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Sample records for a-type potassium channels

  1. The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    seizure data. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Epilepsy , Ketogenic Diet , Seizure Disorder, Potassium Channels, Neurophysiology. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0463 TITLE: The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The overall objective of this Discovery Award is to explore the hypothesis the ketogenic diet

  2. Examining potassium channel function in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Electrophysiologically, astrocytes are characterized by a high K(+) resting conductance and a hyperpolarized resting membrane potential. Both features are due to the activity of astrocytic potassium channels. Astrocytes express a variety of voltage-dependent and leak potassium channels on the plasma membrane that contribute to the hyperpolarized resting membrane potential and other cellular processes. This chapter focuses on measuring K(+) channel function in astrocytes, focusing on Kir4.1, an inwardly rectifying potassium channel. We and others have demonstrated that Kir4.1 contributes significantly to the high-resting K(+) conductance and the hyperpolarized resting membrane potential. This channel is also implicated in channel-mediated regulation of extracellular potassium.

  3. Potassium channel structures: do they conform?

    PubMed

    Gulbis, Jacqueline M; Doyle, Declan A

    2004-08-01

    Potassium channels are signalling elements vital to vertebrate neurotransmission, and cardiac and renal function. Two inherent qualities equip them for their role in the interconversion of chemical and electrical messages: high selectivity for potassium ions and the ability to open (gate) on cue. The crystal structure of KcsA, published in 1998, explained much about potassium selectivity and high ion flux. The enormous diversity of potassium channels (some hundreds of genes in humans) may have hampered similar progress in understanding gating processes. The recent determination of several representative structures has provided us with a valuable reference for discriminating between features that are utilized in gating across the potassium channel genre and features that determine responsiveness to family-specific gating cues.

  4. The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0463 TITLE: The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Geoffrey Murphy...NUMBER The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0463 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Geoffrey Murphy...The overall objective of this Discovery Award was to explore the hypothesis the ketogenic diet (KD) regulates neuronal excitability by influencing

  5. A Novel Potassium Channel in Photosynthetic Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Manuela; Teardo, Enrico; La Rocca, Nicoletta; Zulkifli, Lalu; Checchetto, Vanessa; Shijuku, Toshiaki; Sato, Yuki; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Uozumi, Noboyuki; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Szabò, Ildikò

    2010-01-01

    Elucidation of the structure-function relationship of a small number of prokaryotic ion channels characterized so far greatly contributed to our knowledge on basic mechanisms of ion conduction. We identified a new potassium channel (SynK) in the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, a photosynthetic model organism. SynK, when expressed in a K+-uptake-system deficient E.coli strain, was able to recover growth of these organisms. The protein functions as a potassium selective ion channel when expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. The location of SynK in cyanobacteria in both thylakoid and plasmamembranes was revealed by immunogold electron microscopy and Western blotting of isolated membrane fractions. SynK seems to be conserved during evolution, giving rise to a TPK (two-pore K+ channel) family member which is shown here to be located in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis. Our work characterizes a novel cyanobacterial potassium channel and indicates the molecular nature of the first higher plant thylakoid cation channel, opening the way to functional studies. PMID:20404935

  6. Single-Channel Properties of IKs Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Youshan; Sigworth, Fred J.

    1998-01-01

    Expressed in Xenopus oocytes, KvLQT1 channel subunits yield a small, rapidly activating, voltage- dependent potassium conductance. When coexpressed with the minK gene product, a slowly activating and much larger potassium current results. Using fluctuation analysis and single-channel recordings, we have studied the currents formed by human KvLQT1 subunits alone and in conjunction with human or rat minK subunits. With low external K+, the single-channel conductances of these three channel types are estimated to be 0.7, 4.5, and 6.5 pS, respectively, based on noise analysis at 20 kHz bandwidth of currents at +50 mV. Power spectra computed over the range 0.1 Hz–20 kHz show a weak frequency dependence, consistent with current interruptions occurring on a broad range of time scales. The broad spectrum causes the apparent single-channel current value to depend on the bandwidth of the recording, and is mirrored in very “flickery” single-channel events of the channels from coexpressed KvLQT1 and human minK subunits. The increase in macroscopic current due to the presence of the minK subunit is accounted for by the increased apparent single-channel conductance it confers on the expressed channels. The rat minK subunit also confers the property that the outward single-channel current is increased by external potassium ions. PMID:9834139

  7. Sea Anemone Toxins Affecting Potassium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diochot, Sylvie; Lazdunski, Michel

    The great diversity of K+ channels and their wide distribution in many tissues are associated with important functions in cardiac and neuronal excitability that are now better understood thanks to the discovery of animal toxins. During the past few decades, sea anemones have provided a variety of toxins acting on voltage-sensitive sodium and, more recently, potassium channels. Currently there are three major structural groups of sea anemone K+ channel (SAK) toxins that have been characterized. Radioligand binding and electrophysiological experiments revealed that each group contains peptides displaying selective activities for different subfamilies of K+ channels. Short (35-37 amino acids) peptides in the group I display pore blocking effects on Kv1 channels. Molecular interactions of SAK-I toxins, important for activity and binding on Kv1 channels, implicate a spot of three conserved amino acid residues (Ser, Lys, Tyr) surrounded by other less conserved residues. Long (58-59 amino acids) SAK-II peptides display both enzymatic and K+ channel inhibitory activities. Medium size (42-43 amino acid) SAK-III peptides are gating modifiers which interact either with cardiac HERG or Kv3 channels by altering their voltage-dependent properties. SAK-III toxins bind to the S3C region in the outer vestibule of Kv channels. Sea anemones have proven to be a rich source of pharmacological tools, and some of the SAK toxins are now useful drugs for the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  8. Modulation of Potassium Channels Inhibits Bunyavirus Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Hover, Samantha; King, Barnabas; Hall, Bradley; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Taqi, Hussah; Daly, Janet; Dallas, Mark; Peers, Chris; Schnettler, Esther; McKimmie, Clive; Kohl, Alain; Barr, John N.; Mankouri, Jamel

    2016-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are considered to be emerging pathogens facilitated by the segmented nature of their genome that allows reassortment between different species to generate novel viruses with altered pathogenicity. Bunyaviruses are transmitted via a diverse range of arthropod vectors, as well as rodents, and have established a global disease range with massive importance in healthcare, animal welfare, and economics. There are no vaccines or anti-viral therapies available to treat human bunyavirus infections and so development of new anti-viral strategies is urgently required. Bunyamwera virus (BUNV; genus Orthobunyavirus) is the model bunyavirus, sharing aspects of its molecular and cellular biology with all Bunyaviridae family members. Here, we show for the first time that BUNV activates and requires cellular potassium (K+) channels to infect cells. Time of addition assays using K+ channel modulating agents demonstrated that K+ channel function is critical to events shortly after virus entry but prior to viral RNA synthesis/replication. A similar K+ channel dependence was identified for other bunyaviruses namely Schmallenberg virus (Orthobunyavirus) as well as the more distantly related Hazara virus (Nairovirus). Using a rational pharmacological screening regimen, two-pore domain K+ channels (K2P) were identified as the K+ channel family mediating BUNV K+ channel dependence. As several K2P channel modulators are currently in clinical use, our work suggests they may represent a new and safe drug class for the treatment of potentially lethal bunyavirus disease. PMID:26677217

  9. Voltage Sensor Inactivation in Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Bähring, Robert; Barghaan, Jan; Westermeier, Regina; Wollberg, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    In voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels membrane depolarization causes movement of a voltage sensor domain. This conformational change of the protein is transmitted to the pore domain and eventually leads to pore opening. However, the voltage sensor domain may interact with two distinct gates in the pore domain: the activation gate (A-gate), involving the cytoplasmic S6 bundle crossing, and the pore gate (P-gate), located externally in the selectivity filter. How the voltage sensor moves and how tightly it interacts with these two gates on its way to adopt a relaxed conformation when the membrane is depolarized may critically determine the mode of Kv channel inactivation. In certain Kv channels, voltage sensor movement leads to a tight interaction with the P-gate, which may cause conformational changes that render the selectivity filter non-conductive (“P/C-type inactivation”). Other Kv channels may preferably undergo inactivation from pre-open closed-states during voltage sensor movement, because the voltage sensor temporarily uncouples from the A-gate. For this behavior, known as “preferential” closed-state inactivation, we introduce the term “A/C-type inactivation”. Mechanistically, P/C- and A/C-type inactivation represent two forms of “voltage sensor inactivation.” PMID:22654758

  10. RNA editing in eag potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Mary Y.; Maloney, Rachel; Fineberg, Jeffrey D.; Reenan, Robert A.; Horn, Richard

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing at four sites in eag, a Drosophila voltage-gated potassium channel, results in the substitution of amino acids into the final protein product that are not encoded by the genome. These sites and the editing alterations introduced are K467R (Site 1, top of the S6 segment), Y548C, N567D and K699R (sites 2–4, within the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain). We mutated these residues individually and expressed the channels in Xenopus oocytes. A fully edited construct (all four sites) has the slowest activation kinetics and a paucity of inactivation, whereas the fully unedited channel exhibits the fastest activation and most dramatic inactivation. Editing Site 1 inhibits steady-state inactivation. Mutating Site 1 to the neutral residues resulted in intermediate inactivation phenotypes and a leftward shift of the peak current-voltage relationship. Activation kinetics display a Cole-Moore shift that is enhanced by RNA editing. Normalized open probability relationships for 467Q, 467R and 467K are superimposable, indicating little effect of the mutations on steady-state activation. 467Q and 467R enhance instantaneous inward rectification, indicating a role of this residue in ion permeation. Intracellular tetrabutylammonium blocks 467K significantly better than 467R. Block by intracellular, but not extracellular, tetraethylammonium interferes with inactivation. The fraction of inactivated current is reduced at higher extracellular Mg+2 concentrations, and channels edited at Site 1 are more sensitive to changes in extracellular Mg+2 than unedited channels. These results show that even a minor change in amino acid side-chain chemistry and size can have a dramatic impact on channel biophysics, and that RNA editing is important for fine-tuning the channel’s function. PMID:23064203

  11. Organisation of potassium channels on the neuronal surface.

    PubMed

    Luján, Rafael

    2010-09-01

    Potassium channels are a family of ion channels that govern the intrinsic electrical properties of neurons in the brain. Molecular cloning has revealed over 100 genes encoding the pore-forming alpha subunits of potassium channels in mammals, making them the most diverse subset of ion channels. Multiplicity in this ion channel family is further generated through alternative splicing. The precise location of potassium channels along the dendro-somato-axonic surface of the neurons is an important factor in determining its functional impact. Today, it is widely accepted that potassium channels can be located at any subcellular compartment on the neuronal surface, at synaptic and extrasynaptic sites, from somata to dendritic shafts, dendritic spines, axons or axon terminals. However, they are not evenly distributed on the neuronal surface and depending on the potassium channel subtype, are instead concentrated at different compartments. This selective localization of ion channels to specific neuronal compartments has many different functional implications. One factor necessary to understand the role of potassium channels in neuronal function is to unravel their specialized distribution and subcellular localization within a cell, and this can only be achieved by electron microscopy. In this review, I summarize anatomical findings, describing their distribution in the central nervous system. The distinct regional, cellular and subcellular distribution of potassium channels in the brain will be discussed in view of their possible functional implications. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of ATP sensitive potassium channel in extracellular potassium accumulation and cardiac arrhythmias during myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Billman, G E

    1994-06-01

    Extracellular potassium rises rapidly during myocardial ischaemia, correlating with the onset of ventricular arrhythmias. The extracellular accumulation of potassium can induce abnormalities in both impulse conduction and impulse generation. Inhomogeneities of potassium conductance will elicit regional differences in action potential duration and repolarisation. The resulting spatial dispersion of refractory period will allow for fragmentation of impulse conduction on ensuing beats, the formation of irregular reentrant pathways and ventricular fibrillation. In a similar manner, the spread of injury current from the ischaemic tissue to surrounding normal tissue can trigger extrasystoles (depolarisation induced automaticity). It has been hypothesised that the activation of the ATP sensitive potassium channel contributes significantly to reductions in action potential duration and increases in extracellular potassium accumulation during myocardial ischaemia. ATP sensitive potassium channel antagonists prevent ischaemically induced reductions in action potential duration and the dispersion of refractory period but may induce oscillatory afterpotentials under some conditions (for example, calcium overload). In contrast, potassium channel agonists enhance the dispersion of refractory period ischaemia, which promotes the formation of re-entrant arrhythmias. The pharmacological modulation of the ATP sensitive potassium channels could therefore offer a novel approach for the management of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with ischaemic heart disease. In general, channel antagonists prevent ventricular fibrillation, while high (hypotensive) doses of channel agonists can induce malignant arrhythmias during ischaemia in animal models. However, recent evidence also suggests that potassium channel agonists may promote a better preservation of myocardial mechanical performance during reperfusion while ATP sensitive potassium channel antagonists exacerbate mechanical depression

  13. Functional diversity of potassium channel voltage-sensing domains

    PubMed Central

    Islas, León D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-gated potassium channels or Kv's are membrane proteins with fundamental physiological roles. They are composed of 2 main functional protein domains, the pore domain, which regulates ion permeation, and the voltage-sensing domain, which is in charge of sensing voltage and undergoing a conformational change that is later transduced into pore opening. The voltage-sensing domain or VSD is a highly conserved structural motif found in all voltage-gated ion channels and can also exist as an independent feature, giving rise to voltage sensitive enzymes and also sustaining proton fluxes in proton-permeable channels. In spite of the structural conservation of VSDs in potassium channels, there are several differences in the details of VSD function found across variants of Kvs. These differences are mainly reflected in variations in the electrostatic energy needed to open different potassium channels. In turn, the differences in detailed VSD functioning among voltage-gated potassium channels might have physiological consequences that have not been explored and which might reflect evolutionary adaptations to the different roles played by Kv channels in cell physiology. PMID:26794852

  14. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K+ channels discriminate K+ over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K+ channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K+ channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K+ channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance. PMID:27619418

  15. Slack, Slick, and Sodium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    The Slack and Slick genes encode potassium channels that are very widely expressed in the central nervous system. These channels are activated by elevations in intracellular sodium, such as those that occur during trains of one or more action potentials, or following activation of nonselective cationic neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA receptors. This review covers the cellular and molecular properties of Slack and Slick channels and compares them with findings on the properties of sodium-activated potassium currents (termed KNa currents) in native neurons. Human mutations in Slack channels produce extremely severe defects in learning and development, suggesting that KNa channels play a central role in neuronal plasticity and intellectual function. PMID:24319675

  16. State-dependent inactivation of the Kv3 potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Marom, S; Levitan, I B

    1994-01-01

    Inactivation of Kv3 (Kv1.3) delayed rectifier potassium channels was studied in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. These channels inactivate slowly during a long depolarizing pulse. In addition, inactivation accumulates in response to a series of short depolarizing pulses (cumulative inactivation), although no significant inactivation occurs within each short pulse. The extent of cumulative inactivation does not depend on the voltage during the depolarizing pulse, but it does vary in a biphasic manner as a function of the interpulse duration. Furthermore, the rate of cumulative inactivation is influenced by changing the rate of deactivation. These data are consistent with a model in which Kv3 channel inactivation is a state-dependent and voltage-independent process. Macroscopic and single channel experiments indicate that inactivation can occur from a closed (silent) state before channel opening. That is, channels need not open to inactivate. The transition that leads to the inactivated state from the silent state is, in fact, severalfold faster then the observed inactivation of current during long depolarizing pulses. Long pulse-induced inactivation appears to be slow, because its rate is limited by the probability that channels are in the open state, rather than in the silent state from which they can inactivate. External potassium and external calcium ions alter the rates of cumulative and long pulse-induced inactivation, suggesting that antagonistic potassium and calcium binding steps are involved in the normal gating of the channel. PMID:7948675

  17. Potassium channel dysfunction in neurons and astrocytes in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Wan, Jie-Qing; Tong, Xiao-Ping

    2018-04-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a late-onset fatal neurodegenerative disease, characterized by progressive movement disorders, psychiatric symptoms, and cognitive impairment. The cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) triplet expansion encoding glutamine present in the protein huntingtin (Htt), produces widespread neuronal and glial pathology. Mutant huntingtin (mHtt) nuclear aggregates are the primary cause of cortical and striatal neuron degeneration, neuronal inflammation, apoptosis and eventual cell loss. The precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration in HD remain poorly understood and HD patients have no current cure. Potassium channels are widely expressed in most cell types. In neurons, they play a crucial role in setting the resting membrane potential, mediating the rapid repolarization phase of the action potential and controlling sub-threshold oscillations of membrane potentials. In glial cells, their major contributions are maintaining the resting membrane potential and buffering extracellular K + . Thus, potassium channels have an essential function in both physiological and pathological brain conditions. This review summarizes recent progress on potassium channels involved in the pathology of HD by using different HD mouse models. Exploring the dysfunction of potassium channels in the brain illustrates new approaches for targeting this channel for the treatment of HD. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The pulmonary vasodilator properties of potassium channel opening drugs.

    PubMed

    Wanstall, J C

    1996-06-01

    1. This article reviews the effects of potassium channel opening drugs (KCOs) on blood vessels of the pulmonary circulation. KCOs are effective pulmonary vasodilators in vitro (isolated arteries and perfused lungs) and in vivo in a variety of animal species. They prevent or reverse pulmonary vasoconstriction/contraction induced by a range of vasoconstrictor spasmogens or by alveolar hypoxia. 2. The pulmonary vasorelaxant effects of the KCO drugs are blocked by glibenclamide, do not depend on the endothelium, are dependent on the vasoconstrictor spasmogen used to contract the preparations and are enhanced in preparations taken from pulmonary hypertensive rats. 3. Selectivity for pulmonary compared with systemic vessels is seen in vessels from pulmonary hypertensive rats but not in the absence of pulmonary hypertension. 4. The pulmonary vasodilatation that is induced by (a) endothelium derived hyperpolarising factor, (b) endothelin, (c) increased pulmonary blood flow or (d) prolonged, severe hypoxia is probably due to potassium efflux through the same population of potassium channels as those on which the KCOs act. 5. Acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and also the depolarisation seen in arteries from chronically hypoxic rats, each involve inhibition of potassium efflux through glibenclamide-insensitive potassium channels. 6. It is suggested that the KCOs warrant investigation as possible therapeutic agents in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  19. Relationship between Pore Occupancy and Gating in BK Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Piskorowski, Rebecca A.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2006-01-01

    Permeant ions can have significant effects on ion channel conformational changes. To further understand the relationship between ion occupancy and gating conformational changes, we have studied macroscopic and single-channel gating of BK potassium channels with different permeant monovalent cations. While the slopes of the conductance–voltage curve were reduced with respect to potassium for all permeant ions, BK channels required stronger depolarization to open only when thallium was the permeant ion. Thallium also slowed the activation and deactivation kinetics. Both the change in kinetics and the shift in the GV curve were dependent on the thallium passing through the permeation pathway, as well as on the concentration of thallium. There was a decrease in the mean open time and an increase in the number of short flicker closing events with thallium as the permeating ion. Mean closed durations were unaffected. Application of previously established allosteric gating models indicated that thallium specifically alters the opening and closing transition of the channel and does not alter the calcium activation or voltage activation pathways. Addition of a closed flicker state into the allosteric model can account for the effect of thallium on gating. Consideration of the thallium concentration dependence of the gating effects suggests that the flicker state may correspond to the collapsed selectivity filter seen in crystal structures of the KcsA potassium channel under the condition of low permeant ion concentration. PMID:16636204

  20. TRESK potassium channel in human T lymphoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Miguel, Dénison Selene, E-mail: amurusk@hotmail.com; García-Dolores, Fernando, E-mail: garciaddf@yahoo.com; Rosa Flores-Márquez, María, E-mail: mariafo31@yahoo.com.mx

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • TRESK (KCNK18) mRNA is present in different T lymphoblastic cell lines. • KCNK18 mRNA was not found in resting peripheral blood lymphocytes. • Clinical samples of T lymphoblastic leukemias and lymphomas were positive for TRESK. • TRESK in T lymphoblasts has dual localization, in plasma membrane and intracellular. -- Abstract: TRESK (TWIK-related spinal cord K{sup +}) channel, encoded by KCNK18 gene, belongs to the double-pore domain K{sup +} channel family and in normal conditions is expressed predominantly in the central nervous system. In our previous patch-clamp study on Jurkat T lymphoblasts we have characterized highly selective K{sup +}more » channel with pharmacological profile identical to TRESK. In the present work, the presence of KCNK18 mRNA was confirmed in T lymphoblastic cell lines (Jurkat, JCaM, H9) but not in resting peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors. Positive immunostaining for TRESK was demonstrated in lymphoblastic cell lines, in germinal centers of non-tumoral lymph nodes, and in clinical samples of T acute lymphoblastic leukemias/lymphomas. Besides detection in the plasma membrane, intracellular TRESK localization was also revealed. Possible involvement of TRESK channel in lymphocyte proliferation and tumorigenesis is discussed.« less

  1. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  2. Investigating the putative glycine hinge in Shaker potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shinghua; Ingleby, Lindsey; Ahern, Christopher A; Horn, Richard

    2005-09-01

    The crystal structure of an open potassium channel reveals a kink in the inner helix that lines the pore (Jiang, Y.X., A. Lee, J.Y. Chen, M. Cadene, B.T. Chait, and R. MacKinnon. 2002. Nature 417:523-526). The putative hinge point is a highly conserved glycine residue. We examined the role of the homologous residue (Gly466) in the S6 transmembrane segment of Shaker potassium channels. The nonfunctional alanine mutant G466A will assemble, albeit poorly, with wild-type (WT) subunits, suppressing functional expression. To test if this glycine residue is critical for activation gating, we did a glycine scan along the S6 segment in the background of G466A. Although all of these double mutants lack the higher-level glycosylation that is characteristic of mature Shaker channels, one (G466A/V467G) is able to generate voltage-dependent potassium current. Surface biotinylation shows that functional and nonfunctional constructs containing G466A express at comparable levels in the plasma membrane. Compared with WT channels, the shifted-glycine mutant has impairments in voltage-dependent channel opening, including a right-shifted activation curve and a decreased rate of activation. The double mutant has relatively normal open-channel properties, except for a decreased affinity for intracellular blockers, a consequence of the loss of the side chain of Val467. Control experiments with the double mutants M440A/G466A and G466A/V467A suggest that the flexibility provided by Gly466 is more important for channel function than its small size. Our results support roles for Gly466 both in biogenesis of the channel and as a hinge in activation gating.

  3. Two-pore potassium channels in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Alison; Manoury, Boris

    2009-03-01

    Two-pore domain (K(2P)) channels emerged about a decade ago and since then have been an expanding area of interest. This is because their biophysical and pharmacological properties make them good candidates to support background potassium currents and membrane potential in many cell types. There is clear evidence for TREK-1 and TASK-1 in the heart and these channels are likely to regulate cardiac action potential duration through their regulation by stretch, polyunsaturated fatty acids, pH, and neurotransmitters. TREK-1 may also have a critical role in mediating the vasodilator response of resistance arteries to polyunsaturated fatty acids, thus contributing to their protective effect on the cardiovascular system. TASK-1, on the other hand, is a strong candidate for a role in hypoxic vasoconstriction of pulmonary arteries. Many other members of the K(2P) channel family have been identified in the cardiovascular system, although their functional roles are still to be demonstrated. This review provides an up to date summary of what is known about the involvement of members of the K(2P) channel family in cells of the heart and arterial circulation. Our knowledge of their roles will improve with the rapidly increasing interest in them and as new selective pharmacological tools emerge. As their physiological roles emerge, the K(2P) family of potassium channels may offer promising therapeutic solutions to target cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Mechanism of Electromechanical Coupling in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Blunck, Rikard; Batulan, Zarah

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels play a central role in the generation of action potentials in the nervous system. They are selective for one type of ion – sodium, calcium, or potassium. Voltage-gated ion channels are composed of a central pore that allows ions to pass through the membrane and four peripheral voltage sensing domains that respond to changes in the membrane potential. Upon depolarization, voltage sensors in voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) undergo conformational changes driven by positive charges in the S4 segment and aided by pairwise electrostatic interactions with the surrounding voltage sensor. Structure-function relations of Kv channels have been investigated in detail, and the resulting models on the movement of the voltage sensors now converge to a consensus; the S4 segment undergoes a combined movement of rotation, tilt, and vertical displacement in order to bring 3–4e+ each through the electric field focused in this region. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the voltage sensor movement leads to pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, is still not fully understood. Thus, recently, electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels has been investigated with a multitude of techniques including electrophysiology, 3D crystal structures, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Evidently, the S4–S5 linker, the covalent link between the voltage sensor and pore, plays a crucial role. The linker transfers the energy from the voltage sensor movement to the pore domain via an interaction with the S6 C-termini, which are pulled open during gating. In addition, other contact regions have been proposed. This review aims to provide (i) an in-depth comparison of the molecular mechanisms of electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels; (ii) insight as to how the voltage sensor and pore domain influence one another; and (iii) theoretical predictions on the movement of the cytosolic face of the Kv channels during

  5. Direct binding of estradiol enhances Slack (sequence like a calcium-activated potassium channel) channels' activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Sukhareva, M; Barker, J L; Maric, D; Hao, Y; Chang, Y H; Ma, W; O'Shaughnessy, T; Rubinow, D R

    2005-01-01

    17Beta-estradiol (E2) is a major neuroregulator, exerting both genomic and non-genomic actions. E2 regulation of Slack (sequence like a calcium-activated potassium channel) potassium channels has not been identified in the CNS. We demonstrate E2-induced activation of Slack channels, which display a unitary conductance of about 60 pS, are inhibited by intracellular calcium, and are abundantly expressed in the nervous system. In lipid bilayers derived from rat cortical neuronal membranes, E2 increases Slack open probability and appears to decrease channel inactivation. Additionally, E2 binds to the Slack channel and activates outward currents in human embryonic kidney-293 cells that express Slack channels but not classical estrogen receptors (i.e. ERalpha or ERbeta). Neither E2-induced activation nor the binding intensity of E2 to the Slack channel is blocked by tamoxifen, an ER antagonist/agonist. Thus, E2 activates a potassium channel, Slack, through a non-traditional membrane binding site, adding to known non-genomic mechanisms by which E2 exerts pharmacological and toxicological effects in the CNS.

  6. Expression, purification and functional reconstitution of slack sodium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yangyang; Yang, Youshan; Bian, Shumin; Sigworth, Fred J

    2012-11-01

    The slack (slo2.2) gene codes for a potassium-channel α-subunit of the 6TM voltage-gated channel family. Expression of slack results in Na(+)-activated potassium channel activity in various cell types. We describe the purification and reconstitution of Slack protein and show that the Slack α-subunit alone is sufficient for potassium channel activity activated by sodium ions as assayed in planar bilayer membranes and in membrane vesicles.

  7. Chaotic dynamics in cardiac aggregates induced by potassium channel block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quail, Thomas; McVicar, Nevin; Aguilar, Martin; Kim, Min-Young; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Chaotic rhythms in deterministic models can arise as a consequence of changes in model parameters. We carried out experimental studies in which we induced a variety of complex rhythms in aggregates of embryonic chick cardiac cells using E-4031 (1.0-2.5 μM), a drug that blocks the hERG potassium channel. Following the addition of the drug, the regular rhythm evolved to display a spectrum of complex dynamics: irregular rhythms, bursting oscillations, doublets, and accelerated rhythms. The interbeat intervals of the irregular rhythms can be described by one-dimensional return maps consistent with chaotic dynamics. A Hodgkin-Huxley-style cardiac ionic model captured the different types of complex dynamics following blockage of the hERG mediated potassium current.

  8. Specification of subunit assembly by the hydrophilic amino-terminal domain of the Shaker potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Jan, Y N; Jan, L Y

    1992-08-28

    The functional heterogeneity of potassium channels in eukaryotic cells arises not only from the multiple potassium channel genes and splice variants but also from the combinatorial mixing of different potassium channel polypeptides to form heteromultimeric channels with distinct properties. One structural element that determines the compatibility of different potassium channel polypeptides in subunit assembly has now been localized to the hydrophilic amino-terminal domain. A Drosophila Shaker B (ShB) potassium channel truncated polypeptide that contains only the hydrophilic amino-terminal domain can form a homomultimer; the minimal requirement for the homophilic interaction has been localized to a fragment of 114 amino acids. Substitution of the amino-terminal domain of a distantly related mammalian potassium channel polypeptide (DRK1) with that of ShB permits the chimeric DRK1 polypeptide to coassemble with ShB.

  9. A new pH-sensitive rectifying potassium channel in mitochondria from the embryonic rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kajma, Anna; Szewczyk, Adam

    2012-10-01

    Patch-clamp single-channel studies on mitochondria isolated from embryonic rat hippocampus revealed the presence of two different potassium ion channels: a large-conductance (288±4pS) calcium-activated potassium channel and second potassium channel with outwardly rectifying activity under symmetric conditions (150/150mM KCl). At positive voltages, this channel displayed a conductance of 67.84pS and a strong voltage dependence at holding potentials from -80mV to +80mV. The open probability was higher at positive than at negative voltages. Patch-clamp studies at the mitoplast-attached mode showed that the channel was not sensitive to activators and inhibitors of mitochondrial potassium channels but was regulated by pH. Moreover, we demonstrated that the channel activity was not affected by the application of lidocaine, an inhibitor of two-pore domain potassium channels, or by tertiapin, an inhibitor of inwardly rectifying potassium channels. In summary, based on the single-channel recordings, we characterised for the first time mitochondrial pH-sensitive ion channel that is selective for cations, permeable to potassium ions, displays voltage sensitivity and does not correspond to any previously described potassium ion channels in the inner mitochondrial membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-pore Electrostatics in Inward-rectifier Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Janice L.; Palmer, Lawrence G.; Roux, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels differ from the canonical K+ channel structure in that they possess a long extended pore (∼85 Å) for ion conduction that reaches deeply into the cytoplasm. This unique structural feature is presumably involved in regulating functional properties specific to Kir channels, such as conductance, rectification block, and ligand-dependent gating. To elucidate the underpinnings of these functional roles, we examine the electrostatics of an ion along this extended pore. Homology models are constructed based on the open-state model of KirBac1.1 for four mammalian Kir channels: Kir1.1/ROMK, Kir2.1/IRK, Kir3.1/GIRK, and Kir6.2/KATP. By solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the electrostatic free energy of a K+ ion is determined along each pore, revealing that mammalian Kir channels provide a favorable environment for cations and suggesting the existence of high-density regions in the cytoplasmic domain and cavity. The contribution from the reaction field (the self-energy arising from the dielectric polarization induced by the ion's charge in the complex geometry of the pore) is unfavorable inside the long pore. However, this is well compensated by the electrostatic interaction with the static field arising from the protein charges and shielded by the dielectric surrounding. Decomposition of the static field provides a list of residues that display remarkable correspondence with existing mutagenesis data identifying amino acids that affect conduction and rectification. Many of these residues demonstrate interactions with the ion over long distances, up to 40 Å, suggesting that mutations potentially affect ion or blocker energetics over the entire pore. These results provide a foundation for understanding ion interactions in Kir channels and extend to the study of ion permeation, block, and gating in long, cation-specific pores. PMID:19001143

  11. Potassium Channels Mediate Killing by Human Natural Killer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichter, Lyanne; Sidell, Neil; Hagiwara, Susumu

    1986-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. However, no direct evidence exists for ion channels in NK cells or in their target cells. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, we found a voltage-dependent potassium (K+) current in NK cells. The K+ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd2+. We tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard 51Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd2+, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K+ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na+ current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K+ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. We could not find any evidence of a Ca2+ current in target cells or in NK cells; therefore, our results cannot explain the Ca dependence of killing. Our findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process. In contrast, the endogenous channel type in the target cell is probably not a factor in determining target cell

  12. Characterization of five RNA editing sites in Shab potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Mary Y.; Maloney, Rachel; Reenan, Robert; Horn, Richard

    2008-01-01

    RNA editing revises the genetic code at precise locations, creating single base changes in mRNA. These changes can result in altered coding potential and modifications to protein function. Sequence analysis of the Shab potassium channel of Drosophila melanogaster revealed five such RNA editing sites. Four are constitutively edited (I583V, T643A, Y660C and I681V) and one undergoes developmentally regulated editing (T671A). These sites are located in the S4, S5–S6 loop and the S6 segments of the channel. We examined the biophysical consequences of editing at these sites by creating point mutations, each containing the genomic (unedited) base at one of the five sites in the background of a channel in which all other sites are edited. We also created a completely unedited construct. The function of these constructs was characterized using two-microelectrode voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes. Each individual ‘unediting’ mutation slowed the time course of deactivation and the rise time during channel activation. Two of the mutants exhibited significant hyperpolarized shifts in their midpoints of activation. Constructs that deactivated slowly also inactivated slowly, supporting a mechanism of closed-state inactivation. One of the editing sites, position 660, aligns with the Shaker 449 residue, which is known to be important in tetraethylammonium (TEA) block. The aromatic, genomically-encoded residue tyrosine at this position in Shab enhances TEA block 14 fold compared to the edited residue, cysteine. These results show that both the position of the RNA editing site and the identity of the substituted amino acid are important for channel function. PMID:18836299

  13. Activation of potassium channels during metabolite detoxification in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, G P; Munro, A W; Douglas, R M; McLaggan, D; Booth, I R

    1993-09-01

    In bacteria the detoxification of compounds as diverse as methylglyoxal and chlorodinitrobenzene proceeds through the formation of a glutathione adduct. In the Gram-negative bacteria, e.g. Escherichia coli, such glutathione adducts activate one, or both, of a pair of potassium efflux systems KefB and KefC. These systems share many of the properties of cation-translocating channels in eukaryotes. The activity of these systems has been found to be present in a range of Gram-negative bacteria, but not in the glutathione-deficient species of Gram-positive organisms. The conservation of the activity of these systems in a diverse range of organisms suggested a physiological role for these systems. Here we demonstrate that in E. coli cells activation of the KefB efflux system is essential for the survival of exposure to methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal can be added to the growth medium or its synthesis can be stimulated in the cytoplasm. Under both sets of conditions survival is aided by the activity of KefB. Inhibition of KefB activity by the addition of 10 mM potassium to the growth medium stimulates methylglyoxal-induced cell death. This establishes an essential physiological function for the KefB system.

  14. Location of modulatory β subunits in BK potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoxia; Niu, Xiaowei; Wu, Roland S.; Chudasama, Neelesh; Yao, Yongneng; Jin, Xin; Weinberg, Richard; Zakharov, Sergey I.; Motoike, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels contain four pore-forming α subunits and four modulatory β subunits. From the extents of disulfide cross-linking in channels on the cell surface between cysteine (Cys) substituted for residues in the first turns in the membrane of the S0 transmembrane (TM) helix, unique to BK α, and of the voltage-sensing domain TM helices S1–S4, we infer that S0 is next to S3 and S4, but not to S1 and S2. Furthermore, of the two β1 TM helices, TM2 is next to S0, and TM1 is next to TM2. Coexpression of α with two substituted Cys’s, one in S0 and one in S2, and β1 also with two substituted Cys’s, one in TM1 and one in TM2, resulted in two αs cross-linked by one β. Thus, each β lies between and can interact with the voltage-sensing domains of two adjacent α subunits. PMID:20385746

  15. Model development for the viral Kcv potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Tayefeh, Sascha; Kloss, Thomas; Kreim, Michael; Gebhardt, Manuela; Baumeister, Dirk; Hertel, Brigitte; Richter, Christian; Schwalbe, Harald; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Kast, Stefan M

    2009-01-01

    A computational model for the open state of the short viral Kcv potassium channel was created and tested based on homology modeling and extensive molecular-dynamics simulation in a membrane environment. Particular attention was paid to the structure of the highly flexible N-terminal region and to the protonation state of membrane-exposed lysine residues. Data from various experimental sources, NMR spectroscopy, and electrophysiology, as well as results from three-dimensional reference interaction site model integral equation theory were taken into account to select the most reasonable model among possible variants. The final model exhibits spontaneous ion transitions across the complete pore, with and without application of an external field. The nonequilibrium transport events could be induced reproducibly without abnormally large driving potential and without the need to place ions artificially at certain key positions along the transition path. The transport mechanism through the filter region corresponds to the classic view of single-file motion, which in our case is coupled to frequent exchange of ions between the innermost filter position and the cavity.

  16. Evidence for the existence of a sulfonylurea-receptor-like protein in plants: modulation of stomatal movements and guard cell potassium channels by sulfonylureas and potassium channel openers.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, N; Marin, E; Vavasseur, A; Forestier, C

    1997-12-09

    Limitation of water loss and control of gas exchange is accomplished in plant leaves via stomatal guard cells. Stomata open in response to light when an increase in guard cell turgor is triggered by ions and water influx across the plasma membrane. Recent evidence demonstrating the existence of ATP-binding cassette proteins in plants led us to analyze the effect of compounds known for their ability to modulate ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATP) in animal cells. By using epidermal strip bioassays and whole-cell patch-clamp experiments with Vicia faba guard cell protoplasts, we describe a pharmacological profile that is specific for the outward K+ channel and very similar to the one described for ATP-sensitive potassium channels in mammalian cells. Tolbutamide and glibenclamide induced stomatal opening in bioassays and in patch-clamp experiments, a specific inhibition of the outward K+ channel by these compounds was observed. Conversely, application of potassium channel openers such as cromakalim or RP49356 triggered stomatal closure. An apparent competition between sulfonylureas and potassium channel openers occurred in bioassays, and outward potassium currents, previously inhibited by glibenclamide, were partially recovered after application of cromakalim. By using an expressed sequence tag clone from an Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of the sulfonylurea receptor, a 7-kb transcript was detected by Northern blot analysis in guard cells and other tissues. Beside the molecular evidence recently obtained for the expression of ATP-binding cassette protein transcripts in plants, these results give pharmacological support to the presence of a sulfonylurea-receptor-like protein in the guard-cell plasma membrane tightly involved in the outward potassium channel regulation during stomatal movements.

