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Sample records for a-type kv channels

  1. Postnatal development of A-type and Kv1- and Kv2-mediated potassium channel currents in neocortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongxu; Horton, Leslie R.; Armstrong, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate numerous aspects of neuronal excitability, and several voltage-gated K+ channel subunits have been identified in pyramidal neurons of rat neocortex. Previous studies have either considered the development of outward current as a whole or divided currents into transient, A-type and persistent, delayed rectifier components but did not differentiate between current components defined by α-subunit type. To facilitate comparisons of studies reporting K+ currents from animals of different ages and to understand the functional roles of specific current components, we characterized the postnatal development of identified Kv channel-mediated currents in pyramidal neurons from layers II/III from rat somatosensory cortex. Both the persistent/slowly inactivating and transient components of the total K+ current increased in density with postnatal age. We used specific pharmacological agents to test the relative contributions of putative Kv1- and Kv2-mediated currents (100 nM α-dendrotoxin and 600 nM stromatoxin, respectively). A combination of voltage protocol, pharmacology, and curve fitting was used to isolate the rapidly inactivating A-type current. We found that the density of all identified current components increased with postnatal age, approaching a plateau at 3–5 wk. We found no significant changes in the relative proportions or kinetics of any component between postnatal weeks 1 and 5, except that the activation time constant for A-type current was longer at 1 wk. The putative Kv2-mediated component was the largest at all ages. Immunocytochemistry indicated that protein expression for Kv4.2, Kv4.3, Kv1.4, and Kv2.1 increased between 1 wk and 4–5 wk of age. PMID:21451062

  2. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D; Ritter, David M; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    A-type voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na(+) channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  3. Open channel block of A-type, kv4.3, and delayed rectifier K+ channels, Kv1.3 and Kv3.1, by sibutramine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Eun; Ahn, Hye Sook; Choi, Bok Hee; Jang, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Myung-Jun; Rhie, Duck-Joo; Yoon, Shin-Hee; Jo, Yang-Hyeok; Kim, Myung-Suk; Sung, Ki-Wug; Hahn, Sang June

    2007-05-01

    The effects of sibutramine on voltage-gated K+ channel (Kv)4.3, Kv1.3, and Kv3.1, stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Sibutramine did not significantly decrease the peak Kv4.3 currents, but it accelerated the rate of decay of current inactivation in a concentration-dependent manner. This phenomenon was effectively characterized by integrating the total current over the duration of a depolarizing pulse to +40 mV. The IC50 value for the sibutramine block of Kv4.3 was 17.3 microM. Under control conditions, the inactivation of Kv4.3 currents could be fit to a biexponential function, and the time constants for the fast and slow components were significantly decreased after the application of sibutramine. The association (k+1) and dissociation (k-1) rate constants for the sibutramine block of Kv 4.3 were 1.51 microM-1s-1 and 27.35 s-1, respectively. The theoretical KD value, derived from k-1/k+1, yielded a value of 18.11 microM. The block of Kv4.3 by sibutramine displayed a weak voltage dependence, increasing at more positive potentials, and it was use-dependent at 2 Hz. Sibutramine did not affect the time course for the deactivating tail currents. Neither steady-state activation and inactivation nor the recovery from inactivation was affected by sibutramine. Sibutramine caused the concentration-dependent block of the Kv1.3 and Kv3.1 currents with an IC50 value of 3.7 and 32.7 microM, respectively. In addition, sibutramine reduced the tail current amplitude and slowed the deactivation of the tail currents of Kv1.3 and Kv3.1, resulting in a crossover phenomenon. These results indicate that sibutramine acts on Kv4.3, Kv1.3, and Kv3.1 as an open channel blocker.

  4. KChIPs and Kv4 alpha subunits as integral components of A-type potassium channels in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Kenneth J; Carroll, Karen I; Sung, M Amy; Doliveira, Lisa C; Monaghan, Michael M; Burke, Sharon L; Strassle, Brian W; Buchwalder, Lynn; Menegola, Milena; Cao, Jie; An, W Frank; Trimmer, James S

    2004-09-08

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels from the Kv4, or Shal-related, gene family underlie a major component of the A-type potassium current in mammalian central neurons. We recently identified a family of calcium-binding proteins, termed KChIPs (Kv channel interacting proteins), that bind to the cytoplasmic N termini of Kv4 family alpha subunits and modulate their surface density, inactivation kinetics, and rate of recovery from inactivation (An et al., 2000). Here, we used single and double-label immunohistochemistry, together with circumscribed lesions and coimmunoprecipitation analyses, to examine the regional and subcellular distribution of KChIPs1-4 and Kv4 family alpha subunits in adult rat brain. Immunohistochemical staining using KChIP-specific monoclonal antibodies revealed that the KChIP polypeptides are concentrated in neuronal somata and dendrites where their cellular and subcellular distribution overlaps, in an isoform-specific manner, with that of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3. For example, immunoreactivity for KChIP1 and Kv4.3 is concentrated in the somata and dendrites of hippocampal, striatal, and neocortical interneurons. Immunoreactivity for KChIP2, KChIP4, and Kv4.2 is concentrated in the apical and basal dendrites of hippocampal and neocortical pyramidal cells. Double-label immunofluorescence labeling revealed that throughout the forebrain, KChIP2 and KChIP4 are frequently colocalized with Kv4.2, whereas in cortical, hippocampal, and striatal interneurons, KChIP1 is frequently colocalized with Kv4.3. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses confirmed that all KChIPs coassociate with Kv4 alpha subunits in brain membranes, indicating that KChIPs 1-4 are integral components of native A-type Kv channel complexes and are likely to play a major role as modulators of somatodendritic excitability.

  5. Kv4 Channels Underlie the Subthreshold-Operating A-type K-current in Nociceptive Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Phuket, Thanawath Ratanadilok Na; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) contains heterogeneous populations of sensory neurons including primary nociceptive neurons and C-fibers implicated in pain signaling. Recent studies have demonstrated DRG hyperexcitability associated with downregulation of A-type K(+) channels; however, the molecular correlate of the corresponding A-type K(+) current (I(A)) has remained hypothetical. Kv4 channels may underlie the I(A) in DRG neurons. We combined electrophysiology, molecular biology (Whole-Tissue and Single-Cell RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry to investigate the molecular basis of the I(A) in acutely dissociated DRG neurons from 7- to 8-day-old rats. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate a robust tetraethylammonium-resistant (20 mM) and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive (5 mM) I(A). Matching Kv4 channel properties, activation and inactivation of this I(A) occur in the subthreshold range of membrane potentials and the rate of recovery from inactivation is rapid and voltage-dependent. Among Kv4 transcripts, the DRG expresses significant levels of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 mRNAs. Also, single small-medium diameter DRG neurons ( approximately 30 mum) exhibit correlated frequent expression of mRNAs encoding Kv4.1 and Nav1.8, a known nociceptor marker. In contrast, the expressions of Kv1.4 and Kv4.2 mRNAs at the whole-tissue and single-cell levels are relatively low and infrequent. Kv4 protein expression in nociceptive DRG neurons was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, which demonstrates colocalization of Kv4.3 and Nav1.8, and negligible expression of Kv4.2. Furthermore, specific dominant-negative suppression and overexpression strategies confirmed the contribution of Kv4 channels to I(A) in DRG neurons. Contrasting the expression patterns of Kv4 channels in the central and peripheral nervous systems, we discuss possible functional roles of these channels in primary sensory neurons.

  6. Delayed Rectifier and A-Type Potassium Channels Associated with Kv 2.1 and Kv 4.3 Expression in Embryonic Rat Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dean O.; Rosenheimer, Julie L.; Kalil, Ronald E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Because of the importance of voltage-activated K+ channels during embryonic development and in cell proliferation, we present here the first description of these channels in E15 rat embryonic neural progenitor cells derived from the subventricular zone (SVZ). Activation, inactivation, and single-channel conductance properties of recorded progenitor cells were compared with those obtained by others when these Kv gene products were expressed in oocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Neural progenitor cells derived from the subventricular zone of E15 embryonic rats were cultured under conditions that did not promote differentiation. Immunocytochemical and Western blot assays for nestin expression indicated that almost all of the cells available for recording expressed this intermediate filament protein, which is generally accepted as a marker for uncommitted embryonic neural progenitor cells. However, a very small numbers of the cells expressed GFAP, a marker for astrocytes, O4, a marker for immature oligodendrocytes, and βIII-tubulin, a marker for neurons. Using immunocytochemistry and Western blots, we detected consistently the expression of Kv2.1, and 4.3. In whole-cell mode, we recorded two outward currents, a delayed rectifier and an A-type current. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that Kv2.1, and 4.3 are expressed in E15 SVZ neural progenitor cells, and we propose that they may be associated with the delayed-rectifier and the A-type currents, respectively, that we recorded. These results demonstrate the early expression of delayed rectifier and A-type K+ currents and channels in embryonic neural progenitor cells prior to the differentiation of these cells. PMID:18270591

  7. Calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II modulates Kv4.2 channel expression and upregulates neuronal A-type potassium currents.

    PubMed

    Varga, Andrew W; Yuan, Li-Lian; Anderson, Anne E; Schrader, Laura A; Wu, Gang-Yi; Gatchel, Jennifer R; Johnston, Daniel; Sweatt, J David

    2004-04-07

    Calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) has a long history of involvement in synaptic plasticity, yet little focus has been given to potassium channels as CaMKII targets despite their importance in repolarizing EPSPs and action potentials and regulating neuronal membrane excitability. We now show that Kv4.2 acts as a substrate for CaMKII in vitro and have identified CaMKII phosphorylation sites as Ser438 and Ser459. To test whether CaMKII phosphorylation of Kv4.2 affects channel biophysics, we expressed wild-type or mutant Kv4.2 and the K(+) channel interacting protein, KChIP3, with or without a constitutively active form of CaMKII in Xenopus oocytes and measured the voltage dependence of activation and inactivation in each of these conditions. CaMKII phosphorylation had no effect on channel biophysical properties. However, we found that levels of Kv4.2 protein are increased with CaMKII phosphorylation in transfected COS cells, an effect attributable to direct channel phosphorylation based on site-directed mutagenesis studies. We also obtained corroborating physiological data showing increased surface A-type channel expression as revealed by increases in peak K(+) current amplitudes with CaMKII phosphorylation. Furthermore, endogenous A-currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons were increased in amplitude after introduction of constitutively active CaMKII, which results in a decrease in neuronal excitability in response to current injections. Thus CaMKII can directly modulate neuronal excitability by increasing cell-surface expression of A-type K(+) channels.

  8. Mechanosensitive gating of Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Morris, Catherine E; Prikryl, Emil A; Joós, Béla

    2015-01-01

    K-selective voltage-gated channels (Kv) are multi-conformation bilayer-embedded proteins whose mechanosensitive (MS) Popen(V) implies that at least one conformational transition requires the restructuring of the channel-bilayer interface. Unlike Morris and colleagues, who attributed MS-Kv responses to a cooperative V-dependent closed-closed expansion↔compaction transition near the open state, Mackinnon and colleagues invoke expansion during a V-independent closed↔open transition. With increasing membrane tension, they suggest, the closed↔open equilibrium constant, L, can increase >100-fold, thereby taking steady-state Popen from 0→1; "exquisite sensitivity to small…mechanical perturbations", they state, makes a Kv "as much a mechanosensitive…as…a voltage-dependent channel". Devised to explain successive gK(V) curves in excised patches where tension spontaneously increased until lysis, their L-based model falters in part because of an overlooked IK feature; with recovery from slow inactivation factored in, their g(V) datasets are fully explained by the earlier model (a MS V-dependent closed-closed transition, invariant L≥4). An L-based MS-Kv predicts neither known Kv time courses nor the distinctive MS responses of Kv-ILT. It predicts Kv densities (hence gating charge per V-sensor) several-fold different from established values. If opening depended on elevated tension (L-based model), standard gK(V) operation would be compromised by animal cells' membrane flaccidity. A MS V-dependent transition is, by contrast, unproblematic on all counts. Since these issues bear directly on recent findings that mechanically-modulated Kv channels subtly tune pain-related excitability in peripheral mechanoreceptor neurons we undertook excitability modeling (evoked action potentials). Kvs with MS V-dependent closed-closed transitions produce nuanced mechanically-modulated excitability whereas an L-based MS-Kv yields extreme, possibly excessive (physiologically

  9. The neuronal Kv4 channel complex.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Manuel; Bhattacharji, Aditya; De Santiago-Castillo, Jose A; Dougherty, Kevin; Kaulin, Yuri A; Na-Phuket, Thanawath Ratanadilok; Wang, Guangyu

    2008-08-01

    Kv4 channel complexes mediate the neuronal somatodendritic A-type K(+) current (I(SA)), which plays pivotal roles in dendritic signal integration. These complexes are composed of pore-forming voltage-gated alpha-subunits (Shal/Kv4) and at least two classes of auxiliary beta-subunits: KChIPs (K(+)-Channel-Interacting-Proteins) and DPLPs (Dipeptidyl-Peptidase-Like-Proteins). Here, we review our investigations of Kv4 gating mechanisms and functional remodeling by specific auxiliary beta-subunits. Namely, we have concluded that: (1) the Kv4 channel complex employs novel alternative mechanisms of closed-state inactivation; (2) the intracellular Zn(2+) site in the T1 domain undergoes a conformational change tightly coupled to voltage-dependent gating and is targeted by nitrosative modulation; and (3) discrete and specific interactions mediate the effects of KChIPs and DPLPs on activation, inactivation and permeation of Kv4 channels. These studies are shedding new light on the molecular bases of I(SA) function and regulation.

  10. Mechanosensitive Gating of Kv Channels

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Catherine E.; Prikryl, Emil A.; Joós, Béla

    2015-01-01

    K-selective voltage-gated channels (Kv) are multi-conformation bilayer-embedded proteins whose mechanosensitive (MS) Popen(V) implies that at least one conformational transition requires the restructuring of the channel-bilayer interface. Unlike Morris and colleagues, who attributed MS-Kv responses to a cooperative V-dependent closed-closed expansion↔compaction transition near the open state, Mackinnon and colleagues invoke expansion during a V-independent closed↔open transition. With increasing membrane tension, they suggest, the closed↔open equilibrium constant, L, can increase >100-fold, thereby taking steady-state Popen from 0→1; “exquisite sensitivity to small…mechanical perturbations”, they state, makes a Kv “as much a mechanosensitive…as…a voltage-dependent channel”. Devised to explain successive gK(V) curves in excised patches where tension spontaneously increased until lysis, their L-based model falters in part because of an overlooked IK feature; with recovery from slow inactivation factored in, their g(V) datasets are fully explained by the earlier model (a MS V-dependent closed-closed transition, invariant L≥4). An L-based MS-Kv predicts neither known Kv time courses nor the distinctive MS responses of Kv-ILT. It predicts Kv densities (hence gating charge per V-sensor) several-fold different from established values. If opening depended on elevated tension (L-based model), standard gK(V) operation would be compromised by animal cells’ membrane flaccidity. A MS V-dependent transition is, by contrast, unproblematic on all counts. Since these issues bear directly on recent findings that mechanically-modulated Kv channels subtly tune pain-related excitability in peripheral mechanoreceptor neurons we undertook excitability modeling (evoked action potentials). Kvs with MS V-dependent closed-closed transitions produce nuanced mechanically-modulated excitability whereas an L-based MS-Kv yields extreme, possibly excessive

  11. Functional characterization of Kv channel beta-subunits from rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, S H; Rettig, J; Graack, H R; Pongs, O

    1996-01-01

    1. The potassium channel beta-subunit from rat brain, Kv beta 1.1, is known to induce inactivation of the delayed rectifier channel Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 delta 1-110. 2. Kv beta 1.1 was co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes with various other potassium channel alpha-subunits. Kv beta 1.1 induced inactivation in members of the Kv1 subfamily with the exception of Kv 1.6; no inactivation of Kv 2.1, Kv 3.4 delta 2-28 and Kv4.1 channels could be observed. 3. The second member of the beta-subunit subfamily, Kv beta 2, had a shorter N-terminal end, accelerated inactivation of the A-type channel Kv 1.4, but did not induce inactivation when co-expressed with delayed rectifiers of the Kv1 channel family. 4. To test whether this subunit co-assembles with Kv alpha-subunits, the N-terminal inactivating domains of Kv beta 1.1 and Kv beta 3 were spliced to the N-terminus of Kv beta 2. The chimaeric beta-subunits (beta 1/ beta 2 and beta 3/ beta 2) induced fast inactivation of several Kv1 channels, indicating that Kv beta 2 associates with these alpha-subunits. No inactivation was induced in Kv 1.3, Kv 1.6, Kv2.1 and Kv3.4 delta 2-28 channels. 5. Kv beta 2 caused a voltage shift in the activation threshold of Kv1.5 of about -10 mV, indicating a putative physiological role. Kv beta 2 had a smaller effect on Kv 1.1 channels. 6. Kv beta 2 accelerated the activation time course of Kv1.5 but had no marked effect on channel deactivation. PMID:8799886

  12. Functional characterization of Kv channel beta-subunits from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, S H; Rettig, J; Graack, H R; Pongs, O

    1996-06-15

    1. The potassium channel beta-subunit from rat brain, Kv beta 1.1, is known to induce inactivation of the delayed rectifier channel Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 delta 1-110. 2. Kv beta 1.1 was co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes with various other potassium channel alpha-subunits. Kv beta 1.1 induced inactivation in members of the Kv1 subfamily with the exception of Kv 1.6; no inactivation of Kv 2.1, Kv 3.4 delta 2-28 and Kv4.1 channels could be observed. 3. The second member of the beta-subunit subfamily, Kv beta 2, had a shorter N-terminal end, accelerated inactivation of the A-type channel Kv 1.4, but did not induce inactivation when co-expressed with delayed rectifiers of the Kv1 channel family. 4. To test whether this subunit co-assembles with Kv alpha-subunits, the N-terminal inactivating domains of Kv beta 1.1 and Kv beta 3 were spliced to the N-terminus of Kv beta 2. The chimaeric beta-subunits (beta 1/ beta 2 and beta 3/ beta 2) induced fast inactivation of several Kv1 channels, indicating that Kv beta 2 associates with these alpha-subunits. No inactivation was induced in Kv 1.3, Kv 1.6, Kv2.1 and Kv3.4 delta 2-28 channels. 5. Kv beta 2 caused a voltage shift in the activation threshold of Kv1.5 of about -10 mV, indicating a putative physiological role. Kv beta 2 had a smaller effect on Kv 1.1 channels. 6. Kv beta 2 accelerated the activation time course of Kv1.5 but had no marked effect on channel deactivation.

  13. Kv7 and Kv11 channels in myometrial regulation

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Iain A; Tribe, Rachel M

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels play a key role in defining myometrial contractility. Modulation of ion channel populations is proposed to underpin gestational changes in uterine contractility associated with the transition from uterine quiescence to active labour. Of the myriad ion channels present in the uterus, this article will focus upon potassium channels encoded by the KCNQ genes and ether-à-go-go-related (ERG) genes. Voltage-gated potassium channels encoded by KCNQ and ERG (termed Kv7 and Kv11, respectively) are accepted as major determinants of neuronal excitability and the duration of the cardiac action potential. However, there is now growing appreciation that these ion channels have a major functional impact in vascular and non-vascular smooth muscle. Moreover, Kv7 channels may be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of preterm labour. PMID:24121285

  14. Effect of tyrphostin AG879 on Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haibo; Zou, Beiyan; Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose A-type potassium channels (IA) are important proteins for modulating neuronal membrane excitability. The expression and activity of Kv4.2 channels are critical for neurological functions and pharmacological inhibitors of Kv4.2 channels may have therapeutic potential for Fragile X syndrome. While screening various compounds, we identified tyrphostin AG879, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a Kv4.2 inhibitor from. In the present study we characterized the effect of AG879 on cloned Kv4.2/Kv channel-interacting protein 2 (KChIP2) channels. Experimental Approach To screen the library of pharmacologically active compounds, the thallium flux assay was performed on HEK-293 cells transiently-transfected with Kv4.2 cDNA using the Maxcyte transfection system. The effects of AG879 were further examined on CHO-K1 cells expressing Kv4.2/KChIP2 channels using a whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Key Results Tyrphostin AG879 selectively and dose-dependently inhibited Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 channels. In Kv4.2/KChIP2 channels, AG879 induced prominent acceleration of the inactivation rate, use-dependent block and slowed the recovery from inactivation. AG879 induced a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of the steady-state inactivation of Kv4.2 channels without apparent effect on the V1/2 of the voltage-dependent activation. The blocking effect of AG879 was enhanced as channel inactivation increased. Furthermore, AG879 significantly inhibited the A-type potassium currents in the cultured hippocampus neurons. Conclusion and Implications AG879 was identified as a selective and potent inhibitor the Kv4.2 channel. AG879 inhibited Kv4.2 channels by preferentially interacting with the open state and further accelerating their inactivation. PMID:25752739

  15. Contributions of Kv3 channels to neuronal excitability.

    PubMed

    Rudy, B; Chow, A; Lau, D; Amarillo, Y; Ozaita, A; Saganich, M; Moreno, H; Nadal, M S; Hernandez-Pineda, R; Hernandez-Cruz, A; Erisir, A; Leonard, C; Vega-Saenz de Miera, E

    1999-04-30

    Four mammalian Kv3 genes have been identified, each of which generates, by alternative splicing, multiple protein products differing in their C-terminal sequence. Products of the Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 genes express similar delayed-rectifier type currents in heterologous expression systems, while Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 proteins express A-type currents. All Kv3 currents activate relatively fast at voltages more positive than -10 mV, and deactivate very fast. The distribution of Kv3 mRNAs in the rodent CNS was studied by in situ hybridization, and the localization of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins has been studied by immunohistochemistry. Most Kv3.2 mRNAs (approximately 90%) are present in thalamic-relay neurons throughout the dorsal thalamus. The protein is expressed mainly in the axons and terminals of these neurons. Kv3.2 channels are thought to be important for thalamocortical signal transmission. Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins are coexpressed in some neuronal populations such as in fast-spiking interneurons of the cortex and hippocampus, and neurons in the globus pallidus. Coprecipitation studies suggest that in these cells the two types of protein form heteromeric channels. Kv3 proteins appear to mediate, in native neurons, similar currents to those seen in heterologous expression systems. The activation voltage and fast deactivation rates are believed to allow these channels to help repolarize action potentials fast without affecting the threshold for action potential generation. The fast deactivating current generates a quickly recovering after hyperpolarization, thus maximizing the rate of recovery of Na+ channel inactivation without contributing to an increase in the duration of the refractory period. These properties are believed to contribute to the ability of neurons to fire at high frequencies and to help regulate the fidelity of synaptic transmission. Experimental evidence has now become available showing that Kv3.1-Kv3.2 channels play critical roles in the generation of fast

  16. Kv1.3/Kv1.5 heteromeric channels compromise pharmacological responses in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Villalonga, Nuria; Escalada, Artur; Vicente, Ruben; Sanchez-Tillo, Ester; Celada, Antonio; Solsona, Carles; Felipe, Antonio . E-mail: afelipe@ub.edu

    2007-01-26

    Voltage-dependent K{sup +} (Kv) channels are involved in the immune response. Kv1.3 is highly expressed in activated macrophages and T-effector memory cells of autoimmune disease patients. Macrophages are actively involved in T-cell activation by cytokine production and antigen presentation. However, unlike T-cells, macrophages express Kv1.5, which is resistant to Kv1.3-drugs. We demonstrate that mononuclear phagocytes express different Kv1.3/Kv1.5 ratios, leading to biophysically and pharmacologically distinct channels. Therefore, Kv1.3-based treatments to alter physiological responses, such as proliferation and activation, are impaired by Kv1.5 expression. The presence of Kv1.5 in the macrophagic lineage should be taken into account when designing Kv1.3-based therapies.

  17. Constitutive Activation of the Shaker Kv Channel

    PubMed Central

    Sukhareva, Manana; Hackos, David H.; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2003-01-01

    In different types of K+ channels the primary activation gate is thought to reside near the intracellular entrance to the ion conduction pore. In the Shaker Kv channel the gate is closed at negative membrane voltages, but can be opened with membrane depolarization. In a previous study of the S6 activation gate in Shaker (Hackos, D.H., T.H. Chang, and K.J. Swartz. 2002. J. Gen. Physiol. 119:521–532.), we found that mutation of Pro 475 to Asp results in a channel that displays a large macroscopic conductance at negative membrane voltages, with only small increases in conductance with membrane depolarization. In the present study we explore the mechanism underlying this constitutively conducting phenotype using both macroscopic and single-channel recordings, and probes that interact with the voltage sensors or the intracellular entrance to the ion conduction pore. Our results suggest that constitutive conduction results from a dramatic perturbation of the closed-open equilibrium, enabling opening of the activation gate without voltage-sensor activation. This mechanism is discussed in the context of allosteric models for activation of Kv channels and what is known about the structure of this critical region in K+ channels. PMID:14557403

  18. Functional analysis of Kv1.2 and paddle chimera Kv channels in planar lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xiao; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2010-01-01

    Summary Voltage-dependent K+ channels play key roles in shaping electrical signaling in both excitable as well as non-excitable cells. These channels open and close in response to the voltage changes across the cell membrane. Many studies have been carried out in order to understand the voltage sensing mechanism. Our laboratory recently determined the atomic structures of a mammalian voltage-dependent K+ channel Kv1.2 and a mutant of Kv1.2 named the ‘paddle-chimera’ channel, in which the voltage sensor paddle was transferred from Kv2.1 to Kv1.2. These two structures provide atomic descriptions of voltage-dependent channels with unprecedented clarity. Until now the functional integrity of these two channels biosynthesized in yeast cells have not been assessed. Here we report the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of Kv1.2 and the paddle chimera channels in planar lipid bilayers. We demonstrate that Pichia yeast produce ‘normally functioning’ mammalian voltage-dependent K+ channels with qualitatively similar features to the Shaker K+ channel in the absence of the N-terminal inactivation gate, and that the paddle chimera mutant channel functions as well as Kv1.2. We find, however, that in several respects the Kv1.2 channel exhibits functional properties that are distinct from Kv1.2 channels reported in the literature. PMID:18638484

  19. Modulation of Kv7 channels and excitability in the brain.

    PubMed

    Greene, Derek L; Hoshi, Naoto

    2017-02-01

    Neuronal Kv7 channels underlie a voltage-gated non-inactivating potassium current known as the M-current. Due to its particular characteristics, Kv7 channels show pronounced control over the excitability of neurons. We will discuss various factors that have been shown to drastically alter the activity of this channel such as protein and phospholipid interactions, phosphorylation, calcium, and numerous neurotransmitters. Kv7 channels locate to key areas for the control of action potential initiation and propagation. Moreover, we will explore the dynamic surface expression of the channel modulated by neurotransmitters and neural activity. We will also focus on known principle functions of neural Kv7 channels: control of resting membrane potential and spiking threshold, setting the firing frequency, afterhyperpolarization after burst firing, theta resonance, and transient hyperexcitability from neurotransmitter-induced suppression of the M-current. Finally, we will discuss the contribution of altered Kv7 activity to pathologies such as epilepsy and cognitive deficits.

  20. The voltage-dependent K+ channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Comes, Núria; Bielanska, Joanna; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Condom, Enric; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Ferreres, Joan C.; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv) are involved in a number of physiological processes, including immunomodulation, cell volume regulation, apoptosis as well as differentiation. Some Kv channels participate in the proliferation and migration of normal and tumor cells, contributing to metastasis. Altered expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels has been found in several types of tumors and cancer cells. In general, while the expression of Kv1.3 apparently exhibits no clear pattern, Kv1.5 is induced in many of the analyzed metastatic tissues. Interestingly, evidence indicates that Kv1.5 channel shows inversed correlation with malignancy in some gliomas and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. However, Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 are similarly remodeled in some cancers. For instance, expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 correlates with a certain grade of tumorigenicity in muscle sarcomas. Differential remodeling of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 expression in human cancers may indicate their role in tumor growth and their importance as potential tumor markers. However, despite of this increasing body of information, which considers Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 as emerging tumoral markers, further research must be performed to reach any conclusion. In this review, we summarize what it has been lately documented about Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels in human cancer. PMID:24133455

  1. The voltage-dependent K(+) channels Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Comes, Núria; Bielanska, Joanna; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Condom, Enric; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Ferreres, Joan C; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-10-10

    Voltage-dependent K(+) channels (Kv) are involved in a number of physiological processes, including immunomodulation, cell volume regulation, apoptosis as well as differentiation. Some Kv channels participate in the proliferation and migration of normal and tumor cells, contributing to metastasis. Altered expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels has been found in several types of tumors and cancer cells. In general, while the expression of Kv1.3 apparently exhibits no clear pattern, Kv1.5 is induced in many of the analyzed metastatic tissues. Interestingly, evidence indicates that Kv1.5 channel shows inversed correlation with malignancy in some gliomas and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. However, Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 are similarly remodeled in some cancers. For instance, expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 correlates with a certain grade of tumorigenicity in muscle sarcomas. Differential remodeling of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 expression in human cancers may indicate their role in tumor growth and their importance as potential tumor markers. However, despite of this increasing body of information, which considers Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 as emerging tumoral markers, further research must be performed to reach any conclusion. In this review, we summarize what it has been lately documented about Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 channels in human cancer.

  2. Kv1.1 and Kv1.2: similar channels, different seizure models.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Carol A; Tempel, Bruce L

    2012-06-01

    Voltage-gated K(+) channels (Kv) represent the largest family of genes in the K(+) channel family. The Kv1 subfamily plays an essential role in the initiation and shaping of action potentials, influencing action potential firing patterns and controlling neuronal excitability. Overlapping patterns with differential expression and precise localization of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 channels targeted to specialized subcellular compartments contribute to distinctive patterns of neuronal excitability. Dynamic regulation of the components in these subcellular domains help to finely tune the cellular and regional networks. Disruption of the expression, distribution, and density of these channels through deletion or mutation of the genes encoding these channels, Kcna1 and Kcna2, is associated with neurologic pathologies including epilepsy and ataxia in humans and in rodent models. Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 knockout mice both have seizures beginning early in development; however, each express a different seizure type (pathway), although the channels are from the same subfamily and are abundantly coexpressed. Voltage-gated ion channels clustered in specific locations may present a novel therapeutic target for influencing excitability in neurologic disorders associated with some channelopathies. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Inhibition of Kv4.3 potassium channels by trazodone.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Choi, Jin-Sung; Hahn, Sang June

    2013-08-01

    Trazodone, a triazolopyridine antidepressant, is commonly used in the treatment of depression and insomnia. Kv4.3 channels are transiently, and rapidly, inactivating Kv channels that are highly expressed in cardiac myocytes and neurons. To determine the electrophysiological basis for the cardiac and neuronal actions of trazodone, we studied the effects of trazodone on Kv4.3 currents stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Trazodone decreased the peak amplitude of Kv4.3 in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 55.4 μM. Under control conditions, the time course of inactivation of Kv4.3 at +40 mV was fitted to a double exponential function. Trazodone produced a concentration-dependent slowing of the fast and slow components of Kv4.3 inactivation during a voltage step to +40 mV. The inhibition of Kv4.3 by trazodone was voltage independent over the entire voltage range tested. Trazodone shifted the voltage dependence of the steady-state inactivation of Kv4.3 to a hyperpolarizing direction. However, the slope factor of the steady-state inactivation was not affected by trazodone. Under control conditions, the closed-state inactivation of Kv4.3 was fitted to a single exponential function. Trazodone significantly accelerated the closed-state inactivation of Kv4.3. Trazodone produced a weak use-dependent inhibition of Kv4.3 at frequencies of 1 and 2 Hz. m-Chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP), a major metabolite of trazodone, inhibited Kv4.3 less potently than trazodone, with an IC50 of 118.6 μM. These results suggest that trazodone preferentially inhibited Kv4.3 by both binding to the closed state and accelerating the closed-state inactivation of the channel.

  4. Functional assembly of Kv7.1/Kv7.5 channels with emerging properties on vascular muscle physiology.

    PubMed

    Oliveras, Anna; Roura-Ferrer, Meritxell; Solé, Laura; de la Cruz, Alicia; Prieto, Angela; Etxebarria, Ainhoa; Manils, Joan; Morales-Cano, Daniel; Condom, Enric; Soler, Concepció; Cogolludo, Angel; Valenzuela, Carmen; Villarroel, Alvaro; Comes, Núria; Felipe, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels from the Kv7 family are expressed in blood vessels and contribute to cardiovascular physiology. Although Kv7 channel blockers trigger muscle contractions, Kv7 activators act as vasorelaxants. Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 are expressed in many vessels. Kv7.1 is under intense investigation because Kv7.1 blockers fail to modulate smooth muscle reactivity. In this study, we analyzed whether Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 may form functional heterotetrameric channels increasing the channel diversity in vascular smooth muscles. Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 currents elicited in arterial myocytes, oocyte, and mammalian expression systems suggest the formation of heterotetrameric complexes. Kv7.1/Kv7.5 heteromers, exhibiting different pharmacological characteristics, participate in the arterial tone. Kv7.1/Kv7.5 associations were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Kv7.1/Kv7.5 heterotetramers were highly retained at the endoplasmic reticulum. Studies in HEK-293 cells, heart, brain, and smooth and skeletal muscles demonstrated that the predominant presence of Kv7.5 stimulates release of Kv7.1/Kv7.5 oligomers out of lipid raft microdomains. Electrophysiological studies supported that KCNE1 and KCNE3 regulatory subunits further increased the channel diversity. Finally, the analysis of rat isolated myocytes and human blood vessels demonstrated that Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 exhibited a differential expression, which may lead to channel diversity. Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 form heterotetrameric channels increasing the diversity of structures which fine-tune blood vessel reactivity. Because the lipid raft localization of ion channels is crucial for cardiovascular physiology, Kv7.1/Kv7.5 heteromers provide efficient spatial and temporal regulation of smooth muscle function. Our results shed light on the debate about the contribution of Kv7 channels to vasoconstriction and hypertension. © 2014 American

  5. Cloning and expression of the human kv4.3 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Dilks, D; Ling, H P; Cockett, M; Sokol, P; Numann, R

    1999-04-01

    We report on the cloning and expression of hKv4.3, a fast inactivating, transient, A-type potassium channel found in both heart and brain that is 91% homologous to the rat Kv4.3 channel. Two isoforms of hKv4.3 were cloned. One is full length (hKv4.3 long), and the other has a 19 amino acid deletion (hKv4.3 short). RT-PCR shows that the brain contains both forms of the channel RNA, whereas the heart predominantly has the longer version. Both versions of the channel were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and both contain a significant window or noninactivating current seen near potentials of -30 to -40 mV. The inactivation curve for hKv4.3 short is shifted 10 mV positive relative to hKv4.3 long. This causes the peak window current for the short version to occur near -30 mV and the peak for the longer version to be at -40 mV. There was little difference in the recovery from inactivation or in the kinetics of inactivation between the two isoforms of the channel.

  6. KV1 and KV3 Potassium Channels Identified at Presynaptic Terminals of the Corticostriatal Synapses in Rat.

    PubMed

    Meneses, David; Vega, Ana V; Torres-Cruz, Francisco Miguel; Barral, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    In the last years it has been increasingly clear that KV-channel activity modulates neurotransmitter release. The subcellular localization and composition of potassium channels are crucial to understanding its influence on neurotransmitter release. To investigate the role of KV in corticostriatal synapses modulation, we combined extracellular recording of population-spike and pharmacological blockage with specific and nonspecific blockers to identify several families of KV channels. We induced paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) and studied the changes in paired-pulse ratio (PPR) before and after the addition of specific KV blockers to determine whether particular KV subtypes were located pre- or postsynaptically. Initially, the presence of KV channels was tested by exposing brain slices to tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine; in both cases we observed a decrease in PPR that was dose dependent. Further experiments with tityustoxin, margatoxin, hongotoxin, agitoxin, dendrotoxin, and BDS-I toxins all rendered a reduction in PPR. In contrast heteropodatoxin and phrixotoxin had no effect. Our results reveal that corticostriatal presynaptic KV channels have a complex stoichiometry, including heterologous combinations KV1.1, KV1.2, KV1.3, and KV1.6 isoforms, as well as KV3.4, but not KV4 channels. The variety of KV channels offers a wide spectrum of possibilities to regulate neurotransmitter release, providing fine-tuning mechanisms to modulate synaptic strength.

  7. KV1 and KV3 Potassium Channels Identified at Presynaptic Terminals of the Corticostriatal Synapses in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, David; Vega, Ana V.; Torres-Cruz, Francisco Miguel; Barral, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    In the last years it has been increasingly clear that KV-channel activity modulates neurotransmitter release. The subcellular localization and composition of potassium channels are crucial to understanding its influence on neurotransmitter release. To investigate the role of KV in corticostriatal synapses modulation, we combined extracellular recording of population-spike and pharmacological blockage with specific and nonspecific blockers to identify several families of KV channels. We induced paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) and studied the changes in paired-pulse ratio (PPR) before and after the addition of specific KV blockers to determine whether particular KV subtypes were located pre- or postsynaptically. Initially, the presence of KV channels was tested by exposing brain slices to tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine; in both cases we observed a decrease in PPR that was dose dependent. Further experiments with tityustoxin, margatoxin, hongotoxin, agitoxin, dendrotoxin, and BDS-I toxins all rendered a reduction in PPR. In contrast heteropodatoxin and phrixotoxin had no effect. Our results reveal that corticostriatal presynaptic KV channels have a complex stoichiometry, including heterologous combinations KV1.1, KV1.2, KV1.3, and KV1.6 isoforms, as well as KV3.4, but not KV4 channels. The variety of KV channels offers a wide spectrum of possibilities to regulate neurotransmitter release, providing fine-tuning mechanisms to modulate synaptic strength. PMID:27379187

  8. Subunit composition of Kv1 channels in human CNS.

    PubMed

    Coleman, S K; Newcombe, J; Pryke, J; Dolly, J O

    1999-08-01

    The alpha subunits of Shaker-related K+ channels (Kv1.X) show characteristic distributions in mammalian brain and restricted coassembly. Despite the functional importance of these voltage-sensitive K+ channels and involvement in a number of diseases, little progress has been achieved in deciphering the subunit composition of the (alpha)4(beta)4 oligomers occurring in human CNS. Thus, the association of alpha and beta subunits was investigated in cerebral grey and white matter and spinal cord from autopsy samples. Immunoblotting established the presence of Kv1.1, 1.2, and 1.4 in all the tissues, with varying abundance. Sequential immunoprecipitations identified the subunits coassembled. A putative tetramer of Kv1.3/1.4/1.1/1.2 was found in grey matter. Both cerebral white matter and spinal cord contained the heterooligomers Kv1.1/1.4 and Kv1.1/1.2, similar to grey matter, but both lacked Kv1.3 and the Kv1.4/1.2 combination. An apparent Kv1.4 homooligomer was detected in all the samples, whereas only the brain tissue possessed a putative Kv1.2 homomer. In grey matter, Kvbeta2.1 was coassociated with the Kv1.1/1.2 combination and Kv1.2 homooligomer. In white matter, Kvbeta2.1 was associated with Kv1.2 only, whereas Kvbeta1.1 coprecipitated with all the alpha subunits present. This represents the first description of Kv1 subunit complexes in the human CNS and demonstrates regional variations, indicative of functional specialisation.

  9. Dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel antagonists and agonists block Kv4.2, Kv4.3 and Kv1.4 K+ channels expressed in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Noriyuki; Ohya, Susumu; Muraki, Katsuhiko; Giles, Wayne; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2003-06-01

    (1) We have determined the molecular basis of nicardipine-induced block of cardiac transient outward K(+) currents (I(to)). Inhibition of I(to) was studied using cloned voltage-dependent K(+) channels (Kv) channels, rat Kv4.3L, Kv4.2, and Kv1.4, expressed in human embryonic kidney cell line 293 (HEK293) cells. (2) Application of the dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel antagonist, nicardipine, accelerated the inactivation rate and reduced the peak amplitude of Kv4.3L currents in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50): 0.42 micro M). The dihydropyridine (DHP) Ca(2+) channel agonist, Bay K 8644, also blocked this K(+) current (IC(50): 1.74 micro M). (3) Nicardipine (1 micro M) slightly, but significantly, shifted the voltage dependence of activation and steady-state inactivation to more negative potentials, and also slowed markedly the recovery from inactivation of Kv4.3L currents. (4) Coexpression of K(+) channel-interacting protein 2 (KChIP2) significantly slowed the inactivation of Kv4.3L currents as expected. However, the features of DHP-induced block of K(+) current were not substantially altered. (5) Nicardipine exhibited similar block of Kv1.4 and Kv4.2 channels stably expressed in HEK293 cells; IC(50)'s were 0.80 and 0.62 micro M, respectively. (6) Thus, at submicromolar concentrations, DHP Ca(2+) antagonist and agonist inhibit Kv4.3L and have similar inhibiting effects on other components of cardiac I(to), Kv4.2 and Kv1.4.

  10. The dipeptidyl-peptidase-like protein DPP6 determines the unitary conductance of neuronal Kv4.2 channels.

    PubMed

    Kaulin, Yuri A; De Santiago-Castillo, José A; Rocha, Carmen A; Nadal, Marcela S; Rudy, Bernardo; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-03-11

    The neuronal subthreshold-operating A-type K(+) current regulates electrical excitability, spike timing, and synaptic integration and plasticity. The Kv4 channels underlying this current have been implicated in epilepsy, regulation of dopamine release, and pain plasticity. However, the unitary conductance (gamma) of neuronal somatodendritic A-type K(+) channels composed of Kv4 pore-forming subunits is larger (approximately 7.5 pS) than that of Kv4 channels expressed singly in heterologous cells (approximately 4 pS). Here, we examined the putative novel contribution of the dipeptidyl-peptidase-like protein-6 DPP6-S to the gamma of native [cerebellar granule neuron (CGN)] and reconstituted Kv4.2 channels. Coexpression of Kv4.2 proteins with DPP6-S was sufficient to match the gamma of native CGN channels; and CGN Kv4 channels from dpp6 knock-out mice yielded a gamma indistinguishable from that of Kv4.2 channels expressed singly. Moreover, suggesting electrostatic interactions, charge neutralization mutations of two N-terminal acidic residues in DPP6-S eliminated the increase in gamma. Therefore, DPP6-S, as a membrane protein extrinsic to the pore domain, is necessary and sufficient to explain a fundamental difference between native and recombinant Kv4 channels. These observations may help to understand the molecular basis of neurological disorders correlated with recently identified human mutations in the dpp6 gene.

  11. The Dipeptidyl-Peptidase-Like Protein DPP6 Determines the Unitary Conductance of Neuronal Kv4.2 Channels

    PubMed Central

    De Santiago-Castillo, José A.; Rocha, Carmen A.; Nadal, Marcela S.; Rudy, Bernardo; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The neuronal subthreshold-operating A-type K+ current regulates electrical excitability, spike timing, and synaptic integration and plasticity. The Kv4 channels underlying this current have been implicated in epilepsy, regulation of dopamine release, and pain plasticity. However, the unitary conductance (γ) of neuronal somatodendritic A-type K+ channels composed of Kv4 pore-forming subunits is larger (∼7.5 pS) than that of Kv4 channels expressed singly in heterologous cells (∼4 pS). Here, we examined the putative novel contribution of the dipeptidyl-peptidase-like protein-6 DPP6-S to the γ of native [cerebellar granule neuron (CGN)] and reconstituted Kv4.2 channels. Coexpression of Kv4.2 proteins with DPP6-S was sufficient to match the γ of native CGN channels; and CGN Kv4 channels from dpp6 knock-out mice yielded a γ indistinguishable from that of Kv4.2 channels expressed singly. Moreover, suggesting electrostatic interactions, charge neutralization mutations of two N-terminal acidic residues in DPP6-S eliminated the increase in γ. Therefore, DPP6-S, as a membrane protein extrinsic to the pore domain, is necessary and sufficient to explain a fundamental difference between native and recombinant Kv4 channels. These observations may help to understand the molecular basis of neurological disorders correlated with recently identified human mutations in the dpp6 gene. PMID:19279261

  12. KV7 channels in the human detrusor: channel modulator effects and gene and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Bientinesi, Riccardo; Mancuso, Cesare; Martire, Maria; Bassi, Pier Francesco; Sacco, Emilio; Currò, Diego

    2017-02-01

    Voltage-gated type 7 K(+) (KV7 or KCNQ) channels regulate the contractility of various smooth muscles. With this study, we aimed to assess the role of KV7 channels in the regulation of human detrusor contractility, as well as the gene and protein expression of KV7 channels in this tissue. For these purposes, the isolated organ technique, RT-qPCR, and Western blot were used, respectively. XE-991, a selective KV7 channel blocker, concentration-dependently contracted the human detrusor; mean EC50 and Emax of XE-991-induced concentration-response curve were 14.1 μM and 28.8 % of the maximal bethanechol-induced contraction, respectively. Flupirtine and retigabine, selective KV7.2-7.5 channel activators, induced concentration-dependent relaxations of bethanechol-precontracted strips, with maximal relaxations of 51.6 and 51.8 % of the precontraction, respectively. XE-991 blocked the relaxations induced by flupirtine and retigabine. All five KCNQ genes were found to be expressed in the detrusor with KCNQ4 being the most expressed among them. Different bands, having sizes similar to some of reported KV7.1, 7.4, and 7.5 channel subunit isoforms, were detected in the detrusor by Western blot with the KV7.4 band being the most intense among them. In conclusion, KV7 channels contribute to set the basal tone of the human detrusor. In addition, KV7 channel activators significantly relax the detrusor. The KV7.4 channels are probably the most important KV7 channels expressed in the human detrusor. These data suggest that selective KV7.4 channel activators might represent new pharmacological tools for inducing therapeutic relaxation of the detrusor.

  13. Kv3.4 channel function and dysfunction in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, David M; Zemel, Benjamin M; Lepore, Angelo C; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the isolation of the Kv3.4 current in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and described dysregulation of this current in a spinal cord injury (SCI) model of chronic pain. These studies strongly suggest that rat Kv3.4 channels are major regulators of excitability in DRG neurons from pups and adult females, where they help determine action potential (AP) repolarization and spiking properties. Here, we characterized the Kv3.4 current in rat DRG neurons from adult males and show that it transfers 40–70% of the total repolarizing charge during the AP across all ages and sexes. Following SCI, we also found remodeling of the repolarizing currents during the AP. In the light of these studies, homomeric Kv3.4 channels expressed in DRG nociceptors are emerging novel targets that may help develop new approaches to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:26039360

  14. Kv3.4 channel function and dysfunction in nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Ritter, David M; Zemel, Benjamin M; Lepore, Angelo C; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the isolation of the Kv3.4 current in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and described dysregulation of this current in a spinal cord injury (SCI) model of chronic pain. These studies strongly suggest that rat Kv3.4 channels are major regulators of excitability in DRG neurons from pups and adult females, where they help determine action potential (AP) repolarization and spiking properties. Here, we characterized the Kv3.4 current in rat DRG neurons from adult males and show that it transfers 40-70% of the total repolarizing charge during the AP across all ages and sexes. Following SCI, we also found remodeling of the repolarizing currents during the AP. In the light of these studies, homomeric Kv3.4 channels expressed in DRG nociceptors are emerging novel targets that may help develop new approaches to treat neuropathic pain.

  15. Conserved Negative Charges in the N-terminal Tetramerization Domain Mediate Efficient Assembly of Kv2.1 and Kv2.1/Kv6.4 Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Bocksteins, Elke; Labro, Alain J.; Mayeur, Evy; Bruyns, Tine; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk; Snyders, Dirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are transmembrane tetramers of individual α-subunits. Eight different Shaker-related Kv subfamilies have been identified in which the tetramerization domain T1, located on the intracellular N terminus, facilitates and controls the assembly of both homo- and heterotetrameric channels. Only the Kv2 α-subunits are able to form heterotetramers with members of the silent Kv subfamilies (Kv5, Kv6, Kv8, and Kv9). The T1 domain contains two subdomains, A and B box, which presumably determine subfamily specificity by preventing incompatible subunits to assemble. In contrast, little is known about the involvement of the A/B linker sequence. Both Kv2 and silent Kv subfamilies contain a fully conserved and negatively charged sequence (CDD) in this linker that is lacking in the other subfamilies. Neutralizing these aspartates in Kv2.1 by mutating them to alanines did not affect the gating properties, but reduced the current density moderately. However, charge reversal arginine substitutions strongly reduced the current density of these homotetrameric mutant Kv2.1 channels and immunocytochemistry confirmed the reduced expression at the plasma membrane. Förster resonance energy transfer measurements using confocal microscopy showed that the latter was not due to impaired trafficking, but to a failure to assemble the tetramer. This was further confirmed with co-immunoprecipitation experiments. The corresponding arginine substitution in Kv6.4 prevented its heterotetrameric interaction with Kv2.1. These results indicate that these aspartates (especially the first one) in the A/B box linker of the T1 domain are required for efficient assembly of both homotetrameric Kv2.1 and heterotetrameric Kv2.1/silent Kv6.4 channels. PMID:19717558

  16. Structural Insight into KCNQ (Kv7) Channel Assembly and Channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Clark, Kimberly A.; Holton, James M.; Minor, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Kv7.x (KCNQ) voltage-gated potassium channels form the cardiac and auditory IKs current and the neuronal M-current. The five Kv7 subtypes have distinct assembly preferences encoded by a C-terminal cytoplasmic assembly domain, the A-domain Tail. Here, we present the high-resolution structure of the Kv7.4 A-domain Tail together with biochemical experiments that show that the domain is a self-assembling, parallel, four-stranded coiled coil. Structural analysis and biochemical studies indicate conservation of the coiled coil in all Kv7 subtypes and that a limited set of interactions encode assembly specificity determinants. Kv7 mutations have prominent roles in arrhythmias, deafness, and epilepsy. The structure together with biochemical data indicate that A-domain Tail arrhythmia mutations cluster on the solvent-accessible surface of the subunit interface at a likely site of action for modulatory proteins. Together, the data provide a framework for understanding Kv7 assembly specificity and the molecular basis of a distinct set of Kv7 channelopathies. PMID:17329207

  17. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Frances L.; Kirk, Matthew E.; Rennie, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K+ channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K+ channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space. PMID:26082693

  18. Kv3.3 potassium channels and spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-08-15

    The voltage-dependent potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed at high levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells, in auditory brainstem nuclei and in many other neurons capable of firing at high rates. In the cerebellum, it helps to shape the very characteristic complex spike of Purkinje cells. Kv3.3 differs from other closely related channels in that human mutations in the gene encoding Kv3.3 (KCNC3) result in a unique neurodegenerative disease termed spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13). This primarily affects the cerebellum, but also results in extracerebellar symptoms. Different mutations produce either early onset SCA13, associated with delayed motor and impaired cognitive skill acquisition, or late onset SCA13, which typically produces cerebellar degeneration in middle age. This review covers the localization and physiological function of Kv3.3 in the central nervous system and how the normal function of the channel is altered by the disease-causing mutations. It also describes experimental approaches that are being used to understand how Kv3.3 mutations are linked to neuronal survival, and to develop strategies for treatment.

  19. State-dependent inactivation of the Kv3 potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Marom, S; Levitan, I B

    1994-01-01

    Inactivation of Kv3 (Kv1.3) delayed rectifier potassium channels was studied in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. These channels inactivate slowly during a long depolarizing pulse. In addition, inactivation accumulates in response to a series of short depolarizing pulses (cumulative inactivation), although no significant inactivation occurs within each short pulse. The extent of cumulative inactivation does not depend on the voltage during the depolarizing pulse, but it does vary in a biphasic manner as a function of the interpulse duration. Furthermore, the rate of cumulative inactivation is influenced by changing the rate of deactivation. These data are consistent with a model in which Kv3 channel inactivation is a state-dependent and voltage-independent process. Macroscopic and single channel experiments indicate that inactivation can occur from a closed (silent) state before channel opening. That is, channels need not open to inactivate. The transition that leads to the inactivated state from the silent state is, in fact, severalfold faster then the observed inactivation of current during long depolarizing pulses. Long pulse-induced inactivation appears to be slow, because its rate is limited by the probability that channels are in the open state, rather than in the silent state from which they can inactivate. External potassium and external calcium ions alter the rates of cumulative and long pulse-induced inactivation, suggesting that antagonistic potassium and calcium binding steps are involved in the normal gating of the channel. PMID:7948675

  20. Gating charge immobilization in Kv4.2 channels: the basis of closed-state inactivation.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Kevin; De Santiago-Castillo, Jose A; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2008-03-01

    Kv4 channels mediate the somatodendritic A-type K+ current (I(SA)) in neurons. The availability of functional Kv4 channels is dynamically regulated by the membrane potential such that subthreshold depolarizations render Kv4 channels unavailable. The underlying process involves inactivation from closed states along the main activation pathway. Although classical inactivation mechanisms such as N- and P/C-type inactivation have been excluded, a clear understanding of closed-state inactivation in Kv4 channels has remained elusive. This is in part due to the lack of crucial information about the interactions between gating charge (Q) movement, activation, and inactivation. To overcome this limitation, we engineered a charybdotoxin (CTX)-sensitive Kv4.2 channel, which enabled us to obtain the first measurements of Kv4.2 gating currents after blocking K+ conduction with CTX (Dougherty and Covarrubias. 2006J. Gen. Physiol. 128:745-753). Here, we exploited this approach further to investigate the mechanism that links closed-state inactivation to slow Q-immobilization in Kv4 channels. The main observations revealed profound Q-immobilization at steady-state over a range of hyperpolarized voltages (-110 to -75 mV). Depolarization in this range moves <5% of the observable Q associated with activation and is insufficient to open the channels significantly. The kinetics and voltage dependence of Q-immobilization and ionic current inactivation between -153 and -47 mV are similar and independent of the channel's proximal N-terminal region (residues 2-40). A coupled state diagram of closed-state inactivation with a quasi-absorbing inactivated state explained the results from ionic and gating current experiments globally. We conclude that Q-immobilization and closed-state inactivation at hyperpolarized voltages are two manifestations of the same process in Kv4.2 channels, and propose that inactivation in the absence of N- and P/C-type mechanisms involves desensitization to voltage

  1. Synaptotagmin I delays the fast inactivation of Kv1.4 channel through interaction with its N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.4 is an important A-type potassium channel and modulates the excitability of neurons in central nervous system. Analysis of the interaction between Kv1.4 and its interacting proteins is helpful to elucidate the function and mechanism of the channel. Results In the present research, synaptotagmin I was for the first time demonstrated to be an interacting protein of Kv1.4 and its interaction with Kv1.4 channel did not require the mediation of other synaptic proteins. Using patch-clamp technique, synaptotagmin I was found to delay the inactivation of Kv1.4 in HEK293T cells in a Ca2+-dependent manner, and this interaction was proven to have specificity. Mutagenesis experiments indicated that synaptotagmin I interacted with the N-terminus of Kv1.4 and thus delayed its N-type fast inactivation. Conclusion These data suggest that synaptotagmin I is an interacting protein of Kv1.4 channel and, as a negative modulator, may play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability and synaptic efficacy. PMID:24423395

  2. Kv4 channels exhibit modulation of closed-state inactivation in inside-out patches.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, E J; Covarrubias, M

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms of inactivation gating of the neuronal somatodendritic A-type K(+) current and the cardiac I(to) were investigated in Xenopus oocyte macropatches expressing Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 channels. Upon membrane patch excision (inside-out), Kv4.1 channels undergo time-dependent acceleration of macroscopic inactivation accompanied by a parallel partial current rundown. These changes are readily reversible by patch cramming, suggesting the influence of modulatory cytoplasmic factors. The consequences of these perturbations were investigated in detail to gain insights into the biophysical basis and mechanisms of inactivation gating. Accelerated inactivation at positive voltages (0 to +110 mV) is mainly the result of reducing the time constant of slow inactivation and the relative weight of the slow component of inactivation. Concomitantly, the time constants of closed-state inactivation at negative membrane potentials (-90 to -50 mV) are substantially decreased in inside-out patches. Deactivation is moderately accelerated, and recovery from inactivation and the peak G--V curve exhibit little or no change. In agreement with more favorable closed-state inactivation in inside-out patches, the steady-state inactivation curve exhibits a hyperpolarizing shift of approximately 10 mV. Closed-state inactivation was similarly enhanced in Kv4.3. An allosteric model that assumes significant closed-state inactivation at all relevant voltages can explain Kv4 inactivation gating and the modulatory changes. PMID:11463631

  3. Dendritic A-type potassium channel subunit expression in CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Menegola, M; Misonou, H; Vacher, H; Trimmer, J S

    2008-06-26

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are important and diverse determinants of neuronal excitability and exhibit specific expression patterns throughout the brain. Among Kv channels, Kv4 channels are major determinants of somatodendritic A-type current and are essential in controlling the amplitude of backpropagating action potentials (BAPs) into neuronal dendrites. BAPs have been well studied in a variety of neurons, and have been recently described in hippocampal and cortical interneurons, a heterogeneous population of GABAergic inhibitory cells that regulate activity of principal cells and neuronal networks. We used well-characterized mouse monoclonal antibodies against the Kv4.3 and potassium channel interacting protein (KChIP) 1 subunits of A-type Kv channels, and antibodies against different interneuron markers in single- and double-label immunohistochemistry experiments to analyze the expression patterns of Kv4.3 and KChIP1 in hippocampal Ammon's horn (CA1) neurons. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 40 mum rat brain sections using nickel-enhanced diaminobenzidine staining or multiple-label immunofluorescence. Our results show that Kv4.3 and KChIP1 component subunits of A-type channels are co-localized in the soma and dendrites of a large number of GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. These subunits co-localize extensively but not completely with markers defining the four major interneuron subpopulations tested (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and somatostatin). These results suggest that CA1 hippocampal interneurons can be divided in two groups according to the expression of Kv4.3/KChIP1 channel subunits. Antibodies against Kv4.3 and KChIP1 represent an important new tool for identifying a subpopulation of hippocampal interneurons with a unique dendritic A-type channel complement and ability to control BAPs.

  4. Effect of NIP-142 on potassium channel alpha-subunits Kv1.5, Kv4.2 and Kv4.3, and mouse atrial repolarization.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hikaru; Namekata, Iyuki; Hamaguchi, Shogo; Kawamura, Taro; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yoshio; Iida-Tanaka, Naoko; Takahara, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Effects of NIP-142, a benzopyran compound which terminates experimental atrial arrhythmia, on potassium channel alpha-subunits and mouse atrial repolarization were examined. NIP-142 concentration-dependently blocked the outward current through potassium channel alpha subunits Kv1.5, Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In isolated mouse atrial myocardia, NIP-142 prolonged the action potential duration and effective refractory period, and increased the contractile force. These results suggest that NIP-142 blocks the potassium channels underlying the transient and sustained outward currents, which may contribute to its antiarrhythmic activity.

  5. Kv1.1 and Kv1.3 channels contribute to the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve transection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koeberle, P D; Wang, Y; Schlichter, L C

    2010-01-01

    Degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) - an important cause of visual impairment - is often modeled by optic nerve transection, which leads to apoptotic death of these central nervous system neurons. With this model, we show that specific voltage-gated K(+) channels (Kv1 family) contribute to the degeneration of rat RGCs and expression of apoptosis-related molecules in vivo. Retinal expression of Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.3 and Kv1.5 was examined by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Kv channel blockers and channel-specific short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were used to assess their roles in RGC degeneration. We found that (i) rat RGCs express Kv1.1, Kv1.2 and Kv1.3 (but not Kv1.5); (ii) intraocular injection of agitoxin-2 or margatoxin, potent blockers of Kv1.1, Kv1.2 and Kv1.3 channels, dose-dependently reduced the RGC degeneration; (iii) siRNAs applied to the cut optic nerve were rapidly transported throughout RGCs only, in which they reduced the expression of the cognate channel only. Our results show differential roles of the channels; siRNAs directed against Kv1.1 or Kv1.3 channels greatly reduced RGC death, whereas Kv1.2-targeted siRNAs had only a small effect, and siRNAs against Kv1.5 were without effect. (iv) Kv1.1 and Kv1.3 channels apparently contribute to cell-autonomous death of RGCs through different components of the apoptotic machinery. Kv1.1 depletion increased the antiapoptotic gene, Bcl-X(L), whereas Kv1.3 depletion reduced the proapoptotic genes, caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bad.

  6. Dendritic A-type potassium channel subunit expression in CA1 hippocampal interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Menegola, Milena; Misonou, Hiroaki; Vacher, Helene; Trimmer, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are important and diverse determinants of neuronal excitability and exhibit specific expression patterns throughout the brain. Among Kv channels, Kv4 channels are major determinants of somatodendritic A-type current and are essential in controlling the amplitude of backpropagating action potentials (BAPs) into neuronal dendrites. BAPs have been well studied in a variety of neurons, and have been recently described in hippocampal and cortical interneurons, a heterogeneous population of GABAergic inhibitory cells that regulate activity of principal cells and neuronal networks. We used well-characterized mouse monoclonal antibodies against the Kv4.3 and KChIP1 subunits of A-type Kv channels, and antibodies against different interneuron markers in single- and double-label immunohistochemistry experiments to analyze the expression patterns of Kv4.3 and KChIP1 in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 40 μm rat brain sections using nickel-enhanced diaminobenzidine staining or multiple-label immunofluorescence. Our results show that Kv4.3 and KChIP1 component subunits of A-type channels are co-localized in the soma and dendrites of a large number of GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. These subunits co-localize extensively but not completely with markers defining the four major interneuron subpopulations tested (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, and somatostatin). These results suggest that CA1 hippocampal interneurons can be divided in two groups according to the expression of Kv4.3/KChIP1 channel subunits. Antibodies against Kv4.3 and KChIP1 represent an important new tool for identifying a subpopulation of hippocampal interneurons with unique dendritic A-type channel complement and ability to control BAPs. PMID:18495361

  7. Skeletal muscle Kv7 (KCNQ) channels in myoblast differentiation and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Roura-Ferrer, Meritxell; Sole, Laura; Martinez-Marmol, Ramon; Villalonga, Nuria; Felipe, Antonio

    2008-05-16

    Voltage-dependent K{sup +} channels (Kv) are involved in myocyte proliferation and differentiation by triggering changes in membrane potential and regulating cell volume. Since Kv7 channels may participate in these events, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether skeletal muscle Kv7.1 and Kv7.5 were involved during proliferation and myogenesis. Here we report that, while myotube formation did not regulate Kv7 channels, Kv7.5 was up-regulated during cell cycle progression. Although, Kv7.1 mRNA also increased during the G{sub 1}-phase, pharmacological evidence mainly involves Kv7.5 in myoblast growth. Our results indicate that the cell cycle-dependent expression of Kv7.5 is involved in skeletal muscle cell proliferation.

  8. Quantitative analysis of neurons with Kv3 potassium channel subunits, Kv3.1b and Kv3.2, in macaque primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Constantinople, Christine M; Disney, Anita A; Maffie, Jonathan; Rudy, Bernardo; Hawken, Michael J

    2009-10-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels that are composed of Kv3 subunits exhibit distinct electrophysiological properties: activation at more depolarized potentials than other voltage-gated K+ channels and fast kinetics. These channels have been shown to contribute to the high-frequency firing of fast-spiking (FS) GABAergic interneurons in the rat and mouse brain. In the rodent neocortex there are distinct patterns of expression for the Kv3.1b and Kv3.2 channel subunits and of coexpression of these subunits with neurochemical markers, such as the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin D-28K (CB). The distribution of Kv3 channels and interrelationship with calcium-binding protein expression has not been investigated in primate cortex. We used immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescent labeling and stereological counting techniques to characterize the laminar and cell-type distributions of Kv3-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in macaque V1. We found that across the cortical layers approximately 25% of both Kv3.1b- and Kv3.2-ir neurons are non-GABAergic. In contrast, all Kv3-ir neurons in rodent cortex are GABAergic (Chow et al. [1999] J Neurosci. 19:9332-9345). The putatively excitatory Kv3-ir neurons were mostly located in layers 2, 3, and 4b. Further, the proportion of Kv3-ir neurons that express PV or CB also differs between macaque V1 and rodent cortex. These data indicate that, within the population of cortical neurons, a broader population of neurons, encompassing cells of a wider range of morphological classes may be capable of sustaining high-frequency firing in macaque V1.

  9. The role of Kv3-type potassium channels in cerebellar physiology and behavior.

    PubMed

    Joho, Rolf H; Hurlock, Edward C

    2009-09-01

    Different subunits of the Kv3 subfamily of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels (Kv3.1-Kv3.4) are expressed in distinct neuronal subpopulations in the cerebellum. Behavioral phenotypes in Kv3-null mutant mice such as ataxia with prominent hypermetria and heightened alcohol sensitivity are characteristic of cerebellar dysfunction. Here, we review how the unique biophysical properties of Kv3-type potassium channels, fast activation and fast deactivation that enable cerebellar neurons to generate brief action potentials at high frequencies, affect firing patterns and influence cerebellum-mediated behavior.

  10. Src regulates membrane trafficking of the Kv3.1b channel.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seong Han; Kim, Dong Hyun; Shin, Seok Kyo; Choi, Jin Sung; Park, Kang-Sik

    2014-01-03

    The Kv3.1 channel plays a crucial role in regulating the high-frequency firing properties of neurons. Here, we determined whether Src regulates the subcellular distributions of the Kv3.1b channel. Co-expression of active Src induced a dramatic redistribution of Kv3.1b to the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, co-expression of the Kv3.1b channel with active Src induced a remarkable decrease in the pool of Kv3.1b at the cell surface. Moreover, the co-expression of active Src results in a significant decrease in the peak current densities of the Kv3.1b channel, and a substantial alteration in the voltage dependence of its steady-state inactivation. Taken together, these results indicate that Src kinase may play an important role in regulating membrane trafficking of Kv3.1b channels.

  11. Kv1 channels selectively prevent dendritic hyperexcitability in rat Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Khavandgar, Simin; Walter, Joy T; Sageser, Kristin; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2005-01-01

    Purkinje cells, the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, encode the timing signals required for motor coordination in their firing rate and activity pattern. Dendrites of Purkinje cells express a high density of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels and fire dendritic calcium spikes. Here we show that dendritic subthreshold Kv1.2 subunit-containing Kv1 potassium channels prevent generation of random spontaneous calcium spikes. With Kv1 channels blocked, dendritic calcium spikes drive bursts of somatic sodium spikes and prevent the cell from faithfully encoding motor timing signals. The selective dendritic function of Kv1 channels in Purkinje cells allows them to effectively suppress dendritic hyperexcitability without hindering the generation of somatic action potentials. Further, we show that Kv1 channels also contribute to dendritic integration of parallel fibre synaptic input. Kv1 channels are often targeted to soma and axon and the data presented support a major dendritic function for these channels. PMID:16210348

  12. Regulation of Kv2.1 K+ conductance by cell surface channel density

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Philip D.; Loftus, Rob J.; Tamkun, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    The Kv2.1 voltage-gated K+ channel is found both freely diffusing over the plasma membrane and concentrated in micron-sized clusters localized to the soma, proximal dendrites and axon initial segment of hippocampal neurons. In transfected HEK cells, Kv2.1 channels within cluster microdomains are non-conducting. Using TIRF microscopy the number of GFP-tagged Kv2.1 channels on the HEK cell surface was compared to K+ channel conductance measured by whole-cell voltage-clamp of the same cell. This approach indicated that as channel density increases non-clustered channels cease conducting. At the highest density observed, only 4% of all channels were conducting. Mutant Kv2.1 channels that fail to cluster also possessed the non-conducting state with 17% conducting K+ at higher surface densities. The non-conducting state was specific to Kv2.1 as Kv1.4 was always conducting regardless of the cell-surface expression level. Anti-Kv2.1 immuno-fluorescence intensity, standardized to Kv2.1 surface density in transfected HEK cells, was used to determine the expression levels of endogenous Kv2.1 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Endogenous Kv2.1 levels were compared to the number of conducting channels determined by whole-cell voltage clamp. Only 13 and 27% of the endogenous Kv2.1 was conducting in neurons cultured for 14 and 20 days, respectively. Together these data indicate that the non-conducting state depends primarily on surface density as opposed to cluster location and that this non-conducting state also exists for native Kv2.1 found in cultured hippocampal neurons. This excess of Kv2.1 protein relative to K+ conductance further supports a non-conducting role for Kv2.1 in excitable tissues. PMID:23325261

  13. Participation of KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels in myogenic control of cerebral arterial diameter

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xi Zoë; Harhun, Maksym I; Olesen, Soren P; Ohya, Susumu; Moffatt, James D; Cole, William C; Greenwood, Iain A

    2010-01-01

    KCNQ gene expression was previously shown in various rodent blood vessels, where the products of KCNQ4 and KCNQ5, Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 potassium channel subunits, respectively, have an influence on vascular reactivity. The aim of this study was to determine if small cerebral resistance arteries of the rat express KCNQ genes and whether Kv7 channels participate in the regulation of myogenic control of diameter. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) was undertaken using RNA isolated from rat middle cerebral arteries (RMCAs) and immunocytochemistry was performed using Kv7 subunit-specific antibodies and freshly isolated RMCA myocytes. KCNQ4 message was more abundant than KCNQ5=KCNQ1, but KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 message levels were negligible. Kv7.1, Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 immunoreactivity was present at the sarcolemma of freshly isolated RMCA myocytes. Linopirdine (1 μm) partially depressed, whereas the Kv7 activator S-1 (3 and/or 20 μm) enhanced whole-cell Kv7.4 (in HEK 293 cells), as well as native RMCA myocyte Kv current amplitude. The effects of S-1 were voltage-dependent, with progressive loss of stimulation at potentials of >−15 mV. At the concentrations employed linopirdine and S-1 did not alter currents due to recombinant Kv1.2/Kv1.5 or Kv2.1/Kv9.3 channels (in HEK 293 cells) that are also expressed by RMCA myocytes. In contrast, another widely used Kv7 blocker, XE991 (10 μm), significantly attenuated native Kv current and also reduced Kv1.2/Kv1.5 and Kv2.1/Kv9.3 currents. Pressurized arterial myography was performed using RMCAs exposed to intravascular pressures of 10–100 mmHg. Linopirdine (1 μm) enhanced the myogenic response at ≥20 mmHg, whereas the activation of Kv7 channels with S-1 (20 μm) inhibited myogenic constriction at >20 mmHg and reversed the increased myogenic response produced by suppression of Kv2-containing channels with 30 nm stromatoxin (ScTx1). These data reveal a novel contribution of KCNQ gene products to the

  14. MinK, MiRP1, and MiRP2 diversify Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 potassium channel gating.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Anthony; McCrossan, Zoe A; Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2004-02-27

    High frequency firing in mammalian neurons requires ultra-rapid delayed rectifier potassium currents generated by homomeric or heteromeric assemblies of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 potassium channel alpha subunits. Kv3.1 alpha subunits can also form slower activating channels by coassembling with MinK-related peptide 2 (MiRP2), a single transmembrane domain potassium channel ancillary subunit. Here, using channel subunits cloned from rat and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, we show that modulation by MinK, MiRP1, and MiRP2 is a general mechanism for slowing of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channel activation and deactivation and acceleration of inactivation, creating a functionally diverse range of channel complexes. MiRP1 also negatively shifts the voltage dependence of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channel activation. Furthermore, MinK, MiRP1, and MiRP2 each form channels with Kv3.1-Kv3.2 heteromers that are kinetically distinct from one another and from MiRP/homomeric Kv3 channels. The findings illustrate a mechanism for dynamic expansion of the functional repertoire of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 potassium currents and suggest roles for these alpha subunits outside the scope of sustained rapid neuronal firing.

