Science.gov

Sample records for a-type nuclear lamins

  1. A-type Lamins Form Distinct Filamentous Networks with Differential Nuclear Pore Complex Associations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Chojnowski, Alexandre; Boudier, Thomas; Lim, John S Y; Ahmed, Sohail; Ser, Zheng; Stewart, Colin; Burke, Brian

    2016-10-10

    The nuclear lamina is a universal feature of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs) [1]. In mammalian cells, it appears as a 10-30 nm filamentous layer at the nuclear face of the inner nuclear membrane (INM) and is composed primarily of A- and B-type lamins, members of the intermediate filament family [2]. While providing structural integrity to the NE, the lamina also represents an important signaling and regulatory platform [3]. Two A-type lamin isoforms, lamins A and C (LaA and LaC), are expressed in most adult human cells. Encoded by a single gene, these proteins are largely identical, diverging only in their C-terminal tail domains. By contrast with that of LaC, the unique LaA tail undergoes extensive processing, including farnesylation and endo-proteolysis [4, 5]. However, functional differences between LaA and LaC are still unclear. Compounding this uncertainty, the structure of the lamina remains ill defined. In this study, we used BioID, an in vivo proximity-labeling method to identify differential interactors of A-type lamins [6]. One of these, Tpr, a nuclear pore complex (NPC) protein, is highlighted by its selective association with LaC. By employing superresolution microscopy, we demonstrate that this Tpr association is mirrored in enhanced interaction of LaC with NPCs. Further superresolution studies visualizing both endogenous A- and B-type lamins have allowed us to construct a nanometer-scale model of the mammalian nuclear lamina. Our data indicate that different A- and B-type lamin species assemble into separate filament networks that together form an extended composite structure at the nuclear periphery providing attachment sites for NPCs, thereby regulating their distribution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear Lamins

    PubMed Central

    Dechat, Thomas; Adam, Stephen A.; Taimen, Pekka; Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear lamins are type V intermediate filament proteins that are critically important for the structural properties of the nucleus. In addition, they are involved in the regulation of numerous nuclear processes, including DNA replication, transcription and chromatin organization. The developmentally regulated expression of lamins suggests that they are involved in cellular differentiation. Their assembly dynamic properties throughout the cell cycle, particularly in mitosis, are influenced by posttranslational modifications. Lamins may regulate nuclear functions by direct interactions with chromatin and determining the spatial organization of chromosomes within the nuclear space. They may also regulate chromatin functions by interacting with factors that epigenetically modify the chromatin or directly regulate replication or transcription. PMID:20826548

  3. Loss of Drosophila A-type lamin C initially causes tendon abnormality including disintegration of cytoskeleton and nuclear lamina in muscular defects.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Ryo; Nonaka, Yu-Ki; Horigome, Tuneyoshi; Sugiyama, Shin; Furukawa, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Lamins are the major components of nuclear envelope architecture, being required for both the structural and informational roles of the nuclei. Mutations of lamins cause a spectrum of diseases in humans, including muscular dystrophy. We report here that the loss of the A-type lamin gene, lamin C in Drosophila resulted in pupal metamorphic lethality caused by tendon defects, matching the characteristics of human A-type lamin revealed by Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). In tendon cells lacking lamin C activity, overall cell morphology was affected and organization of the spectraplakin family cytoskeletal protein Shortstop which is prominently expressed in tendon cells gradually disintegrated, notably around the nucleus and in a manner correlating well with the degradation of musculature. Furthermore, lamin C null mutants were efficiently rescued by restoring lamin C expression to shortstop-expressing cells, which include tendon cells but exclude skeletal muscle cells. Thus the critical function of A-type lamin C proteins in Drosophila musculature is to maintain proper function and morphology of tendon cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Directed targeting of chromatin to the nuclear lamina is mediated by chromatin state and A-type lamins.

    PubMed

    Harr, Jennifer C; Luperchio, Teresa Romeo; Wong, Xianrong; Cohen, Erez; Wheelan, Sarah J; Reddy, Karen L

    2015-01-05

    Nuclear organization has been implicated in regulating gene activity. Recently, large developmentally regulated regions of the genome dynamically associated with the nuclear lamina have been identified. However, little is known about how these lamina-associated domains (LADs) are directed to the nuclear lamina. We use our tagged chromosomal insertion site system to identify small sequences from borders of fibroblast-specific variable LADs that are sufficient to target these ectopic sites to the nuclear periphery. We identify YY1 (Ying-Yang1) binding sites as enriched in relocating sequences. Knockdown of YY1 or lamin A/C, but not lamin A, led to a loss of lamina association. In addition, targeted recruitment of YY1 proteins facilitated ectopic LAD formation dependent on histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and histone H3 lysine di- and trimethylation. Our results also reveal that endogenous loci appear to be dependent on lamin A/C, YY1, H3K27me3, and H3K9me2/3 for maintenance of lamina-proximal positioning. © 2015 Harr et al.

  5. Altering lamina assembly reveals lamina-dependent and -independent functions for A-type lamins.

    PubMed

    Zwerger, Monika; Roschitzki-Voser, Heidi; Zbinden, Reto; Denais, Celine; Herrmann, Harald; Lammerding, Jan; Grütter, Markus G; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-10-01

    Lamins are intermediate filament proteins that form a fibrous meshwork, called the nuclear lamina, between the inner nuclear membrane and peripheral heterochromatin of metazoan cells. The assembly and incorporation of lamin A/C into the lamina, as well as their various functions, are still not well understood. Here, we employed designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) as new experimental tools for lamin research. We screened for DARPins that specifically bound to lamin A/C, and interfered with lamin assembly in vitro and with incorporation of lamin A/C into the native lamina in living cells. The selected DARPins inhibited lamin assembly and delocalized A-type lamins to the nucleoplasm without modifying lamin expression levels or the amino acid sequence. Using these lamin binders, we demonstrate the importance of proper integration of lamin A/C into the lamina for nuclear mechanical properties and nuclear envelope integrity. Finally, our study provides evidence for cell-type-specific differences in lamin functions. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Altering lamina assembly reveals lamina-dependent and -independent functions for A-type lamins

    PubMed Central

    Zwerger, Monika; Roschitzki-Voser, Heidi; Zbinden, Reto; Denais, Celine; Herrmann, Harald; Lammerding, Jan; Grütter, Markus G.; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lamins are intermediate filament proteins that form a fibrous meshwork, called the nuclear lamina, between the inner nuclear membrane and peripheral heterochromatin of metazoan cells. The assembly and incorporation of lamin A/C into the lamina, as well as their various functions, are still not well understood. Here, we employed designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) as new experimental tools for lamin research. We screened for DARPins that specifically bound to lamin A/C, and interfered with lamin assembly in vitro and with incorporation of lamin A/C into the native lamina in living cells. The selected DARPins inhibited lamin assembly and delocalized A-type lamins to the nucleoplasm without modifying lamin expression levels or the amino acid sequence. Using these lamin binders, we demonstrate the importance of proper integration of lamin A/C into the lamina for nuclear mechanical properties and nuclear envelope integrity. Finally, our study provides evidence for cell-type-specific differences in lamin functions. PMID:26275827

  7. An Elastic Model of Blebbing in Nuclear Lamin Meshworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funkhouser, Chloe; Sknepnek, Rastko; Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Anne; Goldman, Robert; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2013-03-01

    A two-component continuum elastic model is introduced to analyze a nuclear lamin meshwork, a structural element of the lamina of the nuclear envelope. The main component of the lamina is a meshwork of lamin protein filaments providing mechanical support to the nucleus and also playing a role in gene expression. Abnormalities in nuclear shape are associated with a variety of pathologies, including some forms of cancer and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, and are often characterized by protruding structures termed nuclear blebs. Nuclear blebs are rich in A-type lamins and may be related to pathological gene expression. We apply the two-dimensional elastic shell model to determine which characteristics of the meshwork could be responsible for blebbing, including heterogeneities in the meshwork thickness and mesh size. We find that if one component of the lamin meshwork, rich in A-type lamins, has a tendency to form a larger mesh size than that rich in B-type lamins, this is sufficient to cause segregation of the lamin components and also to form blebs rich in A-type lamins. The model produces structures with comparable morphologies and mesh size distributions as the lamin meshworks of real, pathological nuclei. Funded by US DoE Award DEFG02-08ER46539 and by the DDR&E and AFOSR under Award FA9550-10-1-0167; simulations performed on NU Quest cluster

  8. A-Type Lamins Maintain the Positional Stability of DNA Damage Repair Foci in Mammalian Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Mahen, Robert; Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Lee, Miyoung; Sharma, Pooja; Jeyasekharan, Anand D.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2013-01-01

    A-type lamins encoded by LMNA form a structural fibrillar meshwork within the mammalian nucleus. How this nuclear organization may influence the execution of biological processes involving DNA transactions remains unclear. Here, we characterize changes in the dynamics and biochemical interactions of lamin A/C after DNA damage. We find that DNA breakage reduces the mobility of nucleoplasmic GFP-lamin A throughout the nucleus as measured by dynamic fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy in living cells, suggestive of incorporation into stable macromolecular complexes, but does not induce the focal accumulation of GFP-lamin A at damage sites. Using a proximity ligation assay and biochemical analyses, we show that lamin A engages chromatin via histone H2AX and its phosphorylated form (γH2AX) induced by DNA damage, and that these interactions are enhanced after DNA damage. Finally, we use three-dimensional time-lapse imaging to show that LMNA inactivation significantly reduces the positional stability of DNA repair foci in living cells. This defect is partially rescued by the stable expression of GFP-lamin A. Thus collectively, our findings suggest that the dynamic structural meshwork formed by A-type lamins anchors sites of DNA repair in mammalian nuclei, providing fresh insight into the control of DNA transactions by nuclear structural organization. PMID:23658700

  9. Lamins in the nuclear interior - life outside the lamina.

    PubMed

    Naetar, Nana; Ferraioli, Simona; Foisner, Roland

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear lamins are components of the peripheral lamina that define the mechanical properties of nuclei and tether heterochromatin to the periphery. A-type lamins localize also to the nuclear interior, but the regulation and specific functions of this nucleoplasmic lamin pool are poorly understood. In this Commentary, we summarize known pathways that are potentially involved in the localization and dynamic behavior of intranuclear lamins, including their post-translational modifications and interactions with nucleoplasmic proteins, such as lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α; encoded by TMPO ). In addition, new data suggest that lamins in the nuclear interior have an important role in chromatin regulation and gene expression through dynamic binding to both hetero- and euchromatic genomic regions and promoter subdomains, thereby affecting epigenetic pathways and chromatin accessibility. Nucleoplasmic lamins also have a role in spatial chromatin organization and may be involved in mechanosignaling. In view of this newly emerging concept, we propose that the previously reported cellular phenotypes in lamin-linked diseases are, at least in part, rooted in an impaired regulation and/or function of the nucleoplasmic lamin A/C pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Deregulation of focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal tension due to loss of A-type lamins.

    PubMed

    Corne, Tobias D J; Sieprath, Tom; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Mohammed, Danahe; Te Lindert, Mariska; Gevaert, Kris; Gabriele, Sylvain; Wolf, Katarina; De Vos, Winnok H

    2017-09-03

    The nuclear lamina mechanically integrates the nucleus with the cytoskeleton and extracellular environment and regulates gene expression. These functions are exerted through direct and indirect interactions with the lamina's major constituent proteins, the A-type lamins, which are encoded by the LMNA gene. Using quantitative stable isotope labeling-based shotgun proteomics we have analyzed the proteome of human dermal fibroblasts in which we have depleted A-type lamins by means of a sustained siRNA-mediated LMNA knockdown. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the largest fraction of differentially produced proteins was involved in actin cytoskeleton organization, in particular proteins involved in focal adhesion dynamics, such as actin-related protein 2 and 3 (ACTR2/3), subunits of the ARP2/3 complex, and fascin actin-bundling protein 1 (FSCN1). Functional validation using quantitative immunofluorescence showed a significant reduction in the size of focal adhesion points in A-type lamin depleted cells, which correlated with a reduction in early cell adhesion capacity and an increased cell motility. At the same time, loss of A-type lamins led to more pronounced stress fibers and higher traction forces. This phenotype could not be mimicked or reversed by experimental modulation of the STAT3-IL6 pathway, but it was partly recapitulated by chemical inhibition of the ARP2/3 complex. Thus, our data suggest that the loss of A-type lamins perturbs the balance between focal adhesions and cytoskeletal tension. This imbalance may contribute to mechanosensing defects observed in certain laminopathies.

  11. An extended view of nuclear lamin structure, function, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Paddy, M R; Agard, D A; Sedat, J W

    1992-08-01

    Molecularly-based studies of nuclear lamins have progressed at a rapid rate in the last decade. However, we still have no answer to the most important question: what are the functions of lamins? In this review we describe recent experiments which challenge traditional views of lamin function and structure. These surprising results indicate that much lamin functionality remains to be discovered, and that more global approaches to lamin structure and function are especially appropriate at this time.

  12. Anticancer Pyrroloquinazoline LBL1 Targets Nuclear Lamins.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingbing X; Chen, Jingjin; Chao, Bo; David, Larry L; Xiao, Xiangshu

    2018-05-18

    Target identification of bioactive compounds is critical for understanding their mechanism of action. We previously discovered a novel pyrroloquinazoline compound LBL1 with significant anticancer activity. However, its molecular targets remain to be established. Herein, we developed a clickable photoaffinity probe based on LBL1. Using extensive chemical, biochemical, and cellular studies with this probe and LBL1, we found that LBL1 targets nuclear lamins, which are type V intermediate filament (IF) proteins. Further studies showed that LBL1 binds to the coiled-coil domain of lamin A. These results revealed that IF proteins can also be targeted with appropriate small molecules besides two other cytoskeletal proteins actin filaments and microtubules, providing a novel avenue to investigate lamin biology and a novel strategy to develop distinct anticancer therapies.

  13. Insight into the functional organization of nuclear lamins in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Tatli, Meltem; Medalia, Ohad

    2018-05-22

    Lamins are the main component of the nuclear lamina, a protein meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane which primarily provide mechanical stability to the nucleus. Lamins, type V intermediate filament proteins, are also involved in many nuclear activities. Structural analysis of nuclei revealed that lamins form 3.5nm thick filaments often interact with nuclear pore complexes. Mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins, have been associated with at least 15 distinct diseases collectively termed laminopathies, including muscle, metabolic and neurological disorders, and premature aging syndrome. It is unclear how laminopathic mutations lead to such a wide array of diseases, essentially affecting almost all tissues. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lamina-independent lamins in the nuclear interior serve important functions.

    PubMed

    Dechat, T; Gesson, K; Foisner, R

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear lamins were originally described as the main constituents of the nuclear lamina, a filamentous meshwork closely associated with the inner nuclear membrane. However, within recent years, it has become increasingly evident that a fraction of lamins also resides throughout the nuclear interior. As intermediate-filament-type proteins, lamins have been suggested to fulfill mainly structural functions such as providing shape and mechanical stability to the nucleus. But recent findings show that both peripheral and nucleoplasmic lamins also have important roles in essential cellular processes such as transcription, DNA replication, cell cycle progression, and chromatin organization. Furthermore, more than 300 mutations in the gene encoding A-type lamins have been associated with several human diseases now generally termed laminopathies and comprising muscular dystrophies, lipodystrophies, cardiomyopathies, and premature aging diseases. This review focuses on the lamina-independent pool of lamins in the nuclear interior, which surprisingly has not been studied in much detail so far. We discuss the properties and regulation of nucleoplasmic lamins during the cell cycle, their interaction partners, and their potential involvement in cellular processes and the development of laminopathies.

  15. Concentration-dependent Effects of Nuclear Lamins on Nuclear Size in Xenopus and Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J.; Li, Xiaoyang; Nguyen, Thang; Chen, Pan; Levy, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in cell biology concerns the regulation of organelle size. While nuclear size is exquisitely controlled in different cell types, inappropriate nuclear enlargement is used to diagnose and stage cancer. Clarifying the functional significance of nuclear size necessitates an understanding of the mechanisms and proteins that control nuclear size. One structural component implicated in the regulation of nuclear morphology is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate lamin filaments that lines the inner nuclear membrane. However, there has not been a systematic investigation of how the level and type of lamin expression influences nuclear size, in part due to difficulties in precisely controlling lamin expression levels in vivo. In this study, we circumvent this limitation by studying nuclei in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, open biochemical systems that allow for precise manipulation of lamin levels by the addition of recombinant proteins. We find that nuclear growth and size are sensitive to the levels of nuclear lamins, with low and high concentrations increasing and decreasing nuclear size, respectively. Interestingly, each type of lamin that we tested (lamins B1, B2, B3, and A) similarly affected nuclear size whether added alone or in combination, suggesting that total lamin concentration, and not lamin type, is more critical to determining nuclear size. Furthermore, we show that altering lamin levels in vivo, both in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells, also impacts nuclear size. These results have implications for normal development and carcinogenesis where both nuclear size and lamin expression levels change. PMID:26429910

  16. Roles of endothelial A-type lamins in migration of T cells on and under endothelial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Jaehyun; Park, Hyoungjun; Kim, Hye Mi; Park, Jeehun; Kwon, Keon Woo; Doh, Junsang

    2016-03-01

    Stiff nuclei in cell-dense microenvironments may serve as distinct biomechanical cues for cell migration, but such a possibility has not been tested experimentally. As a first step addressing this question, we altered nuclear stiffness of endothelial cells (ECs) by reducing the expression of A-type lamins using siRNA, and investigated the migration of T cells on and under EC layers. While most T cells crawling on control EC layers avoided crossing over EC nuclei, a significantly higher fraction of T cells on EC layers with reduced expression of A-type lamins crossed over EC nuclei. This result suggests that stiff EC nuclei underlying T cells may serve as “duro-repulsive” cues to direct T cell migration toward less stiff EC cytoplasm. During subendothelial migration under EC layers with reduced expression of A-type lamins, T cells made prolonged contact and substantially deformed EC nuclei, resulting in reduced speed and directional persistence. This result suggests that EC nuclear stiffness promotes fast and directionally persistent subendothelial migration of T cells by allowing minimum interaction between T cells and EC nuclei.

  17. Nuclear lamins during gametogenesis, fertilization and early development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, G. G.; Schatten, G.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of lamins (described by Gerace, 1978, as major proteins of nuclear envelope) during gametogenesis, fertilization, and early development was investigated in germ cells of a mouse (Mus musculus), an echinoderm (Lytechinus variegatus), and the surf clam (Spisula solidissima) was investigated in order to determine whether the differences detected could be correlated with differences in the function of cells in these stages of the germ cells. In order to monitor the behavior of lamins, the gametes and embryos were labeled with antibodies to lamins A, C, and B extracted from autoimmune sera of patients with scleroderma and Lupus erythematosus. Results indicated that lamin B could be identified in nuclear envelopes on only those nuclei where chromatin is attached and where RNA synthesis takes place.

  18. Nuclear lamins and peripheral nuclear antigens during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, G.; Schatten, H.; Simerly, C.; Maul, G. G.; Chaly, N.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear structural changes during fertilization and embryogenesis in mice and sea urchins are traced using four antibodies. The oocytes from virgin female mice, morulae and blastocytes from mated females, and gametes from the sea urchin Lytechnius variegatis are studied using mouse monoclonal antibodies to nuclear lamin A/C, monoclonal antibody to P1, human autoimmune antibodies to lamin A/C, and to lamin B. The mouse fertilization data reveal no lamins on the oocyte; however, lamins are present on the pronuclei, and chromosomes are found on the oocytes and pronuclei. It is detected that on the sea urchin sperm the lamins are reduced to acrosomal and centriolar fossae and peripheral antigens are around the sperm nucleus. The mouse sperm bind lamin antibodies regionally and do not contain antigens. Lamins and antigens are observed on both pronuclei and chromosomes during sea urchin fertilization. Mouse embryogenesis reveals that lamin A/C is not recognized at morula and blastocyst stages; however, lamin B stains are retained. In sea urchin embryogenesis lamin recognition is lost at the blastrula, gastrula, and plutei stages. It is noted that nuclear lamins lost during spermatogenesis are restored at fertilization and peripheral antigens are associated with the surface of chromosomes during meiosis and mitosis and with the periphery of the pronuclei and nuclei during interphase.

  19. High expression of A-type lamin in the leading front is required for Drosophila thorax closure.

    PubMed

    Kosakamoto, Hina; Fujisawa, Yuya; Obata, Fumiaki; Miura, Masayuki

    2018-05-05

    Tissue closure involves the coordinated unidirectional movement of a group of cells without loss of cell-cell contact. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling the tissue closure are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Lamin C, the sole A-type lamin in Drosophila, contributes to the process of thorax closure in pupa. High expression of Lamin C was observed at the leading front of the migrating wing imaginal discs. Live imaging analysis revealed that knockdown of Lamin C in the thorax region affected the coordinated movement of the leading front, resulting in incomplete tissue fusion required for formation of the adult thorax. The closure defect due to knockdown of Lamin C correlated with insufficient accumulation of F-actin at the front. Our study indicates a link between A-type lamin and the cell migration behavior during tissue closure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepedat, Karin; Wagner, Robert; Lang, Jürgen

    The use of phenolic resin for the impregnation of a carrier material such as paper or fabric based on either organic or inorganic fibers was and still is one of the most important application areas for liquid phenolic resins. Substrates like paper, cotton, or glass fabric impregnated with phenolic resins are used as core layers for decorative and technical laminates and for many other different industrial applications. Nowadays, phenolic resins for decorative laminates used for furniture, flooring, or in the construction and transportation industry have gained significant market share. The Laminates chapter mainly describes the manufacture of decorative laminates especially the impregnation and pressing process with special emphasis to new technological developments and recent trends. Moreover, the different types of laminates are introduced, combined with some brief comments as they relate to the market for decorative surfaces.

  1. Differential basal-to-apical accessibility of lamin A/C epitopes in the nuclear lamina regulated by changes in cytoskeletal tension.

    PubMed

    Ihalainen, Teemu O; Aires, Lina; Herzog, Florian A; Schwartlander, Ruth; Moeller, Jens; Vogel, Viola

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear lamins play central roles at the intersection between cytoplasmic signalling and nuclear events. Here, we show that at least two N- and C-terminal lamin epitopes are not accessible at the basal side of the nuclear envelope under environmental conditions known to upregulate cell contractility. The conformational epitope on the Ig-domain of A-type lamins is more buried in the basal than apical nuclear envelope of human mesenchymal stem cells undergoing osteogenesis (but not adipogenesis), and in fibroblasts adhering to rigid (but not soft) polyacrylamide hydrogels. This structural polarization of the lamina is promoted by compressive forces, emerges during cell spreading, and requires lamin A/C multimerization, intact nucleoskeleton-cytoskeleton linkages (LINC), and apical-actin stress-fibre assembly. Notably, the identified Ig-epitope overlaps with emerin, DNA and histone binding sites, and comprises various laminopathy mutation sites. Our findings should help decipher how the physical properties of cellular microenvironments regulate nuclear events.

  2. Differential basal-to-apical accessibility of lamin A/C epitopes in the nuclear lamina regulated by changes in cytoskeletal tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Aires, Lina; Herzog, Florian A.; Schwartlander, Ruth; Moeller, Jens; Vogel, Viola

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear lamins play central roles at the intersection between cytoplasmic signalling and nuclear events. Here, we show that at least two N- and C-terminal lamin epitopes are not accessible at the basal side of the nuclear envelope under environmental conditions known to upregulate cell contractility. The conformational epitope on the Ig-domain of A-type lamins is more buried in the basal than apical nuclear envelope of human mesenchymal stem cells undergoing osteogenesis (but not adipogenesis), and in fibroblasts adhering to rigid (but not soft) polyacrylamide hydrogels. This structural polarization of the lamina is promoted by compressive forces, emerges during cell spreading, and requires lamin A/C multimerization, intact nucleoskeleton-cytoskeleton linkages (LINC), and apical-actin stress-fibre assembly. Notably, the identified Ig-epitope overlaps with emerin, DNA and histone binding sites, and comprises various laminopathy mutation sites. Our findings should help decipher how the physical properties of cellular microenvironments regulate nuclear events.

  3. Nuclear Lamin-A Scales with Tissue Stiffness and Enhances Matrix-Directed Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Joe; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Buxboim, Amnon; Harada, Takamasa; Dingal, P. C. Dave P.; Pinter, Joel; Pajerowski, J. David; Spinler, Kyle R.; Shin, Jae-Won; Tewari, Manorama; Rehfeldt, Florian; Speicher, David W.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissues can be soft like fat, which bears little stress, or stiff like bone, which sustains high stress, but whether there is a systematic relationship between tissue mechanics and differentiation is unknown. Here, proteomics analyses revealed that levels of the nucleoskeletal protein lamin-A scaled with tissue elasticity, E, as did levels of collagens in the extracellular matrix that determine E. Stem cell differentiation into fat on soft matrix was enhanced by low lamin-A levels, whereas differentiation into bone on stiff matrix was enhanced by high lamin-A levels. Matrix stiffness directly influenced lamin-A protein levels, and, although lamin-A transcription was regulated by the vitamin A/retinoic acid (RA) pathway with broad roles in development, nuclear entry of RA receptors was modulated by lamin-A protein. Tissue stiffness and stress thus increase lamin-A levels, which stabilize the nucleus while also contributing to lineage determination. PMID:23990565

  4. Chromatin histone modifications and rigidity affect nuclear morphology independent of lamins

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Andrew D.; Liu, Patrick Z.; Banigan, Edward J.; Almassalha, Luay M.; Backman, Vadim; Adam, Stephen A.; Goldman, Robert D.; Marko, John F.

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear shape and architecture influence gene localization, mechanotransduction, transcription, and cell function. Abnormal nuclear morphology and protrusions termed “blebs” are diagnostic markers for many human afflictions including heart disease, aging, progeria, and cancer. Nuclear blebs are associated with both lamin and chromatin alterations. A number of prior studies suggest that lamins dictate nuclear morphology, but the contributions of altered chromatin compaction remain unclear. We show that chromatin histone modification state dictates nuclear rigidity, and modulating it is sufficient to both induce and suppress nuclear blebs. Treatment of mammalian cells with histone deacetylase inhibitors to increase euchromatin or histone methyltransferase inhibitors to decrease heterochromatin results in a softer nucleus and nuclear blebbing, without perturbing lamins. Conversely, treatment with histone demethylase inhibitors increases heterochromatin and chromatin nuclear rigidity, which results in reduced nuclear blebbing in lamin B1 null nuclei. Notably, increased heterochromatin also rescues nuclear morphology in a model cell line for the accelerated aging disease Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome caused by mutant lamin A, as well as cells from patients with the disease. Thus, chromatin histone modification state is a major determinant of nuclear blebbing and morphology via its contribution to nuclear rigidity. PMID:29142071

  5. Herpes simplex virus 2 UL13 protein kinase disrupts nuclear lamins

    SciTech Connect

    Cano-Monreal, Gina L.; Wylie, Kristine M.; Cao, Feng

    2009-09-15

    Herpesviruses must cross the inner nuclear membrane and underlying lamina to exit the nucleus. HSV-1 US3 and PKC can phosphorylate lamins and induce their dispersion but do not elicit all of the phosphorylated lamin species produced during infection. UL13 is a serine threonine protein kinase conserved among many herpesviruses. HSV-1 UL13 phosphorylates US3 and thereby controls UL31 and UL34 nuclear rim localization, indicating a role in nuclear egress. Here, we report that HSV-2 UL13 alone induced conformational changes in lamins A and C and redistributed lamin B1 from the nuclear rim to intranuclear granular structures. HSV-2 UL13 directly phosphorylated laminsmore » A, C, and B1 in vitro, and the lamin A1 tail domain. HSV-2 infection recapitulated the lamin alterations seen upon expression of UL13 alone, and other alterations were also observed, indicating that additional viral and/or cellular proteins cooperate with UL13 to alter lamins during HSV-2 infection to allow nuclear egress.« less

  6. Dynein pulling forces counteract lamin-mediated nuclear stability during nuclear envelope repair

    PubMed Central

    Penfield, Lauren; Wysolmerski, Brian; Mauro, Michael; Farhadifar, Reza; Martinez, Michael A.; Biggs, Ronald; Wu, Hai-Yin; Broberg, Curtis; Needleman, Daniel; Bahmanyar, Shirin

    2018-01-01

    Recent work done exclusively in tissue culture cells revealed that the nuclear envelope (NE) ruptures and repairs in interphase. The duration of NE ruptures depends on lamins; however, the underlying mechanisms and relevance to in vivo events are not known. Here, we use the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote to analyze lamin’s role in NE rupture and repair in vivo. Transient NE ruptures and subsequent NE collapse are induced by weaknesses in the nuclear lamina caused by expression of an engineered hypomorphic C. elegans lamin allele. Dynein-generated forces that position nuclei enhance the severity of transient NE ruptures and cause NE collapse. Reduction of dynein forces allows the weakened lamin network to restrict nucleo–cytoplasmic mixing and support stable NE recovery. Surprisingly, the high incidence of transient NE ruptures does not contribute to embryonic lethality, which is instead correlated with stochastic chromosome scattering resulting from premature NE collapse, suggesting that C. elegans tolerates transient losses of NE compartmentalization during early embryogenesis. In sum, we demonstrate that lamin counteracts dynein forces to promote stable NE repair and prevent catastrophic NE collapse, and thus provide the first mechanistic analysis of NE rupture and repair in an organismal context. PMID:29386297

  7. Nuclear lamins are not required for lamina-associated domain organization in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Mario; van Steensel, Bas

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, the nuclear lamina interacts with hundreds of large genomic regions, termed lamina-associated domains (LADs) that are generally in a transcriptionally repressed state. Lamins form the major structural component of the lamina and have been reported to bind DNA and chromatin. Here, we systematically evaluate whether lamins are necessary for the LAD organization in murine embryonic stem cells. Surprisingly, removal of essentially all lamins does not have any detectable effect on the genome-wide interaction pattern of chromatin with emerin, a marker of the inner nuclear membrane. This suggests that other components of the lamina mediate these interactions. © 2015 The Authors.

  8. Electron microscopy of lamin and the nuclear lamina in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Merav; Santarella, Rachel; Wiesel, Naama; Mattaj, Iain; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is found between the inner nuclear membrane and the peripheral chromatin. Lamins are the main components of the nuclear lamina, where they form protein complexes with integral proteins of the inner nuclear membrane, transcriptional regulators, histones and chromatin modifiers. Lamins are required for mechanical stability, chromatin organization, Pol II transcription, DNA replication, nuclear assembly, and nuclear positioning. Mutations in human lamins cause at least 13 distinct human diseases, collectively termed laminopathies, affecting muscle, adipose, bone, nerve and skin cells, and range from muscular dystrophies to accelerated aging. Caenorhabditis elegans has unique advantages in studying lamins and nuclear lamina genes including low complexity of lamina genes and the unique ability of bacterially expressed C. elegans lamin protein to form stable 10 nm fibers. In addition, transgenic techniques, simple application of RNA interference, sophisticated genetic analyses, and the production of a large collection of mutant lines, all make C. elegans especially attractive for studying the functions of its nuclear lamina genes. In this chapter we will include a short review of our current knowledge of nuclear lamina in C. elegans and will describe electron microscopy techniques used for their analyses.

  9. The A- and B-type nuclear lamin networks: microdomains involved in chromatin organization and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, Takeshi; Pfleghaar, Katrin; Kojima, Shin-ichiro; Pack, Chan-Gi; Solovei, Irina; Goldman, Anne E.; Adam, Stephen A.; Shumaker, Dale K.; Kinjo, Masataka; Cremer, Thomas; Goldman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear lamins function in the regulation of replication, transcription, and epigenetic modifications of chromatin. However, the mechanisms responsible for these lamin functions are poorly understood. We demonstrate that A- and B-type lamins form separate, but interacting, stable meshworks in the lamina and have different mobilities in the nucleoplasm as determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Silencing lamin B1 (LB1) expression dramatically increases the lamina meshwork size and the mobility of nucleoplasmic lamin A (LA). The changes in lamina mesh size are coupled to the formation of LA/C-rich nuclear envelope blebs deficient in LB2. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of microdissected blebs, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and immunofluorescence localization of modified histones demonstrate that gene-rich euchromatin associates with the LA/C blebs. Enrichment of hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and histone marks for active transcription suggest that blebs are transcriptionally active. However, in vivo labeling of RNA indicates that transcription is decreased, suggesting that the LA/C-rich microenvironment induces promoter proximal stalling of Pol II. We propose that different lamins are organized into separate, but interacting, microdomains and that LB1 is essential for their organization. Our evidence suggests that the organization and regulation of chromatin are influenced by interconnections between these lamin microdomains. PMID:19141474

  10. Essential Roles for Caenorhabditis elegans Lamin Gene in Nuclear Organization, Cell Cycle Progression, and Spatial Organization of Nuclear Pore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Ben-Shahar, Tom Rolef; Riemer, Dieter; Treinin, Millet; Spann, Perah; Weber, Klaus; Fire, Andrew; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2000-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has a single lamin gene, designated lmn-1 (previously termed CeLam-1). Antibodies raised against the lmn-1 product (Ce-lamin) detected a 64-kDa nuclear envelope protein. Ce-lamin was detected in the nuclear periphery of all cells except sperm and was found in the nuclear interior in embryonic cells and in a fraction of adult cells. Reductions in the amount of Ce-lamin protein produce embryonic lethality. Although the majority of affected embryos survive to produce several hundred nuclei, defects can be detected as early as the first nuclear divisions. Abnormalities include rapid changes in nuclear morphology during interphase, loss of chromosomes, unequal separation of chromosomes into daughter nuclei, abnormal condensation of chromatin, an increase in DNA content, and abnormal distribution of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Under conditions of incomplete RNA interference, a fraction of embryos escaped embryonic arrest and continue to develop through larval life. These animals exhibit additional phenotypes including sterility and defective segregation of chromosomes in germ cells. Our observations show that lmn-1 is an essential gene in C. elegans, and that the nuclear lamins are involved in chromatin organization, cell cycle progression, chromosome segregation, and correct spacing of NPCs. PMID:11071918

  11. Nuclear Lamin A/C Deficiency Induces Defects in Cell Mechanics, Polarization, and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jerry S. H.; Hale, Christopher M.; Panorchan, Porntula; Khatau, Shyam B.; George, Jerry P.; Tseng, Yiider; Stewart, Colin L.; Hodzic, Didier; Wirtz, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Lamin A/C is a major constituent of the nuclear lamina, a thin filamentous protein layer that lies beneath the nuclear envelope. Here we show that lamin A/C deficiency in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Lmna−/− MEFs) diminishes the ability of these cells to polarize at the edge of a wound and significantly reduces cell migration speed into the wound. Moreover, lamin A/C deficiency induces significant separation of the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) from the nuclear envelope. Investigations using ballistic intracellular nanorheology reveal that lamin A/C deficiency also dramatically affects the micromechanical properties of the cytoplasm. Both the elasticity (stretchiness) and the viscosity (propensity of a material to flow) of the cytoplasm in Lmna−/− MEFs are significantly reduced. Disassembly of either the actin filament or microtubule networks in Lmna+/+ MEFs results in decrease of cytoplasmic elasticity and viscosity down to levels found in Lmna−/− MEFs. Together these results show that both the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-based processes, including cell motility, coupled MTOC and nucleus dynamics, and cell polarization, depend critically on the integrity of the nuclear lamina, which suggest the existence of a functional mechanical connection between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. These results also suggest that cell polarization during cell migration requires tight mechanical coupling between MTOC and nucleus, which is mediated by lamin A/C. PMID:17631533

  12. Lamins at the crossroads of mechanosignaling

    PubMed Central

    Osmanagic-Myers, Selma; Dechat, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The intermediate filament proteins, A- and B-type lamins, form the nuclear lamina scaffold adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. B-type lamins confer elasticity, while A-type lamins lend viscosity and stiffness to nuclei. Lamins also contribute to chromatin regulation and various signaling pathways affecting gene expression. The mechanical roles of lamins and their functions in gene regulation are often viewed as independent activities, but recent findings suggest a highly cross-linked and interdependent regulation of these different functions, particularly in mechanosignaling. In this newly emerging concept, lamins act as a “mechanostat” that senses forces from outside and responds to tension by reinforcing the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. A-type lamins, emerin, and the linker of the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex directly transmit forces from the extracellular matrix into the nucleus. These mechanical forces lead to changes in the molecular structure, modification, and assembly state of A-type lamins. This in turn activates a tension-induced “inside-out signaling” through which the nucleus feeds back to the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix to balance outside and inside forces. These functions regulate differentiation and may be impaired in lamin-linked diseases, leading to cellular phenotypes, particularly in mechanical load-bearing tissues. PMID:25644599

  13. Nuclear networking.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  14. Separate roles for chromatin and lamins in nuclear mechanics.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Andrew D; Banigan, Edward J; Marko, John F

    2018-01-01

    The cell nucleus houses, protects, and arranges the genome within the cell. Therefore, nuclear mechanics and morphology are important for dictating gene regulation, and these properties are perturbed in many human diseases, such as cancers and progerias. The field of nuclear mechanics has long been dominated by studies of the nuclear lamina, the intermediate filament shell residing just beneath the nuclear membrane. However, a growing body of work shows that chromatin and chromatin-related factors within the nucleus are an essential part of the mechanical response of the cell nucleus to forces. Recently, our group demonstrated that chromatin and the lamina provide distinct mechanical contributions to nuclear mechanical response. The lamina is indeed important for robust response to large, whole-nucleus stresses, but chromatin dominates the short-extension response. These findings offer a clarifying perspective on varied nuclear mechanics measurements and observations, and they suggest several new exciting possibilities for understanding nuclear morphology, organization, and mechanics.

  15. Stochastic genome-nuclear lamina interactions: modulating roles of Lamin A and BAF.

    PubMed

    Kind, Jop; van Steensel, Bas

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear lamina (NL) is thought to aid in the spatial organization of interphase chromosomes by providing an anchoring platform for hundreds of large genomic regions named lamina associated domains (LADs). Recently, a new live-cell imaging approach demonstrated directly that LAD-NL interactions are dynamic and in part stochastic. Here we discuss implications of these new findings and introduce Lamin A and BAF as potential modulators of stochastic LAD positioning.

  16. In silico synchronization reveals regulators of nuclear ruptures in lamin A/C deficient model cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robijns, J.; Molenberghs, F.; Sieprath, T.; Corne, T. D. J.; Verschuuren, M.; de Vos, W. H.

    2016-07-01

    The nuclear lamina is a critical regulator of nuclear structure and function. Nuclei from laminopathy patient cells experience repetitive disruptions of the nuclear envelope, causing transient intermingling of nuclear and cytoplasmic components. The exact causes and consequences of these events are not fully understood, but their stochastic occurrence complicates in-depth analyses. To resolve this, we have established a method that enables quantitative investigation of spontaneous nuclear ruptures, based on co-expression of a firmly bound nuclear reference marker and a fluorescent protein that shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm during ruptures. Minimally invasive imaging of both reporters, combined with automated tracking and in silico synchronization of individual rupture events, allowed extracting information on rupture frequency and recovery kinetics. Using this approach, we found that rupture frequency correlates inversely with lamin A/C levels, and can be reduced in genome-edited LMNA knockout cells by blocking actomyosin contractility or inhibiting the acetyl-transferase protein NAT10. Nuclear signal recovery followed a kinetic that is co-determined by the severity of the rupture event, and could be prolonged by knockdown of the ESCRT-III complex component CHMP4B. In conclusion, our approach reveals regulators of nuclear rupture induction and repair, which may have critical roles in disease development.

  17. C. elegans Nuclear Envelope Proteins Emerin, MAN1, Lamin, and Nucleoporins Reveal Unique Timing of Nuclear Envelope Breakdown during Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kenneth K.; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Spann, Perah; Liu, Jun; Wilson, Katherine L.

    2000-01-01

    Emerin, MAN1, and LAP2 are integral membrane proteins of the vertebrate nuclear envelope. They share a 43-residue N-terminal motif termed the LEM domain. We found three putative LEM domain genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, designated emr-1, lem-2, and lem-3. We analyzed emr-l, which encodes Ce-emerin, and lem-2, which encodes Ce-MAN1. Ce-emerin and Ce-MAN1 migrate on SDS-PAGE as 17- and 52-kDa proteins, respectively. Based on their biochemical extraction properties and immunolocalization, both Ce-emerin and Ce-MAN1 are integral membrane proteins localized at the nuclear envelope. We used antibodies against Ce-MAN1, Ce-emerin, nucleoporins, and Ce-lamin to determine the timing of nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis in C. elegans. The C. elegans nuclear envelope disassembles very late compared with vertebrates and Drosophila. The nuclear membranes remained intact everywhere except near spindle poles during metaphase and early anaphase, fully disassembling only during mid-late anaphase. Disassembly of pore complexes, and to a lesser extent the lamina, depended on embryo age: pore complexes were absent during metaphase in >30-cell embryos but existed until anaphase in 2- to 24-cell embryos. Intranuclear mRNA splicing factors disassembled after prophase. The timing of nuclear disassembly in C. elegans is novel and may reflect its evolutionary position between unicellular and more complex eukaryotes. PMID:10982402

  18. Werner complex deficiency in cells disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex and the distribution of lamin B1.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhu, Yizhou; Zhai, Yujia; R Castroagudin, Michelle; Bao, Yifei; White, Tommy E; Glavy, Joseph S

    2013-12-01

    From the surrounding shell to the inner machinery, nuclear proteins provide the functional plasticity of the nucleus. This study highlights the nuclear association of Pore membrane (POM) protein NDC1 and Werner protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase responsible for the DNA instability progeria disorder, Werner Syndrome. In our previous publication, we connected the DNA damage sensor Werner's Helicase Interacting Protein (WHIP), a binding partner of WRN, to the NPC. Here, we confirm the association of the WRN/WHIP complex and NDC1. In established WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines, we further demonstrate the interdependence of WRN/WHIP and Nucleoporins (Nups). These changes do not completely abrogate the barrier of the Nuclear Envelope (NE) but do affect the distribution of FG Nups and the RAN gradient, which are necessary for nuclear transport. Evidence from WRN/WHIP knockout cell lines demonstrates changes in the processing and nucleolar localization of lamin B1. The appearance of "RAN holes" void of RAN corresponds to regions within the nucleolus filled with condensed pools of lamin B1. From WRN/WHIP knockout cell line extracts, we found three forms of lamin B1 that correspond to mature holoprotein and two potential post-translationally modified forms of the protein. Upon treatment with topoisomerase inhibitors lamin B1 cleavage occurs only in WRN/WHIP knockout cells. Our data suggest the link of the NDC1 and WRN as one facet of the network between the nuclear periphery and genome stability. Loss of WRN complex leads to multiple alterations at the NPC and the nucleolus. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The major nucleoside triphosphatase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei and in rat liver nuclei share common epitopes also present in nuclear lamins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. G.; Dauwalder, M.; Clawson, G. A.; Hatem, C. L.; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The major nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activities in mammalian and pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei are associated with enzymes that are very similar both biochemically and immunochemically. The major NTPase from rat liver nuclei appears to be a 46-kD enzyme that represents the N-terminal portion of lamins A and C, two lamina proteins that apparently arise from the same gene by alternate splicing. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) G2, raised to human lamin C, both immunoprecipitates the major (47 kD) NTPase in pea nuclei and recognizes it in western blot analyses. A polyclonal antibody preparation raised to the 47-kD pea NTPase (pc480) reacts with the same lamin bands that are recognized by MAb G2 in mammalian nuclei. The pc480 antibodies also bind to the same lamin-like bands in pea nuclear envelope-matrix preparations that are recognized by G2 and three other MAbs known to bind to mammalian lamins. In immunofluorescence assays, pc480 and anti-lamin antibodies stain both cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in plant cells, with slightly enhanced staining along the periphery of the nuclei. These results indicate that the pea and rat liver NTPases are structurally similar and that, in pea nuclei as in rat liver nuclei, the major NTPase is probably derived from a lamin precursor by proteolysis.

  20. Progerin phosphorylation in interphase is lower and less mechanosensitive than lamin-A,C in iPS-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sangkyun; Abbas, Amal; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Xia, Yuntao; Tewari, Manu; Discher, Dennis E.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interphase phosphorylation of lamin-A,C depends dynamically on a cell's microenvironment, including the stiffness of extracellular matrix. However, phosphorylation dynamics is poorly understood for diseased forms such as progerin, a permanently farnesylated mutant of LMNA that accelerates aging of stiff and mechanically stressed tissues. Here, fine-excision alignment mass spectrometry (FEA-MS) is developed to quantify progerin and its phosphorylation levels in patient iPS cells differentiated to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The stoichiometry of total A-type lamins (including progerin) versus B-type lamins measured for Progeria iPS-MSCs prove similar to that of normal MSCs, with total A-type lamins more abundant than B-type lamins. However, progerin behaves more like farnesylated B-type lamins in mechanically-induced segregation from nuclear blebs. Phosphorylation of progerin at multiple sites in iPS-MSCs cultured on rigid plastic is also lower than that of normal lamin-A and C. Reduction of nuclear tension upon i) cell rounding/detachment from plastic, ii) culture on soft gels, and iii) inhibition of actomyosin stress increases phosphorylation and degradation of lamin-C > lamin-A > progerin. Such mechano-sensitivity diminishes, however, with passage as progerin and DNA damage accumulate. Lastly, transcription-regulating retinoids exert equal effects on both diseased and normal A-type lamins, suggesting a differential mechano-responsiveness might best explain the stiff tissue defects in Progeria. PMID:29619860

  1. Nuclear Organization in the Spinal Cord Depends on Motor Neuron Lamination Orchestrated by Catenin and Afadin Function.

    PubMed

    Dewitz, Carola; Pimpinella, Sofia; Hackel, Patrick; Akalin, Altuna; Jessell, Thomas M; Zampieri, Niccolò

    2018-02-13

    Motor neurons in the spinal cord are found grouped in nuclear structures termed pools, whose position is precisely orchestrated during development. Despite the emerging role of pool organization in the assembly of spinal circuits, little is known about the morphogenetic programs underlying the patterning of motor neuron subtypes. We applied three-dimensional analysis of motor neuron position to reveal the roles and contributions of cell adhesive function by inactivating N-cadherin, catenin, and afadin signaling. Our findings reveal that nuclear organization of motor neurons is dependent on inside-out positioning, orchestrated by N-cadherin, catenin, and afadin activities, controlling cell body layering on the medio-lateral axis. In addition to this lamination-like program, motor neurons undergo a secondary, independent phase of organization. This process results in segregation of motor neurons along the dorso-ventral axis of the spinal cord, does not require N-cadherin or afadin activity, and can proceed even when medio-lateral positioning is perturbed. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An Inducible DamID System for Profiling Interactions of Nuclear Lamina Protein Component Lamin B1 with Chromosomes in Mouse Cells.

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikova, E N; Leshchenko, A E; Pindyurin, A V

    2018-05-01

    At the level of DNA organization into chromatin, there are mechanisms that define gene expression profiles in specialized cell types. Genes within chromatin regions that are located at the nuclear periphery are generally expressed at lower levels; however, the nature of this phenomenon remains unclear. These parts of chromatin interact with nuclear lamina proteins like Lamin B1 and, therefore, can be identified in a given cell type by chromatin profiling of these proteins. In this study, we created and tested a Dam Identification (DamID) system induced by Cre recombinase using Lamin B1 and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. This inducible system will help to generate genome-wide profiles of chromatin proteins in given cell types and tissues with no need to dissect tissues from organs or separate cells from tissues, which is achieved by using specific regulatory DNA elements and due to the high sensitivity of the method.

  3. Global loss of a nuclear lamina component, lamin A/C, and LINC complex components SUN1, SUN2, and nesprin-2 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ayaka; Hieda, Miki; Yokoyama, Yuhki; Nishioka, Yu; Yoshidome, Katsuhide; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2015-10-01

    Cancer cells exhibit a variety of features indicative of atypical nuclei. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena remain to be elucidated. The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, a nuclear envelope protein complex consisting mainly of the SUN and nesprin proteins, connects nuclear lamina and cytoskeletal filaments and helps to regulate the size and shape of the nucleus. Using immunohistology, we found that a nuclear lamina component, lamin A/C and all of the investigated LINC complex components, SUN1, SUN2, and nesprin-2, were downregulated in human breast cancer tissues. In the majority of cases, we observed lower expression levels of these analytes in samples' cancerous regions as compared to their cancer-associated noncancerous regions (in cancerous regions, percentage of tissue samples exhibiting low protein expression: lamin A/C, 85% [n = 73]; SUN1, 88% [n = 43]; SUN2, 74% [n = 43]; and nesprin-2, 79% [n = 53]). Statistical analysis showed that the frequencies of recurrence and HER2 expression were negatively correlated with lamin A/C expression (P < 0.05), and intrinsic subtype and ki-67 level were associated with nesprin-2 expression (P < 0.05). In addition, combinatorial analysis using the above four parameters showed that all patients exhibited reduced expression of at least one of four components despite the tumor's pathological classification. Furthermore, several cultured breast cancer cell lines expressed less SUN1, SUN2, nesprin-2 mRNA, and lamin A/C compared to noncancerous mammary gland cells. Together, these results suggest that the strongly reduced expression of LINC complex and nuclear lamina components may play fundamental pathological functions in breast cancer progression. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Nuclear envelope proteins Nesprin2 and LaminA regulate proliferation and apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells in response to shear stress.

    PubMed

    Han, Yue; Wang, Lu; Yao, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Bo; Wang, Guo-Liang; Shen, Bao-Rong; Cheng, Binbin; Wang, Yingxiao; Jiang, Zong-Lai; Qi, Ying-Xin

    2015-05-01

    The dysfunction of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) influenced by flow shear stress is crucial for vascular remodeling. However, the roles of nuclear envelope (NE) proteins in shear stress-induced EC dysfunction are still unknown. Our results indicated that, compared with normal shear stress (NSS), low shear stress (LowSS) suppressed the expression of two types of NE proteins, Nesprin2 and LaminA, and increased the proliferation and apoptosis of ECs. Targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA) and gene overexpression plasmid transfection revealed that Nesprin2 and LaminA participate in the regulation of EC proliferation and apoptosis. A protein/DNA array was further used to detect the activation of transcription factors in ECs following transfection with target siRNAs and overexpression plasmids. The regulation of AP-2 and TFIID mediated by Nesprin2 and the activation of Stat-1, Stat-3, Stat-5 and Stat-6 by LaminA were verified under shear stress. Furthermore, using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software and real-time RT-PCR, the effects of Nesprin2 or LaminA on the downstream target genes of AP-2, TFIID, and Stat-1, Stat-3, Stat-5 and Stat-6, respectively, were investigated under LowSS. Our study has revealed that NE proteins are novel mechano-sensitive molecules in ECs. LowSS suppresses the expression of Nesprin2 and LaminA, which may subsequently modulate the activation of important transcription factors and eventually lead to EC dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.

