calibration of the model was performed against short-term (< 1 day) pumping tests, which facilitated the characterization of some of the fractures. The hydraulic properties were then used for other fractures that, according to geophysics and structural geology, belonged to the same families. Model validity was tested by blind prediction of a long-term (4 months) large-scale (1 km) pumping test from the mine, which yielded excellent agreement with the observations. Model results confirmed the sparsely fractured nature of the pluton, which has not been subjected to glacial loading-unloading cycles and whose waters are of Na-HCO3 type.

  14. Colloids in water from a subsurface fracture in granitic rock, Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, C.; Baeyens, B.; Goerlich, W.; Riga, J.; Verbist, J.; Stadelmann, P.

    1989-03-01

    The characterization of colloids from the Grimsel Test Site granitic groundwater has been carried out after concentrating the natural colloids by diaultrafiltration in situ and in the laboratory. A 2-year-long study has shown little variation in the chemistry of the Grimsel water ( T = 285 K, pH = 9.6) and a calculation of saturation indices indicates that quartz and fluorite are slightly oversaturated in the in situ conditions ( log P( CO2)/ atm. = -5.5). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations indicate a colloid concentration of approximately 10 10 particles (40 to 1000 nm) per litre. On the basis electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS), and laser microprobe mass analysis (LAMMA), the particles are a mixture of organic (C, N, O, (S)) and inorganic (Si, Ca, S and to a lesser extent Mg, Sr and Ba) materials. The alpha specific activity in the colloidal phase is less than 0.5 mBq · 1 -1. The mode of formation is discussed together with the size distribution and the concentration.

  15. Ancient microbial activity recorded in fracture fillings from granitic rocks (Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden).

    PubMed

    Heim, C; Lausmaa, J; Sjövall, P; Toporski, J; Dieing, T; Simon, K; Hansen, B T; Kronz, A; Arp, G; Reitner, J; Thiel, V

    2012-07-01

    Fracture minerals within the 1.8-Ga-old Äspö Diorite (Sweden) were investigated for fossil traces of subterranean microbial activity. To track the potential organic and inorganic biosignatures, an approach combining complementary analytical techniques of high lateral resolution was applied to drill core material obtained at -450 m depth in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory. This approach included polarization microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe (EMP) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The fracture mineral succession, consisting of fluorite and low-temperature calcite, showed a thin (20-100 μm), dark amorphous layer lining the boundary between the two phases. Microscopic investigations of the amorphous layer revealed corrosion marks and, in places, branched tubular structures within the fluorite. Geochemical analysis showed significant accumulations of Si, Al, Mg, Fe and the light rare earth elements (REE) in the amorphous layer. In the same area, ToF-SIMS imaging revealed abundant, partly functionalized organic moieties, for example, C(x)H(y)⁺, C(x)H(y)N⁺, C(x)H(y)O⁺. The presence of such functionalized organic compounds was corroborated by Raman imaging showing bands characteristic of C-C, C-N and C-O bonds. According to its organic nature and the abundance of relatively unstable N- and O- heterocompounds, the organic-rich amorphous layer is interpreted to represent the remains of a microbial biofilm that established much later than the initial cooling of the Precambrian host rock. Indeed, δ¹³C, δ¹⁸O and ⁸⁷Sr/⁸⁶Sr isotope data of the fracture minerals and the host rock point to an association with a fracture reactivation event in the most recent geological past. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Vertical structure of a caldera-filling pyroclastics and post-caldera granitic sill: the Middle Miocene Kumano Acidic Rocks emplaced in the Paleogene Shimanto accretionary complex, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, T.; Geshi, N.; Oikawa, T.; Shinjoe, H.; Miura, D.; Koizumi, N.

    2009-04-01

    A 600m all-core drilling penetrated a volcano-plutonic complex associated with middle Miocene Kumano caldera, Kii Peninsula, Southwest Japan. It shows us the vertical cross section of the caldera-filling pyroclastic deposit and granitic sill intruded inside the caldera. The drilling site is located in the southern rim of the north body of Kumano igneous complex. The drilling core consists of the granite porphyry intrusion (Kumano Granite Porphyry) in the upper part (from surface to 464.3 m depth) and the welded tuff (Owase-Shirahama Pyroclastic Rocks) beneath them (464.3 and 600 m depth), which are associated with the caldera formation. The welded tuff in the core sample consists mainly of well-sorted coarse-grained volcanic ash of crystal fragments and lithic fragments. Subordinate amount of pumice fragment more than 10 cm across are scattered. Though most part of the welded tuff in the core sample is massive as observed in the surface outcrops, some parts show remarkable bedding structure. These structural characters suggest that the welded tuff is a pile of many flow units with several 10s meters thick each, which consists of basal pumice-concentrated bed, main massive tuff, and upper bedding part. The lower intrusion boundary of the Kumano Granite Porphyry is exposed at 464.3 m deep, where the granite porphyry intrudes into the host welded tuff with about 10 m thick chilled margin, in which the granite porphyry has very-fine groundmass. The groundmass texture of the granite porphyry shows systematic variation with the distance from the intrusion contact. Within about 20 m from the contact, the groundmass consists of very-fine crystals and entirely shows volcanic rock texture. For 150 m above them, the groundmass consists mainly of quartz and plagioclase and shows equigranular texture. In the upper part (less than 300m deep), the groundmass shows graphic texture with quartz and alkali feldspar. The vertical variation of the groundmass texture indicates upward

  17. A Nd- and O-isotope study of the REE-rich peralkaline Strange Lake granite: implications for Mesoproterozoic A-type magmatism in the Core Zone (NE-Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Karin; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.; Stevenson, Ross

    2017-07-01

    It is well established that A-type granites enriched in high field strength elements, such as Zr, Nb and the REE, form in anorogenic tectonic settings. The sources of these elements and the processes controlling their unusual enrichment, however, are still debated. They are addressed here using neodymium and oxygen isotope analyses of samples from the 1.24 Ga Strange Lake pluton in the Paleoproterozoic Core Zone of Québec-Labrador, an A-type granitic body characterized by hyper-enrichment in the REE, Zr, and Nb. Age-corrected ɛNd values for bulk rock samples and sodic amphiboles (mainly arfvedsonite) from the pluton range from -0.6 to -5.7, and -0.3 to -5.3, respectively. The ɛNd values for the Napeu Kainiut quartz monzonite, which hosts the pluton, range from -4.8 to -8.1. The 147Sm/144Nd ratios of the suite and the host quartz monzonite range from 0.0967 to 0.1659, large variations that can be explained by in situ fractionation of early LREE-minerals (Strange Lake), and late hydrothermal HREE remobilization. Oxygen isotope analyses of quartz of both Strange Lake and the host yielded δ18O values between +8.2 and +9.1, which are considerably higher than the mantle value of 5.7 ± 0.2‰. Bulk rock oxygen isotope analyses of biotite-gneisses in the vicinity of the Strange Lake pluton yielded δ18O values of 6.3, 8.6 and 9.6‰. The negative ɛNd values and positive δ18O values of the Strange Lake and Napeu Kainiut samples indicate that both magmas experienced considerable crustal contamination. The extent of this contamination was estimated, assuming that the contaminants were sedimentary-derived rocks from the underlying Archean Mistinibi (para-) gneiss complex, which is characterized by low ɛNd and high δ18O values. Mixing of 5-15% of a gneiss, having an ɛNd value of -15 and a δ18O value of +11, with a moderately enriched mantle source (ɛNd = +0.9, δ18O = +6.3) would produce values similar to those obtained for the Strange Lake granites. Based on

  18. Some additional observations on inclusions in the granitic rocks of the Sierra Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, F.C.W.; Kistler, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Microgranular quartz diorite and diorite inclusions are widespread in central Sierra Nevada granitoid rocks and are almost exclusively restricted to hornblende-bearing rocks, most commonly felsic tonalites and mafic granodiorites. The Nd-Sm and Rb-Sr systematics indicate that most inclusions were in isotopic equilibrium with enclosing materials at the time of formation. Silica contents of inclusions and granitoids are contiguous, but inclusions generally contain less than, and granitoids more than, 60% SiO2. Ferric oxide and H2O+ trends relative to SiO2 suggests many inclusions formed as concentrations of hydrous mafic minerals. Variation of other major element oxides and trace elements support this inference. Most inclusions represent fragmented crystal accumulations of early-formed, near-liquidus minerals generated from these previously mixed magmas. -from Authors

  19. The Blaník Gneiss in the southern Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic): a rare rock composition among the early palaeozoic granites of Variscan Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    René, Miloš; Finger, Fritz

    2016-08-01

    Metamorphosed and deformed tourmaline-bearing leucogranites with a Cambro-Ordovician formation age are widespread in the Monotonous Group of the Variscan southern Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic. The rocks, known locally as Blaník gneiss, are strongly peraluminous and classify as phosphorus-rich low-T, S-type granite. The magma formed from a metapelitic source, most likely through muscovite dehydration melting. With respect to its low-T origin and the abundance of tourmaline, the Blaník gneiss is exotic within the spectrum of Early Palaeozoic granites of the Variscan fold belt of Central Europe. Coeval granitic gneisses in the neighbouring Gföhl unit of the Bohemian Massif can be classified as higher T S-type granites and were probably generated through biotite dehydration melting. The geochemical differences between the Early Palaeozoic granitic magmatism in the Gföhl unit and the Monotonous Group support models claiming that these two geological units belonged to independent peri-Gondwana terranes before the Variscan collision. It is suggested here, that the Gföhl unit and the Monotonous Group represent zones of higher and lower heat flow within the Early Palaeozoic northern Gondwana margin, respectively. The geochemical data presented in this study could be helpful for terrane correlations and palaeogeographic reconstructions.

  20. Excavation and drilling at a spent-fuel test facility in granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.C.; Mayr, M.C.

    1981-10-01

    Funding for a project to test the feasibility of safe and reliable storage and retrieval of spent fuel from a commercial nuclear reactor was approved by the Department of Energy on June 2, 1978. By May 28, 1980, 11 spent-fuel assemblies had been emplaced 420 m below the surface in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. Design and construction of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax, including fuel emplacement, had taken less than two years, at a total cost of $18.4 million. Construction activities were preceded by geologic exploration using four cored holes and existing underground workings. The sinking of a 0.76-m-diam shaft to the 420-m level initiated construction at the site. Effective rates of sinking varied from 0.16 m/h with a rotary tricone drill to 0.5 m/h with a hammer drill. Underground excavation included a central canister-storage drift 4.6 x 6.1 x 64 m long, two parallel 3.4 x 3.4-m heater drifts, and a tail drift. About 6700 m{sup 3} were excavated at an average rate of 2 m{sup 3}/h, and 178 cored holes, with diameters from 38 to 152 mm, were drilled. A total length of nearly 1100 m was drilled at rates ranging from 0.4 m/h to 1 m/h, depending on hole size and drilling equipment. Eighteen 610-mm-diam canister emplacement holes were hammer-drilled at an average rate of 1.4 m/h. The use of the critical path method, integrated contractors, and close cooperation between project participants facilitated completion of the project on schedule.

  1. LA-SF-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb geochronology of granitic rocks from the central Bundelkhand greenstone complex, Bundelkhand craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sanjeet K.; Verma, Surendra P.; Oliveira, Elson P.; Singh, Vinod K.; Moreno, Juan A.

    2016-03-01

    The central Bundelkhand greenstone complex in Bundelkhand craton, northern India is one of the well exposed Archaean supracrustal amphibolite, banded iron formation (BIF) and felsic volcanic rocks (FV) and associated with grey and pink porphyritic granite, tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG). Here we present high precision zircon U-Pb geochronological data for the pinkish porphyritic granites and TTG. The zircons from the grey-pinkish porphyritic granite show three different concordia ages of 2531 ± 21 Ma, 2516 ± 38 Ma, and 2514 ± 13 Ma, which are interpreted as the best estimate of the magmatic crystallization age for the studied granites. We also report the concordia age of 2669 ± 7.4 Ma for a trondhjemite gneiss sample, which is so far the youngest U-Pb geochronological data for a TTG rock suite in the Bundelkhand craton. This TTG formation at 2669 Ma is also more similar to Precambrian basement TTG gneisses of the Aravalli Craton of north western India and suggests that crust formation in the Bundelkhand Craton occurred in a similar time-frame to that recorded from the Aravalli craton of the North-western India.

  2. Complete zircon and chromite digestion by sintering of granite, rhyolite, andesite and harzburgite rock reference materials for geochronological purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhari, Syed Nadeem H.; Meisel, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO4) is a common accessory mineral in nature that occurs in a wide variety of sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. Zircon has the ability to retain substantial chemical and isotopic information that are used in range of geochemical and geo- chronological investigations. Sample digestion of such rock types is a limiting factor due to the chemical inertness of zircon (ZrSiO4) tourmaline, chromite, barite, monazite, sphene, xenotime etc. as the accuracy of results relies mainly on recovery of analytes from these minerals. Dissolution by wet acid digestions are often incomplete and high blank and total dissolved solids (TDS) contents with alkali fusions lead to an underestimation of analyte concentrations. Hence an effective analytical procedure, that successfully dissolves refractory minerals such as zircon is needed to be employed for reliable analytical results. Na2O2 digestion [1] was applied in characterisation of granite (G-3), rhyolite (MRH), andesite (MGL-AND) and harzburgite (MUH-1) powdered reference material with solution based ICP-MS analysis. In this study we undertake a systematic evaluation of decomposition time and sample:Na2O2 ratio and test portion size after minimising effect of all other constraints that makes homogeneity ambiguous. In recovering zircon and chromite 100 mg test portion was mixed with different amounts of Na2O2 i.e. 100-600 mg. Impact of decomposition time was observed by systematically increasing heating time from 30-45 minutes to 90-120 minutes at 480°C. Different test portion sizes 100-500 mg of samples were digested to control variance of inhomogeneity. An improved recovery of zirconium in zircon in granite (G-3), rhyolite MRH), andesite (MGL-AND) and chromite in harzburgite (MUH-1) was obtained by increasing heating time (2h) at 480°C and by keeping (1:6) ratio of sample:Na2O2. Through this work it has been established that due to presence of zircon and chromite, decomposition time and sample:Na2O2 ratio has

  3. Estimation of the radon production rate in granite rocks and evaluation of the implications for geogenic radon potential maps: A case study in Central Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A; Lamas, R; Miranda, M; Domingos, F; Neves, L; Ferreira, N; Costa, L

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to estimate radon gas production rate in granitic rocks and identify the factors responsible for the observed variability. For this purpose, 180 samples were collected from pre-Hercynian and Hercynian rocks in north and central Portugal and analysed for a) (226)Ra activity, b) radon ((222)Rn) per unit mass activity, and c) radon gas emanation coefficient. On a subset of representative samples from the same rock types were also measured d) apparent porosity and e) apparent density. For each of these variables, the values ranged as follows: a) 15 to 587 Bq kg(-1), b) 2 to 73 Bq kg(-1), c) 0.01 to 0.80, d) 0.3 to 11.4 % and e) 2530 to 2850 kg m(-3). Radon production rate varied between 40 to 1386 Bq m(-3) h(-1). The variability observed was associated with geologically late processes of low and high temperature which led to the alteration of the granitic rock with mobilization of U and increase in radon (222)Rn gas emanation. It is suggested that, when developing geogenic radon potential maps, data on uranium concentration in soils/altered rock should be used, rather than data obtained from unaltered rock.

  4. Effects of Heat Shock on the Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Granitic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardoukhi, Ahmad; Mardoukhi, Yousof; Hokka, Mikko; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a new experimental method for the characterization of the surface damage caused by a heat shock on a Brazilian disk test sample. Prior to mechanical testing with a Hopkinson Split Pressure bar device, the samples were subjected to heat shock by placing a flame torch at a fixed distance from the sample's surface for periods of 10, 30, and 60 s. The sample surfaces were studied before and after the heat shock using optical microscopy and profilometry, and the images were analyzed to quantify the damage caused by the heat shock. The complexity of the surface crack patterns was quantified using fractal dimension of the crack patterns, which were used to explain the results of the mechanical testing. Even though the heat shock also causes damage below the surface which cannot be quantified from the optical images, the presented surface crack pattern analysis can give a reasonable estimate on the drop rate of the tension strength of the rock.

  5. Grenvillian magmatism in the northern Virginia Blue Ridge: Petrologic implications of episodic granitic magma production and the significance of postorogenic A-type charnockite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tollo, R.P.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Borduas, E.A.; Dickin, A.P.; McNutt, R.H.; Fanning, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Grenvillian (1.2 to 1.0 Ga) plutonic rocks in northern Virginia preserve evidence of episodic, mostly granitic magmatism that spanned more than 150 million years (m.y.) of crustal reworking. Crystallization ages determined by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon and monazite, combined with results from previous studies, define three periods of magmatic activity at 1183-1144 Ma (Magmatic Interval I), 1120-1111 Ma (Magmatic Interval II), and 1078-1028 Ma (Magmatic Interval III). Magmatic activity produced dominantly tholeiitic plutons composed of (1) low-silica charnockite, (2) leucogranite, (3) non-leucocratic granitoid (with or without orthopyroxene (opx)), and (4) intermediate biotite-rich granitoid. Field, petrologic, geochemical, and geochronologic data indicate that charnockite and non-charnockitic granitoids were closely associated in both space and time, indicating that presence of opx is related to magmatic conditions, not metamorphic grade. Geochemical and Nd isotopic data, combined with results from experimental studies, indicate that leucogranites (Magmatic Intervals I and III) and non-leucocratic granitoids (Magmatic Intervals I and II) were derived from parental magmas produced by either a high degree of partial melting of isotopically evolved tonalitic sources or less advanced partial melting of dominantly tonalitic sources that also included a more mafic component. Post-orogenic, circa 1050 Ma low-silica charnockite is characterized by A-type compositional affinity including high FeOt/(FeOt + MgO), Ga/Al, Zr, Nb, Y, and Zn, and was derived from parental magmas produced by partial melting of potassic mafic sources in the lower crust. Linear geochemical trends defined by leucogranites, low-silica charnockite, and biotite-rich monzogranite emplaced during Magmatic Interval III reflect differences in source-related characteristics; these features do not represent an igneous fractionation sequence. A

  6. Boron and boron isotope systematics in the peralkaline Ilímaussaq intrusion (South Greenland) and its granitic country rocks: A record of magmatic and hydrothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliwoda, Melanie; Marschall, Horst R.; Marks, Michael A. W.; Ludwig, Thomas; Altherr, Rainer; Markl, Gregor

    2011-07-01

    Concentrations of boron in whole rocks and minerals of the peralkaline, 1.16 Ga Ilímaussaq intrusion and its granitic country rocks (South Greenland) were analysed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNAA) analysis. The intrusion consists of an early augite-syenite shell, a later alkali-granite sheet and still later nepheline syenites, which dominate the Complex. Boron concentrations are high (250-280 μg/g) in all rocks containing fresh sodalite, whereas boron is constantly low in the sodalite-free augite syenites (4-6 μg/g) and in the alkali granites (7-22 μg/g). Rocks with sodalite altered to analcime contain only low amounts of boron (2-7 μg/g), which records boron extraction by late-magmatic fluids. Concentration profiles of B in the analysed minerals (olivine, amphibole, clinopyroxene, aenigmatite, eudialyte, biotite, feldspar, nepheline and sodalite) record magmatic fractionation to various extents, late-magmatic to hydrothermal fluid/rock interaction, and sub-solidus diffusion. Whole-rock concentration data cannot be directly translated into the geochemical evolution of the peralkaline melts, since they are largely affected by cumulate fractionation of sodalite and amphibole and furthermore by late-stage hydrothermal alteration processes resulting in B loss. However, trace-element concentrations of mineral zones representing equilibrium fractionation from magmatic liquids can be used in combination with mineral-melt partition coefficients to unravel the enrichment processes of elements in the melt. Boron isotope values of minerals from the intrusion and the country rocks resemble the trend observed for Li isotopes in an earlier study. Amphibole and feldspar display a clear trend from light boron in the inner nepheline syenitic part of the intrusion (δ11B = -20‰ and -17‰ for amphibole and feldspar, respectively) through intermediate values in the outer augite syenites (δ11B = -10‰ and -6‰ for

  7. Physical property characterization of a damage zone in granitic rock - Implications for geothermal reservoir properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Quinn; Madonna, Claudio; Amann, Florian; Gischig, Valentin; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy offers a viable alternative to mitigate greenhouse gas emitting energy production. A tradeoff between less expensive drilling costs and increased permeability at shallow depths versus increased heat production at deeper depths stipulates the economic energy potential of a given reservoir. From a geological perspective, successful retrieval of geothermal energy from the subsurface requires sufficient knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic relationship of the target formations, which govern the thermal conditions, physical properties, and fluid flow properties of reservoir rocks. In Switzerland, deep basement rocks (~5 km) with fluid conducting damage zones and enhanced fractured systems stimulated by hydraulic shearing are seen as a potential geothermal reservoir system. Damage zones, both natural and induced, provide permeability enhancement that is especially important for creating fluid conductivity where the matrix permeability is low. This study concentrates on characterizing the elastic and transport properties entering into a natural damage zone penetrated by a borehole at the Grimsel underground research laboratory. The borehole drilled from a cavern at 480 m below ground surface penetrates approximately 20 m of mostly intact Grimsel granodiorite before entering the first phyllosilicate-rich shear zone (~0.2 m thick). The borehole intersects a second shear zone at approximately 23.8m. Between the two shear zones the Grimsel granodiorite is heavily fractured. The minimum principle stress magnitude from in-situ measurements decreases along the borehole into the first shear zone. Two mutually perpendicular core samples of Grimsel granodiorite were taken every 0.1 m from 19.5 to 20.1 m to characterize the physical properties and anisotropy changes as a gradient away from the damage zone. Measurements of ultrasonic compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) velocities at 1 MHz frequency are conducted at room temperature and hydrostatic pressures

  8. Behaviour of thermal waters through granite rocks based on residence time and inorganic pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Outeiriño, I.; Araujo-Nespereira, P.; Cid-Fernández, J. A.; Mejuto, J. C.; Martínez-Carballo, E.; Simal-Gándara, J.

    2009-07-01

    SummaryThermal waters are certainly a substantial asset of the Galicia region of Spain. They can be regarded as worth developing because of their human health implications and, if thermal tourism is promoted, their importance to the local economy. In this paper the chemistry of major and trace inorganic elements in about 45 thermal springs and wells discharging in the same hydrographical system are presented and discussed. For handling the results of all measurements, graphical representations of B/Li vs.SO42-/Cl - ratios, Hill-Piper diagram, discriminant analysis (DA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were employed. All this with the intention to classify, based on their inorganic pattern, both thermal springs and wells waters, but also waters circulating through adamellite and granodiorite rocks. The results of the hydrogeochemistry analysis showed three main water families: sulphated, chlorinated and bicarbonated waters. The results show also the presence of saline materials with chloride influence in the deeper aquifer, allowing its classification in deeper and younger/shallow waters.

  9. Ratamah specialized granite, Midyan region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; rock types, geochemistry and rare-metal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douch, Colin J.

    Detailed prospecting at Ratamah (29°07'N, 35°20'E), after reconnaissance prospecting suggested that it was a tin-mineralizing granite, showed that much of the exposed portion of the pluton is albite-bearing alkali-feldspar granite forming a 10 m-thick roof zone above albite-free alkali-feldspar granite. Lenses of albite—amphibole microgranite in marginal contact zones are associated with faults. Albite-bearing granite is enriched in Fe 2O 3, Na 2O, F, La and W compared with albite-free granite. Microgranite is strongly enriched in Al 2O 3, FeO, Na 2O, MnO and Be, La, Nb, Sn, Y, Zr and F. Albitization is thought to have resulted from deuteric and hydrothermal reaction following soda enrichment in residual phases of the crystallizing magma.

  10. Petrogenesis of Paleocene-Eocene porphyry deposit-related granitic rocks in the Yaguila-Sharang ore district, central Lhasa terrane, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junxing; Li, Guangming; Evans, Noreen J.; Qin, Kezhang; Li, Jinxiang; Zhang, Xia'nan

    2016-11-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene ore deposits in the Gangdese Metallogenic Belt, Tibet, are thought to have been formed during the main period of India-Asia continental collision. This paper reports the whole-rock major element, trace element, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions and zircon trace element contents of volcanic and intrusive rocks from the Paleocene Yaguila skarn Pb-Zn-Ag deposit and adjacent Eocene Sharang porphyry Mo deposit in the central Lhasa terrane, Tibet. Geochemical signatures and Nd-Hf isotopic compositions indicate that the Yaguila Cretaceous rhyolitic rocks were formed by the melting of ancient continental crust, whereas the Paleocene causative granite porphyry may have resulted from the interaction between mantle-derived and crustal-derived materials when continental collision was initiated. The dramatic increase of εNd(t) values between emplacement of the granite porphyry and later porphyritic biotite granite suggests a greater involvement of mantle materials during the crystallization of the barren biotite granite stock. The post-ore Miocene granodiorite porphyry has a similar geochemical signature to the Sharang Miocene dykes, suggesting they were both generated from melting of enriched lithospheric mantle. Nd-Hf mixing calculations indicate an increasing contribution of mantle materials in Paleocene to Eocene intrusions, consistent with the regional tectonic model of Neo-Tethyan oceanic slab roll-back and break-off. Zircons from both the Yaguila and Sharang ore-related porphyries have higher Ce anomalies than those from the barren granitoids, suggesting that Mo mineralization was closely related to highly oxidized and differentiated magma. The fertile intrusions in the Yaguila-Sharang district contain EuN/EuN∗ values from 0.3 to 0.6, higher than the non-mineralized intrusions. The processes of early crystallization of plagioclase and/or SO2-degassing from underlying magma can explain the observed negative Eu anomalies in zircon.

  11. Petrogenesis of Jurassic tungsten-bearing granites in the Nanling Range, South China: Evidence from whole-rock geochemistry and zircon U-Pb and Hf-O isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Yang, Jin-Hui; Chen, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Hao; Xiang, Yuan-Xin

    2017-05-01

    The Nanling Range (NLR) is the largest tungsten metallogenic province in China and perhaps in the world. The tungsten mineralization is believed to be related to Jurassic granitic magmatism. However, the petrogenesis of these granites and their relation to the tungsten mineralization are still debated. Whole-rock geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data and zircon in situ U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes are reported for W-bearing granitic intrusions from the southern Jiangxi Province in the NLR, in order to constrain their magmatic sources and petrogenesis. The NLR granites include biotite granites, two-mica granites and garnet muscovite granites. SIMS and LA-ICPMS U-Pb dating of zircons and monazites give emplacement ages of 161-154 Ma for these rocks. The granites are metaluminous to strongly peraluminous with high SiO2 (> 72.3 wt.%) and high K2O (> 3.7 wt.%). Petrographic and geochemical features show that they are highly fractionated I-type granites. The biotite granites are enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) relative to heavy REEs, have weakly negative Eu anomalies and are depleted in Nb, Ba, P and Ti. In contrast, the two-mica and garnet-bearing muscovite granites have tetrad-type REE patterns with strongly negative Eu anomalies and are extremely depleted in Ba, Nb, Sr, P and Ti. Magmatic garnets are mainly almandine and spessartine, and have low-Mn cores and high-Mn rims. Their (Y + HREE) contents are high and generally decrease from core (1.2 wt.%) to rim (average = 4955 ppm). All of these granites are characterized by variable whole-rock initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.7053-0.8000), εNd(t) (- 12.6 to - 9.4) and εHf(t) (- 12.3 to - 8.5), as well as variable zircon εHf(t) and δ18O, with values of - 16.3 to - 7.4 and 7.6 to 10.0‰, respectively. They contain abundant zircon xenocrysts and xenoliths of micaceous schist. All of these features are consistent with a process of crystal fractionation of crustally-derived magmas coupled with strong assimilation of

  12. Assessment of Hydro-Mechanical Behavior of a Granite Rock Mass for a Pilot Underground Crude Oil Storage Facility in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhechao; Li, Shucai; Qiao, Liping

    2015-11-01

    The hydro-mechanical behavior of a pilot underground crude oil storage facility in a granite host rock in China was analyzed using the finite element method (FEM). Characterization of hydro-mechanical behavior of the rock mass was performed using laboratory test, field monitoring, back analysis of field measurements and permeability tests. FEM numerical analyses were used to assess the hydro-mechanical behavior of the granite to study several design and construction issues. The containment properties of the storage facility were investigated without and with the water curtain system. Results showed that the stored oil would leak into rock mass if a water curtain system is not provided, whereas the containment property of the facility will be maintained when a water curtain system is in place. On the influence of cavern excavation sequence, it was indicated that the excavation of the caverns from left to right is a better choice than right to left for the containment property of the facility. On the influence of permeable condition, it was found that the extent of plastic zones, horizontal convergence and crown settlement under permeable condition are lower than those under impermeable condition due to the different stress paths in the rock mass experienced during excavation.

  13. Healed microcrack orientations in granite from Illinois borehole UPH-3 and their relationship to the rock's stress history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowallis, Bart J.; Wang, Herbert F.; Jang, Bo-An

    1987-04-01

    Oriented granite cores from the Illinois borehole UPH-3 contain planes of secondary fluid inclusions, which represent healed microcracks. They record the orientation of a paleostress field, with the maximum stress in the horizontal plane oriented to the NNW about 90° from the present stress field orientation. These bubble planes probably formed while the granite was still quite warm (> 400° C) during initial cooling, uplift, and unroofing of the granite prior to deposition of younger overlying Cambrian sediments. The bubble planes have a much more uniform orientation than the open microcracks, which formed by stress-relief when the core was removed from the borehole.

  14. In-situ investigation of the influence of the long-term shear strength of faults on the regional stress field in a granite rock mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Bruno; Cornet, Francois; Lamas, Luís; Muralha, José

    2016-04-01

    A case study is presented to show how stress field measurements may be used to assess the long-term rheological behaviour of an equivalent geo-material. The example concerns a granitic rock mass at the km3 scale, where an underground hydropower scheme including a new 10 km long power conduit and a powerhouse complex will be constructed. For design of the underground cavern and hydraulic pressure tunnel, several in situ stress measurements were carried out, using hydraulic borehole testing, overcoring and flat jack techniques. A first continuum mechanics model, with a homogenous material, was developed to integrate the several in situ test results and to assess the regional stress field. This model is based on elasticity and relaxation of the elastic properties measured through laboratory tests conducted on cores. Results of integration show that the long-term behavior of this granite rock mass differs markedly from the short-term behaviour as defined by laboratory tests. This suggests that the in-situ stress field depends mostly on the softer material that fills up the faults and hence results from the shear stress relaxation over a large number of pre-existing fractures and faults. A second continuum mechanics model, with consideration of two fault planes located nearby the hydraulic tests, was studied. This model is based on elasticity for the overall rock mass, with the elastic properties extracted from laboratory measurements, and visco-elasticity with small long-term shear strength for the two fault planes. Results show that the overall granite rock mass may be viewed as a combination of stiff elastic blocks separated by soft low strength material, leading to a fairly large scale homogeneous axisymmetrical stress field with vertical axis. Advantages and limitations of the two modelling approaches are discussed.

  15. Petrology and geochemistry of Mesozoic granitic rocks from the Nansha micro-block, the South China Sea: Constraints on the basement nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Quanshu; Shi, Xuefa; Liu, Jihua; Wang, Kunshan; Bu, Wenrui

    2010-01-01

    There are several micro-blocks dispersed in the South China Sea (SCS), e.g., Xisha-Zhongsha block, Nansha block and Reed-Northeastern Palawan block, etc., but detailed petrological constraints on their basement nature were previously lacking. The magmatic ages for granitic rock samples from two dredge stations in the Nansha micro-block vary from 159 to 127 Ma, which are comparable to magmatic activities occurred in the northern margin (Pearl river mouth), HongKong and East China. Petrographic characteristics, major-, trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic data of nine samples from two dredged station performed in the Nansha micro-block, the SCS, are reported. Petrographically, these granitic rocks can be divided into two groups which underwent a complex history of magmatic process, i.e., tonalitic rock (Group I) and monzogranitic rock (Group II). The Rittmann index ( σ) for these rocks (1.9-3.1) suggest that they belong to calc-alkaline rocks. Group I rocks which is of typical I-type, have higher contents of TiO 2, Al 2O 3, FeO, MgO, CaO, Na 2O and P 2O 5, but lower values of SiO 2 and K 2O, when compared with those of Group II with I-type characteristics. Group I rocks are produced by partial melting of older Precambrian basement with the variable influence of mantle-derived magma which results from the interaction of released fluids from the subducted slab and the overlying mantle wedge in a general convergent margin setting, and Group II rocks result from partial melting of lower crustal basic rocks (amphibolite) and/or further partial melting of the Group I rocks associated with the variable influence from the underplating mantle-derived magma resulting from lithospheric extensional regime. Both Groups I and II have undergone assimilation and fractional crystallization (AFC) processes during its petrogenesis. This study therefore demonstrates that there exists a continental basement within micro-blocks in the South China Sea, and further supports the idea that a

  16. Origin and evolution of the granitic intrusions in the Brusque Group of the Dom Feliciano Belt, south Brazil: Petrostructural analysis and whole-rock/isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueck, Mathias; Basei, Miguel Angelo Stipp; Castro, Neivaldo Araújo de

    2016-08-01

    In the southern Brazilian state of Santa Catarina the Dom Feliciano Belt, formed by the tectonic juxtaposition of different crustal blocks during the Brasiliano-Pan African Orogenic cycle, can be divided into three domains. In the central domain, three granitic suites intrude the metavolcanosedimentary sequence of the Brusque Group: São João Batista (SJBS), Valsungana (VS) and Nova Trento (NTS), from the oldest to the youngest. This extensive magmatism, here referred to as granitic intrusions in the Brusqe Group (GIBG), is coeval with the thermal peak in the host metamorphic successions, but postdates its main foliation. A progressive deformation starting from the magmatic stage throughout the cooling history points to the influence of the late stages of deformation recorded in the Brusque Group. The SJBS consists of gray to white leucocratic, equigranular granites, with aluminous minerals such as muscovite, garnet and tourmaline. The porphyritic VS is the largest of the suites and is characterized by its cm-sized K-feldspar megacrysts in a coarse-grained biotite-rich matrix. The granites from the NTS are equigranular, light gray to pink in color and have biotite as the main mafic mineral, but magmatic muscovite, tourmaline and hornblende can occur as well. Geochemically, the GIBG are mildly peraluminous and show a calc-alkaline affinity. Most intrusions have a high REE fractionation, but some SJBS granites show a characteristic pattern with no fractionation and strong negative Eu anomalies ("seagull pattern"). Elevated Sr(i) values, between 0.707 and 0.735, and negative εNd values as low as -24 points to the melting of old evolved crust. The Nd (TDM) ages are scattered between 1.54 and 2.76 Ga, with a predominance of values around 2.0 Ga. The GIBG have a strong crustal signature that most closely connects, within the regional units, to that of the metasedimentary rocks of the Brusque Group and its crystalline basement, the Camboriú Complex. All three suites

  17. Rare-element granitic pegmatite of Miocene age emplaced in UHP rocks from Visole, Pohorje Mountains (Eastern Alps, Slovenia): accessory minerals, monazite and uraninite chemical dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Pavel; Janák, Marian; Konečný, Patrik; Vrabec, Mirijam

    2014-04-01

    The granitic pegmatite dike intruded the Cretaceous UHP rocks at Visole, near Slovenska Bistrica, in the Pohorje Mountains (Slovenia). The rock consists mainly of K-feldspar, albite and quartz, subordinate muscovite and biotite, while the accessory minerals include spessartine-almandine, zircon, ferrocolumbite, fluorapatite, monazite- (Ce), uraninite, and magnetite. Compositions of garnet (Sps48-49Alm45-46Grs + And3-4 Prp1.5-2), metamict zircon with 3.5 to 7.8 wt. % HfO2 [atom. 100Hf/(Hf + Zr) = 3.3-7.7] and ferrocolumbite [atom. Mn/(Mn + Fe) = 0.27-0.43, Ta/(Ta + Nb) = 0.03-0.46] indicate a relatively low to medium degree of magmatic fractionation, characteristic of the muscovite - rare-element class or beryl-columbite subtype of the rare-element class pegmatites. Monazite-(Ce) reveals elevated Th and U contents (≤11 wt. % ThO2, ≤5 wt. % UO2). The monazite-garnet geothermometer shows a possible precipitation temperature of ~495 ± 30 °C at P~4 to 5 kbar. Chemical U-Th-Pb dating of the monazite yielded a Miocene age (17.2 ± 1.8 Ma), whereas uraninite gave a younger (~14 Ma) age. These ages are comtemporaneous with the main crystallization and emplacement of the Pohorje pluton and adjacent volcanic rocks (20 to 15 Ma), providing the first documented evidence of Neogene granitic pegmatites in the Eastern Alps. Consequently, the Visole pegmatite belongs to the youngest rare-element granitic pegmatite populations in Europe, together with the Paleogene pegmatite occurrences along the Periadriatic (Insubric) Fault System in the Alps and in the Rhodope Massif, as well as the Late Miocene to Pliocene pegmatites in the Tuscany magmatic province (mainly on the Island of Elba).

  18. Magmatic inclusions in rhyolites of the Spor Mountain Formation, western Utah: Limitations on compositional inferences from inclusions in granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Eric H.; Venchiarutti, Daniel A.