  15. Behavioral motor dysfunction in Kv3-type potassium channel-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Joho, R H; Street, C; Matsushita, S; Knöpfel, T

    2006-08-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 are expressed in several distinct neuronal subpopulations in brain areas known to be involved in motor control such as cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Depending on the lack of Kv3.1 or Kv3.3 channel subunits, mutant mice show different Kv3-null allele-dependent behavioral alterations that include constitutive hyperactivity, sleep loss, impaired motor performance and, in the case of the Kv3.1/Kv3.3 double mutant, also severe ataxia, tremor and myoclonus (Espinosa et al. 2001, J Neurosci 21, 6657-6665, Genes, Brain Behav 3, 90-100). The lack of Kv3.1 channel subunits is mainly responsible for the constitutively increased locomotor activity and for sleep loss, whereas the absence of Kv3.3 subunits affects cerebellar function, in particular Purkinje cell discharges and olivocerebellar system properties (McMahon et al. 2004, Eur J Neurosci 19, 3317-3327). Here, we describe two sensitive and non-invasive tests to reliably quantify normal and abnormal motor functions, and we apply these tests to characterize motor dysfunction in Kv3-mutant mice. In contrast to wildtype and Kv3.1-single mutants, Kv3.3-single mutants and Kv3 mutants lacking three and four Kv3 alleles display Kv3-null allele-dependent gait alterations. Although the Kv3-null allele-dependent gait changes correlate with reduced motor performance, they appear to not affect the training-induced improvement of motor performance. These findings suggest that altered cerebellar physiology in the absence of Kv3.3 channels is responsible for impaired motor task execution but not motor task learning.

  16. Increased motor drive and sleep loss in mice lacking Kv3-type potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, F; Marks, G; Heintz, N; Joho, R H

    2004-04-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 are widely expressed in the brain, including areas implicated in the control of motor activity and in areas thought to regulate arousal states. Although Kv3.1 and Kv3.3-single mutants show some physiological changes, previous studies revealed relatively subtle behavioral alterations suggesting that Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 channel subunits may be encoded by a pair of redundant genes. In agreement with this hypothesis, Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice display a 'strong' mutant phenotype that includes motor dysfunction (ataxia, myoclonus, tremor) and hyperactivity when exposed to a novel environment. In this paper we report that Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice are also constitutively hyperactive. Compared to wildtype mice, double mutants display 'restlessness' that is particularly prominent during the light period, when mice are normally at rest, characterized by more than a doubling of ambulatory and stereotypic activity, and accompanied by a 40% sleep reduction. When we reinvestigated both single mutants, we observed constitutive increases of ambulatory and stereotypic activity in conjunction with sleep loss in Kv3.1-single mutants but not in Kv3.3-single mutants. These findings indicate that the absence of Kv3.1-channel subunits is primarily responsible for the increased motor drive and the reduction in sleep time.

  17. Kv7.5 Potassium Channel Subunits Are the Primary Targets for PKA-Dependent Enhancement of Vascular Smooth Muscle Kv7 Currents

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Bharath K.; Robakowski, Christina; Brueggemann, Lyubov I.; Cribbs, Leanne L.; Tripathi, Abhishek; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Kv7 (KCNQ) channels, formed as homo- or heterotetramers of Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 α-subunits, are important regulators of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) membrane voltage. Recent studies demonstrate that direct pharmacological modulation of VSMC Kv7 channel activity can influence blood vessel contractility and diameter. However, the physiologic regulation of Kv7 channel activity is still poorly understood. Here, we study the effect of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) activation on whole cell K+ currents through endogenous Kv7.5 channels in A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells or through Kv7.4/Kv7.5 heteromeric channels natively expressed in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells. The contributions of specific α-subunits are further dissected using exogenously expressed human Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 homo- or heterotetrameric channels in A7r5 cells. Stimulation of Gαs-coupled β-adrenergic receptors with isoproterenol induced PKA-dependent activation of endogenous Kv7.5 currents in A7r5 cells. The receptor-mediated enhancement of Kv7.5 currents was mimicked by pharmacological agents that increase [cAMP] (forskolin, rolipram, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, and papaverine) or mimic cAMP (8-bromo-cAMP); the 2- to 4-fold PKA-dependent enhancement of currents was also observed with exogenously expressed Kv7.5 channels. In contrast, exogenously-expressed heterotetrameric Kv7.4/7.5 channels in A7r5 cells or native mesenteric artery smooth muscle Kv7.4/7.5 channels were only modestly enhanced, and homo-tetrameric Kv7.4 channels were insensitive to this regulatory pathway. Correspondingly, proximity ligation assays indicated that isoproterenol induced PKA-dependent phosphorylation of exogenously expressed Kv7.5 channel subunits, but not of Kv7.4 subunits. These results suggest that signal transduction-mediated responsiveness of vascular smooth muscle Kv7 channel subunits to cAMP/PKA activation follows the order of Kv7.5 >> Kv7.4/Kv7.5 > Kv7.4. PMID:26700561

  18. Inhibition of Kv7/M Channel Currents by the Local Anesthetic Chloroprocaine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Yanxin; Li, Hong; Jia, Qingzhong; Zhang, Hailin; Zhao, Senming

    2015-01-01

    Chloroprocaine is a local ester anesthetic, producing excellent sensory block in clinical use. The Kv7/M potassium channel plays an important role in the control of neuronal excitability. In this study, we investigated the effects of the local anesthetic chloroprocaine on Kv7/M channels as well as the effect of retigabine on chloroprocaine-induced seizures. A perforated whole-cell patch technique was used to record Kv7 currents from HEK293 cells and M-type currents from rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Chloroprocaine produced a number of effects on Kv7.2/Kv7.3 currents, including a lowering of current amplitudes, a rightward shift in the voltage-dependent activation curves, and a slowing of channel activation. Chloroprocaine had a more selective inhibitory effect on the homomeric Kv7.3 and heteromeric Kv7.2/Kv7.3 channels than on the homomeric Kv7.2 channel. Chloroprocaine also inhibited native M channel currents and induced a depolarization of the DRG neuron membrane potential. Taken together, the findings indicate that chloroprocaine concentration dependently inhibited Kv7/M channel currents. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The C-terminus of Kv7 channels: a multifunctional module.

    PubMed

    Haitin, Yoni; Attali, Bernard

    2008-04-01

    Kv7 channels (KCNQ) represent a family of voltage-gated K(+) channels which plays a prominent role in brain and cardiac excitability. Their physiological importance is underscored by the existence of mutations in human Kv7 genes, leading to severe cardiovascular and neurological disorders such as the cardiac long QT syndrome and neonatal epilepsy. Kv7 channels exhibit some structural and functional features that are distinct from other Kv channels. Notably, the Kv7 C-terminus is long compared to other K(+) channels and is endowed with characteristic structural domains, including coiled-coils, amphipatic alpha helices containing calmodulin-binding motifs and basic amino acid clusters. Here we provide a brief overview of current insights and as yet unsettled issues about the structural and functional attributes of the C-terminus of Kv7 channels. Recent data indicate that the proximal half of the Kv7 C-terminus associates with one calmodulin constitutively bound to each subunit. Epilepsy and long QT mutations located in this proximal region impair calmodulin binding and can affect channel gating, folding and trafficking. The distal half of the Kv7 C-terminus directs tetramerization, employing tandem coiled-coils. Together, the data indicate that the Kv7 C-terminal domain is a multimodular structure playing a crucial role in channel gating, assembly and trafficking as well as in scaffolding the channel complex with signalling proteins.

  20. Activation of KV7 channels stimulates vasodilatation of human placental chorionic plate arteries.

    PubMed

    Mills, T A; Greenwood, S L; Devlin, G; Shweikh, Y; Robinson, M; Cowley, E; Hayward, C E; Cottrell, E C; Tropea, T; Brereton, M F; Dalby-Brown, W; Wareing, M

    2015-06-01

    Potassium (K(+)) channels are key regulators of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) excitability. In systemic small arteries, Kv7 channel expression/activity has been noted and a role in vascular tone regulation demonstrated. We aimed to demonstrate functional Kv7 channels in human fetoplacental small arteries. Human placental chorionic plate arteries (CPAs) were obtained at term. CPA responses to Kv7 channel modulators was determined by wire myography. Presence of Kv7 channel mRNA (encoded by KCNQ1-5) and protein expression were assessed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence, respectively. Kv7 channel blockade with linopirdine increased CPA basal tone and AVP-induced contraction. Pre-contracted CPAs (AVP; 80 mM K(+) depolarization solution) exhibited significant relaxation to flupirtine, retigabine, the acrylamide (S)-1, and (S) BMS-204352, differential activators of Kv7.1 - Kv7.5 channels. All CPAs assessed expressed KCNQ1 and KCNQ3-5 mRNA; KCNQ2 was expressed only in a subset of CPAs. Kv7 protein expression was confirmed in intact CPAs and isolated VSMCs. Kv7 channels are present and active in fetoplacental vessels, contributing to vascular tone regulation in normal pregnancy. Targeting these channels may represent a therapeutic intervention in pregnancies complicated by increased vascular resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular and functional characterization of Kv7 K+ channel in murine gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Jepps, Thomas A; Greenwood, Iain A; Moffatt, James D; Sanders, Kenton M; Ohya, Susumu

    2009-07-01

    Members of the K(v)7 voltage-gated K(+) channel family are important determinants of cardiac and neuronal membrane excitability. Recently, we and others have shown that K(v)7 channels are also crucial regulators of smooth muscle activity. The aim of the present study was to assess the K(v)7 expression in different parts of the murine gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to assess their functional roles by use of pharmacological agents. Of KCNQ/K(v)7 members, both KCNQ4/K(v)7.4 and KCNQ5/K(v)7.5 genes and proteins were the most abundantly expressed K(v)7 channels in smooth muscles throughout the GI tract. Immunohistochemical staining also revealed that K(v)7.4 and K(v)7.5 but not K(v)7.1 were expressed in the circular muscle layer of the colon. In segments of distal colon circular muscle exhibiting spontaneous phasic contractions, the nonselective K(v)7 blockers XE991 and linopirdine increased the integral of tension. Increases in the integral of tension were also observed under conditions of neuronal blockade. Similar effects, although less marked, were observed in the proximal colon. As expected, the K(v)7.1-selective blocker chromanol 293B had no effect in either type of segment. These data show that K(v)7.x especially K(v)7.4 and K(v)7.5 are expressed in different regions of the murine gastrointestinal tract and blockers of K(v)7 channels augment inherent contractile activity. Drugs that selectively block K(v)7.4/7.5 might be promising therapeutics for the treatment of motility disorders such as constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

  2. Kv3.4 subunits enhance the repolarizing efficiency of Kv3.1 channels in fast-spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Baranauskas, Gytis; Tkatch, Tatiana; Nagata, Keiichi; Yeh, Jay Z; Surmeier, D James

    2003-03-01

    Neurons with the capacity to discharge at high rates--'fast-spiking' (FS) neurons--are critical participants in central motor and sensory circuits. It is widely accepted that K+ channels with Kv3.1 or Kv3.2 subunits underlie fast, delayed-rectifier (DR) currents that endow neurons with this FS ability. Expression of these subunits in heterologous systems, however, yields channels that open at more depolarized potentials than do native Kv3 family channels, suggesting that they differ. One possibility is that native channels incorporate a subunit that modifies gating. Molecular, electrophysiological and pharmacological studies reported here suggest that a splice variant of the Kv3.4 subunit coassembles with Kv3.1 subunits in rat brain FS neurons. Coassembly enhances the spike repolarizing efficiency of the channels, thereby reducing spike duration and enabling higher repetitive spike rates. These results suggest that manipulation of K3.4 subunit expression could be a useful means of controlling the dynamic range of FS neurons.

  3. KChIP1 modulation of Kv4.3-mediated A-type K(+) currents and repetitive firing in hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Bourdeau, M L; Laplante, I; Laurent, C E; Lacaille, J-C

    2011-03-10

    Neuronal A-type K(+) channels regulate action potential waveform, back-propagation and firing frequency. In hippocampal CA1 interneurons located at the stratum lacunosum-moleculare/radiatum junction (LM/RAD), Kv4.3 mediates A-type K(+) currents and a Kv4 β-subunit of the Kv channel interacting protein (KChIP) family, KChIP1, appears specifically expressed in these cells. However, the functional role of this accessory subunit in A-type K(+) currents and interneuron excitability remains largely unknown. Thus, first we studied KChIP1 and Kv4.3 channel interactions in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and determined that KChIP1 coexpression modulated the biophysical properties of Kv4.3 A-type currents (faster recovery from inactivation, leftward shift of activation curve, faster rise time and slower decay) and this modulation was selectively prevented by KChIP1 short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown. Next, we evaluated the effects of KChIP1 down-regulation by siRNA on A-type K(+) currents in LM/RAD interneurons in slice cultures. Recovery from inactivation of A-type K(+) currents was slower after KChIP1 down-regulation but other properties were unchanged. In addition, down-regulation of KChIP1 levels did not affect action potential waveform and firing, but increased firing frequency during suprathreshold depolarizations, indicating that KChIP1 regulates interneuron excitability. The effects of KChIP1 down-regulation were cell-specific since CA1 pyramidal cells that do not express KChIP1 were unaffected. Overall, our findings suggest that KChIP1 interacts with Kv4.3 in LM/RAD interneurons, enabling faster recovery from inactivation of A-type currents and thus promoting stronger inhibitory control of firing during sustained activity.

  4. Coexpression of high-voltage-activated ion channels Kv3.4 and Cav1.2 in pioneer axons during pathfinding in the developing rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Yi; Chu, Dachen; Hwang, Wei-Chao; Tsaur, Meei-Ling

    2012-11-01

    Precise axon pathfinding is crucial for establishment of the initial neuronal network during development. Pioneer axons navigate without the help of preexisting axons and pave the way for follower axons that project later. Voltage-gated ion channels make up the intrinsic electrical activity of pioneer axons and regulate axon pathfinding. To elucidate which channel molecules are present in pioneer axons, immunohistochemical analysis was performed to examine 14 voltage-gated ion channels (Kv1.1-Kv1.3, Kv3.1-Kv3.4, Kv4.3, Cav1.2, Cav1.3, Cav2.2, Nav1.2, Nav1.6, and Nav1.9) in nine axonal tracts in the developing rat forebrain, including the optic nerve, corpus callosum, corticofugal fibers, thalamocortical axons, lateral olfactory tract, hippocamposeptal projection, anterior commissure, hippocampal commissure, and medial longitudinal fasciculus. We found A-type K⁺ channel Kv3.4 in both pioneer axons and early follower axons and L-type Ca²⁺ channel Cav1.2 in pioneer axons and early and late follower axons. Spatially, Kv3.4 and Cav1.2 were colocalized with markers of pioneer neurons and pioneer axons, such as deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), in most fiber tracts examined. Temporally, Kv3.4 and Cav1.2 were expressed abundantly in most fiber tracts during axon pathfinding but were downregulated beginning in synaptogenesis. By contrast, delayed rectifier Kv channels (e.g., Kv1.1) and Nav channels (e.g., Nav1.2) were absent from these fiber tracts (except for the corpus callosum) during pathfinding of pioneer axons. These data suggest that Kv3.4 and Cav1.2, two high-voltage-activated ion channels, may act together to control Ca²⁺ -dependent electrical activity of pioneer axons and play important roles during axon pathfinding.

  5. Developmental Expression of Kv Potassium Channels at the Axon Initial Segment of Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ponce, Diana; DeFelipe, Javier; Garrido, Juan José; Muñoz, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Axonal outgrowth and the formation of the axon initial segment (AIS) are early events in the acquisition of neuronal polarity. The AIS is characterized by a high concentration of voltage-dependent sodium and potassium channels. However, the specific ion channel subunits present and their precise localization in this axonal subdomain vary both during development and among the types of neurons, probably determining their firing characteristics in response to stimulation. Here, we characterize the developmental expression of different subfamilies of voltage-gated potassium channels in the AISs of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, including subunits Kv1.2, Kv2.2 and Kv7.2. In contrast to the early appearance of voltage-gated sodium channels and the Kv7.2 subunit at the AIS, Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits were tethered at the AIS only after 10 days in vitro. Interestingly, we observed different patterns of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunit expression, with each confined to distinct neuronal populations. The accumulation of Kv1.2 and Kv2.2 subunits at the AIS was dependent on ankyrin G tethering, it was not affected by disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and it was resistant to detergent extraction, as described previously for other AIS proteins. This distribution of potassium channels in the AIS further emphasizes the heterogeneity of this structure in different neuronal populations, as proposed previously, and suggests corresponding differences in action potential regulation. PMID:23119056

  6. The Link between Ion Permeation and Inactivation Gating of Kv4 Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Kv4 potassium channels undergo rapid inactivation but do not seem to exhibit the classical N-type and C-type mechanisms present in other Kv channels. We have previously hypothesized that Kv4 channels preferentially inactivate from the preopen closed state, which involves regions of the channel that contribute to the internal vestibule of the pore. To further test this hypothesis, we have examined the effects of permeant ions on gating of three Kv4 channels (Kv4.1, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Rb+ is an excellent tool for this purpose because its prolonged residency time in the pore delays K+ channel closing. The data showed that, only when Rb+ carried the current, both channel closing and the development of macroscopic inactivation are slowed (1.5- to 4-fold, relative to the K+ current). Furthermore, macroscopic Rb+ currents were larger than K+ currents (1.2- to 3-fold) as the result of a more stable open state, which increases the maximum open probability. These results demonstrate that pore occupancy can influence inactivation gating in a manner that depends on how channel closing impacts inactivation from the preopen closed state. By examining possible changes in ionic selectivity and the influence of elevating the external K+ concentration, additional experiments did not support the presence of C-type inactivation in Kv4 channels. PMID:12547775

  7. Deletion of Kv4.2 gene eliminates dendritic A-type K+ current and enhances induction of long-term potentiation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xixi; Yuan, Li-Lian; Zhao, Cuiping; Birnbaum, Shari G; Frick, Andreas; Jung, Wonil E; Schwarz, Thomas L; Sweatt, J David; Johnston, Daniel

    2006-11-22

    Dendritic, backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) facilitate the induction of Hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP). Although bAPs in distal dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are attenuated when propagating from the soma, their amplitude can be increased greatly via downregulation of dendritic A-type K+ currents. The channels that underlie these currents thus may represent a key regulatory component of the signaling pathways that lead to synaptic plasticity. We directly tested this hypothesis by using Kv4.2 knock-out mice. Deletion of the Kv4.2 gene and a loss of Kv4.2 protein resulted in a specific and near-complete elimination of A-type K+ currents from the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. The absence of dendritic Kv4.2-encoded A-type K+ currents led to an increase of bAP amplitude and an increase of concurrent Ca2+ influx. Furthermore, CA1 pyramidal neurons lacking dendritic A-type K+ currents from Kv4.2 knock-out mice exhibited a lower threshold than those of wild-type littermates for LTP induction with the use of a theta burst pairing protocol. LTP triggered with the use of a saturating protocol, on the other hand, remained indistinguishable between Kv4.2 knock-out and wild-type neurons. Our results support the hypothesis that dendritic A-type K+ channels, composed of Kv4.2 subunits, regulate action potential backpropagation and the induction of specific forms of synaptic plasticity.

  8. Interactions between the C-terminus of Kv1.5 and Kvβ regulate pyridine nucleotide-dependent changes in channel gating

    PubMed Central

    Tipparaju, Srinivas M.; Li, Xiao-Ping; Kilfoil, Peter J.; Xue, Bin; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Barski, Oleg A.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are tetrameric assemblies of transmembrane Kv proteins with cytosolic N- and C-termini. The N-terminal domain of Kv1 proteins binds to β-subunits, but the role of the C-terminus is less clear. Therefore, we studied the role of the C-terminus in regulating Kv1.5 channel and its interactions with Kvβ-subunits. When expressed in COS-7 cells, deletion of the C-terminal domain of Kv1.5 did not affect channel gating or kinetics. Co-expression of Kv1.5 with Kvβ3 increased current inactivation, whereas Kvβ2 caused a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of current activation. Inclusion of NADPH in the patch pipette solution accelerated the inactivation of Kv1.5-Kvβ3 currents. In contrast, NADP+ decreased the rate and the extent of Kvβ3-induced inactivation and reversed the hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of activation induced by Kvβ2. Currents generated by Kv1.5ΔC+Kvβ3 or Kv1.5ΔC+Kvβ2 complexes did not respond to changes in intracellular pyridine nucleotide concentration, indicating that the C-terminus is required for pyridine nucleotide-dependent interactions between Kvβ and Kv1.5. A glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein containing the C-terminal peptide of Kv1.5 did not bind to apoKvβ2, but displayed higher affinity for Kvβ2:NADPH than Kvβ2:NADP+. The GST fusion protein also precipitated Kvβ proteins from mouse brain lysates. Pull-down experiments, structural analysis and electrophysiological data indicated that a specific region of the C-terminus (Arg543-Val583) is required for Kvβ binding. These results suggest that the C-terminal domain of Kv1.5 interacts with β-subunits and that this interaction is essential for the differential regulation of Kv currents by oxidized and reduced nucleotides. PMID:22426702

  9. The stoichiometry and biophysical properties of the Kv4 potassium channel complex with K+ channel-interacting protein (KChIP) subunits are variable, depending on the relative expression level.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2014-06-20

    Kv4 is a voltage-gated K(+) channel, which underlies somatodendritic subthreshold A-type current (ISA) and cardiac transient outward K(+) (Ito) current. Various ion channel properties of Kv4 are known to be modulated by its auxiliary subunits, such as K(+) channel-interacting protein (KChIP) or dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein. KChIP is a cytoplasmic protein and increases the current amplitude, decelerates the inactivation, and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that Kv4 and KChIP form an octameric complex with four Kv4 subunits and four KChIP subunits. However, it remains unknown whether the Kv4·KChIP complex can have a different stoichiometry other than 4:4. In this study, we expressed Kv4.2 and KChIP4 with various ratios in Xenopus oocytes and observed that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 gradually changed with the increase in co-expressed KChIP4. The tandem repeat constructs of Kv4.2 and KChIP4 revealed that the 4:4 (Kv4.2/KChIP4) channel shows faster recovery than the 4:2 channel, suggesting that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 change, depending on the number of bound KChIP4s. Subunit counting by single-molecule imaging revealed that the bound number of KChIP4 in each Kv4.2·KChIP4 complex was dependent on the expression level of KChIP4. Taken together, we conclude that the stoichiometry of Kv4·KChIP complex is variable, and the biophysical properties of Kv4 change depending on the number of bound KChIP subunits.

  10. The Stoichiometry and Biophysical Properties of the Kv4 Potassium Channel Complex with K+ Channel-interacting Protein (KChIP) Subunits Are Variable, Depending on the Relative Expression Level*

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Kv4 is a voltage-gated K+ channel, which underlies somatodendritic subthreshold A-type current (ISA) and cardiac transient outward K+ (Ito) current. Various ion channel properties of Kv4 are known to be modulated by its auxiliary subunits, such as K+ channel-interacting protein (KChIP) or dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein. KChIP is a cytoplasmic protein and increases the current amplitude, decelerates the inactivation, and accelerates the recovery from inactivation of Kv4. Crystal structure analysis demonstrated that Kv4 and KChIP form an octameric complex with four Kv4 subunits and four KChIP subunits. However, it remains unknown whether the Kv4·KChIP complex can have a different stoichiometry other than 4:4. In this study, we expressed Kv4.2 and KChIP4 with various ratios in Xenopus oocytes and observed that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 gradually changed with the increase in co-expressed KChIP4. The tandem repeat constructs of Kv4.2 and KChIP4 revealed that the 4:4 (Kv4.2/KChIP4) channel shows faster recovery than the 4:2 channel, suggesting that the biophysical properties of Kv4.2 change, depending on the number of bound KChIP4s. Subunit counting by single-molecule imaging revealed that the bound number of KChIP4 in each Kv4.2·KChIP4 complex was dependent on the expression level of KChIP4. Taken together, we conclude that the stoichiometry of Kv4·KChIP complex is variable, and the biophysical properties of Kv4 change depending on the number of bound KChIP subunits. PMID:24811166

  11. Kv4 Potassium Channels Modulate Hippocampal EPSP-Spike Potentiation and Spatial Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truchet, Bruno; Manrique, Christine; Sreng, Leam; Chaillan, Franck A.; Roman, Francois S.; Mourre, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Kv4 channels regulate the backpropagation of action potentials (b-AP) and have been implicated in the modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP). Here we showed that blockade of Kv4 channels by the scorpion toxin AmmTX3 impaired reference memory in a radial maze task. In vivo, AmmTX3 intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion increased and…

  12. Kv4 Potassium Channels Modulate Hippocampal EPSP-Spike Potentiation and Spatial Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truchet, Bruno; Manrique, Christine; Sreng, Leam; Chaillan, Franck A.; Roman, Francois S.; Mourre, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Kv4 channels regulate the backpropagation of action potentials (b-AP) and have been implicated in the modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP). Here we showed that blockade of Kv4 channels by the scorpion toxin AmmTX3 impaired reference memory in a radial maze task. In vivo, AmmTX3 intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion increased and…

  13. Distribution of Kv3.3 potassium channel subunits in distinct neuronal populations of mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Su Ying; Zagha, Edward; Kwon, Elaine S; Ozaita, Andres; Bobik, Marketta; Martone, Maryann E; Ellisman, Mark H; Heintz, Nathaniel; Rudy, Bernardo

    2007-06-20

    Kv3.3 proteins are pore-forming subunits of voltage-dependent potassium channels, and mutations in the gene encoding for Kv3.3 have recently been linked to human disease, spinocerebellar ataxia 13, with cerebellar and extracerebellar symptoms. To understand better the functions of Kv3.3 subunits in brain, we developed highly specific antibodies to Kv3.3 and analyzed immunoreactivity throughout mouse brain. We found that Kv3.3 subunits are widely expressed, present in important forebrain structures but particularly prominent in brainstem and cerebellum. In forebrain and midbrain, Kv3.3 expression was often found colocalized with parvalbumin and other Kv3 subunits in inhibitory neurons. In brainstem, Kv3.3 was strongly expressed in auditory and other sensory nuclei. In cerebellar cortex, Kv3.3 expression was found in Purkinje and granule cells. Kv3.3 proteins were observed in axons, terminals, somas, and, unlike other Kv3 proteins, also in distal dendrites, although precise subcellular localization depended on cell type. For example, hippocampal dentate granule cells expressed Kv3.3 subunits specifically in their mossy fiber axons, whereas Purkinje cells of the cerebellar cortex strongly expressed Kv3.3 subunits in axons, somas, and proximal and distal, but not second- and third-order, dendrites. Expression in Purkinje cell dendrites was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Kv3 channels have been demonstrated to rapidly repolarize action potentials and support high-frequency firing in various neuronal populations. In this study, we identified additional populations and subcellular compartments that are likely to sustain high-frequency firing because of the expression of Kv3.3 and other Kv3 subunits.

  14. Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 channel subunit expression in murine spinal dorsal horn GABAergic interneurones.

    PubMed

    Nowak, A; Mathieson, H R; Chapman, R J; Janzsó, G; Yanagawa, Y; Obata, K; Szabo, G; King, A E

    2011-09-01

    GABAergic interneurones, including those within spinal dorsal horn, contain one of the two isoforms of the synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), either GAD65 or GAD67. The physiological significance of these two GABAergic phenotypes is unknown but a more detailed anatomical and functional characterization may help resolve this issue. In this study, two transgenic Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) knock-in murine lines, namely GAD65-GFP and GAD67-GFP (Δneo) mice, were used to profile expression of Shaw-related Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 K(+)-channel subunits in dorsal horn interneurones. Neuronal expression of these subunits confers specific biophysical characteristic referred to as 'fast-spiking'. Immuno-labelling for Kv3.1b or Kv3.3 revealed the presence of both of these subunits across the dorsal horn, most abundantly in laminae I-III. Co-localization studies in transgenic mice indicated that Kv3.1b but not Kv3.3 was associated with GAD65-GFP and GAD67-GFP immunopositive neurones. For comparison the distributions of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 K(+)-channel subunits which are linked to an excitatory neuronal phenotype were characterized. No co-localization was found between GAD-GFP +ve neurones and Kv4.2 or Kv4.3. In functional studies to evaluate whether either GABAergic population is activated by noxious stimulation, hindpaw intradermal injection of capsaicin followed by c-fos quantification in dorsal horn revealed co-expression c-fos and GAD65-GFP (quantified as 20-30% of GFP +ve population). Co-expression was also detected for GAD67-GFP +ve neurones and capsaicin-induced c-fos but at a much reduced level of 4-5%. These data suggest that whilst both GAD65-GFP and GAD67-GFP +ve neurones express Kv3.1b and therefore may share certain biophysical traits, their responses to peripheral noxious stimulation are distinct.

  15. Allele-dependent changes of olivocerebellar circuit properties in the absence of the voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Anne; Fowler, Stephen C; Perney, Teresa M; Akemann, Walther; Knöpfel, Thomas; Joho, Rolf H

    2004-06-01

    Double-mutant mice (DKO) lacking the two voltage-gated K(+) channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 display a series of phenotypic alterations that include ataxia, myoclonus, tremor and alcohol hypersensitivity. The prominent cerebellar expression of mRNAs encoding Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 subunits raised the question as to whether altered electrical activity resulting from the lack of these K(+) channels might be related to the dramatic motor changes. We used the tremorogenic agent harmaline to probe mutant mice lacking different K(+) channel alleles for altered olivocerebellar circuit properties. Harmaline induced the characteristic 13-Hz tremor in wildtype mice (WT); however, no tremor was observed in DKO suggesting that the ensemble properties of the olivocerebellar circuitry are altered in the absence of Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 subunits. Harmaline induced tremor in Kv3.1-single mutants, but it was of smaller amplitude and at a lower frequency indicating the participation of Kv3.1 subunits in normal olivocerebellar system function. In contrast, harmaline tremor was virtually absent in Kv3.3-single mutants indicating an essential role for Kv3.3 subunits in tremor induction by harmaline. Immunohistochemical staining for Kv3.3 showed clear expression in the somata and proximal dendrites of Purkinje cells and in their axonal projections to the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). In DCN, both Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 subunits are expressed. Action potential duration is increased by approximately 100% in Purkinje cells from Kv3.3-single mutants compared to WT or Kv3.1-single mutants. We conclude that Kv3.3 channel subunits are essential for the olivocerebellar system to generate and sustain normal harmaline tremor whereas Kv3.1 subunits influence tremor amplitude and frequency.

  16. Kv8.1, a new neuronal potassium channel subunit with specific inhibitory properties towards Shab and Shaw channels.

    PubMed Central

    Hugnot, J P; Salinas, M; Lesage, F; Guillemare, E; de Weille, J; Heurteaux, C; Mattéi, M G; Lazdunski, M

    1996-01-01

    Outward rectifier K+ channels have a characteristic structure with six transmembrane segments and one pore region. A new member of this family of transmembrane proteins has been cloned and called Kv8.1. Kv8.1 is essentially present in the brain where it is located mainly in layers II, IV and VI of the cerebral cortex, in hippocampus, in CA1-CA4 pyramidal cell layer as well in granule cells of the dentate gyrus, in the granule cell layer and in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. The Kv8.1 gene is in the 8q22.3-8q24.1 region of the human genome. Although Kv8.1 has the hallmarks of functional subunits of outward rectifier K+ channels, injection of its cRNA in Xenopus oocytes does not produce K+ currents. However Kv8.1 abolishes the functional expression of members of the Kv2 and Kv3 subfamilies, suggesting that the functional role of Kv8.1 might be to inhibit the function of a particular class of outward rectifier K+ channel types. Immunoprecipitation studies have demonstrated that inhibition occurs by formation of heteropolymeric channels, and results obtained with Kv8.1 chimeras have indicated that association of Kv8.1 with other types of subunits is via its N-terminal domain. Images PMID:8670833

  17. Stichodactyla helianthus peptide, a pharmacological tool for studying Kv3.2 channels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lizhen; Herrington, James; Goldberg, Ethan; Dulski, Paula M; Bugianesi, Randal M; Slaughter, Robert S; Banerjee, Priya; Brochu, Richard M; Priest, Birgit T; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Rudy, Bernardo; Garcia, Maria L

    2005-05-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels regulate many physiological functions and represent important therapeutic targets in the treatment of several clinical disorders. Although some of these channels have been well-characterized, the study of others, such as Kv3 channels, has been hindered because of limited pharmacological tools. The current study was initiated to identify potent blockers of the Kv3.2 channel. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells stably expressing human Kv3.2b (CHO-K1.hKv3.2b) were established and characterized. Stichodactyla helianthus peptide (ShK), isolated from S. helianthus venom and a known high-affinity blocker of Kv1.1 and Kv1.3 channels, was found to potently inhibit 86Rb+ efflux from CHO-K1.hKv3.2b (IC50 approximately 0.6 nM). In electrophysiological recordings of Kv3.2b channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes or in planar patch-clamp studies, ShK inhibited hKv3.2b channels with IC50 values of approximately 0.3 and 6 nM, respectively. Despite the presence of Kv3.2 protein in human pancreatic beta cells, ShK has no effect on the Kv current of these cells, suggesting that it is unlikely that homotetrameric Kv3.2 channels contribute significantly to the delayed rectifier current of insulin-secreting cells. In mouse cortical GABAergic fast-spiking interneurons, however, application of ShK produced effects consistent with the blockade of Kv3 channels (i.e., an increase in action potential half-width, a decrease in the amplitude of the action potential after hyperpolarization, and a decrease in maximal firing frequency in response to depolarizing current injections). Taken together, these results indicate that ShK is a potent inhibitor of Kv3.2 channels and may serve as a useful pharmacological probe for studying these channels in native preparations.

  18. Protein Kinase C (PKC) Activity Regulates Functional Effects of Kvβ1.3 Subunit on KV1.5 Channels

    PubMed Central

    David, Miren; Macías, Álvaro; Moreno, Cristina; Prieto, Ángela; Martínez-Mármol, Ramón; Vicente, Rubén; González, Teresa; Felipe, Antonio; Tamkun, Michael M.; Valenzuela, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Kv1.5 channels are the primary channels contributing to the ultrarapid outward potassium current (IKur). The regulatory Kvβ1.3 subunit converts Kv1.5 channels from delayed rectifiers with a modest degree of slow inactivation to channels with both fast and slow inactivation components. Previous studies have shown that inhibition of PKC with calphostin C abolishes the fast inactivation induced by Kvβ1.3. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon using electrophysiological, biochemical, and confocal microscopy approaches. To achieve this, we used HEK293 cells (which lack Kvβ subunits) transiently cotransfected with Kv1.5+Kvβ1.3 and also rat ventricular and atrial tissue to study native α-β subunit interactions. Immunocytochemistry assays demonstrated that these channel subunits colocalize in control conditions and after calphostin C treatment. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that Kv1.5 and Kvβ1.3 remain associated after PKC inhibition. After knocking down all PKC isoforms by siRNA or inhibiting PKC with calphostin C, Kvβ1.3-induced fast inactivation at +60 mV was abolished. However, depolarization to +100 mV revealed Kvβ1.3-induced inactivation, indicating that PKC inhibition causes a dramatic positive shift of the inactivation curve. Our results demonstrate that calphostin C-mediated abolishment of fast inactivation is not due to the dissociation of Kv1.5 and Kvβ1.3. Finally, immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry experiments revealed an association between Kv1.5, Kvβ1.3, the receptor for activated C kinase (RACK1), PKCβI, PKCβII, and PKCθ in HEK293 cells. A very similar Kv1.5 channelosome was found in rat ventricular tissue but not in atrial tissue. PMID:22547057

  19. Potentiation of the Kv1 family K+ channel by cortisone analogs

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yaping; Levin, Elena J.; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2013-01-01

    The Kv1 family voltage-dependent K+ channels are essential for termination of action potentials in neurons and myocytes. These channels form a stable complex with their beta subunits (Kvβ), some of which inhibit channel activity. Cortisone potentiates Kv1 channel by binding to Kvβ and promoting its dissociation from the channel, but its half-maximum effective concentration is ~46 μM. To identify corticosteroids that are more efficient than cortisone, we examined 25 cortisone analogs and found that fluticasone propionate potentiates channel current with a half-maximum effective concentration (EC50) of 37 ± 1.1 nM. Further studies showed that fluticasone propionate potentiates channel current by inducing dissociation of Kvβ, and docking of fluticasone propionate into the cortisone binding site reveals potential interactions that enhance the EC50 value. Thus, fluticasone propionate provides a starting point for rational design of more efficient small-molecule compounds that increase Kv1 activity and affect the integrity of the Kv1-Kvβ complex. PMID:22803826

  20. Potentiation of the Kv1 family K(+) channel by cortisone analogues.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yaping; Levin, Elena J; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2012-10-19

    The Kv1 family voltage-dependent K(+) channels are essential for termination of action potentials in neurons and myocytes. These channels form a stable complex with their beta subunits (Kvβ), some of which inhibit channel activity. Cortisone potentiates Kv1 channel by binding to Kvβ and promoting its dissociation from the channel, but its half-maximum effective concentration is ∼46 μM. To identify corticosteroids that are more efficient than cortisone, we examined 25 cortisone analogues and found that fluticasone propionate potentiates channel current with a half-maximum effective concentration (EC(50)) of 37 ± 1.1 nM. Further studies showed that fluticasone propionate potentiates channel current by inducing dissociation of Kvβ, and docking of fluticasone propionate into the cortisone binding site reveals potential interactions that enhance the EC(50) value. Thus, fluticasone propionate provides a starting point for rational design of more efficient small-molecule compounds that increase Kv1 activity and affect the integrity of the Kv1-Kvβ complex.

  1. Distinct Ca2+ sources in dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 neurons couple to SK and Kv4 channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kang; Lin, Mike T.; Adelman, John P.; Maylie, James

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Ca2+-activated SK channels and voltage-gated A-type Kv4 channels shape dendritic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Synaptically evoked Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) activates spine SK channels, reducing EPSPs and the associated spine head Ca2+ transient. However, results using glutamate uncaging implicated Ca2+ influx through SNX-482 (SNX) sensitive Cav2.3 (R-type) Ca2+ channels as the Ca2+ source for SK channel activation. The present findings show that using Schaffer collateral stimulation the effects of SNX and apamin are not mutually exclusive and SNX increases EPSPs independent of SK channel activity. Dialysis with 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N’N’N’-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), application of 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP), expression of a Kv4.2 dominant negative subunit, and dialysis with a KChIPs antibody occluded the SNX-induced increase of EPSPs. The results suggest two distinct Ca2+ signaling pathways within dendritic spines, that links Ca2+ influx through NMDARs to SK channels and Ca2+ influx through R-type Ca2+ channels to Kv4.2-containing channels. PMID:24462100

  2. Novel treatment strategies for smooth muscle disorders: Targeting Kv7 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Haick, Jennifer M; Byron, Kenneth L

    2016-09-01

    Smooth muscle cells provide crucial contractile functions in visceral, vascular, and lung tissues. The contractile state of smooth muscle is largely determined by their electrical excitability, which is in turn influenced by the activity of potassium channels. The activity of potassium channels sustains smooth muscle cell membrane hyperpolarization, reducing cellular excitability and thereby promoting smooth muscle relaxation. Research over the past decade has indicated an important role for Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of the excitability of smooth muscle cells. Expression of multiple Kv7 channel subtypes has been demonstrated in smooth muscle cells from viscera (gastrointestinal, bladder, myometrial), from the systemic and pulmonary vasculature, and from the airways of the lung, from multiple species, including humans. A number of clinically used drugs, some of which were developed to target Kv7 channels in other tissues, have been found to exert robust effects on smooth muscle Kv7 channels. Functional studies have indicated that Kv7 channel activators and inhibitors have the ability to relax and contact smooth muscle preparations, respectively, suggesting a wide range of novel applications for the pharmacological tool set. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the physiological functions of Kv7 channels in smooth muscle, and highlights potential therapeutic applications based on pharmacological targeting of smooth muscle Kv7 channels throughout the body. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The Importance of Immunohistochemical Analyses in Evaluating the Phenotype of Kv Channel Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Menegola, Milena; Clark, Eliana; Trimmer, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary To gain insights into the phenotype of Kv1.1 and Kv4.2 knockout mice, we used immunohistochemistry to analyze expression of component principal or α subunits and auxiliary subunits of neuronal Kv channels in knockout mouse brains. Genetic ablation of the Kv1.1 α subunit did not result in compensatory changes in the expression levels or subcellular distribution of related ion channel subunits in hippocampal medial perforant path and mossy fiber nerve terminals, where high levels of Kv1.1 are normally expressed. Genetic ablation of the Kv4.2 α subunit did not result in altered neuronal cytoarchitecture of the hippocampus. While Kv4.2 knockout mice did not exhibit compensatory changes in the expression levels or subcellular distribution of the related Kv4.3 α subunit, we found dramatic decreases in the cellular and subcellular expression of specific KChIPs that reflected their degree of association and colocalization with Kv4.2 in wild-type mouse and rat brains. These studies highlight the insights that can be gained by performing detailed immunohistochemical analyses of Kv channel knockout mouse brains. PMID:22612819

  4. Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels regulate neurotransmitter release from mouse motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Ruth E; Moores, Thomas S; Morris, Neil P; Parson, Simon H; Deuchars, Jim

    2004-12-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are critical to regulation of neurotransmitter release throughout the nervous system but the roles and identity of the subtypes involved remain unclear. Here we show that Kv3 channels regulate transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry revealed Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 subunits within all motor nerve terminals of muscles examined [transversus abdominus, lumbrical and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB)]. To determine the roles of these Kv3 subunits, intracellular recordings were made of end-plate potentials (EPPs) in FDB muscle fibres evoked by electrical stimulation of tibial nerve. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) applied at low concentrations (0.05-0.5 mM), which blocks only a few known potassium channels including Kv3 channels, did not affect muscle fibre resting potential but significantly increased the amplitude of all EPPs tested. Significantly, this effect of TEA was still observed in the presence of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blockers iberiotoxin (25-150 nM) and Penitrem A (100 nM), suggesting a selective action on Kv3 subunits. Consistent with this, 15-microM 4-aminopyridine, which blocks Kv3 but not large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, enhanced evoked EPP amplitude. Unexpectedly, blood-depressing substance-I, a toxin selective for Kv3.4 subunits, had no effect at 0.05-1 microM. The combined presynaptic localization of Kv3 subunits and pharmacological enhancement of EPP amplitude indicate that Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals at the NMJ.

  5. Motor dysfunction and altered synaptic transmission at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse in mice lacking potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Hiroshi; Wolf, Alexander M; Matsushita, Shinichi; Joho, Rolf H; Knöpfel, Thomas

    2003-08-20

    Micelacking both Kv3.1 and both Kv3.3 K+ channel alleles display severe motor deficits such as tremor, myoclonus, and ataxic gait. Micelacking one to three alleles at the Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 loci exhibit in an allele dose-dependent manner a modest degree of ataxia. Cerebellar granule cells coexpress Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 K+ channels and are therefore candidate neurons that might be involved in these behavioral deficits. Hence, we investigated the synaptic mechanisms of transmission in the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell system. Action potentials of parallel fibers were broader in mice lacking both Kv3.1 and both Kv3.3 alleles and in mice lacking both Kv3.1 and a single Kv3.3 allele compared with those of wild-type mice. The transmission of high-frequency trains of action potentials was only impaired at 200 Hz but not at 100 Hz in mice lacking both Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 genes. However, paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses was dramatically reduced in a gene dose-dependent manner in mice lacking Kv3.1 or Kv3.3 alleles. Normal PPF could be restored by reducing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration indicating that increased activity-dependent presynaptic Ca2+ influx, at least in part caused the altered PPF in mutant mice. Induction of metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated EPSCs was facilitated, whereas longterm depression was not impaired but rather facilitated in Kv3.1/Kv3.3 double-knockout mice. These results demonstrate the importance of Kv3 potassium channels in regulating the dynamics of synaptic transmission at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse and suggest a correlation between short-term plasticity at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse and motor performance.

  6. Voltage-dependent metabolic regulation of Kv2.1 channels in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masashi; Nakata, Masanori; Yamato, Shiho; Dezaki, Katsuya; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, San-e; Kawakami, Masanobu; Yada, Toshihiko; Kakei, Masafumi

    2010-05-28

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv channels) play a crucial role in formation of action potentials in response to glucose stimulation in pancreatic beta-ells. We previously reported that the Kv channel is regulated by glucose metabolism, particularly by MgATP. We examined whether the regulation of Kv channels is voltage-dependent and mechanistically related with phosphorylation of the channels. In rat pancreatic beta-cells, suppression of glucose metabolism with low glucose concentrations of 2.8mM or less or by metabolic inhibitors decreased the Kv2.1-channel activity at positive membrane potentials, while increased it at potentials negative to -10 mV, suggesting that modulation of Kv channels by glucose metabolism is voltage-dependent. Similarly, in HEK293 cells expressing the recombinant Kv2.1 channels, 0mM but not 10mM MgATP modulated the channel activity in a manner similar to that in beta-cells. Both steady-state activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel were shifted toward the negative potential in association with the voltage-dependent modulation of the channels by cytosolic dialysis of alkaline phosphatase in beta-cells. The modulation of Kv-channel current-voltage relations were also observed during and after glucose-stimulated electrical excitation. These results suggest that the cellular metabolism including MgATP production and/or channel phosphorylation/dephosphorylation underlie the physiological modulation of Kv2.1 channels during glucose-induced insulin secretion.

  7. AMIGO-Kv2.1 Potassium Channel Complex Is Associated With Schizophrenia-Related Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Marjaana A.; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Liuhanen, Johanna; Võikar, Vootele; Piepponen, Petteri; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Taira, Tomi; Lauri, Sari E.; Suvisaari, Jaana; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Paunio, Tiina; Rauvala, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    The enormous variability in electrical properties of neurons is largely affected by a multitude of potassium channel subunits. Kv2.1 is a widely expressed voltage-dependent potassium channel and an important regulator of neuronal excitability. The Kv2.1 auxiliary subunit AMIGO constitutes an integral part of the Kv2.1 channel complex in brain and regulates the activity of the channel. AMIGO and Kv2.1 localize to the distinct somatodendritic clusters at the neuronal plasma membrane. Here we have created and characterized a mouse line lacking the AMIGO gene. Absence of AMIGO clearly reduced the amount of the Kv2.1 channel protein in mouse brain and altered the electrophysiological properties of neurons. These changes were accompanied by behavioral and pharmacological abnormalities reminiscent of those identified in schizophrenia. Concomitantly, we have detected an association of a rare, population-specific polymorphism of KV2.1 (KCNB1) with human schizophrenia in a genetic isolate enriched with schizophrenia. Our study demonstrates the involvement of AMIGO-Kv2.1 channel complex in schizophrenia-related behavioral domains in mice and identifies KV2.1 (KCNB1) as a strong susceptibility gene for schizophrenia spectrum disorders in humans. PMID:26240432

  8. Kv2 Channel Regulation of Action Potential Repolarization and Firing Patterns in Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons and Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pin W.

    2014-01-01

    Kv2 family “delayed-rectifier” potassium channels are widely expressed in mammalian neurons. Kv2 channels activate relatively slowly and their contribution to action potential repolarization under physiological conditions has been unclear. We explored the function of Kv2 channels using a Kv2-selective blocker, Guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX-1E). Using acutely isolated neurons, mixed voltage-clamp and current-clamp experiments were done at 37°C to study the physiological kinetics of channel gating and action potentials. In both rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons and mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E produced near-saturating block of a component of current typically constituting ∼60–80% of the total delayed-rectifier current. GxTX-1E also reduced A-type potassium current (IA), but much more weakly. In SCG neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes and voltage clamp experiments using action potential waveforms showed that Kv2 channels carry ∼55% of the total outward current during action potential repolarization despite activating relatively late in the spike. In CA1 neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes evoked from −70 mV, but not −80 mV, likely reflecting a greater role of Kv2 when other potassium channels were partially inactivated at −70 mV. In both CA1 and SCG neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels produced dramatic depolarization of interspike voltages during repetitive firing. In CA1 neurons and some SCG neurons, this was associated with increased initial firing frequency. In all neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels depressed maintained firing because neurons entered depolarization block more readily. Therefore, Kv2 channels can either decrease or increase neuronal excitability depending on the time scale of excitation. PMID:24695716

  9. Kv2 channel regulation of action potential repolarization and firing patterns in superior cervical ganglion neurons and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin W; Bean, Bruce P

    2014-04-02

    Kv2 family "delayed-rectifier" potassium channels are widely expressed in mammalian neurons. Kv2 channels activate relatively slowly and their contribution to action potential repolarization under physiological conditions has been unclear. We explored the function of Kv2 channels using a Kv2-selective blocker, Guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX-1E). Using acutely isolated neurons, mixed voltage-clamp and current-clamp experiments were done at 37°C to study the physiological kinetics of channel gating and action potentials. In both rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons and mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E produced near-saturating block of a component of current typically constituting ∼60-80% of the total delayed-rectifier current. GxTX-1E also reduced A-type potassium current (IA), but much more weakly. In SCG neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes and voltage clamp experiments using action potential waveforms showed that Kv2 channels carry ∼55% of the total outward current during action potential repolarization despite activating relatively late in the spike. In CA1 neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes evoked from -70 mV, but not -80 mV, likely reflecting a greater role of Kv2 when other potassium channels were partially inactivated at -70 mV. In both CA1 and SCG neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels produced dramatic depolarization of interspike voltages during repetitive firing. In CA1 neurons and some SCG neurons, this was associated with increased initial firing frequency. In all neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels depressed maintained firing because neurons entered depolarization block more readily. Therefore, Kv2 channels can either decrease or increase neuronal excitability depending on the time scale of excitation.

  10. Potassium channel Kv1.3 is highly expressed by microglia in human Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rangaraju, Srikant; Gearing, Marla; Jin, Lee-Way; Levey, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Recent genetic studies suggest a central role for innate immunity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, wherein microglia orchestrate neuroinflammation. Kv1.3, a voltage-gated potassium channel of therapeutic relevance in autoimmunity, is upregulated by activated microglia and mediates amyloid-mediated microglial priming and reactive oxygen species production in vitro. We hypothesized that Kv1.3 channel expression is increased in human AD brain tissue. In a blinded postmortem immunohistochemical semi-quantitative analysis performed on ten AD patients and ten non-disease controls, we observed a significantly higher Kv1.3 staining intensity (p = 0.03) and Kv1.3-positive cell density (p = 0.03) in the frontal cortex of AD brains, compared to controls. This paralleled an increased number of Iba1-positive microglia in AD brains. Kv1.3-positive cells had microglial morphology and were associated with amyloid-β plaques. In immunofluorescence studies, Kv1.3 channels co-localized primarily with Iba1 but not with astrocyte marker GFAP, confirming that elevated Kv1.3 expression is limited to microglia. Higher Kv1.3 expression in AD brains was also confirmed by western blot analysis. Our findings support that Kv1.3 channels are biologically relevant and microglia-specific targets in human AD.

  11. The transient outward current in mice lacking the potassium channel gene Kv1.4

    PubMed Central

    London, Barry; Wang, Dao W; Hill, Joseph A; Bennett, Paul B

    1998-01-01

    The transient outward current (Ito) plays a prominent role in the repolarization phase of the cardiac action potential. Several K+ channel genes, including Kv1.4, are expressed in the heart, produce rapidly inactivating currents when heterologously expressed, and may be the molecular basis of Ito.We engineered mice homozygous for a targeted disruption of the K+ channel gene Kv1.4 and compared Ito in wild-type (Kv1.4+/+), heterozygous (Kv1.4+/-) and homozygous ‘knockout’ (Kv1.4−/−) mice. Kv1.4 RNA was truncated in Kv1.4−/− mice and protein expression was absent.Adult myocytes isolated from Kv1.4+/+, Kv1.4+/− and Kv1.4−/− mice had large rapidly inactivating outward currents. The peak current densities at 60 mV (normalized by cellular capacitance, in pA pF−1; means ± s.e.m.) were 53.8 ± 5.3, 45.3 ± 2.2 and 44.4 ± 2.8 in cells from Kv1.4+/+, Kv1.4+/− and Kv1.4−/− mice, respectively (P < 0.02 for Kv1.4+/+ vs. Kv1.4−/−). The steady-state values (800 ms after the voltage clamp step) were 30.9 ± 2.9, 26.9 ± 3.8 and 23.5 ± 2.2, respectively (P < 0.02 for Kv1.4+/+ vs. Kv1.4−/−). The inactivating portion of the current was unchanged in the targeted mice.The voltage dependence and time course of inactivation were not changed by targeted disruption of Kv1.4. The mean best-fitting V½ (membrane potential at 50 % inactivation) values for myocytes from Kv1.4 +/+, Kv1.4+/− and Kv1.4−/− mice were -53.5 ± 3.7, -51.1 ± 2.6 and -54.2 ± 2.4 mV, respectively. The slope factors (k) were -10.1 ± 1.4, -8.8 ± 1.4 and -9.5 ± 1.2 mV, respectively. The fast time constants for development of inactivation at -30 mV were 27.8 ± 2.2, 26.2 ± 5.1 and 19.6 ± 2.1 ms in Kv1.4+/+, Kv1.4+/− and Kv1.4−/− myocytes, respectively. At +30 mV, they were 35.5 ± 2.6, 30.0 ± 2.1 and 28.7 ± 1.6 ms, respectively. The time constants for the rapid phase of recovery from inactivation at -80 mV were 32.5 ± 8.2, 23.3 ± 1.8 and 39.0 ± 3.7 ms, respectively

  12. Dysregulation of Kv3.4 channels in dorsal root ganglia following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ritter, David M; Zemel, Benjamin M; Hala, Tamara J; O'Leary, Michael E; Lepore, Angelo C; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2015-01-21

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients develop chronic pain involving poorly understood central and peripheral mechanisms. Because dysregulation of the voltage-gated Kv3.4 channel has been implicated in the hyperexcitable state of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following direct injury of sensory nerves, we asked whether such a dysregulation also plays a role in SCI. Kv3.4 channels are expressed in DRG neurons, where they help regulate action potential (AP) repolarization in a manner that depends on the modulation of inactivation by protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of the channel's inactivation domain. Here, we report that, 2 weeks after cervical hemicontusion SCI, injured rats exhibit contralateral hypersensitivity to stimuli accompanied by accentuated repetitive spiking in putative DRG nociceptors. Also in these neurons at 1 week after laminectomy and SCI, Kv3.4 channel inactivation is impaired compared with naive nonsurgical controls. At 2-6 weeks after laminectomy, however, Kv3.4 channel inactivation returns to naive levels. Conversely, Kv3.4 currents at 2-6 weeks post-SCI are downregulated and remain slow-inactivating. Immunohistochemistry indicated that downregulation mainly resulted from decreased surface expression of the Kv3.4 channel, as whole-DRG-protein and single-cell mRNA transcript levels did not change. Furthermore, consistent with Kv3.4 channel dysregulation, PKC activation failed to shorten the AP duration of small-diameter DRG neurons. Finally, re-expressing synthetic Kv3.4 currents under dynamic clamp conditions dampened repetitive spiking in the neurons from SCI rats. These results suggest a novel peripheral mechanism of post-SCI pain sensitization implicating Kv3.4 channel dysregulation and potential Kv3.4-based therapeutic interventions.

  13. Dysregulation of Kv3.4 Channels in Dorsal Root Ganglia Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, David M.; Zemel, Benjamin M.; Hala, Tamara J.; O'Leary, Michael E.; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients develop chronic pain involving poorly understood central and peripheral mechanisms. Because dysregulation of the voltage-gated Kv3.4 channel has been implicated in the hyperexcitable state of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following direct injury of sensory nerves, we asked whether such a dysregulation also plays a role in SCI. Kv3.4 channels are expressed in DRG neurons, where they help regulate action potential (AP) repolarization in a manner that depends on the modulation of inactivation by protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of the channel's inactivation domain. Here, we report that, 2 weeks after cervical hemicontusion SCI, injured rats exhibit contralateral hypersensitivity to stimuli accompanied by accentuated repetitive spiking in putative DRG nociceptors. Also in these neurons at 1 week after laminectomy and SCI, Kv3.4 channel inactivation is impaired compared with naive nonsurgical controls. At 2–6 weeks after laminectomy, however, Kv3.4 channel inactivation returns to naive levels. Conversely, Kv3.4 currents at 2–6 weeks post-SCI are downregulated and remain slow-inactivating. Immunohistochemistry indicated that downregulation mainly resulted from decreased surface expression of the Kv3.4 channel, as whole-DRG-protein and single-cell mRNA transcript levels did not change. Furthermore, consistent with Kv3.4 channel dysregulation, PKC activation failed to shorten the AP duration of small-diameter DRG neurons. Finally, re-expressing synthetic Kv3.4 currents under dynamic clamp conditions dampened repetitive spiking in the neurons from SCI rats. These results suggest a novel peripheral mechanism of post-SCI pain sensitization implicating Kv3.4 channel dysregulation and potential Kv3.4-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:25609640

  14. Synthesis of psoralen derivatives and their blocking effect of hKv1.5 channel.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jae Soon; Kim, Kwang Sik; Kim, Han Na; Park, Seon Ah; Ma, Tian-Ze; Lee, Kyung A; Kim, Dae Keun; Kim, Hyung Kyo; Kim, In Su; Jung, Young Hoon; Zee, Ok Pyo; Yoo, Dong Jin; Kwak, Yong Geun

    2007-02-01

    Previously, we found that a furocoumarin derivative, psoralen (7H-furo[3,2-g][1]benzopyran-7-one), blocked a human Kv1.5 potassium channel (hKv1.5) and has a potential antiarrhythmic effect. In the present study, to develop more potent hKv1.5 blockers or antiarrhythmic drugs, we synthesized ten psoralen derivatives and examined their blocking effects on hKv1.5 stably expressed in Ltk cells. Among the newly synthesized psoralen derivatives, three derivatives (Compounds 5, 9 and 10) showed the open channel-blocking effect. Compound 9 among them was the most potent in blocking hKv1.5. We found that compound 9, one of the psoralen derivatives, inhibited the hKv1.5 current in a concentration-, use- and voltage-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 27.4 +/- 5.1 nM at +60 mV. Compound 9 accelerated the inactivation kinetics of the hKv1.5 channel, slowed the deactivation kinetics of hKv1.5 current resulting in a tail crossover phenomenon. Compound 9 inhibited hKv1.5 current in a use-dependent manner. These results indicate that compound 9, one of psoralen derivatives, acts on hKv1.5 channel as an open channel blocker and is much more potent than psoralen in blocking hKv1.5 channel. If further studies were done, compound 9 might be an ideal antiarrhythmic drug for atrial fibrillation.

  15. Expression and function of K(V)2-containing channels in human urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Chen, Muyan; Afeli, Serge A Y; Cheng, Qiuping; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2012-06-01

    The functional role of the voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in human detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is largely unexplored. Here, we provide molecular, electrophysiological, and functional evidence for the expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and the electrically silent K(V)9.3 subunits in human DSM. Stromatoxin-1 (ScTx1), a selective inhibitor of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)4.2 homotetrameric channels and of K(V)2.1/9.3 heterotetrameric channels, was used to examine the role of these channels in human DSM function. Human DSM tissues were obtained during open bladder surgeries from patients without a history of overactive bladder. Freshly isolated human DSM cells were studied using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, live-cell Ca(2+) imaging, and the perforated whole cell patch-clamp technique. Isometric DSM tension recordings of human DSM isolated strips were conducted using tissue baths. RT-PCR experiments showed mRNA expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)9.3 (but not K(V)4.2) channel subunits in human isolated DSM cells. K(V)2.1 and K(V)2.2 protein expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Perforated whole cell patch-clamp experiments revealed that ScTx1 (100 nM) inhibited the amplitude of the voltage step-induced K(V) current in freshly isolated human DSM cells. ScTx1 (100 nM) significantly increased the intracellular Ca(2+) level in DSM cells. In human DSM isolated strips, ScTx1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude and muscle force, and enhanced the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions within the range of 3.5-30 Hz stimulation frequencies. These findings reveal that ScTx1-sensitive K(V)2-containing channels are key regulators of human DSM excitability and contractility and may represent new targets for pharmacological or genetic intervention for bladder dysfunction.

  16. Developmental expression of Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channels in the avian hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Doczi, Megan A; Vitzthum, Carl M; Forehand, Cynthia J

    2016-03-11

    Specialized hypothalamic neurons integrate the homeostatic balance between food intake and energy expenditure, processes that may become dysregulated during the development of diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disorders. Shaker family voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1) contribute to the maintenance of resting membrane potential, action potential characteristics, and neurotransmitter release in many populations of neurons, although hypothalamic Kv1 channel expression has been largely unexplored. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from avian hypothalamic brain slices demonstrate a developmental shift in the electrophysiological properties of avian arcuate nucleus neurons, identifying an increase in outward ionic current that corresponds with action potential maturation. Additionally, RT-PCR experiments identified the early expression of Kv1.2, Kv1.3, and Kv1.5 mRNA in the embryonic avian hypothalamus, suggesting that these channels may underlie the electrophysiological changes observed in these neurons. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis on intact microdissections of embryonic hypothalamic tissue revealed a concomitant increase in Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 gene expression at key electrophysiological time points during development. This study is the first to demonstrate hypothalamic mRNA expression of Kv1 channels in developing avian embryos and may suggest a role for voltage-gated ion channel regulation in the physiological patterning of embryonic hypothalamic circuits governing energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mapping the Interaction Anatomy of BmP02 on Kv1.3 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wu, B.; Wu, B. F.; Feng, Y. J.; Tao, J.; Ji, Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    The potassium channel Kv 1.3 plays a vital part in the activation of T lymphocytes and is an attractive pharmacological target for autoimmune diseases. BmP02, a 28-residue peptide isolated from Chinese scorpion (Buthus martensi Karsch) venom, is a potent and selective Kv1.3 channel blocker. However, the mechanism through which BmP02 recognizes and inhibits the Kv1.3 channel is still unclear. In the present study, a complex molecular model of Kv1.3-BmP02 was developed by docking analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. From these simulations, it appears the large β-turn (residues 10–16) of BmP02 might be the binding interface with Kv 1.3. These results were confirmed by scanning alanine mutagenesis of BmP02, which identified His9, Lys11 and Lys13, which lie within BmP02’s β-turn, as key residues for interacting with Kv1.3. Based on these results and molecular modeling, two negatively charged residues of Kv1.3, D421 and D422, located in turret region, were predicted to act as the binding site for BmP02. Mutation of these residues reduced sensitivity of Kv 1.3 to BmP02 inhibition, suggesting that electrostatic interactions play a crucial role in Kv1.3-BmP02 interaction. This study revealed the molecular basis of Kv 1.3 recognition by BmP02 venom, and provides a novel interaction model for Kv channel-specific blocker complex, which may help guide future drug-design for Kv1.3-related channelopathies. PMID:27403813

  18. Mapping the Interaction Anatomy of BmP02 on Kv1.3 Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, B.; Wu, B. F.; Feng, Y. J.; Tao, J.; Ji, Y. H.

    2016-07-01

    The potassium channel Kv 1.3 plays a vital part in the activation of T lymphocytes and is an attractive pharmacological target for autoimmune diseases. BmP02, a 28-residue peptide isolated from Chinese scorpion (Buthus martensi Karsch) venom, is a potent and selective Kv1.3 channel blocker. However, the mechanism through which BmP02 recognizes and inhibits the Kv1.3 channel is still unclear. In the present study, a complex molecular model of Kv1.3-BmP02 was developed by docking analysis and molecular dynamics simulations. From these simulations, it appears the large β-turn (residues 10–16) of BmP02 might be the binding interface with Kv 1.3. These results were confirmed by scanning alanine mutagenesis of BmP02, which identified His9, Lys11 and Lys13, which lie within BmP02’s β-turn, as key residues for interacting with Kv1.3. Based on these results and molecular modeling, two negatively charged residues of Kv1.3, D421 and D422, located in turret region, were predicted to act as the binding site for BmP02. Mutation of these residues reduced sensitivity of Kv 1.3 to BmP02 inhibition, suggesting that electrostatic interactions play a crucial role in Kv1.3-BmP02 interaction. This study revealed the molecular basis of Kv 1.3 recognition by BmP02 venom, and provides a novel interaction model for Kv channel-specific blocker complex, which may help guide future drug-design for Kv1.3-related channelopathies.

  19. Molecular determinants of Kv1.5 channel block by diphenyl phosphine oxide-1.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-mei; Zhang, Xiao-xian; Tu, Dan-na; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Yan-jie; Xiao, Hua; Sanguinetti, Michael C; Zou, Anruo; Liao, Yu-hua

    2010-06-01

    Kv1.5 channels conduct the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier current (I(Kur)) that contributes to action potential repolarization of human atrial myocytes. Block of these channels has been proposed as a treatment for atrial arrhythmias. Diphenyl phosphine oxide-1 (DPO-1) is a novel and potent inhibitor of Kv1.5 potassium channels. The present study was undertaken to characterize the mechanisms and molecular determinants of channel block by DPO-1. Experiments were carried out on wild-type and mutant Kv1.5 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using the standard two microelectrode voltage clamp technique. DPO-1 blocked Kv1.5 current in oocytes with an IC(50) of 0.78+/-0.12 microM at +40 mV. Block was enhanced by higher rates of stimulation, consistent with preferential binding of the drug to the open state of the channel. Ala-scanning mutagenesis of the pore domain of Kv1.5 identified the residues Thr480, Leu499, Leu506, Ile508, Leu510 and Val514 as components of the putative binding site for DPO-1, partially overlapping the site previously defined for the Kv1.5 channel blockers AVE0118 and S0100176. Block of Kv1.5 by DPO-1 was significantly reduced in the presence of Kvbeta1.3.