    1995-08-08

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference. This pump is used in nuclear fission reactors. 19 figs.

  6. Lamin and the heart.

    PubMed

    Captur, Gabriella; Arbustini, Eloisa; Bonne, Gisèle; Syrris, Petros; Mills, Kevin; Wahbi, Karim; Mohiddin, Saidi A; McKenna, William J; Pettit, Stephen; Ho, Carolyn Y; Muchir, Antoine; Gissen, Paul; Elliott, Perry M; Moon, James C

    2018-03-01

    Lamins A and C are intermediate filament nuclear envelope proteins encoded by the LMNA gene. Mutations in LMNA cause autosomal dominant severe heart disease, accounting for 10% of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Characterised by progressive conduction system disease, arrhythmia and systolic impairment, lamin A/C heart disease is more malignant than other common DCMs due to high event rates even when the left ventricular impairment is mild. It has several phenotypic mimics, but overall it is likely to be an under-recognised cause of DCM. In certain clinical scenarios, particularly familial DCM with early conduction disease, the pretest probability of finding an LMNA mutation may be quite high.Recognising lamin A/C heart disease is important because implantable cardioverter defibrillators need to be implanted early. Promising oral drug therapies are within reach thanks to research into the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and affiliated pathways. Personalised heart failure therapy may soon become feasible for LMNA , alongside personalised risk stratification, as variant-related differences in phenotype severity and clinical course are being steadily elucidated.Genotyping and family screening are clinically important both to confirm and to exclude LMNA mutations, but it is the three-pronged integration of such genetic information with functional data from in vivo cardiomyocyte mechanics, and pathological data from microscopy of the nuclear envelope, that is properly reshaping our LMNA knowledge base, one variant at a time. This review explains the biology of lamin A/C heart disease (genetics, structure and function of lamins), clinical presentation (diagnostic pointers, electrocardiographic and imaging features), aspects of screening and management, including current uncertainties, and future directions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  7. Photoresist laminate

    DOEpatents

    Andrade, A.D.; Galbraith, L.K.

    1979-10-01

    The disclosure relates to a laminated negative dry-film photoresist for the production of thick, as well as thin, patterns with vertical sidewalls. Uniform depthwise exposure in a photoresist layer is effected by the use of an ultraviolet filtering top layer.

  8. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jérôme D.; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes. PMID:27602048

  9. Evolutionary changes in lamin expression in the vertebrate lineage

    PubMed Central

    Stick, Reimer; Peter, Annette

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear lamina is involved in fundamental nuclear functions and provides mechanical stability to the nucleus. Lamin filaments form a meshwork closely apposed to the inner nuclear membrane and a small fraction of lamins exist in the nuclear interior. Mutations in lamin genes cause severe hereditary diseases, the laminopathies. During vertebrate evolution the lamin protein family has expanded. While most vertebrate genomes contain 4 lamin genes, encoding the lamins A, B1, B2, and LIII, the majority of non-vertebrate genomes harbor only a single lamin gene. We have collected lamin gene and cDNA sequence information for representatives of the major vertebrate lineages. With the help of RNA-seq data we have determined relative lamin expression levels for representative tissues for species of 9 different gnathostome lineages. Here we report that the level of lamin A expression is low in cartilaginous fishes and ancient fishes and increases toward the mammals. Lamin B1 expression shows an inverse tendency to that of lamin A. Possible implications for the change in the lamin A to B ratio is discussed in the light of its role in nuclear mechanics. PMID:28430006

  10. Laminate article

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas G.; Lee, Dominic F.; Goyal, Amit; Feenstra, Roeland

    2002-01-01

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (RE.sub.x A.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.2-(x/2) buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  11. Significance of host cell kinases in herpes simplex virus type 1 egress and lamin-associated protein disassembly from the nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Leach, Natalie R; Roller, Richard J

    2010-10-10

    The nuclear lamina is thought to be a steric barrier to the herpesvirus capsid. Disruption of the lamina accompanied by phosphorylation of lamina proteins is a conserved feature of herpesvirus infection. In HSV-1-infected cells, protein kinase C (PKC) alpha and delta isoforms are recruited to the nuclear membrane and PKC delta has been implicated in phosphorylation of emerin and lamin B. We tested two critical hypotheses about the mechanism and significance of lamina disruption. First, we show that chemical inhibition of all PKC isoforms reduced viral growth five-fold and inhibited capsid egress from the nucleus. However, specific inhibition of either conventional PKCs or PKC delta does not inhibit viral growth. Second, we show hyperphosphorylation of emerin by viral and cellular kinases is required for its disassociation from the lamina. These data support hypothesis that phosphorylation of lamina components mediates lamina disruption during HSV nuclear egress. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Significance of host cell kinases in herpes simplex virus type 1 egress and lamin-associated protein disassembly from the nuclear lamina

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, Natalie R.; Roller, Richard J., E-mail: richard-roller@uiowa.ed

    2010-10-10

    The nuclear lamina is thought to be a steric barrier to the herpesvirus capsid. Disruption of the lamina accompanied by phosphorylation of lamina proteins is a conserved feature of herpesvirus infection. In HSV-1-infected cells, protein kinase C (PKC) alpha and delta isoforms are recruited to the nuclear membrane and PKC delta has been implicated in phosphorylation of emerin and lamin B. We tested two critical hypotheses about the mechanism and significance of lamina disruption. First, we show that chemical inhibition of all PKC isoforms reduced viral growth five-fold and inhibited capsid egress from the nucleus. However, specific inhibition of eithermore » conventional PKCs or PKC delta does not inhibit viral growth. Second, we show hyperphosphorylation of emerin by viral and cellular kinases is required for its disassociation from the lamina. These data support hypothesis that phosphorylation of lamina components mediates lamina disruption during HSV nuclear egress.« less

  13. Lamin A/C might be involved in the EMT signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lingkun; Zhao, Huanying; Yang, Ronghui; Wang, Liyong; Ma, Hui; Xu, Xiaoxue; Zhou, Ping; Kong, Lu

    2018-07-15

    We have previously reported a heterogeneous expression pattern of the nuclear membrane protein lamin A/C in low- and high-Gleason score (GS) prostate cancer (PC) tissues, and we have now found that this change is not associated with LMNA mutations. This expression pattern appears to be similar to the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) or to that of mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). The role of lamin A/C in EMT or MET in PC remains unclear. Therefore, we first investigated the expression levels of and the associations between lamin A/C and several common EMT markers, such as E-cadherin, N-cadherin, β-catenin, snail, slug and vimentin in PC tissues with different GS values and in different cell lines with varying invasion abilities. Our results suggest that lamin A/C might constitute a type of epithelial marker that better signifies EMT and MET in PC tissue, since a decrease in lamin A/C expression in GS 4 + 5 cases is likely associated with the EMT process, while the re-expression of lamin A/C in GS 5 + 4 cases is likely linked with MET. The detailed GS better exhibited the changes in lamin A/C and the EMT markers examined. Lamin A/C overexpression or knockdown had an impact on EMT biomarkers in a cell model by direct regulation of β-catenin. Hence, we suggest that lamin A/C might serve as a reliable epithelial biomarker for the distinction of PC cell differentiation and might also be a fundamental factor in the occurrence of EMT or MET in PC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Lamins of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and the evolution of the vertebrate lamin protein family.

    PubMed

    Schilf, Paul; Peter, Annette; Hurek, Thomas; Stick, Reimer

    2014-07-01

    Lamin proteins are found in all metazoans. Most non-vertebrate genomes including those of the closest relatives of vertebrates, the cephalochordates and tunicates, encode only a single lamin. In teleosts and tetrapods the number of lamin genes has quadrupled. They can be divided into four sub-types, lmnb1, lmnb2, LIII, and lmna, each characterized by particular features and functional differentiations. Little is known when during vertebrate evolution these features have emerged. Lampreys belong to the Agnatha, the sister group of the Gnathostomata. They split off first within the vertebrate lineage. Analysis of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) lamin complement presented here, identified three functional lamin genes, one encoding a lamin LIII, indicating that the characteristic gene structure of this subtype had been established prior to the agnathan/gnathostome split. Two other genes encode lamins for which orthology to gnathostome lamins cannot be designated. Search for lamin gene sequences in all vertebrate taxa for which sufficient sequence data are available reveals the evolutionary time frame in which specific features of the vertebrate lamins were established. Structural features characteristic for A-type lamins are not found in the lamprey genome. In contrast, lmna genes are present in all gnathostome lineages suggesting that this gene evolved with the emergence of the gnathostomes. The analysis of lamin gene neighborhoods reveals noticeable similarities between the different vertebrate lamin genes supporting the hypothesis that they emerged due to two rounds of whole genome duplication and makes clear that an orthologous relationship between a particular vertebrate paralog and lamins outside the vertebrate lineage cannot be established. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Chromatin and lamin A determine two different mechanical response regimes of the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Andrew D.; Banigan, Edward J.; Adam, Stephen A.; Goldman, Robert D.; Marko, John F.

    2017-01-01

    The cell nucleus must continually resist and respond to intercellular and intracellular mechanical forces to transduce mechanical signals and maintain proper genome organization and expression. Altered nuclear mechanics is associated with many human diseases, including heart disease, progeria, and cancer. Chromatin and nuclear envelope A-type lamin proteins are known to be key nuclear mechanical components perturbed in these diseases, but their distinct mechanical contributions are not known. Here we directly establish the separate roles of chromatin and lamin A/C and show that they determine two distinct mechanical regimes via micromanipulation of single isolated nuclei. Chromatin governs response to small extensions (<3 μm), and euchromatin/heterochromatin levels modulate the stiffness. In contrast, lamin A/C levels control nuclear strain stiffening at large extensions. These results can be understood through simulations of a polymeric shell and cross-linked polymer interior. Our results provide a framework for understanding the differential effects of chromatin and lamin A/C in cell nuclear mechanics and their alterations in disease. PMID:28057760

  16. Chromatin and lamin A determine two different mechanical response regimes of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Andrew D; Banigan, Edward J; Adam, Stephen A; Goldman, Robert D; Marko, John F

    2017-07-07

    The cell nucleus must continually resist and respond to intercellular and intracellular mechanical forces to transduce mechanical signals and maintain proper genome organization and expression. Altered nuclear mechanics is associated with many human diseases, including heart disease, progeria, and cancer. Chromatin and nuclear envelope A-type lamin proteins are known to be key nuclear mechanical components perturbed in these diseases, but their distinct mechanical contributions are not known. Here we directly establish the separate roles of chromatin and lamin A/C and show that they determine two distinct mechanical regimes via micromanipulation of single isolated nuclei. Chromatin governs response to small extensions (<3 μm), and euchromatin/heterochromatin levels modulate the stiffness. In contrast, lamin A/C levels control nuclear strain stiffening at large extensions. These results can be understood through simulations of a polymeric shell and cross-linked polymer interior. Our results provide a framework for understanding the differential effects of chromatin and lamin A/C in cell nuclear mechanics and their alterations in disease. © 2017 Stephens et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Cooperative activity of GABP with PU.1 or C/EBPε regulates lamin B receptor gene expression, implicating their roles in granulocyte nuclear maturation1

    PubMed Central

    Malu, Krishnakumar; Garhwal, Rahul; Pelletier, Margery G. H.; Gotur, Deepali; Halene, Stephanie; Zwerger, Monika; Yang, Zhong-Fa; Rosmarin, Alan G.; Gaines, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear segmentation is a hallmark feature of mammalian neutrophil differentiation, but the mechanisms that control this process are poorly understood. Gene expression in maturing neutrophils requires combinatorial actions of lineage-restricted and more widely expressed transcriptional regulators. Examples include interactions of the widely expressed ETS transcription factor, GA-binding protein (GABP), with the relatively lineage-restricted ETS factor, PU.1, and with CCAAT enhancer binding proteins, C/EBPα and C/EBPε. Whether such cooperative interactions between these transcription factors also regulate the expression of genes encoding proteins that control nuclear segmentation is unclear. We investigated the roles of ETS and C/EBP family transcription factors in regulating the gene encoding the lamin B receptor (LBR), an inner nuclear membrane protein whose expression is required for neutrophil nuclear segmentation. Although C/EBPε was previously shown to bind the Lbr promoter, surprisingly, we found that neutrophils derived from Cebpe null mice exhibited normal Lbr gene and protein expression. Instead, GABP provided transcriptional activation through the Lbr promoter in the absence of C/EBPε, and activities supported by GABP were greatly enhanced by either C/EBPε or PU.1. Both GABP and PU.1 bound Ets sites in the Lbr promoter in vitro, and in vivo within both early myeloid progenitors and differentiating neutrophils. These findings demonstrate that GABP, PU.1, and C/EBPε cooperate to control transcription of the gene encoding LBR, a nuclear envelope protein that is required for the characteristic lobulated morphology of mature neutrophils. PMID:27342846

  18. Lamination cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Rippel, Wally E.; Kobayashi, Daryl M.

    2005-10-11

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a lamination cooling system including a stack of laminations, each defining a plurality of apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define a plurality of cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack, and gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed to prevent a liquid cooling fluid in the passageways from escaping between the laminations. The gaps are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. The apertures of each lamination can be coincident with the same-sized apertures of adjacent laminations to form straight passageways, or they can vary in size, shape and/or position to form non-axial passageways, angled passageways, bidirectional passageways, and manifold sections of passageways that connect a plurality of different passageway sections. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  19. Lamin B1 mediated demyelination: Linking Lamins, Lipids and Leukodystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Padiath, Quasar S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autosomal Dominant Leukodystrophy (ADLD), a fatal adult onset demyelinating disorder, is the only human disease that has been linked to mutations of the nuclear lamina protein, lamin B1, and is primarily caused by duplications of the LMNB1 gene. Why CNS myelin is specifically targeted and the mechanisms underlying ADLD are unclear. Recent work from our group has demonstrated that over expression of lamin B1 in oligodendrocytes, the myelin producing cells in the CNS, resulted in age dependent epigenetic modifications, transcriptional down-regulation of lipogenic gene expression and significant reductions of myelin-enriched lipids. Given the high lipid content of meylin, we hypothesize that lipid loss is one of the primary drivers of the demyelination phenotype. These results can, at least partially, explain the age dependence and cell type specificity in ADLD and are discussed in the context of the existing literature, in an attempt to delineate potential pathways underlying the disease phenotype. PMID:27854160

  20. FHL1B Interacts with Lamin A/C and Emerin at the Nuclear Lamina and is Misregulated in Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ziat, Esma; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Beuvin, Maud; Nelson, Isabelle; Azibani, Feriel; Spuler, Simone; Bonne, Gisèle; Bertrand, Anne T

    2016-11-29

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is associated with mutations in EMD and LMNA genes, encoding for the nuclear envelope proteins emerin and lamin A/C, indicating that EDMD is a nuclear envelope disease. We recently reported mutations in FHL1 gene in X-linked EDMD. FHL1 encodes FHL1A, and the two minor isoforms FHL1B and FHL1C. So far, none have been described at the nuclear envelope. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of EDMD, we focused our attention on the poorly characterized FHL1B isoform. The amount and the localisation of FHL1B were evaluated in control and diseased human primary myoblasts using immunofluorescence and western blotting. We found that in addition to a cytoplasmic localization, this isoform strongly accumulated at the nuclear envelope of primary human myoblasts, like but independently of lamin A/C and emerin. During myoblast differentiation, we observed a major reduction of FHL1B protein expression, especially in the nucleus. Interestingly, we found elevated FHL1B expression level in myoblasts from an FHL1-related EDMD patient where the FHL1 mutation only affects FHL1A, as well as in myoblasts from an LMNA-related EDMD patient. Altogether, the specific localization of FHL1B and its modulation in disease-patient's myoblasts confirmed FHL1-related EDMD as a nuclear envelope disease.

  1. A Novel Lamin A Mutant Responsible for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Causes Distinct Abnormalities of the Cell Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Barateau, Alice; Vadrot, Nathalie; Vicart, Patrick; Ferreiro, Ana; Mayer, Michèle; Héron, Delphine; Vigouroux, Corinne; Buendia, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    A-type lamins, the intermediate filament proteins participating in nuclear structure and function, are encoded by LMNA. LMNA mutations can lead to laminopathies such as lipodystrophies, premature aging syndromes (progeria) and muscular dystrophies. Here, we identified a novel heterozygous LMNA p.R388P de novo mutation in a patient with a non-previously described severe phenotype comprising congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD) and lipodystrophy. In culture, the patient's skin fibroblasts entered prematurely into senescence, and some nuclei showed a lamina honeycomb pattern. C2C12 myoblasts were transfected with a construct carrying the patient's mutation; R388P-lamin A (LA) predominantly accumulated within the nucleoplasm and was depleted at the nuclear periphery, altering the anchorage of the inner nuclear membrane protein emerin and the nucleoplasmic protein LAP2-alpha. The mutant LA triggered a frequent and severe nuclear dysmorphy that occurred independently of prelamin A processing, as well as increased histone H3K9 acetylation. Nuclear dysmorphy was not significantly improved when transfected cells were treated with drugs disrupting microtubules or actin filaments or modifying the global histone acetylation pattern. Therefore, releasing any force exerted at the nuclear envelope by the cytoskeleton or chromatin did not rescue nuclear shape, in contrast to what was previously shown in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria due to other LMNA mutations. Our results point to the specific cytotoxic effect of the R388P-lamin A mutant, which is clinically related to a rare and severe multisystemic laminopathy phenotype.

  2. Composite lamination method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, G. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A process was developed for preparing relatively thick composite laminate structure wherein thin layers of prepreg tapes are assembled, these thin layers are cut into strips that are partially cured, and stacked into the desired thickness with uncured prepreg disposed between each layer of strips. The formed laminate is finally cured and thereafter machined to the desired final dimensions.

  3. Honeycomb-laminate composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A honeycomb-laminate composite structure was comprised of: (1) a cellular core of a polyquinoxaline foam in a honeycomb structure, and (2) a layer of a noncombustible fibrous material impregnated with a polyimide resin laminated on the cellular core. A process for producing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure and articles containing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure is described.

  4. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio; Saggio, Isabella

    2016-08-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. © 2016 The Authors.

  5. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  6. Flexible thermal laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Sauers, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Lightweight flexible laminate of interwoven conducting and insulating yarns, designed to provide localized controlled heating for propellant tanks on space vehicles, is useful for nonspace applications where weight, bulk, and flexibility are critical concerns.

  7. The lipodystrophic hotspot lamin A p.R482W mutation deregulates the mesodermal inducer T/Brachyury and early vascular differentiation gene networks.

    PubMed

    Briand, Nolwenn; Guénantin, Anne-Claire; Jeziorowska, Dorota; Shah, Akshay; Mantecon, Matthieu; Capel, Emilie; Garcia, Marie; Oldenburg, Anja; Paulsen, Jonas; Hulot, Jean-Sebastien; Vigouroux, Corinne; Collas, Philippe

    2018-04-15

    The p.R482W hotspot mutation in A-type nuclear lamins causes familial partial lipodystrophy of Dunnigan-type (FPLD2), a lipodystrophic syndrome complicated by early onset atherosclerosis. Molecular mechanisms underlying endothelial cell dysfunction conferred by the lamin A mutation remain elusive. However, lamin A regulates epigenetic developmental pathways and mutations could perturb these functions. Here, we demonstrate that lamin A R482W elicits endothelial differentiation defects in a developmental model of FPLD2. Genome modeling in fibroblasts from patients with FPLD2 caused by the lamin A R482W mutation reveals repositioning of the mesodermal regulator T/Brachyury locus towards the nuclear center relative to normal fibroblasts, suggesting enhanced activation propensity of the locus in a developmental model of FPLD2. Addressing this issue, we report phenotypic and transcriptional alterations in mesodermal and endothelial differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells we generated from a patient with R482W-associated FPLD2. Correction of the LMNA mutation ameliorates R482W-associated phenotypes and gene expression. Transcriptomics links endothelial differentiation defects to decreased Polycomb-mediated repression of the T/Brachyury locus and over-activation of T target genes. Binding of the Polycomb repressor complex 2 to T/Brachyury is impaired by the mutated lamin A network, which is unable to properly associate with the locus. This leads to a deregulation of vascular gene expression over time. By connecting a lipodystrophic hotspot lamin A mutation to a disruption of early mesodermal gene expression and defective endothelial differentiation, we propose that the mutation rewires the fate of several lineages, resulting in multi-tissue pathogenic phenotypes.

  8. Differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts expressing lamin A mutated at a site responsible for Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is improved by inhibition of the MEK-ERK pathway and stimulation of the PI3-kinase pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Favreau, Catherine; Delbarre, Erwan; Courvalin, Jean-Claude

    2008-04-01

    Mutation R453W in A-type lamins, that are major nuclear envelope proteins, generates Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. We previously showed that mouse myoblasts expressing R453W-lamin A incompletely exit the cell cycle and differentiate into myocytes with a low level of multinucleation. Here we attempted to improve differentiation by treating these cells with a mixture of PD98059, an extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (also known as mitogen-activated kinase, MEK) inhibitor, and insulin-like growth factor-II, an activator of phosphoinositide 3-kinase. We show that mouse myoblasts expressing R453W-lamin A were sensitive to the drug treatment as shown by (i) an increase in multinucleation, (ii) downregulation ofmore » proliferation markers (cyclin D1, hyperphosphorylated Rb), (iii) upregulation of myogenin, and (iv) sustained activation of p21 and cyclin D3. However, nuclear matrix anchorage of p21 and cyclin D3 in a complex with hypophosphorylated Rb that is critical to trigger cell cycle arrest and myogenin induction was deficient and incompletely restored by drug treatment. As the turn-over of R453W-lamin A at the nuclear envelope was greatly enhanced, we propose that R453W-lamin A impairs the capacity of the nuclear lamina to serve as scaffold for substrates of the MEK-ERK pathway and for MyoD-induced proteins that play a role in the differentiation process.« less

  9. Lamination cooling system formation method

    DOEpatents

    Rippel, Wally E [Altadena, CA; Kobayashi, Daryl M [Monrovia, CA

    2012-06-19

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a cooling system. A stack of laminations have apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define straight or angled cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack. Gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  10. Lamination cooling system formation method

    DOEpatents

    Rippel, Wally E [Altadena, CA; Kobayashi, Daryl M [Monrovia, CA

    2009-05-12

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a cooling system. A stack of laminations have apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define straight or angled cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack. Gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  11. Laminate armor and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Henry S; Lillo, Thomas M; Zagula, Thomas M

    2013-02-26

    Laminate armor and methods of manufacturing laminate armor. Specifically, laminate armor plates comprising a commercially pure titanium layer and a titanium alloy layer bonded to the commercially pure titanium outer layer are disclosed, wherein an average thickness of the titanium alloy inner layer is about four times an average thickness of the commercially pure titanium outer layer. In use, the titanium alloy layer is positioned facing an area to be protected. Additionally, roll-bonding methods for manufacturing laminate armor plates are disclosed.

  12. Laminates and reinforced metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    A selective review is presented of the state of the art of metallic laminates and fiber reinforced metals called metallic matrix laminates (MMLs). Design and analysis procedures that are used for, and typical structural components that have been made from MMLs are emphasized. Selected MMLs, constituent materials, typical material properties and fabrication procedures are briefly described, including hybrids and superhybrids. Advantages, disadvantages, and special considerations required during design, analysis, and fabrication of MMLs are examined. Tabular and graphical data are included to illustrate key aspects of MMLs. Appropriate references are cited to provide a selective bibliography of a rapidly expanding and very promising research and development field.

  13. Laminated rare earth structure and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Senor, David J [West Richland, WA; Johnson, Roger N [Richland, WA; Reid, Bruce D [Pasco, WA; Larson, Sandra [Richland, WA

    2002-07-30

    A laminated structure having two or more layers, wherein at least one layer is a metal substrate and at least one other layer is a coating comprising at least one rare earth element. For structures having more than two layers, the coating and metal substrate layers alternate. In one embodiment of the invention, the structure is a two-layer laminate having a rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a metal substrate. In another embodiment of the invention, the structure is a three-layer laminate having the rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a first metal substrate and the coating subsequently abonded to a second metal substrate. The bonding of the coating to the second metal substrate may be accomplished by hot pressing, hot rolling, high deformation rate processing, or combinations thereof. The laminated structure may be used in nuclear components where reactivity control or neutron absorption is desired and in non-nuclear applications such as magnetic and superconducting films.

  14. A historical perspective of laminitis.

    PubMed

    Heymering, Henry W

    2010-04-01

    The causes of laminitis are many-often interrelated, sometimes direct opposites. The history of laminitis has been a search for the cause or causes of laminitis and for effective treatment. Going in and out of fashion, many treatments have lasted for centuries, some for millennia, but very few have been proven. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aberrant localization of lamin B receptor (LBR) in cellular senescence in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Rumi; En, Atsuki; Ukekawa, Ryo

    2016-05-13

    5-Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analogue, induces cellular senescence in mammalian cells. BrdU induces cellular senescence probably through the regulation of chromatin because BrdU destabilizes or disrupts nucleosome positioning and decondenses heterochromatin. Since heterochromatin is tethered to the nuclear periphery through the interaction with the nuclear envelope proteins, we examined the localization of the several nuclear envelope proteins such as lamins, lamin-interacting proteins, nuclear pore complex proteins, and nuclear transport proteins in senescent cells. We have shown here that lamin B receptor (LBR) showed a change in localization in both BrdU-induced and replicative senescent cells.

  16. A peculiar lamin in a peculiar mammal: Expression of lamin LIII in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Peter, Annette; Khandekar, Shaunak; Deakin, Janine E; Stick, Reimer

    2015-11-01

    Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) holds a unique phylogenetic position at the base of the mammalian lineage due to an amalgamation of mammalian and sauropsid-like features. Here we describe the set of four lamin genes for platypus. Lamins are major components of the nuclear lamina, which constitutes a main component of the nucleoskeleton and is involved in a wide range of nuclear functions. Vertebrate evolution was accompanied by an increase in the number of lamin genes from a single gene in their closest relatives, the tunicates and cephalochordates, to four genes in the vertebrate lineage. Of the four genes the LIII gene is characterized by the presence of two alternatively spliced CaaX-encoding exons. In amphibians and fish LIII is the major lamin protein in oocytes and early embryos. The LIII gene is conserved throughout the vertebrate lineage, with the notable exception of marsupials and placental mammals, which have lost the LIII gene. Here we show that platypus has retained an LIII gene, albeit with a significantly altered structure and with a radically different expression pattern. The platypus LIII gene contains only a single CaaX-encoding exon and the head domain together with coil 1a and part of coil1b of the platypus LIII protein is replaced by a novel short non-helical N-terminus. It is expressed exclusively in the testis. These features resemble those of male germ cell-specific lamins in placental mammals, in particular those of lamin C2. Our data suggest (i) that the specific functions of LIII, which it fulfills in all other vertebrates, is no longer required in mammals and (ii) once it had been freed from these functions has undergone structural alterations and has adopted a new functionality in monotremes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Distinct structural and mechanical properties of the nuclear lamina in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Kris Noel; Scaffidi, Paola; Islam, Mohammad F; Yodh, Arjun G; Wilson, Katherine L; Misteli, Tom

    2006-07-05

    The nuclear lamina is a network of structural filaments, the A and B type lamins, located at the nuclear envelope and throughout the nucleus. Lamin filaments provide the nucleus with mechanical stability and support many basic activities, including gene regulation. Mutations in LMNA, the gene encoding A type lamins, cause numerous human diseases, including the segmental premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Here we show that structural and mechanical properties of the lamina are altered in HGPS cells. We demonstrate by live-cell imaging and biochemical analysis that lamins A and C become trapped at the nuclear periphery in HGPS patient cells. Using micropipette aspiration, we show that the lamina in HGPS cells has a significantly reduced ability to rearrange under mechanical stress. Based on polarization microscopy results, we suggest that the lamins are disordered in the healthy nuclei, whereas the lamins in HGPS nuclei form orientationally ordered microdomains. The reduced deformability of the HGPS nuclear lamina possibly could be due to the inability of these orientationally ordered microdomains to dissipate mechanical stress. Surprisingly, intact HGPS cells exhibited a degree of resistance to acute mechanical stress similar to that of cells from healthy individuals. Thus, in contrast to the nuclear fragility seen in lmna null cells, the lamina network in HGPS cells has unique mechanical properties that might contribute to disease phenotypes by affecting responses to mechanical force and misregulation of mechanosensitive gene expression.

  18. LEM4/ANKLE-2 deficiency impairs post-mitotic re-localization of BAF, LAP2α and LaminA to the nucleus, causes nuclear envelope instability in telophase and leads to hyperploidy in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Snyers, Luc; Erhart, Renate; Laffer, Sylvia; Pusch, Oliver; Weipoltshammer, Klara; Schöfer, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The human LEM-domain protein family is involved in fundamental aspects of nuclear biology. The LEM-domain interacts with the barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF), which itself binds DNA. LEM-domain proteins LAP2, emerin and MAN1 are proteins of the inner nuclear membrane; they have important functions: maintaining the integrity of the nuclear lamina and regulating gene expression at the nuclear periphery. LEM4/ANKLE-2 has been proposed to participate in nuclear envelope reassembly after mitosis and to mediate dephosphorylation of BAF through binding to phosphatase PP2A. Here, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to create several cell lines deficient in LEM4/ANKLE-2. By using time-lapse video microscopy, we show that absence of this protein severely compromises the post mitotic re-association of the nuclear proteins BAF, LAP2α and LaminA to chromosomes. These defects give rise to a strong mechanical instability of the nuclear envelope in telophase and to a chromosomal instability leading to increased number of hyperploid cells. Reintroducing LEM4/ANKLE-2 in the cells by transfection could efficiently restore the telophase association of BAF and LAP2α to the chromosomes. This rescue phenotype was abolished for N- or C-terminally truncated mutants that had lost the capacity to bind PP2A. We demonstrate also that, in addition to binding to PP2A, LEM4/ANKLE-2 binds BAF through its LEM-domain, providing further evidence for a generic function of this domain as a principal interactor of BAF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Photovoltaic module and laminate

    SciTech Connect

    Bunea, Gabriela E.; Kim, Sung Dug; Kavulak, David F.J.

    A photovoltaic module is disclosed. The photovoltaic module has a first side directed toward the sun during normal operation and a second, lower side. The photovoltaic module comprises a perimeter frame and a photovoltaic laminate at least partially enclosed by and supported by the perimeter frame. The photovoltaic laminate comprises a transparent cover layer positioned toward the first side of the photovoltaic module, an upper encapsulant layer beneath and adhering to the cover layer, a plurality of photovoltaic solar cells beneath the upper encapsulant layer, the photovoltaic solar cells electrically interconnected, a lower encapsulant layer beneath the plurality of photovoltaicmore » solar cells, the upper and lower encapsulant layers enclosing the plurality of photovoltaic solar cells, and a homogenous rear environmental protection layer, the rear environmental protection layer adhering to the lower encapsulant layer, the rear environmental protection layer exposed to the ambient environment on the second side of the photovoltaic module.« less

  20. Crystal structures of the coil 2B fragment and the globular tail domain of human lamin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Jianbin; Xu, Chao; Bian, Chuanbing

    2012-07-18

    We present here the crystal structures of human lamin B1 globular tail domain and coiled 2B domain, which adopt similar folds to Ig-like domain and coiled-coil domain of lamin A, respectively. Despite the overall similarity, we found an extra intermolecular disulfide bond in the lamin B1 coil 2B domain, which does not exist in lamin A/C. In addition, the structural analysis indicates that interactions at the lamin B1 homodimer interface are quite different from those of lamin A/C. Thus our research not only reveals the diversely formed homodimers among lamin family members, but also sheds light on understanding the importantmore » roles of lamin B1 in forming the nuclear lamina matrix.« less

  1. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  2. Laminated piezoelectric transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez Carazo, Alfredo (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A laminated piezoelectric transformer is provided using the longitudinal vibration modes for step-up voltage conversion applications. The input portions are polarized to deform in a longitudinal plane and are bonded to an output portion. The deformation of the input portions is mechanically coupled to the output portion, which deforms in the same longitudinal direction relative to the input portion. The output portion is polarized in the thickness direction relative its electrodes, and piezoelectrically generates a stepped-up output voltage.

  3. Symmetric Composite Laminate Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Smolinski, K. F.; Gellin, S.

    1985-01-01

    It is demonstrated that COSMIC/NASTRAN may be used to analyze plate and shell structures made of symmetric composite laminates. Although general composite laminates cannot be analyzed using NASTRAN, the theoretical development presented herein indicates that the integrated constitutive laws of a symmetric composite laminate resemble those of a homogeneous anisotropic plate, which can be analyzed using NASTRAN. A detailed analysis procedure is presented, as well as an illustrative example.

  4. Solar cell module lamination process

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Aceves, Randy C.

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell module lamination process using fluoropolymers to provide protection from adverse environmental conditions and thus enable more extended use of solar cells, particularly in space applications. A laminate of fluoropolymer material provides a hermetically sealed solar cell module structure that is flexible and very durable. The laminate is virtually chemically inert, highly transmissive in the visible spectrum, dimensionally stable at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. highly abrasion resistant, and exhibits very little ultra-violet degradation.

  5. The LMNA mutation p.Arg321Ter associated with dilated cardiomyopathy leads to reduced expression and a skewed ratio of lamin A and lamin C proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saaidi, Rasha; Rasmussen, Torsten B.; Palmfeldt, Johan

    2013-11-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart muscle characterized by cardiac chamber enlargement and reduced systolic function of the left ventricle. Mutations in the LMNA gene represent the most frequent known genetic cause of DCM associated with disease of the conduction systems. The LMNA gene generates two major transcripts encoding the nuclear lamina major components lamin A and lamin C by alternative splicing. Both haploinsuffiency and dominant negative effects have been proposed as disease mechanism for premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in LMNA. These mechanisms however are still not clearly established. In this study, we used a representativemore » LMNA nonsense mutation, p.Arg321Ter, to shed light on the molecular disease mechanisms. Cultured fibroblasts from three DCM patients carrying this mutation were analyzed. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and sequencing of these PCR products indicated that transcripts from the mutant allele were degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) mechanism. The fact that no truncated mutant protein was detectable in western blot (WB) analysis strengthens the notion that the mutant transcript is efficiently degraded. Furthermore, WB analysis showed that the expression of lamin C protein was reduced by the expected approximately 50%. Clearly decreased lamin A and lamin C levels were also observed by immunofluorescence microscopy analysis. However, results from both WB and nano-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry demonstrated that the levels of lamin A protein were more reduced suggesting an effect on expression of lamin A from the wild type allele. PCR analysis of the ratio of lamin A to lamin C transcripts showed unchanged relative amounts of lamin A transcript suggesting that the effect on the wild type allele was operative at the protein level. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed no abnormal nuclear morphology of patient fibroblast cells. Based on these data, we propose

  6. Self-Healing Laminate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Michael W. (Inventor); White, Scott R. (Inventor); Beiermann, Brett A. (Inventor); Sottos, Nancy R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A laminate material may include a first flexible layer, and a self-healing composite layer in contact with the first flexible layer. The composite layer includes an elastomer matrix, a plurality of first capsules including a polymerizer, and a corresponding activator for the polymerizer. The laminate material may self-heal when subjected to a puncture or a tear.

  7. Systematic Analysis of the Functional Relevance of Nuclear Structure and Mechanics in Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    epithelial cells; MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells) with systematic alterations in the expression of lamins A, B1, B2, C, and lamin B receptor...LBR). We then evaluated the effect of altered lamin expression on nuclear stiffness in these cell lines. While increased expression of lamin A...caused stiffer, less deformable nuclei, reduction of lamins A/C expression by shRNA reduced nuclear stiffness. The effect of alterations in other lamins

  8. Overexpression of the lamina proteins Lamin and Kugelkern induces specific ultrastructural alterations in the morphology of the nuclear envelope of intestinal stem cells and enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Petrovsky, Roman; Krohne, Georg; Großhans, Jörg

    2018-03-01

    The nuclear envelope has a stereotypic morphology consisting of a flat double layer of the inner and outer nuclear membrane, with interspersed nuclear pores. Underlying and tightly linked to the inner nuclear membrane is the nuclear lamina, a proteinous layer of intermediate filament proteins and associated proteins. Physiological, experimental or pathological alterations in the constitution of the lamina lead to changes in nuclear morphology, such as blebs and lobulations. It has so far remained unclear whether the morphological changes depend on the differentiation state and the specific lamina protein. Here we analysed the ultrastructural morphology of the nuclear envelope in intestinal stem cells and differentiated enterocytes in adult Drosophila flies, in which the proteins Lam, Kugelkern or a farnesylated variant of LamC were overexpressed. Surprisingly, we detected distinct morphological features specific for the respective protein. Lam induced envelopes with multiple layers of membrane and lamina, surrounding the whole nucleus whereas farnesylated LamC induced the formation of a thick fibrillary lamina. In contrast, Kugelkern induced single-layered and double-layered intranuclear membrane structures, which are likely be derived from infoldings of the inner nuclear membrane or of the double layer of the envelope. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Lamin A reassembly at the end of mitosis is regulated by its SUMO-interacting motif

    SciTech Connect

    Moriuchi, Takanobu; Kuroda, Masaki; Kusumoto, Fumiya

    Modification of proteins with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO; SUMOylation) is involved in the regulation of various biological processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that noncovalent associations between SUMOylated proteins and co-operative proteins containing SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) are important for the spatiotemporal organization of many protein complexes. In this study, we demonstrate that interactions between lamin A, a major component of the nuclear lamina, and SUMO isoforms are dependent on one of the four SIMs (SIM3) resided in lamin A polypeptide in vitro. Live cell imaging and immunofluorescence staining showed that SIM3 is required for accumulation of lamin A on the chromosomesmore » during telophase, and subsequent evaluation of a panel of deletion mutants determined that a 156-amino acid region spanning the carboxyl-terminal Ig-fold domain of lamin A is sufficient for this accumulation. Notably, mutation of SIM3 abrogated the dephosphorylation of mitosis-specific phosphorylation at Ser-22 of lamin A, which normally occurs during telophase, and the subsequent nuclear lamina reorganization. Furthermore, expression of a conjugation-defective SUMO2 mutant, which was previously shown to inhibit endogenous SUMOylation in a dominant-negative manner, also impaired the accumulation of wild type lamin A on telophase chromosomes. These findings suggest that interactions between SIM3 of lamin A and a putative SUMO2-modified protein plays an important role in the reorganization of the nuclear lamina at the end of mitosis. - Highlights: • Lamin A interacts with SUMO2 via a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) in the Ig domain. • SIM3 of lamin A is responsible for chromosomal accumulation during telophase. • A 156-aa region spanning the Ig domain is sufficient for chromosomal accumulation. • Accumulation of lamin A is required for timely dephosphorylation on chromosomes. • A putative SUMO2-modified protein may mediate chromosomal accumulation

  10. Role of the nuclear envelope in the pathogenesis of age-related bone loss and osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Christopher; Bermeo, Sandra; Fatkin, Diane; Duque, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is the most important border in the eukaryotic cell. The role of the nuclear envelope in cell differentiation and function is determined by a constant interaction between the elements of the nuclear envelope and the transcriptional regulators involved in signal transcription pathways. Among those components of the nuclear envelope, there is a growing evidence that changes in the expression of A-type lamins, which are essential components of the nuclear lamina, are associated with age-related changes in bone affecting the capacity of differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, favoring adipogenesis and affecting the function and survival of the osteocytes. Overall, as A-type lamins are considered as the 'guardians of the soma', these proteins are also essential for the integrity and quality of the bone and pivotal for the longevity of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23951459

  11. OGT (O-GlcNAc Transferase) Selectively Modifies Multiple Residues Unique to Lamin A.

    PubMed

    Simon, Dan N; Wriston, Amanda; Fan, Qiong; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Florwick, Alyssa; Dharmaraj, Tejas; Peterson, Sherket B; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Carlson, Cathrine R; Grønning-Wang, Line M; Hunt, Donald F; Wilson, Katherine L

    2018-05-17

    The LMNA gene encodes lamins A and C with key roles in nuclear structure, signaling, gene regulation, and genome integrity. Mutations in LMNA cause over 12 diseases ('laminopathies'). Lamins A and C are identical for their first 566 residues. However, they form separate filaments in vivo, with apparently distinct roles. We report that lamin A is β- O -linked N -acetylglucosamine- (O -GlcNAc)-modified in human hepatoma (Huh7) cells and in mouse liver. In vitro assays with purified O -GlcNAc transferase (OGT) enzyme showed robust O -GlcNAcylation of recombinant mature lamin A tails (residues 385⁻646), with no detectable modification of lamin B1, lamin C, or 'progerin' (Δ50) tails. Using mass spectrometry, we identified 11 O -GlcNAc sites in a 'sweet spot' unique to lamin A, with up to seven sugars per peptide. Most sites were unpredicted by current algorithms. Double-mutant (S612A/T643A) lamin A tails were still robustly O -GlcNAc-modified at seven sites. By contrast, O -GlcNAcylation was undetectable on tails bearing deletion Δ50, which causes Hutchinson⁻Gilford progeria syndrome, and greatly reduced by deletion Δ35. We conclude that residues deleted in progeria are required for substrate recognition and/or modification by OGT in vitro. Interestingly, deletion Δ35, which does not remove the majority of identified O -GlcNAc sites, does remove potential OGT-association motifs (lamin A residues 622⁻625 and 639⁻645) homologous to that in mouse Tet1. These biochemical results are significant because they identify a novel molecular pathway that may profoundly influence lamin A function. The hypothesis that lamin A is selectively regulated by OGT warrants future testing in vivo, along with two predictions: genetic variants may contribute to disease by perturbing OGT-dependent regulation, and nutrient or other stresses might cause OGT to misregulate wildtype lamin A.

  12. Hierarchic models for laminated plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Barna A.; Actis, Ricardo L.

    1991-01-01

    The research conducted in the formulation of hierarchic models for laminated plates is described. The work is an extension of the work done for laminated strips. The use of a single parameter, beta, is investigated that represents the degree to which the equilibrium equations of three dimensional elasticity are satisfied. The powers of beta identify members in the hierarchic sequence. Numerical examples that were analyzed with the proposed sequence of models are included. The results obtained for square plates with uniform loading and homogeneous boundary conditions are very encouraging. Several cross-ply and angle-ply laminates were evaluated and the results compared with those of the fully three dimensional model, computed using MSC/PROBE, and with previously reported work on laminated strips.

  13. Sudden bending of cracked laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Chen, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    A dynamic approximate laminated plate theory is developed with emphasis placed on obtaining effective solution for the crack configuration where the 1/square root of r stress singularity and the condition of plane strain are preserved. The radial distance r is measured from the crack edge. The results obtained show that the crack moment intensity tends to decrease as the crack length to laminate plate thickness is increased. Hence, a laminated plate has the desirable feature of stabilizing a through crack as it increases its length at constant load. Also, the level of the average load intensity transmitted to a through crack can be reduced by making the inner layers to be stiffer than the outer layers. The present theory, although approximate, is useful for analyzing laminate failure to crack propagation under dynamic load conditions.

  14. Internal Stresses in Laminated Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heim, A L; Knauss, A C; Seutter, Louis

    1923-01-01

    This report reviews the procedure employed in an investigation of the sources and influence of internal stresses in laminated construction, and discusses the influence of shrinkage and swelling stresses caused by atmospheric conditions upon the tensile strength across grain in laminated construction with special reference to airplane propellers. The investigation covered three sources of internal stress, namely, the combination of plain-sawed and quarter-sawed material in the same construction, the gluing together of laminations of different moisture contents, and the gluing together of laminations of different densities. Glued specimens and free specimens, made up under various manufacturing conditions, were subjected to various climatic changes inducing internal stresses and then were tested.

  15. Abnormal retention of nuclear lamina and disorganization of chromatin-related proteins in spermatozoa from DPY19L2-deleted globozoospermic patients.

    PubMed

    Paci, Marine; Elkhatib, Razan; Longepied, Guy; Hennebicq, Sylviane; Bessonat, Julien; Courbière, Blandine; Bourgeois, Patrice; Levy, Nicolas; Mitchell, Michael J; Metzler-Guillemain, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the nuclear lamina (NL) and lamin chromatin-partners in spermatozoa from four DPY19L2-deleted globozoospermic patients. We tested for spermatid transcripts encoding lamins and their chromatin-partners emerin, LAP2α, BAF and BAF-L, by reverse transcriptase-PCR using spermatozoa RNA. We also determined the localization of lamin B1, BAF and BAF-L by immunofluorescent analysis of spermatozoa from all patients. In RNA from globozoospermic and control spermatozoa we detected transcripts encoding lamin B1, lamin B3, emerin, LAP2α and BAF-L, but not A-type lamins. In contrast, BAF transcripts were detected in globozoospermic but not control spermatozoa. The NL was immature in human globozoospermic spermatozoa: lamin B1 signal was detected in the nuclei of globozoospermic spermatozoa in significantly higher proportions than the control (P < 0.05; 56-91% versus 40%) and was predominantly observed at the whole nuclear periphery, not polarized as in control spermatozoa. Conversely, BAF and BAF-L were detected in control, but not globozoospermic spermatozoa. Our results strongly emphasize the importance of the NL and associated proteins during human spermiogenesis. In globozoospermia, the lack of maturation of the NL, and the modifications in expression and location of chromatin-partners, could explain the chromatin defects observed in this rare phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference.

  17. Push Tester For Laminated Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimura, Russell S.

    1991-01-01

    Small instrument used to measure brittleness of polymer film adhesively bonded to hard substrate. Penlike instrument has microball tip. Small pointer in slot on side of instrument used to calibrate and indicate spring force applied by point. Microball dents only small area of specimen. Such measurements used to measure rates of embrittlement in environmental tests of candidate laminated-film covers for photovoltaic modules. Not limited to transparent films; also used on opaque laminated films on back panels of photovoltaic modules.

  18. The meiotic nuclear lamina regulates chromosome dynamics and promotes efficient homologous recombination in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Link, Jana; Jahn, Daniel; Schmitt, Johannes; Göb, Eva; Baar, Johannes; Ortega, Sagrario; Benavente, Ricardo; Alsheimer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is the structural scaffold of the nuclear envelope and is well known for its central role in nuclear organization and maintaining nuclear stability and shape. In the past, a number of severe human disorders have been identified to be associated with mutations in lamins. Extensive research on this topic has provided novel important clues about nuclear lamina function. These studies have contributed to the knowledge that the lamina constitutes a complex multifunctional platform combining both structural and regulatory functions. Here, we report that, in addition to the previously demonstrated significance for somatic cell differentiation and maintenance, the nuclear lamina is also an essential determinant for germ cell development. Both male and female mice lacking the short meiosis-specific A-type lamin C2 have a severely defective meiosis, which at least in the male results in infertility. Detailed analysis revealed that lamin C2 is required for telomere-driven dynamic repositioning of meiotic chromosomes. Loss of lamin C2 affects precise synapsis of the homologs and interferes with meiotic double-strand break repair. Taken together, our data explain how the nuclear lamina contributes to meiotic chromosome behaviour and accurate genome haploidization on a mechanistic level.

  19. Basic mechanics of laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanics of laminated composite materials is presented in a clear manner with only essential derivations included. The constitutive equations in all of their forms are developed and then summarized in a separate section. The effects of hygrothermal effects are included. The prediction of the engineering constants for a laminate are derived. Strength of laminated composites is not covered.

  20. Strength and stiffness of small glued-laminated beams with different qualities of tension laminations

    Treesearch

    Catherine M. Marx; Russell C. Moody

    1981-01-01

    A total of 180 small Douglas Fir–Larch (DF-L) or Southern Pine (SP) glued-laminated beams were evaluated to determine the tension lamination quality necessary to obtain desired design stresses. The test beams had either the regular laminating grades of L1 DF-L/No. 1D SP or the special 302-24 laminating grade as tension laminations. Because an initial set of SP beams...

  1. Lamin A/C Haploinsufficiency Modulates the Differentiation Potential of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Poonam; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Kumaran, R. Ileng; Kumar, Satish; Parnaik, Veena K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Lamins are structural proteins that are the major determinants of nuclear architecture and play important roles in various nuclear functions including gene regulation and cell differentiation. Mutations in the human lamin A gene cause a spectrum of genetic diseases that affect specific tissues. Most available mouse models for laminopathies recapitulate disease symptoms for muscle diseases and progerias. However, loss of human lamin A/C also has highly deleterious effects on fetal development. Hence it is important to understand the impact of lamin A/C expression levels on embryonic differentiation pathways. Methodology and Principal Findings We have investigated the differentiation potential of mouse embryonic stem cells containing reduced levels of lamin A/C by detailed lineage analysis of embryoid bodies derived from these cells by in vitro culture. We initially carried out a targeted disruption of one allele of the mouse lamin A/C gene (Lmna). Undifferentiated wild-type and Lmna+/− embryonic stem cells showed similar expression of pluripotency markers and cell cycle profiles. Upon spontaneous differentiation into embryoid bodies, markers for visceral endoderm such as α-fetoprotein were highly upregulated in haploinsufficient cells. However, neuronal markers such as β-III tubulin and nestin were downregulated. Furthermore, we observed a reduction in the commitment of Lmna+/− cells into the myogenic lineage, but no discernible effects on cardiac, adipocyte or osteocyte lineages. In the next series of experiments, we derived embryonic stem cell clones expressing lamin A/C short hairpin RNA and examined their differentiation potential. These cells expressed pluripotency markers and, upon differentiation, the expression of lineage-specific markers was altered as observed with Lmna+/− embryonic stem cells. Conclusions We have observed significant effects on embryonic stem cell differentiation to visceral endoderm, neuronal and myogenic lineages upon

  2. O-Linked β-N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Regulates Emerin Binding to Barrier to Autointegration Factor (BAF) in a Chromatin- and Lamin B-enriched “Niche”*

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Jason M.; Maitra, Sushmit; Dawdy, Andrew W.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Wilson, Katherine L.