    1990-10-01

    Inclusions of quenched mafic magma occur in a 21 Ma rhyolite lava and precursory non-welded tuff that form the Spor Mountain Formation in west-central Utah. The mafic inclusions are not lithic inclusions; no comparable volcanic unit was present at the surface when the Spor Mountain Formation erupted. Mineral and bulk compositions preclude liquid immiscibility. The mafic inclusions show clear morphologic and textural effects of magma mingling shortly before eruption of the rhyolite. Globular inclusions from both units are vesicular, phenocryst-poor, plagioclase-sanidine-clinopyroxene-orthopyroxene-magnetite-ilmenite latites and trachytes with quench temperatures of about 1000°C. Although overlapping in SiO2, TiO2, Zr, and Hf concentrations, inclusions from the underlying tuff lack negative Eu anomalies and are enriched in P2O5, K2O, Al2O3, Sr, Pb, Cr, and Ni whereas those hosted in the overlying lava have small negative Eu anomalies and two-fold enrichments in Fe2O3, MnO, HREE, Y, Ta, Th, Rb, and Cs. The most reasonable explanation for the differences between the two sets of inclusions lies in selective chemical exchange between the rhyolite lava and the mafic inclusions after eruption. Limited mechanical mixing occurred after the inclusions solidified and became chemically modified. The textures of the inclusions in the lavas and the elements selectively mobilized in the inclusions imply that vapor-phase transport occurred in this low-pressure volcanic environment. If such substantial variations in inclusion compositions can arise during what must have been a short period of time before chemical reactions were halted by rapid cooling, it seems unlikely that the compositions of mafic inclusions formed by magma mingling in slowly cooled granites preserve their original compositions, mineralogies, or information about their ultimate sources. Using the compositions of such chemically modified inclusions as end-members for mixing calculations may lead to erroneous

  19. Granites in the Sawuer region of the west Junggar, Xinjiang Province, China: Geochronological and geochemical characteristics and their geodynamic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Taofa; Yuan, Feng; Fan, Yu; Zhang, Dayu; Cooke, David; Zhao, Guochun

    2008-12-01

    The Sawuer region is located in the west Junggar, Jimunai County of Altay district and Hefeng County of Tacheng district, Xinjiang Autonomous Region, in northwest China. In the study area granitic intrusions are widespread and can be subdivided into I-type granites (Tasite pluton, Sentasi pluton, Wokensala pluton and Kaerjia pluton) and A-type (A 2) granites (Kuoyitasi pluton and Qiaqihai pluton). The I-type granites consist of granite, adamelite, granodiorite, and the A-type granites are mainly represented by alkali granite. SHRIMP U-Pb dating results indicate that the granites in Sawuer region were formed between 337 Ma and 290.7 Ma (late Carboniferous and early Permian), with the I-type granites being formed between 337 Ma and 302.6 Ma, and the A-type between 297.9 and 290.7 Ma. From the older to the youngest granites, their composition changes from calc-alkalic to high-K calc-alkalic, to alkali series, and from I-type to A-type, based on the characteristics of whole rock trace element and rare earth elements geochemistry. This compositional range is the result of a change in the geodynamic regime from compressional to tensional during the late Paleozoic. Strontium, Nd, Pb, O isotope systematics suggest that both the I-type and A-type granites in Sawuer were sourced from the mantle (DM), but with some crustal contamination for the Kuoyitasi pluton. The I-type granites were formed by equilibrium partial melting, while the A-type granites were formed mainly by fractional crystallization. Based on the Rb-Y + Nb and Nb-Y-Ce discrimination criteria by Eby [Eby G.N., 1992. Chemical subdivision of the A-type granitoids: Petrogenetic and tectonic implications. Geology 20, 641-644] and Pearce [Pearce J.A., 1996. Sources and settings of granitic rocks. Episodes 19, 120-125] and comparisons with granites in other regions of northern Xinjiang, the I-type granites were emplaced during a transition from compressional to extensional settings in a post-collision regime, whereas

  20. Geochronological, elemental and Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of the Triassic post-collisional granitic rocks in NW Thailand and its Paleotethyan implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuejun; He, Huiying; Cawood, Peter A.; Srithai, Boontarika; Feng, Qinglai; Fan, Weiming; Zhang, Yuzhi; Qian, Xin

    2016-12-01

    New U-Pb geochronological, petrologic, elemental and Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotopic data for the granites from the Inthanon and Sukhothai zones in NW Thailand in conjunction with correlations with SW China are presented to constrain the age and position of the Paleotethys Ocean in this region and the associated assembly of Southeast Asia. The geochronological data show that the granitic rocks in the Inthanon and Sukhothai zones, herein named Group 1 and Group 2 granites, respectively, yield similar crystallization ages of 230-200 Ma. Group 1 samples are characterized by monzogranite and granite with I- and S-type geochemical affinity and Group 2 samples by I-type monzogranite and granodiorite. They have generally similar chondrite-normalized REE and PM-normalized multi-element patterns but distinct Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotopic compositions. Group 1 samples have slightly higher initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7111-0.7293) but lower εNd(t) values (- 11.1 to - 14.1) than those of Group 2 samples (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7073-0.7278 and εNd(t) = - 8.3 to - 11.0). Group 1 samples show the lower εHf(t) values (- 5.4 to - 18.2), older TDM (1.62-2.40 Ga) and higher δ18O values (+ 7.95 to + 9.94) than those of Group 2 samples (εHf(t) of - 11.1 to + 4.80, TDM of 0.96-1.95 Ga and δ18O of + 4.95 to + 7.98) for the Triassic crystallization zircons. These geochemical signatures are similar to the Kwangsian and Indosinian granites in the South China and Indochina blocks but distinct from those of the Gangdese I-type granite and Sibumasu Paleozoic granite. Our data suggest that Group 1 samples mainly originated from the early Paleozoic supracrustal rocks containing metapelite and metavolcanic components, which had previously experienced the surface weathering. Group 2 samples were derived from a hybridized source of an old metamorphic and a newly underplated mafic component. Synthesis of our data with available regional observations indicates that the Inthanon zone represents the main suture zone of the

  1. Identification and characterization of hydrothermally altered zones in granite by combining synthetic clay content logs with magnetic mineralogical investigations of drilled rock cuttings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Carola; Kontny, Agnes; Kohl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Clay minerals as products of hydrothermal alteration significantly influence the hydraulic and mechanical properties of crystalline rock. Therefore, the localization and characterization of alteration zones by downhole measurements is a great challenge for the development of geothermal reservoirs. The magnetite bearing granite of the geothermal site in Soultz-sous-Forêts (France) experienced hydrothermal alteration during several tectonic events and clay mineral formation is especially observed in alteration halos around fracture zones. During the formation of clay minerals, magnetite was oxidized into hematite, which significantly reduces the magnetic susceptibility of the granite from ferrimagnetic to mostly paramagnetic values. The aim of this study was to find out if there exists a correlation between synthetic clay content logs (SCCLs) and measurements of magnetic susceptibility on cuttings in the granite in order to characterize their alteration mineralogy. Such a correlation has been proven for core samples of the EPS1 reference well. SCCLs were created from gamma ray and fracture density logs using a neural network. These logs can localize altered fracture zones in the GPK1-4 wells, where no core material is available. Mass susceptibility from 261 cutting samples of the wells GPK1-GPK4 was compared with the neural network derived synthetic logs. We applied a combination of temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements with optical and electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to discriminate different stages of alteration. We found, that also in the granite cuttings an increasing alteration grade is characterized by an advancing oxidation of magnetite into hematite and a reduction of magnetic susceptibility. A challenge to face for the interpretation of magnetic susceptibility data from cuttings material is that extreme alteration grades can also display increased susceptibilities due to the formation of secondary magnetite

  2. Rb-Sr whole-rock and mineral ages, K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar, and U-Pb mineral ages, and strontium, lead, neodymium, and oxygen isotopic compositions for granitic rocks from the Salinian Composite Terrane, California:

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, R.W.; Champion, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes new and published age and isotopic data for whole-rocks and minerals from granitic rocks in the Salinian composite terrane, California. Rubidium-strontium whole-rock ages of plutons are in two groups, Early Cretaceous (122 to 100 Ma) and Late Cretaceous (95 to 82 Ma). Early Cretaceous plutons occur in all granitic rock exposures from Bodega Head in the north to those from the Santa Lucia and Gabilan Ranges in the central part of the terrane. Late Cretaceous plutons have been identified in the Point Reyes Peninsula, the Santa Lucia and the Gabilan Ranges, and in the La Panza Range in the southern part of the terrane. Ranges of initial values of isotopic compositions are 87Sr/86Sr, 0.7046-0.7147, δ18O, +8.5 to +12.5 per mil, 206Pb/204Pb, 18.901-19.860, 207Pb/204Pb, 15.618-15.814, 208Pb/204Pb, 38.569- 39.493, and εNd, +0.9 to -8.6. The initial 87Sr/86Sr=0.706 isopleth is identified in the northern Gabilan Range and in the Ben Lomond area of the Santa Cruz Mountains, in Montara Mountain, in Bodega Head, and to the west of the Farallon Islands on the Cordell Bank. This isotopic boundary is offset about 95 miles (160km) by right-lateral displacements along the San Gregorio-Hosgri and San Andreas fault systems.

  3. Tetrad effect in rare earth element distribution patterns: a method of quantification with application to rock and mineral samples from granite-related rare metal deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, T.; Kempe, U.; Monecke, J.; Sala, M.; Wolf, D.

    2002-04-01

    In some geological environments, the tetrad effect can be observed as a split of rare earth element (REE) patterns into four rounded segments. A new method is proposed to quantify the sizes of the individual segments, and for the first time, the significance of observed tetrad effects is evaluated by taking analytical errors into account. The outlined method was applied to lanthanide patterns of whole-rock and fluorite samples collected from granite-related rare metal deposits. The REE patterns of the granite and greisen samples investigated exhibit significant tetrad effects that may not be accounted for by analytical uncertainties. It is shown that the study of whole-rock samples is insufficient to determine whether this effect is developed during fractional crystallization or is due to other processes such as fluid-rock interaction. A concave tetrad effect mirroring the pattern of the whole-rock samples was not observed in the REE patterns of related vein fluorite samples. Therefore, it is unlikely that the convex tetrad effect in the samples from the magmatic environment can be explained by removal of a respective complementary REE pattern by a coexisting hydrothermal fluid, as previously suggested. It is proposed that the tetrad effect formed within the magma-fluid system before emplacement in the subvolcanic environment where phase separation caused a split of this system into fluid and magma subsystems. Alternatively, the tetrad effect may also be inherited from an external fluid influencing the system during or after the emplacement of the magma. On the basis of the fluorite data, it is shown that the behavior of Eu in the fluids is not related to the tetrad effect. Consequently, different physico-chemical factors control the occurrence of both phenomena. Y was found to be strongly enriched in samples precipitating from hydrothermal fluids that experienced prolonged interaction with the wall-rocks, whereas the tetrad effect in the fluids vanished with time

  4. Complicated secondary textures in zircon record evolution of the host granitic rocks: Studies from Western Tauern Window and Ötztal-Stubai Crystalline Complex (Eastern Alps, Western Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, Elizaveta; Harlov, Daniel; Klötzli, Urs

    2017-07-01

    Samples of metamorphosed and deformed granitic rocks were collected from two Alpine complexes with well-constrained metamorphic history: Western Tauern Window and Ötztal-Stubai Crystalline Complex. Zircon grains from these samples were investigated in situ by a combination of scanning electron microscope techniques, cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and Raman spectroscopy. The aims were: to describe and interpret complicated secondary textures and microstructures in zircon; based on cross-cutting relationships between secondary microstructures, reconstruct the sequence of processes, affecting zircon crystals; link the evolution of zircon with the history of the host rocks. The results indicate that zircon in the sampled granitic rocks forms growth twins and multi-grain aggregates, which are unusual for this mineral. Moreover, various secondary textures have been found in the sampled zircon, often cross-cutting each other in a single crystal. These include: distorted oscillatory CL zoning with inner zones forming inward-penetrating, CL-bright embayments, which are the evidence of dry recrystallization via annealing/lattice recovery; CL mosaicism with no preservation of growth zoning, but abundant nano- and micro-scale pores and mineral inclusions, which are the evidence of recrystallization by coupled dissolution-reprecipitation and/or leaching; embayed zircon boundaries filled with apatite, monazite, epidote and mylonitic matrix, indicating mineral-fluid reactions resulting in zircon dissolution and fragmentation; overgrowth CL-dark rims, which contain nano-pores and point to transport and precipitation of dissolved zircon matter. We conclude that zircon in our meta-granites is sensitive to metamorphism/deformation events, and was reactive with metamorphic fluids. Additionally, we have found evidence of crystal-plastic deformation in the form of low angle boundaries and bent grain tips, which is a result of shearing and ductile deformation of the host rock. We

  5. Influence of the state of stress on the brittle-ductile transition in granitic rock: Evidence from fault steps in the Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Buergmann, R.; Pollard, D.D. )

    1992-07-01

    Left-lateral strike-slip faults in the Lake Edison granodiorite (central Sierra Nevada, California) are composed of an echelon segments. Relative displacement across the faults apparently are transferred between segments by ductile shearing at right steps, and by extensional fracturing at left steps. The granodiorite within right steps displays mylonitic foliation, and thin sections show textures in quartz associated with dislocation glide, recovery processes, and dynamic recrystallization, whereas textures in feldspar are related to fracturing. Only centimeters outside the right steps, the rock fabric is approximately isotropic and deformation is accommodated by mineralized opening-mode fractures. The stress field calculated for the right-step geometry, when a boundary element model is used, shows an increase in mean compressive stress of up to 25 MPa within the step relative to that outside. This difference in stress apparently produced the contrasting behaviors of the granitic rock. Experimentally derived power-law flow laws do not predict these behaviors.

  6. Nd:YVO4 laser removal of graffiti from granite. Influence of paint and rock properties on cleaning efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, T.; Pozo, S.; Fiorucci, M. P.; López, A. J.; Ramil, A.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the cleaning efficiency results for four differently coloured graffiti paints applied to two types of granitic stone by Nd:YVO4 laser at 355 nm. The paints were characterized in terms of mineralogy and chemistry using x-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM); paint absorbance in the ultraviolet-visible-infrared range (200-2000 nm) was also assessed. The studied granites had different mineralogy, texture and porosity properties. Cleaning efficiency was evaluated by polarized microscopy, SEM, FTIR spectroscopy and spectrophotometer colour measurements. The results indicate differences in the effectiveness of surface cleaning for the blue, red and black paints as opposed to the silver paint, mainly attributed to chemical composition. No evidence was found that the granite properties had a bearing on laser effectiveness, although the degree, type and spatial distribution of transgranular fissures in the stone affected the overall assessment of cleaning effectiveness. Polarized light microscopy observations and colour measurements showed that the intensity and distribution of fissures affect the depth of paint penetration, ultimately affecting the cleaning efficiency for both granites.

  7. Natural radionuclide concentrations in granite rocks in Aswan and Central-Southern Eastern Desert, Egypt and their radiological implications.

    PubMed

    Issa, Shams A M; Uosif, M A M; Abd el-Salam, L M

    2012-07-01

    Different types of granites, used extensively in local construction, were collected from five localities in Egypt, namely: Abu Ziran (Central Eastern Desert), Gabal El Maesala (Aswan) and three areas from Wadi Allaqi, (Gabal Abu Marw, Gabal Haumor and Gabal um Shalman), in the South Eastern Desert. Granite samples were studied radiologically, petrographically and geochemically. The contents of natural radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) were measured in investigated samples by using gamma spectrometry [NaI (Tl) 3'×3']. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in the selected granite samples ranged from 9±0.5 to 111±7, 8±1 to 75±4 and 100±6 to 790±40 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The external hazard index (H(ex)), absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate were evaluated to assess the radiation hazard for people living in dwellings made of the materials studied. The calculated radium equivalents were lower than the values recommended for construction materials (370 Bq kg(-1)). The excess lifetime cancer risks were also calculated. Petrographically, the granites studied are varied in the form of potash-feldspar, quartz, plagioclase, mica and hornblende. The accessory minerals are zircon, apatite and allanite. Geochemically, the chemical composition of the granite is studied especially for major oxides. They are characterized to have SiO(2), K(2)O, Na(2)O and Al(2)O(3) with depletion in CaO, MgO, TiO(2) and P(2)O(5).

  8. Uranium and other element geochemical covariation in a granitic host rock and in the derived sediment, Deep Creek Range, Juab County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Correlation and factor analysis of geochemical data from a Tertiary biotite quartz monzonite, the Ibapah stock, and from derived sediment shows on comparison a major shift in element covariation among uranium and 24 other elements. Samples used were collected for a 1978 study in the central part of the Deep Creek Range, Juab County, Utah. Computed correlations among elements in granitic igneous rock samples suggest a high degree of covariation among elements that compose the rock. Uranium, however, shows significant correlation with only 12 elements and almost zero correlation with thorium. Computed correlations among elements in the derived sediment suggest that major decreases have occurred in covariation of the elements in the derived sands. Uranium in the sands, however, shows 15 significant correlations compared to 12 in the igneous rock samples, and shows an extremely high correlation with thorium. Factor analysis shows three geochemical petrogenic factors and the regional Be-U mineralization factor in the igneous rocks, and two mechanical segregation and one chemical precipitation factors in the sediments.

  9. Determination of Granite Rock Massif Weathering and Cracking of Surface Layers in the Oldest Parts of Medieval Mine Depending on Used Mining Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednická, Markéta; Kaláb, Zdeněk

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the use of selected non-destructive testing methods for the purpose of specifying information on weathering and cracking of surface layers of granite rock massif in the medieval Jeroným Mine (the Czech Republic). This mine has been declared the National Heritage Site of the Czech Republic and its opening as a mining museum to the public is gradually prepared. Geological and geomechanical evaluation documents the possibility to find all kinds of weathering grades of rock massif in this mine. Two non-destructive methods have been tested, namely the measurement of ultrasonic pulse velocity and the measurement of Schmidt hammer rebound value. Field measurements were performed in two selected galleries to verify the application of such methods in specific conditions of underground spaces. Used mining method is one of the parameters later influencing cracking of rock massif. In selected galleries, two different mining methods were used which means that a part of a gallery profile was mined out by hand tools in the Middle Ages and another part of the profile was later mined out by blasting. Measurements in these galleries have enabled to analyse the influence of used mining methods on cracking of rock massif in the impaired zone, and, consequently, on ongoing weathering processes in those zones.

  10. Long-term rocky coast erosion: the influence of structural pattern and lithological context, as evidenced in the chalk (NW Normandy) and granitic (SW Brittany) rocks, NW France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duperret, Anne; Raimbault, Céline; Duguet, Timothée; Le Gall, Bernard; Costa, Stéphane; Vandycke, Sara

    2017-04-01

    During the EC2CO/DRIL/CROCODYL project, high-resolution land-sea DEM have been produced in NW Normandy and SW Brittany rocky coastal zone, using high-resolution bathymetry from shallow-water cruises CROCOLIT-1,-2,-3 (Duperret, 2013), SPLASHALIOT-3 (Maillet, 2014), THAPENFROM-1 (Duperret, 2015) and aerial topographic LiDAR data from the Litto3D project. Two study sites were selected to map detailed geomorphology of shore platforms in order to better understand rock coast evolution processes through time and long-term rates of rocky coastal erosion versus geological context. The eastern English Channel is made of coastal chalk cliffs that currently eroding with fast mean rates of the order of a few dm/year. In Normandy coast (NW France), this results to the generation of roughly linear coastal segments of about 20-30km long each. On coastal segments only made of Upper Cretaceous Chalk, erosion occurs by present-day sudden and repeated vertical failures and cliff collapses. Cliff collapse process is shaping vertical chalk cliffs in association with resulting roughly flat shore platforms. Even if shore platforms width are short and homogeneous (a few hundred meters in width), the detailed morphology observed on high-resolution bathymetry evidenced two main submarine geomorphological types. One is linear and regular and associated with linear coastal sections. This corresponds to homogeneous Chalk Formation and the lack of large-scale tectonic features. Coastal sections with chalk lithology variations, local folding, large-scale fractures transverse-oriented to the coastline and onshore valleys incision evidence chaotic shore platforms morphologies. They conduct to variations in coastline orientation and to meter-scale shoreline indentations The southwestern part of Brittany is made of low-lying granitic headland and indented bay cut into meta/granitic rocks. Erosion rates are poorly known, due to slow coastal evolutions through contemporary times. Land-Sea DEM evidence

  11. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the Paleoproterozoic, tin-mineralized Bom Jardim granite of the Velho Guilherme Suite, eastern Amazonian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarão, Claudio Nery; Cordovil Pinho, Sabrina Cristina; de Paiva, Antonio Lima; Galarza, Marco Antônio

    2012-10-01

    The Bom Jardim granite is located to the south of São Felix do Xingu town and is intrusive in the intermediate to felsic volcanic rocks of the Uatumã Group. It is formed dominantly of coarse- to medium-grained isotropic monzogranite and syenogranite, both affected by intense late- to post-magmatic alteration. Biotite, generally chloritized, is the main primary mafic phase, with rare amphibole being found in the monzogranite. Hydrothermally altered and greisenized rocks, containing small primary concentrations of cassiterite + wolframite, as well as quartz veins with millimeter- to centimeter-sized crystals of wolframite + pyrite + fluorite occur in pervasively altered cupolas. Presently, alluvial cassiterite and wolframite (±columbite, tantalite) are mined in the Pedra Preta mine, located in the northern part of the pluton. SEM data showed that Sn-W mineralization is dominantly associated with syenogranite and greisenized rocks. EDS Semi-quantitative analysis revealed that the zircon crystals of the Bom Jardim granite are characteristically enriched in Hf, Y, U, and Th and display Zr/Hf ratios decreasing from monzogranite/leucomonzogranite toward syenogranite and greisenized syenogranite rocks, suggesting that magmatic differentiation significantly contributed for this particular feature. The Bom Jardim granite is slightly peraluminous and displays geochemical affinities with A-type granites. The Bom Jardim granite varieties evolved dominantly by fractional crystallization and their REE patterns are similar to those of the tin-specialized granites of the Velho Guilherme suite. It is concluded that the more evolved granites and associated greisenized rocks of the Bom Jardim pluton are tin-specialized granites. The similarities observed between the granites of the Velho Guilherme suite and the Bom Jardim granite allow to include the latter in this important granite suite.

  12. Permeability and porosity of the Illinois UPH 3 drillhole granite and a comparison with other deep drillhole rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Lockner, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Permeability, porosity, and volumetric strain measurements were conducted on granite cores obtained at depths of 0.7 to 1.6 km from the Illinois UPH 3 drillhole at effective confining pressures from 5 to 100 MPa. Initial permeabilities were in the range of 10-17 to 10-19 m2 and dropped rapidly with applied pressure to values between 10-20 and 10-24 m2 at 100 MPa, typical of other deep granite core samples. These values are several decades lower than equivalent weathered surface granites at comparable effective confining pressures, where weathering products in cracks and pores inhibit crack closure with applied pressure. Permeabilities of the Illinois cores were inversely related to sample depth, suggesting that stress relief and thermal microfractures induced during core retrieval dominated the fluid flow. Thus these samples provide an upper bound on in situ matrix permeability values. A comparison of core permeability from UPH 3 and other deep drillholes shows that stress relief damage can often dominate laboratory permeability measurements. We conclude that it may be difficult to make meaningful estimates of in situ permeability based on either borehole samples (possible damage during retrieval) or surface-derived analogs (altered by weathering). Volumetric strain determined from porosity measurements was compared with differential strain analysis (DSA) data reported by other investigators on samples from the same depths in the drillhole. Our strain measurements (0.002 to 0.005 at 100 MPa) were nearly twice as large as the DSA values, probably because of the crack-enhancing effects of fluids present in our samples that are absent in the dry DSA cores, as well as other time-dependent deformation effects. This difference in observed strain magnitudes between the two measurement methods may be an important consideration if strain and/or porosity data from deep core samples are used in models of stress, fluid circulation, and excess fluid pressure generation in the

  13. Permeability and porosity of the Illinois UPH 3 drillhole granite and a comparison with other deep drillhole rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.; Lockner, D. A.

    1997-02-01

    Permeability, porosity, and volumetric strain measurements were conducted on granite cores obtained at depths of 0.7 to 1.6 km from the Illinois UPH 3 drillhole at effective confining pressures from 5 to 100 MPa. Initial permeabilities were in the range of 10-17 to 10-19 m2 and dropped rapidly with applied pressure to values between 10-20 and 10-24 m2 at 100 MPa, typical of other deep granite core samples. These values are several decades lower than equivalent weathered surface granites at comparable effective confining pressures, where weathering products in cracks and pores inhibit crack closure with applied pressure. Permeabilities of the Illinois cores were inversely related to sample depth, suggesting that stress relief and thermal microfractures induced during core retrieval dominated the fluid flow. Thus these samples provide an upper bound on in situ matrix permeability values. A comparison of core permeability from UPH 3 and other deep drillholes shows that stress relief damage can often dominate laboratory permeability measurements. We conclude that it may be difficult to make meaningful estimates of in situ permeability based on either borehole samples (possible damage during retrieval) or surface-derived analogs (altered by weathering). Volumetric strain determined from porosity measurements was compared with differential strain analysis (DSA) data reported by other investigators on samples from the same depths in the drillhole. Our strain measurements (0.002 to 0.005 at 100 MPa) were nearly twice as large as the DSA values, probably because of the crack-enhancing effects of fluids present in our samples that are absent in the dry DSA cores, as well as other time-dependent deformation effects. This difference in observed strain magnitudes between the two measurement methods may be an important consideration if strain and/or porosity data from deep core samples are used in models of stress, fluid circulation, and excess fluid pressure generation in the

  14. Cadomian S-type granites as basement rocks of the Variscan belt (Massif Central, France): Implications for the crustal evolution of the north Gondwana margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzinié, Simon; Laurent, Oscar; Poujol, Marc; Mintrone, Michaël; Chelle-Michou, Cyril; Moyen, Jean-François; Bouilhol, Pierre; Vezinet, Adrien; Marko, Linda

    2017-08-01

    From the Neoproterozoic to the early Paleozoic, the northern Gondwana margin was sequentially shaped by the Cadomian accretionary and the Variscan collisional orogens which offers the opportunity to investigate the relative extent of crust production/reworking in both geodynamic settings. In the eastern part of the Variscan French Massif Central (FMC), the Velay Orthogneiss Formation (VOF) represents a consistent lithological unit of the pre-Variscan basement and comprises augen gneisses and leucogneisses. Such rocks constitute a unique record of the pre-Variscan magmatic history and bear critical information on the crustal evolution of the northern Gondwana margin. Here, we present whole-rock major and trace element compositions indicating that: (i) the VOF shows a remarkable geochemical homogeneity; (ii) the protolith of the augen gneisses corresponds to strongly peraluminous, ;S-type; porphyritic granites originating from partial melting of an Ediacaran sedimentary sequence; (iii) the leucogneisses are former leucogranites generated by fractionation of the magma at the origin of the porphyritic granites; and (iv) the whole suite emplaced at shallow crustal levels (< 7 km). U-Pb LA-(MC-)ICP-MS analyses on zircon yielded similar emplacement ages of c. 542 Ma and a narrow range of εHf(t) clustering around 0 for the protoliths of both augen and leucogneisses. This homogeneous Hf isotope signature, notably uncommon for S-type granites, would originate from a sequential process of: (i) inherited zircon dissolution during melting and ascent in the crust due to Zr-undersaturated conditions, (ii) isotopic homogenization of the melt by advection and elemental/isotopic diffusion, followed by (iii) early saturation upon emplacement owing to rapid cooling at shallow crustal levels. We propose that partial melting of Ediacaran sediments occurred during inversion of a Cadomian back-arc basin and was promoted by the high thermal gradient typical of thinned crust domains

  15. Granite Symposia and Working Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Calvin

    In addition to the Hutton Symposium on Granites and Related Rocks to be held in Canberra, Australia, Sept. 23-28, 1991, two other international symposia on granitoids will take place during 1991: the inaugural meeting and field excursion of the proposed IGCP project Rapakivi Granites and Related Rocks, to be held in Helsinki, Finland, July 29-August 4, and Granites and Geodynamics, to be held in Moscow, August 6-9. Contacts for these meetings are: Hutton Symposium, Bruce Chappell, Dept. of Geology, Australian National University, GPO Box 4, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia; Rapakivi Granites, Ilmari Haapala or Tapani Ramo, Dept. of Geology, Division of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Helsinki, Snelmaninkatu 5, 60170 Helsinki 17, Finland. Melt segregation and migration in partly molten rocks will be the topic of a special session at the Geological Association/Mineralogical Association of Canada meeting in Toronto, May 27-29, 1991.

  16. Distinguishing major lithologic types in rocks of precambrian age in central Wyoming using multilevel sensing, with a chapter on possible economic significance of iron formation discovered by use of aircraft images in the Granite Mountains of Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Information obtained by remote sensing from three altitude levels: ERTS-1 (565 miles), U-2 (60,000 feet), and C-130 aircraft (15,000 feet) illustrates the possible application of multilevel sensing in mineral exploration. Distinction can be made between rocks of greenstone belts and rocks of granite-granite gneiss areas by using ERTS-1 imagery in portions of the Precambrian of central Wyoming. Study of low altitude color and color infrared photographs of the mafic terrain revealed the presence of metasedimentary rocks with distinct layers that were interpreted as amphibolite by photogeologic techniques. Some of the amphibolite layers were found to be iron formation when examined in the field. To our knowledge this occurrence of iron formation has not been previously reported in the literature.

  17. Geochemistry of zircons from basic rocks of the Korosten anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite complex, north-western region of the Ukrainian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumlyanskyy, Leonid; Belousova, Elena; Petrenko, Oksana

    2017-09-01

    The concentrations of 26 trace elements have been determined by laser ablation ICP-MS in zircons from four samples of basic rocks of the Korosten anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite plutonic complex, the Ukrainian Shield. Zircons from the Fedorivka and Torchyn gabbroic intrusions and Volynsky anorthosite massif have distinctive abundances of many trace elements (REE, Sr, Y, Mn, Th). Zircons from the gabbroic massifs are unusually enriched in trace elements, while zircons from pegmatites in anorthosite are relatively depleted in trace elements. High concentrations of trace elements in zircons from gabbroic intrusions can be explained by their crystallization from residual interstitial melts enriched in incompatible elements. The zircons studied demonstrate a wide range of Ti concentrations, which reflects their temperature of crystallization: the zircons most enriched in Ti, from mafic pegmatites of the Horbuliv quarry (20-40 ppm), have the highest temperature of crystallization (845 ± 40 °C). Lower (720-770 °C) temperatures of zircon crystallization in gabbroic rocks are explained by its crystallization from the latest portions of the interstitial melt or by simultaneous crystallization of ilmenite. The Ce anomaly in zircons correlates with the degree of oxidation of the coexisting ilmenite.

  18. Geochemistry of zircons from basic rocks of the Korosten anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite complex, north-western region of the Ukrainian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumlyanskyy, Leonid; Belousova, Elena; Petrenko, Oksana

    2017-05-01

    The concentrations of 26 trace elements have been determined by laser ablation ICP-MS in zircons from four samples of basic rocks of the Korosten anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-granite plutonic complex, the Ukrainian Shield. Zircons from the Fedorivka and Torchyn gabbroic intrusions and Volynsky anorthosite massif have distinctive abundances of many trace elements (REE, Sr, Y, Mn, Th). Zircons from the gabbroic massifs are unusually enriched in trace elements, while zircons from pegmatites in anorthosite are relatively depleted in trace elements. High concentrations of trace elements in zircons from gabbroic intrusions can be explained by their crystallization from residual interstitial melts enriched in incompatible elements. The zircons studied demonstrate a wide range of Ti concentrations, which reflects their temperature of crystallization: the zircons most enriched in Ti, from mafic pegmatites of the Horbuliv quarry (20-40 ppm), have the highest temperature of crystallization (845 ± 40 °C). Lower (720-770 °C) temperatures of zircon crystallization in gabbroic rocks are explained by its crystallization from the latest portions of the interstitial melt or by simultaneous crystallization of ilmenite. The Ce anomaly in zircons correlates with the degree of oxidation of the coexisting ilmenite.

  19. Predicting the Sources and Formation Mechanisms of Evolved Lunar Crust by Linking K/Ca Ratios of Lunar Granites to Analogous Terrestrial Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. D.; Simon, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    Although silicic rocks (i.e. granites and rhyolites) comprise a minor component of the sampled portion of the lunar crust, recent remote sensing studies [e.g., 1-4] indicate that several un-sampled regions of the Moon have significantly higher concentrations of silicic material (also high in [K], [U], and [Th]) than sampled regions. Within these areas are morphological features that are best explained by the existence of chemically evolved volcanic rocks. Observations of silicic domes [e.g., 1-5] suggest that sizable networks of silicic melt were present during crust formation. Isotopic data indicate that silicic melts were generated over a prolonged timespan from 4.3 to 3.9 Ga [e.g., 6-8]. The protracted age range and broad distribution of silicic rocks on the Moon indicate that their petrogenesis was an important mechanism for secondary crust formation. Understanding the origin and evolution of such silicic magmas is critical to determining the composition of the lunar crustal highlands and will help to distinguish between opposing ideas for the Moon's bulk composition and differentiation. The two main hypotheses for generating silicic melts on Earth are fractional crystallization or partial melting. On the Moon silicic melts are thought to have been generated during extreme fractional crystallization involving end-stage silicate liquid immiscibility (SLI) [e.g. 9, 10]. However, SLI cannot account for the production of significant volumes of silicic melt and its wide distribution, as reported by the remote global surveys [1, 2, 3]. In addition, experimental and natural products of SLI show that U and Th, which are abundant in the lunar granites and seen in the remote sensing data of the domes, are preferentially partitioned into the depolymerized ferrobasaltic magma and not the silicic portion [11, 12]. If SLI is not the mechanism that generated silicic magmas on the Moon then alternative processes such as fractional crystallization (only crystal

  20. Zircon U-Pb ages of the metamorphic supracrustal rocks of the Xinghuadukou Group and granitic complexes in the Argun massif of the northern Great Hinggan Range, NE China, and their tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guang; Chen, Yuchuan; Chen, Yanjing; Zeng, Qingtao

    2012-04-01

    The basement of the Argun massif in the northern Great Hinggan Range consists of the metamorphic supracrustal rocks of the Xinghuadukou Group and associated granitic complexes. The metamorphic supracrustal rocks were previously interpreted as Paleoproterozoic, while the granitic complexes were considered Mesoproterozoic in age. This paper presents new zircon LA-MC-ICP-MS U-Pb ages of biotite-plagioclase leptynite and biotite schist from the Xinghuadukou Group in the Lulin Forest area, Heilongjiang Province; zircon SHRIMP U-Pb ages of biotite-plagioclase gneiss from the Xinghuadukou Group in Lulin Forest; and quartz diorite and monzogranite from the granitic complexes in Mohe County, Heilongjiang Province. New geochronological data from the three metasedimentary rock samples of the Xinghuadukou Group can be preliminarily divided into five groups: (1) 2017-2765 Ma, (2) 1736-1942 Ma, (3) 1359-1610 Ma, (4) 749-1239 Ma, and (5) 448-716 Ma. Except for the zircons of the 448-716 Ma group belonging to a metamorphic origin, the other age groups had the youngest age of 749 ± 17 Ma, indicating that the Xinghuadukou Group formed during the Neoproterozoic era (at least <749 Ma). These detrital zircon ages cluster at ca. 2.0-1.8 Ga and ca. 1.0-0.80 Ga, suggesting that the Argun massif had connections with both Columbia and Rodinia and implying that the provenance of the Xinghuadukou Group metamorphosed sediments must be characteristic of felsic-intermediate igneous rocks with ages of ca. 2.0-1.8 Ga and ca. 1.0-0.80 Ga. The quartz diorite and monzogranite from the granitic complexes of the basement within the Argun massif yielded weighted mean ages of 516 ± 10 Ma and 504 ± 9 Ma, respectively, indicating that these rocks emplaced in the Early Paleozoic. Considering the geochemical and chronological data together, we propose that the Xinghuadukou Group was most likely deposited in a back-arc basin environment, whereas the granitic complexes emplaced in a post-collisional setting

  1. Geology of Nicholson's point granite, Natal Metamorphic Province, South Africa: the chemistry of charnockitic alteration and origin of the granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, G. H.; Allen, A. R.; Cornell, D. H.; Harris, C.

    1996-10-01

    by destabilisation of biotite by a low aH 20 fluid phase, possibly hypersaline brines. The Nicholson's Point granite has geochemical characteristics typical of within-plate granites, A-type granites and rapakivi granites, however the stable and radiogenic isotope characteristics suggest a significant crustal component in the source.

  2. Contrasting fluid/rock interaction between the Notch Peak granitic intrusion and argillites and limestones in western Utah: evidence from stable isotopes and phase assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nabelek, P.I.; Labotka, T.C.; O'Neil, J.R.; Papike, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Jurassic Notch Peak granitic stock, western Utah, discordantly intrudes Cambrian interbedded pure limestones and calcareous argillites. Contact metamorphosed argillite and limestone samples, collected along traverses away from the intrusion, were analyzed for ??18O, ??13C, and ??D. The ??13C and ??18O values for the limestones remain constant at about 0.5 (PDB) and 20 (SMOW), respectively, with increasing metamorphic grade. The whole rock ??18O values of the argillites systematically decrease from 19 to as low as 8.1, and the ??13C values of the carbonate fraction from 0.5 to -11.8. The change in ??13C values can be explained by Rayleigh decarbonation during calcsilicate reactions, where calculated {Mathematical expression} is about 4.5 permil for the high-grade samples and less for medium and low-grade samples suggesting a range in temperatures at which most decarbonation occurred. However, the amount of CO2 released was not anough to decrease the whole rock ??18O to the values observed in the argillites. The low ??18O values close to the intrusion suggest interaction with magmatic water that had a ??18O value of 8.5. The extreme lowering of ??13C by fractional devolatilization and the lowering of ??18O in argillites close to the intrusion indicates oxgen-equivalent fluid/rock ratios in excess of 1.0 and X(CO2)F of the fluid less than 0.2. Mineral assemblages in conjunction with the isotopic data indicate a strong influence of water infiltration on the reaction relations in the argillites and separate fluid and thermal fronts moving thru the argillites. The different stable isotope relations in limestones and argillites attest to the importance of decarbonation in the enhancement of permeability. The flow of fluids was confined to the argillite beds (argillite aquifers) whereas the limestones prevented vertical fluid flow and convective cooling of the stock. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Contrasting sources and P-T crystallization conditions of epidote-bearing granitic rocks, northeastern Brazil: O, Sr, and Nd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, V. P.; Sial, A. N.; Pimentel, M. M.; Armstrong, R.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Guimarães, I. P.; da Silva Filho, A. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 618 Ma Curral de Cima tonalite and 577 Ma Lourenço monzodiorite, northeastern Brazil, are magmatic epidote-bearing plutons that carry ferrohornblende, biotite, titanite, and epidote. Major, trace, and isotope chemistry suggests that the major magmas of the two plutons followed similar differentiation trends but derived from source rocks that differed in age and isotopic composition. The mineral phases of the Curral de Cima tonalite, the presence of amphibole-rich clots, and juvenile component (average εNd = -3.55) point to an I-type source for these rocks. These data and high calculated δ18O(w.r.) (10.0‰) for the tonalite and high δ18O value for a clot (9.3‰) argue that the clots are fragments of a metabasaltic source rock that has been hydrothermally altered at a low temperature. In contrast, average calculated δ18O(w.r.) for the Lourenço monzodiorite = 7.8‰, 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7083, εNd = -14.6, and TDM = 1.92 Ga. These data are compatible with a long crustal residence time of lower crust amphibolites source. Epidote in the Curral de Cima pluton crystallized close to the NNO buffer, and hornblende chemistry, due to Al reequilibration, yielded sub-solidus temperature and pressure. In contrast, in the Lourenço pluton epidote crystallized close to the HM buffer and Al-in-hornblende points to near-solidus solidification (685 °C) around 4.4 Kbar. This study confirms that magmatic epidote in granitic plutons can crystallize at pressures lower than 5.5 Kbar under higher fO2 as experimentally foreseen. Rapid magma transportation through hot continental crust during the peak of metamorphism in early stages of an orogenic cycle prevents epidote dissolution.

  4. Controls on Weathering of Pyrrhotite in a Low-Sulfide, Granitic Mine-Waste Rock in the Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langman, J. B.; Holland, S.; Sinclair, S.; Blowes, D.

    2013-12-01

    Increased environmental risk is incurred with expansion of mineral extraction in the Arctic. A greater understanding of geochemical processes associated with hard-rock mining in this cold climate is needed to evaluate and mitigate these risks. A laboratory and in-situ experiment was conducted to examine mineral weathering and the generation of acid rock drainage in a low-sulfide, run-of-mine waste rock in an Arctic climate. Rock with different concentrations of sulfides (primarily pyrrhotite [Fe7S8] containing small amounts of Co and Ni) and carbonates were weathered in the laboratory and in-situ, large-scale test piles to examine leachate composition and mineral weathering. The relatively larger sulfide-containing rock produced sufficient acid to overcome carbonate buffering and produced a declining pH environment with concomitant release of SO4, Fe, Co, and Ni. Following carbonate consumption, aluminosilicate buffering stabilized the pH above 4 until a reduction in acid generation. Results from the laboratory experiment assisted in determining that after consumption of 1.6 percent of the total sulfide, the larger sulfide-concentration test pile likely is at an internal steady-state or maximal weathering rate after seven years of precipitation input and weathering that is controlled by an annual freeze-thaw cycle. Further weathering of the test pile should be driven by external factors of temperature and precipitation in this Arctic, semi-arid region instead of internal factors of wetting and non-equilibrium buffering. It is predicted that maximal weathering will continue until at least 20 percent of the total sulfide is consumed. Using the identified evolution of sulfide consumption in this Arctic climate, a variable rate factor can now be assessed for the possible early evolution and maximal weathering of larger scale waste-rock piles and seasonal differences because of changes in the volume of a waste-rock pile undergoing active weathering due to the freeze

  5. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Borgesson, Lennart; Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Hernelind, Jan; Jing, Lanru; Kobayashi, Akira; Nguyen, Son

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents numerical modeling of excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, and fluid-pressure responses during excavation of the TSX tunnel at the underground research laboratory (URL) in Canada. Four different numerical models were applied, using a wide range of approaches to model damage and permeability changes in the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around the tunnel. Using in situ calibration of model parameters the modeling could reproduce observed spatial distribution of damage and permeability changes around the tunnel, as a combination of disturbance induced by stress redistribution around the tunnel and by the drill-and-blast operation. The modeling showed that stress-induced permeability increase above the tunnel is a result of micro and macrofracturing under high deviatoric (shear) stress, whereas permeability increases alongside the tunnel as a result of opening of existing microfractures under decreased mean stress. The remaining observed fracturing and permeability changes around the periphery of the tunnel were attributed to damage from the drill-and-blast operation. Moreover, a reasonably good agreement was achieved between simulated and observed excavation-induced pressure responses around the TSX tunnel for 1 year following its excavation. The simulations showed that these pressure responses are caused by poroelastic effects as a result of increasing or decreasing mean stress, with corresponding contraction or expansion of the pore volume. The simulation results for pressure evolution were consistent with previous studies, indicating that the observed pressure responses could be captured in a Biot model using a relatively low Biot-Willis coefficient, {alpha} {approx} 0.2, a porosity of n {approx} 0.007, and a relatively low permeability of k {approx} 2 x 10{sup -22} m{sup 2}, which is consistent with the very tight, unfractured granite at the site.

  6. Two stage mantle-derived granitic rocks and the onset of the Brasiliano orogeny: Evidence from Sr, Nd, and O isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Thyego R.; Ferreira, Valderez P.; Lima, Mariucha Maria C.; Sial, Alcides N.