  17. A comprehensive guide to the ROMK potassium channel: form and function in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of the renal outer medullary K+ channel (ROMK, Kir1.1), the founding member of the inward-rectifying K+ channel (Kir) family, by Ho and Hebert in 1993 revolutionized our understanding of potassium channel biology and renal potassium handling. Because of the central role that ROMK plays in the regulation of salt and potassium homeostasis, considerable efforts have been invested in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we provide a comprehensive guide to ROMK, spanning from the physiology in the kidney to the organization and regulation by intracellular factors to the structural basis of its function at the atomic level. PMID:19458126

  18. Involvement of Potassium and Cation Channels in Hippocampal Abnormalities of Embryonic Ts65Dn and Tc1 Trisomic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Shani; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) mouse models exhibit cognitive deficits, and are used for studying the neuronal basis of DS pathology. To understand the differences in the physiology of DS model neurons, we used dissociated neuronal cultures from the hippocampi of Ts65Dn and Tc1 DS mice. Imaging of [Ca2+]i and whole cell patch clamp recordings were used to analyze network activity and single neuron properties, respectively. We found a decrease of ~ 30% in both fast (A-type) and slow (delayed rectifier) outward potassium currents. Depolarization of Ts65Dn and Tc1 cells produced fewer spikes than diploid cells. Their network bursts were smaller and slower than diploids, displaying a 40% reduction in Δf / f0 of the calcium signals, and a 30% reduction in propagation velocity. Additionally, Ts65Dn and Tc1 neurons exhibited changes in the action potential shape compared to diploid neurons, with an increase in the amplitude of the action potential, a lower threshold for spiking, and a sharp decrease of about 65% in the after-hyperpolarization amplitude. Numerical simulations reproduced the DS measured phenotype by variations in the conductance of the delayed rectifier and A-type, but necessitated also changes in inward rectifying and M-type potassium channels and in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. We therefore conducted whole cell patch clamp measurements of M-type potassium currents, which showed a ~ 90% decrease in Ts65Dn neurons, while HCN measurements displayed an increase of ~ 65% in Ts65Dn cells. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicates overexpression of 40% of KCNJ15, an inward rectifying potassium channel, contributing to the increased inhibition. We thus find that changes in several types of potassium channels dominate the observed DS model phenotype. PMID:26501103

  19. The Sodium-Activated Potassium Channel Slack Is Required for Optimal Cognitive Flexibility in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    "Kcnt1" encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual…

  20. Free energy dissipation of the spontaneous gating of a single voltage-gated potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-Zeng; Wang, Rui-Zhen

    2018-02-01

    Potassium channels mainly contribute to the resting potential and re-polarizations, with the potassium electrochemical gradient being maintained by the pump Na+/K+-ATPase. In this paper, we construct a stochastic model mimicking the kinetics of a potassium channel, which integrates temporal evolving of the membrane voltage and the spontaneous gating of the channel. Its stationary probability density functions (PDFs) are found to be singular at the boundaries, which result from the fact that the evolving rates of voltage are greater than the gating rates of the channel. We apply PDFs to calculate the power dissipations of the potassium current, the leakage, and the gating currents. On a physical perspective, the essential role of the system is the K+-battery charging the leakage (L-)battery. A part of power will inevitably be dissipated among the process. So, the efficiency of energy transference is calculated.

  1. Calcium Ions Regulate K+ Uptake into Brain Mitochondria: The Evidence for a Novel Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Skalska, Jolanta; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Piwońska, Marta; Kulawiak, Bogusz; Wilczynski, Grzegorz; Dołowy, Krzysztof; Kudin, Alexei P.; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Szewczyk, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial response to changes of cytosolic calcium concentration has a strong impact on neuronal cell metabolism and viability. We observed that Ca2+ additions to isolated rat brain mitochondria induced in potassium ion containing media a mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and an accompanying increase of mitochondrial respiration. These Ca2+ effects can be blocked by iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin, well known inhibitors of large conductance potassium channel (BKCa channel). Furthermore, NS1619 – a BKCa channel opener – induced potassium ion–specific effects on brain mitochondria similar to those induced by Ca2+. These findings suggest the presence of a calcium-activated, large conductance potassium channel (sensitive to charybdotoxin and NS1619), which was confirmed by reconstitution of the mitochondrial inner membrane into planar lipid bilayers. The conductance of the reconstituted channel was 265 pS under gradient (50/450 mM KCl) conditions. Its reversal potential was equal to 50 mV, which proved that the examined channel was cation-selective. We also observed immunoreactivity of anti-β4 subunit (of the BKCa channel) antibodies with ~26 kDa proteins of rat brain mitochondria. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the predominant occurrence of β4 subunit in neuronal mitochondria. We hypothesize that the mitochondrial BKCa channel represents a calcium sensor, which can contribute to neuronal signal transduction and survival. PMID:19399240

  2. Potassium intake modulates the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC) activity via the Kir4.1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Xiao; Cuevas, Catherina A; Su, Xiao-Tong; Wu, Peng; Gao, Zhong-Xiuzi; Lin, Dao-Hong; McCormick, James A; Yang, Chao-Ling; Wang, Wen-Hui; Ellison, David H

    2018-04-01

    Kir4.1 in the distal convoluted tubule plays a key role in sensing plasma potassium and in modulating the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC). Here we tested whether dietary potassium intake modulates Kir4.1 and whether this is essential for mediating the effect of potassium diet on NCC. High potassium intake inhibited the basolateral 40 pS potassium channel (a Kir4.1/5.1 heterotetramer) in the distal convoluted tubule, decreased basolateral potassium conductance, and depolarized the distal convoluted tubule membrane in Kcnj10flox/flox mice, herein referred to as control mice. In contrast, low potassium intake activated Kir4.1, increased potassium currents, and hyperpolarized the distal convoluted tubule membrane. These effects of dietary potassium intake on the basolateral potassium conductance and membrane potential in the distal convoluted tubule were completely absent in inducible kidney-specific Kir4.1 knockout mice. Furthermore, high potassium intake decreased, whereas low potassium intake increased the abundance of NCC expression only in the control but not in kidney-specific Kir4.1 knockout mice. Renal clearance studies demonstrated that low potassium augmented, while high potassium diminished, hydrochlorothiazide-induced natriuresis in control mice. Disruption of Kir4.1 significantly increased basal urinary sodium excretion but it abolished the natriuretic effect of hydrochlorothiazide. Finally, hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis in kidney-specific Kir4.1 knockout mice were exacerbated by potassium restriction and only partially corrected by a high-potassium diet. Thus, Kir4.1 plays an essential role in mediating the effect of dietary potassium intake on NCC activity and potassium homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pharmacological rescue of trafficking-impaired ATP-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory M.; Chen, Pei-Chun; Devaraneni, Prasanna; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2013-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels link cell metabolism to membrane excitability and are involved in a wide range of physiological processes including hormone secretion, control of vascular tone, and protection of cardiac and neuronal cells against ischemic injuries. In pancreatic β-cells, KATP channels play a key role in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and gain or loss of channel function results in neonatal diabetes or congenital hyperinsulinism, respectively. The β-cell KATP channel is formed by co-assembly of four Kir6.2 inwardly rectifying potassium channel subunits encoded by KCNJ11 and four sulfonylurea receptor 1 subunits encoded by ABCC8. Many mutations in ABCC8 or KCNJ11 cause loss of channel function, thus, congenital hyperinsulinism by hampering channel biogenesis and hence trafficking to the cell surface. The trafficking defects caused by a subset of these mutations can be corrected by sulfonylureas, KATP channel antagonists that have long been used to treat type 2 diabetes. More recently, carbamazepine, an anticonvulsant that is thought to target primarily voltage-gated sodium channels has been shown to correct KATP channel trafficking defects. This article reviews studies to date aimed at understanding the mechanisms by which mutations impair channel biogenesis and trafficking and the mechanisms by which pharmacological ligands overcome channel trafficking defects. Insight into channel structure-function relationships and therapeutic implications from these studies are discussed. PMID:24399968

  4. Local anesthetic inhibition of baseline potassium channels with two pore domains in tandem.

    PubMed

    Kindler, C H; Yost, C S; Gray, A T

    1999-04-01

    Recently, a new structural family of potassium channels characterized by two pore domains in tandem within their primary amino acid sequence was identified. These tandem pore domain potassium channels are not gated by voltage and appear to be involved in the control of baseline membrane conductances. The goal of this study was to identify mechanisms of local anesthetic action on these channels. Oocytes of Xenopus laevis were injected with cRNA from five cloned tandem pore domain baseline potassium channels (TASK, TREK-1, TOK1, ORK1, and TWIK-1), and the effects of several local anesthetics on the heterologously expressed channels were assayed using two-electrode voltage-clamp and current-clamp techniques. Bupivacaine (1 mM) inhibited all studied tandem pore potassium channels, with TASK inhibited most potently. The potency of inhibition was directly correlated with the octanol: buffer distribution coefficient of the local anesthetic, with the exception of tetracaine, to which TASK is relatively insensitive. The approximate 50% inhibitory concentrations of TASK were 709 microM mepivacaine, 222 microM lidocaine, 51 microM R(+)-ropivacaine, 53 microM S(-)-ropivacaine, 668 microM tetracaine, 41 microM bupivacaine, and 39 microM etidocaine. Local anesthetics (1 mM) significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential of TASK cRNA-injected oocytes compared with saline-injected control oocytes (tetracaine 22+/-6 mV rs. 7+/-1 mV, respectively, and bupivacaine 31+/-7 mV vs. 6+/-4 mV). Local anesthetics inhibit tandem pore domain baseline potassium channels, and they could depolarize the resting membrane potential of cells expressing these channels. Whether inhibition of these channels contributes to conduction blockade or to the adverse effects of local anesthetics remains to be determined.

  5. Scorpion Potassium Channel-blocking Defensin Highlights a Functional Link with Neurotoxin*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lanxia; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Qian; Li, Yang; Yang, Fan; Chen, Zongyun; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-01-01

    The structural similarity between defensins and scorpion neurotoxins suggests that they might have evolved from a common ancestor. However, there is no direct experimental evidence demonstrating a functional link between scorpion neurotoxins and defensins. The scorpion defensin BmKDfsin4 from Mesobuthus martensii Karsch contains 37 amino acid residues and a conserved cystine-stabilized α/β structural fold. The recombinant BmKDfsin4, a classical defensin, has been found to have inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Micrococcus luteus as well as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Interestingly, electrophysiological experiments showed that BmKDfsin4,like scorpion potassium channel neurotoxins, could effectively inhibit Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channel currents, and its IC50 value for the Kv1.3 channel was 510.2 nm. Similar to the structure-function relationships of classical scorpion potassium channel-blocking toxins, basic residues (Lys-13 and Arg-19) of BmKDfsin4 play critical roles in peptide-Kv1.3 channel interactions. Furthermore, mutagenesis and electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the channel extracellular pore region is the binding site of BmKDfsin4, indicating that BmKDfsin4adopts the same mechanism for blocking potassium channel currents as classical scorpion toxins. Taken together, our work identifies scorpion BmKDfsin4 as the first invertebrate defensin to block potassium channels. These findings not only demonstrate that defensins from invertebrate animals are a novel type of potassium channel blockers but also provide evidence of a functional link between defensins and neurotoxins. PMID:26817841

  6. Scorpion Potassium Channel-blocking Defensin Highlights a Functional Link with Neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lanxia; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Qian; Li, Yang; Yang, Fan; Chen, Zongyun; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-03-25

    The structural similarity between defensins and scorpion neurotoxins suggests that they might have evolved from a common ancestor. However, there is no direct experimental evidence demonstrating a functional link between scorpion neurotoxins and defensins. The scorpion defensin BmKDfsin4 from Mesobuthus martensiiKarsch contains 37 amino acid residues and a conserved cystine-stabilized α/β structural fold. The recombinant BmKDfsin4, a classical defensin, has been found to have inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Micrococcus luteusas well as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Interestingly, electrophysiological experiments showed that BmKDfsin4,like scorpion potassium channel neurotoxins, could effectively inhibit Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channel currents, and its IC50value for the Kv1.3 channel was 510.2 nm Similar to the structure-function relationships of classical scorpion potassium channel-blocking toxins, basic residues (Lys-13 and Arg-19) of BmKDfsin4 play critical roles in peptide-Kv1.3 channel interactions. Furthermore, mutagenesis and electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the channel extracellular pore region is the binding site of BmKDfsin4, indicating that BmKDfsin4 adopts the same mechanism for blocking potassium channel currents as classical scorpion toxins. Taken together, our work identifies scorpion BmKDfsin4 as the first invertebrate defensin to block potassium channels. These findings not only demonstrate that defensins from invertebrate animals are a novel type of potassium channel blockers but also provide evidence of a functional link between defensins and neurotoxins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. hERG Potassium Channel Blockade by the HCN Channel Inhibitor Bradycardic Agent Ivabradine

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Dario; Brack, Kieran E.; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Mitcheson, John S.; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Ng, G. André; Hancox, Jules C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ivabradine is a specific bradycardic agent used in coronary artery disease and heart failure, lowering heart rate through inhibition of sinoatrial nodal HCN‐channels. This study investigated the propensity of ivabradine to interact with KCNH2‐encoded human Ether‐à‐go‐go–Related Gene (hERG) potassium channels, which strongly influence ventricular repolarization and susceptibility to torsades de pointes arrhythmia. Methods and Results Patch clamp recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from hERG expressing cells at 37°C. IhERG was inhibited with an IC50 of 2.07 μmol/L for the hERG 1a isoform and 3.31 μmol/L for coexpressed hERG 1a/1b. The voltage and time‐dependent characteristics of IhERG block were consistent with preferential gated‐state‐dependent channel block. Inhibition was partially attenuated by the N588K inactivation‐mutant and the S624A pore‐helix mutant and was strongly reduced by the Y652A and F656A S6 helix mutants. In docking simulations to a MthK‐based homology model of hERG, the 2 aromatic rings of the drug could form multiple π‐π interactions with the aromatic side chains of both Y652 and F656. In monophasic action potential (MAP) recordings from guinea‐pig Langendorff‐perfused hearts, ivabradine delayed ventricular repolarization and produced a steepening of the MAPD90 restitution curve. Conclusions Ivabradine prolongs ventricular repolarization and alters electrical restitution properties at concentrations relevant to the upper therapeutic range. In absolute terms ivabradine does not discriminate between hERG and HCN channels: it inhibits IhERG with similar potency to that reported for native If and HCN channels, with S6 binding determinants resembling those observed for HCN4. These findings may have important implications both clinically and for future bradycardic drug design. PMID:25911606

  8. Sequence of a probable potassium channel component encoded at shaker locus of drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, B.L.; Papazian, D.M.; Schwarz, T.L.

    1987-08-24

    Potassium currents are crucial for the repolarization of electrically excitable membranes, a role that makes potassium channels a target for physiological modifications that alter synaptic efficacy. The Shaker locus of Drosophila is thought to encode a K/sup +/ channel. The sequence of two complementary DNA clones from the Shaker locus is reported here. The sequence predicts an integral membrane protein of 70,200 daltons containing seven potential membrane-spanning sequences. In addition, the predicted protein is homologous to the vertebrate sodium channel in a region previously proposed to be involved in the voltage-dependent activation of the Na/sup +/ channel. These results supportmore » the hypothesis that Shaker encodes a structural component of a voltage-dependent K/sup +/ channel and suggest a conserved mechanism for voltage activation.« less

  9. Involvement of WNK1-mediated potassium channels in the sexual dimorphism of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guofeng; Cheng, Mengting; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Rong; Liu, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    Potassium homeostasis plays an essential role in the control of blood pressure. It is unknown, however, whether potassium balance is involved in the gender-associated blood pressure differences. We therefore investigated the possible mechanism of sexual dimorphism in blood pressure regulation by measuring the blood pressure, plasma potassium, renal actions of potassium channels and upstream regulator in male and female mice. Here we found that female mice exhibited lower blood pressure and higher plasma K + level as compared to male littermates. Western blot analyses of mouse kidney extract revealed a significant decrease in renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) channel expression, while large-conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + (BK) channel and Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) as well as the upstream regulator with-no-lysine kinase 1 (WNK1) enhanced in female mice under normal condition. Surprisingly, both dietary K + loading and K + depletion eliminated the differences in plasma K + and blood pressure between females and males, and the differences of renal K + channels and WNK1 also attenuated in both groups of mice. These findings indicated the existence of a close correlation between K + homeostasis and sex-associated blood pressure. Moreover, the differential regulation of ROMK, BK-α and NKCC2 between female and male mice, at least, were partly mediated via WNK1 pathway, which may contribute to the sexual dimorphism of plasma K + and blood pressure control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms of maurotoxin action on Shaker potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Avdonin, V; Nolan, B; Sabatier, J M; De Waard, M; Hoshi, T

    2000-01-01

    Maurotoxin (alpha-KTx6.2) is a toxin derived from the Tunisian chactoid scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus, and it is a member of a new family of toxins that contain four disulfide bridges (, Eur. J. Biochem. 254:468-479). We investigated the mechanism of the maurotoxin action on voltage-gated K(+) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Maurotoxin blocks the channels in a voltage-dependent manner, with its efficacy increasing with greater hyperpolarization. We show that an amino acid residue in the external mouth of the channel pore segment that is known to be involved in the actions of other peptide toxins is also involved in maurotoxin's interaction with the channel. We conclude that, despite the unusual disulfide bridge pattern, the mechanism of the maurotoxin action is similar to those of other K(+) channel toxins with only three disulfide bridges. PMID:10920011

  11. Differential effect of brief electrical stimulation on voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Morven A; Al Abed, Amr; Buskila, Yossi; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H; Morley, John W

    2017-05-01

    Electrical stimulation of neuronal tissue is a promising strategy to treat a variety of neurological disorders. The mechanism of neuronal activation by external electrical stimulation is governed by voltage-gated ion channels. This stimulus, typically brief in nature, leads to membrane potential depolarization, which increases ion flow across the membrane by increasing the open probability of these voltage-gated channels. In spiking neurons, it is activation of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na V channels) that leads to action potential generation. However, several other types of voltage-gated channels are expressed that also respond to electrical stimulation. In this study, we examine the response of voltage-gated potassium channels (K V channels) to brief electrical stimulation by whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and computational modeling. We show that nonspiking amacrine neurons of the retina exhibit a large variety of responses to stimulation, driven by different K V -channel subtypes. Computational modeling reveals substantial differences in the response of specific K V -channel subtypes that is dependent on channel kinetics. This suggests that the expression levels of different K V -channel subtypes in retinal neurons are a crucial predictor of the response that can be obtained. These data expand our knowledge of the mechanisms of neuronal activation and suggest that K V -channel expression is an important determinant of the sensitivity of neurons to electrical stimulation. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This paper describes the response of various voltage-gated potassium channels (K V channels) to brief electrical stimulation, such as is applied during prosthetic electrical stimulation. We show that the pattern of response greatly varies between K V channel subtypes depending on activation and inactivation kinetics of each channel. Our data suggest that problems encountered when artificially stimulating neurons such as cessation in firing at high frequencies, or

  12. Segmental differences in upregulated apical potassium channels in mammalian colon during potassium adaptation.

    PubMed

    Perry, Matthew D; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M; MacLennan, Kenneth A; Sandle, Geoffrey I

    2016-11-01

    Rat proximal and distal colon are net K + secretory and net K + absorptive epithelia, respectively. Chronic dietary K + loading increases net K + secretion in the proximal colon and transforms net K + absorption to net K + secretion in the distal colon, but changes in apical K + channel expression are unclear. We evaluated expression/activity of apical K + (BK) channels in surface colonocytes in proximal and distal colon of control and K + -loaded animals using patch-clamp recording, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analyses. In controls, BK channels were more abundant in surface colonocytes from K + secretory proximal colon (39% of patches) than in those from K + -absorptive distal colon (12% of patches). Immunostaining demonstrated more pronounced BK channel α-subunit protein expression in surface cells and cells in the upper 25% of crypts in proximal colon, compared with distal colon. Dietary K + loading had no clear-cut effects on the abundance, immunolocalization, or expression of BK channels in proximal colon. By contrast, in distal colon, K + loading 1) increased BK channel abundance in patches from 12 to 41%; 2) increased density of immunostaining in surface cells, which extended along the upper 50% of crypts; and 3) increased expression of BK channel α-subunit protein when assessed by Western blotting (P < 0.001). Thus apical BK channels are normally more abundant in K + secretory proximal colon than in K + absorptive distal colon, and apical BK channel expression in distal (but not proximal) colon is greatly stimulated as part of the enhanced K + secretory response to dietary K + loading. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. [K+] dependence of open-channel conductance in cloned inward rectifier potassium channels (IRK1, Kir2.1).

    PubMed Central

    Lopatin, A N; Nichols, C G

    1996-01-01

    Potassium conduction through unblocked inwardly rectifying (IRK1, Kir2.1) potassium channels was measured in inside-out-patches from Xenopus oocytes, after removal of polyamine-induced strong inward rectification. Unblocked IRK1 channel current-voltage (I-V) relations show very mild inward rectification in symmetrical solutions, are linearized in nonsymmetrical solutions that bring the K+ reversal potential to extreme negative values, and follow Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz constant field equation at extreme positive E alpha. When intracellular K+ concentration (KIN) was varied, at constant extracellular K+ concentration (KOUT) the conductance at the reversal potential (GREV) followed closely the predictions of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz constant field equation at low concentrations and saturated sharply at concentrations of > 150 mM. Similarly, when KOUT was varied, at constant KIN, GREV saturated at concentrations of > 150 mM. A square-root dependence of conductance on KOUT is a well-known property of inward rectifier potassium channels and is a property of the open channel. A nonsymmetrical two-site three-barrier model can qualitatively explain both the I-V relations and the [K+] dependence of conductance of open IRK1 (Kir2.1) channels. PMID:8842207

  14. Escitalopram block of hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hong Joon; Kim, In-Beom; Choi, Jin-Sung; Sung, Ki-Wug; Hahn, Sang June

    2014-01-01

    Escitalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is the pharmacologically active S-enantiomer of the racemic mixture of RS-citalopram and is widely used in the treatment of depression. The effects of escitalopram and citalopram on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels expressed in human embryonic kidney cells were investigated using voltage-clamp and Western blot analyses. Both drugs blocked hERG currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 2.6 μM for escitalopram and an IC50 value of 3.2 μM for citalopram. The blocking of hERG by escitalopram was voltage-dependent, with a steep increase across the voltage range of channel activation. However, voltage independence was observed over the full range of activation. The blocking by escitalopram was frequency dependent. A rapid application of escitalopram induced a rapid and reversible blocking of the tail current of hERG. The extent of the blocking by escitalopram during the depolarizing pulse was less than that during the repolarizing pulse, suggesting that escitalopram has a high affinity for the open state of the hERG channel, with a relatively lower affinity for the inactivated state. Both escitalopram and citalopram produced a reduction of hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane but did not affect the short-term internalization of the hERG channel. These results suggest that escitalopram blocked hERG currents at a supratherapeutic concentration and that it did so by preferentially binding to both the open and the inactivated states of the channels and by inhibiting the trafficking of hERG channel protein to the plasma membrane.

  15. Study of the interaction of potassium ion channel protein with micelle by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantappa, Anil; Talukdar, Keka

    2018-04-01

    Ion channels are proteins forming pore inside the body of all living organisms. This potassium ion channel known as KcsA channel and it is found in the each cell and nervous system. Flow of various ions is regulated by the function of the ion channels. The nerve ion channel protein with protein data bank entry 1BL8, which is basically an ion channel protein in Streptomyces Lividans and which is taken up to form micelle-protein system and the system is analyzed by using molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, ion channel pore is engineered by CHARMM potential and then Micelle-protein system is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation. For some specific micelle concentration, the protein unfolding is observed.

  16. Structural dynamics of potassium-channel gating revealed by single-molecule FRET.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizhen; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Borschel, William F; Ha, Taekjip; Nichols, Colin G

    2016-01-01

    Crystallography has provided invaluable insights regarding ion-channel selectivity and gating, but to advance understanding to a new level, dynamic views of channel structures within membranes are essential. We labeled tetrameric KirBac1.1 potassium channels with single donor and acceptor fluorophores at different sites and then examined structural dynamics within lipid membranes by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We found that the extracellular region is structurally rigid in both closed and open states, whereas the N-terminal slide helix undergoes marked conformational fluctuations. The cytoplasmic C-terminal domain fluctuates between two major structural states, both of which become less dynamic and move away from the pore axis and away from the membrane in closed channels. Our results reveal mobile and rigid conformations of functionally relevant KirBac1.1 channel motifs, implying similar dynamics for similar motifs in eukaryotic Kir channels and in cation channels in general.

  17. Effects of donepezil on hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Lee, Hong Joon; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Kim, In-Beom; Choi, Jin-Sung; Sung, Ki-Wug; Hahn, Sang June

    2015-02-09

    Donepezil is a potent, selective inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, which is used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique and Western blot analyses were used to study the effects of donepezil on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel. Donepezil inhibited the tail current of the hERG in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 1.3 μM. The metabolites of donepezil, 6-ODD and 5-ODD, inhibited the hERG currents in a similar concentration-dependent manner; the IC50 values were 1.0 and 1.5 μM, respectively. A fast drug perfusion system demonstrated that donepezil interacted with both the open and inactivated states of the hERG. A fast application of donepezil during the tail currents inhibited the open state of the hERG in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 2.7 μM. Kinetic analysis of donepezil in an open state of the hERG yielded blocking and unblocking rate constants of 0.54 µM(-1)s(-1) and 1.82 s(-1), respectively. The block of the hERG by donepezil was voltage-dependent with a steep increase across the voltage range of channel activation. Donepezil caused a reduction in the hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane at low concentration, but decreased the channel protein expression at higher concentrations. These results suggest that donepezil inhibited the hERG at a supratherapeutic concentration, and that it did so by preferentially binding to the activated (open and/or inactivated) states of the channels and by inhibiting the trafficking and expression of the hERG channel protein in the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of A-type potassium currents in excitability, network synchronicity, and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fransén, Erik; Tigerholm, Jenny

    2010-07-01

    A range of ionic currents have been suggested to be involved in distinct aspects of epileptogenesis. Based on pharmacological and genetic studies, potassium currents have been implicated, in particular the transient A-type potassium current (K(A)). Epileptogenic activity comprises a rich repertoire of characteristics, one of which is synchronized activity of principal cells as revealed by occurrences of for instance fast ripples. Synchronized activity of this kind is particularly efficient in driving target cells into spiking. In the recipient cell, this synchronized input generates large brief compound excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). The fast activation and inactivation of K(A) lead us to hypothesize a potential role in suppression of such EPSPs. In this work, using computational modeling, we have studied the activation of K(A) by synaptic inputs of different levels of synchronicity. We find that K(A) participates particularly in suppressing inputs of high synchronicity. We also show that the selective suppression stems from the current's ability to become activated by potentials with high slopes. We further show that K(A) suppresses input mimicking the activity of a fast ripple. Finally, we show that the degree of selectivity of K(A) can be modified by changes to its kinetic parameters, changes of the type that are produced by the modulatory action of KChIPs and DPPs. We suggest that the wealth of modulators affecting K(A) might be explained by a need to control cellular excitability in general and suppression of responses to synchronicity in particular. Wealso suggest that compounds changing K(A)-kinetics may be used to pharmacologically improve epileptic status. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Differential distribution of the sodium‐activated potassium channels slick and slack in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Hans‐Günther; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sodium‐activated potassium channels Slick (Slo2.1, KCNT2) and Slack (Slo2.2, KCNT1) are high‐conductance potassium channels of the Slo family. In neurons, Slick and Slack channels are involved in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization, in the regulation of firing patterns, and in setting and stabilizing the resting membrane potential. The distribution and subcellular localization of Slick and Slack channels in the mouse brain have not yet been established in detail. The present study addresses this issue through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Both channels were widely distributed and exhibited distinct distribution patterns. However, in some brain regions, their expression overlapped. Intense Slick channel immunoreactivity was observed in processes, varicosities, and neuronal cell bodies of the olfactory bulb, granular zones of cortical regions, hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septal nuclei, certain hypothalamic and midbrain nuclei, and several regions of the brainstem. The Slack channel showed primarily a diffuse immunostaining pattern, and labeling of cell somata and processes was observed only occasionally. The highest Slack channel expression was detected in the olfactory bulb, lateral septal nuclei, basal ganglia, and distinct areas of the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar cortex. In addition, comparing our data obtained from mouse brain with a previously published study on rat brain revealed some differences in the expression and distribution of Slick and Slack channels in these species. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2093–2116, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26587966

  20. Effectiveness of copper sulfate and potassium permanganate on channel catfish infected with Flavobacterium columnare

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Copper sulfate (CuSO4) and potassium permanganate (KMnO4) were evaluated for their effectiveness to curtail mortality and decrease bacterial load in fish tissues and water in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus naturally infected with Flavobacterium columnare, the causative agent of columnaris. Fis...

  1. Resveratrol attenuates cortical neuron activity: roles of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Jean; Chan, Ming-Huan; Chen, Linyi; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Hwei-Hisen

    2016-05-21

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in grapes and red wine, exhibits diverse pharmacological activities. However, relatively little is known about whether resveratrol modulates the ion channels in cortical neurons. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BKCa) and voltage-gated sodium channels were expressed in cortical neurons and play important roles in regulation of neuronal excitability. The present study aimed to determine the effects of resveratrol on BKCa currents and voltage-gated sodium currents in cortical neurons. Resveratrol concentration-dependently increased the current amplitude and the opening activity of BKCa channels, but suppressed the amplitude of voltage-gated sodium currents. Similar to the BKCa channel opener NS1619, resveratrol decreased the firing rate of action potentials. In addition, the enhancing effects of BKCa channel blockers tetraethylammonium (TEA) and paxilline on action potential firing were sensitive to resveratrol. Our results indicated that the attenuation of action potential firing rate by resveratrol might be mediated through opening the BKCa channels and closing the voltage-gated sodium channels. As BKCa channels and sodium channels are critical molecular determinants for seizure generation, our findings suggest that regulation of these two channels in cortical neurons probably makes a considerable contribution to the antiseizure activity of resveratrol.

  2. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency.

  3. Atom-by-atom tuning of the electrostatic potassium-channel modulator dehydroabietic acid.

    PubMed

    Silverå Ejneby, Malin; Wu, Xiongyu; Ottosson, Nina E; Münger, E Peter; Lundström, Ingemar; Konradsson, Peter; Elinder, Fredrik

    2018-04-06

    Dehydroabietic acid (DHAA) is a naturally occurring component of pine resin that was recently shown to open voltage-gated potassium (K V ) channels. The hydrophobic part of DHAA anchors the compound near the channel's positively charged voltage sensor in a pocket between the channel and the lipid membrane. The negatively charged carboxyl group exerts an electrostatic effect on the channel's voltage sensor, leading to the channel opening. In this study, we show that the channel-opening effect increases as the length of the carboxyl-group stalk is extended until a critical length of three atoms is reached. Longer stalks render the compounds noneffective. This critical distance is consistent with a simple electrostatic model in which the charge location depends on the stalk length. By combining an effective anchor with the optimal stalk length, we create a compound that opens the human K V 7.2/7.3 (M type) potassium channel at a concentration of 1 µM. These results suggest that a stalk between the anchor and the effector group is a powerful way of increasing the potency of a channel-opening drug. © 2018 Silverå Ejneby et al.

  4. Coupling of activation and inactivation gate in a K+-channel: potassium and ligand sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ader, Christian; Schneider, Robert; Hornig, Sönke; Velisetty, Phanindra; Vardanyan, Vitya; Giller, Karin; Ohmert, Iris; Becker, Stefan; Pongs, Olaf; Baldus, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Potassium (K+)-channel gating is choreographed by a complex interplay between external stimuli, K+ concentration and lipidic environment. We combined solid-state NMR and electrophysiological experiments on a chimeric KcsA–Kv1.3 channel to delineate K+, pH and blocker effects on channel structure and function in a membrane setting. Our data show that pH-induced activation is correlated with protonation of glutamate residues at or near the activation gate. Moreover, K+ and channel blockers distinctly affect the open probability of both the inactivation gate comprising the selectivity filter of the channel and the activation gate. The results indicate that the two gates are coupled and that effects of the permeant K+ ion on the inactivation gate modulate activation-gate opening. Our data suggest a mechanism for controlling coordinated and sequential opening and closing of activation and inactivation gates in the K+-channel pore. PMID:19661921

  5. Neuroprotective role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong-shuo; Feng, Zhong-ping

    2013-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are weak, inward rectifiers that couple metabolic status to cell membrane electrical activity, thus modulating many cellular functions. An increase in the ADP/ATP ratio opens KATP channels, leading to membrane hyperpolarization. KATP channels are ubiquitously expressed in neurons located in different regions of the brain, including the hippocampus and cortex. Brief hypoxia triggers membrane hyperpolarization in these central neurons. In vivo animal studies confirmed that knocking out the Kir6.2 subunit of the KATP channels increases ischemic infarction, and overexpression of the Kir6.2 subunit reduces neuronal injury from ischemic insults. These findings provide the basis for a practical strategy whereby activation of endogenous KATP channels reduces cellular damage resulting from cerebral ischemic stroke. KATP channel modulators may prove to be clinically useful as part of a combination therapy for stroke management in the future. PMID:23123646

  6. Three-dimensional structure of the S4-S5 segment of the Shaker potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Hojo, Hironobu; Ramachandran, Ramadurai; Görlach, Matthias; Haris, Parvez I

    2002-01-01

    The propagation of action potentials during neuronal signal transduction in phospholipid membranes is mediated by ion channels, a diverse group of membrane proteins. The S4-S5 linker peptide (S4-S5), that connects the S4 and S5 transmembrane segments of voltage-gated potassium channels is an important region of the Shaker ion-channel protein. Despite its importance, very little is known about its structure. Here we provide evidence for an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation of a synthetic S4-S5 peptide of the voltage-gated Drosophila melanogaster Shaker potassium channel in water/trifluoroethanol and in aqueous phospholipid micelles. The three-dimensional solution structures of the S4-S5 peptide were obtained by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and distance-geometry/simulated-annealing calculations. The detailed structural features are discussed with respect to model studies and available mutagenesis data on the mechanism and selectivity of the potassium channel. PMID:12023222

  7. Analogue pattern matching in a dendritic spine model based on phosphorylation of potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, K H; Blackwell, K T

    2000-11-01

    Modification of potassium channels by protein phosphorylation has been shown to play a role in learning and memory. If such memory storage machinery were part of dendritic spines, then a set of spines could act as an 'analogue pattern matching' device by learning a repeatedly presented pattern of synaptic activation. In this study, the plausibility of such analogue pattern matching is investigated in a detailed circuit model of a set of spines attached to a dendritic branch. Each spine head contains an AMPA synaptic channel in parallel with a calcium-dependent potassium channel whose sensitivity depends on its phosphorylation state. Repeated presentation of synaptic activity results in calcium activation of protein kinases and subsequent channel phosphorylation. Simulations demonstrate that signal strength is greatest when the synaptic input pattern is equal to the previously learned pattern, and smaller when components of the synaptic input pattern are either smaller or larger than corresponding components of the previously learned pattern. Therefore, our results indicate that dendritic spines may act as an analogue pattern matching device, and suggest that modulation of potassium channels by protein kinases may mediate neuronal pattern recognition.

  8. Novel Leishmania and Malaria Potassium Channels: Candidate Therapeutic Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    active drugs included quinidine, clotrimazole , tubocurare, trifluoroperazine, 4-aminopyradine, and haloperidol. The compounds that lacked anti-malarial...75 0 25 0o 7i 100 12s !CL| (UPM) [I•p] (UM) Clotrimazole Trifluoroperazine Ic50 0.6+0.01uM IC50 45+1uM Figure 5. Dose-response curves from... Clotrimazole (C), and Trifluoroperazine (D) are shown (with IC50s). 7 A. 6) Generate specific antibodies that recognize each of the malaria channel

  9. [Estimation of ATP-dependent K(+)-channel contribution to potential-dependent potassium uptake in the rat brain mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Akopova, O V; Nosar', V I; Kolchinskaia, L I; Man'kovskaia, I N; Malysheva, M K; Sagach, V F

    2014-01-01

    The effect of potassium on state 4 respiration (substrate oxidation in the absence of ADP) was investigated. It was shown that potential-dependent potassium uptake in the brain mitochondria results in mitochondrial depolarization. Taking into account depolarization effect of potassium, the contribution of the endogenous proton leak as well as K(+)-uptake to the respiration rate was calculated. It was shown that such estimation allows the share of ATP-dependent potassium channel contribution to potential-dependent potassium uptake to be determined by polarographic method.