  20. Kv2 channels regulate firing rate in pyramidal neurons from rat sensorimotor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongxu; Armstrong, William E; Foehring, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    The largest outward potassium current in the soma of neocortical pyramidal neurons is due to channels containing Kv2.1 α subunits. These channels have been implicated in cellular responses to seizures and ischaemia, mechanisms for intrinsic plasticity and cell death, and responsiveness to anaesthetic agents. Despite their abundance, knowledge of the function of these delayed rectifier channels has been limited by the lack of specific pharmacological agents. To test for functional roles of Kv2 channels in pyramidal cells from somatosensory or motor cortex of rats (layers 2/3 or 5), we transfected cortical neurons with DNA for a Kv2.1 pore mutant (Kv2.1W365C/Y380T: Kv2.1 DN) in an organotypic culture model to manipulate channel expression. Slices were obtained from rats at postnatal days (P7-P14) and maintained in organotypic culture. We used biolistic methods to transfect neurons with gold ‘bullets’ coated with DNA for the Kv2.1 DN and green fluorescent protein (GFP), GFP alone, or wild type (WT) Kv2.1 plus GFP. Cells that fluoresced green, contained a bullet and responded to positive or negative pressure from the recording pipette were considered to be transfected cells. In each slice, we recorded from a transfected cell and a control non-transfected cell from the same layer and area. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings obtained after 3–7 days in culture showed that cells transfected with the Kv2.1 DN had a significant reduction in outward current (∼45% decrease in the total current density measured 200 ms after onset of a voltage step from –78 to –2 mV). Transfection with GFP alone did not affect current amplitude and overexpression of the Kv2.1 WT resulted in greatly increased currents. Current-clamp experiments were used to assess the functional consequences of manipulation of Kv2.1 expression. The results suggest roles for Kv2 channels in controlling membrane potential during the interspike interval (ISI), firing rate, spike frequency adaptation

  1. KV7 channels are involved in hypoxia-induced vasodilatation of porcine coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hedegaard, E R; Nielsen, B D; Kun, A; Hughes, A D; Krøigaard, C; Mogensen, S; Matchkov, V V; Fröbert, O; Simonsen, U

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Hypoxia causes vasodilatation of coronary arteries, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that hypoxia reduces intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by opening of K channels and release of H2S. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Porcine coronary arteries without endothelium were mounted for measurement of isometric tension and [Ca2+]i, and the expression of voltage-gated K channels KV7 channels (encoded by KCNQ genes) and large-conductance calcium-activated K channels (KCa1.1) was examined. Voltage clamp assessed the role of KV7 channels in hypoxia. KEY RESULTS Gradual reduction of oxygen concentration from 95 to 1% dilated the precontracted coronary arteries and this was associated with reduced [Ca2+]i in PGF2α (10 μM)-contracted arteries whereas no fall in [Ca2+]i was observed in 30 mM K-contracted arteries. Blockers of ATP-sensitive voltage-gated potassium channels and KCa1.1 inhibited hypoxia-induced dilatation in PGF2α-contracted arteries; this inhibition was more marked in the presence of the Kv7 channel blockers, XE991 and linopirdine, while a KV7.1 blocker, failed to change hypoxic vasodilatation. XE991 also inhibited H2S- and adenosine-induced vasodilatation. PCR revealed the expression of KV7.1, KV7.4, KV7.5 and KCa1.1 channels, and KCa1.1, KV7.4 and KV7.5 were also identified by immunoblotting. Voltage clamp studies showed the XE991-sensitive current was more marked in hypoxic conditions. CONCLUSION The KV7.4 and KV7.5 channels, which we identified in the coronary arteries, appear to have a major role in hypoxia-induced vasodilatation. The voltage clamp results further support the involvement of KV7 channels in this vasodilatation. Activation of these KV7 channels may be induced by H2S and adenosine. PMID:24111896

  2. Properties and expression of Kv3 channels in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Tiziana; De Luca, Annarita; Tempia, Filippo

    2006-10-01

    In cerebellar Purkinje cells, Kv3 potassium channels are indispensable for firing at high frequencies. In Purkinje cells from young mice (P4-P7), Kv3 currents, recorded in whole-cell in slices, activated at -30 mV, with rapid activation and deactivation kinetics, and they were partially blocked by blood depressing substance-I (BDS-I, 1 microM). At positive potentials, Kv3 currents were slowly but completely inactivating, while the recovery from inactivation was about eightfold slower, suggesting that a previous firing activity or a small change of the resting potential could in principle accumulate inactivated Kv3 channels, thereby finely tuning Kv3 current availability for subsequent action potentials. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis showed the expression by all Purkinje cells (n=10 for each subunit) of Kv3.1, Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 mRNA, while Kv3.2 was not expressed. These results add to the framework for interpreting the physiological function and the molecular determinants of Kv3 currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

  3. Kinesin I transports tetramerized Kv3 channels through the axon initial segment via direct binding.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingxuan; Gu, Yuanzheng; Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2010-11-24

    Precise targeting of various voltage-gated ion channels to proper membrane domains is crucial for their distinct roles in neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. How each channel protein is transported within the cytoplasm is poorly understood. Here, we report that KIF5/kinesin I transports Kv3.1 voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels through the axon initial segment (AIS) via direct binding. First, we have identified a novel interaction between Kv3.1 and KIF5, confirmed by immunoprecipitation from mouse brain lysates and by pull-down assays with exogenously expressed proteins. The interaction is mediated by a direct binding between the Kv3.1 N-terminal T1 domain and a conserved region in KIF5 tail domains, in which proper T1 tetramerization is crucial. Overexpression of this region of KIF5B markedly reduces axonal levels of Kv3.1bHA. In mature hippocampal neurons, endogenous Kv3.1b and KIF5 colocalize. Suppressing the endogenous KIF5B level by RNA interference significantly reduces the Kv3.1b axonal level. Furthermore, mutating the Zn(2+)-binding site within T1 markedly decreases channel axonal targeting and forward trafficking, likely through disrupting T1 tetramerization and hence eliminating the binding to KIF5 tail. The mutation also alters channel activity. Interestingly, coexpression of the YFP (yellow fluorescent protein)-tagged KIF5B assists dendritic Kv3.1a and even mutants with a faulty axonal targeting motif to penetrate the AIS. Finally, fluorescently tagged Kv3.1 channels colocalize and comove with KIF5B along axons revealed by two-color time-lapse imaging. Our findings suggest that the binding to KIF5 ensures properly assembled and functioning Kv3.1 channels to be transported into axons.

  4. Nuclear localization and functional characteristics of voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3.

    PubMed

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Byun, Jun Kyu; Jeon, Won-Il; Choi, Seon Young; Park, Jin; Lee, Bo Hyung; Yang, Ji Eun; Park, Jin Bong; O'Grady, Scott M; Kim, Dae-Yong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, So Yeong

    2015-05-15

    It is widely known that ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane. However, a few studies have suggested that several ion channels including voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels also exist in intracellular organelles where they are involved in the biochemical events associated with cell signaling. In the present study, Western blot analysis using fractionated protein clearly indicates that Kv1.3 channels are expressed in the nuclei of MCF7, A549, and SNU-484 cancer cells and human brain tissues. In addition, Kv1.3 is located in the plasma membrane and the nucleus of Jurkat T cells. Nuclear membrane hyperpolarization after treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a specific blocker of Kv1.3 channels, provides evidence for functional channels at the nuclear membrane of A549 cells. MgTX-induced hyperpolarization is abolished in the nuclei of Kv1.3 silenced cells, and the effects of MgTX are dependent on the magnitude of the K(+) gradient across the nuclear membrane. Selective Kv1.3 blockers induce the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-Fos activation. Moreover, Kv1.3 is shown to form a complex with the upstream binding factor 1 in the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveals that Sp1 transcription factor is directly bound to the promoter region of the Kv1.3 gene, and the Sp1 regulates Kv1.3 expression in the nucleus of A549 cells. These results demonstrate that Kv1.3 channels are primarily localized in the nucleus of several types of cancer cells and human brain tissues where they are capable of regulating nuclear membrane potential and activation of transcription factors, such as phosphorylated CREB and c-Fos.

  5. Nuclear Localization and Functional Characteristics of Voltage-gated Potassium Channel Kv1.3*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Byun, Jun Kyu; Jeon, Won-Il; Choi, Seon Young; Park, Jin; Lee, Bo Hyung; Yang, Ji Eun; Park, Jin Bong; O'Grady, Scott M.; Kim, Dae-Yong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, So Yeong

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane. However, a few studies have suggested that several ion channels including voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels also exist in intracellular organelles where they are involved in the biochemical events associated with cell signaling. In the present study, Western blot analysis using fractionated protein clearly indicates that Kv1.3 channels are expressed in the nuclei of MCF7, A549, and SNU-484 cancer cells and human brain tissues. In addition, Kv1.3 is located in the plasma membrane and the nucleus of Jurkat T cells. Nuclear membrane hyperpolarization after treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a specific blocker of Kv1.3 channels, provides evidence for functional channels at the nuclear membrane of A549 cells. MgTX-induced hyperpolarization is abolished in the nuclei of Kv1.3 silenced cells, and the effects of MgTX are dependent on the magnitude of the K+ gradient across the nuclear membrane. Selective Kv1.3 blockers induce the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-Fos activation. Moreover, Kv1.3 is shown to form a complex with the upstream binding factor 1 in the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveals that Sp1 transcription factor is directly bound to the promoter region of the Kv1.3 gene, and the Sp1 regulates Kv1.3 expression in the nucleus of A549 cells. These results demonstrate that Kv1.3 channels are primarily localized in the nucleus of several types of cancer cells and human brain tissues where they are capable of regulating nuclear membrane potential and activation of transcription factors, such as phosphorylated CREB and c-Fos. PMID:25829491

  6. Sites and Functional Consequence of Alkylphenol Anesthetic Binding to Kv1.2 Channels.

    PubMed

    Bu, Weiming; Liang, Qiansheng; Zhi, Lianteng; Maciunas, Lina; Loll, Patrick J; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2017-02-15

    Inhalational general anesthetics, such as sevoflurane and isoflurane, modulate a subset of brain Kv1 potassium channels. However, the Kv1.2 channel is resistant to propofol, a commonly used intravenous alkylphenol anesthetic. We hypothesize that propofol binds to a presumed pocket involving the channel's S4-S5 linker, but functional transduction is poor and, therefore, propofol efficacy is low. To test this hypothesis, we used a photoactive propofol analog (meta-aziPropofol = AziPm) to directly probe binding and electrophysiological and mutational analyses in Xenopus oocytes to probe function. We find that AziPm photolabels L321 in the S4-S5 linker of both the wild-type Kv1.2 and a mutant Kv1.2 (G329 T) with a novel gating phenotype. Furthermore, whereas propofol does not significantly modulate Kv1.2 WT but robustly potentiates Kv1.2 G329T, AziPm inhibits Kv1.2 WT and also potentiates Kv1.2 G329T. Kv1.2 modulation by AziPm was abolished by two mutations that decreased hydrophobicity at L321 (L321A and L321F), confirming the specific significance of the S4-S5 linker in the mechanism of general anesthetic modulation. Since AziPm binds to Kv1.2 G329T and shares the propofol ability to potentiate this mutant, the parent propofol likely also binds to the Kv1.2 channel. However, binding and alkylphenol-induced transduction are seemingly sensitive to the conformation of the S4-S5 linker site (altered by G329T) and subtle differences in the chemical structures of propofol and AziPm. Overall, the results are consistent with a mechanism of general anesthetic modulation that depends on the complementarity of necessary ligand binding and permissive ion channel conformations that dictate modulation and efficacy.

  7. KCNE1 constrains the voltage sensor of Kv7.1 K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Shamgar, Liora; Haitin, Yoni; Yisharel, Ilanit; Malka, Eti; Schottelndreier, Hella; Peretz, Asher; Paas, Yoav; Attali, Bernard

    2008-04-09

    Kv7 potassium channels whose mutations cause cardiovascular and neurological disorders are members of the superfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels, comprising a central pore enclosed by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) and sharing a homologous S4 sensor sequence. The Kv7.1 pore-forming subunit can interact with various KCNE auxiliary subunits to form K(+) channels with very different gating behaviors. In an attempt to characterize the nature of the promiscuous gating of Kv7.1 channels, we performed a tryptophan-scanning mutagenesis of the S4 sensor and analyzed the mutation-induced perturbations in gating free energy. Perturbing the gating energetics of Kv7.1 bias most of the mutant channels towards the closed state, while fewer mutations stabilize the open state or the inactivated state. In the absence of auxiliary subunits, mutations of specific S4 residues mimic the gating phenotypes produced by co-assembly of Kv7.1 with either KCNE1 or KCNE3. Many S4 perturbations compromise the ability of KCNE1 to properly regulate Kv7.1 channel gating. The tryptophan-induced packing perturbations and cysteine engineering studies in S4 suggest that KCNE1 lodges at the inter-VSD S4-S1 interface between two adjacent subunits, a strategic location to exert its striking action on Kv7.1 gating functions.

  8. Kv3.1 channels stimulate adult neural precursor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Cuny, Hartmut; Adams, David J

    2013-05-15

    Adult neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) play a pivotal role in neuronal plasticity throughout life. Among ion channels identified in adult NPCs, voltage-gated delayed rectifier K(+) (KDR) channels are dominantly expressed. However, the KDR channel subtype and its physiological role are still undefined. We used real-time quantitative RT-PCR and gene knockdown techniques to identify a major functional KDR channel subtype in adult NPCs. Dominant mRNA expression of Kv3.1, a high voltage-gated KDR channel, was quantitatively confirmed. Kv3.1 gene knockdown with specific small interfering RNAs (siRNA) for Kv3.1 significantly inhibited Kv3.1 mRNA expression by 63.9% (P < 0.001) and KDR channel currents by 52.2% (P < 0.001). This indicates that Kv3.1 is the subtype responsible for producing KDR channel outward currents. Resting membrane properties, such as resting membrane potential, of NPCs were not affected by Kv3.1 expression. Kv3.1 knockdown with 300 nm siRNA inhibited NPC growth (increase in cell numbers) by 52.9% (P < 0.01). This inhibition was attributed to decreased cell proliferation, not increased cell apoptosis. We also established a convenient in vitro imaging assay system to evaluate NPC differentiation using NPCs from doublecortin-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. Kv3.1 knockdown also significantly reduced neuronal differentiation by 31.4% (P < 0.01). We have demonstrated that Kv3.1 is a dominant functional KDR channel subtype expressed in adult NPCs and plays key roles in NPC proliferation and neuronal lineage commitment during differentiation.

  9. Retigabine holds KV7 channels open and stabilizes the resting potential

    PubMed Central

    Corbin-Leftwich, Aaron; Mossadeq, Sayeed M.; Ha, Junghoon; Ruchala, Iwona; Le, Audrey Han Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    The anticonvulsant Retigabine is a KV7 channel agonist used to treat hyperexcitability disorders in humans. Retigabine shifts the voltage dependence for activation of the heteromeric KV7.2/KV7.3 channel to more negative potentials, thus facilitating activation. Although the molecular mechanism underlying Retigabine’s action remains unknown, previous studies have identified the pore region of KV7 channels as the drug’s target. This suggested that the Retigabine-induced shift in voltage dependence likely derives from the stabilization of the pore domain in an open (conducting) conformation. Testing this idea, we show that the heteromeric KV7.2/KV7.3 channel has at least two open states, which we named O1 and O2, with O2 being more stable. The O1 state was reached after short membrane depolarizations, whereas O2 was reached after prolonged depolarization or during steady state at the typical neuronal resting potentials. We also found that activation and deactivation seem to follow distinct pathways, suggesting that the KV7.2/KV7.3 channel activity displays hysteresis. As for the action of Retigabine, we discovered that this agonist discriminates between open states, preferentially acting on the O2 state and further stabilizing it. Based on these findings, we proposed a novel mechanism for the therapeutic effect of Retigabine whereby this drug reduces excitability by enhancing the resting potential open state stability of KV7.2/KV7.3 channels. To address this hypothesis, we used a model for action potential (AP) in Xenopus laevis oocytes and found that the resting membrane potential became more negative as a function of Retigabine concentration, whereas the threshold potential for AP firing remained unaltered. PMID:26880756

  10. Position-dependent attenuation by Kv1.6 of N-type inactivation of Kv1.4-containing channels.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Kaza, Seshu; Le Berre, Marie; O'Hara, Liam; Bodeker, MacDara; Wang, Jiafu; Dolly, J Oliver

    2011-09-01

    Assembly of distinct α subunits of Kv1 (voltage-gated K(+) channels) into tetramers underlies the diversity of their outward currents in neurons. Kv1.4-containing channels normally exhibit N-type rapid inactivation, mediated through an NIB (N-terminal inactivation ball); this can be over-ridden if associated with a Kv1.6 α subunit, via its NIP (N-type inactivation prevention) domain. Herein, NIP function was shown to require positioning of Kv1.6 adjacent to the Kv1.4 subunit. Using a recently devised gene concatenation, heterotetrameric Kv1 channels were expressed as single-chain proteins on the plasmalemma of HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells, so their constituents could be arranged in different positions. Placing the Kv1.4 and 1.6 genes together, followed by two copies of Kv1.2, yielded a K(+) current devoid of fast inactivation. Mutation of critical glutamates within the NIP endowed rapid inactivation. Moreover, separating Kv1.4 and 1.6 with a copy of Kv1.2 gave a fast-inactivating K(+) current with steady-state inactivation shifted to more negative potentials and exhibiting slower recovery, correlating with similar inactivation kinetics seen for Kv1.4-(1.2)(3). Alternatively, separating Kv1.4 and 1.6 with two copies of Kv1.2 yielded slow-inactivating currents, because in this concatamer Kv1.4 and 1.6 should be together. These findings also confirm that the gene concatenation can generate K(+) channels with α subunits in pre-determined positions.

  11. β Subunits Functionally Differentiate Human Kv4.3 Potassium Channel Splice Variants

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    The human ventricular cardiomyocyte transient outward K+ current (Ito) mediates the initial phase of myocyte repolarization and its disruption is implicated in Brugada Syndrome and heart failure (HF). Human cardiac Ito is generated primarily by two Kv4.3 splice variants (Kv4.3L and Kv4.3S, diverging only by a C-terminal, S6-proximal, 19-residue stretch unique to Kv4.3L), which are differentially remodeled in HF, but considered functionally alike at baseline. Kv4.3 is regulated in human heart by β subunits including KChIP2b and KCNEs, but their effects were previously assumed to be Kv4.3 isoform-independent. Here, this assumption was tested experimentally using two-electrode voltage-clamp analysis of human subunits co-expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Unexpectedly, Kv4.3L-KChIP2b channels exhibited up to 8-fold lower current augmentation, 40% slower inactivation, and 5 mV-shifted steady-state inactivation compared to Kv4.3S-KChIP2b. A synthetic peptide mimicking the 19-residue stretch diminished these differences, reinforcing the importance of this segment in mediating Kv4.3 regulation by KChIP2b. KCNE subunits induced further functional divergence, including a 7-fold increase in Kv4.3S-KCNE4-KChIP2b current compared to Kv4.3L-KCNE4-KChIP2b. The discovery of β-subunit-dependent functional divergence in human Kv4.3 splice variants suggests a C-terminal signaling hub is crucial to governing β-subunit effects upon Kv4.3, and demonstrates the potential significance of differential Kv4.3 gene-splicing and β subunit expression in myocyte physiology and pathobiology. PMID:28228734

  12. The Inhibitory Effects of Ca2+ Channel Blocker Nifedipine on Rat Kv2.1 Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xi-Mu; Qiu, Xiao-Yue

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that nifedipine, a commonly used dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel blocker, has also significant interactions with voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels. But to date, little is known whether nifedipine exerted an action on Kv2.1 channels, a member of the Shab subfamily with slow inactivation. In the present study, we explored the effects of nifedipine on rat Kv2.1 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Data from whole-cell recording showed that nifedipine substantially reduced Kv2.1 currents with the IC50 value of 37.5 ± 5.7 μM and delayed the time course of activation without effects on the activation curve. Moreover, this drug also significantly shortened the duration of inactivation and deactivation of Kv2.1 currents in a voltage-dependent manner. Interestingly, the half-maximum inactivation potential (V1/2) of Kv2.1 currents was -11.4 ± 0.9 mV in control and became -38.5 ± 0.4 mV after application of 50 μM nifedipine. The large hyperpolarizing shift (27 mV) of the inactivation curve has not been reported previously and may result in more inactivation for outward delayed rectifier K+ currents mediated by Kv2.1 channels at repolarization phases. The Y380R mutant significantly increased the binding affinity of nifedipine to Kv2.1 channels, suggesting an interaction of nifedipine with the outer mouth region of this channel. The data present here will be helpful to understand the diverse effects exerted by nifedipine on various Kv channels. PMID:25893973

  13. The Inhibitory Effects of Ca2+ Channel Blocker Nifedipine on Rat Kv2.1 Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Tao; Li, Xiao-Qing; Hu, Xi-Mu; Qiu, Xiao-Yue

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that nifedipine, a commonly used dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel blocker, has also significant interactions with voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels. But to date, little is known whether nifedipine exerted an action on Kv2.1 channels, a member of the Shab subfamily with slow inactivation. In the present study, we explored the effects of nifedipine on rat Kv2.1 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Data from whole-cell recording showed that nifedipine substantially reduced Kv2.1 currents with the IC50 value of 37.5 ± 5.7 μM and delayed the time course of activation without effects on the activation curve. Moreover, this drug also significantly shortened the duration of inactivation and deactivation of Kv2.1 currents in a voltage-dependent manner. Interestingly, the half-maximum inactivation potential (V1/2) of Kv2.1 currents was -11.4 ± 0.9 mV in control and became -38.5 ± 0.4 mV after application of 50 μM nifedipine. The large hyperpolarizing shift (27 mV) of the inactivation curve has not been reported previously and may result in more inactivation for outward delayed rectifier K+ currents mediated by Kv2.1 channels at repolarization phases. The Y380R mutant significantly increased the binding affinity of nifedipine to Kv2.1 channels, suggesting an interaction of nifedipine with the outer mouth region of this channel. The data present here will be helpful to understand the diverse effects exerted by nifedipine on various Kv channels.

  14. Inhibitory effects of cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil on the Kv1.5 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Cheng, Neng; Li, Xian-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Kv1.5 channels carry ultra-rapid delayed rectifier K+ currents in excitable cells, including neurons and cardiac myocytes. In the current study, the effects of cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil on cloned Kv1.5 channels expressed in HEK29 cells were explored using whole-cell recording technique. Exposure to donepezil resulted in a rapid and reversible block of Kv1.5 currents, with an IC50 value of 72.5 μM. The mutant R476V significantly reduced the binding affinity of donepezil to Kv1.5 channels, showing the target site in the outer mouth region. Donepezil produced a significant delay in the duration of activation and deactivation, and mutant R476V potentiated these effects without altering activation curves. In response to slowed deactivation time course, a typical crossover of Kv1.5 tail currents was clearly evident after bath application of donepezil. In addition, both this chemical and mutant R476V accelerated current decay during channel inactivation in a voltage-dependent way, but barely changed the inactivation and recovery curves. The presence of donepezil exhibited the use-dependent block of Kv1.5 currents in response to a series of depolarizing pulses. Our data indicate that donepezil can directly block Kv1.5 channels in its open and closed states. PMID:28198801

  15. Inhibitory effects of cortisone and hydrocortisone on human Kv1.5 channel currents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Park, Mi-Hyeong; Jo, Su-Hyun

    2015-01-05

    Glucocorticoids are the primary hormones that respond to stress and protect organisms from dangerous situations. The glucocorticoids hydrocortisone and its dormant form, cortisone, affect the cardiovascular system with changes such as increased blood pressure and cardioprotection. Kv1.5 channels play a critical role in the maintenance of cellular membrane potential and are widely expressed in pancreatic β-cells, neurons, myocytes, and smooth muscle cells of the pulmonary vasculature. We examined the electrophysiological effects of both cortisone and hydrocortisone on human Kv1.5 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes using a two-microelectrode voltage clamp technique. Both cortisone and hydrocortisone rapidly and irreversibly suppressed the amplitude of Kv1.5 channel current with IC50 values of 50.2±4.2μM and 33.4±3.2μM, respectively, while sustained the current trace shape of Kv1.5 current. The inhibitory effect of cortisone on Kv1.5 decreased progressively from -10mV to +30mV, while hydrocortisone׳s inhibition of the channel did not change across the same voltage range. Both cortisone and hydrocortisone blocked Kv1.5 channel currents in a non-use-dependent manner and neither altered the channel׳s steady-state activation or inactivation curves. These results show that cortisone and hydrocortisone inhibited Kv1.5 channel currents differently, and that Kv1.5 channels were more sensitive to hydrocortisone than to cortisone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The S1 helix critically regulates the finely tuned gating of Kv11.1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Ng, Chai Ann; David, Erikka; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Kuchel, Philip W.; Vandenberg, Jamie I.; Perry, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    Congenital mutations in the cardiac Kv11.1 channel can cause long QT syndrome type 2 (LQTS2), a heart rhythm disorder associated with sudden cardiac death. Mutations act either by reducing protein expression at the membrane and/or by perturbing the intricate gating properties of Kv11.1 channels. A number of clinical LQTS2-associated mutations have been reported in the first transmembrane segment (S1) of Kv11.1 channels, but the role of this region of the channel is largely unexplored. In part, this is due to problems defining the extent of the S1 helix, as a consequence of its low sequence homology with other Kv family members. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy and electrophysiological characterization to show that the S1 of Kv11.1 channels extends seven helical turns, from Pro-405 to Phe-431, and is flanked by unstructured loops. Functional analysis suggests that pre-S1 loop residues His-402 and Tyr-403 play an important role in regulating the kinetics and voltage dependence of channel activation and deactivation. Multiple residues within the S1 helix also play an important role in fine-tuning the voltage dependence of activation, regulating slow deactivation, and modulating C-type inactivation of Kv11.1 channels. Analyses of LQTS2-associated mutations in the pre-S1 loop or S1 helix of Kv11.1 channels demonstrate perturbations to both protein expression and most gating transitions. Thus, S1 region mutations would reduce both the action potential repolarizing current passed by Kv11.1 channels in cardiac myocytes, as well as the current passed in response to premature depolarizations that normally helps protect against the formation of ectopic beats. PMID:28280240

  17. Disruption of Kv1.3 Channel Forward Vesicular Trafficking by Hypoxia in Human T Lymphocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Chimote, Ameet A.; Kuras, Zerrin; Conforti, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia in solid tumors contributes to decreased immunosurveillance via down-regulation of Kv1.3 channels in T lymphocytes and associated T cell function inhibition. However, the mechanisms responsible for Kv1.3 down-regulation are not understood. We hypothesized that chronic hypoxia reduces Kv1.3 surface expression via alterations in membrane trafficking. Chronic hypoxia decreased Kv1.3 surface expression and current density in Jurkat T cells. Inhibition of either protein synthesis or degradation and endocytosis did not prevent this effect. Instead, blockade of clathrin-coated vesicle formation and forward trafficking prevented the Kv1.3 surface expression decrease in hypoxia. Confocal microscopy revealed an increased retention of Kv1.3 in the trans-Golgi during hypoxia. Expression of adaptor protein-1 (AP1), responsible for clathrin-coated vesicle formation at the trans-Golgi, was selectively down-regulated by hypoxia. Furthermore, AP1 down-regulation increased Kv1.3 retention in the trans-Golgi and reduced Kv1.3 currents. Our results indicate that hypoxia disrupts AP1/clathrin-mediated forward trafficking of Kv1.3 from the trans-Golgi to the plasma membrane thus contributing to decreased Kv1.3 surface expression in T lymphocytes. PMID:22134923

  18. Inhibition of Kv1.3 Channels in Human Jurkat T Cells by Xanthohumol and Isoxanthohumol.

    PubMed

    Gąsiorowska, Justyna; Teisseyre, Andrzej; Uryga, Anna; Michalak, Krystyna

    2015-08-01

    Using whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated influence of selected compounds from groups of prenylated chalcones and flavonoids: xanthohumol and isoxanthohumol on the activity of Kv1.3 channels in human leukemic Jurkat T cells. Obtained results provide evidence that both examined compounds were inhibitors of Kv1.3 channels in these cells. The inhibitory effects occurred in a concentration-dependent manner. The estimated value of the half-blocking concentration (EC50) was about 3 μM for xanthohumol and about 7.8 μM for isoxanthohumol. The inhibition of Kv1.3 channels by examined compounds was not complete. Upon an application of the compounds at the maximal concentrations equal to 30 μM, the activity of Kv1.3 channels was inhibited to about 0.13 of the control value. The inhibitory effect was reversible. The application of xanthohumol and isoxanthohumol did not change the currents' activation and inactivation rate. These results may confirm our earlier hypothesis that the presence of a prenyl group in a molecule is a factor that facilitates the inhibition of Kv1.3 channels by compounds from the groups of flavonoids and chalcones. The inhibition of Kv1.3 channels might be involved in antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of the compounds observed in cancer cell lines expressing these channels.

  19. Functional differences of a Kv2.1 channel and a Kv2.1/Kv1.2S4-chimera are confined to a concerted voltage shift of various gating parameters.

    PubMed

    Koopmann, R; Benndorf, K; Lorra, C; Pongs, O

    1997-01-01

    When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the voltage-dependent K+ channels Kv1.2 and Kv2.1 have similar steady state parameters of activation but the kinetics of activation is significantly faster in the Kv1.2 channels. Activation results from intramolecular arrangements which start with the movement of the voltage sensor and end with the opening of the pore. The S4-segment and the H5-loop comprise at least part of the respective involved structural elements. The molecular mechanism of coupling between sensing of voltage and opening of the pore is less well understood. We have measured whole cell and single channel ionic currents in the rapidly activating Kv1.2 channel of the rat, the slowly activating Kv2.1 channel of the human, and in an S4-chimera Kv2.1/Kv1.2S4. With respect to the Kv2.1 channel, steady state activation and steady state C-type inactivation of the chimeric channel are shifted by more than 50 mV in the depolarizing direction. The property of rapid activation in Kv1.2 channels was not transferred to the Kv2.1 channels with the transplanted S4-region. Instead, the kinetics of activation, deactivation, and recovery from C-type inactivation as well as the voltage sensitivity of the 4-aminopyridine block are similar to the corresponding processes in Kv2.1 channels if they are related to the steady state activation and inactivation, respectively. The unitary current and the mean open time of single channel openings of the S4-chimeric channels resemble the respective values of Kv2.1 channels. It is concluded that the insertion of the S4-segment of Kv1.2 channels into Kv2.1 channels modifies the gating at the early steps of activation leaving all properties associated with the open state(s) of the Kv2.1 channels unaffected.

  20. Complexes of Peptide Blockers with Kv1.6 Pore Domain: Molecular Modeling and Studies with KcsA-Kv1.6 Channel.

    PubMed

    Nekrasova, O V; Volyntseva, A D; Kudryashova, K S; Novoseletsky, V N; Lyapina, E A; Illarionova, A V; Yakimov, S A; Korolkova, Yu V; Shaitan, K V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Feofanov, A V

    2016-09-17

    Potassium voltage-gated Kv1.6 channel, which is distributed primarily in neurons of central and peripheral nervous systems, is of significant physiological importance. To date, several high-affinity Kv1.6-channel blockers are known, but the lack of selective ones among them hampers the studies of tissue localization and functioning of Kv1.6 channels. Here we present an approach to advanced understanding of interactions of peptide toxin blockers with a Kv1.6 pore. It combines molecular modeling studies and an application of a new bioengineering system based on a KcsA-Kv1.6 hybrid channel for the quantitative fluorescent analysis of blocker-channel interactions. Using this system we demonstrate that peptide toxins agitoxin 2, kaliotoxin1 and OSK1 have similar high affinity to the extracellular vestibule of the K(+)-conducting pore of Kv1.6, hetlaxin is a low-affinity ligand, whereas margatoxin and scyllatoxin do not bind to Kv1.6 pore. Binding of toxins to Kv1.6 pore has considerable inverse dependence on the ionic strength. Model structures of KcsA-Kv1.6 and Kv1.6 complexes with agitoxin 2, kaliotoxin 1 and OSK1 were obtained using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation. Interaction interfaces, which are formed by 15-19 toxin residues and 10 channel residues, are described and compared. Specific sites of Kv1.6 pore recognition are identified for targeting of peptide blockers. Analysis of interactions between agitoxin 2 derivatives with point mutations (S7K, S11G, L19S, R31G) and KcsA-Kv1.6 confirms reliability of the calculated complex structure.

  1. Toxins Targeting the Kv1.3 Channel: Potential Immunomodulators for Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yipeng; Huang, Jie; Yuan, Xiaolu; Peng, Biwen; Liu, Wanhong; Han, Song; He, Xiaohua

    2015-05-19

    Autoimmune diseases are usually accompanied by tissue injury caused by autoantigen-specific T-cells. KV1.3 channels participate in modulating calcium signaling to induce T-cell proliferation, immune activation and cytokine production. Effector memory T (TEM)-cells, which play major roles in many autoimmune diseases, are controlled by blocking KV1.3 channels on the membrane. Toxins derived from animal venoms have been found to selectively target a variety of ion channels, including KV1.3. By blocking the KV1.3 channel, these toxins are able to suppress the activation and proliferation of TEM cells and may improve TEM cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes mellitus.

  2. Axon initial segment Kv1 channels control axonal action potential waveform and synaptic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kole, Maarten H P; Letzkus, Johannes J; Stuart, Greg J

    2007-08-16

    Action potentials are binary signals that transmit information via their rate and temporal pattern. In this context, the axon is thought of as a transmission line, devoid of a role in neuronal computation. Here, we show a highly localized role of axonal Kv1 potassium channels in shaping the action potential waveform in the axon initial segment (AIS) of layer 5 pyramidal neurons independent of the soma. Cell-attached recordings revealed a 10-fold increase in Kv1 channel density over the first 50 microm of the AIS. Inactivation of AIS and proximal axonal Kv1 channels, as occurs during slow subthreshold somatodendritic depolarizations, led to a distance-dependent broadening of axonal action potentials, as well as an increase in synaptic strength at proximal axonal terminals. Thus, Kv1 channels are strategically positioned to integrate slow subthreshold signals, providing control of the presynaptic action potential waveform and synaptic coupling in local cortical circuits.

  3. Role of N-Terminal Domain and Accessory Subunits in Controlling Deactivation-Inactivation Coupling of Kv4.2 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Barghaan, Jan; Tozakidou, Magdalini; Ehmke, Heimo; Bähring, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between deactivation and inactivation in Kv4.2 channels. In particular, we were interested in the role of a Kv4.2 N-terminal domain and accessory subunits in controlling macroscopic gating kinetics and asked if the effects of N-terminal deletion and accessory subunit coexpression conform to a kinetic coupling of deactivation and inactivation. We expressed Kv4.2 wild-type channels and N-terminal deletion mutants in the absence and presence of Kv channel interacting proteins (KChIPs) and dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like proteins (DPPs) in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Kv4.2-mediated A-type currents at positive and deactivation tail currents at negative membrane potentials were recorded under whole-cell voltage-clamp and analyzed by multi-exponential fitting. The observed changes in Kv4.2 macroscopic inactivation kinetics caused by N-terminal deletion, accessory subunit coexpression, or a combination of the two maneuvers were compared with respective changes in deactivation kinetics. Extensive correlation analyses indicated that modulatory effects on deactivation closely parallel respective effects on inactivation, including both onset and recovery kinetics. Searching for the structural determinants, which control deactivation and inactivation, we found that in a Kv4.2Δ2–10 N-terminal deletion mutant both the initial rapid phase of macroscopic inactivation and tail current deactivation were slowed. On the other hand, the intermediate and slow phase of A-type current decay, recovery from inactivation, and tail current decay kinetics were accelerated in Kv4.2Δ2–10 by KChIP2 and DPPX. Thus, a Kv4.2 N-terminal domain, which may control both inactivation and deactivation, is not necessary for active modulation of current kinetics by accessory subunits. Our results further suggest distinct mechanisms for Kv4.2 gating modulation by KChIPs and DPPs. PMID:17981906

  4. Kv4 potassium channel subunits control action potential repolarization and frequency-dependent broadening in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhyun; Wei, Dong-Sheng; Hoffman, Dax A

    2005-11-15

    A-type potassium channels regulate neuronal firing frequency and the back-propagation of action potentials (APs) into dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones. Recent molecular cloning studies have found several families of voltage-gated K(+) channel genes expressed in the mammalian brain. At present, information regarding the relationship between the protein products of these genes and the various neuronal functions performed by voltage-gated K(+) channels is lacking. Here we used a combination of molecular, electrophysiological and imaging techniques to show that one such gene, Kv4.2, controls AP half-width, frequency-dependent AP broadening and dendritic action potential propagation. Using a modified Sindbis virus, we expressed either the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-tagged Kv4.2 or an EGFP-tagged dominant negative mutant of Kv4.2 (Kv4.2g(W362F)) in CA1 pyramidal neurones of organotypic slice cultures. Neurones expressing Kv4.2g(W362F) displayed broader action potentials with an increase in frequency-dependent AP broadening during a train compared with control neurones. In addition, Ca(2)(+) imaging of Kv4.2g(W362F) expressing dendrites revealed enhanced AP back-propagation compared to control neurones. Conversely, neurones expressing an increased A-type current through overexpression of Kv4.2 displayed narrower APs with less frequency dependent broadening and decreased dendritic propagation. These results point to Kv4.2 as the major contributor to the A-current in hippocampal CA1 neurones and suggest a prominent role for Kv4.2 in regulating AP shape and dendritic signalling. As Ca(2)(+) influx occurs primarily during AP repolarization, Kv4.2 activity can regulate cellular processes involving Ca(2)(+)-dependent second messenger cascades such as gene expression and synaptic plasticity.

  5. Kv4 potassium channels modulate hippocampal EPSP-spike potentiation and spatial memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Truchet, Bruno; Manrique, Christine; Sreng, Leam; Chaillan, Franck A; Roman, François S; Mourre, Christiane

    2012-06-14

    Kv4 channels regulate the backpropagation of action potentials (b-AP) and have been implicated in the modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP). Here we showed that blockade of Kv4 channels by the scorpion toxin AmmTX3 impaired reference memory in a radial maze task. In vivo, AmmTX3 intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion increased and stabilized the EPSP-spike (E-S) component of LTP in the dentate gyrus (DG), with no effect on basal transmission or short-term plasticity. This increase in E-S potentiation duration could result from the combination of an increase in excitability of DG granular cells with a reduction of GABAergic inhibition, leading to a strong reduction of input specificity. Radioactive in situ hybridization (ISH) was used to evaluate the amounts of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 mRNA in brain structures at different stages of a spatial learning task in naive, pseudoconditioned, and conditioned rats. Significant differences in Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 mRNA levels were observed between conditioned and pseudoconditioned rats. Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 mRNA levels were transiently up-regulated in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, retrosplenial, and cingulate cortices during early stages of learning, suggesting an involvement in the switch from egocentric to allocentric strategies. Spatial learning performance was positively correlated with the levels of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 mRNAs in several of these brain structures. Altogether our findings suggest that Kv4 channels could increase the signal-to-noise ratio during information acquisition, thereby allowing a better encoding of the memory trace.

  6. Putative binding sites for arachidonic acid on the human cardiac Kv1.5 channel

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jia‐Yu; Ding, Wei‐Guang; Kojima, Akiko; Seto, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In human heart, the Kv1.5 channel contributes to repolarization of atrial action potentials. This study examined the electrophysiological and molecular mechanisms underlying arachidonic acid (AA)‐induced inhibition of the human Kv1.5 (hKv1.5) channel. Experimental Approach Site‐directed mutagenesis was conducted to mutate amino acids that reside within the pore domain of the hKv1.5 channel. Whole‐cell patch‐clamp method was used to record membrane currents through wild type and mutant hKv1.5 channels heterologously expressed in CHO cells. Computer docking simulation was conducted to predict the putative binding site(s) of AA in an open‐state model of the Kv1.5 channel. Key Results The hKv1.5 current was minimally affected at the onset of depolarization but was progressively reduced during depolarization by the presence of AA, suggesting that AA acts as an open‐channel blocker. AA itself affected the channel at extracellular sites independently of its metabolites and signalling pathways. The blocking effect of AA was attenuated at pH 8.0 but not at pH 6.4. The blocking action of AA developed rather rapidly by co‐expression of Kvβ1.3. The AA‐induced block was significantly attenuated in H463C, T480A, R487V, I502A, I508A, V512A and V516A, but not in T462C, A501V and L510A mutants of the hKv1.5 channel. Docking simulation predicted that H463, T480, R487, I508, V512 and V516 are potentially accessible for interaction with AA. Conclusions and Implications AA itself interacts with multiple amino acids located in the pore domain of the hKv1.5 channel. These findings may provide useful information for future development of selective blockers of hKv1.5 channels. PMID:26292661

  7. KCNE1 remodels the voltage sensor of Kv7.1 to modulate channel function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dick; Pan, Hua; Delaloye, Kelli; Cui, Jianmin

    2010-12-01

    The KCNE1 auxiliary subunit coassembles with the Kv7.1 channel and modulates its properties to generate the cardiac I(Ks) current. Recent biophysical evidence suggests that KCNE1 interacts with the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of Kv7.1. To investigate the mechanism of how KCNE1 affects the VSD to alter the voltage dependence of channel activation, we perturbed the VSD of Kv7.1 by mutagenesis and chemical modification in the absence and presence of KCNE1. Mutagenesis of S4 in Kv7.1 indicates that basic residues in the N-terminal half (S4-N) and C-terminal half (S4-C) of S4 are important for stabilizing the resting and activated states of the channel, respectively. KCNE1 disrupts electrostatic interactions involving S4-C, specifically with the lower conserved glutamate in S2 (Glu(170) or E2). Likewise, Trp scanning of S4 shows that mutations to a cluster of residues in S4-C eliminate current in the presence of KCNE1. In addition, KCNE1 affects S4-N by enhancing MTS accessibility to the top of the VSD. Consistent with the structure of Kv channels and previous studies on the KCNE1-Kv7.1 interaction, these results suggest that KCNE1 alters the interactions of S4 residues with the surrounding protein environment, possibly by changing the protein packing around S4, thereby affecting the voltage dependence of Kv7.1.

  8. Serum albumin attenuates the open-channel blocking effects of propofol on the human Kv1.5 channel.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Akiko; Bai, Jia-Yu; Ito, Yuki; Ding, Wei-Guang; Kitagawa, Hirotoshi; Matsuura, Hiroshi

    2016-07-15

    The intravenous anesthetic propofol modulates various ion channel functions. It is generally accepted that approximately 98% of propofol binds to blood constituents and that the free (unbound) drug preferentially affects target proteins including ion channels. However, modulatory effects of propofol on ion channels have not been previously explored in the presence of serum albumin. This study was designed to investigate the effects of serum albumin on the blocking action of propofol on the human Kv1.5 (hKv1.5) current. Whole-cell patch-clamp method was used to record the hKv1.5 channel current, heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, in the absence and presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Propofol induced a time-dependent decline of the hKv1.5 current during depolarizing steps and slowed the time course of tail current decay upon repolarization, supporting that propofol acts as an open-channel blocker. This blocking effect was reversible and concentration-dependent with an IC50 of 62.9±3.1μM (n = 6). Bath application of 1% BSA markedly reduced the blocking potency of propofol on hKv1.5 current (IC50 of 1116.0±491.4μM; n = 6). However, in the presence of BSA, the propofol-induced inhibition of hKv1.5 current was also accompanied by a gradual decline of activated current during depolarization and deceleration of deactivating tail current upon repolarization. The presence of BSA greatly attenuated the blocking potency of propofol on hKv1.5 channel without affecting the mode of action of propofol on the channel. Serum albumin thus appears to bind to propofol and thereby reducing effective concentrations of the drug for inhibition of hKv1.5 channel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like protein remodels gating charge dynamics in Kv4.2 channels.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Kevin; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2006-12-01

    Dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like proteins (DPLPs) interact with Kv4 channels and thereby induce a profound remodeling of activation and inactivation gating. DPLPs are constitutive components of the neuronal Kv4 channel complex, and recent observations have suggested the critical functional role of the single transmembrane segment of these proteins (Zagha, E., A. Ozaita, S.Y. Chang, M.S. Nadal, U. Lin, M.J. Saganich, T. McCormack, K.O. Akinsanya, S.Y. Qi, and B. Rudy. 2005. J. Biol. Chem. 280:18853-18861). However, the underlying mechanism of action is unknown. We hypothesized that a unique interaction between the Kv4.2 channel and a DPLP found in brain (DPPX-S) may remodel the channel's voltage-sensing domain. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a robust experimental system to measure Kv4.2 gating currents and study gating charge dynamics in the absence and presence of DPPX-S. The results demonstrated that coexpression of Kv4.2 and DPPX-S causes a -26 mV parallel shift in the gating charge-voltage (Q-V) relationship. This shift is associated with faster outward movements of the gating charge over a broad range of relevant membrane potentials and accelerated gating charge return upon repolarization. In sharp contrast, DPPX-S had no effect on gating charge movements of the Shaker B Kv channel. We propose that DPPX-S destabilizes resting and intermediate states in the voltage-dependent activation pathway, which promotes the outward gating charge movement. The remodeling of gating charge dynamics may involve specific protein-protein interactions of the DPPX-S's transmembrane segment with the voltage-sensing and pore domains of the Kv4.2 channel. This mechanism may determine the characteristic fast operation of neuronal Kv4 channels in the subthreshold range of membrane potentials.

  10. Single particle image reconstruction of the human recombinant Kv2.1 channel.

    PubMed

    Adair, Brian; Nunn, Rashmi; Lewis, Shannon; Dukes, Iain; Philipson, Louis; Yeager, Mark

    2008-03-15

    Kv2.1 channels are widely expressed in neuronal and endocrine cells and generate slowly activating K+ currents, which contribute to repolarization in these cells. Kv2.1 is expressed at high levels in the mammalian brain and is a major component of the delayed rectifier current in the hippocampus. In addition, Kv2.1 channels have been implicated in the regulation of membrane repolarization, cytoplasmic calcium levels, and insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. They are therefore an important drug target for the treatment of Type II diabetes mellitus. We used electron microscopy and single particle image analysis to derive a three-dimensional density map of recombinant human Kv2.1. The tetrameric channel is egg-shaped with a diameter of approximately 80 A and a long axis of approximately 120 A. Comparison to known crystal structures of homologous domains allowed us to infer the location of the cytoplasmic and transmembrane assemblies. There is a very good fit of the Kv1.2 crystal structure to the assigned transmembrane assembly of Kv2.1. In other low-resolution maps of K+ channels, the cytoplasmic N-terminal and transmembrane domains form separate rings of density. In contrast, Kv2.1 displays contiguous density that connects the rings, such that there are no large windows between the channel interior and the cytoplasmic space. The crystal structure of KcsA is thought to be in a closed conformation, and the good fit of the KcsA crystal structure to the Kv2.1 map suggests that our preparations of Kv2.1 may also represent a closed conformation. Substantial cytoplasmic density is closely associated with the T1 tetramerization domain and is ascribed to the approximately 184 kDa C-terminal regulatory domains within each tetramer.

  11. Single Particle Image Reconstruction of the Human Recombinant Kv2.1 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Brian; Nunn, Rashmi; Lewis, Shannon; Dukes, Iain; Philipson, Louis; Yeager, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Kv2.1 channels are widely expressed in neuronal and endocrine cells and generate slowly activating K+ currents, which contribute to repolarization in these cells. Kv2.1 is expressed at high levels in the mammalian brain and is a major component of the delayed rectifier current in the hippocampus. In addition, Kv2.1 channels have been implicated in the regulation of membrane repolarization, cytoplasmic calcium levels, and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. They are therefore an important drug target for the treatment of Type II diabetes mellitus. We used electron microscopy and single particle image analysis to derive a three-dimensional density map of recombinant human Kv2.1. The tetrameric channel is egg-shaped with a diameter of ∼80 Å and a long axis of ∼120 Å. Comparison to known crystal structures of homologous domains allowed us to infer the location of the cytoplasmic and transmembrane assemblies. There is a very good fit of the Kv1.2 crystal structure to the assigned transmembrane assembly of Kv2.1. In other low-resolution maps of K+ channels, the cytoplasmic N-terminal and transmembrane domains form separate rings of density. In contrast, Kv2.1 displays contiguous density that connects the rings, such that there are no large windows between the channel interior and the cytoplasmic space. The crystal structure of KcsA is thought to be in a closed conformation, and the good fit of the KcsA crystal structure to the Kv2.1 map suggests that our preparations of Kv2.1 may also represent a closed conformation. Substantial cytoplasmic density is closely associated with the T1 tetramerization domain and is ascribed to the ∼184 kDa C-terminal regulatory domains within each tetramer. PMID:18212012

  12. Localization of Kv1.3 channels in presynaptic terminals of brainstem auditory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Strumbos, John G.; Mei, Xiaofeng; Chen, Haijun; Rahner, Christoph; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2010-01-01

    Elimination of the Kv1.3 voltage-dependent potassium channel gene produces striking changes in the function of the olfactory bulb, raising the possibility that this channel also influences other sensory systems. We have examined the cellular and subcellular localization of Kv1.3 in the Medial Nucleus of the Trapezoid Body (MNTB) in the auditory brainstem, a nucleus in which neurons fire at high rates with high temporal precision. A clear gradient of Kv1.3 immunostaining along the lateral to medial tonotopic axis of the MNTB was detected. Highest levels were found in the lateral region of the MNTB, which corresponds to neurons that respond selectively to low frequency auditory stimuli. Previous studies have demonstrated that MNTB neurons and their afferent inputs from the cochlear nucleus express three other members of the Kv1 family, Kv1.1, Kv1.2 and Kv1.6. Nevertheless, confocal microscopy of MNTB sections co-immunostained for Kv1.3 with these subunits revealed that the distribution of Kv1.3 differed significantly from other Kv1 family subunits. In particular, no axonal staining of Kv1.3 was detected and most prominent labeling was in structures surrounding the somata of the principal neurons, suggesting specific localization to the large calyx of Held presynaptic endings that envelop the principal cells. The presence of Kv1.3 in presynaptic terminals was confirmed by co-immunolocalization with the synaptic markers synaptophysin, syntaxin, and synaptotagmin and by immunogold electron microscopy. Kv1.3 immunogold particles in the terminals were arrayed along the plasma membrane and on internal vesicular structures. To confirm these patterns of staining, we carried out immunolabeling on sections from Kv1.3−/− mice. No immunoreactivity could be detected in Kv1.3−/− mice either at the light level or in immunogold experiments. The finding of a tonotopic gradient in presynaptic terminals suggests that Kv1.3 may regulate neurotransmitter release differentially in

  13. PKC and AMPK regulation of Kv1.5 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Martin Nybo; Skibsbye, Lasse; Tang, Chuyi; Petersen, Frederic; MacAulay, Nanna; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated Kv1.5 potassium channel, conducting the ultra-rapid rectifier K+ current (IKur), is regulated through several pathways. Here we investigate if Kv1.5 surface expression is controlled by the 2 kinases PKC and AMPK, using Xenopus oocytes, MDCK cells and atrial derived HL-1 cells. By confocal microscopy combined with electrophysiology we demonstrate that PKC activation reduces Kv1.5 current, through a decrease in membrane expressed channels. AMPK activation was found to decrease the membrane expression in MDCK cells, but not in HL-1 cells and was furthermore shown to be dependent on co-expression of Nedd4–2 in Xenopus oocytes. These results indicate that Kv1.5 channels are regulated by both kinases, although through different molecular mechanisms in different cell systems. PMID:26043299

  14. Review on "The secret life of ion channels: Kv1.3 potassium channels and cell proliferation".

    PubMed

    Perez Garcia, M Teresa; Cidad, Pilar; Lopez-Lopez, Jose R

    2017-09-20

    Kv1.3 channels are involved in the switch to proliferation of normally quiescent cells, being implicated in the control of cell cycle in many different cell types and in many different ways. They modulate membrane potential controlling K(+) fluxes, sense changes in potential and interact with many signaling molecules through their intracellular domains. From a mechanistic point of view, we can describe the role of Kv1.3 channels in proliferation with at least three different models. In the "membrane potential model", membrane hyperpolarization resulting from Kv1.3 activation provides the driving force for Ca(2+) influx required to activate Ca(2+)-dependent transcription. This model explains most of the data obtained from several cells from the immune system. In the "voltage sensor model" Kv1.3 channels serve mainly as sensors that transduce electrical signals into biochemical cascades, independently of their effect on membrane potential. Kv1.3-dependent proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) could fit this model. Finally, in the "channelosome balance model", the master switch determining proliferation may be related to the control of the Kv1.3 to Kv1.5 ratio, as described in glial cells and also in VSMCs. Since the three mechanisms cannot function independently, these models are obviously not exclusive. Nevertheless, they could be exploited differentially in different cells and tissues. This large functional flexibility of Kv1.3 channels surely gives a new perspective on their functions beyond their elementary role as ion channels, although a conclusive picture of the mechanisms involved in Kv1.3 signaling to proliferation is yet to be reached. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Cell Physiology.

  15. Thalamic Kv7 channels: pharmacological properties and activity control during noxious signal processing

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Manuela; Szkudlarek, Hanna J; Coulon, Philippe; Meuth, Patrick; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Nguyen, Xuan Vinh; Göbel, Kerstin; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Pape, Hans-Christian; Budde, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The existence of functional Kv7 channels in thalamocortical (TC) relay neurons and the effects of the K+-current termed M-current (IM) on thalamic signal processing have long been debated. Immunocytochemical evidence suggests their presence in this brain region. Therefore, we aimed to verify their existence, pharmacological properties and function in regulating activity in neurons of the ventrobasal thalamus (VB). Experimental Approach Characterization of Kv7 channels was performed by combining in vitro, in vivo and in silico techniques with a pharmacological approach. Retigabine (30 μM) and XE991 (20 μM), a specific Kv7 channel enhancer and blocker, respectively, were applied in acute brain slices during electrophysiological recordings. The effects of intrathalamic injection of retigabine (3 mM, 300 nL) and/or XE991 (2 mM, 300 nL) were investigated in freely moving animals during hot-plate tests by recording behaviour and neuronal activity. Key Results Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 subunits were found to be abundantly expressed in TC neurons of mouse VB. A slow K+-current with properties of IM was activated by retigabine and inhibited by XE991. Kv7 channel activation evoked membrane hyperpolarization, a reduction in tonic action potential firing, and increased burst firing in vitro and in computational models. Single-unit recordings and pharmacological intervention demonstrated a specific burst-firing increase upon IM activation in vivo. A Kv7 channel-mediated increase in pain threshold was associated with fewer VB units responding to noxious stimuli, and increased burst firing in responsive neurons. Conclusions and Implications Kv7 channel enhancement alters somatosensory activity and may reflect an anti-nociceptive mechanism during acute pain processing. PMID:25684311

  16. Cortactin Is Required for N-cadherin Regulation of Kv1.5 Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lan; Yung, Aaron; Covarrubias, Manuel; Radice, Glenn L.

    2011-01-01

    The intercalated disc serves as an organizing center for various cell surface components at the termini of the cardiomyocyte, thus ensuring proper mechanoelectrical coupling throughout the myocardium. The cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin, is an essential component of the intercalated disc. Cardiac-specific deletion of N-cadherin leads to abnormal electrical conduction and sudden arrhythmic death in mice. The mechanisms linking the loss of N-cadherin in the heart and spontaneous malignant ventricular arrhythmias are poorly understood. To investigate whether ion channel remodeling contributes to arrhythmogenesis in N-cadherin conditional knock-out (N-cad CKO) mice, cardiac myocyte excitability and voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv), as well as inwardly rectifying K+ channel remodeling, were investigated in N-cad CKO cardiomyocytes by whole cell patch clamp recordings. Action potential duration was prolonged in N-cad CKO ventricle myocytes compared with wild type. Relative to wild type, IK,slow density was significantly reduced consistent with decreased expression of Kv1.5 and Kv accessory protein, Kcne2, in the N-cad CKO myocytes. The decreased Kv1.5/Kcne2 expression correlated with disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and reduced cortactin at the sarcolemma. Biochemical experiments revealed that cortactin co-immunoprecipitates with Kv1.5. Finally, cortactin was required for N-cadherin-mediated enhancement of Kv1.5 channel activity in a heterologous expression system. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic link among the cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin, the actin-binding scaffold protein, cortactin, and Kv channel remodeling in the heart. These data suggest that in addition to gap junction remodeling, aberrant Kv1.5 channel function contributes to the arrhythmogenic phenotype in N-cad CKO mice. PMID:21507952

  17. Cortactin is required for N-cadherin regulation of Kv1.5 channel function.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lan; Yung, Aaron; Covarrubias, Manuel; Radice, Glenn L

    2011-06-10

    The intercalated disc serves as an organizing center for various cell surface components at the termini of the cardiomyocyte, thus ensuring proper mechanoelectrical coupling throughout the myocardium. The cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin, is an essential component of the intercalated disc. Cardiac-specific deletion of N-cadherin leads to abnormal electrical conduction and sudden arrhythmic death in mice. The mechanisms linking the loss of N-cadherin in the heart and spontaneous malignant ventricular arrhythmias are poorly understood. To investigate whether ion channel remodeling contributes to arrhythmogenesis in N-cadherin conditional knock-out (N-cad CKO) mice, cardiac myocyte excitability and voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv), as well as inwardly rectifying K(+) channel remodeling, were investigated in N-cad CKO cardiomyocytes by whole cell patch clamp recordings. Action potential duration was prolonged in N-cad CKO ventricle myocytes compared with wild type. Relative to wild type, I(K,slow) density was significantly reduced consistent with decreased expression of Kv1.5 and Kv accessory protein, Kcne2, in the N-cad CKO myocytes. The decreased Kv1.5/Kcne2 expression correlated with disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and reduced cortactin at the sarcolemma. Biochemical experiments revealed that cortactin co-immunoprecipitates with Kv1.5. Finally, cortactin was required for N-cadherin-mediated enhancement of Kv1.5 channel activity in a heterologous expression system. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic link among the cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin, the actin-binding scaffold protein, cortactin, and Kv channel remodeling in the heart. These data suggest that in addition to gap junction remodeling, aberrant Kv1.5 channel function contributes to the arrhythmogenic phenotype in N-cad CKO mice.

  18. Selective underexpression of Kv3.2 and Kv3.4 channels in the cortex of rats exposed to ethanol during early postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Tavian, Daniela; De Giorgio, Andrea; Granato, Alberto

    2011-08-01

    The expression of voltage-gated potassium channels belonging to the Kv3 family has been studied in the sensori-motor cortex of rats exposed to alcohol inhalation during the first postnatal week (P2-P6). The study was carried out using comparative RT-PCR. At P9, a significant reduction of the expression of Kv3.2 and Kv3.4 subunits occurred in alcohol-treated animals, as compared with controls. The expression of the Kv3.4a splicing variant, which is thought to be critically involved in the high-frequency firing of some cortical interneurons, was also correspondingly reduced. The downregulation of Kv3.2 and Kv3.4a subunits represented a long-lasting effect of alcohol exposure, since it was also observed in P24 animals. The expression of both Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 channels appeared to be not significantly affected by alcohol exposure. An increased susceptibility to apoptotic neuronal death after early postnatal exposure to ethanol was confirmed by the lower bcl-2/bax ratio observed in alcohol-treated animals. Although Kv3.4 subunits are thought to trigger apoptosis, the lack of upregulation in our model argues against their involvement in the mechanism leading to alcohol-induced apoptosis. The possible consequences of the selective downregulation of Kv3 subunits on the cortical function, as well as their relevance for the genesis of fetal alcohol effects, are discussed.

  19. [Kv3.4 channel is involved in rat pulmonary vasoconstriction induced by 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid].

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Bi, Hai-Rong; Zhang, Rong; Zhu, Da-Ling

    2006-02-25

    We have reported that hypoxia increases the activation of 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO), which converts arachidonic acid (AA) into 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) in small pulmonary arteries (PAs). Through inhibition of Kv channels, 15-HETE causes more robust concentration-dependent contraction of PA rings from the hypoxic compared to the normoxic controls. However, the subtypes of Kv channels inhibited by 15-HETE are incompletely understood. The aim of the present study was to identify the contribution of Kv3.4 channel in the process of pulmonary vasoconstriction induced by 15-HETE using the tension studies of PA rings from rat with Kv3.4 channel blocker in tissue bath; to explore the role of vascular endothelium in15-HETE-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction through denuded endothelia of PA rings; and to define the downregulation of 15-HETE on the expression of Kv3.4 channel in cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) with RT-PCR and Western blot. In the present study, healthy Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups: Group A with normal oxygen supply and group B with hypoxia. Six days later, the rats were killed. Pulmonary artery rings were prepared for organ bath experiments. Firstly, different concentrations of 15-HETE (10~1 000 nmol/L) were added to the Krebs solution. The isometric tension was recorded using a four-channel force-displacement transducer. Then Kv3.4 channel blocker, 100 nmol/L BDS-I, was added, followed by adding 1 mumol/L 15-HETE, and the isometric tension was recorded. Furthermore, RT-PCR and Western blot were employed to identify the influence of 15-HETE on the expression of Kv3.4 channel in cultured rat PASMCs.The results showed the PA tension was significantly increased both in groups A and B by 15-HETE in a concentration-dependent manner (P<0.05), especially in group B (P<0.05 compared to control); denuded endothelia enhanced 15-HETE concentration-related constrictions in rat PA rings; Kv3.4 channel blocker, BDS

  20. BMP signaling controls PASMC KV channel expression in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Young, Katharine A; Ivester, Charles; West, James; Carr, Michelle; Rodman, David M

    2006-05-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of familial pulmonary arterial hypertension. The type 2 receptor (BMPR2) is required for recognition of all BMPs. Transgenic mice with a smooth muscle cell-targeted mutation in this receptor (SM22-tet-BMPR2(delx4+)) developed increased pulmonary artery pressure, associated with a modest increase in arterial muscularization, after 8 wk of transgene activation (West J, Fagan K, Steudel W, Fouty B, Lane K, Harral J, Hoedt-Miller M, Tada Y, Ozimek J, Tuder R, and Rodman DM. Circ Res 94: 1109-1114, 2004). In the present study, we show that these transgenic mice developed increased right ventricular pressures after only 1 wk of transgene activation, without significant remodeling of the vasculature. We then tested the hypothesis that the increased pulmonary artery pressure due to loss of BMPR2 signaling was mediated by reduced K(V) channel expression. There was decreased expression of K(V)1.1, K(V)1.5, and K(V)4.3 mRNA isolated from whole lung. Western blot confirmed decreased K(V)1.5 protein in these lungs. Human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) treated with recombinant BMP2 had increased K(V)1.5 protein and macroscopic K(V) current density, which was blocked by anti-K(V)1.5 antibody. In vivo, nifedipine, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, reduced RV systolic pressure in these dominant-negative BMPR2 mice to levels seen in control animals. This suggests that activation of L-type Ca(2+) channels caused by reduced K(V)1.5 mediates increased pulmonary artery pressure in these animals. These studies suggest that BMP regulates K(V) channel expression and that loss of this signaling pathway in PASMC through a mutation in BMPR2 is sufficient to cause pulmonary artery vasoconstriction.

  1. Membrane cholesterol modulates Kv1.5 potassium channel distribution and function in rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Char, Joëlle; Maguy, Ange; Coulombe, Alain; Balse, Elise; Ratajczak, Philippe; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Nattel, Stanley; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2007-01-01

    Membrane lipid composition is a major determinant of cell excitability. In this study, we assessed the role of membrane cholesterol composition in the distribution and function of Kv1.5-based channels in rat cardiac membranes. In isolated rat atrial myocytes, the application of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD), an agent that depletes membrane cholesterol, caused a delayed increase in the Kv1.5-based sustained component, Ikur, which reached steady state in ∼7 min. This effect was prevented by preloading the MCD with cholesterol. MCD-increased current was inhibited by low 4-aminopyridine concentration. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes transfected with Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-tagged Kv1.5 channels showed a large ultrarapid delayed-rectifier current (IKur), which was also stimulated by MCD. In atrial cryosections, Kv1.5 channels were mainly located at the intercalated disc, whereas caveolin-3 predominated at the cell periphery. A small portion of Kv1.5 floated in the low-density fractions of step sucrose-gradient preparations. In live neonatal cardiomyocytes, GFP-tagged Kv1.5 channels were predominantly organized in clusters at the basal plasma membrane. MCD caused reorganization of Kv1.5 subunits into larger clusters that redistributed throughout the plasma membrane. The MCD effect on clusters was sizable 7 min after its application. We conclude that Kv1.5 subunits are concentrated in cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains distinct from caveolae, and that redistribution of Kv1.5 subunits by depletion of membrane cholesterol increases their current-carrying capacity. PMID:17525113

  2. Membrane cholesterol modulates Kv1.5 potassium channel distribution and function in rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Abi-Char, Joëlle; Maguy, Ange; Coulombe, Alain; Balse, Elise; Ratajczak, Philippe; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Nattel, Stanley; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2007-08-01

    Membrane lipid composition is a major determinant of cell excitability. In this study, we assessed the role of membrane cholesterol composition in the distribution and function of Kv1.5-based channels in rat cardiac membranes. In isolated rat atrial myocytes, the application of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD), an agent that depletes membrane cholesterol, caused a delayed increase in the Kv1.5-based sustained component, I(kur), which reached steady state in approximately 7 min. This effect was prevented by preloading the MCD with cholesterol. MCD-increased current was inhibited by low 4-aminopyridine concentration. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes transfected with Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-tagged Kv1.5 channels showed a large ultrarapid delayed-rectifier current (I(Kur)), which was also stimulated by MCD. In atrial cryosections, Kv1.5 channels were mainly located at the intercalated disc, whereas caveolin-3 predominated at the cell periphery. A small portion of Kv1.5 floated in the low-density fractions of step sucrose-gradient preparations. In live neonatal cardiomyocytes, GFP-tagged Kv1.5 channels were predominantly organized in clusters at the basal plasma membrane. MCD caused reorganization of Kv1.5 subunits into larger clusters that redistributed throughout the plasma membrane. The MCD effect on clusters was sizable 7 min after its application. We conclude that Kv1.5 subunits are concentrated in cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains distinct from caveolae, and that redistribution of Kv1.5 subunits by depletion of membrane cholesterol increases their current-carrying capacity.

  3. Ablation of Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 potassium channels disrupts thalamocortical oscillations in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Felipe; Torres-Vega, Miguel A; Marks, Gerald A; Joho, Rolf H

    2008-05-21

    The genes Kcnc1 and Kcnc3 encode the subunits for the fast-activating/fast-deactivating, voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3, which are expressed in several brain regions known to be involved in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. When these genes are genetically eliminated, Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice display severe sleep loss as a result of unstable slow-wave sleep. Within the thalamocortical circuitry, Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 subunits are highly expressed in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), which is thought to act as a pacemaker at sleep onset and to be involved in slow oscillatory activity (spindle waves) during slow-wave sleep. We showed that in cortical electroencephalographic recordings of freely moving Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient mice, spectral power is reduced up to 70% at frequencies <15 Hz. In addition, the number of sleep spindles in vivo as well as rhythmic rebound firing of TRN neurons in vitro is diminished in mutant mice. Kv3.1/Kv3.3-deficient TRN neurons studied in vitro show approximately 60% increase in action potential duration and a reduction in high-frequency firing after depolarizing current injections and during rebound burst firing. The results support the hypothesis that altered electrophysiological properties of TRN neurons contribute to the reduced EEG power at slow frequencies in the thalamocortical network of Kv3-deficient mice.

  4. Surface expression of Kv1 channels is governed by a C-terminal motif.

    PubMed

    Li, D; Takimoto, K; Levitan, E S

    2000-04-21

    Voltage-gated K(+) channel subunits must reach the plasma membrane to repolarize action potentials. Yet the efficiency of cell surface targeting varies among Kv subunits with some requiring auxiliary subunits for optimal expression. Here we identify a conserved motif located in the variable C-terminal region of Kv1 channels that controls the efficiency of functional channel expression. Variations among wild type channels in the optimal sequence VXXSL produce differences in distribution and the requirement for auxiliary subunits. Furthermore, deletion of this motif decreases subunit glycosylation and surface localization but does not prohibit subunit multimerization. Finally, the action of the essential sequence is shown to be independent of the chaperone effect of Kvbeta subunits. Thus, the newly identified C-terminal motif governs processing and cell surface expression of Kv1 voltage-gated K(+) channels.

  5. Differential expression of Kv3.1b and Kv3.2 potassium channel subunits in interneurons of the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    McDonald, A J; Mascagni, F

    2006-01-01

    The expression of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 voltage-gated potassium channel subunits appears to be critical for high-frequency firing of many neuronal populations. In the cortex these subunits are mainly associated with fast-firing GABAergic interneurons containing parvalbumin or somatostatin. Since the basolateral nuclear complex of the amygdala contains similar interneurons, it is of interest to determine if these potassium channel subunits are expressed in these same interneuronal subpopulations. To investigate this issue, peroxidase and dual-labeling fluorescence immunohistochemistry combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to determine which interneuronal subpopulations in the basolateral nuclear complex of the rat amygdala express Kv3.1b and Kv3.2 subunits. Antibodies to parvalbumin, somatostatin, calretinin, and cholecystokinin were used to label separate subsets of basolateral amygdalar interneurons. Examination of immunoperoxidase preparations suggested that the expression of both channels was restricted to nonpyramidal interneurons in the basolateral amygdala. Somata and proximal dendrites were intensely-stained, and axon terminals arising from presumptive basket cells and chandelier cells were lightly stained. Immunofluorescence observations revealed that parvalbumin+ neurons were the main interneuronal subpopulation expressing the Kv3.1b potassium channel subunit in the basolateral amygdala. More than 92-96% of parvalbumin+ neurons were Kv3.1b+, depending on the nucleus. These parvalbumin+/Kv3.1b+ double-labeled cells constituted 90-99% of all Kv3.1b+ neurons. Parvalbumin+ neurons were also the main interneuronal subpopulation expressing the Kv3.2 potassium channel subunit. More than 67-78% of parvalbumin+ neurons were Kv3.2+, depending on the nucleus. However, these parvalbumin+/Kv3.2+ double-labeled cells constituted only 71-81% of all Kv3.2+ neurons. Most of the remaining neurons with significant levels of the Kv3.2 subunit were somatostatin

  6. Kv3 K+ channels enable burst output in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    McKay, B E; Turner, R W

    2004-08-01

    The ability of cells to generate an appropriate spike output depends on a balance between membrane depolarizations and the repolarizing actions of K(+) currents. The high-voltage-activated Kv3 class of K(+) channels repolarizes Na(+) spikes to maintain high frequencies of discharge. However, little is known of the ability for these K(+) channels to shape Ca(2+) spike discharge or their ability to regulate Ca(2+) spike-dependent burst output. Here we identify the role of Kv3 K(+) channels in the regulation of Na(+) and Ca(2+) spike discharge, as well as burst output, using somatic and dendritic recordings in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells. Kv3 currents pharmacologically isolated in outside-out somatic membrane patches accounted for approximately 40% of the total K(+) current, were very fast and high voltage activating, and required more than 1 s to fully inactivate. Kv3 currents were differentiated from other tetraethylammonium-sensitive currents to establish their role in Purkinje cells under physiological conditions with current-clamp recordings. Dual somatic-dendritic recordings indicated that Kv3 channels repolarize Na(+) and Ca(2+) spikes, enabling high-frequency discharge for both types of cell output. We further show that during burst output Kv3 channels act together with large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels to ensure an effective coupling between Ca(2+) and Na(+) spike discharge by preventing Na(+) spike inactivation. By contributing significantly to the repolarization of Na(+) and especially Ca(2+) spikes, our data reveal a novel function for Kv3 K(+) channels in the maintenance of high-frequency burst output for cerebellar Purkinje cells.

  7. Physiological modulators of Kv3.1 channels adjust firing patterns of auditory brain stem neurons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Maile R; El-Hassar, Lynda; Zhang, Yalan; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Large, Charles H; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-07-01

    Many rapidly firing neurons, including those in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) in the auditory brain stem, express "high threshold" voltage-gated Kv3.1 potassium channels that activate only at positive potentials and are required for stimuli to generate rapid trains of actions potentials. We now describe the actions of two imidazolidinedione derivatives, AUT1 and AUT2, which modulate Kv3.1 channels. Using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing rat Kv3.1 channels, we found that lower concentrations of these compounds shift the voltage of activation of Kv3.1 currents toward negative potentials, increasing currents evoked by depolarization from typical neuronal resting potentials. Single-channel recordings also showed that AUT1 shifted the open probability of Kv3.1 to more negative potentials. Higher concentrations of AUT2 also shifted inactivation to negative potentials. The effects of lower and higher concentrations could be mimicked in numerical simulations by increasing rates of activation and inactivation respectively, with no change in intrinsic voltage dependence. In brain slice recordings of mouse MNTB neurons, both AUT1 and AUT2 modulated firing rate at high rates of stimulation, a result predicted by numerical simulations. Our results suggest that pharmaceutical modulation of Kv3.1 currents represents a novel avenue for manipulation of neuronal excitability and has the potential for therapeutic benefit in the treatment of hearing disorders.