    2016-11-01

    The elongate Monteirópolis batholith (270 km2) is composed of alkali feldspar granite to granodiorite, it is part of the Águas Belas-Canindé composite batholith and it intruded rocks of the Pernambuco-Alagoas Domain, northeastern Brazil. This batholith is bounded by the NNE-SSW-trending Jacaré dos Homens transpressional shear zone on its southwestern margin, and displays low-angle foliation, coeval to the development of a regional flat-lying foliation. Microgranular dioritic enclaves and amphibole-rich clots are abundant. The mineralogy of this pluton comprises biotite and amphibole as major accessory phases, and titanite and magmatic epidote as trace minerals. Major and trace element chemistry shows high SiO2, total alkalis, Ba and Sr, low Fe# and Nb contents, all of these conferring a high-K calc-alkaline character. The rocks are enriched in LREE and LILE and depleted in HFSE, and show fractionated chondrite-normalized REE patterns with Eu/Eu* = 0.67 to 1.25. Chondrite-normalized spidergrams show marked negative Nb-Ta and Ti anomalies, typical of subduction-related magmas. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data yielded a crystallization age of 626 ± 4 Ma. Regional structures and U-Pb geochronological data for the Jacaré dos Homens transpressional shear zone suggest that shearing was initiated at ca. 640 Ma. Dilatational movements along this shear zone opened space for magma emplacement. The rocks in this batholith are characterized by slightly negative to slightly positive εNd values (- 0.78 to + 1.06), average Nd-model age of 1.0 Ga, low initial 87Sr/86Sr(626 Ma) values of 0.7050 to 0.7052, and low δ18O values (zircon) of + 5.00 to + 5.94‰ V-SMOW. A possible protolith, Tonian mantle-derived rocks in the lower continental crust, could have been partially melted by underplating of mantle-derived mafic magma during collision of the São Francisco Craton and the Pernambuco-Alagoas Domain during onset of the Brasiliano orogeny.

  7. New constraints on the rheology of granitic rock during faulting at the brittle-ductile transition: field observations, microstructural analysis and mechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.; Warren, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    a Coulomb friction law (μ = 0.4) for fault slip. Through independent realizations, the model tests the ability of six constitutive laws (von Mises elastic-plasticity, Drucker-Prager elastic-plasticity, Drucker-Prager Cap elastic-plasticity, power-law creep, hyperbolic-sine creep, and viscoplasticity) to reproduce the deformation features observed in outcrop. When available, material properties are taken from the experimental rock mechanics literature. The model results indicate that the constitutive behavior of the continuum involves a component of frictionless plasticity with a yield criterion that depends on the mean normal stress. Of the constitutive laws tested, the viscoplasticity law most accurately reproduces the outcrop deformation. This finding suggests that sensitivity testing of creep properties of granitic rocks within the model may help parameterize the appropriate constitutive equations for brittle-ductile fault-related deformation in continental crust.

  8. Lithological and hydrochemical controls on distribution and speciation of uranium in groundwaters of hard-rock granitic aquifers of Madurai District, Tamil Nadu (India).

    PubMed

    Thivya, C; Chidambaram, S; Keesari, Tirumalesh; Prasanna, M V; Thilagavathi, R; Adithya, V S; Singaraja, C

    2016-04-01

    Uranium is a radioactive element normally present in hexavalent form as U(VI) in solution and elevated levels in drinking water cause health hazards. Representative groundwater samples were collected from different litho-units in this region and were analyzed for total U and major and minor ions. Results indicate that the highest U concentration (113 µg l(-1)) was found in granitic terrains of this region and about 10 % of the samples exceed the permissible limit for drinking water. Among different species of U in aqueous media, carbonate complexes [UO2(CO3)(2)(2-)] are found to be dominant. Groundwater with higher U has higher pCO2 values, indicating weathering by bicarbonate ions resulting in preferential mobilization of U in groundwater. The major minerals uraninite and coffinite were found to be supersaturated and are likely to control the distribution of U in the study area. Nature of U in groundwater, the effects of lithology on hydrochemistry and factors controlling its distribution in hard rock aquifers of Madurai district are highlighted in this paper.

  9. Timing of left-lateral shearing along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone: constraints from zircon U-Pb ages from granitic rocks in the shear zone along the Ailao Shan Range, Western Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yuan; Liu, Junlai; Tran, My-Dung; Song, Zhijie; Wu, Wenbin; Zhang, Zhaochong; Zhao, Zhidan; Chen, Wen

    2013-04-01

    As the boundary between the Indochina and the South China blocks, the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) shear zone underwent a sinistral strike-slip shearing which is characterized by ductile deformation structures along the Ailao Shan range. The timing issue of left-lateral shearing along the ASRR shear zone is of first-order importance in constraining the nature and regional significance of the shear zone. It has been, therefore, focused on by many previous studies, but debates still exist on the age of initiation and termination of shearing along the shear zone. In this paper, we dated 5 samples of granitic plutons (dykes) along the Ailao Shan shear zone. Zircon U-Pb ages of four sheared or partly sheared granitic rocks give ages of 30.9 ± 0.7, 36.6 ± 0.1, 25.9 ± 1.0 and 27.2 ± 0.2 Ma, respectively. An undeformed granitic dyke intruding mylonitic foliation gives crystallization age of 21.8 ± 1 Ma. The Th/U ratios of zircon grains from these rocks fall into two populations (0.17-1.01 and 0.07-0.08), reflecting magmatic and metamorphic origins of the zircons. Detailed structural and microstructural analysis reveals that the granitic intrusions are ascribed to pre-, syn- and post-shearing magmatisms. The zircon U-Pb ages of these granites provide constraints on timing of the initiation (later than 31 Ma from pre-shearing granitic plutons, but earlier than 27 Ma from syn-shearing granitic dykes) and termination (ca. 21 Ma from the post-shearing granitic dykes) of strong ductile left-lateral shearing, which is consistent with previous results on the Diancang Shan and Day Nui Con Voi massifs in the literature. We also conclude that the left-lateral shearing along the ASRR shear zone is the result of southeastward extrusion of the Indochina block during the Indian-Eurasian plate collision. Furthermore, the left-lateral shearing was accompanied by the ridge jump, postdating the opening, of the South China Sea.

  10. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Mesoarchean granites from the Canaã dos Carajás area, Carajás Province, Brazil: Implications for the origin of Archean granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feio, G. R. L.; Dall'Agnol, R.

    2012-12-01

    Four Mesoarchean (2.93 to 2.83 Ga) granite units, which encompass the Canaã dos Carajás, Bom Jesus, Cruzadão and Serra Dourada granites, were recognized in the Canaã dos Carajás area of the Archean Carajás Province. The Mesoarchean units are composed dominantly of biotite leucomonzogranites. They are compared with the Neoarchean Planalto suite (2.73 Ga) which encompasses biotite-hornblende monzogranites to syenogranites. The Canaã dos Carajás, Bom Jesus and the variety of the Cruzadão granite with higher (La/Yb)N are geochemically more akin to the calc-alkaline granites, whereas the other varieties of the Cruzadão granite are transitional between calc-alkaline and alkaline granites. The Serra Dourada granite has an ambiguous geochemical character with some features similar to those of calc-alkaline granites and other peraluminous granites. The Planalto granites have ferroan character, are similar geochemically to reduced A-type granites and show a strong geochemical contrast with the Mesoarchean studied granites. The Mesoarchean granites described in the Canaã dos Carajás area are geochemically distinct to those of the Rio Maria domain of the Carajás Province. The Canaã dos Carajás and Bom Jesus granites are similar to the high-Ca granites, whereas the Cruzadão and Serra Dourada are more akin to the low-CaO granites of the Yilgarn craton. The geochemical characteristics of the Mesoarchean studied granites approach those of the biotite granite group of Dharwar but the latter are enriched in HFSE and HREE compared to the Canaã dos Carajás granites. The Neoarchean Planalto suite granite has no counterpart in the Mesoarchean Rio Maria domain of the Carajás Province, neither in the Yilgarn and Dharwar cratons. Geochemical modeling suggests that partial melting of a source similar in composition to an Archean basaltic andesite of the Carajás Province could give origin to the Bom Jesus and Cruzadão granites. In the case of the Bom Jesus granite the

  11. Low to Extremely Low Water Abundances Measured in Nominally Anhydrous Minerals in Mafic to Granitic Apollo Rock Clasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, J. I.; Christoffersen, R.; Wang, J.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Mills, R. D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2017-01-01

    Lunar sample-based volatile studies have focused on assessing the inventory and distribution of water in the Moon. Some have focused on the relatively young mare basalts and pyroclastic glasses, which result from partial melting of the relatively young lunar mantle. Less certain is the water inventory for the oldest materials available, which have the greater potential to record the earliest history of volatiles in the Moon (and thus provide evidence for the "wet" vs. "dry" accretion hypotheses of the Earth-Moon system. Studies of volatiles in ancient lunar rocks have largely focused on apatite. One recent FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Radiometer) study of plagioclase reported a relatively "wet" (approximately 320 parts per million) magma for primordial ferroan anorthosites (FANs). Another, a NanoSIMS study of alkali feldspar, reported a "wet" (approximately 1 weight percentage) felsic magma, but due to the differentiation processes required for silicic magmatism in the lunar crust, predicted an essentially "dry" (less than 100 parts per million) bulk Moon. Thus, despite evidence that appears to complicate the early "dry" Moon paradigm, there is no apparent unanimity among the measurements, even those on apatite. This disparity is clearly seen by the order of magnitude different water estimates for lunar "alkali-rich suite rocks" (Fig. 1). Some of the apparent differences may be explained by recent improvements in the apatite-based water estimates that better account for relative compatibilities of OH-, Cl, and F. In the present work, we seek to expand our understanding of the volatile abundances in early formed lunar magmas, their source reservoirs, and to address the potential role that felsic magmas play on the lunar hydrogen budget over time by employing NanoSIMS analysis of nominally anhydrous minerals.

  12. A tale of 10 plutons - Revisited: Age of granitic rocks in the White Mountains, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.H.; Conrad, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar incremental heating analysis and conventional K-Ar age determinations on plutonic rocks of the White Mountains define two stages of magmatic emplacement: Late Cretaceous, between ca. 90 Ma and 75 Ma, and Middle-Late Jurassic, between ca. 180 and 140 Ma. The Jurassic stage can be divided into two substages, 180-165 Ma and 150-140 Ma. Thermal effects of the younger plutons on the older granitoids partially to completely reset ages, making it difficult to determine the age of emplacement and cooling of several of the plutons even by 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating analyses. New data together with published ages and regional geochronological synthesis of the Sierra Nevada batholith indicate that regions within the batholith have coherent periods or episodes of magmatic activity. In the White Mountains and Sierra Nevada directly to the west there was little or no activity in Early Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time; magmatism took place during relatively short intervals of 15 m.y. or less in the Middle and Late Jurassic and Late Cretaceous periods. The new K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar analyses of granitoids from the White Mountains help, but do not completely clarify the complex history of emplacement, cooling, and reheating of the batholith.

  13. Carbon transformations by attached bacterial populations in granitic groundwater from deep crystalline bed-rock of the Stripa research mine.

    PubMed

    Ekendahl, S; Pedersen, K

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents and compares the assimilation rates of CO2 and lactate, and the lactate respiration rates, of attached bacterial populations growing in slowly flowing groundwater (1-3 mm s-1) from deep crystalline bed-rock of the Stripa research mine, Sweden. The bacteria studied grew in anoxic, high-pH (9-10) and low-redox artesian groundwater flowing up through tubing from two levels of a borehole designated V2, 812-820 m and 970-1240 m below ground. Bacteria were allowed to attach to and grow on sterile glass microscope slides in laminar-flow reactors connected to the flowing groundwater. Total numbers of bacteria were counted by acridine orange direct counts. The bacteria grew slowly, with doubling times of 34 d at 10 degrees C for the 812-820 m population, 23 d for the 970-1240 m population at 10 degrees C and 16 d for this population at 20 degrees C. Numbers of attached bacteria reached between 10(6) and 10(7) bacteria cm-2. The populations at the two levels of the borehole were different in physiology as well as in phylogeny and reflected the heterogeneity between the sampling levels. The earlier proposed presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria could not be confirmed. This is discussed in relation to results from 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies. The CO2 assimilation rates (as mol CO2 cm-2 h-1, using liquid scintillation techniques) increased with depth and temperature.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. The Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean subduction-related Permian peraluminous granites in northeastern Mongolia: Constraints from zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock elemental and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pan; Xu, Bei; Jahn, Bor-ming

    2017-08-01

    Northeastern Mongolia represents a unique area that experienced evolution of both the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean (MOO) and the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). In order to better understand the evolution of MOO and its effect on the CAOB, we performed zircon U-Pb dating and Hf isotope, and whole-rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic analyses on three Permian peraluminous granitic plutons in northeastern Mongolia. Zircon dating result revealed that granitoids of East Monhhaan, South Monhhaan and Tuvshinshiree plutons were emplaced at 254 ± 3, 265 ± 5, and 273 ± 3 Ma, respectively. The result provides Permian ages for the Permian-Triassic volcanic-plutonic belt in northeastern Mongolia. Geochemical analysis suggests that all the granitoids are of peraluminous S-type granites. Elemental and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data indicate that these S-type granites were generated from mainly clay-poor greywacke with some contribution of juvenile mantle component. The Permian S-type granites emplaced likely in an active margin related to the subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. The protracted intermittent extension during the long-lived compression was considered as a likely geodynamic mechanism for the upwelling of mantle-derived basaltic magma and melting of crustal materials.

  15. Status of LLNL granite projects

    SciTech Connect

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-12-31

    The status of LLNL Projects dealing with nuclear waste disposal in granitic rocks is reviewed. This review covers work done subsequent to the June 1979 Workshop on Thermomechanical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository and is prepared for the July 1980 Workshop on Thermomechanical-Hydrochemical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository. Topics reviewed include laboratory determination of thermal, mechanical, and transport properties of rocks at conditions simulating a deep geologic repository, and field testing at the Climax granitic stock at the USDOE Nevada Test Site.

  16. Early to late Yanshanian I-type granites in Fujian Province, SE China: Implications for the tectonic setting and Mo mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Long; Ni, Pei; Yan, Jun; Wu, Chang-Zhi; Dai, Bao-Zhang; Xu, Ying-Feng

    2017-04-01

    The Cathaysia Block is the southeastern part of the South China Block in Southeast (SE) China, and it hosts voluminous late Mesozoic I-, S-, and A-type granitoids, as well as minor highly fractionated granites. We present here zircon U-Pb age data and Nd-Hf isotopic data for the Dayang and Juzhou granites, together with new petrological and geochemical analyses. The Dayang pluton consists of fine-grained two-mica monzonitic granites in which the plagioclases exhibit zoning and poikilitic textures. In contrast, the Juzhou pluton consists of medium- to coarse-grained biotite K-feldspar granites that lack zoning and poikilitic textures. The emplacement ages are 143 ± 2.3 Ma for the Dayang pluton and 133 ± 2.1 Ma for the Juzhou pluton according to zircon U-Pb isotope analyses. The Dayang and Juzhou granites are both metaluminous and belong to the shoshonitic series. The Dayang granite exhibits very flat REE patterns, showing the tetrad effect, and the spidergrams show striking negative Ba, Sr, Nb, and Ti anomalies and a positive Ta anomaly. In contrast, the Juzhou granite has sloping REE patterns, but like the Dayang granite it also has striking negative Ba, Sr, Nb, Ta, and Ti anomalies. Petrographic and geochemical evidence indicates that the Dayang granite is a highly fractionated I-type granite and that the Juzhou granite is a typical I-type granite. The tetrad effect in the Dayang granite can be interpreted in terms of melt-rock interactions at a late stage of magma evolution, whereas the main mechanism during the evolution of the Juzhou magma was fractionation of plagioclase, biotite, hornblende, apatite, zircon, and allanite. Nd-Hf isotope data suggest that the Dayang and Juzhou granites were both formed partial melting of Paleoproterozoic basement rock and juvenile material (underplating basalts or Mayuan Group amphibolites), with the Juzhou granite having a greater contribution from juvenile material than the Dayang granite. Our new data, together with

  17. Immobilization of uranium in biofilm microorganisms exposed to groundwater seeps over granitic rock tunnel walls in Olkiluoto, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk-Bärsch, Evelyn; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Pedersen, Karsten; Arnold, Thuro; Bok, Frank; Steudtner, Robin; Lehtinen, Anne; Brendler, Vinzenz

    2012-11-01

    In an underground rock characterization facility, the ONKALO tunnel in Finland, massive 5-10-mm thick biofilms were observed attached to tunnel walls where groundwater was seeping from bedrock fractures at a depth of 70 m. In laboratory experiments performed in a flow cell with detached biofilms to study the effect of uranium on the biofilm, uranium was added to the circulating groundwater (CGW) obtained from the fracture feeding the biofilm. The final uranium concentration in the CGW was adjusted to 4.25 × 10-5 M, in the range expected from a leaking spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister in a future underground repository. The effects were investigated using microelectrodes to measure pH and Eh, time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM), and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) studies and thermodynamic calculations were utilized as well. The results indicated that the studied biofilms constituted their own microenvironments, which differed significantly from that of the CGW. A pH of 5.37 was recorded inside the biofilm, approximately 3.5 units lower than the pH observed in the CGW, due to sulfide oxidation to sulfuric acid in the biofilm. Similarly, the Eh of +73 mV inside the biofilm was approximately 420 mV lower than the Eh measured in the CGW. Adding uranium increased the pH in the biofilm to 7.27 and reduced the Eh to -164 mV. The changes of Eh and pH influenced the bioavailability of uranium, since microbial metabolic processes are sensitive to metals and their speciation. EF-TEM investigations indicated that uranium in the biofilm was immobilized intracellularly in microorganisms by the formation of metabolically mediated uranyl phosphate, similar to needle-shaped autunite (Ca[UO2]2[PO4]2·2-6H2O) or meta-autunite (Ca[UO2]2[PO4]2·10-12H2O). In contrast, TRLFS studies of the contaminated CGW identified aqueous uranium carbonate species, likely (Ca2UO2[CO3]3), formed due to the high

  18. Geochronology and isotopic geochemistry of the A-type granites from the Huanggang Sn-Fe deposit, southern Great Hinggan Range, NE China: Implication for their origin and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhen-Hua; Mao, Jing-Wen; Lyckberg, Peter

    2012-04-01

    The Huanggang Sn-Fe deposit, Inner Mongolia, is located in southern Great Hinggan Range metallogenic belt. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating show that the K-feldspar granite and granite-porphyry in the Huanggang mine were formed at 136.7 ± 1.1 Ma and 136.8 ± 0.57 Ma, respectively. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope of the rocks and In situ zircon Hf isotopic systematics show that (87Sr/86Sr)i values range from 0.70211 to 0.70729, close to the (87Sr/86Sr)i of oceanic basalts and lower than those of continental crust. The ɛNd(t) values and Nd model ages (TDM) vary from -0.8 to 0.9 and 855 to 993 Ma, respectively. The Pb isotopic compositions are also variable with 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb values of 18.974-26.107, 15.554-15.914 and 38.894-39.890, respectively, suggesting that the lead is derived from a mixed source. The 176Hf/177Hf values range from 0.282744 to 0.282922, with corresponding ɛHf(t) values ranging from 1.9 to 18.3, and two-stage Hf model ages (TDM2) of between 561 and 888 Ma. The isotope composition shows that Huanggang granites were derived from partial melting of juvenile lower crust that originated from depleted mantle, perhaps contaminated by small amounts of ancient continental crust. Younger Nd, Hf isotope model ages imply that an important crustal growth event took place in this area during the Neoproterozoic. Integrating our data with previously published results and the Late Mesozoic regional tectonic setting, we conclude that the Huanggang granites were generated in an intraplate tectonic-magmatic setting. Asthenospheric mantle upwelling due to lithospheric delamination and magma underplating, caused the partial melting of a mantle wedge metasomatized by the fluids released from subducted oceanic crust or by decompression of depleted mantle. This resulted in remelting, differentiation and a continued evolution of the mafic juvenile crust, producing a large quantity of granitic magma. The tectonic setting for these processes may be linked to the

  19. Excess water generation during reaction-inducing intrusion of granitic melts into ultramafic rocks at crustal P-T conditions in the Sør Rondane Mountains of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Masaoki; Okamoto, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2017-07-01

    Arc magmas are one of the main sources of aqueous geofluids in the crust, and the movement of fluids above magma chambers has been geophysically imaged. Here, we constrain the water budget (i.e., supply, consumption and release of H2O) in these areas above magma chamber by examining the hydration caused by crust-melt reactions in the Sør Rondane Mountains of East Antarctica. The study area contains a phlogopite-pargasite-peridotite unit that has been intruded by numerous granitic dikes, creating hydration reaction zones at the dike-peridotite boundary. These reactions occurred at 0.5 GPa and 700 °C, corresponding to middle crustal conditions, and generated a series of reaction zones with distance from the granitic dikes as follows: (i) granitic dike, (ii) pargasite-actinolite zone, (iii) tremolite-phlogopite zone, (iv) anthophyllite-phlogopite zone, (v) phlogopite-olivine-orthopyroxene zone, and (vi) unaltered pargasite-phlogopite peridotite. The presence of amphiboles with a preferred orientation perpendicular to the dike margins and an absence of Cr-rich magnetite indicate that the pargasite-actinolite zone [zone (ii)] grew from the dike margins as a result of the dike reacting with the host rock, with an initial melt/rock boundary located between zones (ii) and (iii). The H2O contents of reaction zones (ii)-(v) are higher than the content in the hosting pargasite-phlogopite peridotite, suggesting that the intrusion of the dike was associated with hydration reactions. Geochemical analysis along a profile through the reaction zones indicates Mg and Fe depletion, and Si enrichment in zones (iii)-(iv), and Ca depletion and K enrichment in zones (iv)-(v) relative to the hosting pargasite-phlogopite peridotite. In contrast, zone (ii) is characterized by Ca, Fe, and Mg enrichments relative to the granitic dike. These observations suggest that the reaction zone sequence was formed by the elemental transfer between granitic dike and parasite-phlogopite peridotite: Ca

  20. Petrogenesis of syntectonic granites emplaced at the transition from thrusting to transcurrent tectonics in post-collisional setting: Whole-rock and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope geochemistry in the Neoproterozoic Quatro Ilhas and Mariscal Granites, Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florisbal, Luana Moreira; Bitencourt, Maria de Fátima; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Nardi, Lauro Valentim Stoll; Heaman, Larry M.

    2012-11-01

    The Neoproterozoic post-collisional period in southern Brazil (650-580 Ma) is characterized by substantial volumes of magma emplaced along the active shear zones that compose the Southern Brazilian Shear Belt. The early-phase syntectonic magmatism (630-610 Ma) is represented by the porphyritic, high-K, metaluminous to peraluminous Quatro Ilhas Granitoids and the younger heterogranular, slightly peraluminous Mariscal Granite. Quatro Ilhas Granitoids include three main petrographic varieties (muscovite-biotite granodiorite — mbg; biotite monzogranite — bmz; and leucogranite — lcg) that, although sharing some significant geochemical characteristics, are not strictly comagmatic, as shown by chemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data. The most primitive muscovite-biotite granodiorite was produced by contamination of more mafic melts (possibly with some mantle component) with peraluminous crustal melts; the biotite monzogranite, although more felsic, has higher Ca, MgO, TiO2 and Ba, and lower K2O, FeOt, Sr and Rb contents, possibly reflecting some mixing with coeval mafic magmas of tholeiitic affinity; the leucogranite may be derived from pure crustal melts. The Mariscal Granite is formed by two main granite types which occur intimately associated in the same pluton, one with higher K (5-6.5 wt.% K2O) high Rb and lower CaO, Na2O, Ba and Zr as compared to the other (3-5 wt.% of K2O). The two Mariscal Granite varieties have compositional correspondence with fine-grained granites (fgg) that occur as tabular bodies which intruded the Quatro Ilhas Granoitoids before they were fully crystallized, and are inferred to correspond to the Mariscal Granite feeders, an interpretation that is reinforced by similar U-Pb zircon crystallization ages. The initial evolution of the post-collisional magmatism, marked by the emplacement of the Quatro Ilhas Granitoids varieties, activated sources that produced mantle and crustal magmas whose emplacement was controlled both by flat-lying and

  1. Formation of a Granite Bodies in Depleted Granulite Terranes: the Wuluma Granite, Central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavaure, S.; Sawyer, E. W.

    2009-05-01

    The Wuluma Granite (ca.17 km2) is hosted by Palaeoproterozoic, granulite facies metasedimentary and metaigneous rocks. It is believed to have formed by in situ partial melting of quartzo-feldspathic gneisses at 1728±3 Ma due to the influx of an externally derived aqueous fluid after the granulite facies metamorphism. We have reinvestigated the Wuluma Granite and find that most contacts between the granite and the host granulites are intrusive, not gradational. Granite occurs as thin (<1m) subconcordant sheets and dykes in country rocks that contain fresh orthopyroxene and cordierite without much replacement by hydrous minerals. Screens of country rock are common within the granite, and many contain metapelitic rocks that have leucosome and melanosome structures similar those found in the country rocks. Although some of the migmatite structures in the screens still contain garnet, cordierite and orthopyroxene, in most these minerals are replaced by biotite. Biotite is the only ferromagnesian mineral in the thinnest screens of country rock. All the screens contain subconcordant sheets and dykes of granite; typically a narrow selvedge is developed between the intrusive granite and the rocks of the screen; selvedges are either rich in biotite or in quartz depending on the host rock type. Schlieren are common throughout the granite and represent the last vestiges of the country rocks in the granite; there is much morphological and mineralogical variation among the schlieren. The Wuluma granite consists of innumerable thin (less than a metre) subparallel sheets and cross-cutting dykes, that are distinguished by variations in grain size, microstructure and the proportion of minerals present. The earliest phase to be porphyritic and rich in biotite, whereas the last is leucocratic, coarse grained and locally forms dykes up to 20m wide. The centre of the granite contains large (1 cm) crystals of garnet and, more rarely, cordierite. However, in many places these have been

  2. A conceptual hydrodynamic model of a geological discontinuity in hard rock aquifers: Example of a quartz reef in granitic terrain in South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewandel, Benoît; Lachassagne, Patrick; Zaidi, Faisal K.; Chandra, Subash

    2011-08-01

    SummaryThe structure and hydrodynamic properties of geological discontinuities and of a deeply weathered granite aquifer near these structures are described on the basis of geological, geophysical and hydrodynamic investigations in two sites of South India located along a 20-40-m-wide quartz reef intruding a weathered Archean biotite granite. One of the two sites also comprises a metre-wide dolerite dyke. Weathering processes appear to be at the origin of fissures development and of a related enhanced local hydraulic conductivity, both in the quartz reef and in the surrounding granite. The weathering profile in the granite (saprolite and fissured layer) is characterized by an abrupt deepening of the weathered layers in the granite near the contact and in the quartz reef itself. Therefore, the weathering profile shows a 'U'-shape geometry with, among others, the verticalization of the granite's fissured layer. The hydraulic conductivity of this verticalized layer is on average 5 × 10 -6 m/s and storativity about 10 -3 (-). The hydraulic conductivity of the fissured quartz is 4-6 × 10 -6 m/s and its storativity about 3-5 × 10 -4 (-). Both media are also characterized by a matrix hydraulic conductivity (10 -7-10 -9 m/s) and by a significant heterogeneity in hydrodynamic properties that generates preferential flow paths along the sub-vertical fissures parallel to the reef axis. A special attention has been paid for characterizing this heterogeneity. The weathering of the dolerite dyke, however, results in a local low hydraulic conductivity, which consequently does not enhance either the thickness of weathered granite layers or its hydraulic conductivity. The obtained results complete the conceptual hydrogeological model developed for weathered granite aquifers in characterizing the relationships between weathering processes and hydrodynamic properties near geological discontinuities.

  3. Mineral inclusions in zircons of S-type granite: implications for high pressure metamorphism history of meta-sedimentary rocks in the Huai'an terrain, North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haozheng; Zhang, Huafeng; Zhai, Mingguo; Cui, Xiahong

    2016-04-01

    The Paleoproterozoic evolution of North China Craton (NCC) arises many argument as geologists have different viewpoints on the distribution and metamorphic history of mafic granulites and granulite facies meta-sedimentary rocks. To provide more evidence of constraining the metamorphic history of granulite facies meta-sedimentary rocks, we select granulite facies meta-sedimentary rocks and co-existing S-type granite in the Huai'an terrain to make a deep research. Magmatic zircons derived from the S-type granite reveal the magmatic age of ˜1.95 Ga and metamorphic age of ˜1.85 Ga with ɛHf(t) value of -4.5 - -0.5. The ɛHf(t) value of S-type granite and relict of garnet-sillimanite gneiss suggest that the S-type granite is generated by melting of meta-sedimentary rocks. Zircons with ages of ˜1.95 Ga and ˜1.85 Ga have the mineral inclusions of Ky + Qz + Ru + Pl and these mineral inclusions are determined by method of Laser-Raman. The ˜1.95 Ga magmatic zircons with inclusions of Ky + Qz + Ru + Pl suggest that meta-sedimentary rocks have mineral assemblages Ky + Qz + Ru + Pl. However, previous studies in the Huai'an terrain showed that almost granulite facies metamorphic condition of meta-sedimentary rocks were regarded as medium pressure by considering the Sill + Grt + Bt + Pl + Qz + Ru + Kf. Presence of kyanite instructs that meta-sedimentary rocks may experience high pressure granulite facies metamorphism. According to pseudosection calculation by using effective bulk composition of garnet-sillimanite gneiss, mineral assemblage of Grt + Ky + Pl + Bt + Qz + Ru + Kf is regarded as the peak stage of high pressure metamorphism. This mineral assemblage is occurred at field of 1033 - 1123 K and 9 - 15 Kbar and the peak pressure is around 11 - 13 Kbar, determined by the XMg and XCa isopleths of garnet. This P-T result is consistent with peak condition of high pressure mafic granulite. Considering the ˜1.95 Ga magmatic age of S-type granite generated by decompression

  4. Thermodynamic modeling of non-ideal mineral-fluid equilibria in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-K-H-O-Cl at elevated temperatures and pressures: Implications for hydrothermal mass transfer in granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejš, David; Wagner, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of thermodynamic modeling of fluid-rock interaction in the system Si-Al-Fe-Mg-Ca-Na-H-O-Cl using the GEM-Selektor Gibbs free energy minimization code. Combination of non-ideal mixing properties in solids with multicomponent aqueous fluids represents a substantial improvement and it provides increased accuracy over existing modeling strategies. Application to the 10-component system allows us to link fluid composition and speciation with whole-rock mineralogy, mass and volume changes. We have simulated granite-fluid interaction over a wide range of conditions (200-600 °C, 100 MPa, 0-5 m Cl and fluid/rock ratios of 10-2-104) in order to explore composition of magmatic fluids of variable salinity, temperature effects on fluid composition and speciation and to simulate several paths of alteration zoning. At low fluid/rock ratios (f/r) the fluid composition is buffered by the silicate-oxide assemblage and remains close to invariant. This behavior extends to a f/r of 0.1 which exceeds the amount of exsolved magmatic fluids controlled by water solubility in silicate melts. With increasing peraluminosity of the parental granite, the Na-, K- and Fe-bearing fluids become more acidic and the oxidation state increases as a consequence of hydrogen and ferrous iron transfer to the fluid. With decreasing temperature, saline fluids become more Ca- and Na-rich, change from weakly acidic to alkaline, and become significantly more oxidizing. Large variations in Ca/Fe and Ca/Mg ratios in the fluid are a potential geothermometer. The mineral assemblage changes from cordierite-biotite granites through two-mica granites to chlorite-, epidote- and zeolite-bearing rocks. We have carried out three rock-titration simulations: (1) reaction with the 2 m NaCl fluid leads to albitization, chloritization and desilication, reproducing essential features observed in episyenites, (2) infiltration of a high-temperature fluid into the granite at 400 °C leads to hydrolytic

  5. Origin of late Archean granite: geochemical evidence from the Vermilion Granitic Complex of northern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Warren C.; Weiblen, P. W.

    1986-07-01

    The 2,700-Ma Vermilion Granitic Complex of northern Minnesota is a granite-migmatite terrane composed of supracrustal metasedimentary rocks, mafic rocks, tonalitic and granodioritic plutonic rocks, and granite. The metasedimentary rocks are predominantly graywacke, which has been regionally metamorphosed to garnet-sillimanite-muscovite-bearing biotite schist, and has locally undergone anatexis. The mafic rocks form early phases within the complex and are of two types: (1) basaltic amphibolite, and (2) monzodiorite and essexite rich in large ion lithophile elements (LILE). The members of the early plutonic suite form small bodies that intrude the metasedimentary rocks and mafic rocks, producing an early migmatite. The granite is of two distinct varieties: (1) white garnet-muscovite-biotite leucogranite ( S-type; Chappell and White 1974) and (2) grayish-pink biotite-magnetite Lac La Croix Granite ( I-type). The leucogranite occurs in the early migmatite and in paragneissic portions of the complex, whereas the Lac La Croix Granite is a late-stage intrusive phase that invades the early migmatite and metasediment (producing a late migmatite) and forms a batholith. This study focuses specifically on the origin of granite in the Vermilion Granitic Complex. Chemical mass-balance calculations suggest that the S-type two-mica leucogranite had a metagraywacke source, and that the I-type Lac La Croix Granite formed via partial fusion of calc-alkaline tonalitic material, which may have been similar to rocks of the early plutonic suite. This model is satisfactory for petrogenesis of similar Late Archean post-kinematic granites throughout the Canadian Shield.

  6. Origin of late Archean granite: geochemical evidence from the Vermilion Granitic Complex of northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, W.C.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The 2,700-Ma Vermilion Granitic Complex of northern Minnesota is a granite-migmatite terrane composed of supracrustal metasedimentary rocks, mafic rocks, tonalitic and granodioritic plutonic rocks, and granite. The metasedimentary rocks are predominantly graywacke, which has been regionally metamorphosed to garnet-sillimanite-muscovite-bearing biotite schist, and has locally undergone anatexis. The mafic rocks form early phases within the complex and are of two types: (1) basaltic amphibolite, and (2) monzodiorite and essexite rich in large ion lithophile elements (LILE). The members of the early plutonic suite form small bodies that intrude the metasedimentary rocks and mafic rocks, producing an early migmatite. The granite is of two distinct varieties: (1) white garnet-muscovite-biotite leucogranite (S-type; Chappell and White 1974) and (2) grayish-pink biotite-magnetite Lac La Croix Granite (I-type). The leucogranite occurs in the early migmatite and in paragneissic portions of the complex, whereas the Lac La Croix Granite is a late-stage intrusive phase that invades the early migmatite and metasediment (producing a late migmatite) and forms a batholith. This study focuses specifically on the origin of granite in the Vermilion Granitic Complex. Chemical mass-balance calculations suggest that the S-type two-mica leucogranite had a metagraywacke source, and that the I-type Lac La Croix Granite formed via partial fusion of calc-alkaline tonalitic material, which may have been similar to rocks of the early plutonic suite. This model is satisfactory for petrogenesis of similar Late Archean post-kinematic granites throughout the Canadian Shield. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  7. U-Pb zircon and CHIME monazite dating of granitoids and high-grade metamorphic rocks from the Eastern and Peninsular Thailand - A new report of Early Paleozoic granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, T.; Nakano, N.; Higashino, F.; Hokada, T.; Osanai, Y.; Yuhara, M.; Charusiri, P.; Kamikubo, H.; Yonemura, K.; Hirata, T.

    2014-07-01

    In order to understand the age and tectonic framework of Eastern to Peninsular Thailand from the viewpoint of basement (metamorphic and plutonic) geology, the LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon dating and the chemical Th-U-total Pb isochron method (CHIME) monazite dating were performed in the Khao Chao, Hub-Kapong to Pran Buri, and Khanom areas in Eastern to Peninsular Thailand. The LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon dating of the garnet-hornblende gneiss from the Khao Chao area gave 229 ± 3 Ma representing the crystallization age of the gabbro, and that of the garnet-biotite gneisses gave 193 ± 4 Ma representing the timing of an upper amphibolite facies metamorphism. The CHIME monazite dating of pelitic gneiss from the Khao Chao gneiss gave scattered result of 68 ± 22 Ma, due to low PbO content and rejuvenation of older monazite grains during another metamorphism in the Late Cretaceous to Tertiary time. The U-Pb ages of zircon from the Hua Hin gneissic granite in the Hub-Kapong to Pran Buri area scatter from 250 Ma to 170 Ma on the concordia. Granite crystallization was at 219 ± 2 Ma, followed by the sillimanite-grade regional metamorphism at 185 ± 2 Ma. Monazite in the pelitic gneiss from this area also preserves Early to Middle Jurassic metamorphism and rejuvenation by later contact metamorphism by non-foliated granite or by another fluid infiltration event in the Late Cretaceous to Tertiary time. The Khao Dat Fa granite from the Khanom area of Peninsular Thailand gave a U-Pb zircon age of 477 ± 7 Ma. This is the second oldest granite pluton ever reported from Thailand, and is a clear evidence for the Sibumasu block having a crystalline basement that was formed during the Pan-African Orogeny. The Khao Pret granite gives U-Pb zircon concordia age of 67.5 ± 1.3 Ma, which represents the timing of zircon crystallization from the granitic melt and accompanied sillimanite-grade contact metamorphism against surrounding metapelites and gneisses. Metamorphic rocks in the Doi Inthanon area

  8. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?"…

  9. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?"…

  10. Potassium-argon dating of the cape granite and a granitized xenolith at sea point.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, G D; Basson, H H; Verbeek, A A

    1968-11-01

    Ages obtained by potassium-argon dating are reported for the total rock, light mineral fraction and heavy mineral fractions of the Cape Granite, and of a granitized xenolith derived from the Malmesbury sediments. These ages lie between 430 and 554 million years. The heavy mineral fractions from each rock type show the oldest age, 540 (granite) and 554 (xenolith) million years. These ages are interpreted as lower limits, and the granite age confirms the age of 553 million years found by rubidium-strontium dating. The coincidence of the ages of the different fractions of the granite and xenolith samples is discussed in the light of the different suggestions about the age of the Malmesbury sediments. The conclusion is reached that all pre-granitization history has been eliminated. The possibility of the use of argon retention as a measure of metamorphic activity is suggested.

  11. Granodiorites of the South Mountain Batholith (Nova Scotia, Canada) derived by partial melting of Avalonia granulite rocks beneath the Meguma terrane: Implications for the heat source of the Late Devonian granites of the Northern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory; Dostal, Jaroslav

    2015-08-01

    The Late Devonian South Mountain Batholith (SMB) of Nova Scotia is the largest batholith of the northern Appalachians. The peraluminous granitic rocks range from biotite granodiorite to leucogranite. Samples collected from a drill core of the Scrag Lake granodioritic pluton of the western SMB are chemically homogeneous from the surface to a depth of ~ 1425 m. The homogeneous composition implies that the granodiorite was derived from a relatively homogeneous source and that country rock assimilation was not an important source for the parental magma. Equilibrium partial melt modeling of underlying sub-Meguma granulite rocks indicates that they are the primary source rocks of the granodiorites. We suggest that mantle-derived magmas intruded the lower crust and induce large-scale melting of the granulite basement rocks to produce the granodiorites. Fractional crystallization of the granodiorites plus assimilation of Meguma Supergroup metasediments likely produces the silica-rich rocks of the SMB. The cause of mantle melting is uncertain however it may be related to the transitioning of the northern Appalachians from a position above the deep mantle Pacific large low shear velocity province (LLSVP) to a higher shear velocity region of the mantle.

  12. Lunar granites with unique ternary feldspars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, G.; Stoeser, D. B.; Marvin, U. B.; Bower, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    An unusually high concentration of granitic fragments, with textures ranging from holocrystalline to glassy, occurs throughout Boulder 1, a complex breccia of highland rocks from Apollo 17, Station 2. Among the minerals included in the granites are enigmatic K-Ca-rich feldspars that fall in the forbidden region of the ternary diagram. The great variability in chemistry and texture is probably the result of impact degradation and melting of a granitic source-rock. Studies of the breccia matrix suggest that this original granitic source-rock may have contained more pyroxenes and phosphates than most of the present clasts contain. Petrographic observations on Apollo 15 KREEP basalts indicate that granitic liquids may be produced by differentiation without immiscibility, and the association of the granites with KREEP-rich fragments in the boulder suggests that the granites represent a residual liquid from the plutonic fractional crystallization of a KREEP-rich magma. Boulder 1 is unique among Apollo 17 samples in its silica-KREEP-rich composition. We conclude that the boulder represents a source-rock unlike the bedrock of South Massif.

  13. Petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the early Mesozoic Xitian granitic pluton in the middle Qin-Hang Belt, South China: Constraints from zircon U-Pb ages and bulk-rock trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianhong; Cao, Jingya; Kong, Hua; Shao, Yongjun; Li, Huan; Xi, Xiaoshuang; Deng, Xuantong

    2016-10-01

    The Xitian pluton in southeast Hunan province is one of the early Mesozoic (Indosinian) granitic plutons in the South China Block. It is composed of biotite adamellite with K-feldspar megacrysts, biotite adamellite, and biotite granite that have U-Pb zircon ages of 229.9 ± 1.4 Ma, 223.6 ± 1.3 Ma, and 224.0 ± 1.4 Ma, respectively. The Indosinian granitoids in the Xitian pluton belong to S-type granites, with highly radiogenic initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.71397-0.71910), negative εNd(t) values ranging from -10.1 to -9.4, and old Nd model ages (1858-1764 Ma). They are enriched in radiogenic Pb isotopes, with (206Pb/204Pb)t ranging from 18.130 to 18.903, (207Pb/204Pb)t from 15.652 to 15.722, and (208Pb/204Pb)t from 38.436 to 39.037, respectively. These features indicate that the granitoidswithin the Xitian pluton were formed from magmas generated by remelting of metapelite and metapsammite of the Paleoproterozoic metamorphic basement at temperatures of ca. 800 °C, with low oxygen fugacity. The Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the rocks from Xitian pluton indicate that the granitic magmas were mixed with less than 10% mantle-derived magmas. We suggest that the Xitian pluton was emplaced in an extensional tectonic setting related to release of compressional stresses within the thickened crust during the early Mesozoic.