    2013-01-01

    Emerin, a membrane component of nuclear “lamina” networks with lamins and barrier to autointegration factor (BAF), is highly O-GlcNAc-modified (“O-GlcNAcylated”) in mammalian cells. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed eight sites of O-GlcNAcylation, including Ser-53, Ser-54, Ser-87, Ser-171, and Ser-173. Emerin O-GlcNAcylation was reduced ∼50% by S53A or S54A mutation in vitro and in vivo. O-GlcNAcylation was reduced ∼66% by the triple S52A/S53A/S54A mutant, and S173A reduced O-GlcNAcylation of the S52A/S53A/S54A mutant by ∼30%, in vivo. We separated two populations of emerin, A-type lamins and BAF; one population solubilized easily, and the other required sonication and included histones and B-type lamins. Emerin and BAF associated only in histone- and lamin-B-containing fractions. The S173D mutation specifically and selectively reduced GFP-emerin association with BAF by 58% and also increased GFP-emerin hyper-phosphorylation. We conclude that β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, an essential enzyme, controls two regions in emerin. The first region, defined by residues Ser-53 and Ser-54, flanks the LEM domain. O-GlcNAc modification at Ser-173, in the second region, is proposed to promote emerin association with BAF in the chromatin/lamin B “niche.” These results reveal direct control of a conserved LEM domain nuclear lamina component by β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, a nutrient sensor that regulates cell stress responses, mitosis, and epigenetics. PMID:24014020

  3. Dynamics of Lamin-A Processing Following Precursor Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Kim, Dae In; Syme, Janet; LuValle, Phyllis; Burke, Brian; Roux, Kyle J.

    2010-01-01

    Lamin A (LaA) is a component of the nuclear lamina, an intermediate filament meshwork that underlies the inner nuclear membrane (INM) of the nuclear envelope (NE). Newly synthesized prelamin A (PreA) undergoes extensive processing involving C-terminal farnesylation followed by proteolysis yielding non-farnesylated mature lamin A. Different inhibitors of these processing events are currently used therapeutically. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is most commonly caused by mutations leading to an accumulation of a farnesylated LaA isoform, prompting a clinical trial using farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) to reduce this modification. At therapeutic levels, HIV protease inhibitors (PI) can unexpectedly inhibit the final processing step in PreA maturation. We have examined the dynamics of LaA processing and associated cellular effects during PI or FTI treatment and following inhibitor washout. While PI reversibility was rapid, with respect to both LaA maturation and associated cellular phenotype, recovery from FTI treatment was more gradual. FTI reversibility is influenced by both cell type and rate of proliferation. These results suggest a less static lamin network than has previously been observed. PMID:20526372

  4. Lamination residual strains and stresses in hybrid laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the effects of hybridization on the magnitude of lamination residual stresses. Eight-ply graphite/Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite/S-glass/epoxy laminates were studied. The same matrix resin was selected for all basic materials to ensure compatibility and uniform curing of the various plies. The specimens, with inserted strain gages and thermocouples, were subjected to curing and postcuring cycles in an autoclave. Subsequently, the specimens were subjected to a thermal cycle from room temperature to 444 K and down to room temperature. It was found that hydridizing reduces apparently residual strains and stresses in the graphite plies. However, these strains were not affected much by the type and degree of hybridization.

  5. Lamin A expression in circulating osteoprogenitors as a potential biomarker for frailty: The Nepean Osteoporosis and Frailty (NOF) Study.

    PubMed

    Al Saedi, Ahmed; Gunawardene, Piumali; Bermeo, Sandra; Vogrin, Sara; Boersma, Derek; Phu, Steven; Singh, Lakshman; Suriyaarachchi, Pushpa; Duque, Gustavo

    2018-02-01

    Lamin A is a protein of the nuclear lamina. Low levels of lamin A expression are associated with osteosarcopenia in mice. In this study, we hypothesized that low lamin A expression is also associated with frailty in humans. We aimed to develop a non-invasive method to quantify lamin A expression in epithelial and circulating osteoprogenitor (COP) cells, and to determine the relationship between lamin A expression and frailty in older individuals. COP cells and buccal swabs were obtained from 66 subjects (median age 74; 60% female; 26 non-frail, 23 pre-frail, and 17 frail) participating at the Nepean Osteoporosis and Frailty (NOF) Study. We quantified physical performance and disability, and stratified frailty in this population. Lamin A expression in epithelial and COP cells was quantified by flow cytometry. Linear regression models estimated the relationship between lamin A expression in buccal and COP cells, and prevalent disability and frailty. Lamin A expression in buccal cells showed no association with either disability or frailty. Low lamin A expression values in COP cells were associated with frailty. Frail individuals showed 60% lower levels of lamin A compared to non-frail (95% CI -36 to -74%, p<0.001) and 62% lower levels compared to pre-frail (95%CI -40 to -76%, p<0.001). In summary, we have identified lamin A expression in COP cells as a strong indicator of frailty. Further work is needed to understand lamin A expression as a risk stratifier, biomarker, or therapeutic target in frail older persons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A computational procedure to analyze metal matrix laminates with nonlinear lamination residual strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    An approximate computational procedure is described for the analysis of angleplied laminates with residual nonlinear strains. The procedure consists of a combination of linear composite mechanics and incremental linear laminate theory. The procedure accounts for initial nonlinear strains, unloading, and in-situ matrix orthotropic nonlinear behavior. The results obtained in applying the procedure to boron/aluminum angleplied laminates show that this is a convenient means to accurately predict the initial tangent properties of angleplied laminates in which the matrix has been strained nonlinearly by the lamination residual stresses. The procedure predicted initial tangent properties results which were in good agreement with measured data obtained from boron/aluminum angleplied laminates.

  7. Lamin A/C Depletion Enhances DNA Damage-Induced Stalled Replication Fork Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mayank; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Raj K.; Kumar, Rakesh; Yang, Chin-Rang; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Bachoo, Robert; Serag, Sara; Story, Michael D.; Shay, Jerry W.; Powell, Simon N.; Gupta, Arun; Jeffery, Jessie; Pandita, Shruti; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Deckbar, Dorothee; Löbrich, Markus; Yang, Qin; Khanna, Kum Kum; Worman, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    The human LMNA gene encodes the essential nuclear envelope proteins lamin A and C (lamin A/C). Mutations in LMNA result in altered nuclear morphology, but how this impacts the mechanisms that maintain genomic stability is unclear. Here, we report that lamin A/C-deficient cells have a normal response to ionizing radiation but are sensitive to agents that cause interstrand cross-links (ICLs) or replication stress. In response to treatment with ICL agents (cisplatin, camptothecin, and mitomycin), lamin A/C-deficient cells displayed normal γ-H2AX focus formation but a higher frequency of cells with delayed γ-H2AX removal, decreased recruitment of the FANCD2 repair factor, and a higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. Similarly, following hydroxyurea-induced replication stress, lamin A/C-deficient cells had an increased frequency of cells with delayed disappearance of γ-H2AX foci and defective repair factor recruitment (Mre11, CtIP, Rad51, RPA, and FANCD2). Replicative stress also resulted in a higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations as well as defective replication restart. Taken together, the data can be interpreted to suggest that lamin A/C has a role in the restart of stalled replication forks, a prerequisite for initiation of DNA damage repair by the homologous recombination pathway, which is intact in lamin A/C-deficient cells. We propose that lamin A/C is required for maintaining genomic stability following replication fork stalling, induced by either ICL damage or replicative stress, in order to facilitate fork regression prior to DNA damage repair. PMID:23319047

  8. Glucocorticoids and laminitis in the horse.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip J; Slight, Simon H; Ganjam, Venkataseshu K; Kreeger, John M

    2002-08-01

    The administration of exogenously administered GCs and syndromes associated with GC excess are both attended by increased risk for the development of laminitis in adult horses. However, there exists substantial controversy as to whether excess GCs cause laminitis de novo. If true, the pathogenesis of laminitis arising from the effects of GC excess is probably different from that associated with diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and endotoxemia. Although a satisfactory explanation for the development of laminitis as a consequence of GC action is currently lacking, numerous possible and plausible theoretical mechanisms do exist. Veterinarians must exert caution with respect to the use of GCs in adult horses. The extent to which individual horses are predisposed to laminitis as a result of GC effect cannot be predicted based on current information. However, the administration of systemic GCs to horses that have been previously affected by laminitis should be used only with extreme caution, and should be accompanied by careful monitoring for further signs of laminitis. The risk of laminitis appears to be greater during treatment using some GCs (especially dexamethasone and triamcinalone) compared with others (prednisone and prednisolone). Whenever possible, to reduce the risk of laminitis, GCs should be administered locally. For example, the risk of GC-associated laminitis is evidently considerably reduced in horses affected with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) if GC treatment is administered via inhalation. We have hypothesized that structural changes in the equine hoof that resemble laminitis may arise as a consequence of excess GC effect. Although these changes are not painful per se, and are not associated with inflammation, they could likely predispose affected horses to the development of bona fide laminitis for other reasons. Moreover, the gross morphological appearance of the chronically GC-affected hoof resembles that of a chronically

  9. Geometrically nonlinear analysis of laminated elastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Laminated composite plates and shells that can be used to model automobile bodies, aircraft wings and fuselages, and pressure vessels among many other were analyzed. The finite element method, a numerical technique for engineering analysis of structures, is used to model the geometry and approximate the solution. Various alternative formulations for analyzing laminated plates and shells are developed and their finite element models are tested for accuracy and economy in computation. These include the shear deformation laminate theory and degenerated 3-D elasticity theory for laminates.

  10. Field performance of stress-laminated highway bridges constructed with glued laminated timber

    Treesearch

    J.P. Wacker

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes the field performance of three stress-laminated deck timber bridges located in Wisconsin, New York, and Arizona. The deck superstructures of these single-span highway bridges is comprised of full-span glued laminated timber (glulam) beam laminations manufactured with southern pine, hem fir/red maple combination, and/or Douglas fir lumber species....

  11. Functional association of Sun1 with nuclear pore complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Pante, Nelly; Misteli, Tom; Elsagga, Mohamed; Crisp, Melissa; Hodzic, Didier; Burke, Brian; Roux, Kyle J.

    2007-01-01

    Sun1 and 2 are A-type lamin-binding proteins that, in association with nesprins, form a link between the inner nuclear membranes (INMs) and outer nuclear membranes of mammalian nuclear envelopes. Both immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy reveal that Sun1 but not Sun2 is intimately associated with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Topological analyses indicate that Sun1 is a type II integral protein of the INM. Localization of Sun1 to the INM is defined by at least two discrete regions within its nucleoplasmic domain. However, association with NPCs is dependent on the synergy of both nucleoplasmic and lumenal domains. Cells that are either depleted of Sun1 by RNA interference or that overexpress dominant-negative Sun1 fragments exhibit clustering of NPCs. The implication is that Sun1 represents an important determinant of NPC distribution across the nuclear surface. PMID:17724119

  12. Ply cracking in composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Youngmyong.

    1989-01-01

    Ply cracking behavior and accompanying stiffness changes in thermoset as well as thermoplastic matrix composites under various loading conditions are investigated. Specific topics addressed are: analytical model development for property degradations due to ply cracking under general in-plane loading; crack initiation and multiplication under static loading; and crack multiplication under cyclic loading. A model was developed to calculate the energy released due to ply cracking in a composite laminate subjected to general in-plane loading. The method is based on the use of a second order polynomial to represent the crack opening displacement and the concept of a through-the-thickness inherent flaw.more » The model is then used in conjunction with linear elastic fracture mechanics to predict the progressive ply cracking as well as first ply cracking. A resistance curve for crack multiplication is proposed as a means of characterizing the resistance to ply cracking in composite laminates. A methodology of utilizing the resistance curve to assess the crack density or overloading is also discussed. The method was applied to the graphite/thermoplastic polyimide composite to predict progressive ply cracking. However, unlike the thermoset matrix composites, a strength model is found to fit the experimental results better than the fracture mechanics based model. A set of closed form equations is also developed to calculate the accompanying stiffness changes due to the ply cracking. The effect of thermal residual stress is included in the analysis. A new method is proposed to characterize transverse ply cracking of symmetric balanced laminates under cyclic loading. The method is based on the concept of a through-the-thickness inherent flaw, the Paris law, and the resistance curve. Only two constants are needed to predict the crack density as a function of fatigue cycles.« less

  13. NITRILE ELASTOMER-NYLON LAMINATES INCLUDING BARRIER FILMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ADHESIVES, *NYLON, *NITRILE RUBBER , LAMINATES, LAMINATES, FILMS, TEXTILES, RUBBER COATINGS, BUTADIENES, ACRYLONITRILE POLYMERS, BONDING, ADHESION... DEGRADATION , MOISTUREPROOFING, PHENOLIC PLASTICS, HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS, ISOCYANATES, CURING AGENTS, ELASTOMERS.

  14. Symmetries in laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The different types of symmetry exhibited by laminated anisotropic fibrous composite plates are identified and contrasted with the symmetries of isotropic and homogeneous orthotropic plates. The effects of variations in the fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of the layers on the symmetries exhibited by composite plates are discussed. Both the linear and geometrically nonlinear responses of the plates are considered. A simple procedure is presented for exploiting the symmetries in the finite element analysis. Examples are given of square, skew and polygonal plates where use of symmetry concepts can significantly reduce the scope and cost of analysis.

  15. The intriguing plant nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Ciska, Malgorzata; Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a complex protein mesh attached to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which is also associated with nuclear pore complexes. It provides mechanical support to the nucleus and nuclear envelope, and as well as facilitating the connection of the nucleoskeleton to the cytoskeleton, it is also involved in chromatin organization, gene regulation, and signaling. In metazoans, the nuclear lamina consists of a polymeric layer of lamins and other interacting proteins responsible for its association with the INM and chromatin. In plants, field emission scanning electron microscopy of nuclei, and thin section transmission electron microscopy of isolated nucleoskeletons, reveals the lamina to have a similar structure to that of metazoans. Moreover, although plants lack lamin genes and the genes encoding most lamin-binding proteins, the main functions of the lamina are fulfilled in plants. Hence, it would appear that the plant lamina is not based on lamins and that other proteins substitute for lamins in plant cells. The nuclear matrix constituent proteins are the best characterized structural proteins in the plant lamina. Although these proteins do not display strong sequence similarity to lamins, their predicted secondary structure and sub-nuclear distribution, as well as their influence on nuclear size and shape, and on heterochromatin organization, suggest they could be functional lamin analogs. In this review we shall summarize what is currently known about the organization and composition of the plant nuclear lamina and its interacting complexes, and we will discuss the activity of this structure in the plant cell and its nucleus.

  16. The laminA/NF-Y protein complex reveals an unknown transcriptional mechanism on cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mancone, Carmine; Regazzo, Giulia; Spagnuolo, Manuela; Alonzi, Tonino; Carlomosti, Fabrizio; Lucia, Maria Dell’Anna; Dell, Giulia 'Omo; Picardo, Mauro; Ciana, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Tripodi, Marco; Magenta, Alessandra; Giulia, Maria Rizzo; Gurtner, Aymone; Piaggio, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear matrix that also controls proliferation by largely unknown mechanisms. NF-Y is a ubiquitous protein involved in cell proliferation composed of three subunits (-YA -YB -YC) all required for the DNA binding and transactivation activity. To get clues on new NF-Y partner(s) we performed a mass spectrometry screening of proteins that co-precipitate with the regulatory subunit of the complex, NF-YA. By this screening we identified lamin A as a novel putative NF-Y interactor. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and confocal analysis confirmed the interaction between the two endogenous proteins. Interestingly, this association occurs on euchromatin regions, too. ChIP experiments demonstrate lamin A enrichment in several promoter regions of cell cycle related genes in a NF-Y dependent manner. Gain and loss of function experiments reveal that lamin A counteracts NF-Y transcriptional activity. Taking advantage of a recently generated transgenic reporter mouse, called MITO-Luc, in which an NF-Y–dependent promoter controls luciferase expression, we demonstrate that lamin A counteracts NF-Y transcriptional activity not only in culture cells but also in living animals. Altogether, our data demonstrate the occurrence of lamin A/NF-Y interaction and suggest a possible role of this protein complex in regulation of NF-Y function in cell proliferation. PMID:27793050

  17. Lamin-like analogues in plants: the characterization of NMCP1 in Allium cepa

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2013-01-01

    The nucleoskeleton of plants contains a peripheral lamina (also called plamina) and, even though lamins are absent in plants, their roles are still fulfilled in plant nuclei. One of the most intriguing topics in plant biology concerns the identity of lamin protein analogues in plants. Good candidates to play lamin functions in plants are the members of the NMCP (nuclear matrix constituent protein) family, which exhibit the typical tripartite structure of lamins. This paper describes a bioinformatics analysis and classification of the NMCP family based on phylogenetic relationships, sequence similarity and the distribution of conserved regions in 76 homologues. In addition, NMCP1 in the monocot Allium cepa characterized by its sequence and structure, biochemical properties, and subnuclear distribution and alterations in its expression throughout the root were identified. The results demonstrate that these proteins exhibit many similarities to lamins (structural organization, conserved regions, subnuclear distribution, and solubility) and that they may fulfil the functions of lamins in plants. These findings significantly advance understanding of the structural proteins of the plant lamina and nucleoskeleton and provide a basis for further investigation of the protein networks forming these structures. PMID:23378381

  18. Lamin-like analogues in plants: the characterization of NMCP1 in Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Ciska, Malgorzata; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2013-04-01

    The nucleoskeleton of plants contains a peripheral lamina (also called plamina) and, even though lamins are absent in plants, their roles are still fulfilled in plant nuclei. One of the most intriguing topics in plant biology concerns the identity of lamin protein analogues in plants. Good candidates to play lamin functions in plants are the members of the NMCP (nuclear matrix constituent protein) family, which exhibit the typical tripartite structure of lamins. This paper describes a bioinformatics analysis and classification of the NMCP family based on phylogenetic relationships, sequence similarity and the distribution of conserved regions in 76 homologues. In addition, NMCP1 in the monocot Allium cepa characterized by its sequence and structure, biochemical properties, and subnuclear distribution and alterations in its expression throughout the root were identified. The results demonstrate that these proteins exhibit many similarities to lamins (structural organization, conserved regions, subnuclear distribution, and solubility) and that they may fulfil the functions of lamins in plants. These findings significantly advance understanding of the structural proteins of the plant lamina and nucleoskeleton and provide a basis for further investigation of the protein networks forming these structures.

  19. Residual stresses in angleplied laminates and their effects on laminate behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    Evidence of the presence of lamination residual stresses in angleplied laminates were transply cracks and warpage of unsymmetric laminates which occur prior to application of any mechanical load. Lamination residual strains were measured using the embedded strain gage technique. These strains result from the temperature differences between cure and room temperature and vary linearly within this temperature range. Lamination residual stresses were usually present in angleplied fiber composites laminates; they were also present in unidirectional hybrids and superhybrids. For specific applications, the magnitudes of lamination residual stresses were determined and evaluated relative to the anticipated applied stresses. Particular attention was given to cyclic thermal loadings in applications where the thermal cycling takes place over a wide temperature range.

  20. The strength of Norwegian glued laminated beams

    Treesearch

    Kjell Solli; Erik Aasheim; Robert H. Falk

    1992-01-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization and the performance of glued laminated (glulam) timber beams manufactured from machine stress graded Norwegian spruce in comparison to developing CEN standards. Material property testing indicated that the supplied laminating timber can be represented by two CEN strength classes, C37-14E and C30-12E, with about 50% yield in...

  1. Ductilisation of tungsten (W): Tungsten laminated composites

    DOE PAGES

    Reiser, Jens; Garrison, Lauren M.; Greuner, Henri; ...

    2017-08-02

    Here we elucidate the mechanisms of plastic deformation and fracture of tungsten laminated composites. Furthermore our results suggest that the mechanical response of the laminates is governed by the plastic deformation of the tungsten plies. In most cases, the impact of the interlayer is of secondary importance.

  2. Evaluating the warping of laminated particleboard panels

    Treesearch

    Zhiyong Cai

    2004-01-01

    Laminated wood composites have been used widely in the secondary manufacturing processes in the wood panel industries. Warping, which is defined as the out-of-plane deformation of an initially flat panel, is a longstanding problem associated with the use of laminated wood composites. The mechanism of warping is still not fully understood. A new two- dimensional warping...

  3. Baculovirus infection induces disruption of the nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Kaiyan; Wei, Denghui; Wu, Wenbi; Yang, Kai; Yuan, Meijin

    2017-08-10

    Baculovirus nucleocapsids egress from the nucleus primarily via budding at the nuclear membrane. The nuclear lamina underlying the nuclear membrane represents a substantial barrier to nuclear egress. Whether the nuclear lamina undergoes disruption during baculovirus infection remains unknown. In this report, we generated a clonal cell line, Sf9-L, that stably expresses GFP-tagged Drosophila lamin B. GFP autofluorescence colocalized with immunofluorescent anti-lamin B at the nuclear rim of Sf9-L cells, indicating GFP-lamin B was incorporated into the nuclear lamina. Meanwhile, virus was able to replicate normally in Sf9-L cells. Next, we investigated alterations to the nuclear lamina during baculovirus infection in Sf9-L cells. A portion of GFP-lamin B localized diffusely at the nuclear rim, and some GFP-lamin B was redistributed within the nucleus during the late phase of infection, suggesting the nuclear lamina was partially disrupted. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed associations between GFP-lamin B and the edges of the electron-dense stromal mattes of the virogenic stroma, intranuclear microvesicles, and ODV envelopes and nucleocapsids within the nucleus, indicating the release of some GFP-lamin B from the nuclear lamina. Additionally, GFP-lamin B phosphorylation increased upon infection. Based on these data, baculovirus infection induced lamin B phosphorylation and disruption of the nuclear lamina.

  4. Novel origin of lamin-derived cytoplasmic intermediate filaments in tardigrades.

    PubMed

    Hering, Lars; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Reichelt, Julian; Magin, Thomas M; Mayer, Georg

    2016-02-03

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins, including nuclear lamins and cytoplasmic IF proteins, are essential cytoskeletal components of bilaterian cells. Despite their important role in protecting tissues against mechanical force, no cytoplasmic IF proteins have been convincingly identified in arthropods. Here we show that the ancestral cytoplasmic IF protein gene was lost in the entire panarthropod (onychophoran + tardigrade + arthropod) rather than arthropod lineage and that nuclear, lamin-derived proteins instead acquired new cytoplasmic roles at least three times independently in collembolans, copepods, and tardigrades. Transcriptomic and genomic data revealed three IF protein genes in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, one of which (cytotardin) occurs exclusively in the cytoplasm of epidermal and foregut epithelia, where it forms belt-like filaments around each epithelial cell. These results suggest that a lamin derivative has been co-opted to enhance tissue stability in tardigrades, a function otherwise served by cytoplasmic IF proteins in all other bilaterians.

  5. Wettability of graphene-laminated micropillar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bong, Jihye; Seo, Keumyoung; Ju, Sanghyun, E-mail: jrahn@skku.edu, E-mail: shju@kgu.ac.kr

    2014-12-21

    The wetting control of graphene is of great interest for electronic, mechanical, architectural, and bionic applications. In this study, the wettability of graphene-laminated micropillar structures was manipulated by changing the height of graphene-laminated structures and employing the trichlorosilane (HDF-S)-based self-assembly monolayer. Graphene-laminated micropillar structures with HDF-S exhibited higher hydrophobicity (contact angle of 129.5°) than pristine graphene thin film (78.8°), pristine graphene-laminated micropillar structures (97.5°), and HDF-S self-assembled graphene thin film (98.5°). Wetting states of the graphene-laminated micropillar structure with HDF-S was also examined by using a urea solution, which flowed across the surface without leaving any residues.

  6. Stationary turbine component with laminated skin

    DOEpatents

    James, Allister W [Orlando, FL

    2012-08-14

    A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

  7. Structure-function relationship of biological gels revealed by multiple-particle tracking and differential interference contrast microscopy: The case of human lamin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panorchan, Porntula; Wirtz, Denis; Tseng, Yiider

    2004-10-01

    Lamin B1 filaments organize into a thin dense meshwork underlying the nucleoplasmic side of the nuclear envelope. Recent experiments in vivo suggest that lamin B1 plays a key structural role in the nuclear envelope, but the intrinsic mechanical properties of lamin B1 networks remain unknown. To assess the potential mechanical contribution of lamin B1 in maintaining the integrity and providing structural support to the nucleus, we measured the micromechanical properties and examined the ultrastructural distribution of lamin B1 networks in vitro using particle tracking methods and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. We exploit various surface chemistries of the probe microspheres (carboxylated, polyethylene glycol-coated, and amine-modified) to differentiate lamin-rich from lamin-poor regions and to rigorously extract local viscoelastic moduli from the mean-squared displacements of noninteracting particles. Our results show that human lamin B1 can, even in the absence of auxiliary proteins, form stiff and yet extremely porous networks that are well suited to provide structural strength to the nuclear lamina. Combining DIC microscopy and particle tracking allows us to relate directly the local organization of a material to its local mechanical properties, a general methodology that can be extended to living cells.

  8. Laminitis and the equine metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip J; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; LaCarrubba, Alison; Ganjam, V K Seshu; Messer, Nat T

    2010-08-01

    Although much has been written about laminitis in the context of its association with inflammatory processes, recognition is growing that most cases of laminitis examined by veterinarians in private practice are those associated with pasture grazing, obesity, and insulin resistance (IR). The term 'endocrinopathic laminitis' has been adopted to classify the instances of laminitis in which the origin seems to be more strongly associated with an underlying endocrinopathy, such as either IR or the influence of corticosteroids. Results of a recent study suggest that obesity and IR represent the most common metabolic and endocrinopathic predispositions for laminitis in horses. IR also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of laminitis that develops when some horses or ponies are allowed to graze pastures at certain times of the year. The term equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) has been proposed as a label for horses whose clinical examination results (including both physical examination and laboratory testing) suggest heightened risk for developing laminitis as a result of underlying IR. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural feasibility of parallel-laminated veneer crossarms

    Treesearch

    John Youngquist; Frank Brey; Joseph Jung

    1977-01-01

    Experimentally and commercially produced laminated M-19 crossarms were tested by standard Rural Electrification Administration (REA) crossarm tests. The laminated crossarms, produced by laminating veneer and by laminating solid-sawn dimension stock, generally performed satisfactorily according to REA specified standards. Materials tested are described and results on...

  10. Indentation law for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S. H.

    1981-01-01

    Static indentation tests are described for glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy composite laminates with steel balls as the indentor. Beam specimens clamped at various spans were used for the tests. Loading, unloading, and reloading data were obtained and fitted into power laws. Results show that: (1) contact behavior is not appreciably affected by the span; (2) loading and reloading curves seem to follow the 1.5 power law; and (3) unloading curves are described quite well by a 2.5 power law. In addition, values were determined for the critical indentation, alpha sub cr which can be used to predict permanent indentations in unloading. Since alpha sub cr only depends on composite material properties, only the loading and an unloading curve are needed to establish the complete loading-unloading-reloading behavior.

  11. Method of laminating structural members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A laminate is obtained by providing a lightweight core material, such as a honeycombed plastic or metal, within the cavity defined by an annular mold cavity frame. Face sheets, which are to be bonded to the core material, are provided on opposite sides of the frame and extend over the frame, thus sealing the core material in the cavity. An adhesive is provided between the core material and the face sheets and the combined thickness of the core material and adhesive is a close fit within the opposed face sheets. A gas tight seal, such as an O-ring gasket, is provided between the frame and the face sheet members to form a gas tight cavity between the face sheet members and the frame. External heat and pressure are used to bond the face sheets to the core material. Gas pressure is introduced into the sealed cavity to minimize out-gasing of the adhesive.

  12. Flat laminated microbial mat communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, John F.

    2009-10-01

    Flat laminated microbial mats are complex microbial ecosystems that inhabit a wide range of environments (e.g., caves, iron springs, thermal springs and pools, salt marshes, hypersaline ponds and lagoons, methane and petroleum seeps, sea mounts, deep sea vents, arctic dry valleys). Their community structure is defined by physical (e.g., light quantity and quality, temperature, density and pressure) and chemical (e.g., oxygen, oxidation/reduction potential, salinity, pH, available electron acceptors and donors, chemical species) parameters as well as species interactions. The main primary producers may be photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria, purple phototrophs, green phototrophs) or chemolithoautophs (e.g., colorless sulfur oxidizing bacteria). Anaerobic phototrophy may predominate in organic rich environments that support high rates of respiration. These communities are dynamic systems exhibiting both spatial and temporal heterogeneity. They are characterized by steep gradients with microenvironments on the submillimeter scale. Diel oscillations in the physical-chemical profile (e.g., oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, pH) and species distribution are typical for phototroph-dominated communities. Flat laminated microbial mats are often sites of robust biogeochemical cycling. In addition to well-established modes of metabolism for phototrophy (oxygenic and non-oxygenic), respiration (both aerobic and anaerobic), and fermentation, novel energetic pathways have been discovered (e.g., nitrate reduction couple to the oxidation of ammonia, sulfur, or arsenite). The application of culture-independent techniques (e.g., 16S rRNA clonal libraries, metagenomics), continue to expand our understanding of species composition and metabolic functions of these complex ecosystems.

  13. NOLIN: A nonlinear laminate analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibler, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    A nonlinear, plane-stress, laminate analysis program, NOLIN, was developed which accounts for laminae nonlinearity under inplane shear and transverse extensional stress. The program determines the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of symmetric laminates subjected to any combination of inplane shear and biaxial extensional loadings. The program has the ability to treat different stress-strain behavior in tension and compression, and predicts laminate failure using any or all of maximum stress, maximum strain, and quadratic interaction failure criteria. A brief description of the program is presented including discussion of the flow of information and details of the input required. Sample problems and a complete listing of the program is also provided.

  14. Behaviour of Mechanically Laminated CLT Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklík, P.; Velebil, L.

    2015-11-01

    Cross laminated timber (CLT) is one of the structural building systems based on the lamination of multiple layers, where each layer is oriented perpendicularly to each other. Recent requirements are placed to develop an alternative process based on the mechanical lamination of the layers, which is of particular interest to our research group at the University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings. The goal is to develop and verify the behaviour of mechanically laminated CLT wall panels exposed to shear stresses in the plane. The shear resistance of mechanically jointed CLT is ensured by connecting the layers by screws. The paper deals with the experimental analysis focused on the determination of the torsional stiffness and the slip modulus of crossing areas for different numbers of orthogonally connected layers. The results of the experiments were compared with the current analytical model.

  15. Method for fabricating laminated uranium composites

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, L.R.

    1983-08-03

    The present invention is directed to a process for fabricating laminated composites of uranium or uranium alloys and at least one other metal or alloy. The laminated composites are fabricated by forming a casting of the molten uranium with the other metal or alloy which is selectively positioned in the casting and then hot-rolling the casting into a laminated plate in or around which the casting components are metallurgically bonded to one another to form the composite. The process of the present invention provides strong metallurgical bonds between the laminate components primarily since the bond disrupting surface oxides on the uranium or uranium alloy float to the surface of the casting to effectively remove the oxides from the bonding surfaces of the components.

  16. Free edge effects in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    The fundamental mechanics of free-edge effects in laminated fiber-reinforced composites is examined, reviewing the results of recent experimental and analytical investigations. The derivation of the governing equations for the basic problem is outlined, including the equilibrium and mismatch conditions and the elasticity formulation, and experimental data on axial displacement and shear strain in angle-ply laminates are summarized. Numerical predictions of free-edge deformation and interlaminar and through-thickness stress distributions are presented for cross-ply, angle-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates, and the mechanisms of edge damage and failure in angle-ply laminates are briefly characterized. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  17. Fracture and crack growth in orthotropic laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, James G.; Kaw, Autar K.

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical model based on the classical shear-lag assumptions is used to study the residual strength and fracture behavior of composite laminates with symmetrically placed buffer strips. The laminate is loaded by a uniform remote longitudinal tensile strain and has initial damage in the form of a transverse crack in the parent laminate between buffer strips. The crack growth behavior as a function of material properties, number of buffer-strip plies, spacing, width of buffer strips, longitudinal matrix splitting, and debonding at the interface is studied. Buffer-strip laminates are shown to arrest fracture and increase the residual strengths significantly over those of one material laminates, with S-glass being a more effective buffer strip material than Kevlar in increasing the damage tolerance of graphite/epoxy panels. For a typical graphite/epoxy laminate with S-glass buffer-strips, the residual strength is about 2.4 times the residual strength of an all graphite/epoxy panel with the same crack length. Approximately 50% of this increase is due to the S-glass/epoxy buffer-strips, 40% due to longitudinal splitting of the buffer strip interface and 10% due to bonding.

  18. Argonaute2 and LaminB modulate gene expression by controlling chromatin topology

    PubMed Central

    Nazer, Ezequiel; Dale, Ryan K.; Chinen, Madoka; Radmanesh, Behram

    2018-01-01

    Drosophila Argonaute2 (AGO2) has been shown to regulate expression of certain loci in an RNA interference (RNAi)-independent manner, but its genome-wide function on chromatin remains unknown. Here, we identified the nuclear scaffolding protein LaminB as a novel interactor of AGO2. When either AGO2 or LaminB are depleted in Kc cells, similar transcription changes are observed genome-wide. In particular, changes in expression occur mainly in active or potentially active chromatin, both inside and outside LaminB-associated domains (LADs). Furthermore, we identified a somatic target of AGO2 transcriptional repression, no hitter (nht), which is immersed in a LAD located within a repressive topologically-associated domain (TAD). Null mutation but not catalytic inactivation of AGO2 leads to ectopic expression of nht and downstream spermatogenesis genes. Depletion of either AGO2 or LaminB results in reduced looping interactions within the nht TAD as well as ectopic inter-TAD interactions, as detected by 4C-seq analysis. Overall, our findings reveal coordination of AGO2 and LaminB function to dictate genome architecture and thereby regulate gene expression. PMID:29529026

  19. Decreased Bone Formation and Osteopenia in Lamin A/C-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Christopher; McCorquodale, Thomas; Herrmann, Markus; Fatkin, Diane; Duque, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Age-related bone loss is associated with changes in bone cellularity with characteristically low levels of osteoblastogenesis. The mechanisms that explain these changes remain unclear. Although recent in vitro evidence has suggested a new role for proteins of the nuclear envelope in osteoblastogenesis, the role of these proteins in bone cells differentiation and bone metabolism in vivo remains unknown. In this study, we used the lamin A/C null (Lmna −/−) mice to identify the role of lamin A/C in bone turnover and bone structure in vivo. At three weeks of age, histological and micro computed tomography measurements of femurs in Lmna −/− mice revealed a significant decrease in bone mass and microarchitecture in Lmna −/− mice as compared with their wild type littermates. Furthermore, quantification of cell numbers after normalization with bone surface revealed a significant reduction in osteoblast and osteocyte numbers in Lmna −/− mice compared with their WT littermates. In addition, Lmna −/− mice have significantly lower osteoclast number, which show aberrant changes in their shape and size. Finally, mechanistic analysis demonstrated that absence of lamin A/C is associated with increase expression of MAN-1 a protein of the nuclear envelope closely regulated by lamin A/C, which also colocalizes with Runx2 thus affecting its capacity as osteogenic transcription factor. In summary, these data clearly indicate that the presence of lamin A/C is necessary for normal bone turnover in vivo and that absence of lamin A/C induces low bone turnover osteopenia resembling the cellular changes of age-related bone loss. PMID:21547077

  20. Effect of laminate edge conditions on the formation of microvoids in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. P.; Altan, M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Manufacturing defects such as microvoids are common in thermoset composite components and are known to negatively affect their strength. The resin pressure developed in and the resin flow out from the laminates during cure have been reported to be the primary factors influencing the final void content of a composite component. In this work, the effect of laminate edge conditions during the cure process on the formation of microvoids was experimentally investigated. This was achieved by fabricating eight-ply laminates from TenCate® BT250/7781 prepreg in a hot-press at a constant cure pressure of 170 kPa while limiting the laminate perimeter available for resin flow by 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%. The individual plies of these five laminates were conditioned at 99% relative humidity before curing to maximize the moisture present in the lay-up before fabrication. The presence of moisture in the lay-ups was expected to promote void formation and allow the effect of restricting flow at the edges of a laminate to be better identified. The restriction of resin outflow was found to cause the average characteristic void diameter to decrease by 17% and void content to rise by 33%. This phenomenon was identified to be a result of the outflow restriction increasing the number of voids trapped within the laminate and indicates that for laminates cured at low pressures resin outflow is the dominant mechanism for void reduction.

  1. 78 FR 13083 - Products Having Laminated Packaging, Laminated Packaging, and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Docket No. 2940] Products Having Laminated Packaging, Laminated... Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Products Having...

  2. Role of Nuclear Lamina in Gene Repression and Maintenance of Chromosome Architecture in the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Shevelyov, Y Y; Ulianov, S V

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear lamina is a protein meshwork composed of lamins and lamin-associated proteins that lines the nuclear envelope from the inside and forms repressive transcription compartment. The review presents current data on the contribution of nuclear lamina to the repression of genes located in this compartment and on the mechanisms of chromatin attachment to the nuclear envelope.

  3. Fracture behavior of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The tensile fracture behavior of 15 center-notched hybrid laminates was studied. Three basic laminate groups were tested: (1) a baseline group with graphite/epoxy plies, (2) a group with the same stacking sequence but where the zero-deg plies were one or two plies of S-glass or Kevlar, and (3) a group with graphite plies but where the zero-deg plies were sandwiched between layers of perforated Mylar. Specimens were loaded linearly with time; load, far field strain, and crack opening displacement (COD) were monitored. The loading was stopped periodically and the notched region was radiographed to reveal the extent and type of damage (failure progression). Results of the tests showed that the hybrid laminates had higher fracture toughnesses than comparable all-graphite laminates. The higher fracture toughness was due primarily to the larger damage region at the ends of the slit; delamination and splitting lowered the stress concentration in the primary load-carrying plies. A linear elastic fracture analysis, which ignored delamination and splitting, underestimated the fracture toughness. For almost all of the laminates, the tests showed that the fracture toughness increased with crack length. The size of the damage region at the ends of the slit and COD measurements also increased with crack length.

  4. Lamination residual stresses in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the magnitude of lamination residual stresses in angle-ply composites and to evaluate their effects on composite structural integrity. The materials investigated were boron/epoxy, boron/polyimide, graphite/low modulus epoxy, graphite/high modulus epoxy, graphite/polyimide and s-glass/epoxy. These materials were fully characterized. Static properties of laminates were also determined. Experimental techniques using embedded strain gages were developed and used to measure residual strains during curing. The extent of relaxation of lamination residual stresses was investigated. It was concluded that the degree of such relaxation is low. The behavior of angle-ply laminates subjected to thermal cycling, tensile load cycling, and combined thermal cycling with tensile load was investigated. In most cases these cycling programs did not have any measurable influence on residual strength and stiffness of the laminates. In the tensile load cycling tests, the graphite/polyimide shows the highest endurance with 10 million cycle runouts at loads up to 90 percent of the static strength.

  5. Evaluation of Behaviours of Laminated Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, L.; Japins, G.; Kalnins, K.

    2015-11-01

    Visual appearance of building facades and other load bearing structures, which now are part of modern architecture, is the reason why it is important to investigate in more detail the reliability of laminated glass for civil structures. Laminated glass in particular has become one of the trendy materials, for example Apple© stores have both load carrying capacity and transparent appearance. Glass has high mechanical strength and relatively medium density, however, the risk of sudden brittle failure like concrete or other ceramics determine relatively high conservatism in design practice of glass structures. This should be changed as consumer requirements evolve calling for a safe and reliable design methodology and corresponding building standards. A design methodology for glass and glass laminates should be urgently developed and included as a chapter in Eurocode. This paper presents initial experimental investigation of behaviour of simple glass sheets and laminated glass samples in 4-point bending test. The aim of the current research is to investigate laminated glass characteristic values and to verify the obtained experimental results with finite element method for glass and EVA material in line with future European Structural Design of Glass Components code.

  6. Mechanical Behavior of Fabric-Film Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Said, Magdi S.

    1999-01-01

    Inflatable structures are gaining wide support in planetary scientific missions as well as commercial applications. For such applications a new class of materials made of laminating thin homogenous films to lightweight fabrics are being considered us structura1 gas envelops. The emerging composite materials are a result of recent advances in the manufacturing cf 1ightweight, high strength fibers, fabrics and scrims. The lamination of these load-carrying members with the proper gas barrier film results in wide range of materials suitable for various loading and environmental conditions. Polyester - based woven fabrics laminated to thin homogeneus film of polyester (Maylar) is an example of this class. This fabric/ film laminate is being considered for the development a material suitable for building large gas envelopes for use in the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon Program (ULDB). Compared to commercial homogeneus films, the material provides relatively high strength to weight ratio as well as better resistance to crack and tear propagation. The purpose of this papers is to introduce the mechanical behavior of this class of multi-layers composite and to highlight some of the concerns observed during the characterization of these laminate composites.

  7. Nonlinear effects on composite laminate thermal expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashin, Z.; Rosen, B. W.; Pipes, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    Analyses of Graphite/Polyimide laminates shown that the thermomechanical strains cannot be separated into mechanical strain and free thermal expansion strain. Elastic properties and thermal expansion coefficients of unidirectional Graphite/Polyimide specimens were measured as a function of temperature to provide inputs for the analysis. The + or - 45 degrees symmetric Graphite/Polyimide laminates were tested to obtain free thermal expansion coefficients and thermal expansion coefficients under various uniaxial loads. The experimental results demonstrated the effects predicted by the analysis, namely dependence of thermal expansion coefficients on load, and anisotropy of thermal expansion under load. The significance of time dependence on thermal expansion was demonstrated by comparison of measured laminate free expansion coefficients with and without 15 day delay at intermediate temperature.

  8. Preliminary evaluation of hybrid titanium composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. L.; Progar, D. J.; Johnson, W. S.; St.clair, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the mechanical response of hybrid titanium composite laminates (HTCL) was evaluated at room and elevated temperatures. Also, the use of an elastic-plastic laminate analysis program for predicting the tensile response from constituent properties was verified. The improvement in mechanical properties achieved by the laminates was assessed by comparing the results of static strength and constant amplitude fatigue tests to those for monolithic titanium sheet. Two HTCL were fabricated with different fiber volume fractions, resin layer thicknesses, and resins. One panel was thicker and was more poorly bonded in comparison to other. Consequently, the former had a lower tensile strength, while fewer cracks grew in this panel and at a slower rate. Both panels showed an improvement in fatigue life of almost two orders of magnitude. The model predictions were also in good agreement with the experimental results for both HTCL panels.

  9. Plated lamination structures for integrated magnetic devices

    DOEpatents

    Webb, Bucknell C.

    2014-06-17

    Semiconductor integrated magnetic devices such as inductors, transformers, etc., having laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are provided, wherein the laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are formed using electroplating techniques. For example, an integrated laminated magnetic device includes a multilayer stack structure having alternating magnetic and insulating layers formed on a substrate, wherein each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by an insulating layer, and a local shorting structure to electrically connect each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to an underlying magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to facilitate electroplating of the magnetic layers using an underlying conductive layer (magnetic or seed layer) in the stack as an electrical cathode/anode for each electroplated magnetic layer in the stack structure.

  10. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  11. Stochastic damage evolution in textile laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzenis, Yuris A.; Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Pastore, Christopher M.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic model utilizing random material characteristics to predict damage evolution in textile laminates is presented. Model is based on a division of each ply into two sublaminas consisting of cells. The probability of cell failure is calculated using stochastic function theory and maximal strain failure criterion. Three modes of failure, i.e. fiber breakage, matrix failure in transverse direction, as well as matrix or interface shear cracking, are taken into account. Computed failure probabilities are utilized in reducing cell stiffness based on the mesovolume concept. A numerical algorithm is developed predicting the damage evolution and deformation history of textile laminates. Effect of scatter of fiber orientation on cell properties is discussed. Weave influence on damage accumulation is illustrated with the help of an example of a Kevlar/epoxy laminate.

  12. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of silicon modified resins for graphite fiber laminates which will prevent the dispersal of graphite fibers when the composites are burned is discussed. Eighty-five silicone modified resins were synthesized and evaluated including unsaturated polyesters, thermosetting methacrylates, epoxies, polyimides, and phenolics. Neat resins were judged in terms of Si content, homogeneity, hardness, Char formation, and thermal stability. Char formation was estimated by thermogravimetry to 1,000 C in air and in N2. Thermal stability was evaluated by isothermal weight loss measurements for 200 hrs in air at three temperatures. Four silicone modified epoxies were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 25 to 50%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 140 kpsi and a modulus of 10 Mpsi. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 5.3 kpsi.

  13. Structural reliability analysis of laminated CMC components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Palko, Joseph L.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    For laminated ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials to realize their full potential in aerospace applications, design methods and protocols are a necessity. The time independent failure response of these materials is focussed on and a reliability analysis is presented associated with the initiation of matrix cracking. A public domain computer algorithm is highlighted that was coupled with the laminate analysis of a finite element code and which serves as a design aid to analyze structural components made from laminated CMC materials. Issues relevant to the effect of the size of the component are discussed, and a parameter estimation procedure is presented. The estimation procedure allows three parameters to be calculated from a failure population that has an underlying Weibull distribution.

  14. Hybrid Laminates for Application in North Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, V. V.; Oreshko, E. I.; Erasov, V. S.; Serebrennikova, N. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    A hybrid aluminum-lithium alloy/SIAL laminate as a possible material for application in structures operated in North conditions is considered. The finite-element method is used for a buckling stability analysis of hybrid panels, bars, and plates. A technique allowing one to compare the buckling stability of multilayered hybrid plates is offered. Compression tests were run on a hybrid laminate wing panel as a prototype of the top panel of TU-204SM airplane made from a high-strength B95T2 aluminum alloy. It turned out that the lighter composite panel had a higher load-carrying capacity than the aluminum one. Results of investigation into the properties the hybrid aluminum-lithium alloy/SIAL laminate and an analysis of scientific-technical data on this subject showed that this composite material could be used in the elements of airframes, including those operated in north conditions.

  15. On thermal edge effects in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for a finite-element investigation of the combined influence of edge effects due to mechanical and thermal mismatch in composite laminates with free edges. Laminates of unidirectional boron/epoxy symmetrically bonded to sheets of aluminum and titanium were studied. It is shown that interlaminar thermal stresses may be more significant than the interlaminar stresses due to loading only. In addition, the stresses due to thermal mismatch may be of the same sign as those due to Poisson's mismatch or they may be of opposite sign depending upon material properties, stacking sequence, and direction of loading. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of thermal stresses in all-composite laminates.

  16. Adhesives for laminating polyimide insulated flat conductor cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montermoso, J. C.; Saxton, T. R.; Taylor, R. L.

    1967-01-01

    Polymer adhesive laminates polyimide-film flat conductor cable. It is obtained by reacting an appropriate diamine with a dianhydride. The adhesive has also been used in the lamination of copper to copper for the preparation of multilayer circuit boards.

  17. Small Laminated Axial Turbine Design and Test Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    ILLUSTRATIONS Figure No. Title Page 1 Typical Test Results from TFE731 -3 Hot-Rig Testing. 5 2 Laminated Blade Chordwise Flow Patterns 8 3 Laminated Blade Cooling...Flow Parameter Versus Pressure Ratio 36 24 Blade Flow Distribution 37 25 TFE731 Turbofan Engine 38 26 Laminated Turbine Wheel 40 27 Selected Blade...facility, which was specifically developed to permit evaluation of cooled compo- nents for gas turbine engines. Four TFE731 -3 Laminated Turbine Wheels

  18. Sudden bending of a cracked laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Chen, E. P.

    1981-01-01

    The intensification of stresses near a through crack in the laminate that suddenly undergoes bending is investigated. A dynamic plate theory is developed which includes the effects of material inhomogeneity in the thickness direction and realistic crack edge stress singularity and distribution. Numerical examples indicate that (1) the crack moment intensity tends to decrease as the crack length to laminate thickness is increased, and (2) the average load intensity transmitted to a through crack can be reduced by making the inner layers to be stiffer than the outer layers.

  19. Ultrasonic transducer with laminated coupling wedge

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1976-08-03

    An ultrasonic transducer capable of use in a high-temperature environment incorporates a laminated metal coupling wedge including a reflecting edge shaped as a double sloping roof and a transducer crystal backed by a laminated metal sound absorber disposed so as to direct sound waves through the coupling wedge and into a work piece, reflections from the interface between the coupling wedge and the work piece passing to the reflecting edge. Preferably the angle of inclination of the two halves of the reflecting edge are different.

  20. Static Properties of Fibre Metal Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenbeek, M.; van Hengel, C.; Bosker, O. J.; Vermeeren, C. A. J. R.

    2003-07-01

    In this article a brief overview of the static properties of Fibre Metal Laminates is given. Starting with the stress-strain relation, an effective calculation tool for uniaxial stress-strain curves is given. The method is valid for all Glare types. The Norris failure model is described in combination with a Metal Volume Fraction approach leading to a useful tool to predict allowable blunt notch strength. The Volume Fraction approach is also useful in the case of the shear yield strength of Fibre Metal Laminates. With the use of the Iosipescu test shear yield properties are measured.

  1. A study of delamination buckling of laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, Yu-Xie; Xie, Zhi-Cheng; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1990-01-01

    The subject of this paper is the buckling of laminated plates, with a preexisting delamination, subjected to in-plane loading. Each laminate is modelled as an orthotropic Mindlin plate. The analysis is carried out by a combination of the finite element and asymptotic expansion methods. By applying the finite element method, plates with general delamination regions can be studied. The asymptotic expansion method reduces the number of unknown variables of the eigenvalue equation to that of the equation for a single Kirchhoff plate. Numerical results are presented for several examples. The effects of the shape, size, and position of the delamination on the buckling load are studied through these examples.

  2. Multi-layer laminate structure and manufacturing method

    SciTech Connect

    Keenihan, James R; Cleereman, Robert J; Eurich, Gerald

    2012-04-24

    The present invention is premised upon a multi-layer laminate structure and method of manufacture, more particularly to a method of constructing the multi-layer laminate structure utilizing a laminate frame and at least one energy activated flowable polymer.

  3. Multi-layer laminate structure and manufacturing method

    SciTech Connect

    Keenihan, James R.; Cleereman, Robert J.; Eurich, Gerald

    2013-01-29

    The present invention is premised upon a multi-layer laminate structure and method of manufacture, more particularly to a method of constructing the multi-layer laminate structure utilizing a laminate frame and at least one energy activated flowable polymer.

  4. Buckling and weight optimization for non-coupled antisymmetric laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Aditi

    This research work describes the application of genetic algorithms to weight minimization and buckling load maximization of the non-coupled antisymmetric composite laminated plates. Previous studies of composite tailoring were limited to symmetric and balanced laminates. With the availability of many methodologies for composite tailoring, genetic algorithm is preferably used because of its ability to handle discrete design variable and attain multiple near optimum design solutions. A comparative study is made between optimum symmetric-balanced laminate designs and optimum non-coupled antisymmetric laminate designs, both of which are subjected to biaxial in-plane compressive loads. With the implementation of various genetic algorithm operators such as selection, crossover and mutation, critical buckling load factors are obtained for the optimum stacking sequence for both types of laminates. The mechanical properties for non-coupled antisymmetric laminates is independent of all types of coupling effects such as bending-twisting coupling, bending-extension coupling, and shear-extension coupling, thus giving the laminate a non-coupling behavior. This is in contrast to that of symmetric-balanced laminates where finite bending-twisting coupling terms are present. Optimized laminate layups satisfying the constraints of balance, buckling and adjoining were obtained for two types of graphite epoxy rectangular composite laminated plates. The current research augments the laminate thickness minimization designs with both odd and even number of layers, and the optimum buckling load maximization designs by the introduction of non-coupled antisymmetric laminates.