  8. Tst26, a novel peptide blocker of Kv1.2 and Kv1.3 channels from the venom of Tityus stigmurus.

    PubMed

    Papp, Ferenc; Batista, Cesar V F; Varga, Zoltan; Herceg, Monika; Román-González, Sergio A; Gaspar, Rezso; Possani, Lourival D; Panyi, Gyorgy

    2009-09-15

    Using high-performance liquid chromatography Tst26, a novel potassium channel blocker peptide, was purified from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus stigmurus. Its primary structure was determined by means of automatic Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. The peptide is composed of 37 amino acid residues and tightly folded through three disulfide bridges, similar to other K(+) channel blocking peptides purified from scorpion venoms. It contains the "essential dyad" for K(+) channel recognition comprised of a lysine at position 27 and a tyrosine at position 36. Electrophysiological assays revealed that Tst26 blocked hKv1.2 and hKv1.3 channels with high affinity (K(d)=1.9 nM and 10.7 nM, respectively) while it did not affect several other ion channels (mKv1.1, hKv1.4, hKv1.5, hERG, hIKCa1, hBK, hNav1.5) tested at 10 nM concentration. The voltage-dependent steady-state parameters of K(+) channel gating were unaffected by the toxin in both channels, but due to the fast association and dissociation kinetics Tst26 slowed the rate of inactivation of Kv1.3 channels. Based on the primary structure, the systematic nomenclature proposed for this peptide is alpha-KTx 4.6.

  9. Kv3 channel assembly, trafficking and activity are regulated by zinc through different binding sites.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuanzheng; Barry, Joshua; Gu, Chen

    2013-05-15

    Zinc, a divalent heavy metal ion and an essential mineral for life, regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability via ion channels. However, its binding sites and regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we report that Kv3 channel assembly, localization and activity are regulated by zinc through different binding sites. Local perfusion of zinc reversibly reduced spiking frequency of cultured neurons most likely by suppressing Kv3 channels. Indeed, zinc inhibited Kv3.1 channel activity and slowed activation kinetics, independent of its site in the N-terminal T1 domain. Biochemical assays surprisingly identified a novel zinc-binding site in the Kv3.1 C-terminus, critical for channel activity and axonal targeting, but not for the zinc inhibition. Finally, mutagenesis revealed an important role of the junction between the first transmembrane (TM) segment and the first extracellular loop in sensing zinc. Its mutant enabled fast spiking with relative resistance to the zinc inhibition. Therefore, our studies provide novel mechanistic insights into the multifaceted regulation of Kv3 channel activity and localization by divalent heavy metal ions.

  10. Mitochondrial Ultrastructure and Glucose Signaling Pathways Attributed to the Kv1.3 Ion Channel.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Christopher P; Al Koborssy, Dolly; Huang, Zhenbo; Chelette, Brandon M; Fadool, James M; Fadool, Debra A

    2016-01-01

    Gene-targeted deletion of the potassium channel Kv1.3 (Kv1.3(-∕-)) results in "Super-smeller" mice with a sensory phenotype that includes an increased olfactory ability linked to changes in olfactory circuitry, increased abundance of olfactory cilia, and increased expression of odorant receptors and the G-protein, Golf. Kv1.3(-∕-) mice also have a metabolic phenotype including lower body weight and decreased adiposity, increased total energy expenditure (TEE), increased locomotor activity, and resistance to both diet- and genetic-induced obesity. We explored two cellular aspects to elucidate the mechanism by which loss of Kv1.3 channel in the olfactory bulb (OB) may enhance glucose utilization and metabolic rate. First, using in situ hybridization we find that Kv1.3 and the insulin-dependent glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) are co-localized to the mitral cell layer of the OB. Disruption of Kv1.3 conduction via construction of a pore mutation (W386F Kv1.3) was sufficient to independently translocate GLUT4 to the plasma membrane in HEK 293 cells. Because olfactory sensory perception and the maintenance of action potential (AP) firing frequency by mitral cells of the OB is highly energy demanding and Kv1.3 is also expressed in mitochondria, we next explored the structure of this organelle in mitral cells. We challenged wildtype (WT) and Kv1.3(-∕-) male mice with a moderately high-fat diet (MHF, 31.8 % kcal fat) for 4 months and then examined OB ultrastructure using transmission electron microscopy. In WT mice, mitochondria were significantly enlarged following diet-induced obesity (DIO) and there were fewer mitochondria, likely due to mitophagy. Interestingly, mitochondria were significantly smaller in Kv1.3(-∕-) mice compared with that of WT mice. Similar to their metabolic resistance to DIO, the Kv1.3(-∕-) mice had unchanged mitochondria in terms of cross sectional area and abundance following a challenge with modified diet. We are very interested to

  11. Mitochondrial Ultrastructure and Glucose Signaling Pathways Attributed to the Kv1.3 Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, Christopher P.; Al Koborssy, Dolly; Huang, Zhenbo; Chelette, Brandon M.; Fadool, James M.; Fadool, Debra A.

    2016-01-01

    Gene-targeted deletion of the potassium channel Kv1.3 (Kv1.3−∕−) results in “Super-smeller” mice with a sensory phenotype that includes an increased olfactory ability linked to changes in olfactory circuitry, increased abundance of olfactory cilia, and increased expression of odorant receptors and the G-protein, Golf. Kv1.3−∕− mice also have a metabolic phenotype including lower body weight and decreased adiposity, increased total energy expenditure (TEE), increased locomotor activity, and resistance to both diet- and genetic-induced obesity. We explored two cellular aspects to elucidate the mechanism by which loss of Kv1.3 channel in the olfactory bulb (OB) may enhance glucose utilization and metabolic rate. First, using in situ hybridization we find that Kv1.3 and the insulin-dependent glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) are co-localized to the mitral cell layer of the OB. Disruption of Kv1.3 conduction via construction of a pore mutation (W386F Kv1.3) was sufficient to independently translocate GLUT4 to the plasma membrane in HEK 293 cells. Because olfactory sensory perception and the maintenance of action potential (AP) firing frequency by mitral cells of the OB is highly energy demanding and Kv1.3 is also expressed in mitochondria, we next explored the structure of this organelle in mitral cells. We challenged wildtype (WT) and Kv1.3−∕− male mice with a moderately high-fat diet (MHF, 31.8 % kcal fat) for 4 months and then examined OB ultrastructure using transmission electron microscopy. In WT mice, mitochondria were significantly enlarged following diet-induced obesity (DIO) and there were fewer mitochondria, likely due to mitophagy. Interestingly, mitochondria were significantly smaller in Kv1.3−∕− mice compared with that of WT mice. Similar to their metabolic resistance to DIO, the Kv1.3−∕− mice had unchanged mitochondria in terms of cross sectional area and abundance following a challenge with modified diet. We are very

  12. Anti-voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.4 antibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Romi, Fredrik; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Norihiro; Petzold, Axel; Plant, Gordon T; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2012-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease characterized by skeletal muscle weakness mainly caused by acetylcholine receptor antibodies. MG can be divided into generalized and ocular, and into early-onset (<50 years of age) and late-onset (≥50 years of age). Anti-Kv1.4 antibodies targeting α-subunits (Kv1.4) of the voltage-gated potassium K(+) channel occurs frequently among patients with severe MG, accounting for 18% of a Japanese MG population. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features and serological associations of anti-Kv1.4 antibodies in a Caucasian MG population with mild and localized MG. Serum samples from 129 Caucasian MG patients with mainly ocular symptoms were tested for the presence of anti-Kv1.4 antibodies and compared to clinical and serological parameters. There were 22 (17%) anti-Kv1.4 antibody-positive patients, most of them women with late-onset MG, and all of them with mild MG. This contrasts to the Japanese anti-Kv1.4 antibody-positive patients who suffered from severe MG with bulbar symptoms, myasthenic crisis, thymoma, myocarditis and prolonged QT time on electrocardiography, despite equal anti-Kv1.4 antibody occurrence in both populations. No other clinical or serological parameters influenced anti-Kv1.4 antibody occurrence.

  13. Effect of Methamphetamine on the Microglial Damage: Role of Potassium Channel Kv1.3

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingli; Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Pan; Jiang, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Gao, Rong; Xiao, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abusing represents a major public health problem worldwide. Meth has long been known to induce neurotoxicity. However, the mechanism is still remained poorly understood. Growing evidences indicated that the voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) were participated in neuronal damage and microglia function. With the whole cell patch clamp, we found that Meth significantly increased the outward K+ currents, therefore, we explored whether Kv1.3, one of the major K+ channels expressed in microglia, was involved in Meth-induced microglia damage. Our study showed that Meth significantly increased the cell viability in a dose dependent manner, while the Kv blocker, tetraethylamine (TEA), 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) and Kv1.3 specific antagonist margatoxin (MgTx), prevented against the damage mediated by Meth. Interestingly, treatment of cells with Meth resulted in increasing expression of Kv1.3 rather than Kv1.5, at both mRNA and protein level, which is partially blocked by MgTx. Furthermore, Meth also stimulated a significant increased expression of IL-6 and TNF-α at protein level, which was significantly inhibited by MgTx. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Kv1.3 was involved in Meth-mediated microglial damage, providing the potential target for the development of therapeutic strategies for Meth abuse. PMID:24533129

  14. AMIGO is an auxiliary subunit of the Kv2.1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Marjaana A; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi; Rauvala, Heikki

    2011-12-01

    Kv2.1 is a potassium channel α-subunit abundantly expressed throughout the brain. It is a main component of delayed rectifier current (I(K)) in several neuronal types and a regulator of excitability during high-frequency firing. Here we identify AMIGO (amphoterin-induced gene and ORF), a neuronal adhesion protein with leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobin domains, as an integral part of the Kv2.1 channel complex. AMIGO shows extensive spatial and temporal colocalization and association with Kv2.1 in the mouse brain. The colocalization of AMIGO and Kv2.1 is retained even during stimulus-induced changes in Kv2.1 localization. AMIGO increases Kv2.1 conductance in a voltage-dependent manner in HEK cells. Accordingly, inhibition of endogenous AMIGO suppresses neuronal I(K) at negative membrane voltages. In conclusion, our data indicate AMIGO as a function-modulating auxiliary subunit for Kv2.1 and thus provide new insights into regulation of neuronal excitability.

  15. AMIGO is an auxiliary subunit of the Kv2.1 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Marjaana A; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi; Rauvala, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    Kv2.1 is a potassium channel α-subunit abundantly expressed throughout the brain. It is a main component of delayed rectifier current (IK) in several neuronal types and a regulator of excitability during high-frequency firing. Here we identify AMIGO (amphoterin-induced gene and ORF), a neuronal adhesion protein with leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobin domains, as an integral part of the Kv2.1 channel complex. AMIGO shows extensive spatial and temporal colocalization and association with Kv2.1 in the mouse brain. The colocalization of AMIGO and Kv2.1 is retained even during stimulus-induced changes in Kv2.1 localization. AMIGO increases Kv2.1 conductance in a voltage-dependent manner in HEK cells. Accordingly, inhibition of endogenous AMIGO suppresses neuronal IK at negative membrane voltages. In conclusion, our data indicate AMIGO as a function-modulating auxiliary subunit for Kv2.1 and thus provide new insights into regulation of neuronal excitability. PMID:22056818

  16. Effect of methamphetamine on the microglial damage: role of potassium channel Kv1.3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Qian, Wenyi; Liu, Jingli; Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Pan; Jiang, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Gao, Rong; Xiao, Hang

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abusing represents a major public health problem worldwide. Meth has long been known to induce neurotoxicity. However, the mechanism is still remained poorly understood. Growing evidences indicated that the voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) were participated in neuronal damage and microglia function. With the whole cell patch clamp, we found that Meth significantly increased the outward K⁺ currents, therefore, we explored whether Kv1.3, one of the major K⁺ channels expressed in microglia, was involved in Meth-induced microglia damage. Our study showed that Meth significantly increased the cell viability in a dose dependent manner, while the Kv blocker, tetraethylamine (TEA), 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) and Kv1.3 specific antagonist margatoxin (MgTx), prevented against the damage mediated by Meth. Interestingly, treatment of cells with Meth resulted in increasing expression of Kv1.3 rather than Kv1.5, at both mRNA and protein level, which is partially blocked by MgTx. Furthermore, Meth also stimulated a significant increased expression of IL-6 and TNF-α at protein level, which was significantly inhibited by MgTx. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Kv1.3 was involved in Meth-mediated microglial damage, providing the potential target for the development of therapeutic strategies for Meth abuse.

  17. Kv4.3 is not required for the generation of functional Ito,f channels in adult mouse ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Noriko; Wang, Wei; Sha, Qun; Marionneau, Céline; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that the heteromeric assembly of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 α subunits underlies the fast transient Kv current (Ito,f) in rodent ventricles. Recent studies, however, demonstrated that the targeted deletion of Kv4.2 results in the complete elimination of Ito,f in adult mouse ventricles, revealing an essential role for the Kv4.2 α subunit in the generation of mouse ventricular Ito,f channels. The present study was undertaken to investigate directly the functional role of Kv4.3 by examining the effects of the targeted disruption of the KCND3 (Kv4.3) locus. Mice lacking Kv4.3 (Kv4.3−/−) appear indistinguishable from wild type control animals, and no structural or functional abnormalities were evident in Kv4.3−/− hearts. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed that functional Ito,f channels are expressed in Kv4.3−/− ventricular myocytes, and that mean Ito,f densities are similar to those recorded from wild type cells. In addition, Ito,f properties (inactivation rates, voltage-dependences of inactivation and rates of recovery from inactivation) in Kv4.3−/− and wild type mouse ventricular myocytes were indistinguishable. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses did not reveal any measurable changes in the expression of Kv4.2 or the Kv channel interacting protein (KChIP2) in Kv4.3−/−ventricles. Taken together, the results presented here suggest that, in contrast with Kv4.2, Kv4.3 is not required for the generation of functional mouse ventricular Ito,f channels. PMID:18045613

  18. Determinants of frequency-dependent regulation of Kv1.2-containing potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Baronas, Victoria A; Yang, Runying; Vilin, Yury Y; Kurata, Harley T

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are important regulators of electrical excitation in many tissues, with Kv1.2 standing out as an essential contributor in the CNS. Genetic deletion of Kv1.2 invariably leads to early lethality in mice. In humans, mutations affecting Kv1.2 function are linked to epileptic encephalopathy and movement disorders. We have demonstrated that Kv1.2 is subject to a unique regulatory mechanism in which repetitive stimulation leads to dramatic potentiation of current. In this study, we explore the properties and molecular determinants of this use-dependent potentiation/activation. First, we examine how alterations in duty cycle (depolarization and repolarization/recovery times) affect the onset and extent of use-dependent activation. Also, we use trains of repetitive depolarizations to test the effects of a variety of Thr252 (S2-S3 linker) mutations on use-dependent activation. Substitutions of Thr with some sterically similar amino acids (Ser, Val, and Met, but not Cys) retain use-dependent activation, while bulky or charged amino acid substitutions eliminate use-dependence. Introduction of Thr at the equivalent position in other Kv1 channels (1.1, 1.3, 1.4), was not sufficient to transfer the phenotype. We hypothesize that use-dependent activation of Kv1.2 channels is mediated by an extrinsic regulator that binds preferentially to the channel closed state, with Thr252 being necessary but not sufficient for this interaction to alter channel function. These findings extend the conclusions of our recent demonstration of use-dependent activation of Kv1.2-containing channels in hippocampal neurons, by adding new details about the molecular mechanism underlying this effect.

  19. Molecular Template for a Voltage Sensor in a Novel K+ Channel. III. Functional Reconstitution of a Sensorless Pore Module from a Prokaryotic Kv Channel

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Jose S.; Grigoriev, Sergey M.; Montal, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    KvLm is a prokaryotic voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel from Listeria monocytogenes. The sequence of the voltage-sensing module (transmembrane segments S1-S4) of KvLm is atypical in that it contains only three of the eight conserved charged residues known to be deterministic for voltage sensing in eukaryotic Kv's. In contrast, the pore module (PM), including the S4-S5 linker and cytoplasmic tail (linker-S5-P-S6-C-terminus) of KvLm, is highly conserved. Here, the full-length (FL)-KvLm and the KvLm-PM only proteins were expressed, purified, and reconstituted into giant liposomes. The properties of the reconstituted FL-KvLm mirror well the characteristics of the heterologously expressed channel in Escherichia coli spheroplasts: a right-shifted voltage of activation, micromolar tetrabutylammonium-blocking affinity, and a single-channel conductance comparable to that of eukaryotic Kv's. Conversely, ionic currents through the PM recapitulate both the conductance and blocking properties of the FL-KvLm, yet the KvLm-PM exhibits only rudimentary voltage dependence. Given that the KvLm-PM displays many of the conduction properties of FL-KvLm and of other eukaryotic Kv's, including strict ion selectivity, we conclude that self-assembly of the PM subunits in lipid bilayers, in the absence of the voltage-sensing module, generates a conductive oligomer akin to that of the native KvLm, and that the structural independence of voltage sensing and PMs observed in eukaryotic Kv channels was initially implemented by nature in the design of prokaryotic Kv channels. Collectively, the results indicate that this robust functional module will prove valuable as a molecular template for coupling new sensors and to elucidate PM residue–specific contributions to Kv conduction properties. PMID:19029373

  20. Molecular template for a voltage sensor in a novel K+ channel. III. Functional reconstitution of a sensorless pore module from a prokaryotic Kv channel.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose S; Grigoriev, Sergey M; Montal, Mauricio

    2008-12-01

    KvLm is a prokaryotic voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channel from Listeria monocytogenes. The sequence of the voltage-sensing module (transmembrane segments S1-S4) of KvLm is atypical in that it contains only three of the eight conserved charged residues known to be deterministic for voltage sensing in eukaryotic Kv's. In contrast, the pore module (PM), including the S4-S5 linker and cytoplasmic tail (linker-S5-P-S6-C-terminus) of KvLm, is highly conserved. Here, the full-length (FL)-KvLm and the KvLm-PM only proteins were expressed, purified, and reconstituted into giant liposomes. The properties of the reconstituted FL-KvLm mirror well the characteristics of the heterologously expressed channel in Escherichia coli spheroplasts: a right-shifted voltage of activation, micromolar tetrabutylammonium-blocking affinity, and a single-channel conductance comparable to that of eukaryotic Kv's. Conversely, ionic currents through the PM recapitulate both the conductance and blocking properties of the FL-KvLm, yet the KvLm-PM exhibits only rudimentary voltage dependence. Given that the KvLm-PM displays many of the conduction properties of FL-KvLm and of other eukaryotic Kv's, including strict ion selectivity, we conclude that self-assembly of the PM subunits in lipid bilayers, in the absence of the voltage-sensing module, generates a conductive oligomer akin to that of the native KvLm, and that the structural independence of voltage sensing and PMs observed in eukaryotic Kv channels was initially implemented by nature in the design of prokaryotic Kv channels. Collectively, the results indicate that this robust functional module will prove valuable as a molecular template for coupling new sensors and to elucidate PM residue-specific contributions to Kv conduction properties.

  1. Protein kinase C modulates inactivation of Kv3.3 channels.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rooma; Kronengold, Jack; Mei, Jianfeng; Forman, Stuart A; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2008-08-08

    Modulation of some Kv3 family potassium channels by protein kinase C (PKC) regulates their amplitude and kinetics and adjusts firing patterns of auditory neurons in response to stimulation. Nevertheless, little is known about the modulation of Kv3.3, a channel that is widely expressed throughout the nervous system and is the dominant Kv3 family member in auditory brainstem. We have cloned the cDNA for the Kv3.3 channel from mouse brain and have expressed it in a mammalian cell line and in Xenopus oocytes to characterize its biophysical properties and modulation by PKC. Kv3.3 currents activate at positive voltages and undergo inactivation with time constants of 150-250 ms. Activators of PKC increased current amplitude and removed inactivation of Kv3.3 currents, and a specific PKC pseudosubstrate inhibitor peptide prevented the effects of the activators. Elimination of the first 78 amino acids of the N terminus of Kv3.3 produced noninactivating currents suggesting that PKC modulates N-type inactivation, potentially by phosphorylation of sites in this region. To identify potential phosphorylation sites, we investigated the response of channels in which serines in this N-terminal domain were subjected to mutagenesis. Our results suggest that serines at positions 3 and 9 are potential PKC phosphorylation sites. Computer simulations of model neurons suggest that phosphorylation of Kv3.3 by PKC may allow neurons to maintain action potential height during stimulation at high frequencies, and may therefore contribute to stimulus-induced changes in the intrinsic excitability of neurons such as those of the auditory brainstem.

  2. Kv7 channels regulate pairwise spiking covariability in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ocker, Gabriel Koch; Doiron, Brent

    2014-07-15

    Low-threshold M currents are mediated by the Kv7 family of potassium channels. Kv7 channels are important regulators of spiking activity, having a direct influence on the firing rate, spike time variability, and filter properties of neurons. How Kv7 channels affect the joint spiking activity of populations of neurons is an important and open area of study. Using a combination of computational simulations and analytic calculations, we show that the activation of Kv7 conductances reduces the covariability between spike trains of pairs of neurons driven by common inputs. This reduction is beyond that explained by the lowering of firing rates and involves an active cancellation of common fluctuations in the membrane potentials of the cell pair. Our theory shows that the excess covariance reduction is due to a Kv7-induced shift from low-pass to band-pass filtering of the single neuron spike train response. Dysfunction of Kv7 conductances is related to a number of neurological diseases characterized by both elevated firing rates and increased network-wide correlations. We show how changes in the activation or strength of Kv7 conductances give rise to excess correlations that cannot be compensated for by synaptic scaling or homeostatic modulation of passive membrane properties. In contrast, modulation of Kv7 activation parameters consistent with pharmacological treatments for certain hyperactivity disorders can restore normal firing rates and spiking correlations. Our results provide key insights into how regulation of a ubiquitous potassium channel class can control the coordination of population spiking activity.

  3. Mechanism of functional interaction between potassium channel Kv1.3 and sodium channel NavBeta1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Tomoya; Correa, Ana M.; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel subfamily A member 3 (Kv1.3) dominantly expresses on T cells and neurons. Recently, the interaction between Kv1.3 and NavBeta1 subunits has been explored through ionic current measurements, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated yet. We explored the functional interaction between Kv1.3 and NavBeta1 through gating current measurements using the Cut-open Oocyte Voltage Clamp (COVC) technique. We showed that the N-terminal 1–52 sequence of hKv1.3 disrupts the channel expression on the Xenopus oocyte membrane, suggesting a potential role as regulator of hKv1.3 expression in neurons and lymphocytes. Our gating currents measurements showed that NavBeta1 interacts with the voltage sensing domain (VSD) of Kv1.3 through W172 in the transmembrane segment and modifies the gating operation. The comparison between G-V and Q-V with/without NavBeta1 indicates that NavBeta1 may strengthen the coupling between hKv1.3-VSD movement and pore opening, inducing the modification of kinetics in ionic activation and deactivation. PMID:28349975

  4. Modulation of Kv3.4 channel N-type inactivation by protein kinase C shapes the action potential in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ritter, David M; Ho, Cojen; O'Leary, Michael E; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Fast inactivation of heterologously expressed Kv3.4 channels is dramatically slowed upon phosphorylation of the channel's N-terminal (N-type) inactivation gate by protein kinase C (PKC). However, the presence and physiological importance of this exquisite modulation in excitable tissues were unknown. Here, we employed minimally invasive cell-attached patch-clamping, single-cell qPCR and specific siRNAs to unambiguously demonstrate that fast-inactivating Kv3.4 channels underlie a robust high voltage-activated A-type K(+) current (I(AHV)) in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons from 7-day-old rats. We also show that PKC activation with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) causes a 4-fold slowing of Kv3.4 channel inactivation and, consequently, accelerates the repolarization of the action potential (AP) by 22%, which shortens the AP duration by 14%. G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists eliminate I(AHV) fast inactivation in a membrane-delimited manner, suggesting a Kv3.4 channel signalling complex. Preincubation of the neurons with the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide II inhibits the effect of GPCR agonists and PDBu. Furthermore, activation of PKC via GPCR agonists recapitulates the effects of PDBu on the AP. Finally, transfection of the neurons with Kv3.4 siRNA prolongs the AP by 25% and abolishes the GPCR agonist-induced acceleration of the AP repolarization. These results show that Kv3.4 channels help shape the repolarization of the nociceptor AP, and that modulation of Kv3.4 channel N-type inactivation by PKC regulates AP repolarization and duration. We propose that the dramatic modulation of I(AHV) fast inactivation by PKC represents a novel mechanism of neural plasticity with potentially significant implications in the transition from acute to chronic pain.

  5. Tracking single Kv2.1 channels in live cells reveals anomalous subdiffusion and ergodicity breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, Aubrey; Simon, Blair; Tamkun, Michael; Krapf, Diego

    2011-03-01

    The dynamic organization of the plasma membrane is responsible for essential cellular processes, such as receptor trafficking and signaling. By studying the dynamics of transmembrane proteins a greater understanding of these processes as a whole can be achieved. It is broadly observed that the diffusion pattern of membrane protein displays anomalous subdiffusion. However, the mechanisms responsible for this behavior are not yet established. We explore the dynamics of the voltage gated potassium channel Kv2.1 by using single-particle tracking. We analyze Kv2.1 channel trajectories in terms of the time and ensemble distributions of square displacements. Our results reveal that all Kv2.1 channels experience anomalous subdiffusion and we observe that the Kv2.1 diffusion pattern is non-ergodic. We further investigated the role of the actin cytoskeleton in these channel dynamics by applying actin depolymerizing drugs. It is seen that with the breakdown of the actin cytoskeleton the Kv2.1 channel trajectories recover ergodicity.

  6. Distribution of Kv1-like potassium channels in the electromotor and electrosensory systems of the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Smith, G Troy; Unguez, Graciela A; Weber, Christopher M

    2006-08-01

    The electromotor and electrosensory systems of the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus are model systems for studying mechanisms of high-frequency motor pattern generation and sensory processing. Voltage-dependent ionic currents, including low-threshold potassium currents, influence excitability of neurons in these circuits and thereby regulate motor output and sensory filtering. Although Kv1-like potassium channels are likely to carry low-threshold potassium currents in electromotor and electrosensory neurons, the distribution of Kv1 alpha subunits in A. leptorhynchus is unknown. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry with six different antibodies raised against specific mammalian Kv1 alpha subunits (Kv1.1-Kv1.6) to characterize the distribution of Kv1-like channels in electromotor and electrosensory structures. Each Kv1 antibody labeled a distinct subset of neurons, fibers, and/or dendrites in electromotor and electrosensory nuclei. Kv1-like immunoreactivity in the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) and pacemaker nucleus are particularly relevant in light of previous studies suggesting that potassium currents carried by Kv1 channels regulate neuronal excitability in these regions. Immunoreactivity of pyramidal cells in the ELL with several Kv1 antibodies is consistent with Kv1 channels carrying low-threshold outward currents that regulate spike waveform in these cells (Fernandez et al., J Neurosci 2005;25:363-371). Similarly, Kv1-like immunoreactivity in the pacemaker nucleus is consistent with a role of Kv1 channels in spontaneous high-frequency firing in pacemaker neurons. Robust Kv1-like immunoreactivity in several other structures, including the dorsal torus semicircularis, tuberous electroreceptors, and the electric organ, indicates that Kv1 channels are broadly expressed and are likely to contribute significantly to generating the electric organ discharge and processing electrosensory inputs.

  7. RNA editing modulates the binding of drugs and highly unsaturated fatty acids to the open pore of Kv potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Decher, Niels; Streit, Anne K; Rapedius, Markus; Netter, Michael F; Marzian, Stefanie; Ehling, Petra; Schlichthörl, Günter; Craan, Tobias; Renigunta, Vijay; Köhler, Annemarie; Dodel, Richard C; Navarro-Polanco, Ricardo A; Preisig-Müller, Regina; Klebe, Gerhard; Budde, Thomas; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Daut, Jürgen

    2010-07-07

    The time course of inactivation of voltage-activated potassium (Kv) channels is an important determinant of the firing rate of neurons. In many Kv channels highly unsaturated lipids as arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and anandamide can induce fast inactivation. We found that these lipids interact with hydrophobic residues lining the inner cavity of the pore. We analysed the effects of these lipids on Kv1.1 current kinetics and their competition with intracellular tetraethylammonium and Kvbeta subunits. Our data suggest that inactivation most likely represents occlusion of the permeation pathway, similar to drugs that produce 'open-channel block'. Open-channel block by drugs and lipids was strongly reduced in Kv1.1 channels whose amino acid sequence was altered by RNA editing in the pore cavity, and in Kv1.x heteromeric channels containing edited Kv1.1 subunits. We show that differential editing of Kv1.1 channels in different regions of the brain can profoundly alter the pharmacology of Kv1.x channels. Our findings provide a mechanistic understanding of lipid-induced inactivation and establish RNA editing as a mechanism to induce drug and lipid resistance in Kv channels.

  8. Tityustoxin-K(alpha) blockade of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Aldo Rogelis A; Arantes, Eliane C; Monje, Francisco; Stuhmer, Walter; Varanda, Wamberto Antonio

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the action of TsTX-Kα on cloned Kv1.3 channels of the Shaker subfamily of voltage-gated potassium channels, using the voltage–clamp technique. Highly purified TsTX-Kα was obtained from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus using a new purification protocol. Our results show that TsTX-Kα blocks Kv1.3 with high affinity in two expression systems. TsTX-Kα blockade of Kv1.3 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes was found to be completely reversible and to exhibit a pH dependence. The KD was 3.9 nM at pH 7.5, 9.5 nM at pH 7.0 and 94.5 nM at pH 6.5. The blocking properties of TsTX-Kα in a mammalian cell line (L929), stably transfected to express Kv1.3, were studied using the patch–clamp technique. In this preparation, the toxin had a KD of 19.8 nM at pH 7.4. TsTX-Kα was found to affect neither the voltage-dependence of activation, nor the activation and deactivation time constants. The block appeared to be independent of the transmembrane voltage and the toxin did not interfere with the C-type inactivation process. Taken as a whole, our findings indicate that TsTX-Kα acts as a simple blocker of Kv1.3 channels. It is concluded that this toxin is a useful tool for probing not only the physiological roles of Kv1.2, but also those mediated by Kv1.3 channels. PMID:12871837

  9. Overexpression of Tau Downregulated the mRNA Levels of Kv Channels and Improved Proliferation in N2A Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiantao; Hu, Ximu; Li, Xiaoqing; Hao, Xuran

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule binding protein tau has a crucial function in promoting the assembly and stabilization of microtubule. Besides tuning the action potentials, voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv) are important for cell proliferation and appear to play a role in the development of cancer. However, little is known about the possible interaction of tau with Kv channels in various tissues. In the present study, tau plasmids were transiently transfected into mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to explore the possible linkages between tau and Kv channels. This treatment led to a downregulation of mRNA levels of several Kv channels, including Kv2.1, Kv3.1, Kv4.1, Kv9.2, and KCNH4, but no significant alteration was observed for Kv5.1 and KCNQ4. Furthermore, the macroscopic currents through Kv channels were reduced by 36.5% at +60 mV in tau-tranfected N2A cells. The proliferation rates of N2A cells were also improved by the induction of tau expression and the incubation of TEA (tetraethylammonium) for 48 h by 120.9% and 149.3%, respectively. Following the cotransfection with tau in HEK293 cells, the mRNA levels and corresponding currents of Kv2.1 were significantly declined compared with single Kv2.1 transfection. Our data indicated that overexpression of tau declined the mRNA levels of Kv channels and related currents. The effects of tau overexpression on Kv channels provided an alternative explanation for low sensitivity to anti-cancer chemicals in some specific cancer tissues. PMID:25590133

  10. Overexpression of tau downregulated the mRNA levels of Kv channels and improved proliferation in N2A cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiantao; Hu, Ximu; Li, Xiaoqing; Hao, Xuran

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule binding protein tau has a crucial function in promoting the assembly and stabilization of microtubule. Besides tuning the action potentials, voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv) are important for cell proliferation and appear to play a role in the development of cancer. However, little is known about the possible interaction of tau with Kv channels in various tissues. In the present study, tau plasmids were transiently transfected into mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells to explore the possible linkages between tau and Kv channels. This treatment led to a downregulation of mRNA levels of several Kv channels, including Kv2.1, Kv3.1, Kv4.1, Kv9.2, and KCNH4, but no significant alteration was observed for Kv5.1 and KCNQ4. Furthermore, the macroscopic currents through Kv channels were reduced by 36.5% at +60 mV in tau-transfected N2A cells. The proliferation rates of N2A cells were also improved by the induction of tau expression and the incubation of TEA (tetraethylammonium) for 48 h by 120.9% and 149.3%, respectively. Following the cotransfection with tau in HEK293 cells, the mRNA levels and corresponding currents of Kv2.1 were significantly declined compared with single Kv2.1 transfection. Our data indicated that overexpression of tau declined the mRNA levels of Kv channels and related currents. The effects of tau overexpression on Kv channels provided an alternative explanation for low sensitivity to anti-cancer chemicals in some specific cancer tissues.

  11. Deletion of the Kv2.1 delayed rectifier potassium channel leads to neuronal and behavioral hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Speca, David J.; Ogata, Genki; Mandikian, Danielle; Bishop, Hannah I.; Wiler, Steve W.; Eum, Kenneth; Wenzel, H. Jürgen; Doisy, Emily T.; Matt, Lucas; Campi, Katharine L.; Golub, Mari S.; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Hell, Johannes W.; Trainor, Brian C.; Sack, Jon T.; Schwartzkroin, Philip A.; Trimmer, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The Kv2.1 delayed rectifier potassium channel exhibits high-level expression in both principal and inhibitory neurons throughout the central nervous system, including prominent expression in hippocampal neurons. Studies of in vitro preparations suggest that Kv2.1 is a key yet conditional regulator of intrinsic neuronal excitability, mediated by changes in Kv2.1 expression, localization and function via activity-dependent regulation of Kv2.1 phosphorylation. Here we identify neurological and behavioral deficits in mutant (Kv2.1−/−) mice lacking this channel. Kv2.1−/− mice have grossly normal characteristics. No impairment in vision or motor coordination was apparent, although Kv2.1−/− mice exhibit reduced body weight. The anatomic structure and expression of related Kv channels in the brains of Kv2.1−/− mice appears unchanged. Delayed rectifier potassium current is diminished in hippocampal neurons cultured from Kv2.1−/− animals. Field recordings from hippocampal slices of Kv2.1−/− mice reveal hyperexcitability in response to the convulsant bicuculline, and epileptiform activity in response to stimulation. In Kv2.1−/− mice, long-term potentiation at the Schaffer collateral – CA1 synapse is decreased. Kv2.1−/− mice are strikingly hyperactive, and exhibit defects in spatial learning, failing to improve performance in a Morris Water Maze task. Kv2.1−/− mice are hypersensitive to the effects of the convulsants flurothyl and pilocarpine, consistent with a role for Kv2.1 as a conditional suppressor of neuronal activity. Although not prone to spontaneous seizures, Kv2.1−/− mice exhibit accelerated seizure progression. Together, these findings suggest homeostatic suppression of elevated neuronal activity by Kv2.1 plays a central role in regulating neuronal network function. PMID:24494598

  12. JZTX-XIII, a Kv channel gating modifier toxin from Chinese tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chunhua; Liu, Zhonghua; Hu, Weijun; Gao, Tianming; Liang, Songping

    2012-02-01

    Jingzhaotoxin-XIII (JZTX-XIII), a 35 residue polypeptide, with the ability to inhibit voltage-dependent potassium channels in the shab (Kv2) and shal (Kv4) subfamilies, was purified from the venom of the Chinese tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao. Electrophysiological recordings carried out in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that JZTX-XIII acted as gating modifier of voltage-dependent K+ channels which inhibited the Kv2.1 channel and Kv4.1 channel, with the IC50 value of 0.47 μM and 1.17 μM, respectively. JZTX-XIII shares high sequence similarity with gating modifier toxins inhibiting a wide variety of ion channels including Nav1.5 subtype, but it showed no Nav1.5 channel activity. Structure-function analysis indicates that the acidic residues of Glu10 and Glu17 in JZTX-XIII might be responsible for the loss of the Nav1.5 channel inhibitory potency for JZTX-XIII. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. K+ channel mechanisms underlying cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation and sweating in young humans: roles of KCa, KATP, and KV channels?

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Louie, Jeffrey C; McNeely, Brendan D; Zhang, Sarah Yan; Tran, My-An; Kenny, Glen P

    2016-09-01

    Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is involved in heat loss responses of cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. K(+) channels are thought to play a role in regulating cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation and sweating, though which K(+) channels are involved in their regulation remains unclear. We evaluated the hypotheses that 1) Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa), ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP), and voltage-gated K(+) (KV) channels all contribute to cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation; and 2) KV channels, but not KCa and KATP channels, contribute to cholinergic sweating. In 13 young adults (24 ± 5 years), cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate were evaluated at intradermal microdialysis sites that were continuously perfused with: 1) lactated Ringer (Control), 2) 50 mM tetraethylammonium (KCa channel blocker), 3) 5 mM glybenclamide (KATP channel blocker), and 4) 10 mM 4-aminopyridine (KV channel blocker). At all sites, cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation and sweating were induced by coadministration of methacholine (0.0125, 0.25, 5, 100, and 2,000 mM, each for 25 min). The methacholine-induced increase in CVC was lower with the KCa channel blocker relative to Control at 0.0125 (1 ± 1 vs. 9 ± 6%max) and 5 (2 ± 5 vs. 17 ± 14%max) mM methacholine, whereas it was lower in the presence of KATP (69 ± 7%max) and KV (57 ± 14%max) channel blocker compared with Control (79 ± 6%max) at 100 mM methacholine. Furthermore, methacholine-induced sweating was lower at the KV channel blocker site (0.42 ± 0.17 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2)) compared with Control (0.58 ± 0.15 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2)) at 2,000 mM methacholine. In conclusion, we show that KCa, KATP, and KV channels play a role in cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation, whereas only KV channels contribute to cholinergic sweating in normothermic resting humans. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Control of ionic selectivity by a pore helix residue in the Kv1.2 channel.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Chia; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Kuo, Chang-Shin; Leung, Yuk-Man

    2010-11-01

    Interaction between the selectivity filter and the adjacent pore helix of voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels controls pore stability during K(+) conduction. Kv channels, having their selectivity filter destabilized during depolarization, are said to undergo C-type inactivation. We examined the functionality of a residue at the pore helix of the Kv1.2 channel (V370), which reportedly affects C-type inactivation. A mutation into glycine (V370G) caused a shift in reversal potential from around -72 to -9 mV. The permeability ratios (P(Na)/P(K)) of the wild type and V370G mutant are 0.04 and 0.76, respectively. In the wild-type, P(Rb)/P(K), P(Cs)/P(K) and P(Li)/P(K) are 0.78, 0.10 and 0.05, respectively. Kv1.2 V370G channels had enhanced permeability to Rb(+) and Cs(+) (P(Rb)/P(K) and P(Cs)/P(K) are 1.63 and 1.18, respectively); however, Li(+) permeability was not significantly augmented (P(Li)/P(K) is 0.13). Therefore, in addition to its known effect on pore stability, V370 of Kv1.2 is also crucial in controlling ion selectivity.

  15. Effects of dapoxetine on cloned Kv1.5 channels expressed in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Imju; Yoon, Shin Hee; Hahn, Sang June

    2012-07-01

    The effects of dapoxetine were examined on cloned Kv1.5 channels stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Dapoxetine decreased the peak amplitude of Kv1.5 currents and accelerated the decay rate of current inactivation in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC ( 50 ) of 11.6 μM. Kinetic analysis of the time-dependent effects of dapoxetine on Kv1.5 current decay yielded the apparent association (k (+1 )) and dissociation (k (-1 )) rate constants of 2.8 μM(-1) s(-1) and 34.2 s(-1), respectively. The theoretical K ( D ) value, derived by k (-1 )/k (+1 ), yielded 12.3 μM, which was reasonably similar to the IC ( 50 ) value obtained from the concentration-response curve. Dapoxetine decreased the tail current amplitude and slowed the deactivation process of Kv1.5, which resulted in a tail crossover phenomenon. The block by dapoxetine is voltage-dependent and steeply increased at potentials between -10 and +10 mV, which correspond to the voltage range of channel activation. At more depolarized potentials, a weaker voltage dependence was observed (δ=0.31). Dapoxetine had no effect on the steady-state activation of Kv1.5 but shifted the steady-state inactivation curves in a hyperpolarizing direction. Dapoxetine produced a use-dependent block of Kv1.5 at frequencies of 1 and 2 Hz and slowed the time course for recovery of inactivation. These effects were reversible after washout of the drug. Our results indicate that dapoxetine blocks Kv1.5 currents by interacting with the channel in both the open and inactivated states of the channel.

  16. Induction of stable ER–plasma-membrane junctions by Kv2.1 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Philip D.; Haberkorn, Christopher J.; Akin, Elizabeth J.; Seel, Peter J.; Krapf, Diego; Tamkun, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Junctions between cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) and the plasma membrane are a subtle but ubiquitous feature in mammalian cells; however, very little is known about the functions and molecular interactions that are associated with neuronal ER–plasma-membrane junctions. Here, we report that Kv2.1 (also known as KCNB1), the primary delayed-rectifier K+ channel in the mammalian brain, induces the formation of ER–plasma-membrane junctions. Kv2.1 localizes to dense, cell-surface clusters that contain non-conducting channels, indicating that they have a function that is unrelated to membrane-potential regulation. Accordingly, Kv2.1 clusters function as membrane-trafficking hubs, providing platforms for delivery and retrieval of multiple membrane proteins. Using both total internal reflection fluorescence and electron microscopy we demonstrate that the clustered Kv2.1 plays a direct structural role in the induction of stable ER–plasma-membrane junctions in both transfected HEK 293 cells and cultured hippocampal neurons. Glutamate exposure results in a loss of Kv2.1 clusters in neurons and subsequent retraction of the cER from the plasma membrane. We propose Kv2.1-induced ER–plasma-membrane junctions represent a new macromolecular plasma-membrane complex that is sensitive to excitotoxic insult and functions as a scaffolding site for both membrane trafficking and Ca2+ signaling. PMID:25908859

  17. Raloxifene inhibits cloned Kv4.3 channels in an estrogen receptor-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Kim, Dae Hun; Lee, Hong Joon; Sung, Ki-Wug; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Hahn, Sang June

    2015-08-01

    Raloxifene is widely used for the treatment and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We examined the effects of raloxifene on the Kv4.3 currents expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and on the long-term modulation of Kv4.3 messenger RNA (mRNA) by real-time PCR analysis. Raloxifene decreased the Kv4.3 currents with an IC50 of 2.0 μM and accelerated the inactivation and activation kinetics in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of raloxifene on Kv4.3 were time-dependent: the association and dissociation rate constants for raloxifene were 9.5 μM(-1) s(-1) and 23.0 s(-1), respectively. The inhibition by raloxifene was voltage-dependent (δ = 0.13). Raloxifene shifted the steady-state inactivation curves in a hyperpolarizing direction and accelerated the closed-state inactivation of Kv4.3. Raloxifene slowed the time course of recovery from inactivation, thus producing a use-dependent inhibition of Kv4.3. β-Estradiol and tamoxifen had little effect on Kv4.3. A preincubation of ICI 182,780, an estrogen receptor antagonist, for 1 h had no effect on the inhibitory effect of raloxifene on Kv4.3. The metabolites of raloxifene, raloxifene-4'-glucuronide and raloxifene-6'-glucuronide, had little or no effect on Kv4.3. Coexpression of KChIP2 subunits did not alter the drug potency and steady-state inactivation of Kv4.3 channels. Long-term exposure to raloxifene (24 h) significantly decreased the expression level of Kv4.3 mRNA. This effect was not abolished by the coincubation with ICI 182,780. Raloxifene inhibited Kv4.3 channels by interacting with their open state during depolarization and with the closed state at subthreshold potentials. This effect was not mediated via an estrogen receptor.

  18. Kv3.1/Kv3.2 channel positive modulators enable faster activating kinetics and increase firing frequency in fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Boddum, Kim; Hougaard, Charlotte; Xiao-Ying Lin, Julie; von Schoubye, Nadia Lybøl; Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas

    2017-02-24

    Due to their fast kinetic properties, Kv3.1 voltage gated potassium channels are important in setting and controlling firing frequency in neurons and pivotal in generating high frequency firing of interneurons. Pharmacological activation of Kv3.1 channels may possess therapeutic potential for treatment of epilepsy, hearing disorders, schizophrenia and cognitive impairments. Here we thoroughly investigate the selectivity and positive modulation of the two small molecules, EX15 and RE01, on Kv3 channels. Selectivity studies, conducted in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirmed a positive modulatory effect of the two compounds on Kv3.1 and to a minor extent on Kv3.2 channels. RE01 had no effect on the Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 channels, whereas EX15 had an inhibitory impact on the Kv3.4 mediated current. Voltage-clamp experiments in monoclonal hKv3.1b/HEK293 cells (34 °C) revealed that the two compounds indeed induced larger currents and faster activation kinetics. They also decrease the speed of deactivation and shifted the voltage dependence of activation, to a more negative activation threshold. Application of action potential clamping and repetitive stimulation protocols of hKv3.1b expressing HEK293 cells revealed that EX15 and RE01 significantly increased peak amplitude, half width and decay time of Kv3.1 mediated currents, even during high-frequency action potential clamping (250 Hz). In rat hippocampal slices, EX15 and RE01 increased neuronal excitability in fast-spiking interneurons in dentate gyrus. Action potential frequency was prominently increased at minor depolarizing steps, whereas more marginal effects of EX15 and RE01 were observed after stronger depolarizations. In conclusion, our results suggest that EX15 and RE01 positive modulation of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 currents facilitate increased firing frequency in fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons.

  19. Spiro azepane-oxazolidinones as Kv1.3 potassium channel blockers: WO2010066840.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Heike

    2010-12-01

    This article evaluates a patent application from Solvay Pharmaceuticals, which claims spiro azepane-oxazolidinones as novel blockers of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3 for the treatment of diabetes, psoriasis, obesity, transplant rejection and T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and MS. The patent describes a new chemotype of Kv1.3 blockers and thus illustrates the growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in Kv1.3 as a target of immunosuppression and metabolic disorders. This article briefly summarizes the chemistry and biological data provided in the patent and then compares the new compounds to Kv1.3 blockers previously disclosed by both academia and pharmaceutical companies.

  20. Concerted Trafficking Regulation of Kv2.1 and KATP Channels by Leptin in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Shyng, Show-Ling; Chen, Pei-Chun

    2015-12-11

    In pancreatic β-cells, voltage-gated potassium 2.1 (Kv2.1) channels are the dominant delayed rectifier potassium channels responsible for action potential repolarization. Here, we report that leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes known to inhibit insulin secretion, causes a transient increase in surface expression of Kv2.1 channels in rodent and human β-cells. The effect of leptin on Kv2.1 surface expression is mediated by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of AMPK mimics whereas inhibition of AMPK occludes the effect of leptin. Inhibition of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β, a known upstream kinase of AMPK, also blocks the effect of leptin. In addition, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is involved in Kv2.1 channel trafficking regulation. Inhibition of PKA prevents leptin or AMPK activators from increasing Kv2.1 channel density, whereas stimulation of PKA is sufficient to promote Kv2.1 channel surface expression. The increased Kv2.1 surface expression by leptin is dependent on actin depolymerization, and pharmacologically induced actin depolymerization is sufficient to enhance Kv2.1 surface expression. The signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying Kv2.1 channel trafficking regulation by leptin mirror those reported recently for ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, which are critical for coupling glucose stimulation with membrane depolarization. We show that the leptin-induced increase in surface KATP channels results in more hyperpolarized membrane potentials than control cells at stimulating glucose concentrations, and the increase in Kv2.1 channels leads to a more rapid repolarization of membrane potential in cells firing action potentials. This study supports a model in which leptin exerts concerted trafficking regulation of KATP and Kv2.1 channels to coordinately inhibit insulin secretion.

  1. Characterization of N-glycosylation consensus sequences in the Kv3.1 channel.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Natasha L; Corey, Melissa J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2006-07-01

    N-Glycosylation is a cotranslational and post-translational process of proteins that may influence protein folding, maturation, stability, trafficking, and consequently cell surface expression of functional channels. Here we have characterized two consensus N-glycosylation sequences of a voltage-gated K+ channel (Kv3.1). Glycosylation of Kv3.1 protein from rat brain and infected Sf9 cells was demonstrated by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Digestion of total brain membranes with peptide N glycosidase F (PNGase F) produced a much faster-migrating Kv3.1 immunoband than that of undigested brain membranes. To demonstrate N-glycosylation of wild-type Kv3.1 in Sf9 cells, cells were treated with tunicamycin. Also, partially purified proteins were digested with either PNGase F or endoglycosidase H. Attachment of simple-type oligosaccharides at positions 220 and 229 was directly shown by single (N229Q and N220Q) and double (N220Q/N229Q) Kv3.1 mutants. Functional measurements and membrane fractionation of infected Sf9 cells showed that unglycosylated Kv3.1s were transported to the plasma membrane. Unitary conductance of N220Q/N229Q was similar to that of the wild-type Kv3.1. However, whole cell currents of N220Q/N229Q channels had slower activation rates, and a slight positive shift in voltage dependence compared to wild-type Kv3.1. The voltage dependence of channel activation for N229Q and N220Q was much like that for N220Q/N229Q. These results demonstrate that the S1-S2 linker is topologically extracellular, and that N-glycosylation influences the opening of the voltage-dependent gate of Kv3.1. We suggest that occupancy of the sites is critical for folding and maturation of the functional Kv3.1 at the cell surface.

  2. The MiRP2-Kv3.4 potassium channel: muscling in on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun; Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2007-09-01

    In this issue of Molecular Pharmacology (p. 665), Pannacione et al. provide evidence of a role for the voltage-gated potassium channel alpha subunit Kv3.4 and its ancillary subunit MiRP2 in beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide-mediated neuronal death. The MiRP2-Kv3.4 channel complex-previously found to be important in skeletal myocyte physiology-is now argued to be a molecular correlate of the transient outward potassium current up-regulated by Abeta peptide, considered a significant step in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. The authors conclude that MiRP2 and Kv3.4 are up-regulated by Abeta peptide in a nuclear factor kappaB-dependent fashion at the transcriptional level, and the sea anemone toxin BDS-I is shown to protect against Abeta peptide-mediated cell death by specific blockade of Kv3.4-generated current. The findings lend weight to the premise that specific channels, such as MiRP2-Kv3.4, could hold promise as future therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease and potentially other neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Positive Allosteric Modulation of Kv Channels by Sevoflurane: Insights into the Structural Basis of Inhaled Anesthetic Action

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qiansheng; Anderson, Warren D.; Jones, Shelly T.; Souza, Caio S.; Hosoume, Juliana M.; Treptow, Werner; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational general anesthesia results from the poorly understood interactions of haloethers with multiple protein targets, which prominently includes ion channels in the nervous system. Previously, we reported that the commonly used inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane potentiates the activity of voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels, specifically, several mammalian Kv1 channels and the Drosophila K-Shaw2 channel. Also, previous work suggested that the S4-S5 linker of K-Shaw2 plays a role in the inhibition of this Kv channel by n-alcohols and inhaled anesthetics. Here, we hypothesized that the S4-S5 linker is also a determinant of the potentiation of Kv1.2 and K-Shaw2 by sevoflurane. Following functional expression of these Kv channels in Xenopus oocytes, we found that converse mutations in Kv1.2 (G329T) and K-Shaw2 (T330G) dramatically enhance and inhibit the potentiation of the corresponding conductances by sevoflurane, respectively. Additionally, Kv1.2-G329T impairs voltage-dependent gating, which suggests that Kv1.2 modulation by sevoflurane is tied to gating in a state-dependent manner. Toward creating a minimal Kv1.2 structural model displaying the putative sevoflurane binding sites, we also found that the positive modulations of Kv1.2 and Kv1.2-G329T by sevoflurane and other general anesthetics are T1-independent. In contrast, the positive sevoflurane modulation of K-Shaw2 is T1-dependent. In silico docking and molecular dynamics-based free-energy calculations suggest that sevoflurane occupies distinct sites near the S4-S5 linker, the pore domain and around the external selectivity filter. We conclude that the positive allosteric modulation of the Kv channels by sevoflurane involves separable processes and multiple sites within regions intimately involved in channel gating. PMID:26599217

  4. Positive Allosteric Modulation of Kv Channels by Sevoflurane: Insights into the Structural Basis of Inhaled Anesthetic Action.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiansheng; Anderson, Warren D; Jones, Shelly T; Souza, Caio S; Hosoume, Juliana M; Treptow, Werner; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational general anesthesia results from the poorly understood interactions of haloethers with multiple protein targets, which prominently includes ion channels in the nervous system. Previously, we reported that the commonly used inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane potentiates the activity of voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels, specifically, several mammalian Kv1 channels and the Drosophila K-Shaw2 channel. Also, previous work suggested that the S4-S5 linker of K-Shaw2 plays a role in the inhibition of this Kv channel by n-alcohols and inhaled anesthetics. Here, we hypothesized that the S4-S5 linker is also a determinant of the potentiation of Kv1.2 and K-Shaw2 by sevoflurane. Following functional expression of these Kv channels in Xenopus oocytes, we found that converse mutations in Kv1.2 (G329T) and K-Shaw2 (T330G) dramatically enhance and inhibit the potentiation of the corresponding conductances by sevoflurane, respectively. Additionally, Kv1.2-G329T impairs voltage-dependent gating, which suggests that Kv1.2 modulation by sevoflurane is tied to gating in a state-dependent manner. Toward creating a minimal Kv1.2 structural model displaying the putative sevoflurane binding sites, we also found that the positive modulations of Kv1.2 and Kv1.2-G329T by sevoflurane and other general anesthetics are T1-independent. In contrast, the positive sevoflurane modulation of K-Shaw2 is T1-dependent. In silico docking and molecular dynamics-based free-energy calculations suggest that sevoflurane occupies distinct sites near the S4-S5 linker, the pore domain and around the external selectivity filter. We conclude that the positive allosteric modulation of the Kv channels by sevoflurane involves separable processes and multiple sites within regions intimately involved in channel gating.

  5. Open channel block of Kv3.1 currents by fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min Ji; Ahn, Hye Sook; Hahn, Sang June; Choi, Bok Hee

    2008-01-01

    The action of fluoxetine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on the cloned neuronal rat Kv3.1 channels stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Fluoxetine reduced Kv3.1 whole-cell currents in a reversible, concentration-dependent manner, with an IC(50) value and a Hill coefficient of 13.4 muM and 1.4, respectively. Fluoxetine accelerated the decay rate of inactivation of Kv3.1 currents without modifying the kinetics of current activation. The inhibition increased steeply between 0 and +30 mV, which corresponded with the voltage range for channel opening. In the voltage range positive to +30 mV, inhibition displayed a weak voltage dependence, consistent with an electrical distance delta of 0.38. The binding (k(+1)) and dissociation (k(-1)) rate constants for fluoxetine-induced block of Kv3.1 were 5.7 microM(-1)s(-1) and 53.5 s(-1), respectively. The theoretical K(D) value derived by k(-1)/k(+1) yielded 9.3 microM. Fluoxetine did not affect the ion selectivity of Kv3.1. Fluoxetine slowed the deactivation time course, resulting in a tail crossover phenomenon when the tail currents, recorded in the presence and absence of fluoxetine, were superimposed. Inhibition of Kv3.1 by fluoxetine was use-dependent. The present results suggest that fluoxetine acts on Kv3.1 currents as an open-channel blocker.

  6. Independent and cooperative motions of the Kv1.2 channel: voltage sensing and gating.

    PubMed

    Yeheskel, Adva; Haliloglu, Turkan; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2010-05-19

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, such as Kv1.2, are involved in the generation and propagation of action potentials. The Kv channel is a homotetramer, and each monomer is composed of a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) and a pore domain (PD). We analyzed the fluctuations of a model structure of Kv1.2 using elastic network models. The analysis suggested a network of coupled fluctuations of eight rigid structural units and seven hinges that may control the transition between the active and inactive states of the channel. For the most part, the network is composed of amino acids that are known to affect channel activity. The results suggested allosteric interactions and cooperativity between the subunits in the coupling between the motion of the VSD and the selectivity filter of the PD, in accordance with recent empirical data. There are no direct contacts between the VSDs of the four subunits, and the contacts between these and the PDs are loose, suggesting that the VSDs are capable of functioning independently. Indeed, they manifest many inherent fluctuations that are decoupled from the rest of the structure. In general, the analysis suggests that the two domains contribute to the channel function both individually and cooperatively.

  7. Kv3 channels contribute to the delayed rectifier current in small cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Bocksteins, Elke; Van de Vijver, Gerda; Van Bogaert, Pierre-Paul; Snyders, Dirk J

    2012-08-15

    Delayed rectifier voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels are important determinants of neuronal excitability. However, the large number of K(V) subunits poses a major challenge to establish the molecular composition of the native neuronal K(+) currents. A large part (∼60%) of the delayed rectifier current (I(K)) in small mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons has been shown to be carried by both homotetrameric K(V)2.1 and heterotetrameric channels of K(V)2 subunits with silent K(V) subunits (K(V)S), while a contribution of K(V)1 channels has also been demonstrated. Because K(V)3 subunits also generate delayed rectifier currents, we investigated the contribution of K(V)3 subunits to I(K) in small mouse DRG neurons. After stromatoxin (ScTx) pretreatment to block the K(V)2-containing component, application of 1 mM TEA caused significant additional block, indicating that the ScTx-insensitive part of I(K) could include K(V)1, K(V)3, and/or M-current channels (KCNQ2/3). Combining ScTx and dendrotoxin confirmed a relevant contribution of K(V)2 and K(V)2/K(V)S, and K(V)1 subunits to I(K) in small mouse DRG neurons. After application of these toxins, a significant TEA-sensitive current (∼19% of total I(K)) remained with biophysical properties that corresponded to those of K(V)3 currents obtained in expression systems. Using RT-PCR, we detected K(V)3.1-3 mRNA in DRG neurons. Furthermore, Western blot and immunocytochemistry using K(V)3.1-specific antibodies confirmed the presence of K(V)3.1 in cultured DRG neurons. These biophysical, pharmacological, and molecular results demonstrate a relevant contribution (∼19%) of K(V)3-containing channels to I(K) in small mouse DRG neurons, supporting a substantial role for K(V)3 subunits in these neurons.

  8. Kv3.3 channels at the Purkinje cell soma are necessary for generation of the classical complex spike waveform.

    PubMed

    Zagha, Edward; Lang, Eric J; Rudy, Bernardo

    2008-02-06

    Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is prominently expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells and is known to be important for cerebellar function, as human and mouse movement disorders result from mutations in Kv3.3. To understand these behavioral deficits, it is necessary to know the role of Kv3.3 channels on the physiological responses of Purkinje cells. We studied the function of Kv3.3 channels in regulating the synaptically evoked Purkinje cell complex spike, the massive postsynaptic response to the activation of climbing fiber afferents, believed to be fundamental to cerebellar physiology. Acute slice recordings revealed that Kv3.3 channels are required for generation of the repetitive spikelets of the complex spike. We found that spikelet expression is regulated by somatic, and not by dendritic, Kv3 activity, which is consistent with dual somatic-dendritic recordings that demonstrate spikelet generation at axosomatic membranes. Simulations of Purkinje cell Na+ currents show that the unique electrical properties of Kv3 and resurgent Na+ channels are coordinated to limit accumulation of Na+ channel inactivation and enable rapid, repetitive firing. We additionally show that Kv3.3 knock-out mice produce altered complex spikes in vitro and in vivo, which is likely a cellular substrate of the cerebellar phenotypes observed in these mice. This characterization presents new tools to study complex spike function, cerebellar signaling, and Kv3.3-dependent human and mouse phenotypes.

  9. Altered expression and localization of hippocampal A-type potassium channel subunits in the pilocarpine-induced model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, M M; Menegola, M; Vacher, H; Rhodes, K J; Trimmer, J S

    2008-10-15

    Altered ion channel expression and/or function may contribute to the development of certain human epilepsies. In rats, systemic administration of pilocarpine induces a model of human temporal lobe epilepsy, wherein a brief period of status epilepticus (SE) triggers development of spontaneous recurrent seizures that appear after a latency of 2-3 weeks. Here we investigate changes in expression of A-type voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, which control neuronal excitability and regulate action potential propagation and neurotransmitter release, in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression of component subunits of somatodendritic (Kv4.2, Kv4.3, KChIPl and KChIP2) and axonal (Kv1.4) A-type Kv channels in hippocampi of pilocarpine-treated rats that entered SE. We found that Kv4.2, Kv4.3 and KChIP2 staining in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus changes from being uniformly distributed across the molecular layer to concentrated in just the outer two-thirds. We also observed a loss of KChIP1 immunoreactive interneurons, and a reduction of Kv4.2 and KChIP2 staining in stratum radiatum of CA1. These changes begin to appear 1 week after pilocarpine treatment and persist or are enhanced at 4 and 12 weeks. As such, these changes in Kv channel distribution parallel the acquisition of recurrent spontaneous seizures as observed in this model. We also found temporal changes in Kv1.4 immunoreactivity matching those in Timm's stain, being expanded in stratum lucidum of CA3 and in the inner third of the dentate molecular layer. Among pilocarpine-treated rats, changes were only observed in those that entered SE. These changes in A-type Kv channel expression may contribute to hyperexcitability of dendrites in the associated hippocampal circuits as observed in previous studies of the effects of pilocarpine-induced SE.

  10. Developmental changes in the expression of calbindin and potassium-channel subunits Kv3.1b and Kv3.2 in mouse Renshaw cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Z-M; Hu, J; Rudy, B; Redman, S J

    2006-05-12

    One class of spinal interneurons, the Renshaw cells, is able to discharge at very high frequencies in adult mammals. Neuronal firing at such high frequencies requires voltage-gated potassium channels to rapidly repolarize the membrane potential after each action potential. We sought to establish the pattern of expression of calbindin and potassium channels with Kv3.1b and Kv3.2 subunits in Renshaw cells at different developmental stages of postnatal mice. The pattern of expression of calbindin changed dramatically during early postnatal development. An adult pattern of calbindin reactive neurons started to emerge from postnatal day 10 to postnatal day 14, with cells in laminae I and II of superficial dorsal horn and the ventral lamina VII. Renshaw cells were identified immunohistochemically by their expression of calbindin and their location in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Western blot results of the lumbar spinal cord showed that Kv3.1b expression became faintly evident from postnatal day 10, reached a maximum at postnatal day 21 and was maintained through postnatal day 49. Double labeling results showed that all Renshaw cells expressed Kv3.1b weakly from postnatal day 14, and strongly at postnatal day 21. Western blot results showed that Kv3.2 expression became detectable in the lumbar cord from postnatal day 12, and increased steadily until reaching an adult level at postnatal day 28. In contrast to the Kv3.1b results, Kv3.2 was not expressed in Renshaw cells, although some neurons located at laminae VIII and VI expressed Kv3.2. We conclude that Renshaw cells express Kv3.1b but not Kv3.2 from postnatal day 14.

  11. A selective blocker of Kv1.2 and Kv1.3 potassium channels from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Papp, Ferenc; Varga, Zoltan; Barraza, Omar; Espino-Solis, Pavel G; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Gaspar, Rezso; Panyi, Gyorgy; Possani, Lourival D

    2008-10-30

    A novel potassium channel blocker peptide was purified from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus by high-performance liquid chromatography and its amino acid sequence was completed by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. It contains 38 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 4000.3Da, tightly folded by three disulfide bridges. This peptide, named Css20, was shown to block preferentially the currents of the voltage-dependent K+-channels Kv1.2 and Kv1.3. It did not affect several other ion channels tested at 10 nM concentration. Concentration-response curves of Css20 yielded an IC50 of 1.3 and 7.2 nM for Kv1.2- and Kv1.3-channels, respectively. Interestingly, despite the similar affinities for the two channels the association and dissociation rates of the toxin were much slower for Kv1.2, implying that different interactions may be involved in binding to the two channel types; an implication further supported by in silico docking analyses. Based on the primary structure of Css20, the systematic nomenclature proposed for this toxin is alpha-KTx 2.13.

  12. Hydrophobic interactions between the voltage sensor and pore mediate inactivation in Kv11.1 channels.

    PubMed

    Perry, Matthew D; Wong, Sophia; Ng, Chai Ann; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2013-09-01

    Kv11.1 channels are critical for the maintenance of a normal heart rhythm. The flow of potassium ions through these channels is controlled by two voltage-regulated gates, termed "activation" and "inactivation," located at opposite ends of the pore. Crucially in Kv11.1 channels, inactivation gating occurs much more rapidly, and over a distinct range of voltages, compared with activation gating. Although it is clear that the fourth transmembrane segments (S4), within each subunit of the tetrameric channel, are important for controlling the opening and closing of the activation gate, their role during inactivation gating is much less clear. Here, we use rate equilibrium free energy relationship (REFER) analysis to probe the contribution of the S4 "voltage-sensor" helix during inactivation of Kv11.1 channels. Contrary to the important role that charged residues play during activation gating, it is the hydrophobic residues (Leu529, Leu530, Leu532, and Val535) that are the key molecular determinants of inactivation gating. Within the context of an interconnected multi-domain model of Kv11.1 inactivation gating, our REFER analysis indicates that the S4 helix and the S4-S5 linker undergo a conformational rearrangement shortly after that of the S5 helix and S5P linker, but before the S6 helix. Combining REFER analysis with double mutant cycle analysis, we provide evidence for a hydrophobic interaction between residues on the S4 and S5 helices. Based on a Kv11.1 channel homology model, we propose that this hydrophobic interaction forms the basis of an intersubunit coupling between the voltage sensor and pore domain that is an important mediator of inactivation gating.

  13. PKC-DEPENDENT REGULATION OF Kv7.5 CHANNELS BY THE BRONCHOCONSTRICTOR HISTAMINE IN HUMAN AIRWAY SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS.

    PubMed

    Haick, Jennifer M; Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Cribbs, Leanne L; Denning, Mitchell F; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Byron, Kenneth L

    2017-03-10

    Kv7 potassium channels have recently been found to be expressed and functionally important for relaxation of airway smooth muscle. Previous research suggests that native Kv7 currents are inhibited following treatment of freshly isolated airway smooth muscle cells with bronchoconstrictor agonists, and in intact airways inhibition of Kv7 channels is sufficient to induce bronchiolar constriction. However, the mechanism by which Kv7 currents are inhibited by bronchoconstrictor agonists has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, native Kv7 currents in cultured human trachealis smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) were observed to be inhibited upon treatment with histamine; inhibition of Kv7 currents was associated with membrane depolarization and an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt). The latter response was inhibited by verapamil, a blocker of L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Protein kinase C (PKC) has been implicated as a mediator of bronchoconstrictor actions, though the targets of PKC are not clearly established. We found that histamine treatment significantly and dose-dependently suppressed currents through overexpressed wild-type human Kv7.5 (hKv7.5) channels in cultured HTSMCs, and this effect was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor Ro-31-8220 (3 µM). The PKC-dependent suppression of hKv7.5 currents corresponded with a PKC-dependent increase in hKv7.5 channel phosphorylation. Knocking down or inhibiting PKCα, or mutating hKv7.5 serine 441 to alanine, abolished the inhibitory effects of histamine on hKv7.5 currents. These findings provide the first evidence linking PKC activation to suppression of Kv7 currents, membrane depolarization, and Ca2+ influx via L-type VSCCs as a mechanism for histamine-induced bronchoconstriction.

  14. Kv3.1-containing K(+) channels are reduced in untreated schizophrenia and normalized with antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, M; Joho, R H; Southcott, S A; Shukla, A A; Ghose, S; Tamminga, C A

    2014-05-01

    Neuronal firing is a fundamental element of cerebral function; and, voltage-gated potassium (K(+)) channels regulate that firing through the repolarization of action potentials. Kv3-type channels (Kv3.1-Kv3.4) represent a family of voltage-gated K(+) channels that have fast-spiking properties. Kv3.1 channel subunits are predominantly localized to cortical parvalbumin (PV)-positive, inhibitory interneurons. The firing properties of these interneurons participate in establishing the normal gamma oscillations and synchrony of cortical neuronal populations, thought to be the signature of higher information processing in human brain. Schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with abnormalities in cortical gamma synchrony and in information processing, particularly with dysfunction in working memory and executive function. Here, we report the distribution of Kv3.1b and Kv3.2 protein in normal human brain, showing that Kv3.1b is limited to neocortical areas, whereas Kv3.2 is abundantly represented in neo- and subcortical regions. In SZ cases, levels of Kv3.1b protein are decreased in the neocortex, but only in cases without antipsychotic drug (APD) treatment; Kv3.1 levels are normal in antipsychotic-treated cases. Kv3.2 is not different in distribution or in level between normal and SZ cases, nor influenced by APD, in any region tested. The apparent increase in Kv3.1b protein levels by APDs in SZ neocortex was confirmed in laboratory rodents treated with chronic APDs. These findings show a decrease in Kv3.1b channel protein in SZ neocortex, a deficit that is restored by APDs. This alteration could be fundamentally involved in the cortical manifestations of SZ and in the therapeutic response to APDs.