  14. Comparison of Proterozoic and Phanerozoic rift-related basaltic-granitic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapala, Ilmari; Rämö, O. Tapani; Frindt, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    This paper compares the 1.67-1.47 Ga rapakivi granites of Finland and vicinity to the 1.70-1.68 Ga rapakivi granites of the Beijing area in China, the anorogenic ˜130 Ma granites of western Namibia, and the 20-15 Ma granites of the Colorado River extensional corridor in the Basin and Range Province of southern Nevada. In Finland and China, the tectonic setting was incipient, aborted rifting of Paleoproterozoic or Archean continental crust, in Namibia it was continental rifting and mantle plume activity that led to the opening of southern Atlantic at ˜130 Ma. The 20-15 Ma granites of southern Nevada were related to rifting that followed the Triassic-Paleogene subduction of the Farallon plate beneath the southwestern United States. In all cases, extension-related magmatism was bimodal and accompanied by swarms of diabase and rhyolite-quartz latite dikes. Rapakivi texture with plagioclase-mantled alkali feldspar megacrysts occurs in varying amounts in the granites, and the latest intrusive phases are commonly topaz-bearing granites or rhyolites that may host tin, tungsten, and beryllium mineralization. The granites are typically ferroan alkali-calcic metaluminous to slightly peraluminous rocks with A-type and within-plate geochemical and mineralogical characteristics. Isotope studies (Nd, Sr) suggest dominant crustal sources for the granites. The preferred genetic model is magmatic underplating involving dehydration melting of intermediate-felsic deep crust. Juvenile mafic magma was incorporated either via magma mingling and mixing, or by remelting of newly hybridized lower crust. In Namibia, partial melting of subcontinental lithospheric mantle was caused by the Tristan mantle plume, in the other cases the origin of the mantle magmatism is controversial. For the Fennoscandian suites, extensive long-time mantle upwelling associated with periodic, migrating melting of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle, governed by heat flow and deep crustal structures, is

  15. U-Th-Pb systematics of zircon inclusions in rock-forming minerals: A study of armoring against isotopic loss using the Sherman Granite of Colorado-Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    Zircon inclusions were separated from the five major rock-forming minerals of the Sherman Granite of southern Wyoming, in order to evaluate the degree of discordance as a possible function of host minerals. U-Th-Pb isotopic ratios were determined for two size fractions of zircon inclusions from each mineral, plus five size fractions from the bulk rock. Isotopic data from the inclusions have more than double the spread of data on a discordia obtained from the bulk sample, thereby yielding better-resolved concordia intercepts. However, isotopic ratios and morphologic characteristics indicate that the Pb/U systematics are complicated by inherited radiogenic lead. Although the data array cannot unequivocally be explained by the armoring process, the proposed methodology has succeeded in identifying groups of zircon with different isotopic characteristics. As such, this technique can be used to decipher complex geologic/isotopic histories and may be a useful addition to routine zircon geochronology. ?? 1983 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Geochemistry and Sm-Nd geochronology of the metasomatised mafic rocks in the Khetri complex, Rajasthan, NW India: Evidence of an Early Cryogenian metasomatic event in the northern Aravalli orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parampreet; Chaudhri, Naveen; Hofmann, Albrecht W.; Raczek, Ingrid; Okrusch, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The mafic magmatic rocks associated with 1720-1700 Ma albitised A-type granites in the northern segment of the Aravalli orogen, NW India show evidence of metasomatism. It is, however, not clear whether the metasomatism of mafic rocks is related to the cooling of these associated granites or whether it took place much later after the emplacement of the granites on a regional scale. For this, we have investigated the mafic magmatic rocks, which occur in close association with these granites. In the Biharipur intrusive, the mafic rocks are intensely commingled with the A-type granites, whereas in the vicinity of the Dosi intrusive, the mafic rocks (clinopyroxenite) do not show any evidence of granite mingling. The commingled and metasomatised Biharipur mafics occur in contact with the albitised granites instead of original granite, indicating that the mafics were metasomatised along with the granites. This is supported by the similarity in REE and spider patterns of the intermixed mafic rocks and the albite granites. On the other hand, the Dosi mafic rocks, free from granite commingling, are scapolitised where the original diopside has been partly transformed to chlorine-rich marialites with a meionite component ranging from Me14.0 to Me16.0. The scapolite, occurring as anastomosing veins, within these rocks is also of similar composition, and the undeformed nature of these veins suggests that the scapolitisation postdates regional metamorphism in the region. Mineralogical, geochemical and Nd isotopic characteristics of the mafic rocks indicate that originally, these were clinopyroxenites, which have been altered to a monomineralic actinolite-bearing rock. The immobile incompatible trace element ratios indicate a continental tholeiite affinity for the mafics, which is in consonance with the A-type nature of the associated granites. During this metasomatic event, the mafic magmatic rocks experienced albitisation and scapolitisation, although the dominance of these

  17. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  18. Climax granite test results

    SciTech Connect

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-01-15

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only those field data taken to date that address thermomechanical modeling for a hard-rock repository. The results to be discussed include thermal measurements in a heater test that was conducted from October 1977 through July 1978, and stress and displacement measurements made during and after excavation of the canister storage drift for the Spent Fuel Test (SFT) in the Climax granite. Associated laboratory and field measurements are summarized. The rock temperature for a given applied heat load at a point in time and space can be adequately modeled with simple analytic calculations involving superposition and integration of numerous point source solutions. The input, for locations beyond about a meter from the source, can be a constant thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The value of thermal conductivity required to match the field data is as much as 25% different from laboratory-measured values. Therefore, unless we come to understand the mechanisms for this difference, a simple in situ test will be required to obtain a value for final repository design. Some sensitivity calculations have shown that the temperature field is about ten times more sensitive to conductivity than to diffusivity under the test conditions. The orthogonal array was designed to detect anisotropy. After considering all error sources, anisotropic efforts in the thermal field were less than 5 to 10%.

  19. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of post-collisional ultrapotassic syenites and granites from southernmost Brazil: the Piquiri Syenite Massif.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Lauro V S; Plá-Cid, Jorge; Bitencourt, Maria de Fátima; Stabel, Larissa Z

    2008-06-01

    The Piquiri Syenite Massif, southernmost Brazil, is part of the post-collisional magmatism related to the Neoproterozoic Brasiliano-Pan-African Orogenic Cycle. The massif is about 12 km in diameter and is composed of syenites, granites, monzonitic rocks and lamprophyres. Diopside-phlogopite, diopside-biotite-augite-calcic-amphibole, are the main ferro-magnesian paragenesis in the syenitic rocks. Syenitic and granitic rocks are co-magmatic and related to an ultrapotassic, silica-saturated magmatism. Their trace element patterns indicate a probable mantle source modified by previous, subduction-related metasomatism. The ultrapotassic granites of this massif were produced by fractional crystallization of syenitic magmas, and may be considered as a particular group of hypersolvus and subsolvus A-type granites. Based upon textural, structural and geochemical data most of the syenitic rocks, particularly the fine-grained types, are considered as crystallized liquids, in spite of the abundance of cumulatic layers, schlieren, and compositional banding. Most of the studied samples are metaluminous, with K2O/Na2O ratios higher than 2. The ultrapotassic syenitic and lamprophyric rocks in the Piquiri massif are interpreted to have been produced from enriched mantle sources, OIB-type, like most of the post-collisional shoshonitic, sodic alkaline and high-K tholeiitic magmatism in southernmost Brazil. The source of the ultrapotassic and lamprophyric magmas is probably the same veined mantle, with abundant phlogopite + apatite + amphibole that reflects a previous subduction-related metasomatism.

  20. A Clinopyroxene-Plagioclase Geobarometer for A-type Silicic Volcanic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J.; Iveson, A. A.; Davis, K.; Johnson, T. A.; Gahagan, S.; Ellis, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the crustal storage depths of magmas is important in understanding volcanism. The reaction: anorthite (pl) = Ca-Tschermak's (cpx) + silica (Q or liq) has a large volume change and hence offers potential as a geobarometer, but has not been extensively exploited as such. One of the chief barriers to its wide application is consistent estimation of melt silica activity for assemblages that lack quartz. We have skirted this problem by confining attention to metaluminous silicic compositions (SiO2 > 60% by weight), for which silica activity during crystallization is presumed to be close to 1, and calibrated the barometer for the range 0 - 2 GPa using the LEPR database and additional experiments from the literature. Additional improvement is obtained by excluding hydrous phase-bearing assemblages. Despite the analytical uncertainties present in older experimental investigations, with knowledge of temperature, and clinopyroxene, plagioclase and host melt compositions, pressures for amphibole- and biotite-free dacites and rhyolites can be estimated to ±0.17 GPa (1 sigma). The limitations of the barometer render it most applicable to intraplate, A-type rhyolites. Application to one such system, the Snake River Plain rhyolites, indicate that both melt-hosted phenocrysts and clinopyroxene-plagioclase aggregate grains found in these rhyolites formed at low pressures, <0.5 GPa. This is consistent with isotopic evidence for a shallow crustal origin for Snake River Plain rhyolites.

  1. Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P J

    2004-04-13

    In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

  2. Granite Exfoliation, Cosumnes River Watershed, Somerset, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, I. Q.; Neiss-Cortez, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the Sierra Nevada foothills of California there are many exposed granite plutons within the greater Sierra Nevada batholith. As with most exposed parts of the batholith, these granite slabs exfoliate. It is important to understand exfoliation for issues of public safety as it can cause rock slides near homes, roads, and recreation areas. Through observation, measuring, and mapping we characterize exfoliation in our Cosumnes River watershed community.

  3. Thermomechanical properties of Stripa granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myer, L.

    1982-09-01

    The Stripa material properties testing program was initiated to study, by laboratory testing, the thermomechanical behavior of the Stripa rock mass and to provide material properties for input into numerical programs for simulation of the in situ heater experiments at Stripa. Measurement of elastic moduli and coefficients of thermal expansion of dry, intact samples of Stripa granite was completed in fiscal year 1980. A summary of the most significant findings resulting from tests on six samples are presented.

  4. Re-examination of models for the origin of granite-rhyolite provinces in the midcontinent region, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Van Schmus, W.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    New isotopic data for the 1.47 Ga Eastern Granite-Rhyolite Province and the 1.37 Ga Southern Granite-Rhyolite Province require re-examination of models for the origin of these suites of rock. For the most part, eNd(t) values for the granite-rhyolite provinces and A-type plutons intrusive into adjacent Early proterozoic basement are compatible with origin through melting of 1.8 Ga continental crust. However, new data shows that southeastern parts of the granite-rhyolite provinces yield positive [var epsilon]Nd(t) data is an E-W trending belt of intermediate values in northern Oklahoma; [var epsilon]Nd(t) data south of this belt, in s. Oklahoma, are equivalent to that in Kansas and Nebraska, reflecting cal 1.8 Ga lower crust. The granite-rhyolite provinces are not related to any well defined tectonic event, and they have commonly been referred to as anorogenic. The thermal event responsible for producing the silicic melts may have been associated with an extensional regime, in view of the a-type character of the granites.

  5. GRANITE PEAK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, Donald F.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Peak Roadless Area occupies an area of about 5 sq mi in the southern part of the Trinity Alps of the Klamath Mountains, about 12 mi north-northeast of Weaverville, California. Rock and stream-sediment samples were analyzed. All streams draining the roadless area were sampled and representative samples of the rock types in the area were collected. Background values were established for each element and anomalous values were examined within their geologic settings and evaluated for their significance. On the basis of mineral surveys there seems little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources.

  6. Elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry of Cretaceous to Early Paleogene granites and volcanic rocks in the Sikhote-Alin Orogenic Belt (Russian Far East): implications for the regional tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pan; Jahn, Bor-ming; Xu, Bei

    2017-09-01

    The Sikhote-Alin Orogenic Belt in Russian Far East is an important Late Mesozoic to Early Cenozoic accretionary orogen related to the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate. This belt was generated by successive accretion of terranes made of accretionary prisms, turbidite basins and island arcs to the continental margin of northeastern Asia (represented by the Bureya-Jiamusi-Khanka Block) from Jurassic to Late Cretaceous. In order to study the tectonic and crustal evolution of this orogenic belt, we carried out zircon U-Pb dating, and whole-rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic analyses on granites and volcanic rocks from the Primorye region of southern Sikhote-Alin. Zircon dating revealed three episodes of granitoid emplacement: Permian, Early Cretaceous and Late Cretaceous to Early Paleogene. Felsic volcanic rocks (mainly rhyolite, dacite and ignimbrite) that overlay all tectonostratigraphic terranes were erupted during 80-57 Ma, postdating the accretionary process in the Sikhote-Alin belt. The Cretaceous-Paleogene magmatism represents the most intense tectonothermal event in the Sikhote-Alin belt. Whole-rock major and trace elemental data show arc-like affinity for granitoids and volcanic rocks, indicating that they were likely generated in a supra-subduction setting. Their initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios range from 0.7048 to 0.7114, and εNd(t) values vary from +1.7 to -3.8 (mostly < 0). Thus, the elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic data suggest that the felsic magmas were generated by partial melting of source rocks comprising mantle-derived juvenile component and recycled crustal component. In addition to the occurrence in the Sikhote-Alin orogenic belt, Cretaceous to Early Paleogene magmatic rocks are also widespread in NE China, southern Korean peninsula, Japanese islands and other areas of Russian Far East, particularly along the coastal regions of the Okhotsk and Bering Seas. These rocks constitute an extended magmatic belt along the continental margin of NE Asia. The

  7. Grusification of granite (scheme based on the study of granites from Sudety Mts., SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajdas, Bartlomiej; Michalik, Marek

    2014-05-01

    Gruses that are developed on the Karkonosze granite (three outcrops) and the Izera granite (one outcrop) were investigated using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope equipped with EDS and electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, IR spectrometry, chemical analysis (ICP-AES and ICP-MS), hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratio determination and K-Ar dating. Three groups of samples were distinguished according to the degree of grusification (group I - compact granite; group II - friable granite; group III - granitic grus). The results of the examination allowed to present the simplified scheme of the grusification: 1. Development of microcracks (caused by tectonic stress, mechanical upload or magma cooling processes) promote circulation of hydrothermal fluids in granites; 2. The presence of the microcracks in granite facilitate the circulation of low-temperature fluids (low-temperature hydrothermal or weathering fluids). Fluids cause hydration and expansion of primary biotite (vermiculitization), what leads to development of secondary cracks in a rock. Fluids can also induce advanced alteration of plagioclases into clay minerals (mainly smectite or vermiculite). Expansion of biotite during vermiculitization is the most important factor in grusification. Other processes of alteration also contribute to grusification. Hydrothermal fluids in granite contribute the increase of alteration degree of primary minerals (e.g. sericitization and albitization of feldspar, chloritization or muscovitization of biotite, decomposition of monazite-(Ce) and formation of secondary REE phosphates). If primary biotite is subjected to muscovitization or chloritization, complete grusification of granite does not occur because of lack of vermiculitation.

  8. Radiological implications of granite of northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Asghar, M; Tufail, M; Sabiha-Javied; Abid, A; Waqas, M

    2008-09-01

    Granite is an igneous rock that contains natural radioactivity of primordial radionuclides. In Pakistan, granite is distributed in a vast area called the Ambela Granitic Complex (AGC) in North West Frontier Province (NWFP). Granite is a hard rock that exists in different colours and is used to decorate floors, kitchen counter tops, etc. The use of granite in a building as a decor material is a potential source of radiation dose; therefore, natural radioactivity has been measured in 20 granite samples of the AGC with an HPGe (high purity germanium) based gamma ray spectrometer. The average specific activities and their range (given in parentheses) for primordial radionuclides (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th were 1218 (899-1927), 659 (46-6120) and 598 (92-3214) Bq kg(-1), respectively. The measured activity concentrations were used for the assessment of hazard indices and radiation dose which were evaluated based on the permissible limits defined for these parameters. The measured specific activities and the derived quantities, hazard indices and radiation dose, have been compared with those given in the literature for these parameters.

  9. Two-mica granites of northeastern Nevada.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, D.E.; Kistler, R.W.; Friedman, I.; Van Loenen, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The field settings are described and analytical data are presented for six two-mica granites from NE Nevada. High delta 18O and 87Sr/86Sr values indicate that all are S-type granite, derived from continental crust. The major element chemistry and accessory mineral contents of these rocks also are characteristic of S-type granites. Chemical, X ray, and other data are presented for the micas recovered from these granites. The muscovites are notably high in Fe2O3, FeO, and MgO. Except for one hydrobiotite, each of the biotites has an MgO content near 6.0 wt%. Two different types of two-mica granites are recognized in the area of this study. One type is distinguished by the presence of many biotite euhedra within muscovite phenocrysts and by an unusual suite of accessory minerals completely devoid of opaque oxides. This type probably resulted from anatexis of late Precambrian argillites under conditions of relatively low oxygen fugacity, along a line that roughly coincides with the westward disappearance of continental basement. In the other textural type of two-mica granite the micas are equigranular and there is a greater variety of accessory minerals. The magmatic evolution of this type also appears to reflect the influence of late Precambrian argillites; there may be age differences between the two types of two-mica granites.-Author

  10. An improved determination of the internal beta-ray dose-rate in granite rocks and its effect on thermoluminescence dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachy, A. L.

    1980-12-01

    The dose is due primarily to the potassium 40 contained in the other minerals in the rock. The purpose of improving the dosimeter determination is to produce thermoluminescence (TL) dates of sufficient accuracy that they can be used to calibrate radiocarbon dates beyond 7000 years before present. To accurately determine the dose rate, a matrix representation of the rock is made using color photography of the cathodoluminescence (CL) from polished rock sections to identify and map the minerals. This matrix is the input data for a FORTRAN IV computer program which finds the quartz points and then determines the average distribution of minerals about the quartz points. This is combined with beta ray dosimetry data and the potassium 40 concentrations of the various minerals to yield the dose rate.

  11. Geochemistry and zircon U-Pb geochronology of granitic rocks in the Buqingshan tectonic mélange belt, northern Tibet Plateau, China and its implications for Prototethyan evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruibao; Pei, Xianzhi; Li, Zuochen; Pei, Lei; Liu, Chengjun; Chen, Youxin; Chen, Guochao; Liu, Zhanqing; Yang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    The Yikehalaer intrusives are distributed in the Buqingshan tectonic mélange belt at the southern margin of East Kunlun, China. They tectonically intruded the conglomerate of Permian Gequ Formation to the south and the marble of Mesoproterozoic Kuhai Group to the north. These intrusives mainly consist of off-white coarse- and fine-grained granodiorite and granite. U-Pb dating of zircons from the intrusive samples yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 436 ± 7 Ma and 437 ± 6 Ma, indicating Early Silurian crystallization age. The intrusives are high-silica, Na-rich, I-type calc-alkalic rocks. They are divisible into two subgroups on the basis of their trace element content: adakitic rocks in the northern part and normal calc-alkalic arc rocks in the southern part. Rocks in the northern part exhibit high Sr (280-493 ppm), low Y (3.8-11.7 ppm), high Sr/Y ratios (23.9-125.0), high light rare earth elements (LREE)/ heavy rare earth elements (HREE) (15.1-35.7), and invisible Eu/Eu∗. They resemble adakites formed by slab melting in subduction zones. However, the rocks in the southern part possess the attributes of normal arc rocks. In addition, the εHf(t) values of the intrusives are consistently positive (0.6-7.6), implying that they were generated by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle source, with insignificant contributions from crustal materials. The source residues likely contained 10-20% garnet and hornblende, and plagioclase was either absent or totally consumed during partial melting. Combining the regional tectonic data, we conclude that the Buqingshan paleo-ocean may have started to subduct in Middle Cambrian until Early Silurian (436 Ma), generating an important adakitic magma event during the late stage of oceanic crust subduction. Moreover, the Proto-Tethyan Ocean closed, and the Bayan Har, East Kunlun, and Qaidam blocks collided during the Middle-Late Silurian.

  12. Origin of peralkaline granites of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radain, A. A. M.; Fyfe, W. S.; Kerrich, R.

    1982-01-01

    Small volumes of peralkaline granites were generated as the final phase of a Pan African calc-alkaline igneous event which built the Arabian Peninsula. The peralkaline granites are closely associated with trends or sutures related to ophiolites. Peralkaline rocks are chemically heterogeneous, with anomalous abundances of Zr (average 2,150 ppm±2,600 1σ), Y (200±190), and Nb (105±100), representing up to ten-fold enrichments of these elements relative to abundances in calc alkaline granite counterparts. Large enrichments of some rare earth elements and fluorine are also present. The peralkaline granites have scattered whole rock 18O values, averaging 8.7±0.6% in the Hadb Aldyaheen Complex and 10.7±1% in the Jabal Sayid Complex. Quartz-albite fractionations of 0.5 to 1.5% signify that the heavier whole rock δ-values probably represent the oxygen isotope composition of the peralkaline magma. Small variable enrichments of 18O, in conjunction with slightly elevated 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios relative to broadly contemporaneous calc alkaline granites, are both suggestive of a small degree of involvement of crustal, or crustal derived material in the peralkaline magmas. It is proposed that the peculiar magma genesis is associated with a relaxation event which followed continental collision and underthrusting of salt rich sediments.

  13. The geology and petrogenesis of the southern closepet granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayananda, M.; Mahabaleswar, B.; Oak, K. A.; Friend, C. R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The Archaean Closepet Granite is a polyphase body intruding the Peninsular Gneiss Complex and the associated supracrustal rocks. The granite out-crop runs for nearly 500 km with an approximate width of 20 to 25 km and cut across the regional metamorphic structure passing from granulite facies in the South and green schist facies in the north. In the amphibolite-granulite facies transition zone the granite is intimately mixed with migmatites and charnockite. Field observations suggests that anatexis of Peninsular gneisses led to the formation of granite melt, and there is a space relationship between migmatite formation, charnockite development and production and emplacement of granite magma. Based on texture and cross cutting relationships four major granite phases are recognized: (1) Pyroxene bearing dark grey granite; (2) Porphyritec granite; (3) Equigranular grey granite; and (4) Equigranular pink granite. The granite is medium to coarse grained and exhibit hypidiomorphic granular to porphyritic texture. The modal composition varies from granite granodiorite to quartz monzonite. Geochemical variation of the granite suite is consistent with either fractional crystallization or partial melting, but in both the cases biotite plus feldspar must be involved as fractionating or residual phases during melting to account trace element chemistry. The trace element data has been plotted on discriminant diagrams, where majority of samples plot in volcanic arc and within plate, tectonic environments. The granite show distinct REE patterns with variable total REE content. The REE patterns and overall abundances suggests that the granite suite represents a product of partial melting of crustal source in which fractional crystallization operated in a limited number of cases.

  14. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  15. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  16. Subsurface drainage erodes forested granitic terrane

    Treesearch

    Philip Durgin

    1984-01-01

    Abstract - Solution and landsliding, the dominant erosion processes in undisturbed forested mountainous watersheds, are both influenced by subsurface drainage. Biological processes that generate organic acids accelerate loss of dissolved solids by promoting the dissolution of primary minerals in granitic rock. These organic acids can also disperse the secondary...

  17. Retention of Anionic Species on Granite: Influence of Granite Composition - 12129

    SciTech Connect

    Videnska, Katerina; Havlova, Vaclava

    2012-07-01

    Technetium (Tc-99, T{sub 1/2} = 2.1.10{sup 5} yrs) and selenium (Se-79, T{sub 1/2} = 6.5.10{sup 4} yrs) belong among fission products, being produced by fission of nuclear fuel. Both elements can significantly contribute to risk due to their complicated chemistry, long life times, high mobility and prevailing anionic character. Therefore, knowledge of migration behaviour under different conditions can significantly improve input into performance and safety assessment models. Granite is considered as a potential host rock for deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in many countries. Granitic rocks consist usually of quartz, feldspar, plagioclase (main components), mica, chlorite, kaolinite (minor components). The main feature of the rock is advection governed transport in fractures, complemented with diffusion process from fracture towards undisturbed rock matrix. The presented work is focused on interaction of anionic species (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) with granitic rock. Furthermore, the importance of mineral composition on sorption of anionic species was also studied. The batch sorption experiments were conducted on the crushed granite from Bohemian Massive. Five fractions with defined grain size were used for static batch method. Mineral composition of each granitic fraction was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. The results showed differences in composition of granitic fractions, even though originating from one homogenized material. Sorption experiments showed influence of granite composition on adsorption of both TcO4{sup -} and SeO3{sup 2-} on granitic rock. Generally, Se(IV) showed higher retention than Tc(VII). Se(VI) was not almost sorbed at all. Fe containing minerals are pronounced as a selective Se and Tc sorbent, being reduced on their surface. As micas in granite are usually enriched in Fe, increased sorption of anionic species onto mica enriched fractions can be explained by this reason. On the other hand

  18. AMS studies in Portuguese variscan granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant'Ovaia, Helena; Martins, Helena; Noronha, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    A large volume of Variscan granitic rocks outcrop in Central Iberian Zone which are well documented concerning geological mapping, petrography and geochemistry but whose magnetic characteristics and fabric remain unknown. In this study we summarize the available AMS data from approximately 644 sampling stations (5152 samples) on different massifs of Variscan Portuguese granites. Despite their different geological, petrographic and geochemical characteristics, magnetic susceptibility (K) values obtained for the majority of the studied granites range from 15 to 300 × 10-6 SI. The dominant paramagnetic behaviour of the granite bodies reflects the presence of ilmenite as the main iron oxide. This feature indicates the reduced conditions involved in the granite melt formation during the Variscan orogeny. The two-mica granites show K values ranging between 15 to 70 × 10-6 SI which are lower than values displayed by the biotite-rich facies scattered within the interval of 70 and 300 × 10-6 SI. The magnetite-bearing granites are scarce but represented in Lavadores, Gerês and Manteigas. Even so, only the Lavadores body could be considered as a true magnetite-type granite (K >3.0 × 10-3 SI) in face of its K, comprised between 1550 and 19303 × 10-6 SI. Magnetic anisotropy can be used as a "marker" for the deformation experienced by granite mushes during their crustal emplacement and further cooling. Magnetic anisotropy can thus be correlated with the finite deformation of a rock, as record by mineral fabrics. Post-tectonic granites, such as those from Vila Pouca de Aguiar, Pedras Salgadas, Caria, Vila da Ponte, Chaves and Lamas de Olo, have a magnetic anisotropy <2.5% which corresponds to a deformation hardly visible to the naked eye. Nevertheless, at microscopic scale, these granites display almost ubiquitous magmatic to submagmatic microstructures (rare wavy extinction in quartz, erratic subgrain boundaries in quartz and, eventually, folded or kinked biotites). For

  19. Multivariate analyses of Erzgebirge granite and rhyolite composition: Implications for classification of granites and their genetic relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forster, H.-J.; Davis, J.C.; Tischendorf, G.; Seltmann, R.

    1999-01-01

    High-precision major, minor and trace element analyses for 44 elements have been made of 329 Late Variscan granitic and rhyolitic rocks from the Erzgebirge metallogenic province of Germany. The intrusive histories of some of these granites are not completely understood and exposures of rock are not adequate to resolve relationships between what apparently are different plutons. Therefore, it is necessary to turn to chemical analyses to decipher the evolution of the plutons and their relationships. A new classification of Erzgebirge plutons into five major groups of granites, based on petrologic interpretations of geochemical and mineralogical relationships (low-F biotite granites; low-F two-mica granites; high-F, high-P2O5 Li-mica granites; high-F, low-P2O5 Li-mica granites; high-F, low-P2O5 biotite granites) was tested by multivariate techniques. Canonical analyses of major elements, minor elements, trace elements and ratio variables all distinguish the groups with differing amounts of success. Univariate ANOVA's, in combination with forward-stepwise and backward-elimination canonical analyses, were used to select ten variables which were most effective in distinguishing groups. In a biplot, groups form distinct clusters roughly arranged along a quadratic path. Within groups, individual plutons tend to be arranged in patterns possibly reflecting granitic evolution. Canonical functions were used to classify samples of rhyolites of unknown association into the five groups. Another canonical analysis was based on ten elements traditionally used in petrology and which were important in the new classification of granites. Their biplot pattern is similar to that from statistically chosen variables but less effective at distinguishing the five groups of granites. This study shows that multivariate statistical techniques can provide significant insight into problems of granitic petrogenesis and may be superior to conventional procedures for petrological interpretation.

  20. Multivariate analyses of Erzgebirge granite and rhyolite composition: implications for classification of granites and their genetic relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Hans-Jürgen; Davis, John C.; Tischendorf, Gerhard; Seltmann, Reimar

    1999-06-01

    High-precision major, minor and trace element analyses for 44 elements have been made of 329 Late Variscan granitic and rhyolitic rocks from the Erzgebirge metallogenic province of Germany. The intrusive histories of some of these granites are not completely understood and exposures of rock are not adequate to resolve relationships between what apparently are different plutons. Therefore, it is necessary to turn to chemical analyses to decipher the evolution of the plutons and their relationships. A new classification of Erzgebirge plutons into five major groups of granites, based on petrologic interpretations of geochemical and mineralogical relationships (low-F biotite granites; low-F two-mica granites; high-F, high-P 2O 5 Li-mica granites; high-F, low-P 2O 5 Li-mica granites; high-F, low-P 2O 5 biotite granites) was tested by multivariate techniques. Canonical analyses of major elements, minor elements, trace elements and ratio variables all distinguish the groups with differing amounts of success. Univariate ANOVA's, in combination with forward-stepwise and backward-elimination canonical analyses, were used to select ten variables which were most effective in distinguishing groups. In a biplot, groups form distinct clusters roughly arranged along a quadratic path. Within groups, individual plutons tend to be arranged in patterns possibly reflecting granitic evolution. Canonical functions were used to classify samples of rhyolites of unknown association into the five groups. Another canonical analysis was based on ten elements traditionally used in petrology and which were important in the new classification of granites. Their biplot pattern is similar to that from statistically chosen variables but less effective at distinguishing the five groups of granites. This study shows that multivariate statistical techniques can provide significant insight into problems of granitic petrogenesis and may be superior to conventional procedures for petrological

  1. Conventional U-Pb dating versus SHRIMP of the Santa Barbara Granite Massif, Rondonia, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparrenberger, I.; Bettencourt, Jorge S.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Santa Ba??rbara Granite Massif is part of the Younger Granites of Rondo??nia (998 - 974 Ma) and is included in the Rondo??nia Tin Province (SW Amazonian Craton). It comprises three highly fractionated metaluminous to peraluminous within-plate A-type granite units emplaced in older medium-grade metamorphic rocks. Sn-mineralization is closely associated with the late-stage unit. U-Pb monazite conventional dating of the early-stage Serra do Cicero facies and late-stage Serra Azul facies yielded ages of 993 ?? 5 Ma and 989 ?? 13 Ma, respectively. Conventional multigrain U-Pb isotope analyses of zircon demonstrate isotopic disturbance (discordance) and the preservation of inherited older zircons of several different ages and thus yield little about the ages of Sn-granite magmatism. SHRIMP U-Pb ages for the Santa Ba??rbara facies association yielded a 207Pb/206Pb weighted-mean age of 978 ?? 13 Ma. The textural complexity of the zircon crystals of the Santa Ba??rbara facies association, the variable concentrations of U, Th and Pb, as well as the mixed inheritance of zircon populations are major obstacles to using conventional multigrain U-Pb isotopic analyses. Sm-Nd model ages and ??Nd (T) values reveal anomalous isotopic data, attesting to the complex isotopic behaviour within these highly fractionated granites. Thus, SHRIMP U-Pb zircon and conventional U-Pb monazite dating methods are the most appropriate to constrain the crystallization age of the Sn-bearing granite systems in the Rondo??nia Tin Province.

  2. Impact of rock heterogeneity in matrix diffusion process : a single fracture case at the Äspö granitic site (Sweden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, C.; Fourno, A.; Mouche, E.; Benabderrahmane, H.

    2003-04-01

    Within the framework of nuclear spent fuel storage, special concern is put on experimentation and modelling work to improve the modelling capacities for the transfers of radionuclides within natural fractured media. Several aspects make it a challenging task, among which the heterogeneity of the system, the scarcity of the available information, the strong contrasts in the parameter values between mobile and immobile zones. One of the key retention process is related with diffusion in immobile zones within the fractured medium (fractions of the plume are temporally retained from the main flow paths by diffusion processes into these zones). The importance of this mechanism increases with the contact time of the plume with these zones. This means that for a post closure situation matrix diffusion plays the larger role. We provide here with results obtained within the SKB Task Force (Task6) in relation with the single fracture tracer experiments (TRUE1 Project - feature A at Äspö site in Sweden). The purpose of this task, involving several other modelling teams, is to provide a bridge between detailed SC (Site Characterization) models operating at experimental time scale and more simple PA (Performance Assessment) models operating at large time scales. A good level of realism is obtained in the definition of the task by relying on the very extensive and valuable Äspö site data base. We conducted the study with different representations of the system (involving deterministic and stochastic approaches). Our simulation code is Cast3M with a mixed and hybrid finite element scheme. We show here our main conclusions concerning the role played by different matrix zones (fracture coating, fracture infilling, altered and non altered rock ), the ability to identify the heterogeneous matrix zone properties from tracer tests or independent measurements, the type of zones accessed by the plume as a function of the time scale of the test, the homogenisation of transport

  3. Geotechnical Descriptions of Rock and Rock Masses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    user of the field log can relate to the general class of rock being described. For example, the rock name " syenite " might be qualified by adding "the...FELDSPAR PRE-S---- Coarne Texture Granite Syenite Qts ononite Honzonite Cabbro Peridotite (Platonic or to Qtx Diorite to Diorite Pyroxenite intrusive

  4. The petrogenesis of the Early Permian Variscan granites of the Cornubian Batholith: Lower plate post-collisional peraluminous magmatism in the Rhenohercynian Zone of SW England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, B.; Shail, Robin K.; Andersen, Jens C. Ø.

    2016-09-01

    not exhibit the typical geochemical characteristics of intraplate A-type granites.

  5. The role of felsic microgranular enclaves on the evolution of some Neoproterozoic granite plutons in SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Adriana; Janasi, Valdecir A.; Pereira, Giovanna

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies of granite petrogenesis are strongly influenced by the finding that mafic microgranular enclaves (mme) witness frequent and volumetrically significant contribution of mantle-derived magmas to the origin and evolution of granitic melts, be it as a heat source and/or as a source compositional diversity. On the other hand, the origin of felsic microgranular enclaves (fme) is still a matter of debate; current hypotheses consider them as fragments of chilled margins, products of protracted hybridization between invading basic magmas and resident granite mushes or products of interaction between fairly similar melts. Felsic microgranular enclaves are widespread in various granite plutons from SE Brazil, in many cases surpassing mme in size and volume. Two groups of occurrences are studied in more detail illustrate different scenarios, with and without clear connections with mafic magmas. In the Mauá and Mogi das Cruzes plutons, made up of (muscovite)-biotite monzogranite, only fme occur, and the participation of more mafic melts is not evident from field structures or from whole rock and mineral chemical/isotope data. Our preferred model relate the fme to self-mixing events, suggesting mingling/mixing between highly viscous and chemically similar felsic endmembers. In the Itu Batholith, mme enclaves occur, albeit in very different volumes, in three chemically distinct plutons, all with A-type chemical affinities, In the rapakivi Salto Pluton, fme are large (dm to meter-sized) and widespread, except in a central body of porphyry granite. Scattered cm-sized mme of variable composition, some clearly brought as inclusions in the fme, are thought to represent different stages of hybridization, as indicated by disequilibrum features common also in the host syenogranites (rapakivi texture; mafic-rimmed quartz). The enclave assemblage of the Cabreúva Pluton is similarly dominated by fme, but larger mme and small diorite occurrences are evidence that basic magmas

  6. Petrogenesis of Mesoproterozoic granitic plutons, eastern Llano Uplift, central Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. K.; Gray, Walt; Gibbs, Tyson; Gallegos, M. A.

    2010-08-01

    The Llano Uplift of central Texas is a gentle structural dome exposing ˜ 1370 to 1230 Ma metaigneous and metasedimentary rocks of Grenville affinity along the southern margin of Laurentia. The metamorphic rocks were subsequently intruded by ˜ 1119 to 1070 Ma late syn- to post-tectonic granites collectively known as the Town Mountain Granite (TMG). The eastern most of the TMG, the Marble Falls (MF), Kingsland (KL), and Lone Grove (LG) plutons, are metaluminous to marginally peraluminous, high-K, calc-alkaline, ferroan, biotite-calcic amphibole granites [Fe/(Fe + Mg) = 0.71-0.92 and 0.78-0.91 for biotite and calcic amphibole, respectively] displaying distinct variation trends with increasing silica content. They are chemically and texturally zoned and have mineralogical and chemical characteristics similar to A-type granites; i.e., 1) Fe-rich biotites, calcic amphiboles, accessory fluorite, and sporadic rapakivi texture, 2) high K 2O (> 4 wt.%), 3) low Al 2O 3 (< 16 wt.%) and CaO (< 3 wt.%), 4) high Fe/(Fe + Mg), 5) enrichments in Zr, Nb, REE, Ga/Al, and 6) depleted Eu. However, in contrast to typical A-type granites (having low Sr and Ba) the MF, KL,and LG plutons are enriched in Sr and Ba; i.e., up to 229 ppm and 1090 ppm, respectively. On granite discrimination diagrams [(K 2O + Na 2O)/CaO vs. Zr + Nb + Ce + Y (ppm) and Zr (ppm) vs. Ga/Al*10,000] the KL and MF plutons plot within the A-type field, whereas the LG pluton compositions are divided between A-type and fractionated granite fields (I-, S- and M-types). On tectonic discrimination diagrams (Y vs. Nb ) the MF and KL granites plot in the "within-plate" granite field, but the LG pluton plots across several fields including "within-plate" and "volcanic arc plus syn-collisional" fields. Consequently the tectonic classification on a geochemical basis for the LG pluton is unclear. Based on thermal metamorphic mineral assemblages, normative Q-Ab-Or plots, and Q-Ab-Or-H 2O experimental data (Johannes and Holtz

  7. Preface to special issue: Granite magmatism in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; de Pinho Guimarães, Ignez; Nardi, Lauro Valentim Stoll

    2016-07-01

    Granites are important both to the geologic evolution and to the economy of Brazil. Deposits of precious and rare metals, such as Au, Sn and many others, are directly or indirectly associated with granites, especially in the geologically under-explored Amazon region. On the opposite eastern side of the country, expanding exploitation of natural granite as dimension stone makes Brazil currently the world's second largest exporter of granite blocks. Granites are a major constituent of the Brazilian Archean-Proterozoic cratonic domains (the Amazon and São Francisco cratons) and their surrounding Neoproterozoic fold belts. The granites are thus fundamental markers of the major events of crustal generation and recycling that shaped the South American Platform. As a result, Brazilian granites have received great attention from the national and international community, and a number of influential meetings focused on the study of granites were held in the country in the last three decades. These meetings include the two International Symposia on Granites and Associated Mineralization (Salvador, January 21-31, 1987, and August 24-29, 1997), the Symposium on Rapakivi Granites and Related Rocks (Belém, August 2-5, 1995) and the Symposium on Magmatism, Crustal Evolution, and Metallogenesis of the Amazonian Craton (Belém, August 2006). Special issues dedicated to contributions presented at these meetings in the Journal of South American Earth Sciences (Sial et al., 1998), Lithos (Stephens et al., 1999), Canadian Mineralogist (Dall'Agnol and Ramo, 2006), Precambrian Research (Ramo et al., 2002) and Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências (Dall'Agnol and Bettencourt, 1997; Sial et al., 1999a) are still important references on the knowledge of Brazilian granites and granite petrology in general.

  8. Ancient granite gneiss in the Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zartman, R.E.; Norton, J.J.; Stern, T.W.

    1964-01-01

    Granite gneiss, with an age of approximately 2.5 billion years, in the Black Hills, South Dakota , provides a link betweeen ancient rocks in western Wyoming and Montana and in eastern North and South Dakota and Minnesota. The discovery suggests that early Precambrian rocks covered an extensive area in northcentral United States and were not restricted to several small nuclei.