  5. Impact performance of two bamboo-based laminated composites

    Treesearch

    Huanrong Liu; Zehui Jiang; Zhengjun Sun; Yan Yan; Zhiyong Cai; Xiubiao Zhang

    2017-01-01

    The present work aims to determine the impact performance of two bamboo-based laminated composites [bamboo/poplar laminated composite (BPLC) and bamboo/ glass fiber laminated composite (BGFLC)] using lowvelocity impact tests by a drop tower. In addition, fracture characteristics were evaluated using computed tomography (CT). Results showed that BPLC presented better...

  6. An EDMD mutation in C. elegans lamin blocks muscle-specific gene relocation and compromises muscle integrity.

    PubMed

    Mattout, Anna; Pike, Brietta L; Towbin, Benjamin D; Bank, Erin M; Gonzalez-Sandoval, Adriana; Stadler, Michael B; Meister, Peter; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Gasser, Susan M

    2011-10-11

    In worms, as in other organisms, many tissue-specific promoters are sequestered at the nuclear periphery when repressed and shift inward when activated. It has remained unresolved, however, whether the association of facultative heterochromatin with the nuclear periphery, or its release, has functional relevance for cell or tissue integrity. Using ablation of the unique lamin gene in C. elegans, we show that lamin is necessary for the perinuclear positioning of heterochromatin. We then express at low levels in otherwise wild-type worms a lamin carrying a point mutation, Y59C, which in humans is linked to an autosomal-dominant form of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Using embryos and differentiated tissues, we track the subnuclear position of integrated heterochromatic arrays and their expression. In LMN-1 Y59C-expressing worms, we see abnormal retention at the nuclear envelope of a gene array bearing a muscle-specific promoter. This correlates with impaired activation of the array-borne myo-3 promoter and altered expression of a number of muscle-specific genes. However, an equivalent array carrying the intestine-specific pha-4 promoter is expressed normally and shifts inward when activated in gut cells of LMN-1 Y59C worms. Remarkably, adult LMN-1 Y59C animals have selectively perturbed body muscle ultrastructure and reduced muscle function. Lamin helps sequester heterochromatin at the nuclear envelope, and wild-type lamin permits promoter release following tissue-specific activation. A disease-linked point mutation in lamin impairs muscle-specific reorganization of a heterochromatic array during tissue-specific promoter activation in a dominant manner. This dominance and the correlated muscle dysfunction in LMN-1 Y59C worms phenocopies Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simulating Progressive Damage of Notched Composite Laminates with Various Lamination Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, B.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2017-05-01

    A three dimensional finite element based progressive damage model has been developed for the failure analysis of notched composite laminates. The material constitutive relations and the progressive damage algorithms are implemented into finite element code ABAQUS using user-defined subroutine UMAT. The existing failure criteria for the composite laminates are modified by including the failure criteria for fiber/matrix shear damage and delamination effects. The proposed numerical model is quite efficient and simple compared to other progressive damage models available in the literature. The efficiency of the present constitutive model and the computational scheme is verified by comparing the simulated results with the results available in the literature. A parametric study has been carried out to investigate the effect of change in lamination scheme on the failure behaviour of notched composite laminates.

  8. Flexural properties of glued-laminated Southern pine beams with laminations positioned by visual-stiffness criteria

    Treesearch

    R. C. Moody; Billy Bohannan

    1970-01-01

    To establish the effect of using modulus elasticity in addition to visual grade as criteria for the positioning of laminations in laminated beams, an experimental study on southern pine members was conducted. The beams were manufactured in accordance with current specifications for glued-laminated southern pine timber, except that (a) minimum-quality tension...

  9. Analysis of laminated plates under thermal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Iyenger, N.G.R.; Shankara, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Use of composites in advanced aircrafts and spacecraft structures calls for a thorough understanding of their behaviour under various types of loads. In the present paper, an attempt has been made to study the effect of thermal loads on the flexural response of composite laminated plates. Most of the studies in this area are either based on Classical Lamination Theory or First Order Shear Deformation Theory. In the present investigation, analysis has been carried out using a Higher Order Shear Deformation Theory, that allows for a parabolic variation of transverse shear stress through the thickness. The displacement model presented bymore » Reddy has been transformed so that only C{degrees} continuous element is required. This, however, increases the Degree of freedom per node from 5 to 7. Nine-noded isoparametric Legrangian elements are used for computing the results. The results were found to be very stable and comparable with those of exact elasticity solutions. The temperature is assumed to remain constant or vary linearly through the thickness. However, it varies sinusoidally in the plane of the plate. Effect of various parameters like material, fiber orientation, number of layers and boundary conditions on the response of the laminate has been investigated. The present study indicates that the flexural behaviour of laminates under thermal loads is very much different from that when subjected only to mechanical loads. Further, the variation of plate deflection with increase in temperature is not linear.« less

  10. Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors

    DOEpatents

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2010-03-23

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  11. Laminated root rot in western North America.

    Treesearch

    Walter G. Thies; Rona N. Sturrock

    1995-01-01

    Laminated root rot, caused by Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gilb., is a serious root disease affecting Douglas-fir and other commercially important species of conifers in northwestern North America. This report gives an overview of the dis-ease as it occurs in the Pacific Northwest in Canada and the United States. Information on recognizing crown...

  12. How to make a laminated diving board

    Treesearch

    U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. Forest Service. Forest Products Laboratory.

    1965-01-01

    The Forest Products Laboratory has developed a laminated diving board that has shown excellent performance characteristics. This board has given long, economical service under the severe moisture hazards and heavy service conditions such as found at public swimming places. The adhesive used is of the fully waterproof synthetic-resin type, which requires no protection...

  13. Laminated Root Rot of Western Conifers

    Treesearch

    E.E. Nelson; N.E. Martin; R.E. Williams

    1981-01-01

    Laminated root rot is caused by the native fungus Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gilb. It occurs throughout the Northwestern United States and in southern British Columbia, Canada. The disease has also been reported in Japan and Manchuria. In the United States, the pathogen is most destructive in pure Douglas-fir stands west of the crest of the Cascade Range in Washington...

  14. Probabilistic sizing of laminates with uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, A. R.; Liaw, D. G.; Chamis, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    A reliability based design methodology for laminate sizing and configuration for a special case of composite structures is described. The methodology combines probabilistic composite mechanics with probabilistic structural analysis. The uncertainties of constituent materials (fiber and matrix) to predict macroscopic behavior are simulated using probabilistic theory. Uncertainties in the degradation of composite material properties are included in this design methodology. A multi-factor interaction equation is used to evaluate load and environment dependent degradation of the composite material properties at the micromechanics level. The methodology is integrated into a computer code IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures). Versatility of this design approach is demonstrated by performing a multi-level probabilistic analysis to size the laminates for design structural reliability of random type structures. The results show that laminate configurations can be selected to improve the structural reliability from three failures in 1000, to no failures in one million. Results also show that the laminates with the highest reliability are the least sensitive to the loading conditions.

  15. The Role of Lamination in Neocortical Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-20

    U. Studies of the Tectofugal System: Tectal pathways to the telencephalon in birds and mammals. The tecto-thalamo-telencephalic visual pathway is...significance of lamination of the telencephalon . Visual Structures and Integrated Functions, Research Notes in Neural Computing (Michael Arbib and J6rg

  16. Laminated insulators having heat dissipation means

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, R.C.; Mataya, K.F.; Gonczy, J.D.

    1980-04-24

    A laminated body is provided with heat dissipation capabilities. The insulator body is formed by dielectric layers interleaved with heat conductive layers, and bonded by an adhesive to form a composite structure. The heat conductive layers include provision for connection to an external thermal circuit.

  17. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, Larry D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    The present work deals with modes and mechanisms of failure in compression of angle-ply laminates. Experimental results were obtained from 42 angle-ply IM7/8551-7a specimens with a lay-up of ((plus or minus theta)/(plus or minus theta)) sub 6s where theta, the off-axis angle, ranged from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. The results showed four failure modes, these modes being a function of off-axis angle. Failure modes include fiber compression, inplane transverse tension, inplane shear, and inplane transverse compression. Excessive interlaminar shear strain was also considered as an important mode of failure. At low off-axis angles, experimentally observed values were considerably lower than published strengths. It was determined that laminate imperfections in the form of layer waviness could be a major factor in reducing compression strength. Previously developed linear buckling and geometrically nonlinear theories were used, with modifications and enhancements, to examine the influence of layer waviness on compression response. The wavy layer is described by a wave amplitude and a wave length. Linear elastic stress-strain response is assumed. The geometrically nonlinear theory, in conjunction with the maximum stress failure criterion, was used to predict compression failure and failure modes for the angle-ply laminates. A range of wave length and amplitudes were used. It was found that for 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 15 degrees failure was most likely due to fiber compression. For 15 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 35 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse tension. For 35 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane shear. For theta less than 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse compression. The fiber compression and transverse tension failure modes depended more heavily on wave length than on wave amplitude. Thus using a single

  18. Nonlinear laminate analysis for metal matrix fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear laminate analysis is described for predicting the mechanical behavior (stress-strain relationships) of angleplied laminates in which the matrix is strained nonlinearly by both the residual stress and the mechanical load and in which additional nonlinearities are induced due to progressive fiber fractures and ply relative rotations. The nonlinear laminate analysis (NLA) is based on linear composite mechanics and a piece wise linear laminate analysis to handle the nonlinear responses. Results obtained by using this nonlinear analysis on boron fiber/aluminum matrix angleplied laminates agree well with experimental data. The results shown illustrate the in situ ply stress-strain behavior and synergistic strength enhancement.

  19. Progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates: A new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the laminate behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach accounts for all types of composite behavior, laminate configuration, load conditions, and delamination processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation, and to laminate fracture. Results of laminate fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach.

  20. Fatigue damage development of various CFRP-laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, K.; Baron, CH.

    1988-01-01

    The chronic strength and fatigue behavior of a woven carbon-fiber reinforced laminate in a balanced eight-shaft satin weave style was compared to nonwoven laminates with an equivalent cross-ply layup. Half the fibers were arranged in the direction of the load and the other half perpendicular to it. Two types of nonwoven laminates consisting of continuous fibers and aligned discontinuous fibers, both produced from carbon fiber prepregs, were studied. The cross-ply laminate with continuous fiber showed the best characteristics with regard to both static strength and fatigue. The similarities and differences in damage mechanisms in the laminates are described.

  1. Three dimensional thermal stresses in angle-ply composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The room temperature stress distributions and shapes of a family of angle ply graphite/epoxy laminates have been obtained using a three-dimensional linear finite element analysis. The sensitivity of the corners to fiber angle variations is examined, in addition to the errors introduced by assuming planes of symmetry which do not exist in angle-ply laminates. The results show that angle ply laminates with 'clustered' plies will tend to delaminate at diagonally opposite corners, and that matrix cracks in this family of laminates will be initiated in the laminate interior.

  2. Edge effects in angle-ply composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, P. W.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a zeroth-order solution for edge effects in angle-ply composite laminates obtained using perturbation techniques and a limiting free body approach. The general solution for edge effects in laminates of arbitrary angle ply is applied to the special case of a (+ or - 45)s graphite/epoxy laminate. Interlaminar stress distributions are obtained as a function of the laminate thickness-to-width ratio and compared to finite difference results. The solution predicts stable, continuous stress distributions, determines finite maximum tensile interlaminar normal stress and provides mathematical evidence for singular interlaminar shear stresses in (+ or - 45) graphite/epoxy laminates.

  3. Composite laminates with negative through-the-thickness Poisson's ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    A simple analysis using two dimensional lamination theory combined with the appropriate three dimensional anisotropic constitutive equation is presented to show some rather surprising results for the range of values of the through-the-thickness effective Poisson's ratio nu sub xz for angle ply laminates. Results for graphite-epoxy show that the through-the-thickness effective Poisson's ratio can range from a high of 0.49 for a 90 laminate to a low of -0.21 for a + or - 25s laminate. It is shown that negative values of nu sub xz are also possible for other laminates.

  4. Composite laminates with negative through-the-thickness Poisson's ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    A simple analysis using two-dimensional lamination theory combined with the appropriate three-dimensional anisotropic constitutive equation is presented to show some rather surprising results for the range of values of the through-the-thickness effective Poisson's ratio nu sub xz for angle ply laminates. Results for graphite-epoxy show that the through-the-thickness effective Poisson's ratio can range from a high of 0.49 for a 90 laminate to a low of -0.21 for a + or - 25s laminate. It is shown that negative values of nu sub xz are also possible for other laminates.

  5. Methods to Monitor DNA Repair Defects and Genomic Instability in the Context of a Disrupted Nuclear Lamina.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray

    2016-01-01

    The organization of the genome within the nuclear space is viewed as an additional level of regulation of genome function, as well as a means to ensure genome integrity. Structural proteins associated with the nuclear envelope, in particular lamins (A- and B-type) and lamin-associated proteins, play an important role in genome organization. Interestingly, there is a whole body of evidence that links disruptions of the nuclear lamina with DNA repair defects and genomic instability. Here, we describe a few standard techniques that have been successfully utilized to identify mechanisms behind DNA repair defects and genomic instability in cells with an altered nuclear lamina. In particular, we describe protocols to monitor changes in the expression of DNA repair factors (Western blot) and their recruitment to sites of DNA damage (immunofluorescence); kinetics of DNA double-strand break repair after ionizing radiation (neutral comet assays); frequency of chromosomal aberrations (FISH, fluorescence in situ hybridization); and alterations in telomere homeostasis (Quantitative-FISH). These techniques have allowed us to shed some light onto molecular mechanisms by which alterations in A-type lamins induce genomic instability, which could contribute to the pathophysiology of aging and aging-related diseases.

  6. Evaluation of shear-compressive strength properties for laminated GFRP composites in electromagnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun Hee; Kim, Hak Kun; Kim, Sam Yeon

    2014-07-01

    Laminated fiber-reinforced composites can be applied to an insulating structure of a nuclear fusion device. It is necessary to investigate the interlaminar fracture characteristics of the laminated composites for the assurance of design and structural integrity. The three methods used to prepare the glass fiber reinforced plastic composites tested in this study were vacuum pressure impregnation, high pressure laminate (HPL), and prepreg laminate. We discuss the design criteria for safe application of composites and the shear-compressive test methods for evaluating mechanical properties of the material. Shear-compressive tests could be performed successfully using series-type test jigs that were inclined 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 75° to the normal axis. Shear strength depends strongly on the applied compressive stress. The design range of allowable shear stress was extended by use of the appropriate composite fabrication method. HPL had the largest design range, and the allowable interlaminar shear stress was 0.254 times the compressive stress.

  7. Lamin A/C deficiency reduces circulating tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Denais, Celine; Chan, Maxine F.; Wang, Zhexiao; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis contributes to over 90% of cancer-related deaths and is initiated when cancer cells detach from the primary tumor, invade the basement membrane, and enter the circulation as circulating tumor cells (CTCs). While metastasis is viewed as an inefficient process with most CTCs dying within the bloodstream, it is evident that some CTCs are capable of resisting hemodynamic shear forces to form secondary tumors in distant tissues. We hypothesized that nuclear lamins A and C (A/C) act as key structural components within CTCs necessary to resist destruction from elevated shear forces of the bloodstream. Herein, we show that, compared with nonmalignant epithelial cells, tumor cells are resistant to elevated fluid shear forces in vitro that mimic those within the bloodstream, as evidenced by significant decreases in cellular apoptosis and necrosis. Knockdown of lamin A/C significantly reduced tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress, with significantly increased cell death compared with parental tumor cell and nontargeting controls. Interestingly, lamin A/C knockdown increased shear stress-induced tumor cell apoptosis, but did not significantly affect cellular necrosis. These data demonstrate that lamin A/C is an important structural component that enables tumor cell resistance to fluid shear stress-mediated death in the bloodstream, and may thus facilitate survival and hematogenous metastasis of CTCs. PMID:26447202

  8. Tensile stress-strain behavior of boron/aluminum laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, J. A.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The tensile stress-strain behavior of five types of boron/aluminum laminates was investigated. Longitudinal and transverse stress-strain curves were obtained for monotonic loading to failure and for three cycles of loading to successively higher load levels. The laminate strengths predicted by assuming that the zero deg plies failed first correlated well with the experimental results. The stress-strain curves for all the boron/aluminum laminates were nonlinear except at very small strains. Within the small linear regions, elastic constants calculated from laminate theory corresponded to those obtained experimentally to within 10 to 20 percent. A limited amount of cyclic loading did not affect the ultimate strength and strain for the boron/aluminum laminates. The laminates, however, exhibited a permanent strain on unloading. The Ramberg-Osgood equation was fitted to the stress-strain curves to obtain average curves for the various laminates.

  9. Novel Remanufacturing Process of Recycled Polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE)/GF Laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Z.; Ghita, O. R.; Johnston, P.; Evans, K. E.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the PTFE/GF laminate and PTFE PCB manufacturers are under considerable pressure to address the recycling issues due to Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive, shortage of landfill capacity and cost of disposal. This study is proposing a novel manufacture method for reuse of the mechanical ground PTFE/Glass fibre (GF) laminate and production of the first reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate. The reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate proposed here consists of a layer of recycled sub-sheet, additional layers of PTFE and PTFE coated glass cloth, also covered by copper foils. The reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate showed good dielectric properties. Therefore, there is potential to use the mechanical ground PTFE/GF laminate powder to produce reconstitute PTFE/GF laminate, for use in high frequencies PCB applications.

  10. NUP-1 Is a Large Coiled-Coil Nucleoskeletal Protein in Trypanosomes with Lamin-Like Functions

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Kelly N.; Alsford, Sam; Holden, Jennifer M.; Buisson, Johanna; Swiderski, Michal; Bart, Jean-Mathieu; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Wan, Yakun; Bastin, Philippe; Barry, J. David; Navarro, Miguel; Horn, David; Aitchison, John D.; Rout, Michael P.; Field, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    A unifying feature of eukaryotic nuclear organization is genome segregation into transcriptionally active euchromatin and transcriptionally repressed heterochromatin. In metazoa, lamin proteins preserve nuclear integrity and higher order heterochromatin organization at the nuclear periphery, but no non-metazoan lamin orthologues have been identified, despite the likely presence of nucleoskeletal elements in many lineages. This suggests a metazoan-specific origin for lamins, and therefore that distinct protein elements must compose the nucleoskeleton in other lineages. The trypanosomatids are highly divergent organisms and possess well-documented but remarkably distinct mechanisms for control of gene expression, including polycistronic transcription and trans-splicing. NUP-1 is a large protein localizing to the nuclear periphery of Trypanosoma brucei and a candidate nucleoskeletal component. We sought to determine if NUP-1 mediates heterochromatin organization and gene regulation at the nuclear periphery by examining the influence of NUP-1 knockdown on morphology, chromatin positioning, and transcription. We demonstrate that NUP-1 is essential and part of a stable network at the inner face of the trypanosome nuclear envelope, since knockdown cells have abnormally shaped nuclei with compromised structural integrity. NUP-1 knockdown also disrupts organization of nuclear pore complexes and chromosomes. Most significantly, we find that NUP-1 is required to maintain the silenced state of developmentally regulated genes at the nuclear periphery; NUP-1 knockdown results in highly specific mis-regulation of telomere-proximal silenced variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites and procyclin loci, indicating a disruption to normal chromatin organization essential to life-cycle progression. Further, NUP-1 depletion leads to increased VSG switching and therefore appears to have a role in control of antigenic variation. Thus, analogous to vertebrate lamins, NUP-1 is a

  11. Aspects of nuclear envelope dynamics in mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Burke, Brian; Shanahan, Catherine; Salina, Davide; Crisp, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    Major features of the nuclear envelope (NE) are a pair of inner and outer nuclear membranes (INM, ONM) spanned by nuclear pore complexes. While the composition of the ONM resembles that of the endoplasmic reticulum, the INM contains a unique spectrum of proteins. Localization of INM proteins involves a mechanism of selective retention whereby integral proteins are immobilized and concentrated by virtue of interactions with nuclear components. In the case of emerin, INM localization involves interaction with A-type lamins. Interactions between membrane proteins may also play a significant role in INM localization. This conclusion stems from studies on nesprins, a family of membrane proteins that feature a large cytoplasmic domain, a single C-terminal membrane-spanning domain and a small lumenal domain. The nesprin membrane anchor and lumenal (KASH) domains are related to the Drosophila Klarsicht protein. Evidence is emerging that this KASH region interacts with other NE proteins and may influence their distributions. Overexpression of GFP-KASH causes loss of emerin and LAP2 from the NE. This is not due to global reorganization of the NE since LAP1 as well as lamins and NPCs remain unaffected. Our results suggest that interactions between NE membrane components are far more extensive and complex than current models suggest.

  12. Autophagy mediates degradation of nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zhixun; Xu, Caiyue; Donahue, Greg; Shimi, Takeshi; Pan, Ji-An; Zhu, Jiajun; Ivanov, Andrejs; Capell, Brian C; Drake, Adam M; Shah, Parisha P; Catanzaro, Joseph M; Ricketts, M Daniel; Lamark, Trond; Adam, Stephen A; Marmorstein, Ronen; Zong, Wei-Xing; Johansen, Terje; Goldman, Robert D; Adams, Peter D; Berger, Shelley L

    2015-11-05

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a catabolic membrane trafficking process that degrades a variety of cellular constituents and is associated with human diseases. Although extensive studies have focused on autophagic turnover of cytoplasmic materials, little is known about the role of autophagy in degrading nuclear components. Here we report that the autophagy machinery mediates degradation of nuclear lamina components in mammals. The autophagy protein LC3/Atg8, which is involved in autophagy membrane trafficking and substrate delivery, is present in the nucleus and directly interacts with the nuclear lamina protein lamin B1, and binds to lamin-associated domains on chromatin. This LC3-lamin B1 interaction does not downregulate lamin B1 during starvation, but mediates its degradation upon oncogenic insults, such as by activated RAS. Lamin B1 degradation is achieved by nucleus-to-cytoplasm transport that delivers lamin B1 to the lysosome. Inhibiting autophagy or the LC3-lamin B1 interaction prevents activated RAS-induced lamin B1 loss and attenuates oncogene-induced senescence in primary human cells. Our study suggests that this new function of autophagy acts as a guarding mechanism protecting cells from tumorigenesis.

  13. Mechanisms of nuclear lamina growth in interphase.

    PubMed

    Zhironkina, Oxana A; Kurchashova, Svetlana Yu; Pozharskaia, Vasilisa A; Cherepanynets, Varvara D; Strelkova, Olga S; Hozak, Pavel; Kireev, Igor I

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear lamina represents a multifunctional platform involved in such diverse yet interconnected processes as spatial organization of the genome, maintenance of mechanical stability of the nucleus, regulation of transcription and replication. Most of lamina activities are exerted through tethering of lamina-associated chromatin domains (LADs) to the nuclear periphery. Yet, the lamina is a dynamic structure demonstrating considerable expansion during the cell cycle to accommodate increased number of LADs formed during DNA replication. We analyzed dynamics of nuclear growth during interphase and changes in lamina structure as a function of cell cycle progression. The nuclear lamina demonstrates steady growth from G1 till G2, while quantitative analysis of lamina meshwork by super-resolution microscopy revealed that microdomain organization of the lamina is maintained, with lamin A and lamin B microdomain periodicity and interdomain gap sizes unchanged. FRAP analysis, in contrast, demonstrated differences in lamin A and B1 exchange rates; the latter showing higher recovery rate in S-phase cells. In order to further analyze the mechanism of lamina growth in interphase, we generated a lamina-free nuclear envelope in living interphase cells by reversible hypotonic shock. The nuclear envelope in nuclear buds formed after such a treatment initially lacked lamins, and analysis of lamina formation revealed striking difference in lamin A and B1 assembly: lamin A reassembled within 30 min post-treatment, whereas lamin B1 did not incorporate into the newly formed lamina at all. We suggest that in somatic cells lamin B1 meshwork growth is coordinated with replication of LADs, and lamin A meshwork assembly seems to be chromatin-independent process.

  14. The structural response of unsymmetrically laminated composite cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. A.; Hyer, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    The responses of an unsymmetrically laminated fiber-reinforced composite cylinder to an axial compressive load, a torsional load, and the temperature change associated with cooling from the processing temperature to the service temperature are investigated. These problems are considered axisymmetric and the response is studied in the context of linear elastic material behavior and geometrically linear kinematics. Four different laminates are studied: a general unsymmetric laminate; two unsymmetric but more conventional laminates; and a conventional quasi-isotropic symmetric laminate. The responses based on closed-form solutions for different boundary conditions are computed and studied in detail. Particular emphasis is directed at understanding the influence of elastic couplings in the laminates. The influence of coupling decreased from a large effect in the general unsymmetric laminate, to practically no effect in the quasi-isotropic laminate. For example, the torsional loading of the general unsymmetric laminate resulted in a radial displacement. The temperature change also caused a significant radial displacement to occur near the ends of the cylinder. On the other hand, the more conventional unsymmetric laminate and the quasi-isotropic cylinder did not deform radially when subjected to a torsional load. From the results obtained, it is clear the degree of elastic coupling can be controlled and indeed designed into a cylinder, the degree and character of the coupling being dictated by the application.

  15. Investigating Delamination Migration in Composite Tape Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.

    2014-01-01

    A modification to a recently developed test specimen designed to investigate migration of a delamination between neighboring ply interfaces in tape laminates is presented. The specimen is a cross-ply laminated beam consisting of 40 plies with a polytetrafluoroethylene insert spanning part way along its length. The insert is located between a lower 0-degree ply (specimen length direction) and a stack of four 90-degree plies (specimen width direction). The modification involved a stacking sequence that promotes stable delamination growth prior to migration, and included a relocation of the insert from the specimen midplane to the interface between plies 14 and 15. Specimens were clamped at both ends onto a rigid baseplate and loaded on their upper surface via a piano hinge assembly, resulting in a predominantly flexural loading condition. Tests were conducted with the load-application point positioned at various locations along a specimen's span. This position affected the sequence of damage events during a test.

  16. Fabrication of CFRP/Al Active Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi; Haga, Osamu; Ohira, Junichiro; Takemoto, Kyosuke; Imori, Masataka

    This paper describes fabrication and evaluation of the active laminate. It was made by hot-pressing of an aluminum plate as a high CTE material, a unidirectional CFRP prepreg as a low CTE material and an electric resistance heater, a KFRP prepreg as a low CTE material and an insulator between them, and copper foils as electrodes. In this study, fabricating conditions and performances such as curvature change and output force were examined. Under optimized fabricating conditions, it became clear that 1) the curvature of the active laminate linearly changes as a function of temperature, between room temperature and its hot pressing temperature without hysteresis by electric resistance heating of carbon fiber in the CFRP layer and cooling, and 2) the output force against a fixed punch almost linearly increases with increasing temperature during heating from 313K up to around the glass transition temperature of the epoxy matrix.

  17. On a generalized laminate theory with application to bending, vibration, and delamination buckling in composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Barbero, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    In this study, a computational model for accurate analysis of composite laminates and laminates with including delaminated interfaces is developed. An accurate prediction of stress distributions, including interlaminar stresses, is obtained by using the Generalized Laminate Plate Theory of Reddy in which layer-wise linear approximation of the displacements through the thickness is used. Analytical as well as finite-element solutions of the theory are developed for bending and vibrations of laminated composite plates for the linear theory. Geometrical nonlinearity, including buckling and postbuckling are included and used to perform stress analysis of laminated plates. A general two dimensional theory of laminatedmore » cylindrical shells is also developed in this study. Geometrical nonlinearity and transverse compressibility are included. Delaminations between layers of composite plates are modelled by jump discontinuity conditions at the interfaces. The theory includes multiple delaminations through the thickness. Geometric nonlinearity is included to capture layer buckling. The strain energy release rate distribution along the boundary of delaminations is computed by a novel algorithm. The computational models presented herein are accurate for global behavior and particularly appropriate for the study of local effects.« less

  18. Composite laminated shells under internal pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical study is conducted of the response of filament-wound composite shells under internal pressure; a system of sixth-order ordinary differential equations is obtained by means of the cylindrically anisotropic elasticity field equations and Lekhnitskii's (1963) stress functions. The general expressions for the stresses and displacements in the laminated composite shells under internal pressure are discussed. Attention is given to the influence of the degree of material anisotropy and fiber orientation on the axial and induced twisting deformation.

  19. Laminated grid and web magnetic cores

    DOEpatents

    Sefko, John; Pavlik, Norman M.

    1984-01-01

    A laminated magnetic core characterized by an electromagnetic core having core legs which comprise elongated apertures and edge notches disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of the legs, such as high reluctance cores with linear magnetization characteristics for high voltage shunt reactors. In one embodiment the apertures include compact bodies of microlaminations for more flexibility and control in adjusting permeability and/or core reluctance.

  20. Delamination stresses in semicircular laminated composite bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Using anisotropic elasticity theory, delamination stresses in a semicircular laminated composite curved bar subjected to end forces and end moments were calculated, and their radial locations determined. A family of design curves was presented, showing variation of the intensity of delamination stresses and their radial locations with different geometry and different degrees of anisotropy of the curved bar. The effect of anisotropy on the location of peak delamination stress was found to be small.

  1. Fatigue Damage Mechanisms in Advanced Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Rhymer, Donald W.; St.Clair, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates (HTCL) are a type of hybrid composite laminate with promise for high-speed aerospace applications, specifically designed for improved damage tolerance and strength at high-temperature (350 F, 177 C). However, in previous testing, HTCL demonstrated a propensity to excessive delamination at the titanium/PMC interface following titanium cracking. An advanced HTCL has been constructed with an emphasis on strengthening this interface, combining a PETI-5/IM7 PMC with Ti-15-3 foils prepared with an alkaline-perborate surface treatment. This paper discusses how the fatigue capabilities of the "advanced" HTCL compare to the first generation HTCL which was not modified for interface optimization, in both tension-tension (R = 0.1) and tension-compression (R=-0.2). The advanced HTCL under did not demonstrate a significant improvement in fatigue life, in either tension-tension or tension-compression loading. However, the advanced HTCL proved much more damage tolerant. The R = 0.1 tests revealed the advanced HTCL to increase the fatigue life following initial titanium ply damage up to 10X that of the initial HTCL at certain stress levels. The damage progression following the initial ply damage demonstrated the effect of the strengthened PMC/titanium interface. Acetate film replication of the advanced HTCL edges showed a propensity for some fibers in the adjacent PMC layers to fail at the point of titanium crack formation, suppressing delamination at the Ti/PMC interface. The inspection of failure surfaces validated these findings, revealing PMC fibers bonded to the majority of the titanium surfaces. Tension compression fatigue (R = -0.2) demonstrated the same trends in cycles between initial damage and failure, damage progression, and failure surfaces. Moreover, in possessing a higher resistance to delamination, the advanced HTCL did not exhibit buckling following initial titanium ply cracking under compression unlike the initial HTCL.

  2. Distributed dynamic load on composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langella, A.; Lopresto, V.; Caprino, G.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental activity conducted in order to assess the impact behavior at room and low temperature of carbon fibre in vinylester resin laminates used in the shipbuilding industry, was reported. The conditions which reproduce the impact of a hull at low temperature with a solid body suspended in the water was reproduced. A test equipment was designed and realized to reproduce the real material behaviour in water to obtain a load distribution on the entire surface of the specimen. The results were obtained impacting the laminates placed between the cilyndrical steel impactor and a bag containing water. A falling weight machine, equipped with an instrumented steel impactor and a thermal chamber, was adopted for the experimental tests. The impact behaviour in hostile environments was compared to the behaviour at room temperature and the data obtained under distributed load conditions were compared with the results from concentrated loads: a completely different behaviour was observed between the two different loading conditions in terms of load-displacement curve. The effect of the impact on the laminates has been related with the delaminations, evaluated by ultrasonic scanning, and the indentation.

  3. Modeling Composite Laminate Crushing for Crash Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.; Jones, Lisa (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Crash modeling of composite structures remains limited in application and has not been effectively demonstrated as a predictive tool. While the global response of composite structures may be well modeled, when composite structures act as energy-absorbing members through direct laminate crushing the modeling accuracy is greatly reduced. The most efficient composite energy absorbing structures, in terms of energy absorbed per unit mass, are those that absorb energy through a complex progressive crushing response in which fiber and matrix fractures on a small scale dominate the behavior. Such failure modes simultaneously include delamination of plies, failure of the matrix to produce fiber bundles, and subsequent failure of fiber bundles either in bending or in shear. In addition, the response may include the significant action of friction, both internally (between delaminated plies or fiber bundles) or externally (between the laminate and the crushing surface). A figure shows the crushing damage observed in a fiberglass composite tube specimen, illustrating the complexity of the response. To achieve a finite element model of such complex behavior is an extremely challenging problem. A practical crushing model based on detailed modeling of the physical mechanisms of crushing behavior is not expected in the foreseeable future. The present research describes attempts to model composite crushing behavior using a novel hybrid modeling procedure. Experimental testing is done is support of the modeling efforts, and a test specimen is developed to provide data for validating laminate crushing models.

  4. Laminate articles on biaxially textured metal substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beach, David B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chirayil, Thomas; Specht, Eliot D.; Goyal, Amit

    2003-12-16

    A laminate article comprises a substrate and a biaxially textured (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer over the substrate, wherein 0laminate article can include a layer of YBCO over the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. A layer of CeO.sub.2 between the YBCO layer and the (RE.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer can also be include. Further included can be a layer of YSZ between the CeO.sub.2 layer and the (R.sup.1.sub.x RE.sup.2.sub.(1-x)).sub.2 O.sub.3 buffer layer. The substrate can be a biaxially textured metal, such as nickel. A method of forming the laminate article is also disclosed.

  5. Characteristics of laminates with delamination control strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Goering, J. C.; Alper, J. M.; Gause, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    Tough resin is needed to resist delamination crack propagation. However, modulus often has to be compromised because it is difficult to retain both high modulus and toughness in a matrix material. A potential solution is to use a hybrid system in which tough resin strips are included within a conventional matrix composite. By adjusting the spacing of the tough resin strips, maximum delamination size can be controlled. Experimental results for impact damage and subsequent damage propagation in laminates containing tough resin strips are reported. Plain adhesive strips and fiber-reinforced tough resin composite strips were used in constructing the hybrid laminates. Test results indicated that size of delamination inflicted by impact was confined between the tough resin strips. As a result, significantly increased residual compressive strength was obtained. Impacted laminates containing tough resin strips were also fatigue tested. It was found that these strips reduced the growth of the impact damage area relative to the growth seen in coupons with no tough resin strips. Damage growth from an open hole under tension fatigue was evaluated using both tough resin strips and glass fiber reinforced tough resin strips. Unreinforced tough resin strips retarded delamination growth from the open hole, but did not stop matrix cracks growing in the fiber direction. Fiber reinforced tough resin strips did not contain axial delamination growth from the open hole. However, they did act as crack arresters, stopping the through-the-thickness tension crack originating from the hole.

  6. Scaling effects in angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

    1992-01-01

    The effect of specimen size upon the response and strength of +/- 45 degree angle-ply laminates was investigated for two graphite fiber reinforced plastic systems and several stacking sequences. The first material system was a brittle epoxy based system, AS4 fibers in 3502 epoxy, and the second was a tough thermoplastic based system, AS4 fibers in PEEK matrix. For the epoxy based system, two generic +/- 45 degree lay-ups were studied: (+45 degrees sub n/-45 degrees sub n) sub 2S (blocked plies), and (+45 degrees/-45 degrees) sub 2nS, for n=1 and 2. The in-plane dimensions of the specimens were varied such that the width/length relationship was 12.7 x n/127 x n mm, for m=1, 2, 3, or 4. It is shown that the stress/strain response and the ultimate strength of these angle-ply laminates depends on the laminate thickness and the type of generic lay-up used. Furthermore, it is shown that first ply failure occurs in the surface plies as a result of normal rather than shear stresses. The implications of the experimental findings upon the validity of the +/- 45 degree tensile test which is used to determine the in-plane shear response of unidirectional composites are discussed.

  7. Novel origin of lamin-derived cytoplasmic intermediate filaments in tardigrades

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Lars; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Reichelt, Julian; Magin, Thomas M; Mayer, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins, including nuclear lamins and cytoplasmic IF proteins, are essential cytoskeletal components of bilaterian cells. Despite their important role in protecting tissues against mechanical force, no cytoplasmic IF proteins have been convincingly identified in arthropods. Here we show that the ancestral cytoplasmic IF protein gene was lost in the entire panarthropod (onychophoran + tardigrade + arthropod) rather than arthropod lineage and that nuclear, lamin-derived proteins instead acquired new cytoplasmic roles at least three times independently in collembolans, copepods, and tardigrades. Transcriptomic and genomic data revealed three IF protein genes in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, one of which (cytotardin) occurs exclusively in the cytoplasm of epidermal and foregut epithelia, where it forms belt-like filaments around each epithelial cell. These results suggest that a lamin derivative has been co-opted to enhance tissue stability in tardigrades, a function otherwise served by cytoplasmic IF proteins in all other bilaterians. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11117.001 PMID:26840051

  8. Improved damage tolerance of titanium by adhesive lamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    Basic damage tolerance properties of Ti-6A1-4V titanium plate can be improved by laminating thin sheets of titanium with adhesives. Compact tension and center cracked tension specimens made from thick plate, thin sheet, and laminated plate (six plies of thin sheet) were tested. The fracture toughness of the laminated plate was 39 percent higher than the monolithic plate. The laminated plate's through the thickness crack growth rate was about 20 percent less than that of the monolithic plate. The damage tolerance life of the surface cracked laminate was 6 to over 15 times the life of a monolithic specimen. A simple method of predicting crack growth in a crack ply of a laminate is presented.

  9. Thermo-mechanical response predictions for metal matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aboudi, J.; Hidde, J. S.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical micromechanical model is employed for prediction of the stress-strain response of metal matrix composite laminates subjected to thermomechanical loading. The predicted behavior of laminates is based upon knowledge of the thermomechanical response of the transversely isotropic, elastic fibers and the elastic-viscoplastic, work-hardening matrix. The method is applied to study the behavior of silicon carbide/titanium metal matrix composite laminates. The response of laminates is compared with that of unidirectional lamina. The results demonstrate the effect of cooling from a stress-free temperature and the mismatch of thermal and mechanical properties of the constituent phases on the laminate's subsequent mechanical response. Typical results are presented for a variety of laminates subjected to monotonic tension, monotonic shear and cyclic tensile/compressive loadings.

  10. A theory for predicting composite laminate warpage resulting from fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Linear laminate theory is used in conjunction with the moment-curvature relationship to derive equations for predicting end deflections due to warpage without solving the coupled fourth-order partial differential equations of the plate. Using these equations, it is found that a 1 deg error in the orientation angle of one ply is sufficient to produce warpage end deflection equal to two laminate thicknesses in a 10 inch by 10 inch laminate made from 8-ply Mod-I/epoxy. From a sensitivity analysis on the governing parameters, it is found that a 3 deg fiber migration or a void volume ratio of three percent in some plies is sufficient to produce laminate warpage corner deflection equal to several laminate thicknesses. Tabular and graphical data are presented which can be used to identify possible errors contributing to laminate warpage and/or to obtain an a priori assessment when unavoidable errors during fabrication are anticipated.

  11. A continuum model for damage evolution in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, D. C.; Allen, D. H.; Harris, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The accumulation of matrix cracking is examined using continuum damage mechanics lamination theory. A phenomenologically based damage evolutionary relationship is proposed for matrix cracking in continuous fiber reinforced laminated composites. The use of material dependent properties and damage dependent laminate averaged ply stresses in this evolutionary relationship permits its application independently of the laminate stacking sequence. Several load histories are applied to crossply laminates using this model, and the results are compared to published experimental data. The stress redistribution among the plies during the accumulation of matrix damage is also examined. It is concluded that characteristics of the stress redistribution process could assist in the analysis of the progressive failure process in laminated composites.

  12. Processing and mechanical characterization of alumina laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, John K.

    2002-08-01

    Single-phase ceramics that combine property gradients or steps in monolithic bodies are sought as alternatives to ceramic composites made of dissimilar materials. This work describes novel processing methods to produce stepped-density (or laminated) alumina single-phase bodies that maintain their mechanical integrity. One arrangement consists of a stiff, dense bulk material with a thin, flaw tolerant, porous exterior layer. Another configuration consists of a lightweight, low-density bulk material with a thin, hard, wear resistant exterior layer. Alumina laminates with strong interfaces have been successfully produced in this work using two different direct-casting processes. Gelcasting is a useful near-net shape processing technique that has been combined with several techniques, such as reaction bonding of aluminum oxide and the use of starch as a fugative filler, to successfully produced stepped-density alumina laminates. The other direct casting process that has been developed in this work is thermoreversible gelcasting (TRG). This is a reversible gelation process that has been used to produce near-net shape dense ceramic bodies. Also, individual layers can be stacked together and heated to produce laminates. Bilayer laminate samples were produced with varied thickness of porous and dense layers. It was shown that due to the difference in modulus and hardness, transverse cracking is found upon Hertzian contact when the dense layer is on the exterior. In the opposite arrangement, compacted damage zones formed in the porous material and no damage occurred in the underlying dense layer. Flaw tolerant behavior of the porous exterior/dense underlayer was examined by measuring biaxial strength as a function of Vickers indentation load. It was found that the thinnest layer of porous material results in the greatest flaw tolerance. Also, higher strength was exhibited at large indentation loads when compared to dense monoliths. The calculated stresses on the surfaces

  13. Methods for Preparing Nanoparticle-Containing Thermoplastic Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Gruber, Mark B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    High quality thermoplastic composites and composite laminates containing nanoparticles and/or nanofibers, and methods of producing such composites and laminates are disclosed. The composites comprise a thermoplastic polymer and a plurality of nanoparticles, and may include a fibrous structural reinforcement. The composite laminates are formed from a plurality of nanoparticle-containing composite layers and may be fused to one another via an automated process.

  14. Fracture behavior of thick, laminated graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of laminate thickness on the fracture behavior of laminated graphite epoxy (T300/5208) composites was studied. The predominantly experimental research program included the study of the 0/+ or - 45/90 sub ns and 0/90 sub ns laminates with thickness of 8, 32, 64, 96 and 120 plies and the 0/+ or - 45 sub ns laminate with thickness of 6, 30, 60, 90 and 120 plies. The research concentrated on the measurement of fracture toughness utilizing the center-cracked tension, compact tension and three point bend specimen configurations. The development of subcritical damage at the crack tip was studied nondestructively using enhanced X-ray radiography and destructively using the laminate deply technique. The test results showed fracture toughness to be a function of laminate thickness. The fracture toughness of the 0 + or - 45/90 sub ns and 0/90 sub ns laminates decreased with increasing thickness and asymptotically approached lower bound values of 30 ksi square root of in. (1043 MPa square root of mm and 25 ksi square root of in (869 MPa square root of mm respectively. In contrast to the other two laminates, the fracture toughness of the 0/+ or - 45 sub ns laminate increased sharply with increasing thickness but reached an upper plateau value of 40 ksi square root of in (1390 MPa square root of mm) at 30 plies. Fracture toughness was independent of crack size for both thin and thick laminates for all three laminate types except for the 0/90 sub 2s laminate which spilt extensively. The center cracked tension, three point bend and compact tension specimens gave comparable results.

  15. Time Domain Reflectometry for Damage Detection of Laminated CFRP plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-18

    Final Report PROJECT ID: AOARD-10-4112 Title: Time Domain Reflectometry for damage detection of laminated CFRP plate Researcher: Professor Akira...From July/2010 To July/2011 Abstract Recently, high toughness Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) laminates are used to primary structures. The...large laminated CFRP structures. In the previous study, Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) method is adopted for the detection of the fiber breakages of

  16. Non-linear behavior of fiber composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashin, Z.; Bagchi, D.; Rosen, B. W.

    1974-01-01

    The non-linear behavior of fiber composite laminates which results from lamina non-linear characteristics was examined. The analysis uses a Ramberg-Osgood representation of the lamina transverse and shear stress strain curves in conjunction with deformation theory to describe the resultant laminate non-linear behavior. A laminate having an arbitrary number of oriented layers and subjected to a general state of membrane stress was treated. Parametric results and comparison with experimental data and prior theoretical results are presented.

  17. Retortable Laminate/Polymeric Food Tubes for Specialized Feeding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    on commercial off-the-shelf materials and not military unique. A market survey of commercially available laminated tubes revealed that they are all...on commercial off-the-shelf materials and not military unique. A market survey of commercially available laminated tubes revealed that they are...available materials and not be uniquely military. We surveyed the market for laminated retortable tubes and were not able to find any application

  18. A unified theory for laminated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiamatsia Tafeuvoukeng, Irene

    A literature survey on plate and beam theories show how the advent of the finite element method and the variational method circa 1940 have been a great stimulant for the research in this field. The initial thin plate formulation has been incrementally expanded to treat the isotropic thick plate, the anisotropic single layer, and then laminated plates. It appears however that current formulations still fall into one of two categories: (1) The formulation is tailored for a specific laminate and/or loading case; (2) or the formulation is too complicated to be of practical relevance. In this work a new unifying approach to laminated plate formulation is presented. All laminated plates, including sandwich panels, subjected to any surface load and with any boundary conditions are treated within a single model. In addition, the fundamental behavior of the plate as a two-dimensional structural element is explained. The novel idea is the introduction of fundamental state solutions, which are analytical far field stress and strain solutions of the laminated plate subjected to a set of hierarchical primary loads, the fundamental loads. These loads are carefully selected to form a basis of the load space, and corresponding solutions are superposed to obtain extremely accurate predictions of the three dimensional solution. six,y,z =aklx,y sikl z where i = 1,..., 6; 1=1,...,l max is a substate of the kth fundamental state k=1,2,3,... Typically, a fundamental state solution is expressed as a through-thickness function (z), while the amplitudes of each fundamental load are found from two dimensional finite element solution as a function of in-plane coordinates (x,y). Three major contributions are produced in this work: (1) A complete calibration of the plate as a two-dimensional structure is performed with pure bending and constant shear fundamental states. (2) There are four independent ways to apply a constant shear resultant on a plate, as opposed to one for a beam. This makes

  19. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Shawn M; Baranova, Inessa; Poley, Joseph

    2012-02-27

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates overmore » the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington

  20. Energy Saving Glass Lamination via Selective Radio Frequency Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Shawn M.

    2012-02-27

    This project focused on advancing radio-frequency (RF) lamination technology closer to commercial implementation, in order to reduce the energy intensity of glass lamination by up to 90%. Lamination comprises a wide range of products including autoglass, architectural safety and innovative design glass, transparent armor (e.g. bullet proof glass), smart glass, mirrors, and encapsulation of photovoltaics. Lamination is also the fastest growing segment of glass manufacturing, with photovoltaics, architectural needs, and an anticipated transition to laminated side windows in vehicles. The state-of-the-art for glass lamination is to use autoclaves, which apply heat and uniform gas pressure to bond the laminates overmore » the course of 1 to 18 hours. Laminates consist of layers of glass or other materials bonded with vinyl or urethane interlayers. In autoclaving, significant heat energy is lost heating the chamber, pressurized air, glass racks, and the glass. In RF lamination, the heat is generated directly in the vinyl interlayer, causing it to heat and melt quickly, in just 1 to 10 minutes, without significantly heating the glass or the equipment. The main purpose of this project was to provide evidence that low energy, rapid RF lamination quality met the same standards as conventionally autoclaved windows. The development of concepts for laminating curved glass with RF lamination was a major goal. Other primary goals included developing a stronger understanding of the lamination product markets described above, and to refine the potential benefits of commercial implementation. The scope of the project was to complete implementation concept studies in preparation for continuation into advanced development, pilot studies, and commercial implementation. The project consisted of 6 main tasks. The first dealt with lamination with poly-vinyl butyral (PVB) interlayers, which prior work had shown difficulties in achieving good quality laminates, working with Pilkington

  1. Solution Structure and Molecular Interactions of Lamin B Receptor Tudor Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Liokatis, Stamatis; Edlich, Christian; Soupsana, Katerina; Giannios, Ioannis; Panagiotidou, Parthena; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Sattler, Michael; Georgatos, Spyros D.; Politou, Anastasia S.

    2012-01-01

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is a polytopic protein of the nuclear envelope thought to connect the inner nuclear membrane with the underlying nuclear lamina and peripheral heterochromatin. To better understand the function of this protein, we have examined in detail its nucleoplasmic region, which is predicted to harbor a Tudor domain (LBR-TD). Structural analysis by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy establishes that LBR-TD indeed adopts a classical β-barrel Tudor fold in solution, which, however, features an incomplete aromatic cage. Removal of LBR-TD renders LBR more mobile at the plane of the nuclear envelope, but the isolated module does not bind to nuclear lamins, heterochromatin proteins (MeCP2), and nucleosomes, nor does it associate with methylated Arg/Lys residues through its aromatic cage. Instead, LBR-TD exhibits tight and stoichiometric binding to the “histone-fold” region of unassembled, free histone H3, suggesting an interesting role in histone assembly. Consistent with such a role, robust binding to native nucleosomes is observed when LBR-TD is extended toward its carboxyl terminus, to include an area rich in Ser-Arg residues. The Ser-Arg region, alone or in combination with LBR-TD, binds both unassembled and assembled H3/H4 histones, suggesting that the TD/RS interface may operate as a “histone chaperone-like platform.” PMID:22052904

  2. In vitro characterization of the RS motif in N-terminal head domain of goldfish germinal vesicle lamin B3 necessary for phosphorylation of the p34cdc2 target serine by SRPK1☆

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akihiko; Iwatani, Miho; Ogawa, Mariko; Kitano, Hajime; Matsuyama, Michiya

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear envelopes surrounding the oocyte germinal vesicles of lower vertebrates (fish and frog) are supported by the lamina, which consists of the protein lamin B3 encoded by a gene found also in birds but lost in the lineage leading to mammals. Like other members of the lamin family, goldfish lamin B3 (gfLB3) contains two putative consensus phosphoacceptor p34cdc2 sites (Ser-28 and Ser-398) for the M-phase kinase to regulate lamin polymerization on the N- and C-terminal regions flanking a central rod domain. Partial phosphorylation of gfLB3 occurs on Ser-28 in the N-terminal head domain in immature oocytes prior to germinal vesicle breakdown, which suggests continual rearrangement of lamins by a novel lamin kinase in fish oocytes. We applied the expression-screening method to isolate lamin kinases by using phosphorylation site Ser-28-specific monoclonal antibody and a vector encoding substrate peptides from a goldfish ovarian cDNA library. As a result, SRPK1 was screened as a prominent lamin kinase candidate. The gfLB3 has a short stretch of the RS repeats (9-SRASTVRSSRRS-20) upstream of the Ser-28, within the N-terminal head. This stretch of repeats is conserved among fish lamin B3 but is not found in other lamins. In vitro phosphorylation studies and GST-pull down assay revealed that SRPK1 bound to the region of sequential RS repeats (9–20) with affinity and recruited serine into the active site by a grab-and-pull manner. These results indicate SRPK1 may phosphorylate the p34cdc2 site in the N-terminal head of GV-lamin B3 at the RS motifs, which have the general property of aggregation. PMID:23772390

  3. 78 FR 19007 - Certain Products Having Laminated Packaging, Laminated Packaging, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-874] Certain Products Having Laminated... States Code AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a complaint was filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission on February 20, 2013, under...