  10. Contributory role of endothelium and voltage-gated potassium channels in apocynin-induced vasorelaxations.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei-qing; Wong, Wing Tak; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu; Wu, Ling-yun; Zhu, Ding-liang; Gao, Ping-jin

    2010-10-01

    Although apocynin, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor improves vascular function in hypertension, its specificity has been questioned. The present study examined whether apocynin-induced vasorelaxations involve endothelium and/or K channels in vascular cells. Aortas from Sprague-Dawley rats were suspended in organ baths for functional studies. Changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca]i) and nitric oxide ([NO]i) in rat endothelial cells were detected by fluorescence imaging. Whole-cell voltage-gated K (Kv) currents were recorded in vascular smooth muscle cells. Apocynin-induced aortic relaxations were attenuated by the absence of endothelium, endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, or nitric oxide-dependent soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP, voltage-gated potassium channels blocker) attenuated apocynin-induced relaxations, its combined treatment with 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) did not cause further inhibition. Apocynin increased [Ca]i and [NO]i in endothelial cells, which were abolished by 4-AP, indicating the involvement of voltage-gated potassium channels in endothelial cells. In addition, apocynin-stimulated increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation at Ser depended on the presence of extracellular Ca. Notably, 4-AP also reduced apocynin-induced relaxations in the absence of endothelium and apocynin increased 4-AP-sensitive voltage-gated potassium channel currents in vascular smooth muscle cells. This study provides novel data showing that apocynin-induced relaxations of rat aortas are mediated by 4-AP-sensitive stimulation of [Ca]i and [NO]i increases in endothelium and by activation of voltage-gated potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  11. Voltage-gated potassium channels regulate calcium-dependent pathways involved in human T lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, C S; Boltz, R C; Blake, J T; Nguyen, M; Talento, A; Fischer, P A; Springer, M S; Sigal, N H; Slaughter, R S; Garcia, M L

    1993-03-01

    The role that potassium channels play in human T lymphocyte activation has been investigated by using specific potassium channel probes. Charybdotoxin (ChTX), a blocker of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels (PK,Ca) and voltage-gated potassium channels (PK,V) that are present in human T cells, inhibits the activation of these cells. ChTX blocks T cell activation induced by signals (e.g., anti-CD2, anti-CD3, ionomycin) that elicit a rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) by preventing the elevation of [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner. However, ChTX has no effect on the activation pathways (e.g., anti-CD28, interleukin 2 [IL-2]) that are independent of a rise in [Ca2+]i. In the former case, both proliferative response and lymphokine production (IL-2 and interferon gamma) are inhibited by ChTX. The inhibitory effect of ChTX can be demonstrated when added simultaneously, or up to 4 h after the addition of the stimulants. Since ChTX inhibits both PK,Ca and PK,V, we investigated which channel is responsible for these immunosuppressive effects with the use of two other peptides, noxiustoxin (NxTX) and margatoxin (MgTX), which are specific for PK,V. These studies demonstrate that, similar to ChTX, both NxTX and MgTX inhibit lymphokine production and the rise in [Ca2+]i. Taken together, these data provide evidence that blockade of PK,V affects the Ca(2+)-dependent pathways involved in T lymphocyte proliferation and lymphokine production by diminishing the rise in [Ca2+]i that occurs upon T cell activation.

  12. A naturally occurring omega current in a Kv3 family potassium channel from a platyhelminth.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Tara L; Spencer, Andrew N; Gallin, Warren J

    2008-06-19

    Voltage-gated ion channels are membrane proteins containing a selective pore that allows permeable ions to transit the membrane in response to a change in the transmembrane voltage. The typical selectivity filter in potassium channels is formed by a tetrameric arrangement of the carbonyl groups of the conserved amino-acid sequence Gly-Tyr-Gly. This canonical pore is opened or closed by conformational changes that originate in the voltage sensor (S4), a transmembrane helix with a series of positively charged amino acids. This sensor moves through a gating pore formed by elements of the S1, S2 and S3 helices, across the plane of the membrane, without allowing ions to pass through the membrane at that site. Recently, synthetic mutagenesis studies in the Drosophila melanogaster Shaker channel and analysis of human disease-causing mutations in sodium channels have identified amino acid residues that are integral parts of the gating-pore; when these residues are mutated the proteins allow a non-specific cation current, known as the omega current, to pass through the gating-pore with relatively low selectivity. The N.at-Kv3.2 potassium channel has an unusual weak inward rectifier phenotype. Several mutations of two amino acids in the voltage sensing (S4) transmembrane helix change the phenotype to a typical delayed rectifier. The inward rectifier channels (wild-type and mutant) are sensitive to 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) but not tetra-ethyl ammonium (TEA), whereas the delayed rectifier mutants are sensitive to TEA but not 4-AP. The inward rectifier channels also manifest low cation selectivity. The relative selectivity for different cations is sensitive to specific mutations in the S4 helix, N.at-Kv3.2, a naturally occurring potassium channel of the Kv3 sequence family, mediates ion permeation through a modified gating pore, not the canonical, highly selective pore typical of potassium channels. This channel has evolved to yield qualitatively different ion permeability when

  13. A bursting potassium channel in isolated cholinergic synaptosomes of Torpedo electric organ.

    PubMed Central

    Edry-Schiller, J; Ginsburg, S; Rahamimoff, R

    1991-01-01

    1. Pinched-off cholinergic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) prepared from the electric organ of Torpedo ocelata were fused into large structures (greater than 20 microns) using dimethyl sulphoxide and polyethylene glycol 1500, as previously described for synaptic vesicles from the same organ. 2. The giant fused synaptosomes were easily amenable to the patch clamp technique and 293 seals with a resistance greater than 4 G omega were obtained in the 'cell-attached' configuration. In a large fraction of the experiments, an 'inside-out' patch configuration was achieved. 3. Several types of unitary ionic currents were observed. This study describes the most frequently observed single-channel activity which was found in 247 out of the 293 membrane patches (84.3%). 4. The single-channel current-voltage relation was linear between -60 and 20 mV and showed a slope conductance of 23.8 +/- 1.3 pS when the pipette contained 350-390 mM-Na+ and the bath facing the inside of the synaptosomal membrane contained 390 mM-K+. 5. From extrapolated reversal potential measurements, it was concluded that this channel has a large selectivity for K+ over Na+ (70.4 +/- 11.5, mean +/- S.E.M.). Chloride ions are not transported significantly through this potassium channel. 6. This potassium channel has a low probability of opening. The probability of being in the open state increases upon depolarization and reaches about 1% when the inside of the patch is 20 mV positive compared to the pipette side. 7. The mean channel open time increases with depolarization; thus the product current x time (= charge) also increases upon depolarization, showing properties of an outward rectifier. 8. The potassium channel in the giant synaptosome membrane has a bursting behaviour. Open-time distribution, closed-time distribution and a Poisson analysis indicate that the minimal kinetic scheme requires one open state and three closed states. PMID:1654418

  14. Inwardly rectifying potassium channels influence Drosophila wing morphogenesis by regulating Dpp release.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Giri Raj; Pradhan, Sarala Joshi; Bates, Emily Anne

    2017-08-01

    Loss of embryonic ion channel function leads to morphological defects, but the underlying reason for these defects remains elusive. Here, we show that inwardly rectifying potassium (Irk) channels regulate release of the Drosophila bone morphogenetic protein Dpp in the developing fly wing and that this is necessary for developmental signaling. Inhibition of Irk channels decreases the incidence of distinct Dpp-GFP release events above baseline fluorescence while leading to a broader distribution of Dpp-GFP. Work by others in different cell types has shown that Irk channels regulate peptide release by modulating membrane potential and calcium levels. We found calcium transients in the developing wing, and inhibition of Irk channels reduces the duration and amplitude of calcium transients. Depolarization with high extracellular potassium evokes Dpp release. Taken together, our data implicate Irk channels as a requirement for regulated release of Dpp, highlighting the importance of the temporal pattern of Dpp presentation for morphogenesis of the wing. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Potassium channel gene associations with joint processing speed and white matter impairments in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bruce, H A; Kochunov, P; Paciga, S A; Hyde, C L; Chen, X; Xie, Z; Zhang, B; Xi, H S; O'Donnell, P; Whelan, C; Schubert, C R; Bellon, A; Ament, S A; Shukla, D K; Du, X; Rowland, L M; O'Neill, H; Hong, L E

    2017-06-01

    Patients with schizophrenia show decreased processing speed on neuropsychological testing and decreased white matter integrity as measured by diffusion tensor imaging, two traits shown to be both heritable and genetically associated indicating that there may be genes that influence both traits as well as schizophrenia disease risk. The potassium channel gene family is a reasonable candidate to harbor such a gene given the prominent role potassium channels play in the central nervous system in signal transduction, particularly in myelinated axons. We genotyped members of the large potassium channel gene family focusing on putatively functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a population of 363 controls, 194 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD) and 28 patients with affective disorders with psychotic features who completed imaging and neuropsychological testing. We then performed three association analyses using three phenotypes - processing speed, whole-brain white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) and schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis. We extracted SNPs showing an association at a nominal P value of <0.05 with all three phenotypes in the expected direction: decreased processing speed, decreased FA and increased risk of SSD. A single SNP, rs8234, in the 3' untranslated region of voltage-gated potassium channel subfamily Q member 1 (KCNQ1) was identified. Rs8234 has been shown to affect KCNQ1 expression levels, and KCNQ1 levels have been shown to affect neuronal action potentials. This exploratory analysis provides preliminary data suggesting that KCNQ1 may contribute to the shared risk for diminished processing speed, diminished white mater integrity and increased risk of schizophrenia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  16. Characterization of the potassium channel from frog skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Best, P M

    1994-06-01

    1. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane of skeletal muscle contains potassium channels which are thought to support charge neutralization during calcium release by providing a permeability pathway for counter-ion movement. To describe the behaviour of the SR K+ channel under physiological conditions, single channel activity was recorded from excised patches of SR membrane. Patches were made from membrane blebs extruded from contracted muscle fibres whose surface membranes had been removed previously by mechanical dissection. 2. The channel was active over a large voltage range from -80 to +100 mV. The current-voltage relationship of the channel was linear over most of this voltage range (slope conductance equal to 60 pS in 130 mM potassium), but showed rectification at voltages below -50 mV. 3. The activity of the channel (number of state transitions per unit time) was greater at positive voltages than at negative voltages. Analysis of dwell-time distributions showed that the time spent in the open state is best fitted by a double Gaussian, suggesting that the channel possesses both a long (l)- and a short (s)-lived open state with identical conductances. The dwell times for the two states were Ts = 0.3 ms and Tl = 2.6 ms at +90 mV and Ts = 0.1 ms and Tl = 15.1 ms at -40 mV. Thus, positive voltage decreased the long open time significantly which was consistent with the observed increase in channel activity at positive potentials. 4. The permeability sequence of the channel to various monovalent cations was deduced from the channel reversal potential under bi-ionic conditions and was found to be: K+ > Rb+ > Na+ > Cs+ > Li+. 5. Channel activity was reduced when the patch was perfused with 1,10-bis-guanidino-n-decane (BisG10), a drug reported to block the SR K+ channel with high affinity. The drug concentration necessary to reduce the open probability (P(o)) by 50% was 19.8 microM at -40 mV and 338.2 microM at +50 mV. The zero voltage dissociation constant (Kd

  17. Pore Hydration States of KcsA Potassium Channels in Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Blasic, Joseph R.; Worcester, David L.; Gawrisch, Klaus; Gurnev, Philip; Mihailescu, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Water-filled hydrophobic cavities in channel proteins serve as gateways for transfer of ions across membranes, but their properties are largely unknown. We determined water distributions along the conduction pores in two tetrameric channels embedded in lipid bilayers using neutron diffraction: potassium channel KcsA and the transmembrane domain of M2 protein of influenza A virus. For the KcsA channel in the closed state, the distribution of water is peaked in the middle of the membrane, showing water in the central cavity adjacent to the selectivity filter. This water is displaced by the channel blocker tetrabutyl-ammonium. The amount of water associated with the channel was quantified, using neutron diffraction and solid state NMR. In contrast, the M2 proton channel shows a V-shaped water profile across the membrane, with a narrow constriction at the center, like the hourglass shape of its internal surface. These two types of water distribution are therefore very different in their connectivity to the bulk water. The water and protein profiles determined here provide important evidence concerning conformation and hydration of channels in membranes and the potential role of pore hydration in channel gating. PMID:26370089

  18. High temperature sensitivity is intrinsic to voltage-gated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are members of the large tetrameric cation channels superfamily but are considered to be uniquely sensitive to heat, which has been presumed to be due to the existence of an unidentified temperature-sensing domain. Here we report that the homologous voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels also exhibit high temperature sensitivity comparable to that of TRPV1, which is detectable under specific conditions when the voltage sensor is functionally decoupled from the activation gate through either intrinsic mechanisms or mutations. Interestingly, mutations could tune Shaker channel to be either heat-activated or heat-deactivated. Therefore, high temperature sensitivity is intrinsic to both TRP and Kv channels. Our findings suggest important physiological roles of heat-induced variation in Kv channel activities. Mechanistically our findings indicate that temperature-sensing TRP channels may not contain a specialized heat-sensor domain; instead, non-obligatory allosteric gating permits the intrinsic heat sensitivity to drive channel activation, allowing temperature-sensitive TRP channels to function as polymodal nociceptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03255.001 PMID:25030910

  19. Fear conditioning suppresses large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in lateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, P; Zhang, Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, L; Yamamoto, R; Sugai, T; Kato, N

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that depression-like behavior is accompanied with suppression of the large-conductance calcium activated potassium (BK) channel in cingulate cortex pyramidal cells. To test whether BK channels are also involved in fear conditioning, we studied neuronal properties of amygdala principal cells in fear conditioned mice. After behavior, we made brain slices containing the amygdala, the structure critically relevant to fear memory. The resting membrane potential in lateral amygdala (LA) neurons obtained from fear conditioned mice (FC group) was more depolarized than in neurons from naïve controls. The frequencies of spikes evoked by current injections were higher in neurons from FC mice, demonstrating that excitability of LA neurons was elevated by fear conditioning. The depolarization in neurons from FC mice was shown to depend on BK channels by using the BK channel blocker charybdotoxin. Suppression of BK channels in LA neurons from the FC group was further confirmed on the basis of the spike width, since BK channels affect the descending phase of spikes. Spikes were broader in the FC group than those in the naïve control in a manner dependent on BK channels. Consistently, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a decreased expression of BK channel mRNA. The present findings suggest that emotional disorder manifested in the forms of fear conditioning is accompanied with BK channel suppression in the amygdala, the brain structure critical to this emotional disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in coronary microvascular autoregulatory responses.

    PubMed

    Komaru, T; Lamping, K G; Eastham, C L; Dellsperger, K C

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that ATP-sensitive potassium channels mediate autoregulatory vasodilatation of coronary arterioles in vivo. Experiments were performed in 23 open-chest anesthetized dogs. Coronary arterial microvascular diameters were directly measured with fluorescence microangiography using an intravital microscope and stroboscopic epi-illumination synchronized to the cardiac cycle. A mild coronary stenosis (perfusion pressure = 60 mm Hg), a critical coronary stenosis (perfusion pressure = 40 mm Hg), and complete coronary artery occlusion were produced with an occluder around the left anterior descending coronary artery in the presence or absence of glibenclamide (10(-5) M, topically), which inhibits ATP-sensitive potassium channels, or of vehicle. During topical application of vehicle (0.01% dimethyl sulfoxide), there was dilatation of small (less than 100 microns diameter) arterioles during reductions in perfusion pressure (percent change in diameter: 6.7 +/- 1.5%, 11.7 +/- 3.5%, and 10.4 +/- 5.1% during mild stenosis, critical stenosis, and complete occlusion, respectively). In the presence of glibenclamide, arteriolar dilatations during coronary stenoses and occlusions were abolished. Glibenclamide did not affect responses of arterioles greater than 100 microns. Glibenclamide did not alter microvascular responses to nitroprusside. These data suggest that ATP-sensitive potassium channels play an important role in determining the coronary microvascular response to reductions in perfusion pressure.

  1. Disruption of the potassium channel regulatory subunit KCNE2 causes iron-deficient anemia

    PubMed Central

    Salsbury, Grace; Cambridge, Emma L.; McIntyre, Zoe; Arends, Mark J.; Karp, Natasha A.; Isherwood, Christopher; Shannon, Carl; Hooks, Yvette; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Adams, David J.; White, Jacqueline K.; Speak, Anneliese O.

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is a dynamic process that is tightly controlled to balance iron uptake, storage, and export. Reduction of dietary iron from the ferric to the ferrous form is required for uptake by solute carrier family 11 (proton-coupled divalent metal ion transporters), member 2 (Slc11a2) into the enterocytes. Both processes are proton dependent and have led to the suggestion of the importance of acidic gastric pH for the absorption of dietary iron. Potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E, member 2 (KCNE2), in combination with potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily, member 1 (KCNQ1), form a gastric potassium channel essential for gastric acidification. Deficiency of either Kcne2 or Kcnq1 results in achlorhydia, gastric hyperplasia, and neoplasia, but the impact on iron absorption has not, to our knowledge, been investigated. Here we report that Kcne2-deficient mice, in addition to the previously reported phenotypes, also present with iron-deficient anemia. Interestingly, impaired function of KCNQ1 results in iron-deficient anemia in Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome patients. We speculate that impaired function of KCNE2 could result in the same clinical phenotype. PMID:25127743

  2. Disruption of the potassium channel regulatory subunit KCNE2 causes iron-deficient anemia.

    PubMed

    Salsbury, Grace; Cambridge, Emma L; McIntyre, Zoe; Arends, Mark J; Karp, Natasha A; Isherwood, Christopher; Shannon, Carl; Hooks, Yvette; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Adams, David J; White, Jacqueline K; Speak, Anneliese O

    2014-12-01

    Iron homeostasis is a dynamic process that is tightly controlled to balance iron uptake, storage, and export. Reduction of dietary iron from the ferric to the ferrous form is required for uptake by solute carrier family 11 (proton-coupled divalent metal ion transporters), member 2 (Slc11a2) into the enterocytes. Both processes are proton dependent and have led to the suggestion of the importance of acidic gastric pH for the absorption of dietary iron. Potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E, member 2 (KCNE2), in combination with potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily, member 1 (KCNQ1), form a gastric potassium channel essential for gastric acidification. Deficiency of either Kcne2 or Kcnq1 results in achlorhydia, gastric hyperplasia, and neoplasia, but the impact on iron absorption has not, to our knowledge, been investigated. Here we report that Kcne2-deficient mice, in addition to the previously reported phenotypes, also present with iron-deficient anemia. Interestingly, impaired function of KCNQ1 results in iron-deficient anemia in Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome patients. We speculate that impaired function of KCNE2 could result in the same clinical phenotype. Copyright © 2014 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ion conduction in the KcsA potassium channel analyzed with a minimal kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Mafé, Salvador; Pellicer, Julio

    2005-02-01

    We use a model by Nelson to study the current-voltage and conductance-concentration curves of bacterial potassium channel KcsA without assuming rapid ion translocation. Ion association to the channel filter is rate controlling at low concentrations, but dissociation and transport in the filter can limit conduction at high concentration for ions other than K+. The absolute values of the effective rate constants are tentative but the relative changes in these constants needed to qualitatively explain the experiments should be of significance.

  4. Block of voltage-gated potassium channels by Pacific ciguatoxin-1 contributes to increased neuronal excitability in rat sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Birinyi-Strachan, Liesl C.; Gunning, Simon J.; Lewis, Richard J.

    2005-04-15

    The present study investigated the actions of the polyether marine toxin Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) on neuronal excitability in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using patch-clamp recording techniques. Under current-clamp conditions, bath application of 2-20 nM P-CTX-1 caused a rapid, concentration-dependent depolarization of the resting membrane potential in neurons expressing tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive voltage-gated sodium (Na{sub v}) channels. This action was completely suppressed by the addition of 200 nM TTX to the external solution, indicating that this effect was mediated through TTX-sensitive Na{sub v} channels. In addition, P-CTX-1 also prolonged action potential and afterhyperpolarization (AHP) duration. In a subpopulation of neurons,more » P-CTX-1 also produced tonic action potential firing, an effect that was not accompanied by significant oscillation of the resting membrane potential. Conversely, in neurons expressing TTX-resistant Na{sub v} currents, P-CTX-1 failed to alter any parameter of neuronal excitability examined in this study. Under voltage-clamp conditions in rat DRG neurons, P-CTX-1 inhibited both delayed-rectifier and 'A-type' potassium currents in a dose-dependent manner, actions that occurred in the absence of alterations to the voltage dependence of activation. These actions appear to underlie the prolongation of the action potential and AHP, and contribute to repetitive firing. These data indicate that a block of potassium channels contributes to the increase in neuronal excitability, associated with a modulation of Na{sub v} channel gating, observed clinically in response to ciguatera poisoning.« less

  5. Hydrogen bonds as molecular timers for slow inactivation in voltage-gated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Pless, Stephan A; Galpin, Jason D; Niciforovic, Ana P; Kurata, Harley T; Ahern, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels enable potassium efflux and membrane repolarization in excitable tissues. Many Kv channels undergo a progressive loss of ion conductance in the presence of a prolonged voltage stimulus, termed slow inactivation, but the atomic determinants that regulate the kinetics of this process remain obscure. Using a combination of synthetic amino acid analogs and concatenated channel subunits we establish two H-bonds near the extracellular surface of the channel that endow Kv channels with a mechanism to time the entry into slow inactivation: an intra-subunit H-bond between Asp447 and Trp434 and an inter-subunit H-bond connecting Tyr445 to Thr439. Breaking of either interaction triggers slow inactivation by means of a local disruption in the selectivity filter, while severing the Tyr445–Thr439 H-bond is likely to communicate this conformational change to the adjacent subunit(s). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01289.001 PMID:24327560

  6. The potent insulin secretagogue effect of betulinic acid is mediated by potassium and chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Gomes Castro, Allisson Jhonatan; Cazarolli, Luisa Helena; Bretanha, Lizandra C; Sulis, Paola Miranda; Rey Padilla, Diana Patricia; Aragón Novoa, Diana Marcela; Dambrós, Betina Fernanda; Pizzolatti, Moacir G; Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina

    2018-04-25

    Betulinic acid (BA) has been described as an insulin secretagogue which may explain its potent antihyperglycemic effect; however, the exact role of BA as an insulinogenic agent is not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of BA on calcium influx and static insulin secretion in pancreatic islets isolated from euglycemic rats. We found that BA triggers calcium influx by a mechanism dependent on ATP-dependent potassium channels and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. Additionally, the voltage-dependent and calcium-dependent chloride channels are also involved in the mechanism of BA, probably due to an indirect stimulation of calcium entry and increased intracellular calcium. Additionally, the downstream activation of PKC, which is necessary for the effect of BA on calcium influx, is involved in the full stimulatory response of the triterpene. BA stimulated the static secretion of insulin in pancreatic islets, indicating that the abrupt calcium influx may be a key step in its secretagogue effect. As such, BA stimulates insulin secretion through the activation of electrophysiological mechanisms, such as the closure of potassium channels and opening of calcium and chloride channels, inducing cellular depolarization associated with metabolic-biochemical effects, in turn activating PKC and ensuring the secretion of insulin. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Role of inward rectifier potassium channels in salivary gland function and sugar feeding of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The arthropod salivary gland is of critical importance for horizontal transmission of pathogens, yet a detailed understanding of the ion conductance pathways responsible for saliva production and excretion is lacking. A superfamily of potassium ion channels, known as inward rectifying potassium (Ki...

  8. The inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir1.1: development of functional assays to identify and characterize channel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Felix, John P; Priest, Birgit T; Solly, Kelli; Bailey, Timothy; Brochu, Richard M; Liu, Chou J; Kohler, Martin G; Kiss, Laszlo; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Tang, Haifeng; Pasternak, Alexander; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L

    2012-10-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) channel is a member of the inwardly rectifying family of potassium (Kir) channels. ROMK (Kir1.1) is predominantly expressed in kidney where it plays a major role in the salt reabsorption process. Loss-of-function mutations in the human Kir1.1 channel are associated with antenatal Bartter's syndrome type II, a life-threatening salt and water balance disorder. Heterozygous carriers of Kir1.1 mutations associated with antenatal Bartter's syndrome have reduced blood pressure and a decreased risk of developing hypertension by age 60. These data suggest that Kir1.1 inhibitors could represent novel diuretics for the treatment of hypertension. Because little is known about the molecular pharmacology of Kir1.1 channels, assays that provide a robust, reliable readout of channel activity-while operating in high-capacity mode-are needed. In the present study, we describe high-capacity, 384- and 1,536-well plate, functional thallium flux, and IonWorks electrophysiology assays for the Kir1.1 channel that fulfill these criteria. In addition, 96-well (86)Rb(+) flux assays were established that can operate in the presence of 100% serum, and can provide an indication of the effect of a serum shift on compound potencies. The ability to grow Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing Kir1.1 in Transwell supports provides a polarized cell system that can be used to study the mechanism of Kir1.1 inhibition by different agents. All these functional Kir1.1 assays together can play an important role in supporting different aspects of drug development efforts during lead identification and/or optimization.

  9. A role for two-pore potassium (K2P) channels in endometrial epithelial function

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Suraj K; Jackson, Leigh; Warren, Averil Y; Arya, Pratibha; Shaw, Robert W; Khan, Raheela N

    2013-01-01

    The human endometrial epithelium is pivotal to menstrual cycle progression, implantation and early pregnancy. Endometrial function is directly regulated by local factors that include pH, oxygen tension and ion concentrations to generate an environment conducive to fertilization. A superfamily of potassium channels characterized by two-pore domains (K2P) and encoded by KCNK genes is implicated in the control of the cell resting membrane potential through the generation of leak currents and modulation by various physicochemical stimuli. The aims of the study were to determine the expression and function of K2P channel subtypes in proliferative and secretory phase endometrium obtained from normo-ovulatory women and in an endometrial cancer cell line. Using immunochemical methods, real-time qRT-PCR proliferation assays and electrophysiology. Our results demonstrate mRNA for several K2P channel subtypes in human endometrium with molecular expression of TREK-1 shown to be higher in proliferative than secretory phase endometrium (P < 0.001). The K2P channel blockers methanandamide, lidocaine, zinc and curcumin had antiproliferative effects (P < 0.01) in an endometrial epithelial cancer cell line indicating a role for TASK and TREK-1 channels in proliferation. Tetraethylammonium- and 4-aminopyridine-insensitive outwards currents were inhibited at all voltages by reducing extracellular pH from 7.4 to 6.6. Higher expression of TREK-1 expression in proliferative phase endometrium may, in part, underlie linked to increased cell division. The effects of pH and a lack of effect of non-specific channel blockers of voltage-gated potassium channels imply a role for K2P channels in the regulation of human endometrial function. PMID:23305490

  10. Thalamic microinfusion of antibody to a voltage-gated potassium channel restores consciousness during anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Alkire, Michael T; Asher, Christopher D; Franciscus, Amanda M; Hahn, Emily L

    2009-04-01

    The Drosophila Shaker mutant fruit-fly, with its malfunctioning voltage-gated potassium channel, exhibits anesthetic requirements that are more than twice normal. Shaker mutants with an abnormal Kv1.2 channel also demonstrate significantly reduced sleep. Given the important role the thalamus plays in both sleep and arousal, the authors investigated whether localized central medial thalamic (CMT) microinfusion of an antibody designed to block the pore of the Kv1.2 channel might awaken anesthetized rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with a cannula aimed at the CMT or lateral thalamus. One week later, unconsciousness was induced with either desflurane (3.6 +/- 0.2%; n = 55) or sevoflurane (1.2 +/- 0.1%; n = 51). Arousal effects of a single 0.5-microl infusion of Kv1.2 potassium channel blocking antibody (0.1- 0.2 mg/ml) or a control infusion of Arc-protein antibody (0.2 mg/ml) were then determined. The Kv1.2 antibody, but not the control antibody, temporarily restored consciousness in 17% of all animals and in 75% of those animals where infusions occurred within the CMT (P < 0.01 for each anesthetic). Lateral thalamic infusions showed no effects. Consciousness returned on average (+/- SD) 170 +/- 99 s after infusion and lasted a median time of 398 s (interquartile range: 279-510 s). Temporary seizures, without apparent consciousness, predominated in 33% of all animals. These findings support the idea that the CMT plays a role in modulating levels of arousal during anesthesia and further suggest that voltage-gated potassium channels in the CMT may contribute to regulating arousal or may even be relevant targets of anesthetic action.

  11. Chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension decreases calcium-sensitive potassium channel mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Cornfield, D N; Resnik, E R; Herron, J M; Abman, S H

    2000-11-01

    Calcium-sensitive potassium (K(Ca)) channels play a critical role in mediating perinatal pulmonary vasodilation. Because infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) have blunted vasodilator responses to birth-related stimuli, we hypothesized that lung K(Ca) channel gene expression is decreased in PPHN. To test this hypothesis, we measured K(Ca) channel gene expression in distal lung homogenates from both fetal lambs with severe pulmonary hypertension caused by prolonged compression of the ductus arteriosus and age-matched, sham-operated animals (controls). After at least 9 days of compression of the ductus arteriosus, fetal lambs were killed. To determine lung K(Ca) channel mRNA levels, primers were designed against the known sequence of the K(Ca) channel and used in semiquantitative RT-PCR, with lung 18S rRNA content as an internal control. Compared to that in control lambs, lung K(Ca) channel mRNA content in the PPHN group was reduced by 26 +/- 6% (P < 0.02), whereas lung voltage-gated K(+) 2.1 mRNA content was unchanged. We conclude that lung K(Ca) channel mRNA expression is decreased in an ovine model of PPHN. Decreased K(Ca) channel gene expression may contribute to the abnormal pulmonary vascular reactivity associated with PPHN.

  12. Differentially Expressed Potassium Channels Are Associated with Function of Human Effector Memory CD8+T Cells.

    PubMed

    Sim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Kyung Soo; Park, Hyoungjun; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Lin, Haiyue; Kim, Tae-Joo; Shin, Hyun Mu; Kim, Gwanghun; Lee, Dong-Sup; Park, Chan-Wook; Lee, Dong Hun; Kang, Insoo; Kim, Sung Joon; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Doh, Junsang; Kim, Hang-Rae

    2017-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv1.3, and the Ca 2+ -activated potassium channel, KCa3.1, regulate membrane potentials in T cells, thereby controlling T cell activation and cytokine production. However, little is known about the expression and function of potassium channels in human effector memory (EM) CD8 + T cells that can be further divided into functionally distinct subsets based on the expression of the interleukin (IL)-7 receptor alpha (IL-7Rα) chain. Herein, we investigated the functional expression and roles of Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 in EM CD8 + T cells that express high or low levels of the IL-7 receptor alpha chain (IL-7Rα high and IL-7Rα low , respectively). In contrast to the significant activity of Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 in IL-7Rα high EM CD8 + T cells, IL-7Rα low EM CD8 + T cells showed lower expression of Kv1.3 and insignificant expression of KCa3.1. Kv1.3 was involved in the modulation of cell proliferation and IL-2 production, whereas KCa3.1 affected the motility of EM CD8 + T cells. The lower motility of IL-7Rα low EM CD8 + T cells was demonstrated using transendothelial migration and motility assays with intercellular adhesion molecule 1- and/or chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α-coated surfaces. Consistent with the lower migration property, IL-7Rα low EM CD8 + T cells were found less frequently in human skin. Stimulating IL-7Rα low EM CD8 + T cells with IL-2 or IL-15 increased their motility and recovery of KCa3.1 activity. Our findings demonstrate that Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 are differentially involved in the functions of EM CD8 + T cells. The weak expression of potassium channels in IL-7Rα low EM CD8 + T cells can be revived by stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15, which restores the associated functions. This study suggests that IL-7Rα high EM CD8 + T cells with functional potassium channels may serve as a reservoir for effector CD8 + T cells during peripheral inflammation.

  13. Diclofenac distinguishes among homomeric and heteromeric potassium channels composed of KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 subunits.

    PubMed

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Mackie, Alexander R; Martin, Jody L; Cribbs, Leanne L; Byron, Kenneth L

    2011-01-01

    KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 potassium channel subunits are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, although it remains uncertain how these subunits assemble to form functional channels. Using patch-clamp techniques, we compared the electrophysiological characteristics and effects of diclofenac, a known KCNQ channel activator, on human KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 channels expressed individually or together in A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. The conductance curves of the overexpressed channels were fitted by a single Boltzmann function in each case (V(0.5) values: -31, -44, and -38 mV for KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and KCNQ4/5, respectively). Diclofenac (100 μM) inhibited KCNQ5 channels, reducing maximum conductance by 53%, but increased maximum conductance of KCNQ4 channels by 38%. The opposite effects of diclofenac on KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 could not be attributed to the presence of a basic residue (lysine) in the voltage-sensing domain of KCNQ5, because mutation of this residue to neutral glycine (the residue present in KCNQ4) resulted in a more effective block of the channel. Differences in deactivation rates and distinct voltage-dependent effects of diclofenac on channel activation and deactivation observed with each of the subunit combinations (KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and KCNQ4/5) were used as diagnostic tools to evaluate native KCNQ currents in vascular smooth muscle cells. A7r5 cells express only KCNQ5 channels endogenously, and their responses to diclofenac closely resembled those of the overexpressed KCNQ5 currents. In contrast, mesenteric artery myocytes, which express both KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 channels, displayed whole-cell KCNQ currents with properties and diclofenac responses characteristic of overexpressed heteromeric KCNQ4/5 channels.

  14. Identification of quaternary ammonium compounds as potent inhibitors of hERG potassium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Menghang, E-mail: mxia@mail.nih.gov; Shahane, Sampada A.; Huang, Ruili

    2011-05-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel, a member of a family of voltage-gated potassium (K{sup +}) channels, plays a critical role in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. The reduction of hERG channel activity as a result of adverse drug effects or genetic mutations may cause QT interval prolongation and potentially leads to acquired long QT syndrome. Thus, screening for hERG channel activity is important in drug development. Cardiotoxicity associated with the inhibition of hERG channels by environmental chemicals is also a public health concern. To assess the inhibitory effects of environmental chemicals on hERG channel function, we screenedmore » the National Toxicology Program (NTP) collection of 1408 compounds by measuring thallium influx into cells through hERG channels. Seventeen compounds with hERG channel inhibition were identified with IC{sub 50} potencies ranging from 0.26 to 22 {mu}M. Twelve of these compounds were confirmed as hERG channel blockers in an automated whole cell patch clamp experiment. In addition, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of seven compounds belonging to the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) series on hERG channel inhibition. Among four active QAC compounds, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide was the most potent with an IC{sub 50} value of 260 nM in the thallium influx assay and 80 nM in the patch clamp assay. The potency of this class of hERG channel inhibitors appears to depend on the number and length of their aliphatic side-chains surrounding the charged nitrogen. Profiling environmental compound libraries for hERG channel inhibition provides information useful in prioritizing these compounds for cardiotoxicity assessment in vivo.« less

  15. Identification of quaternary ammonium compounds as potent inhibitors of hERG potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Menghang; Shahane, Sampada; Huang, Ruili; Titus, Steven A.; Shum, Enoch; Zhao, Yong; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel, a member of a family of voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels, plays a critical role in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. The reduction of hERG channel activity as a result of adverse drug effects or genetic mutations may cause QT interval prolongation and potentially lead to acquired long QT syndrome. Thus, screening for hERG channel activity is important in drug development. Cardiotoxicity associated with the inhibition of hERG channels by environmental chemicals is also a public health concern. To assess the inhibitory effects of environmental chemicals on hERG channel function, we screened the National Toxicology Program (NTP) collection of 1408 compounds by measuring thallium influx into cells through hERG channels. Seventeen compounds with hERG channel inhibition were identified with IC50 potencies ranging from 0.26 to 22 μM. Twelve of these compounds were confirmed as hERG channel blockers in an automated whole cell patch clamp experiment. In addition, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of seven compounds belonging to the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) series on hERG channel inhibition. Among four active QAC compounds, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide was the most potent with an IC50 value of 260 nM in the thallium influx assay and 80 nM in the patch clamp assay. The potency of this class of hERG channel inhibitors appears to depend on the number and length of their aliphatic side-chains surrounding the charged nitrogen. Profiling environmental compound libraries for hERG channel inhibition provides information useful in prioritizing these compounds for cardiotoxicity assessment in vivo. PMID:21362439

  16. Interfacial gating triad is crucial for electromechanical transduction in voltage-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sandipan; Haehnel, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium channels play a crucial role in electrical excitability and cellular signaling by regulating potassium ion flux across membranes. Movement of charged residues in the voltage-sensing domain leads to a series of conformational changes that culminate in channel opening in response to changes in membrane potential. However, the molecular machinery that relays these conformational changes from voltage sensor to the pore is not well understood. Here we use generalized interaction-energy analysis (GIA) to estimate the strength of site-specific interactions between amino acid residues putatively involved in the electromechanical coupling of the voltage sensor and pore in the outwardly rectifying KV channel. We identified candidate interactors at the interface between the S4–S5 linker and the pore domain using a structure-guided graph theoretical approach that revealed clusters of conserved and closely packed residues. One such cluster, located at the intracellular intersubunit interface, comprises three residues (arginine 394, glutamate 395, and tyrosine 485) that interact with each other. The calculated interaction energies were 3–5 kcal, which is especially notable given that the net free-energy change during activation of the Shaker KV channel is ∼14 kcal. We find that this triad is delicately maintained by balance of interactions that are responsible for structural integrity of the intersubunit interface while maintaining sufficient flexibility at a critical gating hinge for optimal transmission of force to the pore gate. PMID:25311635

  17. Expression and Stress-Dependent Induction of Potassium Channel Transcripts in the Common Ice Plant1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua; Golldack, Dortje; Katsuhara, Maki; Zhao, Chengsong; Bohnert, Hans J.