  9. Estimation of crystallization pressure of granite intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-Ming

    2017-08-01

    A numerical method is presented to estimate the crystallization pressure of granite intrusions based on two polynomial equations obtained by an analysis of the existing haplogranite ternary phase diagram and associated dataset. The results indicate that the pressure is correlated respectively with normative quartz (Qtz) content and with normative albite (Ab) plus orthoclase (Or) contents of granitic rocks as follows. where P is pressure in MPa, and R denotes correlation coefficient. It is noted that the procedure of normalizing the sum of CIPW norm (quartz, albite, orthoclase) contents to 100% is required before using Eqs. (1) and (2). The difference in pressure calculations between these two equations is ≤ 16 MPa for the range of normative quartz contents from 15 to 40 wt%. An example of how to use these equations to estimate the crystallization pressure of a granite intrusion is also provided to show the validity and convenience of this method. The uncertainty of such pressure estimation is not well known, although it must fall into the uncertainty range of the existing experimental work on pressure constraints. The simplicity of this empirical method is appreciable, although its applicability to natural granitoids needs further test. More experimental work is required to constrain the effects of components, such as CaO, FeO, MgO, F, Cl, CO2, on the granite phase equilibria. These equations, however, can be used for estimating crystallization pressures of water-saturated and quartz-oversaturated granitic systems.

  10. The Indosinian collision-extension event between the South China Block and the Palaeo-Pacific plate: Evidence from Indosinian alkaline granitic rocks in Dashuang, eastern Zhejiang, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jianren; Ye, Haimin; Liu, Kai; Li, Zilong; Takahashi, Yutaka; Zhao, Xilin; Kee, Weon-Seo

    2013-07-01

    This study reports on the first comprehensive analysis of the geology, petrology and origin of the Dashuang pluton in Jinhua, eastern Zhejiang, South China, which is predominantly composed of quartz monzonite and subordinate quartz syenite that includes variable amounts of aegirine-augite. The quartz monzonite has a porphyritic texture defined by K-feldspar phenocrysts, whereas the quartz syenite shows considerable variation in grain size and is categorised into fine- and coarse-grained types. Zircons from the quartz monzonite and fine-grained quartz syenite yield LA-MC-ICP-MS (laser ablation-multi-collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry) U-Pb ages of 231.60 ± 0.86 Ma and 231.7 ± 1.1 Ma, respectively, indicating crystallisation in the Middle Triassic. The chemistry of the quartz monzonite indicates a calc-alkaline to alkaline evolutionary trend, which may reflect partial melting of upper mantle contaminated by Proterozoic basement rocks, subjected to fractional crystallisation during ascent. Both the fine- and coarse-grained quartz syenites are alkaline and have high rare earth element (REE) concentrations, especially light rare earth elements (LREE), and are relatively enriched in large ion lithosphere elements (LILE). The Al2O3 and NaO2 contents of the quartz syenite increase proportionally with SiO2, owing to greater amounts of aegirine-augite and feldspar. The fine-grained quartz syenite has the lowest initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio and lowest Nd model age, and the highest εNd value compared with the quartz monzonite. The quartz syenite compositions are best explained by fractional crystallisation of an enriched mantle-derived alkaline magma. Slight chemical variations result from source heterogeneities, as well as the spatially variable degrees of melting, assimilation, and other factors. Our new age and geochemical data for the alkaline rocks in eastern Zhejiang, considered together with collisional granites from South Korea, support a history of

  11. Tertiary epizonal plutonic rocks of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Idaho County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Motzer, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness identified approximately 731 kmS of epizonal plutonic granitic rocks within the Bitterroot lobe of the Idaho batholith. From north to south, the intrusions are the Rock Lake Creek stock and the Whistling Pig, Running Creek, Bad Luck and Painted Rocks plutons. The stock and plutons consist of medium- to coarse-grained biotite and hornblende-biotite syenorgranite to monzogranite and quartz syenite capped by fine-grained biotite leucogranite. These rocks are intruded by late-synplutonic leucogranite dikes and post plutonic porphyritic rhyolite to rhyodacite and basalt dikes. The medium-grained granitic rocks are high in SiO2, K2O, Na2O, Ga, Th, U, W and Zr, but low in Al7O3, CaO, MgO, Cr, Ni, Co and V. Most of the granites are peraluminous. Rare-earth element (REE) plots (rock sample/chondrite) show enrichment in light REE over heavy REE with strong EU depletions. K-Ar biotite radiometric age determinations for medium-grained granites in all of the plutons range from approximately 51 Ma (Whistling Pig pluton) to 43.7 Ma (Painted Rocks pluton). Petrogenetic studies suggest that the plutons were rapidly emplaced to within 3.0 km of the paleosurface. The types, textures and color of the rocks result from devolatilization of the crystallizing melt and very low-grade hydrothermal alteration. The fluorine-rich melts are the fractionated with accumulate residue; they are considered to be anorogenic (A-type) granites intruded into the center of a metamorphic core complex.

  12. Marginal continental and within-plate neoproterozoic granites and rhyolites of Wrangel Island, Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchitskaya, M. V.; Moiseev, A. V.; Sokolov, S. D.; Tuchkova, M. I.; Sergeev, S. A.; O'Sullivan, P. B.; Verzhbitskii, V. E.; Malyshev, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents new data on the U-Pb zircon age, as well as results of isotopic geochemical analysis, of granites and rhyolites from Wrangel Island. The U-Pb age estimates of granites and rhyolites are grouped into two clusters ( 690-730 and 590-610 Ma), which imply that these rocks crystallized in the Late Neoproterozoic. Granitic rocks dated back to 690-730 Ma are characterized by negative ɛNd( t) values and Paleoproterozoic Sm-Nd model age. The older inherited zircons corroborate the ancient age of their crustal source. The granitic rocks pertain to involved peraluminous granites of type I, which form at a continental margin of the Andean type and can be compared with coeval granites and orthogneisses from the Seward Peninsula in Alaska. Rhyolites and granites 590-610 Ma in age are distinguished by a moderately positive ɛNd( t) and Mesoproterozoic model age. It is suggested that they have a heterogeneous magma source comprising crustal and mantle components. The geochemical features of granites and rhyolites correspond to type A granites. Together with coeval OIB-type basalts, they make up a riftogenic bimodal association of igneous rocks, which are comparable with orthogneisses (565 Ma) and gabbroic rocks (540 Ma) of Seward Peninsula in Alaska.

  13. FROGS (Friends of Granites) report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Calvin

    This VGP News, which is devoted to petrology, is a good one for noting the existence of FROGS. FROGS is, as the name suggests, an informal organization of people whose research relates in one way or another to granitic rocks. Its purpose has been to promote communication among geoscientists with different perspectives and concerns about felsic plutonism. Initially, a major focus was experimental petrology and integration of field-oriented and lab-oriented viewpoints; now that there is the opportunity to communicate with the Eos readership, an obvious additional goal will be to bring together volcanic and plutonic views of felsic magmatism.FROGS first gathered in late 1982 under the guidance of E-an Zen and Pete Toulmin (both at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Reston, Va.), who saw a need for greater interaction among those interested in granites and for renewed, focused experimental investigations. They produced two newsletters (which were sent out by direct mail) and organized an informal meeting at the Geological Society of America meeting at Indianapolis, Ind., and then turned over the FROG reins to Sue Kieffer (USGS, Flagstaff, Ariz.) and John Clemens (Arizona State University, Tempe). They generated another newsletter, which was directly mailed to a readership that had grown beyond 200.

  14. Petrogenesis of two Triassic A-type intrusions in the interior of South China and their implications for tectonic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li-Qiang; Ling, Hong-Fei; Shen, Wei-Zhou; Wang, Kai-Xing; Huang, Guo-Long

    2017-07-01

    The evolution of the tectonic regime that was responsible for the Indosinian granitoids in the South China Block (SCB) is still controversial. Investigations on A-type granites can provide important information regarding this tectonic evolution. A detailed study that utilizes whole-rock elemental, Sr-Nd isotopic, in situ zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic geochemistry is conducted on the Miantuwo biotite granite in northern Guangdong Province and the Pingtian biotite monzogranite in southern Jiangxi Province, South China. The new data indicate that both the Miantuwo and Pingtian granites were emplaced at 233 ± 2 Ma and show metaluminous to slightly peraluminous A-type granite affinity. The two granites are characterized by high amounts of rare earth elements (total REEs = 247 ppm-557 ppm and 251 ppm-342 ppm) and high field strength elements (Zr + Nb + Ce + Y = 325 ppm-605 ppm and 343 ppm-496 ppm) and high Ga/Al ratios (10,000 × Ga/Al = 2.50-2.98 and 2.62-2.70). Calculations from a zircon saturation thermometer and apatite saturation thermometer indicate that the magmatic temperatures were 800 °C-980 °C for both granites. Both the Miantuwo and Pingtian granites show relatively high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7151-0.7185 and 0.7170-0.7189), low εNd(t) values (- 9.8 to - 8.6 and - 9.7 to - 9.1) and low to moderate zircon εHf(t) values (- 10.4 to - 6.6 and - 9.5 to - 4.6). Based on these data, we suggest that these two A-type granites were derived from the partial melting of existing mafic to intermediate rocks in the lower crust in response to the underplating and/or intraplating of mantle-derived magma. Our study on the Miantuwo and Pingtian granites, alongside previous studies on other Triassic A-type granites in South China, indicates an extensional tectonic environment during the Late Triassic in the interior of the Cathaysia Block. Alongside existing geological observations and the tectonic evolution in the SCB, we suggest that the interior of the SCB was

  15. Mesozoic Granitic Magmatism in Macao, Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quelhas, P. M.; Mata, J.; Lou, U. T.; Ribeiro, M. L.; Dias, Á. A.

    2016-12-01

    Macao ( 30 Km2) is a territory characterized by small granitic intrusions, located along the coastal region of Southeast China (Cathaysia Block). Granitoids occur as different facies, including microgranite dykes, with distinct textural, mineralogical and geochemical features, for which a middle-upper Jurassic age ( 164 Ma) has been proposed. New data suggest that these granitoids are mostly high-K calc-alkaline metaluminous (A/CNK = 0.8 - 1.1) biotite granites, consistent with total absence of primary muscovite. They show variable amounts of SiO2 (67-77%), reflecting different degrees of magmatic evolution. There is also variability in terms of trace elements, particularly Rare Earth Elements (REEs), evidenced by decreasing (La/Sm)N, (Gd/Lu)N, (Ce/Yb)N and (Eu/Eu*)N towards the more evolved samples, which can be partly attributed to fractional crystallization processes. Most of the granitoids are characterized by (La/Yb)N = 3 - 10.8, showing negative Ba, Nb, Sr, Zr, P, Ti and Eu anomalies. On the other hand, microgranite dykes, along with a few more evolved granites, show an opposite tendency, being usually enriched in HREEs relatively to LREEs with (La/Yb)N = 0.4 - 1.1. Our data suggests intermediate genetic affinities between I-type and A-type granites. Although these granitoids are mostly metaluminous (characteristic of I-types), Ga/Al ratios, usually used to identify A-types, are close to the accepted boundary between A-type and other granite types. The affinities with A-type granites are more marked for the more evolved facies, which depict higher values of FeOt/MgO (14 - 60) and K2O/MgO (60 - 250). Their trace element characteristics are also transitional between WPG (Within-plate granites) and Syn-COLG (Collision Granites). We interpret those transitional characteristics (A/I and WPG/Syn-COLG) of Macao granitoids as reflecting an origin by melting of infracrustal sources over a period of high heat transfer from mantle to crust during an extensional tectonic

  16. Rare accessory uraninite in a Sierran granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snetsinger, K. G.; Polkowski, G.

    1977-01-01

    One grain of uraninite was found in a single thin-section of Sierran granite. Electron and ion microprobe analysis were used to determine the composition. Since the U-Pb age calculated for the uraninite does not differ greatly from the K-Ar age of the unit in which it occurs, it is suggested that the mineral is primary and not reworked from a preexisting rock. No uraninite has been detected in heavy mineral concentrates from other rocks of the local area.

  17. Late Ediacaran volcano-sedimentary successions of southern Sinai (Egypt): tracing the evolution from late- to post-collisional volcanism and its relation to A-type rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azer, Mokhles; Asimow, Paul; Obeid, Mohamed; Price, Jason; Wang, Max

    2017-04-01

    The Late Ediacaran post-collisional volcano-sedimentary successions exposed in southern Sinai (Egypt) represent the last stage of magmatic activity associated with assembly of the northernmost segment of the Neoproterozoic Arabian-Nubian Shield. To clarify the age and tempo of post-collisional activity, three volcanic successions from southern Sinai were selected for the present study: the Sahiya, Iqna Shar'a and Meknas volcanics. They comprise a series of intermediate to silicic volcanic flows and their pyroclastic rocks. New zircon U-Pb dating by SIMS of the lava flows from the three successions yielded ages ranging between ca. 619 to 600 Ma. Combined with field evidence and the geochemical data, the obtained SIMS zircon ages enable us to recognize two phases of volcanic activity in southern Sinai at ca. 619-615 Ma and 606-600 Ma. Both age groups were found within the more northerly volcanic successions at Iqna Shar'a and Meknas and in both these sequences the younger phase uncomformably overlies the older phase. Only the older ages, ca. 615-619 Ma, were found in the Sahiya volcanics, exposed at the southern tip of Sinai. The ages of the youngest calc-alkaline volcanics in the study areas are similar to or slightly younger than the earliest phases of alkaline volcanism in southern Sinai, indicating coeval extrusion of calc-alkalic and alkalic A-type rocks. This observation corroborates similar observations documenting cogenetic calc-alkalic and alkalic plutons in the surrounding areas in southern Sinai. Geochemically, the volcanic rocks of the three successions display large silica variations and are mostly medium- to high-K calc-alkaline rocks. The first phase, from ca. 619-615 Ma, observed in all three volcanic suites, comprises basaltic andesite, andesite and dacite, whereas the second phase, from ca. 606-600 Ma and observed only in the northern volcanic suites (Iqna Shar'a and Meknas), comprises dacite, rhyodacite and rhyolite. In the Sahiya succession basal

  18. Miocene rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calzia, James P.; Ramo, O.T.

    2005-01-01

    Rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, include the 12.4-Ma granite of Kingston Peak, the ca. 10.6-Ma Little Chief stock, and the 9.8-Ma Shoshone pluton. All of these granitic rocks are texturally zoned from a porphyritic rim facies, characterized by rapakivi textures and miarolitic cavities, to an equigranular aplite core. These granites crystallized from anhydrous and peraluminous to metaluminous magmas that were more oxidized and less alkalic than type rapakivi granites from southern Finland. Chemical and isotope (Nd–Sr–Pb) data suggest that rapakivi granites of the southern Death Valley region were derived by partial melting of lower crustal rocks (possibly including Mesozoic plutonic component) with some mantle input as well; they were emplaced at shallow crustal levels (4 km) in an actively extending orogen.

  19. Miocene rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calzia, J.P.; Ramo, O.T.

    2005-01-01

    Rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, include the 12.4-Ma granite of Kingston Peak, the ca. 10.6-Ma Little Chief stock, and the 9.8-Ma Shoshone pluton. All of these granitic rocks are texturally zoned from a porphyritic rim facies, characterized by rapakivi textures and miarolitic cavities, to an equigranular aplite core. These granites crystallized from anhydrous and peraluminous to metaluminous magmas that were more oxidized and less alkalic than type rapakivi granites from southern Finland. Chemical and isotope (Nd-Sr-Pb) data suggest that rapakivi granites of the southern Death Valley region were derived by partial melting of lower crustal rocks (possibly including Mesozoic plutonic component) with some mantle input as well; they were emplaced at shallow crustal levels (4 km) in an actively extending orogen.

  20. Petrogenesis of the Xihuashan granites in southeastern China: Constraints from geochemistry and in-situ analyses of zircon Usbnd Pbsbnd Hfsbnd O isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chunli; Chen, Yuchuan; Zeng, Zailin; Lou, Fasheng

    2012-09-01

    The Xihuashan tungsten deposit, located in the Nanling tungstensbnd tin province, is renowned for being one of the largest and the earliest exploited deposits of tungsten worldwide. It is a vein-type deposit genetically associated with the Xihuashan granite pluton. The granite was emplaced in four phases, and representative samples from each phase were analyzed using SIMS zircon Usbnd Pb techniques, and the results indicate ages ranging from 161 ± 3 Ma to 158 ± 2 Ma (2σ). Whole rock analyses show the Xihuashan granitic rocks have high contents of SiO2 (74.5 wt.%-78.1 wt.%) and total alkali (7.68 wt.%-8.86 wt.%), and their aluminum saturation index (ASI) values have a narrow range of 1.01-1.16. The second and third phases of the Xihuashan granite are enriched in heavy rare earth elements and are depleted in Eu, Ba, Sr, P and Ti. P2O5 vs SiO2, zirconium saturation temperatures and zircon δ18O values indicate that the Xihuashan granites are highly evolved I-S transformation-type. Whole rock ɛNd(t), zircon ɛHf(t) and δ18O values fall into the ranges - 11.3 to - 10.4, -14.0 to - 4.8, and 6.93‰-11.23‰ respectively, and the Nd and Hf two-stage model ages (TDM2) are 1.63-1.88 Ga and 1.51-2.09 Ga, respectively. The data indicate a primary reworking of Late Paleoproterozoic to Early Mesoproterozoic lower crust without any obvious participation of mantle material. The Xihuashan intrusion was emplaced at the same time as the widespread 165-150 Ma I-type and A-type granites and syenites of the Nanling region, following the initiation in adjacent areas of intraplate basaltic activity, gabbros, bimodal volcanic rocks, and A-type granites from 190 to 165 Ma. It can be inferred that the Nanling Range and neighboring regions were subjected to lithospheric extension during the Early Jurassic.

  1. Lead isotopic evidence for mixed sources of Proterozoic granites and pegmatites, Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, Eirik J.; Walker, Richard J.; Nabelek, Peter I.; Russ-Nabelek, Carol

    1993-10-01

    The lead isotopic compositions of K-feldspars separated from the ca. 1700 Ma Harney Peak Granite complex and spatially associated granitic pegmatites indicate that these rocks were derived from at least two sources. It has been reported previously that the core of the Harney Peak Granite complex is dominated by relatively lower/ gd18O (avg. 11.5 %.) granites, whereas higher / gd18O (avg. 13.2%.) granites occur around the periphery of the complex. The higher δ 18O granites and one simple pegmatite have low values of 207Pb /204Pb for their 206Pb /204Pb Thus, they likely were derived from a source with a short crustal residence time. This source may have been the pelitic schists into which the Harney Peak Granite complex and pegmatites were intruded. Feldspars from granites with lower / gd18O values have significantly higher 207Pb /204Pb for their 206Pb /204Pb . The data define a linear array with a slope equivalent to an age of ca. 2.6 Ga with t 2 defined to be 1.7 Ga. Such a slope could represent a mixing array or a secondary isochron for the source. These low δ18O granites could have been derived from a source with a high U/ Pb and with a crustal residence beginning before the Proterozoic. The source (s) of these granites may have been a sediment derived from late Archean continental crust. The highly evolved Tin Mountain pegmatite has lead isotopic systematics intermediate between those of the two granite groups, suggesting either a mixed source or contamination. Two late Archean granites, the Little Elk Granite and the Bear Mountain Granite, had precursors with high U/Pb and low Th/U histories. The Th/U history of the Bear Mountain Granite is too low for this rock to have been an important component of the source of the Proterozoic granites. However, crustal rocks with lead isotopic compositions similar to those of the Little Elk Granite were an important source of lead for some of the Proterozoic granitic rocks.

  2. Subsolidus physical and chemical mixing of granite and gabbro during mylonitization, South Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachel Walcott, C.; Craw, Dave

    1993-12-01

    At Dromedary Massif, Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, a suite of coarse-grained granite dykes cross-cuts a gabbro pluton which has been partially metamorphosed at amphibolite facies. During regional deformation, strain has been inhomogeneously distributed through the gabbro pluton and has been concentrated in granite dykes. In zones of relatively high strain, the granite dykes have developed a mylonitic fabric. A high strain gradient between granitic mylonite and metagabbroic host rock has induced isochemical mylonitization of the margin of the host. This grain size reduction allowed chemical diffusion between granitic and metagabbroic mylonites, resulting in a marginal zone of biotite-rich mylonite with intermediate composition. Biotite-rich mylonite decoupled from metagabbroic mylonite and flowed with granitic mylonite. Continued folding and transposition of granitic mylonite and biotite-rich mylonite has produced compositionally banded mylonite zones through thorough and irreversible mixing of the two lithologies.

  3. Thermometers and thermobarometers in granitic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, J.L.; Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.; ,

    2008-01-01

    The ability to determine the thermal and barometric history during crystallization and emplacement of granitic plutons has been enhanced by several new calibrations applicable to granitic mineral assemblages. Other existing calibrations for granitic plutons have continued to be popular and fairly robust. Recent advances include the trace element thermometers Ti-in-quartz, Ti-in-zircon, and Zr-in-sphene (titanite), which need to be further evaluated on the roles of reduced activities due to lack of a saturating phase, the effect of pressure dependence (particularly for the Ti-in-zircon thermometer), and how resistive these thermometers are to subsolidus reequilibration. As zircon and sphene are also hosts to radiogenic isotopes, these minerals potentially also provide new insights into the temperature - time history of magmas. When used in conjunction with pressure-sensitive mineral equilibria in the same rocks, a complete assessment of the P-T-t (pressure-temperature-time) path is possible given that the mineralogy of plutons can reflect crystallization over a range of pressure and temperature during ascent and emplacement and that many intrusions are now seen as forming over several millions of years during the protracted history of batholith construction. Accessory mineral saturation thermometers, such as those for zircon, apatite, and allanite, provide a different and powerful perspective, specifically that of the temperature of the onset of crystallization of these minerals, which can allow an estimate of the range of temperature between the liquidus and solidus of a given pluton. In assessment of the depth of crystallization and emplacement of granitic plutons, the Al-in-hornblende remains popular for metaluminous granites when appropriately corrected for temperature. For peraluminous granites, potential new calibrations exist for the assemblages bearing garnet, biotite, plagioclase, muscovite, and quartz. Other thermometers, based on oxygen abundance, and

  4. Metalliferous deposits near Granite Mountain, eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Thomas P.; Elliott, R.L.

    1969-01-01

    New deposits of lead, zinc, and silver were found in a large altered zone 18 miles long and 2 to 5 miles wide near Quartz Creek west of Granite Mountain in the eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. New deposits of molybdenum, bismuth, and silver were found associated with a previously reported occurrence of uranium, copper, lead, and zinc minerals in the upper Peace River drainage northeast of Granite Mountain. Both groups of deposits are associated spatially with felsic plutonic rocks and occur near the western edge of a late Mesozoic province of volcanic plutonic rocks. Both groups of deposits warrant further investigation as possible exploration target areas.

  5. Experimental constraints on the Qitianling granite in south China: phase equilibria and petrogenetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fangfang; Scaillet, Bruno; Wang, Rucheng; Erdmann, Saskia; Chen, Yan; Faure, Michel; Liu, Hongsheng; Xie, Lei; Wang, Bo; Zhu, Jinchu

    2016-04-01

    In South China, the huge distribution of the Mesozoic metallogenic province reflects the abundant magmatism and associated mineralizations which occurred during that period. Building up the phase equilibrium diagrams of representative Mesozoic granites allows us to better understand Mesozoic magmatic events, an approach so far little applied to granites of South China. The Qitianling ganite is a representative Jurassic A-type metaluminous pluton which is associated with tin mineralization in South China. The dominant rock-types are hornblende-biotite monzonitic granites, biotite±hornblende bearing granites and fine-grained biotite-bearing granites. Three metaluminous granite samples (QTL38C, QTL14A and QTL13), of varying mafic character but all bearing hornblende, were chosen for constraining crystallization and magma generation conditions of the Qitianling composite batholith. Crystallization experiments were performed in the 100-700 MPa range, albeit mainly at 200 MPa, at an fO2 at NNO-1 or NNO +2.5, in a temperature range 700°C to 900°C. At 200 MPa, the water content in melt varies between 3 wt% and 6.5 wt% (water-saturated). Experimental results show that under H2O-saturated conditions and at NNO-1, ilmenite, magnetite and pyroxene are the liquidus phases, followed by hornblende, biotite and plagioclase. Hornblende is present only in the most mafic sample (QTL38C), below 900°C and above 5 wt% H2O. In contrast, for H2O-saturated conditions and at NNO+2.5, magnetite, pyroxene crystallize first, followed by biotite while ilmenite is rarely observed. Petrographic observations of natural samples show that magnetite and ilmenite coexist, whereas pyroxene is never observed. The Fe# value (Fe/Mg+Fe) of natural amphibole goes up to 0.69, being on average at 0.67. Experiments indicate that the crystallization of pyroxene occurs at early magmatic stages, but it breaks down to hornblende and biotite at low temperatures, explaining its absence in natural assemblages

  6. Genesis of a zoned granite stock, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Travis

    1977-01-01

    A composite epizonal stock of biotite granite has intruded a diverse assemblage of metamorphic rocks in the Serpentine Hot Springs area of north-central Seward Peninsula, Alaska. The metamorphic rocks include amphibolite-facies orthogneiss and paragneiss, greenschist-facies fine-grained siliceous and graphitic metasediments, and a variety of carbonate rocks. Lithologic units within the metamorphic terrane trend generally north-northeast and dip moderately toward the southeast. Thrust faults locally juxtapose lithologic units in the metamorphic assemblage, and normal faults displace both the metamorphic rocks and some parts of the granite stock. The gneisses and graphitic metasediments are believed to be late Precambrian in age, but the carbonate rocks are in part Paleozoic. Dating by the potassium-argon method indicates that the granite stock is Late Cretaceous. The stock has sharp discordant contacts, beyond which is a well-developed thermal aureole with rocks of hornblende hornfels facies. The average mode of the granite is 29 percent plagioclase, 31 percent quartz, 36 percent K-feldspar, and 4 percent biotite. Accessory minerals include apatite, magnetite, sphene, allanite, and zircon. Late-stage or deuteric minerals include muscovite, fluorite, tourmaline, quartz, and albite. The stock is a zoned complex containing rocks with several textural facies that are present in four partly concentric zones. Zone 1 is a discontinuous border unit, containing fine- to coarse-grained biotite granite, that grades inward into zone 2. Zone 2 consists of porphyritic biotite granite with oriented phenocrysts of pinkish-gray microcline in a coarse-grained equigranular groundmass of plagioclase, quartz, and biotite. It is in sharp, concordant to discordant contact with rocks of zone 3. Zone 3 consists of seriate-textured biotite granite that has been intruded by bodies of porphyritic biotite granite containing phenocrysts of plagioclase, K-feldspar, quartz, and biotite in an

  7. Lithium Isotopes; a Potential aid to Understanding Granite Petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, C.; Chappell, B.; Bennett, V.

    2002-12-01

    Significant enrichment in 6Li occurs during the weathering of continental crustal materials to clays, contributing to depleted δ7Li in the resultant sedimentary rocks. As such Li isotopes potentially provide a unique perspective on the nature of crustal components involved granite genesis. Carboniferous-Permian granites of the New England Batholith (NEB), Australia, emplaced in a Devonian-Triassic arc setting, are subdivided into 5 major supersuites1. Bundarra and Hillgrove are both S-types, interpreted to be derived from strongly weathered arc rocks1, and immature greywackes2, respectively. Moonbi, Uralla and Clarence River represent three distinct I-type supersuites. Moonbi granites are high-K and strongly oxidised. Uralla granites are medium-high-K, and more reduced. Clarence River are low-K, isotopically primitive granites, equivalent to arc magmas. Li isotopes were evaluated using MC-ICP-MS analysis under conditions of reduced RF power. This 'cool' plasma technique yields precision equivalent to TIMS (2\\sigma SD; 0.5‰ , 680W; 0.7‰ , 800W)3. Overall variations of ~10‰ δ 7Li are observed, greater than the differences observed in arc lavas worldwide (δ 7Li = ~2 to 7‰ ). Clarence River granites typically have δ7Li > 4‰ , similar to lavas from sediment poor island arcs (e.g. Izu-Bonin and Kuriles). Bundarra granites have low δ7Li, consistent with involvement of more strongly weathered source components. The higher δ7Li (< 4.9‰ ) observed for Hillgrove supports the inferred derivation from immature arc sediments2. Moonbi and Uralla overlap with the lighter values observed for arc lavas. The slightly heavier values for Uralla granites are consistent with the greater involvement of sedimentary components in the latter. Although no simple delineation exists between NEB S- and I-type granites, Li isotopes provide important insights into the nature of the crustal components involved in granite magma-genesis. 1Shaw, S.E. and Flood, R.H. 1981. JGR, 86

  8. Enclaves in the S-type granites of the Kösseine massif (Fichtelgebirge, Germany): implications for the origin of granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödlbauer, S.; Hecht, L.; Höhndorf, A.; Morteani, G.

    The Hercynian peraluminous granites of the Kösseine massif differ in composition and content of enclaves from the other granites of the Fichtelgebirge. They are garnet-, cordierite- and andalusite-bearing S-type granites containing at least five different types of enclaves. Based on petrography and geochemical data, including radiogenic isotopes, the following is concluded: The amphibolite enclave (AE) and most of the aluminium silicate-bearing surmicaceous enclaves (SEA) are country-rock xenoliths picked up by the granite at or close to the emplacement level. The orthopyroxene-bearing surmicaceous enclave (SEO) probably represents a restite from the source level of the granite. The gneiss enclaves (GE) could be fragments of Saxothuringian paragneisses taken up by the granite near the source level. The pale microgranular enclaves with igneous texture (PMEI) could be fragments of a yet-unknown granitic material or unmelted igneous material of an inhomogeneous source. The biotite-rich microgranular enclaves with igneous texture (BMEI) and the microgranular enclaves with polygonal texture (MEP) represent material which derives from the source region of the granite. The Kösseine granites represent an independent intrusion among the Fichtelgebirge granites formed by a combination of incomplete restite unmixing, assimilation and probably fractional crystallization in the course of magma formation, ascent and emplacement.

  9. Radionuclide Transport in Fracture-Granite Interface Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Mori, A

    2007-09-12

    In situ radionuclide migration experiments, followed by excavation and sample characterization, were conducted in a water-conducting shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland to study diffusion paths of radionuclides in fractured granite. In this work, we employed a micro-scale mapping technique that interfaces laser ablation sampling with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA/ICP-MS) to measure the fine-scale (micron-range) distribution of actinides ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np) in the fracture-granite interface zones. Long-lived {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np were detected in flow channels, as well as in the adjacent rock matrix, using the sensitive, feature-based mapping of the LA/ICP-MS technique. The injected sorbing actinides are mainly located within the advective flowing fractures and the immediately adjacent regions. The water-conducting fracture studied in this work is bounded on one side by mylonite and the other by granitic matrix regions. These actinides did not penetrate into the mylonite side as much as the relatively higher-porosity granite matrix, most likely due to the low porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and diffusivity of the fracture wall (a thickness of about 0.4 mm separates the mylonite region from the fracture) and the mylonite region itself. Overall, the maximum penetration depth detected with this technique for the more diffusive {sup 237}Np over the field experimental time scale of about 60 days was about 10 mm in the granitic matrix, illustrating the importance of matrix diffusion in retarding radionuclide transport from the advective fractures. Laboratory tests and numerical modeling of radionuclide diffusion into granitic matrix was conducted to complement and help interpret the field results. Measured apparent diffusivity of multiple tracers in granite provided consistent predictions for radionuclide transport in the fractured granitic rock.

  10. Petrogenesis of pegmatites and granites in southwestern Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Tomascak, P.B.; Walker, R.J.; Krogstad, E.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Granitic pegmatites occurring near the town of Topsham in southwestern Maine are mineralogically diverse, featuring abundant dikes and contain rare earth element minerals as well as one pegmatite that contains Li minerals. The pegmatite series crops out near the Brunswick granite, a texturally diverse granitic pluton, and lies 13 km southeast of the Mississippian age Sebago batholith. Areas intruded by pegmatites that possess such different mineral assemblages are globally rare. The origins of these mixed'' pegmatite series have not been comprehensively investigated. There is no known pattern of regional zonation (mineral/chemical) among Topsham series pegmatites, hence simple fractionation processes are probably not responsible for the compositional variations. The authors are attempting to clarify pegmatite petrogenesis using common Pb isotopic ratios of feldspars and Sm-Nd isotopic data from whole rocks and minerals. Pb isotopic ratios from leached feldspars reflect the Pb ratios of the source from which they were derived. The range of Pb isotopic compositions of alkali feldspars from 7 granitic pegmatites is as follows: [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 18.5-19.1; [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 15.53-15.69; [sup 208]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 38.3-38.6. The Brunswick granite has K-feldspars with [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 18.40-18.47, [sup 207]/[sup 204]Pb = 15.64-15.66 and [sup 208]Pb/[sup 204]Pb = 38.29-38.39. The Pb isotopic compositions of both pegmatites and granites are significantly more radiogenic than existing data for the Sebago granite and argue against the consanguinity of Topsham pegmatites and the Sebago batholith. These data instead support a genetic link between the pegmatites and the Brunswick granite, which ranges from a fine-grained two-mica granite to a garnet-bearing pegmatitic leucogranite.

  11. Petrogenesis of the Yaochong granite and Mo deposit, Western Dabie orogen, eastern-central China: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and molybdenite Re-Os ages, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Zhaowen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Chao; Yu, Yang; Wang, Hao; Su, Yang

    2015-05-01

    The Dabie orogen is among the most famous continent-continent collisional orogenic belts in the world, and is characterized by intensive post-collisional extension, magmatism and Mo mineralization. However, the genetic links between the mineralization and the geodynamic evolution of the orogen remain unresolved. In this paper, the Yaochong Mo deposit and its associated granitic stocks were investigated to elucidate this issue. Our new zircon U-Pb ages yielded an Early Cretaceous age (133.3 ± 1.3 Ma) for the Yaochong granite, and our molybdenite Re-Os dating gave a similar age (135 ± 1 Ma) for the Mo deposit. The Yaochong stock is characterized by high silica and alkali but low Mg, Fe and Ca. It is enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs: Rb, K, Th and U), but strongly depleted in heavy REEs, and high field strength elements (HFSEs: Nb, Ta, Ti and Y). The Yaochong granite has initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7087-0.7096, and Pb isotopic ratios of (206Pb/204Pb)i = 16.599-16.704, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.170-15.618 and (208Pb/204Pb)i = 36.376-38.248. The granite has εNd(t) of -18.0 to -16.3 and εHf(t) values of -26.5 to -20.0. All these data indicate that the Yaochong granite is a high-K calc-alkaline fractionated I-type granite, and may have originated from partial melting of the thickened Yangtze continental crust. The Mo ores also show low radiogenic Pb isotopes similar to the Yaochong stock. Medium Re content in molybdenite (21.8-74.8 ppm) also suggests that the ore-forming materials were derived from the thickened lower crust with possibly minor mixing with the mantle. Similar to the Eastern Dabie orogen, the thickened crust beneath the Western Dabie orogen may also have experienced tectonic collapse, which may have exerted fundamental geodynamic controls on the two-stage Mo mineralization in the region.

  12. Granite microcracks: Structure and connectivity at different depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fan; Dong, Yan-Hui; Xu, Zhi-Fang; Zhou, Peng-Peng; Wang, Li-Heng; Tong, Shao-Qing; Duan, Rui-Qi

    2016-07-01

    Granite is one rock type used to host high-level radioactive waste repositories, and the structure of microcracks in the rock can influence its hydraulic characteristics. Thus, a quantitative analysis of granite microcracks is relevant for understanding the hydrogeological characteristics of the rocks surrounding geological repositories. The analysis can also contribute scientific data to a seepage model for low permeability rocks and materials with microscopic pores. In this study, seven granite core samples were drilled from different depths up to 600 m in Alxa, Inner Mongolia, China. Using a grid survey method and image processing technology, micrographs were converted into binary images of microcracks. The geometric parameters of the microcracks, including their quantity, width, cranny ratio, crack intersections and dimensional parameters of the fracture network, were analyzed in order to fully describe their spatial distribution. In addition, the morphological characteristics and elemental compositions of the microcracks were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS), and the natural moisture content was also determined through heated. Finally, two-dimensional microcrack network seepage models of the granite samples were simulated using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which revealed the influence of the microcrack structure on their connectivity. The results show that the growth and development of microcracks in the granite samples generally decreases as sampling depth increases in this study area. Connectivity is positively correlated with a number of the geometric parameters: the quantity of microcracks, the cranny ratio, the number of crack intersections and dimensional parameters of the fracture network, which is revealed in the two-dimensional microcrack network seepage models for these granite samples.

  13. Chemical composition and origin of black patinas on granite.

    PubMed

    Silva, Benita; Aira, Noelia; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; Prieto, Beatriz

    2009-12-15

    Black patinas from the surfaces of granite outcrops (including some with engravings) and granite buildings were analysed. Rock samples were also taken from areas of the same surfaces where there were no black patinas. The constituent elements of the granite rocks, elements of essentially biological origin (C, N, H) and other minor elements, including some typical from pollution, were all determined. The ratios between the concentrations of each element in the patinas and in the corresponding rock samples without patina were calculated in order to determine which elements form the patinas. The data were then examined by hierarchical cluster analysis and principal components analysis to establish the factors that determine the differences between samples. It was found that the elements that differentiate the patinas from the samples of rock without patina are those unrelated to granite, which indicates that, at least from a geochemical point of view, the rocky substrate does not affect patina formation. In all patinas analysed, the concentrations of carbon were higher than in the corresponding samples without patina; there were also relatively higher concentrations of sulphur, phosphorus, chlorine, calcium, etc. in some patinas, depending on the situation of the outcrop or monument.

  14. Contrasted crustal sources as defined by whole-rock and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope geochemistry of neoproterozoic early post-collisional granitic magmatism within the Southern Brazilian Shear Belt, Camboriú, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florisbal, Luana Moreira; de Assis Janasi, Valdecir; de Fátima Bitencourt, Maria; Stoll Nardi, Lauro Valentim; Heaman, Larry M.

    2012-11-01

    The early phase of post-collisional granitic magmatism in the Camboriú region, south Brazil, is represented by the porphyritic biotite ± hornblende Rio Pequeno Granite (RPG; 630-620 Ma) and the younger (˜610 Ma), equigranular, biotite ± muscovite Serra dos Macacos Granite (SMG). The two granite types share some geochemical characteristics, but the more felsic SMG constitutes a distinctive group not related to RPG by simple fractionation processes, as indicated by its lower FeOt, TiO2, K2O/Na2O and higher Zr Al2O3, Na2O, Ba and Sr when compared to RPG of similar SiO2 range. Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes require different sources. The SMG derives from old crustal sources, possibly related to the Paleoproterozoic protoliths of the Camboriú Complex, as indicated by strongly negative ɛNdt (-23 to -24) and unradiogenic Pb (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb = 16.0-16.3; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.3-15.4) and confirmed by previous LA-MC-ICPMS data showing dominant zircon inheritance of Archean to Paleoproterozoic age. In contrast, the RPG shows less negative ɛNdt (-12 to -15) and a distinctive zircon inheritance pattern with no traces of post-1.6 Ga sources. This is indicative of younger sources whose significance in the regional context is still unclear; some contribution of mantle-derived magmas is indicated by coeval mafic dykes and may account for some of the geochemical and isotopic characteristics of the least differentiated varieties of the RPG. The transcurrent tectonics seems to have played an essential role in the generation of mantle-derived magmas despite their emplacement within a low-strain zone. It may have facilitated their interaction with crustal melts which seem to be to a large extent the products of reworking of Paleoproterozoic orthogneisses from the Camboriú Complex.