  4. Viral mimicry of Cdc2/cyclin-dependent kinase 1 mediates disruption of nuclear lamina during human cytomegalovirus nuclear egress.

    PubMed

    Hamirally, Sofia; Kamil, Jeremy P; Ndassa-Colday, Yasmine M; Lin, Alison J; Jahng, Wan Jin; Baek, Moon-Chang; Noton, Sarah; Silva, Laurie A; Simpson-Holley, Martha; Knipe, David M; Golan, David E; Marto, Jarrod A; Coen, Donald M

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a major obstacle encountered by herpesvirus nucleocapsids in their passage from the nucleus to the cytoplasm (nuclear egress). We found that the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded protein kinase UL97, which is required for efficient nuclear egress, phosphorylates the nuclear lamina component lamin A/C in vitro on sites targeted by Cdc2/cyclin-dependent kinase 1, the enzyme that is responsible for breaking down the nuclear lamina during mitosis. Quantitative mass spectrometry analyses, comparing lamin A/C isolated from cells infected with viruses either expressing or lacking UL97 activity, revealed UL97-dependent phosphorylation of lamin A/C on the serine at residue 22 (Ser(22)). Transient treatment of HCMV-infected cells with maribavir, an inhibitor of UL97 kinase activity, reduced lamin A/C phosphorylation by approximately 50%, consistent with UL97 directly phosphorylating lamin A/C during HCMV replication. Phosphorylation of lamin A/C during viral replication was accompanied by changes in the shape of the nucleus, as well as thinning, invaginations, and discrete breaks in the nuclear lamina, all of which required UL97 activity. As Ser(22) is a phosphorylation site of particularly strong relevance for lamin A/C disassembly, our data support a model wherein viral mimicry of a mitotic host cell kinase activity promotes nuclear egress while accommodating viral arrest of the cell cycle.

  5. Micromechanics of composite laminate compression failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. Gail; Bradley, Walter L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this annual progress report is to summarize the work effort and results accomplished from July 1987 through July 1988 on NASA Research Grant NAG1-659 entitled Micromechanics of Composite Laminate Compressive Failure. The report contains: (1) the objective of the proposed research, (2) the summary of accomplishments, (3) a more extensive review of compression literature, (4) the planned material (and corresponding properties) received to date, (5) the results for three possible specimen geometries, experimental procedures planned, and current status of the experiments, and (6) the work planned for the next contract year.

  6. Laminated anisotropic reinforced plastic plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korolev, V. I.

    1981-01-01

    Basic technical theories and engineering calculation equations for anisotropic plates and shells made of rigid reinforced plastics, mainly laminated fiberglass, are presented and discussed. Solutions are given for many problems of design of structural plates and shells, including curved sections and tanks, as well as two chapters on selection of the optimum materials, are given. Accounting for interlayer shearing and transverse separation, which are new engineering properties, are discussed. Application of the results obtained to thin three ply plates and shells wth a light elastic filler is presented and discussed.

  7. Fracture modes in notched angleplied composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, T. B.; Ginty, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The Composite Durability Structural Analysis (CODSTRAN) computer code is used to determine composite fracture. Fracture modes in solid and notched, unidirectional and angleplied graphite/epoxy composites were determined by using CODSTRAN. Experimental verification included both nondestructive (ultrasonic C-Scanning) and destructive (scanning electron microscopy) techniques. The fracture modes were found to be a function of ply orientations and whether the composite is notched or unnotched. Delaminations caused by stress concentrations around notch tips were also determined. Results indicate that the composite mechanics, structural analysis, laminate analysis, and fracture criteria modules embedded in CODSTRAN are valid for determining composite fracture modes.

  8. Differential Curing In Fiber/Resin Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Charles N.

    1989-01-01

    Modified layup schedule counteracts tendency toward delamination. Improved manufacturing process resembles conventional process, except prepregs partially cured laid on mold in sequence in degree of partial cure decreases from mold side to bag side. Degree of partial cure of each layer at time of layup selected by controlling storage and partial-curing temperatures of prepreg according to Arrhenius equation for rate of gel of resin as function of temperature and time from moment of mixing. Differential advancement of cure in layers made large enough to offset effect of advance bag-side heating in oven or autoclave. Technique helps prevent entrapment of volatile materials during manufacturing of fiber/resin laminates.

  9. Better Thermal Insulation in Solar-Array Laminators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.; Knox, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Glass marbles improve temperature control. Modified vacuum laminator for photovoltaic solar arrays includes thermal insulation made of conventional glass marbles. Marbles serve as insulation for temperature control of lamination process at cure temperatures as high as 350 degrees F. Used to replace original insulation made of asbestos cement.

  10. Advanced Fatigue Damage Development in Graphite Epoxy Laminates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    8217essary and identify by block number) Composite Materials Stiffness Changes Nondestructive Graphite/Epoxy Laminates Delamination Evaluation (NDE...30 3. Specimen in the Testing Machine with Extensometer Mounted ................................................. 32 4. Initial...for Micocrack Formation in [0,±45]. Laminat •s....115 43. Typical Stiffness Reduction Curve for a [0,90,±45]sLaminate

  11. Self-heating forecasting for thick laminate specimens in fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahuerta, F.; Westphal, T.; Nijssen, R. P. L.

    2014-12-01

    Thick laminate sections can be found from the tip to the root in most common wind turbine blade designs. Obtaining accurate and reliable design data for thick laminates is subject of investigations, which include experiments on thick laminate coupons. Due to the poor thermal conductivity properties of composites and the material self-heating that occurs during the fatigue loading, high temperature gradients may appear through the laminate thickness. In the case of thick laminates in high load regimes, the core temperature might influence the mechanical properties, leading to premature failures. In the present work a method to forecast the self-heating of thick laminates in fatigue loading is presented. The mechanical loading is related with the laminate self-heating, via the cyclic strain energy and the energy loss ratio. Based on this internal volumetric heat load a thermal model is built and solved to obtain the temperature distribution in the transient state. Based on experimental measurements of the energy loss factor for 10mm thick coupons, the method is described and the resulting predictions are compared with experimental surface temperature measurements on 10 and 30mm UD thick laminate specimens.

  12. Lateral testing of glued laminated timber tudor arch

    Treesearch

    Douglas R. Rammer; Philip Line

    2016-01-01

    Glued laminated timber Tudor arches have been in wide use in the United States since the 1930s, but detailed knowledge related to seismic design in modern U.S. building codes is lacking. FEMA P-695 (P-695) is a methodology to determine seismic performance factors for a seismic force resisting system. A limited P-695 study for glued laminated timber arch structures...

  13. Chapter 2: Manufacturing Cross-laminated timber manufacturing

    Treesearch

    Borjen Yeh; Dave Kretschmann; Brad (Jianhe) Wang

    2013-01-01

    Cross-laminated timber ( CLT) is defined as a prefabricated solid engineered wood product made of at least three orthogonally bonded layers of solid-sawn lumber or structural composite lumber (SCL) that are laminated by gluing oflongitudinal and transverse layers with structural adhesives to form a solid rectangular-shaped, straight, and plane timber intended for roof...

  14. Laminated lumber may be more profitable than sawn lumber

    Treesearch

    P. Koch

    1976-01-01

    By laminating 1/4-in. rotary-cut veneer into structural lumber, manufacturers can expand lumber output by at least 30% without increasing volume logged. The idea merits intensive study. Manufacturing plus raw material costs should total about $142/Mbf; sales price for desirable widths and lengths of the strong laminated product should approach or exceed $200/Mbf.

  15. The North American Product Standard for Cross-Laminated Timber

    Treesearch

    Borjen Yeh; Sylvain Gagnon; Tom Williamson; Ciprian Pirvu; Conroy Lum; Dave Kretschmann

    2012-01-01

    Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is a prefabricated solid engineered wood product made of at least three orthogonally bonded layers of solid-sawn lumber or structural composite lumber that are laminated by gluing of longitudinal and transverse layers with structural adhesives to form a solid rectangular-shaped, straight, and plane timber intended for roof, floor, or wall...

  16. Mechanical performance of cellulose nanofibril film-wood flake laminate

    Treesearch

    Jen-Chieh Liu; Robert J. Moon; Alan Rudie; Jeffrey P. Youngblood

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous and transparent CNF films, fabricated from the (2,2,6,6- tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl) oxyl (TEMPO)-modified CNF suspension, were laminated onto wood flakes (WF) based on phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin and the reinforcement potential of the material has been investigated. The focus was on the influence of CNF film lamination, relative humidity (RH), heat...

  17. A theory for predicting composite laminate warpage resulting from fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Linear laminate theory is used with the moment-curvature relationship to derive equations for predicting end deflections due to warpage without solving the coupled fourth-order partial differential equations of the plate. Composite micro- and macrohyphenmechanics are used with laminate theory to assess the contribution of factors such as ply misorientation, fiber migration, and fiber and/or void volume ratio nonuniformity on the laminate warpage. Using these equations, it was found that a 1 deg error in the orientation angle of one ply was sufficient to produce warpage end deflection equal to two laminate thicknesses in a 10 inch by 10 inch laminate made from 8 ply Mod-I/epoxy. Using a sensitivity analysis on the governing parameters, it was found that a 3 deg fiber migration or a void volume ratio of three percent in some plies is sufficient to produce laminate warpage corner deflection equal to several laminate thicknesses. Tabular and graphical data are presented which can be used to identify possible errors contributing to laminate warpage and/or to obtain an a priori assessment when unavoidable errors during fabrication are anticipated.

  18. Maleated polypropylene film and wood fiber handsheet laminates

    Treesearch

    Sangyeob Lee; Todd F. Shupe; Leslie H. Groom; Chung Y. Hse

    2008-01-01

    The grafting effect of maleic anhydride (MA) as an interfacial bonding agent and its influence on the tensile strength properties of thermomechanical pulp handsheet-isotactic polypropylene (iPP) film laminates was studied. For the MA treated with benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as an initiator, tensile strength properties increased 76% with PP film over untreated laminates. The...

  19. 78 FR 23591 - Certain Prepregs, Laminates, and Finished Circuit Boards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-659 (Enforcement)] Certain Prepregs... United States after importation of certain prepregs, laminates, and finished circuit boards that infringe... prepregs and laminates that are the subject of the investigation or that otherwise infringe, induce, and/or...

  20. Mapping disease-related missense mutations in the immunoglobulin-like fold domain of lamin A/C reveals novel genotype-phenotype associations for laminopathies.

    PubMed

    Scharner, Juergen; Lu, Hui-Chun; Fraternali, Franca; Ellis, Juliet A; Zammit, Peter S

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in A-type nuclear lamins cause laminopathies. However, genotype-phenotype correlations using the 340 missense mutations within the LMNA gene are unclear: partially due to the limited availability of three-dimensional structure. The immunoglobulin (Ig)-like fold domain has been solved, and using bioinformatics tools (including Polyphen-2, Fold X, Parameter OPtimized Surfaces, and PocketPicker) we characterized 56 missense mutations for position, surface exposure, change in charge and effect on Ig-like fold stability. We find that 21 of the 27 mutations associated with a skeletal muscle phenotype are distributed throughout the Ig-like fold, are nonsurface exposed and predicted to disrupt overall stability of the Ig-like fold domain. Intriguingly, the remaining 6 mutations clustered, had higher surface exposure, and did not affect stability. The majority of 9 lipodystrophy or 10 premature aging syndrome mutations also did not disrupt Ig-like fold domain stability and were surface exposed and clustered in distinct regions that overlap predicted binding pockets. Although buried, the 10 cardiac mutations had no other consistent properties. Finally, most lipodystrophy and premature aging mutations resulted in a -1 net charge change, whereas skeletal muscle mutations caused no consistent net charge changes. Since premature aging, lipodystrophy and the subset of 6 skeletal muscle mutations cluster tightly in distinct, charged regions, they likely affect lamin A/C -protein/DNA/RNA interactions: providing a consistent genotype-phenotype relationship for mutations in this domain. Thus, this subgroup of skeletal muscle laminopathies that we term the 'Skeletal muscle cluster', may have a distinct pathological mechanism. These novel associations refine the ability to predict clinical features caused by certain LMNA missense mutations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Residual stresses and their effects in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Hwang, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Residual stresses in composite laminates are caused by the anisotropy in expansional properties of constituent unidirectional plies. The effect of these residual stresses on dimensional stability is studied through the warping of unsymmetric (0 sub 4/90 sub 4)sub T graphite/epoxy laminates while their effect on ply failure is analyzed for (0/90)sub 2s Kevlar 49/epoxy laminate. The classical laminated plate theory is used to predict the warping of small and large panels. The change of warping does not indicate a noticeable stress relaxation at 75 C while it is very sensitive to moisture content and hence to environment. A prolonged gellation at the initial cure temperature reduces residual stresses while postcure does not. The matrix/interface cracking in dry (0/90)sub 2s Kevlar 49/epoxy laminate is shown to be the result of the residual stress exceeding the transverse strength.

  2. Matrix cracking in laminated composites under monotonic and cyclic loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.; Lee, Jong-Won

    1991-01-01

    An analytical model based on the internal state variable (ISV) concept and the strain energy method is proposed for characterizing the monotonic and cyclic response of laminated composites containing matrix cracks. A modified constitution is formulated for angle-ply laminates under general in-plane mechanical loading and constant temperature change. A monotonic matrix cracking criterion is developed for predicting the crack density in cross-ply laminates as a function of the applied laminate axial stress. An initial formulation for a cyclic matrix cracking criterion for cross-ply laminates is also discussed. For the monotonic loading case, a number of experimental data and well-known models are compared with the present study for validating the practical applicability of the ISV approach.

  3. The mechanical behavior of GLARE laminates for aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guocai; Yang, J.-M.

    2005-01-01

    GLARE (glass-reinforced aluminum laminate) is a new class of fiber metal laminates for advanced aerospace structural applications. It consists of thin aluminum sheets bonded together with unidirectional or biaxially reinforced adhesive prepreg of high-strength glass fibers. GLARE laminates offer a unique combination of properties such as outstanding fatigue resistance, high specific static properties, excellent impact resistance, good residual and blunt notch strength, flame resistance and corrosion properties, and ease of manufacture and repair. GLARE laminates can be tailored to suit a wide variety of applications by varying the fiber/resin system, the alloy type and thickness, stacking sequence, fiber orientation, surface pretreatment technique, etc. This article presents a comprehensive overview of the mechanical properties of various GLARE laminates under different loading conditions.

  4. Nuclear envelope: positioning nuclei and organizing synapses

    PubMed Central

    Razafsky, David; Hodzic, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear envelope plays an essential role in nuclear positioning within cells and tissues. This review highlights advances in understanding the mechanisms of nuclear positioning during skeletal muscle and central nervous system development. New findings, particularly about Atype lamins and Nesprin1, may link nuclear envelope integrity to synaptic integrity. Thus synaptic defects, rather than nuclear mispositioning, may underlie human pathologies associated with mutations of nuclear envelope proteins. PMID:26079712

  5. Interlaminar interaction in paper thermoplastic laminate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prambauer, M.; Paulik, C.; Burgstaller, C.

    2016-07-01

    Bio-based composites are a research topic since several decades, which aims for sustainable and durable materials. In the scope of this research, many different sources for biobased reinforcements have been investigated. Typical issues associated with the use of such are property variations due to cultivation area and climate, besides the influences of the type, pretreatment and fibre geometry. Another issue can be the availability of such natural fibres. Due to these reasons, we started using paper sheets as reinforcements in laminate composites with thermoplastic materials. In preliminary studies with polypropylene composites, we found good mechanical properties, even higher than could be expected by estimating the composite properties from the constituents by applying simple rule of mixtures type models. We suspect, besides some effect of paper compaction, interlaminar effects to be the reason for this. Therefore, the aim of this work is to investigate the effects of the interfacial interaction on the different paper laminate properties due to different matrix polymers. For this work, we used polypropylene, polyamide 6 and 12 as well as polystyrene. Composites were produced via compression moulding and samples for mechanical testing and density evaluation were cut from the moulded plates. The results from mechanical tests show, that there is a reinforcing effect, regardless of matrix polymer used. Simple rule of mixtures evaluations show, that the different matrices exhibit different degrees of interaction, based on their chemical structure. In addition, also influences due to processing were found.

  6. High Pressure Laminates with Antimicrobial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Magina, Sandra; Santos, Mauro D.; Ferra, João; Cruz, Paulo; Portugal, Inês; Evtuguin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    High-pressure laminates (HPLs) are durable, resistant to environmental effects and good cost-benefit decorative surface composite materials with special properties tailored to meet market demand. In the present work, polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) was incorporated for the first time into melamine-formaldehyde resin (MF) matrix on the outer layer of HPLs to provide them antimicrobial properties. Chemical binding of PHMB to resin matrix was detected on the surface of produced HPLs by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Antimicrobial evaluation tests were carried out on the ensuing HPLs doped with PHMB against gram-positive Listeria innocua and gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria. The results revealed that laminates prepared with 1.0 wt % PHMB in MF resin were bacteriostatic (i.e., inhibited the growth of microorganisms), whereas those prepared with 2.4 wt % PHMB in MF resin exhibited bactericidal activity (i.e., inactivated the inoculated microorganisms). The results herein reported disclose a promising strategy for the production of HPLs with antimicrobial activity without affecting basic intrinsic quality parameters of composite material. PMID:28787897

  7. High Pressure Laminates with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Magina, Sandra; Santos, Mauro D; Ferra, João; Cruz, Paulo; Portugal, Inês; Evtuguin, Dmitry

    2016-02-06

    High-pressure laminates (HPLs) are durable, resistant to environmental effects and good cost-benefit decorative surface composite materials with special properties tailored to meet market demand. In the present work, polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) was incorporated for the first time into melamine-formaldehyde resin (MF) matrix on the outer layer of HPLs to provide them antimicrobial properties. Chemical binding of PHMB to resin matrix was detected on the surface of produced HPLs by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Antimicrobial evaluation tests were carried out on the ensuing HPLs doped with PHMB against gram-positive Listeria innocua and gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria. The results revealed that laminates prepared with 1.0 wt % PHMB in MF resin were bacteriostatic ( i.e. , inhibited the growth of microorganisms), whereas those prepared with 2.4 wt % PHMB in MF resin exhibited bactericidal activity ( i.e. , inactivated the inoculated microorganisms). The results herein reported disclose a promising strategy for the production of HPLs with antimicrobial activity without affecting basic intrinsic quality parameters of composite material.

  8. Development of a heterogeneous laminating resin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, T. F.; Hopper, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The factors which effect the impact resistance of laminating resin systems and yet retain equivalent performance with the conventional 450 K curing epoxy matrix systems in other areas were studied. Formulation work was conducted on two systems, an all-epoxy and an epoxy/bismaleimide, to gain fundamental information on the effect formulation changes have upon neat resin and composite properties. The all-epoxy work involved formulations with various amounts and combinations of eight different epoxy resins, four different hardeners, fifteen different toughening agents, a filler, and a catalyst. The epoxy/bismaleimide effort improved formulations with various amounts and combinations of nine different resins, four different hardeners, eight different toughening agents, four different catalysts, and a filler. When a formulation appeared to offer the proper combination of properties required for a laminating resin Celion 3K-70P fabric was prepregged. Initial screening tests on composites primarily involved Gardner type impact and measurement of short beam shear strengths under dry and hot/wet conditions.

  9. Free Vibration of Uncertain Unsymmetrically Laminated Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.; Goyal, Vijay K.

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo Simulation and Stochastic FEA are used to predict randomness in the free vibration response of thin unsymmetrically laminated beams. For the present study, it is assumed that randomness in the response is only caused by uncertainties in the ply orientations. The ply orientations may become random or uncertain during the manufacturing process. A new 16-dof beam element, based on the first-order shear deformation beam theory, is used to study the stochastic nature of the natural frequencies. Using variational principles, the element stiffness matrix and mass matrix are obtained through analytical integration. Using a random sequence a large data set is generated, containing possible random ply-orientations. This data is assumed to be symmetric. The stochastic-based finite element model for free vibrations predicts the relation between the randomness in fundamental natural frequencies and the randomness in ply-orientation. The sensitivity derivatives are calculated numerically through an exact formulation. The squared fundamental natural frequencies are expressed in terms of deterministic and probabilistic quantities, allowing to determine how sensitive they are to variations in ply angles. The predicted mean-valued fundamental natural frequency squared and the variance of the present model are in good agreement with Monte Carlo Simulation. Results, also, show that variations between plus or minus 5 degrees in ply-angles can affect free vibration response of unsymmetrically and symmetrically laminated beams.

  10. Recycling of waste automotive laminated glass and valorization of polyvinyl butyral through mechanochemical separation

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, Basudev, E-mail: swain@iae.re.kr; Ryang Park, Jae; Yoon Shin, Dong

    Due to strong binding, optical clarity, adhesion to many surfaces, toughness and flexibility polyvinyl butyral (PVB) resin films are commonly used in the automotive and architectural application as a protective interlayer in the laminated glass. Worldwide million tons of PVB waste generated from end-of-life automotive associated with various environmental issues. Stringent environmental directive, higher land cost eliminates land filling option, needs a study, we have developed a mechanochemical separation process to separate PVB resins from glass and characterized the separated PVB through various techniques, i.e., scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonancemore » spectroscopy (NMR). Commercial nonionic surfactants D201 used for the mechanochemical separation purpose. Through parameter optimization following conditions are considered to be the optimum condition; 30 vol% D201, stirring speed of 400 rpm, 35 °C temperature, operation time 1 h, and dilute D201 volume to waste automotive laminated glass weight ratio of ≈25. The technology developed in our laboratory is sustainable, environmentally friendly, techno-economical feasible process, capable of mass production (recycling). - Highlights: • Waste automotive laminated glass and polyvinyl butyral mechanochemically separated. • An economical total recovery and environment-friendly process has been developed. • It is a global problem rather than regional environmental issue has been addressed. • Without using hazardous chemical wastes are being converted to a wealth.« less

  11. A Step-by-Step Conservative Approach for CAD-CAM Laminate Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez Gutiérrez, Ismael; Guzmán Marusic, Álvaro; Báez Rosales, Abelardo; Tisi Lanchares, José Pablo

    2017-01-01

    The use of CAD/CAM technology has allowed the fabrication of ceramic restorations efficiently and with predictable results. Lithium disilicate is a type of glass ceramic material that can be used for the elaboration of laminate veneers, being monolithic restorations which require characterization through a covering ceramic in order to achieve acceptable esthetic results. The next case report shows a predictable clinical protocol for the rehabilitation of the anterior teeth through the preparation of CAD/CAM veneers (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) which have been characterized by a nanofluorapatite ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) through the layering technique. PMID:28884029

  12. Rapamycin Reverses Elevated mTORC1 Signaling in Lamin A/C–Deficient Mice, Rescues Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle Function, and Extends Survival

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Fresnida J.; Chen, Steven C.; Garelick, Michael G.; Dai, Dao-Fu; Liao, Chen-Yu; Schreiber, Katherine H.; MacKay, Vivian L.; An, Elroy H.; Strong, Randy; Ladiges, Warren C.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Kaeberlein, Matt; Kennedy, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in LMNA, the gene that encodes A-type lamins, cause multiple diseases including dystrophies of the skeletal muscle and fat, dilated cardiomyopathy, and progeria-like syndromes (collectively termed laminopathies). Reduced A-type lamin function, however, is most commonly associated with skeletal muscle dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy rather than lipodystrophy or progeria. The mechanisms underlying these diseases are only beginning to be unraveled. We report that mice deficient in Lmna, which corresponds to the human gene LMNA, have enhanced mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) signaling specifically in tissues linked to pathology, namely, cardiac and skeletal muscle. Pharmacologic reversal of elevated mTORC1 signaling by rapamycin improves cardiac and skeletal muscle function and enhances survival in mice lacking A-type lamins. At the cellular level, rapamycin decreases the number of myocytes with abnormal desmin accumulation and decreases the amount of desmin in both muscle and cardiac tissue of Lmna–/– mice. In addition, inhibition of mTORC1 signaling with rapamycin improves defective autophagic-mediated degradation in Lmna–/– mice. Together, these findings point to aberrant mTORC1 signaling as a mechanistic component of laminopathies associated with reduced A-type lamin function and offer a potential therapeutic approach, namely, the use of rapamycin-related mTORC1 inhibitors. PMID:22837538

  13. Combined tension and bending testing of tapered composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Murri, Gretchen B.; Hagemeier, Rick; Rogers, Charles

    1994-11-01

    A simple beam element used at Bell Helicopter was incorporated in the Computational Mechanics Testbed (COMET) finite element code at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) to analyze the responce of tappered laminates typical of flexbeams in composite rotor hubs. This beam element incorporated the influence of membrane loads on the flexural response of the tapered laminate configurations modeled and tested in a combined axial tension and bending (ATB) hydraulic load frame designed and built at LaRC. The moments generated from the finite element model were used in a tapered laminated plate theory analysis to estimate axial stresses on the surface of the tapered laminates due to combined bending and tension loads. Surfaces strains were calculated and compared to surface strains measured using strain gages mounted along the laminate length. The strain distributions correlated reasonably well with the analysis. The analysis was then used to examine the surface strain distribution in a non-linear tapered laminate where a similarly good correlation was obtained. Results indicate that simple finite element beam models may be used to identify tapered laminate configurations best suited for simulating the response of a composite flexbeam in a full scale rotor hub.

  14. Formaldehyde and TVOC emission behavior of laminate flooring by structure of laminate flooring and heating condition.

    PubMed

    An, Jae-Yoon; Kim, Sumin; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2011-03-15

    Formaldehyde was measured with a desiccator, a 20 L chamber and the FLEC method. The formaldehyde emission rate from laminate was the highest at 32 °C using the desiccator, which then decreased with time. The formaldehyde emission using the 20 L small chamber and FLEC showed a similar tendency. There was a strong correlation between the formaldehyde and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) with both types of floorings using the two different methods. The formaldehyde emission rate and TVOC results were higher when tested using the FLEC method than with the 20 L small chamber method. The emission rate was affected by the joint edge length in laminate flooring. Toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene were the main VOCs emitted from laminate flooring, and there were more unidentified VOCs emitted than identified VOCs. The samples heated with a floor heating system emitted more formaldehyde than those heated using an air circulation system due to the temperature difference between the bottom panel and flooring. The TVOC emission level of the samples was higher when an air circulation system was used than when a floor heating system was used due to the high ventilation rate. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bending strength of shallow glued-laminated beams of a uniform grade

    Treesearch

    Catherine M. Marx; Russell C. Moody

    1981-01-01

    Ninety glued-laminated Douglas-fir or southern pine beams of a uniform grade with 2-, 4-, or 6-laminations were evaluated in static bending tests. No specially graded tension laminations or end joints were used. The purpose of the tests was to determine which of three present design criteria best predict near minimum bending strength values for shallow glued-laminated...

  16. LamLum : a tool for evaluating the financial feasibility of laminated lumber plants

    Treesearch

    E.M. (Ted) Bilek; John F. Hunt

    2006-01-01

    A spreadsheet-based computer program called LamLum was created to analyze the economics of value- added laminated lumber manufacturing facilities. Such facilities manufacture laminations, typically from lower grades of structural lumber, then glue these laminations together to make various types of higher value laminated lumber products. This report provides the...

  17. The Creep of Laminated Synthetic Resin Plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkuhn, H

    1941-01-01

    The long-time loading strength of a number of laminated synthetic resin plastics was ascertained and the effect of molding pressure and resin content determined. The best value was observed with a 30 to 40 percent resin content. The long-time loading strength also increases with increasing molding pressure up to 250 kg/cm(exp 2); a further rise in pressure affords no further substantial improvement. The creep strength is defined as the load which in the hundredth hour of loading produces a rate of elongation of 5 X 10(exp -4) percent per hour. The creep strength values of different materials were determined and tabulated. The effect of humidity during long-term tests is pointed out.

  18. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  19. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  20. Transient response of a laminated composite plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S. K.; Ju, T. H.; Bratton, R. L.; Shah, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an investigation of the effect of layering on transient wave propagation in a laminated cross-ply plate, giving attention to the case of 2D plane strain in the case where a line vertical force is applied on a free surface of the plate; the line may be either parallel or perpendicular to the fibers in a ply. The results are in both the time and frequency domains for the normal stress component in the x direction, at a point on the surface of the plate on which the force is applied. Comparative results are also presented for a homogeneous plate whose properties are the static effective ones, when the number of plies is large.

  1. Chronic laminitis: strategic hoof wall resection.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Amy

    2010-04-01

    In the chronic-laminitic foot, severe soft-tissue compression and compromised circulation can result in osteitis and sepsis at the margin of the distal phalanx. Resultant inflammation and sepsis may cause the coronary corium to swell, drain, or separate from the hoof capsule, usually within 8 weeks of laminitis onset. Slow-onset cases of soft-tissue impingement can develop secondary to distal phalanx displacement due to lack of wall attachment. With either presentation, partial upper wall resection is required to reverse compression and vascular impingement by the hoof capsule. If the pathology is not overwhelming, the area reepithelializes and grows attached tubular horn. Firm bandaging and restricted exercise until tubular horn has regrown enhances recovery and the return of a strong hoof. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Micromechanics of composite laminate compression failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. Gail; Bradley, Walter L.

    1986-01-01

    The Dugdale analysis for metals loaded in tension was adapted to model the failure of notched composite laminates loaded in compression. Compression testing details, MTS alignment verification, and equipment needs were resolved. Thus far, only 2 ductile material systems, HST7 and F155, were selected for study. A Wild M8 Zoom Stereomicroscope and necessary attachments for video taping and 35 mm pictures were purchased. Currently, this compression test system is fully operational. A specimen is loaded in compression, and load vs shear-crippling zone size is monitored and recorded. Data from initial compression tests indicate that the Dugdale model does not accurately predict the load vs damage zone size relationship of notched composite specimens loaded in compression.

  3. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, L. D.; Hyer, M. W.; Shuart, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Test results from the compression loading of (+ or - Theta/ - or + Theta)(sub 6s) angle-ply IM7-8551-7a specimens, 0 less than or = Theta less than or = 90 degs, are presented. The observed failure strengths and modes are discussed, and typical stress-strain relations shown. Using classical lamination theory and the maximum stress criterion, an attempt is made to predict failure stress as a function of Theta. This attempt results in poor correlation with test results and thus a more advanced model is used. The model, which is based on a geometrically nonlinear theory, and which was taken from previous work, includes the influence of observed layer waviness. The waviness is described by the wave length and the wave amplitude. The theory is briefly described and results from the theory are correlated with test results. It is shown that by using levels of waviness observed in the specimens, the correlation between predictions and observations is good.

  4. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1983-08-15

    A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

  5. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest

    1986-01-01

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  6. Prediction of microcracking in composite laminates under thermomechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, Jason R.; Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1995-01-01

    Composite laminates used in space structures are exposed to both thermal and mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. An analytical methodology is developed to predict microcrack density in a general laminate exposed to an arbitrary thermomechanical load history. The analysis uses a shear lag stress solution in conjunction with an energy-based cracking criterion. Experimental investigation was used to verify the analysis. Correlation between analysis and experiment is generally excellent. The analysis does not capture machining-induced cracking, or observed delayed crack initiation in a few ply groups, but these errors do not prevent the model from being a useful preliminary design tool.

  7. Analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after crack arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing-to-width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  8. Analysis of a hybrid-undirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after the arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing to width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  9. Modeling delamination of FRP laminates under low velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Wen, H. M.; Ren, S. L.

    2017-09-01

    Fiber reinforced plastic laminates (FRP) have been increasingly used in various engineering such as aeronautics, astronautics, transportation, naval architecture and their impact response and failure are a major concern in academic community. A new numerical model is suggested for fiber reinforced plastic composites. The model considers that FRP laminates has been constituted by unidirectional laminated plates with adhesive layers. A modified adhesive layer damage model that considering strain rate effects is incorporated into the ABAQUS / EXPLICIT finite element program by the user-defined material subroutine VUMAT. It transpires that the present model predicted delamination is in good agreement with the experimental results for low velocity impact.

  10. Interlaminar stresses in composite laminates: A perturbation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, P. W.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    A general method of solution for an elastic balanced symmetric composite laminate subject to a uniaxial extension was developed based upon a perturbation analysis of a limiting free body containing an interfacial plane. The solution satisfies more physical requirements and boundary conditions than previous investigations, and predicts smooth continuous interlaminar stresses with no instabilities. It determines the finite maximum intensity for the interlaminar normal stress in all laminates, provides mathematical evidences for the singular stresses in angle-ply laminates, suggests the need for the experimental determination of an important problem parameter, and introduces a viable means for solving related problems of practical interest.

  11. Wave propagation in graphite/epoxy laminates due to impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, T. M.; Sun, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    The low velocity impact response of graphite-epoxy laminates is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A nine-node isoparametric finite element in conjunction with an empirical contact law was used for the theoretical investigation. Flat laminates subjected to pendulum impact were used for the experimental investigation. Theoretical results are in good agreement with strain gage experimental data. The collective results of the investigation indicate that the theoretical procedure describes the impact response of the laminate up to about 150 in/sec. impact velocity.

  12. Nuclear lamina builds tissues from the stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Yixian

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies show that nuclear lamins, the type V intermediate filament proteins, are required for proper building of at least some organs. As the major structural components of the nuclear lamina found underneath the inner nuclear membranes, lamins are ubiquitously expressed in all animal cells. How the broadly expressed lamins support the building of specific tissues is not understood. By studying Drosophila testis, we have uncovered a mechanism by which lamin-B functions in the cyst stem cell (CySC) and its differentiated cyst cell, the cell types known to form the niche/microenvironment for the germline stem cells (GSC) and the developing germ line, to ensure testis organogenesis (1). In this extra view, we discuss some remaining questions and the implications of our findings in the understanding of how the ubiquitous nuclear lamina regulates tissue building in a context-dependent manner.

  13. Tensile stress-strain behavior of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the stress-strain response of several hybrid laminates, and the damage was correlated with nonlinear stress-strain response and ultimate strength. The fibers used in the laminates were graphite, S-glass, and Kevlar. Some laminates with graphite fibers had perforated Mylar film between plies, which lowered the interlaminar bond strength. The laminate configurations were chosen to be like those of buffer strips in large panels and fracture coupons. Longitudinal and transverse specimens were loaded in tension to failure. Some specimens were radiographed to reveal damage due to edge effects. Stress-strain response is discussed in terms of damage shown by the radiographs. Ultimate strengths are compared with simple failure criteria, one of which account for damage.

  14. Analysis of a unidirectional, symmetric buffer strip laminate with damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A method for predicting the fracture behavior of hybrid buffer strip laminates is presented in which the classical shear-lag model is used to represent the shear stress distribution between adjacent fibers. The method is demonstrated by applying it to a notched graphite/epoxy laminate, and the results show clearly the manner in which the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties can be selected in order to arrest the crack. The ultimate failure stress of the laminate is plotted vs the buffer strip width. It is shown that in the case of graphite-epoxy and S-glass epoxy laminates, the optimum buffer strip spacing to width ratio should be about four to one.

  15. Vibration Analysis of Composite Laminate Plate Excited by Piezoelectric Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Lin, Chi-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials can be used as actuators for the active vibration control of smart structural systems. In this work, piezoelectric patches are surface bonded to a composite laminate plate and used as vibration actuators. A static analysis based on the piezoelectricity and elasticity is conducted to evaluate the loads induced by the piezoelectric actuators to the host structure. The loads are then employed to develop the vibration response of a simply supported laminate rectangular plate excited by piezoelectric patches subjected to time harmonic voltages. An analytical solution of the vibration response of a simply supported laminate rectangular plate under time harmonic electrical loading is obtained and compared with finite element results to validate the present approach. The effects of location and exciting frequency of piezoelectric actuators on the vibration response of the laminate plate are investigated through a parametric study. Numerical results show that modes can be selectively excited, leading to structural vibration control. PMID:23529121

  16. Characterization of delamination onset and growth in a composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1981-01-01

    The onset and growth of delaminations in unnotched (+ or - 30/+ or - 30/90/90 bar) sub S graphite epoxy laminates is described quantitatively. These laminates, designed to delaminate at the edges under tensile loads, were tested and analyzed. Delamination growth and stiffness loss were monitored nondestructively. Laminate stiffness decreased linearly with delamination size. The strain energy release rate, G, associated with delamination growth, was calculated from two analyses. A critical G for delamination onset was determined, and then was used to predict the onset of delaminations in (+45 sub n/-45 sub n/o sub n/90 sub n) sub s (n=1,2,3) laminates. A delamination resistance curve (R curve) was developed to characterize the observed stable delamination growth under quasi static loading. A power law correlation between G and delamination growth rates in fatigue was established.

  17. Reliability analysis of composite laminates with load sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherhold, Robert C.; Thomas, David J.

    1991-01-01

    By viewing a composite lamina as a homogeneous solid whose directional strengths are random variables, lamina reliability under multiaxial stresses may be determined using either an interactive or a noninteractive criterion. From the reliability values for the individual laminae comprising a given laminate, Thomas and Wetherhold (1991) have proposed a method for determining bounds for the overall laminate reliability. In this paper, simple physically plausible phenomenological rules are proposed for redistribution of load after a lamina has failed within the confines of a laminate. These rules are illustrated by application to (0/ +/-15)s and (90/ +/-45/0)s graphite/epoxy laminates, and the results are compared to the previously proposed bounds.

  18. Fatigue damage mechanics of notched graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spearing, Mark; Beaumont, Peter W. R.; Ashby, Michael F.

    A modeling approach is presented that recognizes that the residual properties of composite laminates after any form of loading depend on the damage state. Therefore, in the case of cyclic loading, it is necessary to first derive a damage growth law and then relate the residual properties to the accumulated damage. The propagation of fatigue damage in notched laminates is investigated. A power law relationship between damage growth and the strain energy release rate is developed. The material constants used in the model have been determined in independent experiments and are invariant for all the layups investigated. The strain energy release rates are calculated using a simple finite element representation of the damaged specimen. The model is used to predict the effect of tension-tension cyclic loading on laminates of the T300/914C carbon-fiber epoxy system. The extent of damage propagation is successfully predicted in a number of cross-ply laminates.

  19. Progressive Failure Analysis Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.

    1999-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis method has been developed for predicting the failure of laminated composite structures under geometrically nonlinear deformations. The progressive failure analysis uses C(exp 1) shell elements based on classical lamination theory to calculate the in-plane stresses. Several failure criteria, including the maximum strain criterion, Hashin's criterion, and Christensen's criterion, are used to predict the failure mechanisms and several options are available to degrade the material properties after failures. The progressive failure analysis method is implemented in the COMET finite element analysis code and can predict the damage and response of laminated composite structures from initial loading to final failure. The different failure criteria and material degradation methods are compared and assessed by performing analyses of several laminated composite structures. Results from the progressive failure method indicate good correlation with the existing test data except in structural applications where interlaminar stresses are important which may cause failure mechanisms such as debonding or delaminations.

  20. Exact solution of conductive heat transfer in cylindrical composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayhani, M. H.; Shariati, M.; Nourozi, M.; Karimi Demneh, M.

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents an exact solution for steady-state conduction heat transfer in cylindrical composite laminates. This laminate is cylindrical shape and in each lamina, fibers have been wound around the cylinder. In this article heat transfer in composite laminates is being investigated, by using separation of variables method and an analytical relation for temperature distribution in these laminates has been obtained under specific boundary conditions. Also Fourier coefficients in each layer obtain by solving set of equations that related to thermal boundary layer conditions at inside and outside of the cylinder also thermal continuity and heat flux continuity between each layer is considered. In this research LU factorization method has been used to solve the set of equations.

  1. Fatigue of notched fiber composite laminates. Part 1: Analytical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P. V., Jr.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Huang, S. N.; Rosen, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a semi-empirical, deterministic analysis for prediction and correlation of fatigue crack growth, residual strength, and fatigue lifetime for fiber composite laminates containing notches (holes). The failure model used for the analysis is based upon composite heterogeneous behavior and experimentally observed failure modes under both static and fatigue loading. The analysis is consistent with the wearout philosophy. Axial cracking and transverse cracking failure modes are treated together in the analysis. Cracking off-axis is handled by making a modification to the axial cracking analysis. The analysis predicts notched laminate failure from unidirectional material fatique properties using constant strain laminate analysis techniques. For multidirectional laminates, it is necessary to know lamina fatique behavior under axial normal stress, transverse normal stress and axial shear stress. Examples of the analysis method are given.

  2. Modelling of thick composites using a layerwise laminate theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, D. H., Jr.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    The layerwise laminate theory of Reddy (1987) is used to develop a layerwise, two-dimensional, displacement-based, finite element model of laminated composite plates that assumes a piecewise continuous distribution of the tranverse strains through the laminate thickness. The resulting layerwise finite element model is capable of computing interlaminar stresses and other localized effects with the same level of accuracy as a conventional 3D finite element model. Although the total number of degrees of freedom are comparable in both models, the layerwise model maintains a 2D-type data structure that provides several advantages over a conventional 3D finite element model, e.g. simplified input data, ease of mesh alteration, and faster element stiffness matrix formulation. Two sample problems are provided to illustrate the accuracy of the present model in computing interlaminar stresses for laminates in bending and extension.

  3. 10. Detail view of pendant lamps, laminated arch beams and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail view of pendant lamps, laminated arch beams and ceiling structure, facing north - Mountain Home Air Force Base, Base Chapel, 350 Willow Street, Cantonment Area, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  4. 11. Detail of laminated arch beams, radiators, pews and portion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of laminated arch beams, radiators, pews and portion of the office to the left of the sanctuary, facing north - Mountain Home Air Force Base, Base Chapel, 350 Willow Street, Cantonment Area, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  5. Calculation of the room-temperature shapes of unsymmetric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    1981-01-01

    A theory explaining the characteristics of the cured shapes of unsymmetric laminates is presented. The theory is based on an extension of classical lamination theory which accounts for geometric nonlinearities. A Rayleigh-Ritz approach to minimizing the total potential energy is used to obtain quantitative information regarding the room temperature shapes of square T300/5208 (0(2)/90(2))T and (0(4)/90(4))T graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that, depending on the thickness of the laminate and the length of the side the square, the saddle shape configuration is actually unstable. For values of length and thickness that render the saddle shape unstable, it is shown that two stable cylindrical shapes exist. The predictions of the theory are compared with existing experimental data.

  6. Recovery behaviour of shape memory polyurethane based laminates after thermoforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuiliang; Xu, Wensen; Prasath Balamurugan, G.; Thompson, Michael R.; Nielsen, Kent E.; Brandys, Frank A.

    2017-11-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can be used to produce a new class of decorative films capable of improved formability and shape recovery in polymer laminates, which are increasingly being used for automotive, aerospace, construction and commercial applications. As a relatively new field there is little knowledge on the shape recovery behaviour of laminates with a SMP film and few methods of quantify that behaviour. The influences of different variables that affect the recovery behaviour of thermoplastic shape memory polyurethanes based laminates including ambient temperature (45 °C and 65 °C), material modulus, and adhesive strength were investigated after thermoforming, through both experimental and modelling methods. The empirical model assisted in identifying the contributions of the adhesive to transfer stresses, which dampened the recovery of the laminate with lower shear strength adhesives. Increasing ambient temperature and the film modulus increased both the final angle recovery ratios and recovery rates.

  7. Post-Crazing Stress Analysis of Glass-Epoxy Laminates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    element Stress concentrations Thick-shell element b. Identiflers/Open-Ended Terms Thick-plate element Glass-epoxy Laminates Composite materials Failure...number) / Glass-Epoxy Angle Plys Finite Elements’ Laminates Shear Testing Isoparametric.,lement Composite Materials Compression Testing Doubly-Curved...with light weight. This favorable strength- weight ratio makes the material attractive for some flight structures as well as other machines and

  8. Laminated microchannel devices, mixing units and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Wendy D [Kennewick, WA; Hammerstrom, Donald J [West Richland, WA; Martin, Peter M [Kennewick, WA; Matson, Dean W [Kennewick, WA

    2002-10-17

    A laminated microchannel device is described in which there is a unit operation process layer that has longitudinal channel. The longitudinal channel is cut completely through the layer in which the unit process operation resides. Both the device structure and method of making the device provide significant advantages in terms of simplicity and efficiency. A static mixing unit that can be incorporated in the laminated microchannel device is also described.

  9. Damage Tolerance of Composite Laminates from an Empirical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2009-01-01

    Damage tolerance consists of analysis and experimentation working together. Impact damage is usually of most concern for laminated composites. Once impacted, the residual compression strength is usually of most interest. Other properties may be of more interest than compression (application dependent). A damage tolerance program is application specific (not everyone is building aircraft). The "Building Block Approach" is suggested for damage tolerance. Advantage can be taken of the excellent fatigue resistance of damaged laminates to save time and costs.

  10. Determination of the technical constants of laminates in oblique directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidouse, F.

    1979-01-01

    An off-axis tensile test theory based on Hooke's Law is applied to glass fiber reinforced laminates. A corrective parameter dependent on the characteristics of the strain gauge used is introduced by testing machines set up for isotropic materials. Theoretical results for a variety of strain gauges are compared with those obtained by a finite element method and with experimental results obtained on laminates reinforced with glass.

  11. Review on antibacterial biocomposites of structural laminated veneer lumber

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-xiang; Lei, Qiong; He, Rui-lin; Zhang, Zhong-feng; Chowdhury, Ahmed Jalal Khan

    2015-01-01

    In this review, the characteristics and applications of structural laminated veneer lumber made from planted forest wood is introduced, and its preparation is explained, including various tree species and slab qualities, treatments for multiple effects and reinforced composites. The relevant factors in the bonding technology and pressing processes as well as the mechanical properties, research direction and application prospects of structural laminated veneer lumber made from planted forest wood are discussed. PMID:26858559

  12. Long-term strength and damage accumulation in laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzenis, Yuris A.; Joshi, Shiv P.

    1993-04-01

    A modified version of the probabilistic model developed by authors for damage evolution analysis of laminates subjected to random loading is utilized to predict long-term strength of laminates. The model assumes that each ply in a laminate consists of a large number of mesovolumes. Probabilistic variation functions for mesovolumes stiffnesses as well as strengths are used in the analysis. Stochastic strains are calculated using the lamination theory and random function theory. Deterioration of ply stiffnesses is calculated on the basis of the probabilities of mesovolumes failures using the theory of excursions of random process beyond the limits. Long-term strength and damage accumulation in a Kevlar/epoxy laminate under tension and complex in-plane loading are investigated. Effects of the mean level and stochastic deviation of loading on damage evolution and time-to-failure of laminate are discussed. Long-term cumulative damage at the time of the final failure at low loading levels is more than at high loading levels. The effect of the deviation in loading is more pronounced at lower mean loading levels.

  13. Response of automated tow placed laminates to stress concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Douglas S.; Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Walker, Tom

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the response of laminates with stress concentrations is explored. Automated Tow Placed (ATP, also known as Fiber Placement) laminates are compared to conventional tape layup manufacturing. Previous tensile fracture tests on fiber placed laminates show an improvement in tensile fracture of large notches over 20 percent compared to tape layup laminates. A hierarchial modeling scheme is presented. In this scheme, a global model is developed for laminates with notches. A local model is developed to study the influence of inhomogeneities at the notch tip, which are a consequence of the fiber placement manufacturing technique. In addition, a stacked membrane model was developed to study delaminations and splitting on a ply-by-ply basis. The results indicate that some benefit with respect to tensile fracture (up to 11 percent) can be gained from inhomogeneity alone, but that the most improvement may be obtained with splitting and delaminations which are more severe in the case of fiber placement compared to tape layup. Improvements up to 36 percent were found from the model for fiber placed laminates with damage at the notch tip compared to conventional tape layup.

  14. Tracer Lamination in the Stratosphere: A Global Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appenzeller, Christof; Holton, James R.

    1997-01-01

    Vertical soundings of stratospheric ozone often exhibit laminated tracer structures characterized by strong vertical tracer gradients. The change in time of these gradients is used to define a tracer lamination rate. It is shown that this quantity can be calculated by the cross product of the horizontal temperature and horizontal tracer gradients. A climatology based on UARS satellite-borne ozone data and on ozone-like pseudotracer data is presented. Three stratospheric regions with high lamination rates were found: the part of the stratospheric overworld which is influenced by the polar vortex, the part of the lowermost stratosphere which is influenced by the tropopause and a third region in the subtropical lower stratosphere mainly characterized with strong vertical shear. High lamination rates in the stratospheric overworld were absent during summer, whereas in the lowermost stratosphere high lamination rates were found year-round. This is consistent with the occurrence and seasonal variation of the horizontal tracer gradient and vertical shear necessary for tilting the tracer surfaces. During winter, high lamination rates associated with the stratospheric polar vortex are present down to approximately 100 hPa. Several features of the derived climatology are roughly consistent with earlier balloon-borne studies. The patterns in the southern and northern hemisphere are comparable, but details differ as anticipated from a less disturbed and more symmetric southern polar vortex.

  15. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    An analytical, parametric study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers or edge effects in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated thin cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize and quantify the effects of laminate orthotropy and laminate anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general and encompassing manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all the laminate constructions considered, the results show that the differences between results that were obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that in some cases neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and in other cases it results in an overestimation.