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized transcripts for three potassium channel homologs in the AKT/KAT subfamily (Shaker type) from the common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum), with a focus on their expression during salt stress (up to 500 mm NaCl). Mkt1 and 2, Arabidopsis AKT homologs, and Kmt1, a KAT homolog, are members of small gene families with two to three isoforms each. Mkt1 is root specific; Mkt2 is found in leaves, flowers, and seed capsules; and Kmt1 is expressed in leaves and seed capsules. Mkt1 is present in all cells of the root, and in leaves a highly conserved isoform is detected present in all cells with highest abundance in the vasculature. MKT1 for which antibodies were made is localized to the plasma membrane. Following salt stress, MKT1 (transcripts and protein) is drastically down-regulated, Mkt2 transcripts do not change significantly, and Kmt1 is strongly and transiently (maximum at 6 h) up-regulated in leaves and stems. The detection and stress-dependent behavior of abundant transcripts representing subfamilies of potassium channels provides information about tissue specificity and the complex regulation of genes encoding potassium uptake systems in a halophytic plant. PMID:11161018

  18. Potassium channels in the central nervous system of the snail, Helix pomatia: localization and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Battonyai, I; Krajcs, N; Serfőző, Z; Kiss, T; Elekes, K

    2014-05-30

    The distribution and functional presence of three voltage-dependent potassium channels, Kv2.1, Kv3.4, Kv4.3, respectively, were studied in the central nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia by immunohistochemical and electrophysiological methods. Cell clusters displaying immunoreactivity for the different channels were observed in all parts of the CNS, although their localization and number partly varied. Differences were also found in their intracellular, perikaryonal and axonal localization, as well as in their presence in non-neuronal tissues nearby the CNS, such as the perineurium and the aorta wall. At ultrastructural level Kv4.3 channel immunolabeling was observed in axon profiles containing large 80-100nm granular vesicles. Blotting analyses revealed specific signals for the Kv2.1, Kv3.4 and Kv4.3 channels, confirming the presence of the channels in the Helix CNS. Voltage-clamp recordings proved that outward currents obtained from neurons displaying Kv3.4 or Kv4.3 immunoreactivity contained transient components while Kv2.1 immunoreactive cells were characterized by delayed currents. The distribution of the K(+)-channels containing neurons suggests specific roles in intercellular signaling processes in the Helix CNS, most probably related to well-defined, partly local events. The cellular localization of the K(+)-channels studied supports their involvement in both pre- and postsynaptic events at perikaryonal and axonal levels. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Compression Induces Acute Demyelination and Potassium Channel Exposure in Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Hui; Sun, Wenjing; Fu, Yan; Li, Jianming; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Nauman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Crush to the mammalian spinal cord leads to primary mechanical damage followed by a series of secondary biomolecular events. The chronic outcomes of spinal cord injuries have been well detailed in multiple previous studies. However, the initial mechanism by which constant displacement injury induces conduction block is still unclear. We therefore investigated the anatomical factors that may directly contribute to electrophysiological deficiencies in crushed cord. Ventral white matter strips from adult guinea pig spinal cord were compressed 80%, either briefly or continuously for 30 min. Immunofluorescence imaging and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) were used to visualize key pathological changes to ion channels and myelin. Compression caused electrophysiological deficits, including compound action potential (CAP) decline that was injury-duration-dependent. Compression further induced myelin retraction at the nodes of Ranvier. This demyelination phenomenon exposed a subclass of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1.2). Application of a potassium channel blocker, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), restored the CAP to near pre-injury levels. To further investigate the myelin detachment phenomenon, we constructed a three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the axon and surrounding myelin. We found that the von Mises stress was highly concentrated at the paranodal junction. Thus, the mechanism of myelin retraction may be associated with stress concentrations that cause debonding at the axoglial interface. In conclusion, our findings implicate myelin disruption and potassium channel pathophysiology as the culprits causing compression-mediated conduction block. This result highlights a potential therapeutic target for compressive spinal cord injuries. PMID:20373847

  20. Potassium channel changes of peripheral blood T-lymphocytes from Kazakh hypertensive patients in Northwest China and the inhibition effect towards potassium channels by telmisartan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiubing; Gou, Fang; Zhang, Yuanming; He, Yuanjun; He, Jixian; Peng, Ling; Cheng, Lufeng; Yuan, Qingyan; Zhang, Guiming; Huang, Shasha

    Increasing evidence indicates that chronic inflammation is a direct or indirect manifestation of hypertension. Potassium channels are thought to be critical for lymphocyte activation, which suggests that hypertension may be an inflammatory disease initiated at the ion channel level. This study investigated changes in interleukin (IL)-6, IL-17, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-b1) expression in the blood of Kazakh hypertensive patients in Northwest China using ELISA technology. Whole-cell patch clamp technology was used to evaluate current changes associated with Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 in peripheral blood T lymphocytes of hypertensive patients, and to investigate current changes induced by telmisartan. We also investigated the effects of telmisartan on expression of Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 at mRNA and protein levels in peripheral blood T lymphocytes using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Expression of IL-6, IL-17 and TGF-b1 in the blood of Kazakh hypertensive patients in Northwest China was significantly higher than in healthy controls (p < 0.05). The current mediated by Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 and the corresponding expression at mRNA and protein levels in T lymphocytes were also higher in these hypertensive patients than in controls (p < 0.05). Telmisartan intervention for 24 h and 48 h inhibited the current and expression of Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 at mRNA and protein levels (p < 0.05). These results indicated that the increase in functional Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 channels expressed in T lymphocytes of Kazakh patients with hypertension was blocked by telmisartan, resulting in a reduced inflammatory response. These results provide theoretical support for the treatment of hypertension at the cellular ion channel level.

  1. Ethanol Affects Network Activity in Cultured Rat Hippocampus: Mediation by Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Korkotian, Eduard; Bombela, Tatyana; Odegova, Tatiana; Zubov, Petr; Segal, Menahem

    2013-01-01

    The effects of ethanol on neuronal network activity were studied in dissociated cultures of rat hippocampus. Exposure to low (0.25–0.5%) ethanol concentrations caused an increase in synchronized network spikes, and a decrease in the duration of individual spikes. Ethanol also caused an increase in rate of miniature spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Higher concentrations of ethanol eliminated network spikes. These effects were reversible upon wash. The effects of the high, but not the low ethanol were blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline. The enhancing action of low ethanol was blocked by apamin, an SK potassium channel antagonist, and mimicked by 1-EBIO, an SK channel opener. It is proposed that in cultured hippocampal networks low concentration of ethanol is associated with SK channel activity, rather than the GABAergic receptor. PMID:24260098

  2. The Arabidopsis guard cell outward potassium channel GORK is regulated by CPK33.

    PubMed

    Corratgé-Faillie, Claire; Ronzier, Elsa; Sanchez, Frédéric; Prado, Karine; Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Lanciano, Sophie; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Lacombe, Benoît; Xiong, Tou Cheu

    2017-07-01

    A complex signaling network involving voltage-gated potassium channels from the Shaker family contributes to the regulation of stomatal aperture. Several kinases and phosphatases have been shown to be crucial for ABA-dependent regulation of the ion transporters. To date, the Ca 2+ -dependent regulation of Shaker channels by Ca 2+ -dependent protein kinases (CPKs) is still elusive. A functional screen in Xenopus oocytes was launched to identify such CPKs able to regulate the three main guard cell Shaker channels KAT1, KAT2, and GORK. Seven guard cell CPKs were tested and multiple CPK/Shaker couples were identified. Further work on CPK33 indicates that GORK activity is enhanced by CPK33 and unaffected by a nonfunctional CPK33 (CPK33-K102M). Furthermore, Ca 2+ -induced stomatal closure is impaired in two cpk33 mutant plants. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. The marine algal toxin azaspiracid is an open state blocker of hERG potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Twiner, Michael J.; Doucette, Gregory J.; Rasky, Andrew; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L.; Sanguinetti, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Azaspiracids (AZA) are polyether marine dinoflagellate toxins that accumulate in shellfish and represent an emerging human health risk. Although human exposure is primarily manifested by severe and protracted diarrhea, this toxin class has been shown to be highly cytotoxic, a teratogen to developing fish, and a possible carcinogen in mice. Until now, AZA's molecular target(s) has not yet been determined. Using three independent methods (voltage clamp, channel binding assay, and thallium flux assay), we have for the first time demonstrated that AZA1, AZA2, and AZA3 each bind to and block the hERG (human ether-à-go-go related gene) potassium channel heterologously expressed in HEK-293 mammalian cells. Inhibition of K+ current for each AZA analogue was concentration-dependent (IC50 value range: 0.64 - 0.84 μM). The mechanism of hERG channel inhibition by AZA1 was investigated further in Xenopus oocytes where it was shown to be an open state-dependent blocker and, using mutant channels, to interact with F656 but not with Y652 within the S6 transmembrane domain that forms the channel's central pore. AZA1, AZA2, and AZA3 were each shown to inhibit [3H]dofetilide binding to the hERG channel and thallium ion flux through the channel (IC50 value range: 2.1 – 6.6 μM). AZA1 did not block K+ current of the closely related EAG1 channel. Collectively, these data suggest that the AZAs physically block the K+ conductance pathway of hERG1 channels by occluding the cytoplasmic mouth of the open pore. Although the concentrations necessary to block hERG channels are relatively high, AZA-induced blockage may prove to contribute to the toxicological properties of the AZAs. PMID:22856456

  4. Marine algal toxin azaspiracid is an open-state blocker of hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Twiner, Michael J; Doucette, Gregory J; Rasky, Andrew; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2012-09-17

    Azaspiracids (AZA) are polyether marine dinoflagellate toxins that accumulate in shellfish and represent an emerging human health risk. Although human exposure is primarily manifested by severe and protracted diarrhea, this toxin class has been shown to be highly cytotoxic, a teratogen to developing fish, and a possible carcinogen in mice. Until now, AZA's molecular target has not yet been determined. Using three independent methods (voltage clamp, channel binding assay, and thallium flux assay), we have for the first time demonstrated that AZA1, AZA2, and AZA3 each bind to and block the hERG (human ether-à-go-go related gene) potassium channel heterologously expressed in HEK-293 mammalian cells. Inhibition of K(+) current for each AZA analogue was concentration-dependent (IC(50) value range: 0.64-0.84 μM). The mechanism of hERG channel inhibition by AZA1 was investigated further in Xenopus oocytes where it was shown to be an open-state-dependent blocker and, using mutant channels, to interact with F656 but not with Y652 within the S6 transmembrane domain that forms the channel's central pore. AZA1, AZA2, and AZA3 were each shown to inhibit [(3)H]dofetilide binding to the hERG channel and thallium ion flux through the channel (IC(50) value range: 2.1-6.6 μM). AZA1 did not block the K(+) current of the closely related EAG1 channel. Collectively, these data suggest that the AZAs physically block the K(+) conductance pathway of hERG1 channels by occluding the cytoplasmic mouth of the open pore. Although the concentrations necessary to block hERG channels are relatively high, AZA-induced blockage may prove to contribute to the toxicological properties of the AZAs.

  5. The potassium channel Kir4.1 associates with the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex via alpha-syntrophin in glia.

    PubMed

    Connors, Nathan C; Adams, Marvin E; Froehner, Stanley C; Kofuji, Paulo

    2004-07-02

    One of the major physiological roles of potassium channels in glial cells is to promote "potassium spatial buffering" in the central nervous system, a process necessary to maintain an optimal potassium concentration in the extracellular environment. This process requires the precise distribution of potassium channels accumulated at high density in discrete subdomains of glial cell membranes. To obtain a better understanding of how glial cells selectively target potassium channels to discrete membrane subdomains, we addressed the question of whether the glial inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir4.1 associates with the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC). Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Kir4.1 is associated with the DGC in mouse brain and cultured cortical astrocytes. In vitro immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays demonstrated that Kir4.1 can bind directly to alpha-syntrophin, requiring the presence of the last three amino acids of the channel (SNV), a consensus PDZ domain-binding motif. Furthermore, Kir4.1 failed to associate with the DGC in brains from alpha-syntrophin knockout mice. These results suggest that Kir4.1 is localized in glial cells by its association with the DGC through a PDZ domain-mediated interaction with alpha-syntrophin and suggest an important role for the DGC in central nervous system physiology.

  6. Toxin-induced conformational changes in a potassium channel revealed by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Adam; Giller, Karin; Hornig, Sönke; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2006-04-01

    The active site of potassium (K+) channels catalyses the transport of K+ ions across the plasma membrane-similar to the catalytic function of the active site of an enzyme-and is inhibited by toxins from scorpion venom. On the basis of the conserved structures of K+ pore regions and scorpion toxins, detailed structures for the K+ channel-scorpion toxin binding interface have been proposed. In these models and in previous solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies using detergent-solubilized membrane proteins, scorpion toxins were docked to the extracellular entrance of the K+ channel pore assuming rigid, preformed binding sites. Using high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy, here we show that high-affinity binding of the scorpion toxin kaliotoxin to a chimaeric K+ channel (KcsA-Kv1.3) is associated with significant structural rearrangements in both molecules. Our approach involves a combined analysis of chemical shifts and proton-proton distances and demonstrates that solid-state NMR is a sensitive method for analysing the structure of a membrane protein-inhibitor complex. We propose that structural flexibility of the K+ channel and the toxin represents an important determinant for the high specificity of toxin-K+ channel interactions.

  7. The sodium-activated potassium channel Slack is required for optimal cognitive flexibility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2015-01-01

    Kcnt1 encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual development. In particular, recent findings have shown that human Slack mutations produce very severe intellectual disability and that Slack channels interact directly with the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a protein that when missing or mutated results in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and autism in humans. We have now analyzed a recently developed Kcnt1 null mouse model in several behavioral tasks to assess which aspects of memory and learning are dependent on Slack. We demonstrate that Slack deficiency results in mildly altered general locomotor activity, but normal working memory, reference memory, as well as cerebellar control of motor functions. In contrast, we find that Slack channels are required for cognitive flexibility, including reversal learning processes and the ability to adapt quickly to unfamiliar situations and environments. Our data reveal that hippocampal-dependent spatial learning capabilities require the proper function of Slack channels. PMID:26077685

  8. Scorpion Toxins Specific for Potassium (K+) Channels: A Historical Overview of Peptide Bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Zachary L.; Bingham, Jon-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Scorpion toxins have been central to the investigation and understanding of the physiological role of potassium (K+) channels and their expansive function in membrane biophysics. As highly specific probes, toxins have revealed a great deal about channel structure and the correlation between mutations, altered regulation and a number of human pathologies. Radio- and fluorescently-labeled toxin isoforms have contributed to localization studies of channel subtypes in expressing cells, and have been further used in competitive displacement assays for the identification of additional novel ligands for use in research and medicine. Chimeric toxins have been designed from multiple peptide scaffolds to probe channel isoform specificity, while advanced epitope chimerization has aided in the development of novel molecular therapeutics. Peptide backbone cyclization has been utilized to enhance therapeutic efficiency by augmenting serum stability and toxin half-life in vivo as a number of K+-channel isoforms have been identified with essential roles in disease states ranging from HIV, T-cell mediated autoimmune disease and hypertension to various cardiac arrhythmias and Malaria. Bioengineered scorpion toxins have been monumental to the evolution of channel science, and are now serving as templates for the development of invaluable experimental molecular therapeutics. PMID:23202307

  9. Selective Open-Channel Block of Shaker (Kv1) Potassium Channels by S-Nitrosodithiothreitol (Sndtt)

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Mathew W.; Mathes, Chris; Gilly, William F.

    2001-01-01

    Large quaternary ammonium (QA) ions block voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels by binding with a 1:1 stoichiometry in an aqueous cavity that is exposed to the cytoplasm only when channels are open. S-nitrosodithiothreitol (SNDTT; ONSCH2CH(OH)CH(OH)CH2SNO) produces qualitatively similar “open-channel block” in Kv channels despite a radically different structure. SNDTT is small, electrically neutral, and not very hydrophobic. In whole-cell voltage-clamped squid giant fiber lobe neurons, bath-applied SNDTT causes reversible time-dependent block of Kv channels, but not Na+ or Ca2+ channels. Inactivation-removed ShakerB (ShBΔ) Kv1 channels expressed in HEK 293 cells are similarly blocked and were used to study further the action of SNDTT. Dose–response data are consistent with a scheme in which two SNDTT molecules bind sequentially to a single channel, with binding of the first being sufficient to produce block. The dissociation constant for the binding of the second SNDTT molecule (K d2 = 0.14 mM) is lower than that of the first molecule (K d1 = 0.67 mM), indicating cooperativity. The half-blocking concentration (K 1/2) is ∼0.2 mM. Steady-state block by this electrically neutral compound has a voltage dependence (about −0.3 e0) similar in magnitude but opposite in directionality to that reported for QA ions. Both nitrosyl groups on SNDTT (one on each sulfur atom) are required for block, but transfer of these reactive groups to channel cysteine residues is not involved. SNDTT undergoes a slow intramolecular reaction (τ ≈ 770 s) in which these NO groups are liberated, leading to spontaneous reversal of the SNDTT effect. Competition with internal tetraethylammonium indicates that bath-applied SNDTT crosses the cell membrane to act at an internal site, most likely within the channel cavity. Finally, SNDTT is remarkably selective for Kv1 channels. When individually expressed in HEK 293 cells, rat Kv1.1–1.6 display profound time-dependent block by SNDTT, an effect

  10. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions - a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel.

  11. Uncoupling Charge Movement from Channel Opening in Voltage-gated Potassium Channels by Ruthenium Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Ishida, Itzel G.; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E.; Espinosa-Jalapa, Noel; Pérez-Guzmán, José A.; Elías-Viñas, David; Le Lagadec, Ronan; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, León D.

    2011-01-01

    The Kv2.1 channel generates a delayed-rectifier current in neurons and is responsible for modulation of neuronal spike frequency and membrane repolarization in pancreatic β-cells and cardiomyocytes. As with other tetrameric voltage-activated K+-channels, it has been proposed that each of the four Kv2.1 voltage-sensing domains activates independently upon depolarization, leading to a final concerted transition that causes channel opening. The mechanism by which voltage-sensor activation is coupled to the gating of the pore is still not understood. Here we show that the carbon-monoxide releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) is an allosteric inhibitor of the Kv2.1 channel and that its inhibitory properties derive from the CORM-2 ability to largely reduce the voltage dependence of the opening transition, uncoupling voltage-sensor activation from the concerted opening transition. We additionally demonstrate that CORM-2 modulates Shaker K+-channels in a similar manner. Our data suggest that the mechanism of inhibition by CORM-2 may be common to voltage-activated channels and that this compound should be a useful tool for understanding the mechanisms of electromechanical coupling. PMID:21454671

  12. Increase of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels in the heart of type-1 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An impairment of cardiovascular function in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats has been mentioned within 5 days-to-3 months of induction. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are expressed on cardiac sarcolemmal membranes. It is highly responsive to metabolic fluctuations and can have effects on cardiac contractility. The present study attempted to clarify the changes of cardiac KATP channels in diabetic disorders. Methods Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes treated with a high concentration of glucose (a D-glucose concentration of 30 mM was used and cells were cultured for 24 hr) were used to examine the effect of hyperglycemia on cardiac function and the expression of KATP channels. KATP channels expression was found to be linked to cardiac tonic dysfunction, and we evaluated the expression levels of KATP channels by Western blot and Northern blot analysis. Results The result shows diazoxide produced a marked reduction of heart rate in control group. Furthermore, the methods of Northern blotting and Western blotting were employed to identify the gene expression of KATP channel. Two subunits of cardiac KATP channel (SUR2A and kir 6.2) were purchased as indicators and showed significantly decreased in both diabetic rats and high glucose treated rat cardiac myocytes. Correction of hyperglycemia by insulin or phlorizin restored the gene expression of cardiac KATP in these diabetic rats. Conclusions Both mRNA and protein expression of cardiac KATP channels are decreased in diabetic rats induced by STZ for 8 weeks. This phenomenon leads to result in desensitization of some KATP channel drugs. PMID:22257425

  13. Prostacyclin reduces microvascular fluid conductivity in cat skeletal muscle through opening of ATP-dependent potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bentzer, P; Holbeck, S; Grände, P O

    1999-01-01

    Prostacyclin is suggested to reduce microvascular permeability, but the cellular mechanisms mediating this response in the microvascular endothelial cells are still unknown. Considering that prostacyclin relaxes vascular smooth muscle cells via opening of ATP-dependent potassium channels, and opening of ATP-dependent potassium channels in the endothelial cells is suggested to influence microvascular permeability, this study was designed to test (1) if ATP-dependent potassium channels are involved in the regulation of microvascular hydraulic permeability, (2) if the permeability-reducing effect of prostacyclin is mediated through opening of ATP-dependent potassium channels, and (3) if cAMP is involved in this process. An autoperfused cat calf hindlimb was used as experimental model, and microvascular hydraulic permeability (conductivity) was estimated by a capillary filtration coefficient (CFC) technique. The potassium channel opener PCO-400 (0.5 microg x min(-1) per 100 g muscle, intra-arterially), prostacyclin (1 ng x min(-1) per kg body weight, intravenously) and the cAMP analogue dibutyryl-cAMP (24 microg x min(-1) per 100 g muscle, intra-arterially), decreased CFC to 77, 72 and 69% compared to control, respectively (p < 0.01). The decrease in CFC obtained by these substances was completely restituted after the start of a simultaneous infusion of the ATP-dependent potassium channel blocker glibenclamide (6 microg x min(-1) per 100 g muscle, intra-arterially; p < 0.01). Infusion of glibenclamide alone increased CFC to 107% of control (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the ATP-dependent potassium channels contribute to the regulation of microvascular hydraulic conductivity, and the prostacyclin permeability-reducing effect may act through this mechanism via increase in intracellular cAMP. Copyright 1999 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Differential expression of the Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channel family in the rat nephron.

    PubMed

    Carrisoza-Gaytán, Rolando; Salvador, Carolina; Diaz-Bello, Beatriz; Escobar, Laura I

    2014-10-01

    Several potassium (K(+)) channels contribute to maintaining the resting membrane potential of renal epithelial cells. Apart from buffering the cell membrane potential and cell volume, K(+) channels allow sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule (PT), K(+) recycling and K(+) reabsorption in the thick ascending limb (TAL) and K(+) secretion and K(+) reabsorption in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), connecting tubule (CNT) and collecting duct. Previously, we identified Kv.1.1, Kv1.3 and Kv1.6 channels in collecting ducts of the rat inner medulla. We also detected intracellular Kv1.3 channel in the acid secretory intercalated cells, which is trafficked to the apical membrane in response to dietary K(+) to function as a secretory K(+) channel. In this work we sought to characterize the expression of all members of the Kv1 family in the rat nephron. mRNA and protein expression were detected for all Kv1 channels. Immunoblots identified differential expression of each Kv1 in the cortex, outer and inner medulla. Immunofluorescence labeling detected Kv1.5 in Bowman´s capsule and endothelial cells and Kv1.7 in podocytes, endothelial cells and macula densa in glomeruli; Kv1.4, Kv1.5 and Kv1.7 in PT; Kv1.2, Kv1.4 and Kv1.6 in TAL; Kv1.1, Kv1.4 and Kv1.6 in DCT and CNT and Kv1.3 in DCT, and all the Kv1 family in the cortical and medullary collecting ducts. Recently, some hereditary renal syndromes have been attributed to mutations in K(+) channels. Our results expand the repertoire of K(+) channels that contribute to K(+) homeostasis to include the Kv1 family.

  15. Disrupting information coding via block of 4-AP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Krishnan; Urban, Nathaniel N

    2014-09-01

    Recent interest has emerged on the role of intrinsic biophysical diversity in neuronal coding. An important question in neurophysiology is understanding which voltage-gated ion channels are responsible for this diversity and how variable expression or activity of one class of ion channels across neurons of a single type affects they way populations carry information. In mitral cells in the olfactory bulb of mice, we found that biophysical diversity was conferred in part by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-sensitive potassium channels and reduced following block of those channels. When populations of mitral cells were stimulated with identical inputs, the diversity exhibited in their output spike patterns reduced with the addition of 4-AP, decreasing the stimulus information carried by ensembles of 15 neurons from 437 ± 15 to 397 ± 19 bits/s. Decreases in information were due to reduction in the diversity of population spike patterns generated in response to different features of the stimulus, suggesting that the coding capacity of a population can be altered by changes in the function of single ion channel types. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Developmental expression of Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channels in the avian hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Doczi, Megan A; Vitzthum, Carl M; Forehand, Cynthia J

    2016-03-11

    Specialized hypothalamic neurons integrate the homeostatic balance between food intake and energy expenditure, processes that may become dysregulated during the development of diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disorders. Shaker family voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1) contribute to the maintenance of resting membrane potential, action potential characteristics, and neurotransmitter release in many populations of neurons, although hypothalamic Kv1 channel expression has been largely unexplored. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from avian hypothalamic brain slices demonstrate a developmental shift in the electrophysiological properties of avian arcuate nucleus neurons, identifying an increase in outward ionic current that corresponds with action potential maturation. Additionally, RT-PCR experiments identified the early expression of Kv1.2, Kv1.3, and Kv1.5 mRNA in the embryonic avian hypothalamus, suggesting that these channels may underlie the electrophysiological changes observed in these neurons. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis on intact microdissections of embryonic hypothalamic tissue revealed a concomitant increase in Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 gene expression at key electrophysiological time points during development. This study is the first to demonstrate hypothalamic mRNA expression of Kv1 channels in developing avian embryos and may suggest a role for voltage-gated ion channel regulation in the physiological patterning of embryonic hypothalamic circuits governing energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the piracetam induced blockade of opioid effects.

    PubMed

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Nirmal; Jindal, Seema

    2007-12-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of piracetam on morphine/ buprenorphine-induced antinociception in rats and effect of piracetam on morphine or minoxidil induced relaxation in KCl-precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation. Nociceptive threshold was measured by the tail flick test in rats. The cumulative dose responses of morphine or minoxidil were recorded in KCl-precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation. Piracetam attenuated buprenorphine-induced antinociception in rats. Piracetam significantly reduced the morphine and minoxidil induced relaxation in KCl precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation suggesting that piracetam interferes with opioid receptor and ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) opener mediated responses in vitro. Thus, it may be suggested that piracetam attenuates opioid effects by an opioid receptor-KATP channel linked mechanism.

  18. Role of aromatic localization in the gating process of a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Domene, Carmen; Vemparala, Satyavani; Klein, Michael L; Vénien-Bryan, Catherine; Doyle, Declan A

    2006-01-01

    Position of the transmembrane aromatic residues of the KirBac1.1 potassium channel shifts from an even distribution in the closed state toward the membrane/solute interface in the open state model. This is the first example of an integral membrane protein making use of the observed preference for transmembrane aromatic residues to reside at the interfaces. The process of aromatic localization is proposed as a means of directing and stabilizing structural changes during conformational transitions within the transmembrane region of integral membrane proteins. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the open and closed conformers in a membrane environment have been carried out to take account of the interactions between the aromatic residues and the lipids, which may be involved in the conformational change, e.g., the gating of the channel.

  19. Structure of the BK potassium channel in a lipid membrane from electron cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liguo; Sigworth, Fred J

    2009-09-10

    A long-sought goal in structural biology has been the imaging of membrane proteins in their membrane environments. This goal has been achieved with electron crystallography in those special cases where a protein forms highly ordered arrays in lipid bilayers. It has also been achieved by NMR methods in proteins up to 50 kilodaltons (kDa) in size, although milligram quantities of protein and isotopic labelling are required. For structural analysis of large soluble proteins in microgram quantities, an increasingly powerful method that does not require crystallization is single-particle reconstruction from electron microscopy of cryogenically cooled samples (electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM)). Here we report the first single-particle cryo-EM study of a membrane protein, the human large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channel (BK), in a lipid environment. The new method is called random spherically constrained (RSC) single-particle reconstruction. BK channels, members of the six-transmembrane-segment (6TM) ion channel family, were reconstituted at low density into lipid vesicles (liposomes), and their function was verified by a potassium flux assay. Vesicles were also frozen in vitreous ice and imaged in an electron microscope. From images of 8,400 individual protein particles, a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the BK channel and its membrane environment was obtained at a resolution of 1.7-2.0 nm. Not requiring the formation of crystals, the RSC approach promises to be useful in the structural study of many other membrane proteins as well.

  20. Voltage dependent potassium channel remodeling in murine intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Hai; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xin; Meng, Xiang-Min; Wu, Yi-Song; Lu, Hong-Li; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Kim, Young-chul; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2014-01-01

    Partial obstruction of the small intestine causes obvious hypertrophy of smooth muscle cells and motility disorder in the bowel proximate to the obstruction. To identify electric remodeling of hypertrophic smooth muscles in partially obstructed murine small intestine, the patch-clamp and intracellular microelectrode recording methods were used to identify the possible electric remodeling and Western blot, immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were utilized to examine the channel protein expression and phosphorylation level changes in this research. After 14 days of obstruction, partial obstruction caused obvious smooth muscle hypertrophy in the proximally located intestine. The slow waves of intestinal smooth muscles in the dilated region were significantly suppressed, their amplitude and frequency were reduced, whilst the resting membrane potentials were depolarized compared with normal and sham animals. The current density of voltage dependent potassium channel (KV) was significantly decreased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells and the voltage sensitivity of KV activation was altered. The sensitivity of KV currents (IKV) to TEA, a nonselective potassium channel blocker, increased significantly, but the sensitivity of IKv to 4-AP, a KV blocker, stays the same. The protein levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were up-regulated in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cell membrane. The serine and threonine phosphorylation levels of KV4.3 and KV2.2 were significantly increased in the hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Thus this study represents the first identification of KV channel remodeling in murine small intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy induced by partial obstruction. The enhanced phosphorylations of KV4.3 and KV2.2 may be involved in this process.

  1. [Mechanism of potassium channel in hypoxia-ischemic brain edema: experiment with neonatal rat astrocyte].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xue-mei; Xiang, Long; Liao, Da-qing; Feng, Zhi-chun; Mu, De-zhi

    2008-11-04

    To investigate the mechanism of potassium channel in brain edema caused by hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Astrocytes were obtained from 3-day-old SD rats, cultured, and randomly divided into 2 groups: normoxia group, cultured under normoxic condition, and hypoxic-ischemic group, cultured under hypoxic-ischemic condition. The cell volume was measured by radiologic method. Patch-clamp technique was used to observe the electric physiological properties of the voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) in a whole cell configuration, and the change of voltage-gated potassium channel current (IKv) was recorded in cultured neonatal rat astrocyte during HI. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression vector was constructed from pSUPER vector and transfected into the astrocytes (AQP4 RNAi) to construct AQP4 knockdown (AQP4-/-) cells. cellular volume was determined using [3H]-3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake in both AQP4-/- and AQP4+/+ cells under the condition of HI. Real time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of AQP4. The percentages of the AQP4+/+ and AQP4-/- astrocyte volumes in the condition of HI for 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h were 104+/-7, 109+/-6, 126+/-12, and 152+/-9 times, and 97+/-7, 105+/-9, 109+/-7, and 132+/-6 times as those of their corresponding control groups (all P<0.05), thus showing that the cellular volume of both AQP4+/+ and AQP4-/- astrocytes significantly increased during HI and the degrees of edema mediated by AQP4 knockdown at different time points were all significantly milder (all P<0.05). The current density values at the time points 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h of the HI group were 107+/-9, 91+/-10, 76+/-6, 37+/-11, respectively, compared to that of the control group of 116+/-8, showing a tendency of time-dependent decreasing manner (all P<0.05). During HI, the downregulation of outward potassium (K+) conductance may prevent the emission of intracellularly accumulated K+ ions, thus resulting in osmotically derived water influx into astrocytes via

  2. Huntington disease skeletal muscle is hyperexcitable owing to chloride and potassium channel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waters, Christopher W; Varuzhanyan, Grigor; Talmadge, Robert J; Voss, Andrew A

    2013-05-28

    Huntington disease is a progressive and fatal genetic disorder with debilitating motor and cognitive defects. Chorea, rigidity, dystonia, and muscle weakness are characteristic motor defects of the disease that are commonly attributed to central neurodegeneration. However, no previous study has examined the membrane properties that control contraction in Huntington disease muscle. We show primary defects in ex vivo adult skeletal muscle from the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington disease. Action potentials in diseased fibers are more easily triggered and prolonged than in fibers from WT littermates. Furthermore, some action potentials in the diseased fibers self-trigger. These defects occur because of decreases in the resting chloride and potassium conductances. Consistent with this, the expression of the muscle chloride channel, ClC-1, in Huntington disease muscle was compromised by improper splicing and a corresponding reduction in total Clcn1 (gene for ClC-1) mRNA. Additionally, the total Kcnj2 (gene for the Kir2.1 potassium channel) mRNA was reduced in disease muscle. The resulting muscle hyperexcitability causes involuntary and prolonged contractions that may contribute to the chorea, rigidity, and dystonia that characterize Huntington disease.

  3. Potassium channel blockers from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus ().

    PubMed

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Pimenta, Adriano M C; Bougis, Pierre E; De Lima, Maria-Elena

    2016-09-01

    Potassium (K(+)) channels are trans-membrane proteins, which play a key role in cellular excitability and signal transduction pathways. Scorpion toxins blocking the ion-conducting pore from the external side have been invaluable probes to elucidate the structural, functional, and physio-pathological characteristics of these ion channels. This review will focus on the interaction between K(+) channels and their peptide blockers isolated from the venom of the scorpion Tityus serrulatus, which is considered as the most dangerous scorpion in Brazil, in particular in Minas-Gerais State, where many casualties are described each year. The primary mechanisms of action of these K(+) blockers will be discussed in correlation with their structure, very often non-canonical compared to those of other well known K(+) channels blockers purified from other scorpion venoms. Also, special attention will be brought to the most recent data obtained by proteomic and transcriptomic analyses on Tityus serrulatus venoms and venom glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular mechanism underlying ethanol activation of G-protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Bodhinathan, Karthik; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) produces a wide range of pharmacological effects on the nervous system through its actions on ion channels. The molecular mechanism underlying ethanol modulation of ion channels is poorly understood. Here we used a unique method of alcohol-tagging to demonstrate that alcohol activation of a G-protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK or Kir3) channel is mediated by a defined alcohol pocket through changes in affinity for the membrane phospholipid signaling molecule phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Surprisingly, hydrophobicity and size, but not the canonical hydroxyl, were important determinants of alcohol-dependent activation. Altering levels of G protein Gβγ subunits, conversely, did not affect alcohol-dependent activation, suggesting a fundamental distinction between receptor and alcohol gating of GIRK channels. The chemical properties of the alcohol pocket revealed here might extend to other alcohol-sensitive proteins, revealing a unique protein microdomain for targeting alcohol-selective therapeutics in the treatment of alcoholism and addiction. PMID:24145411

  5. Inward rectifier potassium (Kir2.1) channels as end-stage boosters of endothelium-dependent vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Sonkusare, Swapnil K; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Bonev, Adrian D; Nelson, Mark T

    2016-06-15

    Increase in endothelial cell (EC) calcium activates calcium-sensitive intermediate and small conductance potassium (IK and SK) channels, thereby causing hyperpolarization and endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Endothelial cells express inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels, but their role in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation is not clear. In the mesenteric arteries, only ECs, but not smooth muscle cells, displayed Kir currents that were predominantly mediated by the Kir2.1 isoform. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatations in response to muscarinic receptor, TRPV4 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 4) channel and IK/SK channel agonists were highly attenuated by Kir channel inhibitors and by Kir2.1 channel knockdown. These results point to EC Kir channels as amplifiers of vasodilatation in response to increases in EC calcium and IK/SK channel activation and suggest that EC Kir channels could be targeted to treat endothelial dysfunction, which is a hallmark of vascular disorders. Endothelium-dependent vasodilators, such as acetylcholine, increase intracellular Ca(2+) through activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels in the plasma membrane and inositol trisphosphate receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to stimulation of Ca(2+) -sensitive intermediate and small conductance K(+) (IK and SK, respectively) channels. Although strong inward rectifier K(+) (Kir) channels have been reported in the native endothelial cells (ECs) their role in EC-dependent vasodilatation is not clear. Here, we test the idea that Kir channels boost the EC-dependent vasodilatation of resistance-sized arteries. We show that ECs, but not smooth muscle cells, of small mesenteric arteries have Kir currents, which are substantially reduced in EC-specific Kir2.1 knockdown (EC-Kir2.1(-/-) ) mice. Elevation of extracellular K(+) to 14 mm caused vasodilatation of pressurized arteries, which was prevented by endothelial denudation and Kir channel

  6. Human ether-à-go-go gene potassium channels are regulated by EGFR tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Dong, Ming-Qing; Wu, Xing-Gang; Sun, Hai-Ying; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lau, Chu-Pak; Li, Gui-Rong

    2012-02-01

    Human ether á-go-go gene potassium channels (hEAG1 or Kv10.1) are expressed in brain and various human cancers and play a role in neuronal excitement and tumor progression. However, the functional regulation of hEAG channels by signal transduction is not fully understood. The present study was therefore designed to investigate whether hEAG1 channels are regulated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in HEK 293 cells stably expressing hEAG1 gene using whole-cell patch voltage-clamp, immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and mutagenesis approaches. We found that the selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitor AG556 (10 μM), but not the platelet growth factor receptor (PDGFR) kinase inhibitor AG1295 (10 μM) or the Src-family inhibitor PP2 (10 μM), can inhibit hEAG1 current, and the inhibitory effect can be reversed by the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor orthovanadate. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation level of hEAG1 channels was reduced by AG556, and the reduction was significantly countered by orthovanadate. The hEAG1 mutants Y90A, Y344A and Y485A, but not Y376A and Y479A, exhibited reduced response to AG556. Interestingly, the inhibition effect of AG556 was lost in triple mutant hEAG1 channels at Y90, Y344, and Y485 with alanine. These results demonstrate for the first time that hEAG1 channel activity is regulated by EGFR kinase at the tyrosine residues Tyr90, Try344, and Try485. This effect is likely involved in regulating neuronal activity and/or tumor growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential role of potassium and chloride channels in regulation of silymarin-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonjong; Lee, Dong Gun

    2018-03-01

    Silymarin, which is derived from the seeds of Silybum marianum, has been widely used to prevent and treat liver diseases. In our previous study, we reported that at concentrations above the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), silymarin exhibited antifungal activity against Candida albicans by targeting its plasma membrane. However, the antifungal mechanism at concentration below the MIC remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to determine the underlying mechanism of antifungal effects of silymarin at concentration below the MIC. To evaluate the inhibitory effects on the ion channels, C. albicans cells were separately pretreated with potassium and chloride channel blockers. The antifungal activity of silymarin at sub-MIC was affected by the ion channel blockers. Potassium channel blockade inhibited the antifungal effects, whereas chloride channel blockade slightly enhanced these effects. Subsequently, we found that silymarin induced disturbances in calcium homeostasis via the cytosolic and mitochondrial accumulation of calcium. Furthermore, apoptotic responses, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), DNA damage, and caspase activation were induced in response to silymarin treatment. The increases in intracellular calcium level and pro-apoptotic changes were prevented when potassium ion channels were blocked. In contrast, these changes were enhanced upon chloride channels blockade; however, this did not affect the intracellular calcium levels and MMP loss. Thus, we showed that silymarin treatment at concentration below the MIC induced apoptosis in C. albicans; additionally, ion channels contributed these effects. © 2018 IUBMB Life, 70(3):197-206, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel holds the key to the conundrum of familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jo; Kang, Sun-Yang; Yi, Jin Woong; Kim, Seung-Min

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is an autosomal dominant channelopathy characterized by episodic attacks of muscle weakness and hypokalemia. Mutations in the calcium channel gene, CACNA1S, or the sodium channel gene, SCN4A, have been found to be responsible for HOKPP; however, the mechanism that causes hypokalemia remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to improve the understanding of this mechanism by investigating the expression of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channel genes in HOKPP patients. Methods We measured the intracellular calcium concentration with fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester in skeletal muscle cells of HOKPP patients and healthy individuals. We examined the mRNA and protein expression of KCa channel genes (KCNMA1, KCNN1, KCNN2, KCNN3, and KCNN4) in both cell types. Results Patient cells exhibited higher cytosolic calcium levels than normal cells. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the mRNA levels of the KCa channel genes did not significantly differ between patient and normal cells. However, western blot analysis showed that protein levels of the KCNMA1 gene, which encodes KCa1.1 channels (also called big potassium channels), were significantly lower in the membrane fraction and higher in the cytosolic fraction of patient cells than normal cells. When patient cells were exposed to 50 mM potassium buffer, which was used to induce depolarization, the altered subcellular distribution of BK channels remained unchanged. Conclusion These findings suggest a novel mechanism for the development of hypokalemia and paralysis in HOKPP and demonstrate a connection between disease-associated mutations in calcium/sodium channels and pathogenic changes in nonmutant potassium channels. PMID:25379045

  9. Modeling the concentration-dependent permeation modes of the KcsA potassium ion channel.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Peter Hugo

    2003-12-01

    The potassium channel from Streptomyces lividans (KcsA) is an integral membrane protein with sequence similarity to all known potassium channels, particularly in the selectivity filter region. A recently proposed model for ion channels containing either n or (n-1) single-file ions in their selectivity filters [P. H. Nelson, J. Chem. Phys. 177, 11396 (2002)] is applied to published KcsA channel K+ permeation data that exhibit a high-affinity process at low concentrations and a low-affinity process at high concentrations [M. LeMasurier et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 118, 303 (2001)]. The kinetic model is shown to provide a reasonable first-order explanation for both the high- and low-concentration permeation modes observed experimentally. The low-concentration mode ([K+]<200 mM) has a 200-mV dissociation constant of 56 mM and a conductance of 88 pS. The high-concentration mode ([K+]>200 mM) has a 200-mV dissociation constant of 1100 mM and a conductance of 500 pS. Based on the permeation model, and x-ray analysis [J. H. Morais-Cabral et al., Nature (London) 414, 37 (2001)], it is suggested that the experimentally observed K+ permeation modes correspond to an n=3 mechanism at high concentrations and an n=2 mechanism at low concentrations. The ratio of the electrical dissociation distances for the high- and low-concentration modes is 3:2, also consistent with the proposed n=3 and n=2 modes. Model predictions for K+ channels that exhibit asymmetric current-voltage (I-V) curves are presented, and further validation of the kinetic model via molecular simulation and experiment is discussed. The qualitatively distinct I-V characteristics exhibited experimentally by Tl+, NH+4, and Rb+ ions at 100 mM concentration can also be explained using the model, but more extensive experimental tests are required for quantitative validation of the model predictions.