  15. Fault controlled Carboniferous A-type magmatism in the proto-Andean foreland (Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina): Geochemical constraints and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlquist, Juan A.; Alasino, Pablo H.; Eby, G. Nelson; Galindo, Carmen; Casquet, César

    2010-03-01

    The intrusion of granitoids into the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas in the Early Carboniferous took place after a long period of mainly compressional deformation that included the Famatinian (Ordovician) and Achalian (Devonian) orogenies. These granitoids occur as small scattered plutons emplaced in a dominant extensional setting, within older metamorphic and igneous rocks, and many of them are arranged along a reactivated large shear zone. A set of 46 samples from different granitic rocks: Huaco granitic complex, San Blas pluton, and the La Chinchilla stock from the Sierra de Velasco, Zapata granitic complex from Sierra de Zapata, and the Los Árboles pluton from Sierra de Fiambalá, display high and restricted SiO 2 contents between 69.2 and 76.4 wt.%. On both FeO/(FeO + MgO) vs. SiO 2 and [(Na 2O + K 2O) - CaO] vs. SiO 2 plots the samples plot in the ferroan and alkaline-calcic to calco-alkaline fields (FeO/(FeO + MgO) = 0.88-1.0%;[(Na 2O + K 2O) - CaO] = 6.3-8.3%), thus showing an A-type granitoid signature. The high concentrations for the High Field Strength Elements (HSFE), such as Y, Nb, Ga, Ta, U, Th, etc. and flat REE patterns showing significant negative Eu anomalies are also typical features of A-type granites. Our petrogenetic model supports progressive fractional crystallization with dominant fractionation of feldspar and a source mineral assemblage enriched in plagioclase. Biotites have distinctive compositions with high FeO/MgO ratios (7.8-61.5), F (360-5610 ppm), and Cl (120-1050 ppm). The FeO/MgO ratios together with the F and Cl content of igneous biotites seem to reflect the nature of their parental host magmas and may be useful in identifying A-type granitoids. The isotopic data (Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd) confirm that the A-type granites represent variable mixtures of asthenospheric mantle and continental crust and different mixtures lead to different subtypes of A-type granite (illustrating the lack of consensus about A-type magma origin). We conclude that

  16. Petrography, geochemistry, and geochronology of granitoid rocks in the Neoproterozoic-Paleozoic Lufilian?Zambezi belt, Zambia: Implications for tectonic setting and regional correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katongo, Crispin; Koller, Friedrich; Kloetzli, Urs; Koeberl, Christian; Tembo, Francis; Waele, Bert De

    2004-12-01

    There are several pre-orogenic Neoproterozoic granitoid and metavolcanic rocks in the Lufilian-Zambezi belt in Zambia and Zimbabwe that are interpreted to have been emplaced in a continental-rift setting that is linked to the break-up of the Rodinia supercontinent. However, no geochemical data were previously available for these rocks in the Zambian part of the belt to support this model. We conducted petrographic and whole-rock chemical analyses of the Neoproterozoic Nchanga Granite, Lusaka Granite, Ngoma Gneiss and felsic metavolcanic rocks from the Lufilian-Zambezi belt in Zambian, in order to evaluate their chemical characteristics and tectonic settings. Other magmatic rocks of importance for understanding the evolution of the belt in Zambia, included in this study, are the Mesoproterozoic Munali Hills Granite and associated amphibolites and the Mpande Gneiss. The Neoproterozoic rocks have monzogranitic compositions, aluminum-saturation indices (ASI) < 1.1, and high contents of high field strength elements (HFSE) and rare earth elements (REE). The chondrite-normalised spider diagrams are similar to those of A-type granites from the Lachlan fold belt and show negative Sr, P, and Ti anomalies. On various tectonic discrimination diagrams the Neoproterozoic rocks plot mainly in A-type granite fields. These petrographic and trace element compositions indicate that these rocks are A-type felsic rocks, but they do not have features of granites and rhyolites emplaced in true continental-rift settings, as previously suggested. On the basis of the A-type features and independent regional geological and geochronological data, we suggest that the Neoproterozoic granitoid and felsic metavolcanic rocks were emplaced during the earliest extensional stages of continental rifting in the Lufilian-Zambezi belt. The apparent continental-arc like chemistry of the granitoid and felsic metavolcanic rocks is thus inferred to be inherited from calcalkaline sources. The Mesoproterozoic

  17. High-spatial resolution SIMS U-Pb zircon dating on Malay tin granites: New insights to crustal evolution of the Malaysian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S.; Searle, M. P.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Chung, S.; Robb, L. J.; Ghani, A. A.; Sone, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Southeast Asian tin granite province has previously been recognized as comprising three distinct granitic belt (Cobbing et al., 1986): (1) Middle Permian - Late Triassic Eastern Province with mainly subduction-related I-type granites associated with Cu-Au deposits, (2) Late Permian - Early Jurassic Main Range Province with mainly S-type granites associated with Sn-W deposits, and (3) Late Triassic - Cretaceous Western Province with mixed I- and S-type granites associated with Sn-W deposits. These ages were obtained mainly using whole rock Rb-Sr and K-Ar geochronology in the 70s and 80s, methods that are no longer considered suitable for obtaining crystallization ages of granites due to unstable behaviour of these isotopes in hydrothermal systems. During 2011 we collected over 50 samples of granites across all three zones in Northern Malaysia for U-Pb dating using high-spatial resolution precision SIMS at the Swedish Museum of Natural History. The results reveal a westward younging trend across the Malay Peninsula. The Eastern Province hornblende- and biotite-granites in Eastern Malaysia formed by subduction-related processes have ages lying between 220-285 Ma. The Main Range Province dominantly S-type granites in west and central Malaysia have ages lying between 206-226 Ma. These include dominantly biotite granites with less common tourmaline+biotite leucocratic granites related to crustal thickening processes following collision of Sibumasu with Indochina and closing of the Palaeo-Tethyan Bentong-Raub suture zone. Some enigmatic young Cretaceous zircon rim ages (c. 81-80 Ma) may indicate a young hydrothermal - metasomatic origin for some tin mineralization from both the Eastern Province (Tioman Island) and the Western province (Phuket, Thailand) (Searle et al., 2012). Granites in Malaysia cannot be simply categorized as I-, S- or A-type as most of them failed to show distinctive minerals for classification and there is considerable overlap in geochemical

  18. Grenville-age A-type and related magmatism in southern Laurentia, Texas and New Mexico, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yujia; Barnes, Melanie A.; Barnes, Calvin G.; Frost, Carol D.

    2007-08-01

    Large Grenville-age plutons are known to be present in the 1340-1370 Ma basement in Texas and eastern New Mexico, but their distribution and compositional ranges are poorly known. New U-Pb zircon dates (SHRIMP-RG, Stanford University) on subsurface samples have identified widespread presence of compositionally diverse Grenville-age (1070-1110 Ma) plutonic rocks. In the Texas Panhandle, core from a > 175 m thick, sill-like gabbroic intrusion yielded a date of 1081 ± 8.3 Ma. In situ differentiation of this tholeiitic magma led to a ˜ 7-fold increase in incompatible element concentrations as REE patterns remained essentially flat. Trace element data suggest an E-MORB-like source. To the south, alkali-feldspar granite with A-type affinities was recovered from drill core from the Abilene gravity minimum near Albany, Texas. It yielded a date of 1078 ± 23 Ma; similar to undeformed (post-orogenic) granites in the Llano uplift. Further west, an anorthosite xenolith from the Eocene Three Sisters intrusion in El Paso, Texas yielded a date of 1068 ± 30 Ma which is within error of the 1110 ± 19 Ma age determined for the main stage of the nearby A-type Red Bluff granitic suite. Xenoliths from Potrillo maar volcano in the center of the southern Rio Grande rift include monzonitic xenoliths with granulitic texture which yielded dates of ˜ 1072 Ma. In contrast, Potrillo maar xenoliths with igneous textures yielded U-Pb dates of ˜ 27 Ma. Development of the granulitic texture is interpreted to reflect granulite facies metamorphism during Tertiary time (26-27 Ma) on the basis of age zoning and U concentrations in the zircon crystals. Our results show that Grenville-age magmatism in the Texas and New Mexico subsurface was widespread and was coeval with syn- and post-deformation granites in the Llano uplift of central Texas. The compositions of dated samples suggest that mafic magmas were broadly tholeiitic in character and that granitic magmas were "A-type". These magmatic

  19. Major magmatic events in Mt Meredith, Prince Charles Mountains: First evidence for early Palaeozoic syntectonic granites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gongurov, N.A.; Laiba, A.A.; Beliatsky, B.V.

    2007-01-01

    Precambrian rocks at Mt Meredith underwent granulite-facies metamorphism M1. Zircon isotope dating for two orthogneisses revealed the following age signatures: 1294±3 and 957±4Ma; 1105±5 and 887±2Ma. The oldest ages could reflect the time of orthogneiss protolith crystallization and the latest age determinations date Grenvillian metamorphism. The metamorphic rocks were intruded by two-mica and garnet-biotite granites. The granites and host rocks underwent amphibolite-facies metamorphism M2. Zircon isotope analysis of the two-mica granites showed age estimation within 550-510Ma and zircon dating of the garnet-biotite granites revealed the ages of 1107±5, 953±8, and 551±4Ma. As Pan-African age signatures were obtained from only the granite samples, it is possible to suggest that the granites were formed at the time of 510-550Ma and the zircons with greater age values were captured by granites from the host rocks.

  20. Petrogenesis of Oxidized Arfvedsonite Granite Gneiss from Dimra Pahar, Hazaribagh, Eastern India: Constraints from Mineral Chemistry and Trace Element Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Ankita; Goswami, Bapi

    2017-04-01

    The arfvedsonite granite gneiss of Dimra Pahar occurs along the North Purulia Shear Zone (NPSZ) which pivots the Proterozoic Chotannagpur Gneissic Complex (CGC), Eastern India. Although minerals like arfvedsonite and aegirine depict the peralkaline nature of the pluton, the geochemistry of the rock reflects its composition varying from peralkaline to mildly peraluminous. K-feldspar, quartz, arfvedsonite, albite with accessory aegirine, titaniferous iron oxides and zircon form the dominant mineralogy of this alkali feldspar granite (IUGS, 2000) gneiss. The zircon saturation temperature corresponds to 747oC-1066oC. The granitic magma contains low water content evidenced by the absence of any pegmatite associated with this pluton. Geochemically these granites are classified as ferroan and alkalic (cf. Frost et al., 2001). These highly evolved granites possess enrichment of SiO2, Na2O + K2O, FeO(t)/MgO, Ga/Al, Zr, Nb, Ga, Y, Ce and rare earth elements (REE) with low abundance of CaO, MgO, Ba and Sr which characterize their A-type nature while standard discrimination diagrams ( cf. Eby, 1992; Grebennikov, 2014) help to further discriminate them as A1 type. Tectonic discriminations diagrams (Pearce et al., 1984; Maniar and Piccoli, 1989; Batchelor and Bowden, 1985) constrain the tectonic setting of the magma to be anorogenic, within plate, rift-related one. The REE compositions show moderately fractionated patterns with (La/Yb)N 2.57-10.5 and Eu/Eu* 0.16-0.70. Multielement spider diagram and various trace element ratio together with oxidized nature (ΔNNO: +2) of these granites further suggest that these have been derived from OIB-type parental magma. The peralkaline nature of the granite and its lack of subduction- related geochemical features are consistent with an origin in a zone of regional extension. The extremely high Rb/Sr ratios combined with the extreme Sr, Ba, P, Ti and Eu depletions clearly indicate that these A-type granites were highly evolved and require

  1. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

    2001-12-01

    Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the

  2. Geothermal potential of Caledonian granites underlying Upper Palaeozoic sedimentary basins astride the Iapetus Suture Zone in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritschle, Tobias; Daly, J. Stephen; Whitehouse, Martin J.; McConnell, Brian; Buhre, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Upper Palaeozoic sedimentary basins in Ireland overlie crystalline rocks within the Caledonian Iapetus Suture Zone. Beneath these basins, Lower Palaeozoic rocks, formed and deformed during the Caledonian orogenic cycle, were intruded by c. 420-390 Ma late-tectonic granites at various tectonic levels. These include the subsurface Kentstown and Glenamaddy granites discovered by mineral exploration drilling. While these granites comprise actual targets for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) exploration, several others likely exist based on geophysical considerations. In order to test the regional geothermal potential, the buried granites as well as analogue exposed rocks are being investigated geochemically. The geothermal potential of the intrusives depends on their heat production rate (HPR), which is calculated using rock density and concentrations of the heat producing elements (HPE) uranium, thorium and potassium. In spite of their close spacing and similar ages, the whole-rock geochemistry of the granites varies significantly, but with no obvious geographical control (Fritschle et al., 2013; 2014). The granite HPR values range from 1.4 μW/m3 for the Dhoon Granite (Isle of Man) to 4.9 μW/m3 for the Drogheda Granite (Ireland). This compares with the average HPR for a 'typical' granite of 2.7 μW/m3 (Goldstein et al., 2009). It is demonstrated that an elevated HPR of a granite can be related to enrichment in one of the HPE alone (e.g., uranium-enrichment in the Foxdale Granite (Isle of Man), or thorium-enrichment in the Drogheda Granite). Enrichment in HPE in a granite may occur due to different reasons including hydrothermal (re-) distribution of uranium, or the assimilation of thorium-rich wall-rocks. Hence, the distribution of the HPE in particular minerals, veins and source lithologies, along with the petrophysical characteristics of the sedimentary basins and the granites' petrogenesis, are currently being investigated as possible mechanisms controlling their

  3. The H2O Content of Granite Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, O.; Cesare, B.; Remusat, L.; Acosta-Vigil, A.; Poli, S.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of H2O contents of natural granites has been an on-going challenge owing to the extremely fugitive character of H2O during cooling and ascent of melts and magmas. Here we approach this problem by studying granites in their source region (i.e. the partially melted continental crust) and we present the first NanoSIMS analyses of anatectic melt inclusions (MI) hosted in peritectic phases of migmatites and granulites. These MI which totally crystallized upon slow cooling represent the embryos of the upper-crustal granites. The approach based on the combination of MI and NanoSIMS has been here tested on amphibolite-facies migmatites at Ronda (S Spain) that underwent fluid-present to fluid-absent melting at ~700 °C and ~5 kbar. Small (≤ 5 µm) crystallized MI trapped in garnet have been remelted using a piston-cylinder apparatus and they show leucogranitic compositions. We measure high and variable H2O contents (mean of 6.5±1.4 wt%) in these low-temperature, low-pressure granitic melts. We demonstrate that, when the entire population from the same host is considered, MI reveal the H2O content of melt in the specific volume of rock where the host garnet grew. Mean H2O values for the MI in different host crystals range from 5.4 to 9.1 wt%. This range is in rather good agreement with experimental models for granitic melts at the inferred P-T conditions. Our study documents for the first time the occurrence of H2O heterogeneities in natural granitic melts at the source region. These heterogeneities are interpreted to reflect the birth of granitic melts under conditions of "mosaic" equilibrium, where the distinct fractions of melt experience different buffering assemblages at the micro-scale, with concomitant differences in melt H2O content. These results confirm the need for small-scale geochemical studies on natural samples to improve our quantitative understanding of crustal melting and granite formation. The same approach adopted here can be applied to

  4. The H2O content of granite embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, Omar; Cesare, Bernardo; Remusat, Laurent; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Poli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of H2O contents of natural granites has been an on-going challenge owing to the extremely fugitive character of H2O during cooling and ascent of melts and magmas. Here we approach this problem by studying granites in their source region (i.e. the partially melted continental crust) and we present the first NanoSIMS analyses of anatectic melt inclusions (MI) hosted in peritectic phases of migmatites and granulites. These MI which totally crystallized upon slow cooling represent the embryos of the upper-crustal granites [1, 2, 3]. The approach based on the combination of MI and NanoSIMS has been here tested on amphibolite-facies migmatites at Ronda (S Spain) that underwent fluid-present to fluid-absent melting at ~700 °C and ~5 kbar. Small (≤ 5 µm) crystallized MI trapped in garnet have been remelted using a piston-cylinder apparatus and they show leucogranitic compositions. We measure high and variable H2O contents (mean of 6.5±1.4 wt%) in these low-temperature, low-pressure granitic melts. We demonstrate that, when the entire population from the same host is considered, MI reveal the H2O content of melt in the specific volume of rock where the host garnet grew. Mean H2O values for the MI in different host crystals range from 5.4 to 9.1 wt%. This range is in rather good agreement with experimental models for granitic melts at the inferred P-T conditions. Our study documents for the first time the occurrence of H2O heterogeneities in natural granitic melts at the source region [3]. These heterogeneities are interpreted to reflect the birth of granitic melts under conditions of "mosaic" equilibrium, where the distinct fractions of melt experience different buffering assemblages at the micro-scale, with concomitant differences in melt H2O content. These results confirm the need for small-scale geochemical studies on natural samples to improve our quantitative understanding of crustal melting and granite formation. The same approach adopted here can

  5. The GRANIT spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Baessler, Stefan; Beau, M; Kreuz, Michael; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Kurlov, V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K.; Vezzu, Francis; Voronin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The existence of quantum states of matter in a gravitational field was demonstrated recently in the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble, in a series of experiments with ultra cold neutrons (UCN). UCN in low quantum states is an excellent probe for fundamental physics, in particular for constraining extra short-range forces; as well as a tool in quantum optics and surface physics. The GRANIT is a follow-up project based on a second-generation spectrometer with ultra-high energy resolution, permanently installed in ILL. It has been constructed in framework of an ANR grant; and will become operational in 2011.

  6. Anomalously low strength of serpentinite sheared against granite and implications for creep on the Hayward and Calaveras Faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.; Ponce, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Serpentinized ophiolitic rocks are juxtaposed against quartzofeldspathic rocks at depth across considerable portions of the Hayward and Calaveras Faults. The marked compositional contrast between these rock types may contribute to fault creep that has been observed along these faults. To investigate this possibility, we are conducting hydrothermal shearing experiments to look for changes in frictional properties resulting from the shear of ultramafic rock juxtaposed against quartzose rock units. In this paper we report the first results in this effort: shear of bare-rock surfaces of serpentinite and granite, and shear of antigorite-serpentinite gouge between forcing blocks of granitic rock. All experiments were conducted at 250°C. Serpentinite sheared against granite at 50 MPa pore-fluid pressure is weaker than either rock type separately, and the weakening is significantly more pronounced at lower shearing rates. In contrast, serpentinite gouge sheared dry between granite blocks is as strong as the bare granite surface. We propose that the weakening is the result of a solution-transfer process involving the dissolution of serpentine minerals at grain-to-grain contacts. Dissolution of serpentine is enhanced by modifications to pore-fluid chemistry caused by interaction of the fluid with the quartz-bearing rocks. The compositional differences between serpentinized ultramafic rocks of the Coast Range Ophiolite and quartzofeldspathic rock units such as those of the Franciscan Complex may provide the mechanism for aseismic slip (creep) in the shallow crust along the Hayward, Calaveras, and other creeping faults in central and northern California.

  7. Thermal stress microfracturing of crystalline and sedimentary rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.F.

    1989-05-01

    The goal of the research program is to understand mechanisms of thermal cracking in granitic rocks. The research plan included development of a theoretical understanding of cracking due to thermal stresses, laboratory work to characterize crack strain in rocks thermally stressed under different conditions (including natural thermal histories), and microscopic work to count and catalog crack occurrences, and geologic application to naturally occurring granites.

  8. Petrology and physical properties of granites from the Illinois Deep Hole in Stephenson County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidiak, Edward G.; Denison, Roger E.

    1983-09-01

    Two main basement granitoid types have been identified in core samples from the Illinois deep hole project. The main variety is a medium- to coarse-grained porphyritic biotite granite with phenocrysts of microcline perthite and less commonly quartz and sodic plagioclase in a matrix of these minerals and biotite, muscovite, fluorite, magnetite, ilmenite, zircon, hornblende, apatite, sphene, monazite, rutile, and clinopyroxene (relict). The texture is typically hypidiomorphic gradational to recrystallized xenomorphic. The second main granitoid, which occurs in the upper part of hole UPH 3, is a fine-grained granoblastic to lepidoblastic gneissic granite that is distinct from and possibly older than the nonfoliated granite. The textures of both rocks have been modified by a mild cataclastic shearing that has partially recrystallized the more susceptible mineral phases. Thin fracture planes that crosscut the earlier foliations are common. Microprobe analyses indicate that biotites in the gneissic granite are chemically distinct from those in the granite. Biotites in the gneissic granite have higher Fe/Fe + Mg ratio, FeO, and Al2O3 and lower MgO and SiO2. Reflection microscopy and microprobe analyses indicate that the oxide phases in the two rocks are also different. The oxides in the granite are magnetite and ilmenite, whereas hematite and pseudobrookite occur in the gneissic granite. The biotite and Fe-Ti oxide data represent additional evidence in support of the fact that the granite and gneissic granite are distinct rocks and probably not part of a continuous comagmatic sequence. Major element chemical analyses indicate that the granites have affinities to anorogenic rapakivi granites. The granites in the deep holes are high in SiO2, alkalis (Na2O+K2O), F, FeO/MgO; low in Al2O3, FeO, Fe2O3, TiO2, MnO, and P2O5; and slightly low in MgO and CaO. Magnetic susceptibility and density measurements correlate generally well with magnetic susceptibility and density logs

  9. Identification of Rocks on Planetary Surface Using Husar-9 Rover Camera: Field Work Simulations with Hunveyor-9 Space Probe Model System at Eötvös High School, Tata, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, I.; Badics, A.; Bakonyi, I.; Csiszár, Á.; Franko, M.; Gyürki, Á.; Héricz, M.; Marschall, B.; Nagyházi, Á.; Varga, T. N.; Végh, Gy.; Varga, T. P.; Bérczi, Sz.

    2009-03-01

    We studied the rock types along the Husar-9 rover’s path and identified them on the basis of their shape, color and surface textures: komatiite, basalt, granite, conglomerate, schist rock, porphyritic granite, suevite breccia, and vesicular basalt.

  10. Fractures in Rock: An Annotated Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Joint spacings for two mutually perpendicular joint sets were measured in each of five sample sites in gabbronorites and anorthosites . Joint density...amount of glacial erosion. The rocks include granite, granite gneiss and quartz monzonite. Sheeting is similar in all three, as well as in anorthosites

  11. The Origin of Graphic Granite: New Insights from Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Wu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Graphic granite, found predominantly in granitic pegmatite, is a leucocratic granitic rock consisting of an intimate intergrowth of alkali feldspar and quartz with a distinctive texture as ancient cuneiform writing when viewed in certain cross sections. Deciphering the graphic texture is important for understanding its origin and the crystallization process of granitic rocks. In this study, we present investigations on petrology, mineral composition, crystallographic relationship and topotaxy of quartz and alkali feldspar in graphic granites from the Fangshan adakitic pluton, Beijing, north China and the Luotian dome in the Northern Dabie Mountains, central China. The euhedral to subhedral coarse-grained feldspar host in graphic granite can be alkali feldspar or plagioclase. Microscopically, the feldspar host is usually a perthite, which is decomposed into irregular intergrowth of sodic and potassic feldspar. The volume content of quartz usually ranges from 20% to 45%, and the composition of feldspar in graphic granite depends greatly on the formation conditions. However, the quartz-feldspar ratio and the composition of feldspar in graphic granite are relatively stable in coeval graphic granites in the same area. The majority of the quartz grains undergrown with host feldspar are in the form of sub-parallel tabular, long rods and unconnected dendritic crystals, which only shows a distinctive graphic texture in certain cross sections. Under cross polarized light microscopy, multiple domains of quartz grains exhibit a nearly simultaneous extinction within a single crystal of feldspar. The crystallographic orientations of the quartz grains and the host feldspar were measured using the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Statistical analyses indicate a definite crystallographic orientation relationship between the majority of graphic quartz grains and the host feldspar in that [11-23]Quartz parallel to [001]Feldspar. Moreover, Dauphiné twin of quartz

  12. Mineral chemistry and magnetic petrology of the Archean Planalto Suite, Carajás Province - Amazonian Craton: Implications for the evolution of ferroan Archean granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Ingrid Roberta Viana da; Dall'Agnol, Roberto; Feio, Gilmara Regina Lima

    2016-04-01

    The Planalto Suite is located in the Canaã dos Carajás subdomain of the Carajás Province in the southeastern part of the Amazonian Craton. The suite is of Neoarchean age (∼2.73 Ga), ferroan character, and A-type affinity. Magnetic petrology studies allowed for the distinction of two groups: (1) ilmenite granites showing low magnetic susceptibility (MS) values between 0.6247×10-3 and 0.0102 × 10-3 SI and (2) magnetite-ilmenite-bearing granites with comparatively higher but still moderate MS values between 15.700×10-3 and 0.8036 × 10-3 SI. Textural evidence indicates that amphibole, ilmenite, titanite, and, in the rocks of Group 2, magnetite also formed during magmatic crystallization. However, compositional zoning suggests that titanite was partially re-equilibrated by subsolidus processes. The amphibole varies from potassian-hastingsite to chloro-potassian-hastingsite and shows Fe/(Fe + Mg) > 0.8. Biotite also shows high Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratios and is classified as annite. Plagioclase porphyroclasts are oligoclase (An25-10), and the grains of the recrystallized matrix show a similar composition or are albitic (An9-2). The dominant Group 1 granites of the Planalto Suite were formed under reduced conditions below the FMQ buffer. The Group 2 granites crystallized under more oxidizing conditions on or slightly above the FMQ buffer. Pressures of 900-700 MPa for the origin and of 500-300 MPa for the emplacement were estimated for the Planalto magmas. Geothermometers suggest initial crystallization temperatures between 900 °C and 830 °C, and the water content in the magma is estimated to be higher than 4 wt%. The Neoarchean Planalto Suite and the Estrela Granite of the Carajás Province reveal strong mineralogical analogies, and their amphibole and biotite compositions have high total Al contents. The latter characteristic is also observed in the same minerals of the Neoarchean Matok Pluton of the Limpopo Belt but not in those of the Proterozoic rapakivi A-type

  13. Relationship between UHP eclogite and two different types of granite in the North Qaidam, NW China: Evidence from zircon SHRIMP ages of granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Yang, J.; Wooden, J.; Ernst, G. W.; Liou, J. G.; Li, H.; Zhang, J.; Wan, Y.; Shi, R.

    2001-12-01

    The southern margin of the Qilianshan is a long, narrow mountain range extending from the Altyn Mtn southeastward to the Alcitoshan for about 800 km and consists chiefly of Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks. Our recent studies show that this foldbelt consists of a Caledonian north Qaidam UHP belt near the Qaidam Basin and I-type and S-type granites to the north near the Qilianshan. Two types of granite bodies at the Aolaoshan and Qaidamshan were selected for zircon SHRIMP dating. The results indicate that the Aolaoshan granites range from 496+/-7.6 to 445+/-15.3 Ma whereas the Qaidamshan granites range from 435+/-6 to 456+/-11 Ma. The Aolaoshan granites have geochemical characteristics similar to I-type granite probably formed in an island arc setting whereas the Qaidamshan granites are S type granites coeval with timing of collision. The UHP eclogites at Yuca have 238U-206Pb age of 494.6+/-6.5Ma, representing the peak stage of UHP metamorphism, and the 39 Ar-40Ar plateau and isochron ages of phengite respectively at 466.7+/-1.2 Ma and 465.9+/-5.4Ma represent the cooling ages of retrograde metamorphism during exhumation. In addition, the SHRIMP ages of UHP eclogites from Xitieshan and Dulan are the Caledonian. These spatial and temporal relationships suggest that UHP eclogites and two different types of Caledonian granites occur in north Qaidam with the eclogite belt to the south and the granite bodies to the north. The country rocks of UHP eclogites are Proterozoic age whereas granitic bodies have both Proterozoic and Paleozoic groups. Thus, an early Caledonian northward subduction of an oceanic lithosphere resulted in the formation of high-P eclogite to the south and I type Aolaoshan granite to the north. Subsequent continent-continent collision induced widespread partial melting of continental crust to form S type Qaidamshan granites. Hence both eclogite and two different types of granites in this foldbelt are the products of two different stages of plate

  14. The Wuluma granite, Arunta Block, central Australia: An example of in situ, near-isochemical granite formation in a granulite-facies terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W. J.; Flood, R. H.; Vernon, R. H.; Shaw, S. E.

    1989-06-01

    The Wuluma granite is a small, elongate, relatively undeformed pluton in the Proterozoic Strangways Metamorphic Complex, central Australia. The complex constitutes a supracrustal assemblage that underwent granulite-facies metamorphism 1800 Ma ago. Metamorphism was associated with at least three phases of folding that ultimately produced upright, regional, doubly plunging F 3 folds and isobaric cooling ensued. Generation of the Wuluma granite occurred at ˜ 1750 Ma, based on RbSr isotopic data, during syn-D 3 regional retrogression and rehydration of the terrane. Contacts between the granite and gneisses are invariably gradational. At the pluton margin, banded gneisses grade along strike into granite containing abundant biotite schlieren that parallel regional structures. Granite and pegmatite dykes cut these rocks. Inwards from the contact, the granite is more homogeneous, containing diffuse parallel schlieren and small aligned rectangular feldspar crystals, indicating flow of magma. Rafts of unmelted granofels form a ghost layering; they mimic macroscopic F 3 folds and show only minor retrogressive metamorphic effects. At the pluton core, the granite is homogeneous and structurally isotropic, containing some subrounded granofelsic inclusions, very diffuse schlieren and disaggregated pegmatite dykes. Thus, it appears that an isoclinally folded, vertical body of quartzofeldspathic gneiss was melted "in situ" to form the pluton, which did not break away from the source. The body resembles a tapered diapir and we term this type of pluton a regional migmatite terrane granite. Geochemical data are consistent with the granite forming by anatexis of quartzofeldspathic migmatitic gneisses with appropriate composition. The chemical similarity of both rock types implies derivation of the granite by either partial melting and retention of residual material in the magma or more complete melting, followed by solidification virtually in situ. The latter interpretation is

  15. Ulkan-Dzhugdzhur ore-bearing anorthosite-rapakivi granite-peralkaline granite association, Siberian Craton: Age, tectonic setting, sources, and metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    The paper systematizes and integrates the results of geological, isotopic geochronological, and geochemical studies of the igneous rocks that make up the Ulkan-Dzhugdzhur anorthosite-rapakivi granite-peralkaline granite association and related mineralization. This association is a typical example of anorogenic igneous rocks that formed in the within-plate geodynamic setting most likely under effect of the mantle superplume, which was active in the territory of the Siberian Craton 1.75-1.70 Ga ago. The igneous rock association formed in a discrete regime that reflected the pulsatory evolution of a sublithospheric mantle source. The prerift (1736-1727 Ma) and rift proper (1722-1705 Ma) stages and a number of substages are distinguished. All igneous rocks pertaining to this association have mixed mantle-crustal origin. Basic rocks crystallized from the OIB-type basaltic magma, which underwent crustal contamination at various depths. Felsic rocks are products of mantle and crustal magma mixing. The contribution of mantle component progressively increased in a time-dependent sequence: moderately alkaline subsolvus granite → moderately alkaline and alkaline hypersolvus granites → peralkaline hypersolvus granite. All endogenic deposits in the studied district are related to a single source represented by the mantle plume and its derivatives. The Fe-Ti-apatite deposits hosted in anorthosite formed as a result of intense lower crustal contamination of basaltic magma near the Moho discontinuity and two stages of fractional crystallization at lower and upper crustal depth levels. The rare-metal deposits are genetically related to peralkaline granite. Formation of uranium deposits was most likely caused by Middle Riphean rejuvenation of the region, which also involved rocks of the Ulkan-Dzhugdzhur association.

  16. Fungal leaching of titanium from rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Munoz, E. F.

    1971-01-01

    Penicillium simplicissimum is found to solubilize up to 80% of the titanium in granitic rocks but less than 2% of the titanium in basaltic rocks. These findings were made in investigating the interactions of microorganisms with rocks and minerals of the biosphere in studies aimed at developing experiments for the detection of extraterrestrial life.

  17. Fungal leaching of titanium from rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Munoz, E. F.

    1971-01-01

    Penicillium simplicissimum is found to solubilize up to 80% of the titanium in granitic rocks but less than 2% of the titanium in basaltic rocks. These findings were made in investigating the interactions of microorganisms with rocks and minerals of the biosphere in studies aimed at developing experiments for the detection of extraterrestrial life.

  18. The identification and significance of pure sediment-derived granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, Thomas N.; Harris, Nigel B. W.; Warren, Clare J.; Spencer, Christopher J.; Roberts, Nick M. W.; Horstwood, Matthew S. A.; Parrish, Randall R.; EIMF

    2017-06-01

    The characterization of the geochemical reservoirs of the Earth's continental crust, including the determination of representative upper and lower crustal compositions, underpins our understanding of crustal evolution. The classic I- and S-type granite classification has often been invoked to distinguish between melts derived from igneous protoliths and those derived from the melting of a sedimentary source. Recent geochemical studies suggest that most granites, even those cited as typical examples of 'S-type', show evidence for a mixture of mantle and upper crustal sources, thereby implying that granite formation is evidence for overall crustal growth. We have examined the source of leucogranite bodies in one of the world's youngest collisional orogens using novel zircon techniques that can resolve the presence of even minor mantle contributions. 232 zircons from 12 granites from the Bhutan Himalaya were analysed by in-situ techniques for O, Hf and U-Pb isotopic signatures. In combination with data from the granite host rocks, our data show that the Himalayan leucogranites were derived solely from metamorphosed crustal sediments, and do not record any mantle contribution. This finding is consistent with the time-lag between crustal thickening and widespread crustal melting, and the heat-producing capacities of the pelitic source rocks. We conclude that Himalayan leucogranites provide a more suitable type locality for 'S-type' granites than the Lachlan area in South-East Australia where the term was first defined. The Himalayan leucogranites therefore provide evidence that syn-orogenic melting during collisional events does not necessarily result in crustal growth. Importantly, crustal growth models should not always assume that crustal growth is achieved during collisional orogenesis.

  19. Permeability reduction in granite under hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of impermeable fault seals between earthquake events is a feature of many models of earthquake generation, suggesting that earthquake recurrence may depend in part on the rate of permeability reduction of fault zone materials under hydrothermal conditions. In this study, permeability measurements were conducted on intact, fractured, and gouge-bearing Westerly granite at an effective pressure of 50 MPa and at temperatures from 150?? to 500??C, simulating conditions in the earthquake-generating portions of fault zones. Pore fluids were cycled back and forth under a 2 MPa pressure differential for periods of up to 40 days. Permeability of the granite decreased with time t, following the exponential relation k = c(10-rt). For intact samples run between 250?? and 500??C the time constant for permeability decrease r was proportional to temperature and ranged between 0.001 and 0.1 days-1 (i.e., between 0.4 and 40 decades year-1 loss of permeability). Values of r for the lower-temperature experiments differed little from the 250??C runs. In contrast, prefractured samples showed higher rates of permeability decrease at a given temperature. The surfaces of the fractured samples showed evidence of dissolution and mineral growth that increased in abundance with both temperature and time. The experimentally grown mineral assemblages varied with temperature and were consistent with a rock-dominated hydrothermal system. As such mineral deposits progressively seal the fractured samples, their rates of permeability decrease approach the rates for intact rocks at the same temperature. These results place constraints on models of precipitation sealing and suggest that fault rocks may seal at a rate consistent with earthquake recurrence intervals of typical fault zones.

  20. Time-Dependent Behaviors of Granite: Loading-Rate Dependence, Creep, and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, K.; Fukui, K.

    2016-07-01

    To assess the long-term stability of underground structures, it is important to understand the time-dependent behaviors of rocks, such as their loading-rate dependence, creep, and relaxation. However, there have been fewer studies on crystalline rocks than on tuff, mudstone, and rock salt, because the high strength of crystalline rocks makes the detection of their time-dependent behaviors much more difficult. Moreover, studies on the relaxation, temporal change of stress and strain (TCSS) conditions, and relations between various time-dependent behaviors are scarce for not only granites, but also other rocks. In this study, previous reports on the time-dependent behaviors of granites were reviewed and various laboratory tests were conducted using Toki granite. These tests included an alternating-loading-rate test, creep test, relaxation test, and TCSS test. The results showed that the degree of time dependence of Toki granite is similar to other granites, and that the TCSS resembles the stress-relaxation curve and creep-strain curve. A viscoelastic constitutive model, proposed in a previous study, was modified to investigate the relations between the time-dependent behaviors in the pre- and post-peak regions. The modified model reproduced the stress-strain curve, creep, relaxation, and the results of the TCSS test. Based on a comparison of the results of the laboratory tests and numerical simulations, close relations between the time-dependent behaviors were revealed quantitatively.

  1. The Keimoes Suite redefined: The geochronological and geochemical characteristics of the ferroan granites of the eastern Namaqua Sector, Mesoproterozoic Namaqua-Natal Metamorphic Province, southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailie, Russell; Macey, Paul Hugh; Nethenzheni, Sedzani; Frei, Dirk; le Roux, Petrus

    2017-10-01

    Voluminous granite gneisses and granites straddle the boundary between the Kakamas and Areachap Terranes in the eastern Namaqua Sector (NS) of the Mesoproterozoic Namaqua-Natal Metamorphic Province (NNMP). These rocks have been previously poorly defined and loosely grouped into the Keimoes Suite, but a recent U-Pb age study has suggested the suite be subdivided into syn-tectonic and post-tectonic groups relative to the main phase of the Namaqua Orogeny. This study adds new whole rock geochemical, isotopic and age data for these granites that confirms the subdivision is appropriate. The older group of syn-tectonic granite gneisses, dated between 1175 and 1146 Ma, have penetrative foliations and are largely derived from fractionated, leucogranitic metaluminous to peraluminous magmas with low maficity, low Ti, Mn and Ca. They were derived from mildly depleted sources (εNd(t): -1.47 to 1.78), with Meso-to Paleoproterozoic Nd model ages (1.57-1.91 Ga), and high initial Sr ratios (0.71970-0.75567) suggesting mixing between younger depleted and older, arc-like sources imparting an arc-like signature to the magmas. High initial Sr ratios appear to be an intrinsic character of these granites reflecting those of granites in the region and the highly radiogenic nature of the NS. The weakly to unfoliated late-to post-tectonic megacrystic granodiorites and monzogranites, including charnockites, intruded between 1110 and 1078 Ma and constitute the Keimoes Suite proper. They have I-type characteristics, being strongly metaluminous and locally hornblende- and orthopyroxene-bearing with moderate SiO2 and with arc-type affinities (LILE enrichment relative to the HFSE, Ta-Nb, Ti and P anomalies). However, the granitoids also have high Fe/Mg ratios, along with high HFSE, LILE and REE contents more indicative of A-type granites. They show an increasing maficity, metaluminous character, and general decreasing degree of fractionation with decreasing age. They are similar to the syn

  2. A 3D Magnetotelluric Perspective on the Galway Granite, Western Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Thomas; Muller, Mark; Vozar, Jan; Feely, Martin; Hogg, Colin

    2017-04-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) and audi-magnetotelluric (AMT) data were acquired at 75 locations across the exposed calc-alkaline Caledonian Galway granite batholith and surrounding country rocks into which the granite intruded. The Galway granite is located in western Ireland on the north shore of Galway bay, and has an ESE-WNW long axis. The granite is cut by trans-batholith faults, the Shannawona Fault Zone (SFZ) in the western part of the batholith, which has a NE-SW trend, and the Bearna Fault Zone (BFZ) in the eastern sector that has a NW-SE trend. Geobarometry data indicate that the central granite block between these fault zones has been uplifted, with the interpretation being that the granite in this central block is thinned. To the west of the SFZ, much of the Galway granite is below sea level, with the majority of the southern granite contact also beneath the sea in Galway bay. To the east of the batholith, the Carboniferous successions, consisting of mainly limestone with shale, overlie the basement rocks. The country rock to the north includes the metagabbro-gneiss suite, which itself intruded the deformed Dalradian successions that were deposited on the Laurentian margin of the Iapetus Ocean. The deformation of the Dalradian rocks, the intrusion of the metagabbro-gneiss suite and the intrusion of the Galway granite were major events in the protracted closure of the Iapetus Ocean. It is clear from geological mapping, from geobarometry and from the present submergence by the sea of a large part of the Galway granite, that inversion of MT data in this structurally complex geology is likely to require a 3D approach. We present a summary of 3D inversion of the Galway MT and AMT data. The study shows that the structure of the Galway granite is quite different from the pre-existing perspective. The central block, thought by its uplifting to be thinned, is shown to be the thickest part of the batholith. A geological model of granite intrusion is offered to explain this

  3. Peralkaline and peraluminous granites and related mineral deposits of the Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Existing geochemical and geologic data for many parts of the Arabian Shield were compiled as a basis for evaluating the resource potential of the granites of the Shield. Commodities associated with granites that have potential for economic mineral deposits include tin, tungsten, molybdenum, beryllium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, uranium, thorium, rare-earth elements, and fluorite. Prospecting methods useful in discriminating those granites having significant economic potential include reconnaissance geologic mapping, petrographic and mineralogic studies, geochemical sampling of rock and wadi sediment, and radiometric surveying.

  4. Earth's youngest exposed granite and its tectonic implications: the 10-0.8 Ma Kurobegawa Granite.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hisatoshi; Yamada, Ryuji; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji; Horie, Kenji; Hokada, Tomokazu

    2013-01-01

    Although the quest for Earth's oldest rock is of great importance, identifying the youngest exposed pluton on Earth is also of interest. A pluton is a body of intrusive igneous rock that crystallized from slowly cooling magma at depths of several kilometers beneath the surface of the Earth. Therefore, the youngest exposed pluton represents the most recent tectonic uplift and highest exhumation. The youngest exposed pluton reported to date is the Takidani Granodiorite (~ 1.4 Ma) in the Hida Mountain Range of central Japan. Using LA-ICP-MS and SHRIMP U-Pb zircon dating methods, this study demonstrates that the Kurobegawa Granite, also situated in the Hida Mountain Range, is as young as ~ 0.8 Ma. In addition, data indicate multiple intrusion episodes in this pluton since 10 Ma with a ~ 2-million-year period of quiescence; hence, a future intrusion event is likely within 1 million years.

  5. The mechanism of ascent and emplacement of granite magma during transpression: a syntectonic granite paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Solar, G. S.