  15. Kv1 channels control spike threshold dynamics and spike timing in cortical pyramidal neurones

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Matthew H; Spain, William J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies showed that cortical pyramidal neurones (PNs) have a dynamic spike threshold that functions as a high-pass filter, enhancing spike timing in response to high-frequency input. While it is commonly assumed that Na+ channel inactivation is the primary mechanism of threshold accommodation, the possible role of K+ channel activation in fast threshold changes has not been well characterized. The present study tested the hypothesis that low-voltage activated Kv1 channels affect threshold dynamics in layer 2–3 PNs, using α-dendrotoxin (DTX) or 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) to block these conductances. We found that Kv1 blockade reduced the dynamic changes of spike threshold in response to a variety of stimuli, including stimulus-evoked synaptic input, current steps and ramps of varied duration, and noise. Analysis of the responses to noise showed that Kv1 channels increased the coherence of spike output with high-frequency components of the stimulus. A simple model demonstrates that a dynamic spike threshold can account for this effect. Our results show that the Kv1 conductance is a major mechanism that contributes to the dynamic spike threshold and precise spike timing of cortical PNs. PMID:21911608

  16. KvDB; mining and mapping sequence variants in voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Stead, Lucy F; Wood, Ian C; Westhead, David R

    2010-08-01

    We have created KvDB: a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel-specific database that houses natural and experimental variant data and includes highly curated multiple sequence alignments and additional analytical tools, such as structural variant mapping and transmembrane segment prediction. KvDB is available at www.bioinformatics.leeds.ac.uk/KvDB. Analyzing the characterized gene variants in terms of topological location revealed the following. The S4, S4-S5, S5, S5-S6, and S6 segments are most likely to house disease-causing variants. Neurological disorders are more likely to be caused by variants affecting voltage sensing, whereas cardiac disorders are more likely to be caused by variants in the pore. Long QT Syndrome 2 (LQT2) is more often caused by N-terminus variation, a region containing a domain that affects deactivation, suggesting a potential disease mechanism. Conversely, a higher proportion of LQT1-causing variants reside in S4-S5, suggesting communication of voltage-sensing to the pore as a disease mechanism. By structurally mapping functionally characterized variants, we also provide mechanistic insight into Kv channel function; identifying an intersubunit interaction that may be partly responsible for setting activation voltage. Investigating phenotypically characterized variants that map to the same position as functionally characterized ones indicates only weak association between locations that cause disease and those that alter electrophysiological properties.

  17. A Novel Modulator of Kv3 Potassium Channels Regulates the Firing of Parvalbumin-Positive Cortical Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Rosato-Siri, Marcelo D; Zambello, Erika; Mutinelli, Chiara; Garbati, Nicoletta; Benedetti, Roberto; Aldegheri, Laura; Graziani, Francesca; Virginio, Caterina; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Large, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 high voltage-activated potassium channels, which display fast activation and deactivation kinetics, are known to make a crucial contribution to the fast-spiking phenotype of certain neurons. Pharmacological experiments show that the blockade of native Kv3 currents with low concentrations of tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine impairs the expression of this firing phenotype. In particular, Kv3 channels are highly expressed by fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive interneurons in corticolimbic brain circuits, which modulate the synchronization of cortical circuits and the generation of brain rhythms. Here, we describe a novel small molecule, (5R)-5-ethyl-3-(6-{[4-methyl-3-(methyloxy)phenyl]oxy}-3-pyridinyl)-2,4-imidazolidinedione (AUT1), which modulates Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels in human recombinant and rodent native neurons. AUT1 increased whole currents mediated by human Kv3.1b and Kv3.2a channels, with a concomitant leftward shift in the voltage dependence of activation. A less potent effect was observed on hKv3.3 currents. In mouse somatosensory cortex slices in vitro, AUT1 rescued the fast-spiking phenotype of parvalbumin-positive-fast-spiking interneurons following an impairment of their firing capacity by blocking a proportion of Kv3 channels with a low concentration of tetraethylammonium. Notably, AUT1 had no effect on interneuron firing when applied alone. Together, these data confirm the role played by Kv3 channels in the regulation of the firing phenotype of somatosensory interneurons and suggest that AUT1 and other Kv3 modulators could represent a new and promising therapeutic approach to the treatment of disorders associated with dysfunction of inhibitory feedback in corticolimbic circuits, such as schizophrenia.

  18. Effect of dextromethorphan on human K(v)1.3 channel activity: involvement of C-type inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Choi, Sun-Hye; Shin, Tae-Joon; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2011-01-25

    Dextromethorphan exhibits neuroprotective effects against inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration. However, relatively little is known regarding the molecular mechanism for this inflammation-mediated neuroprotection. Human K(v)1.3 channels, one of the voltage-gated potassium channels, are widely expressed in the immune and nervous systems. Activation of human K(v)1.3 channels causes neuroglia-mediated neurodegeneration. Agents that inhibit human K(v)1.3 channel activity have been developed as novel drugs for immunosuppression. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dextromethorphan on human K(v)1.3 or K(v)1.2 channel activity heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The channel currents were measured with the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Activation of both channels induced outward peak and steady-state currents. Dextromethorphan treatment induced a slight inhibition of peak currents in human K(v)1.2 and K(v)1.3 channels, whereas dextromethorphan profoundly inhibited the steady-state currents of human K(v)1.3 channels compared to K(v)1.2 channel currents. Dextromethorphan's action on steady-state currents of human K(v)1.3 channels was in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) on steady-state currents of human K(v)1.3 channels was 12.8±1.6μM. Dextromethorphan also accelerated the C-type inactivation rate, increased the current decay rate, and inhibited currents in a use-dependent manner. These results indicate that dextromethorphan accelerates C-type inactivation of human K(v)1.3 channels and acts as an open-channel blocker. These results further suggest the possibility that dextromethorphan-mediated acceleration of C-type inactivation of human K(v)1.3 channels might be one of the cellular bases of dextromethorphan-mediated protection against inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Syntaxin 1A binds to the cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv2.1 to regulate channel gating and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yuk M; Kang, Youhou; Gao, Xiaodong; Xia, Fuzhen; Xie, Huanli; Sheu, Laura; Tsuk, Sharon; Lotan, Ilana; Tsushima, Robert G; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2003-05-09

    Voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) 2.1 is the dominant Kv channel that controls membrane repolarization in rat islet beta-cells and downstream insulin exocytosis. We recently showed that exocytotic SNARE protein SNAP-25 directly binds and modulates rat islet beta-cell Kv 2.1 channel protein at the cytoplasmic N terminus. We now show that SNARE protein syntaxin 1A (Syn-1A) binds and modulates rat islet beta-cell Kv2.1 at its cytoplasmic C terminus (Kv2.1C). In HEK293 cells overexpressing Kv2.1, we observed identical effects of channel inhibition by dialyzed GST-Syn-1A, which could be blocked by Kv2.1C domain proteins (C1: amino acids 412-633, C2: amino acids 634-853), but not the Kv2.1 cytoplasmic N terminus (amino acids 1-182). This was confirmed by direct binding of GST-Syn-1A to the Kv2.1C1 and C2 domains proteins. These findings are in contrast to our recent report showing that Syn-1A binds and modulates the cytoplasmic N terminus of neuronal Kv1.1 and not by its C terminus. Co-expression of Syn-1A in Kv2.1-expressing HEK293 cells inhibited Kv2.1 surfacing, which caused a reduction of Kv2.1 current density. In addition, Syn-1A caused a slowing of Kv2.1 current activation and reduction in the slope factor of steady-state inactivation, but had no affect on inactivation kinetics or voltage dependence of activation. Taken together, SNAP-25 and Syn-1A mediate secretion not only through its participation in the exocytotic SNARE complex, but also by regulating membrane potential and calcium entry through their interaction with Kv and Ca(2+) channels. In contrast to Ca(2+) channels, where these SNARE proteins act on a common synprint site, the SNARE proteins act not only on distinct sites within a Kv channel, but also on distinct sites between different Kv channel families.

  20. Roscovitine differentially affects CaV2 and Kv channels by binding to the open state.

    PubMed

    Buraei, Zafir; Schofield, Geoffrey; Elmslie, Keith S

    2007-03-01

    Roscovitine potently inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and can independently slow the closing of neuronal (CaV2.2) calcium channels. We were interested if this drug could affect other ion channels similarly. Using whole cell recordings, we found that roscovitine specifically slows deactivation of all CaV2 channels (N, P/Q and R) by binding to the open state. This effect had a rapid onset and EC(50)=54, 120 and 54microM for N-, P/Q-, and R-type channels, respectively. Deactivation of other channel types was not slowed, including L-type calcium channels (CaV1.2, CaV1.3), potassium channels (native, Kv4.2, Kv2.1 and Kv1.3), and native sodium channels. However, most of the channels tested were inhibited by roscovitine. The inhibition was characterized by slow development and a lower affinity (EC(50)=100-300microM). Surprisingly, potassium channels were rapidly inhibited with an EC(50)=23microM, which is similar to the EC(50) for roscovitine block of cell division [Meijer, L., Borgne, A., Mulner, O., Chong, J., Blow, J., Inagaki, N., Inagaki, M., Delcros, J., Moulinoux, J., 1997. Biochemical and cellular effects of roscovitine, a potent and selective inhibitor of the cyclin-dependent kinases cdc2, cdk2 and cdk5. Eur. J. Biochem. 243, 527-536]. Potassium current inhibition seemed to result from open channel block. The high potency of these two rapid onset effects makes them complicating factors for ongoing clinical trials and research using roscovitine. Thus, the physiology and pharmacology of slow CaV2 deactivation and potassium channel block must be explored.

  1. Critical contribution of KV1 channels to the regulation of coronary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Noblet, Jillian N; Sassoon, Daniel; Fu, Lijuan; Kassab, Ghassan S; Schepers, Luke; Herring, B Paul; Rottgen, Trey S; Tune, Johnathan D; Dick, Gregory M

    2016-09-01

    Ion channels in smooth muscle control coronary vascular tone, but the identity of the potassium channels involved requires further investigation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional role of KV1 channels on porcine coronary blood flow using the selective antagonist correolide. KV1 channel gene transcripts were found in porcine coronary arteries, with KCNA5 (encoding KV1.5) being most abundant (P < 0.001). Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated KV1.5 protein in the vascular smooth muscle layer of both porcine and human coronary arteries, including microvessels. Whole-cell patch-clamp experiments demonstrated significant correolide-sensitive (1-10 µM) current in coronary smooth muscle. In vivo studies included direct intracoronary infusion of vehicle or correolide into a pressure-clamped left anterior descending artery of healthy swine (n = 5 in each group) with simultaneous measurement of coronary blood flow. Intracoronary correolide (~0.3-3 µM targeted plasma concentration) had no effect on heart rate or systemic pressure, but reduced coronary blood flow in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Dobutamine (0.3-10 µg/kg/min) elicited coronary metabolic vasodilation and intracoronary correolide (3 µM) significantly reduced coronary blood flow at any given level of myocardial oxygen consumption (P < 0.001). Coronary artery occlusions (15 s) elicited reactive hyperemia and correolide (3 µM) reduced the flow volume repayment by approximately 30 % (P < 0.05). Taken together, these data support a major role for KV1 channels in modulating baseline coronary vascular tone and, perhaps, vasodilation in response to increased metabolism and transient ischemia.

  2. Biophysical characterization of KV3.1 potassium channel activating compounds.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Bahar; von Schoubye, Nadia Lybøl; Sheykhzade, Majid; Bastlund, Jesper Frank; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-07-05

    The effect of two positive modulators, RE1 and EX15, on the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv3.1 was investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on HEK293 cells expressing Kv3.1a. RE1 and EX15 increased the Kv3.1 currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 4.5 and 1.3µM, respectively. However, high compound concentrations caused an inhibition of the Kv3.1 current. The compound-induced activation of Kv3.1 channels showed a profound hyperpolarized shift in activation kinetics. 30µM RE1 shifted V1/2 from 5.63±0.31mV to -9.71±1.00mV and 10µM EX15 induced a shift from 10.77±0.32mV to -15.11±1.57mV. The activation time constant (Tauact) was reduced for both RE1 and EX15, with RE1 being the fastest activator. The deactivation time constant (Taudeact) was also markedly reduced for both RE1 and EX15, with EX15 inducing the most prominent effect. Furthermore, subjected to depolarizing pulses at 30Hz, both compounds were showing a use-dependent effect resulting in a reduction of the compound-mediated effect. However, during these conditions, RE1- and EX15-modified current amplitudes still exceeded the control condition amplitudes by up to 200%. In summary, the present study introduces the first detailed biophysical characterization of two new Kv3.1 channel modifying compounds with different modulating properties.

  3. Developmental expression of potassium-channel subunit Kv3.2 within subpopulations of mouse hippocampal inhibitory interneurons.

    PubMed

    Tansey, Emily Phillips; Chow, Alan; Rudy, Bernardo; McBain, Chris J

    2002-01-01

    The developmental expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel subunit, Kv3.2, and its localization within specific mouse hippocampal inhibitory interneuron populations were determined using immunoblotting and immunohistochemical techniques. Using immunoblotting techniques, the Kv3.2 protein was weakly detected at postnatal age day 7 (P7), and full expression was attained at P21 in tissue extracts from homogenized hippocampal preparations. A similar developmental profile was observed using immunohistochemical techniques in hippocampal tissue sections. Kv3.2 protein expression was clustered on the somata and proximal dendrites of presumed inhibitory interneurons. Using double immunofluorescence, Kv3.2 subunit expression was detected on subpopulations of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. Kv3.2 was detected in approximately 100% of parvalbumin-positive interneurons, 86% of interneurons expressing nitric oxide synthase, and approximately 50% of somatostatin-immunoreactive cells. Kv3.2 expression was absent from both calbindin- and calretinin-containing interneurons. Using immunoprecipitation, we further demonstrate that Kv3.2 and its related subunit Kv3.1b are coexpressed within the same protein complexes in the hippocampus. These data demonstrate that potassium channel subunit Kv3.2 expression is developmentally regulated in a specific set of interneurons. The vast majority of these interneuron subpopulations possess a "fast-spiking" phenotype, consistent with a role for currents through Kv3.2 containing channels in determining action potential kinetics in these cells.

  4. KV7 channels contribute to paracrine, but not metabolic or ischemic, regulation of coronary vascular reactivity in swine

    PubMed Central

    Goodwill, Adam G.; Fu, Lijuan; Noblet, Jillian N.; Casalini, Eli D.; Berwick, Zachary C.; Kassab, Ghassan S.; Tune, Johnathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and voltage-dependent K+ (KV) channels play key roles in regulating coronary blood flow in response to metabolic, ischemic, and paracrine stimuli. The KV channels responsible have not been identified, but KV7 channels are possible candidates. Existing data regarding KV7 channel function in the coronary circulation (limited to ex vivo assessments) are mixed. Thus we examined the hypothesis that KV7 channels are present in cells of the coronary vascular wall and regulate vasodilation in swine. We performed a variety of molecular, biochemical, and functional (in vivo and ex vivo) studies. Coronary arteries expressed KCNQ genes (quantitative PCR) and KV7.4 protein (Western blot). Immunostaining demonstrated KV7.4 expression in conduit and resistance vessels, perhaps most prominently in the endothelial and adventitial layers. Flupirtine, a KV7 opener, relaxed coronary artery rings, and this was attenuated by linopirdine, a KV7 blocker. Endothelial denudation inhibited the flupirtine-induced and linopirdine-sensitive relaxation of coronary artery rings. Moreover, linopirdine diminished bradykinin-induced endothelial-dependent relaxation of coronary artery rings. There was no effect of intracoronary flupirtine or linopirdine on coronary blood flow at the resting heart rate in vivo. Linopirdine had no effect on coronary vasodilation in vivo elicited by ischemia, H2O2, or tachycardia. However, bradykinin increased coronary blood flow in vivo, and this was attenuated by linopirdine. These data indicate that KV7 channels are expressed in some coronary cell type(s) and influence endothelial function. Other physiological functions of coronary vascular KV7 channels remain unclear, but they do appear to contribute to endothelium-dependent responses to paracrine stimuli. PMID:26825518

  5. KV7 channels contribute to paracrine, but not metabolic or ischemic, regulation of coronary vascular reactivity in swine.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Fu, Lijuan; Noblet, Jillian N; Casalini, Eli D; Sassoon, Daniel; Berwick, Zachary C; Kassab, Ghassan S; Tune, Johnathan D; Dick, Gregory M

    2016-03-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and voltage-dependent K(+) (KV) channels play key roles in regulating coronary blood flow in response to metabolic, ischemic, and paracrine stimuli. The KV channels responsible have not been identified, but KV7 channels are possible candidates. Existing data regarding KV7 channel function in the coronary circulation (limited to ex vivo assessments) are mixed. Thus we examined the hypothesis that KV7 channels are present in cells of the coronary vascular wall and regulate vasodilation in swine. We performed a variety of molecular, biochemical, and functional (in vivo and ex vivo) studies. Coronary arteries expressed KCNQ genes (quantitative PCR) and KV7.4 protein (Western blot). Immunostaining demonstrated KV7.4 expression in conduit and resistance vessels, perhaps most prominently in the endothelial and adventitial layers. Flupirtine, a KV7 opener, relaxed coronary artery rings, and this was attenuated by linopirdine, a KV7 blocker. Endothelial denudation inhibited the flupirtine-induced and linopirdine-sensitive relaxation of coronary artery rings. Moreover, linopirdine diminished bradykinin-induced endothelial-dependent relaxation of coronary artery rings. There was no effect of intracoronary flupirtine or linopirdine on coronary blood flow at the resting heart rate in vivo. Linopirdine had no effect on coronary vasodilation in vivo elicited by ischemia, H2O2, or tachycardia. However, bradykinin increased coronary blood flow in vivo, and this was attenuated by linopirdine. These data indicate that KV7 channels are expressed in some coronary cell type(s) and influence endothelial function. Other physiological functions of coronary vascular KV7 channels remain unclear, but they do appear to contribute to endothelium-dependent responses to paracrine stimuli.

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of a Kv1.1-like potassium channel from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, W B; Watanabe, I; Sutachan, J J; Wu, M B; Wu, X; Zhu, J; Recio-Pinto, E

    2003-11-01

    Electrocytes from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus exhibited sodium action potentials that have been proposed to be repolarized by leak currents and not by outward voltage-gated potassium currents. However, patch-clamp recordings have suggested that electrocytes may contain a very low density of voltage-gated K(+) channels. We report here the cloning of a K(+) channel from an eel electric organ cDNA library, which, when expressed in mammalian tissue culture cells, displayed delayed-rectifier K(+) channel characteristics. The amino-acid sequence of the eel K(+) channel had the highest identity to Kv1.1 potassium channels. However, different important functional regions of eel Kv1.1 had higher amino-acid identity to other Kv1 members, for example, the eel Kv1.1 S4-S5 region was identical to Kv1.5 and Kv1.6. Northern blot analysis indicated that eel Kv1.1 mRNA was expressed at appreciable levels in the electric organ but it was not detected in eel brain, muscle, or cardiac tissue. Because electrocytes do not express robust outward voltage-gated potassium currents we speculate that eel Kv1.1 channels are chronically inhibited in the electric organ and may be functionally recruited by an unknown mechanism.

  7. Characterization of a new Kv1.3 channel-specific blocker, J123, from the scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch.

    PubMed

    Shijin, Yin; Hong, Yi; Yibao, Ma; Zongyun, Chen; Han, Song; Yingliang, Wu; Zhijian, Cao; Wenxin, Li

    2008-09-01

    The potassium channel Kv1.3 is an attractive pharmacological target for T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, and specific and selective peptidic blockers of Kv1.3 channels have served as valuable therapeutic leads for treating these diseases. Here, we found a new peptide toxin, J123, with 43 amino acids including six cysteine residues by screening the venomous cDNA library of scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch, which has been used as traditional medicine in China for more than 2000 years. The sequence analysis suggested that peptide J123 constituted a new member of the alpha-KTx toxins. The electrophysiological experiments further indicated that peptide J123 has a novel pharmacological profiles: it blocked Kv1.3 channel with high potency (IC50=0.79 nM), and exhibited good selectivity on Kv1.3 over Kv1.1 (>1000-fold) and Kv1.2 (about 30-fold), respectively. Furthermore, peptide J123 had no activity on SKCa2 and SKCa3 channels at micromolar concentration level. Based on the pharmacological activities, the possible channel-interacting surface of peptide J123 was also predicted by molecular modeling and docking. All these data not only enrich the knowledge of the structure-function relationship of the new Kv1.3-speicific peptide but also present a potential drug candidate for selectively targeting Kv1.3 channels.

  8. Heteromeric Kv7.2/7.3 channels differentially regulate action potential initiation and conduction in neocortical myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Battefeld, Arne; Tran, Baouyen T; Gavrilis, Jason; Cooper, Edward C; Kole, Maarten H P

    2014-03-05

    Rapid energy-efficient signaling along vertebrate axons is achieved through intricate subcellular arrangements of voltage-gated ion channels and myelination. One recently appreciated example is the tight colocalization of K(v)7 potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) channels in the axonal initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. The local biophysical properties of these K(v)7 channels and the functional impact of colocalization with Na(v) channels remain poorly understood. Here, we quantitatively examined K(v)7 channels in myelinated axons of rat neocortical pyramidal neurons using high-resolution confocal imaging and patch-clamp recording. K(v)7.2 and 7.3 immunoreactivity steeply increased within the distal two-thirds of the axon initial segment and was mirrored by the conductance density estimates, which increased from ~12 (proximal) to 150 pS μm(-2) (distal). The axonal initial segment and nodal M-currents were similar in voltage dependence and kinetics, carried by K(v)7.2/7.3 heterotetramers, 4% activated at the resting membrane potential and rapidly activated with single-exponential time constants (~15 ms at 28 mV). Experiments and computational modeling showed that while somatodendritic K(v)7 channels are strongly activated by the backpropagating action potential to attenuate the afterdepolarization and repetitive firing, axonal K(v)7 channels are minimally recruited by the forward-propagating action potential. Instead, in nodal domains K(v)7.2/7.3 channels were found to increase Na(v) channel availability and action potential amplitude by stabilizing the resting membrane potential. Thus, K(v)7 clustering near axonal Na(v) channels serves specific and context-dependent roles, both restraining initiation and enhancing conduction of the action potential.

  9. Heteromeric Kv7.2/7.3 Channels Differentially Regulate Action Potential Initiation and Conduction in Neocortical Myelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Battefeld, Arne; Tran, Baouyen T.; Gavrilis, Jason; Cooper, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid energy-efficient signaling along vertebrate axons is achieved through intricate subcellular arrangements of voltage-gated ion channels and myelination. One recently appreciated example is the tight colocalization of Kv7 potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels in the axonal initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. The local biophysical properties of these Kv7 channels and the functional impact of colocalization with Nav channels remain poorly understood. Here, we quantitatively examined Kv7 channels in myelinated axons of rat neocortical pyramidal neurons using high-resolution confocal imaging and patch-clamp recording. Kv7.2 and 7.3 immunoreactivity steeply increased within the distal two-thirds of the axon initial segment and was mirrored by the conductance density estimates, which increased from ∼12 (proximal) to 150 pS μm−2 (distal). The axonal initial segment and nodal M-currents were similar in voltage dependence and kinetics, carried by Kv7.2/7.3 heterotetramers, 4% activated at the resting membrane potential and rapidly activated with single-exponential time constants (∼15 ms at 28 mV). Experiments and computational modeling showed that while somatodendritic Kv7 channels are strongly activated by the backpropagating action potential to attenuate the afterdepolarization and repetitive firing, axonal Kv7 channels are minimally recruited by the forward-propagating action potential. Instead, in nodal domains Kv7.2/7.3 channels were found to increase Nav channel availability and action potential amplitude by stabilizing the resting membrane potential. Thus, Kv7 clustering near axonal Nav channels serves specific and context-dependent roles, both restraining initiation and enhancing conduction of the action potential. PMID:24599470

  10. Voltage-Gated K+ Channel, Kv3.3 Is Involved in Hemin-Induced K562 Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Song, Min Seok; Choi, Seon Young; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels are well known to be involved in cell proliferation. However, even though cell proliferation is closely related to cell differentiation, the relationship between Kv channels and cell differentiation remains poorly investigated. This study demonstrates that Kv3.3 is involved in K562 cell erythroid differentiation. Down-regulation of Kv3.3 using siRNA-Kv3.3 increased hemin-induced K562 erythroid differentiation through decreased activation of signal molecules such as p38, cAMP response element-binding protein, and c-fos. Down-regulation of Kv3.3 also enhanced cell adhesion by increasing integrin β3 and this effect was amplified when the cells were cultured with fibronectin. The Kv channels, or at least Kv3.3, appear to be associated with cell differentiation; therefore, understanding the mechanisms of Kv channel regulation of cell differentiation would provide important information regarding vital cellular processes.

  11. Potassium Channel Kv1.3 Is Highly Expressed by Microglia in Human Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rangaraju, Srikant; Gearing, Marla; Jin, Lee-Way; Levey, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Recent genetic studies suggest a central role for innate immunity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis, wherein microglia orchestrate neuroinflammation. Kv1.3, a voltage-gated potassium channel of therapeutic relevance in autoimmunity, is upregulated by activated microglia and mediates amyloid-mediated microglial priming and reactive oxygen species production in vitro. We hypothesized that Kv1.3 channel expression is increased in human AD brain tissue. In a blinded postmortem immunohistochemical semi-quantitative analysis performed on ten AD patients and ten non-disease controls, we observed a significantly higher Kv1.3 staining intensity (p = 0.03) and Kv1.3-positive cell density (p = 0.03) in the frontal cortex of AD brains, compared to controls. This paralleled an increased number of Iba1-positive microglia in AD brains. Kv1.3-positive cells had microglial morphology and were associated with amyloid-β plaques. In immunofluorescence studies, Kv1.3 channels co-localized primarily with Iba1 but not with astrocyte marker GFAP, confirming that elevated Kv1.3 expression is limited to microglia. Higher Kv1.3 expression in AD brains was also confirmed by western blot analysis. Our findings support that Kv1.3 channels are biologically relevant and microglia-specific targets in human AD. PMID:25362031

  12. Alternative splicing modulates Kv channel clustering through a molecular ball and chain mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandany, Nitzan; Marciano, Shir; Magidovich, Elhanan; Frimerman, Teddy; Yehezkel, Rinat; Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Lewin, Limor; Abdu, Uri; Orr, Irit; Yifrach, Ofer

    2015-03-01

    Ion channel clustering at the post-synaptic density serves a fundamental role in action potential generation and transmission. Here, we show that interaction between the Shaker Kv channel and the PSD-95 scaffold protein underlying channel clustering is modulated by the length of the intrinsically disordered C terminal channel tail. We further show that this tail functions as an entropic clock that times PSD-95 binding. We thus propose a ‘ball and chain’ mechanism to explain Kv channel binding to scaffold proteins, analogous to the mechanism describing channel fast inactivation. The physiological relevance of this mechanism is demonstrated in that alternative splicing of the Shaker channel gene to produce variants of distinct tail lengths resulted in differential channel cell surface expression levels and clustering metrics that correlate with differences in affinity of the variants for PSD-95. We suggest that modulating channel clustering by specific spatial-temporal spliced variant targeting serves a fundamental role in nervous system development and tuning.

  13. KV7 Channels Regulate Firing during Synaptic Integration in GABAergic Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ramírez, M. Belén; Laville, Antonio; Tapia, Dagoberto; Lara-González, Esther; Bargas, José; Galarraga, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Striatal projection neurons (SPNs) process motor and cognitive information. Their activity is affected by Parkinson's disease, in which dopamine concentration is decreased and acetylcholine concentration is increased. Acetylcholine activates muscarinic receptors in SPNs. Its main source is the cholinergic interneuron that responds with a briefer latency than SPNs during a cortical command. Therefore, an important question is whether muscarinic G-protein coupled receptors and their signaling cascades are fast enough to intervene during synaptic responses to regulate synaptic integration and firing. One of the most known voltage dependent channels regulated by muscarinic receptors is the KV7/KCNQ channel. It is not known whether these channels regulate the integration of suprathreshold corticostriatal responses. Here, we study the impact of cholinergic muscarinic modulation on the synaptic response of SPNs by regulating KV7 channels. We found that KV7 channels regulate corticostriatal synaptic integration and that this modulation occurs in the dendritic/spines compartment. In contrast, it is negligible in the somatic compartment. This modulation occurs on sub- and suprathreshold responses and lasts during the whole duration of the responses, hundreds of milliseconds, greatly altering SPNs firing properties. This modulation affected the behavior of the striatal microcircuit. PMID:26113994

  14. Zn2+-dependent redox switch in the intracellular T1-T1 interface of a Kv channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2007-05-04

    The thiol-based redox regulation of proteins plays a central role in cellular signaling. Here, we investigated the redox regulation at the Zn(2+) binding site (HX(5)CX(20)CC) in the intracellular T1-T1 inter-subunit interface of a Kv4 channel. This site undergoes conformational changes coupled to voltage-dependent gating, which may be sensitive to oxidative stress. The main results show that internally applied nitric oxide (NO) inhibits channel activity profoundly. This inhibition is reversed by reduced glutathione and suppressed by intracellular Zn(2+), and at least two Zn(2+) site cysteines are required to observe the NO-induced inhibition (Cys-110 from one subunit and Cys-132 from the neighboring subunit). Biochemical evidence suggests strongly that NO induces a disulfide bridge between Cys-110 and Cys-132 in intact cells. Finally, further mutational studies suggest that intra-subunit Zn(2+) coordination involving His-104, Cys-131, and Cys-132 protects against the formation of the inhibitory disulfide bond. We propose that the interfacial T1 Zn(2+) site of Kv4 channels acts as a Zn(2+)-dependent redox switch that may regulate the activity of neuronal and cardiac A-type K(+) currents under physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Localization and mobility of the delayed-rectifer K+ channel Kv2.1 in adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Kristen M S; Whitesell, Jennifer D; Tamkun, Michael M

    2008-01-01

    The delayed-rectifier voltage-gated K(+) channel (Kv) 2.1 underlies the cardiac slow K(+) current in the rodent heart and is particularly interesting in that both its function and localization are regulated by many stimuli in neuronal systems. However, standard immunolocalization approaches do not detect cardiac Kv2.1; therefore, little is known regarding its localization in the heart. In the present study, we used recombinant adenovirus to determine the subcellular localization and lateral mobility of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Kv2.1 and yellow fluorescent protein-Kv1.4 in atrial and ventricular myocytes. In atrial myocytes, Kv2.1 formed large clusters on the cell surface similar to those observed in hippocampal neurons, whereas Kv1.4 was evenly distributed over both the peripheral sarcolemma and the transverse tubules. However, fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP) experiments indicate that atrial Kv2.1 was immobile, whereas Kv1.4 was mobile (tau = 252 +/- 42 s). In ventricular myocytes, Kv2.1 did not form clusters and was localized primarily in the transverse-axial tubules and sarcolemma. In contrast, Kv1.4 was found only in transverse tubules and sarcolemma. FRAP studies revealed that Kv2.1 has a higher mobility in ventricular myocytes (tau = 479 +/- 178 s), although its mobility is slower than Kv1.4 (tau(1) = 18.9 +/- 2.3 s; tau(2) = 305 +/- 55 s). We also observed the movement of small, intracellular transport vesicles containing GFP-Kv2.1 within ventricular myocytes. These data are the first evidence of Kv2.1 localization in living myocytes and indicate that Kv2.1 may have distinct physiological roles in atrial and ventricular myocytes.

  16. Activation and inactivation of homomeric KvLQT1 potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, M; Magrassi, R; Wollnik, B; Conti, F

    1998-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel protein KvLQT1 (Wang et al., 1996. Nature Genet. 12:17-23) is believed to underlie the delayed rectifier potassium current of cardiac muscle together with the small membrane protein minK (also named IsK) as an essential auxiliary subunit (Barhanin et al., 1996. Nature. 384:78-80; Sanguinetti et al., 1996. Nature. 384:80-83) Using the Xenopus oocyte expression system, we analyzed in detail the gating characteristics of homomeric KvLQT1 channels and of heteromeric KvLQT1/minK channels using two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings. Activation of homomeric KvLQT1 at positive voltages is accompanied by an inactivation process that is revealed by a transient increase in conductance after membrane repolarization to negative values. We studied the recovery from inactivation and the deactivation of the channels during tail repolarizations at -120 mV after conditioning pulses of variable amplitude and duration. Most measurements were made in high extracellular potassium to increase the size of inward tail currents. However, experiments in normal low-potassium solutions showed that, in contrast to classical C-type inactivation, the inactivation of KvLQT1 is independent of extracellular potassium. At +40 mV inactivation develops with a delay of 100 ms. At the same potential, the activation estimated from the amplitude of the late exponential decay of the tail currents follows a less sigmoidal time course, with a late time constant of 300 ms. Inactivation of KvLQT1 is not complete, even at the most positive voltages. The delayed, voltage-dependent onset and the incompleteness of inactivation suggest a sequential gating scheme containing at least two open states and ending with an inactivating step that is voltage independent. In coexpression experiments of KvLQT1 with minK, inactivation seems to be largely absent, although biphasic tails are also observed that could be related to similar phenomena. PMID:9675180

  17. Identification of a key residue in Kv7.1 potassium channel essential for sensing external potassium ions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenying; Flores, Maria Cristina Perez; Sihn, Choong-Ryoul; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Zhang, Yinuo; Doyle, Karen J.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-01-01

    Kv7.1 voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels are present in the apical membranes of marginal cells of the stria vascularis of the inner ear, where they mediate K+ efflux into the scala media (cochlear duct) of the cochlea. As such, they are exposed to the K+-rich (∼150 mM of external K+ (K+e)) environment of the endolymph. Previous studies have shown that Kv7.1 currents are substantially suppressed by high K+e (independent of the effects of altering the electrochemical gradient). However, the molecular basis for this inhibition, which is believed to involve stabilization of an inactivated state, remains unclear. Using sequence alignment of S5-pore linkers of several Kv channels, we identified a key residue, E290, found in only a few Kv channels including Kv7.1. We used substituted cysteine accessibility methods and patch-clamp analysis to provide evidence that the ability of Kv7.1 to sense K+e depends on E290, and that the charge at this position is essential for Kv7.1’s K+e sensitivity. We propose that Kv7.1 may use this feedback mechanism to maintain the magnitude of the endocochlear potential, which boosts the driving force to generate the receptor potential of hair cells. The implications of our findings transcend the auditory system; mutations at this position also result in long QT syndrome in the heart. PMID:25712016

  18. Differential regulation of action potential firing in adult murine thalamocortical neurons by Kv3.2, Kv1, and SK potassium and N-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, Michael R; Rudy, Bernardo; Anderson, Matthew P

    2007-01-01

    Sensory signals of widely differing dynamic range and intensity are transformed into a common firing rate code by thalamocortical neurons. While a great deal is known about the ionic currents, far less is known about the specific channel subtypes regulating thalamic firing rates. We hypothesized that different K+ and Ca2+ channel subtypes control different stimulus–response curve properties. To define the channels, we measured firing rate while pharmacologically or genetically modulating specific channel subtypes. Inhibiting Kv3.2 K+ channels strongly suppressed maximum firing rate by impairing membrane potential repolarization, while playing no role in the firing response to threshold stimuli. By contrast, inhibiting Kv1 channels with α-dendrotoxin or maurotoxin strongly increased firing rates to threshold stimuli by reducing the membrane potential where action potentials fire (Vth). Inhibiting SK Ca2+-activated K+ channels with apamin robustly increased gain (slope of the stimulus–response curve) and maximum firing rate, with minimum effects on threshold responses. Inhibiting N-type Ca2+ channels with ω-conotoxin GVIA or ω-conotoxin MVIIC partially mimicked apamin, while inhibiting L-type and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels had small or no effects. EPSC-like current injections closely mimicked the results from tonic currents. Our results show that Kv3.2, Kv1, SK potassium and N-type calcium channels strongly regulate thalamic relay neuron sensory transmission and that each channel subtype controls a different stimulus–response curve property. Differential regulation of threshold, gain and maximum firing rate may help vary the stimulus–response properties across and within thalamic nuclei, normalize responses to diverse sensory inputs, and underlie sensory perception disorders. PMID:17761775

  19. Increasing the molecular contacts between maurotoxin and Kv1.2 channel augments ligand affinity.

    PubMed

    M'Barek, Sarrah; Chagot, Benjamin; Andreotti, Nicolas; Visan, Violeta; Mansuelle, Pascal; Grissmer, Stephan; Marrakchi, Mohamed; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Sampieri, François; Darbon, Hervé; Fajloun, Ziad; De Waard, Michel; Sabatier, Jean-Marc

    2005-08-15

    Scorpion toxins interact with their target ion channels through multiple molecular contacts. Because a "gain of function" approach has never been described to evaluate the importance of the molecular contacts in defining toxin affinity, we experimentally examined whether increasing the molecular contacts between a toxin and an ion channel directly impacts toxin affinity. For this purpose, we focused on two scorpion peptides, the well-characterized maurotoxin with its variant Pi1-like disulfide bridging (MTX(Pi1)), used as a molecular template, and butantoxin (BuTX), used as an N-terminal domain provider. BuTX is found to be 60-fold less potent than MTX(Pi1) in blocking Kv1.2 (IC(50) values of 165 nM for BuTX versus 2.8 nM for MTX(Pi1)). Removal of its N-terminal domain (nine residues) further decreases BuTX affinity for Kv1.2 by 5.6-fold, which is in agreement with docking simulation data showing the importance of this domain in BuTX-Kv1.2 interaction. Transfer of the BuTX N-terminal domain to MTX(Pi1) results in a chimera with five disulfide bridges (BuTX-MTX(Pi1)) that exhibits 22-fold greater affinity for Kv1.2 than MTX(Pi1) itself, in spite of the lower affinity of BuTX as compared to MTX(Pi1). Docking experiments performed with the 3-D structure of BuTX-MTX(Pi1) in solution, as solved by (1)H-NMR, reveal that the N-terminal domain of BuTX participates in the increased affinity for Kv1.2 through additional molecular contacts. Altogether, the data indicate that acting on molecular contacts between a toxin and a channel is an efficient strategy to modulate toxin affinity.

  20. How does KCNE1 regulate the Kv7.1 potassium channel? Model-structure, mutations, and dynamics of the Kv7.1-KCNE1 complex.

    PubMed

    Gofman, Yana; Shats, Simona; Attali, Bernard; Haliloglu, Turkan; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2012-08-08

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.1 and its auxiliary subunit KCNE1 are expressed in the heart and give rise to the major repolarization current. The interaction of Kv7.1 with the single transmembrane helix of KCNE1 considerably slows channel activation and deactivation, raises single-channel conductance, and prevents slow voltage-dependent inactivation. We built a Kv7.1-KCNE1 model-structure. The model-structure agrees with previous disulfide mapping studies and enables us to derive molecular interpretations of electrophysiological recordings that we obtained for two KCNE1 mutations. An elastic network analysis of Kv7.1 fluctuations in the presence and absence of KCNE1 suggests a mechanistic perspective on the known effects of KCNE1 on Kv7.1 function: slow deactivation is attributed to the low mobility of the voltage-sensor domains upon KCNE1 binding, abolishment of voltage-dependent inactivation could result from decreased fluctuations in the external vestibule, and amalgamation of the fluctuations in the pore region is associated with enhanced ion conductivity.

  1. A functional Kv1.2-hERG chimaeric channel expressed in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Mandeep S.; Cockcroft, Christopher J.; Munsey, Tim; Smith, Kathrine J.; Powell, Andrew J.; Carter, Paul; Wrighton, David C.; Rong, Hong-lin; Yusaf, Shahnaz P.; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2014-01-01

    Members of the six-transmembrane segment family of ion channels share a common structural design. However, there are sequence differences between the members that confer distinct biophysical properties on individual channels. Currently, we do not have 3D structures for all members of the family to help explain the molecular basis for the differences in their biophysical properties and pharmacology. This is due to low-level expression of many members in native or heterologous systems. One exception is rat Kv1.2 which has been overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and crystallised. Here, we tested chimaeras of rat Kv1.2 with the hERG channel for function in Xenopus oocytes and for overexpression in Pichia. Chimaera containing the S1–S6 transmembrane region of HERG showed functional and pharmacological properties similar to hERG and could be overexpressed and purified from Pichia. Our results demonstrate that rat Kv1.2 could serve as a surrogate to express difficult-to-overexpress members of the six-transmembrane segment channel family. PMID:24569544

  2. Voltage-gated potassium channel KCNV2 (Kv8.2) contributes to epilepsy susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Benjamin S.; Campbell, Courtney M.; Miller, Alison R.; Rutter, Elizabeth D.; Gurnett, Christina A.; Vanoye, Carlos G.; George, Alfred L.; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated ion channels are responsible for several types of epilepsy. Genetic epilepsies often exhibit variable severity in individuals with the same mutation, which may be due to variation in genetic modifiers. The Scn2aQ54 transgenic mouse model has a sodium channel mutation and exhibits epilepsy with strain-dependent severity. We previously mapped modifier loci that influence Scn2aQ54 phenotype severity and identified Kcnv2, encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv8.2, as a candidate modifier. In this study, we demonstrate a threefold increase in hippocampal Kcnv2 expression associated with more severe epilepsy. In vivo exacerbation of the phenotype by Kcnv2 transgenes supports its identification as an epilepsy modifier. The contribution of KCNV2 to human epilepsy susceptibility is supported by identification of two nonsynonymous variants in epilepsy patients that alter function of Kv2.1/Kv8.2 heterotetrameric potassium channels. Our results demonstrate that altered potassium subunit function influences epilepsy susceptibility and implicate Kcnv2 as an epilepsy gene. PMID:21402906

  3. A functional Kv1.2-hERG chimaeric channel expressed in Pichia pastoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Mandeep S.; Cockcroft, Christopher J.; Munsey, Tim; Smith, Kathrine J.; Powell, Andrew J.; Carter, Paul; Wrighton, David C.; Rong, Hong-Lin; Yusaf, Shahnaz P.; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2014-02-01

    Members of the six-transmembrane segment family of ion channels share a common structural design. However, there are sequence differences between the members that confer distinct biophysical properties on individual channels. Currently, we do not have 3D structures for all members of the family to help explain the molecular basis for the differences in their biophysical properties and pharmacology. This is due to low-level expression of many members in native or heterologous systems. One exception is rat Kv1.2 which has been overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and crystallised. Here, we tested chimaeras of rat Kv1.2 with the hERG channel for function in Xenopus oocytes and for overexpression in Pichia. Chimaera containing the S1-S6 transmembrane region of HERG showed functional and pharmacological properties similar to hERG and could be overexpressed and purified from Pichia. Our results demonstrate that rat Kv1.2 could serve as a surrogate to express difficult-to-overexpress members of the six-transmembrane segment channel family.

  4. Molecular Surface of Tarantula Toxins Interacting with Voltage Sensors in Kv Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Julia M.; Roh, Soung Hun; Kim, Sunghwan; Lee, Chul Won; Kim, Jae Il; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2004-01-01

    The venom from spiders, scorpions, and sea anemone contain a rich diversity of protein toxins that interact with ion channel voltage sensors. Although atomic structures have been solved for many of these toxins, the surfaces that are critical for interacting with voltage sensors are poorly defined. Hanatoxin and SGTx are tarantula toxins that inhibit activation of Kv channels by interacting with each of the four voltage sensors. In this study we set out to identify the active surface of these toxins by alanine-scanning SGTx and characterizing the interaction of each mutant with the Kv2.1 channel. Examination of the concentration dependence for inhibition identified 15 mutants with little effect on the concentration dependence for toxin inhibition of the Kv2.1 channel, and 11 mutants that display moderate to dramatic perturbations. Mapping of these results onto the structure of SGTx identifies one face of the toxin where mutations with pronounced perturbations cluster together, and a backside of the toxin where mutations are well tolerated. The active surface of SGTx contains a ring-like assembly of highly polar residues, with two basic residues that are particularly critical, concentrically arranged around a hydrophobic protrusion containing critical aliphatic and aromatic residues. These results identify the active surface of the toxin and reveal the types of side chains that are important for interacting with voltage sensors. PMID:15051809

  5. Impaired voltage gated potassium (KV) channel responses in a fetal lamb model of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Konduri, Girija G.; Bakhutashvili, Ivane; Eis, Annie; Gauthier, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that oxidative stress in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) impairs voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel function. We induced PPHN in fetal lambs by prenatal ligation of ductus arteriosus; controls had sham ligation. We studied changes in the tone of pulmonary artery rings and Kv channel current of freshly isolated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) using standard techniques. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP), a Kv channel antagonist, induced dose dependent constriction of control PA rings; this response was attenuated in PPHN pulmonary arteries. Exogenous superoxide and peroxynitrite inhibited the response to 4-AP in control rings. Tiron, a superoxide scavenger, improved the response to 4-AP in PPHN rings. 4-AP inhibited the NOS- independent relaxation response to ATP in control PA rings. Relaxation response to ATP was blunted in PPHN rings and was improved by NOS antagonist, n-nitro-l- arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). 4-AP attenuated this response in L-NAME treated PPHN rings. Exogenous superoxide suppressed 4-AP sensitive Kv current in control PASMC. Kv channel current was attenuated in cells from PPHN lambs and was restored by tiron. Oxidative stress impairs Kv channel function in PPHN. Superoxide scavengers may improve pulmonary vasodilation in PPHN in part by restoring Kv channel function. PMID:19542906

  6. Cell Type Specific Spatial and Functional Coupling Between Mammalian Brain Kv2.1 K+ Channels and Ryanodine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mandikian, Danielle; Bocksteins, Elke; Parajuli, Laxmi Kumar; Bishop, Hannah I.; Cerda, Oscar; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Trimmer, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The Kv2.1 voltage-gated K+ channel is widely expressed throughout mammalian brain where it contributes to dynamic activity-dependent regulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability. Here we show that somatic plasma membrane Kv2.1 clusters are juxtaposed to clusters of intracellular ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+-release channels in mouse brain neurons, most prominently in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum. Electron microscopy-immunogold labeling shows that in MSNs, plasma membrane Kv2.1 clusters are adjacent to subsurface cisternae, placing Kv2.1 in close proximity to sites of RyR-mediated Ca2+ release. Immunofluorescence labeling in transgenic mice expressing GFP in specific MSN populations reveals the most prominent juxtaposed Kv2.1-RyR clusters in indirect pathway MSNs. Kv2.1 in both direct and indirect pathway MSNs exhibits markedly lower levels of labeling with phosphospecific antibodies directed against the S453, S563, and S603 phosphorylation site compared to levels observed in neocortical neurons, although labeling for Kv2.1 phosphorylation at S563 was significantly lower in indirect pathway MSNs compared to those in the direct pathway. Finally, acute stimulation of RyRs in heterologous cells causes a rapid hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of activation of Kv2.1, typical of Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent Kv2.1 dephosphorylation. Together, these studies reveal that striatal MSNs are distinct in their expression of clustered Kv2.1 at plasma membrane sites juxtaposed to intracellular RyRs, as well as in Kv2.1 phosphorylation state. Differences in Kv2.1 expression and phosphorylation between MSNs in direct and indirect pathways provide a cell- and circuit-specific mechanism for coupling intracellular Ca2+ release to phosphorylation-dependent regulation of Kv2.1 to dynamically impact intrinsic excitability. PMID:24962901

  7. The role of PSD-95 in the rearrangement of Kv1.3 channels to the immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Szilágyi, Orsolya; Boratkó, Anita; Panyi, György; Hajdu, Péter

    2013-09-01

    Establishment of the immunological synapse (IS) between T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells is a key step in the adaptive immune response. Several proteins accumulate in the IS, such as the Kv1.3 potassium channel; however, the mechanism of this translocation is unknown. PSD-95 and SAP97 are adaptor proteins that regulate the polarized cell surface expression and localization of Kv1 channels in neurons. We investigated whether these proteins affect the redistribution of Kv1.3 into the IS in non-excitable human T cells. We show here that PSD-95 and SAP97 are expressed in Jurkat and interact with the C terminus of Kv1.3. Disruption of the interaction between PSD-95 or SAP97 and Kv1.3 in Jurkat was realized by the expression of a C-terminal truncated Kv1.3, which lacks the binding domain for these proteins, or by the knockdown of the expression of PSD-95 or SAP97 using specific shRNA. Expression of the truncated Kv1.3 or knockdown of PSD-95, but not the knockdown of SAP97, inhibited the recruitment of Kv1.3 into the IS; the fraction of cells showing polarized Kv1.3 expression upon engagement in an IS was significantly lower than in control cells expressing the full-length Kv1.3, and the rearrangement of Kv1.3 did not show time dependence. In contrast, Jurkat cells expressing the full-length channel showed marked time dependence in the recruitment into the IS peaking at 1 min after the conjugation of the cells. These results demonstrate that PSD-95 participates in the targeting of Kv1.3 into the IS, implying its important role in human T-cell activation.

  8. Cellular Mechanism of Inner Ear Genetic Disease, roles of Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi Nik, Atefeh

    Potassium channels are the most diverse and widely distributed membrane protein in all living organisms. They have various roles in the body such as controlling membrane potential, cell volume, and cell migration. Many studies have shown that mutation in these channels is associated with different diseases for example: Hearing Defect, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Episodic Ataxia, Seizure and Neuromyotonia. One of the most important diseases associated with K+ channel mutations is called Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS). This disease causes bilateral congenital deafness and the patients also suffer from Long QT and they usually experience syncopal episodes in their life and eventually die as a result of cardiac arrest. The gene KCNQ1 encodes the Kv7.1 voltage gated potassium channel. This channel expresses in apical membrane of marginal cell in stria vasularis of cochlea and secret K+ ion to endolymp to keep the endocochlear potential stable, which is necessary for the inner ear to function properly. Kv7.1 channel also expresses in cardiac myocytes and mutation in this gene is associated with another syndrome called Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS). Although Romano-Ward patients have mutation in KCNQ1, similar to Jervell and Lange-Nielsen patients, they only suffer from cardiac defect, and their hearing is completely normal. Several studies identified that mutations in Kv7.1 gene is associated with JLNS and RWS, but the biophysical and cellular mechanisms of these mutations are still unknown. To determine the cellular mechanisms of JLNS and RWS, and to provide mechanistic insight on the functional outputs of JLNS versus RWS mutations, we generated several mutant forms of the human Kv7.1 ( KCNQ1) clone, using site-directed mutagenesis to define their sub-cellular localization and examined their electrophysiological properties. We identified JLNS and RWS mutations at the S4-S5-linker, the pore loop (P-loop) and the C-terminus of hKv7.1 which have been found to control

  9. Dynamics and modulation studies of human voltage gated Kv1.5 channel.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Rajabrata; Seal, Alpana

    2017-02-01

    The voltage gated Kv1.5 channels conduct the ultrarapid delayed rectifier current (IKur) and play critical role in repolarization of action potential duration. It is the most rapidly activated channel and has very little or no inactivated states. In human cardiac cells, these channels are expressed more extensively in atrial myocytes than ventricle. From the evidences of its localization and functions, Kv1.5 has been declared a selective drug target for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). In this present study, we have tried to identify the rapidly activating property of Kv1.5 and studied its mode of inhibition using molecular modeling, docking, and simulation techniques. Channel in open conformation is found to be stabilized quickly within the dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membrane, whereas most of the secondary structure elements were lost in closed state conformation. The obvious reason behind its ultra-rapid property is possibly due to the amino acid alteration in S4-S5 linker; the replacement of Lysine by Glutamine and vice versa. The popular published drugs as well as newly identified lead molecules were able to inhibit the Kv1.5 in a very similar pattern, mainly through the nonpolar interactions, and formed sable complexes. V512 is found as the main contributor for the interaction along with the other important residues such as V505, I508, A509, V512, P513, and V516. Furthermore, two screened novel compounds show surprisingly better inhibitory potency and can be considered for the future perspective of antiarrhythmic survey.

  10. Expression and function of Kv1.1 potassium channels in human atria from patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Glasscock, Edward; Voigt, Niels; McCauley, Mark D; Sun, Qiang; Li, Na; Chiang, David Y; Zhou, Xiao-Bo; Molina, Cristina E; Thomas, Dierk; Schmidt, Constanze; Skapura, Darlene G; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated Kv1.1 channels encoded by the Kcna1 gene are traditionally regarded as being neural-specific with no known expression or intrinsic functional role in the heart. However, recent studies in mice reveal low-level Kv1.1 expression in heart and cardiac abnormalities associated with Kv1.1-deficiency suggesting that the channel may have a previously unrecognized cardiac role. Therefore, this study tests the hypothesis that Kv1.1 channels are associated with arrhythmogenesis and contribute to intrinsic cardiac function. In intra-atrial burst pacing experiments, Kcna1-null mice exhibited increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation (AF). The atria of Kcna1-null mice showed minimal Kv1 family ion channel remodeling and fibrosis as measured by qRT-PCR and Masson's trichrome histology, respectively. Using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and immunoblotting, KCNA1 mRNA and protein were detected in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes and human atria for the first time. Patients with chronic AF (cAF) showed no changes in KCNA1 mRNA levels relative to controls; however, they exhibited increases in atrial Kv1.1 protein levels, not seen in paroxysmal AF patients. Patch-clamp recordings of isolated human atrial myocytes revealed significant dendrotoxin-K (DTX-K)-sensitive outward current components that were significantly increased in cAF patients, reflecting a contribution by Kv1.1 channels. The concomitant increases in Kv1.1 protein and DTX-K-sensitive currents in atria of cAF patients suggest that the channel contributes to the pathological mechanisms of persistent AF. These findings provide evidence of an intrinsic cardiac role of Kv1.1 channels and indicate that they may contribute to atrial repolarization and AF susceptibility.

  11. Expression and function of Kv1.1 potassium channels in human atria from patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Glasscock, Edward; Voigt, Niels; McCauley, Mark D.; Sun, Qiang; Li, Na; Chiang, David Y.; Zhou, Xiao-Bo; Molina, Cristina E.; Thomas, Dierk; Schmidt, Constanze; Skapura, Darlene G.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv1.1 channels encoded by the Kcna1 gene are traditionally regarded as being neural-specific with no known expression or intrinsic functional role in the heart. However, recent studies in mice reveal low-level Kv1.1 expression in heart and cardiac abnormalities associated with Kv1.1-deficiency suggesting that the channel may have a previously unrecognized cardiac role. Therefore, this study tests the hypothesis that Kv1.1 channels are associated with arrhythmogenesis and contribute to intrinsic cardiac function. In intra-atrial burst pacing experiments, Kcna1-null mice exhibited increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation (AF). The atria of Kcna1-null mice showed minimal Kv1 family ion channel remodeling and fibrosis as measured by qRT-PCR and Masson’s trichrome histology, respectively. Using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and immunoblotting, KCNA1 mRNA and protein were detected in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes and human atria for the first time. Patients with chronic AF (cAF) showed no changes in KCNA1 mRNA levels relative to controls; however, they exhibited increases in atrial Kv1.1 protein levels, not seen in paroxysmal AF patients. Patch-clamp recordings of isolated human atrial myocytes revealed significant dendrotoxin-K (DTX-K)-sensitive outward current components that were significantly increased in cAF patients, reflecting a contribution by Kv1.1 channels. The concomitant increases in Kv1.1 protein and DTX-K-sensitive currents in atria of cAF patients suggest that the channel contributes to the pathological mechanisms of persistent AF. These findings provide evidence of an intrinsic cardiac role of Kv1.1 channels and indicate that they may contribute to atrial repolarization and AF susceptibility. PMID:26162324

  12. Expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.4 in oral leucoplakias and oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Valle, Álvaro; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; García-Pedrero, Juana M; Rodríguez-Santamarta, Tania; Allonca, Eva; Lequerica-Fernández, Paloma; de Vicente, Juan Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.4 was investigated in both oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) and oral leucoplakias to establish its clinical significance during the development and progression of OSCC. Tissue specimens from 62 patients with oral leucoplakia were collected prospectively and 100 patients with OSCC who underwent surgical treatment were collected retrospectively, and Kv3.4 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Thirty-nine of 100 tumours exhibited Kv3.4-positive expression, and staining was associated with the degree of differentiation (P = 0.05) but showed no impact on patient prognosis. Abnormal Kv3.4 expression was detected in 16% (7 of 43) hyperplastic lesions and at a significantly higher proportion in oral dysplasias (50%, 8 of 16 cases; P = 0.008), whereas expression was negligible in normal adjacent epithelia. Furthermore, patients carrying Kv3.4-positive lesions exhibited a higher progression risk than those with Kv3.4-negative lesions; however, histology but not Kv3.4 expression predicted oral cancer development significantly in this prospective cohort. This study provides original evidence to demonstrate the early occurrence and high prevalence of abnormal Kv3.4 expression in oral leucoplakias. Our results support a role for Kv3.4 potassium channel in OSCC tumorigenesis rather than tumour progression and disease outcome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The S1 Helix Critically Regulates the Finely-tuned Gating of Kv11.1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Ng, Chai Ann; David, Erikka; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Kuchel, Philip W; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Perry, Matthew D

    2017-03-09

    Congenital mutations in the cardiac Kv11.1 channel can cause long QT syndrome type 2 (LQTS2), a heart rhythm disorder associated with sudden cardiac death. Mutations act either by reducing protein expression at the membrane, and/or by perturbing the intricate gating properties of Kv11.1 channels. A number of clinical LQTS2-associated mutations have been reported in the first transmembrane segment (S1) of Kv11.1 channels but the role of this region of the channel is largely unexplored. In part this is due to problems defining the extent of the S1 helix, as a consequence of its low sequence homology with other Kv family members. Here we used NMR spectroscopy and electrophysiological characterization to show that the S1 of Kv11.1 channels extends seven helical turns, from Pro405 to Phe431, and is flanked by unstructured loops. Functional analysis suggests that pre-S1 loop residues His402 and Tyr403 play an important role in regulating the kinetics and voltage dependence of channel activation and deactivation. Multiple residues within the S1 helix also play an important role in fine-tuning the voltage dependence of activation, regulating slow deactivation, and modulating C-type inactivation of Kv11.1 channels. Analyses of LQTS2-associated mutations in the pre-S1 loop or S1 helix of Kv11.1 channels demonstrate perturbations to both protein expression and most gating transitions. Thus S1 region mutations would reduce both the action potential repolarizing current passed by Kv11.1 channels in cardiac myocytes, as well as the current passed in response to premature depolarizations that normally helps protect against the formation of ectopic beats.

  14. The Role of Kv7/M Potassium Channels in Controlling Ectopic Firing in Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Barkai, Omer; Goldstein, Robert H.; Caspi, Yaki; Katz, Ben; Lev, Shaya; Binshtok, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nociceptive neurons encode and convey injury-inducing stimuli toward the central nervous system. In normal conditions, tight control of nociceptive resting potential prevents their spontaneous activation. However, in many pathological conditions the control of membrane potential is disrupted, leading to ectopic, stimulus-unrelated firing of nociceptive neurons, which is correlated to spontaneous pain. We have investigated the role of KV7/M channels in stabilizing membrane potential and impeding spontaneous firing of nociceptive neurons. These channels generate low voltage-activating, noninactivating M-type K+ currents (M-current, IM), which control neuronal excitability. Using perforated-patch recordings from cultured, rat nociceptor-like dorsal root ganglion neurons, we show that inhibition of M-current leads to depolarization of nociceptive neurons and generation of repetitive firing. To assess to what extent the M-current, acting at the nociceptive terminals, is able to stabilize terminals' membrane potential, thus preventing their ectopic activation, in normal and pathological conditions, we built a multi-compartment computational model of a pseudo-unipolar unmyelinated nociceptive neuron with a realistic terminal tree. The modeled terminal tree was based on the in vivo structure of nociceptive peripheral terminal, which we assessed by in vivo multiphoton imaging of GFP-expressing nociceptive neuronal terminals innervating mice hind paw. By modifying the conductance of the KV7/M channels at the modeled terminal tree (terminal gKV7/M) we have found that 40% of the terminal gKV7/M conductance is sufficient to prevent spontaneous firing, while ~75% of terminal gKV7/M is sufficient to inhibit stimulus induced activation of nociceptive neurons. Moreover, we showed that terminal M-current reduces susceptibility of nociceptive neurons to a small fluctuations of membrane potentials. Furthermore, we simulated how the interaction between terminal persistent

  15. Sustained upregulation in embryonic spinal neurons of a Kv3.1 potassium channel gene encoding a delayed rectifier current.

    PubMed

    Gurantz, D; Lautermilch, N J; Watt, S D; Spitzer, N C

    2000-02-15

    Differentiation of electrical excitability entails changes in the currents that generate action potentials in spinal neurons of Xenopus embryos, resulting in reduced calcium entry during impulses generated at later stages of development. A dramatic increase in delayed rectifier current (I(Kv)) during the first day of development plays the major role in this process. Identification of potassium channel genes responsible for the increase in I(Kv) is critical to understanding the molecular mechanisms involved. Several members of the Shaw Kv3 gene subfamily encode delayed rectifier currents, indicating that they could contribute to the upregulation of I(Kv) that reduces the duration of action potentials. We isolated a Xenopus (x) Kv3.1 gene whose expression is restricted to the central nervous system, which is upregulated throughout the period during which I(Kv) develops in vivo. The fraction of neurons in which transcripts of this gene are detected by single-cell RT-PCR increases to 40% with time in culture, paralleling the development of I(Kv) in neurons in vitro. Expression of xKv3.1 mRNA generates a delayed rectifier potassium current in oocytes, suggesting that xKv3. 1 contributes to the maturation of I(Kv) and shortening of the action potential.

  16. Altered Kv3.3 channel gating in early-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 13.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Natali A; Lin, Meng-Chin A; Papazian, Diane M

    2012-04-01

    Mutations in Kv3.3 cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13). Depending on the causative mutation, SCA13 is either a neurodevelopmental disorder that is evident in infancy or a progressive neurodegenerative disease that emerges during adulthood. Previous studies did not clarify the relationship between these distinct clinical phenotypes and the effects of SCA13 mutations on Kv3.3 function. The F448L mutation alters channel gating and causes early-onset SCA13. R420H and R423H suppress Kv3 current amplitude by a dominant negative mechanism. However, R420H results in the adult form of the disease whereas R423H produces the early-onset, neurodevelopmental form with significant clinical overlap with F448L. Since individuals with SCA13 have one wild type and one mutant allele of the Kv3.3 gene, we analysed the properties of tetrameric channels formed by mixtures of wild type and mutant subunits. We report that one R420H subunit and at least one R423H subunit can co-assemble with the wild type protein to form active channels. The functional properties of channels containing R420H and wild type subunits strongly resemble those of wild type alone. In contrast, channels containing R423H and wild type subunits show significantly altered gating, including a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage dependence of activation, slower activation, and modestly slower deactivation. Notably, these effects resemble the modified gating seen in channels containing a mixture of F448L and wild type subunits, although the F448L subunit slows deactivation more dramatically than the R423H subunit. Our results suggest that the clinical severity of R423H reflects its dual dominant negative and dominant gain of function effects. However, as shown by R420H, reducing current amplitude without altering gating does not result in infant onset disease. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that changes in Kv3.3 gating contribute significantly to an early age of onset in SCA13.

  17. Kv7 potassium channels in airway smooth muscle cells: signal transduction intermediates and pharmacological targets for bronchodilator therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Kakad, Priyanka P.; Love, Robert B.; Solway, Julian; Dowell, Maria L.; Cribbs, Leanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Expression and function of Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-activated potassium channels in guinea pig and human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) were investigated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), patch-clamp electrophysiology, and precision-cut lung slices. qRT-PCR revealed expression of multiple KCNQ genes in both guinea pig and human ASMCs. Currents with electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics of Kv7 currents were measured in freshly isolated guinea pig and human ASMCs. In guinea pig ASMCs, Kv7 currents were significantly suppressed by application of the bronchoconstrictor agonists methacholine (100 nM) or histamine (30 μM), but current amplitudes were restored by addition of a Kv7 channel activator, flupirtine (10 μM). Kv7 currents in guinea pig ASMCs were also significantly enhanced by another Kv7.2–7.5 channel activator, retigabine, and by celecoxib and 2,5-dimethyl celecoxib. In precision-cut human lung slices, constriction of airways by histamine was significantly reduced in the presence of flupirtine. Kv7 currents in both guinea pig and human ASMCs were inhibited by the Kv7 channel blocker XE991. In human lung slices, XE991 induced robust airway constriction, which was completely reversed by addition of the calcium channel blocker verapamil. These findings suggest that Kv7 channels in ASMCs play an essential role in the regulation of airway diameter and may be targeted pharmacologically to relieve airway hyperconstriction induced by elevated concentrations of bronchoconstrictor agonists. PMID:21964407

  18. Targeting Kv1.3 channels to reduce white matter pathology after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Thomas M.; Trimmer, Patricia A.; Colley, Beverly S.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    Axonal injury is present in essentially all clinically significant cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI). While no effective treatment has been identified to date, experimental TBI models have shown promising axonal protection using immunosuppressants FK506 and Cyclosporine-A, with treatment benefits attributed to calcineurin inhibition or protection of mitochondrial function. However, growing evidence suggests neuroprotective efficacy of these compounds may also involve direct modulation of ion channels, and in particular Kv1.3. The present study tested whether blockade of Kv1.3 channels, using Clofazimine (CFZ), would alleviate TBI-induced white matter pathology in rodents. Postinjury CFZ administration prevented suppression of compound action potential (CAP) amplitude in the corpus callosum of adult rats following midline fluid percussion TBI, with injury and treatment effects primarily expressed in unmyelinated CAPs. Kv1.3 protein levels in callosal tissue extracts were significantly reduced postinjury, but this loss was prevented by CFZ treatment. In parallel, CFZ also attenuated the injury-induced elevation in pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1-β. The effects of CFZ on glial function were further studied using mixed microglia/astrocyte cell cultures derived from P3-5 mouse corpus callosum. Cultures of callosal glia challenged with lipopolysaccharide exhibited a dramatic increase in IL1-β levels, accompanied by reactive morphological changes in microglia, both of which were attenuated by CFZ treatment. These results support a cell specific role for Kv1.3 signaling in white matter pathology after TBI, and suggest a treatment approach based on the blockade of these channels. This therapeutic strategy may be especially efficacious for normalizing neuro-glial interactions affecting unmyelinated axons after TBI. PMID:27302680

  19. Kv Channel S1-S2 Linker Working as a Binding Site of Human β-Defensin 2 for Channel Activation Modulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Yang, Weishan; Xie, Zili; Xiang, Fang; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Hu, Hongzhen; Chen, Zongyun; Wu, Yingliang

    2015-06-19

    Among the three extracellular domains of the tetrameric voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels consisting of six membrane-spanning helical segments named S1-S6, the functional role of the S1-S2 linker still remains unclear because of the lack of a peptide ligand. In this study, the Kv1.3 channel S1-S2 linker was reported as a novel receptor site for human β-defensin 2 (hBD2). hBD2 shifts the conductance-voltage relationship curve of the human Kv1.3 channel in a positive direction by nearly 10.5 mV and increases the activation time constant for the channel. Unlike classical gating modifiers of toxin peptides from animal venoms, which generally bind to the Kv channel S3-S4 linker, hBD2 only targets residues in both the N and C termini of the S1-S2 linker to influence channel gating and inhibit channel currents. The increment and decrement of the basic residue number in a positively charged S4 sensor of Kv1.3 channel yields conductance-voltage relationship curves in the positive direction by ∼31.2 mV and 2-4 mV, which suggests that positively charged hBD2 is anchored in the channel S1-S2 linker and is modulating channel activation through electrostatic repulsion with an adjacent S4 helix. Together, these findings reveal a novel peptide ligand that binds with the Kv channel S1-S2 linker to modulate channel activation. These findings also highlight the functional importance of the Kv channel S1-S2 linker in ligand recognition and modification of channel activation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. A unique role for Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels in starburst amacrine cell signaling in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Ozaita, Ander; Petit-Jacques, Jerome; Völgyi, Béla; Ho, Chi Shun; Joho, Rolf H; Bloomfield, Stewart A; Rudy, Bernardo

    2004-08-18

    Direction-selective retinal ganglion cells show an increased activity evoked by light stimuli moving in the preferred direction. This selectivity is governed by direction-selective inhibition from starburst amacrine cells occurring during stimulus movement in the opposite or null direction. To understand the intrinsic membrane properties of starburst cells responsible for direction-selective GABA release, we performed whole-cell recordings from starburst cells in mouse retina. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed prominent voltage-dependent K(+) currents. The currents were mostly blocked by 1 mm TEA, activated rapidly at voltages more positive than -20 mV, and deactivated quickly, properties reminiscent of the currents carried by the Kv3 subfamily of K+ channels. Immunoblots confirmed the presence of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins in retina and immunohistochemistry revealed their expression in starburst cell somata and dendrites. The Kv3-like current in starburst cells was absent in Kv3.1-Kv3.2 knock-out mice. Current-clamp recordings showed that the fast activation of the Kv3 channels provides a voltage-dependent shunt that limits depolarization of the soma to potentials more positive than -20 mV. This provides a mechanism likely to contribute to the electrical isolation of individual starburst cell dendrites, a property thought essential for direction selectivity. This function of Kv3 channels differs from that in other neurons where they facilitate high-frequency repetitive firing. Moreover, we found a gradient in the intensity of Kv3.1b immunolabeling favoring proximal regions of starburst cells. We hypothesize that this Kv3 channel gradient contributes to the preference for centrifugal signal flow in dendrites underlying direction-selective GABA release from starburst amacrine cells

  1. Contribution of N- and C-terminal Kv4.2 channel domains to KChIP interaction [corrected].

    PubMed

    Callsen, Britta; Isbrandt, Dirk; Sauter, Kathrin; Hartmann, L Sven; Pongs, Olaf; Bähring, Robert

    2005-10-15

    Association of Shal gene-related voltage-gated potassium (Kv4) channels with cytoplasmic Kv channel interacting proteins (KChIPs) influences inactivation gating and surface expression. We investigated both functional and biochemical consequences of mutations in cytoplasmic N and C-terminal Kv4.2 domains to characterize structural determinants for KChIP interaction. We performed a lysine-scanning mutagenesis within the proximal 40 amino acid portion and a structure-based mutagenesis in the tetramerization 1 (T1) domain of Kv4.2. In addition, the cytoplasmic Kv4.2 C-terminus was truncated at various positions. Wild-type and mutant Kv4.2 channels were coexpressed with KChIP2 isoforms in mammalian cell lines. The KChIP2-induced modulation of Kv4.2 currents was studied with whole-cell patch clamp and the binding of KChIP2 isoforms to Kv4.2 channels with coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Our results define one major interaction site for KChIPs, including amino acids in the proximal N-terminus between residues 11 and 23, where binding and functional modulation are essentially equivalent. A further interaction site includes residues in the T1 domain. Notably, C-terminal deletions also had marked effects on KChIP2-dependent gating modulation and KChIP2 binding, revealing a previously unknown involvement of domains within the cytoplasmic Kv4.2 C-terminus in KChIP interaction. Less coincidence of binding and functional modulation indicates a more loose 'anchoring' at T1- and C-terminal interaction sites. Our results refine and extend previously proposed structural models for Kv4.2/KChIP complex formation.