  16. Scintigraphic evaluation of digital circulation during the developmental and acute phases of equine laminitis

    SciTech Connect

    Trout, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Using nuclear isotopic imaging, digital circulation was sequentially evaluated at 24-hour intervals in 11 control horses and in 9 horses affected with acute laminitis, created by administration of a high-starch ration. Following intra-arterial injection of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin into the brachiocephalic trunk, a gamma camera and dedicated nuclear medicine computer were used to acquire static images of the right front foot. Dynamic vascular-phase and static interstitial-phase images were also obtained after jugular vein injection of /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid. These procedures were performed on standing horses, using either minimal or no tranquilization. The images were quantitatively analyzed formore » parameters indicative of circulation to the foot as a whole and to specific regions of interest within the foot. There was no evidence of reduced total blood flow to the lamellae during either the developmental or acute phases of laminitis. Although total flow tended to increase throughout the peripheral/external regions of the foot, statistically significant elevations were consistently present only within the lamellae. Changes indicative of decreased total blood flow were noted in the central/internal regions of the foot. These alterations usually occurred coincident with or after the onset of clinical lameness.« less

  17. The nuclear membrane-associated honeycomb structure of the unicellular organism Amoeba proteus: on the search for homologies with the nuclear lamina of metazoa.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Grossmann, U; Krohne, G

    1995-07-01

    In the protozoon Amoeba proteus, a complex and highly organized structure with the morphology of a honeycomb is associated with the nucleoplasmic surface of the nuclear membrane. We have tested whether this structure exhibits similarity to the nuclear lamina of metazoic organisms. First, we have shown that the honeycomb layer is composed of 3 to 5 nm thick protein fibrils resistant to treatment with detergent, high salt, and digestion with nucleases, thus possessing properties typical for karyoskeletal elements. However, in contrast to the meshwork of lamin filaments in somatic cells of metazoic organisms, the honeycomb layer is not tightly anchored to the nucleoplasmic side of pore complexes, or to the inner nuclear membrane. Second, in microinjection experiments we investigated whether fluorescently labeled lamins of Xenopus laevis (lamins A and LI) and Drosophila melanogaster (lamin Dmo) were able to associate in vivo with the Amoeba proteus honeycomb structure. In microinjected amoeba these three lamins were efficiently transported into the nucleus, but did not associate with the nuclear envelope. Our results suggest that the Amoeba proteus nuclear envelope, including the honeycomb layer, does not contain proteins exhibiting high homologies to lamins of metazoan species thus preventing the localized assembly of microinjected lamins along the nuclear periphery.

  18. Crush testing, characterizing, and modeling the crashworthiness of composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, David Michael, Jr.

    Research in the field of crashworthiness of composite materials is presented. A new crush test method was produced to characterize the crush behavior of composite laminates. In addition, a model of the crush behavior and a method for rank ordering the energy absorption capability of various laminates were developed. The new crush test method was used for evaluating the crush behavior of flat carbon/epoxy composite specimens at quasi-static and dynamic rates. The University of Utah crush test fixture was designed to support the flat specimen against catastrophic buckling. A gap, where the specimen is unsupported, allowed unhindered crushing of the specimen. In addition, the specimen's failure modes could be clearly observed during crush testing. Extensive crush testing was conducted wherein the crush force and displacement data were collected to calculate the energy absorption, and high speed video was captured during dynamic testing. Crush tests were also performed over a range of fixture gap heights. The basic failure modes were buckling, crack growth, and fracture. Gap height variations resulted in poorly, properly, and overly constrained specimens. In addition, guidelines for designing a composite laminate for crashworthiness were developed. Modeling of the crush behavior consisted of the delamination and fracture of a single ply or group of like plies during crushing. Delamination crack extension was modeled using the mode I energy release rate, G lc, where an elastica approach was used to obtain the strain energy. Variations in Glc were briefly explored with double cantilever beam tests wherein crack extension occurred along a multidirectional ply interface. The model correctly predicted the failure modes for most of the test cases, and offered insight into how the input parameters affect the model. The ranking method related coefficients of the laminate and sublaminate stiffness matrices, the ply locations within the laminate, and the laminate thickness. The

  19. Attenuated hypertrophic response to pressure overload in a lamin A/C haploinsufficiency mouse.

    PubMed

    Cupesi, Mihaela; Yoshioka, Jun; Gannon, Joseph; Kudinova, Anastacia; Stewart, Colin L; Lammerding, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Inherited mutations cause approximately 30% of all dilated cardiomyopathy cases, with autosomal dominant mutations in the LMNA gene accounting for more than one third of these. The LMNA gene encodes the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, which provide structural support to the nucleus and also play critical roles in transcriptional regulation. Functional deletion of a single allele is sufficient to trigger dilated cardiomyopathy in humans and mice. However, whereas Lmna(-/-) mice develop severe muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy and die by 8 weeks of age, heterozygous Lmna(+/-) mice have a much milder phenotype, with changes in ventricular function and morphology only becoming apparent at 1 year of age. Here, we studied 8- to 20-week-old Lmna(+/-) mice and wild-type littermates in a pressure overload model to examine whether increased mechanical load can accelerate or exacerbate myocardial dysfunction in the heterozygotes. While overall survival was similar between genotypes, Lmna(+/-) animals had a significantly attenuated hypertrophic response to pressure overload as evidenced by reduced ventricular mass and myocyte size. Analysis of pressure overload-induced transcriptional changes suggested that the reduced hypertrophy in the Lmna(+/-) mice was accompanied by impaired activation of the mechanosensitive gene Egr-1. In conclusion, our findings provide further support for a critical role of lamins A and C in regulating the cellular response to mechanical stress in cardiomyocytes and demonstrate that haploinsufficiency of lamins A and C alone is sufficient to alter hypertrophic responses and cardiac function in the face of pressure overload in the heart. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Attenuated hypertrophic response to pressure overload in a lamin A/C haploinsufficiency mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cupesi, Mihaela; Yoshioka, Jun; Gannon, Joseph; Kudinova, Anastacia; Stewart, Colin L.; Lammerding, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Inherited mutations cause approximately 30% of all dilated cardiomyopathy cases, with autosomal dominant mutations in the LMNA gene accounting for more than one third of these. The LMNA gene encodes the nuclear envelope proteins lamins A and C, which provide structural support to the nucleus and also play critical roles in transcriptional regulation. Functional deletion of a single allele is sufficient to trigger dilated cardiomyopathy in humans and mice. However, whereas Lmna−/− mice develop severe muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy and die by 8 weeks of age, heterozygous Lmna+/− mice have a much milder phenotype, with changes in ventricular function and morphology only becoming apparent at one year of age. Here, we studied 8 to 20 week old Lmna+/− mice and wild-type littermates in a pressure overload model to examine whether increased mechanical load can accelerate or exacerbate myocardial dysfunction in the heterozygotes. While overall survival was similar between genotypes, Lmna+/− animals had a significantly attenuated hypertrophic response to pressure overload as evidenced by reduced ventricular mass and myocyte size. Analysis of pressure-overload induced transcriptional changes suggested that the reduced hypertrophy in the Lmna+/− mice was accompanied by impaired activation of the mechanosensitive gene Egr-1. In conclusion, our findings provide further support for a critical role of lamins A and C in regulating the cellular response to mechanical stress in cardiomyocytes and demonstrate that haploinsufficiency of lamins A and C alone is sufficient to alter hypertrophic responses and cardiac function in the face of pressure overload in the heart. PMID:19913544

  1. Mapping of protein- and chromatin-interactions at the nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Kubben, Nard; Voncken, Jan Willem; Misteli, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope and the lamina define the nuclear periphery and are implicated in many nuclear processes including chromatin organization, transcription and DNA replication. Mutations in lamin A proteins, major components of the lamina, interfere with these functions and cause a set of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. The phenotypic diversity of laminopathies is thought to be the result of alterations in specific protein- and chromatin interactions due to lamin A mutations. Systematic identification of lamin A-protein and -chromatin interactions will be critical to uncover the molecular etiology of laminopathies. Here we summarize and critically discuss recent technology to analyze lamina-protein and-chromatin interactions.

  2. Fracture behavior of unidirectional boron/aluminum composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.; Jones, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to verify the results of mathematical models which predict the stresses and displacements of fibers and the amount of damage growth in a center-notched lamina as a function of the applied remote stress and the matrix and fiber material properties. A brittle lacquer coating was used to detect the yielding in the matrix while X-ray techniques were used to determine the number of broken fibers in the laminate. The notched strengths and the amounts of damage found in the specimens agree well with those predicted by the mathematical model. It is shown that the amount of damage and the crack opening displacement does not depend strongly on the number of plies in the laminate for a given notch width. By heat-treating certain laminates to increase the yield stress of the alumina matrix, the effect of different matrix properties on the fracture behavior was investigated. The stronger matrix is shown to weaken the notched laminate by decreasing the amount of matrix damage, thereby making the laminate more notch sensitive.

  3. Human Lamin B Contains a Farnesylated Cysteine Residue*

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Christopher C.; Wolda, Sharon L.; Gelb, Michael H.; Glomset, John A.

    2012-01-01

    We recently showed that HeLa cell lamin B is modified by a mevalonic acid derivative. Here we identified the modified amino acid, determined its mode of link-age to the mevalonic acid derivative, and established the derivative’s structure. A cysteine residue is modified because experiments with lamin B that had been biosynthetically labeled with [3H] mevalonic acid or [35S] cysteine and then extensively digested with proteases yielded 3H- or 35S-labeled products that co-chromatographed in five successive systems. A thioether linkage rather than a thioester linkage is involved because the mevalonic acid derivative could be released from the 3H-labeled products in a pentane-extractable form by treatment with Raney nickel but not with methanolic KOH. The derivative is a farnesyl moiety because the Raney nickel-released material was identified as 2,6,10-trimethyl-2,6,10-dodecatriene by a combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The thioether-modified cysteine residue appears to be located near the carboxyl end of lamin B because treatment of 3H-labeled lamin B with cyanogen bromide yielded a single labeled polypeptide that mapped toward this end of the cDNA-inferred sequence of human lamin B. PMID:2684976

  4. Dynamic Stability of Uncertain Laminated Beams Under Subtangential Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, Vijay K.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Adelman, Howard (Technical Monitor); Horta, Lucas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of the inherent complexity of fiber-reinforced laminated composites, it can be challenging to manufacture composite structures according to their exact design specifications, resulting in unwanted material and geometric uncertainties. In this research, we focus on the deterministic and probabilistic stability analysis of laminated structures subject to subtangential loading, a combination of conservative and nonconservative tangential loads, using the dynamic criterion. Thus a shear-deformable laminated beam element, including warping effects, is derived to study the deterministic and probabilistic response of laminated beams. This twenty-one degrees of freedom element can be used for solving both static and dynamic problems. In the first-order shear deformable model used here we have employed a more accurate method to obtain the transverse shear correction factor. The dynamic version of the principle of virtual work for laminated composites is expressed in its nondimensional form and the element tangent stiffness and mass matrices are obtained using analytical integration The stability is studied by giving the structure a small disturbance about an equilibrium configuration, and observing if the resulting response remains small. In order to study the dynamic behavior by including uncertainties into the problem, three models were developed: Exact Monte Carlo Simulation, Sensitivity Based Monte Carlo Simulation, and Probabilistic FEA. These methods were integrated into the developed finite element analysis. Also, perturbation and sensitivity analysis have been used to study nonconservative problems, as well as to study the stability analysis, using the dynamic criterion.

  5. Steel skin - SMC laminate structures for lightweight automotive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliato, Luca; Jang, Changsoon; Murugesan, Mohanraj; Kim, Naksoo

    2017-09-01

    In the present research work an innovative material, made of steel skin and sheet molding compound core, is presented and is aimed to be utilized for the production of automotive body frames. For a precise description of the laminate structure, the material properties of all the components, including the adhesive utilized as an interlayer, have been carried out, along with the simple tension test of the composite material. The result have shown that the proposed laminate structure has a specific yield strength 114% higher than 6061 T6 aluminum, 34% higher than 7075 T6 aluminum, 186% higher than AISI 304 stainless steel (30HRC) and 42% than SK5 high-strength steel (52HRC), showing its reliability and convenience for the realization of automotive components. After calibrating the material properties of the laminate structure, and utilizing as reference the simple tension results of the laminate structure, the derived material properties have been utilized for the simulation of the mechanical behavior of an automotive B-pillar. The results have been compared with those of a standard B-pillar made of steel, showing that the MS-SMC laminate structure manifests load and impact carry capacity comparable with those of high strength steel, while granting, at least, an 11% weight reduction.

  6. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    A study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all laminates considered, the results show that the differences between results obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that, in some cases, neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and, in other cases, results in an overestimation.

  7. Actin-myosin-based contraction is responsible for apoptotic nuclear disintegration.

    PubMed

    Croft, Daniel R; Coleman, Mathew L; Li, Shuixing; Robertson, David; Sullivan, Teresa; Stewart, Colin L; Olson, Michael F

    2005-01-17

    Membrane blebbing during the apoptotic execution phase results from caspase-mediated cleavage and activation of ROCK I. Here, we show that ROCK activity, myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, MLC ATPase activity, and an intact actin cytoskeleton, but not microtubular cytoskeleton, are required for disruption of nuclear integrity during apoptosis. Inhibition of ROCK or MLC ATPase activity, which protect apoptotic nuclear integrity, does not affect caspase-mediated degradation of nuclear proteins such as lamins A, B1, or C. The conditional activation of ROCK I was sufficient to tear apart nuclei in lamin A/C null fibroblasts, but not in wild-type fibroblasts. Thus, apoptotic nuclear disintegration requires actin-myosin contractile force and lamin proteolysis, making apoptosis analogous to, but distinct from, mitosis where nuclear disintegration results from microtubule-based forces and from lamin phosphorylation and depolymerization.

  8. Actin-myosin–based contraction is responsible for apoptotic nuclear disintegration

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Daniel R.; Coleman, Mathew L.; Li, Shuixing; Robertson, David; Sullivan, Teresa; Stewart, Colin L.; Olson, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    Membrane blebbing during the apoptotic execution phase results from caspase-mediated cleavage and activation of ROCK I. Here, we show that ROCK activity, myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, MLC ATPase activity, and an intact actin cytoskeleton, but not microtubular cytoskeleton, are required for disruption of nuclear integrity during apoptosis. Inhibition of ROCK or MLC ATPase activity, which protect apoptotic nuclear integrity, does not affect caspase-mediated degradation of nuclear proteins such as lamins A, B1, or C. The conditional activation of ROCK I was sufficient to tear apart nuclei in lamin A/C null fibroblasts, but not in wild-type fibroblasts. Thus, apoptotic nuclear disintegration requires actin-myosin contractile force and lamin proteolysis, making apoptosis analogous to, but distinct from, mitosis where nuclear disintegration results from microtubule-based forces and from lamin phosphorylation and depolymerization. PMID:15657395

  9. Nuclear Physics in a biological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2012-02-01

    A solid tissue can be soft like fat or brain, stiff like striated muscle and heart, or rigid like bone -- and of course every cell has a nucleus that contributes in some way small or large to tissue mechanics. Indeed, nuclei generally exhibit rheology and plasticity that reflects both the chromatin and the nuclear envelope proteins called lamins, all of which change in differentiation. Profiling of tissue nuclei shows that the nuclear intermediate filament protein Lamin-A/C varies over 30-fold between adult tissues and scales strongly with micro-elasticity of tissue, while other nuclear envelope components such as Lamin-B exhibit small variations. Lamin-A/C has been implicated in aging syndromes that affect muscle and fat but not brain, and we find nuclei in brain-derived cells are indeed dominated by Lamin-B and are much softer than nuclei derived from muscle cells with predominantly Lamin-A/C. In vitro, matrix elasticity can affect expression of nuclear envelope components in adult stem cells, and major changes in Lamin-A/C are indeed shown to direct lineage with lower levels favoring soft tissue and higher levels promoting rigid tissue lineage. Further molecular studies provide evidence that the nucleus transduces physical stress. References: (1) J.D. Pajerowski, K.N. Dahl, F.L. Zhong, P.J. Sammak, and D.E. Discher. Physical plasticity of the nucleus in stem cell differentiation. PNAS 104: 15619-15624 (2007). (2) A. Buxboim, I. Ivanova, and D.E. Discher. Matrix Elasticity, Cytoskeletal Forces, and Physics of the Nucleus: how deeply do cells `feel' outside and in? Journal of Cell Science 123: 297-308 (2010).

  10. Thermal modeling of carbon-epoxy laminates in fire environments.

    SciTech Connect

    McGurn, Matthew T.; DesJardin, Paul Edward; Dodd, Amanda B.

    2010-10-01

    A thermal model is developed for the response of carbon-epoxy composite laminates in fire environments. The model is based on a porous media description that includes the effects of gas transport within the laminate along with swelling. Model comparisons are conducted against the data from Quintere et al. Simulations are conducted for both coupon level and intermediate scale one-sided heating tests. Comparisons of the heat release rate (HRR) as well as the final products (mass fractions, volume percentages, porosity, etc.) are conducted. Overall, the agreement between available the data and model is excellent considering the simplified approximations to account formore » flame heat flux. A sensitivity study using a newly developed swelling model shows the importance of accounting for laminate expansion for the prediction of burnout. Excellent agreement is observed between the model and data of the final product composition that includes porosity, mass fractions and volume expansion ratio.« less

  11. A comparison of simple shear characterization methods for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Brinson, H. F.

    1978-01-01

    Various methods for the shear stress/strain characterization of composite laminates are examined and their advantages and limitations are briefly discussed. Experimental results and the necessary accompanying analysis are then presented and compared for three simple shear characterization procedures. These are the off-axis tensile test method, the (+/- 45 deg)s tensile test method and the (0/90 deg)s symmetric rail shear test method. It is shown that the first technique indicates the shear properties of the graphite/epoxy laminates investigated are fundamentally brittle in nature while the latter two methods tend to indicate that these laminates are fundamentally ductile in nature. Finally, predictions of incrementally determined tensile stress/strain curves utilizing the various different shear behaviour methods as input information are presented and discussed.

  12. A comparison of simple shear characterization methods for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Brinson, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Various methods for the shear stress-strain characterization of composite laminates are examined, and their advantages and limitations are briefly discussed. Experimental results and the necessary accompanying analysis are then presented and compared for three simple shear characterization procedures. These are the off-axis tensile test method, the + or - 45 degs tensile test method and the 0 deg/90 degs symmetric rail shear test method. It is shown that the first technique indicates that the shear properties of the G/E laminates investigated are fundamentally brittle in nature while the latter two methods tend to indicate that the G/E laminates are fundamentally ductile in nature. Finally, predictions of incrementally determined tensile stress-strain curves utilizing the various different shear behavior methods as input information are presented and discussed.

  13. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  14. Nonlinear temperature dependent failure analysis of finite width composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarkar, A. P.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional, nonlinear elastic finite element stress analysis of finite width composite laminates including curing stresses is presented. Cross-ply, angle-ply, and two quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates are studied. Curing stresses are calculated using temperature dependent elastic properties that are input as percent retention curves, and stresses due to mechanical loading in the form of an axial strain are calculated using tangent modulii obtained by Ramberg-Osgood parameters. It is shown that curing stresses and stresses due to tensile loading are significant as edge effects in all types of laminate studies. The tensor polynomial failure criterion is used to predict the initiation of failure. The mode of failure is predicted by examining individual stress contributions to the tensor polynomial.

  15. An Historic Overview of the Development of Fibre Metal Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeeren, C. A. J. R.

    2003-07-01

    In this paper a brief overview of the history of Fibre Metal Laminates Arall and Glare is given as background information for the other, technical articles in this journal. The story of the development of Fibre Metal Laminates is rather a unique story in the history of aircraft materials: A university laboratory invented, developed and certified an aircraft material. Many parties were involved naturally, yet the very heart of the activity was the Structures and Materials Laboratory of the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering of Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands. At the break of the world's largest passenger transport aircraft, the Airbus A380, in which a substantial part of the fuselage will be made of Glare, the glass fibre-aluminium version of Fibre Metal Laminates, it is a good moment to tell some of its history.

  16. Design, fabrication, and characterization of laminated hydroxyapatite-polysulfone composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Clifford Adams, II

    There exists a need to develop devices that can be used to replace hard tissues, such as bone, in load-bearing areas of the body. An ideal hard tissue replacement device is one that stimulates growth of natural tissues, and is slowly resorbed by the body. The implant is also required to have elastic modulus, strength, and toughness values similar to the tissues being replaced. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is the primary mineral phase of bone and has the potential for use in biomedical applications because it stimulates cell growth and is resorbable. Unfortunately, HA is a relatively low strength, low toughness material, which limits its application to only low load-bearing regions of the body. In order to apply HA to greater load-bearing areas of the body, strength and toughness must be improved through the formation of a composite structure. The goal of this study to show that a composite structure formed from HA and a biocompatible polymer can be fabricated with strength and toughness values that are within the range necessary for load-bearing biomedical applications. Therefore, Polysulfone-HA composites were developed and tested. Polysulfone (PSu) is a hard, glassy polymer that has been shown to be biocompatible. Composites were fabricated through a combination of tape casting, solvent casting, and lamination. Monolithic HA and laminate specimens were tested in biaxial flexure. A unique laminate theory solution was developed to characterize stress distributions for laminates. Failure loads, failure stress, work of fracture, and apparent toughness were compared for the laminates against monolithic HA specimens. Initial testing results showed that laminates had a failure stress of 60 +/- 10, which is a 170% improvement over the 22 +/- 2 MPa failure stress for monolithic HA. The work of fracture was improved by 5500% from 11 +/- 2 for the monolithic HA to 612 +/- 240 for the laminates. Work of fracture values gave the laminates an apparent fracture toughness of 7.2 MPa•m1

  17. Understanding the laminated layer of larval Echinococcus I: structure.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Alvaro; Casaravilla, Cecilia; Irigoín, Florencia; Lin, Gerardo; Previato, José O; Ferreira, Fernando

    2011-05-01

    Echinococcus larvae are protected by a massive carbohydrate-rich acellular structure, called the laminated layer. In spite of being widely considered the crucial element of these host-parasite interfaces, the laminated layer has been historically poorly understood. In fact, it is still often called 'chitinous', 'hyaline' or 'cuticular' layer, or said to be composed of polysaccharides. However, over the past few years the laminated layer was found to be comprised of mucins bearing defined galactose-rich carbohydrates, and accompanied, in the case of Echinococcus granulosus, by calcium inositol hexakisphosphate deposits. In this review, the architecture and biosynthesis of this unusual structure is discussed at depth in terms of what is known and what needs to be discovered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms of compressive failure in woven composites and stitched laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, B. N.; Dadkhah, M. S.; Inman, R. V.; Morris, W. L.; Schroeder, S.

    1992-01-01

    Stitched laminates and angle interlock woven composites have been studied in uniaxial, in-plane, monotonic compression. Failure mechanisms have been found to depend strongly on both the reinforcement architecture and the degree of constraint imposed by the loading grips. Stitched laminates show higher compressive strength, but are brittle, possessing no load bearing capacity beyond the strain for peak load. Post-mortem inspection shows a localized shear band of buckled and broken fibers, which is evidently the product of an unstably propagating kink band. Similar shear bands are found in the woven composites if the constraint of lateral displacements is weak; but, under strong constraint, damage is not localized but distributed throughout the gauge section. While the woven composites tested are weaker than the stitched laminates, they continue to bear significant loads to compressive strains of approx. 15 percent, even when most damage is confined to a shear band.

  19. A mathematical model for the stressed state analysis of cylindrical laminated-composite pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Roman; Matyja, Tomasz

    An algorithm and a computer program have been developed for calculating the strength of pressure vessels made of laminated composites. Numerical results for pressure vessels of Kevlar 49 laminates are compared with experimental data in the literature.

  20. 40 CFR 426.70 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass laminating subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... resulting from the processes which laminate a plastic sheet between two layers of glass, and which prepare the glass for lamination such as cutting, bending and washing, to produce automobile windshields. ...

  1. 40 CFR 426.70 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass laminating subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... resulting from the processes which laminate a plastic sheet between two layers of glass, and which prepare the glass for lamination such as cutting, bending and washing, to produce automobile windshields. ...

  2. 40 CFR 426.70 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass laminating subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... resulting from the processes which laminate a plastic sheet between two layers of glass, and which prepare the glass for lamination such as cutting, bending and washing, to produce automobile windshields. ...

  3. Development of laminated fiber-reinforced nanocomposites for bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weijie

    There have been numerous efforts to develop synthetic and/or natural tissue engineering scaffolds that are suitable for bone regeneration applications to replace autograft and allograft bones. Current biomaterials as a scaffold for bone regeneration are limited by the extent of degradation concurrent with bone formation, mechanical strength, and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells migrating from the surrounding tissues. In this project, a novel laminated nanocomposite scaffold is fabricated, consisting of poly (L-lactide ethylene oxide fumarate) (PLEOF) hydrogel reinforced with poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun nanofibers and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles. PLEOF is a novel in situ crosslinkable macromer synthesized from biocompatible building units which can be functionalized with bioactive peptides like the cell-adhesive Arg--Gly--Asp (RGD) amino acid sequence. The hydrophilicity and degradation rate of the macromer can be tailored to a particular application by controlling the ratio of PEG to PLA blocks in the macromer and the unsaturated fumarate units can be used for in-situ crosslinking. The PLLA nanofibers were electrospun from high molecular weight PLLA. The laminated nanocomposites were fabricated by dry-hand lay up technique followed by compression molding and thermal crosslinking. The laminated nanocomposites were evaluated with respect to degradation, water uptake, mechanical strength, and the extent of osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. Laminates with or without HA nanoparticles showed modulus values much higher than that of trabecular bone (50-100 MPa). The effect of laminated nanocomposites on osteogenic differentiation of BMS cells was determined in terms of cell number, ALPase activity and calcium content. Our results demonstrate that grafting RGD peptide and HA nanoparticles to a PLEOF hydrogel reinforced with PLLA nanofibers synergistically enhance osteogenic differentiation of BMS

  4. Recycling of waste automotive laminated glass and valorization of polyvinyl butyral through mechanochemical separation.

    PubMed

    Swain, Basudev; Ryang Park, Jae; Yoon Shin, Dong; Park, Kyung-Soo; Hwan Hong, Myung; Gi Lee, Chan

    2015-10-01

    Due to strong binding, optical clarity, adhesion to many surfaces, toughness and flexibility polyvinyl butyral (PVB) resin films are commonly used in the automotive and architectural application as a protective interlayer in the laminated glass. Worldwide million tons of PVB waste generated from end-of-life automotive associated with various environmental issues. Stringent environmental directive, higher land cost eliminates land filling option, needs a study, we have developed a mechanochemical separation process to separate PVB resins from glass and characterized the separated PVB through various techniques, i.e., scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Commercial nonionic surfactants D201 used for the mechanochemical separation purpose. Through parameter optimization following conditions are considered to be the optimum condition; 30v ol% D201, stirring speed of 400 rpm, 35 °C temperature, operation time 1h, and dilute D201 volume to waste automotive laminated glass weight ratio of ≈25. The technology developed in our laboratory is sustainable, environmentally friendly, techno-economical feasible process, capable of mass production (recycling). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fracture Mechanics of Transverse Cracks and Edge Delamination in Graphite-Epoxy Composite Laminates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Fracture failure in multi-layer epoxy-based composite laminates seldom begins with breaking of the load-carrying reinforcing fibers. Rather, smeall...often observed sub-laminate fracture mudes in, e.g., glass-epoxy and graph- ite-epoxy composite laminates. Although these matrix-dominated crackings...the uicrostructures of any given fibrous composite , fracture analysis of sub-laminate cracks based on micro leanie [I Is almost Impossible If not

  6. Critical temperatures of hybrid laminates using finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chockalingam, S.; Mathew, T. C.; Singh, G.; Rao, G. V.

    1992-06-01

    Thermal buckling of antisymmetric cross-ply hybrid laminates is investigated. A one-dimensional finite element based on first-order shear deformation theory, having two nodes and six degrees of freedom per node, namely axial displacement, transverse displacements and rotation of the normal to the beam axis and their derivatives with respect to beam coordinate axis, is employed for this purpose. Various types of hybrid laminates with different combination of glass/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy and carbon/epoxy are considered. Effects of slenderness ratio, boundary conditions and lay-ups are studied in detail.

  7. Investigation and Modeling of Damage Growth in Composite Laminates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-25

    6t 27 51 FqTIRTION-At MODELING 1WF DAKA0GEtOTW#TN COMPOSITE LAMINATES..(U) VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INST AND STATE UV BLACKSBIJRG MATERIALS. UNCLASSIFIED...yiodeling of Damage Growth in Composite Lamina es :12. PERSONAL AUTHORIS) i K.L. Reifsnider, W.W. Stinchcomb, C.E. Bakis, H.R. Yih, Doron Shalev - - 13...boundary layer near a hole in composite laminates has been completed. And a brief study of the applicability of chaos theory to damage development

  8. Reliability analysis of laminated CMC components through shell subelement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starlinger, A.; Duffy, S. F.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    An updated version of the integrated design program C/CARES (composite ceramic analysis and reliability evaluation of structures) was developed for the reliability evaluation of CMC laminated shell components. The algorithm is now split in two modules: a finite-element data interface program and a reliability evaluation algorithm. More flexibility is achieved, allowing for easy implementation with various finite-element programs. The new interface program from the finite-element code MARC also includes the option of using hybrid laminates and allows for variations in temperature fields throughout the component.

  9. The fatigue behavior of composite laminates under various mean stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotem, A.

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed for predicting the S-N curve of a composite laminate which is subjected to an arbitrary stress ratio, R (minimum stress/maximum stress). The method is based on the measuring of the S-N behavior of two distinct cases, tension-tension and compression-compression fatigue loadings. Using these parameters, expressions are formulated that estimate the fatigue behavior under any stress ratio loading. Experimental results from the testing of graphite/epoxy laminates, with various structures, are compared with the predictions and show good agreement.

  10. Delamination Behavior of L-Shaped Laminated Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geleta, Tsinuel N.; Woo, Kyeongsik; Lee, Bongho

    2018-05-01

    We studied the delamination behavior of L-shaped laminated composites numerically and experimentally. In finite-element modeling, cohesive zone modeling was used to simulate the delamination of plies. Cohesive elements were inserted between bulk elements at each interlayer to represent the occurrence of multiple delaminations. The laminated composite models were subjected to several types of loading inducing opening and shearing types of delamination. Numerical results were compared to those in the literature and of experiments conducted in this study. The results were carefully examined to investigate diverse delamination initiation and propagation behaviors. The effect of varying presence and location of pre-crack was also studied.

  11. Laminated structures and methods and compositions for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Fumei, Giancarlo J.; Karabedian, James A.

    1977-04-05

    Methods for bonding two substrates, one of which is polymeric, which comprise coating the surface of at least one substrate with an adhesive composition comprising a major component which is an adhesive for the first substrate and a minor disperse phase which is a solution of a polymer in a solvent for the polymeric substrate and contacting the coated surface of the one substrate with the surface of the other substrate, together with adhesive compositions useful for joining such substrates, laminates so formed, and articles comprised of such laminates.

  12. Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT) code: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Morel, M. R.; Saravanos, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The User's Manual for the Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT) program is presented. The code is capable of tailoring the fabrication process, constituent characteristics, and laminate parameters (individually or concurrently) for a wide variety of metal matrix composite (MMC) materials, to improve the performance and identify trends or behavior of MMC's under different thermo-mechanical loading conditions. This document is meant to serve as a guide in the use of the MMLT code. Detailed explanations of the composite mechanics and tailoring analysis are beyond the scope of this document, and may be found in the references. MMLT was developed by the Structural Mechanics Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC).

  13. Effect of microstructural damage on ply stresses in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. H.; Nottorf, E. W.; Harris, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in damage and failure of laminated orthotropic composites are investigated theoretically. The continuum model developed accounts for both matrix cracks and interply delamination using second-order tensor-valued internal-state variables based on the locally averaged microcrack dynamics. The derivation of the model is given in detail, and numerical results for sample problems are presented in extensive graphs and tables. The model is shown to be effective in predicting stresses at the ply level, and significant damage-induced decreases in laminate stress states are found.

  14. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of graphite epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasonic techniques are summarized with applications to the measurement of frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter and to the NDE of composite laminates. Results are listed for the ultrasonic NDE of graphite-epoxy composite laminates including impact and fatigue damage as well as porosity. The methods reviewed include transmission measurements of attenuation, reconstructive tomography based on attenuation, estimating attenuation from backscattered ultrasound, and backscatter approaches. Phase-sensitive and -insensitive detection techniques are mentioned such as phase cancellation at piezoelectric receiving transducers and acoustoelectric effects. The techniques permit the NDE of the parameters listed in inhomogeneous media and provide both images from the transmission mode and in the reflection mode.

  15. Accelerated telomere shortening and replicative senescence in human fibroblasts overexpressing mutant and wild-type lamin A

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. Tomore » our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectable WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes.« less

  16. Assessment and maintenance of a 15 year old stress-laminated timber bridge

    Treesearch

    T. Russell Gentry; Karl N. Brohammer; John Wells; James P. Wacker

    2006-01-01

    A timber bridge consisting of three 6.7 meter spans with a stress laminated deck was constructed in 1991 in the Spirit Creek State Forest near August, Georgia, USA. The stress laminated bridge uses a series of post-tensioning bars to hold the laminations together. The bridge remained in service until 2001 with no maintenance, at which time the bridge was inspected,...

  17. Analysis of interlaminar stresses in thick composite laminates with and without edge delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of laminate thickness on the interlaminar stresses in rectangular quasi-isotropic laminates under uniform axial strain was studied. Laminates from 8-ply to infinitely thick were analyzed. Thick laminates were synthesized by stacking (45/0/-45/90) ply groups, rather than grouping like plies. Laminates with and without delaminations were studied. In laminates without delaminations, the free-edge interlaminar normal stress distribution in the outer ply groups was insensitive to total laminate thickness. The interlaminar normal stress distribution for the interior ply groups was nearly the same as for an infinitely thick laminate. In contrast, the free-edge inter-laminar shear stress distribution was nearly the same for inner and outer ply groups and was insensitive to laminate thickness. In laminates with delaminations those delaminations near the top and bottom surfaces of a thick laminate have much larger total strain-energy-release rates (G sub t) and mode I-to-total (G sub t/G sub t) ratios than delaminations deep in the interior. Therefore, delaminations can be expected to grow more easily near the surfaces of a laminate than in the interior.

  18. 77 FR 61025 - Certain Prepregs, Laminates, and Finished Circuit Boards: Notice of Institution of Formal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-659] Certain Prepregs, Laminates, and Finished..., and the sale within the United States after importation of certain prepregs, laminates, and finished... for sale, and selling for importation into the United States prepregs and laminates that are the...

  19. Ancient Eukaryotic Origin and Evolutionary Plasticity of Nuclear Lamina

    PubMed Central

    Field, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The emergence of the nucleus was a major event of eukaryogenesis. How the nuclear envelope (NE) arose and acquired functions governing chromatin organization and epigenetic control has direct bearing on origins of developmental/stage-specific expression programs. The configuration of the NE and the associated lamina in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) is of major significance and can provide insight into activities within the LECA nucleus. Subsequent lamina evolution, alterations, and adaptations inform on the variation and selection of distinct mechanisms that subtend gene expression in distinct taxa. Understanding lamina evolution has been difficult due to the diversity and limited taxonomic distributions of the three currently known highly distinct nuclear lamina. We rigorously searched available sequence data for an expanded view of the distribution of known lamina and lamina-associated proteins. While the lamina proteins of plants and trypanosomes are indeed taxonomically restricted, homologs of metazoan lamins and key lamin-binding proteins have significantly broader distributions, and a lamin gene tree supports vertical evolution from the LECA. Two protist lamins from highly divergent taxa target the nucleus in mammalian cells and polymerize into filamentous structures, suggesting functional conservation of distant lamin homologs. Significantly, a high level of divergence of lamin homologs within certain eukaryotic groups and the apparent absence of lamins and/or the presence of seemingly different lamina proteins in many eukaryotes suggests great evolutionary plasticity in structures at the NE, and hence mechanisms of chromatin tethering and epigenetic gene control. PMID:27189989

  20. A method for observing gas evolution during plastic laminate cure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, A. H.

    1969-01-01

    Polyimide, phenolic, and other resins which develop volatiles during laminating or molding cure are studied using optimum cure cycles. The specimen is placed on a platen and sealed in a plastic bag, then heated and observed for gas evolution using a binocular microscope. A cover plate is added to sumulate an autoclave.

  1. Thermoviscoelastic characterization and prediction of Kevlar/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramoll, K. C.; Dillard, D. A.; Brinson, H. F.

    1990-01-01

    The thermoviscoelastic characterization of Kevlar 49/Fiberite 7714A epoxy composite lamina and the development of a numerical procedure to predict the viscoelastic response of any general laminate constructed from the same material were studied. The four orthotropic material properties, S sub 11, S sub 12, S sub 22, and S sub 66, were characterized by 20 minute static creep tests on unidirectional (0) sub 8, (10) sub 8, and (90) sub 16 lamina specimens. The Time-Temperature Superposition-Principle (TTSP) was used successfully to accelerate the characterization process. A nonlinear constitutive model was developed to describe the stress dependent viscoelastic response for each of the material properties. A numerical procedure to predict long term laminate properties from lamina properties (obtained experimentally) was developed. Numerical instabilities and time constraints associated with viscoelastic numerical techniques were discussed and solved. The numerical procedure was incorporated into a user friendly microcomputer program called Viscoelastic Composite Analysis Program (VCAP), which is available for IBM PC type computers. The program was designed for ease of use. The final phase involved testing actual laminates constructed from the characterized material, Kevlar/epoxy, at various temperatures and load level for 4 to 5 weeks. These results were compared with the VCAP program predictions to verify the testing procedure and to check the numerical procedure used in the program. The actual tests and predictions agreed for all test cases which included 1, 2, 3, and 4 fiber direction laminates.

  2. Chapter 1: CLT Introduction to cross-laminated timber

    Treesearch

    Sylvan Gagnon; E.M.(Ted) Bilek; Lisa Podesto; Pablo Crespell

    2013-01-01

    Cross-laminated timber ( CLT), a new generation of engineered wood product developed initially in Europe, has been gaining increased popularity in residential and non-residential applications in several countries. Many impressive low- and mid-rise buildings built around the world using CLT showcase the many advantages this product has to offer to the construction...

  3. Dynamic delamination crack propagation in a graphite/epoxy laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, J. E.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic delamination crack propagation in a (90/0) 5s Graphite/Epoxy laminate with an embedded interfacial crack was investigated experimentally using high speed photography. The dynamic motion was produced by impacting the beamlike laminate specimen with a silicon rubber ball. The threshold impact velocities required to initiate dynamic crack propagation in laminates with varying initial crack positions were determined. The crack propagation speeds were estimated from the photographs. Results show that the through the thickness position of the embedded crack can significantly affect the dominant mechanism and the threshold impact velocity for the onset of crack movement. If the initial delamination is placed near the top of bottom surface of the laminate, local buckling of the delaminated plies may cause instability of the crack. If the initial delamination lies on the midplane, local buckling does not occur and the initiation of crack propagation appears to be dominated by Mode II fracture. The crack propagation and arrest observed was seen to be affected by wave motion within the delamination region.

  4. Low Velocity Impact Damage to Carbon/Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2011-01-01

    Impact damage tends to be more detrimental to a laminate's compression strength as compared to tensile strength. Proper use of Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) Techniques can remove conservatism (weight) from many structures. Test largest components economically feasible as coupons. If damage tolerance is a driver, then consider different resin systems. Do not use a single knockdown factor to account for damage.

  5. Direct deposit laminate nanocomposites with enhanced propellent properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyu; Guerieri, Philip; Zhou, Wenbo; Huang, Chuan; Zachariah, Michael R

    2015-05-06

    One of the challenges in the use of energetic nanoparticles within a polymer matrix for propellant applications is obtaining high particle loading (high energy density) while maintaining mechanical integrity and reactivity. In this study, we explore a new strategy that utilizes laminate structures. Here, a laminate of alternating layers of aluminum nanoparticle (Al-NPs)/copper oxide nanoparticle (CuO-NPs) thermites in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) reactive binder, with a spacer layer of PVDF was fabricated by a electrospray layer-by-layer deposition method. The deposited layers containing up to 60 wt % Al-NPs/CuO-NPs thermite are found to be uniform and mechanically flexible. Both the reactive and mechanical properties of laminate significantly outperformed the single-layer structure with the same material composition. These results suggest that deploying a multilayer laminate structure enables the incorporation of high loadings of energetic materials and, in some cases, enhances the reactive properties over the corresponding homogeneous structure. These results imply that an additive manufacturing approach may yield significant advantages in developing a tailored architecture for advanced propulsion systems.

  6. Evaluation of laminated aluminum plate for shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    Flaw growth behavior in roll diffusion bonded and adhesive bonded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy was compared to that in monolothic 2219-T87. Based on tests at 40 KSI cyclic stress, for equivalent cyclic life, a .004 interlayer laminate can tolerate a surface flaw twice as wide as in monolithic material, or provide an 8% weight saving by operating at higher stress for the same initial flaw. Roll diffusion bonded material with three structural plies of 2219-T87 and two interlayers of 1100 aluminum was prepared with interlayer thicknesses of .004, .007 and .010 in. Total laminate thickness was .130 in. The .004 interlayer laminate was most effective and gave better results than monolithic material at 40 and 48 ksi. Adhesive bonded specimens were fabricated of three sheets of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy bonded with METLBOND 329 adhesive. Adhesive bonded specimens gave longer lives to failure than diffusion bonded specimens at 40 ksi the diffusion bonded material was superior. Flaws initiated in one ply of the laminate grew to the edges of the specimen in that ply but did not propagate into adjacent plies.

  7. Bending strength of water-soaked glued laminated beams

    Treesearch

    Ronald W. Wolfe; Russell C. Moody

    1978-01-01

    The effects of water soaking on the bending strength and stiffness of laminated timber were determined by deriving wet-dry ratios for these properties. Values for these ratios, when compared to currently recommended wet use factors, confirm the value now used for modulus of rupture. For modulus of elasticity, the reduction due to water soaking was found to be less than...

  8. Design of Multiple Bolted Connections for Laminated Veneer Lumber

    Treesearch

    Borjen Yeh; Douglas Rammer; Jeff Linville

    2014-01-01

    The design of multiple bolted connections in accordance with Appendix E of the National Design Specification for Wood Construction (NDS) has incorporated provisions for evaluating localized member failure modes of row and group tear-out when the connections are closely spaced. Originally based on structural glued laminated timber (glulam) members made with all L1...

  9. Chapter 5: Connections Connections in cross-laminated timber buildings

    Treesearch

    Mohammad Mohammad; Bradford Douglas; Douglas Rammer; Steven E. Pryor

    2013-01-01

    The light weight of cross-laminated timber (CLT) products combined with the high level of prefabrication involved, in addition to the need to provide wood-based alternative products and systems to steel land concrete, have significantly contributed to the development of CLT products and systems, especially in mid-rise buildings (5 to 9 stories). While this product is...

  10. Finite element analyses of wood laminated composite poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; R.C. Tang; Chung Y. Hse

    2005-01-01

    Finite element analyses using ANSYS were conducted on orthotropic, polygonal, wood laminated composite poles subjected to a body force and a concentrated load at the free end. Deflections and stress distributions of small-scale and full-size composite poles were analyzed and compared to the results obtained in an experimental study. The predicted deflection for both...

  11. Repair of white oak glued-laminated beams

    Treesearch

    Lawrence A. Soltis; Robert J. Ross

    1999-01-01

    Connections between steel side plates and white oak glued-laminated beams subjected to tension perpendicular-to-grain stresses were tested to failure. The beams were then repaired with five different configurations using two sizes of lag screws, with and without steel reinforcing plates. The repaired beams were re-tested to failure. Results indicate that in all...

  12. Theoretical modeling and experimental analyses of laminated wood composite poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Vijaya Gopu; Chung Y. Hse

    2005-01-01

    Wood laminated composite poles consist of trapezoid-shaped wood strips bonded with synthetic resin. The thick-walled hollow poles had adequate strength and stiffness properties and were a promising substitute for solid wood poles. It was necessary to develop theoretical models to facilitate the manufacture and future installation and maintenance of this novel...

  13. Buckling analysis for anisotropic laminated plates under combined inplane loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanathan, A. V.; Tamekuni, M.; Baker, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The buckling analysis presented considers rectangular flat or curved general laminates subjected to combined inplane normal and shear loads. Linear theory is used in the analysis. All prebuckling deformations and any initial imperfections are ignored. The analysis method can be readily extended to longitudinally stiffened structures subjected to combined inplane normal and shear loads.

  14. Southern pine veneer laminates at various moduli of elasticity

    Treesearch

    George E. Woodson

    1972-01-01

    Modulus of rigidity (GLT) of veneer laminates was shown to be unrelated to dynamic modulus of elasticity (Ed) of single veneers and also, within the range of samples tested, unrelated to specific gravity. Values determined by flexure test (GLR) were consistent with those from standard plate shear...

  15. Chapter 4: Lateral design of cross-laminated timber buildings

    Treesearch

    John W. van de Lindt; Douglas Rammer; Marjan Popovski; Phil Line; Shiling Pei; Steven E. Pryor

    2013-01-01

    Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is an innovative wood product that was developed approximately two decades ago in Europe and has since been gaining in popularity. Based on the experience of European researchers and designers, it is believed that CLT can provide the U.S. market the opportunity to build mid- and high-rise wood buildings. This Chapter presents a summary of...

  16. Polarized light reveals stress in machined laminated plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J.

    1967-01-01

    Polarized light applied to drilled laminated plastic components exposes to the human eye the locked-in stresses that will result in fractures and delaminations when the soldering procedure takes place. This technique detects stresses early in the production cycle before appreciable man-hours are invested in an item destined for rejection.

  17. Pressure Modeling of Char-Forming and Laminated Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    flame spread rates for various types of materials. For instance, the PMMA fuel used for the laminated wall fires in the present study has a pyroly - sis...thermal conduction and pyroly - sis with one-step Arrhenius kinetics. This numerical procedure is documented in detail in Appendix A, which is taken from

  18. Computational Fatigue Life Analysis of Carbon Fiber Laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastry, Shrimukhi G.; Chandrashekara, C. V., Dr.

    2018-02-01

    In the present scenario, many traditional materials are being replaced by composite materials for its light weight and high strength properties. Industries like automotive industry, aerospace industry etc., are some of the examples which uses composite materials for most of its components. Replacing of components which are subjected to static load or impact load are less challenging compared to components which are subjected to dynamic loading. Replacing the components made up of composite materials demands many stages of parametric study. One such parametric study is the fatigue analysis of composite material. This paper focuses on the fatigue life analysis of the composite material by using computational techniques. A composite plate is considered for the study which has a hole at the center. The analysis is carried on (0°/90°/90°/90°/90°)s laminate sequence and (45°/-45°)2s laminate sequence by using a computer script. The life cycles for both the lay-up sequence are compared with each other. It is observed that, for the same material and geometry of the component, cross ply laminates show better fatigue life than that of angled ply laminates.

  19. Development of High Performance CFRP/Metal Active Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi; Haga, Osamu; Imori, Masataka

    This paper describes development of high performance CFRP/metal active laminates mainly by investigating the kind and thickness of the metal. Various types of the laminates were made by hot-pressing of an aluminum, aluminum alloys, a stainless steel and a titanium for the metal layer as a high CTE material, a unidirectional CFRP prepreg as a low CTE/electric resistance heating material, a unidirectional KFRP prepreg as a low CTE/insulating material. The aluminum and its alloy type laminates have almost the same and the highest room temperature curvatures and they linearly change with increasing temperature up to their fabrication temperature. The curvature of the stainless steel type jumps from one to another around its fabrication temperature, whereas the titanium type causes a double curvature and its change becomes complicated. The output force of the stainless steel type attains the highest of the three under the same thickness. The aluminum type successfully increased its output force by increasing its thickness and using its alloys. The electric resistance of the CFRP layer can be used to monitor the temperature, that is, the curvature of the active laminate because the curvature is a function of temperature.

  20. Mechanical properties of small-scale wood laminated composite poles

    Treesearch

    Cheng Piao; Todd F. Shupe; Chung Y. Hse

    2004-01-01

    Power companies in the United States consume millions of solid wood poles every year. These poles are from high-valued trees that are becoming more expensive and less available. wood laminated composite poles (LCP) are a novel alternative to solid wood poles. LCP consists of trapezoid wood strips that are bonded by a synthetic resin. The wood strips can be made from...

  1. Geochemistry records from laminated sediments of Shira Lake (Russian Asia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phedorin, M.; Vologina, E.; Drebuschak, M.; Tolomeev, A.; Kirichenko, I.; Toyabin, A.

    2009-04-01

    We measured downcore elements distributions in five cores collected across the Shira Lake situated in Central part of Asia (E90o12', N54o30'). The lake is small (32km2), saline (ca.20g/l SO4-, Cl-, Na+, Mg+, K+), being filled with regional precipitation of about 300mm/year (mainly through one major tributary, river Son) and has no surface outflow. The aim of our study was to reconstruct history of changes in the regime of the lake that happened both before and during period of instrumental meteorological observations. In particular, we were interested in lake-level changes due to evaporation, water supply from surface and from underground sources, and in changes of bioproduction in the lake as well. To construct depth-age model for the cores, we measured Cs-137 and unsupported Pb-210 in top layers of the cores. The sedimentation rate thus identified varied in the range of 1-2 mm/year for different cores. We visually observed fine sedimentation ‘rhythms' having thickness of about 0.x-2.x mm: these layers may now be reliably identified as annual lamination. We also determined concentrations of elements in the sediments by recording x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra when continuously scanning the halves of the cores under sharp synchrotron radiation (SR) beam, using an instrument described in (Zolotarev et al., 2001). The resolution of the scanning was 0.1 mm. After processing of the measured XRF-SR data as in (Phedorin and Goldberg, 2005) we obtained downcore records of 20 elements. We correlated all five cores employing elements patterns. We qualitatively identified variations in surface-water supply treating markers of ‘clastic' material (Ti, Rb, Zr). We identified downcore variations in authgenic mineralization, which appeared to have different kinds: Ca-related, Sr-related, Ba-related, Fe-related. We tried to assess biogenic production changes from Br distribution, admitting analogy of Br in Shira sediments to Br in Lake Baikal sediments (Phedorin et al., 2000

  2. An experimental investigation on the three-point bending behavior of composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Azzam; W, Li

    2014-08-01

    The response of composite laminate structure to three-point bending load was investigated by subjecting two types of stacking sequences of composite laminate structure by using electronic universal tester (Type: WDW-20) machine. Optical microscope was selected in order to characterize bending damage, delamination, and damage shapes in composite laminate structures. The results showed that the [0/90/-45/45]2s exhibits a brittle behavior, while other laminates exhibit a progressive failure mode consisting of fiber failure, debonding (splitting), and delamination. The [45/45/90/0]2s laminate has a highly nonlinear load- displacement curve due to compressive yielding.