  10. NMDA receptors mediate leptin signaling and regulate potassium channel trafficking in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Fortin, Dale A; Cochrane, Veronica A; Chen, Pei-Chun; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2017-09-15

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are Ca 2+ -permeant, ligand-gated ion channels activated by the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and have well-characterized roles in the nervous system. The expression and function of NMDARs in pancreatic β-cells, by contrast, are poorly understood. Here, we report a novel function of NMDARs in β-cells. Using a combination of biochemistry, electrophysiology, and imaging techniques, we now show that NMDARs have a key role in mediating the effect of leptin to modulate β-cell electrical activity by promoting AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent trafficking of K ATP and Kv2.1 channels to the plasma membrane. Blocking NMDAR activity inhibited the ability of leptin to activate AMPK, induce K ATP and Kv2.1 channel trafficking, and promote membrane hyperpolarization. Conversely, activation of NMDARs mimicked the effect of leptin, causing Ca 2+ influx, AMPK activation, and increased trafficking of K ATP and Kv2.1 channels to the plasma membrane, and triggered membrane hyperpolarization. Moreover, leptin potentiated NMDAR currents and triggered NMDAR-dependent Ca 2+ influx. Importantly, NMDAR-mediated signaling was observed in rat insulinoma 832/13 cells and in human β-cells, indicating that this pathway is conserved across species. The ability of NMDARs to regulate potassium channel surface expression and thus, β-cell excitability provides mechanistic insight into the recently reported insulinotropic effects of NMDAR antagonists and therefore highlights the therapeutic potential of these drugs in managing type 2 diabetes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Novel Bayesian classification models for predicting compounds blocking hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-li; Lu, Jing; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Ming-yue; Luo, Xiao-min; Zhu, Wei-liang; Jiang, Hua-liang; Chen, Kai-xian

    2014-08-01

    A large number of drug-induced long QT syndromes are ascribed to blockage of hERG potassium channels. The aim of this study was to construct novel computational models to predict compounds blocking hERG channels. Doddareddy's hERG blockage data containing 2644 compounds were used, which divided into training (2389) and test (255) sets. Laplacian-corrected Bayesian classification models were constructed using Discovery Studio. The models were internally validated with the training set of compounds, and then applied to the test set for validation. Doddareddy's experimentally validated dataset with 60 compounds was used for external test set validation. A Bayesian classification model considering the effects of four molecular properties (Mw, PPSA, ALogP and pKa_basic) as well as extended-connectivity fingerprints (ECFP_14) exhibited a global accuracy (91%), parameter sensitivity (90%) and specificity (92%) in the test set validation, and a global accuracy (58%), parameter sensitivity (61%) and specificity (57%) in the external test set validation. The novel model is better than those in the literatures for predicting compounds blocking hERG channels, and can be used for large-scale prediction.

  12. Novel Bayesian classification models for predicting compounds blocking hERG potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-li; Lu, Jing; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Ming-yue; Luo, Xiao-min; Zhu, Wei-liang; Jiang, Hua-liang; Chen, Kai-xian

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A large number of drug-induced long QT syndromes are ascribed to blockage of hERG potassium channels. The aim of this study was to construct novel computational models to predict compounds blocking hERG channels. Methods: Doddareddy's hERG blockage data containing 2644 compounds were used, which divided into training (2389) and test (255) sets. Laplacian-corrected Bayesian classification models were constructed using Discovery Studio. The models were internally validated with the training set of compounds, and then applied to the test set for validation. Doddareddy's experimentally validated dataset with 60 compounds was used for external test set validation. Results: A Bayesian classification model considering the effects of four molecular properties (Mw, PPSA, ALogP and pKa_basic) as well as extended-connectivity fingerprints (ECFP_14) exhibited a global accuracy (91%), parameter sensitivity (90%) and specificity (92%) in the test set validation, and a global accuracy (58%), parameter sensitivity (61%) and specificity (57%) in the external test set validation. Conclusion: The novel model is better than those in the literatures for predicting compounds blocking hERG channels, and can be used for large-scale prediction. PMID:24976154

  13. New mutation of the Na channel in the severe form of potassium-aggravated myotonia.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Masanobu; Sasaki, Ryogen; Aoike, Futoshi; Takahashi, Masanori P; Sakoda, Saburo; Hirose, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-01

    Myotonia manifests in several hereditary diseases, including hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP), paramyotonia congenita (PMC), and potassium-aggravated myotonia (PAM). These are allelic disorders originating from missense mutations in the gene that codes the skeletal muscle sodium channel, Nav1.4. Moreover, a severe form of PAM has been designated as myotonia permanens. A new mutation of Nav1.4, Q1633E, was identified in a Japanese family presenting with the PAM phenotype. The proband suffered from cyanotic attacks during infancy. The mutated amino acid residue is located on the EF-hand calcium-binding motif in the intracellular C-terminus. A functional analysis of the mutant channel using the voltage-clamp method revealed disruption of fast inactivation, a slower rate of current decay, and a depolarized shift in the voltage dependence of availability. This study has identified a new mutation of PAM with a severe phenotype and emphasizes the importance of the C-terminus for fast inactivation of the sodium channel. Muscle Nerve 39: 666-673, 2009.

  14. Molecular interactions involved in proton-dependent gating in KcsA potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Posson, David J.; Thompson, Ameer N.; McCoy, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial potassium channel KcsA is gated open by the binding of protons to amino acids on the intracellular side of the channel. We have identified, via channel mutagenesis and x-ray crystallography, two pH-sensing amino acids and a set of nearby residues involved in molecular interactions that influence gating. We found that the minimal mutation of one histidine (H25) and one glutamate (E118) near the cytoplasmic gate completely abolished pH-dependent gating. Mutation of nearby residues either alone or in pairs altered the channel’s response to pH. In addition, mutations of certain pairs of residues dramatically increased the energy barriers between the closed and open states. We proposed a Monod–Wyman–Changeux model for proton binding and pH-dependent gating in KcsA, where H25 is a “strong” sensor displaying a large shift in pKa between closed and open states, and E118 is a “weak” pH sensor. Modifying model parameters that are involved in either the intrinsic gating equilibrium or the pKa values of the pH-sensing residues was sufficient to capture the effects of all mutations. PMID:24218397

  15. The involvement of potassium channel ORK1 in short-term memory and sleep in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Yabin; Ren, Qingguo; Zhou, Hong

    2017-07-01

    The sleep and cognitive dysfunction are common in major depressive disorders (MDDs). Recently, the 2-pore domain potassium channel twik-related K(+) channel 1 (TREK-1) has been identified to be closely related to the etiology of MDD. However, whether TREK-1 is involved in the regulation of sleep and cognition is still unknown. The present study tried to dissect the role of outwardly rectifying K+ channel-1 (ORK1) (TREK-1 homolog in Drosophila) in sleep and cognition in Drosophila. The mutant and over-expressed lines of ork1 were generated using Drosophila genetics. Sleep analysis and short-term memory experiments were used to test sleep time and short-term memory of the mutant and over-expressed ORK1 lines, respectively. Our results showed that the learning index of ork1 mutant lines was increased compared with the wild type. However, ork1 mutant could obviously decrease sleep time in Drosophila. Contrary to the ork1 mutant lines, we also found that ORK1 over-expression could increase sleep time and decreased learning index in Drosophila. Results from this study suggest that ORK1 might play an important role in the regulation of sleep time and short-term memory in Drosophila.

  16. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes suppress potassium channel activities in PC12 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haifei; Bai, Juan; Meng, Jie; Hao, Wei; Xu, Haiyan; Cao, Ji-Min

    2009-07-01

    The advancement in nanotechnology has produced technological and conceptual breakthroughs but the effects nanomaterials have on organisms at the cellular level are poorly understood. Here we report that carboxyl-terminated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) act as antagonists of three types of potassium channels as assessed by whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology on undifferentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Our results showed that carboxyl-terminated MWCNTs suppress the current densities of Ito, IK and IK1 in a time-dependent and irreversible manner. The suppressions were most distinct 24 h after incubation with MWCNTs. However, MWCNTs did not significantly change the expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or intracellular free calcium and also did not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in PC12 cells. These results suggest that oxidative stress was not involved in the MWCNTs suppression of Ito, IK and IK1 current densities. Nonetheless, the suppression of potassium currents by MWCNTs will impact on electrical signaling of excitable cells such as neurons and muscles.

  17. Forced gating motions by a substituted titratable side chain at the bundle crossing of a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Anu; Shao, Evan S; Kim, Robin Y; Vilin, Yury Y; Huang, Xinyang; Yang, Runying; Kurata, Harley T

    2011-10-21

    Numerous inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels possess an aromatic residue in the helix bundle crossing region, forming the narrowest pore constriction in crystal structures. However, the role of the Kir channel bundle crossing as a functional gate remains uncertain. We report a unique phenotype of Kir6.2 channels mutated to encode glutamate at this position (F168E). Despite a prediction of four glutamates in close proximity, Kir6.2(F168E) channels are predominantly closed at physiological pH, whereas alkalization causes rapid and reversible channel activation. These findings suggest that F168E glutamates are uncharged at physiological pH but become deprotonated at alkaline pH, forcing channel opening due to mutual repulsion of nearby negatively charged side chains. The potassium channel pore scaffold likely brings these glutamates close together, causing a significant pK(a) shift relative to the free side chain (as seen in the KcsA selectivity filter). Alkalization also shifts the apparent ATP sensitivity of the channel, indicating that forced motion of the bundle crossing is coupled to the ATP-binding site and may resemble conformational changes involved in wild-type Kir6.2 gating. The study demonstrates a novel mechanism for engineering extrinsic control of channel gating by pH and shows that conformational changes in the bundle crossing region are involved in ligand-dependent gating of Kir channels.

  18. Optical, Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Potassium Metal Loaded into Channel-Type Zeolite L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan Thi, Pham; Nakano, Takehito; Sakamoto, Yasuhiro; Nozue, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Potassium metal was loaded into K-form zeolite L crystals which have one-dimensional (1D) main-channels with an inside diameter of ≈1 nm. The loading density of K atoms per unit cell, n, was changed from 0 to 9.6. Optical, electrical and magnetic properties were measured for the powders of K-loaded zeolite L crystals. A resonant optical absorption-reflection band is observed at ≈1.1 eV in all K-loaded samples. Another reflection band at ≈1.8 eV appears at n ⪆ 5. The 1.1 and 1.8 eV bands are assigned to the respective excitations from 1s to 1p and from 1p to 1d states of s-electrons confined in main-channels. A mid-infrared absorption around 0.3 eV is observed at n ⪆ 3 and increases with n. This absorption is assigned to a Drude term of s-electrons. A temperature-dependent semiconducting resistivity is observed at 3 ≤ssapprox n ≤ssapprox 9. A nearly metallic resistivity is observed at 9 ≤ssapprox n. The semiconducting and metallic resistivities are assigned to the polaron hopping between main-channels and the three-dimensional (3D) band conduction, respectively. A temperature independent spin-susceptibility is extracted from the integrated intensity of ESR signal, and increases at n ⪆ 5. This term is assigned to the Pauli paramagnetism. These properties are interpreted in terms of an insulating state of 1s and 1p states at n ≤ssapprox 5, a 1D metallic state of 1s and 1p states at 5 ≤ssapprox n ≤ssapprox 9 and a 3D metallic state of 1d state at 9 ≤ssapprox n for s-electrons in the bundle of main-channels.

  19. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P.; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation. PMID:25825713

  20. Glioma Big Potassium Channel Expression in Human Cancers and Possible T Cell Epitopes for Their Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lisheng; Hoa, Neil T.; Cornforth, Andrew N.; Bota, Daniela A.; Mai, Anthony; Kim, Dong In; Chiou, Shiun-Kwei; Hickey, Michelle J.; Kruse, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Big potassium (BK) ion channels have several spliced variants. One spliced variant initially described within human glioma cells is the glioma BK (gBK) channel. This isoform consists of 34 aa inserted into the intracellular region of the basic BK ion channel. PCR primers specific for this inserted region confirmed that human glioma cell lines and freshly resected surgical tissues from glioblastoma multiforme patients strongly expressed gBK mRNA. Normal human brain tissue very weakly expressed this transcript. An Ab specific for this gBK isoform confirmed that human glioma cells displayed this protein in the cell membrane, mitochondria, Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum. Within the gBK region, two putative epitopes (gBK1 and gBK2) are predicted to bind to the HLA-A*0201 molecule. HLA-A*0201–restricted human CTLs were generated in vitro using gBK peptide-pulsed dendritic cells. Both gBK1 and gBK2 peptide-specific CTLs killed HLA-A2+/gBK+ gliomas, but they failed to kill non-HLA-A2–expressing but gBK+ target cells in cytolytic assays. T2 cells loaded with exogenous gBK peptides, but not with the influenza M1 control peptide, were only killed by their respective CTLs. The gBK-specific CTLs also killed a variety of other HLA-A*0201+ cancer cells that possess gBK, as well as HLA-A2+ HEK cells transfected with the gBK gene. Of clinical relevance, we found that T cells derived from glioblastoma multiforme patients that were sensitized to the gBK peptide could also kill target cells expressing gBK. This study shows that peptides derived from cancer-associated ion channels maybe useful targets for T cell-mediated immunotherapy. PMID:22844111

  1. Use of optical biosensors to detect modulation of Slack potassium channels by G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Matthew R; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2009-01-01

    Ion channels control the electrical properties of neurons and other excitable cell types by selectively allowing ion to flow through the plasma membrane. To regulate neuronal excitability, the biophysical properties of ion channels are modified by signaling proteins and molecules, which often bind to the channels themselves to form a heteromeric channel complex. Traditional assays examining the interaction between channels and regulatory proteins generally provide little information on the time-course of interactions in living cells. We have now used a novel label-free technology to detect changes in the distribution of mass close to the plasma membrane following modulation of potassium channels by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This technology uses optical sensors embedded in microplates to detect changes in the refractive index at the surface of cells. Although the activation of GPCRs has been studied with this system, protein-protein interactions due to modulation of ion channels have not yet been characterized. Here we present data that the characteristic pattern of mass distribution following GPCR activation is significantly modified by the presence of a sodium-activated potassium channel, Slack-B, a channel that is known to be potently modulated by activation of these receptors.

  2. Students' Understanding of External Representations of the Potassium Ion Channel Protein Part II: Structure-Function Relationships and Fragmented Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This study focuses on students' understanding of three external representations (ribbon diagram, wireframe, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic) of the potassium ion channel protein. Analysis…

  3. Comparative effects of copper sulfate or potassium permanganate on channel catfish concurrently infected with Flavobacterium columnare and Ichthyobodo necator

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An opportunistic study was conducted to determine the effects of two chemical therapeutants on channel catfish (CCF) Ictalurus punctatus concurrently infected Flavobacterium columnare and Ichthyobodo necator. Copper sulfate (CuSO4) and potassium permanganate (KMnO4) were investigated for their abil...

  4. [Effect of G protein in the dual regulation of opioid receptor agonist on the delayed rectified potassium channels].

    PubMed

    Ye, Cai-ying; Li, Qing-xia; Yu, Xiao-li; Qi, Jing-jing; Li, Juan; Zhang, De-chang

    2003-06-01

    To observe the role of G protein in the dual regulation of opioid receptor agonist on the delayed rectified potassium channels. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques applied to NG108-15 cells, investigate the effect of opioid receptor agonist on the delayed rectified potassium channels by administration of Guanosine-5'-0'-2-thiociphosphate (GDP beta S), Pertusis Toxin (PTX), Tetroacetic acid nueleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) and Adenosine-3' 5' cyclic monophosphate cAMP in the pipette solution. (1) GDP beta S could block the changes induced by both high and low concentration of (D-Pen2.5)-enkephalin (DPDPE) (P < 0.05). (2) PTX could inhibit the excitative regulation on K+ channel by high concentration of DPDPE (P < 0.05). But CTX had no effect on K+ channel caused by DPDPE. (3) UDP could block the excitative effect of K+ channel by high concentration of NDPK, while have no changes on the inhibitory effect caused by low concentration of opioid agonists. (4) cAMP took part in the regulation in high concentration of agonist administration (P < 0.05), while no changes for low concentration of agonists. Dual changes were observed on delayed rectifier potassium channel by agonist treatment on NG108-15 cells. The excitative effect was Gi/o coupled in high concentration of agonist incubation, related to cAMP. While the inhibitory effect was possibly induced by G protein beta gamma subunit directly.

  5. Targeting potassium channels for increasing delivery of imaging agents and therapeutics to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Khaitan, Divya; Ningaraj, Nagendra S

    2013-01-01

    Every year in the US, 20,000 new primary and nearly 200,000 metastatic brain tumor cases are reported. The cerebral microvessels/capillaries that form the blood-brain barrier not only protect the brain from toxic agents in the blood but also pose a significant hindrance to the delivery of small and large therapeutic molecules. Different strategies have been employed to circumvent the physiological barrier posed by blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). Studies in our laboratory have identified significant differences in the expression levels of certain genes and proteins between normal and brain tumor capillary endothelial cells (ECs). In this study, we validated the non-invasive and clinically relevant dynamic contrast enhancing-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) method with invasive, clinically irrelevant but highly accurate quantitative autoradiography method using rat glioma model. We also showed that DCE-MRI metric of tissue vessel perfusion-permeability is sensitive to changes in blood vessel permeability following administration of calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channel activator NS-1619. Our results show that human gliomas and brain tumor ECs that overexpress BKCa channels can be targeted for increased BTB permeability for MRI enhancing agents to brain tumors. We conclude that monitoring the outcome of increased MRI enhancing agents' delivery to microsatellites and leading tumor edges in glioma patients would lead to beneficial clinical outcome.

  6. Dynamic memory of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel: A stochastic nonequilibrium thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Kinshuk, E-mail: kbpchem@gmail.com

    2015-05-14

    In this work, we have studied the stochastic response of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel to a periodic external voltage that keeps the system out-of-equilibrium. The system exhibits memory, resulting from time-dependent driving, that is reflected in terms of dynamic hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. The hysteresis loop area has a maximum at some intermediate voltage frequency and disappears in the limits of low and high frequencies. However, the (average) dissipation at long-time limit increases and finally goes to saturation with rising frequency. This raises the question: how diminishing hysteresis can be associated with growing dissipation? To answer this,more » we have studied the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system and analyzed different thermodynamic functions which also exhibit hysteresis. Interestingly, by applying a temporal symmetry analysis in the high-frequency limit, we have analytically shown that hysteresis in some of the periodic responses of the system does not vanish. On the contrary, the rates of free energy and internal energy change of the system as well as the rate of dissipative work done on the system show growing hysteresis with frequency. Hence, although the current-voltage hysteresis disappears in the high-frequency limit, the memory of the ion channel is manifested through its specific nonequilibrium thermodynamic responses.« less

  7. Overexpression of the potassium channel TPKb in small vacuoles confers osmotic and drought tolerance to rice.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Izhar; Devonshire, Jean; Mohamed, Radwa; Schultze, Michael; Maathuis, Frans J M

    2016-02-01

    Potassium (K(+) ) is the most important cationic nutrient for all living organisms. Vacuolar two-pore K(+) (TPK) channels are important players in the regulation of cellular levels of K(+) but have not been characterised in rice. In order to assess the role of OsTPKb, a K(+) selective ion channel predominantly expressed in the tonoplast of small vacuoles, we generated overexpressing (OX) lines using a constitutive promoter and compared their phenotypes with control plants. Relative to control plants, OX lines showed better growth when exposed to low-K(+) or water stress conditions. K(+) uptake was greater in OX lines which may be driven by increased AKT1 and HAK1 activity. The enhanced K(+) uptake led to tissue K(+) levels that were raised in roots and shoots. Furthermore, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses showed a higher cytoplasm: vacuole K(+) ratio which is likely to contribute to the increased stress tolerance. In all, the data suggest that TPKb can alter the K(+) status of small vacuoles, which is important for general cellular K(+) homeostasis which, in turn, affects stress tolerance. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Conserved Single Residue in the BK Potassium Channel Required for Activation by Alcohol and Intoxication in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Scott J.; Scott, Luisa L.; Hu, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol directly modulates the BK potassium channel to alter behaviors in species ranging from invertebrates to humans. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, mutations that eliminate the BK channel, SLO-1, convey dramatic resistance to intoxication by ethanol. We hypothesized that certain conserved amino acids are critical for ethanol modulation, but not for basal channel function. To identify such residues, we screened C. elegans strains with different missense mutations in the SLO-1 channel. A strain with the SLO-1 missense mutation T381I in the RCK1 domain was highly resistant to intoxication. This mutation did not interfere with other BK channel-dependent behaviors, suggesting that the mutant channel retained normal in vivo function. Knock-in of wild-type versions of the worm or human BK channel rescued intoxication and other BK channel-dependent behaviors in a slo-1-null mutant background. In contrast, knock-in of the worm T381I or equivalent human T352I mutant BK channel selectively rescued BK channel-dependent behaviors while conveying resistance to intoxication. Single-channel patch-clamp recordings confirmed that the human BK channel engineered with the T352I missense mutation was insensitive to activation by ethanol, but otherwise had normal conductance, potassium selectivity, and only subtle differences in voltage dependence. Together, our behavioral and electrophysiological results demonstrate that the T352I mutation selectively disrupts ethanol modulation of the BK channel. The T352I mutation may alter a binding site for ethanol and/or interfere with ethanol-induced conformational changes that are critical for behavioral responses to ethanol. PMID:25031399

  9. Conducting-state properties of the KcsA potassium channel from molecular and Brownian dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Shin-Ho; Allen, Toby W; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying transport of ions across the potassium channel are examined using electrostatic calculations and three-dimensional Brownian dynamics simulations. We first build open-state configurations of the channel with molecular dynamics simulations, by pulling the transmembrane helices outward until the channel attains the desired interior radius. To gain insights into ion permeation, we construct potential energy profiles experienced by an ion traversing the channel in the presence of other resident ions. These profiles reveal that in the absence of an applied field the channel accommodates three potassium ions in a stable equilibrium, two in the selectivity filter and one in the central cavity. In the presence of a driving potential, this three-ion state becomes unstable, and ion permeation across the channel is observed. These qualitative explanations are confirmed by the results of three-dimensional Brownian dynamics simulations. We find that the channel conducts when the ionizable residues near the extracellular entrance are fully charged and those near the intracellular side are partially charged. The conductance increases steeply as the radius of the intracellular mouth of the channel is increased from 2 A to 5 A. Our simulation results reproduce several experimental observations, including the current-voltage curves, conductance-concentration relationships, and outward rectification of currents. PMID:11806907

  10. SP protects cerebellar granule cells against beta-amyloid-induced apoptosis by down-regulation and reduced activity of Kv4 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Pieri, M; Amadoro, G; Carunchio, I; Ciotti, M T; Quaresima, S; Florenzano, F; Calissano, P; Possenti, R; Zona, C; Severini, C

    2010-01-01

    The tachykinin endecapeptide substance P (SP) has been demonstrated to exert a functional role in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aim of the present study was to evaluate the SP neuroprotective potential against apoptosis induced by the neurotoxic beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). We found that SP protects CGCs against both A beta(25-35)- and A beta(1-42)-induced apoptotic CGCs death as revealed by live/dead cell assay, Hoechst staining and caspase(s)-induced PARP-1 cleavage, through an Akt-dependent mechanism. Since in CGCs the fast inactivating or A-type K(+) current (I(KA)) was potentiated by A beta treatment through up-regulation of Kv4 subunits, we investigated whether I(KA) and the related potassium channel subunits could be involved in the SP anti-apoptotic activity. Patch-clamp experiments showed that the A beta-induced increase of I(KA) current amplitude was reversed by SP treatment. In addition, as revealed by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence studies, SP prevented the up-regulation of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 channel subunits expression. These results indicate that SP plays a role in the regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels in A beta-mediated neuronal death and may represent a new approach in the understanding and treatment of AD.

  11. Eliciting renal failure in mosquitoes with a small-molecule inhibitor of inward-rectifying potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Raphemot, Rene; Rouhier, Matthew F; Hopkins, Corey R; Gogliotti, Rocco D; Lovell, Kimberly M; Hine, Rebecca M; Ghosalkar, Dhairyasheel; Longo, Anthony; Beyenbach, Klaus W; Denton, Jerod S; Piermarini, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever take a large toll on global health. The primary chemical agents used for controlling mosquitoes are insecticides that target the nervous system. However, the emergence of resistance in mosquito populations is reducing the efficacy of available insecticides. The development of new insecticides is therefore urgent. Here we show that VU573, a small-molecule inhibitor of mammalian inward-rectifying potassium (Kir) channels, inhibits a Kir channel cloned from the renal (Malpighian) tubules of Aedes aegypti (AeKir1). Injection of VU573 into the hemolymph of adult female mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti) disrupts the production and excretion of urine in a manner consistent with channel block of AeKir1 and renders the mosquitoes incapacitated (flightless or dead) within 24 hours. Moreover, the toxicity of VU573 in mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti) is exacerbated when hemolymph potassium levels are elevated, suggesting that Kir channels are essential for maintenance of whole-animal potassium homeostasis. Our study demonstrates that renal failure is a promising mechanism of action for killing mosquitoes, and motivates the discovery of selective small-molecule inhibitors of mosquito Kir channels for use as insecticides.

  12. Eliciting Renal Failure in Mosquitoes with a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Inward-Rectifying Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Raphemot, Rene; Rouhier, Matthew F.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Gogliotti, Rocco D.; Lovell, Kimberly M.; Hine, Rebecca M.; Ghosalkar, Dhairyasheel; Longo, Anthony; Beyenbach, Klaus W.; Denton, Jerod S.; Piermarini, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever take a large toll on global health. The primary chemical agents used for controlling mosquitoes are insecticides that target the nervous system. However, the emergence of resistance in mosquito populations is reducing the efficacy of available insecticides. The development of new insecticides is therefore urgent. Here we show that VU573, a small-molecule inhibitor of mammalian inward-rectifying potassium (Kir) channels, inhibits a Kir channel cloned from the renal (Malpighian) tubules of Aedes aegypti (AeKir1). Injection of VU573 into the hemolymph of adult female mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti) disrupts the production and excretion of urine in a manner consistent with channel block of AeKir1 and renders the mosquitoes incapacitated (flightless or dead) within 24 hours. Moreover, the toxicity of VU573 in mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti) is exacerbated when hemolymph potassium levels are elevated, suggesting that Kir channels are essential for maintenance of whole-animal potassium homeostasis. Our study demonstrates that renal failure is a promising mechanism of action for killing mosquitoes, and motivates the discovery of selective small-molecule inhibitors of mosquito Kir channels for use as insecticides. PMID:23734226

  13. Glucose sensitivity of mouse olfactory bulb neurons is conveyed by a voltage-gated potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal; Cho, Sukhee; Thiebaud, Nicolas; Henderson, Michael X; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2013-01-01

    The olfactory bulb has recently been proposed to serve as a metabolic sensor of internal chemistry, particularly that modified by metabolism. Because the voltage-dependent potassium channel Kv1.3 regulates a large proportion of the outward current in olfactory bulb neurons and gene-targeted deletion of the protein produces a phenotype of resistance to diet-induced obesity in mice, we hypothesized that this channel may play a role in translating energy availability into a metabolic signal. Here we explored the ability of extracellular glucose concentration to modify evoked excitability of the mitral neurons that principally regulate olfactory coding and processing of olfactory information. Using voltage-clamp electrophysiology of heterologously expressed Kv1.3 channels in HEK 293 cells, we found that Kv1.3 macroscopic currents responded to metabolically active (d-) rather than inactive (l-) glucose with a response profile that followed a bell-shaped curve. Olfactory bulb slices stimulated with varying glucose concentrations showed glucose-dependent mitral cell excitability as evaluated by current-clamp electrophysiology. While glucose could be either excitatory or inhibitory, the majority of the sampled neurons displayed a decreased firing frequency in response to elevated glucose concentration that was linked to increased latency to first spike and decreased action potential cluster length. Unlike modulation attributed to phosphorylation, glucose modulation of mitral cells was rapid, less than one minute, and was reversible within the time course of a patch recording. Moreover, we report that modulation targets properties of spike firing rather than action potential shape, involves synaptic activity of glutamate or GABA signalling circuits, and is dependent upon Kv1.3 expression. Given the rising incidence of metabolic disorders attributed to weight gain, changes in neuronal excitability in brain regions regulating sensory perception of food are of consequence

  14. Big conductance calcium-activated potassium channel openers control spasticity without sedation.

    PubMed

    Baker, David; Pryce, Gareth; Visintin, Cristina; Sisay, Sofia; Bondarenko, Alexander I; Vanessa Ho, W S; Jackson, Samuel J; Williams, Thomas E; Al-Izki, Sarah; Sevastou, Ioanna; Okuyama, Masahiro; Graier, Wolfgang F; Stevenson, Lesley A; Tanner, Carolyn; Ross, Ruth; Pertwee, Roger G; Henstridge, Christopher M; Irving, Andrew J; Schulman, Jesse; Powell, Keith; Baker, Mark D; Giovannoni, Gavin; Selwood, David L

    2017-08-01

    Our initial aim was to generate cannabinoid agents that control spasticity, occurring as a consequence of multiple sclerosis (MS), whilst avoiding the sedative side effects associated with cannabis. VSN16R was synthesized as an anandamide (endocannabinoid) analogue in an anti-metabolite approach to identify drugs that target spasticity. Following the initial chemistry, a variety of biochemical, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches, using isolated cells, tissue-based assays and in vivo animal models, were used to demonstrate the activity, efficacy, pharmacokinetics and mechanism of action of VSN16R. Toxicological and safety studies were performed in animals and humans. VSN16R had nanomolar activity in tissue-based, functional assays and dose-dependently inhibited spasticity in a mouse experimental encephalomyelitis model of MS. This effect occurred with over 1000-fold therapeutic window, without affecting normal muscle tone. Efficacy was achieved at plasma levels that are feasible and safe in humans. VSN16R did not bind to known CB 1 /CB 2 /GPPR55 cannabinoid-related receptors in receptor-based assays but acted on a vascular cannabinoid target. This was identified as the major neuronal form of the big conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK Ca ) channel. Drug-induced opening of neuronal BK Ca channels induced membrane hyperpolarization, limiting excessive neural-excitability and controlling spasticity. We identified the neuronal form of the BK Ca channel as the target for VSN16R and demonstrated that its activation alleviates neuronal excitability and spasticity in an experimental model of MS, revealing a novel mechanism to control spasticity. VSN16R is a potential, safe and selective ligand for controlling neural hyper-excitability in spasticity. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Big conductance calcium‐activated potassium channel openers control spasticity without sedation

    PubMed Central

    Pryce, Gareth; Visintin, Cristina; Sisay, Sofia; Bondarenko, Alexander I; Vanessa Ho, W S; Jackson, Samuel J; Williams, Thomas E; Al‐Izki, Sarah; Sevastou, Ioanna; Okuyama, Masahiro; Graier, Wolfgang F; Stevenson, Lesley A; Tanner, Carolyn; Ross, Ruth; Pertwee, Roger G; Henstridge, Christopher M; Irving, Andrew J; Schulman, Jesse; Powell, Keith; Baker, Mark D; Giovannoni, Gavin; Selwood, David L

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Our initial aim was to generate cannabinoid agents that control spasticity, occurring as a consequence of multiple sclerosis (MS), whilst avoiding the sedative side effects associated with cannabis. VSN16R was synthesized as an anandamide (endocannabinoid) analogue in an anti‐metabolite approach to identify drugs that target spasticity. Experimental Approach Following the initial chemistry, a variety of biochemical, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches, using isolated cells, tissue‐based assays and in vivo animal models, were used to demonstrate the activity, efficacy, pharmacokinetics and mechanism of action of VSN16R. Toxicological and safety studies were performed in animals and humans. Key Results VSN16R had nanomolar activity in tissue‐based, functional assays and dose‐dependently inhibited spasticity in a mouse experimental encephalomyelitis model of MS. This effect occurred with over 1000‐fold therapeutic window, without affecting normal muscle tone. Efficacy was achieved at plasma levels that are feasible and safe in humans. VSN16R did not bind to known CB1/CB2/GPPR55 cannabinoid‐related receptors in receptor‐based assays but acted on a vascular cannabinoid target. This was identified as the major neuronal form of the big conductance, calcium‐activated potassium (BKCa) channel. Drug‐induced opening of neuronal BKCa channels induced membrane hyperpolarization, limiting excessive neural‐excitability and controlling spasticity. Conclusions and Implications We identified the neuronal form of the BKCa channel as the target for VSN16R and demonstrated that its activation alleviates neuronal excitability and spasticity in an experimental model of MS, revealing a novel mechanism to control spasticity. VSN16R is a potential, safe and selective ligand for controlling neural hyper‐excitability in spasticity. PMID:28677901

  16. A medium-throughput functional assay of KCNQ2 potassium channels using rubidium efflux and atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scott, Clay W; Wilkins, Deidre E; Trivedi, Shephali; Crankshaw, Denis J

    2003-08-15

    Heterologous expression of KCNQ2 (Kv7.2) results in the formation of a slowly activating, noninactivating, voltage-gated potassium channel. Using a cell line that stably expresses KCNQ2, we developed a rubidium flux assay to measure the functional activity and pharmacological modulation of this ion channel. Rubidium flux was performed in a 96-well microtiter plate format; rubidium was quantified using an automated atomic absorption spectrometer to enable screening of 1000 data points/day. Cells accumulated rubidium at 37 degrees C in a monoexponential manner with t(1/2)=40min. Treating cells with elevated extracellular potassium caused membrane depolarization and stimulation of rubidium efflux through KCNQ2. The rate of rubidium efflux increased with increasing extracellular potassium: the t(1/2) at 50mM potassium was 5.1 min. Potassium-stimulated efflux was potentiated by the anticonvulsant drug retigabine (EC(50)=0.5 microM). Both potassium-induced and retigabine-facilitated efflux were blocked by TEA (IC(50)s=0.4 and 0.3mM, respectively) and the neurotransmitter release enhancers and putative cognition enhancers linopirdine (IC(50)s=2.3 and 7.1 microM, respectively) and XE991 (IC(50)s=0.3 and 0.9 microM, respectively). Screening a collection of ion channel modulators revealed additional inhibitors including clofilium (IC(50) = 27 microM). These studies extend the pharmacological profile of KCNQ2 and demonstrate the feasibility of using this assay system to rapidly screen for compounds that modulate the function of KCNQ2.