  2. Decrease of a Current Mediated by Kv1.3 Channels Causes Striatal Cholinergic Interneuron Hyperexcitability in Experimental Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Tubert, Cecilia; Taravini, Irene R E; Flores-Barrera, Eden; Sánchez, Gonzalo M; Prost, María Alejandra; Avale, María Elena; Tseng, Kuei Y; Rela, Lorena; Murer, Mario Gustavo

    2016-09-06

    The mechanism underlying a hypercholinergic state in Parkinson's disease (PD) remains uncertain. Here, we show that disruption of the Kv1 channel-mediated function causes hyperexcitability of striatal cholinergic interneurons in a mouse model of PD. Specifically, our data reveal that Kv1 channels containing Kv1.3 subunits contribute significantly to the orphan potassium current known as IsAHP in striatal cholinergic interneurons. Typically, this Kv1 current provides negative feedback to depolarization that limits burst firing and slows the tonic activity of cholinergic interneurons. However, such inhibitory control of cholinergic interneuron excitability by Kv1.3-mediated current is markedly diminished in the parkinsonian striatum, suggesting that targeting Kv1.3 subunits and their regulatory pathways may have therapeutic potential in PD therapy. These studies reveal unexpected roles of Kv1.3 subunit-containing channels in the regulation of firing patterns of striatal cholinergic interneurons, which were thought to be largely dependent on KCa channels.

  3. Hypoxia suppresses Kv 2.1 channel expression through endogenous 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in rat pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Qiu, Zhaoping; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Shuo; Zhu, Daling

    2010-09-01

    We have previously reported that hypoxia activates lung 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which catalyzes arachidonic acid to produce 15-HETE, leading to constriction of neonatal rabbit pulmonary arteries. Hypoxia suppresses Kv2.1 channel expression. Although the Kv channel inhibition by hypoxia is likely to be mediated through 15-HETE, direct evidence is still lacking. To explore whether 15-LOX/15-HETE pathway contributes to the hypoxia-induced down-regulation of Kv2.1 channel, we performed studies using 15-LOX blockers, semi-quantitative PCR and western blot analysis. We found that Kv2.1 channel expression at the mRNA and protein levels was greatly up-regulated in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and pulmonary artery (PA) after blockade of endogenous 15-HETE under hypoxic condition. 15-HETE further decreased Kv2.1 channel expression in comparison with 12-HETE and 5-HETE in cultured PASMCs and PA under normoxic conditions. These data indicate that hypoxia suppresses Kv2.1 channel expression through endogenous 15-HETE in PA.

  4. Molecular Expression and Pharmacological Evidence for a Functional Role of Kv7 Channel Subtypes in Guinea Pig Urinary Bladder Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Afeli, Serge A. Y.; Malysz, John; Petkov, Georgi V.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv7 (KCNQ) channels are emerging as essential regulators of smooth muscle excitability and contractility. However, their physiological role in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) remains to be elucidated. Here, we explored the molecular expression and function of Kv7 channel subtypes in guinea pig DSM by RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, and isometric tension recordings. In whole DSM tissue, mRNAs for all Kv7 channel subtypes were detected in a rank order: Kv7.1~Kv7.2Kv7.3~Kv7.5Kv7.4. In contrast, freshly-isolated DSM cells showed mRNA expression of: Kv7.1~Kv7.2Kv7.5Kv7.3~Kv7.4. Immunohistochemical confocal microscopy analyses of DSM, conducted by using co-labeling of Kv7 channel subtype-specific antibodies and α-smooth muscle actin, detected protein expression for all Kv7 channel subtypes, except for the Kv7.4, in DSM cells. L-364373 (R-L3), a Kv7.1 channel activator, and retigabine, a Kv7.2-7.5 channel activator, inhibited spontaneous phasic contractions and the 10-Hz electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contractions of DSM isolated strips. Linopiridine and XE991, two pan-Kv7 (effective at Kv7.1-Kv7.5 subtypes) channel inhibitors, had opposite effects increasing DSM spontaneous phasic and 10 Hz EFS-induced contractions. EFS-induced DSM contractions generated by a wide range of stimulation frequencies were decreased by L-364373 (10 µM) or retigabine (10 µM), and increased by XE991 (10 µM). Retigabine (10 µM) induced hyperpolarization and inhibited spontaneous action potentials in freshly-isolated DSM cells. In summary, Kv7 channel subtypes are expressed at mRNA and protein levels in guinea pig DSM cells. Their pharmacological modulation can control DSM contractility and excitability; therefore, Kv7 channel subtypes provide potential novel therapeutic targets for urinary bladder dysfunction. PMID:24073284

  5. Concatemers of brain Kv1 channel alpha subunits that give similar K+ currents yield pharmacologically distinguishable heteromers.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Maxim V; Shamotienko, Oleg; Dhochartaigh, Sorcha Ní; Sack, Jon T; Dolly, J Oliver

    2007-08-01

    At least five subtypes of voltage-gated (Kv1) channels occur in neurons as tetrameric combinations of different alpha subunits. Their involvement in controlling cell excitability and synaptic transmission make them potential targets for neurotherapeutics. As a prerequisite for this, we established herein how the characteristics of hetero-oligomeric K(+) channels can be influenced by alpha subunit composition. Since the three most prevalent Kv1 subunits in brain are Kv1.2, 1.1 and 1.6, new Kv1.6-1.2 and Kv1.1-1.2 concatenated constructs in pIRES-EGFP were stably expressed in HEK cells and the biophysical plus pharmacological properties of their K(+) currents determined relative to those for the requisite homo-tetramers. These heteromers yielded delayed-rectifier type K(+) currents whose activation, deactivation and inactivation parameters are fairly similar although substituting Kv1.1 with Kv1.6 led to a small negative shift in the conductance-voltage relationship, a direction unexpected from the characteristics of the parental homo-tetramers. Changes resulting from swapping Kv1.6 for Kv1.1 in the concatemers were clearly discerned with two pharmacological agents, as measured by inhibition of the K(+) currents and Rb(+) efflux. alphaDendrotoxin and 4-aminopyridine gave a similar blockade of both hetero-tetramers, as expected. Most important for pharmacological dissection of channel subtypes, dendrotoxin(k) and tetraethylammonium readily distinguished the susceptible Kv1.1-1.2 containing oligomers from the resistant Kv1.6-1.2 channels. Moreover, the discriminating ability of dendrotoxin(k) was further confirmed by its far greater ability to displace (125)I-labelled alphadendrotoxin binding to Kv1.1-1.2 than Kv1.6-1.2 channels. Thus, due to the profiles of these two channel subtypes being found to differ, it seems that only multimers corresponding to those present in the nervous system provide meaningful targets for drug development.

  6. Inhibition of Kv channel expression by NSAIDs depolarizes membrane potential and inhibits cell migration by disrupting calpain signaling

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, Alaina; Thomas, Laurel; Marsh, Elizabeth; Lillich, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is well known to cause gastrointestinal ulcer formation via several mechanisms that include inhibiting epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution. The drug-affected signaling pathways that contribute to inhibition of migration by NSAIDs are poorly understood, though previous studies have shown that NSAIDs depolarize membrane potential and suppress expression of calpain proteases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel subunits. Kv channels play significant roles in cell migration and are targets of NSAID activity in white blood cells, but the specific functional effects of NSAID-induced changes in Kv channel expression, particularly on cell migration, are unknown in intestinal epithelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of NSAIDs on expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, and 1.6 in vitro and/or in vivo and evaluated the functional significance of loss of Kv subunit expression. Indomethacin or NS-398 reduced total and plasma membrane protein expression of Kv1.3 in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Additionally, depolarization of membrane potential with margatoxin (MgTx), 40 mM K+, or silencing of Kv channel expression with siRNA significantly reduced IEC-6 cell migration and disrupted calpain activity. Furthermore, in rat small intestinal epithelia, indomethacin and NS-398 had significant, yet distinct, effects on gene and protein expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, or 1.6, suggesting that these may be clinically relevant targets. Our results show that inhibition of epithelial cell migration by NSAIDs is associated with decreased expression of Kv channel subunits, and provide a mechanism through which NSAIDs inhibit cell migration and may contribute to NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. PMID:26549367

  7. Inhibition of Kv channel expression by NSAIDs depolarizes membrane potential and inhibits cell migration by disrupting calpain signaling.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, Alaina; Thomas, Laurel; Marsh, Elizabeth; Lillich, James D

    2015-12-15

    Clinical use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is well known to cause gastrointestinal ulcer formation via several mechanisms that include inhibiting epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution. The drug-affected signaling pathways that contribute to inhibition of migration by NSAIDs are poorly understood, though previous studies have shown that NSAIDs depolarize membrane potential and suppress expression of calpain proteases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel subunits. Kv channels play significant roles in cell migration and are targets of NSAID activity in white blood cells, but the specific functional effects of NSAID-induced changes in Kv channel expression, particularly on cell migration, are unknown in intestinal epithelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of NSAIDs on expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, and 1.6 in vitro and/or in vivo and evaluated the functional significance of loss of Kv subunit expression. Indomethacin or NS-398 reduced total and plasma membrane protein expression of Kv1.3 in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Additionally, depolarization of membrane potential with margatoxin (MgTx), 40mM K(+), or silencing of Kv channel expression with siRNA significantly reduced IEC-6 cell migration and disrupted calpain activity. Furthermore, in rat small intestinal epithelia, indomethacin and NS-398 had significant, yet distinct, effects on gene and protein expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, or 1.6, suggesting that these may be clinically relevant targets. Our results show that inhibition of epithelial cell migration by NSAIDs is associated with decreased expression of Kv channel subunits, and provide a mechanism through which NSAIDs inhibit cell migration and may contribute to NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity.

  8. Selective Kv1.3 channel blocker as therapeutic for obesity and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Sanjeev Kumar; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin L.; Mirbolooki, M. Reza; Tjong, Indra; Griffey, Stephen M.; Schmunk, Galina; Koehne, Amanda; Halbout, Briac; Iadonato, Shawn; Pedersen, Brian; Borrelli, Emiliana; Wang, Ping H.; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Chandy, K. George

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an epidemic, calling for innovative and reliable pharmacological strategies. Here, we show that ShK-186, a selective and potent blocker of the voltage-gated Kv1.3 channel, counteracts the negative effects of increased caloric intake in mice fed a diet rich in fat and fructose. ShK-186 reduced weight gain, adiposity, and fatty liver; decreased blood levels of cholesterol, sugar, HbA1c, insulin, and leptin; and enhanced peripheral insulin sensitivity. These changes mimic the effects of Kv1.3 gene deletion. ShK-186 did not alter weight gain in mice on a chow diet, suggesting that the obesity-inducing diet enhances sensitivity to Kv1.3 blockade. Several mechanisms may contribute to the therapeutic benefits of ShK-186. ShK-186 therapy activated brown adipose tissue as evidenced by a doubling of glucose uptake, and increased β-oxidation of fatty acids, glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis, and uncoupling protein 1 expression. Activation of brown adipose tissue manifested as augmented oxygen consumption and energy expenditure, with no change in caloric intake, locomotor activity, or thyroid hormone levels. The obesity diet induced Kv1.3 expression in the liver, and ShK-186 caused profound alterations in energy and lipid metabolism in the liver. This action on the liver may underlie the differential effectiveness of ShK-186 in mice fed a chow vs. an obesity diet. Our results highlight the potential use of Kv1.3 blockers for the treatment of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:23729813

  9. Blockade of Kv1.3 channels ameliorates radiation-induced brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Lu, Kui; Li, Zichen; Zhao, Yaodong; Wang, Yiping; Hu, Bin; Xu, Pengfei; Shi, Xiaolei; Zhou, Bin; Pennington, Michael; Chandy, K. George; Tang, Yamei

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumors affecting the head, neck, and brain account for significant morbidity and mortality. The curative efficacy of radiotherapy for these tumors is well established, but radiation carries a significant risk of neurologic injury. So far, neuroprotective therapies for radiation-induced brain injury are still limited. In this study we demonstrate that Stichodactyla helianthus (ShK)–170, a specific inhibitor of the voltage-gated potassium (Kv)1.3 channel, protected mice from radiation-induced brain injury. Methods Mice were treated with ShK-170 for 3 days immediately after brain irradiation. Radiation-induced brain injury was assessed by MRI scans and a Morris water maze. Pathophysiological change of the brain was measured by immunofluorescence. Gene and protein expressions of Kv1.3 and inflammatory factors were measured by quantitative real-time PCR, reverse transcription PCR, ELISA assay, and western blot analyses. Kv currents were recorded in the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Results Radiation increased Kv1.3 mRNA and protein expression in microglia. Genetic silencing of Kv1.3 by specific short interference RNAs or pharmacological blockade with ShK-170 suppressed radiation-induced production of the proinflammatory factors interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor–α by microglia. ShK-170 also inhibited neurotoxicity mediated by radiation-activated microglia and promoted neurogenesis by increasing the proliferation of neural progenitor cells. Conclusions The therapeutic effect of ShK-170 is mediated by suppression of microglial activation and microglia-mediated neurotoxicity and enhanced neurorestoration by promoting proliferation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:24305723

  10. A naturally occurring omega current in a Kv3 family potassium channel from a platyhelminth.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Tara L; Spencer, Andrew N; Gallin, Warren J

    2008-06-19

    Voltage-gated ion channels are membrane proteins containing a selective pore that allows permeable ions to transit the membrane in response to a change in the transmembrane voltage. The typical selectivity filter in potassium channels is formed by a tetrameric arrangement of the carbonyl groups of the conserved amino-acid sequence Gly-Tyr-Gly. This canonical pore is opened or closed by conformational changes that originate in the voltage sensor (S4), a transmembrane helix with a series of positively charged amino acids. This sensor moves through a gating pore formed by elements of the S1, S2 and S3 helices, across the plane of the membrane, without allowing ions to pass through the membrane at that site. Recently, synthetic mutagenesis studies in the Drosophila melanogaster Shaker channel and analysis of human disease-causing mutations in sodium channels have identified amino acid residues that are integral parts of the gating-pore; when these residues are mutated the proteins allow a non-specific cation current, known as the omega current, to pass through the gating-pore with relatively low selectivity. The N.at-Kv3.2 potassium channel has an unusual weak inward rectifier phenotype. Several mutations of two amino acids in the voltage sensing (S4) transmembrane helix change the phenotype to a typical delayed rectifier. The inward rectifier channels (wild-type and mutant) are sensitive to 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) but not tetra-ethyl ammonium (TEA), whereas the delayed rectifier mutants are sensitive to TEA but not 4-AP. The inward rectifier channels also manifest low cation selectivity. The relative selectivity for different cations is sensitive to specific mutations in the S4 helix, N.at-Kv3.2, a naturally occurring potassium channel of the Kv3 sequence family, mediates ion permeation through a modified gating pore, not the canonical, highly selective pore typical of potassium channels. This channel has evolved to yield qualitatively different ion permeability when

  11. Silencing of Kv4.1 potassium channels inhibits cell proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Choi, Changsun; Hong, Seong-Geun; Yarishkin, Oleg V.; Bae, Young Min; Kim, Jae Gon; O'Grady, Scott M.; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2009-06-26

    Potassium channel activity has been shown to facilitate cell proliferation in cancer cells. In the present study, the role of Kv4.1 channels in immortal and tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells was investigated. Kv4.1 protein expression was positively correlated with tumorigenicity. Moreover, transfection with siRNAs targeting Kv4.1 mRNA suppressed proliferation of tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells. Experiments using mRNA isolated from human breast cancer tissues revealed that the level of Kv4.1 mRNA expression varied depending on the stage of the tumor. Kv4.1 protein expression increased during stages T2 and T3 compared to normal tissue. These results demonstrated that Kv4.1 plays a role in proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells. In addition, elevated Kv4.1 expression may be useful as a diagnostic marker for staging mammary tumors and selective blockers of Kv4.1 may serve to suppress tumor cell proliferation.

  12. Kv3.1-Kv3.2 channels underlie a high-voltage-activating component of the delayed rectifier K+ current in projecting neurons from the globus pallidus.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pineda, R; Chow, A; Amarillo, Y; Moreno, H; Saganich, M; Vega-Saenz de Miera, E C; Hernández-Cruz, A; Rudy, B

    1999-09-01

    The globus pallidus plays central roles in the basal ganglia circuitry involved in movement control as well as in cognitive and emotional functions. There is therefore great interest in the anatomic and electrophysiological characterization of this nucleus. Most pallidal neurons are GABAergic projecting cells, a large fraction of which express the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV). Here we show that PV-containing pallidal neurons coexpress Kv3. 1 and Kv3.2 K+ channel proteins and that both Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 antibodies coprecipitate both channel proteins from pallidal membrane extracts solubilized with nondenaturing detergents, suggesting that the two channel subunits are forming heteromeric channels. Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels have several unusual electrophysiological properties when expressed in heterologous expression systems and are thought to play special roles in neuronal excitability including facilitating sustained high-frequency firing in fast-spiking neurons such as interneurons in the cortex and the hippocampus. Electrophysiological analysis of freshly dissociated pallidal neurons demonstrates that these cells have a current that is nearly identical to the currents expressed by Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins in heterologous expression systems, including activation at very depolarized membrane potentials (more positive than -10 mV) and very fast deactivation rates. These results suggest that the electrophysiological properties of native channels containing Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins in pallidal neurons are not significantly affected by factors such as associated subunits or postranslational modifications that result in channels having different properties in heterologous expression systems and native neurons. Most neurons in the globus pallidus have been reported to fire sustained trains of action potentials at high-frequency. Kv3.1-Kv3.2 voltage-gated K+ channels may play a role in helping maintain sustained high-frequency repetitive firing as they probably do

  13. Taurine activates delayed rectifier KV channels via a metabotropic pathway in retinal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bulley, Simon; Liu, Yufei; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Taurine is one of the most abundant amino acids in the retina, throughout the CNS, and in heart and muscle cells. In keeping with its broad tissue distribution, taurine serves as a modulator of numerous basic processes, such as enzyme activity, cell development, myocardial function and cytoprotection. Despite this multitude of functional roles, the precise mechanism underlying taurine's actions has not yet been identified. In this study we report findings that indicate a novel role for taurine in the regulation of voltage-gated delayed rectifier potassium (KV) channels in retinal neurons by means of a metabotropic receptor pathway. The metabotropic taurine response was insensitive to the Cl− channel blockers, picrotoxin and strychnine, but it was inhibited by a specific serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, MDL11939. Moreover, we found that taurine enhanced KV channels via intracellular protein kinase C-mediated pathways. When 5-HT2A receptors were expressed in human embryonic kidney cells, taurine and AL34662, a non-specific 5-HT2 receptor activator, produced a similar regulation of KIR channels. In sum, this study provides new evidence that taurine activates a serotonin system, apparently via 5-HT2A receptors and related intracellular pathways. PMID:23045337

  14. Up-regulation of the Kv3.4 potassium channel subunit in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Ester; Noé, Véronique; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Lluis, Carmen; Ferrer, Isidre; Ciudad, Carlos J; Franco, Rafael

    2004-11-01

    Gene expression throughout the different stages of Alzheimer's disease was analysed in samples from cerebral cortex. The gene encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.4 was already overexpressed in early stages of the disease, and in advanced stages Kv3.4 was present at high levels in neurodegenerative structures. This subunit regulates delayed-rectifier currents, which are primary determinants of spike repolarization in neurones. In unique samples from a patient with Alzheimer's disease whose amount of amyloid plaques was decreased by beta amyloid immunization, Kv3.4 was overexpressed. The channel subunit was expressed in the neuropil, in the remaining conventional plaques in the frontal cortex and in collapsed plaques in the orbitary cortex. Therefore, amyloid deposition in plaques does not seem to be responsible for the increase in Kv3.4 levels. Nevertheless, Kv3.4 up-regulation is related to amyloid pathology, given that transgenic mice with the Swedish mutation of amyloid precursor protein showed increased expression of Kv3.4. Up-regulation of voltage-gated potassium channel subunits alters potassium currents in neurones and leads to altered synaptic activity that may underlie the neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, Kv3.4 likely represents a novel therapeutic target for the disease.

  15. KV10.1 K(+)-channel plasma membrane discrete domain partitioning and its functional correlation in neurons.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Garduño, Aura M; Mitkovski, Miso; Alexopoulos, Ioannis K; Sánchez, Araceli; Stühmer, Walter; Pardo, Luis A; Ortega, Alicia

    2014-03-01

    KV10.1 potassium channels are implicated in a variety of cellular processes including cell proliferation and tumour progression. Their expression in over 70% of human tumours makes them an attractive diagnostic and therapeutic target. Although their physiological role in the central nervous system is not yet fully understood, advances in their precise cell localization will contribute to the understanding of their interactions and function. We have determined the plasma membrane (PM) distribution of the KV10.1 protein in an enriched mouse brain PM fraction and its association with cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich domains. We show that the KV10.1 channel has two different populations in a 3:2 ratio, one associated to and another excluded from Detergent Resistant Membranes (DRMs). This distribution of KV10.1 in isolated PM is cholesterol- and cytoskeleton-dependent since alteration of those factors changes the relationship to 1:4. In transfected HEK-293 cells with a mutant unable to bind Ca(2+)/CaM to KV10.1 protein, Kv10.1 distribution in DRM/non-DRM is 1:4. Mean current density was doubled in the cholesterol-depleted cells, without any noticeable effects on other parameters. These results demonstrate that recruitment of the KV10.1 channel to the DRM fractions involves its functional regulation.

  16. Regulation of intrinsic excitability in hippocampal neurons by activity-dependent modulation of the Kv2.1 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Durga P.; Misonou, Hiroaki; Pan, Sheng-Jun; Held, Joshua E.; Surmeier, D. James; Trimmer, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Kv2.1 is the prominent somatodendritic sustained or delayed rectifier voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel in mammalian central neurons, and is a target for activity-dependent modulation via calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation. Using hanatoxin-mediated block of Kv2.1 we show that, in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, glutamate stimulation leads to significant hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation gating properties of the Kv2.1-component of delayed rectifier K+ (IK) currents. In computer models of hippocampal neurons, these glutamate-stimulated shifts in the gating of the Kv2.1-component of IK lead to a dramatic suppression of action potential firing frequency. Current-clamp experiments in cultured rat hippocampal neurons showed glutamate-stimulation induced a similar suppression of neuronal firing frequency. Membrane depolarization also resulted in similar hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependent gating properties of neuronal IK currents, and suppression of neuronal firing. The glutamate-induced effects on neuronal firing were eliminated by hanatoxin, but not by dendrotoxin-K, a blocker of Kv1.1-containing channels. These studies together demonstrate a specific contribution of modulation of Kv2.1 channels in the activity-dependent regulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability. PMID:19276663

  17. Kv5, Kv6, Kv8, and Kv9 subunits: No simple silent bystanders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Members of the electrically silent voltage-gated K+ (Kv) subfamilies (Kv5, Kv6, Kv8, and Kv9, collectively identified as electrically silent voltage-gated K+ channel [KvS] subunits) do not form functional homotetrameric channels but assemble with Kv2 subunits into heterotetrameric Kv2/KvS channels with unique biophysical properties. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed Kv2 subunits, KvS subunits show a more restricted expression. This raises the possibility that Kv2/KvS heterotetramers have tissue-specific functions, making them potential targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Here, I provide an overview of the expression of KvS subunits in different tissues and discuss their proposed role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. This overview demonstrates the importance of KvS subunits and Kv2/KvS heterotetramers in vivo and the importance of considering KvS subunits and Kv2/KvS heterotetramers in the development of novel treatments. PMID:26755771

  18. XE991 and Linopirdine Are State-Dependent Inhibitors for Kv7/KCNQ Channels that Favor Activated Single Subunits.

    PubMed

    Greene, Derek L; Kang, Seungwoo; Hoshi, Naoto

    2017-07-01

    M-channel inhibitors, especially XE991, are being used increasingly in animal experiments; however, insufficient characterization of XE991 at times confounds the interpretation of results when using this compound. Here, we demonstrate that XE991 and linopirdine are state-dependent inhibitors that favor the activated-subunit of neuronal Kv7/KCNQ channels. We performed patch-clamp experiments on homomeric Kv7.2 or heteromeric Kv7.2/3 channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells to characterize XE991 and linopirdine. Neither inhibitor was efficacious around the resting membrane potential of cells in physiologic conditions. Inhibition of Kv7.2 and Kv7.2/3 channels by XE991 was closely related with channel activation. When the voltage dependence of activation was left-shifted by retigabine or right-shifted by the mutation, Kv7.2(R214D), the shift in half-activation voltage proportionally coincided with the shift in the half-effective potential for XE991 inhibition. Inhibition kinetics during XE991 wash-in was facilitated at depolarized potentials. Ten-minute washout of XE991 resulted in ∼30% current recovery, most of which was attributed to surface transport of Kv7.2 channels. Linopirdine also exhibited similar inhibition characteristics, with the exception of near- complete current recovery after washout at depolarized potentials. Inhibition kinetics of both XE991 and linopirdine was not as sensitive to changes in voltage as would be predicted by open- channel inhibition. Instead, they were well explained by binding to a single activated subunit. The characteristics of XE991 and linopirdine should be taken into account when these M-channel inhibitors are used in experiments. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Manipulation of the delayed rectifier Kv1.5 potassium channel in glial cells by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Roy, M L; Saal, D; Perney, T; Sontheimer, H; Waxman, S G; Kaczmarek, L K

    1996-11-01

    Glial cells have been shown to express several biophysically and pharmacology distinct potassium channel types. However, the molecular identity of most glial K+ channels is unknown. We have developed an antibody specific for the Shaker type potassium channel Kv1.5 protein, and demonstrate by immunohistochemistry the presence of this channel in glial cells of adult rat hippocampal and cerebellar slices, as well as in cultured spinal cord astrocytes. Immunoreactivity was particularly intense in the endfoot processes of astrocytes surrounding the microvasculature of the hippocampus. The specific contribution of this channel protein to the delayed rectifying K+ current of spinal cord astrocytes was determined by incubating these cells with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to the mRNA coding for Kv1.5 protein. Such treatment reduced delayed rectifier current density and shifted the potassium current steadystate inactivation, without altering current activation, cell capacitance, or cell resting potential. The tetraethylammonium acetate (TEA) sensitivity of astrocytic delayed rectifier current was enhanced following antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment, suggesting that Kv1.5 channel protein may provide a significant component of the TEA-insensitive current in this preparation. Our results suggest that Kv1.5 is widely expressed in glial cells of brain and spinal cord and that delayed rectifying K+ currents in astrocytes are largely mediated by Kv1.5 channel protein.

  20. Kv1.3 channel-blocking immunomodulatory peptides from parasitic worms: implications for autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Sandeep; Chang, Shih Chieh; Nguyen, Hai M.; Huq, Redwan; Tanner, Mark R.; Londono, Luz M.; Estrada, Rosendo; Dhawan, Vikas; Chauhan, Satendra; Upadhyay, Sanjeev K.; Gindin, Mariel; Hotez, Peter J.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Swarbrick, James D.; Wulff, Heike; Iadonato, Shawn P.; Gutman, George A.; Beeton, Christine; Pennington, Michael W.; Norton, Raymond S.; Chandy, K. George

    2014-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium (Kv) 1.3 channel is widely regarded as a therapeutic target for immunomodulation in autoimmune diseases. ShK-186, a selective inhibitor of Kv1.3 channels, ameliorates autoimmune diseases in rodent models, and human phase 1 trials of this agent in healthy volunteers have been completed. In this study, we identified and characterized a large family of Stichodactyla helianthus toxin (ShK)–related peptides in parasitic worms. Based on phylogenetic analysis, 2 worm peptides were selected for study: AcK1, a 51-residue peptide expressed in the anterior secretory glands of the dog-infecting hookworm Ancylostoma caninum and the human-infecting hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum, and BmK1, the C-terminal domain of a metalloprotease from the filarial worm Brugia malayi. These peptides in solution adopt helical structures closely resembling that of ShK. At doses in the nanomolar–micromolar range, they block native Kv1.3 in human T cells and cloned Kv1.3 stably expressed in L929 mouse fibroblasts. They preferentially suppress the proliferation of rat CCR7− effector memory T cells without affecting naive and central memory subsets and inhibit the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response caused by skin-homing effector memory T cells in rats. Further, they suppress IFNγ production by human T lymphocytes. ShK-related peptides in parasitic worms may contribute to the potential beneficial effects of probiotic parasitic worm therapy in human autoimmune diseases.—Chhabra, S., Chang, S. C., Nguyen, H. M., Huq, R., Tanner, M. R., Londono, L. M., Estrada, R., Dhawan, V., Chauhan, S., Upadhyay, S. K., Gindin, M., Hotez, P. J., Valenzuela, J. G., Mohanty, B., Swarbrick, J. D., Wulff, H., Iadonato, S. P., Gutman, G. A., Beeton, C., Pennington, M. W., Norton, R. S., Chandy, K. G. Kv1.3 channel-blocking immunomodulatory peptides from parasitic worms: implications for autoimmune diseases. PMID:24891519

  1. Stabilization of the conductive conformation of a voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel: the lid mechanism.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose S; Syeda, Ruhma; Montal, Mauricio

    2013-06-07

    Voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels are molecular switches that sense membrane potential and in response open to allow K(+) ions to diffuse out of the cell. In these proteins, sensor and pore belong to two distinct structural modules. We previously showed that the pore module alone is a robust yet dynamic structural unit in lipid membranes and that it senses potential and gates open to conduct K(+) with unchanged fidelity. The implication is that the voltage sensitivity of K(+) channels is not solely encoded in the sensor. Given that the coupling between sensor and pore remains elusive, we asked whether it is then possible to convert a pore module characterized by brief openings into a conductor with a prolonged lifetime in the open state. The strategy involves selected probes targeted to the filter gate of the channel aiming to modulate the probability of the channel being open assayed by single channel recordings from the sensorless pore module reconstituted in lipid bilayers. Here we show that the premature closing of the pore is bypassed by association of the filter gate with two novel open conformation stabilizers: an antidepressant and a peptide toxin known to act selectively on Kv channels. Such stabilization of the conductive conformation of the channel is faithfully mimicked by the covalent attachment of fluorescein at a cysteine residue selectively introduced near the filter gate. This modulation prolongs the occupancy of permeant ions at the gate. It is this longer embrace between ion and gate that we conjecture underlies the observed stabilization of the conductive conformation. This study provides a new way of thinking about gating.

  2. Regulation of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel Kv1.5 by the Janus Kinase JAK3.

    PubMed

    Warsi, Jamshed; Elvira, Bernat; Bissinger, Rosi; Hosseinzadeh, Zohreh; Lang, Florian

    2015-12-01

    The tyrosine kinase Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) participates in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. The kinase further influences ion channels and transport proteins. The present study explored whether JAK3 contributes to the regulation of the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv1.5, which participates in the regulation of diverse functions including atrial cardiac action potential and tumor cell proliferation. To this end, cRNA encoding Kv1.5 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional injection of cRNA encoding wild-type JAK3, constitutively active (A568V)JAK3, or inactive (K851A)JAK3. Voltage-gated K(+) channel activity was measured utilizing dual electrode voltage clamp, and Kv1.5 channel protein abundance in the cell membrane was quantified utilizing chemiluminescence of Kv1.5 containing an extracellular hemagglutinin epitope (Kv1.5-HA). As a result, Kv1.5 activity and Kv1.5-HA protein abundance were significantly decreased by wild-type JAK3 and (A568V)JAK3, but not by (K851A)JAK3. Inhibition of Kv1.5 protein insertion into the cell membrane by brefeldin A (5 μM) resulted in a decline of the voltage-gated current, which was similar in the absence and presence of (A568V)JAK3, suggesting that (A568V)JAK3 did not accelerate Kv1.5 protein retrieval from the cell membrane. A 24 h treatment with ouabain (100 µM) significantly decreased the voltage-gated current in oocytes expressing Kv1.5 without or with (A568V)JAK3 and dissipated the difference between oocytes expressing Kv1.5 alone and oocytes expressing Kv1.5 with (A568V)JAK3. In conclusion, JAK3 contributes to the regulation of membrane Kv1.5 protein abundance and activity, an effect sensitive to ouabain and thus possibly involving Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity.

  3. Reconstitution of a Kv Channel into Lipid Membranes for Structural and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2013-01-01

    To study the lipid-protein interaction in a reductionistic fashion, it is necessary to incorporate the membrane proteins into membranes of well-defined lipid composition. We are studying the lipid-dependent gating effects in a prototype voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, and have worked out detailed procedures to reconstitute the channels into different membrane systems. Our reconstitution procedures take consideration of both detergent-induced fusion of vesicles and the fusion of protein/detergent micelles with the lipid/detergent mixed micelles as well as the importance of reaching an equilibrium distribution of lipids among the protein/detergent/lipid and the detergent/lipid mixed micelles. Our data suggested that the insertion of the channels in the lipid vesicles is relatively random in orientations, and the reconstitution efficiency is so high that no detectable protein aggregates were seen in fractionation experiments. We have utilized the reconstituted channels to determine the conformational states of the channels in different lipids, record electrical activities of a small number of channels incorporated in planar lipid bilayers, screen for conformation-specific ligands from a phage-displayed peptide library, and support the growth of 2D crystals of the channels in membranes. The reconstitution procedures described here may be adapted for studying other membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, especially for the investigation of the lipid effects on the eukaryotic voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:23892292

  4. Kv1.3 channels mark functionally competent CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chimote, Ameet A.; Hajdu, Peter; Sfyris, Alexandros M.; Gleich, Brittany N.; Wise-Draper, Trisha; Casper, Keith A.; Conforti, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are potent mediators of an anti-tumor response. However, their function is attenuated in solid tumors. CD8+ T cell effector functions such as cytokine and granzyme production depend on cytoplasmic Ca2+, which is controlled by ion channels. In particular, Kv1.3 channels regulate the membrane potential and Ca2+ influx in human effector memory T (TEM) cells. In this study, we assessed the contribution of reduced Kv1.3 and Ca2+ flux on TIL effector function in head and neck cancer (HNC). We obtained tumor samples and matched peripheral blood from 14 patients with HNC. CD3+ TILs were comprised of 57% CD4+ (82% TEM and 20% Treg) and 36% CD8+ cells. Electrophysiology revealed a 70% reduction in functional Kv1.3 channels in TILs as compared to peripheral blood T cells from paired patients, which was accompanied by a decrease in Ca2+ influx. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that CD8+ TILs expressing high Kv1.3 preferentially localized in the stroma. Importantly, high expression of Kv1.3 correlated with high Ki67 and granzyme B expression. Overall, these data indicate that defective Kv1.3 channels and Ca2+ fluxes in TILs may contribute to reduced immune surveillance in HNC. PMID:27815390

  5. Fe2O3 nanoparticles suppress Kv1.3 channels via affecting the redox activity of Kvβ2 subunit in Jurkat T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Wei-Xia; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Ning; Hao, Wei; Gao, Xue; Cao, Ji-Min

    2015-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are promising nanomaterials in medical practice due to their special magnetic characteristics and nanoscale size. However, their potential impacts on immune cells are not well documented. This study aims to investigate the effects of Fe2O3 nanoparticles (Fe2O3-NPs) on the electrophysiology of Kv1.3 channels in Jurkat T cells. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate that incubation of Jurkat cells with Fe2O3-NPs dose- and time-dependently decreased the current density and shifted the steady-state inactivation curve and the recovery curve of Kv1.3 channels to a rightward direction. Fe2O3-NPs increased the NADP level but decreased the NADPH level of Jurkat cells. Direct induction of NADPH into the cytosole of Jurkat cells via the pipette abolished the rightward shift of the inactivation curve. In addition, transmission electron microscopy showed that Fe2O3-NPs could be endocytosed by Jurkat cells with relatively low speed and capacity. Fe2O3-NPs did not significantly affect the viability of Jurkat cells, but suppressed the expressions of certain cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ and IL-2) and interferon responsive genes (IRF-1 and PIM-1), and the time courses of Fe2O3-NPs endocytosis and effects on the expressions of cytokines and interferon responsive genes were compatible. We conclude that Fe2O3-NPs can be endocytosed by Jurkat cells and act intracellularly. Fe2O3-NPs decrease the current density and delay the inactivation and recovery kinetics of Kv1.3 channels in Jurkat cells by oxidizing NADPH and therefore disrupting the redox activity of the Kvβ2 auxiliary subunit, and as a result, lead to changes of the Kv1.3 channel function. These results suggest that iron oxide nanoparticles may affect T cell function by disturbing the activity of Kv1.3 channels. Further, the suppressing effects of Fe2O3-NPs on the expressions of certain inflammatory cytokines and interferon responsive genes suggest that iron

  6. Regulation of KCNQ/Kv7 family voltage-gated K(+) channels by lipids.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Keenan C; Sanders, Charles R

    2017-04-01

    Many years of studies have established that lipids can impact membrane protein structure and function through bulk membrane effects, by direct but transient annular interactions with the bilayer-exposed surface of protein transmembrane domains, and by specific binding to protein sites. Here, we focus on how phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) impact ion channel function and how the structural details of the interactions of these lipids with ion channels are beginning to emerge. We focus on the Kv7 (KCNQ) subfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels, which are regulated by both PIP2 and PUFAs and play a variety of important roles in human health and disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  7. Retigabine, a Kv7.2/Kv7.3-Channel Opener, Attenuates Drug-Induced Seizures in Knock-In Mice Harboring Kcnq2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Yukiko; Tomonoh, Yuko; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Zhang, Bo; Uchida, Taku; Ishii, Atsushi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The hetero-tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.2/Kv7.3, which is encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, plays an important role in limiting network excitability in the neonatal brain. Kv7.2/Kv7.3 dysfunction resulting from KCNQ2 mutations predominantly causes self-limited or benign epilepsy in neonates, but also causes early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Retigabine (RTG), a Kv7.2/ Kv7.3-channel opener, seems to be a rational antiepileptic drug for epilepsies caused by KCNQ2 mutations. We therefore evaluated the effects of RTG on seizures in two strains of knock-in mice harboring different Kcnq2 mutations, in comparison to the effects of phenobarbital (PB), which is the first-line antiepileptic drug for seizures in neonates. The subjects were heterozygous knock-in mice (Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+) bearing the Y284C or A306T Kcnq2 mutation, respectively, and their wild-type (WT) littermates, at 63–100 days of age. Seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA, 12mg/kg) were recorded using a video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring system. Effects of RTG on KA-induced seizures of both strains of knock-in mice were assessed using seizure scores from a modified Racine’s scale and compared with those of PB. The number and total duration of spike bursts on EEG and behaviors monitored by video recording were also used to evaluate the effects of RTG and PB. Both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice showed significantly more KA-induced seizures than WT mice. RTG significantly attenuated KA-induced seizure activities in both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice, and more markedly than PB. This is the first reported evidence of RTG ameliorating KA-induced seizures in knock-in mice bearing mutations of Kcnq2, with more marked effects than those observed with PB. RTG or other Kv7.2-channel openers may be considered as first-line antiepileptic treatments for epilepsies resulting from KCNQ2 mutations. PMID:26910900

  8. The Novel KV7.2/KV7.3 Channel Opener ICA-069673 Reveals Subtype-Specific Functional Roles in Guinea Pig Detrusor Smooth Muscle Excitability and Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Provence, Aaron; Malysz, John

    2015-01-01

    The physiologic roles of voltage-gated KV7 channel subtypes (KV7.1–KV7.5) in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) are poorly understood. Here, we sought to elucidate the functional roles of KV7.2/KV7.3 channels in guinea pig DSM excitability and contractility using the novel KV7.2/KV7.3 channel activator ICA-069673 [N-(2-chloro-5-pyrimidinyl)-3,4-difluorobenzamide]. We employed a multilevel experimental approach using Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, isometric DSM tension recordings, fluorescence Ca2+ imaging, and perforated whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Western blot experiments revealed the protein expression of KV7.2 and KV7.3 channel subunits in DSM tissue. In isolated DSM cells, immunocytochemistry with confocal microscopy further confirmed protein expression for KV7.2 and KV7.3 channel subunits, where they localize within the vicinity of the cell membrane. ICA-069673 inhibited spontaneous phasic, pharmacologically induced, and nerve-evoked contractions in DSM isolated strips in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of ICA-069673 on DSM spontaneous phasic and tonic contractions were abolished in the presence of the KV7 channel inhibitor XE991 [10,10-bis(4-pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone dihydrochloride]. Under conditions of elevated extracellular K+ (60 mM), the effects of ICA-069673 on DSM tonic contractions were significantly attenuated. ICA-069673 decreased the global intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DSM cells, an effect blocked by the L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor nifedipine. ICA-069673 hyperpolarized the membrane potential and inhibited spontaneous action potentials of isolated DSM cells, effects that were blocked in the presence of XE991. In conclusion, using the novel KV7.2/KV7.3 channel activator ICA-069673, this study provides strong evidence for a critical role for the KV7.2- and KV7.3-containing channels in DSM function at both cellular and tissue levels. PMID:26087697

  9. Distinct Kv channel subtypes contribute to differences in spike signaling properties in the axon initial segment and presynaptic boutons of cerebellar interneurons.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew J M; Tranquil, Elizabeth; Christie, Jason M

    2014-05-07

    The discrete arrangement of voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels in axons may impart functional advantages in action potential (AP) signaling yet, in compact cell types, the organization of Kv channels is poorly understood. We find that in cerebellar stellate cell interneurons of mice, the composition and influence of Kv channels populating the axon is diverse and depends on location allowing axonal compartments to differentially control APs in a local manner. Kv1 channels determine AP repolarization at the spike initiation site but not at more distal sites, limiting the expression of use-dependent spike broadening to the most proximal axon region, likely a key attribute informing spiking phenotype. Local control of AP repolarization at presynaptic boutons depends on Kv3 channels keeping APs brief, thus limiting Ca(2+) influx and synaptic strength. These observations suggest that AP repolarization is tuned by the local influence of distinct Kv channel types, and this organization enhances the functional segregation of axonal compartments.

  10. Kv4.2 and accessory dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein 10 (DPP10) subunit preferentially form a 4:2 (Kv4.2:DPP10) channel complex.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masahiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Nakajo, Koichi

    2015-09-11

    Kv4 is a member of the voltage-gated K(+) channel family and forms a complex with various accessory subunits. Dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like protein (DPP) is one of the auxiliary subunits for the Kv4 channel. Although DPP has been well characterized and is known to increase the current amplitude and accelerate the inactivation and recovery from inactivation of Kv4 current, it remains to be determined how many DPPs bind to one Kv4 channel. To examine whether the expression level of DPP changes the biophysical properties of Kv4, we expressed Kv4.2 and DPP10 in different ratios in Xenopus oocytes and analyzed the currents under two-electrode voltage clamp. The current amplitude and the speed of recovery from inactivation of Kv4.2 changed depending on the co-expression level of DPP10. This raised the possibility that the stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex is variable and affects the biophysical properties of Kv4.2. We next determined the stoichiometry of DPP10 alone by subunit counting using single-molecule imaging. Approximately 70% of the DPP10 formed dimers in the plasma membrane, and the rest existed as monomers in the absence of Kv4.2. We next determined the stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex; Kv4.2-mCherry and mEGFP-DPP10 were co-expressed in different ratios and the stoichiometries of Kv4.2-DPP10 complexes were evaluated by the subunit counting method. The stoichiometry of the Kv4.2-DPP10 complex was variable depending on the relative expression level of each subunit, with a preference for 4:2 stoichiometry. This preference may come from the bulky dimeric structure of the extracellular domain of DPP10.

  11. Subtype-selective activation of K(v)7 channels by AaTXKβ₂₋₆₄, a novel toxin variant from the Androctonus australis scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Landoulsi, Zied; Miceli, Francesco; Palmese, Angelo; Amoresano, Angela; Marino, Gennaro; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Benkhalifa, Rym

    2013-11-01

    K(v)7.4 channel subunits are expressed in central auditory pathways and in inner ear sensory hair cells and skeletal and smooth muscle cells. Openers of K(v)7.4 channels have been suggested to improve hearing loss, systemic or pulmonary arterial hypertension, urinary incontinence, gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric diseases, and skeletal muscle disorders. Scorpion venoms are a large source of peptides active on K⁺ channels. Therefore, we have optimized a combined purification/screening procedure to identify specific modulator(s) of K(v)7.4 channels from the venom of the North African scorpion Androctonus australis (Aa). We report the isolation and functional characterization of AaTXKβ₂₋₆₄, a novel variant of AaTXKβ₁₋₆₄, in a high-performance liquid chromatography fraction from Aa venom (named P8), which acts as the first peptide activator of K(v)7.4 channels. In particular, in both Xenopus oocytes and mammalian Chinese hamster ovary cells, AaTXKβ₂₋₆₄, but not AaTXKβ₁₋₆₄, hyperpolarized the threshold voltage of current activation and increased the maximal currents of heterologously expressed K(v)7.4 channels. AaTXKβ₂₋₆₄ also activated K(v)7.3, K(v)7.2/3, and K(v)7.5/3 channels, whereas homomeric K(v)1.1, K(v)7.1, and K(v)7.2 channels were unaffected. We anticipate that these results may prove useful in unraveling the novel biologic roles of AaTXKβ₂₋₆₄-sensitive K(v)7 channels and developing novel pharmacologic tools that allow subtype-selective targeting of K(v)7 channels.

  12. Artificial Modulation of the Gating Behavior of a K+ Channel in a KvAP-DNA Chimera

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    We present experiments where the gating behavior of a voltage-gated ion channel is modulated by artificial ligand binding. We construct a channel-DNA chimera with the KvAP potassium channel reconstituted in an artificial membrane. The channel is functional and the single channel ion conductivity unperturbed by the presence of the DNA. However, the channel opening probability vs. bias voltage, i.e., the gating, can be shifted considerably by the electrostatic force between the charges on the DNA and the voltage sensing domain of the protein. Different hybridization states of the chimera DNA thus lead to different response curves of the channel. PMID:21526187

  13. SUMO modification of cell surface Kv2.1 potassium channels regulates the activity of rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.; Dowdell, Evan J.; Dementieva, Irina S.; Marks, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv2.1 potassium channels are important in the brain for determining activity-dependent excitability. Small ubiquitin-like modifier proteins (SUMOs) regulate function through reversible, enzyme-mediated conjugation to target lysine(s). Here, sumoylation of Kv2.1 in hippocampal neurons is shown to regulate firing by shifting the half-maximal activation voltage (V1/2) of channels up to 35 mV. Native SUMO and Kv2.1 are shown to interact within and outside channel clusters at the neuronal surface. Studies of single, heterologously expressed Kv2.1 channels show that only K470 is sumoylated. The channels have four subunits, but no more than two non-adjacent subunits carry SUMO concurrently. SUMO on one site shifts V1/2 by 15 mV, whereas sumoylation of two sites produces a full response. Thus, the SUMO pathway regulates neuronal excitability via Kv2.1 in a direct and graded manner. PMID:21518833

  14. Kv3.3 Channels Bind Hax-1 and Arp2/3 to Assemble a Stable Local Actin Network that Regulates Channel Gating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Fleming, Matthew R; Amiri, Anahita; El-Hassar, Lynda; Surguchev, Alexei A; Hyland, Callen; Jenkins, David P; Desai, Rooma; Brown, Maile R; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Waters, Michael F; Large, Charles H; Horvath, Tamas L; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar; Vaccarino, Flora M; Forscher, Paul; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-04-07

    Mutations in the Kv3.3 potassium channel (KCNC3) cause cerebellar neurodegeneration and impair auditory processing. The cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 contains a proline-rich domain conserved in proteins that activate actin nucleation through Arp2/3. We found that Kv3.3 recruits Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in formation of a relatively stable cortical actin filament network resistant to cytochalasin D that inhibits fast barbed end actin assembly. These Kv3.3-associated actin structures are required to prevent very rapid N-type channel inactivation during short depolarizations of the plasma membrane. The effects of Kv3.3 on the actin cytoskeleton are mediated by the binding of the cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv3.3 to Hax-1, an anti-apoptotic protein that regulates actin nucleation through Arp2/3. A human Kv3.3 mutation within a conserved proline-rich domain produces channels that bind Hax-1 but are impaired in recruiting Arp2/3 to the plasma membrane, resulting in growth cones with deficient actin veils in stem cell-derived neurons.

  15. Bilayer deformation by the Kv channel voltage sensor domain revealed by self-assembly simulations.

    PubMed

    Bond, Peter J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2007-02-20

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore the interaction with a phospholipid bilayer of the voltage sensor (VS) domain and the S4 helix from the archaebacterial voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel KvAP. Multiple 2-mus self-assembly simulations reveal that the isolated S4 helix may adopt either interfacial or transmembrane (TM) locations with approximately equal probability. In the TM state, the insertion of the voltage-sensing region of S4 is facilitated via local bilayer deformation that, combined with side chain "snorkeling," enables its Arg side chains to interact with lipid headgroups and water. Multiple 0.2-mus self-assembly simulations of the VS domain are also performed, along with simulations of MscL and KcsA, to permit comparison with more "canonical" integral membrane protein structures. All three stably adopt a TM orientation within a bilayer. For MscL and KcsA, there is no significant bilayer deformation. In contrast, for the VS, there is considerable local deformation, which is again primarily due to the lipid-exposed S4. It is shown that for both the VS and isolated S4 helix, the positively charged side chains of S4 are accommodated within the membrane through a combination of stabilizing interactions with lipid glycerol and headgroup regions, water, and anionic side chains. Our results support the possibility that bilayer deformation around key gating charge residues in Kv channels may result in "focusing" of the electrostatic field, and indicate that, when considering competing models of voltage-sensing, it is essential to consider the dynamics and structure of not only the protein but also of the local lipid environment.

  16. Kv3 channels modulate calcium signals induced by fast firing patterns in the rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Kirill I; Grygorov, Oleksii O; Maslov, Vitaly Yu; Veselovsky, Nikolay S; Fedulova, Svetlana A

    2012-11-01

    Expression of non-inactivating Kv3.1/Kv3.2 potassium channels determines fast-spiking phenotype of many types of neurones including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs); furthermore Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals. In the present study we investigated how inhibition of Kv3 channel by low TEA concentrations modifies firing properties and Ca2+ influx in the rat RGCs. Experiments were performed on the whole-mount retinal preparations from 4 to 6 weeks old Wistar rats using simultaneous whole cell patch clamp and intracellular Ca2+ measurements in combination with single-cell RT-PCR. In response to 500-ms depolarization step the RGCs demonstrated fast firing tonic behaviour with a mean frequency of spiking 61±5 Hz (n=28). All of the tonic cells tested (n=9) expressed specific mRNA for either Kv3.1 or Kv3.2 or for both channels. Bath applications of TEA (250 μM, 500 μM and 1 mM) modified firing patterns dose-dependently as follows: firing frequency was decreased, mean action potential (AP) half-width increased and mean amplitude of after hyperpolarization was reduced. The amplitude of the Ca2+ signals induced by the cells firing was linearly dependent on number of APs with a mean slope of 7.3±0.9 nM per one AP (n=8). APs widening by TEA increased the slope of the amplitude vs. AP number plots in a dose-dependent manner: 250 μM of TEA increased the mean slope value to 9.5±1.2 nM/AP, 500 μM to 12.4±2.4 nM/AP and 1 mM to 13.2±2.9 nM/AP (n=6). All these parameters, as well as the cells firing properties, were significantly different from controls and from each other except between 500 μM and 1 mM. This is consistent with the pharmacological properties of Kv3.1/Kv3.2 channels: the TEA IC50 is in the range 150-300 μM with almost complete block at 1 mM. This suggests that Kv3.1/Kv3.2 channels underlie the fast firing of the rat RGCs and provide at a given firing frequency 1.8-fold restriction Ca2+ influx, thus protecting the cells

  17. Ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 modulates Kv1.3 current amplitude and ion channel protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Patricio; Schwartz, Austin B.; Iyer, Subashini R.; Warrington, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv) go beyond the stabilization of the resting potential and regulate biochemical pathways, regulate intracellular signaling, and detect energy homeostasis. Because targeted deletion and pharmacological block of the Kv1.3 channel protein produce marked changes in metabolism, resistance to diet-induced obesity, and changes in olfactory structure and function, this investigation explored Nedd4-2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation to regulate Kv1.3 channel density. Heterologous coexpression of Nedd4-2 ligase and Kv1.3 in HEK 293 cells reduced Kv1.3 current density without modulation of kinetic properties as measured by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Modulation of current density was dependent on ligase activity and was lost through point mutation of cysteine 938 in the catalytic site of the ligase (Nedd4-2CS). Incorporation of adaptor protein Grb10 relieved Nedd4-2-induced current suppression as did application of the proteasome inhibitor Mg-132. SDS-PAGE and immunoprecipitation strategies demonstrated a channel/adaptor/ligase signalplex. Pixel immunodensity was reduced for Kv1.3 in the presence of Nedd4-2, which was eliminated upon additional incorporation of Grb10. We confirmed Nedd4-2/Grb10 coimmunoprecipitation and observed an increased immunodensity for Nedd4-2 in the presence of Kv1.3 plus Grb10, regardless of whether the catalytic site was active. Kv1.3/Nedd4-2 were reciprocally coimmunoprecipated, whereby mutation of the COOH-terminal, SH3-recognition (493–498), or ubiquitination sites on Kv1.3 (lysines 467, 476, 498) retained coimmunoprecipitation, while the latter prevented the reduction in channel density. A model is presented for which an atypical interaction outside the canonical PY motif may permit channel/ligase interaction to lead to protein degradation and reduced current density, which can involve Nedd4-2/Grb10 interactions to disrupt Kv1.3 loss of current density. PMID:27146988

  18. Ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 modulates Kv1.3 current amplitude and ion channel protein targeting.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Patricio; Schwartz, Austin B; Iyer, Subashini R; Warrington, Anthony; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2016-08-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv) go beyond the stabilization of the resting potential and regulate biochemical pathways, regulate intracellular signaling, and detect energy homeostasis. Because targeted deletion and pharmacological block of the Kv1.3 channel protein produce marked changes in metabolism, resistance to diet-induced obesity, and changes in olfactory structure and function, this investigation explored Nedd4-2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation to regulate Kv1.3 channel density. Heterologous coexpression of Nedd4-2 ligase and Kv1.3 in HEK 293 cells reduced Kv1.3 current density without modulation of kinetic properties as measured by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Modulation of current density was dependent on ligase activity and was lost through point mutation of cysteine 938 in the catalytic site of the ligase (Nedd4-2CS). Incorporation of adaptor protein Grb10 relieved Nedd4-2-induced current suppression as did application of the proteasome inhibitor Mg-132. SDS-PAGE and immunoprecipitation strategies demonstrated a channel/adaptor/ligase signalplex. Pixel immunodensity was reduced for Kv1.3 in the presence of Nedd4-2, which was eliminated upon additional incorporation of Grb10. We confirmed Nedd4-2/Grb10 coimmunoprecipitation and observed an increased immunodensity for Nedd4-2 in the presence of Kv1.3 plus Grb10, regardless of whether the catalytic site was active. Kv1.3/Nedd4-2 were reciprocally coimmunoprecipated, whereby mutation of the COOH-terminal, SH3-recognition (493-498), or ubiquitination sites on Kv1.3 (lysines 467, 476, 498) retained coimmunoprecipitation, while the latter prevented the reduction in channel density. A model is presented for which an atypical interaction outside the canonical PY motif may permit channel/ligase interaction to lead to protein degradation and reduced current density, which can involve Nedd4-2/Grb10 interactions to disrupt Kv1.3 loss of current density. Copyright © 2016 the American

  19. Activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor by gintonin inhibits Kv1.2 channel activity: involvement of tyrosine kinase and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Choi, Sun-Hye; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Rhee, Jeehae; Chung, Chihye; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2013-08-26

    Gintonin is a novel ginseng-derived G protein-coupled lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand. The primary action of gintonin is to elicit a transient increase in [Ca(2+)]i via activation of LPA receptor subtypes. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels play important roles in synaptic transmission in nervous systems. The previous reports have shown that Kv channels can be regulated by Gαq/11 protein-coupled receptor ligands. In the present study, we examined the effects of gintonin on Kv1.2 channel activity expressed in Xenopus oocytes after injection of RNA encoding the human Kv1.2 α subunit. Gintonin treatment inhibited Kv1.2 channel activity in reversible and concentration-dependent manners. The inhibitory effect of gintonin on Kv1.2 channel activity was blocked by active phospholipase C inhibitor, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor antagonist, and intracellular Ca(2+) chelator. The co-expression of active receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α (RPTPα) with Kv1.2 channel greatly attenuated gintonin-mediated inhibition of Kv1.2 channel activity, but attenuation was not observed with catalytically inactive RPTPα. Furthermore, neither genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nor site-directed mutation of a tyrosine residue (Y132 to Y132F), which is phosphorylated by tyrosine kinase of the N-terminal of the Kv1.2 channel α subunit, significantly attenuated gintonin-mediated inhibition of Kv1.2 channel activity. These results indicate that the gintonin-mediated Kv1.2 channel regulation involves the dual coordination of both tyrosine kinase and RPTPα coupled to this receptor. Finally, gintonin-mediated regulation of Kv1.2 channel activity might explain one of the modulations of gintonin-mediated neuronal activities in nervous systems.

  20. Participation of Kv1 Channels in Control of Membrane Excitability and Burst Generation in Mesencephalic V Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chie-Fang; Kaur, Gurvinder; Vong, Angela; Bawa, Harpreet; Chandler, Scott H.

    2009-01-01

    The function and biophysical properties of low threshold Kv1 current in control of membrane resonance, subthreshold oscillations, and bursting in mesencephalic V neurons (Mes V) were examined in rat brain stem slices (P8–P12) using whole cell current and voltage patch-clamp methods. α-dendrotoxin application, a toxin with high specificity for Kv1.1, 1.2, and 1.6 channels, showed the presence of a low-threshold K+ current that activated rapidly around −50 mV and was relatively noninactivating over a 1-s period and had a V1/2max of −36.2 mV. Other toxins, specific for individual channels containing either Kv 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3 α-subunits, were applied individually, or in combination, and showed that Kv1 channels are heteromeric, composed of combinations of subunits. In current-clamp mode, toxin application transformed the high-frequency resonant properties of the membrane into a low-pass filter and concomitantly reduced the frequency of the subthreshold membrane oscillations. During this period, rhythmical bursting was transformed into low-frequency tonic discharge. Interestingly, in a subset of neurons that did not show bursting, low doses of α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX) sufficient to block 50% of the low threshold Kv1 channels induced bursting and increased the resonant peak impedance and subthreshold oscillations, which was replicated with computer simulation. This suggests that a critical balance between inward and outward currents is necessary for bursting. This was replicated with computer simulation. Single cell RT-PCR and immunohistochemical methods confirmed the presence of Kv1.1, 1.2, and 1.6 α-subunits in Mes V neurons. These data indicate that low threshold Kv1 channels are responsible for membrane resonance, contribute to subthreshold oscillations, and are critical for burst generation. PMID:19144742

  1. Altered Expression and Localization of Hippocampal A-Type Potassium Channel Subunits in the Pilocarpine-Induced Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael M.; Menegola, Milena; Vacher, Helene; Rhodes, Kenneth J.; Trimmer, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Altered ion channel expression and/or function may contribute to the development of certain human epilepsies. In rats, systemic administration of pilocarpine induces a model of human temporal lobe epilepsy, wherein a brief period of status epilepticus (SE) triggers development of spontaneous recurrent seizures that appear after a latency of two-three weeks. Here we investigate changes in expression of A-type voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, which control neuronal excitability and regulate action potential propagation and neurotransmitter release, in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression of component subunits of somatodendritic (Kv4.2, Kv4.3, KChIPl and KChIP2) and axonal (Kv1.4) A-type Kv channels in hippocampi of pilocarpine-treated rats that entered SE. We found that Kv4.2, Kv4.3 and KChIP2 staining in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus changes from being uniformly distributed across the molecular layer to concentrated in just the outer two-thirds. We also observed a loss of KChIP1 immunoreactive interneurons, and a reduction of Kv4.2 and KChIP2 staining in stratum radiatum of CA1. These changes begin to appear 1 week after pilocarpine treatment and persist or are enhanced at 4 and 12 weeks. As such, these changes in Kv channel distribution parallel the acquisition of recurrent spontaneous seizures as observed in this model. We also found temporal changes in Kv1.4 immunoreactivity matching those in Timm's stain, being expanded in stratum lucidum of CA3 and in the inner third of the dentate molecular layer. Among pilocarpine-treated rats, changes were only observed in those that entered SE. These changes in A-type Kv channel expression may contribute to hyperexcitability of dendrites in the associated hippocampal circuits as observed in previous studies of the effects of pilocarpine-induced SE. PMID:18727953

  2. The Antibody Targeting the E314 Peptide of Human Kv1.3 Pore Region Serves as a Novel, Potent and Specific Channel Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Cheng, Long-Xian; Liu, Jin-Ping; Wang, Yan-Fu; Gao, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Hua; Wang, Min; Zeng, Qiu-Tang; Liu, Kun

    2012-01-01

    Selective blockade of Kv1.3 channels in effector memory T (TEM) cells was validated to ameliorate autoimmune or autoimmune-associated diseases. We generated the antibody directed against one peptide of human Kv1.3 (hKv1.3) extracellular loop as a novel and possible Kv1.3 blocker. One peptide of hKv1.3 extracellular loop E3 containing 14 amino acids (E314) was chosen as an antigenic determinant to generate the E314 antibody. The E314 antibody specifically recognized 63.8KD protein stably expressed in hKv1.3-HEK 293 cell lines, whereas it did not recognize or cross-react to human Kv1.1(hKv1.1), Kv1.2(hKv1.2), Kv1.4(hKv1.4), Kv1.5(hKv1.5), KCa3.1(hKCa3.1), HERG, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1, Nav1.5 and Cav1.2 proteins stably expressed in HEK 293 cell lines or in human atrial or ventricular myocytes by Western blotting analysis and immunostaining detection. By the technique of whole-cell patch clamp, the E314 antibody was shown to have a directly inhibitory effect on hKv1.3 currents expressed in HEK 293 or Jurkat T cells and the inhibition showed a concentration-dependence. However, it exerted no significant difference on hKv1.1, hKv1.2, hKv1.4, hKv1.5, hKCa3.1, HERG, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1, L-type Ca2+ or voltage-gated Na+ currents. The present study demonstrates that the antibody targeting the E314 peptide of hKv1.3 pore region could be a novel, potent and specific hKv1.3 blocker without affecting a variety of closely related Kv1 channels, KCa3.1 channels and functional cardiac ion channels underlying central nervous systerm (CNS) disorders or drug-acquired arrhythmias, which is required as a safe clinic-promising channel blocker. PMID:22558454

  3. Voltage-sensor conformation shapes the intra-membrane drug binding site that determines gambierol affinity in Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Kopljar, Ivan; Grottesi, Alessandro; de Block, Tessa; Rainier, Jon D; Tytgat, Jan; Labro, Alain J; Snyders, Dirk J

    2016-08-01

    Marine ladder-shaped polyether toxins are implicated in neurological symptoms of fish-borne food poisonings. The toxin gambierol, produced by the marine dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, belongs to the group of ladder-shaped polyether toxins and inhibits Kv3.1 channels with nanomolar affinity through a mechanism of gating modification. Binding determinants for gambierol localize at the lipid-exposed interface of the pore forming S5 and S6 segments, suggesting that gambierol binds outside of the permeation pathway. To explore a possible involvement of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD), we made different chimeric channels between Kv3.1 and Kv2.1, exchanging distinct parts of the gating machinery. Our results showed that neither the electro-mechanical coupling nor the S1-S3a region of the VSD affect gambierol sensitivity. In contrast, the S3b-S4 part of the VSD (paddle motif) decreased gambierol sensitivity in Kv3.1 more than 100-fold. Structure determination by homology modeling indicated that the position of the S3b-S4 paddle and its primary structure defines the shape and∖or the accessibility of the binding site for gambierol, explaining the observed differences in gambierol affinity between the channel chimeras. Furthermore, these findings explain the observed difference in gambierol affinity for the closed and open channel configurations of Kv3.1, opening new possibilities for exploring the VSDs as selectivity determinants in drug design.

  4. Modulation of the transient outward current (Ito) in rat cardiac myocytes and human Kv4.3 channels by mefloquine.

    PubMed

    Perez-Cortes, E J; Islas, A A; Arevalo, J P; Mancilla, C; Monjaraz, E; Salinas-Stefanon, E M

    2015-10-15

    The antimalarial drug mefloquine, is known to be a potassium channel blocker, although its mechanism of action has not being elucidated and its effects on the transient outward current (Ito) and the molecular correlate, the Kv4.3 channel has not being studied. Here, we describe the mefloquine-induced inhibition of the rat ventricular Ito and of CHO cells co-transfected with human Kv4.3 and its accessory subunit hKChIP2C by whole-cell voltage-clamp. Mefloquine inhibited rat Ito and hKv4.3+KChIP2C currents in a concentration-dependent manner with a limited voltage dependence and similar potencies (IC50=8.9μM and 10.5μM for cardiac myocytes and Kv4.3 channels, respectively). In addition, mefloquine did not affect the activation of either current but significantly modified the hKv4.3 steady-state inactivation and recovery from inactivation. The effects of this drug was compared with that of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a well-known potassium channel blocker and its binding site does not seem to overlap with that of 4-AP.

  5. Vm24, a Natural Immunosuppressive Peptide, Potently and Selectively Blocks Kv1.3 Potassium Channels of Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Zoltan; Gurrola-Briones, Georgina; Papp, Ferenc; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C.; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Tajhya, Rajeev B.; Gaspar, Rezso; Cardenas, Luis; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Beeton, Christine; Possani, Lourival D.

    2012-01-01

    Blockade of Kv1.3 K+ channels in T cells is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes mellitus. Vm24 (α-KTx 23.1) is a novel 36-residue Kv1.3-specific peptide isolated from the venom of the scorpion Vaejovis mexicanus smithi. Vm24 inhibits Kv1.3 channels of human lymphocytes with high affinity (Kd = 2.9 pM) and exhibits >1500-fold selectivity over other ion channels assayed. It inhibits the proliferation and Ca2+ signaling of human T cells in vitro and reduces delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions in rats in vivo. Our results indicate that Vm24 has exceptional pharmacological properties that make it an excellent candidate for treatment of certain autoimmune diseases. PMID:22622363

  6. Vm24, a natural immunosuppressive peptide, potently and selectively blocks Kv1.3 potassium channels of human T cells.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltan; Gurrola-Briones, Georgina; Papp, Ferenc; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Tajhya, Rajeev B; Gaspar, Rezso; Cardenas, Luis; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Beeton, Christine; Possani, Lourival D; Panyi, Gyorgy

    2012-09-01

    Blockade of Kv1.3 K(+) channels in T cells is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes mellitus. Vm24 (α-KTx 23.1) is a novel 36-residue Kv1.3-specific peptide isolated from the venom of the scorpion Vaejovis mexicanus smithi. Vm24 inhibits Kv1.3 channels of human lymphocytes with high affinity (K(d) = 2.9 pM) and exhibits >1500-fold selectivity over other ion channels assayed. It inhibits the proliferation and Ca(2+) signaling of human T cells in vitro and reduces delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions in rats in vivo. Our results indicate that Vm24 has exceptional pharmacological properties that make it an excellent candidate for treatment of certain autoimmune diseases.

  7. Roles of Lymphocyte Kv1.3-Channels in the Pathogenesis of Renal Diseases and Novel Therapeutic Implications of Targeting the Channels

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Delayed rectifier K+-channels (Kv1.3) are predominantly expressed in T lymphocytes. Based on patch-clamp studies, the channels play crucial roles in facilitating the calcium influx necessary to trigger lymphocyte activation and proliferation. Using selective channel inhibitors in experimental animal models, in vivo studies then revealed the clinically relevant relationship between the channel expression and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In renal diseases, in which “chronic inflammation” or “the overstimulation of cellular immunity” is responsible for the pathogenesis, the overexpression of Kv1.3-channels in lymphocytes promotes their cellular proliferation and thus contributes to the progression of tubulointerstitial fibrosis. We recently demonstrated that benidipine, a potent dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, which also strongly and persistently inhibits the lymphocyte Kv1.3-channel currents, suppressed the proliferation of kidney lymphocytes and actually ameliorated the progression of renal fibrosis. Based on the recent in vitro evidence that revealed the pharmacological properties of the channels, the most recent studies have revealed novel therapeutic implications of targeting the lymphocyte Kv1.3-channels for the treatment of renal diseases. PMID:25866450

  8. Molecular and functional characterization of Kv 7 channels in penile arteries and corpus cavernosum of healthy and metabolic syndrome rats.