  3. A Micromechanics-Based Damage Model for [+/- Theta/90n]s Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayugo, Joan-Andreu; Camanho, Pedro P.; Maimi, Pere; Davila, Carlos G.

    2006-01-01

    A new damage model based on a micromechanical analysis of cracked [+/- Theta/90n]s laminates subjected to multiaxial loads is proposed. The model predicts the onset and accumulation of transverse matrix cracks in uniformly stressed laminates, the effect of matrix cracks on the stiffness of the laminate, as well as the ultimate failure of the laminate. The model also accounts for the effect of the ply thickness on the ply strength. Predictions relating the elastic properties of several laminates and multiaxial loads are presented.

  4. Mechanics of damping for fiber composite laminates including hygro-thermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated mechanics theory has been developed for the modeling of composite damping from the micromechanics to the laminate level. Simplified, design oriented equations based on hysteretic damping are presented for on-axis plies, off-axis plies, and laminates including the effect of temperature, moisture, and interply hysteretic damping. The temperature rise within vibrating composite laminates resulting from strain energy dissipation is also modeled, and their coupled hygro-thermo-mechanical response is predicted. The method correlates well with reported damping measurements. Application examples illustrate the effect of various ply, laminate, and hygro-thermal parameters on the overall damping performance of composite laminates.

  5. Mechanics of damping for fiber composite laminates including hygro-thermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated mechanics theory was developed for the modeling of composite damping from the micromechanics to the laminate level. Simplified, design oriented equations based on hysteretic damping are presented for on-axis plies, off-axis plies, and laminates including the effect of temperature, moisture, and interply hysteretic damping. The temperature rise within vibrating composite laminates resulting from strain energy dissipation is also modeled, and their coupled hygro-thermo-mechanical response is predicted. The method correlates well with reported damping measurements. Application examples illustrate the effect of various ply, laminate, and hygro-thermal parameters on the overall damping performance of composite laminates.

  6. Preliminary investigation of crack arrest in composite laminates containing buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties of some hybrid buffer strip laminates and the crack arrest potential of laminates containing buffer strips were determined. The hybrid laminates consisted of graphite with either S-glass, E-glass, or Kevlar. Unnotched tensile coupons and center-cracked fracture coupons were tested. Elastic properties, complete stress/strain curves, and critical stress intensity values are given. The measured elastic properties compare well with those calculated by classical lamination theory for laminates with linear stress/strain behavior. The glass hybrids had more delamination and higher fracture toughness than the all-graphite or the Kevlar hybrid.

  7. A limiting analysis for edge effects in angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, P. W.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    A zeroth order solution for edge effects in angle ply composite laminates using perturbation techniques and a limiting free body approach was developed. The general method of solution for laminates is developed and then applied to the special case of a graphite/epoxy laminate. Interlaminar stress distributions are obtained as a function of the laminate thickness to width ratio h/b and compared to existing numerical results. The solution predicts stable, continuous stress distributions, determines finite maximum tensile interlaminar normal stress for two laminates, and provides mathematical evidence for singular interlaminar shear stresses.

  8. Analysis of local delaminations and their influence on composite laminate behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    An equation was derived for the strain energy release rate, G, associated with local delamination growth from a matrix ply crack. The critical GC for edge delamination onset in 25/902s graphite epoxy laminates was measured and used in this equation to predict local delamination onset strains in 25/90ns, n = 4, 6, 8 laminates. A simple technique for predicting strain concentrations in the primary load bearing plies near local delaminations was developed. These strain concentrations were responsible for reduced laminate nominal failure strains in laminates containing local delaminations. The influence of edge delamination and matrix crack tip delamination on laminate stiffness and strength was compared.

  9. Analysis of local delaminations and their influence on composite laminate behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    An equation was derived for the strain energy release rate, G, associated with local delamination growth from a matrix ply crack. The critical GC for edge delamination onset in 25/902s graphite epoxy laminates was measured and used in this equation to predict local delamination onset strains in 25/90ns, n = 4, 6, 8 laminates. A simple technique for predicting strain concentrations in the primary load bearing plies near local delaminations was developed. These strain concentrations were responsible for reduced laminate nominal failure strains in laminates containing local delaminations. The influence of edge delamination and matrix crack tip delamination on laminate stiffness and strength was compared.

  10. Concurrent material-fabrication optimization of metal-matrix laminates under thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Morel, M. R.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is developed to tailor fabrication and material parameters of metal-matrix laminates for maximum loading capacity under thermomechanical loads. The stresses during the thermomechanical response are minimized subject to failure constrains and bounds on the laminate properties. The thermomechanical response of the laminate is simulated using nonlinear composite mechanics. Evaluations of the method on a graphite/copper symmetric cross-ply laminate were performed. The cross-ply laminate required different optimum fabrication procedures than a unidirectional composite. Also, the consideration of the thermomechanical cycle had a significant effect on the predicted optimal process.

  11. Amyloid domains in the cell nucleus controlled by nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 reveal a new pathway of mercury neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Arnhold, Florian; Gührs, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a bioaccumulating trace metal that globally circulates the atmosphere and waters in its elemental, inorganic and organic chemical forms. While Hg represents a notorious neurotoxicant, the underlying cellular pathways are insufficiently understood. We identify amyloid protein aggregation in the cell nucleus as a novel pathway of Hg-bio-interactions. By mass spectrometry of purified protein aggregates, a subset of spliceosomal components and nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 were detected as constituent parts of an Hg-induced nuclear aggregome network. The aggregome network was located by confocal imaging of amyloid-specific antibodies and dyes to amyloid cores within splicing-speckles that additionally recruit components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Hg significantly enhances global proteasomal activity in the nucleus, suggesting that formation of amyloid speckles plays a role in maintenance of protein homeostasis. RNAi knock down showed that lamin B1 for its part regulates amyloid speckle formation and thus likewise participates in nuclear protein homeostasis. As the Hg-induced cascade of interactions between the nucleoskeleton and protein homeostasis reduces neuronal signalling, amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus is introduced as a feature of Hg-neurotoxicity that opens new avenues of future research. Similar to protein aggregation events in the cytoplasm that are controlled by the cytoskeleton, amyloid fibrillation of nuclear proteins may be driven by the nucleoskeleton. PMID:25699204

  12. 21 CFR 177.1390 - Laminate structures for use at temperatures of 250 °F and above.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Laminate structures for use at temperatures of 250 °F and above. (a) The high-temperature laminates... of layers. These layers may be laminated, extruded, coextruded, or fused. (b) When containers subject... produced from high-temperature laminates may be safely used to package all food types except those...

  13. Analysis and experiments for composite laminates with holes and subjected to 4-point bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Prasad, C. B.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results are presented for composite laminates with a hole and subjected to four-point bending. A finite-plate analysis is used to predict moment and strain distributions for six-layer quasi-isotropic laminates and transverse-ply laminates. Experimental data are compared with the analytical results. Experimental and analytical strain results show good agreement for the quasi-isotropic laminates. Failure of the two types of composite laminates is described, and failure strain results are presented as a function of normalized hole diameter. The failure results suggest that the initial failure mechanism for laminates subjected to four-point bending are similar to the initial failure mechanisms for corresponding laminates subjected to uniaxial inplane loadings.

  14. Fission yeast Lem2 and Man1 perform fundamental functions of the animal cell nuclear lamina.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Yanira; Saito, Akira; Sazer, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    In animal cells the nuclear lamina, which consists of lamins and lamin-associated proteins, serves several functions: it provides a structural scaffold for the nuclear envelope and tethers proteins and heterochromatin to the nuclear periphery. In yeast, proteins and large heterochromatic domains including telomeres are also peripherally localized, but there is no evidence that yeast have lamins or a fibrous nuclear envelope scaffold. Nonetheless, we found that the Lem2 and Man1 proteins of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, evolutionarily distant relatives of the Lap2/Emerin/Man1 (LEM) sub-family of animal cell lamin-associated proteins, perform fundamental functions of the animal cell lamina. These integral inner nuclear membrane localized proteins, with nuclear localized DNA binding Helix-Extension-Helix (HEH) domains, impact nuclear envelope structure and integrity, are essential for the enrichment of telomeres at the nuclear periphery and by means of their HEH domains anchor chromatin, most likely transcriptionally repressed heterochromatin, to the nuclear periphery. These data indicate that the core functions of the nuclear lamina are conserved between fungi and animal cells and can be performed in fission yeast, without lamins or other intermediate filament proteins.

  15. Preparation of Chitin-PLA laminated composite for implantable application.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, Romana; Biswas, Shanta; Rashid, Taslim Ur; Afrin, Sanjida; Jahan, Rumana Akhter; Haque, Papia; Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur

    2017-12-01

    The present study explores the possibilities of using locally available inexpensive waste prawn shell derived chitin reinforced and bioabsorbable polylactic acid (PLA) laminated composites to develop new materials with excellent mechanical and thermal properties for implantable application such as in bone or dental implant. Chitin at different concentration (1-20% of PLA) reinforced PLA films (CTP) were fabricated by solvent casting process and laminated chitin-PLA composites (LCTP) were prepared by laminating PLA film (obtained by hot press method) with CTP also by hot press method at 160 °C. The effect of variation of chitin concentration on the resulting laminated composite's behavior was investigated. The detailed physico-mechanical, surface morphology and thermal were assessed with different characterization technique such as FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TGA. The FTIR spectra showed the characteristic peaks for chitin and PLA in the composites. SEM images showed an excellent dispersion of chitin in the films and composites. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the complete degradation of chitin, PLA film, 5% chitin reinforced PLA film (CTP2) and LCTP are 98%, 95%, 87% and 98% respectively at temperature of 500 °C. The tensile strength of the LCTP was found 25.09 MPa which is significantly higher than pure PLA film (18.55 MPa) and CTP2 film (8.83 MPa). After lamination of pure PLA and CTP2 film, the composite (LCTP) yielded 0.265-1.061% water absorption from 30 min to 24 h immerse in water that is much lower than PLA and CTP. The increased mechanical properties of the laminated films with the increase of chitin content indicated good dispersion of chitin into PLA and strong interfacial actions between the polymer and chitin. The improvement of mechanical properties and the results of antimicrobial and cytotoxicity of the composites also evaluated and revealed the composite would be a suitable candidate for implant application in biomedical sector.

  16. Defects of Lipid Synthesis Are Linked to the Age-Dependent Demyelination Caused by Lamin B1 Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Hernandez, Marylens; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Nmezi, Bruce C.; Lu, Yue; Estécio, Marcos R. H.; Lin, Kevin; Chen, Junda; He, Rong-Rong; Gong, Pin; Rigatti, Lora H.; Dupree, Jeffrey; Bayır, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E.; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Lamin B1 is a component of the nuclear lamina and plays a critical role in maintaining nuclear architecture, regulating gene expression and modulating chromatin positioning. We have previously shown that LMNB1 gene duplications cause autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD), a fatal adult onset demyelinating disease. The mechanisms by which increased LMNB1 levels cause ADLD are unclear. To address this, we used a transgenic mouse model where Lamin B1 overexpression is targeted to oligodendrocytes. These mice showed severe vacuolar degeneration of the spinal cord white matter together with marked astrogliosis, microglial infiltration, and secondary axonal damage. Oligodendrocytes in the transgenic mice revealed alterations in histone modifications favoring a transcriptionally repressed state. Chromatin changes were accompanied by reduced expression of genes involved in lipid synthesis pathways, many of which are known to play important roles in myelin regulation and are preferentially expressed in oligodendrocytes. Decreased lipogenic gene expression resulted in a significant reduction in multiple classes of lipids involved in myelin formation. Many of these gene expression changes and lipid alterations were observed even before the onset of the phenotype, suggesting a causal role. Our findings establish, for the first time, a link between LMNB1 and lipid synthesis in oligodendrocytes, and provide a mechanistic framework to explain the age dependence and white matter involvement of the disease phenotype. These results have implications for disease pathogenesis and may also shed light on the regulation of lipid synthesis pathways in myelin maintenance and turnover. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is fatal neurological disorder caused by increased levels of the nuclear protein, Lamin B1. The disease is characterized by an age-dependent loss of myelin, the fatty sheath that covers nerve fibers. We have studied a mouse model where Lamin B

  17. Evaluation of failure criterion for graphite/epoxy fabric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Wharram, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis is described. Emphasis is given to the fabrication and testing of Narmco Rigidite 5208-WT300, a plain weave fabric of Thornel 300 Graphite fibers impregnated with Narmco 5208 Resin. The quadratic-failure criterion with F sub 12=0 provides accurate estimates of failure stresses for the graphite/epoxy investigated. The cubic failure criterion was recast into an operationally easier form, providing design curves that can be applied to laminates fabricated from orthotropic woven fabric prepregs. In the form presented, no interaction strength tests are required, although recourse to the quadratic model and the principal strength parameters is necessary. However, insufficient test data exist at present to generalize this approach for all prepreg constructions, and its use must be restricted to the generic materials and configurations investigated to date.

  18. Development of failure criterion for Kevlar-epoxy fabric laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Elliott, W. G.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis is discussed. In particular, emphasis is given to the fabrication and testing of Kevlar-49 fabric (Style 285)/Narmco 5208 Epoxy. The quadratic-failure criterion with F(12)=0 provides accurate estimates of failure stresses for the Kevlar/Epoxy investigated. The cubic failure criterion was re-cast into an operationally easier form, providing the engineer with design curves that can be applied to laminates fabricated from unidirectional prepregs. In the form presented no interaction strength tests are required, although recourse to the quadratic model and the principal strength parameters is necessary. However, insufficient test data exists at present to generalize this approach for all undirectional prepregs and its use must be restricted to the generic materials investigated to-date.

  19. Hygrothermal influence on delamination behavior of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Ishai, O.

    1985-01-01

    The hygrothermal effect on the fracture behavior of graphite-epoxy laminates was investigated to develop a methodology for damage tolerance predictions in advanced composite materials. Several T300/934 laminates were tested using a number of specimen configurations to evaluate the effects of temperature and humidity on delamination fracture toughness under mode 1 and mode 2 loading. It is indicated that moisture has a slightly beneficial influence on fracture toughness or critical strain energy release rate during mode 1 delamination, but has a slightly deleterious effect on mode 2 delamination, and mode 1 transverse cracking. The failed specimens are examined by SEM and topographical differences due to fracture modes are identified. It is concluded that the effect of moisture on fracture topography can not be distinguished.

  20. Hygrothermal influence on delamination behavior of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Ishai, O.

    1984-01-01

    The hygrothermal effect on the fracture behavior of graphite-epoxy laminates was investigated to develop a methodology for damage tolerance predictions in advanced composite materials. Several T300/934 laminates were tested using a number of specimen configurations to evaluate the effects of temperature and humidity on delamination fracture toughness under mode 1 and mode 2 loading. It is indicated that moisture has a slightly beneficial influence on fracture toughness or critical strain energy release rate during mode 1 delamination, but has a slightly deleterious effect on mode 2 delamination and mode 1 transverse cracking. The failed specimens are examined by SEM and topographical differences due to fracture modes are identified. It is concluded that the effect of moisture on fracture topography can not be distinguished.

  1. Failure analysis of composite laminates including biaxial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Elliott, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a continued effort on the development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis. In particular, emphasis is given to the design, construction and testing of a cross-beam laminate configuration to obtain "pure' biaxial compression failure. The purpose of this test case was to provide to permit "closure' of the cubic form of the failure surface in the 1-2 compression-compression quadrant. This resulted in a revised set of interaction strength parameters and the construction of a failure surface which can be used with confidence for strength predictions, assuming a plane stress state exists. Furthermore, the problem of complex conjugate roots which can occur in some failure regions is addressed and an "engineering' interpretation is provided. Results are presented illustrating this behavior and the methodology for overcoming this problem is discussed.

  2. Edge delamination in angle-ply composite laminates, part 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical method was developed for describing the edge delamination stress intensity characteristics in angle-ply composite laminates. The method is based on the theory of anisotropic elasticity. The edge delamination problem is formulated using Lekhnitskii's complex-variable stress potentials and an especially developed eigenfunction expansion method. The method predicts exact orders of the three-dimensional stress singularity in a delamination crack tip region. With the aid of boundary collocation, the method predicts the complete stress and displacement fields in a finite-dimensional, delaminated composite. Fracture mechanics parameters such as the mixed-mode stress intensity factors and associated energy release rates for edge delamination can be calculated explicity. Solutions are obtained for edge delaminated (theta/-theta theta/-theta) angle-ply composites under uniform axial extension. Effects of delamination lengths, fiber orientations, lamination and geometric variables are studied.

  3. Iosipescu shear properties of graphite fabric/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walrath, D. E.; Adams, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Iosipescu shear test method is used to measure the in-plane and interlaminar shear properties of four T300 graphite fabric/934 epoxy composite materials. Different weave geometries tested include an Oxford weave, a 5-harness satin weave, an 8-harness satin weave, and a plain weave with auxiliary warp yarns. Both orthogonal and quasi-isotropic layup laminates were tested. In-plane and interlaminar shear properties are obtained for laminates of all four fabric types. Overall, little difference in shear properties attributable to the fabric weave pattern is observed. The auxiliary warp material is significantly weaker and less stiff in interlaminar shear parallel to its fill direction. A conventional strain gage extensometer is modified to measure shear strains for use with the Iosipescu shear test. While preliminary results are encouraging, several design iterations failed to produce a reliable shear transducer prototype. Strain gages are still the most reliable shear strain transducers for use with this test method.

  4. Fiberglass epoxy laminate fatigue properties at 300 and 20 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, J. M., Jr.; Bailey, W. J.; Boyce, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A subcritical liquid hydrogen orbital storage and supply experiment is being designed for flight in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The Cryogenic Fluid Management Experiment (CFME) includes a liquid hydrogen tank supported in a vacuum jacket by two fiberglass epoxy composite trunnion mounts. The ability of the CFME to last for the required seven missions depends primarily on the fatigue life of the composite trunnions at cryogenic temperatures. To verify the trunnion design and test the performance of the composite material, fatigue property data at 300 and 20 K were obtained for the specific E-glass fabric/S-glass unidirectional laminate that will be used for the CFME trunnions. The fatigue life of this laminate was greater at 20 K than at 300 K, and was satisfactory for the intended application.

  5. Passively Damped Laminated Piezoelectric Shell Structures with Integrated Electric Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-field mechanics are presented for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates interfaced with distributed passive electric components. The equations of motion for laminated piezoelectric shell structures with embedded passive electric networks are directly formulated and solved using a finite element methodology. The modal damping and frequencies of the piezoelectric shell are calculated from the poles of the system. Experimental and numerical results are presented for the modal damping and frequency of composite beams with a resistively shunted piezoceramic patch. The modal damping and frequency of plates, cylindrical shells and cylindrical composite blades with piezoelectric-resistor layers are predicted. Both analytical and experimental studies illustrate a unique dependence of modal damping and frequencies on the shunting resistance and show the effect of structural shape and curvature on piezoelectric damping.

  6. Development of lightweight reinforced plastic laminates for spacecraft interior applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, J.

    1975-01-01

    Lightweight, Kevlar - reinforced laminating systems that are non-burning, generate little smoke in the space shuttle environment, and are physically equivalent to the fiberglass/polyimide system used in the Apollo program for non-structural cabin panels, racks, etc. Resin systems representing five generic classes were screened as matrices for Kevlar 49 reinforced laminates. Of the systems evaluated, the polyimides were the most promising with the phenolics a close second. Skybond 703 was selected as the most promising resin candidate. With the exception of compression strength, all program goals of physical and mechanical properties were exceeded. Several prototype space shuttle mobility and translation handrail segments were manufactured using Kevlar/epoxy and Kevlar-graphite/epoxy. This application shows significant weight savings over the baseline aluminum configuration used previous. The hybrid Kevlar-graphite/epoxy is more suitable from a processing standpoint.

  7. Design of multiple-ply laminated composite tapered beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P.

    1993-01-01

    A study of a special case of symmetric laminated composite cantilever beams is presented. The approach models beams that are tapered both in depth and width and investigates the effect of the ply layup angle and the ply taper on bending and interlaminar shearing stresses. For the determination of stresses and deflections, the beam stiffness matrices are expressed as linear functions of the beam length. Using classical lamination theory (CLT) the stiffness matrices are determined and assembled at strategic locations along the length of the beam. They are then inverted and necessary stiffness parameters are obtained numerically and extracted for determination of design information at each location chosen. Several ply layup configurations are investigated, and design considerations are presented based on the findings. Finally, recommendations for the design of these beams are presented, and a means for anticipating the location of highest stresses is offered.

  8. Influence of bruxism on survival of porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Granell-Ruíz, Maria; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Fons-Font, Antonio; Román-Rodríguez, Juan-Luis; Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to determine whether bruxism and the use of occlusal splints affect the survival of porcelain laminate veneers in patients treated with this technique. Restorations were made in 70 patients, including 30 patients with some type of parafunctional habit. A total of 323 veneers were placed, 170 in patients with bruxism activity, and the remaining 153 in patients without it. A clinical examination determined the presence or absence of ceramic failure (cracks, fractures and debonding) of the restorations; these incidents were analyzed for association with bruxism and the use of splints. Analysis of the ceramic failures showed that of the 13 fractures and 29 debonding that were present in our study, 8 fractures and 22 debonding were related to the presence of bruxism. Porcelain laminate veneers are a predictable treatment option that provides excellent results, recognizing a higher risk of failure in patients with bruxism activity. The use of occlusal splints reduces the risk of fractures.

  9. Probabilistic simulation of stress concentration in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Liaw, L.

    1993-01-01

    A computational methodology is described to probabilistically simulate the stress concentration factors in composite laminates. This new approach consists of coupling probabilistic composite mechanics with probabilistic finite element structural analysis. The probabilistic composite mechanics is used to probabilistically describe all the uncertainties inherent in composite material properties while probabilistic finite element is used to probabilistically describe the uncertainties associated with methods to experimentally evaluate stress concentration factors such as loads, geometry, and supports. The effectiveness of the methodology is demonstrated by using it to simulate the stress concentration factors in composite laminates made from three different composite systems. Simulated results match experimental data for probability density and for cumulative distribution functions. The sensitivity factors indicate that the stress concentration factors are influenced by local stiffness variables, by load eccentricities and by initial stress fields.

  10. Probabilistic Simulation of Stress Concentration in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Liaw, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    A computational methodology is described to probabilistically simulate the stress concentration factors (SCF's) in composite laminates. This new approach consists of coupling probabilistic composite mechanics with probabilistic finite element structural analysis. The composite mechanics is used to probabilistically describe all the uncertainties inherent in composite material properties, whereas the finite element is used to probabilistically describe the uncertainties associated with methods to experimentally evaluate SCF's, such as loads, geometry, and supports. The effectiveness of the methodology is demonstrated by using is to simulate the SCF's in three different composite laminates. Simulated results match experimental data for probability density and for cumulative distribution functions. The sensitivity factors indicate that the SCF's are influenced by local stiffness variables, by load eccentricities, and by initial stress fields.

  11. Protein footprinting by pyrite shrink-wrap laminate.

    PubMed

    Leser, Micheal; Pegan, Jonathan; El Makkaoui, Mohammed; Schlatterer, Joerg C; Khine, Michelle; Law, Matt; Brenowitz, Michael

    2015-04-07

    The structure of macromolecules and their complexes dictate their biological function. In "footprinting", the solvent accessibility of the residues that constitute proteins, DNA and RNA can be determined from their reactivity to an exogenous reagent such as the hydroxyl radical (·OH). While ·OH generation for protein footprinting is achieved by radiolysis, photolysis and electrochemistry, we present a simpler solution. A thin film of pyrite (cubic FeS2) nanocrystals deposited onto a shape memory polymer (commodity shrink-wrap film) generates sufficient ·OH via Fenton chemistry for oxidative footprinting analysis of proteins. We demonstrate that varying either time or H2O2 concentration yields the required ·OH dose-oxidation response relationship. A simple and scalable sample handling protocol is enabled by thermoforming the "pyrite shrink-wrap laminate" into a standard microtiter plate format. The low cost and malleability of the laminate facilitates its integration into high throughput screening and microfluidic devices.

  12. Delamination properity of 2060 aluminium lithium alloy laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiang; Huang, Yi; Tong, Dihua; Ma, Shaojun

    2018-03-01

    Delamination is an significant property of aluminium lithium alloy laminate for damage tolerance design. Double Crack Lap Shear specimens of "2/1" structure are used for testing delamination properity. Experiments of 2 stress ratio conditions R=0.06, 0.5 are conducted, and 5 stress levels for each stress ratio. Delamination growth data b-N are obtained from 4 crack tips’ locations. The energy release rate, Gd, of the "2/1" structure laminate are calculated. Alderliesten modelis used for describing delamination growth db/dN and energy release rate Gd. Parameters Cd and nd in Alderliesten model are determined for R=0.06 and R=0.5 by linear fitting. An analysis is made by comparing the results of different stress ratio conditons.

  13. Tensile stress-strain behavior of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    The tensile stress-strain behavior of a variety of graphite/epoxy laminates was examined. Longitudinal and transverse specimens from eleven different layups were monotonically loaded in tension to failure. Ultimate strength, ultimate strain, and strss-strain curves wee obtained from four replicate tests in each case. Polynominal equations were fitted by the method of least squares to the stress-strain data to determine average curves. Values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, derived from polynomial coefficients, were compared with laminate analysis results. While the polynomials appeared to accurately fit the stress-strain data in most cases, the use of polynomial coefficients to calculate elastic moduli appeared to be of questionable value in cases involving sharp changes in the slope of the stress-strain data or extensive scatter.

  14. Exact solutions for laminated composite cylindrical shells in cylindrical bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    Analytic elasticity solutions for laminated composite cylindrical shells under cylindrical bending are presented. The material of the shell is assumed to be general cylindrically anisotropic. Based on the theory of cylindrical anisotropic elasticity, coupled governing partial differential equations are developed. The general expressions for the stresses and displacements in the laminated composite cylinders are discussed. The closed form solutions based on Classical Shell Theory (CST) and Donnell's (1933) theory are also derived for comparison purposes. Three examples illustrate the effect of radius-to-thickness ratio, coupling and stacking sequence. The results show that, in general, CST yields poor stress and displacement distributions for thick-section composite shells, but converges to the exact elasticity solution as the radius-to-thickness ratio increases. It is also shown that Donnell's theory significantly underestimates the stress and displacement response.

  15. An experimental investigation of glare and restructured fiber metal laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, Adelina Vanessa

    Fiber Metal Laminates (FMLs) are a group of materials fabricated by bonding glass/epoxy layers within metal layers. This class of materials can provide good mechanical properties, as well as weight savings. An FML known as Glass Laminate Aluminum Reinforced Epoxy (GLARE) was studied. An experimental investigation comprising of microscopy and tensile testing was carried out using different grades of GLARE. Microscopy revealed the construction details of GLARE, while tensile testing provided means of measuring and analyzing its stress-strain responses. Next, different metal surface pretreatment methods were explored. These included sandblasting, Phosphoric Acid Anodizing (PAA), and AC-130 Sol-Gel treatment. Woven S-2 glass, an epoxy adhesive, and aluminum alloy sheet metal were used to fabricate restructured FMLs using time and cost effective procedures. Additional microscopy and tensile testing allowed for comparisons with GLARE and aircraft grade aluminum alloys. The restructured FMLs showed similar behaviors to GLARE with potential significant improvements in fabrication efficiency.

  16. Failure criterion of glass fabric reinforced plastic laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haga, O.; Hayashi, N.; Kasuya, K.

    1986-01-01

    Failure criteria are derived for several modes of failure (in unaxial tensile or compressive loading, or biaxial combined tensile-compressive loading) in the case of closely woven plain fabric, coarsely-woven plain fabric, or roving glass cloth reinforcements. The shear strength in the interaction formula is replaced by an equation dealing with tensile or compressive strength in the direction making a 45 degree angle with one of the anisotropic axes, for the uniaxial failure criteria. The interaction formula is useful as the failure criterion in combined tension-compression biaxial failure for the case of closely woven plain fabric laminates, but poor agreement is obtained in the case of coarsely woven fabric laminates.

  17. Analysis for delamination initiation in postbuckled dropped-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Johnson, Eric R.

    1992-01-01

    The compression strength of dropped-ply, graphite-epoxy laminated plates for the delamination mode of failure is studied by analysis and corroborated with experiments. The nonlinear response of the test specimens is modeled by a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis. The methodology for predicting delamination is based on a quadratic interlaminar stress criterion evaluated at a characteristic distance from the ply drop-off. The compression strength of specimens exhibiting a linear response is greater than the compression strength of specimens with the same layup exhibiting a geometrically nonlinear response. The analyses for both linear and nonlinear response show that severe interlaminar stress gradients occur in the interfaces at the drop-off because of the thickness/stiffness discontinuity. However, these interlaminar stress distributions are altered in the geometrically nonlinear response such that, with increasing load, their growth at the center of the laminate is retarded while their growth near the unloaded supported edge is increased.

  18. Design of multiple-ply laminated composite tapered beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, P.

    1993-06-01

    A study of a special case of symmetric laminated composite cantilever beams is presented. The approach models beams that are tapered both in depth and width and investigates the effect of the ply layup angle and the ply taper on bending and interlaminar shearing stresses. For the determination of stresses and deflections, the beam stiffness matrices are expressed as linear functions of the beam length. Using classical lamination theory (CLT) the stiffness matrices are determined and assembled at strategic locations along the length of the beam. They are then inverted and necessary stiffness parameters are obtained numerically and extracted formore » determination of design information at each location chosen. Several ply layup configurations are investigated, and design considerations are preSDsented based on the findings. Finally, recommendations for the design of these beams are presented, and a means for anticipating the location of highest stresses is offered.« less

  19. Modelling low velocity impact induced damage in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Soutis, Constantinos

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents recent progress on modelling low velocity impact induced damage in fibre reinforced composite laminates. It is important to understand the mechanisms of barely visible impact damage (BVID) and how it affects structural performance. To reduce labour intensive testing, the development of finite element (FE) techniques for simulating impact damage becomes essential and recent effort by the composites research community is reviewed in this work. The FE predicted damage initiation and propagation can be validated by Non Destructive Techniques (NDT) that gives confidence to the developed numerical damage models. A reliable damage simulation can assist the design process to optimise laminate configurations, reduce weight and improve performance of components and structures used in aircraft construction.

  20. Contact law and impact responses of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yang, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    Static identation tests were performed to determine the law of contact between a steel ball and glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy laminated composites. For both composites the power law with an index of 1.5 was found to be adequate for the loading curve. Substantial permanent deformations were noted after the unloading. A high order beam finite element was used to compute the dynamic contact force and response of the laminated composite subjected to the impact of an elastic sphere. This program can be used with either the classical Hertzian contact law or the measured contact law. A simple method is introduced for estimating the contact force and contact duration in elastic impacts.

  1. Behavior of fiber reinforced metal laminates at high strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newaz, Golam; Sasso, Marco; Amodio, Dario; Mancini, Edoardo

    2018-05-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Laminate (CARALL) is a good system for energy absorption through plastic deformation in aluminum and micro-cracking in the composite layers. Moreover, CARALL FMLs also provide excellent impact resistance due to the presence of aluminum layer. The focus of this research is to characterize the CARALL behavior under dynamic conditions. High strain rate tests on sheet laminate samples have been carried out by means of direct Split Hopkinson Tension Bar. The sample geometry and the clamping system were optimized by FEM simulations. The clamping system has been designed and optimized in order reduce impedance disturbance due to the fasteners and to avoid the excessive plastic strain outside the gauge region of the samples.

  2. Laminated thermoplastic composite material from recycled high density polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, Tommy L.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a materials-science, educational experiment is presented. The student should understand the fundamentals of polymer processing and mechanical property testing of materials. The ability to use American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards is also necessary for designing material test specimens and testing procedures. The objectives of the experiment are (1) to understand the concept of laminated composite materials, processing, testing, and quality assurance of thermoplastic composites and (2) to observe an application example of recycled plastics.

  3. Delamination modeling of laminate plate made of sublaminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormaníková, Eva; Kotrasová, Kamila

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents the mixed-mode delamination of plates made of sublaminates. To this purpose an opening load mode of delamination is proposed as failure model. The failure model is implemented in ANSYS code to calculate the mixed-mode delamination response as energy release rate. The analysis is based on interface techniques. Within the interface finite element modeling there are calculated the individual components of damage parameters as spring reaction forces, relative displacements and energy release rates along the lamination front.

  4. Fiber Metal Laminates Made by the VARTM Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Cano, Roberto J.; Hales, Stephen J.; Alexa, Joel A.; Weiser, Erik S.; Loos, Alfred; Johnson, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber metal laminates (FMLs) are multi-component materials utilizing metals, fibers and matrix resins. Tailoring their properties is readily achievable by varying one or more of these components. Established FMLs like GLARE utilize aluminum foils, glass fibers and epoxy matrices and are manufactured using an autoclave. Two new processes for manufacturing FMLs using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) have been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). A description of these processes and the resulting FMLs are presented.

  5. Test evaluation of a laminated wood wind turbine blade concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of tests conducted on a root end section of a laminated wood wind turbine blade are reported. The blade to hub transition of the wood blade uses steel studs cast into the wood D spar with a filled epoxy. Both individual studs and a full scale, short length, root section were tested. Results indicate that the bonded stud concept is more than adequate for both the 30 year life fatigue loads and for the high wind or hurricane gust loads.

  6. Deep drawability of Ti/resin/Ti laminated sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardada, Yasunroi; Hattori, Shuji

    2017-10-01

    Aiming to enhance functionality of titanium cup, the formability of titanium/resin/titanium laminated sheet by deep drawing was investigated. Although pure titanium has excellent corrosion resistance, the density of titanium is higher than that of light metals, such as aluminum and magnesium. Part of the titanium cup made of resin allows for weight reduction of the cup. Furthermore, the clad cup is more likely to have heat retention and protection against vibration characteristics. In the experiment, the materials were pure titanium and polycarbonate. The initial thickness of the sheet was 0.2 to 0.5 mm in thickness. A total plate thickness of the blank was 1.0 to 1.5 mm in thickness. The blank diameter is 70 mm. The laminated sheet was constituted by interposing resin between two titanium sheets. Each sheet in stacked condition was not joined each other. In the deep drawing process, the laminated sheet was employed and a flat sheet blank was formed into a circle by a punch. For the prevention of seizure in contact area between a drawing tool and titanium, titanium blank was treated by oxide coating. By this method, the fresh and clean titanium is not in direct contact with the die during the forming due to the existence of the oxide layer. The deep drawing was carried out to investigate the formability. The laminated sheet was successfully drawn without the cracks. The section of the drawn cup was observed to examine a formability of the resin sheet. The reduction rate of the thickness was less than 10%. It was found that the titanium/resin/titanium clad cup was successfully drawn.

  7. Condensed tannin-resorcinol adducts in laminating adhesives

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Hemingway; Roland E. Kreibich

    1985-01-01

    A condensed tannin-resorcinol adduct made by co-reaction of an extract from southern pine bark with resorcinol at a 2 to 1 weight ratio was used to prepare a laminating resin in which the entire amount of resorcinol normally used was replaced by this adduct. The resin was formulated into a room temperature setting adhesive that meets the basic criteria of product...

  8. Encapsulant Material For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.; Klemchuk, Peter P.

    2001-02-13

    An encapsulant material includes a layer of metallocene polyethylene disposed between two layers of an acid copolymer of polyethylene. More specifically, the layer of metallocene polyethylene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the first layer of the acid copolymer of polyethylene, and a second layer of the acid copolymer of polyethlene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the layer of metallocene polyethylene. The encapsulant material can be used in solar cell module and laminated glass applications.

  9. Encapsulant Material For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.

    2000-09-05

    An encapsulant material includes a layer of metallocene polyethylene disposed between two layers of ionomer. More specifically, the layer of metallocene polyethylene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the first ionomer layer, and a second layer of ionomer is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the layer of metallocene polyethylene. The encapsulant material can be used in solar cell module and laminated glass applications.

  10. Development and Application of Optimization Techniques for Composite Laminates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    Institute of Technolgy Air University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science by Gerald V. Flanagan, S.B. Lt. USAF...global minima [9]. An informal definition of convexity is that any two points in the space can be connected by a straight line which does not pass out of...question. A quick look at gradient information suggests that too few angles (2 for example) will make the laminate sensitive to small changes in

  11. Flexible matrix composite laminated disk/ring flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, B. P.; Hannibal, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    An energy storage flywheel consisting of a quasi-isotropic composite disk overwrapped by a circumferentially wound ring made of carbon fiber and a elastometric matrix is proposed. Through analysis it was demonstrated that with an elastomeric matrix to relieve the radial stresses, a laminated disk/ring flywheel can be designed to store a least 80.3 Wh/kg or about 68% more than previous disk/ring designs. at the same time the simple construction is preserved.

  12. Development of Improved LOX-Compatible Laminated Gasket Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-08-01

    Braided Teflon 2. Bleached fluorocarbon felt 3. Teflon and asbestos fibers 4. Teflon and ceramic fibers 5. Teflon and glass fibers 6. Viton A and asbestos 7...fluorinated ethylene- propylene (Teflon FEP), polychlorotrifluoroethylene films (Aclar - Kel F), and fluorocarbon elastomers (Viton A - Fluorel, etc...2nd 10th CYCLE CYCLE CYCLE CYCLE CYCLE CYCLE CYCLE CYCLE CYCLE FILLED FLUOROCARBON GLASS FILLED TEFLON FLUOROCARBON LAMINATE ELASTOMER Figure 21

  13. Laminated Object Manufacturing-Based Design Ceramic Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    components for DoD applications. Program goals included the development of (1) a new LOM based design methodology for CMC, (2) optimized preceramic polymer ...3.1.1-20 3.1.1-12 Detail of LOM Composites Forming System w/ glass fiber/ polymer laminate................ 3.1.1-21 3.1.1-13...such as polymer matrix composites have faced similar barriers to implementation. These barriers have been overcome through the development of suitable

  14. Structural Laminate Aluminum-Glass-Fiber Materials 1441-Sial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestov, V. V.; Antipov, V. V.; Senatorova, O. G.; Sidel'nikov, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure, composition and set of properties of specimens and components, and some parameters of the process of production of a promising FML class of metallic polymers based on sheets of high-modulus ( E 79 GPa) alloy 1441 with reduced density ( d 2.6 g/cm3) and an optimized glued prepreg reinforced with fibers of high-strength high-modulus VMPglass are described. Results of fire and fatigue tests of a promising 1441-SIAL structural laminate are presented.

  15. Fatigue delamination onset prediction in tapered composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen Bostaph; Salpekar, Satish A.; Obrien, T. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    Tapered (0 deg) laminates of S2/CE9000 and S2/SP250 glass/epoxies, and IM6/1827I graphite/epoxy were tested in cyclic tension. The specimens usually showed some initial stable delaminations in the tapered region, but these did not affect the stiffness of the specimens, and loading was continued until the specimens either delaminated unstably, or reached 10(exp 6) to 2 x 10(exp 7) million cycles with no unstable delamination. The final unstable delamination originated at the junction of the thin and tapered regions. A finite-element model was developed for the tapered laminate with and without the initial stable delaminations observed in the tests. The analysis showed that for both cases the most likely place for an opening (Mode 1) delamination to originate is at the junction of the taper and thin regions. For each material type, the models were used to calculate the strain energy release rate, G, associated with delaminations originating at that junction and growing either into the thin region or tapered region. For the materials tested, cyclic G(sub Imax) values from DCB tests were used with the maximum strain energy release rates calculated from the finite-element analysis to predict the onset of unstable delamination at the junction as a function of fatigue cycles. The predictions were compared to experimental values of maximum cyclic load as a function of cycles to unstable delamination from fatigue tests in tapered laminates. For the IM6/1827I and S2/SP250 laminates, the predictions agreed very well with the test data. Predicted values for the S2/CE9000 were conservative compared to the test data.

  16. On the stabilization of viscoelastic laminated beams with interfacial slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Muhammad I.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we consider a viscoelastic laminated beam model. This structure is given by two identical uniform layers on top of each other, taking into account that an adhesive of small thickness is bonding the two surfaces and produces an interfacial slip. We use viscoelastic damping with general assumptions on the relaxation function and establish explicit energy decay result from which we can recover the optimal exponential and polynomial rates. Our result generalizes the earlier related results in the literature.

  17. A Shear Deformable Shell Element for Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, W. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional element based on the total Lagrangian description of the motion of a layered anisotropic composite medium is developed, validated, and used to analyze layered composite shells. The element contains the following features: geometric nonlinearity, dynamic (transient) behavior, and arbitrary lamination scheme and lamina properties. Numerical results of nonlinear bending, natural vibration, and transient response are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the element.

  18. A life prediction model for laminated composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1990-01-01

    A life prediction methodology for laminated continuous fiber composites subjected to fatigue loading conditions was developed. A summary is presented of research completed. A phenomenological damage evolution law was formulated for matrix cracking which is independent of stacking sequence. Mechanistic and physical support was developed for the phenomenological evolution law proposed above. The damage evolution law proposed above was implemented to a finite element computer program. And preliminary predictions were obtained for a structural component undergoing fatigue loading induced damage.

  19. Nonlinear probabilistic finite element models of laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells has been developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated 3-D laminated composite shell with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, forms the modeling foundation. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. The effects of material nonlinearity are included through the use of a rate-independent anisotropic plasticity formulation with the macroscopic point of view. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables can be selected, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. A number of sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. Experimental data is compared in many cases, and the Monte Carlo simulation method is used to check the probabilistic results. In general, the procedure is quite effective in modeling the mean and variance response of the linear and nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  20. A single fracture toughness parameter for fibrous composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A general fracture toughness parameter Qc was previously derived and verified to be a material constant, independent of layup, for centrally cracked boron aluminum composite specimens. The specimens were made with various proportions of 0 and + or - 45 degree plies. A limited amount of data indicated that the ratio Qc/epsilon tuf' where epsilon tuf is the ultimate tensile strain of the fibers, might be a constant for all composite laminates, regardless of material and layup. In that case, a single value of Qc/epsilon tuf could be used to predict the fracture toughness of all fibrous composite laminates from only the elastic constants and epsilon tuf. Values of Qc/epsilon tuf were calculated for centrally cracked specimens made from graphite/polyimide, graphite/epoxy, E glass/epoxy, boron/epoxy, and S glass graphite/epoxy materials with numerous layups. Within ordinary scatter, the data indicate that Qc/epsilon tuf is a constant for all laminates that did not split extensively at the crack tips or have other deviate failure modes.

  1. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.

    2014-01-27

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties aremore » dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.« less

  2. A serpentine laminating micromixer combining splitting/recombination and advection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Sung; Lee, Se Hwan; Kwon, Tai Hun; Ahn, Chong H

    2005-07-01

    Mixing enhancement has drawn great attention from designers of micromixers, since the flow in a microchannel is usually characterized by a low Reynolds number (Re) which makes the mixing quite a difficult task to accomplish. In this paper, a novel integrated efficient micromixer named serpentine laminating micromixer (SLM) has been designed, simulated, fabricated and fully characterized. In the SLM, a high level of efficient mixing can be achieved by combining two general chaotic mixing mechanisms: splitting/recombination and chaotic advection. The splitting and recombination (in other terms, lamination) mechanism is obtained by the successive arrangement of "F"-shape mixing units in two layers. The advection is induced by the overall three-dimensional serpentine path of the microchannel. The SLM was realized by SU-8 photolithography, nickel electroplating, injection molding and thermal bonding. Mixing performance of the SLM was fully characterized numerically and experimentally. The numerical mixing simulations show that the advection acts favorably to realize the ideal vertical lamination of fluid flow. The mixing experiments based on an average mixing color intensity change of phenolphthalein show a high level of mixing performance was obtained with the SLM. Numerical and experimental results confirm that efficient mixing is successfully achieved from the SLM over the wide range of Re. Due to the simple and mass producible geometry of the efficient micromixer, SLM proposed in this study, the SLM can be easily applied to integrated microfluidic systems, such as micro-total-analysis-systems or lab-on-a-chip systems.

  3. Curing of Thick Thermoset Composite Laminates: Multiphysics Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, S.; Dhaliwal, G. S.; Huo, Z.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Apetre, N.; Iyyer, N.

    2017-11-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites are used in high-performance aerospace applications as they are resistant to fatigue, corrosion free and possess high specific strength. The mechanical properties of these composite components depend on the degree of cure and residual stresses developed during the curing process. While these parameters are difficult to determine experimentally in large and complex parts, they can be simulated using numerical models in a cost-effective manner. These simulations can be used to develop cure cycles and change processing parameters to obtain high-quality parts. In the current work, a numerical model was built in Comsol MultiPhysics to simulate the cure behavior of a carbon/epoxy prepreg system (IM7/Cycom 5320-1). A thermal spike was observed in thick laminates when the recommended cure cycle was used. The cure cycle was modified to reduce the thermal spike and maintain the degree of cure at the laminate center. A parametric study was performed to evaluate the effect of air flow in the oven, post cure cycles and cure temperatures on the thermal spike and the resultant degree of cure in the laminate.

  4. Connections: Superplasticity, Damascus Steels, Laminated Steels, and Carbon Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a description is given of the connections that evolved from the initial development of a family of superplastic plain carbon steels that came to be known as Ultra-High Carbon Steels (UHCS). It was observed that their very high carbon contents were similar, if not identical, to those of Damascus steels. There followed a series of attempts to rediscover how the famous patterns found on Damascus steels blades were formed. At the same time, in order to improve the toughness at room temperature of the newly-developed UHCS, laminated composites were made of alternating layers of UHCS and mild steel (and subsequently other steels and other metals). This led to a study of ancient laminated composites, the motives for their manufacture, and the plausibility of some of the claims relating to the number of layers in the final blades. One apparently ancient laminated composite, recovered in 1837 from the great pyramid of Giza which was constructed in about 2750 B.C., stimulated a carbon dating study of ancient steels. The modern interest in "Bladesmithing" has connections back to many of these ancient weapons.

  5. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  6. Studies in Cup Drawing Behavior of Polymer Laminated Sheet Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnagmi, M.; Jain, M.; Bruhis, M.; Nielsen, K.

    2011-08-01

    Axisymmetric deep drawing behavior of a polymer laminated sheet metal (PLSM) is investigated using an axisymmetric cup drawing test. PLSMs are of interest as a replacement for painted finishes for automotive applications as they have the potential to achieve good quality long lasting and aesthetically appealing surfaces on stamped parts. However, there is limited understanding of PLSMs in automotive deep drawing situations to produce complex 3-D parts. The tests are carried out using well-controlled, laboratory-based, dual-action, servo-hydraulic forming presses under blank-holder force and punch displacement control conditions. An optical strain mapping system is used to measure the surface strains (and to construct 3D strain maps) from the film side of the deformed samples for a range of forming conditions. Deep drawing characteristics such as punch load versus punch displacement traces, strain distribution along the cup profile, flange wrinkling and fracture characteristics are experimentally assessed for stainless steel-plastic film laminated sheet materials. Also the effect of lamination pressure on wrinkling and delamination is investigated for a decorative pressure sensitive adhesive film affixed to the stainless steel sheet.

  7. Lamination of the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus of Catarrhine Primates

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Alexandra A.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Hof, Patrick R.; Zilles, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of catarrhines – with the exception of gibbons – is typically described as a six-layered structure, comprised of two ventral magnocellular layers, and four dorsal parvocellular layers. The parvocellular layers of the LGN are involved in color vision. Therefore, it is hypothesized that a six-layered LGN is a shared-derived trait among catarrhines. This might suggest that in gibbons the lack of further subdivisions of the parvocellular layers is a recent change, and could be related to specializations of visual information processing in this taxon. To address these hypotheses, the lamination of the LGN was investigated in a range of catarrhine species, including several taxa not previously described, and the evolution of the LGN was reconstructed using phylogenetic information. The findings indicate that while all catarrhine species have four parvocellular leaflets, two main patterns of LGN parvocellular lamination occur: two undivided parvocellular layers in some species, and four parvocellular leaflets (with occasional subleaflets) in other species. LGN size was not found to be related to lamination pattern. Both patterns were found to occur in divergent clades, which is suggestive of homoplasy within the catarrhines in LGN morphology. PMID:23467282

  8. Fatigue crack growth in fiber-metal laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, YuE; Xia, ZhongChun; Xiong, XiaoFeng

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-metal laminates (FMLs) consist of three layers of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and two layers of glass/epoxy prepreg, and it (it means FMLs) is laminated by Al alloy and fiber alternatively. Fatigue crack growth rates in notched fiber-metal laminates under constant amplitude fatigue loading were studied experimentally and numerically and were compared with them in monolithic 2024-T3 Al alloy plates. It is shown that the fatigue life of FMLs is about 17 times longer than monolithic 2024-T3 Al alloy plate; and crack growth rates in FMLs panels remain constant mostly even when the crack is long, unlike in the monolithic 2024-T3 Al alloy plates. The formula to calculate bridge stress profiles of FMLs was derived based on the fracture theory. A program by Matlab was developed to calculate the distribution of bridge stress in FMLs, and then fatigue growth lives were obtained. Finite element models of FMLs were built and meshed finely to analyze the stress distributions. Both results were compared with the experimental results. They agree well with each other.

  9. Static and fatigue interlaminar tensile characterization of laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Koudela, K.L.; Strait, L.H.; Caiazzo, A.A.

    1997-12-31

    Spool and curved-beam specimens were evaluated to determine the viability of using either one or both of these configurations to characterize the static and fatigue interlaminar tensile behavior of carbon/epoxy laminates. Unidirectional curved-beam and quasi-isotropic spool specimens were fabricated, nondestructively inspected, and statically tested to failure. Tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted at 10 Hz and an R-ratio ({sigma}{sub min}/{sigma}{sub max}) equal to 0.1 for each specimen configuration. The interlaminar tensile strength of the spool specimen was 12% larger than the strength obtained using curved-beam specimens. In addition, data scatter associated with spool specimens was significantly less than the scatter associatedmore » with curved-beam specimens. The difference in data scatter was attributed to the influence of the fabrication process on the quality of the laminates tested. The fatigue limit at 0{sup 7} cycles for both specimen types was shown to be at least 40% of the average interlaminar tensile strength. Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that either the spool or the curved-beam specimens can be used to characterize the interlaminar tensile static and fatigue behavior of carbon/epoxy laminates. However, to obtain the most representative results, the test specimen configuration should be selected so that the specimen fabrication process closely simulates the actual component fabrication process.« less

  10. Fracture and crack growth in orthotropic laminates. Part 1: Analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional laminate with damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    The fracture behavior of unifirectional hybrid (buffer strip) composite laminates is studied. Three particular solutions are discussed: (1) broken fibers in a unidirectional half plane; (2) adjoined half planes of different fiber and matrix properties and (3) the solution of two half planes bounding a third distinct region of finite width. This finite width region represents a buffer strip and the potential of this strip to arrest a crack that originates in one of the half planes is investigated. The analysis is based on a materials modeling approach using the classical shear lag assumption to described the stress transfer between fibers. Explicit fiber and matrix properties of the three regions are retained and changes in the laminate behavior as a function of the relative material properties, buffer strip width and initial crack length are discussed.