    1999-10-01

    We propose a model for syntectonic ascent and emplacement of granite magma based on structural relations in part of the northern Appalachians. In the study area in western Maine, strain was distributed heterogeneously during Devonian Acadian transpression. Metasedimentary rocks (migmatites at high grades) record two contrasting types of finite strain in zones that alternate across strike. Rocks in both types of zones have a penetrative, moderately-to-steeply NE-plunging mineral elongation lineation defined by bladed muscovite (fibrolite/sillimanite at high grades). In `straight' belts of enhanced deformation rocks have S > L fabrics that record apparent flattening-to-plane strain (apparent flattening zones, AFZs), but rocks between these belts have L > S fabrics that record apparent constriction (apparent constriction zones, ACZs). At metamorphic grades above the contemporary solidus, rocks in AFZs developed stromatic structure in migmatite, which suggests that percolative flow of melt occurred along the evolving flattening fabric. Stromatic migmatites are intruded by concordant to weakly discordant, m-scale composite sheet-like bodies of granite to suggest magma transport in planar conduits through the AFZ rocks. Inhomogeneous migmatite is found in the intervening ACZs, which suggests migration of partially molten material through these zones en masse, probably by melt-assisted granular flow. Inhomogeneous migmatites are intruded by irregular m-scale bodies of granite that vary from elongate to sub-circular in plan view and seem cylindrical in three dimensions. These bodies apparently plunge to the northeast, parallel to the regional mineral elongation lineation, to suggest magma transport in pipe-like conduits through the ACZ rocks. We postulate that the form of magma ascent conduits was deformation-controlled, and was governed by the contemporaneous strain partitioning. Magma ascent in planar and pipe-like conduits through migmatites is possible because oblique

  6. Rapakivi granites in the geological history of the earth. Part 1, magmatic associations with rapakivi granites: Age, geochemistry, and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, A. M.

    2009-06-01

    Rapakivi granites characteristic practically of all old platforms are greatly variable in age and irregularly distributed over the globe. Four types of magmatic associations, which include rapakivi granites, are represented by anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite, anorthosite-mangerite-rapakivi-peralkaline granite, gabbro-rapakivi granite-foidite, and rapakivi granite-shoshonite rock series. Granitoids of these associations used to be divided into the following three groups: (1) classical rapakivi granites from magmatic associations of the first three types, which correspond to subalkaline high-K and high-Fe reduced A2-type granites exemplifying the plumasitic trend of evolution; (2) peralkaline granites of the second magmatic association representing the highly differentiated A1-type reduced granites of Na-series, which are extremely enriched in incompatible elements and show the agpaitic trend of evolution; and (3) subalkaline oxidized granites of the fourth magmatic association ranging in composition from potassic A2-type granites to S-granites. Magmatic complexes including rapakivi granites originated during the geochronological interval that spanned three supercontinental cycles 2.7-1.8, 1.8-1.0 and 1.0-0.55 Ga ago. The onset and end of each cycle constrained the assembly periods of supercontinents and the formation epochs of predominantly anorthosite-charnockite complexes of the anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite magmatic association. Peak of the respective magmatism at the time of Grenvillian Orogeny signified the transition from the tectonics of small lithospheric plates to the subsequent plate tectonics of the current type. The outburst of rapakivi granite magmatism was typical of the second cycle exclusively. The anorthosite-mangerite-charnockite-rapakivi granite magmatic series associated with this magmatism originated in back-arc settings, if we consider the latter in a broad sense as corresponding to the rear parts of

  7. Tonian granitic magmatism of the Borborema Province, NE Brazil: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Ignez P.; de Fatima L. de Brito, Maria; de A. Lages, Geysson; da Silva Filho, Adejardo F.; Santos, Lucilene; Brasilino, Roberta G.

    2016-07-01

    involvement of distinct proportions of mantle and crustal components in the source of their protoliths. There is no consensus in the literature about the tectonic setting of the CVG ie they have been related to either continental margin magmatic arc, with possible back-arc association, or extention-related setting, with generation of A-type granites. However, all the available geochemical data suggest that the CVG represent extension related magmatism. The geochemical signature associated to bimodal volcanism, including pyroclastic rocks, with similar ages, and absence, up to now, of evidence for metamorphism of Tonian age, support the hypothesis of extension - related magmatism.

  8. Review of geomechanics data from French nuclear explosions in the Hoggar granite, with some comparisons to tests in US granite

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.

    1983-05-01

    Numerous unclassified reports on the French nuclear explosions in the Hoggar (1961-1966) were reviewed from the standpoint of geomechanics. The following aspects of the tests are summarized: spectral content of the tests compared to U.S. results; shock front positions with time; cavity radius as a function of yield, coupling, density of rock, rock shear strength, and overburden; radial pressure, tangential pressure and peak velocity as a function of distance and yield; pressure vs. time at various distances; mechanical properties of granite; scaling laws for acceleration, velocity and displacement as a function of yield and distance for all Hoggar shots; extent of tunnel damage as a function of distance and yield; time to collapse of chimney as a function of yield, or cavity radius; extent of granite crushing and disking as a function of distance and yield cavity height relation to cavity radius; faulting and jointing on the Taourirt Tan Afella massif; and influence of water content on cavity radius vs. yield. Whenever possible, these French data are compared to corresponding data obtained in the U.S. granite events Hard Hat, Shoal, and Piledriver. The following results emerge from the comparison: (1) agreement is found between the French and U.S. experience for: mechanical properties of the granites, rock damage due to the blast, and yield-scaled peak values of acceleration, velocity and displacement; and (2) lack of agreement exists for: cavity size, chminey height, and time to cavity collapse. Average spacing of rock joints also was about 5 times greater in the Hoggar.

  9. Late Paleozoic vertical crustal growth of Western Junggar, Xinjiang in China: evidence from petrology and Nd isotope in charnockites and alkaline granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, W. S.; Sun, M.; Zhang, L. F.; Zhao, G. C.; Malpas, J.

    2003-04-01

    This abstract reports our new petrographic, mineralogical, geochemical and Nd isotope studies on the charnockites and alkaline granites in the western Junggar of Xinjiang, China. During the 1997 field excursion, we for the first time discovered charnockites in the Miaergou alkaline granite batholith, one of the six largest intrusive A-type bodies in the western Junggar of Xinjiang, Northwest China. The batholith is located in the southwestern part of the East-Central Asian Orogenic Belt, which is characterized by the presence of voluminous Paleozoic to Mesozoic granitoids with positive ɛNd(t) values. In spatial distribution, the batholith occurs as a ring-like igneous complex, which intrudes the early-Carboniferous volcanic sedimentary rocks of low-grade metamorphism. It is mainly composed of charnockite, quartz diorite, alkaline granite, potash feldspar granite, syenite and rare tourmaline-bearing intermediate-mafic dykes. Charnockites occur only within the diorite. A large amount of gabbroic, dioritic and leucogranitic enclaves are found in a zone between the alkaline granite and diorite. Petrographic and mineralogical studies indicate that the charnockites were derived from partial melting of the lower crust and crystallized under P-T conditions of 5.44˜5.63 ± 1.0 kbar and 700˜800^oC. Zircons from a charnockite sample and an alkaline granite sample yielded concordant U-Pb TIMS ages of 305.3 ± 1. 1 Ma and 274.1 ± 2.9 Ma, respectively, interpreted as the age of the emplacement of the charnockites and alkaline granites. Two-pyroxene granulites, biotite-spinel-cordierite gneisses and sillimanlite-biotite gneisses occur as enclaves within the charnockites. The two-pyroxene granulite enclaves are considered to be restites of partial melting of the previous lower crust at ˜845^oC, whereas the xenoliths of biotite-spinel-cordierite and sillimanlite-biotite gneisses were metamorphosed at low-pressure amphibolite- to granulite-facies, which were related to the

  10. Mineralogy maketh mountains: Granitic landscapes shaped by dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleton, Richard A.

    2017-05-01

    In tectonically quiet regions, the shape of the landscape is controlled by the erosion resistance of the rocks. Erosion largely depends on the release of particles from the weathering rock, which in turn requires a degree of dissolution of the more soluble grains. The rate of dissolution of the common rock forming minerals allows the construction of a numerical Rock Weatherability Scale (RWS) based on the rock's modal mineralogical analysis. Applied regionally to three granitic landscape regions of the Bega Valley of southern New South Wales, the Tate Batholith and Featherbed Volcanics of north Queensland, and granitoids in the Beaufort region of Victoria, the mean elevation of the larger plutons in each region correlates highly (r = 0.83-0.93) with their RWS. Variation in composition within a pluton also shows there is a clear connection between changes in RWS and relief within the pluton. From these results it is apparent that the landscape of such granitic terrains is determined very largely by mineral dissolution rates, with plagioclase composition and content being a major factor.

  11. Fractionated alkaline rare-metal granites: two examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liverton, Timothy; Botelho, Nilson F.

    2001-04-01

    Two suites of tin-related alkaline granites are compared: the Seagull-Thirtymile granites of the Yukon, which were emplaced in a cordilleran setting and the Paranã suite of Goiás, which were emplaced in an incipient rift environment. The geochemistry of these two suites is similar and both have evolved small volumes of Li-Rb rich alkali feldspar leucogranites. Both fall partly, but not wholly, within the compositional fields defined for 'A-types' on various tectonic discrimination diagrams. Halogen contents and major element chemistry of Fe-Li micas from the Seagull-Thirtymile suite indicate that these plutons were reduced magmas that evolved magmatic/hydrothermal systems with increasing Cl content in a shallow, at least periodically 'open' system. The most important Sn-granites of the Paranã suite of Goiás were also emplaced at shallow depth and developed extensive greisen in active shear zones, which contrasts with a more passive environment for the Seagull granites. Both of these suites may be classified as low-P 2O 5 alkaline types and they display particularly Fe 2+-rich biotite micas that separate the alkaline plutons from S-type tin granites.

  12. F-rich strongly peraluminous A-type magmatism in the pre-Andean foreland Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina: Geochemical, geochronological, isotopic constraints and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Cámera, Matías M.; Dahlquist, Juan A.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Galindo, Carmen; da Costa Campos Neto, Mario; Facetti, Nicolás

    2017-04-01

    The petrogenetic nature of A-type granites is a controversial problem. The Vinquis batholith in the Sierras Pampeanas of Argentina contains unusual F-rich and strongly peraluminous A-type monzogranites. A new LA-MC-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon crystallization age of 355 ± 7 Ma indicates emplacement in latest Devonian or earliest Carboniferous time, overlapping with extensive metaluminous A-type magmatism in the area. The monzogranites have a restricted range of SiO2 content (71.5-74.8 %), they are poor in Ca (0.54-1.4% CaO) and rich in FeOt, with relatively high FeOt/(FeOt+MgO) values ranging from 0.77 to 0.86 (average = 0.80) Both [FeOt/ (FeOt+MgO)] vs. SiO2 and [(Na2O+K2O)-CaO] vs. SiO2 plots indicate ferroan and alkali-calcic signatures typical of A-type granitoids. The samples have MgO/TiO2 > 1.2 and are moderately enriched in total alkalis (average 8.18%), with high K2O/Na2O values of 1.40-2.24. The granites are strongly peraluminous, with ASI (molar Al2O3/[CaO + Na2O + K2O]) values of 1.2 to 1.3. The high P2O5 content (0.23-0.37%) is distinctive and close to values reported for other Paleozoic F-rich peraluminous A-type granites in the Sierras Pampeanas. They have moderate contents of high field strength elements (e.g., Zr, Nb, Th, Y, etc.) and moderately fractionated to flat REE patterns [(La/Yb)N in the range 4.8-19.6] showing significant negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.41). Biotite has a distinctive composition, with relatively high Fe2 +/(Fe2 + + Mg) ratios (0.61-0.74) and high F (0.55-1.42 wt.%) content. Together with the whole-rock chemistry this may be useful in identifying strongly peraluminous A-type granites. In addition, the Rb/Sr vs. Th + Zr + Ce diagram may be an appropriate discriminant between metaluminous and peralkaline A-type granites, strongly peraluminous A-type granites and strongly peraluminous orogenic granites. The geochemical evidence indicates that differentiation of the granitic rocks occurred by mineral fractionation from a F

  13. From granite to highly evolved pegmatite: A case study of the Pinilla de Fermoselle granite-pegmatite system (Zamora, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roda-Robles, E.; Pesquera, A.; Gil-Crespo, P.; Torres-Ruiz, J.

    2012-11-01

    The Pinilla de Fermoselle pegmatite is a cap-like body with an asymmetrical vertical zoning, from a granitic facies at the bottom to the upper contact with the metamorphic country-rocks. The granite grades imperceptibly into the pegmatite, which includes three main zones with different degrees of enrichment in Li + F + B (± P, Rb, Cs, Be, Sn). The essential minerals are quartz, feldspar, Al-micas from the muscovite-lepidolite series, Fe-micas (biotite and zinnwaldite), tourmaline (schorl-elbaite-rossmanite) and Fe-Mn phosphates. Apatite, beryl, cassiterite and cookeite are the most significant accessory minerals. The trace elements Li, Be and Sr show similar trends in feldspar, micas and tourmaline, with an increase in the Li and Be contents and a decrease in Sr from the granite to the most evolved pegmatitic zone. Similar trends are shown by Rb, Cs and Ba for micas and K-feldspar, Rb and Cs increasing gradually from the granite to most evolved pegmatitic zones, simultaneously to the decrease of Ba. In tourmaline Nb and Ta contents increase upwards whereas Zn contents decrease in the same way. The Mn contents increase until intermediate degrees of evolution, and decrease again in the pinkish elbaite. Combined field, petrographic and geochemical data are consistent with a fractional crystallization model from a granitic melt, with a clear petrogenetic relationship between the underlying peraluminous granite and the pegmatite body. K-feldspar and, particularly, micas and tourmaline appear as good geochemical monitors using trace elements such as Li, Rb, Be, Sr and Ba, which offer intriguing insights into the petrogenesis of pegmatites.

  14. Bluish granites from Extremadura (Spain): a radiological evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Dolores; Neves, Luís.; Peinado, Mercedes; Pereira, Alcides; Rodríguez, Leticia; António Blanco, José

    2010-05-01

    We have found in the area of Trujillo (Extremadura, Spain) a variety of striking bluish granites, outcropping within the Plasenzuela pluton. They are all quarried under different names and are characterized by leucocratic minerals such as quartz, feldspar (both potassium and plagioclase), sometimes giving a fenocrystic texture and muscovite, with some biotite. As accessory phases, idiomorphic tourmaline is found. Recently a bluish phosphate distributed in the whole rock was detected, included within most mineral phases and fillings from stressed structures that are cutting the rock. We attribute the bluish color of the granites to this phosphate. Although biotite is almost always transformed to chlorite, the rock gives an excellent response to be polished. Physico-mechanical properties make this bluish granite a perfect option for most applications. Absorption coefficient is rather low and alteration by thermal changes has not been observed. A secondary facies with yellow colour also occurs, spatially close to the topographic surface, and probably represents an alteration product of the original granite. This facies is also commercialized as ornamental stone. A radiological survey was carried out in the field, using a gamma ray spectrometer. The radiological background is quite homogeneous in the pluton, without significant differences between gamma ray fluxes of both facies (altered and non altered). The average contents of U, Th and K2O determined in situ with the spectrometer are 7.4 ppm, 0.8 ppm and 3.67%, respectively (n=15). Using U as a Ra proxy, the I index of the EU technical document 112 can be determined, and results in a value of 0.64 for the referred composition. This implies that the rock can be used without any restrictions for building purposes. However, a marked difference was observed in radon exhalation tests carried out in laboratorial facilities. The dominant blue variety shows radon exhalation rates comprised between 0.02 and 0.04 Bq.kg-1.h-1

  15. Getting granite dikes out of the source region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Allan M.

    1995-01-01

    Whether a dike can propagate far from a magma reservoir depends upon the competition between the rate at which propagation widens the dike and the rate at which freezing constricts the aperture available for magma flow. Various formulations are developed for a viscous fluid at temperature T(sub m) intruding a growing crack in an elastic solid. The initial solid temperature equals T(sub m) at the source and decreases linearly with distance from the source. If T(sub m) is the unique freezing temperature of the fluid, dike growth is initially self-similar and an essentially exact solution is obtained; if T(sub m) is above the solidus temperature, the solution is approximate but is designed to overestimate the distance the dike may propagate. The ability of a dike to survive thermally depends primarily upon a single parameter that is a measure of the ratio of the dike frozen margin thickness to elastic thickness. Perhaps more intuitively, one may define a minimum distance from the essentially solid reservoir wall to the point at which the host rock temperature drops below the solidus, necessary for dikes to propagate far into subsolidus rock. It is concluded that for reasonable material properties and source conditions, most basalt dikes will have little difficulty leaving the source region, but most rhyolite dikes will be halted by freezing soon after the magma encounters rock at temperatures below the magma solidus. While these results can explain why granitic dikes are common near granitic plutons but rare elsewhere, the potentially large variation in magmatic systems makes it premature to rule out the possibility that most granites are transported through the crust in dikes. Nonetheless, these results highlight difficulties with such proposals and suggest that it may also be premature to rule out the possibility that most granite plutons ascend as more equidimensional bodies.

  16. Crystalline rocks of the Strawberry Lake area, Front Range, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    This report is a petrographic and geochemical study of the bedrock and a petrologic discussion based on felsic-mafic and silica-saturation ratios of the Strawberry Lake area. This volume is published as chapters A and B. These chapters are not available separatelyThe Strawberry lake area lies between the Continental Divide and Granby, Colorado, just north of Tabernash. It is underlain by Proterozoic rocks composed of biotite gneiss and two plutons-Boulder Creek Granodiorite of the Routt Plutonic Suite and Silver Plume Granite of the Berthoud Plutonic Suite. Relict enclaves of biotite gneiss are not uncommon in the Boulder Creek Granodiorite, in the Silver Plume Granite, and in the granitic enclaves in the biotite gneiss. Granitic and mafic enclaves in the Boulder Creek Granodiorite, granitic enclaves in the Silver Plume Granite and in the biotite gneiss, and a Tertiary andesite porphyry dike complete the rock types.

  17. Vermont granite workers' mortality study.

    PubMed

    Costello, J; Graham, W G

    1988-01-01

    A cohort mortality study was carried out in Vermont granite workers who had been employed between the years 1950 and 1982. The cohort included men who had been exposed to high levels of granite dust prior to 1938-1940 (average cutters to 40 million parts/cubic foot), and those employed at dust levels after 1940, which on average were less than 10 million parts/cubic foot. Deaths were coded by a qualified nosologist and standardized mortality ratios were calculated. The results confirm previous studies that show that death rates from silicosis and tuberculosis, the major health threats in the years before 1940, were essentially eliminated after dust controls. However, we found excessive mortality rates from lung cancer in stone shed workers who had been employed prior to 1930, and hence had been exposed to high levels of granite dust. When information was available, 100% of those dying from lung cancer had been smokers.

  18. Determination of Matrix Diffusion Properties of Granite

    SciTech Connect

    Holtta, Pirkko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Huittinen, Nina; Poteri, Antti

    2007-07-01

    Rock-core column experiments were introduced to estimate the diffusion and sorption properties of Kuru Grey granite used in block-scale experiments. The objective was to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport through rock fractures, especially matrix diffusion. The objective was also to estimate the importance of retention processes during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Rock-core columns were constructed from cores drilled into the fracture and were placed inside tubes to form flow channels in the 0.5 mm gap between the cores and the tube walls. Tracer experiments were performed using uranin, HTO, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 131}I, {sup 22}Na and {sup 85}Sr at flow rates of 1-50 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. Rock matrix was characterized using {sup 14}C-PMMA method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (EDX) and the B.E.T. method. Solute mass flux through a column was modelled by applying the assumption of a linear velocity profile and molecular diffusion. Coupling of the advection and diffusion processes was based on the model of generalised Taylor dispersion in the linear velocity profile. Experiments could be modelled applying a consistent parameterization and transport processes. The results provide evidence that it is possible to investigate matrix diffusion at the laboratory scale. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly-sorbing tracer breakthrough curves. Based on scoping calculations matrix diffusion begins to be clearly observable for non-sorbing tracer when the flow rate is 0.1 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. The experimental results presented here cannot be transferred directly to the spatial and temporal scales that prevail in an underground repository. However, the knowledge and understanding of transport and retention processes gained from this study is transferable to different scales from laboratory to in-situ conditions. (authors)

  19. New methodical developments for GRANIT

    SciTech Connect

    Baessler, Stefan; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Toperverg, B; Zhernenkov, K.; Gagarski, A; Lychagin, E; Muzychka, A; Strelkov, A; Mietke, A

    2011-01-01

    New methodical developments for the GRANIT spectrometer address further improvements of the critical parameters of this experimental installation, as well as its applications to new fields of research. Keeping in mind an extremely small fraction of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) that could be bound in gravitational quantum states, we look for methods to increase statistics due to: developing UCN sources with maximum phase-space density, counting simultaneously a large fraction of neutrons using position-sensitive detectors, and decreasing detector backgrounds. Also we explore an eventual application of the GRANIT spectrometer beyond the scope of its initial goals, for instance, for reflectometry with UCN.

  20. The Pan-African high-K calc-alkaline peraluminous Elat granite from southern Israel: geology, geochemistry and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyal, M.; Litvinovsky, B. A.; Katzir, Y.; Zanvilevich, A. N.

    2004-10-01

    Calc-alkaline leucocratic granites that were emplaced at the late post-collision stage of the Pan-African orogeny are abundant in the northern half of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Commonly, they are referred to as the Younger Granite II suite. In southern Israel such rocks are known as Elat granite. Studies of these rocks enable to recognize two types of granites: coarse-grained, massive Elat granite (EG), and fine- to medium-grained Shahmon gneissic granite (SGG). Both granite types are high-K and peraluminous ( ASI ranges from 1.03 to 1.16). They are similar in modal composition, mineral and whole-rock chemistry. Within the EG, a noticeable distinction in whole-rock chemistry and mineral composition is observed between rocks making up different plutons. In particular, the granite of Wadi Shelomo, as compared to the Rehavam pluton, is enriched in SiO 2, FeO∗, K 2O, Ba, Zr, Th, LREE and impoverished in MgO, Na 2O, Sr, and HREE. The Eu/Eu∗ values in the granite are low, up to 0.44. Mass-balance calculations suggest that chemical and mineralogical variations were caused by fractionation of ˜16 wt.% plagioclase from the parental Rehavam granite magma at temperature of 760-800 °C (muscovite-biotite geothermometer). The Rb-Sr isochrons yielded a date of 623 ± 24 Ma for the EG, although high value of age-error does not allow to constrain time of emplacement properly. The Rb-Sr date for SGG is 640 ± 9 Ma; however, it is likely that this date points to the time of metamorphism. A survey of the literature shows that peraluminous, high-K granites, similar to the EG, are abundant among the Younger Granite II plutons in the Sinai Peninsula and Eastern Desert, Egypt. They were emplaced at the end of the batholithic (late post-collision) stage. The most appropriate model for the generation of the peraluminous granitic magma is partial melting of metapelite and metagreywacke.

  1. Geochronology, geochemistry, and petrology of the Precambrian Sandia granite, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, A.

    1985-01-01

    The Precambrian Sandia granite of north-central New Mexico belongs to the 1.2-1.6 Ga crustal province of the western USA. The granite shows an intrusive contact with the metamorphic country rocks. The Rb-Sr whole rock isochron age of the country rocks is 1.61 +/- 0.06 Ga, (/sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr)/sub 0/ = 0.705 +/- 0.001. The culmination of the intrusion of the Sandia granite took place at 1.44 +/- 0.04 GA. (/sup 87/Sr//sup 86/)/sub 0/ = 0.7054 +/- 0.0005. Rb-Sr ages on biotite-whole rock pairs and an /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar dating of a biotite from the granite indicate final cooling to 300-350/sup 0/C at 1.33 Ga. This suggests slow cooling of the granite at rates which averaged 4/sup 0/C/Ma for about 100 Ma after its emplacement; during this period the Rb-Sr isotope system perhaps remained partially open. The Sandia granite shows compositional variation from granodiorite to quartz monzonite in both the northern and southern blocks. The field geology, petrology, and geochemistry of the two blocks suggest that they form a single pluton. Both the Sandia granite and mesocratic, two pyroxene granulite xenoliths therein give an ..delta../sup 18/O value of +8.0 +/- 0.5% indicating (meta)igneous source ricks for each of them. These values tend to rule out Condie's (1978) favored hypothesis for magma generation of 30-50% partial melting of siliceous gradulites. Rather, they favor an alternative hypothesis, equally satisfactory from the geochemical viewpoint, involving 5-10% melt of a gabbroic or two-pyroxene granulite parent rock in the lower crust. The Sandia granite, and by implication, the other high-Ca granitic rocks of the western USA thus do not seem to represent addition of new mantle-derived materials to the middle-late Proterozoic crust of this section of the continent.

  2. Chemical weathering of granite under acid rainfall environment, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Soo Jin; Baik, Min Hoon

    2008-08-01

    Chemical weathering was investigated by collecting samples from five selected weathering profiles in a high elevation granitic environment located in Seoul, Korea. The overall changes of chemistry and mineralogical textures were examined reflecting weathering degrees of the samples, using polarization microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron probe micro analysis (EPMA), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The chemical distribution in the weathering profiles shows that few trace elements are slightly immobile, whereas most major (particularly Ca and Na) and trace elements are mobile from the beginning of the granite weathering. On the other hand, there were mineralogical changes initiated from a plagioclase breakdown, which shows a characteristic circular dissolved pattern caused by a preferential leaching of Ca cation along grain boundaries and zoning. The biotite in that region is also supposed to be sensitive to exterior environmental condition and may be easily dissolved by acidic percolated water. As a result, it seems that some rock-forming minerals in the granitic rock located in Seoul are significantly unstable due to the environmental condition of acidic rainfall and steep slopes, where they are susceptible to be dissolved incongruently leading some elements to be highly depleted.

  3. Study of the contaminant transport into granite microfractures using nuclear ion beam techniques.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ursula; Missana, Tiziana; Patelli, Alessandro; Rigato, Valentino; Rivas, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    Hydrated bentonite is a very plastic material and it is expected to enter in the rock microfractures at the granite/bentonite boundary of a deep geological high-level waste repository. This process is enhanced by the high swelling pressure of the clay. Since bentonite has a very good sorption capability for many radionuclides, the displacement of the clay might lead to a "clay-mediated" contaminant transport into the rock. The aim of this work is to study the contaminant transport into granite microfractures using nuclear ion beam techniques, and to determine to what extent the clay can favour it. To do so, bentonite previously doped with uranium, cesium and europium was put in contact with the surface of granite sheets. Granite sheets contacted with non-doped bentonite and with radionuclide solutions were also prepared as references. This allowed analysing the differences in the diffusion behaviour of the three systems: clay, radionuclides and clay plus radionuclides. A combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and other nuclear ion-beam techniques such as particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and microPIXE was used to study the depth and lateral distribution of clay and contaminants inside granite. It was also tried to evaluate not only the diffusion depth and diffusion coefficients but also the different areas of the granite where the diffusants have a preferential access.

  4. Hydraulic fracturing in granite under geothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solberg, P.; Lockner, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental hydraulic fracturing of granite under geothermal conditions produces tensile fracture at rapid fluid injection rates and shear fracture at slow injection rates and elevated differential stress levels. A sudden burst of acoustic emission activity accompanies tensile fracture formation whereas the acoustic emission rate increases exponentially prior to shear fracture. Temperature does not significantly affect the failure mechanism, and the experimental results have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing. A critical result of these experiments is that fluid injection at intermediate rates and elevated differential stress levels increases permeability by more than an order of magnitude without producing macroscopic fractures, and low-level acoustic emission activity occurs simultaneously near the borehole and propagates outward into the specimen with time. Permeability measurements conducted at atmospheric pressure both before and after these experiments show that increased permeability is produced by permanent structural changes in the rock. Although results of this study have not demonstrated the occurrence of thermal fracturing, they suggest that fluid injection at certain rates in situ may markedly increase local permeability. This could prove critical to increasing the efficiency of heat exchange for geothermal energy extraction from hot dry rock. ?? 1980.

  5. Ionium dating of igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Kigoshi, K

    1967-05-19

    Local fractionation of uranium and thorium, between minerals within a sample of igneous rock at the time of crystallization, makes it possible to date its solidification by use of ionium and uranium. Results on samples of granite, pumice, and lava suggest that this method of dating is reliable.

  6. Textural and chemical evolution of a fractionated granitic system: the Podlesí stock, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Karel; Müller, Axel; Leichmann, Jaromír; Gabašová, Ananda

    2005-03-01

    The Podlesí granite stock (Czech Republic) is a fractionated, peraluminous, F-, Li- and P-rich, and Sn, W, Nb, Ta-bearing rare-metal granite system. Its magmatic evolution involved processes typical of intrusions related to porphyry type deposits (explosive breccia, comb layers), rare-metal granites (stockscheider), and rare metal pegmatites (extreme F-P-Li enrichment, Nb-Ta-Sn minerals, layering). Geological, textural and mineralogical data suggest that the Podlesí granites evolved from fractionated granitic melt progressively enriched in H 2O, F, P, Li, etc. Quartz, K-feldspar, Fe-Li mica and topaz bear evidence of multistage crystallization that alternated with episodes of resorption. Changes in chemical composition between individual crystal zones and/or populations provide evidence of chemical evolution of the melt. Variations in rock textures mirror changes in the pressure and temperature conditions of crystallization. Equilibrium crystallization was interrupted several times by opening of the system and the consequent adiabatic decrease of pressure and temperature resulted in episodes of nonequilibrium crystallization. The Podlesí granites demonstrate that adiabatic fluctuation of pressure ("swinging eutectic") and boundary-layer crystallization of undercooled melt can explain magmatic layering and unidirectional solidification textures (USTs) in highly fractionated granites.

  7. Mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) in amphibole-bearing granites of the Bintang batholith, Main Range granite province: Evidence for a meta-igneous basement in Western Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quek, Long Xiang; Ghani, Azman A.; Chung, Sun-Lin; Li, Shan; Lai, Yu-Ming; Saidin, Mokhtar; Amir Hassan, Meor H.; Muhammad Ali, Muhammad Afiq; Badruldin, Muhammad Hafifi; Abu Bakar, Ahmad Farid

    2017-08-01

    Mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) with varying sizes are a common occurrence in porphyritic amphibole-bearing granite of the Bintang batholith, which is part of the Main Range granite province. The MMEs of the amphibole-bearing granite are significant as they are related to the I-type granitoids within the Main Range granite province. Petrographic observations indicate the MMEs are mantled with coarse mafic crystals on the rim and contain similar minerals to the host (biotite + plagioclase + K-feldspar + pyroxene + amphibole), but in different proportions. Geochemical analyses indicate the MMEs are shoshonitic with mg# comparable to the granite host. Substantial similarities exist between the MMEs and granite with regards to the normalized rare earth element patterns and trace elements variation diagrams. The MMEs and granite are not completely coeval as the MME zircon U-Pb age (224.3 ± 1.2 Ma) is slightly older than its granite host zircon U-Pb age (216.2 ± 1.0 Ma). The age difference is also observed from the unusual 500 m-long Tiak MME and another amphibole-bearing granite sample from the south of the pluton, which yield 221.8 ± 1.1 Ma and 217.4 ± 1.0 Ma respectively. The oldest inherited zircons found in the MME and granite are 2.0 Ga and 1.3 Ga respectively, while the oldest xenocrystic zircons found in the MME and granite are 2.5 Ga and 1.5 Ga respectively. Identical negative εHf(t) values from zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf analysis for a MME-granite pair indicates the rocks were generated from a similar, ancient source in the basement. Combining the results, we suggest that incongruent melting of an ancient protolith played an important part in the evolution of the MMEs and granite and the MMEs characteristics are best explained as restite. The zircon Hf model age (two-stage) and the I-type peritectic and restitic mineral assemblages in the MMEs further describe the protolith as Early Proterozoic-Late Archean (≈2.5 Ga) meta-igneous rock. This shows the

  8. Quasi-static and dynamic mechanical properties of a granite and a sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, W.A.

    1989-09-01

    The quasi-static failure criteria, elastic constants, and p-wave velocities have been determined for a granite and a sandstone in which blasting experiments are being carried out by the Advanced Technology Division (6258). In addition, the dynamic strength of the granite was measured using a Kolsky bar. Both rocks show a linear increase in strength with increasing confining pressure. The dynamic strength of the granite is as much as 330% greater than the quasi-static value. The strength of the granite was also dependent on the angle between the foliation and the loading direction. There was a 20% difference in the p-wave velocity between that measured parallel to and perpendicular to the bedding in the sandstone. 4 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Opaque rock fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit, B.; Molinaroli, E.; Olsen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors describe a new, rare, but petrogenetically significant variety of rock fragments from Holocene detrital sediments. Approximately 50% of the opaque heavy mineral concentrates from Holocene siliciclastic sands are polymineralic-Fe-Ti oxide particles, i.e., they are opaque rock fragments. About 40% to 70% of these rock fragments show intergrowth of hm + il, mt + il, and mt + hm +/- il. Modal analysis of 23,282 opaque particles in 117 polished thin sections of granitic and metamorphic parent rocks and their daughter sands from semi-arid and humid climates show the following relative abundances. The data show that opaque rock fragments are more common in sands from igneous source rocks and that hm + il fragments are more durable. They assume that equilibrium conditions existed in parent rocks during the growth of these paired minerals, and that the Ti/Fe ratio did not change during oxidation of mt to hm. Geothermometric determinations using electron probe microanalysis of opaque rock fragments in sand samples from Lake Erie and the Adriatic Sea suggest that these rock fragments may have equilibrated at approximately 900/sup 0/ and 525/sup 0/C, respectively.

  10. Hydrothermal alteration of Variscan granites, southern Schwarzwald, Federal Republic of Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, K.

    1990-03-01

    Hercynian S-type granites from the southeastern Schwarzwald granite series represent cogenetic biotite-and two-mica granites. Oxygen- and hydrogen-isotope data show that hydrothermal alteration invoking isotopically light surface waters resulted in a drastic reduction in δ18O and δ D and pronounced disequilibrium between the minerals. Effective water-rock ratios are calculated to be high, about 0.8 vol units. A shift in the18O/16O and the chemical composition of the fluid due to water-rock interaction is continuously traced from pure H2O with meteoric isotopic character in the deep-seated biotite granites to slightly saline water with rock-equilibrated isotopic composition in the two-mica granites at a shallower level. Substantial retrograde hydrometamorphism in the temperature range 500° to 200° C resulted mineralogically in high-temperature chloritization of biotite, and low-temperature muscovitization as well as feldspar alteration, respectively. Another result of the re-equilibration of cations is strong disturbance of the Rb-Sr system which affects measured ages and initial87Sr/86Sr values. Hydrothermal differentiation and alteration probably overlap to a very large extent magmatic differentiation processes.

  11. Fracture controls on valley persistence: the Cairngorm Granite pluton, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, A. M.; Gillespie, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    Valleys are remarkably persistent features in many different tectonic settings, but the reasons for this persistence are rarely explored. Here, we examine the structural controls on valleys in the Cairngorms Mountains, Scotland, part of the passive margin of the eastern North Atlantic. We consider valleys at three scales: straths, glens and headwater valleys. The structural controls on valleys in and around the Cairngorm Granite pluton were examined on satellite and aerial photographs and by field survey. Topographic lineaments, including valleys, show no consistent orientation with joint sets or with sheets of microgranite and pegmatitic granite. In this granite landscape, jointing is not a first-order control on valley development. Instead, glens and headwater valleys align closely to quartz veins and linear alteration zones (LAZs). LAZs are zones of weakness in the granite pluton in which late-stage hydrothermal alteration and hydro-fracturing have greatly reduced rock mass strength and increased permeability. LAZs, which can be kilometres long and >700 m deep, are the dominant controls on the orientation of valleys in the Cairngorms. LAZs formed in the roof zone of the granite intrusion. Although the Cairngorm pluton was unroofed soon after emplacement, the presence of Old Red Sandstone (ORS) outliers in the terrain to the north and east indicates that the lower relief of the sub-ORS basement surface has been lowered by <500 m. Hence, the valley patterns in and around the Cairngorms have persisted through >1 km of vertical erosion and for 400 Myr. This valley persistence is a combined product of regionally low rates of basement exhumation and of the existence of LAZs in the Cairngorm pluton and sub-parallel Caledonide fractures in the surrounding terrain with depths that exceed 1 km.

  12. Fracture controls on valley persistence: the Cairngorm Granite pluton, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, A. M.; Gillespie, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Valleys are remarkably persistent features in many different tectonic settings, but the reasons for this persistence are rarely explored. Here, we examine the structural controls on valleys in the Cairngorms Mountains, Scotland, part of the passive margin of the eastern North Atlantic. We consider valleys at three scales: straths, glens and headwater valleys. The structural controls on valleys in and around the Cairngorm Granite pluton were examined on satellite and aerial photographs and by field survey. Topographic lineaments, including valleys, show no consistent orientation with joint sets or with sheets of microgranite and pegmatitic granite. In this granite landscape, jointing is not a first-order control on valley development. Instead, glens and headwater valleys align closely to quartz veins and linear alteration zones (LAZs). LAZs are zones of weakness in the granite pluton in which late-stage hydrothermal alteration and hydro-fracturing have greatly reduced rock mass strength and increased permeability. LAZs, which can be kilometres long and >700 m deep, are the dominant controls on the orientation of valleys in the Cairngorms. LAZs formed in the roof zone of the granite intrusion. Although the Cairngorm pluton was unroofed soon after emplacement, the presence of Old Red Sandstone (ORS) outliers in the terrain to the north and east indicates that the lower relief of the sub-ORS basement surface has been lowered by <500 m. Hence, the valley patterns in and around the Cairngorms have persisted through >1 km of vertical erosion and for 400 Myr. This valley persistence is a combined product of regionally low rates of basement exhumation and of the existence of LAZs in the Cairngorm pluton and sub-parallel Caledonide fractures in the surrounding terrain with depths that exceed 1 km.

  13. Hydrothermal fluids responsible for the formation of precious minerals in the Nigerian Younger Granite Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaa, S. I.

    1991-04-01

    Preliminary investigations in the Younger Granite Province of Nigeria have revealed that precious and semi-precious minerals like rubies, sapphires, emeralds, aquamarine, zircon and fluorite can be found in the region. The gem minerals are shown to have been produced either by direct deposition along fissures, veins and greisens by hydrothermal fluids or as a result of hydrothermal fluids reacting with wall-rocks. These wall rocks are either biotite granites from which the hydrothermal fluids originated or basement rocks or any other rocks which the biotite granites intrude and their residual hydrothermal fluids have invaded. The hydrothermal fluids appear to have been rich in alkalis (Na+, K+, etc.), rare elements (Be, Zr, F, REE, etc.) and siliceous. As these fluids rose through fractures and channel ways through the rocks, they either deposited the gem minerals in the fractures at the appropriate stability conditions or reacted with the wall-rocks producing the gem minerals at the expense of elements like Ca and A1 in the minerals of these rocks.

  14. Scaling minerals from deep-seated granitic geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Norio

    2016-04-01

    To promote geothermal energy use and sustainable production, the information of scaling situation from deep-seated geothermal reservoir is important. In Japan, at the Kakkonda geothermal field, Iwate prefecture, north-eastern of Japan, there is 80MW geothermal power plant using about 300 degree C fluid from the reservoir at the boundary between Quaternary Kakkonda granite and Pre-Tertiary formations about 3km depth and more deep-seated reservoir survey was carried out by NEDO. Then, to understand the mechanism of deep-seated reservoir, we survey the metal sulphide minerals deposited at production wellhead and pipeline and compare with the brine And the brine of WD-1a at 3.7km depth, into Quaternary Kakkonda granite rock. In Kakkonda geothermal system, the scales are classified into two types based on sulphide mineralogy, which are Pb-Zn rich type and Cu rich type. Pb-Zn rich scales, for example galena (PbS) and Sphalerite (ZnS), are found in Well-19 located at the marginal part of the Kakkonda granite And Cu-rich scales, for example chalcocite (Cu2S), loellingite (FeAs2) and native antimony (Sb), are found in Well-13, located at the central part of the Kakkonda granite. And the brine of WD-1a at 3.7km depth about 500 degree C, into Quaternary Kakkonda granite rock near Well-19 is rich in Pb and Zn and similar composition as the Well-19 scale. Therefore, deep reservoir of Kakkonda field evolves with mixing the fluid of shallow reservoir and the brine of occurred in the Quaternary Kakkonda granite. Then, the existence of both Pb-Zn rich scale and Cu rich scale is a characteristic feature of Kakkonda geothermal and this fact suggest to have similar zoning as found in Porphyry Copper Zoning. On progress of production the fluids from deep reservoir continue to be suffered by the fluid of shallow reservoir and meteoritic water. With temperature of production well decreasing and chemical composition changed, silica precipitation decreased and the metal sulfide mineral

  15. Isotopic, major and trace element constraints on the sources of granites in an 1800-Ma-old igneous complex near St. Cloud, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    A suite of basic to granitic rocks was emplaced near St. Cloud, MN about 1800 Ma ago. These are strongly LREE enriched and were derived from LREE enriched sources. Nd-Sm systematics suggest that LREE enrichment occurred during the Early Proterozoic. Initial Pb ratios for basic rocks through granites are similar to inferred 1800 Ma old mantle Pb, and suggest sources that became U/Pb enriched during the Proterozoic or latest Archean. These sources had long-term Th/U ratios similar to inferred mantle or average crustal values. Oxygen isotopes indicate that granitic rocks incorporated a small previous crustal component. Petrogenetic modeling suggest these processes: Granodiorite represents an evolved high Mg-andesite or a partial melt of a basic precursor distinct from the nearby basic rocks. Granites and quartz monzonites were derived at temperatures of ca. 800-950 (e.g. water-undersaturated) and at 15 to 20 km depth. The sources are inferred to have been quartz saturated with respect to tholeiite. Because granites have similar isotopic histories as basic, sources of granites were ultimately derived from the mantle. REE and Nd isotope systematics allow these scenarios: (1) 40-75% of the Nd in the rocks was derived from continental crust recycled into the mantle. (2) The mantle source had a chondritic REE geochemistry but was enriched in LREE shortly before melting. (3) The rocks were in fact derived by melting a basic lower crust that included a small fraction of intercalated sedimentary rocks.