    PubMed

    Jepps, T A; Olesen, S P; Greenwood, I A; Dalsgaard, T

    2016-05-01

    KCNQ-encoded voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv 7) are involved in the regulation of vascular tone. In this study we evaluated the influence of Kv 7 channel activation on smooth muscle relaxation in rat penile arteries and corpus cavernosum from normal and spontaneously hypertensive, heart failure-prone (SHHF) rats - a rat model of human metabolic syndrome. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression of KCNQ isoforms in penile tissue. Isometric tension was measured in intracavernous arterial rings and corpus cavernosum strips isolated from normal and SHHF rats. Transcripts for KCNQ3, KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 were detected in penile arteries and corpus cavernosum. KCNQ1 was only found in corpus cavernosum. Immunofluorescence signals to Kv 7.4 and Kv 7.5 were found in penile arteries, penile veins and corpus cavernosum. The Kv 7.2-7.5 activators, ML213 and BMS204352, relaxed pre-contracted penile arteries and corpus cavernosum independently of nitric oxide synthase or endothelium-derived hyperpolarization. Relaxations to sildenafil, a PDE5 inhibitor, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an nitric oxide donor, were reduced by blocking Kv 7 channels with linopirdine in penile arteries and corpus cavernosum. In SHHF rat penile arteries and corpus cavernosum, relaxations to ML213 and BMS204352 were attenuated, and the blocking effect of linopirdine on sildenafil-induced and SNP-induced relaxations reduced. KCNQ3, KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 were down-regulated, and KCNQ1 was up-regulated in corpus cavernosum from SHHF rats. KCNQ1-5 transcripts remained unchanged in penile arteries from SHHF rats. These data suggest that Kv 7 channels play a role in erectile function and contribute to the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction, an early indicator of cardiovascular disease. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Molecular and functional characterization of Kv7 channels in penile arteries and corpus cavernosum of healthy and metabolic syndrome rats

    PubMed Central

    Jepps, T A; Olesen, S P; Greenwood, I A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose KCNQ‐encoded voltage‐dependent potassium channels (Kv7) are involved in the regulation of vascular tone. In this study we evaluated the influence of Kv7 channel activation on smooth muscle relaxation in rat penile arteries and corpus cavernosum from normal and spontaneously hypertensive, heart failure‐prone (SHHF) rats – a rat model of human metabolic syndrome. Experimental Approach Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression of KCNQ isoforms in penile tissue. Isometric tension was measured in intracavernous arterial rings and corpus cavernosum strips isolated from normal and SHHF rats. Key Results Transcripts for KCNQ3, KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 were detected in penile arteries and corpus cavernosum. KCNQ1 was only found in corpus cavernosum. Immunofluorescence signals to Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 were found in penile arteries, penile veins and corpus cavernosum. The Kv7.2–7.5 activators, ML213 and BMS204352, relaxed pre‐contracted penile arteries and corpus cavernosum independently of nitric oxide synthase or endothelium‐derived hyperpolarization. Relaxations to sildenafil, a PDE5 inhibitor, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an nitric oxide donor, were reduced by blocking Kv7 channels with linopirdine in penile arteries and corpus cavernosum. In SHHF rat penile arteries and corpus cavernosum, relaxations to ML213 and BMS204352 were attenuated, and the blocking effect of linopirdine on sildenafil‐induced and SNP‐induced relaxations reduced. KCNQ3, KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 were down‐regulated, and KCNQ1 was up‐regulated in corpus cavernosum from SHHF rats. KCNQ1–5 transcripts remained unchanged in penile arteries from SHHF rats. Conclusions and Implications These data suggest that Kv7 channels play a role in erectile function and contribute to the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction, an early indicator of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26802314

  10. Effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium channel (Kv1.1)

    PubMed Central

    Tytgat, J; Maertens, Ch; Daenens, P

    1997-01-01

    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is widely used as an antidepressant drug and is assumed to be a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Claims that its beneficial psychotropic effects extend beyond those in treatment of depression have drawn clinical and popular attention to this compound, raising the question of whether there is anything exceptional about the supposed selective actions.We have used the voltage clamp technique to study the effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channel (RCK1; Kv1.1), expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. This channel subunit is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system and K+ channels containing this subunit are involved in the repolarization process of many types of neurones.Blockade of the K+ currents by fluoxetine was found to be use- and dose-dependent. Wash-out of this compound could not be achieved. Fluoxetine did not affect the ion selectivity of this K+ channel, as the reversal potential was unaltered.Slowing of both activation and deactivation kinetics of the channel by fluoxetine was observed, including tail current crossover upon repolarization.Hodgkin-Huxley type of models and more generalized Markov chain models were used to fit the kinetics of the data. Based upon a Markov kinetic scheme, our data can be interpreted to mean that blockade of fluoxetine consists of two components: a voltage-independent occurring in the last closed, but available state of the channel, and a voltage-dependent occurring in the open state.This study describes the first biophysical working model for the mechanism of action of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent K+ channel, RCK1. Although this channel is not very potently blocked by fluoxetine when expressed in oocytes, this study may help us to understand some of the clinical symptoms seen with elevated serum concentrations of this SSRI. PMID:9421290

  11. Effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium channel (Kv1.1).

    PubMed

    Tytgat, J; Maertens, C; Daenens, P

    1997-12-01

    1. Fluoxetine (Prozac) is widely used as an antidepressant drug and is assumed to be a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Claims that its beneficial psychotropic effects extend beyond those in treatment of depression have drawn clinical and popular attention to this compound, raising the question of whether there is anything exceptional about the supposed selective actions. 2. We have used the voltage clamp technique to study the effect of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channel (RCK1; Kv1.1), expressed in p6nopus laevis oocytes. This channel subunit is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system and K+ channels containing this subunit are involved in the repolarization process of many types of neurones. 3. Blockade of the K+ currents by fluoxetine was found to be use- and dose-dependent. Wash-out of this compound could not be achieved. Fluoxetine did not affect the ion selectivity of this K+ channel, as the reversal potential was unaltered. 4. Slowing of both activation and deactivation kinetics of the channel by fluoxetine was observed, including tail current crossover upon repolarization. 5. Hodgkin-Huxley type of models and more generalized Markov chain models were used to fit the kinetics of the data. Based upon a Markov kinetic scheme, our data can be interpreted to mean that blockade of fluoxetine consists of two components: a voltage-independent occurring in the last closed, but available state of the channel, and a voltage-dependent occurring in the open state. 6. This study describes the first biophysical working model for the mechanism of action of fluoxetine on a neuronal, voltage-dependent K+ channel, RCK1. Although this channel is not very potently blocked by fluoxetine when expressed in oocytes, this study may help us to understand some of the clinical symptoms seen with elevated serum concentrations of this SSRI.

  12. The Scorpion Toxin Analogue BmKTX-D33H as a Potential Kv1.3 Channel-Selective Immunomodulator for Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fang; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Weiwei; Xie, Zili; Hu, Jun; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-04-19

    The Kv1.3 channel-acting scorpion toxins usually adopt the conserved anti-parallel β-sheet domain as the binding interface, but it remains challenging to discover some highly selective Kv1.3 channel-acting toxins. In this work, we investigated the pharmacological profile of the Kv1.3 channel-acting BmKTX-D33H, a structural analogue of the BmKTX scorpion toxin. Interestingly, BmKTX-D33H, with its conserved anti-parallel β-sheet domain as a Kv1.3 channel-interacting interface, exhibited more than 1000-fold selectivity towards the Kv1.3 channel as compared to other K⁺ channels (including Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.7, Kv11.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3, and KCa3.1). As expected, BmKTX-D33H was found to inhibit the cytokine production and proliferation of both Jurkat cells and human T cells in vitro. It also significantly improved the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses, an autoreactive T cell-mediated inflammation in rats. Amino acid sequence alignment and structural analysis strongly suggest that the "evolutionary" Gly11 residue of BmKTX-D33H interacts with the turret domain of Kv1 channels; it appears to be a pivotal amino acid residue with regard to the selectivity of BmKTX-D33H towards the Kv1.3 channel (in comparison with the highly homologous scorpion toxins). Together, our data indicate that BmKTX-D33H is a Kv1.3 channel-specific blocker. Finally, the remarkable selectivity of BmKTX-D33H highlights the great potential of evolutionary-guided peptide drug design in future studies.

  13. Regulation of Kv channel expression and neuronal excitability in rat medial nucleus of the trapezoid body maintained in organotypic culture.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huaxia; Steinert, Joern R; Robinson, Susan W; Chernova, Tatyana; Read, David J; Oliver, Douglas L; Forsythe, Ian D

    2010-05-01

    Principal neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) express a spectrum of voltage-dependent K(+) conductances mediated by Kv1-Kv4 channels, which shape action potential (AP) firing and regulate intrinsic excitability. Postsynaptic factors influencing expression of Kv channels were explored using organotypic cultures of brainstem prepared from P9-P12 rats and maintained in either low (5 mm, low-K) or high (25 mm, high-K) [K(+)](o) medium. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were made after 7-28 days in vitro. MNTB neurons cultured in high-K medium maintained a single AP firing phenotype, while low-K cultures had smaller K(+) currents, enhanced excitability and fired multiple APs. The calyx of Held inputs degenerated within 3 days in culture, having lost their major afferent input; this preparation of calyx-free MNTB neurons allowed the effects of postsynaptic depolarisation to be studied with minimal synaptic activity. The depolarization caused by the high-K aCSF only transiently increased spontaneous AP firing (<2 min) and did not measurably increase synaptic activity. Chronic depolarization in high-K cultures raised basal levels of [Ca(2+)](i), increased Kv3 currents and shortened AP half-widths. These events relied on raised [Ca(2+)](i), mediated by influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and release from intracellular stores, causing an increase in cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. Block of VGCCs or of CREB function suppressed Kv3 currents, increased AP duration, and reduced Kv3.3 and c-fos expression. Real-time PCR revealed higher Kv3.3 and Kv1.1 mRNA in high-K compared to low-K cultures, although the increased Kv1.1 mRNA was mediated by a CREB-independent mechanism. We conclude that Kv channel expression and hence the intrinsic membrane properties of MNTB neurons are homeostatically regulated by [Ca(2+)](i)-dependent mechanisms and influenced by sustained depolarization of the resting membrane potential.

  14. Regulation of Kv channel expression and neuronal excitability in rat medial nucleus of the trapezoid body maintained in organotypic culture

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Huaxia; Steinert, Joern R; Robinson, Susan W; Chernova, Tatyana; Read, David J; Oliver, Douglas L; Forsythe, Ian D

    2010-01-01

    Principal neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) express a spectrum of voltage-dependent K+ conductances mediated by Kv1–Kv4 channels, which shape action potential (AP) firing and regulate intrinsic excitability. Postsynaptic factors influencing expression of Kv channels were explored using organotypic cultures of brainstem prepared from P9–P12 rats and maintained in either low (5 mm, low-K) or high (25 mm, high-K) [K+]o medium. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were made after 7–28 days in vitro. MNTB neurons cultured in high-K medium maintained a single AP firing phenotype, while low-K cultures had smaller K+ currents, enhanced excitability and fired multiple APs. The calyx of Held inputs degenerated within 3 days in culture, having lost their major afferent input; this preparation of calyx-free MNTB neurons allowed the effects of postsynaptic depolarisation to be studied with minimal synaptic activity. The depolarization caused by the high-K aCSF only transiently increased spontaneous AP firing (<2 min) and did not measurably increase synaptic activity. Chronic depolarization in high-K cultures raised basal levels of [Ca2+]i, increased Kv3 currents and shortened AP half-widths. These events relied on raised [Ca2+]i, mediated by influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and release from intracellular stores, causing an increase in cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. Block of VGCCs or of CREB function suppressed Kv3 currents, increased AP duration, and reduced Kv3.3 and c-fos expression. Real-time PCR revealed higher Kv3.3 and Kv1.1 mRNA in high-K compared to low-K cultures, although the increased Kv1.1 mRNA was mediated by a CREB-independent mechanism. We conclude that Kv channel expression and hence the intrinsic membrane properties of MNTB neurons are homeostatically regulated by [Ca2+]i-dependent mechanisms and influenced by sustained depolarization of the resting membrane potential. PMID:20211981

  15. Isoenzyme-specific regulation of cardiac Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 ion channel complex by protein kinase C: central role of PKCβII.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Fathima; Vonderlin, Nadine; Seyler, Claudia; Zitron, Edgar; Korkmaz, Sevil; Szabó, Gábor; Thomas, Dierk; Katus, Hugo A; Scholz, Eberhard P

    2014-05-01

    The ultrarapidly activating delayed rectifier current, I(Kur), is a main determinant of atrial repolarization in humans. I(Kur) and the underlying ion channel complex Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 are negatively regulated by protein kinase C. However, the exact mode of action is only incompletely understood. We therefore analyzed isoenzyme-specific regulation of the Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 ion channel complex by PKC. Cloned ion channel subunits were heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and measurements were performed using the double-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Activation of PKC with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) resulted in a strong reduction of Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 current. This effect could be prevented using the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. Using the bisindolylmaleimide Ro-31-8220 as an inhibitor and ingenol as an activator of the conventional PKC isoforms, we were able to show that the Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 ion channel complex is mainly regulated by conventional isoforms. Whereas pharmacological inhibition of PKCα with HBDDE did not attenuate the PMA-induced effect, current reduction could be prevented using inhibitors of PKCβ. Here, we show the isoform βII plays a central role in the PKC-dependent regulation of Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 channels. These results add to the current understanding of isoenzyme-selective regulation of cardiac ion channels by protein kinases.

  16. Contribution of electromechanical coupling between KV and CaV1.2 channels to coronary dysfunction in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Zachary C.; Dick, Gregory M.; O’Leary, Heather A.; Bender, Shawn B.; Goodwill, Adam G.; Moberly, Steven P.; Owen, Meredith Kohr; Miller, Steven J.; Obukhov, Alexander G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that diminished functional expression of voltage-dependent K+ (KV) channels impairs control of coronary blood flow in obesity/metabolic syndrome. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that KV channels are electromechanically coupled to CaV1.2 channels and that coronary microvascular dysfunction in obesity is related to subsequent increases in CaV1.2 channel activity. Initial studies revealed that inhibition of KV channels with 4-aminopyridine (4AP, 0.3 mM) increased intracellular [Ca2+], contracted isolated coronary arterioles and decreased coronary reactive hyperemia. These effects were reversed by blockade of CaV1.2 channels. Further studies in chronically instrumented Ossabaw swine showed that inhibition of CaV1.2 channels with nifedipine (10 μg/kg, iv) had no effect on coronary blood flow at rest or during exercise in lean swine. However, inhibition of CaV1.2 channels significantly increased coronary blood flow, conductance, and the balance between coronary flow and metabolism in obese swine (P < 0.05). These changes were associated with a ~50 % increase in inward CaV1.2 current and elevations in expression of the pore-forming subunit (α1c) of CaV1.2 channels in coronary smooth muscle cells from obese swine. Taken together, these findings indicate that electromechanical coupling between KV and CaV1.2 channels is involved in the regulation of coronary vasomotor tone and that increases in CaV1.2 channel activity contribute to coronary microvascular dysfunction in the setting of obesity. PMID:23856709

  17. The roles of KCa, KATP, and KV channels in regulating cutaneous vasodilation and sweating during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Louie, Jeffrey C; Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D; McNeely, Brendan D; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-05-01

    We recently showed the varying roles of Ca(2+)-activated (KCa), ATP-sensitive (KATP), and voltage-gated (KV) K(+) channels in regulating cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation and sweating in normothermic conditions. However, it is unclear whether the respective contributions of these K(+) channels remain intact during dynamic exercise in the heat. Eleven young (23 ± 4 yr) men completed a 30-min exercise bout at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) followed by a 40-min recovery period in the heat (35°C, 20% relative humidity). Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and local sweat rate were assessed at four forearm skin sites perfused via intradermal microdialysis with: 1) lactated Ringer solution (control); 2) 50 mM tetraethylammonium (nonspecific KCa channel blocker); 3) 5 mM glybenclamide (selective KATP channel blocker); or 4) 10 mM 4-aminopyridine (nonspecific KV channel blocker). Responses were compared at baseline and at 10-min intervals during and following exercise. KCa channel inhibition resulted in greater CVC versus control at end exercise (P = 0.04) and 10 and 20 min into recovery (both P < 0.01). KATP channel blockade attenuated CVC compared with control during baseline (P = 0.04), exercise (all P ≤ 0.04), and 10 min into recovery (P = 0.02). No differences in CVC were observed with KV channel inhibition during baseline (P = 0.15), exercise (all P ≥ 0.06), or recovery (all P ≥ 0.14). With the exception of KV channel inhibition augmenting sweating during baseline (P = 0.04), responses were similar to control with all K(+) channel blockers during each time period (all P ≥ 0.07). We demonstrated that KCa and KATP channels contribute to the regulation of cutaneous vasodilation during rest and/or exercise and recovery in the heat. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  19. The C-terminus of neuronal Kv2.1 channels is required for channel localization and targeting but not for NMDA-receptor mediated regulation of channel function

    PubMed Central

    Baver, Scott B.; O'Connell, Kristen M.S.

    2012-01-01

    The delayed rectifier voltage-gated potassium channel Kv2.1 underlies a majority of the somatic K+ current in neurons and is particularly important for regulating intrinsic neuronal excitability. Various stimuli alter Kv2.1 channel gating as well as localization of the channel to cell-surface cluster domains. It has been postulated that specific domains within the C-terminus of Kv2.1 are critical for channel gating and sub-cellular localization; however, the distinct regions that govern these processes remain elusive. Here we show that the soluble C-terminal fragment of the closely related channel Kv2.2 displaces Kv2.1 from clusters in both rat hippocampal neurons and HEK293 cells, however neither steady-state activity nor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-dependent modulation are altered in spite of this non-clustered localization. Further, we demonstrate that the C-terminus of Kv2.1 is not necessary for steady-state gating, sensitivity to intracellular phosphatase or NMDA-dependent modulation, though this region is required for localization of Kv2.1 to clusters. Thus, the molecular determinants of Kv2.1 localization and modulation are distinct regions of the channel that function independently. PMID:22554782

  20. Remodelling inactivation gating of Kv4 channels by KChIP1, a small-molecular-weight calcium-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Edward J; Bowlby, Mark; An, W Frank; Rhodes, Kenneth J; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2002-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins dubbed KChIPs favour surface expression and modulate inactivation gating of neuronal and cardiac A-type Kv4 channels. To investigate their mechanism of action, Kv4.1 or Kv4.3 were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, either alone or together with KChIP1, and the K+ currents were recorded using the whole-oocyte voltage-clamp and patch-clamp methods. KChIP1 similarly remodels gating of both channels. At positive voltages, KChIP1 slows the early phase of the development of macroscopic inactivation. By contrast, the late phase is accelerated, which allows complete inactivation in < 500 ms. Thus, superimposed traces from control and KChIP1-remodelled currents crossover. KChIP1 also accelerates closed-state inactivation and recovery from inactivation (3- to 5-fold change). The latter effect is dominating and, consequently, the prepulse inactivation curves exhibit depolarizing shifts (ΔV = 4–12 mV). More favourable closed-state inactivation may also contribute to the overall faster inactivation at positive voltages because Kv4 channels significantly inactivate from the preopen closed state. KChIP1 favours this pathway further by accelerating channel closing. The peak G-V curves are modestly leftward shifted in the presence of KChIP1, but the apparent ‘threshold’ voltage of current activation remains unaltered. Single Kv4.1 channels exhibited multiple conductance levels that ranged between 1.8 and 5.6 pS in the absence of KChIP1 and between 1.9 and 5.3 pS in its presence. Thus, changes in unitary conductance do not contribute to current upregulation by KChIP1. An allosteric kinetic model explains the kinetic changes by assuming that KChIP1 mainly impairs open-state inactivation, favours channel closing and lowers the energy barrier of closed-state inactivation. PMID:11826158

  1. Functionally active t1-t1 interfaces revealed by the accessibility of intracellular thiolate groups in kv4 channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Rocha, Carmen A; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2005-07-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent K(+) channels involves movements of membrane-spanning regions that control the opening of the pore. Much less is known, however, about the contributions of large intracellular channel domains to the conformational changes that underlie gating. Here, we investigated the functional role of intracellular regions in Kv4 channels by probing relevant cysteines with thiol-specific reagents. We find that reagent application to the intracellular side of inside-out patches results in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 currents. In the absence or presence of Kv4-specific auxiliary subunits, mutational and electrophysiological analyses showed that none of the 14 intracellular cysteines is essential for channel gating. C110, C131, and C132 in the intersubunit interface of the tetramerization domain (T1) are targets responsible for the irreversible inhibition by a methanethiosulfonate derivative (MTSET). This result is surprising because structural studies of Kv4-T1 crystals predicted protection of the targeted thiolate groups by constitutive high-affinity Zn(2+) coordination. Also, added Zn(2+) or a potent Zn(2+) chelator (TPEN) does not significantly modulate the accessibility of MTSET to C110, C131, or C132; and furthermore, when the three critical cysteines remained as possible targets, the MTSET modification rate of the activated state is approximately 200-fold faster than that of the resting state. Biochemical experiments confirmed the chemical modification of the intact alpha-subunit and the purified tetrameric T1 domain by MTS reagents. These results conclusively demonstrate that the T1--T1 interface of Kv4 channels is functionally active and dynamic, and that critical reactive thiolate groups in this interface may not be protected by Zn(2+) binding.

  2. Functionally Active T1-T1 Interfaces Revealed by the Accessibility of Intracellular Thiolate Groups in Kv4 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Rocha, Carmen A.; Strang, Candace; Pfaffinger, Paul J.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent K+ channels involves movements of membrane-spanning regions that control the opening of the pore. Much less is known, however, about the contributions of large intracellular channel domains to the conformational changes that underlie gating. Here, we investigated the functional role of intracellular regions in Kv4 channels by probing relevant cysteines with thiol-specific reagents. We find that reagent application to the intracellular side of inside-out patches results in time-dependent irreversible inhibition of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 currents. In the absence or presence of Kv4-specific auxiliary subunits, mutational and electrophysiological analyses showed that none of the 14 intracellular cysteines is essential for channel gating. C110, C131, and C132 in the intersubunit interface of the tetramerization domain (T1) are targets responsible for the irreversible inhibition by a methanethiosulfonate derivative (MTSET). This result is surprising because structural studies of Kv4-T1 crystals predicted protection of the targeted thiolate groups by constitutive high-affinity Zn2+ coordination. Also, added Zn2+ or a potent Zn2+ chelator (TPEN) does not significantly modulate the accessibility of MTSET to C110, C131, or C132; and furthermore, when the three critical cysteines remained as possible targets, the MTSET modification rate of the activated state is ∼200-fold faster than that of the resting state. Biochemical experiments confirmed the chemical modification of the intact α-subunit and the purified tetrameric T1 domain by MTS reagents. These results conclusively demonstrate that the T1–T1 interface of Kv4 channels is functionally active and dynamic, and that critical reactive thiolate groups in this interface may not be protected by Zn2+ binding. PMID:15955876

  3. Complex oligosaccharides are N-linked to Kv3 voltage-gated K+ channels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Tara A; Corey, Melissa J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2007-04-01

    Neuronal Kv3 voltage-gated K(+) channels have two absolutely conserved N-glycosylation sites. Here, it is shown that Kv3.1, 3.3, and 3.4 channels are N-glycosylated in rat brain. Digestion of total brain membranes with peptide N glycosidase F (PNGase F) produced faster migrating immunobands than those of undigested membranes. Additionally, partial PNGase F digests showed that both sites are occupied by oligosaccharides. Neuraminidase treatment produced a smaller immunoband shift relative to PNGase F treatment. These results indicate that both sites are highly available and occupied by N-linked oligosaccharides for Kv3.1, 3.3, and 3.4 in rat brain, and furthermore that at least one oligosaccharide is of complex type. Additionally, these results point to an extracytoplasmic S1-S2 linker in Kv3 proteins expressed in native membranes. We suggest that N-glycosylation processing of Kv3 channels is critical for the expression of K(+) currents at the surface of neurons, and perhaps contributes to the pathophysiology of congenital disorders of glycosylation.

  4. The Scorpion Toxin Analogue BmKTX-D33H as a Potential Kv1.3 Channel-Selective Immunomodulator for Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fang; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Weiwei; Xie, Zili; Hu, Jun; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-01-01

    The Kv1.3 channel-acting scorpion toxins usually adopt the conserved anti-parallel β-sheet domain as the binding interface, but it remains challenging to discover some highly selective Kv1.3 channel-acting toxins. In this work, we investigated the pharmacological profile of the Kv1.3 channel-acting BmKTX-D33H, a structural analogue of the BmKTX scorpion toxin. Interestingly, BmKTX-D33H, with its conserved anti-parallel β-sheet domain as a Kv1.3 channel-interacting interface, exhibited more than 1000-fold selectivity towards the Kv1.3 channel as compared to other K+ channels (including Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.7, Kv11.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3, and KCa3.1). As expected, BmKTX-D33H was found to inhibit the cytokine production and proliferation of both Jurkat cells and human T cells in vitro. It also significantly improved the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses, an autoreactive T cell-mediated inflammation in rats. Amino acid sequence alignment and structural analysis strongly suggest that the “evolutionary” Gly11 residue of BmKTX-D33H interacts with the turret domain of Kv1 channels; it appears to be a pivotal amino acid residue with regard to the selectivity of BmKTX-D33H towards the Kv1.3 channel (in comparison with the highly homologous scorpion toxins). Together, our data indicate that BmKTX-D33H is a Kv1.3 channel–specific blocker. Finally, the remarkable selectivity of BmKTX-D33H highlights the great potential of evolutionary-guided peptide drug design in future studies. PMID:27104568

  5. Spike Ca2+ influx upmodulates the spike afterdepolarization and bursting via intracellular inhibition of KV7/M channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shmuel; Yaari, Yoel

    2008-01-01

    In principal brain neurons, activation of Ca2+ channels during an action potential, or spike, causes Ca2+ entry into the cytosol within a millisecond. This in turn causes rapid activation of large conductance Ca2+-gated channels, which enhances repolarization and abbreviates the spike. Here we describe another remarkable consequence of spike Ca2+ entry: enhancement of the spike afterdepolarization. This action is also mediated by intracellular modulation of a particular class of K+ channels, namely by inhibition of KV7 (KCNQ) channels. These channels generate the subthreshold, non-inactivating M-type K+ current, whose activation curtails the spike afterdepolarization. Inhibition of KV7/M by spike Ca2+ entry allows the spike afterdepolarization to grow and can convert solitary spikes into high-frequency bursts of action potentials. Through this novel intracellular modulatory action, Ca2+ spike entry regulates the discharge mode and the signalling capacity of principal brain neurons. PMID:18187471

  6. Jingzhaotoxin-35, a novel gating-modifier toxin targeting both Nav1.5 and Kv2.1 channels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peng; Xu, Changxi; Wu, Qiaoqi; Huang, Lang; Liang, Songping; Yuan, Chunhua

    2014-12-15

    Jingzhaotoxin-35 (JZTX-35), a 36-residue polypeptide, was purified from the venom of the Chinese tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao. JZTX-35 inhibited Nav1.5 and Kv2.1 currents with the IC50 value of 1.07 μM and 3.62 μM, respectively, but showed no significant effect on either Na(+) currents or Ca(2+) currents evoked in hippocampal neurons. It shifted the activation of the Nav1.5 and Kv2.1 channels to more depolarized voltages, and markedly shifted the steady-state inactivation of Nav1.5 currents toward more hyperpolarized potentials. Moreover, JZTX-35 can bind to a close state of Nav1.5 and Kv2.1 channels. These results indicate that JZTX-35 is a new gating modifier toxin. JZTX-35 shares high sequence similarity with Jingzhaotoxins (JZTXs) targeting Nav1.5 or Kv2.1 channels, but they showed different ion channel selectivity. Structure-function analysis in this study would provide important clues for the exploration of ion channel selectivity of JZTXs.

  7. The episodic ataxia type 1 mutation I262T alters voltage-dependent gating and disrupts protein biosynthesis of human Kv1.1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Han; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Huang, Jing-Jia; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-18

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential for setting neuronal membrane excitability. Mutations in human Kv1.1 channels are linked to episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). The EA1-associated mutation I262T was identified from a patient with atypical phenotypes. Although a previous report has characterized its suppression effect, several key questions regarding the impact of the I262T mutation on Kv1.1 as well as other members of the Kv1 subfamily remain unanswered. Herein we show that the dominant-negative effect of I262T on Kv1.1 current expression is not reversed by co-expression with Kvβ1.1 or Kvβ2 subunits. Biochemical examinations indicate that I262T displays enhanced protein degradation and impedes membrane trafficking of Kv1.1 wild-type subunits. I262T appears to be the first EA1 mutation directly associated with impaired protein stability. Further functional analyses demonstrate that I262T changes the voltage-dependent activation and Kvβ1.1-mediated inactivation, uncouples inactivation from activation gating, and decelerates the kinetics of cumulative inactivation of Kv1.1 channels. I262T also exerts similar dominant effects on the gating of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 channels. Together our data suggest that I262T confers altered channel gating and reduced functional expression of Kv1 channels, which may account for some of the phenotypes of the EA1 patient.

  8. The episodic ataxia type 1 mutation I262T alters voltage-dependent gating and disrupts protein biosynthesis of human Kv1.1 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Han; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Huang, Jing-Jia; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential for setting neuronal membrane excitability. Mutations in human Kv1.1 channels are linked to episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). The EA1-associated mutation I262T was identified from a patient with atypical phenotypes. Although a previous report has characterized its suppression effect, several key questions regarding the impact of the I262T mutation on Kv1.1 as well as other members of the Kv1 subfamily remain unanswered. Herein we show that the dominant-negative effect of I262T on Kv1.1 current expression is not reversed by co-expression with Kvβ1.1 or Kvβ2 subunits. Biochemical examinations indicate that I262T displays enhanced protein degradation and impedes membrane trafficking of Kv1.1 wild-type subunits. I262T appears to be the first EA1 mutation directly associated with impaired protein stability. Further functional analyses demonstrate that I262T changes the voltage-dependent activation and Kvβ1.1-mediated inactivation, uncouples inactivation from activation gating, and decelerates the kinetics of cumulative inactivation of Kv1.1 channels. I262T also exerts similar dominant effects on the gating of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 channels. Together our data suggest that I262T confers altered channel gating and reduced functional expression of Kv1 channels, which may account for some of the phenotypes of the EA1 patient. PMID:26778656

  9. Targeting the voltage sensor of Kv7.2 voltage-gated K+ channels with a new gating-modifier.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Asher; Pell, Liat; Gofman, Yana; Haitin, Yoni; Shamgar, Liora; Patrich, Eti; Kornilov, Polina; Gourgy-Hacohen, Orit; Ben-Tal, Nir; Attali, Bernard

    2010-08-31

    The pore and gate regions of voltage-gated cation channels have been often targeted with drugs acting as channel modulators. In contrast, the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) was practically not exploited for therapeutic purposes, although it is the target of various toxins. We recently designed unique diphenylamine carboxylates that are powerful Kv7.2 voltage-gated K(+) channel openers or blockers. Here we show that a unique Kv7.2 channel opener, NH29, acts as a nontoxin gating modifier. NH29 increases Kv7.2 currents, thereby producing a hyperpolarizing shift of the activation curve and slowing both activation and deactivation kinetics. In neurons, the opener depresses evoked spike discharges. NH29 dampens hippocampal glutamate and GABA release, thereby inhibiting excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Mutagenesis and modeling data suggest that in Kv7.2, NH29 docks to the external groove formed by the interface of helices S1, S2, and S4 in a way that stabilizes the interaction between two conserved charged residues in S2 and S4, known to interact electrostatically, in the open state of Kv channels. Results indicate that NH29 may operate via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism similar to that suggested for scorpion and sea-anemone toxins. Reflecting the promiscuous nature of the VSD, NH29 is also a potent blocker of TRPV1 channels, a feature similar to that of tarantula toxins. Our data provide a structural framework for designing unique gating-modifiers targeted to the VSD of voltage-gated cation channels and used for the treatment of hyperexcitability disorders.

  10. Targeting the voltage sensor of Kv7.2 voltage-gated K+ channels with a new gating-modifier

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Asher; Pell, Liat; Gofman, Yana; Haitin, Yoni; Shamgar, Liora; Patrich, Eti; Kornilov, Polina; Gourgy-Hacohen, Orit; Ben-Tal, Nir; Attali, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The pore and gate regions of voltage-gated cation channels have been often targeted with drugs acting as channel modulators. In contrast, the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) was practically not exploited for therapeutic purposes, although it is the target of various toxins. We recently designed unique diphenylamine carboxylates that are powerful Kv7.2 voltage-gated K+ channel openers or blockers. Here we show that a unique Kv7.2 channel opener, NH29, acts as a nontoxin gating modifier. NH29 increases Kv7.2 currents, thereby producing a hyperpolarizing shift of the activation curve and slowing both activation and deactivation kinetics. In neurons, the opener depresses evoked spike discharges. NH29 dampens hippocampal glutamate and GABA release, thereby inhibiting excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Mutagenesis and modeling data suggest that in Kv7.2, NH29 docks to the external groove formed by the interface of helices S1, S2, and S4 in a way that stabilizes the interaction between two conserved charged residues in S2 and S4, known to interact electrostatically, in the open state of Kv channels. Results indicate that NH29 may operate via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism similar to that suggested for scorpion and sea-anemone toxins. Reflecting the promiscuous nature of the VSD, NH29 is also a potent blocker of TRPV1 channels, a feature similar to that of tarantula toxins. Our data provide a structural framework for designing unique gating-modifiers targeted to the VSD of voltage-gated cation channels and used for the treatment of hyperexcitability disorders. PMID:20713704

  11. Bupivacaine Blocks N-Type Inactivating Kv Channels in the Open State: No Allosteric Effect on Inactivation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Johanna; Madeja, Michael; Elinder, Fredrik; Århem, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Local anesthetics bind to ion channels in a state-dependent manner. For noninactivating voltage-gated K channels the binding mainly occurs in the open state, while for voltage-gated inactivating Na channels it is assumed to occur mainly in inactivated states, leading to an allosterically caused increase in the inactivation probability, reflected in a negative shift of the steady-state inactivation curve, prolonged recovery from inactivation, and a frequency-dependent block. How local anesthetics bind to N-type inactivating K channels is less explored. In this study, we have compared bupivacaine effects on inactivating (Shaker and Kv3.4) and noninactivating (Shaker-IR and Kv3.2) channels, expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Bupivacaine was found to block these channels time-dependently without shifting the steady-state inactivation curve markedly, without a prolonged recovery from inactivation, and without a frequency-dependent block. An analysis, including computational testing of kinetic models, suggests binding to the channel mainly in the open state, with affinities close to those estimated for corresponding noninactivating channels (300 and 280 μM for Shaker and Shaker-IR, and 60 and 90 μM for Kv3.4 and Kv3.2). The similar magnitudes of Kd, as well as of blocking and unblocking rate constants for inactivating and noninactivating Shaker channels, most likely exclude allosteric interactions between the inactivation mechanism and the binding site. The relevance of these results for understanding the action of local anesthetics on Na channels is discussed. PMID:18790854

  12. Long-Term Potentiation at the Mossy Fiber-Granule Cell Relay Invokes Postsynaptic Second-Messenger Regulation of Kv4 Channels.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, Arsalan P; Zhan, Xiaoqin; Zamponi, Gerald W; Turner, Ray W

    2016-11-02

    Mossy fiber afferents to cerebellar granule cells form the primary synaptic relay into cerebellum, providing an ideal site to process signal inputs differentially. Mossy fiber input is known to exhibit a long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic efficacy through a combination of presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. However, the specific postsynaptic mechanisms contributing to LTP of mossy fiber input is unknown. The current study tested the hypothesis that LTP induces a change in intrinsic membrane excitability of rat cerebellar granule cells through modification of Kv4 A-type potassium channels. We found that theta-burst stimulation of mossy fiber input in lobule 9 granule cells lowered the current threshold to spike and increases the gain of spike firing by 2- to 3-fold. The change in postsynaptic excitability was traced to hyperpolarizing shifts in both the half-inactivation and half-activation potentials of Kv4 that occurred upon coactivating NMDAR and group I metabotropic glutamatergic receptors. The effects of theta-burst stimulation on Kv4 channel control of the gain of spike firing depended on a signaling cascade leading to extracellular signal-related kinase activation. Under physiological conditions, LTP of synaptically evoked spike output was expressed preferentially for short bursts characteristic of sensory input, helping to shape signal processing at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay.

  13. The axon-dendrite targeting of Kv3 (Shaw) channels is determined by a targeting motif that associates with the T1 domain and ankyrin G.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingxuan; Cao, Ruifeng; Xiao, Rui; Zhu, Michael X; Gu, Chen

    2007-12-19

    Kv3 (Shaw) channels regulate rapid spiking, transmitter release and dendritic integration of many central neurons. Crucial to functional diversity are the complex targeting patterns of channel proteins. However, the targeting mechanisms are not known. Here we report that the axon-dendrite targeting of Kv3.1 is controlled by a conditional interaction of a C-terminal axonal targeting motif (ATM) with the N-terminal T1 domain and adaptor protein ankyrin G. In cultured hippocampal neurons, although the two splice variants of Kv3.1, Kv3.1a and Kv3.1b, are differentially targeted to the somatodendritic and axonal membrane, respectively, the lysine-rich ATM is surprisingly common for both splice variants. The ATM not only directly binds to the T1 domain in a Zn2+-dependent manner, but also associates with the ankyrin-repeat domain of ankyrin G. However, the full-length channel proteins of Kv3.1b display stronger association to ankyrin G than those of Kv3.1a, suggesting that the unique splice domain at Kv3.1b C terminus influences ATM binding to T1 and ankyrin G. Because ankyrin G mainly resides at the axon initial segment, we propose that it may function as a barrier for axon-dendrite targeting of Kv3.1 channels. In support of this idea, disrupting ankyrin G function either by over-expressing a dominant-negative mutant or by siRNA knockdown decreases polarized axon-dendrite targeting of both Kv3.1a and Kv3.1b. We conclude that the conditional ATM masked by the T1 domain in Kv3.1a is exposed by the splice domain in Kv3.1b, and is subsequently recognized by ankyrin G to target Kv3.1b into the axon.

  14. Sigma-1 receptor alters the kinetics of Kv1.3 voltage gated potassium channels but not the sensitivity to receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Maho; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Mirrielees, Jennifer; Yang, Jay

    2012-05-03

    Sigma1 receptors (Sigma1R) are intracellular chaperone proteins that bind psychotropic drugs and also clinically used drugs such as ketamine and haloperidol. Co-expression of the Sigma1R has been reported to enhance the sensitivity of several voltage-gated ion channels to Sigma1R ligands. Kv1.3 is the predominant voltage-gated potassium channel expressed in T lymphocytes with a documented role in immune activation. To gain a better understanding of Sigma1R modulation of Kv ion channels, we investigated the effects of Sigma1R co-expression on Kv1.3 physiology and pharmacology in ion channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We also explored the protein domains of Kv1.3 necessary for protein:protein interaction between Kv1.3 and Sigma1R through co-immunoprecipitation studies. Slowly inactivating outward-going currents consistent with Kv1.3 expression were elicited on step depolarizations. The current characterized by E(rev), V(1/2), and slope factor remained unchanged when co-expressed with Sigma1R. Analysis of inactivation time constant revealed a faster Kv1.3 current decay when co-expressed with Sigma1R. However the sensitivity to Sigma1R ligands remained unaltered when co-expressed with the Sigma1R in contrast to the previously reported modulation of ligand sensitivity in closely related Kv1.4 and Kv1.5 voltage gated potassium channels. Co-immunoprecipitation assays of various Kv1.3 truncation constructs indicated that the transmembrane domain of the Kv1.3 protein was responsible for the protein:protein interaction with the Sigma1R. Sigma1R likely interacts with different domains of Kv ion channel family proteins resulting in distinct modulation of different channels.

  15. Interaction site for the inhibition of tarantula Jingzhaotoxin-XI on voltage-gated potassium channel Kv2.1.

    PubMed

    Tao, Huai; Chen, Xia; Deng, Meichun; Xiao, Yucheng; Wu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Zhonghua; Zhou, Sainan; He, Yingchun; Liang, Songping

    2016-12-15

    Jingzhaotoxin-XI (JZTX-XI) is a 34-residue peptide from the Chinese tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao venom that potently inhibits both voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5 and voltage-gated potassium channel Kv2.1. In the present study, we further showed that JZTX-XI blocked Kv2.1 currents with the IC50 value of 0.39 ± 0.06 μM. JZTX-XI significantly shifted the current-voltage (I-V) curves and normalized conductance-voltage (G-V) curves of Kv2.1 channel to more depolarized voltages. Ala-scanning mutagenesis analyses demonstrated that mutants I273A, F274A, and E277A reduced toxin binding affinity by 10-, 16-, and 18-fold, respectively, suggesting that three common residues (I273, F274, E277) in the Kv2.1 S3b segment contribute to the formation of JZTX-XI receptor site, and the acidic residue Glu at the position 277 in Kv2.1 is the most important residue for JZTX-XI sensitivity. A single replacement of E277 with Asp(D) increased toxin inhibitory activity. These results establish that JZTX-XI inhibits Kv2.1 activation by trapping the voltage sensor in the rested state through a similar mechanism to that of HaTx1, but these two toxins have small differences in the most crucial molecular determinant. Furthermore, the in-depth investigation of the subtle differences in molecular determinants may be useful for increasing our understanding of the molecular details regarding toxin-channel interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Competition of calcified calmodulin N lobe and PIP2 to an LQT mutation site in Kv7.1 channel.

    PubMed

    Tobelaim, William Sam; Dvir, Meidan; Lebel, Guy; Cui, Meng; Buki, Tal; Peretz, Asher; Marom, Milit; Haitin, Yoni; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Hirsch, Joel Alan; Attali, Bernard

    2017-01-31

    Voltage-gated potassium 7.1 (Kv7.1) channel and KCNE1 protein coassembly forms the slow potassium current IKS that repolarizes the cardiac action potential. The physiological importance of the IKS channel is underscored by the existence of mutations in human Kv7.1 and KCNE1 genes, which cause cardiac arrhythmias, such as the long-QT syndrome (LQT) and atrial fibrillation. The proximal Kv7.1 C terminus (CT) binds calmodulin (CaM) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), but the role of CaM in channel function is still unclear, and its possible interaction with PIP2 is unknown. Our recent crystallographic study showed that CaM embraces helices A and B with the apo C lobe and calcified N lobe, respectively. Here, we reveal the competition of PIP2 and the calcified CaM N lobe to a previously unidentified site in Kv7.1 helix B, also known to harbor an LQT mutation. Protein pulldown, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and patch-clamp recordings indicate that residues K526 and K527 in Kv7.1 helix B form a critical site where CaM competes with PIP2 to stabilize the channel open state. Data indicate that both PIP2 and Ca(2+)-CaM perform the same function on IKS channel gating by producing a left shift in the voltage dependence of activation. The LQT mutant K526E revealed a severely impaired channel function with a right shift in the voltage dependence of activation, a reduced current density, and insensitivity to gating modulation by Ca(2+)-CaM. The results suggest that, after receptor-mediated PIP2 depletion and increased cytosolic Ca(2+), calcified CaM N lobe interacts with helix B in place of PIP2 to limit excessive IKS current inhibition.

  17. Contribution of Kv2.1 channels to the delayed rectifier current in freshly dispersed smooth muscle cells from rabbit urethra.

    PubMed

    Kyle, B; Bradley, E; Ohya, S; Sergeant, G P; McHale, N G; Thornbury, K D; Hollywood, M A

    2011-11-01

    We have characterized the native voltage-dependent K(+) (K(v)) current in rabbit urethral smooth muscle cells (RUSMC) and compared its pharmacological and biophysical properties with K(v)2.1 and K(v)2.2 channels cloned from the rabbit urethra and stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells (HEK(Kv2.1) and HEK(Kv2.2)). RUSMC were perfused with Hanks' solution at 37°C and studied using the patch-clamp technique with K(+)-rich pipette solutions. Cells were bathed in 100 nM Penitrem A (Pen A) to block large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) currents and depolarized to +40 mV for 500 ms to evoke K(v) currents. These were unaffected by margatoxin, κ-dendrotoxin, or α-dendrotoxin (100 nM, n = 3-5) but were blocked by stromatoxin-1 (ScTx, IC(50) ∼130 nM), consistent with the idea that the currents were carried through K(v)2 channels. RNA was detected for K(v)2.1, K(v)2.2, and the silent subunit K(v)9.3 in urethral smooth muscle. Immunocytochemistry showed membrane staining for both K(v)2 subtypes and K(v)9.3 in isolated RUSMC. HEK(Kv2.1) and HEK(Kv2.2) currents were blocked in a concentration-dependent manner by ScTx, with estimated IC(50) values of ∼150 nM (K(v)2.1, n = 5) and 70 nM (K(v)2.2, n = 6). The mean half-maximal voltage (V(1/2)) of inactivation of the USMC K(v) current was -56 ± 3 mV (n = 9). This was similar to the HEK(Kv2.1) current (-55 ± 3 mV, n = 13) but significantly different from the HEK(Kv2.2) currents (-30 ± 3 mV, n = 11). Action potentials (AP) evoked from RUSMC studied under current-clamp mode were unaffected by ScTx. However, when ScTx was applied in the presence of Pen A, the AP duration was significantly prolonged. Similarly, ScTx increased the amplitude of spontaneous contractions threefold, but only after Pen A application. These data suggest that K(v)2.1 channels contribute significantly to the K(v) current in RUSMC.

  18. Precise localization of the voltage-gated potassium channel subunits Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 revealed in the molecular layer of the rat cerebellar cortex by a pre-embedding immunogold method.

    PubMed

    Puente, Nagore; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Reguero, Leire; Buceta, Ianire; Grandes, Pedro

    2010-10-01

    A proper motor activity relies on a correct cerebellar function. The Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 voltage-gated potassium channels are key proteins involved in cerebellar function and dysfunction, as the lack of these causes severe motor deficits. Both channel subunits are coexpressed in granule cells and are rapidly activated at relatively positive potentials to support the generation of fast action potentials. However, the contribution of each subunit to the molecular architecture of the parallel fibers, the granule cell axons, is so far unknown. The goal of this study was to elucidate the relative distribution of Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 in specific compartments of the rat parallel fibers by using a pre-embedding immunocytochemical method for electron microscopy. Numerous Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 silver-intensified gold particles were associated with membranes of parallel fiber synaptic terminals and their intervaricose segments. Kv3.1b was found in about 85% of parallel fiber synaptic terminals and in about 47% of their intervaricose portions. However, only 28% of intervaricosities and 23% of parallel fiber presynaptic boutons were Kv3.3 immunopositive. The analysis also revealed that 54% of Purkinje cell dendritic spines localized Kv3.3. Although both potassium channel subunits share localization in the same presynaptic parallel fiber compartments, the present results with the method used indicate that there are a higher percentage of parallel fibers labeled for Kv3.1b than for Kv3.3, and that the labeling intensity for each subunit is higher in specific subcompartments analyzed than in others.

  19. Closed-state inactivation involving an internal gate in Kv4.1 channels modulates pore blockade by intracellular quaternary ammonium ions.

    PubMed

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D; Szanto, Tibor G; Panyi, Gyorgy; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2016-08-09

    Voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channel activation depends on interactions between voltage sensors and an intracellular activation gate that controls access to a central pore cavity. Here, we hypothesize that this gate is additionally responsible for closed-state inactivation (CSI) in Kv4.x channels. These Kv channels undergo CSI by a mechanism that is still poorly understood. To test the hypothesis, we deduced the state of the Kv4.1 channel intracellular gate by exploiting the trap-door paradigm of pore blockade by internally applied quaternary ammonium (QA) ions exhibiting slow blocking kinetics and high-affinity for a blocking site. We found that inactivation gating seemingly traps benzyl-tributylammonium (bTBuA) when it enters the central pore cavity in the open state. However, bTBuA fails to block inactivated Kv4.1 channels, suggesting gated access involving an internal gate. In contrast, bTBuA blockade of a Shaker Kv channel that undergoes open-state P/C-type inactivation exhibits fast onset and recovery inconsistent with bTBuA trapping. Furthermore, the inactivated Shaker Kv channel is readily blocked by bTBuA. We conclude that Kv4.1 closed-state inactivation modulates pore blockade by QA ions in a manner that depends on the state of the internal activation gate.

  20. Closed-state inactivation involving an internal gate in Kv4.1 channels modulates pore blockade by intracellular quaternary ammonium ions

    PubMed Central

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D.; Szanto, Tibor G.; Panyi, Gyorgy; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel activation depends on interactions between voltage sensors and an intracellular activation gate that controls access to a central pore cavity. Here, we hypothesize that this gate is additionally responsible for closed-state inactivation (CSI) in Kv4.x channels. These Kv channels undergo CSI by a mechanism that is still poorly understood. To test the hypothesis, we deduced the state of the Kv4.1 channel intracellular gate by exploiting the trap-door paradigm of pore blockade by internally applied quaternary ammonium (QA) ions exhibiting slow blocking kinetics and high-affinity for a blocking site. We found that inactivation gating seemingly traps benzyl-tributylammonium (bTBuA) when it enters the central pore cavity in the open state. However, bTBuA fails to block inactivated Kv4.1 channels, suggesting gated access involving an internal gate. In contrast, bTBuA blockade of a Shaker Kv channel that undergoes open-state P/C-type inactivation exhibits fast onset and recovery inconsistent with bTBuA trapping. Furthermore, the inactivated Shaker Kv channel is readily blocked by bTBuA. We conclude that Kv4.1 closed-state inactivation modulates pore blockade by QA ions in a manner that depends on the state of the internal activation gate. PMID:27502553

  1. Systemic Administration of Substance P Recovers Beta Amyloid-Induced Cognitive Deficits in Rat: Involvement of Kv Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Florenzano, Fulvio; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Marolda, Roberta; Palmery, Maura; Rinaldi, Anna Maria; Zona, Cristina; Possenti, Roberta; Calissano, Pietro; Severini, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Reduced levels of Substance P (SP), an endogenous neuropeptide endowed with neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic properties, have been found in brain and spinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Potassium (K+) channel dysfunction is implicated in AD development and the amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced up-regulation of voltage-gated potassium channel subunits could be considered a significant step in Aβ brain toxicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SP could reduce, in vivo, Aβ-induced overexpression of Kv subunits. Rats were intracerebroventricularly infused with amyloid-β 25–35 (Aβ25–35, 20 µg) peptide. SP (50 µg/Kg, i.p.) was daily administered, for 7 days starting from the day of the surgery. Here we demonstrate that the Aβ infused rats showed impairment in cognitive performances in the Morris water maze task 4 weeks after Aβ25–35 infusion and that this impairing effect was prevented by SP administration. Kv1.4, Kv2.1 and Kv4.2 subunit levels were quantified in hippocampus and in cerebral cortex by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. Interestingly, SP reduced Kv1.4 levels overexpressed by Aβ, both in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for a neuroprotective activity of systemic administration of SP in a rat model of AD and suggest a possible mechanism underlying this effect. PMID:24265678

  2. Subcellular localization of the K+ channel subunit Kv3.1b in selected rat CNS neurons.

    PubMed

    Sekirnjak, C; Martone, M E; Weiser, M; Deerinck, T; Bueno, E; Rudy, B; Ellisman, M

    1997-08-22

    Voltage-gated potassium channels constitute the largest group of heteromeric ion channels discovered to date. Over 20 genes have been isolated, encoding different channel subunit proteins which form functional tetrameric K+ channels. We have analyzed the subcellular localization of subunit Kv3.1b, a member of the Kv3 (Shaw-like) subfamily, in rat brain at the light and electron microscopic level, using immunocytochemical detection. Detailed localization was carried out in specific neurons of the neocortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. The identity of Kv3.1b-positive neurons was established using double labeling with markers for specific neuronal populations. In the neocortex, the Kv3.1b subunit was expressed in most parvalbumin-containing bipolar, basket or chandelier cells, and in some bipolar or double bouquet neurons containing calbindin. In the hippocampus, Kv3.1b was expressed in many parvalbumin-containing basket cells, as well as in calbindin-positive neurons in the stratum oriens, and in a small number of interneurons that did not stain for either parvalbumin or calbindin. Kv3.1b protein was not present in pyramidal cells in the neocortex and the hippocampus, but these cells were outlined by labeled presynaptic terminals from interneuron axons that surround the postsynaptic cell. In the cerebellar cortex, granule cells were the only population expressing the channel protein. Careful examination of individual granule cells revealed a non-uniform distribution of Kv3.1 staining on the somata: circular bands of labeling were present in the vicinity of the axon hillock. In cortical and hippocampal interneurons, as well as in cerebellar granule cells, the Kv3.1b subunit was present in somatic and unmyelinated axonal membranes and adjacent cytoplasm, as well as in the most proximal portion of dendritic processes, but not throughout most of the dendrite. Labeling was also seen in the terminals of labeled axons, but not at a higher concentration than in other parts

  3. Potassium channels Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 cooperatively and compensatorily regulate antigen-specific memory T cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Eugene Y.; Li, Tianbo; Jeet, Surinder; Peng, Ivan; Zhang, Juan; Lee, Wyne P.; DeVoss, Jason; Caplazi, Patrick; Chen, Jun; Warming, Søren; Hackos, David H.; Mukund, Susmith; Koth, Christopher M.; Grogan, Jane L.

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv1.3 and Ca2+-dependent KCa3.1 are the most prevalent K+ channels expressed by human and rat T cells. Despite the preferential upregulation of Kv1.3 over KCa3.1 on autoantigen-experienced effector memory T cells, whether Kv1.3 is required for their induction and function is unclear. Here we show, using Kv1.3-deficient rats, that Kv1.3 is involved in the development of chronically activated antigen-specific T cells. Several immune responses are normal in Kv1.3 knockout (KO) rats, suggesting that KCa3.1 can compensate for the absence of Kv1.3 under these specific settings. However, experiments with Kv1.3 KO rats and Kv1.3 siRNA knockdown or channel-specific inhibition of human T cells show that maximal T-cell responses against autoantigen or repeated tetanus toxoid stimulations require both Kv1.3 and KCa3.1. Finally, our data also suggest that T-cell dependency on Kv1.3 or KCa3.1 might be irreversibly modulated by antigen exposure. PMID:28248292

  4. Potassium channels Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 cooperatively and compensatorily regulate antigen-specific memory T cell functions.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Eugene Y; Li, Tianbo; Jeet, Surinder; Peng, Ivan; Zhang, Juan; Lee, Wyne P; DeVoss, Jason; Caplazi, Patrick; Chen, Jun; Warming, Søren; Hackos, David H; Mukund, Susmith; Koth, Christopher M; Grogan, Jane L

    2017-03-01

    Voltage-gated Kv1.3 and Ca(2+)-dependent KCa3.1 are the most prevalent K(+) channels expressed by human and rat T cells. Despite the preferential upregulation of Kv1.3 over KCa3.1 on autoantigen-experienced effector memory T cells, whether Kv1.3 is required for their induction and function is unclear. Here we show, using Kv1.3-deficient rats, that Kv1.3 is involved in the development of chronically activated antigen-specific T cells. Several immune responses are normal in Kv1.3 knockout (KO) rats, suggesting that KCa3.1 can compensate for the absence of Kv1.3 under these specific settings. However, experiments with Kv1.3 KO rats and Kv1.3 siRNA knockdown or channel-specific inhibition of human T cells show that maximal T-cell responses against autoantigen or repeated tetanus toxoid stimulations require both Kv1.3 and KCa3.1. Finally, our data also suggest that T-cell dependency on Kv1.3 or KCa3.1 might be irreversibly modulated by antigen exposure.

  5. Association of potassium channel Kv3.4 subunits with pre- and post-synaptic structures in brainstem and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Brooke, R E; Atkinson, L; Batten, T F C; Deuchars, S A; Deuchars, J

    2004-01-01

    Voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv) are divided into eight subfamilies (Kv1-8) and play a major role in determining the excitability of neurones. Members of the Kv3 subfamily are highly abundant in the CNS, with each Kv3 gene (Kv3.1-Kv3.4) exhibiting a unique pattern of expression, although single neurones can express more than one subtype. Of the Kv3 subunits relatively little is known of the Kv3.4 subunit distribution in the nervous system, particularly in the brainstem and spinal cord of the rat. We performed immunohistochemistry to determine both the cellular and sub-cellular distribution of the Kv3.4 subunit in these areas. Kv3.4 subunit immunoreactivity (Kv3.4-IR) was widespread, with dense, punctate staining in many regions including the intermediolateral cell column (IML) and the dorsal vagal nucleus (DVN), nucleus ambiguus (NA) and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). In the ventral horn a presynaptic location was confirmed by co-localization of Kv3.4-IR with the synaptic vesicle protein, SV2 and also with the glutamate vesicle markers vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT) 1, VGluT2 or the glycine transporter GlyT2, suggesting a role for the channel in both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Electron microscopy confirmed a presynaptic terminal location of Kv3.4-IR in the VH, IML, DVN, NA and NTS. Interestingly however, patches of Kv3.4-IR were also revealed postsynaptically in dendritic and somatic structures throughout these areas. This staining was striking due to its localization at synaptic junctions at terminals with morphological features consistent with excitatory functions, suggesting an association with the postsynaptic density. Therefore the pre and postsynaptic localization of Kv3.4-IR suggests a role both in the control of transmitter release and in regulating neuronal excitability.

  6. A high-Na(+) conduction state during recovery from inactivation in the K(+) channel Kv1.5.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Hesketh, J C; Fedida, D

    2000-01-01

    Na(+) conductance through cloned K(+) channels has previously allowed characterization of inactivation and K(+) binding within the pore, and here we have used Na(+) permeation to study recovery from C-type inactivation in human Kv1.5 channels. Replacing K(+) in the solutions with Na(+) allows complete Kv1.5 inactivation and alters the recovery. The inactivated state is nonconducting for K(+) but has a Na(+) conductance of 13% of the open state. During recovery, inactivated channels progress to a higher Na(+) conductance state (R) in a voltage-dependent manner before deactivating to closed-inactivated states. Channels finally recover from inactivation in the closed configuration. In the R state channels can be reactivated and exhibit supernormal Na(+) currents with a slow biexponential inactivation. Results suggest two pathways for entry to the inactivated state and a pore conformation, perhaps with a higher Na(+) affinity than the open state. The rate of recovery from inactivation is modulated by Na(+)(o) such that 135 mM Na(+)(o) promotes the recovery to normal closed, rather than closed-inactivated states. A kinetic model of recovery that assumes a highly Na(+)-permeable state and deactivation to closed-inactivated and normal closed states at negative voltages can account for the results. Thus these data offer insight into how Kv1. 5 channels recover their resting conformation after inactivation and how ionic conditions can modify recovery rates and pathways. PMID:11053120

  7. KV1 channels identified in rodent myelinated axons, linked to Cx29 in innermost myelin: support for electrically active myelin in mammalian saltatory conduction

    PubMed Central

    Vanderpool, Kimberly G.; Yasumura, Thomas; Hickman, Jordan; Beatty, Jonathan T.; Nagy, James I.

    2016-01-01

    Saltatory conduction in mammalian myelinated axons was thought to be well understood before recent discoveries revealed unexpected subcellular distributions and molecular identities of the K+-conductance pathways that provide for rapid axonal repolarization. In this study, we visualize, identify, localize, quantify, and ultrastructurally characterize axonal KV1.1/KV1.2 channels in sciatic nerves of rodents. With the use of light microscopic immunocytochemistry and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling electron microscopy, KV1.1/KV1.2 channels are localized to three anatomically and compositionally distinct domains in the internodal axolemmas of large myelinated axons, where they form densely packed “rosettes” of 9-nm intramembrane particles. These axolemmal KV1.1/KV1.2 rosettes are precisely aligned with and ultrastructurally coupled to connexin29 (Cx29) channels, also in matching rosettes, in the surrounding juxtaparanodal myelin collars and along the inner mesaxon. As >98% of transmembrane proteins large enough to represent ion channels in these specialized domains, ∼500,000 KV1.1/KV1.2 channels define the paired juxtaparanodal regions as exclusive membrane domains for the voltage-gated K+ conductance that underlies rapid axonal repolarization in mammals. The 1:1 molecular linkage of KV1 channels to Cx29 channels in the apposed juxtaparanodal collars, plus their linkage to an additional 250,000–400,000 Cx29 channels along each inner mesaxon in every large-diameter myelinated axon examined, supports previously proposed K+ conductance directly from juxtaparanodal axoplasm into juxtaparanodal myeloplasm in mammalian axons. With neither Cx29 protein nor myelin rosettes detectable in frog myelinated axons, these data showing axon-to-myelin linkage by abundant KV1/Cx29 channels in rodent axons support renewed consideration of an electrically active role for myelin in increasing both saltatory conduction velocity and maximum propagation frequency in

  8. Gating currents from a Kv3 subfamily potassium channel: charge movement and modification by BDS-II toxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuren; Robertson, Brian; Fedida, David

    2007-11-01

    Kv3 channels have a major role in determining neuronal excitability, and are characterized by ultra-rapid kinetics of gating and a high activation threshold. However, the gating currents, which occur as a result of positional changes of the charged elements in the channel structure during activation, are not well understood. Here we report a study of gating currents from wild-type Kv3.2b channels, expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells to facilitate high time-resolution recording. On-gating currents (I(g,on)) had extremely rapid kinetics such that at +80 mV, the time constant for the decay of I(g,on) was only approximately 0.3 ms. Decay of I(g,on) appeared mono-exponential at all potentials studied, and in support of this, the charge-voltage (Q-V) relationship was fitted with a single Boltzmann function, supporting the idea that only one charge system is required to account for the time course of I(g,on) and the voltage dependence of Q(on). The voltage (V((1/2))) for half movement of gating charge was -8.4 +/- 4.0 mV (n = 6), which closely matches the voltage dependence of activation of Kv3.2b ionic currents reported before. Depolarizations to more positive potentials than 0 mV decreased the amplitude and slowed the decay of the off-gating currents (I(g,off)), suggesting that a rate-limiting step in opening was present in Kv3 channels as in Shaker and other Kv channels. Return of charge was negatively shifted along the potential axis with a V((1/2)) of Q(off) of -80.9 +/- 0.8 mV (n = 3), which allowed approximately 90% charge return upon repolarization to -100 mV. BDS-II toxin apparently reduced I(g,on), and greatly slowed the kinetics of I(g,on), while shifting the Q-V relationship in the depolarizing direction. However, the Q-V relationship remained well fitted by a single Boltzmann function. These data provide the first description of Kv3 gating currents and give further insight into the interaction of BDS toxins and Kv3 channels.

  9. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    PubMed

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease.

  10. The dipeptidyl-aminopeptidase-like protein 6 is an integral voltage sensor-interacting beta-subunit of neuronal K(V)4.2 channels.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Kevin; Tu, Liwei; Deutsch, Carol; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Auxiliary beta-subunits dictate the physiological properties of voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in excitable tissues. In many instances, however, the underlying mechanisms of action are poorly understood. The dipeptidyl-aminopeptidase-like protein 6 (DPP6) is a specific beta-subunit of neuronal K(V)4 channels, which may promote gating through interactions between the single transmembrane segment of DPP6 and the channel's voltage sensing domain (VSD). A combination of gating current measurements and protein biochemistry (in-vitro translation and co-immunoprecipitations) revealed preferential physical interaction between the isolated K(V)4.2-VSD and DPP6. Significantly weaker interactions were detected between DPP6 and K(V)1.3 channels or the K(V)4.2 pore domain. More efficient gating charge movement resulting from a direct interaction between DPP6 and the K(V)4.2-VSD is unique among the known actions of K(V) channel beta-subunits. This study shows that the modular VSD of a K(V) channel can be directly regulated by transmembrane protein-protein interactions involving an extrinsic beta-subunit. Understanding these interactions may shed light on the pathophysiology of recently identified human disorders associated with mutations affecting the dpp6 gene.

  11. Association of the Kv1 family of K+ channels and their functional blueprint in the properties of auditory neurons as revealed by genetic and functional analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenying; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Lv, Ping; Tempel, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Developmental plasticity in spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) ensues from profound alterations in the functional properties of the developing hair cell (HC). For example, prehearing HCs are spontaneously active. However, at the posthearing stage, HC membrane properties transition to graded receptor potentials. The dendrotoxin (DTX)-sensitive Kv1 channel subunits (Kv1.1, 1.2, and 1.6) shape the firing properties and membrane potential of SGNs, and the expression of the channel undergoes developmental changes. Because of the stochastic nature of Kv subunit heteromultimerization, it has been difficult to determine physiologically relevant subunit-specific interactions and their functions in the underlying mechanisms of Kv1 channel plasticity in SGNs. Using Kcna2 null mutant mice, we demonstrate a surprising paradox in changes in the membrane properties of SGNs. The resting membrane potential of Kcna2−/− SGNs was significantly hyperpolarized compared with that of age-matched wild-type (WT) SGNs. Analyses of outward currents in the mutant SGNs suggest an apparent approximately twofold increase in outward K+ currents. We show that in vivo and in vitro heteromultimerization of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 α-subunits underlies the striking and unexpected alterations in the properties of SGNs. The results suggest that heteromeric interactions of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 dominate the defining features of Kv1 channels in SGNs. PMID:23864368

  12. Association of the Kv1 family of K+ channels and their functional blueprint in the properties of auditory neurons as revealed by genetic and functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenying; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Lv, Ping; Tempel, Bruce; Yamoah, Ebenezer N

    2013-10-01

    Developmental plasticity in spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) ensues from profound alterations in the functional properties of the developing hair cell (HC). For example, prehearing HCs are spontaneously active. However, at the posthearing stage, HC membrane properties transition to graded receptor potentials. The dendrotoxin (DTX)-sensitive Kv1 channel subunits (Kv1.1, 1.2, and 1.6) shape the firing properties and membrane potential of SGNs, and the expression of the channel undergoes developmental changes. Because of the stochastic nature of Kv subunit heteromultimerization, it has been difficult to determine physiologically relevant subunit-specific interactions and their functions in the underlying mechanisms of Kv1 channel plasticity in SGNs. Using Kcna2 null mutant mice, we demonstrate a surprising paradox in changes in the membrane properties of SGNs. The resting membrane potential of Kcna2(-/-) SGNs was significantly hyperpolarized compared with that of age-matched wild-type (WT) SGNs. Analyses of outward currents in the mutant SGNs suggest an apparent approximately twofold increase in outward K(+) currents. We show that in vivo and in vitro heteromultimerization of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 α-subunits underlies the striking and unexpected alterations in the properties of SGNs. The results suggest that heteromeric interactions of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 dominate the defining features of Kv1 channels in SGNs.

  13. Variability of Potassium Channel Blockers in Mesobuthus eupeus Scorpion Venom with Focus on Kv1.1

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I.; Vassilevski, Alexander A.; Kudryashova, Kseniya S.; Nekrasova, Oksana V.; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Feofanov, Alexey V.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Grishin, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    The lesser Asian scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus (Buthidae) is one of the most widely spread and dispersed species of the Mesobuthus genus, and its venom is actively studied. Nevertheless, a considerable amount of active compounds is still under-investigated due to the high complexity of this venom. Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of putative potassium channel toxins (KTxs) from the cDNA library of M. eupeus venom glands, and we compare the deduced KTx structures with peptides purified from the venom. For the transcriptome analysis, we used conventional tools as well as a search for structural motifs characteristic of scorpion venom components in the form of regular expressions. We found 59 candidate KTxs distributed in 30 subfamilies and presenting the cysteine-stabilized α/β and inhibitor cystine knot types of fold. M. eupeus venom was then separated to individual components by multistage chromatography. A facile fluorescent system based on the expression of the KcsA-Kv1.1 hybrid channels in Escherichia coli and utilization of a labeled scorpion toxin was elaborated and applied to follow Kv1.1 pore binding activity during venom separation. As a result, eight high affinity Kv1.1 channel blockers were identified, including five novel peptides, which extend the panel of potential pharmacologically important Kv1 ligands. Activity of the new peptides against rat Kv1.1 channel was confirmed (IC50 in the range of 1–780 nm) by the two-electrode voltage clamp technique using a standard Xenopus oocyte system. Our integrated approach is of general utility and efficiency to mine natural venoms for KTxs. PMID:25792741

  14. Developmental expression and functional characterization of the potassium-channel subunit Kv3.1b in parvalbumin-containing interneurons of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Zhang, L; Weiser, M; Rudy, B; McBain, C J

    1996-01-15

    The expression of the voltage-gated K(+)-channel subunit Kv3.1b in the developing hippocampus was determined by immunoblot and immunohistochemical techniques. Kv3.1b protein was detected first at postnatal day (P) 8. The Kv3.1b-immunopositive cell number per tissue section reached a maximum at P14 and was maintained through P40. In contrast, the Kv3.1b protein content of isolated membrane vesicles in immunoblots progressively increased through P40, suggesting an increase in Kv3.1b content per cell throughout this time period. Kv3.1b protein was expressed selectively in the somata, proximal dendrites, and axons of cells lying within or near the pyramidal cell layer, consistent with their being GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. Kv3.1b was present in approximately 80% of parvalbumin-positive interneurons. The developmental onset of Kv3.1b and parvalbumin immunoreactivity was identical. In contrast, Kv3.1b was mostly absent from the subset of somatostatin-positive inhibitory interneurons. Electrophysiological recordings were made from stratum pyramidale interneurons in which morphology and Kv3.1b-positive immunoreactivity were confirmed post hoc. Outward currents had voltage-dependent and biophysical properties resembling those of channels formed by Kv3.1b. The current blocked by low concentrations of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) showed marked inactivation, suggesting that Kv3.1b may coassemble with other members of the Kv3 subfamily. In current-clamp recordings, concentrations of 4-AP that blocked the current through Kv3.1b channels allowed us tentatively to assign a role to Kv3.1b-containing channels in action-potential repolarization. These data demonstrate that Kv3.1b is regulated developmentally in a specific subpopulation of hippocampal interneurons and that channels containing this subunit may be a major determinant in imparting "fast-spiking" characteristics to these and other cells throughout the central nervous system containing the Kv3.1b subunit.