  17. Activation of inward rectifier potassium channels accelerates atrial fibrillation in humans: evidence for a reentrant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Atienza, Felipe; Almendral, Jesús; Moreno, Javier; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Talkachou, Arkazdi; Kalifa, Jérôme; Arenal, Angel; Villacastín, Julian P; Torrecilla, Esteban G; Sánchez, Ana; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Jalife, José; Berenfeld, Omer

    2006-12-05

    It is unclear whether atrial fibrillation (AF) drivers in humans are focal or reentrant. To test the hypothesis that functional reentry is involved in human AF maintenance, we determined the effects of adenosine infusion on local dominant frequency (DF) at different atrial sites. By increasing inward rectifier potassium channel conductance, adenosine would increase DF of reentrant drivers but decrease it in the case of a focal mechanism. Thirty-three patients were studied during AF (21 paroxysmal, 12 persistent) using recordings from each pulmonary vein-left atrial junction (PV-LAJ), high right atrium, and coronary sinus. DFs were determined during baseline and peak adenosine effect. In paroxysmal AF, adenosine increased maximal DF at each region compared with baseline (PV-LAJ, 8.03+/-2.2 versus 5.7+/-0.8; high right atrium, 7+/-2.2 versus 5.4+/-0.7; coronary sinus, 6.6+/-1.1 versus 5.3+/-0.7 Hz; P=0.001) and increased the left-to-right DF gradient (P=0.007). In contrast, in persistent AF, adenosine increased DF only in the high right atrium (8.33+/-1.1 versus 6.8+/-1.2 Hz; P=0.004). In 4 paroxysmal AF patients, real-time DF mapping of the left atrium identified the highest DF sites near the PV-LAJ, where adenosine induced an increase in DF (6.7+/-0.29 versus 4.96+/-0.26 Hz; P=0.008). Finally, simulations demonstrate that the frequency of reentrant drivers accelerates proportionally to the adenosine-modulated inward rectifier potassium current. Adenosine accelerates drivers and increases frequency differently in paroxysmal compared with persistent human AF. The results strongly suggest that AF is maintained by reentrant sources, most likely located at the PV-LAJ in paroxysmal AF, whereas non-PV locations are more likely in persistent AF.

  18. Inhibition by acrolein of light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of inward-rectifying potassium channels in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Moshiul; Ye, Wenxiu; Matsushima, Daiki; Khokon, Md Atiqur Rahman; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Acrolein is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde derived from lipid peroxides, which are produced in plants under a variety of stress. We investigated effects of acrolein on light-induced stomatal opening using Arabidopsis thaliana. Acrolein inhibited light-induced stomatal opening in a dose-dependent manner. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited plasma membrane inward-rectifying potassium (Kin) channels in guard cells. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited Kin channel KAT1 expressed in a heterologous system using Xenopus leaves oocytes. These results suggest that acrolein inhibits light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of Kin channels in guard cells.

  19. Functional identification of a GORK potassium channel from the ancient desert shrub Ammopiptanthus mongolicus (Maxim.) Cheng f.

    PubMed

    Li, Junlin; Zhang, Huanchao; Lei, Han; Jin, Man; Yue, Guangzhen; Su, Yanhua

    2016-04-01

    A GORK homologue K(+) channel from the ancient desert shrub Ammopiptanthus mongolicus (Maxim.) Cheng f. shows the functional conservation of the GORK channels among plant species. Guard cell K(+) release through the outward potassium channels eventually enables the closure of stomata which consequently prevents plant water loss from severe transpiration. Early patch-clamp studies with the guard cells have revealed many details of such outward potassium currents. However, genes coding for these potassium-release channels have not been sufficiently characterized from species other than the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We report here the functional identification of a GORK (for Gated or Guard cell Outward Rectifying K(+) channels) homologue from the ancient desert shrub Ammopiptanthus mongolicus (Maxim.) Cheng f. AmGORK was primary expressed in shoots, where the transcripts were regulated by stress factors simulated by PEG, NaCl or ABA treatments. Patch-clamp measurements on isolated guard cell protoplasts revealed typical depolarization voltage gated outward K(+) currents sensitive to the extracelluar K(+) concentration and pH, resembling the fundamental properties previously described in other species. Two-electrode voltage-clamp analysis in Xenopus lavies oocytes with AmGORK reconstituted highly similar characteristics as assessed in the guard cells, supporting that the function of AmGORK is consistent with a crucial role in mediating stomatal closure in Ammopiptanthus mongolicus. Furthermore, a single amino acid mutation D297N of AmGORK eventually abolishes both the voltage-gating and its outward rectification and converts the channel into a leak-like channel, indicating strong involvement of this residue in the gating and voltage dependence of AmGORK. Our results obtained from this anciently originated plant support a strong functional conservation of the GORK channels among plant species and maybe also along the progress of revolution.

  20. Selection of inhibitor-resistant viral potassium channels identifies a selectivity filter site that affects barium and amantadine block.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Franck C; Gazzarrini, Sabrina; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Arrigoni, Cristina; Domigan, Courtney; Ferrara, Giuseppina; Pantoja, Carlos; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna; Minor, Daniel L

    2009-10-16

    Understanding the interactions between ion channels and blockers remains an important goal that has implications for delineating the basic mechanisms of ion channel function and for the discovery and development of ion channel directed drugs. We used genetic selection methods to probe the interaction of two ion channel blockers, barium and amantadine, with the miniature viral potassium channel Kcv. Selection for Kcv mutants that were resistant to either blocker identified a mutant bearing multiple changes that was resistant to both. Implementation of a PCR shuffling and backcrossing procedure uncovered that the blocker resistance could be attributed to a single change, T63S, at a position that is likely to form the binding site for the inner ion in the selectivity filter (site 4). A combination of electrophysiological and biochemical assays revealed a distinct difference in the ability of the mutant channel to interact with the blockers. Studies of the analogous mutation in the mammalian inward rectifier Kir2.1 show that the T-->S mutation affects barium block as well as the stability of the conductive state. Comparison of the effects of similar barium resistant mutations in Kcv and Kir2.1 shows that neighboring amino acids in the Kcv selectivity filter affect blocker binding. The data support the idea that permeant ions have an integral role in stabilizing potassium channel structure, suggest that both barium and amantadine act at a similar site, and demonstrate how genetic selections can be used to map blocker binding sites and reveal mechanistic features.

  1. Antianginal and anti-ischaemic efficacy of tedisamil, a potassium channel blocker

    PubMed Central

    Fox, K; Henderson, J; Kaski, J; Sachse, A; Kuester, L; Wonnacott, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the efficacy and safety of the potassium channel blocker tedisamil versus placebo in the treatment of patients with stable angina.
DESIGN—Prospective, double blind, placebo controlled study. 203 patients first completed a seven day placebo run in. They were then randomised to receive 50 mg, 100 mg or 150 mg tedisamil twice daily, or placebo. Treadmill exercise testing was carried out at baseline and after 14 days of double blind treatment.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Primary efficacy parameters were an increase in total exercise duration and a reduction of the sum of ST segment depression using six ECG leads at maximum workload at trough (12 hours after last medication). Secondary aims included increase in exercise time to onset of 0.1 mV ST segment depression, increase in exercise time to onset of any anginal pain, and reduction in ST segment depression in any of the six specified leads at maximum workload. These were all at trough. The same parameters were also assessed at peak concentrations (two hours after administration). Overall attacks of angina and the use of short acting nitrates were assessed from patient diaries.
RESULTS—Tedisamil led to a dose dependent prolongation of exercise duration (significant at all concentrations), an effect that was greater at peak than at trough. Treatment also led to a significant dose dependent reduction in the sum of ST segment depression at both trough and peak concentrations. Tedisamil also decreased (in a dose dependent way) the frequency of anginal attacks and the consumption of short acting nitrates, an improvement that became significant for all doses in the second treatment week. Adverse events with tedisamil were few. There was a pronounced rise in the incidence of diarrhoea with the 150 mg twice daily regimen. Bradycardic effects and increases in QT interval were dose dependent, but were no more evident at exercise than at rest.
CONCLUSIONS—Tedisamil, at doses of 50-100

  2. Conformational heterogeneity in closed and open states of the KcsA potassium channel in lipid bicelles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dorothy M.; Dikiy, Igor; Upadhyay, Vikrant; Posson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The process of ion channel gating—opening and closing—involves local and global structural changes in the channel in response to external stimuli. Conformational changes depend on the energetic landscape that underlies the transition between closed and open states, which plays a key role in ion channel gating. For the prokaryotic, pH-gated potassium channel KcsA, closed and open states have been extensively studied using structural and functional methods, but the dynamics within each of these functional states as well as the transition between them is not as well understood. In this study, we used solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the conformational transitions within specific functional states of KcsA. We incorporated KcsA channels into lipid bicelles and stabilized them into a closed state by using either phosphatidylcholine lipids, known to favor the closed channel, or mutations designed to trap the channel shut by disulfide cross-linking. A distinct state, consistent with an open channel, was uncovered by the addition of cardiolipin lipids. Using selective amino acid labeling at locations within the channel that are known to move during gating, we observed at least two different slowly interconverting conformational states for both closed and open channels. The pH dependence of these conformations and the predictable disruptions to this dependence observed in mutant channels with altered pH sensing highlight the importance of conformational heterogeneity for KcsA gating. PMID:27432996

  3. Kinetic modeling of ion conduction in KcsA potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Mafé, Salvador; Pellicer, Julio; Cervera, Javier

    2005-05-22

    KcsA constitutes a potassium channel of known structure that shows both high conduction rates and selectivity among monovalent cations. A kinetic model for ion conduction through this channel that assumes rapid ion transport within the filter has recently been presented by Nelson. In a recent, brief communication, we used the model to provide preliminary explanations to the experimental current-voltage J-V and conductance-concentration g-S curves obtained for a series of monovalent ions (K(+),Tl(+), and Rb(+)). We did not assume rapid ion transport in the calculations, since ion transport within the selectivity filter could be rate limiting for ions other than native K(+). This previous work is now significantly extended to the following experimental problems. First, the outward rectification of the J-V curves in K(+) symmetrical solutions is analyzed using a generalized kinetic model. Second, the J-V and g-S curves for NH(4) (+) are obtained and compared with those of other ions (the NH(4) (+) J-V curve is qualitatively different from those of Rb(+) and Tl(+)). Third, the effects of Na(+) block on K(+) and Rb(+) currents through single KcsA channels are studied and the different blocking behavior is related to the values of the translocation rate constants characteristic of ion transport within the filter. Finally, the significantly decreased K(+) conductance caused by mutation of the wild-type channel is also explained in terms of this rate constant. In order to keep the number of model parameters to a minimum, we do not allow the electrical distance (an empirical parameter of kinetic models that controls the exponential voltage dependence of the dissociation rate) to vary with the ionic species. Without introducing the relatively high number of adjustable parameters of more comprehensive site-based models, we show that ion association to the filter is rate controlling at low concentrations, but ion dissociation from the filter and ion transport within the filter

  4. The ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker glibenclamide prevents renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Pompermayer, Kenia; Souza, Danielle G; Lara, Giovanna G; Silveira, Kátia D; Cassali, Geovanni D; Andrade, Anderson A; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Passaglio, Kátia T; Assreuy, Jamil; Cunha, Fernando Q; Vieira, Maria Aparecida R; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2005-05-01

    Renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a complex neutrophil-mediated syndrome. Adenosine-triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels are involved in neutrophil migration in vivo. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of glibenclamide, a K(ATP) channel blocker, in renal I/R injury in rats. The left kidney of the rats was excised through a flank incision and ischemia was performed in the contralateral kidney by total interruption of renal artery flow for 45 minutes. Renal perfusion was reestablished, and the kidney and lungs were removed for analysis of vascular permeability, neutrophil accumulation, and content of cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-10] 4 and 24 hours later. Renal function was assessed by measuring creatinine, Na(+), and K(+) levels in the plasma and by determination of creatinine clearance. Drugs were administered subcutaneously after the onset of ischemia. Reperfusion of the ischemic kidney induced local (kidney) and remote (lung) inflammatory injury and marked renal dysfunction. Glibenclamide (20 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the reperfusion-associated increase in vascular permeability, neutrophil accumulation, increase in TNF-alpha levels and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) translocation. These inhibitory effects were noticed in the kidney and lungs. Moreover, glibenclamide markedly ameliorated the renal dysfunction at 4 and 24 hours. Treatment with glibenclamide is associated with inhibition of neutrophil recruitment and amelioration of renal dysfunction following renal I/R. Glibenclamide may have a therapeutic role in the treatment of renal I/R injury, such as after renal transplantation.

  5. Potassium Channel Subfamily K Member 3 (KCNK3) Contributes to the Development of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antigny, Fabrice; Hautefort, Aurélie; Meloche, Jolyane; Belacel-Ouari, Milia; Manoury, Boris; Rucker-Martin, Catherine; Péchoux, Christine; Potus, François; Nadeau, Valérie; Tremblay, Eve; Ruffenach, Grégoire; Bourgeois, Alice; Dorfmüller, Peter; Breuils-Bonnet, Sandra; Fadel, Elie; Ranchoux, Benoît; Jourdon, Philippe; Girerd, Barbara; Montani, David; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric

    2016-04-05

    Mutations in the KCNK3 gene have been identified in some patients suffering from heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). KCNK3 encodes an outward rectifier K(+) channel, and each identified mutation leads to a loss of function. However, the pathophysiological role of potassium channel subfamily K member 3 (KCNK3) in PAH is unclear. We hypothesized that loss of function of KCNK3 is a hallmark of idiopathic and heritable PAH and contributes to dysfunction of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and pulmonary artery endothelial cells, leading to pulmonary artery remodeling: consequently, restoring KCNK3 function could alleviate experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH). We demonstrated that KCNK3 expression and function were reduced in human PAH and in monocrotaline-induced PH in rats. Using a patch-clamp technique in freshly isolated (not cultured) pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and pulmonary artery endothelial cells, we found that KCNK3 current decreased progressively during the development of monocrotaline-induced PH and correlated with plasma-membrane depolarization. We demonstrated that KCNK3 modulated pulmonary arterial tone. Long-term inhibition of KCNK3 in rats induced distal neomuscularization and early hemodynamic signs of PH, which were related to exaggerated proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells, pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell, adventitial fibroblasts, and pulmonary and systemic inflammation. Lastly, in vivo pharmacological activation of KCNK3 significantly reversed monocrotaline-induced PH in rats. In PAH and experimental PH, KCNK3 expression and activity are strongly reduced in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. KCNK3 inhibition promoted increased proliferation, vasoconstriction, and inflammation. In vivo pharmacological activation of KCNK3 alleviated monocrotaline-induced PH, thus demonstrating that loss of KCNK3 is a key event in PAH pathogenesis and thus could be therapeutically targeted.

  6. Interaction between Soluble and Membrane-Embedded Potassium Channel Peptides Monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.; Ramesh, Bala; Srai, Surjit K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the utility of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in dynamic monitoring of soluble protein-protein interactions. Here, we investigated the applicability of FTIR to detect interaction between synthetic soluble and phospholipid-embedded peptides corresponding to, respectively, a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel inactivation domain (ID) and S4–S6 of the Shaker Kv channel (KV1; including the S4–S5 linker “pre-inactivation” ID binding site). KV1 was predominantly α-helical at 30°C when incorporated into dimyristoyl-l-α-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers. Cooling to induce a shift in DMPC from liquid crystalline to gel phase reversibly decreased KV1 helicity, and was previously shown to partially extrude a synthetic S4 peptide. While no interaction was detected in liquid crystalline DMPC, upon cooling to induce the DMPC gel phase a reversible amide I peak (1633 cm−1) consistent with novel hydrogen bond formation was detected. This spectral shift was not observed for KV1 in the absence of ID (or vice versa), nor when the non-inactivating mutant V7E ID was applied to KV1 under similar conditions. Alteration of salt or redox conditions affected KV1-ID hydrogen bonding in a manner suggesting electrostatic KV1-ID interaction favored by a hairpin conformation for the ID and requiring extrusion of one or more KV1 domains from DMPC, consistent with ID binding to S4–S5. These findings support the utility of FTIR in detecting reversible interactions between soluble and membrane-embedded proteins, with lipid state-sensitivity of the conformation of the latter facilitating control of the interaction. PMID:23145073

  7. Phenotypic analysis of vertigo 2 Jackson mice with a Kcnq1 potassium channel mutation.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Takeshi; Nishio, Hajime; Yagi, Takeo; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Tsubone, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Koichi

    2007-07-01

    The KCNQ1 gene encodes a voltage-dependent potassium ion channel, and mutations in this gene are the most common cause of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS). In the present study, we investigated the various phenotypic characteristics of vertigo 2 Jackson (C3H/HeJCrl-Kcnq1(vtg-2J)/J) mice with a Kcnq1 mutation. Both heterozygotes (vtg-2J/+) and homozygotes (vtg-2J/vtg-2J) showed prolonged QT intervals in electrocardiograms (ECGs) compared to C3H/HeJ control (+/+) mice. Furthermore, vtg-2J/vtg-2J mice showed gastric achlorhydria associated with elevation of their serum gastrin levels. The serum corticosterone levels were also significantly increased in vtg-2J/vtg-2J mice. In addition, vtg-2J/vtg-2J mice exhibited significantly higher blood pressure. These findings indicate that the Kcnq1 mutation in vtg-2J mice alters various physiological functions in the cardiac, gastric and adrenocortical systems, and suggest that vtg-2J mice may represent a useful model for studying Kcnq1 functions.

  8. A novel 13 residue acyclic peptide from the marine snail, Conus monile, targets potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Sudarslal, Sadasivannair; Singaravadivelan, Govindaswamy; Ramasamy, Palanisamy; Ananda, Kuppanna; Sarma, Siddhartha P; Sikdar, Sujit K; Krishnan, K S; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2004-05-07

    A novel 13-residue peptide Mo1659 has been isolated from the venom of a vermivorous cone snail, Conus monile. HPLC fractions of the venom extract yielded an intense UV absorbing fraction with a mass of 1659Da. De novo sequencing using both matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization and electrospray MS/MS methods together with analysis of proteolytic fragments successfully yielded the amino acid sequence, FHGGSWYRFPWGY-NH(2). This was further confirmed by comparison with the chemically synthesized peptide and by conventional Edman sequencing. Mo1659 has an unusual sequence with a preponderance of aromatic residues and the absence of apolar, aliphatic residues like Ala, Val, Leu, and Ile. Mo1659 has no disulfide bridges distinguishing it from the conotoxins and bears no sequence similarity with any of the acyclic peptides isolated thus far from the venom of cone snails. Electrophysiological studies on the effect of Mo1659 on measured currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons suggest that the peptide targets non-inactivating voltage-dependent potassium channels.

  9. Mechanism of Action of Novel Glibenclamide Derivatives on Potassium and Calcium Channels for Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Frederico, Marisa Jadna Silva; Castro, Allisson Jhonatan Gomes; Menegaz, Danusa; Murat, Cahue De Bernardis; Mendes, Camila Pires; Mascarello, Alessandra; Nunes, Ricardo Jose; Silva, Fatima Regina Mena Barreto

    2017-01-01

    Glibenclamide is widely used and remains a cornerstone and an effective antihyperglycemic drug. After the casual discovery of its hypoglycemic potential, this compound was introduced for diabetes treatment. However, the long-term side effects reveal that glibenclamide should be replaced by new molecules able to maintain the health of β-cells, protecting them from hyperstimulation/hyperexcitability, hyperinsulinemia, functional failure and cell death. The aim of this review was to highlight the main mechanism of action of glibenclamide and the influence of its derivatives, such as acylhydrazones, sulfonamides and sulfonylthioureas on β-cells potassium and calcium channels for insulin secretion as well as the contribution of these new compounds to restore glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, the role of glibenclamide-based novel structures that promise less excitability of β-cell in a long-term treatment with effectiveness and safety for diabetes therapy was discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. ATP-sensitive potassium channel modulators and cardiac arrhythmias: an update.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Danina M; Kiss, Loránd; Jost, Norbert; Baczko, István

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia and heart failure-related cardiac arrhythmias, both atrial (e.g., atrial fibrillation) and ventricular (e.g., malignant tachyarrhythmias) represent a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the progress made in the last decade in understanding their pathophysiological mechanisms there is still an unmet need for safer and more efficacious pharmacological treatment, especially when considering the drawbacks and complications of implantable devices. Cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium channels located in the sarcolemmal membrane (sarcKATP) and the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP) have emerged as crucial controllers of several key cellular functions. In the past three decades a tremendous amount of research led to their structural and functional characterization unveiling both a protective role in cardiac adaptive responses to metabolic stress and a seemingly paradoxical role in promoting as well as protecting against atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. On the other hand, several KATP inhibitors have emerged as potential ischemia selective antiarrhythmic drugs. In this respect, cardioselective, chamber specific and combined sarcKATP and mitoKATP modulators currently represent a promising field for drug development.

  11. Modulation of spike-evoked synaptic transmission: The role of presynaptic calcium and potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Rama, Sylvain; Zbili, Mickaël; Debanne, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    Action potentials are usually considered as the smallest unit of neuronal information conveyed by presynaptic neurons to their postsynaptic target. Thus, neuronal signaling in brain circuits is all-or-none or digital. However, recent studies indicate that subthreshold analog variation in presynaptic membrane potential modulates spike-evoked transmission. The informational content of each presynaptic action potential is therefore greater than initially expected. This property constitutes a form of fast activity-dependent modulation of functional coupling. Therefore, it could have important consequences on information processing in neural networks in parallel with more classical forms of presynaptic short-term facilitation based on repetitive stimulation, modulation of presynaptic calcium or modifications of the release machinery. We discuss here how analog voltage shift in the presynaptic neuron may regulate spike-evoked release of neurotransmitter through the modulation of voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in the axon and presynaptic terminal. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanism of inhibition of mouse Slo3 (KCa 5.1) potassium channels by quinine, quinidine and barium.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, David C; Muench, Stephen P; Lippiat, Jonathan D

    2015-09-01

    The Slo3 (KCa 5.1) channel is a major component of mammalian KSper (sperm potassium conductance) channels and inhibition of these channels by quinine and barium alters sperm motility. The aim of this investigation was to determine the mechanism by which these drugs inhibit Slo3 channels. Mouse (m) Slo3 (KCa 5.1) channels or mutant forms were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and currents recorded with 2-electrode voltage-clamp. Gain-of-function mSlo3 mutations were used to explore the state-dependence of the inhibition. The interaction between quinidine and mSlo3 channels was modelled by in silico docking. Several drugs known to block KSper also affected mSlo3 channels with similar levels of inhibition. The inhibition induced by extracellular barium was prevented by increasing the extracellular potassium concentration. R196Q and F304Y mutations in the mSlo3 voltage sensor and pore, respectively, both increased channel activity. The F304Y mutation did not alter the effects of barium, but increased the potency of inhibition by both quinine and quinidine approximately 10-fold; this effect was not observed with the R196Q mutation. Block of mSlo3 channels by quinine, quinidine and barium is not state-dependent. Barium inhibits mSlo3 outside the cell by interacting with the selectivity filter, whereas quinine and quinidine act from the inside, by binding in a hydrophobic pocket formed by the S6 segment of each subunit. Furthermore, we propose that the Slo3 channel activation gate lies deep within the pore between F304 in the S6 segment and the selectivity filter. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. SKF-96365 blocks human ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Lei; Chen, Kui-Hao; Sun, Hai-Ying; Jin, Man-Wen; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-02-01

    SKF-96365 is a TRPC channel antagonist commonly used to characterize the potential functions of TRPC channels in different systems, which was recently reported to induce QTc prolongation on ECG by inhibiting TRPC channels. The present study investigates whether the blockade of cardiac repolarization currents would be involved in the increase of QTc interval. Cardiac repolarization currents were recorded in HEK 293 cells stably expressing human ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium (hERG or hKv11.1) channels, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1 channels (IKs) or hKir2.1 channels and cardiac action potentials were recorded in guinea pig ventricular myocytes using a whole-cell patch technique. The potential effect of SKF-96365 on QT interval was evaluated in ex vivo guinea pig hearts. It was found that SKF-96365 inhibited hERG current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50, 3.4μM). The hERG mutants S631A in the pore helix and F656V of the S6 region reduced the inhibitory sensitivity with IC50s of 27.4μM and 11.0μM, suggesting a channel pore blocker. In addition, this compound inhibited IKs and hKir2.1currents with IC50s of 10.8 and 8.7μM. SKF-96365 (10μM) significantly prolonged ventricular APD90 in guinea pig ventricular myocytes and QTc interval in ex vivo guinea pig hearts. These results indicate that the TRPC channel antagonist SKF-96365 exerts blocking effects on hERG, IKs, and hKir2.1 channels. Prolongation of ventricular APD and QT interval is related to the inhibition of multiple repolarization potassium currents, especially hERG channels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cytotoxic effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles on murine photoreceptor cells via potassium channel block and Na+ /K+ -ATPase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Bu, Wenjuan; Ding, Hongyan; Li, Qin; Wang, Dabo; Bi, Hongsheng; Guo, Dadong

    2017-06-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles can exhibit toxicity towards organisms and oxidative stress is often hypothesized to be one of the most important factors. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanism of toxicity-induced by ZnO nanoparticles has not been completely addressed. The present study aimed to investigate the toxic effects of ZnO nanoparticles on the expression and activity of Na + /K + -ATPase and on potassium channel block. In the present study, we explored the cytotoxic effect of ZnO nanoparticles on murine photoreceptor cells using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) determination, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δφm) measurement, delayed rectifier potassium current recordings and Na + /K + -ATPase expression and activity monitoring. The results indicated that ZnO nanoparticles could increase the LDH release in medium, aggravate the ROS level within cells, collapse the Δφm, block the delayed rectifier potassium current, and attenuate the expressions of Na + /K + -ATPase at both mRNA and protein levels and its activity, and thus exert cytotoxic effects on murine photoreceptor cells, finally damaging target cells. Our findings will facilitate the understanding of the mechanism involved in ZnO nanoparticle-induced cytotoxicity in murine photoreceptor cells via potassium channel block and Na + /K + -ATPase inhibition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Role of potassium channels in the antidepressant-like effect of folic acid in the forced swimming test in mice.

    PubMed

    Budni, Josiane; Freitas, Andiara E; Binfaré, Ricardo W; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2012-03-01

    Potassium (K(+)) channels have been implicated in depressive disorders and in the mechanism of action of antidepressants. Considering that several studies have indicated that folic acid plays an important role in the pathophysiology of depression, the present study investigated the involvement of potassium channels in the antidepressant-like effect of this vitamin. For this aim, the effect of the combined administration of different types of K(+) channel blockers and folic acid in the forced swimming test (FST) was investigated. Treatment of mice by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) route with subactive doses of glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K(+) channels blocker, 0.5pg/site), charybdotoxin (a large- and intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel blocker, 25pg/site) or apamin (a small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel blocker, 10pg/site), augmented the effect of folic acid (10mg/kg, p.o., subeffective dose) in the FST. Additionally, the administration of folic acid and the K(+) channel blockers, alone or in combination, did not affect locomotion in the open-field test. Moreover, the reduction in the immobility time in the FST elicited by folic acid administered at a higher dose (50mg/kg, p.o.) was prevented by the pretreatment of mice with the K(+) channel opener cromakalim (10μg/site, i.c.v.), without affecting locomotor activity. The results of this study indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of folic acid in the FST may be at least partly due to its modulatory effects on neuronal excitability, via inhibition of K(+) channels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Novel Current Pathway Parallel to the Central Pore in a Mutant Voltage-gated Potassium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Prütting, Sylvia; Grissmer, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are proteins composed of four subunits consisting of six membrane-spanning segments S1–S6, with S4 as the voltage sensor. The region between S5 and S6 forms the potassium-selective ion-conducting central α-pore. Recent studies showed that mutations in the voltage sensor of the Shaker channel could disclose another ion permeation pathway through the voltage-sensing domain (S1–S4) of the channel, the ω-pore. In our studies we used the voltage-gated hKv1.3 channel, and the insertion of a cysteine at position V388C (Shaker position 438) generated a current through the α-pore in high potassium outside and an inward current at hyperpolarizing potentials carried by different cations like Na+, Li+, Cs+, and NH4+. The observed inward current looked similar to the ω-current described for the R1C/S Shaker mutant channel and was not affected by some pore blockers like charybdotoxin and tetraethylammonium but was inhibited by a phenylalkylamine blocker (verapamil) that acts from the intracellular side. Therefore, we hypothesize that the hKv1.3_V388C mutation in the P-region generated a channel with two ion-conducting pathways. One, the α-pore allowing K+ flux in the presence of K+, and the second pathway, the σ-pore, functionally similar but physically distinct from the ω-pathway. The entry of this new pathway (σ-pore) is presumably located at the backside of Y395 (Shaker position 445), proceeds parallel to the α-pore in the S6–S6 interface gap, ending between S5 and S6 at the intracellular side of one α-subunit, and is blocked by verapamil. PMID:21498510

  17. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels

    PubMed Central

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D.; Ritter, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A-type voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na+ channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  18. The role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in cellular function and protection in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Andrew; Aziz, Qadeer; Thomas, Alison

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP)) are widely distributed and present in a number of tissues including muscle, pancreatic beta cells and the brain. Their activity is regulated by adenine nucleotides, characteristically being activated by falling ATP and rising ADP levels. Thus, they link cellular metabolism with membrane excitability. Recent studies using genetically modified mice and genomic studies in patients have implicated K(ATP) channels in a number of physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus on their role in cellular function and protection particularly in the cardiovascular system. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Identification and pharmacological characterization of sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the murine atrial HL-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jocelyn E Manning; Jones, Lynn; Light, Peter E

    2005-01-01

    Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels is known to have cardioprotective effects during periods of ischemia and reperfusion, making these channels important targets for clinical drug discovery. Using electrophysiological techniques we identify KATP channels in a mouse atrial cell line (HL-1). HL-1 KATP channels exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition by ATP (IC50 = 23.3 +/- 3.2 microM), a unitary single-channel conductance of 55 pS, and sensitivity to the isoform-specific KATP channel opener P1075 and inhibitor HMR1098. Adenoviral infection of a dominant-negative Kir6.2 subunit significantly reduced the P1075-sensitive sarcKATP current. Taken together, the data indicate that HL-1 KATP channels are composed of sulfonylurea receptor isoform SUR2A coupled to the pore-forming Kir6.2 subunit--the molecular makeup of sarcKATP channels found in native cardiac myocytes. Pharmacological activation of HL-1 cell KATP channels also resulted in action potential shortening. Using the membrane potential-sensitive dye DiBac4(3), we demonstrated that the sarcKATP channel opener P1075 (20 microM) produced a concentration-dependent hyperpolarization of a monolayer of HL-1 cells that could be reversed by channel inhibition with HMR1098 (20 microM). We conclude that the HL-1 cells are an excellent cell line for studying cardiac sarcKATP channels, and these cells may also provide an important tool for the testing of novel pharmacological modulators of KATP channels in fluorescence-based assays.

  20. A novel mechanism for fine-tuning open-state stability in a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Pless, Stephan A; Niciforovic, Ana P; Galpin, Jason D; Nunez, John-Jose; Kurata, Harley T; Ahern, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels elicit membrane hyperpolarization through voltage-sensor domains that regulate the conductive status of the pore domain. To better understand the inherent basis for the open-closed equilibrium in these channels, we undertook an atomistic scan using synthetic fluorinated derivatives of aromatic residues previously implicated in the gating of Shaker potassium channels. Here we show that stepwise dispersion of the negative electrostatic surface potential of only one site, Phe481, stabilizes the channel open state. Furthermore, these data suggest that this apparent stabilization is the consequence of the amelioration of an inherently repulsive open-state interaction between the partial negative charge on the face of Phe481 and a highly co-evolved acidic side chain, Glu395, and this interaction is potentially modulated through the Tyr485 hydroxyl. We propose that the intrinsic open-state destabilization via aromatic repulsion represents a new mechanism by which ion channels, and likely other proteins, fine-tune conformational equilibria.

  1. Vascular ATP-sensitive potassium channels are over-expressed and partially regulated by nitric oxide in experimental septic shock.

    PubMed

    Collin, Solène; Sennoun, Nacira; Dron, Anne-Gaëlle; de la Bourdonnaye, Mathilde; Montemont, Chantal; Asfar, Pierre; Lacolley, Patrick; Meziani, Ferhat; Levy, Bruno

    2011-05-01

    To study the activation and expression of vascular (aorta and small mesenteric arteries) potassium channels during septic shock with or without modulation of the NO pathway. Septic shock was induced in rats by peritonitis. Selective inhibitors of vascular K(ATP) (PNU-37883A) or BK(Ca) [iberiotoxin (IbTX)] channels were used to demonstrate their involvement in vascular hyporeactivity. Vascular response to phenylephrine was measured on aorta and small mesenteric arteries mounted on a wire myograph. Vascular expression of potassium channels was studied by PCR and Western blot, in the presence or absence of 1400W, an inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibitor. Aortic activation of the transcriptional factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Arterial pressure as well as in vivo and ex vivo vascular reactivity were reduced by sepsis and improved by PNU-37883A but not by IbTX. Sepsis was associated with an up-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of vascular K(ATP) channels, while expression of vascular BK(Ca) channels remained unchanged. Selective iNOS inhibition blunted the sepsis-induced increase in aortic NO, decreased NF-κB activation, and down-regulated vascular K(ATP) channel expression. Vascular K(ATP) but not BK(Ca) channels are activated, over-expressed, and partially regulated by NO via NF-κB activation during septic shock. Their selective inhibition restores arterial pressure and vascular reactivity and decreases lactate concentration. The present data suggest that selective vascular K(ATP) channel inhibitors offer potential therapeutic perspectives for septic shock.

  2. Expression of intermediate conductance potassium channel immunoreactivity in neurons and epithelial cells of the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Furness, John B; Robbins, Heather L; Selmer, Inger-Sofie; Hunne, Billie; Chen, Mao Xiang; Hicks, Gareth A; Moore, Stephen; Neylon, Craig B

    2003-11-01

    Recent functional evidence suggests that intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (IK channels) occur in neurons in the small intestine and in mucosal epithelial cells in the colon. This study was undertaken to investigate whether IK channel immunoreactivity occurs at these and at other sites in the gastrointestinal tract of the rat. IK channel immunoreactivity was found in nerve cell bodies throughout the gastrointestinal tract, from the esophagus to the rectum. It was revealed in the initial segments of the axons, but not in axon terminals. The majority of immunoreactive neurons had Dogiel type II morphology and in the myenteric plexus of the ileum all immunoreactive neurons were of this shape. Intrinsic primary afferent neurons in the rat small intestine are Dogiel type II neurons that are immunoreactive for calretinin, and it was found that almost all the IK channel immunoreactive neurons were also calretinin immunoreactive. IK channel immunoreactivity also occurred in calretinin-immunoreactive, Dogiel type II neurons in the caecum. Epithelial cells of the mucosal lining were immunoreactive in the esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines. In the intestines, the immunoreactivity occurred in transporting enterocytes, but not in mucous cells. Immunoreactivity was at both the apical and basolateral surfaces. A small proportion of mucosal endocrine cells was immunoreactive in the duodenum, ileum and caecum, but not in the stomach, proximal colon, distal colon or rectum. There was immunoreactivity of vascular endothelial cells. It is concluded that IK channels are located on cell bodies and proximal parts of axons of intrinsic primary afferent neurons, where, from functional studies, they would be predicted to lower neuronal excitability when opened in response to calcium entry. In the mucosa of the small and large intestine, IK channels are probably involved in control of potassium exchange, and in the esophageal and gastric mucosa they

  3. Loss of auditory activity modifies the location of potassium channel KCNQ5 in auditory brainstem neurons.

    PubMed

    Caminos, Elena; Garcia-Pino, Elisabet; Juiz, Jose M

    2015-04-01

    KCNQ5/Kv7.5, a low-threshold noninactivating voltage-gated potassium channel, is preferentially targeted to excitatory endings of auditory neurons in the adult rat brainstem. Endbulds of Held from auditory nerve axons on the bushy cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) and calyces of Held around the principal neurons in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) are rich in KCNQ5 immunoreactivity. We have previously shown that this synaptic distribution occurs at about the time of hearing onset. The current study tests whether this localization in excitatory endings depends on the peripheral activity carried by the auditory nerve. Auditory nerve activity was abolished by cochlear removal or intracochlear injection of tetrodotoxin (TTX). Presence of KCNQ5 was analyzed by immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. After cochlear removal, KCNQ5 immunoreactivity was virtually undetectable at its usual location in endbulbs and calyces of Held in the anteroventral CN and in the MNTB, respectively, although it was found in cell bodies in the VCN. The results were comparable after intracochlear TTX injection, which drastically reduced KCNQ5 immunostaining in MNTB calyces and increased immunolabeling in VCN cell bodies. Endbulbs of Held in the VCN also showed diminished KCNQ5 labeling after intracochlear TTX injection. These results show that peripheral activity from auditory nerve afferents is necessary to maintain the subcellular distribution of KCNQ5 in synaptic endings of the auditory brainstem. This may contribute to adaptations in the excitability and neurotransmitter release properties of these presynaptic endings under altered input conditions. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. DPPX potassium channel antibody: frequency, clinical accompaniments, and outcomes in 20 patients.