  11. Laminated beams: deflection and stress as a function of epoxy shear modulus

    SciTech Connect

    Bialek, J.

    1976-01-01

    The large toroidal field coil deflections observed during the PLT power test are due to the poor shear behavior of the insulation material used between layers of copper. Standard techniques for analyzing such laminated structures do not account for this effect. This paper presents an analysis of laminated beams that corrects this deficiency. The analysis explicitly models the mechanical behavior of each layer in a laminated beam and hence avoids the pitfalls involved in any averaging technique. In particular, the shear modulus of the epoxy in a laminated beam (consisting of alternate layers of metal and epoxy) may span themore » entire range of values from zero to classical. Solution of the governing differential equations defines the stress, strain, and deflection for any point within a laminated beam. The paper summarizes these governing equations and also includes a parametric study of a simple laminated beam.« less

  12. Coupled mixed-field laminate theory and finite element for smart piezoelectric composite shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanics for the analysis of laminated composite shells with piezoelectric actuators and sensors are presented. A new mixed-field laminate theory for piezoelectric shells is formulated in curvilinear coordinates which combines single-layer assumptions for the displacements and a layerwise representation for the electric potential. The resultant coupled governing equations for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates are described. Structural mechanics are subsequently developed and an 8-node finite-element is formulated for the static and dynamic analysis of adaptive composite structures of general laminations containing piezoelectric layers. Evaluations of the method and comparisons with reported results are presented for laminated piezoelectric-composite plates, a closed cylindrical shell with a continuous piezoceramic layer and a laminated composite semi-circular cantilever shell with discrete cylindrical piezoelectric actuators and/or sensors.

  13. Fracture mechanics of matrix cracking and delamination in glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caslini, M.; Zanotti, C.; Obrien, T. K.

    1986-01-01

    This study focused on characterizing matrix cracking and delamination behavior in multidirectional laminates. Static tension and tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted on two different layups. Damage onset, accumulation, and residual properties were measured. Matrix cracking was shown to have a considerable influence on residual stiffness of glass epoxy laminates, and could be predicted reasonably well for cracks in 90 deg piles using a simple shear lag analysis. A fracture mechanics analysis for the strain energy release rate associated with 90 deg ply-matrix crack formation was developed and was shown to correlate the onset of 90 deg ply cracks in different laminates. The linear degradation of laminate modulus with delamination area, previously observed for graphite epoxy laminates, was predicted for glass epoxy laminates using a simple rule of mixtures analysis. The strain energy release rate associated with edge delamination formation under static and cyclic loading was difficult to analyze because of the presence of several contemporary damage phenomena.

  14. Predictions of Poisson's ratio in cross-ply laminates containing matrix cracks and delaminations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Allen, David H.; Nottorf, Eric W.

    1989-01-01

    A damage-dependent constitutive model for laminated composites has been developed for the combined damage modes of matrix cracks and delaminations. The model is based on the concept of continuum damage mechanics and uses second-order tensor valued internal state variables to represent each mode of damage. The internal state variables are defined as the local volume average of the relative crack face displacements. Since the local volume for delaminations is specified at the laminate level, the constitutive model takes the form of laminate analysis equations modified by the internal state variables. Model implementation is demonstrated for the laminate engineering modulus E(x) and Poisson's ratio nu(xy) of quasi-isotropic and cross-ply laminates. The model predictions are in close agreement to experimental results obtained for graphite/epoxy laminates.

  15. Using guided ultrasonic wave inspection to quantify the length of delaminations in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bo; Ribeiro, Artur Lopes; Ramos, Helena Geirinhas

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a study of the characteristics of Lamb wave (S0 mode) testing signals in carbon fiber composite laminates containing delaminations. The study was implemented by using commercial finite element simulation software - ANSYS. The delamination signal is proven to be the superposition of the two waves travelling from upper and lower sub-laminates. Dispersion curves for the two sub-laminates were calculated to show the difference between phase velocities of the waves in the sub-laminates. Two models are specifically designed to get the phase difference between the waves that travel in each of the two sub-laminates. From the simulation results, it was found that the phase difference increases with the delamination length. Furthermore, the amplitude of delamination signal decreases first, then it starts to increase after reaching the minimum value. The minimum is reached when the waves from the two sub-laminates are 180° out of phase.

  16. Parvoviral nuclear import: bypassing the host nuclear-transport machinery.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sarah; Behzad, Ali R; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Panté, Nelly

    2006-11-01

    The parvovirus Minute virus of mice (MVM) is a small DNA virus that replicates in the nucleus of its host cells. However, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying parvovirus' nuclear import. Recently, it was found that microinjection of MVM into the cytoplasm of Xenopus oocytes causes damage to the nuclear envelope (NE), suggesting that the nuclear-import mechanism of MVM involves disruption of the NE and import through the resulting breaks. Here, fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy were used to examine the effect of MVM on host-cell nuclear structure during infection of mouse fibroblast cells. It was found that MVM caused dramatic changes in nuclear shape and morphology, alterations of nuclear lamin immunostaining and breaks in the NE of infected cells. Thus, it seems that the unusual nuclear-import mechanism observed in Xenopus oocytes is in fact used by MVM during infection of host cells.

  17. Dynamic Response of Monolithic and Laminate/Particulate Reactive Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chung-Ting

    Two dynamic compression methods were applied to a monolithic metal and reactive mixtures to investigate their responses: (a) Dynamic experiments using a split Hopkinson pressure bar were applied to reactive mixtures densified by explosive consolidation in order to establish their mechanical response and failure mechanisms. (b) Laser compression and release, which can impart high stresses, up to hundreds GPa, in times of nanoseconds and fractions thereof, was applied to establish the spalling strength of vanadium and the reaction threshold for Ni/Al laminates. The spallation and fragmentation exhibited by recovered mono- and poly-crystalline vanadium prove that the laser intensities and crystal structure play important roles in determining spall strength, fragmentation, and microstructural processes. Densified reactive mixtures with different microstructures (Ni, Mo, W, Nb and Ta with Al) were subjected to the quasi-static and dynamic strain rates. Two distinct failure mechanisms, axial splitting and shear failure, were observed in the recovered specimens. Axial splitting occurred when the bonding between the powders was poor; shear failure was primarily associated with extensive deformation of continuous Ta and Nb phases. Finite element simulations provided valuable information in interpreting the experimental results and predicting failure mechanisms akin to those observed. Ni/Al laminates were subjected to laser compression. The strain rates varied from 105 to 108 s-1, and the initial stress varied from 30 to ˜300 GPa. It is found the thickness of the lamellar and the interlaminar bonding strength are the two critical factors in determining mechanical failure. The intermetallic reaction leading to Ni3Al and NiAl were produced by the laser energies and laser pulse durations in direct laser shock experiments. Laser-driven compression was also applied to study the high temperature synthesis in nano-scale Ni/Al laminates with bilayer thickness 54 nm. Intermetallic

  18. Hierarchic models for laminated plates. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Actis, Ricardo Luis

    1991-01-01

    Structural plates and shells are three-dimensional bodies, one dimension of which happens to be much smaller than the other two. Thus, the quality of a plate or shell model must be judged on the basis of how well its exact solution approximates the corresponding three-dimensional problem. Of course, the exact solution depends not only on the choice of the model but also on the topology, material properties, loading and constraints. The desired degree of approximation depends on the analyst's goals in performing the analysis. For these reasons models have to be chosen adaptively. Hierarchic sequences of models make adaptive selection of the model which is best suited for the purposes of a particular analysis possible. The principles governing the formulation of hierarchic models for laminated plates are presented. The essential features of the hierarchic models described models are: (1) the exact solutions corresponding to the hierarchic sequence of models converge to the exact solution of the corresponding problem of elasticity for a fixed laminate thickness; and (2) the exact solution of each model converges to the same limit as the exact solution of the corresponding problem of elasticity with respect to the laminate thickness approaching zero. The formulation is based on one parameter (beta) which characterizes the hierarchic sequence of models, and a set of constants whose influence was assessed by a numerical sensitivity study. The recommended selection of these constants results in the number of fields increasing by three for each increment in the power of beta. Numerical examples analyzed with the proposed sequence of models are included and good correlation with the reference solutions was found. Results were obtained for laminated strips (plates in cylindrical bending) and for square and rectangular plates with uniform loading and with homogeneous boundary conditions. Cross-ply and angle-ply laminates were evaluated and the results compared with those of

  19. SUN2 Modulates HIV-1 Infection and Latency through Association with Lamin A/C To Maintain the Repressive Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Wei; Jiao, Shi; Sun, Li; Zhou, Zhaocai; Jin, Xia; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2018-05-01

    The postintegrational latency of HIV-1 is characterized by reversible silencing of long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven transcription of the HIV genome. It is known that the formation of repressive chromatin at the 5'-LTR of HIV-1 proviral DNA impedes viral transcription by blocking the recruitment of positive transcription factors. How the repressive chromatin is formed and modulated during HIV-1 infection remains elusive. Elucidation of which chromatin reassembly factor mediates the reorganization of chromatin is likely to facilitate the understanding of the host's modulation of HIV-1 transcription and latency. Here we revealed that "Sad1 and UNC84 domain containing 2" (SUN2), an inner nuclear membrane protein, maintained the repressive chromatin and inhibited HIV LTR-driven transcription of proviral DNA through an association with lamin A/C. Specifically, lamin A/C tethered SUN2 to the nucleosomes 1 and 2 of the HIV-1 5'-LTR to block the initiation and elongation of HIV-1 transcription. SUN2 knockdown converted chromatin to an active form and thus enhanced the phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II and its recruitment to the 5'-LTR HIV-1 proviral DNA, leading to reactivation of HIV-1 from latency. Conversely, the exogenous factors such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) induced reactivation, and the replication of HIV-1 led to the disassociation between SUN2 and lamin A/C, suggesting that disruption of the association between SUN2 and lamin A/C to convert the repressive chromatin to the active form might be a prerequisite for the initiation of HIV-1 transcription and replication. Together, our findings indicate that SUN2 is a novel chromatin reassembly factor that helps to maintain chromatin in a repressive state and consequently inhibits HIV-1 transcription. IMPORTANCE Despite the successful use of scores of antiretroviral drugs, HIV latency poses a major impediment to virus eradication. Elucidation of the mechanism of latency facilitates the discovery of new

  20. Effect of Translaminar Reinforcements and Hybridization on Damage Resistance and Tolerance of Composite Laminates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    REINFORCEMENTS AND HYBRIDIZATION ON DAMAGE RESISTANCE AND TOLERANCE OF COMPOSITE LAMINATES It was shown that the damage resistance and tolerance of... laminated composites can be enhanced by the employment of translaminar reinforcements (TLR) such as stitching, z-pinning and 3D weaving and also by hybrid...Park, NC 27709-2211 Composite Laminates Resistance REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM

  1. Field performance of stress-laminated timber bridges on low-volume roads

    Treesearch

    M. A. Ritter; J. P. Wacker; S. R. Duwadi

    1995-01-01

    Stress-laminated timber bridges were first introduced in the United States in the late 1980s. Since that time, the concept of stress-laminating has received a great deal of attention and hundreds of bridges have been built. Most of these bridges are located on rural low-volume roads. To evaluate the performance of stress-laminated bridges, the United States Department...

  2. Field performance of timber bridges. 9, Big Erick`s stress-laminated deck bridge

    Treesearch

    J. A. Kainz; J. P. Wacker; M. Nelson

    The Big Erickas bridge was constructed during September 1992 in Baraga County, Michigan. The bridge is 72 ft long, 16 ft wide, and consists of three simple spans: two stress-laminated deck approach spans and a stress-laminated box center span. The bridge is unique in that it is one of the first known stress-laminated timber bridge applications to use Eastern Hemlock...

  3. Damage-Survivable and Damage-Tolerant Laminated Composites with Optimally Placed Piezoelectric Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-13

    AD-A269 879 Damage-Survivable j and Damage-Tolerant Laminated Composites .4.. with Optimally placed Piezoelectric Layers Final Report No. 1 S. P...Damage Surviable and Damage-Tolerant Laminated Composites With Optimally Placed Piezoelectric Layers 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) S.P. Joshi, W.S. Chan ൕa...block number) The main objective of the research is to assure that the embedded sensors/actuators in a smart laminated composite structure are damage

  4. The effects of embedded internal delaminations on composite laminate compression strength; an experimental review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    Delaminations in laminated composite materials can degrade the compressive strength of these materials. Delaminations can form as a result of impact damage or processing flaws. In order to better understand the effects of these delaminations on the compressive behavior of laminated composite plates, programs have been conducted to assess the criticality of prescribed delaminations of known size, shape, and location on the compression strength of laminated composites. A review of these programs is presented along with highlights of pertinent findings from each.

  5. Investigating compression failure mechanisms in composite laminates with a transparent fiberglass-epoxy birefringent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The response and failure of a + or - 45s class laminate was studied by transparent fiberglass epoxy composite birefringent material. The birefringency property allows the laminate stress distribution to be observed during the test and also after the test if permanent residual stresses occur. The location of initial laminate failure and of the subsequent failure propagation are observed through its transparency characteristics. Experimental results are presented.

  6. Field performance of timber bridges. 13, Mohawk Canal stress-laminated bridge

    Treesearch

    P. D. Hilbrich Lee; X. Lauderdale

    The Mohawk Canal bridge was constructed in August 1994, just outside Roll, Arizona. It is a simple-span, double-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure, approximately 6.4 m (21 ft) long and 10.4 m (34 ft) wide and constructed with Combination 16F-V3 Douglas Fir glued-laminated timber beam laminations. The performance of the bridge was monitored continuously for 2...

  7. Interphase Thermomechanical Reliability and Optimization for High-Performance Ti Metal Laminates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-19

    Thermomechanical Reliability and Optimization for High-Performance Ti FA9550-08-l-0015 Metal Laminates Sb. GRANT NUMBER Program Manager: Dr Joycelyn Harrison...OSR-VA-TR-2012-0202 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT A 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Hybrid laminated composites such as titanium...graphite (TiGr) laminates are an emerging class of structural materials with the potential to enable a new generation of efficient, high-performance

  8. Verification of Accelerated Testing Methodology for Long-Term Durability of CFRP Laminates for Marine Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-30

    CFRP LAMINATES FOR MARINE USE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-06-1-1139 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Miyano, Yasushi...prediction of CFRP laminates proposed and confirmed experimentally in the previous ONR project of Grant # N000140110949 was verified theoretically and refined...DURABILITY OF CFRP LAMINATES FOR MARINE USE Principal Investigator Yasushi Miyano Co-principal Investigator Isao Kimpara Materials System

  9. Quantification of the Spatial Organization of the Nuclear Lamina as a Tool for Cell Classification

    PubMed Central

    Righolt, Christiaan H.; Zatreanu, Diana A.; Raz, Vered

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is the structural scaffold of the nuclear envelope that plays multiple regulatory roles in chromatin organization and gene expression as well as a structural role in nuclear stability. The lamina proteins, also referred to as lamins, determine nuclear lamina organization and define the nuclear shape and the structural integrity of the cell nucleus. In addition, lamins are connected with both nuclear and cytoplasmic structures forming a dynamic cellular structure whose shape changes upon external and internal signals. When bound to the nuclear lamina, the lamins are mobile, have an impact on the nuclear envelop structure, and may induce changes in their regulatory functions. Changes in the nuclear lamina shape cause changes in cellular functions. A quantitative description of these structural changes could provide an unbiased description of changes in cellular function. In this review, we describe how changes in the nuclear lamina can be measured from three-dimensional images of lamins at the nuclear envelope, and we discuss how structural changes of the nuclear lamina can be used for cell classification. PMID:27335676

  10. Quantification of the Spatial Organization of the Nuclear Lamina as a Tool for Cell Classification.

    PubMed

    Righolt, Christiaan H; Zatreanu, Diana A; Raz, Vered

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is the structural scaffold of the nuclear envelope that plays multiple regulatory roles in chromatin organization and gene expression as well as a structural role in nuclear stability. The lamina proteins, also referred to as lamins, determine nuclear lamina organization and define the nuclear shape and the structural integrity of the cell nucleus. In addition, lamins are connected with both nuclear and cytoplasmic structures forming a dynamic cellular structure whose shape changes upon external and internal signals. When bound to the nuclear lamina, the lamins are mobile, have an impact on the nuclear envelop structure, and may induce changes in their regulatory functions. Changes in the nuclear lamina shape cause changes in cellular functions. A quantitative description of these structural changes could provide an unbiased description of changes in cellular function. In this review, we describe how changes in the nuclear lamina can be measured from three-dimensional images of lamins at the nuclear envelope, and we discuss how structural changes of the nuclear lamina can be used for cell classification.

  11. Moment distributions around holes in symmetric composite laminates subjected to bending moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. B.; Shuart, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical investigation of the effects of holes on the moment distribution of symmetric composite laminates subjected to bending moments is described. A general, closed-form solution for the moment distribution of an infinite anisotropic plate is derived, and this solution is used to determine stress distributions both on the hole boundary and throughout the plate. Results are presented for several composite laminates that have holes and are subjected to either pure bending or cylindrical bending. Laminates with a circular hole or with an elliptical hole are studied. Laminate moment distributions are discussed, and ply stresses are described.

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STRUCTURAL AND STRENGTH CHARACTERISTICS OF FIBER-GLASS LAMINATES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    REINFORCED PLASTICS, STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES, LAMINATES, EPOXY RESINS, GLASS TEXTILES, LOADS(FORCES), TENSILE PROPERTIES, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, LIFE EXPECTANCY(SERVICE LIFE), USSR, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES.

  13. The initiation, propagation, and effect of matrix microcracks in cross-ply and related laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, John A.; Hu, Shoufeng; Liu, Siulie; Bark, Jong

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a variational mechanics approach was used to determine the thermoelastic stress state in cracked laminates. Described here is a generalization of the variational mechanics techniques to handle other cross-ply laminates, related laminates, and to account for delaminations emanating from microcrack tips. Microcracking experiments on Hercules 3501-6/AS4 carbon fiber/epoxy laminates show a staggered cracking pattern. These results can be explained by the variational mechanics analysis. The analysis of delaminations emanating from microcrack tips has resulted in predictions about the structural and material variables controlling competition between microcracking and delamination failure modes.

  14. Fatigue Damage in Notched Composite Laminates Under Tension-Tension Cyclic Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinchcomb, W. W.; Henneke, E. G.; Reifsnider, K. L.; Kress, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The results are given of an investigation to determine the damage states which develop in graphite epoxy laminates with center holes due to tension-tension cyclic loads, to determine the influence of stacking sequence on the initiation and interaction of damage modes and the process of damage development, and to establish the relationships between the damage states and the strength, stiffness, and life of the laminates. Two quasi-isotropic laminates were selected to give different distributions of interlaminar stresses around the hole. The laminates were tested under cyclic loads (R=0.1, 10 Hz) at maximum stresses ranging between 60 and 95 percent of the notched tensile strength.

  15. Interlaminar stress singularities at a straight free edge in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-three-dimensional finite-element analysis was used to analyze the edge-stress problem in four-ply, composite laminates. The seven laminates that were considered belong to the laminate family where the outer ply angle is between 0 and 90 deg. Systematic convergence studies were made to explore the existence of stress singularities near the free edge. The present analysis appears to confirm the existence of stress singularities at the intersection of the interface and the free edge. The power of the stress singularity was the same for all seven laminates considered.

  16. Eddy-current effect on resonant magnetoelectric coupling in magnetostrictive-piezoelectric laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoxi; Zhang, Chunli; Chen, Weiqiu; Dong, Shuxiang

    2013-07-01

    An analytical model of resonant magnetoelectric (ME) coupling in magnetostrictive (MS)-piezoelectric (PE) laminated composites in consideration of eddy-current effect in MS layer using equivalent circuit method is presented. Numerical calculations show that: (1) the eddy-current has a strong effect on ME coupling in MS-PE laminated composites at resonant frequency; and (2) the resonant ME coupling is then significantly dependent on the sizes of ME laminated composites, which were neglected in most previous theoretical analyses. The achieved results provide a theoretical guidance for the practice engineering design, manufacture, and application of ME laminated composites and devices.

  17. Mouse neutrophils lacking lamin B receptor expression exhibit aberrant development and lack critical functional responses

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Peter; Tien, Chiung W.; Olins, Ada L.; Olins, Donald E.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Carney, Lisa; Berliner, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Objective The capacity of neutrophils to eradicate bacterial infections is dependent on normal development and the activation of functional responses, which include chemotaxis and the generation of oxygen radicals during the respiratory burst. A unique feature of the neutrophil is its highly lobulated nucleus, which is thought to facilitate chemotaxis but may also play a role in other critical neutrophil functions. Nuclear lobulation is dependent on the expression of the inner nuclear envelope protein, the lamin B receptor (LBR), mutations of which cause hypolobulated neutrophil nuclei in human Pelger-Huët anomaly (PHA) and the "ichthyosis" (ic) phenotype in mice. In this study we have investigated roles for LBR in mediating neutrophil development and the activation of multiple neutrophil functions, including chemotaxis and the respiratory burst. Materials and Methods A progenitor EML cell line was generated from an ic/ic mouse, and derived cells that lacked LBR expression were induced to mature neutrophils and then examined for abnormal morphology and functional responses. Results Neutrophils derived from EML-ic/ic cells exhibited nuclear hypolobulation identical to that observed in ichthyosis mice. The ic/ic neutrophils also displayed abnormal chemotaxis, supporting the notion that nuclear segmentation augments neutrophil extravasation. Furthermore, promyelocytic forms of ic/ic cells displayed decreased proliferative responses and produced a deficient respiratory burst upon terminal maturation. Conclusions Our studies of promyelocytes that lack LBR expression have identified roles for LBR in regulating not only the morphologic maturation of the neutrophil nucleus but also proliferative and functional responses that are critical to innate immunity. PMID:18550262

  18. Effect of shallow angles on compressive strength of biaxial and triaxial laminates.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongli; Yang, Hyun-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Biaxial (BX) and triaxial (TX) composite laminates with ±45° angled plies have been widely used in wind turbine blades. As the scale of blades increases, BX and TX laminates with shallow-angled plies (i.e. off-axis ply angle <45°) might be utilized for reducing mass and/or improving performance. The compressive properties of shallow-angled BX and TX laminates are critical considering their locations in a wind turbine blade, and therefore in this study, the uniaxial static compression tests were conducted using BX and TX laminates with angled-plies of ±45°, ±35°, and ±25°, for the purpose of evaluation. On the other hand, Mori-Tanaka mean field homogenization method was employed to predict elastic constants of plies in BX and TX laminates involved in tests; linear regression analyses of experimentally measured ply strengths collected from various sources were then performed to estimate strengths of plies in BX and TX laminates; finally, Tsai-Wu, Hashin, and Puck failure criteria were chosen to predict compressive strengths of BX and TX laminates. Comparison between theoretical predictions and test results were carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of each criterion. The compressive strength of BX laminate decreases as ply angle increases, and the trend was successfully predicted by all three failure criteria. For TX laminates, ±35° angled plies rather than ±45° angled plies led to the lowest laminate compressive strength. Hashin and Puck criteria gave good predictions at certain ply angles for TX laminates, but Tsai-Wu criterion was able to capture the unexpected strength variation of TX laminates with ply angle. It was concluded that the transverse tensile stress in 0° plies of TX laminates, which attains its maximum when the off-axis ply angle is 35°, is the dominant factor in failure determination if using Tsai-Wu criterion. This explains the unexpected strength variation of TX laminates with ply angle, and also indicates that proper

  19. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2)sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  20. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Phillips, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2) sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  1. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1997-01-01

    The viability of a method for determining the fatigue life of composite rotor hub flexbeam laminates using delamination fatigue characterization data and a geometric non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was studied. Combined tension and bending loading was applied to non-linear tapered flexbeam laminates with internal ply drops. These laminates, consisting of coupon specimens cut from a full-size S2/E7T1 glass-epoxy flexbeam were tested in a hydraulic load frame under combined axial-tension and transverse cyclic bending. The magnitude of the axial load remained constant and the direction of the load rotated with the specimen as the cyclic bending load was applied. The first delamination damage observed in the specimens occurred at the area around the tip of the outermost ply-drop group. Subsequently, unstable delamination occurred by complete delamination along the length of the specimen. Continued cycling resulted in multiple delaminations. A 2D finite element model of the flexbeam was developed and a geometrically non-linear analysis was performed. The global responses of the model and test specimens agreed very well in terms of the transverse displacement. The FE model was used to calculate strain energy release rates (G) for delaminations initiating at the tip of the outer ply-drop area and growing toward the thick or thin regions of the flexbeam, as was observed in the specimens. The delamination growth toward the thick region was primarily mode 2, whereas delamination growth toward the thin region was almost completely mode 1. Material characterization data from cyclic double-cantilevered beam tests was used with the peak calculated G values to generate a curve predicting fatigue failure by unstable delamination as a function of the number of loading cycles. The calculated fatigue lives compared well with the test data.

  2. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; O''Brien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1997-01-01

    The viability of a method for determining the fatigue life of composite rotor hub flexbeam laminates using delamination fatigue characterization data and a geometric non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was studied. Combined tension and bending loading was applied to nonlinear tapered flexbeam laminates with internal ply drops. These laminates, consisting of coupon specimens cut from a full-size S2/E7T1 glass-epoxy flexbeam were tested in a hydraulic load frame under combined axial-tension and transverse cyclic bending loads. The magnitude of the axial load remained constant and the direction of the load rotated with the specimen as the cyclic bending load was applied. The first delamination damage observed in the specimens occurred at the area around the tip of the outermost ply-drop group. Subsequently, unstable delamination occurred by complete delamination along the length of the specimen. Continued cycling resulted in multiple delaminations. A 2D finite element model of the flexbeam was developed and a geometrically non-linear analysis was performed. The global responses of the model and test specimens agreed very well in terms of the transverse flexbeam tip-displacement and flapping angle. The FE model was used to calculate strain energy release rates (G) for delaminations initiating at the tip of the outer ply-drop area and growing toward the thick or thin regions of the flexbeam, as was observed in the specimens. The delamination growth toward the thick region was primarily mode 2, whereas delamination growth toward the thin region was almost completely mode 1. Material characterization data from cyclic double-cantilevered beam tests was used with the peak calculated G values to generate a curve predicting fatigue failure by unstable delamination as a function of the number of loading cycles. The calculated fatigue lives compared well with the test data.

  3. Environmental effects on long term behavior of composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, S. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    Model equations are presented for approximate methods simulating the long-term behavior of composite materials and structures in hot/humid service environments. These equations allow laminate property upgradings with time, and can account for the effects of service environments on creep response. These methodologies are illustrated for various individual and coupled temperature/moisture, longitudinal/transverse, and composite material type cases. Creep deformation is noted to rise dramatically for cases of matrix-borne, but not of fiber-borne, loading in hot, humid environments; the coupled influence of temperature and moisture is greater than a mere combination of their individual influences.

  4. Environmental effects on long term behavior of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, S. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Model equations are presented for approximate methods simulating the long-term behavior of composite materials and structures in hot/humid service environments. These equations allow laminate property upgradings with time, and can account for the effects of service environments on creep response. These methodologies are illustrated for various individual and coupled temperature/moisture, longitudinal/transverse, and composite material type cases. Creep deformation is noted to rise dramatically for cases of matrix-borne, but not of fiber-borne, loading in hot, humid environments; the coupled influence of temperature and moisture is greater than a mere combination of their individual influences.

  5. Symbolic manipulation techniques for vibration analysis of laminated elliptic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. M.; Noor, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    A computational scheme is presented for the free vibration analysis of laminated composite elliptic plates. The scheme is based on Hamilton's principle, the Rayleigh-Ritz technique and symmetry considerations and is implemented with the aid of the MACSYMA symbolic manipulation system. The MACYSMA system, through differentiation, integration, and simplification of analytic expressions, produces highly-efficient FORTRAN code for the evaluation of the stiffness and mass coefficients. Multiple use is made of this code to obtain not only the frequencies and mode shapes of the plate, but also the derivatives of the frequencies with respect to various material and geometric parameters.

  6. Pasture management to minimize the risk of equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Watts, Kathryn

    2010-08-01

    The sugar, starch, and fructan content (collectively referred to as nonstructural carbohydrates [NSC]) of pasture plants is dependent on the environmental conditions under which they have grown. Pasture that is stressed by cold, drought, or lack of nutrients can be 2 to 3 times higher in NSC than pasture that grows quickly in warm weather and is adequately watered and fertilized. Horses at risk for laminitis should have access to pasture limited or be removed completely when environmental conditions are conducive to high levels of NSC accumulation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Study of a Waveguide Antenna Implemented in Laminated Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    CRC had some experience with fabricating microwave circuits with laminated copper clad dielectric. There was bonding material (CLTE-P) that could be...PEC) and copper walls in Table 4. For all of the simulations, the physical parameters (width= 5.13 mm, height=3.40 mm, length=24.27 mm) and the... copper waveguide. As shown in Chapter 2, it is also possible to determine the losses from the conductor and dielectric (Equations 2.6 - 2.8) of a RWG

  8. Fatigue Damage-Strength Relationships in Composite Laminates. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    NUMBER 2. A ES ION N • /NT’S CATALOG NUMBER AFWAL-TR-83-3084, Vol I .A_"_.._ 4. TITLE (ad Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED 1 June 1981...Fatigue Damage-Strength Relationships in Final: 31 May 1983 Composite Laminates 6. PERFORMING OAG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) 6. CONTRACT OR GRANT...I1. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE September 1983 AFWAL/FIBEC 13. NUMBER OF PAGES Wright Patterson AFB, OH 45433 55 14. MONITORING

  9. Microcracking in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loading. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, Jason R.

    1995-01-01

    Composites used in space structures are exposed to both extremes in temperature and applied mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a predictive methodology to quantify microcracking in general composite laminates under both thermal and mechanical loading. This objective is successfully met through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental investigation. In the analysis, the stress and displacement distributions in the vicinity of a crack are determined using a shear lag model. These are incorporated into an energy based cracking criterion to determine the favorability of crack formation. A progressive damage algorithm allows the inclusion of material softening effects and temperature-dependent material properties. The analysis is implemented by a computer code which gives predicted crack density and degraded laminate properties as functions of any thermomechanical load history. Extensive experimentation provides verification of the analysis. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates are manufactured with three different layups to investigate ply thickness and orientation effects. Thermal specimens are cooled to progressively lower temperatures down to -184 C. After conditioning the specimens to each temperature, cracks are counted on their edges using optical microscopy and in their interiors by sanding to incremental depths. Tensile coupons are loaded monotonically to progressively higher loads until failure. Cracks are counted on the coupon edges after each loading. A data fit to all available results provides input parameters for the analysis and shows them to be material properties, independent of geometry and loading. Correlation between experiment and analysis is generally very good under both thermal and mechanical loading, showing the methodology to be a powerful, unified tool. Delayed crack initiation observed in a few cases is attributed to a

  10. Analysis of shear test method for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergner, H. W., Jr.; Davis, J. G., Jr.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    An elastic plane stress finite element analysis of the stress distributions in four flat test specimens for in-plane shear response of composite materials subjected to mechanical or thermal loads is presented. The shear test specimens investigated include: slotted coupon, cross beam, losipescu, and rail shear. Results are presented in the form of normalized shear contour plots for all three in-plane stess components. It is shown that the cross beam, losipescu, and rail shear specimens have stress distributions which are more than adequate for determining linear shear behavior of composite materials. Laminate properties, core effects, and fixture configurations are among the factors which were found to influence the stress distributions.

  11. An ideal clamping analysis for a cross-ply laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valisetty, R. R.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Rehfield, L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Different elementary clamping models are discussed for a three layer crossply laminate to study the sensitivity of clamping to the definition of cross-sectional rotation. All of these models leave a considerable residual warping at the edges. Using a complimentary energy principle and principle of superposition, an analysis is conducted to reduce this residual warping. This led to the identification of exact interior solution corresponding to the ideal clamping. This study also suggests a presence of stress singularities at the corners and between different layers near the fixed edge.

  12. Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, P.T.; Fisher, R.W.; Hosking, F.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1996-08-20

    A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone. 6 figs.

  13. Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, Paul T.; Fisher, Robert W.; Hosking, Floyd M.; Zanner, Frank J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone.

  14. Nuclear lamina at the crossroads of the cytoplasm and nucleus.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Larry; Huber, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a protein meshwork that lines the nuclear envelope in metazoan cells. It is composed largely of a polymeric assembly of lamins, which comprise a distinct sequence homology class of the intermediate filament protein family. On the basis of its structural properties, the lamina originally was proposed to provide scaffolding for the nuclear envelope and to promote anchoring of chromatin and nuclear pore complexes at the nuclear surface. This viewpoint has expanded greatly during the past 25 years, with a host of surprising new insights on lamina structure, molecular composition and functional attributes. It has been established that the self-assembly properties of lamins are very similar to those of cytoplasmic intermediate filament proteins, and that the lamin polymer is physically associated with components of the cytoplasmic cytoskeleton and with a multitude of chromatin and inner nuclear membrane proteins. Cumulative evidence points to an important role for the lamina in regulating signaling and gene activity, and in mechanically coupling the cytoplasmic cytoskeleton to the nucleus. The significance of the lamina has been vaulted to the forefront by the discovery that mutations in lamins and lamina-associated polypeptides lead to an array of human diseases. A key future challenge is to understand how the lamina integrates pathways for mechanics and signaling at the molecular level. Understanding the structure of the lamina from the atomic to supramolecular levels will be essential for achieving this goal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Flaw criticality of circular disbond defects in compressive laminates. M.S. Thesis. Interim Report, 1980 - 1981; [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The compressive behavior of T300/5208 graphite-epoxy laminates containing circular delaminations was studied to determine the flaw criticality of two types of implanted defect, Kapton bag and Teflon film, on several laminate configurations. Defect size was varied. Results, presented in the form of residual strength curves, indicate that the Teflon film defect reduced strength more than the Kapton bad defect in 12-ply samples, but that two laminates (+ or - 45) sub 2s and (90/+ or - 45) sub s were insensitive to any implanted defect. A clear thickness effect was shown to exist for the (o/+ pr 45) sub ns laminate and was attributed to failure mode transition. The analytically predicted buckling loads show excellent agreement with experimental results and are useful in predicting failure mode transition.

  16. Compression response of thick layer composite laminates with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Smith, Barry T.; Maiden, Janice

    1992-01-01

    Compression and compression-after-impact (CAI) tests were conducted on seven different AS4-3501-6 (0/90) 0.64-cm thick composite laminates. Four of the seven laminates had through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcement fibers. Two TTT reinforcement methods, stitching and integral weaving, and two reinforcement fibers, Kevlar and carbon, were used. The remaining three laminates were made without TTT reinforcements and were tested to establish a baseline for comparison with the laminates having TTT reinforcement. Six of the seven laminates consisted of nine thick layers whereas the seventh material was composed of 46 thin plies. The use of thick-layer material has the potential for reducing structural part cost because of the reduced part count (layers of material). The compression strengths of the TTT reinforced laminates were approximately one half those of the materials without TTT reinforcements. However, the CAI strengths of the TTT reinforced materials were approximately twice those of materials without TTT reinforcements. The improvement in CAI strength is due to an increase in interlaminar strength produced by the TTT reinforcement. Stitched laminates had slightly higher compression and CAI strengths than the integrally woven laminates.

  17. Examining the Relationship Between Ballistic and Structural Properties of Lightweight Thermoplastic Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Kevlar KM2® Style 705 PVB phenolic woven aramid composite was included. A developmental unidirectional thermoplastic aramid fiber, Honeywell...Examining the Relationship Between Ballistic and Structural Properties of Lightweight Thermoplastic Unidirectional Composite Laminates by...Unidirectional Composite Laminates Lionel R. Vargas-Gonzalez, Shawn M. Walsh, and James C. Gurganus Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  18. 40 CFR 426.70 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass laminating subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... automotive glass laminating subcategory. 426.70 Section 426.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Laminating Subcategory § 426.70 Applicability; description of the automotive glass...

  19. 40 CFR 426.70 - Applicability; description of the automotive glass laminating subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... automotive glass laminating subcategory. 426.70 Section 426.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Automotive Glass Laminating Subcategory § 426.70 Applicability; description of the automotive glass...

  20. A Theoretical Model for Estimation of Yield Strength of Fiber Metal Laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Sunil; Nagesh, Suresh; Umesh, C. K.; Narayanan, S.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a theoretical model for estimation of yield strength of fiber metal laminate. Principles of elasticity and formulation of residual stress are employed to determine the stress state in metal layer of the laminate that is found to be higher than the stress applied over the laminate resulting in reduced yield strength of the laminate in comparison with that of the metal layer. The model is tested over 4A-3/2 Glare laminate comprising three thin aerospace 2014-T6 aluminum alloy layers alternately bonded adhesively with two prepregs, each prepreg built up of three uni-directional glass fiber layers laid in longitudinal and transverse directions. Laminates with prepregs of E-Glass and S-Glass fibers are investigated separately under uni-axial tension. Yield strengths of both the Glare variants are found to be less than that of aluminum alloy with use of S-Glass fiber resulting in higher laminate yield strength than with the use of E-Glass fiber. Results from finite element analysis and tensile tests conducted over the laminates substantiate the theoretical model.

  1. The effect of lamination-induced stresses on fatigue damage development at internal flaws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifsnider, K. L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of stresses induced by the lamination of off-axis plies to O-deg lamina on the development of damage during the fatigue loading of the O-deg plies are discussed. The transverse normal stresses in the plane of the laminae and the laminate created by the laminating constraints when an axial force is applied to the laminate are calculated in terms of a differential Poisson ratio between the ply in question in the unconstrained and constrained states, and significant differences in the constraint environments of an unnotched specimen joined to plies of 45 and 90 deg inclination are noted which correspond to an increase in longitudinal splitting in the 90 deg case and a marked decrease in longitudinal splitting in the 45 deg case. If a notch is present, shear and crack-opening damage is found to be very effectively suppressed in 45-deg laminates, and less so in the 90-deg case. It is pointed out that whereas the 45-deg laminate represents the least damage situation, it does not have the greatest notched strength. It is concluded that an understanding and prediction of damage development in laminates requires knowledge of the stress fields caused by the lamination constraints.

  2. An analytical and experimental investigation of edge delamination in laminates subjected to tension, bending, and torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Wen S.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated two-dimensional finite element was developed to calculate interlaminar stresses and strain energy release rates for the study of delamination in composite laminates subjected to uniaxial tension, bending, and torsion loads. Addressed are the formulation, implementation, and verification of the model. Parametric studies were conducted on the effect of Poisson's ratio mismatch between plies and the stacking sequence on interlaminar stress, and on the effect of delamination opening height and delamination length, due to bending, on strain energy release rate for various laminates. A comparison of strain energy release rates in all-graphite and graphite/glass hybrid laminates is included. The preliminary results of laminates subjected to torsion are also included. Fatigue tension tests were conducted on Mode 1 and mixed mode edge-delamination coupons to establish the relationship between fatigue load vs. onset of delamination cycle. The effect on the fatigue delamination onset of different frequencies (1 and 5 Hz) was investigated for glass, graphite,and their hybrid laminates. Although a 20 percent increase in the static onset-of-delamination strength and a 10 percent increase in ultimate strength resulted from hybridizing the all-graphite laminate with a 90 deg glass ply, the fatigue onset is lower in the hybrid laminate than in the all-graphite laminate.

  3. Structural Performance of the Second Oldest Glued-Laminated Structure in the United States

    Treesearch

    Douglas R. Rammer; Jorge de Melo Moura; Robert J. Ross

    2014-01-01

    The second glued-laminated structure built in the United States was constructed at the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) in 1934 to demonstrate the performance of wooden arch buildings. After 75 years of use the structure was decommissioned in 2010. Shortly after construction, researchers structurally evaluated the glued-laminated arch structure for uniform loading...

  4. Structural Evaluation of the Second Oldest Glued-Laminated Structure in the United States

    Treesearch

    Douglas R. Rammer; Jorge de Melo Moura

    2013-01-01

    The second glued-laminated structure built in the United States was constructed at the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) in 1934 to demonstrate the performance of wooden arch buildings. After decades of use the structure was decommissioned in 2010. Shortly after construction, researchers structurally evaluated the glued-laminated arch structure for uniform loading...

  5. A summary of modulus of elasticity and knot size surveys for laminating grades of lumber

    Treesearch

    R. W. Wolfe; R. C. Moody

    1981-01-01

    A summary of modulus of elasticity (MOE) and knot data is presented for grades of lumber commonly used to manufacture glued-laminated (glulam) timber by the laminating Industry. Tabulated values represent 30 different studies covering a time span of over 16 years. Statistical estimates of average and near-maximum knot sizes as well as mean and coefficient of variation...

  6. Efficient utilization of red maple lumber in glued-laminated timber beams

    Treesearch

    J. J. Janowiak; H. B. Manbeck; R. Hernandez; R. C. Moody; P. R. Blankenhorn; P. Labosky

    The feasibility of utilizing cant-sawn hardwood lumber, which would not usually be desired for furniture manufacture, was studied for the manufacture of structural glued-laminated (glulam) timber. Two red maple beam combinations were evaluated: (1) a glulam combination designed with E-rated lumber in 25 percent of the outer laminations (top and bottom) and No. 3 grade...

  7. Probabilistic and structural reliability analysis of laminated composite structures based on the IPACS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, Larry; Buttitta, Claudio; Suarez, James

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic predictions based on the Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures (IPACS) code are presented for the material and structural response of unnotched and notched, 1M6/3501-6 Gr/Ep laminates. Comparisons of predicted and measured modulus and strength distributions are given for unnotched unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates. The predicted modulus distributions were found to correlate well with the test results for all three unnotched laminates. Correlations of strength distributions for the unnotched laminates are judged good for the unidirectional laminate and fair for the cross-ply laminate, whereas the strength correlation for the quasi-isotropic laminate is deficient because IPACS did not yet have a progressive failure capability. The paper also presents probabilistic and structural reliability analysis predictions for the strain concentration factor (SCF) for an open-hole, quasi-isotropic laminate subjected to longitudinal tension. A special procedure was developed to adapt IPACS for the structural reliability analysis. The reliability results show the importance of identifying the most significant random variables upon which the SCF depends, and of having accurate scatter values for these variables.

  8. 76 FR 72161 - Laminated Woven Sacks From the People's Republic of China: Negative Preliminary Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... merchandise anti-circumvention inquiry to determine whether laminated woven sacks printed with two colors in... Circumvention (Printed Ink Colors) dated March 25, 2011. \\5\\ See Laminated Woven Sacks From the People's... to an exterior ply of paper that is suitable for high quality print graphics; \\6\\ printed with three...

  9. Field performance of timber bridges. 5, Little Salmon Creek stress-laminated deck bridge

    Treesearch

    M. A. Ritter; J. A. Kainz; G. J. Porter

    The Little Salmon Creek bridge was constructed in November 1988 on the Allegheny National Forest in Pennsylvania. The bridge is a simple span, single-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure that is approximately 26-ft long and 16-ft wide. The bridge is unique in that it is the first known stress-laminated timber bridge to be constructed of hardwood lumber. The...

  10. Field performance of timber bridges. 7, Connell Lake stress-laminated deck bridge

    Treesearch

    L. E. Hislop; M. A. Ritter

    The Connell Lake bridge was constructed in early 1991 on the Tongass National Forest, Alaska, as a demonstration bridge under the Timber Bridge Initiative. The bridge is a stress-laminated deck structure with an approximate 36-ft length and 18-ft width and is the first known stress-laminated timber bridge constructed in Alaska. Performance of the bridge was monitored...

  11. Bending analyses for 3D engineered structural panels made from laminated paper and carbon fabric

    Treesearch

    Jinghao Li; John F. Hunt; Zhiyong Cai; Xianyan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents analysis of a 3-dimensional engineered structural panel (3DESP) having a tri-axial core structure made from phenolic impregnated laminated-paper composites with and without high strength composite carbon-fiber fabric laminated to the outside of both faces. Both I-beam equations and finite element method were used to analyze four-point bending of the...

  12. Performance of stress-laminated timber highway bridges in cold climates

    Treesearch

    James P. Wacker

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent laboratory and field data studies on thermal performance of stress-laminated timber highway bridges. Concerns about the reliability of stress-laminated deck bridges when exposed to sub-freezing temperatures triggered several investigations. Two laboratory studies were conducted to study the effects of wood species, preservative, moisture...

  13. Normalization of Impact Energy by Laminate Thickness for Compression After Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Hromisin, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    The amount of impact energy used to damage a composite laminate is a critical parameter when assessing residual strength properties. The compression after impact (CAI) strength of impacted laminates is dependent upon how thick the laminate is and this has traditionally been accounted for by normalizing (dividing) the impact energy by the laminate's thickness. However, when comparing CAI strength values for a given lay-up sequence and fiber/resin system, dividing the impact energy by the specimen thickness has been noted by the author to give higher CAI strength values for thicker laminates. A study was thus undertaken to assess the comparability of CAI strength data by normalizing the impact energy by the specimen thickness raised to a power to account for the higher strength of thicker laminates. One set of data from the literature and two generated in this study were analyzed by dividing the impact energy by the specimen thickness to the 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 powers. Results show that as laminate thickness and damage severity decreased, the value which the laminate thickness needs to be raised to in order to yield more comparable CAI data increases.

  14. Fiberglass Lamination Program. Course of Instruction for Adult and Post-Secondary Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuin, Dean

    Seven courses of instruction are provided for a fiberglass lamination program for adult and postsecondary classes. The courses cover these areas: (1) mold preparation, (2) gelcoating, (3) fiberglass lamination, (4) stiffening, (5) popping, (6) grinding, and (7) mold making. Information provided at the beginning of each course consists of the…

  15. Strength validation and fire endurance of glued-laminated timber beams

    Treesearch

    E. L. Schaffer; C. M. Marx; D. A. Bender; F. E. Woeste

    A previous paper presented a reliability-based model to predict the strength of glued-laminated timber beams at both room temperature and during fire exposure. This Monte Carlo simulation procedure generates strength and fire endurance (time-to-failure, TTF) data for glued- laminated beams that allow assessment of mean strength and TTF as well as their variability....

  16. Reliability formulation for the strength and fire endurance of glued-laminated beams

    Treesearch

    D. A. Bender

    A model was developed for predicting the statistical distribution of glued-laminated beam strength and stiffness under normal temperature conditions using available long span modulus of elasticity data, end joint tension test data, and tensile strength data for laminating-grade lumber. The beam strength model predictions compared favorably with test data for glued-...

  17. Improving the fatigue resistance of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Theodore L.; River, Bryan H.; Murmanis, Lidija L.; Christiansen, Alfred W.

    1988-01-01

    The premature fatigue failure of a laminated wood/epoxy test beam containing a cross section finger joint was the subject of a multi-disciplinary investigation. The primary objectives were to identify the failure mechanisms which occurred during the finger joint test and to provide avenues for general improvements in the design and fabrication of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures.

  18. Field performance of timber bridges. 6, Hoffman Run stress-laminated deck bridge

    Treesearch

    M. A. Ritter; P. D. Hilbrich Lee; G. J. Porter

    The Hoffman Run bridge, located just outside Dahoga, Pennsylvania, was constructed in October 1990. The bridge is a simple-span, single-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure that is approximately 26 ft long and 16 ft wide. It is the second stress-laminated timber bridge to be constructed of hardwood lumber in Pennsylvania. The performance of the bridge was...

  19. The oral glucose test predicts laminitis risk in ponies fed a diet high in nonstructural carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Meier, A D; de Laat, M A; Reiche, D B; Pollitt, C C; Walsh, D M; McGree, J M; Sillence, M N

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between laminitis development in ponies and insulin/glucose concentrations in response to the oral glucose test (OGT) and a dietary challenge high in nonstructural carbohydrates (NSCs). After undergoing an OGT (1 g dextrose/kg BW in feed), 37 ponies with 2-h serum insulin concentrations ranging from 22 to 1,133 μIU/mL were subjected to a diet challenge period (DCP), consuming 12 g NSC/kg BW/d for up to 18 d. Insulin and glucose responses were measured on day 2 of the DCP. Clinical laminitis was diagnosed by blinded experts and confirmed radiographically. Basal ACTH levels and clinical signs were assessed to investigate concurrent putative pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID). The diet induced Obel grade 1 or 2 laminitis in 14 ponies (38%). The ponies that developed laminitis had higher maximum concentrations of blood glucose (P = 0.04) and serum insulin (P = 0.02) in response to the diet. The geometric mean (95% CI) blood glucose concentration for laminitis cases was 14.9 (12.9-17.2) mM, compared to 10.7 (9.2-12.5) mM for ponies who did not develop laminitis. Similarly, the geometric mean (95% CI) for serum insulin was 396 (301-520) μIU/mL for laminitis cases, compared to 216 (148-316) μIU/mL for ponies who did not develop laminitis. Laminitis incidence was likewise associated with insulin concentrations measured during the OGT. Laminitis occurred at frequencies of 0% (0/7) if postdextrose insulin (μIU/mL) was <50; 35% (8/23) if insulin was 50 to 195; and 86% (6/7) if insulin was >195 μIU/mL. Basal ACTH concentrations were above seasonally accepted reference ranges in 16/37 ponies, and 8 of these animals (50%) developed laminitis. This included all 5 ponies in the study that had clinical signs of PPID (100%). In contrast, hyperinsulinemia and laminitis occurred in only 3/11 ponies (27%) with elevated ACTH concentrations and no clinical signs of PPID (P = 0.009). Thus, laminitis occurrence

  20. A transparent, solvent-free laminated top electrode for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Makha, Mohammed; Fernandes, Silvia Letícia; Jenatsch, Sandra; Offermans, Ton; Schleuniger, Jürg; Tisserant, Jean-Nicolas; Véron, Anna C; Hany, Roland

    2016-01-01

    A simple lamination process of the top electrode for perovskite solar cells is demonstrated. The laminate electrode consists of a transparent and conductive plastic/metal mesh substrate, coated with an adhesive mixture of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate), PEDOT:PSS, and sorbitol. The laminate electrode showed a high degree of transparency of 85%. Best cell performance was achieved for laminate electrodes prepared with a sorbitol concentration of ~30 wt% per milliliter PEDOT:PSS dispersion, and using a pre-annealing temperature of 120°C for 10 min before lamination. Thereby, perovskite solar cells with stabilized power conversion efficiencies of (7.6 ± 1.0)% were obtained which corresponds to 80% of the reference devices with reflective opaque gold electrodes.