  15. Differential Regulation of Action Potential Shape and Burst-Frequency Firing by BK and Kv2 Channels in Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kimm, Tilia; Khaliq, Zayd M; Bean, Bruce P

    2015-12-16

    Little is known about the voltage-dependent potassium currents underlying spike repolarization in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Studying mouse substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons both in brain slice and after acute dissociation, we found that BK calcium-activated potassium channels and Kv2 channels both make major contributions to the depolarization-activated potassium current. Inhibiting Kv2 or BK channels had very different effects on spike shape and evoked firing. Inhibiting Kv2 channels increased spike width and decreased the afterhyperpolarization, as expected for loss of an action potential-activated potassium conductance. BK inhibition also increased spike width but paradoxically increased the afterhyperpolarization. Kv2 channel inhibition steeply increased the slope of the frequency-current (f-I) relationship, whereas BK channel inhibition had little effect on the f-I slope or decreased it, sometimes resulting in slowed firing. Action potential clamp experiments showed that both BK and Kv2 current flow during spike repolarization but with very different kinetics, with Kv2 current activating later and deactivating more slowly. Further experiments revealed that inhibiting either BK or Kv2 alone leads to recruitment of additional current through the other channel type during the action potential as a consequence of changes in spike shape. Enhancement of slowly deactivating Kv2 current can account for the increased afterhyperpolarization produced by BK inhibition and likely underlies the very different effects on the f-I relationship. The cross-regulation of BK and Kv2 activation illustrates that the functional role of a channel cannot be defined in isolation but depends critically on the context of the other conductances in the cell. This work shows that BK calcium-activated potassium channels and Kv2 voltage-activated potassium channels both regulate action potentials in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. Although both

  16. Differential Regulation of Action Potential Shape and Burst-Frequency Firing by BK and Kv2 Channels in Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kimm, Tilia; Khaliq, Zayd M.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the voltage-dependent potassium currents underlying spike repolarization in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Studying mouse substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons both in brain slice and after acute dissociation, we found that BK calcium-activated potassium channels and Kv2 channels both make major contributions to the depolarization-activated potassium current. Inhibiting Kv2 or BK channels had very different effects on spike shape and evoked firing. Inhibiting Kv2 channels increased spike width and decreased the afterhyperpolarization, as expected for loss of an action potential-activated potassium conductance. BK inhibition also increased spike width but paradoxically increased the afterhyperpolarization. Kv2 channel inhibition steeply increased the slope of the frequency–current (f–I) relationship, whereas BK channel inhibition had little effect on the f–I slope or decreased it, sometimes resulting in slowed firing. Action potential clamp experiments showed that both BK and Kv2 current flow during spike repolarization but with very different kinetics, with Kv2 current activating later and deactivating more slowly. Further experiments revealed that inhibiting either BK or Kv2 alone leads to recruitment of additional current through the other channel type during the action potential as a consequence of changes in spike shape. Enhancement of slowly deactivating Kv2 current can account for the increased afterhyperpolarization produced by BK inhibition and likely underlies the very different effects on the f–I relationship. The cross-regulation of BK and Kv2 activation illustrates that the functional role of a channel cannot be defined in isolation but depends critically on the context of the other conductances in the cell. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This work shows that BK calcium-activated potassium channels and Kv2 voltage-activated potassium channels both regulate action potentials in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra

  17. Heterogeneous intrinsic excitability of murine spiral ganglion neurons is determined by Kv1 and HCN channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Lee, E; Davis, R L

    2014-01-17

    The spiral ganglion conveys afferent auditory information predominantly through a single class of type I neurons that receive signals from inner hair cell sensory receptors. These auditory primary afferents, like in other systems (Puopolo and Belluzzi, 1998; Gascon and Moqrich, 2010; Leao et al., 2012) possess a marked diversity in their electrophysiological features (Taberner and Liberman, 2005). Consistent with these observations, when the auditory primary afferents were assessed in neuronal explants separated from their peripheral and central targets it was found that individual neurons were markedly heterogeneous in their endogenous electrophysiological features. One aspect of this heterogeneity, obvious throughout the ganglion, was their wide range of excitability as assessed by voltage threshold measurements (Liu and Davis, 2007). Thus, while neurons in the base differed significantly from apical and middle neurons in their voltage thresholds, each region showed distinctly wide ranges of values. To determine whether the resting membrane potentials (RMPs) of these neurons correlate with the threshold distribution and to identify the ion channel regulatory elements underlying heterogeneous neuronal excitability in the ganglion, patch-clamp recordings were made from postnatal day (P5-8) murine spiral ganglion neurons in vitro. We found that RMP mirrored the tonotopic threshold distribution, and contributed an additional level of heterogeneity in each cochlear location. Pharmacological experiments further indicated that threshold and RMP was coupled through the Kv1 current, which had a dual impact on both electrophysiological parameters. Whereas, hyperpolarization-activated cationic channels decoupled these two processes by primarily affecting RMP without altering threshold level. Thus, beyond mechanical and synaptic specializations, ion channel regulation of intrinsic membrane properties imbues spiral ganglion neurons with different excitability levels, a

  18. A recurrent KCNQ2 pore mutation causing early onset epileptic encephalopathy has a moderate effect on M current but alters subcellular localization of Kv7 channels.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Affef; Devaux, Jérôme J; Molinari, Florence; Alcaraz, Gisèle; Michon, François-Xavier; Sutera-Sardo, Julie; Becq, Hélène; Lacoste, Caroline; Altuzarra, Cécilia; Afenjar, Alexandra; Mignot, Cyril; Doummar, Diane; Isidor, Bertrand; Guyen, Sylvie N; Colin, Estelle; De La Vaissière, Sabine; Haye, Damien; Trauffler, Adeline; Badens, Catherine; Prieur, Fabienne; Lesca, Gaetan; Villard, Laurent; Milh, Mathieu; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the KCNQ2 gene encoding the voltage-dependent potassium M channel Kv7.2 subunit cause either benign epilepsy or early onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE). It has been proposed that the disease severity rests on the inhibitory impact of mutations on M current density. Here, we have analyzed the phenotype of 7 patients carrying the p.A294V mutation located on the S6 segment of the Kv7.2 pore domain (Kv7.2(A294V)). We investigated the functional and subcellular consequences of this mutation and compared it to another mutation (Kv7.2(A294G)) associated with a benign epilepsy and affecting the same residue. We report that all the patients carrying the p.A294V mutation presented the clinical and EEG characteristics of EOEE. In CHO cells, the total expression of Kv7.2(A294V) alone, assessed by western blotting, was only 20% compared to wild-type. No measurable current was recorded in CHO cells expressing Kv7.2(A294V) channel alone. Although the total Kv7.2(A294V) expression was rescued to wild-type levels in cells co-expressing the Kv7.3 subunit, the global current density was still reduced by 83% compared to wild-type heteromeric channel. In a configuration mimicking the patients' heterozygous genotype i.e., Kv7.2(A294V)/Kv7.2/Kv7.3, the global current density was reduced by 30%. In contrast to Kv7.2(A294V), the current density of homomeric Kv7.2(A294G) was not significantly changed compared to wild-type Kv7.2. However, the current density of Kv7.2(A294G)/Kv7.2/Kv7.3 and Kv7.2(A294G)/Kv7.3 channels were reduced by 30% and 50% respectively, compared to wild-type Kv7.2/Kv7.3. In neurons, the p.A294V mutation induced a mislocalization of heteromeric mutant channels to the somato-dendritic compartment, while the p.A294G mutation did not affect the localization of the heteromeric channels to the axon initial segment. We conclude that this position is a hotspot of mutation that can give rise to a severe or a benign epilepsy. The p.A294V mutation does not exert a

  19. Frequency-dependent regulation of rat hippocampal somato-dendritic excitability by the K+ channel subunit Kv2.1

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Haak, Laurel L; Phillips-Tansey, Emily; Russell, James T; McBain, Chris J

    2000-01-01

    The voltage-dependent potassium channel subunit Kv2.1 is widely expressed throughout the mammalian CNS and is clustered primarily on the somata and proximal dendrites, but not axons, of both principal neurones and inhibitory interneurones of the cortex and hippocampus. This expression pattern suggests that Kv2.1-containing channels may play a role in the regulation of pyramidal neurone excitability. To test this hypothesis and to determine the functional role of Kv2.1-containing channels, cultured hippocampal slices were incubated with antisense oligonucleotides directed against Kv2.1 mRNA.Western blot analysis demonstrated that Kv2.1 protein content of cultured slices decreased > 90 % following 2 weeks of treatment with antisense oligonucleotides, when compared with either control missense-treated or untreated cultures. Similarly, Kv2.1 immunostaining was selectively decreased in antisense-treated cultures.Sustained outward potassium currents, recorded in both whole-cell and outside-out patch configurations, demonstrated a selective reduction of amplitude only in antisense-treated CA1 pyramidal neurones.Under current-clamp conditions, action potential durations were identical in antisense-treated, control missense-treated and untreated slices when initiated by low frequency stimulation (0.2 Hz). In contrast, spike repolarization was progressively prolonged during higher frequencies of stimulation (1 Hz) only in cells from antisense-treated slices. Similarly, action potentials recorded during electrographic interictal activity in the ‘high [K+]o’ model of epilepsy demonstrated pronounced broadening of their late phase only in cells from antisense-treated slices.Consistent with the frequency-dependent spike broadening, calcium imaging experiments from single CA1 pyramidal neurones revealed that high frequency Schaffer collateral stimulation resulted in a prolonged elevation of dendritic [Ca2+]i transients only in antisense-treated neurones.These studies

  20. Early-onset epileptic encephalopathy caused by a reduced sensitivity of Kv7.2 potassium channels to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Ambrosino, Paolo; Mosca, Ilaria; De Maria, Michela; Moretto, Edoardo; Miceli, Francesco; Alaimo, Alessandro; Iraci, Nunzio; Manocchio, Laura; Medoro, Alessandro; Passafaro, Maria; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 subunits underlie the M-current, a neuronal K+ current characterized by an absolute functional requirement for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Kv7.2 gene mutations cause early-onset neonatal seizures with heterogeneous clinical outcomes, ranging from self-limiting benign familial neonatal seizures to severe early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (Kv7.2-EE). In this study, the biochemical and functional consequences prompted by a recurrent variant (R325G) found independently in four individuals with severe forms of neonatal-onset EE have been investigated. Upon heterologous expression, homomeric Kv7.2 R325G channels were non-functional, despite biotin-capture in Western blots revealed normal plasma membrane subunit expression. Mutant subunits exerted dominant-negative effects when incorporated into heteromeric channels with Kv7.2 and/or Kv7.3 subunits. Increasing cellular PIP2 levels by co-expression of type 1γ PI(4)P5-kinase (PIP5K) partially recovered homomeric Kv7.2 R325G channel function. Currents carried by heteromeric channels incorporating Kv7.2 R325G subunits were more readily inhibited than wild-type channels upon activation of a voltage-sensitive phosphatase (VSP), and recovered more slowly upon VSP switch-off. These results reveal for the first time that a mutation-induced decrease in current sensitivity to PIP2 is the primary molecular defect responsible for Kv7.2-EE in individuals carrying the R325G variant, further expanding the range of pathogenetic mechanisms exploitable for personalized treatment of Kv7.2-related epilepsies. PMID:27905566

  1. Lovastatin blocks Kv1.3 channel in human T cells: a new mechanism to explain its immunomodulatory properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ning; Dong, Qian; Qian, Cheng; Li, Sen; Wu, Qiong-Feng; Ding, Dan; Li, Jing; Wang, Bin-Bin; Guo, Ke-fang; Xie, Jiang-jiao; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Hua; Du, Yi-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Lovastatin is a member of Statins, which are beneficial in a lot of immunologic cardiovascular diseases and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Kv1.3 channel plays important roles in the activation and proliferation of T cells, and have become attractive target for immune-related disorders. The present study was designed to examine the block effect of Lovastatin on Kv1.3 channel in human T cells, and to clarify its new immunomodulatory mechanism. We found that Lovastatin inhibited Kv1.3 currents in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, and the IC50 for peak, end of the pulse was 39.81 ± 5.11, 6.92 ± 0.95 μM, respectively. Lovastatin also accelerated the decay rate of current inactivation and negatively shifted the steady-state inactivation curves concentration-dependently, without affecting the activation curve. However, 30 μM Lovastatin had no apparent effect on KCa current in human T cells. Furthermore, Lovastatin inhibited Ca2+ influx, T cell proliferation as well as IL-2 production. The activities of NFAT1 and NF-κB p65/50 were down-regulated by Lovastatin, too. At last, Mevalonate application only partially reversed the inhibition of Lovastatin on IL-2 secretion, and the siRNA against Kv1.3 also partially reduced this inhibitory effect of Lovastatin. In conclusion, Lovastatin can exert immunodulatory properties through the new mechanism of blocking Kv1.3 channel. PMID:26616555

  2. Lovastatin blocks Kv1.3 channel in human T cells: a new mechanism to explain its immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Dong, Qian; Qian, Cheng; Li, Sen; Wu, Qiong-Feng; Ding, Dan; Li, Jing; Wang, Bin-Bin; Guo, Ke-fang; Xie, Jiang-jiao; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Hua; Du, Yi-Mei

    2015-11-30

    Lovastatin is a member of Statins, which are beneficial in a lot of immunologic cardiovascular diseases and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Kv1.3 channel plays important roles in the activation and proliferation of T cells, and have become attractive target for immune-related disorders. The present study was designed to examine the block effect of Lovastatin on Kv1.3 channel in human T cells, and to clarify its new immunomodulatory mechanism. We found that Lovastatin inhibited Kv1.3 currents in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, and the IC50 for peak, end of the pulse was 39.81 ± 5.11, 6.92 ± 0.95 μM, respectively. Lovastatin also accelerated the decay rate of current inactivation and negatively shifted the steady-state inactivation curves concentration-dependently, without affecting the activation curve. However, 30 μM Lovastatin had no apparent effect on KCa current in human T cells. Furthermore, Lovastatin inhibited Ca(2+) influx, T cell proliferation as well as IL-2 production. The activities of NFAT1 and NF-κB p65/50 were down-regulated by Lovastatin, too. At last, Mevalonate application only partially reversed the inhibition of Lovastatin on IL-2 secretion, and the siRNA against Kv1.3 also partially reduced this inhibitory effect of Lovastatin. In conclusion, Lovastatin can exert immunodulatory properties through the new mechanism of blocking Kv1.3 channel.

  3. The endocannabinoid 2-AG controls skeletal muscle cell differentiation via CB1 receptor-dependent inhibition of Kv7 channels

    PubMed Central

    Iannotti, Fabio A.; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Mazzarella, Enrico; Martella, Andrea; Calvigioni, Daniela; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Ambrosino, Paolo; Petrosino, Stefania; Czifra, Gabriella; Bíró, Tamás; Harkany, Tibor; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Little is known of the involvement of endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors in skeletal muscle cell differentiation. We report that, due to changes in the expression of genes involved in its metabolism, the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are decreased both during myotube formation in vitro from murine C2C12 myoblasts and during mouse muscle growth in vivo. The endocannabinoid, as well as the CB1 agonist arachidonoyl-2-chloroethylamide, prevent myotube formation in a manner antagonized by CB1 knockdown and by CB1 antagonists, which, per se, instead stimulate differentiation. Importantly, 2-AG also inhibits differentiation of primary human satellite cells. Muscle fascicles from CB1 knockout embryos contain more muscle fibers, and postnatal mice show muscle fibers of an increased diameter relative to wild-type littermates. Inhibition of Kv7.4 channel activity, which plays a permissive role in myogenesis and depends on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), underlies the effects of 2-AG. We find that CB1 stimulation reduces both total and Kv7.4-bound PIP2 levels in C2C12 cells and inhibits Kv7.4 currents in transfected CHO cells. We suggest that 2-AG is an endogenous repressor of myoblast differentiation via CB1-mediated inhibition of Kv7.4 channels. PMID:24927567

  4. Novel Roles for Kv7 Channels in Shaping Histamine-Induced Contractions and Bradykinin-Dependent Relaxations in Pig Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingjuan; Li, Wennan; Hiett, S Christopher; Obukhov, Alexander G

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv7 channels are inhibited by agonists of Gq-protein-coupled receptors, such as histamine. Recent works have provided evidence that inhibition of vascular Kv7 channels may trigger vessel contractions. In this study, we investigated how Kv7 activity modulates the histamine-induced contractions in "healthy" and metabolic syndrome (MetS) pig right coronary arteries (CAs). We performed isometric tension and immunohistochemical studies with domestic, lean Ossabaw, and MetS Ossabaw pig CAs. We found that neither the Kv7.2/Kv7.4/Kv7.5 activator ML213 nor the general Kv7 inhibitor XE991 altered the tension of CA rings under preload, indicating that vascular Kv7 channels are likely inactive in the preloaded rings. Conversely, ML213 potently dilated histamine-pre-contracted CAs, suggesting that Kv7 channels are activated during histamine applications and yet partially inhibited by histamine. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed strong Kv7.4 immunostaining in the medial and intimal layers of the CA wall, whereas Kv7.5 immunostaining intensity was strong in the intimal but weak in the medial layers. The medial Kv7 immunostaining was significantly weaker in MetS Ossabaw CAs as compared to lean Ossabaw or domestic CAs. Consistently, histamine-pre-contracted MetS Ossabaw CAs exhibited attenuated ML213-dependent dilations. In domestic pig CAs, where medial Kv7 immunostaining intensity was stronger, histamine-induced contractions spontaneously decayed to ~31% of the peak amplitude within 4 minutes. Oppositely, in Ossabaw CAs, where Kv7 immunostaining intensity was weaker, the histamine-induced contractions were more sustained. XE991 pretreatment significantly slowed the decay rate of histamine-induced contractions in domestic CAs, supporting the hypothesis that increased Kv7 activity correlates with a faster rate of histamine-induced contraction decay. Alternatively, XE991 significantly decreased the amplitude of bradykinin-dependent dilations in pre-contracted CAs

  5. Novel Roles for Kv7 Channels in Shaping Histamine-Induced Contractions and Bradykinin-Dependent Relaxations in Pig Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingjuan; Li, Wennan; Hiett, S. Christopher; Obukhov, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv7 channels are inhibited by agonists of Gq-protein-coupled receptors, such as histamine. Recent works have provided evidence that inhibition of vascular Kv7 channels may trigger vessel contractions. In this study, we investigated how Kv7 activity modulates the histamine-induced contractions in “healthy” and metabolic syndrome (MetS) pig right coronary arteries (CAs). We performed isometric tension and immunohistochemical studies with domestic, lean Ossabaw, and MetS Ossabaw pig CAs. We found that neither the Kv7.2/Kv7.4/Kv7.5 activator ML213 nor the general Kv7 inhibitor XE991 altered the tension of CA rings under preload, indicating that vascular Kv7 channels are likely inactive in the preloaded rings. Conversely, ML213 potently dilated histamine-pre-contracted CAs, suggesting that Kv7 channels are activated during histamine applications and yet partially inhibited by histamine. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed strong Kv7.4 immunostaining in the medial and intimal layers of the CA wall, whereas Kv7.5 immunostaining intensity was strong in the intimal but weak in the medial layers. The medial Kv7 immunostaining was significantly weaker in MetS Ossabaw CAs as compared to lean Ossabaw or domestic CAs. Consistently, histamine-pre-contracted MetS Ossabaw CAs exhibited attenuated ML213-dependent dilations. In domestic pig CAs, where medial Kv7 immunostaining intensity was stronger, histamine-induced contractions spontaneously decayed to ~31% of the peak amplitude within 4 minutes. Oppositely, in Ossabaw CAs, where Kv7 immunostaining intensity was weaker, the histamine-induced contractions were more sustained. XE991 pretreatment significantly slowed the decay rate of histamine-induced contractions in domestic CAs, supporting the hypothesis that increased Kv7 activity correlates with a faster rate of histamine-induced contraction decay. Alternatively, XE991 significantly decreased the amplitude of bradykinin-dependent dilations in pre

  6. Molecular determinants for the tarantula toxin jingzhaotoxin-I interacting with potassium channel Kv2.1.

    PubMed

    Tao, Huai; Wu, Yuanyuan; Deng, Meichun; He, Juan; Wang, Meichi; Xiao, Yucheng; Liang, Songping

    2013-03-01

    With high binding affinity and distinct pharmacological functions, animal toxins are powerful ligands to investigate the structure-function relationships of voltage-gated ion channels. Jingzhaotoxin-I (JZTX-I) is an important neurotoxin from the tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao venom that inhibits both sodium and potassium channels. In our previous work, JZTX-I, as a gating modifier, is able to inhibit activation of the potassium channel subtype Kv2.1. However, its binding site on Kv2.1 remains unknown. In this study, using Ala-scanning mutagenesis strategy, we demonstrated that four residues (I273, F274, E277, and K280) in S3b-S4 motif contributed to the formation of JZTX-I binding site. The mutations I273A, F274A, E277A, and K280A reduced toxin binding affinity by 6-, 10-, 8-, and 7-fold, respectively. Taken together with our previous data that JZTX-I accelerated channel deactivation, these results suggest that JZTX-I inhibits Kv2.1 activation by docking onto the voltage sensor paddle and trapping the voltage sensor in the closed state. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Subacute hypoxia suppresses Kv3.4 channel expression and whole-cell K+ currents through endogenous 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Tang, Xiaobo; Tian, Hua; Liu, Ye; Wang, Zhigang; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jing; Guo, Sholi; Zhu, Daling

    2008-06-10

    We have previously reported that subacute hypoxia activates lung 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which catalyzes arachidonic acid to produce 15-HETE, leading to constriction of neonatal rabbit pulmonary arteries. Subacute hypoxia suppresses Kv3.4 channel expression and results in an inhibition of whole-cell K(+) currents (I(K)). Although the Kv channel inhibition is likely to be mediated through 15-HETE, direct evidence is still lacking. To reveal the role of the 15-LOX/15-HETE pathway in the hypoxia-induced down-regulation of Kv3.4 channel expression and inhibition of I(K), we performed studies using 15-LOX blockers, whole-cell patch-clamp, semi-quantitative PCR, ELISA and Western blot analysis. We found that Kv3.4 channel expression at the mRNA and protein levels was greatly up-regulated in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells after blockade of 15-LOX by CDC or NDGA. The 15-LOX blockade also partially restored I(K). In comparison, 15-HETE had a stronger effect than 12-HETE on the expression of Kv3.4 channels. 5-HETE had no noticeable effect on Kv3.4 channel expression. These data indicate that the 15-LOX pathway via its metabolite, 15-HETE, seems to play a role in the down-regulation of Kv3.4 expression and I(K) inhibition after subacute hypoxia.

  8. Overlapping binding sites of structurally different antiarrhythmics flecainide and propafenone in the subunit interface of potassium channel Kv2.1.

    PubMed

    Madeja, Michael; Steffen, Wibke; Mesic, Ivana; Garic, Bojan; Zhorov, Boris S

    2010-10-29

    Kv2.1 channels, which are expressed in brain, heart, pancreas, and other organs and tissues, are important targets for drug design. Flecainide and propafenone are known to block Kv2.1 channels more potently than other Kv channels. Here, we sought to explore structural determinants of this selectivity. We demonstrated that flecainide reduced the K(+) currents through Kv2.1 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes in a voltage- and time-dependent manner. By systematically exchanging various segments of Kv2.1 with those from Kv1.2, we determined flecainide-sensing residues in the P-helix and inner helix S6. These residues are not exposed to the inner pore, a conventional binding region of open channel blockers. The flecainide-sensing residues also contribute to propafenone binding, suggesting overlapping receptors for the drugs. Indeed, propafenone and flecainide compete for binding in Kv2.1. We further used Monte Carlo-energy minimizations to map the receptors of the drugs. Flecainide docking in the Kv1.2-based homology model of Kv2.1 predicts the ligand ammonium group in the central cavity and the benzamide moiety in a niche between S6 and the P-helix. Propafenone also binds in the niche. Its carbonyl group accepts an H-bond from the P-helix, the amino group donates an H-bond to the P-loop turn, whereas the propyl group protrudes in the pore and blocks the access to the selectivity filter. Thus, besides the binding region in the central cavity, certain K(+) channel ligands can expand in the subunit interface whose residues are less conserved between K(+) channels and hence may be targets for design of highly desirable subtype-specific K(+) channel drugs.

  9. Pancreatic β-cell prosurvival effects of the incretin hormones involve post-translational modification of Kv2.1 delayed rectifier channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S-J; Widenmaier, S B; Choi, W S; Nian, C; Ao, Z; Warnock, G; McIntosh, C H S

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are the major incretin hormones that exert insulinotropic and anti-apoptotic actions on pancreatic β-cells. Insulinotropic actions of the incretins involve modulation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. In multiple cell types, Kv channel activity has been implicated in cell volume changes accompanying initiation of the apoptotic program. Focusing on Kv2.1, we examined whether regulation of Kv channels in β-cells contributes to the prosurvival effects of incretins. Overexpression of Kv2.1 in INS-1 β-cells potentiated apoptosis in response to mitochondrial and ER stress and, conversely, co-stimulation with GIP/GLP-1 uncoupled this potentiation, suppressing apoptosis. In parallel, incretins promoted phosphorylation and acetylation of Kv2.1 via pathways involving protein kinase A (PKA)/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase-1 (MSK-1) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT)/histone deacetylase (HDAC). Further studies demonstrated that acetylation of Kv2.1 was mediated by incretin actions on nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of CREB binding protein (CBP) and its interaction with Kv2.1. Regulation of β-cell survival by GIP and GLP-1 therefore involves post-translational modifications (PTMs) of Kv channels by PKA/MSK-1 and HAT/HDAC. This appears to be the first demonstration of modulation of delayed rectifier Kv channels contributing to the β-cell prosurvival effects of incretins and of 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-stimulated export of a nuclear lysine acetyltransferase that regulates cell surface ion channel function. PMID:21818121

  10. Peroxisomal dysfunctions cause lysosomal storage and axonal Kv1 channel redistribution in peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kleinecke, Sandra; Richert, Sarah; de Hoz, Livia; Brügger, Britta; Kungl, Theresa; Asadollahi, Ebrahim; Quintes, Susanne; Blanz, Judith; McGonigal, Rhona; Naseri, Kobra; Sereda, Michael W; Sachsenheimer, Timo; Lüchtenborg, Christian; Möbius, Wiebke; Willison, Hugh; Baes, Myriam; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kassmann, Celia Michèle

    2017-01-01

    Impairment of peripheral nerve function is frequent in neurometabolic diseases, but mechanistically not well understood. Here, we report a novel disease mechanism and the finding that glial lipid metabolism is critical for axon function, independent of myelin itself. Surprisingly, nerves of Schwann cell-specific Pex5 mutant mice were unaltered regarding axon numbers, axonal calibers, and myelin sheath thickness by electron microscopy. In search for a molecular mechanism, we revealed enhanced abundance and internodal expression of axonal membrane proteins normally restricted to juxtaparanodal lipid-rafts. Gangliosides were altered and enriched within an expanded lysosomal compartment of paranodal loops. We revealed the same pathological features in a mouse model of human Adrenomyeloneuropathy, preceding disease-onset by one year. Thus, peroxisomal dysfunction causes secondary failure of local lysosomes, thereby impairing the turnover of gangliosides in myelin. This reveals a new aspect of axon-glia interactions, with Schwann cell lipid metabolism regulating the anchorage of juxtaparanodal Kv1-channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23332.001 PMID:28470148

  11. Docking ellipticine to the V-VI transmembrane domain of the Kv11.1 potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Brancaleon, Lorenzo; Gentile, S.

    2011-03-01

    Ellipticines such as 9-methoxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (MMEA) and 9-hydroxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (NMEA, Celiptium ) are antineoplastic drugs exerting their selective cytotoxicity against leukemia and endometrial carcinoma. Ellipticine's action is also related to severe physical side effects, but the link between undesired effects and pharmacological application is not well understood. We investigated the binding of Ellipticine derivatives with the Kv11.1 potassium ion channel using Autodock and revealed that hydroxyellipticinium derivatives provide binding configurations with Kv11.1, but the energy, location and estimated dissociation constant varied. The binding energy is as follows: Chloroceliptium (-6.60 kcal/mol) Celiptium (- 6.37 kcal / mol) > Methoxyceliptium (- 6.20 kcal / mol) Datelliptium (-6.08 kcal/mol). The data shows that some configurations enable these molecules to bridge among channel subunits, thus potentially inhibiting the flow of ions.

  12. Domain and interdomain energetics underlying gating in Shaker-type Kv channels.

    PubMed

    Peyser, Alexander; Gillespie, Dirk; Roth, Roland; Nonner, Wolfgang

    2014-10-21

    To understand gating events with a time-base many orders-of-magnitude slower than that of atomic motion in voltage-gated ion channels such as the Shaker-type KV channels, a multiscale physical model is constructed from the experimentally well-characterized voltage-sensor (VS) domains coupled to a hydrophobic gate. The four VS domains are described by a continuum electrostatic model under voltage-clamp conditions, the control of ion flow by the gate domain is described by a vapor-lock mechanism, and the simple coupling principle is informed by known experimental results and trial-and-error. The configurational energy computed for each element is used to produce a total Hamiltonian that is a function of applied voltage, VS positions, and gate radius. We compute statistical-mechanical expectation values of macroscopic laboratory observables. This approach stands in contrast with molecular-dynamic models which are challenged by increasing scale, and kinetic models which assume a probability distribution rather than derive it from the underlying physics. This generic model predicts well the Shaker charge/voltage and conductance/voltage relations; the tight constraints underlying these results allow us to quantitatively assess the underlying physical mechanisms. The total electrical work picked up by the VS domains is an order-of-magnitude larger than the work required to actuate the gate itself, suggesting an energetic basis for the evolutionary flexibility of the voltage-gating mechanism. The cooperative slide-and-interlock behavior of the VS domains described by the VS-gate coupling relation leads to the experimentally observed bistable gating. This engineering approach should prove useful in the investigation of various elements underlying gating characteristics and degraded behavior due to mutation.

  13. Immunohistochemical localisation of the voltage gated potassium ion channel subunit Kv3.3 in the rat medulla oblongata and thoracic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Ruth E; Atkinson, Lucy; Edwards, Ian; Parson, Simon H; Deuchars, Jim

    2006-01-27

    Voltage gated K+ channels (Kv) are a diverse group of channels important in determining neuronal excitability. The Kv superfamily is divided into 12 subfamilies (Kv1-12) and members of the Kv3 subfamily are highly abundant in the CNS, with each Kv3 gene (Kv3.1-Kv3.4) exhibiting a unique expression pattern. Since the localisation of Kv subunits is important in defining the roles they play in neuronal function, we have used immunohistochemistry to determine the distribution of the Kv3.3 subunit in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of rats. Kv3.3 subunit immunoreactivity (Kv3.3-IR) was widespread but present only in specific cell populations where it could be detected in somata, dendrites and synaptic terminals. Labelled neurones were observed in the spinal cord in laminae IV and V, in the region of the central canal and in the ventral horn. In the medulla oblongata, labelled cell bodies were numerous in the spinal trigeminal, cuneate and gracilis nuclei whilst rarer in the lateral reticular nucleus, hypoglossal nucleus and raphe nucleus. Regions containing autonomic efferent neurones were predominantly devoid of labelling with only occasional labelled neurones being observed. Dual immunohistochemistry revealed that some Kv3.3-IR neurones in the ventral medullary reticular nucleus, spinal trigeminal nucleus, dorsal horn, ventral horn and central canal region were also immunoreactive for the Kv3.1b subunit. The presence of Kv3.3 subunits in terminals was confirmed by co-localisation of Kv3.3-IR with the synaptic vesicle protein SV2, the vesicular glutamate transporter VGluT2 and the glycine transporter GlyT2. Co-localisation of Kv3.3-IR was not observed with VGluT1, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin or choline acetyl transferase. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of Kv3.3-IR in terminals and somatic membranes in ventral horn neurones, but not motoneurones. This study provides evidence supporting a role for Kv3.3 subunits in regulating neuronal excitability

  14. Effect of sensor domain mutations on the properties of voltage-gated ion channels: molecular dynamics studies of the potassium channel Kv1.2.

    PubMed

    Delemotte, Lucie; Treptow, Werner; Klein, Michael L; Tarek, Mounir

    2010-11-03

    The effects on the structural and functional properties of the Kv1.2 voltage-gated ion channel, caused by selective mutation of voltage sensor domain residues, have been investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Following experiments that have identified mutations of voltage-gated ion channels involved in state-dependent omega currents, we observe for both the open and closed conformations of the Kv1.2 that specific mutations of S4 gating-charge residues destabilize the electrostatic network between helices of the voltage sensor domain, resulting in the formation of hydrophilic pathways linking the intra- and extracellular media. When such mutant channels are subject to transmembrane potentials, they conduct cations via these so-called "omega pores." This study provides therefore further insight into the molecular mechanisms that lead to omega currents, which have been linked to certain channelopathies.

  15. AKAP proteins anchor cAMP-dependent protein kinase to KvLQT1/IsK channel complex.

    PubMed

    Potet, F; Scott, J D; Mohammad-Panah, R; Escande, D; Baró, I

    2001-05-01

    In cardiac myocytes, the slow component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current (I(Ks)) is regulated by cAMP. Elevated cAMP increases I(Ks) amplitude, slows its deactivation kinetics, and shifts its activation curve. At the molecular level, I(Ks) channels are composed of KvLQT1/IsK complexes. In a variety of mammalian heterologous expression systems maintained at physiological temperature, we explored cAMP regulation of recombinant KvLQT1/IsK complexes. In these systems, KvLQT1/IsK complexes were totally insensitive to cAMP regulation. cAMP regulation was not restored by coexpression with the dominant negative isoform of KvLQT1 or with the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator. In contrast, coexpression of the neuronal A kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)79, a fragment of a cardiac AKAP (mAKAP), or cardiac AKAP15/18 restored cAMP regulation of KvLQT1/IsK complexes inasmuch as cAMP stimulation increased the I(Ks) amplitude, increased its deactivation time constant, and negatively shifted its activation curve. However, in cells expressing an AKAP, the effects of cAMP stimulation on the I(Ks) amplitude remained modest compared with those previously reported in cardiac myocytes. The effects of cAMP stimulation were fully prevented by including the Ht31 peptide (a global disruptor of protein kinase A anchoring) in the intracellular medium. We concluded that cAMP regulation of I(Ks) requires protein kinase A anchoring by AKAPs, which therefore participate with the channel protein complex underlying I(Ks).

  16. Kv3-like potassium channels are required for sustained high-frequency firing in basal ganglia output neurons.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shengyuan; Matta, Shannon G; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2011-02-01

    The GABA projection neurons in the substantial nigra pars reticulata (SNr) are key output neurons of the basal ganglia motor control circuit. These neurons fire sustained high-frequency, short-duration spikes that provide a tonic inhibition to their targets and are critical to movement control. We hypothesized that a robust voltage-activated K(+) conductance that activates quickly and resists inactivation is essential to the remarkable fast-spiking capability in these neurons. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis on laser capture-microdissected nigral neurons indicated that mRNAs for Kv3.1 and Kv3.4, two key subunits for forming high activation threshold, fast-activating, slow-inactivating, 1 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive, fast delayed rectifier (I(DR-fast)) type Kv channels, are more abundant in fast-spiking SNr GABA neurons than in slow-spiking nigral dopamine neurons. Nucleated patch clamp recordings showed that SNr GABA neurons have a strong Kv3-like I(DR-fast) current sensitive to 1 mM TEA that activates quickly at depolarized membrane potentials and is resistant to inactivation. I(DR-fast) is smaller in nigral dopamine neurons. Pharmacological blockade of I(DR-fast) by 1 mM TEA impaired the high-frequency firing capability in SNr GABA neurons. Taken together, these results indicate that Kv3-like channels mediating fast-activating, inactivation-resistant I(DR-fast) current are critical to the sustained high-frequency firing in SNr GABA projection neurons and hence movement control.

  17. Distinctive role of KV1.1 subunit in the biology and functions of low threshold K(+) channels with implications for neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Ovsepian, Saak V; LeBerre, Marie; Steuber, Volker; O'Leary, Valerie B; Leibold, Christian; Oliver Dolly, J

    2016-03-01

    The diversity of pore-forming subunits of KV1 channels (KV1.1-KV1.8) affords their physiological versatility and predicts a range of functional impairments resulting from genetic aberrations. Curiously, identified so far human neurological conditions associated with dysfunctions of KV1 channels have been linked exclusively to mutations in the KCNA1 gene encoding for the KV1.1 subunit. The absence of phenotypes related to irregularities in other subunits, including the prevalent KV1.2 subunit of neurons is highly perplexing given that deletion of the corresponding kcna2 gene in mouse models precipitates symptoms reminiscent to those of KV1.1 knockouts. Herein, we critically evaluate the molecular and biophysical characteristics of the KV1.1 protein in comparison with others and discuss their role in the greater penetrance of KCNA1 mutations in humans leading to the neurological signs of episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). Future research and interpretation of emerging data should afford new insights towards a better understanding of the role of KV1.1 in integrative mechanisms of neurons and synaptic functions under normal and disease conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Initial segment Kv2.2 channels mediate a slow delayed rectifier and maintain high frequency action potential firing in medial nucleus of the trapezoid body neurons.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jamie; Griffin, Sarah J; Baker, Claire; Skrzypiec, Anna; Chernova, Tatanya; Forsythe, Ian D

    2008-07-15

    The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) is specialized for high frequency firing by expression of Kv3 channels, which minimize action potential (AP) duration, and Kv1 channels, which suppress multiple AP firing, during each calyceal giant EPSC. However, the outward K(+) current in MNTB neurons is dominated by another unidentified delayed rectifier. It has slow kinetics and a peak conductance of approximately 37 nS; it is half-activated at -9.2 +/- 2.1 mV and half-inactivated at -35.9 +/- 1.5 mV. It is blocked by several non-specific potassium channel antagonists including quinine (100 microm) and high concentrations of extracellular tetraethylammonium (TEA; IC(50) = 11.8 mM), but no specific antagonists were found. These characteristics are similar to recombinant Kv2-mediated currents. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that Kv2.2 mRNA was much more prevalent than Kv2.1 in the MNTB. A Kv2.2 antibody showed specific staining and Western blots confirmed that it recognized a protein approximately 110 kDa which was absent in brainstem tissue from a Kv2.2 knockout mouse. Confocal imaging showed that Kv2.2 was highly expressed in axon initial segments of MNTB neurons. In the absence of a specific antagonist, Hodgkin-Huxley modelling of voltage-gated conductances showed that Kv2.2 has a minor role during single APs (due to its slow activation) but assists recovery of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) from inactivation by hyperpolarizing interspike potentials during repetitive AP firing. Current-clamp recordings during high frequency firing and characterization of Nav inactivation confirmed this hypothesis. We conclude that Kv2.2-containing channels have a distinctive initial segment location and crucial function in maintaining AP amplitude by regulating the interspike potential during high frequency firing.

  19. Kv4.2 Knockout Mice Have Hippocampal-Dependent Learning and Memory Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Joaquin N.; Brewster, Amy L.; Spencer, Corinne M.; Anderson, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Kv4.2 channels contribute to the transient, outward K[superscript +] current (A-type current) in hippocampal dendrites, and modulation of this current substantially alters dendritic excitability. Using Kv4.2 knockout (KO) mice, we examined the role of Kv4.2 in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. We found that Kv4.2 KO mice showed a deficit…

  20. Kv4.2 Knockout Mice Have Hippocampal-Dependent Learning and Memory Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Joaquin N.; Brewster, Amy L.; Spencer, Corinne M.; Anderson, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Kv4.2 channels contribute to the transient, outward K[superscript +] current (A-type current) in hippocampal dendrites, and modulation of this current substantially alters dendritic excitability. Using Kv4.2 knockout (KO) mice, we examined the role of Kv4.2 in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. We found that Kv4.2 KO mice showed a deficit…

  1. Somatic membrane potential and Kv1 channels control spike repolarization in cortical axon collaterals and presynaptic boutons.

    PubMed

    Foust, Amanda J; Yu, Yuguo; Popovic, Marko; Zecevic, Dejan; McCormick, David A

    2011-10-26

    The shape of action potentials invading presynaptic terminals, which can vary significantly from spike waveforms recorded at the soma, may critically influence the probability of synaptic neurotransmitter release. Revealing the conductances that determine spike shape in presynaptic boutons is important for understanding how changes in the electrochemical context in which a spike is generated, such as subthreshold depolarization spreading from the soma, can modulate synaptic strength. Utilizing recent improvements in the signal-to-noise ratio of voltage-sensitive dye imaging in mouse brain slices, we demonstrate that intracortical axon collaterals and en passant presynaptic terminals of layer 5 pyramidal cells exhibit a high density of Kv1 subunit-containing ion channels, which generate a slowly inactivating K(+) current critically important for spike repolarization in these compartments. Blockade of the current by low doses of 4-aminopyridine or α-dendrotoxin dramatically slows the falling phase of action potentials in axon collaterals and presynaptic boutons. Furthermore, subthreshold depolarization of the soma broadened action potentials in collaterals bearing presynaptic boutons, an effect abolished by blocking Kv1 channels with α-dendrotoxin. These results indicate that action potential-induced synaptic transmission may operate through a mix of analog-digital transmission owing to the properties of Kv1 channels in axon collaterals and presynaptic boutons.

  2. Quantifying noise-induced stability of a cortical fast-spiking cell model with Kv3-channel-like current.

    PubMed

    Tateno, T; Robinson, H P C

    2007-01-01

    Population oscillations in neural activity in the gamma (>30 Hz) and higher frequency ranges are found over wide areas of the mammalian cortex. Recently, in the somatosensory cortex, the details of neural connections formed by several types of GABAergic interneurons have become apparent, and they are believed to play a significant role in generating these oscillations through synaptic and gap-junctional interactions. However, little is known about the mechanism of how such oscillations are maintained stably by particular interneurons and by their local networks, in a noisy environment with abundant synaptic inputs. To obtain more insight into this, we studied a fast-spiking (FS)-cell model including Kv3-channel-like current, which is a distinctive feature of these cells, from the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamical systems. To examine the specific role of the Kv3-channel in determining oscillation properties, we analyzed basic properties of the FS-cell model, such as the bifurcation structure and phase resetting curves (PRCs). Furthermore, to quantitatively characterize the oscillation stability under noisy fluctuations mimicking small fast synaptic inputs, we applied a recently developed method from random dynamical system theory to estimate Lyapunov exponents, both for the original four-dimensional dynamics and for a reduced one-dimensional phase-equation on the circle. The results indicated that the presence of the Kv3-channel-like current helps to regulate the stability of noisy neural oscillations and a transient-period length to stochastic attractors.

  3. Kv7 voltage-activated potassium channel inhibitors reduce fluid resuscitation requirements after hemorrhagic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Nassoiy, Sean P; Byron, Kenneth L; Majetschak, Matthias

    2017-01-17

    Recent evidence suggests that drugs targeting Kv7 channels could be used to modulate vascular function and blood pressure. Here, we studied whether Kv7 channel inhibitors can be utilized to stabilize hemodynamics and reduce resuscitation fluid requirements after hemorrhagic shock. Anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with arterial and venous catheters for blood pressure monitoring, hemorrhage and fluid resuscitation. Series 1: Linopirdine (Kv7 channel blocker, 0.1-6 mg/kg) or retigabine (Kv7 channel activator, 0.1-12 mg/kg) were administered to normal animals. Series 2: Animals were hemorrhaged to a MAP of 25 mmHg for 30 min, followed by fluid resuscitation with normal saline (NS) to a MAP of 70 mmHg until t = 75 min. Animals were treated with single bolus injections of vehicle, linopirdine (1-6 mg/kg), XE-991 (structural analogue of linopirdine with higher potency for channel blockade, 1 mg/kg) prior to fluid resuscitation. Series 3: Animals were resuscitated with NS alone or NS supplemented with linopirdine (1.25-200 μg/mL). Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA/Bonferroni post-hoc testing. Series 1: Linopirdine transiently (10-15 min) and dose-dependently increased MAP by up to 15%. Retigabine dose-dependently reduced MAP by up to 60%, which could be reverted with linopirdine. Series 2: Fluid requirements to maintain MAP at 70 mmHg were 65 ± 34 mL/kg with vehicle, and 57 ± 13 mL/kg, 22 ± 8 mL/kg and 22 ± 11 mL/kg with intravenous bolus injection of 1, 3 and 6 mg/kg linopirdine, respectively. XE-991 (1 mg/kg), reduced resuscitation requirements comparable to 3 mg/kg linopirdine. Series 3: When resuscitation was performed with linopirdine-supplemented normal saline (NS), fluid requirements to stabilize MAP were 73 ± 12 mL/kg with NS alone and 72 ± 24, 61 ± 20, 36 ± 9 and 31 ± 9 mL/kg with NS supplemented with 1.25, 6.25, 12.5 and 200 μg/mL linopirdine, respectively. Our data suggest that Kv7

  4. Subcellular localization of the voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 in the cerebellar dentate nucleus of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Espinaco, V; Elezgarai, I; Díez-García, J; Puente, N; Knöpfel, T; Grandes, P

    2008-09-09

    Deep cerebellar dentate nuclei are in a key position to control motor planning as a result of an integration of cerebropontine inputs and hemispheric Purkinje neurons signals, and their influence through synaptic outputs onto extracerebellar hubs. GABAergic dentate neurons exhibit broader action potentials and slower afterhyperpolarization than non-GABAergic (presumably glutamatergic) neurons. Specific potassium channels may be involved in these distinct firing profiles, particularly, Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 subunits which rapidly activate at relatively positive potentials to support the generation of fast action potentials. To investigate the subcellular localization of Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 in GAD- and GAD+ dentate neurons of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67-green fluorescent protein (GAD67-GFP) knock-in mice a preembedding immunocytochemical method for electron microscopy was used. Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 were in membranes of cell somata, dendrites, axons and synaptic terminals of both GAD- and GAD+ dentate neurons. The vast majority of GAD- somatodendritic membrane segments domains labeled for Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 (96.1% and 84.7%, respectively) whereas 56.2% and 69.8% of GAD- axonal membrane segments were immunopositive for these subunits. Furthermore, density of Kv3.1b immunoparticles was much higher in GAD- somatodendritic than axonal domains. As to GAD+ neurons, only 70.6% and 50% of somatodendritic membrane segments, and 53.3% and 59.5% of axonal membranes exhibited Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 labeling, respectively. In contrast to GAD- cells, GAD+ cells exhibited a higher density labeling for both Kv3 subunits at their axonal than at their somatodendritic membranes. Taken together, Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 potassium subunits are expressed in both GAD- and GAD+ cells, albeit at different densities and distribution. They likely contribute to the distinct biophysical properties of both GAD- and GAD+ neurons in the dentate nucleus.

  5. A fundamental role for KChIPs in determining the molecular properties and trafficking of Kv4.2 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Riichi; Misonou, Hiroaki; Campomanes, Claire R; Anderson, Anne E; Schrader, Laura A; Doliveira, Lisa C; Carroll, Karen I; Sweatt, J David; Rhodes, Kenneth J; Trimmer, James S

    2003-09-19

    Kv4 potassium channels regulate action potentials in neurons and cardiac myocytes. Co-expression of EF hand-containing Ca2+-binding proteins termed KChIPs with pore-forming Kv4 alpha subunits causes changes in the gating and amplitude of Kv4 currents (An, W. F., Bowlby, M. R., Betty, M., Cao, J., Ling, H. P., Mendoza, G., Hinson, J. W., Mattsson, K. I., Strassle, B. W., Trimmer, J. S., and Rhodes, K. J. (2000) Nature 403, 553-556). Here we show that KChIPs profoundly affect the intracellular trafficking and molecular properties of Kv4.2 alpha subunits. Co-expression of KChIPs1-3 causes a dramatic redistribution of Kv4.2, releasing intrinsic endoplasmic reticulum retention and allowing for trafficking to the cell surface. KChIP co-expression also causes fundamental changes in Kv4.2 steady-state expression levels, phosphorylation, detergent solubility, and stability that reconstitute the molecular properties of Kv4.2 in native cells. Interestingly, the KChIP4a isoform, which exhibits unique effects on Kv4 channel gating, does not exert these effects on Kv4.2 and negatively influences the impact of other KChIPs. We provide evidence that these KChIP effects occur through the masking of an N-terminal Kv4.2 hydrophobic domain. These studies point to an essential role for KChIPs in determining both the biophysical and molecular characteristics of Kv4 channels and provide a molecular basis for the dramatic phenotype of KChIP knockout mice.

  6. Kv1.5 blockers preferentially inhibit TASK-1 channels: TASK-1 as a target against atrial fibrillation and obstructive sleep apnea?

    PubMed

    Kiper, Aytug K; Rinné, Susanne; Rolfes, Caroline; Ramírez, David; Seebohm, Guiscard; Netter, Michael F; González, Wendy; Decher, Niels

    2015-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation and obstructive sleep apnea are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in the industrialized world. There is a high medical need for novel drugs against both diseases, and here, Kv1.5 channels have emerged as promising drug targets. In humans, TASK-1 has an atrium-specific expression and TASK-1 is also abundantly expressed in the hypoglossal motor nucleus. We asked whether known Kv1.5 channel blockers, effective against atrial fibrillation and/or obstructive sleep apnea, modulate TASK-1 channels. Therefore, we tested Kv1.5 blockers with different chemical structures for their TASK-1 affinity, utilizing two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) recordings in Xenopus oocytes. Despite the low structural conservation of Kv1.5 and TASK-1 channels, we found all Kv1.5 blockers analyzed to be even more effective on TASK-1 than on Kv1.5. For instance, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of AVE0118 and AVE1231 (A293) were 10- and 43-fold lower on TASK-1. Also for MSD-D, ICAGEN-4, S20951 (A1899), and S9947, the IC50 values were 1.4- to 70-fold lower than for Kv1.5. To describe this phenomenon on a molecular level, we used in silico models and identified unexpected structural similarities between the two drug binding sites. Kv1.5 blockers, like AVE0118 and AVE1231, which are promising drugs against atrial fibrillation or obstructive sleep apnea, are in fact potent TASK-1 blockers. Accordingly, block of TASK-1 channels by these compounds might contribute to the clinical effectiveness of these drugs. The higher affinity of these blockers for TASK-1 channels suggests that TASK-1 might be an unrecognized molecular target of Kv1.5 blockers effective in atrial fibrillation or obstructive sleep apnea.

  7. TRPA1 expression levels and excitability brake by KV channels influence cold sensitivity of TRPA1-expressing neurons.

    PubMed

    Memon, Tosifa; Chase, Kevin; Leavitt, Lee S; Olivera, Baldomero M; Teichert, Russell W

    2017-06-14

    The molecular sensor of innocuous (painless) cold sensation is well-established to be transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 8 (TRPM8). However, the role of transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) in noxious (painful) cold sensation has been controversial. We find that TRPA1 channels contribute to the noxious cold sensitivity of mouse somatosensory neurons, independent of TRPM8 channels, and that TRPA1-expressing neurons are largely non-overlapping with TRPM8-expressing neurons in mouse dorsal-root ganglia (DRG). However, relatively few TRPA1-expressing neurons (e.g., responsive to allyl isothiocyanate or AITC, a selective TRPA1 agonist) respond overtly to cold temperature in vitro, unlike TRPM8-expressing neurons, which almost all respond to cold. Using somatosensory neurons from TRPM8-/- mice and subtype-selective blockers of TRPM8 and TRPA1 channels, we demonstrate that responses to cold temperatures from TRPA1-expressing neurons are mediated by TRPA1 channels. We also identify two factors that affect the cold-sensitivity of TRPA1-expressing neurons: (1) cold-sensitive AITC-sensitive neurons express relatively more TRPA1 transcripts than cold-insensitive AITC-sensitive neurons and (2) voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels attenuate the cold-sensitivity of some TRPA1-expressing neurons. The combination of these two factors, combined with the relatively weak agonist-like activity of cold temperature on TRPA1 channels, partially explains why few TRPA1-expressing neurons respond to cold. Blocking KV channels also reveals another subclass of noxious cold-sensitive DRG neurons that do not express TRPM8 or TRPA1 channels. Altogether, the results of this study provide novel insights into the cold-sensitivity of different subclasses of somatosensory neurons. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Di-substituted cyclohexyl derivatives bind to two identical sites with positive cooperativity on the voltage-gated potassium channel, K(v)1.3.

    PubMed

    Schmalhofer, William A; Slaughter, Robert S; Matyskiela, Mary; Felix, John P; Tang, Yui S; Rupprecht, Kathleen; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L

    2003-04-29

    Di-substituted cyclohexyl (DSC) derivatives inhibit the voltage-gated potassium channel, K(v)1.3, and have immunosuppressant activity (Schmalhofer et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 7781-7794). This class of inhibitors displays Hill coefficients of near 2 in functional assays, and trans DSC analogues appear to selectively interact with K(v)1.3 channel conformations related to C-type inactivation. To further understand the details of the DSC inhibitor interaction with potassium channels, trans-1-(N-n-propylcarbamoyloxy)-4-phenyl-4-(3-(2-methoxyphenyl)-3-oxo-2-azaprop-1-yl)cyclo-hexane (trans-NPCO-DSC) was radiolabeled with tritium, and its binding characteristics to K(v)1.3 channels were determined. Specific binding of [(3)H]-trans-NPCO-DSC to K(v)1.3 channels is a saturable, time-dependent, and fully reversible process. Saturation binding isotherms and competition binding experiments are consistent with the presence of two receptor sites for DSC derivatives on the K(v)1.3 channel that display positive allosteric cooperativity. The high affinity interaction of [(3)H]-trans-NPCO-DSC with K(v)1.3 channels appears to correlate with the rates of C-type inactivation of the channel. These data, taken together, mark the first demonstration of the existence of multiple binding sites for an inhibitor of an ion channel and suggest that the high affinity interaction of trans-NPCO-DSC and similar inhibitors with K(v)1.3 channels could be exploited for the development of selective molecules that target this protein.

  9. KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine protects against acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Huang, P; Lu, Q; Zhou, M; Guo, L; Xu, X

    2014-11-07

    Spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) are impaired by stress. KCNQ/Kv7 channels are closely associated with memory and the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine represents neuroprotective effects. This study aims to test whether KCNQ/Kv7 channel activation prevents acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP. Rats were placed on an elevated platform in the middle of a bright room for 30 min to evoke acute stress. The expression of KCNQ/Kv7 subunits was analyzed at 1, 3 and 12 h after stress by Western blotting. Spatial memory was examined by the Morris water maze (MWM) and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) in the hippocampal CA1 area was recorded in vivo. Acute stress transiently decreased the expression of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 in the hippocampus. Acute stress impaired the spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP, the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine prevented the impairments, and the protective effects of flupirtine were blocked by XE-991 (10,10-bis(4-Pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone), a selective KCNQ channel blocker. Furthermore, acute stress decreased the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 in the hippocampus, and flupirtine inhibited the reduction. These results suggest that the KCNQ/Kv7 channels may be a potential target for protecting both hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory retrieval from acute stress influences.

  10. Identification of residues in dendrotoxin K responsible for its discrimination between neuronal K+ channels containing Kv1.1 and 1.2 alpha subunits.

    PubMed

    Wang, F C; Bell, N; Reid, P; Smith, L A; McIntosh, P; Robertson, B; Dolly, J O

    1999-07-01

    Dendrotoxin (DTX) homologues are powerful blockers of K+ channels that contain certain subfamily Kv1 (1.1-1.6) alpha- and beta-subunits, in (alpha)4(beta)4 stoichiometry. DTXk inhibits potently Kv1.1-containing channels only, whereas alphaDTX is less discriminating, but exhibits highest affinity for Kv1.2. Herein, the nature of interactions of DTXk with native K+ channels composed of Kv1.1 and 1.2 (plus other) subunits were examined, using 15 site-directed mutants in which amino acids were altered in the 310-helix, beta-turn, alpha-helix and random-coil regions. The mutants' antagonism of high-affinity [125I]DTXk binding to Kv1. 1-possessing channels in rat brain membranes and blockade of the Kv1. 1 current expressed in oocytes were quantified. Also, the levels of inhibition of [125I]alphaDTX binding to brain membranes by the DTXk mutants were used to measure their high- and low-affinity interactions, respectively, with neuronal Kv1.2-containing channels that possess Kv1.1 as a major or minor constituent. Displacement of toxin binding to either of these subtypes was not altered by single substitution with alanine of three basic residues in the random-coil region, or R52 or R53 in the alpha-helix; accordingly, representative mutants (K17A, R53A) blocked the Kv1.1 current with the same potency as the natural toxin. In contrast, competition of the binding of the radiolabelled alphaDTX or DTXk was dramatically reduced by alanine substitution of K26 or W25 in the beta-turn whereas changing nearby residues caused negligible alterations. Consistently, W25A and K26A exhibited diminished functional blockade of the Kv1.1 homo-oligomer. The 310-helical N-terminal region of DTXk was found to be responsible for recognition of Kv1.1 channels because mutation of K3A led to approximately 1246-fold reduction in the inhibitory potency for [125I]DTXk binding and a large decrease in its ability to block the Kv1.1 current; the effect of this substitution on the affinity of DTXk for Kv1

  11. Impaired fast-spiking, suppressed cortical inhibition, and increased susceptibility to seizures in mice lacking Kv3.2 K+ channel proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, D; Vega-Saenz de Miera, E C; Contreras, D; Ozaita, A; Harvey, M; Chow, A; Noebels, J L; Paylor, R; Morgan, J I; Leonard, C S; Rudy, B

    2000-12-15

    Voltage-gated K(+) channels of the Kv3 subfamily have unusual electrophysiological properties, including activation at very depolarized voltages (positive to -10 mV) and very fast deactivation rates, suggesting special roles in neuronal excitability. In the brain, Kv3 channels are prominently expressed in select neuronal populations, which include fast-spiking (FS) GABAergic interneurons of the neocortex, hippocampus, and caudate, as well as other high-frequency firing neurons. Although evidence points to a key role in high-frequency firing, a definitive understanding of the function of these channels has been hampered by a lack of selective pharmacological tools. We therefore generated mouse lines in which one of the Kv3 genes, Kv3.2, was disrupted by gene-targeting methods. Whole-cell electrophysiological recording showed that the ability to fire spikes at high frequencies was impaired in immunocytochemically identified FS interneurons of deep cortical layers (5-6) in which Kv3.2 proteins are normally prominent. No such impairment was found for FS neurons of superficial layers (2-4) in which Kv3.2 proteins are normally only weakly expressed. These data directly support the hypothesis that Kv3 channels are necessary for high-frequency firing. Moreover, we found that Kv3.2 -/- mice showed specific alterations in their cortical EEG patterns and an increased susceptibility to epileptic seizures consistent with an impairment of cortical inhibitory mechanisms. This implies that, rather than producing hyperexcitability of the inhibitory interneurons, Kv3.2 channel elimination suppresses their activity. These data suggest that normal cortical operations depend on the ability of inhibitory interneurons to generate high-frequency firing.

  12. The Kv2.1 K+ channel targets to the axon initial segment of hippocampal and cortical neurons in culture and in situ

    PubMed Central

    Sarmiere, Patrick D; Weigle, Cecile M; Tamkun, Michael M

    2008-01-01

    Background The Kv2.1 delayed-rectifier K+ channel regulates membrane excitability in hippocampal neurons where it targets to dynamic cell surface clusters on the soma and proximal dendrites. In the past, Kv2.1 has been assumed to be absent from the axon initial segment. Results Transfected and endogenous Kv2.1 is now demonstrated to preferentially accumulate within the axon initial segment (AIS) over other neurite processes; 87% of 14 DIV hippocampal neurons show endogenous channel concentrated at the AIS relative to the soma and proximal dendrites. In contrast to the localization observed in pyramidal cells, GAD positive inhibitory neurons within the hippocampal cultures did not show AIS targeting. Photoactivable-GFP-Kv2.1-containing clusters at the AIS were stable, moving <1 μm/hr with no channel turnover. Photobleach studies indicated individual channels within the cluster perimeter were highly mobile (FRAP τ = 10.4 ± 4.8 sec), supporting our model that Kv2.1 clusters are formed by the retention of mobile channels behind a diffusion-limiting perimeter. Demonstrating that the AIS targeting is not a tissue culture artifact, Kv2.1 was found in axon initial segments within both the adult rat hippocampal CA1, CA2, and CA3 layers and cortex. Conclusion In summary, Kv2.1 is associated with the axon initial segment both in vitro and in vivo where it may modulate action potential frequency and back propagation. Since transfected Kv2.1 initially localizes to the AIS before appearing on the soma, it is likely multiple mechanisms regulate Kv2.1 trafficking to the cell surface. PMID:19014551

  13. Contribution of Kv2.1 channels to the delayed rectifier current in freshly dispersed smooth muscle cells from rabbit urethra

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, B.; Bradley, E.; Ohya, S.; Sergeant, G. P.; McHale, N. G.; Thornbury, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    We have characterized the native voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) current in rabbit urethral smooth muscle cells (RUSMC) and compared its pharmacological and biophysical properties with Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 channels cloned from the rabbit urethra and stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells (HEKKv2.1 and HEKKv2.2). RUSMC were perfused with Hanks′ solution at 37°C and studied using the patch-clamp technique with K+-rich pipette solutions. Cells were bathed in 100 nM Penitrem A (Pen A) to block large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) currents and depolarized to +40 mV for 500 ms to evoke Kv currents. These were unaffected by margatoxin, κ-dendrotoxin, or α-dendrotoxin (100 nM, n = 3–5) but were blocked by stromatoxin-1 (ScTx, IC50 ∼130 nM), consistent with the idea that the currents were carried through Kv2 channels. RNA was detected for Kv2.1, Kv2.2, and the silent subunit Kv9.3 in urethral smooth muscle. Immunocytochemistry showed membrane staining for both Kv2 subtypes and Kv9.3 in isolated RUSMC. HEKKv2.1 and HEKKv2.2 currents were blocked in a concentration-dependent manner by ScTx, with estimated IC50 values of ∼150 nM (Kv2.1, n = 5) and 70 nM (Kv2.2, n = 6). The mean half-maximal voltage (V1/2) of inactivation of the USMC Kv current was −56 ± 3 mV (n = 9). This was similar to the HEKKv2.1 current (−55 ± 3 mV, n = 13) but significantly different from the HEKKv2.2 currents (−30 ± 3 mV, n = 11). Action potentials (AP) evoked from RUSMC studied under current-clamp mode were unaffected by ScTx. However, when ScTx was applied in the presence of Pen A, the AP duration was significantly prolonged. Similarly, ScTx increased the amplitude of spontaneous contractions threefold, but only after Pen A application. These data suggest that Kv2.1 channels contribute significantly to the Kv current in RUSMC. PMID:21813710

  14. Effects of MiRP1 and DPP6 β-subunits on the blockade induced by flecainide of KV4.3/KChIP2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Radicke, S; Vaquero, M; Caballero, R; Gómez, R; Núñez, L; Tamargo, J; Ravens, U; Wettwer, E; Delpón, E

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The human cardiac transient outward potassium current (Ito) is believed to be composed of the pore-forming KV4.3 α-subunit, coassembled with modulatory β-subunits as KChIP2, MiRP1 and DPP6 proteins. β-Subunits can alter the pharmacological response of Ito; therefore, we analysed the effects of flecainide on KV4.3/KChIP2 channels coassembled with MiRP1 and/or DPP6 β-subunits. Experimental approach: Currents were recorded in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing KV4.3/KChIP2 channels, and transiently transfected with either MiRP1, DPP6 or both, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Key results: In control conditions, KV4.3/KChIP2/MiRP1 channels exhibited the slowest activation and inactivation kinetics and showed an ‘overshoot' in the time course of recovery from inactivation. The midpoint values (Vh) of the activation and inactivation curves for KV4.3/KChIP2/DPP6 and KV4.3/KChIP2/MiRP1/DPP6 channels were ≈10 mV more negative than Vh values for KV4.3/KChIP2 and KV4.3/KChIP2/MiRP1 channels. Flecainide (0.1–100 μM) produced a similar concentration-dependent blockade of total integrated current flow (IC50 ≈10 μM) in all the channel complexes. However, the IC50 values for peak current amplitude and inactivated channel block were significantly different. Flecainide shifted the Vh values of both the activation and inactivation curves to more negative potentials and apparently accelerated inactivation kinetics in all channels. Moreover, flecainide slowed recovery from inactivation in all the channel complexes and suppressed the ‘overshoot' in KV4.3/KChIP2/MiRP1 channels. Conclusions and implications: Flecainide directly binds to the KV4.3 α-subunit when the channels are in the open and inactivated state and the presence of the β-subunits modulates the blockade by altering the gating function. PMID:18536731

  15. BmP02 Atypically Delays Kv4.2 Inactivation: Implication for a Unique Interaction between Scorpion Toxin and Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; Zhu, Yan; Shi, Jian; Tao, Jie; Ji, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    BmP02, a short-chain peptide with 28 residues from the venom of Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, has been reported to inhibit the transient outward potassium currents (Ito) in rat ventricular muscle cells. However, it remains unclear whether BmP02 modulates the Kv4.2 channel, one of the main contributors to Ito. The present study investigated the effects of BmP02 on Kv4.2 kinetics and its underlying molecular mechanism. The electrophysiological recordings showed that the inactivation of Kv4.2 expressed in HEK293T cells was significantly delayed by BmP02 in a dose-response manner with EC50 of ~850 nM while the peak current, activation and voltage-dependent inactivation of Kv4.2 were not affected. Meanwhile, the recovery from inactivation of Kv4.2 was accelerated and the deactivation was slowed after the application of BmP02. The site-directed mutagenesis combined with computational modelling identified that K347 and K353, located in the turret motif of the Kv4.2, and E4/E5, D20/D21 in BmP02 are key residues to interact with BmP02 through electrostatic force. These findings not only reveal a novel interaction between Kv4.2 channel and its peptidyl modulator, but also provide valuable information for design of highly-selective Kv4.2 modulators. PMID:27690098

  16. A Synthetic S6 Segment Derived from KvAP Channel Self-assembles, Permeabilizes Lipid Vesicles, and Exhibits Ion Channel Activity in Bilayer Lipid Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Richa; Malik, Chetan; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Srivastava, Saurabh; Ghosh, Subhendu; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2011-01-01

    KvAP is a voltage-gated tetrameric K+ channel with six transmembrane (S1–S6) segments in each monomer from the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix. The objective of the present investigation was to understand the plausible role of the S6 segment, which has been proposed to form the inner lining of the pore, in the membrane assembly and functional properties of KvAP channel. For this purpose, a 22-residue peptide, corresponding to the S6 transmembrane segment of KvAP (amino acids 218–239), and a scrambled peptide (S6-SCR) with rearrangement of only hydrophobic amino acids but without changing its composition were synthesized and characterized structurally and functionally. Although both peptides bound to the negatively charged phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol model membrane with comparable affinity, significant differences were observed between these peptides in their localization, self-assembly, and aggregation properties onto this membrane. S6-SCR also exhibited reduced helical structures in SDS micelles and phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol lipid vesicles as compared with the S6 peptide. Furthermore, the S6 peptide showed significant membrane-permeabilizing capability as evidenced by the release of calcein from the calcein-entrapped lipid vesicles, whereas S6-SCR showed much weaker efficacy. Interestingly, although the S6 peptide showed ion channel activity in the bilayer lipid membrane, despite having the same amino acid composition, S6-SCR was significantly inactive. The results demonstrated sequence-specific structural and functional properties of the S6 wild type peptide. The selected S6 segment is probably an important structural element that could play an important role in the membrane interaction, membrane assembly, and functional property of the KvAP channel. PMID:21592970

  17. A synthetic S6 segment derived from KvAP channel self-assembles, permeabilizes lipid vesicles, and exhibits ion channel activity in bilayer lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Verma, Richa; Malik, Chetan; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Srivastava, Saurabh; Ghosh, Subhendu; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2011-07-15

    KvAP is a voltage-gated tetrameric K(+) channel with six transmembrane (S1-S6) segments in each monomer from the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix. The objective of the present investigation was to understand the plausible role of the S6 segment, which has been proposed to form the inner lining of the pore, in the membrane assembly and functional properties of KvAP channel. For this purpose, a 22-residue peptide, corresponding to the S6 transmembrane segment of KvAP (amino acids 218-239), and a scrambled peptide (S6-SCR) with rearrangement of only hydrophobic amino acids but without changing its composition were synthesized and characterized structurally and functionally. Although both peptides bound to the negatively charged phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol model membrane with comparable affinity, significant differences were observed between these peptides in their localization, self-assembly, and aggregation properties onto this membrane. S6-SCR also exhibited reduced helical structures in SDS micelles and phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol lipid vesicles as compared with the S6 peptide. Furthermore, the S6 peptide showed significant membrane-permeabilizing capability as evidenced by the release of calcein from the calcein-entrapped lipid vesicles, whereas S6-SCR showed much weaker efficacy. Interestingly, although the S6 peptide showed ion channel activity in the bilayer lipid membrane, despite having the same amino acid composition, S6-SCR was significantly inactive. The results demonstrated sequence-specific structural and functional properties of the S6 wild type peptide. The selected S6 segment is probably an important structural element that could play an important role in the membrane interaction, membrane assembly, and functional property of the KvAP channel.

  18. Modulation of Kv3.1b potassium channel phosphorylation in auditory neurons by conventional and novel protein kinase C isozymes.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2006-06-02

    In fast-spiking neurons such as those in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) in the auditory brainstem, Kv3.1 potassium channels are required for high frequency firing. The Kv3.1b splice variant of this channel predominates in the mature nervous system and is a substrate for phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) at Ser-503. In resting neurons, basal phosphorylation at this site decreases Kv3.1 current, reducing neuronal ability to follow high frequency stimulation. We used a phospho-specific antibody to determine which PKC isozymes control serine 503 phosphorylation in Kv3.1b-tranfected cells and in auditory neurons in brainstem slices. By using isozyme-specific inhibitors, we found that the novel PKC-delta isozyme, together with the novel PKC-epsilon and conventional PKCs, contributed to the basal phosphorylation of Kv3.1b in MNTB neurons. In contrast, only PKC-epsilon and conventional PKCs mediate increases in phosphorylation produced by pharmacological activ