    PubMed

    Tobin, William Oliver; Lennon, Vanda A; Komorowski, Lars; Probst, Christian; Clardy, Stacey Lynn; Aksamit, Allen J; Appendino, Juan Pablo; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Pittock, Sean J; Sandroni, Paola; Tippmann-Peikert, Maja; Wirrell, Elaine C; McKeon, Andrew

    2014-11-11

    To describe the detection frequency and clinical associations of immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting dipeptidyl-peptidase-like protein-6 (DPPX), a regulatory subunit of neuronal Kv4.2 potassium channels. Specimens from 20 patients evaluated on a service basis by tissue-based immunofluorescence yielded a synaptic immunostaining pattern consistent with DPPX-IgG (serum, 20; CSF, all 7 available). Transfected HEK293 cell-based assay confirmed DPPX specificity in all specimens. Sixty-nine patients with stiff-person syndrome and related disorders were also evaluated by DPPX-IgG cell-based assay. Of 20 seropositive patients, 12 were men; median symptom onset age was 53 years (range, 13-75). Symptom onset was insidious in 15 and subacute in 5. Twelve patients reported prodromal weight loss. Neurologic disorders were multifocal. All had one or more brain or brainstem manifestations: amnesia (16), delirium (8), psychosis (4), depression (4), seizures (2), and brainstem disorders (15; eye movement disturbances [8], ataxia [7], dysphagia [6], dysarthria [4], respiratory failure [3]). Nine patients reported sleep disturbance. Manifestations of central hyperexcitability included myoclonus (8), exaggerated startle (6), diffuse rigidity (6), and hyperreflexia (6). Dysautonomia involved the gastrointestinal tract (9; diarrhea [6], gastroparesis, and constipation [3]), bladder (7), cardiac conduction system (3), and thermoregulation (1). Two patients had B-cell neoplasms: gastrointestinal lymphoma (1), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (1). Substantial neurologic improvements followed immunotherapy in 7 of 11 patients with available treatment data. DPPX-IgG was not detected in any of the stiff-person syndrome patients. DPPX-IgG is a biomarker for an immunotherapy-responsive multifocal neurologic disorder of the central and autonomic nervous systems. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Clinical spectrum and diagnostic value of antibodies against the potassium channel-related protein complex☆

    PubMed Central

    Montojo, M.T.; Petit-Pedrol, M.; Graus, F.; Dalmau, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antibodies against a protein complex that includes voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) have been reported in patients with limbic encephalitis, peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, Morvan's syndrome, and a large variety of neurological syndromes. Review summary In this article, a review is presented of the syndromes associated with antibodies against VGKC-related proteins and the main antigens of this protein complex, the proteins LGI1 (leucine rich glioma inactivated protein 1) and Caspr2 (contactin-associated protein-like 2). The conceptual problems and clinical implications of the description of antibodies against VGKC-related proteins other than LGI1 and Caspr2 are also discussed. Although initial studies indicated the occurrence of antibodies against VGKC, recent investigations have shown that the main antigens are a neuronal secreted protein known as LGI1 which modulates synaptic excitability, and a protein called Caspr2 located on the cell surface and processes of neurons of different brain regions, and at the juxtaparanodal region of myelinated axons. While antibodies against LGI1 preferentially associate with classical limbic encephalitis, antibodies against Caspr2 associate with a wider spectrum of symptoms, including Morvan's syndrome, peripheral nerve hyperexcitability or neuromyotonia, and limbic or more extensive encephalitis. In addition there are reports of patients with antibodies against VGKC-related proteins that are different from LGI1 or Caspr2. In these cases, the identity and location of the antigens are unknown, the syndrome association is not specific, and the response to treatment uncertain. Conclusions The discovery of antigens such as LGI1 and Caspr2 has resulted in a clinical and molecular definition of the broad group of diseases previously attributed to antibodies against VGKC. Considering the literature that describes the presence of antibodies against VGKC other than LGI1 and Caspr2 proteins, we propose a practical

  6. Clinical utility of seropositive voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibody.

    PubMed

    Jammoul, Adham; Shayya, Luay; Mente, Karin; Li, Jianbo; Rae-Grant, Alexander; Li, Yuebing

    2016-10-01

    Antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex are implicated in the pathogenesis of acquired neuromyotonia, limbic encephalitis, faciobrachial dystonic seizure, and Morvan syndrome. Outside these entities, the clinical value of VGKC-complex antibodies remains unclear. We conducted a single-center review of patients positive for VGKC-complex antibodies over an 8-year period. Among 114 patients positive for VGKC-complex antibody, 11 (9.6%) carrying the diagnosis of limbic encephalitis (n = 9) or neuromyotonia (n = 2) constituted the classic group, and the remaining 103 cases of various neurologic and non-neurologic disorders comprised the nonclassic group. The median titer for the classic group was higher than the nonclassic group ( p < 0.0001). A total of 90.9% of the patients in the classic and 21.4% in the nonclassic group possessed high (>0.25 nM) VGKC-complex antibody levels ( p < 0.0001). A total of 75.0% of the patients in the high-level group had definite or probable autoimmune basis, while nonautoimmune disorders were seen in 75.6% of patients from the low-level group ( p < 0.0001). A total of 26.3% of patients were found with active or remote solid organ or hematologic malignancy, but no antibody titer difference was observed among subgroups of absent, active, or remote malignancy. Compared to age-matched US national census, rates of active cancer in our cohort were higher in patients older than 45 years. High VGKC-complex antibody titers are more likely found in patients with classically associated syndromes and other autoimmune conditions. Low-level VGKC-complex antibodies can be detected in nonspecific and mostly nonautoimmune disorders. The presence of VGKC-complex antibody, rather than its level, may serve as a marker of malignancy.

  7. [Role of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel in hydrogen sulfide-induced inhibition of high glucoseinduced osteoblast damage].

    PubMed

    Yuanyuan, Liu; Xiumei, Guan; Min, Cheng; Xin, Li; Yueyang, Pan; Zhiliang, Guo

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the role of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) in hydrogen sulfide (H₂S)-induced inhibition of high glucose (HG)-induced osteoblast damage. Osteoblasts from rat mandible were cultured and identified. The osteoblasts were then treated with HG, H₂S, KATP channel opener pinacidil (Pia), and KATP channel blocker glibenclamide (Gli). Western blot method was performed to detect the expression of KATP channel protein. CCK8, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) , and image analysis were used to determine the effects of H₂S-KATP on the proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of osteoblasts. The expression of KATP channel protein in osteoblasts was significantly decreased under the influence of HG. H₂S pretreatment significantly inhibited HG on KATP channel protein down-regulation. Moreover, H₂S pretreatment significantly inhibited the effect of HG on the proliferation of osteoblasts, thereby preventing HG-induced inhibition of osteoblasts differentiation and mineralization. Meanwhile, the KATP channel blocker effectively blocked the H₂S on osteoblasts and had a protective effect. Through the KATP channel, H₂S inhibited osteoblasts damage induced by HG.

  8. Microelectrode array measurement of potassium ion channel remodeling on the field action potential duration in rapid atrial pacing rabbits model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Juan; Yan, Huang; Wugeti, Najina; Guo, Yujun; Zhang, Ling; Ma, Mei; Guo, Xingui; Jiao, Changan; Xu, Wenli; Li, Tianqi

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) arises from abnormalities in atrial structure and electrical activity. Microelectrode arrays (MEA) is a real-time, nondestructive measurement of the resting and action potential signal, from myocardial cells, to the peripheral circuit of electrophysiological activity. This study examined the field action potential duration (fAPD) of the right atrial appendage (RAA) by MEA in rapid atrial pacing (RAP) in the right atrium of rabbits. In addition, this study also investigated the effect of potassium ion channel blockers on fAPD. 40 New Zealand white rabbits of either sex were randomly divided into 3 groups: 1) the control, 2) potassium ion channel blocker (TEA, 4-Ap and BaCl2), and 3) amiodarone groups. The hearts were quickly removed and right atrial appendage sectioned (slice thickness 500 μm). Each slice was perfused with Tyrode's solution and continuously stimulated for 30 minutes. Sections from the control group were superfused with Tyrode's solution for 10 minutes, while the blocker groups and amiodarone were both treated with their respective compounds for 10 minutes each. The fAPD of RAA and action field action potential morphology were measured using MEA. In non-pace (control) groups, fAPD was 188.33 ± 18.29 ms after Tyrode's solution superfusion, and 173.91 ± 6.83 ms after RAP. In pace/potassium ion channel groups, TEA and BaCl2 superfusion prolonged atrial field action potential (fAPD) (control vs blocker: 176.67 ± 8.66 ms vs 196.11 ± 10.76 ms, 182.22 ± 12.87 ms vs 191.11 ± 13.09 ms with TEA and BaCl2 superfusion, respectively, P < 0.05). 4-AP superfusion significantly prolonged FAPD. In pace/amiodarone groups, 4-Ap superfusion extended fAPD. MEA was a sensitive and stable reporter for the measurement of the tissue action potential in animal heart slices. After superfusing potassium ion channel blockers, fAPD was prolonged. These results suggest that Ito, IKur and IK1 remodel and mediate RAP-induced atrial electrical

  9. Functional coupling between sodium-activated potassium channels and voltage-dependent persistent sodium currents in cricket Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Izumi; Yoshino, Masami

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we examined the functional coupling between Na(+)-activated potassium (KNa) channels and Na(+) influx through voltage-dependent Na(+) channels in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Single-channel activity of KNa channels was recorded with the cell-attached patch configuration. The open probability (Po) of KNa channels increased with increasing Na(+) concentration in a bath solution, whereas it decreased by the substitution of Na(+) with an equimolar concentration of Li(+). The Po of KNa channels was also found to be reduced by bath application of a high concentration of TTX (1 μM) and riluzole (100 μM), which inhibits both fast (INaf) and persistent (INaP) Na(+) currents, whereas it was unaffected by a low concentration of TTX (10 nM), which selectively blocks INaf. Bath application of Cd(2+) at a low concentration (50 μM), as an inhibitor of INaP, also decreased the Po of KNa channels. Conversely, bath application of the inorganic Ca(2+)-channel blockers Co(2+) and Ni(2+) at high concentrations (500 μM) had little effect on the Po of KNa channels, although Cd(2+) (500 μM) reduced the Po of KNa channels. Perforated whole cell clamp analysis further indicated the presence of sustained outward currents for which amplitude was dependent on the amount of Na(+) influx. Taken together, these results indicate that KNa channels could be activated by Na(+) influx passing through voltage-dependent persistent Na(+) channels. The functional significance of this coupling mechanism was discussed in relation to the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells and its possible role in the formation of long-term memory. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Diclofenac Distinguishes among Homomeric and Heteromeric Potassium Channels Composed of KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 SubunitsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Mackie, Alexander R.; Martin, Jody L.; Cribbs, Leanne L.

    2011-01-01

    KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 potassium channel subunits are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, although it remains uncertain how these subunits assemble to form functional channels. Using patch-clamp techniques, we compared the electrophysiological characteristics and effects of diclofenac, a known KCNQ channel activator, on human KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 channels expressed individually or together in A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. The conductance curves of the overexpressed channels were fitted by a single Boltzmann function in each case (V0.5 values: −31, −44, and −38 mV for KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and KCNQ4/5, respectively). Diclofenac (100 μM) inhibited KCNQ5 channels, reducing maximum conductance by 53%, but increased maximum conductance of KCNQ4 channels by 38%. The opposite effects of diclofenac on KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 could not be attributed to the presence of a basic residue (lysine) in the voltage-sensing domain of KCNQ5, because mutation of this residue to neutral glycine (the residue present in KCNQ4) resulted in a more effective block of the channel. Differences in deactivation rates and distinct voltage-dependent effects of diclofenac on channel activation and deactivation observed with each of the subunit combinations (KCNQ4, KCNQ5, and KCNQ4/5) were used as diagnostic tools to evaluate native KCNQ currents in vascular smooth muscle cells. A7r5 cells express only KCNQ5 channels endogenously, and their responses to diclofenac closely resembled those of the overexpressed KCNQ5 currents. In contrast, mesenteric artery myocytes, which express both KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 channels, displayed whole-cell KCNQ currents with properties and diclofenac responses characteristic of overexpressed heteromeric KCNQ4/5 channels. PMID:20876743

  11. Overexpression of GmAKT2 potassium channel enhances resistance to soybean mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lian; He, Hongli; Liu, Ruifang; Han, Qiang; Shou, Huixia; Liu, Bao

    2014-06-03

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is the most prevalent viral disease in many soybean production areas. Due to a large number of SMV resistant loci and alleles, SMV strains and the rapid evolution in avirulence/effector genes, traditional breeding for SMV resistance is complex. Genetic engineering is an effective alternative method for improving SMV resistance in soybean. Potassium (K+) is the most abundant inorganic solute in plant cells, and is involved in plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Studies have shown that altering the level of K+ status can reduce the spread of the viral diseases. Thus K+ transporters are putative candidates to target for soybean virus resistance. The addition of K+ fertilizer significantly reduced SMV incidence. Analysis of K+ channel gene expression indicated that GmAKT2, the ortholog of Arabidopsis K+ weak channel encoding gene AKT2, was significantly induced by SMV inoculation in the SMV highly-resistant genotype Rsmv1, but not in the susceptible genotype Ssmv1. Transgenic soybean plants overexpressing GmAKT2 were produced and verified by Southern blot and RT-PCR analysis. Analysis of K+ concentrations on different leaves of both the transgenic and the wildtype (Williams 82) plants revealed that overexpression of GmAKT2 significantly increased K+ concentrations in young leaves of plants. In contrast, K+ concentrations in the old leaves of the GmAKT2-Oe plants were significantly lower than those in WT plants. These results indicated that GmAKT2 acted as a K+ transporter and affected the distribution of K+ in soybean plants. Starting from 14 days after inoculation (DAI) of SMV G7, severe mosaic symptoms were observed on the WT leaves. In contrast, the GmAKT2-Oe plants showed no symptom of SMV infection. At 14 and 28 DAI, the amount of SMV RNA in WT plants increased 200- and 260- fold relative to GmAKT2-Oe plants at each time point. Thus, SMV development was significantly retarded in GmAKT2-overexpressing transgenic soybean

  12. Inward rectifier potassium (Kir2.1) channels as end‐stage boosters of endothelium‐dependent vasodilators

    PubMed Central

    Dalsgaard, Thomas; Bonev, Adrian D.; Nelson, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Increase in endothelial cell (EC) calcium activates calcium‐sensitive intermediate and small conductance potassium (IK and SK) channels, thereby causing hyperpolarization and endothelium‐dependent vasodilatation.Endothelial cells express inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels, but their role in endothelium‐dependent vasodilatation is not clear.In the mesenteric arteries, only ECs, but not smooth muscle cells, displayed Kir currents that were predominantly mediated by the Kir2.1 isoform.Endothelium‐dependent vasodilatations in response to muscarinic receptor, TRPV4 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 4) channel and IK/SK channel agonists were highly attenuated by Kir channel inhibitors and by Kir2.1 channel knockdown.These results point to EC Kir channels as amplifiers of vasodilatation in response to increases in EC calcium and IK/SK channel activation and suggest that EC Kir channels could be targeted to treat endothelial dysfunction, which is a hallmark of vascular disorders. Abstract Endothelium‐dependent vasodilators, such as acetylcholine, increase intracellular Ca2+ through activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels in the plasma membrane and inositol trisphosphate receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to stimulation of Ca2+‐sensitive intermediate and small conductance K+ (IK and SK, respectively) channels. Although strong inward rectifier K+ (Kir) channels have been reported in the native endothelial cells (ECs) their role in EC‐dependent vasodilatation is not clear. Here, we test the idea that Kir channels boost the EC‐dependent vasodilatation of resistance‐sized arteries. We show that ECs, but not smooth muscle cells, of small mesenteric arteries have Kir currents, which are substantially reduced in EC‐specific Kir2.1 knockdown (EC‐Kir2.1 −/−) mice. Elevation of extracellular K+ to 14 mm caused vasodilatation of pressurized arteries, which was prevented by endothelial

  13. Selection of Inhibitor-Resistant Viral Potassium Channels Identifies a Selectivity Filter Site that Affects Barium and Amantadine Block

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Arrigoni, Cristina; Domigan, Courtney; Ferrara, Giuseppina; Pantoja, Carlos; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna; Minor, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Understanding the interactions between ion channels and blockers remains an important goal that has implications for delineating the basic mechanisms of ion channel function and for the discovery and development of ion channel directed drugs. Methodology/Principal Findings We used genetic selection methods to probe the interaction of two ion channel blockers, barium and amantadine, with the miniature viral potassium channel Kcv. Selection for Kcv mutants that were resistant to either blocker identified a mutant bearing multiple changes that was resistant to both. Implementation of a PCR shuffling and backcrossing procedure uncovered that the blocker resistance could be attributed to a single change, T63S, at a position that is likely to form the binding site for the inner ion in the selectivity filter (site 4). A combination of electrophysiological and biochemical assays revealed a distinct difference in the ability of the mutant channel to interact with the blockers. Studies of the analogous mutation in the mammalian inward rectifier Kir2.1 show that the T→S mutation affects barium block as well as the stability of the conductive state. Comparison of the effects of similar barium resistant mutations in Kcv and Kir2.1 shows that neighboring amino acids in the Kcv selectivity filter affect blocker binding. Conclusions/Significance The data support the idea that permeant ions have an integral role in stabilizing potassium channel structure, suggest that both barium and amantadine act at a similar site, and demonstrate how genetic selections can be used to map blocker binding sites and reveal mechanistic features. PMID:19834614

  14. Polarized Axonal Surface Expression of Neuronal KCNQ Potassium Channels Is Regulated by Calmodulin Interaction with KCNQ2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwan Young; Kim, Edward H.; Issema, Rodal S.; Chung, Hee Jung

    2014-01-01

    KCNQ potassium channels composed of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 subunits give rise to the M-current, a slow-activating and non-inactivating voltage-dependent potassium current that limits repetitive firing of action potentials. KCNQ channels are enriched at the surface of axons and axonal initial segments, the sites for action potential generation and modulation. Their enrichment at the axonal surface is impaired by mutations in KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail that cause benign familial neonatal convulsion and myokymia, suggesting that their correct surface distribution and density at the axon is crucial for control of neuronal excitability. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating enrichment of KCNQ channels at the neuronal axon remain elusive. Here, we show that enrichment of KCNQ channels at the axonal surface of dissociated rat hippocampal cultured neurons is regulated by ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin. Using immunocytochemistry and the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) membrane protein as a trafficking reporter, we demonstrate that fusion of KCNQ2 carboxy-terminal tail is sufficient to target CD4 protein to the axonal surface whereas inhibition of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 abolishes axonal surface expression of CD4 fusion proteins by retaining them in the endoplasmic reticulum. Disruption of calmodulin binding to KCNQ2 also impairs enrichment of heteromeric KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels at the axonal surface by blocking their trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the axon. Consistently, hippocampal neuronal excitability is dampened by transient expression of wild-type KCNQ2 but not mutant KCNQ2 deficient in calmodulin binding. Furthermore, coexpression of mutant calmodulin, which can interact with KCNQ2/KCNQ3 channels but not calcium, reduces but does not abolish their enrichment at the axonal surface, suggesting that apo calmodulin but not calcium-bound calmodulin is necessary for their preferential targeting to the axonal surface. These findings

  15. A Conserved Residue Cluster That Governs Kinetics of ATP-dependent Gating of Kir6.2 Potassium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Roger S.; Wright, Jordan D.; Pless, Stephan A.; Nunez, John-Jose; Kim, Robin Y.; Li, Jenny B. W.; Yang, Runying; Ahern, Christopher A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are heteromultimeric complexes of an inwardly rectifying Kir channel (Kir6.x) and sulfonylurea receptors. Their regulation by intracellular ATP and ADP generates electrical signals in response to changes in cellular metabolism. We investigated channel elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of ∼60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp-68 and Lys-170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp-68 or Lys-170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 and 700 ms for W68L and K170N, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using φ value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies that these residues play a role in lowering the transition state energy barrier between open and closed channel states. Using unnatural amino acid incorporation, we demonstrate the requirement for a planar amino acid at Kir6.2 position 68 for normal channel gating, which is potentially necessary to localize the ϵ-amine of Lys-170 in the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding site. Overall, our findings identify a discrete pair of highly conserved residues with an essential role for controlling gating kinetics of Kir channels. PMID:25934393

  16. Use of label-free optical biosensors to detect modulation of potassium channels by G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Matthew R; Shamah, Steven M; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2014-02-10

    Ion channels control the electrical properties of neurons and other excitable cell types by selectively allowing ions to flow through the plasma membrane(1). To regulate neuronal excitability, the biophysical properties of ion channels are modified by signaling proteins and molecules, which often bind to the channels themselves to form a heteromeric channel complex(2,3). Traditional assays examining the interaction between channels and regulatory proteins require exogenous labels that can potentially alter the protein's behavior and decrease the physiological relevance of the target, while providing little information on the time course of interactions in living cells. Optical biosensors, such as the X-BODY Biosciences BIND Scanner system, use a novel label-free technology, resonance wavelength grating (RWG) optical biosensors, to detect changes in resonant reflected light near the biosensor. This assay allows the detection of the relative change in mass within the bottom portion of living cells adherent to the biosensor surface resulting from ligand induced changes in cell adhesion and spreading, toxicity, proliferation, and changes in protein-protein interactions near the plasma membrane. RWG optical biosensors have been used to detect changes in mass near the plasma membrane of cells following activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases, and other cell surface receptors. Ligand-induced changes in ion channel-protein interactions can also be studied using this assay. In this paper, we will describe the experimental procedure used to detect the modulation of Slack-B sodium-activated potassium (KNa) channels by GPCRs.

  17. Modification of sodium and potassium channel kinetics by diethyl ether and studies on sodium channel inactivation in the crayfish giant axon membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, Bruce Palmer

    1979-01-01

    The effects of ether and halothane on membrane currents in the voltage clamped crayfish giant axon membrane were investigated. Concentrations of ether up to 300 mM and of halothane up to 32 mM had no effect on resting potential or leakage conductance. Ether and halothane reduced the size of sodium currents without changing the voltage dependence of the peak currents or their reversal potential. Ether and halothane also produced a reversible, dose-dependent speeding of sodium current decay at all membrane potentials. Ether reduced the time constants for inactivation, and also shifted the midpoint of the steady-state inactivation curve in themore » hyperpolarizing direction. Potassium currents were smaller with ether present, with no change in the voltage dependence of steady-state currents. The activation of potassium channels was faster with ether present. There was no apparent change in the capacitance of the crayfish giant axon membrane with ether concentrations of up to 100 mM. Experiments on sodium channel inactivation kinetics were performed using 4-aminopyridine to block potassium currents. Sodium currents decayed with a time course generally fit well by a single exponential. The time constant of decay was a steep function of voltage, especially in the negative resistance region of the peak current vs voltage relation.The time course of inactivation was very similar to that of the decay of the current at the same potential. The measurement of steady-state inactivation curves with different test pulses showed no shifts along the voltage asix. The voltage-dependence of the integral of sodium conductance was measured to test models of sodium channel inactivation in which channels must open before inactivating; the results appear inconsistent with some of the simplest cases of such models.« less

  18. Effects of potassium channel inhibitors in the forced swimming test: possible involvement of L-arginine-nitric oxide-soluble guanylate cyclase pathway.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella P; Ferreira, Priscilla K; Santos, Adair R S; Rodrigues, Ana L S

    2005-12-07

    The effects of inhibitors of different subtypes of potassium (K+) channels were investigated in the mouse forced swimming test (FST). The treatment of animals with tetraethylammonium (TEA, a non-specific inhibitor of potassium channels, 0.25-2.5 ng/site, intracerebroventricular, i.c.v.), glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP) inhibitor, 0.05-5 ng/site, i.c.v.), apamine (a small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels inhibitor (SKCa), 0.1-1 ng/site, i.c.v.), charybdotoxin (a large- (big, BK) and intermediate- (IK) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels inhibitor, 2.5-25 ng/site, i.c.v.) produced an anti-depressant-like effect in the FST. At the highest effective doses, none of the drugs affected the locomotor activity in an open-field. Besides that, the pre-treatment of animals with l-arginine (a nitric oxide (NO) precursor, 750 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, i.p.) or sildenafil (a specific phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, 5 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented the anti-depressant-like effect of all K+ channel inhibitors. The present results demonstrate that the decrease in the immobility time in the FST elicited by the inhibition of several subtypes of K+ channels is also dependent on the inhibition of NO-cGMP synthesis.

  19. Metformin restores electrophysiology of small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in the atrium of GK diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xi; Pan, Yilong; Cao, Qian; Li, Bin; Wang, Shuo; Du, Hongjiao; Duan, Na; Li, Xiaodong

    2018-04-10

    Small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) play a critical role in action potential repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Recently, the potential anti-arrhythmic effect of metformin in diabetic patients has been recognized, yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were untreated or treated with metformin (300 mg/kg/day) for 12 weeks, and age-matched Wistar rats were used as control (n = 6 per group). Electrocardiography, Hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson's trichome staining were performed to assess cardiac function, histology and fibrosis. The expression levels of the SK channels in the myocardium were determined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The electrophysiology of the SK channels in the cardiomyocytes isolated from the three groups of rats was examined by patch clamp assay, with specific blockade of the SK channels with apamin. Metformin treatment significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and alleviated arrhythmia in the diabetic rats. In the atrial myocytes from control, GK and metformin-treated GK rats, the expression of KCa2.2 (SK2 channel) was down-regulated and the expression of KCa2.3 (SK3 channel) was up-regulated in the atrium of GK rats as compared with that of control rats, and metformin reversed diabetes-induced alterations in atrial SK channel expression. Moreover, patch clamp assay revealed that the SK current was markedly reduced and the action potential duration was prolonged in GK atrial myocytes, and the SK channel function was partially restored in the atrial myocytes from metformin-treated GK rats. Our data suggests an involvement of the SK channels in the development of arrhythmia under diabetic conditions, and supports a potential beneficial effect of metformin on atrial electrophysiology.

  20. Contribution of the Kv3.1 potassium channel to high-frequency firing in mouse auditory neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Yang; Gan, Li; Forsythe, Ian D; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    1998-01-01

    Using a combination of patch-clamp, in situ hybridization and computer simulation techniques, we have analysed the contribution of potassium channels to the ability of a subset of mouse auditory neurones to fire at high frequencies.Voltage-clamp recordings from the principal neurones of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) revealed a low-threshold dendrotoxin (DTX)-sensitive current (ILT) and a high-threshold DTX-insensitive current (IHT).IHT displayed rapid activation and deactivation kinetics, and was selectively blocked by a low concentration of tetraethylammonium (TEA; 1 mm).The physiological and pharmacological properties of IHT very closely matched those of the Shaw family potassium channel Kv3.1 stably expressed in a CHO cell line.An mRNA probe corresponding to the C-terminus of the Kv3.1 channel strongly labelled MNTB neurones, suggesting that this channel is expressed in these neurones.TEA did not alter the ability of MNTB neurones to follow stimulation up to 200 Hz, but specifically reduced their ability to follow higher frequency impulses.A computer simulation, using a model cell in which an outward current with the kinetics and voltage dependence of the Kv3.1 channel was incorporated, also confirmed that the Kv3.1- like current is essential for cells to respond to a sustained train of high-frequency stimuli.We conclude that in mouse MNTB neurones the Kv3.1 channel contributes to the ability of these cells to lock their firing to high-frequency inputs. PMID:9547392

  1. Clinical spectrum and diagnostic value of antibodies against the potassium channel related protein complex.

    PubMed

    Montojo, M T; Petit-Pedrol, M; Graus, F; Dalmau, J

    2015-06-01

    Antibodies against a protein complex that includes voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) have been reported in patients with limbic encephalitis, peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, Morvan's syndrome, and a large variety of neurological syndromes. In this article, a review is presented of the syndromes associated with antibodies against VGKC-related proteins and the main antigens of this protein complex, the proteins LGI1 (leucine rich glioma inactivated protein 1) and Caspr2 (contactin-associated protein-like 2). The conceptual problems and clinical implications of the description of antibodies against VGKC-related proteins other than LGI1 and Caspr2 are also discussed. Although initial studies indicated the occurrence of antibodies against VGKC, recent investigations have shown that the main antigens are a neuronal secreted protein known as LGI1 which modulates synaptic excitability, and a protein called Caspr2 located on the cell surface and processes of neurons of different brain regions, and at the juxtaparanodal region of myelinated axons. While antibodies against LGI1 preferentially associate with classical limbic encephalitis, antibodies against Caspr2 associate with a wider spectrum of symptoms, including Morvan's syndrome, peripheral nerve hyperexcitability or neuromyotonia, and limbic or more extensive encephalitis. In addition there are reports of patients with antibodies against VGKC-related proteins that are different from LGI1 or Caspr2. In these cases, the identity and location of the antigens are unknown, the syndrome association is not specific, and the response to treatment uncertain. The discovery of antigens such as LGI1 and Caspr2 has resulted in a clinical and molecular definition of the broad group of diseases previously attributed to antibodies against VGKC. Considering the literature that describes the presence of antibodies against VGKC other than LGI1 and Caspr2 proteins, we propose a practical algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment

  2. Potassium channel antibody-associated encephalopathy: a potentially immunotherapy-responsive form of limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Angela; Buckley, Camilla; Schott, Jonathan M; Baker, Ian; Dewar, Bonnie-Kate; Detert, Niels; Clover, Linda; Parkinson, Abigail; Bien, Christian G; Omer, Salah; Lang, Bethan; Rossor, Martin N; Palace, Jackie

    2004-03-01

    Patients presenting with subacute amnesia are frequently seen in acute neurological practice. Amongst the differential diagnoses, herpes simplex encephalitis, Korsakoff's syndrome and limbic encephalitis should be considered. Limbic encephalitis is typically a paraneoplastic syndrome with a poor prognosis; thus, identifying those patients with potentially reversible symptoms is important. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC-Ab) have recently been reported in three cases of reversible limbic encephalitis. Here we review the clinical, immunological and neuropsychological features of 10 patients (nine male, one female; age range 44-79 years), eight of whom were identified in two centres over a period of 15 months. The patients presented with 1-52 week histories of memory loss, confusion and seizures. Low plasma sodium concentrations, initially resistant to treatment, were present in eight out of 10. Brain MRI at onset showed signal change in the medial temporal lobes in eight out of 10 cases. Paraneoplastic antibodies were negative, but VGKC-Ab ranged from 450 to 5128 pM (neurological and healthy controls <100 pM). CSF oligoclonal bands were found in only one, but bands matched with those in the serum were found in six other patients. VGKC-Abs in the CSF, tested in five individuals, varied between <1 and 10% of serum values. Only one patient had neuromyotonia, which was excluded by electromyography in seven of the others. Formal neuropsychology testing showed severe and global impairment of memory, with sparing of general intellect in all but two patients, and of nominal functions in all but one. Variable regimes of steroids, plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin were associated with variable falls in serum VGKC-Abs, to values between 2 and 88% of the initial values, together with marked improvement of neuropsychological functioning in six patients, slight improvement in three and none in one. The improvement in neuropsychological functioning in

  3. Impaired voltage gated potassium (KV) channel responses in a fetal lamb model of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Konduri, Girija G.; Bakhutashvili, Ivane; Eis, Annie; Gauthier, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that oxidative stress in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) impairs voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel function. We induced PPHN in fetal lambs by prenatal ligation of ductus arteriosus; controls had sham ligation. We studied changes in the tone of pulmonary artery rings and Kv channel current of freshly isolated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) using standard techniques. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP), a Kv channel antagonist, induced dose dependent constriction of control PA rings; this response was attenuated in PPHN pulmonary arteries. Exogenous superoxide and peroxynitrite inhibited the response to 4-AP in control rings. Tiron, a superoxide scavenger, improved the response to 4-AP in PPHN rings. 4-AP inhibited the NOS- independent relaxation response to ATP in control PA rings. Relaxation response to ATP was blunted in PPHN rings and was improved by NOS antagonist, n-nitro-l- arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). 4-AP attenuated this response in L-NAME treated PPHN rings. Exogenous superoxide suppressed 4-AP sensitive Kv current in control PASMC. Kv channel current was attenuated in cells from PPHN lambs and was restored by tiron. Oxidative stress impairs Kv channel function in PPHN. Superoxide scavengers may improve pulmonary vasodilation in PPHN in part by restoring Kv channel function. PMID:19542906

  4. Impaired voltage gated potassium channel responses in a fetal lamb model of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Konduri, Girija G; Bakhutashvili, Ivane; Eis, Annie; Gauthier, Kathryn M

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that oxidative stress in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) impairs voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel function. We induced PPHN in fetal lambs by prenatal ligation of ductus arteriosus; controls had sham ligation. We studied changes in the tone of pulmonary artery (PA) rings and Kv channel current of freshly isolated PA smooth muscle cells (PASMC) using standard techniques. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP), a Kv channel antagonist, induced dose-dependent constriction of control PA rings; this response was attenuated in PPHN pulmonary arteries. Exogenous superoxide and peroxynitrite inhibited the response to 4-AP in control rings. Tiron, a superoxide scavenger, improved the response to 4-AP in PPHN rings. 4-AP inhibited the NOS-independent relaxation response to ATP in control PA rings. Relaxation response to ATP was blunted in PPHN rings and was improved by NOS antagonist, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). 4-AP attenuated this response in L-NAME-treated PPHN rings. Exogenous superoxide suppressed 4-AP sensitive Kv current in control PASMC. Kv channel current was attenuated in cells from PPHN lambs and was restored by tiron. Oxidative stress impairs Kv channel function in PPHN. Superoxide scavengers may improve pulmonary vasodilation in PPHN in part by restoring Kv channel function.

  5. The receptor-like pseudokinase MRH1 interacts with the voltage-gated potassium channel AKT2

    PubMed Central

    Sklodowski, Kamil; Riedelsberger, Janin; Raddatz, Natalia; Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio; Chérel, Isabelle; Schulze, Waltraud; Graf, Alexander; Dreyer, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    The potassium channel AKT2 plays important roles in phloem loading and unloading. It can operate as inward-rectifying channel that allows H+-ATPase-energized K+ uptake. Moreover, through reversible post-translational modifications it can also function as an open, K+-selective channel, which taps a ‘potassium battery’, providing additional energy for transmembrane transport processes. Knowledge about proteins involved in the regulation of the operational mode of AKT2 is very limited. Here, we employed a large-scale yeast two-hybrid screen in combination with fluorescence tagging and null-allele mutant phenotype analysis and identified the plasma membrane localized receptor-like kinase MRH1/MDIS2 (AT4G18640) as interaction partner of AKT2. The phenotype of the mrh1-1 knockout plant mirrors that of akt2 knockout plants in energy limiting conditions. Electrophysiological analyses showed that MRH1/MDIS2 failed to exert any functional regulation on AKT2. Using structural protein modeling approaches, we instead gathered evidence that the putative kinase domain of MRH1/MDIS2 lacks essential sites that are indispensable for a functional kinase suggesting that MRH1/MDIS2 is a pseudokinase. We propose that MRH1/MDIS2 and AKT2 are likely parts of a bigger protein complex. MRH1 might help to recruit other, so far unknown partners, which post-translationally regulate AKT2. Additionally, MRH1 might be involved in the recognition of chemical signals. PMID:28300158

  6. The receptor-like pseudokinase MRH1 interacts with the voltage-gated potassium channel AKT2.

    PubMed

    Sklodowski, Kamil; Riedelsberger, Janin; Raddatz, Natalia; Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio; Chérel, Isabelle; Schulze, Waltraud; Graf, Alexander; Dreyer, Ingo

    2017-03-16

    The potassium channel AKT2 plays important roles in phloem loading and unloading. It can operate as inward-rectifying channel that allows H + -ATPase-energized K + uptake. Moreover, through reversible post-translational modifications it can also function as an open, K + -selective channel, which taps a 'potassium battery', providing additional energy for transmembrane transport processes. Knowledge about proteins involved in the regulation of the operational mode of AKT2 is very limited. Here, we employed a large-scale yeast two-hybrid screen in combination with fluorescence tagging and null-allele mutant phenotype analysis and identified the plasma membrane localized receptor-like kinase MRH1/MDIS2 (AT4G18640) as interaction partner of AKT2. The phenotype of the mrh1-1 knockout plant mirrors that of akt2 knockout plants in energy limiting conditions. Electrophysiological analyses showed that MRH1/MDIS2 failed to exert any functional regulation on AKT2. Using structural protein modeling approaches, we instead gathered evidence that the putative kinase domain of MRH1/MDIS2 lacks essential sites that are indispensable for a functional kinase suggesting that MRH1/MDIS2 is a pseudokinase. We propose that MRH1/MDIS2 and AKT2 are likely parts of a bigger protein complex. MRH1 might help to recruit other, so far unknown partners, which post-translationally regulate AKT2. Additionally, MRH1 might be involved in the recognition of chemical signals.

  7. The receptor-like pseudokinase MRH1 interacts with the voltage-gated potassium channel AKT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklodowski, Kamil; Riedelsberger, Janin; Raddatz, Natalia; Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio; Chérel, Isabelle; Schulze, Waltraud; Graf, Alexander; Dreyer, Ingo

    2017-03-01

    The potassium channel AKT2 plays important roles in phloem loading and unloading. It can operate as inward-rectifying channel that allows H+-ATPase-energized K+ uptake. Moreover, through reversible post-translational modifications it can also function as an open, K+-selective channel, which taps a ‘potassium battery’, providing additional energy for transmembrane transport processes. Knowledge about proteins involved in the regulation of the operational mode of AKT2 is very limited. Here, we employed a large-scale yeast two-hybrid screen in combination with fluorescence tagging and null-allele mutant phenotype analysis and identified the plasma membrane localized receptor-like kinase MRH1/MDIS2 (AT4G18640) as interaction partner of AKT2. The phenotype of the mrh1-1 knockout plant mirrors that of akt2 knockout plants in energy limiting conditions. Electrophysiological analyses showed that MRH1/MDIS2 failed to exert any functional regulation on AKT2. Using structural protein modeling approaches, we instead gathered evidence that the putative kinase domain of MRH1/MDIS2 lacks essential sites that are indispensable for a functional kinase suggesting that MRH1/MDIS2 is a pseudokinase. We propose that MRH1/MDIS2 and AKT2 are likely parts of a bigger protein complex. MRH1 might help to recruit other, so far unknown partners, which post-translationally regulate AKT2. Additionally, MRH1 might be involved in the recognition of chemical signals.