  16. Geochemistry of biotite granites from the Lamas de Olo Pluton, northern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Susana; Gomes, Maria; Teixeira, Rui; Corfu, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    In the Central Iberian Zone (CIZ) extensive crustal recycling occurred during the post-thickening extension stage of the Variscan orogeny (~330-290 Ma). After the ductile deformation phase D3 (~320-300 Ma), characterized by the intrusion of large volumes of highly peraluminous granitic magmas, rapid and drastic tectonic changes at about 300 Ma gave rise to the brittle phase of deformation D4 that controlled the emplacement of Fe-K subalkaline granites (296-290 Ma; Dias et al. 1998). The Lamas de Olo Pluton (LOP) is controlled by NE-SW and NW-SE fracture systems, probably related to the Régua-Verin fault zone (Pereira, 1989). The LOP is a medium to coarse-grained, porphyritic biotite granite, accompanied by medium- to fine grained, porphyritic biotite granite (Alto dos Cabeços- AC) and a more leucocratic, fine-grained, slightly porphyritic biotite-muscovite granite (Barragens- BA). The contacts between LO and AC are generally diffuse, whereas those to BA are sharp. In fact, the BA granite can occur in dykes and sills cutting LO and AC. Microgranular enclaves and xenoliths are very rare. The LOP intrudes the Douro Group, presumably of Precambrian to Cambrian age, and two-mica granites from the Vila Real composite massif. The LOP granites consist of quartz, microcline, plagioclase, biotite, zircon, titanite, tourmaline apatite, fluorite, ilmenite, magnetite, and rutile, with muscovite in BA granite and rare allanite in the LO and AC granites. The plagioclase composition is of oligoclase (An12) - andesine (An35) for LO granite, albite (An9) - andesine (An30) for CA granite and albite (An5) - oligoclase (An20) for BA granite. There are decreases in: a) anorthite content from phenocryst to matrix plagioclase; b) Ba content from phenocryst to matrix microcline in all granites. The Fe2+ biotite has a composition similar to that of biotite from calc-alkaline to sub-alkaline rock series. The LO and AC granites are meta- to peraluminous with ASI variable between 1.05 and 1

  17. New observations on the quartz monzodiorite-granite suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvin, U. B.; Holmberg, B. B.; Lindstrom, M. M.; Martinez, R. R.

    Five new fragments of quartz monzodiorite (QMD) were identified in particles from soil 15403, which was collected from the boulder sampled as rock 15405, an impact-melt breccia containing clasts of KREEP basalt, QMD, granite, and a more primitive alkali norite. Petrographic and geochemical studies of the fragments show considerable variation in modal proportions and bulk composition. This heterogeneity is due to unrepresentative sampling in small fragments of coarse-grained rocks. Variations in the proportions of accessory minerals have marked effects on incompatible-trace-element concentrations and ratios. Semiquantitative calculations support the derivation of QMD from 60-percent fractional crystallization of a KREEP basalt magma as suggested by Hess (1989). Apollo 15 KREEP basalt cannot be the actual parent magma because the evolved rocks predate volcanic KREEP basalts. It is suggested that ancient KREEP basalt magmas have crystallized as plutons, with alkali norite clasts offering the only direct evidence of this precursor.

  18. Granite disposal of U.S. high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Lee, Joon H.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Goldstein, Barry; Hansen, Francis D.; Price, Ronald H.; Lord, Anna Snider

    2011-08-01

    This report evaluates the feasibility of disposing U.S. high-level radioactive waste in granite several hundred meters below the surface of the earth. The U.S. has many granite formations with positive attributes for permanent disposal. Similar crystalline formations have been extensively studied by international programs, two of which, in Sweden and Finland, are the host rocks of submitted or imminent repository license applications. This report is enabled by the advanced work of the international community to establish functional and operational requirements for disposal of a range of waste forms in granite media. In this report we develop scoping performance analyses, based on the applicable features, events, and processes (FEPs) identified by international investigators, to support generic conclusions regarding post-closure safety. Unlike the safety analyses for disposal in salt, shale/clay, or deep boreholes, the safety analysis for a mined granite repository depends largely on waste package preservation. In crystalline rock, waste packages are preserved by the high mechanical stability of the excavations, the diffusive barrier of the buffer, and favorable chemical conditions. The buffer is preserved by low groundwater fluxes, favorable chemical conditions, backfill, and the rigid confines of the host rock. An added advantage of a mined granite repository is that waste packages would be fairly easy to retrieve, should retrievability be an important objective. The results of the safety analyses performed in this study are consistent with the results of comprehensive safety assessments performed for sites in Sweden, Finland, and Canada. They indicate that a granite repository would satisfy established safety criteria and suggest that a small number of FEPs would largely control the release and transport of radionuclides. In the event the U.S. decides to pursue a potential repository in granite, a detailed evaluation of these FEPs would be needed to inform site

  19. Do S-type granites commonly sample infracrustal sources? New results from an integrated O, U-Pb and Hf isotope study of zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Sarah K.; Gillespie, Martin R.; Graham, Colin M.; Hinton, Richard W.; Oliver, Grahame J. H.; Kelly, Nigel M.

    2010-07-01

    In contrast to I-type granites, which commonly comprise infracrustal and supracrustal sources, S-type granites typically incorporate predominantly supracrustal sources. The initial aim of this study was to identify the sources of three Scottish Caledonian (~460 Ma) S-type granites (Kemnay, Cove and Nigg Bay) by conducting oxygen, U-Pb and Hf isotope analyses in zircon in order to characterise one potential end-member magma involved in the genesis of the voluminous late Caledonian (~430-400 Ma) I-type granites. Field, whole-rock geochemical and isotopic data are consistent with the generation of the S-type granites by melting their Dalradian Supergroup country rocks. While Hf isotope compositions of magmatic zircon, U-Pb data of inherited zircons, and high mean zircon δ18O values of 9.0 ± 2.7‰ (2SD) and 9.8 ± 2.0‰ for the Kemnay and Cove granites support this model, the Nigg Bay Granite contains zircons with much lower δ18O values (6.8 ± 2.1‰), similar to those found in Scottish I-type granites. This suggests that the Nigg Bay Granite contains low-δ18O material representing either altered supracrustal material, or more likely, an infracrustal source component with mantle-like δ18O. Mixing trends in plots of δ18O vs. ɛHf for S-type granite zircons indicate involvement of at least two sources in all three granites. This pilot study of Scottish Caledonian S-type granites demonstrates that, while field and whole-rock geochemical data are consistent with local melting of only supracrustal sources, the oxygen isotopic record stored in zircon reveals a much more complex petrogenetic evolution involving two or more magma sources.

  20. Emanation of radon from household granite.

    PubMed

    Kitto, Michael E; Haines, Douglas K; Arauzo, Hernando Diaz

    2009-04-01

    Emanation of radon (222Rn) from granite used for countertops and mantels was measured with continuous and integrating radon monitors. Each of the 24 granite samples emitted a measurable amount of radon. Of the two analytical methods that utilized electret-based detectors, one measured the flux of radon from the granite surfaces, and the other one measured radon levels in a glass jar containing granite cores. Additional methods that were applied utilized alpha-scintillation cells and a continuous radon monitor. Measured radon flux from the granites ranged from 2 to 310 mBq m-2 s-1, with most granites emitting <20 mBq m-2 s-1. Emanation of radon from granites encapsulated in airtight containers produced equilibrium concentrations ranging from <0.01 to 11 Bq kg-1 when alpha-scintillation cells were used, and from <0.01 to 4.0 Bq kg-1 when the continuous radon monitor was used.

  1. Chronology and petrogenesis of a 1.8 g lunar granitic clast:14321,1062

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Bansal, B. M.; Wiesmann, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Wooden, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Geochronological, isotopic, and trace element data for a pristine granite clast from Apollo 14 breccia 14321 obtained using Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and (Ar-39)-(Ar-40) methods are presented. Trace element data for a possibly related evolved rock, the quartz-monodiorite clast from breccia 15404 are also presented, and the relationship between these two rock types is discussed. The concordancy of the Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd internal isochron ages and especially the Rb-Sr model age strongly suggest that the granite clast formed 4.1 AE ago. It probably crystallized slowly in the crust and was later excavated and brecciated about 3.88 AE ago, as indicated by the Ar-Ar age. A two-stage model involving crystal fractionation followed by silicate liquid immiscibility is proposed for the lunar granite genesis.

  2. Middle Devonian hornblende granite of the Imjingang Belt in South Korea: SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age and its implication on the depositional age of the Imjingang Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeoncheol; Horie, Kenji; Kim, Yoonsup; Kee, Weon-Seo; Williams, Ian S.; Hidaka, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Yeoncheon Group, comprising the major part of the Imjingang belt in central Korean peninsula, is composed mainly of stratigraphically the lower Misan Formation, consisting of calc-silicates rocks alternating with pelitic schists, quartzite, marble and amphibolite, and the upper Daegwangri Formation, consisting of metapelites with rare intercalation of hornblende-bearing siliceous layers. The hornblende granite locally intrudes the lower part of the calc-silicate rocks. Pegmatite veins intrude both calc-silicate rocks and hornblende granite. All these rocks are strongly deformed during the Triassic collision orogeny to have the same geometry of structural elements. The granite is highly strained mylonite with isoclinal and sheath folds, and mineral stretching lineation parallel to the fold axis. On the other hand, competent pegmatite veins are deformed to have lens-shaped boudin structure. Shear criteria in mylonitized granite indicate the top-to-the-east sense of movement. Alkali-feldspar porphyroclasts (

  3. [Analysis of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and plasma mass spectrometry of the Guidong granite body and its implications to granite evolution].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Wei; Chen, Guo-Neng; Peng, Zhuo-Lun

    2013-07-01

    The Guidong composite granite body (CGB) located in the north Guangdong Province consists of numerous rock bodies formed respectively in the early and late Jurassic and early Cretaceous. Analysis of the granites of different period with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and plasma mass spectrometry indicates: (1) From the top of a granite body downwards, the felsic components of rock decrease, while the mafic and sigmaREE, LREE/HREE, (La/Yb)N, as well as delta Eu value increase, suggesting the material differentiation in the in-situ melting of crustal rocks and crystallisation of magma; (2) From old to young of the different period granite-massifs in the Guidong CGB, the felsic compositions totally decrease, and the mafic components, sigmaEE, LREE/HREE, (La/Yb)N, and delta Eu value increase as well, implying multiple crustal melting (remelting) events in the Mesozoic in this area; and (3) Primitive mantle-normalized spider diagram for trace elements of Guidong CGB suggests high maturity of the crust involved in the in-situ melting.

  4. Geotechnical properties of weathered and hydrothermally decomposed granite and their influence on slope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuro, K.; Scholz, M.

    2003-04-01

    Weathering and alternation in granite has a deep inpact on both geotechnical properties of the rock as well as of the rock mass. In a granite rock mass, the discontinuity pattern together with joint cohesion and friction plays a major role especially when prone to sliding. These pheneomena could be exclusively studied at the Königshainer Berge Tunnel Project (Lausitz, Germany) where 3.5 km of tunnel and several kilometers of road cuts have been built in connection with the extension of the German Federal Freeway A4 to the Polish border. The two tubes provided an unique cross section through zones of intensive weathering and hydrothermal alteration within two-mica granites. During running excavation works, these zones could be studied intensively by proceeding a detailed engineering geological documentation, rock mass classification and rock and soil sampling, testing and monitoring. The main topics of the extensive field studies and laboratory work were the characterization of each weathering stage with rock or soil properties such as mineral composition, compressive and tensile strength, young´s modulus, specific destruction work, cohesion, friction angle etc. One of the main observations was the increase of pore volume with the degree of weathering and therefore a distinct decrease of most of the rock properties. A second topic was to get an idea of the distribution of the weathering zones in the rock mass along the tunnel section and the road cuts that are prone to sliding, and to evaluate the common geological model of granite weathering in dependence of discontinnuity pattern and depth. Some parts of the granites underwent two stages of hydrothermal alteration before beeing under surface conditions. Therefore it was necessary to distinguish between the effect of weathering and hydrothermal alteration on mineralogy as well as on geotechnical rock properties. Only after the endogene alteration processes had finished, the rock has been exposed to the exogene

  5. 53. VIEW OF ROCK FOUNDATIONS AIR CLEANED FOR MONOLITHS 1722, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. VIEW OF ROCK FOUNDATIONS AIR CLEANED FOR MONOLITHS 17-22, INTERMEDIATE WALL, LOOKING NORTH Photograph No. 12840. September 10, 1948 - Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam 27, Granite City, Madison County, IL

  6. VIEW OF SOUTHERN QUARRY, FACING SOUTH, WITH ROCK PILES IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTHERN QUARRY, FACING SOUTH, WITH ROCK PILES IN FOREGROUND - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  7. View of drill holes with found chisel on rock face ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of drill holes with found chisel on rock face in work area, facing northeast - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 4, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  8. 3D density modelling of Gemeric granites of the Western Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šefara, Ján; Bielik, Miroslav; Vozár, Jozef; Katona, Martin; Szalaiová, Viktória; Vozárová, Anna; Šimonová, Barbora; Pánisová, Jaroslava; Schmidt, Sabine; Götze, Hans-Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    The position of the Gemeric Superunit within the Western Carpathians is unique due to the occurrence of the Lower Palaeozoic basement rocks together with the autochthonous Upper Palaeozoic cover. The Gemeric granites play one of the most important roles in the framework of the tectonic evolution of this mountain range. They can be observed in several small intrusions outcropping in the western and south-eastern parts of the Gemeric Superunit. Moreover, these granites are particularly interesting in terms of their mineralogy, petrology and ages. The comprehensive geological and geophysical research of the Gemeric granites can help us to better understand structures and tectonic evolution of the Western Carpathians. Therefore, a new and original 3D density model of the Gemeric granites was created by using the interactive geophysical program IGMAS. The results show clearly that the Gemeric granites represent the most significant upper crustal anomalous low-density body in the structure of the Gemeric Superunit. Their average thickness varies in the range of 5-8 km. The upper boundary of the Gemeric granites is much more rugged in comparison with the lower boundary. There are areas, where the granite body outcrops and/or is very close to the surface and places in which its upper boundary is deeper (on average 1 km in the north and 4-5 km in the south). While the depth of the lower boundary varies from 5-7 km in the north to 9-10 km in the south. The northern boundary of the Gemeric granites along the tectonic contact with the Rakovec and Klátov Groups (North Gemeric Units) was interpreted as very steep (almost vertical). The results of the 3D modelling show that the whole structure of the Gemeric Unit, not only the Gemeric granite itself, has an Alpine north-vergent nappe structure. Also, the model suggests that the Silicicum-Turnaicum and Meliaticum nappe units have been overthrusted onto the Golčatov Group.

  9. The geochemical and Srsbnd Nd isotopic characteristics of Paleozoic fractionated S-types granites of north Queensland: Implications for S-type granite petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, David C.; Bultitude, Robert J.

    2013-03-01

    -type granites were derived from unexposed metasedimentary source rocks at depth, consistent with the geology and accretionary tectonic models for the region. Comparison of the S-type granites with nearby similarly extensively fractionated Carboniferous I-type granites shows contrasting geochemical behaviour which appears to relate to ASI-driven changes in solubility of accessory phases. Fractionating peraluminous magmas, like the North Queensland S-type granites, are characterised by increasing ASI, P2O5 and strongly decreasing Th, LREE, HREE, Zr and Y. In contrast, P2O5 strongly decreases while ASI, Th, LREE, HREE, Zr and Y increase or are constant within the I-type granites. These differences, which are also observable between I- and S-type granites elsewhere, provide evidence of how the nature of the source can control the behaviour of even the most fractionated granites.

  10. Lithium and boron in late-orogenic granites - Isotopic fingerprints for the source of crustal melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, Rolf L.; Meixner, Anette; Förster, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    Geochemically diverse late- and post-Variscan granites of the Erzgebirge-Vogtland, the Saxon Granulite Massif, and Thuringia (Germany) formed by anatectic melting of Palaeozoic sedimentary successions and associated mafic to felsic volcanic rocks. The compositional diversity of the least evolved of these granites is largely inherited from the protoliths. We present Li and B-isotopic data of these granites and compare them with the isotopic composition of their protoliths, to investigate whether (i) there exist systematic differences in the Li and B-isotopic composition among different granite types and (ii) Li and B-isotopic compositions provide information on the granite sources complementary to information from the isotopic composition of Sr, Nd, and Pb and the trace-element signatures. Low-F biotite and two-mica granite types have flat upper continental crust (UCC)-normalized trace-element pattern with variable enrichments in Li, Rb, Cs, Sn, and W and depletions in Sr, Ba, and Eu. These signatures are least pronounced for the Niederbobritzsch biotite granite, which has the largest contribution of mafic material, and most pronounced for the two-mica granites. The granites show a relatively narrow range of δ7Li values (-3.0 to -0.5) and a broad range of δ11B values (-13.4 to +20.1). The δ11B values are lower in rocks with distinctly higher contents of Li, Rb, Cs, and Sn. The high δ11B of the Niederbobritzsch granite may be explained by the melting of former altered oceanic crust in its source. Relative to UCC, intermediate-F to high-F low-P granites show strong depletions in Sr, Ba, Eu as well as Zr and Hf, strong enrichments in Li, Rb, and Cs as well as Nb, Sn, Ta, and W, and REE pattern with stronger enrichments for HREE than for LREE. These granites show narrow ranges of δ7Li (-2.0 to +1.6) and δ11B values (-14.7 to -9.1), reflecting the smaller variability of the Li and B-isotopic composition in their source lithologies. The anomalously high δ7Li value

  11. The role of external fluid in the Shanggusi dynamic granitic magma system, East Qinling, China: Quantitative integration of textural and chemical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zong-Feng; Luo, Zhao-Hua; Lu, Xin-Xiang; Huang, Fan; Chen, Bi-He; Zhou, Jiu-Long; Cheng, Li-Lu

    2014-11-01

    It is well recognized that various degrees of mantle-derived materials are incorporated in the formation of granite, and mantle-derived mafic melts are generally considered to mix with crustal felsic melt. Here, however, we provide an example of the Shanggusi leucocratic granite where external mantle-derived hydrous fluid, rather than mafic melt, might be incorporated into a nearly pure crustal granitic melt system. Field observations suggest that the Shanggusi granite consists of granite porphyry, granite dyke and granitic pegmatite and they have consistent zircon U-Pb ages and molybdenite Re-Os ages. The marginal pegmatite, interconnected miarolitic cavities, heterogeneous molybdenite mineralization and significant variation of micro-texture of the Shanggusi granite physically indicate that strong fluid activities occurred in the granitic system. Accumulation of quartz and K-feldspar and bulk-rock major element data imply that fractional crystallization played an important role in the evolution of the granitic system which, however, cannot reasonably explain the significant trace elements fractionation, non-CHARAC trace elements behavior and simultaneous concave and convex REE tetrad effect of the Shanggusi granite, but which can be best explained by the influence of external fluorine-rich hydrous fluid. Importantly, the chemical fractionation, including bulk-rock trace elements and isotopes, is closely correlated with quantitative textural parameter Lmax (the average length of the four largest quartz crystals in each sample), indicating that the vast majority of physical and chemical characteristics of the granitic system were most likely controlled by the wholesale fluid flow. The Shanggusi granite is highly siliceous (SiO2 = 74.91-79.50 wt.%, except granitic pegmatite with SiO2 = 67.41 wt.%), extremely poor in mafic minerals, and with relative homogeneous bulk-rock major element chemistry and mineralogy, which approximate experimentally pure crustal melt that

  12. Geochronology of the Xihuashan composite granitic body and tungsten mineralization, Jiangxi province, south China.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.H.; Rytuba, J.J.; Xu, Keqin

    1987-01-01

    One of the goals of this visit was to collect samples of different granitic rocks in the pluton for radiometric dating to establish the geochronology of intrusion, alteration, and mineralization. This report summarises geochronologic studies during a visit by Chinese and US scientists to the Xihuashan mine.-after Authors

  13. Multiple-staged granite evolution and TaNb mineralization in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yin; Jinchu, Zhu; Shouxi, Hu

    The Mesozoic post-orogenic granites in South China are widespread. Hundreds of tungsten and tin mineral deposits are closely associated with these granites. However, the number of TaNb deposits including those of the granite-type and the pegmatite-type, are relatively less. On the basis of geology, petrology, geochemistry and mineralization data from 8 ore deposits and related granites, we suggest that the TaNb mineralized granites are the special products of well-evolved granite magmas. The most important W and Sn deposits are clustered in post-Caledonian uplift and adjacent Hercynian-Indosinian depression of the South China orogenic belt. Most of the TaNb mineralizations are found within 20 km from the boundary faults surrounding the South Jiangxi post-Caledonian uplift. The paragenetic features of rare metal elements show that TaNb are accompanied by W in the uplift region, and by Sn in the depression region. The general intrusive sequence of a rare metal-bearing granite complex is: rare metal barren (porphyrytic) biotite granite—W and/or Sn ore-forming granite—TaNb (Sn) mineralized granite. The geological and geochemical data from eight mineralization districts indicate that the TaNb mineralizations are always developed in the last stage of a multiple-stage granite evolution. Albite-rich granite is the most common rock type of the TaNb ore-bearing granite, while the maximum albite contents in different deposits vary from more than 60% to less than 30%. Quartz with "snow ball" structure, topaz, and Li-micas (lepidolite, zinnwaldite, Li-muscovite and protolithionite) exist as common typomorphic minerals. The typical TaNb host are Mn-rich columbite-Tantalite and sometimes microlite and Ta-cassiterite. The pegmatoid crust (stockscheider) can be used as one of the most distinctive indicators for the degree of rare metal-tearing granite evolution based on its thickness and zonation. Compared with the normal granites, the Ta

  14. Building the New England Batholith, eastern Australia-Linking granite petrogenesis with geodynamic setting using Hf isotopes in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Landenberger, B.; Belousova, E. A.

    2011-02-01

    leucomonzogranites and A-type magmas (+ 9-+ 12 εHf units). Through combining new U-Pb and Hf zircon isotope data with pre-existing whole rock Nd and geochemical data, a link between geodynamic setting and granite petrogenesis has been identified, where: (i) in thick orogens, granites formed via partial melting of the crust and lack a significant depleted component; (ii) in thin orogens, granites form by mixing of crustal-derived and depleted mantle-derived magmas; and (iii) in highly attenuated orogens, granites can be extremely depleted and dominantly derived from the melting of upper mantle sources. This relationship may be associated with the development or reactivation of lithosphere scale detachments during orogenic extension that could facilitate the transportation of depleted magmas into the crust.

  15. Hydrothermal alteration and permeability changes in granitic intrusions related to Sn-W deposits : case study of Panasqueira (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, Gaetan; Sizaret, Stanislas; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Gloaguen, Eric; Melleton, Jérémie; Pichavant, Michel; Champallier, Rémi; Pinto, Filipe

    2017-04-01

    The Panasqueira Sn-W deposit occurs as a dense network of flat wolframite and cassiterite-bearing quartz veins concentrated in the vicinity of a hidden greisen cupola, and to a lesser extent as disseminated cassiterites in the greisen. Previous studies (Thadeu 1951; 1979) have suggested that the Panasqueira deposit is genetically related to magmatic activity for which the most part is unexposed, and being only represented by the greisen cupola. Hydrothermal fluid circulation during the final stages of granite crystallisation has probably led to the greisenisation of the cupola followed by the deposition of the mineralization in the veins system. Mineral replacement reactions that occurred during the greisenisation could affect rock properties (porosity, density and permeability) which control fluid circulation in the granite. This study aims to investigate effects of greisenisation reactions on the dynamic (time varying) permeability that ultimately leads to fluid circulation in the greisen cupola. To do so, petrological study and experimental determinations of hydrodynamic features (porosity and permeability) for different granite alteration levels and petrographic types (unaltered granite to greisen) are combined and then integrated in coupled numerical models of fluid circulation around the granitic intrusion. Greisen occurs in the apical part of the granitic body and results in the pervasive alteration of the granite along the granite-schist contact. This greisen consists mainly of quartz and muscovite formed by the replacement of feldspars and bleaching of biotites of the initial granite. Otherwise, greisen is generally vuggy which suggests a porosity increase of the granite during hydrothermal alteration processes. This porosity increase has a positive effect on the permeability of the granitic system. Indeed, experimental measurements of permeability with the Paterson press indicate that the initial granite is impermeable (10-20 m2) whereas the greisen is

  16. The density of dry and hydrous granitic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malfait, W. J.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Seifert, R.; Petitgirard, S.; Perrillat, J.

    2011-12-01

    volatile content of the samples. Our results, combined with literature data on granite melt density at atmospheric pressure, provides the first experimentally derived equation of state of dry and hydrous granitic liquids at crustal and upper mantle conditions. This equation of state enables the prediction of the partial molar volume of water and granite melt density for the pressures, temperatures and water contents relevant for partial melting in the lower crust, melt migration through the middle crust and the emplacement of intrusions in the upper crust. [1] N. Petford, A.R. Cruden, K.J.W. McCaffrey, J.-L. Vigneresse, 2000, Nature, 408, 669. [2] Y. Tatsumi, 2000, Geology, 29, 323. [3] N.L. Bowen, 1956, The evolution of igneous rocks. [4] W.A. Chrichton, M. Mezouar, 2002, High Temp.-High Press, 34, 235.

  17. Sources of granite magmatism in the Embu Terrane (Ribeira Belt, Brazil): Neoproterozoic crust recycling constrained by elemental and isotope (Sr-Nd-Pb) geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Adriana; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Campos Neto, Mario da Costa

    2016-07-01

    Whole rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotope geochemistry and in situ K-feldspar Pb isotope geochemistry were used to identify the sources involved in the genesis of Neoproterozoic granites from the Embu Terrane, Ribeira Belt, SE Brazil. Granite magmatism spanned over 200 Ma (810-580 Ma), and is dominated by crust-derived relatively low-T (850-750 °C, zircon saturation) biotite granites to biotite-muscovite granites. Two Cryogenian plutons show the least negative εNdt (-8 to -10) and highest mg# (30-40) of the whole set. Their compositions are strongly contrasted, implying distinct sources for the peraluminous (ASI ∼ 1.2) ∼660 Ma Serra do Quebra-Cangalha batholith (metasedimentary rocks from relatively young upper crust with high Rb/Sr and low Th/U) and the metaluminous (ASI = 0.96-1.00) ∼ 630 Ma Santa Catarina Granite. Although not typical, the geochemical signature of these granites may reflect a continental margin arc environment, and they could be products of a prolonged period of oceanic plate consumption started at ∼810 Ma. The predominant Ediacaran (595-580 Ma) plutons have a spread of compositions from biotite granites with SiO2 as low as ∼65% (e.g., Itapeti, Mauá, Sabaúna and Lagoinha granites) to fractionated muscovite granites (Mogi das Cruzes, Santa Branca and Guacuri granites; up to ∼75% SiO2). εNdT are characteristically negative (-12 to -18), with corresponding Nd TDM indicating sources with Paleoproterozoic mean crustal ages (2.0-2.5 Ga). The Guacuri and Santa Branca muscovite granites have the more negative εNdt, highest 87Sr/86Srt (0.714-0.717) and lowest 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb, consistent with an old metasedimentary source with low time-integrated Rb/Sr. However, a positive Nd-Sr isotope correlation is suggested by data from the other granites, and would be consistent with mixing between an older source predominant in the Mauá granite and a younger, high Rb/Sr source that is more abundant in the Lagoinha granite sample. The

  18. Geothermal potential of Caledonian granites in Ireland and the Isle of Man: Implications from hydrothermal alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritschle, Tobias; Daly, J. Stephen; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Buhre, Stephan; McConnell, Brian; The Iretherm Team

    2015-04-01

    Ordovician to Devonian (Caledonian) granites are common in the Iapetus Suture Zone (ISZ) in Ireland and Britain. Some of these, e.g., the buried Kentstown and Glenamaddy granites, are situated beneath Upper Palaeozoic sedimentary basins, and hence are potential geothermal targets. Numerous granites of similar age and related origin (Fritschle et al., 2014) are exposed astride the ISZ. They are considered to be analogous to the buried ones, and their geochemical characteristics are used as a proxy for the buried granites as samples from deep drilling are naturally limited. The whole-rock geochemistry of nine granite intrusions (71 samples, including both hydrothermally altered and unaltered samples) varies significantly, but with no obvious geographical control. The granites are S- and I-Types with ASI (Aluminium Saturation Index) between 0.7 - 1.4. Average heat production rates range from 1.4 μW/m³ for the Leinster Granite to 4.9 μW/m³ for the Drogheda Granite (Fritschle et al., 2015). The heat-producing elements uranium (U), thorium (Th) and potassium (K) and calculated heat production rates generally correlate positively with niobium and rubidium concentrations. However, S-Type compared to I-Type granites show elevated abundances in rubidium (>130 ppm) and usually have a lower Th/U ratio. Altered samples tend to have a higher Th/U ratio compared to unaltered ones. Within individual plutons trends of decreasing heat production rates with increasing Th/U ratios were observed. This trend is attributed to the hydrothermal redistribution of the mobile heat-producing element uranium. This is also implied by uranium-enrichment in hydrothermally generated Ca and Si-veinlets. Metasomatic processes such as hydrothermal alteration appear capable of significantly redistributing mobile elements such as uranium. Hence, these processes may act as a major mechanism controlling the granite's heat production budget, often shaping a pluton's geothermal exploitation potential

  19. Hydro-thermal experiments and simulations within a granitic fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, Amélie; Flekkøy, Eirik; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Toussaint, Renaud; Galland, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    The porous medium that we consider is a fracture with impermeable walls that have a complex topography. Our study aims at addressing the heat and mass transport which occurs during the injection of cold water into a fracture, initially filled with warm water and embedded in a warm rock. The characterization of such transfers is relevant to, for instance, hydrothermal circulations occurring at depth, or use of temperature measurements as a tracer of flow pathways. The fluid-rock interface separates exclusively-diffusive from advecto-diffusive processes where the water flows, and the heat diffusion is different in the water and rock. We look at the shape of the isotherm lines (in two dimensions) or surfaces (in three dimensions -- 3D) through time, until steady state is reached. We have both numerical and experimental approaches. The numerical simulations are done with a coupled lattice Boltzmann method that solves both the complete Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations in 3D. The experimental setup has been developed in order to adjust the scaling of our simulations and further investigate the complexity of the hydro-thermal exchange. In this setup, an infrared camera and thermistors are used to monitor the temperature in space and time. Water is injected through a partly natural rough fracture: the bottom part is a granitic bloc with a rough wall, and the top part is a flat layer which is transparent in the infrared range. The surface of the granitic bloc has been digitized using a photogrammetry software (MicMac, developed by the French Institut Géographique National). This digitized surface is then transformed into a 3D mask showing void spaces and rock (digitized porous medium), and is used for the 3D hydro-thermal simulations. We will first present a numerical simulation where the geometry of the fracture consists of flat parallel walls perturbed by a single cavity. Then we will present experimental observations of the temperature done using a

  20. Reconnaissance geology and geochronology of the Precambrian of the Granite Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Zell E.; Hildreth, Robert A.

    1978-01-01

    The Precambrian of the western part of the Granite Mountains, Wyoming, contains a metamorphic complex of gneisses, schists, and amphibolites that were derived through amphibolite-grade metamorphism from a sedimentary-volcanic sequence perhaps similar to that exposed in the southeastern Wind River Mountains. Whole-rock Rb-Sr dating places the time of metamorphism at 2,860?80 million years. A high initial 87Sr/ 86 S r ratio of 0.7048 suggests that either the protoliths or the source terrane of the sedimentary component is several hundred million years older than the time of metamorphism. Following an interval of 300:t100 million years for which the geologic record is lacking or still undeciphered, the metamorphic complex was intruded by a batholith and satellite bodies of medium- to coarse-grained, generally massive biotite granite and related pegmatite and aplite. The main body of granite is dated at 2,550?60 million years by the Rb-Sr method. Limited data suggest that diabase dikes were emplaced and nephrite veins were formed only shortly after intrusion of the granite. Emplacement of the granite at about 2,550 million years ago appears to be related to a major period of regional granitic plutonism in the Precambrian of southern and western Wyoming. Granites, in the strict sense, that are dated between 2,450 and 2,600 million years occur in the Teton Range, the Sierra Madre, the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Laramie Range. This episode of granitic plutonism occured some 50 to 100 million years later than the major tonalitic to granitic plutonism in the Superior province of northern Minnesota and adjacent Ontario-the nearest exposed Precambrian W terrane that is analogous to the Wyoming province. Initial 87Sr / 86Sr ratios of some of the Wyoming granites are higher than expected if the rocks had been derived from juvenile magmas and it is likely that older crustal rocks were involved to some degree in the generation of these granites. Slightly to highly disturbed

  1. Correlations between microstructures, K-feldspar triclinicity and trace element geochemistry in stanniferous and barren granites, northern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badejoko, T. A.

    The biotite granites in the Nigerian Younger Granites are a major source of the economic metals Sn, Nb, Zn and W. The textural variations in these rocks are considered together with the composition and structural state of the K-feldspars. The curious disparity in the degree of mineralization of these rocks of similar mineral assemblage is considered to be related to the textural and structural variations. The stanniferous granites are characterized by medium- to fine-grained texture, miarolitic cavities, subsolidus crystallization of biotite and albite; turbidity, coarsening and incoherent perthitic texture of the K-feldspar. The barren granites are usually coarse-grained with few druses, silvery irridescent feldspar grains and coherent perthitic texture. K-feldspars in the stanniferous granites are mainly of maximum microcline structure while the barren ones are characterized by intermediate microcline structure. Compositionally, all the K-feldspars have less than 3% An; they have crystallized in the binary system at temperatures close to 700°C but have now re-equilibrated to various lower temperatures as a result of variable rock-fluid interaction. Positive correlations are observed between Nb, Sn, Rb, Li and F in granites and triclinicity of their K-feldspars. Enhancement of Rb-values is observed in both the stanniferous rocks and their K-feldspar constituents. The variable textures, degree of Al, Si order in the feldspars and enrichment in ore and trace elements are attributed to the presence and abundance of a fluid phase. It is suggested that in the course of magmatic evolution of these rocks an alkali-rich volatile phase developed, accumulated and was trapped in the roof zone of the stanniferous granites.

  2. New contributions to granite characterization by ultrasonic testing.

    PubMed

    Cerrillo, C; Jiménez, A; Rufo, M; Paniagua, J; Pachón, F T

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound evaluation permits the state of rocks to be determined quickly and cheaply, satisfying the demands faced by today's producers of ornamental stone, such as environmental sustainability, durability and safety of use. The basic objective of the present work is to analyse and develop the usefulness of ultrasound testing in estimating the physico-mechanical properties of granite. Various parameters related to Fast Fourier Transform (FFTs) and attenuation have been extracted from some of the studies conducted (parameters which have not previously been considered in work on this topic, unlike the ultrasonic pulse velocity). The experimental study was carried out on cubic specimens of 30 cm edges using longitudinal and shear wave transducers and equipment which extended the normally used natural resonance frequency range up to 500 kHz. Additionally, a validation study of the laboratory data has been conducted and some methodological improvements have been implemented. The main contribution of the work is the analysis of linear statistical correlations between the aforementioned new ultrasound parameters and physico-mechanical properties of the granites that had not previously been studied, i.e., resistance to salt crystallization and breaking load for anchors. Being properties that directly affect the durability and safety of use of granites, these correlations consolidate ultrasonics as a nondestructive method well suited to this type of material.

  3. Granite petrogenesis revealed by combined gravimetric and radiometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartèse, Romain; Boulvais, Philippe; Poujol, Marc; Vigneresse, Jean-Louis

    2011-03-01

    In peneplaned terranes, it is often impossible to get a full 3D view of geological objects. In the case of granitic plutons, for which intrusive relationships between constituent units can provide first order information regarding their petrogenesis, this lack of 3D field evidence is a major issue. Indirect observations can be provided by geophysical surveys. Here, we interpret field gravity data and airborne gamma ray radiometric maps with whole rock geochemistry data in order to obtain information on granite petrogenesis. First, we test our proposed combined geophysical and geochemical approach on the Huelgoat Variscan intrusion (Armorican Massif, France) and we show that ternary radiometric maps are a good proxy for the distribution of K, U and Th radioelements. Then, we apply our method to the Lizio and Questembert Variscan granitic intrusions (Armorican Massif) and show that some features characteristic of the intrusions, such as the feeding zones, can be localised by geophysical imaging. Indeed, radiometric maps constitute a frozen image of the latest stage of the magmatic building of plutons.

  4. Static and Dynamic Flexural Strength Anisotropy of Barre Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Zuo, J. P.; Zhang, R.; Xu, N. W.

    2013-11-01

    Granite exhibits anisotropy due to pre-existing microcracks under tectonic loadings; and the mechanical property anisotropy such as flexural/tensile strength is vital to many rock engineering applications. In this paper, Barre Granite is studied to understand the flexural strength anisotropy under a wide range of loading rates using newly proposed semi-circular bend tests. Static tests are conducted with a MTS hydraulic servo-control testing machine and dynamic tests with a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. Six samples groups are fabricated with respect to the three principle directions of Barre granite. Pulse shaping technique is used in all dynamic SHPB tests to facilitate dynamic stress equilibrium. Finite element method is utilized to build up equations calculating the flexural tensile strength. For samples in the same orientation group, a loading rate dependence of the flexural tensile strength is observed. The measured flexural tensile strength is higher than the tensile strength measured using Brazilian disc method at given loading rate and this scenario has been rationalized using a non-local failure theory. The flexural tensile strength anisotropy features obvious dependence on the loading rates, the higher the loading rate, the less the anisotropy and this phenomenon may be explained considering the interaction of the preferentially oriented microcracks.

  5. Understanding Granites: Integrating New and Classical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Philip A.

    Many aspects of granite geology are covered in Understanding Granites: Integrating New and Classical Techniques, a 288-page volume edited by Antonio Castro, Carlos Ferñandez, and Jean-Louis Vigneresse. However, the topics chosen for this collection lean toward the physical, rather than the chemical end of the spectrum. In the introduction to this 16-chapter collection, the authors set the stage by reviewing the groundwork laid by Hutton, Reed, and Bowen; they then discuss the landmark work of Chappell and White, first published in the 1970s, which ushered in the new era of granite research—one that has continued unabated to the present day. Finally, the editors outline some of the perennial questions of granite science, such as the “room problem,” granite ascent and emplacement, and the thermal and petrochemical requirements for granite genesis.

  6. Weathering-associated bacteria from the Damma glacier forefield: physiological capabilities and impact on granite dissolution.

    PubMed

    Frey, Beat; Rieder, Stefan R; Brunner, Ivano; Plötze, Michael; Koetzsch, Stefan; Lapanje, Ales; Brandl, Helmut; Furrer, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Several bacterial strains isolated from granitic rock material in front of the Damma glacier (Central Swiss Alps) were shown (i) to grow in the presence of granite powder and a glucose-NH(4)Cl minimal medium without additional macro- or micronutrients and (ii) to produce weathering-associated agents. In particular, four bacterial isolates (one isolate each of Arthrobacter sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Leifsonia sp., and Polaromonas sp.) were weathering associated. In comparison to what was observed in abiotic experiments, the presence of these strains caused a significant increase of granite dissolution (as measured by the release of Fe, Ca, K, Mg, and Mn). These most promising weathering-associated bacterial species exhibited four main features rendering them more efficient in mineral dissolution than the other investigated isolates: (i) a major part of their bacterial cells was attached to the granite surfaces and not suspended in solution, (ii) they secreted the largest amounts of oxalic acid, (iii) they lowered the pH of the solution, and (iv) they formed significant amounts of HCN. As far as we know, this is the first report showing that the combined action of oxalic acid and HCN appears to be associated with enhanced elemental release from granite, in particular of Fe. This suggests that extensive microbial colonization of the granite surfaces could play a crucial role in the initial soil formation in previously glaciated mountain areas.

  7. {sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo; Oka, Takamitsu

    1997-06-01

    Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

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