  8. α-Synuclein forms non-selective cation channels and stimulates ATP-sensitive potassium channels in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Sergej L

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease and several other neurodegenerative diseases, the protein α-synuclein (αS) is produced within neurons and accumulates in the extracellular fluid. Several mechanisms of αS action are proposed, one of which is the formation of cation-permeable pores that may mediate toxicity. αS induces non-selective cation channels in lipid bilayers, but whether this occurs in living neurons and which properties the channels possess have not yet been examined. In this study the properties of αS channels in dissociated hippocampal neurons are documented. In cell-attached recordings the incorporation of αS into membranes was driven by applied negative potentials. These channels exhibited multiple levels of conductance (30, 70 and 120 pS at −100 mV) and inward rectification. The persistent activity of αS channels induced local changes in intracellular Na+ and Ca2+, depolarized neurons and augmented bursting activity. αS channels formed by adding αS to the intracellular membrane in inside-out patches exhibited outward rectification. αS channels were equally permeable to Na+, K+ and Ca2+. These channels were also observed in neurons transfected with wild-type or mutant A53T αS, and after extracellular application of wild-type or mutant A53T αS proteins. Opening of αS channels stimulated opening of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP ) channels and did not interfere with the activity of delayed rectifier K+ channels. The properties of αS channels in neuronal membranes suggest stronger toxicity of extracellularly applied αS than intracellular αS. Enhancement of neuronal excitability and distortions in ion homeostasis may underlie the toxic effects of αS that can be dampened by KATP channels. PMID:25556793

  9. Genetic variation in the KCNMA1 potassium channel alpha subunit as risk factor for severe essential hypertension and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Marta; Vázquez, Esther; Fernández-Fernández, José M; Subirana, Isaac; Plata, Cristina; Heras, Magda; Vila, Joan; Marrugat, Jaume; Valverde, Miguel A; Sentí, Mariano

    2008-11-01

    The large conductance Ca2+ -dependent potassium channel plays a critical role in the control of vascular tone, coupling local increases in intracellular Ca2+ to membrane hyperpolarization and vascular relaxation. It also impacts blood pressure by modulating the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Previous studies have shown that a polymorphism in the beta1 regulatory subunit of the Ca2+ -dependent potassium channel modulates the risk of diastolic hypertension in humans. We have studied polymorphisms in the pore-forming alpha subunit gene (KCNMA1) and their association to hypertension and myocardial infarction. Sequencing of the KCNMA1 gene revealed two genetic variants (polymorphisms C864T and IVS17) in population-based epidemiological studies (4786 participants). We detected a significant increase in the frequency of the IVS17+37T>C polymorphism with severe systolic hypertension (48.3% for normotensive vs. 69% for severe systolic hypertension, P=0.03) and with severe general hypertension (48.7 vs. 65.8%, P=0.04), although the adjusted odd ratios did not reach statistical significance. Four C864T/IVS17 haplotypes were identified. Haplotype 4 (encompassing the C allele of the IVS17 polymorphism and the T allele of the C864T polymorphism) was related with increased severity of systolic and general hypertension as well as increased risk of myocardial infarction. Our study provides genetic evidence that highlights the relevance of the Ca2+ -dependent potassium channel in the control of human blood pressure and its impact on cardiovascular disease.

  10. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Peigneur, Steve; Pons, Tirso; Alvarez, Carlos; González, Lidice; Chávez, María A.; Tytgat, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713) is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends. PMID:27089366

  11. A highly polarized excitable cell separates sodium channels from sodium-activated potassium channels by more than a millimeter.

    PubMed

    Ban, Yue; Smith, Benjamin E; Markham, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    The bioelectrical properties and resulting metabolic demands of electrogenic cells are determined by their morphology and the subcellular localization of ion channels. The electric organ cells (electrocytes) of the electric fish Eigenmannia virescens generate action potentials (APs) with Na(+) currents >10 μA and repolarize the AP with Na(+)-activated K(+) (KNa) channels. To better understand the role of morphology and ion channel localization in determining the metabolic cost of electrocyte APs, we used two-photon three-dimensional imaging to determine the fine cellular morphology and immunohistochemistry to localize the electrocytes' ion channels, ionotropic receptors, and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPases. We found that electrocytes are highly polarized cells ∼ 1.5 mm in anterior-posterior length and ∼ 0.6 mm in diameter, containing ∼ 30,000 nuclei along the cell periphery. The cell's innervated posterior region is deeply invaginated and vascularized with complex ultrastructural features, whereas the anterior region is relatively smooth. Cholinergic receptors and Na(+) channels are restricted to the innervated posterior region, whereas inward rectifier K(+) channels and the KNa channels that terminate the electrocyte AP are localized to the anterior region, separated by >1 mm from the only sources of Na(+) influx. In other systems, submicrometer spatial coupling of Na(+) and KNa channels is necessary for KNa channel activation. However, our computational simulations showed that KNa channels at a great distance from Na(+) influx can still terminate the AP, suggesting that KNa channels can be activated by distant sources of Na(+) influx and overturning a long-standing assumption that AP-generating ion channels are restricted to the electrocyte's posterior face. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Brownian dynamics study of a multiply-occupied cation channel: application to understanding permeation in potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Bek, S; Jakobsson, E

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of a multiply-occupied cation-selective channel has been computed by Brownian dynamics. The length, cross-section, ion-ion repulsion force, and ionic mobility within the channel are all estimated from data and physical reasoning. The only free parameter is a partition energy at the mouth of the channel, defining the free energy of an ion in the channel compared to the bath. It is presumed that this partition energy is associated with the energetics of exchanging a bulk hydration environment for a channel hydration environment. Varying the partition energy alone, keeping all other parameters fixed, gives approximately the full range of magnitudes of single channel conductances seen experimentally for K channels. Setting the partition energy at -11 kT makes the computed channel look similar to a squid axon K channel with respect to magnitude of conductance, shape of the I-V curve, non-unity of Ussing flux ratio exponents, decrease of current and increase of conductance with extracellular ion accumulation, and saturation at high ion concentration in the bathing solution. The model includes no preferred binding sites (local free energy minima) for ions in the channel. Therefore it follows that none of the above-mentioned properties of K channels are strong evidence for the existence of such sites. The model does not show supersaturation of current at very high bathing concentrations nor any pronounced voltage-dependence of the Ussing flux ratio exponent, suggesting that these features would require additional details not included in the model presented herein. PMID:7518703

  13. Brownian dynamics study of a multiply-occupied cation channel: application to understanding permeation in potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bek, S; Jakobsson, E

    1994-04-01

    The behavior of a multiply-occupied cation-selective channel has been computed by Brownian dynamics. The length, cross-section, ion-ion repulsion force, and ionic mobility within the channel are all estimated from data and physical reasoning. The only free parameter is a partition energy at the mouth of the channel, defining the free energy of an ion in the channel compared to the bath. It is presumed that this partition energy is associated with the energetics of exchanging a bulk hydration environment for a channel hydration environment. Varying the partition energy alone, keeping all other parameters fixed, gives approximately the full range of magnitudes of single channel conductances seen experimentally for K channels. Setting the partition energy at -11 kT makes the computed channel look similar to a squid axon K channel with respect to magnitude of conductance, shape of the I-V curve, non-unity of Ussing flux ratio exponents, decrease of current and increase of conductance with extracellular ion accumulation, and saturation at high ion concentration in the bathing solution. The model includes no preferred binding sites (local free energy minima) for ions in the channel. Therefore it follows that none of the above-mentioned properties of K channels are strong evidence for the existence of such sites. The model does not show supersaturation of current at very high bathing concentrations nor any pronounced voltage-dependence of the Ussing flux ratio exponent, suggesting that these features would require additional details not included in the model presented herein.

  14. Urinary bladder instability induced by selective suppression of the murine small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK3) channel

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Gerald M; Pozo, Maria J; Zvara, Peter; Petkov, Georgi V; Bond, Chris T; Adelman, John P; Nelson, Mark T

    2003-01-01

    Small conductance, calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels have an important role in determining the excitability and contractility of urinary bladder smooth muscle. Here, the role of the SK isoform SK3 was examined by altering expression levels of the SK3 gene using a mouse model that conditionally overexpresses SK3 channels (SK3T/T). Prominent SK3 immunostaining was found in both the smooth muscle (detrusor) and urothelium layers of the urinary bladder. SK currents were elevated 2.4-fold in isolated myocytes from SK3T/T mice. Selective suppression of SK3 expression by dietary doxycycline (DOX) decreased SK current density in isolated myocytes, increased phasic contractions of isolated urinary bladder smooth muscle strips and exposed high affinity effects of the blocker apamin of the SK isoforms (SK1–3), suggesting an additional participation from SK2 channels. The role of SK3 channels in urinary bladder function was assessed using cystometry in conscious, freely moving mice. The urinary bladders of SK3T/T had significantly greater bladder capacity, and urine output exceeded the infused saline volume. Suppression of SK3 channel expression did not alter filling pressure, threshold pressure or bladder capacity, but micturition pressure was elevated compared to control mice. However, SK3 suppression did eliminate excess urine production and caused a marked increase in non-voiding contractions. The ability to examine bladder function in mice in which SK3 channel expression is selectively altered reveals that these channels have a significant role in the control of non-voiding contractions in vivo. Activation of these channels may be a therapeutic approach for management of non-voiding contractions, a condition which characterizes many types of urinary bladder dysfunctions including urinary incontinence. PMID:12813145

  15. Deregulation of 2 potassium channels in pancreas adenocarcinomas: implication of KV1.3 gene promoter methylation.

    PubMed

    Brevet, Marie; Fucks, David; Chatelain, Denis; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Delcenserie, Richard; Sevestre, Henri; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine expression of 2 potassium (K) channels in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The immunohistochemical and mRNA expression of GIRK1 (G-protein inwardly rectifying K channel 1) and KV1.3 channel (voltage-dependent K channel) was studied in 55 and 18 adenocarcinomas and 33 and 8 normal pancreas specimens, respectively. The methylation status of KV1.3 promoter was studied by methyl-specific polymerase chain reaction in 33 pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The results were correlated with the patients' prognosis. GIRK1 was highly expressed in 80% (44/55) of adenocarcinoma samples versus 57.6% (19/33) of normal samples (P=0.03), as confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction results (P=0.007). KV1.3 expression was decreased in pancreatic adenocarcinomas compared with normal tissue (7.3% vs 39.4%; P=0.0005). KV1.3 down-expression was associated with metastatic tumors (P=0.018). KV1.3 promoter methylation was observed in 69.7% (22/33) of adenocarcinomas. This is the first report of deregulation of 2 K channels in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. GIRK1 was highly expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas, corresponding to its role in cell proliferation. Methylation of KV1.3 gene promoter could explain the decrease of KV1.3 expression in adenocarcinomas. New therapeutic agents, such as DNA methylation inhibitors, could be useful against this dramatic cancer.

  16. Preclinical study of a Kv11.1 potassium channel activator as antineoplastic approach for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fukushiro-Lopes, Daniela F.; Hegel, Alexandra D.; Rao, Vidhya; Wyatt, Debra; Baker, Andrew; Breuer, Eun-Kyoung; Osipo, Clodia; Zartman, Jeremiah J.; Burnette, Miranda; Kaja, Simon; Kouzoukas, Dimitrios; Burris, Sarah; Jones, W. Keith; Gentile, Saverio

    2018-01-01

    Potassium ion (K+) channels have been recently found to play a critical role in cancer biology. Despite that pharmacologic manipulation of ion channels is recognized as an important therapeutic approach, very little is known about the effects of targeting of K+ channels in cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that use of the Kv11.1 K+ channel activator NS1643 inhibits tumor growth in an in vivo model of breast cancer. Tumors exposed to NS1643 had reduced levels of proliferation markers, high expression levels of senescence markers, increased production of ROS and DNA damage compared to tumors of untreated mice. Importantly, mice treated with NS1643 did not exhibit significant cardiac dysfunction. In conclusion, pharmacological stimulation of Kv11.1 activity produced arrested TNBC-derived tumor growth by generating DNA damage and senescence without significant side effects. We propose that use of Kv11.1 channels activators could be considered as a possible pharmacological strategy against breast tumors. PMID:29423049

  17. Preclinical study of a Kv11.1 potassium channel activator as antineoplastic approach for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fukushiro-Lopes, Daniela F; Hegel, Alexandra D; Rao, Vidhya; Wyatt, Debra; Baker, Andrew; Breuer, Eun-Kyoung; Osipo, Clodia; Zartman, Jeremiah J; Burnette, Miranda; Kaja, Simon; Kouzoukas, Dimitrios; Burris, Sarah; Jones, W Keith; Gentile, Saverio

    2018-01-09

    Potassium ion (K + ) channels have been recently found to play a critical role in cancer biology. Despite that pharmacologic manipulation of ion channels is recognized as an important therapeutic approach, very little is known about the effects of targeting of K + channels in cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that use of the Kv11.1 K + channel activator NS1643 inhibits tumor growth in an in vivo model of breast cancer. Tumors exposed to NS1643 had reduced levels of proliferation markers, high expression levels of senescence markers, increased production of ROS and DNA damage compared to tumors of untreated mice. Importantly, mice treated with NS1643 did not exhibit significant cardiac dysfunction. In conclusion, pharmacological stimulation of Kv11.1 activity produced arrested TNBC-derived tumor growth by generating DNA damage and senescence without significant side effects. We propose that use of Kv11.1 channels activators could be considered as a possible pharmacological strategy against breast tumors.

  18. Voltage-dependent gating of KCNH potassium channels lacking a covalent link between voltage-sensing and pore domains

    PubMed Central

    Lörinczi, Éva; Gómez-Posada, Juan Camilo; de la Peña, Pilar; Tomczak, Adam P.; Fernández-Trillo, Jorge; Leipscher, Ulrike; Stühmer, Walter; Barros, Francisco; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated channels open paths for ion permeation upon changes in membrane potential, but how voltage changes are coupled to gating is not entirely understood. Two modules can be recognized in voltage-gated potassium channels, one responsible for voltage sensing (transmembrane segments S1 to S4), the other for permeation (S5 and S6). It is generally assumed that the conversion of a conformational change in the voltage sensor into channel gating occurs through the intracellular S4–S5 linker that provides physical continuity between the two regions. Using the pathophysiologically relevant KCNH family, we show that truncated proteins interrupted at, or lacking the S4–S5 linker produce voltage-gated channels in a heterologous model that recapitulate both the voltage-sensing and permeation properties of the complete protein. These observations indicate that voltage sensing by the S4 segment is transduced to the channel gate in the absence of physical continuity between the modules. PMID:25818916

  19. Inwardly Rectifying Potassium (Kir) Channels Represent a Critical Ion Conductance Pathway in the Nervous Systems of Insects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Swale, Daniel R

    2018-01-25

    A complete understanding of the physiological pathways critical for proper function of the insect nervous system is still lacking. The recent development of potent and selective small-molecule modulators of insect inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels has enabled the interrogation of the physiological role and toxicological potential of Kir channels within various insect tissue systems. Therefore, we aimed to highlight the physiological and functional role of neural Kir channels the central nervous system, muscular system, and neuromuscular system through pharmacological and genetic manipulations. Our data provide significant evidence that Drosophila neural systems rely on the inward conductance of K + ions for proper function since pharmacological inhibition and genetic ablation of neural Kir channels yielded dramatic alterations of the CNS spike discharge frequency and broadening and reduced amplitude of the evoked EPSP at the neuromuscular junction. Based on these data, we conclude that neural Kir channels in insects (1) are critical for proper function of the insect nervous system, (2) represents an unexplored physiological pathway that is likely to shape the understanding of neuronal signaling, maintenance of membrane potentials, and maintenance of the ionic balance of insects, and (3) are capable of inducing acute toxicity to insects through neurological poisoning.

  20. Synergistic activation of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels by cholesterol and PI(4,5)P2.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2017-07-01

    G-protein gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK or Kir3) channels play a major role in the control of the heart rate, and require the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-bis-phosphate (PI(4,5)P 2 ) for activation. Recently, we have shown that the activity of the heterotetrameric Kir3.1/Kir3.4 channel that underlies atrial K ACh currents was enhanced by cholesterol. Similarly, the activities of both the Kir3.4 homomer and its active pore mutant Kir3.4* (Kir3.4_S143T) were also enhanced by cholesterol. Here we employ planar lipid bilayers to investigate the crosstalk between PI(4,5)P 2 and cholesterol, and demonstrate that these two lipids act synergistically to activate Kir3.4* currents. Further studies using the Xenopus oocytes heterologous expression system suggest that PI(4,5)P 2 and cholesterol act via distinct binding sites. Whereas PI(4,5)P 2 binds to the cytosolic domain of the channel, the putative binding region of cholesterol is located at the center of the transmembrane domain overlapping the central glycine hinge region of the channel. Together, our data suggest that changes in the levels of two key membrane lipids - cholesterol and PI(4,5)P 2 - could act in concert to provide fine-tuning of Kir3 channel function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hyperexcitability and reduced low threshold potassium currents in auditory neurons of mice lacking the channel subunit Kv1.1

    PubMed Central

    Brew, Helen M; Hallows, Janice L; Tempel, Bruce L

    2003-01-01

    A low voltage-activated potassium current, IKL, is found in auditory neuron types that have low excitability and precisely preserve the temporal pattern of activity present in their presynaptic inputs. The gene Kcnal codes for Kv1.1 potassium channel subunits, which combine in expression systems to produce channel tetramers with properties similar to those of IKL, including sensitivity to dendrotoxin (DTX). Kv1.1 is strongly expressed in neurons with IKL, including auditory neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). We therefore decided to investigate how the absence of Kv1.1 affected channel properties and function in MNTB neurons from mice lacking Kcnal. We used the whole cell version of the patch clamp technique to record from MNTB neurons in brainstem slices from Kcnal-null (−/−) mice and their wild-type (+/+) and heterozygous (+/−) littermates. There was an IKL in voltage-clamped −/− MNTB neurons, but it was about half the amplitude of the IKL in +/+ neurons, with otherwise similar properties. Consistent with this, −/− MNTB neurons were more excitable than their +/+ counterparts; they fired more than twice as many action potentials (APs) during current steps, and the threshold current amplitude required to generate an AP was roughly halved. +/− MNTB neurons had excitability and IKL amplitudes identical to the +/+ neurons. The IKL remaining in −/− neurons was blocked by DTX, suggesting the underlying channels contained subunits Kv1.2 and/or Kv1.6 (also DTX-sensitive). DTX increased excitability further in the already hyperexcitable −/− MNTB neurons, suggesting that −/−IKL limited excitability despite its reduced amplitude in the absence of Kv1.1 subunits. PMID:12611922

  2. Probing potassium channel function in vivo by intracellular delivery of antibodies in a rat model of retinal neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Raz-Prag, Dorit; Grimes, William N.; Fariss, Robert N.; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Campos, Maria M.; Bush, Ronald A.; Diamond, Jeffrey S.; Sieving, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Inward rectifying potassium (Kir) channels participate in regulating potassium concentration (K+) in the central nervous system (CNS), including in the retina. We explored the contribution of Kir channels to retinal function by delivering Kir antibodies (Kir-Abs) into the rat eye in vivo to interrupt channel activity. Kir-Abs were coupled to a peptide carrier to reach intracellular epitopes. Functional effects were evaluated by recording the scotopic threshold response (STR) and photopic negative response (PhNR) of the electroretinogram (ERG) noninvasively with an electrode on the cornea to determine activity of the rod and cone pathways, respectively. Intravitreal delivery of Kir2.1-Ab coupled to the peptide carrier diminished these ERG responses equivalent to dimming the stimulus 10- to 100-fold. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed Kir2.1 immunostaining of retinal bipolar cells (BCs) matching the labeling pattern obtained with conventional IHC of applying Kir2.1-Ab to fixed retinal sections postmortem. Whole-cell voltage-clamp BC recordings in rat acute retinal slices showed suppression of barium-sensitive Kir2.1 currents upon inclusion of Kir2.1-Ab in the patch pipette. The in vivo functional and structural results implicate a contribution of Kir2.1 channel activity in these electronegative ERG potentials. Studies with Kir4.1-Ab administered in vivo also suppressed the ERG components and showed immunostaining of Müller cells. The strategy of administering Kir antibodies in vivo, coupled to a peptide carrier to facilitate intracellular delivery, identifies roles for Kir2.1 and Kir4.1 in ERG components arising in the proximal retina and suggests this approach could be of further value in research. PMID:20616020

  3. Stretch-dependent potassium channels in murine colonic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sang Don; Sanders, Kenton M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal muscles are able to maintain negative resting membrane potentials in spite of stretch. We investigated whether stretch-dependent K+ channels might contribute to myogenic regulation of smooth muscle cells from the mouse colon. Negative pressure applied to on-cell membrane patches activated K+ channels that were voltage independent and had a slope conductance of 95 pS in symmetrical K+ gradients. The effects of negative pressure on open probability were graded as a function of pressure and reversible when atmospheric pressure was restored. Cell elongation activated K+ channels with the same properties as those activated by negative pressure, suggesting that the channels were stretch-dependent K+ (SDK) channels. Channels with the same properties were maximally activated by patch excision, suggesting that either an intracellular messenger or interactions with the cytoskeleton regulate open probability. Internal 4-aminopyridine, Ca2+ (10−8 to 10−6m), and tetraethylammonium (internal or external) were without effect on SDK channels. Nitric oxide donors (and cell-permeant cGMP analogues) activated SDK channels, suggesting that these channels may mediate a portion of the enteric inhibitory neural response in colonic muscles. In summary, SDK channels are an important conductance expressed by colonic muscle cells. SDK channels may stabilize membrane potential during dynamic changes in cell length and mediate responses to enteric neurotransmitters. PMID:11351024

  4. Mechanism of HERG potassium channel inhibition by tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Yan; Lin, Zuoxian; Xia, Menghang

    2013-03-01

    Tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride are synthetic quaternary ammonium salts that are widely used in hospitals and industries for the disinfection and surface treatment and as the preservative agent. Recently, the activities of HERG channel inhibition by these compounds have been found to have potential risks to induce the long QT syndrome and cardiac arrhythmia, although the mechanism of action is still elusive. This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of HERG channel inhibition by these compounds by using whole-cell patch clamp experiments in a CHO cell line stably expressing HERG channels. Tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride exhibited concentration-dependentmore » inhibitions of HERG channel currents with IC{sub 50} values of 4 nM and 17 nM, respectively, which were also voltage-dependent and use-dependent. Both compounds shifted the channel activation I–V curves in a hyperpolarized direction for 10–15 mV and accelerated channel activation and inactivation processes by 2-fold. In addition, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide shifted the inactivation I–V curve in a hyperpolarized direction for 24.4 mV and slowed the rate of channel deactivation by 2-fold, whereas benzethonium chloride did not. The results indicate that tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride are open-channel blockers that inhibit HERG channels in the voltage-dependent, use-dependent and state-dependent manners. - Highlights: ► Tetra-n-octylammonium and benzethonium are potent HERG channel inhibitors. ► Channel activation and inactivation processes are accelerated by the two compounds. ► Both compounds are the open-channel blockers to HERG channels. ► HERG channel inhibition by both compounds is use-, voltage- and state dependent. ► The in vivo risk of QT prolongation needs to be studied for the two compounds.« less

  5. ATP-sensitive potassium channel: a novel target for protection against UV-induced human skin cell damage.

    PubMed

    Cao, Cong; Healey, Sarah; Amaral, Ashley; Lee-Couture, Avery; Wan, Shu; Kouttab, Nicola; Chu, Wenming; Wan, Yinsheng

    2007-07-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) induces cell damages leading to skin photoaging and skin cancer. ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel openers (KCOs) have been shown to exert significant myocardial preservation and neuroprotection in vitro and in vivo, and yet the potential role of those KCOs in protection against UV-induced skin cell damage is unknown. We investigated the effects of pinacidil and diazoxide, two classical KCOs, on UV-induced cell death using cultured human keratinocytes (HaCat cells). Here, we demonstrated for the first time that Kir 6.1, Kir 6.2 and SUR2 subunits of K(ATP) channels are functionally expressed in HaCaT cells and both non-selective K(ATP) channel opener pinacidil and mitoK(ATP) (mitochondrial K(ATP)) channel opener diazoxide attenuated UV-induced keratinocytes cell death. The protective effects were abolished by both non-selective K(ATP) channel blocker glibenclamide and selective mitoK(ATP) channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD). Also, activation of K(ATP) channel with pinacidil or diazoxide resulted in suppressive effects on UV-induced MAPK activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Unexpectedly, we found that the level of intracellular ROS was slightly elevated in HaCaT cells when treated with pinacidil or diazoxide alone. Furthermore, UV-induced mitochondrial membrane potential loss, cytochrome c release and ultimately apoptotic cell death were also inhibited by preconditioning with pinacidil and diazoxide, and their effects were reversed by glibenclamide and 5-HD. Taken together, we contend that mitoK(ATP) is likely to contribute the protection against UV-induced keratinocytes cell damage. Our findings suggest that K(ATP) openers such as pinacidil and diazoxide may be utilized to prevent from UV-induced skin aging.

  6. Disruption of ATP-sensitive potassium channel function in skeletal muscles promotes production and secretion of musclin

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, Ana, E-mail: ana-sierra@uiowa.edu; Subbotina, Ekaterina, E-mail: ekaterina-subbotina@uiowa.edu; Zhu, Zhiyong, E-mail: zhiyong-zhu@uiowa.edu

    2016-02-26

    Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels control skeletal muscle energy use through their ability to adjust membrane excitability and related cell functions in accordance with cellular metabolic status. Mice with disrupted skeletal muscle K{sub ATP} channels exhibit reduced adipocyte size and increased fatty acid release into the circulation. As yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying this link between skeletal muscle K{sub ATP} channel function and adipose mobilization have not been established. Here, we demonstrate that skeletal muscle-specific disruption of K{sub ATP} channel function in transgenic (TG) mice promotes production and secretion of musclin. Musclin is a myokine with high homology tomore » atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) that enhances ANP signaling by competing for elimination. Augmented musclin production in TG mice is driven by a molecular cascade resulting in enhanced acetylation and nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) – an inhibitor of transcription of the musclin encoding gene. Musclin production/secretion in TG is paired with increased mobilization of fatty acids and a clear trend toward increased circulating ANP, an activator of lipolysis. These data establish K{sub ATP} channel-dependent musclin production as a potential mechanistic link coupling “local” skeletal muscle energy consumption with mobilization of bodily resources from fat. Understanding such mechanisms is an important step toward designing interventions to manage metabolic disorders including those related to excess body fat and associated co-morbidities. - Highlights: • ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels regulate musclin production by skeletal muscles. • Lipolytic ANP signaling is promoted by augmented skeletal muscle musclin production. • Skeletal muscle musclin transcription is promoted by a CaMKII/HDAC/FOXO1 pathway. • Musclin links adipose mobilization to energy use in K{sub ATP} channel deficient skeletal

  7. Quantitative Confocal Microscopy Analysis as a Basis for Search and Study of Potassium Kv1.x Channel Blockers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofanov, Alexey V.; Kudryashova, Kseniya S.; Nekrasova, Oksana V.; Vassilevski, Alexander A.; Kuzmenkov, Alexey I.; Korolkova, Yuliya V.; Grishin, Eugene V.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.

    Artificial KcsA-Kv1.x (x = 1, 3) receptors were recently designed by transferring the ligand-binding site from human Kv1.x voltage-gated potassium channels into corresponding domain of the bacterial KscA channel. We found that KcsA-Kv1.x receptors expressed in E. coli cells are embedded into cell membrane and bind ligands when the cells are transformed to spheroplasts. We supposed that E. coli spheroplasts with membrane-embedded KcsA-Kv1.x and fluorescently labeled ligand agitoxin-2 (R-AgTx2) can be used as elements of an advanced analytical system for search and study of Kv1-channel blockers. To realize this idea, special procedures were developed for measurement and quantitative treatment of fluorescence signals obtained from spheroplast membrane using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The worked out analytical "mix and read" systems supported by quantitative CLSM analysis were demonstrated to be reliable alternative to radioligand and electrophysiology techniques in the search and study of selective Kv1.x channel blockers of high scientific and medical importance.

  8. TWIK-1 two-pore domain potassium channels change ion selectivity and conduct inward leak sodium currents in hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liqun; Zhang, Xuexin; Chen, Haijun

    2011-06-07

    Background potassium (K+) channels, which are normally selectively permeable to K+, maintain the cardiac resting membrane potential at around -80 mV. In subphysiological extracellular K+ concentrations ([K+]o), which occur in pathological hypokalemia, the resting membrane potential of human cardiomyocytes can depolarize to around -50 mV, whereas rat and mouse cardiomyocytes become hyperpolarized, consistent with the Nernst equation for K+. This paradoxical depolarization of cardiomyocytes in subphysiological [K+]o, which may contribute to cardiac arrhythmias, is thought to involve an inward leak sodium (Na+) current. Here, we show that human cardiac TWIK-1 (also known as K2P1) two-pore domain K+ channels change ion selectivity, becoming permeable to external Na+, and conduct inward leak Na+ currents in subphysiological [K+]o. A specific threonine residue (Thr118) within the pore selectivity sequence TxGYG was required for this altered ion selectivity. Mouse cardiomyocyte-derived HL-1 cells exhibited paradoxical depolarization with ectopic expression of TWIK-1 channels, whereas TWIK-1 knockdown in human spherical primary cardiac myocytes eliminated paradoxical depolarization. These findings indicate that ion selectivity of TWIK-1 K+ channels changes during pathological hypokalemia, elucidate a molecular basis for inward leak Na+ currents that could trigger or contribute to cardiac paradoxical depolarization in lowered [K+]o, and identify a mechanism for regulating cardiac excitability.

  9. Direct activation of inward rectifier potassium channels by PIP2 and its stabilization by Gbetagamma.

    PubMed

    Huang, C L; Feng, S; Hilgemann, D W

    1998-02-19

    Inward rectifier K+ channels, which modulate electrical activity in many cell types, are regulated by protein kinases, guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) and probably actin cytoskeleton. Generation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) by ATP-dependent lipid kinases is known to activate inward rectifier K+ channels in cardiac membrane patches. Here we report that several cloned inward rectifier K+ channels directly bind PIP2, and that this binding correlates with channel activity. Application of ATP or PIP2 liposomes activates the cloned channels. Stabilized by lipid phosphatase inhibitors, PIP2 antibodies potently inhibit each channel with a unique rate (GIRK1/4 approximately GIRK2 > IRK1 approximately ROMK. Consistent with the faster dissociation of PIP2 from the GIRK channels, the carboxy terminus of GIRK1 binds 3H-PIP2 liposomes more weakly than does that of IRK1 or ROMK1. Mutation of a conserved arginine to glutamine at position 188 reduces the ability of ROMK1 to bind PIP2 and increases its sensitivity to inhibition by PIP2 antibodies. Interactions between GIRK channels and PIP2 are modulated by the betagamma subunits of the G protein (Gbetagamma). When GIRK1/4 channels are allowed to run down completely, they are not activated by addition of Gbetagamma alone, but application of PIP2 activates them in minutes without Gbetagamma and in just seconds with Gbetagamma. Finally, coexpression of Gbetagamma with GIRK channels slows the inhibition of K+ currents by PIP2 antibodies by more than 10-fold. Thus Gbetagamma activates GIRK channels by stabilizing interactions between PIP2 and the K+ channel.

  10. Phycodnavirus Potassium Ion Channel Proteins Question the Virus Molecular Piracy Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamacher, Kay; Greiner, Timo; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Van Etten, James L.; Gebhardt, Manuela; Villarreal, Luis P.; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Phycodnaviruses are large dsDNA, algal-infecting viruses that encode many genes with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Among the viral gene products are the smallest proteins known to form functional K+ channels. To determine if these viral K+ channels are the product of molecular piracy from their hosts, we compared the sequences of the K+ channel pore modules from seven phycodnaviruses to the K+ channels from Chlorella variabilis and Ectocarpus siliculosus, whose genomes have recently been sequenced. C. variabilis is the host for two of the viruses PBCV-1 and NY-2A and E. siliculosus is the host for the virus EsV-1. Systematic phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that the viral K+ channels are not related to any lineage of the host channel homologs and that they are more closely related to each other than to their host homologs. A consensus sequence of the viral channels resembles a protein of unknown function from a proteobacterium. However, the bacterial protein lacks the consensus motif of all K+ channels and it does not form a functional channel in yeast, suggesting that the viral channels did not come from a proteobacterium. Collectively, our results indicate that the viruses did not acquire their K+ channel-encoding genes from their current algal hosts by gene transfer; thus alternative explanations are required. One possibility is that the viral genes arose from ancient organisms, which served as their hosts before the viruses developed their current host specificity. Alternatively the viral proteins could be the origin of K+ channels in algae and perhaps even all cellular organisms. PMID:22685610

  11. Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels: regulation by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M.; Bukiya, Anna N.; Singh, Aditya K.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol (CLR) is an essential component of eukaryotic plasma membranes. CLR regulates the membrane physical state, microdomain formation and the activity of membrane-spanning proteins, including ion channels. Large conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-gated K+ (BK) channels link membrane potential to cell Ca2+ homeostasis. Thus, they control many physiological processes and participate in pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. Because plasmalemma BK channels cluster in CLR-rich membrane microdomains, a major driving force for studying BK channel-CLR interactions is determining how membrane CLR controls the BK current phenotype, including its pharmacology, channel sorting, distribution, and role in cell physiology. Since both BK channels and CLR tissue levels play a pathophysiological role in human disease, identifying functional and structural aspects of the CLR-BK channel interaction may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the studies documenting membrane CLR-BK channel interactions, dissecting out the many factors that determine the final BK current response to changes in membrane CLR content. We also summarize work in reductionist systems where recombinant BK protein is studied in artificial lipid bilayers, which documents a direct inhibition of BK channel activity by CLR and builds a strong case for a direct interaction between CLR and the BK channel-forming protein. Bilayer lipid-mediated mechanisms in CLR action are also discussed. Finally, we review studies of BK channel function during hypercholesterolemia, and underscore the many consequences that the CLR-BK channel interaction brings to cell physiology and human disease. PMID:22584144

  12. Therapeutic targeting of two-pore-domain potassium (K(2P)) channels in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Felix; Schmidt, Constanze; Lugenbiel, Patrick; Staudacher, Ingo; Rahm, Ann-Kathrin; Seyler, Claudia; Schweizer, Patrick A; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2016-05-01

    The improvement of treatment strategies in cardiovascular medicine is an ongoing process that requires constant optimization. The ability of a therapeutic intervention to prevent cardiovascular pathology largely depends on its capacity to suppress the underlying mechanisms. Attenuation or reversal of disease-specific pathways has emerged as a promising paradigm, providing a mechanistic rationale for patient-tailored therapy. Two-pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels conduct outward K(+) currents that stabilize the resting membrane potential and facilitate action potential repolarization. K(2P) expression in the cardiovascular system and polymodal K2P current regulation suggest functional significance and potential therapeutic roles of the channels. Recent work has focused primarily on K(2P)1.1 [tandem of pore domains in a weak inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (TWIK)-1], K(2P)2.1 [TWIK-related K(+) channel (TREK)-1], and K(2P)3.1 [TWIK-related acid-sensitive K(+) channel (TASK)-1] channels and their role in heart and vessels. K(2P) currents have been implicated in atrial and ventricular arrhythmogenesis and in setting the vascular tone. Furthermore, the association of genetic alterations in K(2P)3.1 channels with atrial fibrillation, cardiac conduction disorders and pulmonary arterial hypertension demonstrates the relevance of the channels in cardiovascular disease. The function, regulation and clinical significance of cardiovascular K(2P) channels are summarized in the present review, and therapeutic options are emphasized. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  13. The Role of Potassium Channels in Arabidopsis thaliana Long Distance Electrical Signalling: AKT2 Modulates Tissue Excitability While GORK Shapes Action Potentials.

    PubMed

    Cuin, Tracey Ann; Dreyer, Ingo; Michard, Erwan

    2018-03-21

    Fast responses to an external threat depend on the rapid transmission of signals through a plant. Action potentials (APs) are proposed as such signals. Plant APs share similarities with their animal counterparts; they are proposed to depend on the activity of voltage-gated ion channels. Nonetheless, despite their demonstrated role in (a)biotic stress responses, the identities of the associated voltage-gated channels and transporters remain undefined in higher plants. By demonstrating the role of two potassium-selective channels in Arabidopsis thaliana in AP generation and shaping, we show that the plant AP does depend on similar Kv -like transport systems to those of the animal signal. We demonstrate that the outward-rectifying potassium-selective channel GORK limits the AP amplitude and duration, while the weakly-rectifying channel AKT2 affects membrane excitability. By computational modelling of plant APs, we reveal that the GORK activity not only determines the length of an AP but also the steepness of its rise and the maximal amplitude. Thus, outward-rectifying potassium channels contribute to both the repolarisation phase and the initial depolarisation phase of the signal. Additionally, from modelling considerations we provide indications that plant APs might be accompanied by potassium waves, which prime the excitability of the green cable.

  14. Cholesterol up-regulates neuronal G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel activity in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bukiya, Anna N.; Noskov, Sergei; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2017-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a well known risk factor for the development of neurodegenerative disease. However, the underlying mechanisms are mostly unknown. In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that cholesterol-driven effects on physiology and pathophysiology derive from its ability to alter the function of a variety of membrane proteins including ion channels. Yet, the effect of cholesterol on G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels expressed in the brain is unknown. GIRK channels mediate the actions of inhibitory brain neurotransmitters. As a result, loss of GIRK function can enhance neuron excitability, whereas gain of GIRK function can reduce neuronal activity. Here we show that in rats on a high-cholesterol diet, cholesterol levels in hippocampal neurons are increased. We also demonstrate that cholesterol plays a critical role in modulating neuronal GIRK currents. Specifically, cholesterol enrichment of rat hippocampal neurons resulted in enhanced channel activity. In accordance, elevated currents upon cholesterol enrichment were also observed in Xenopus oocytes expressing GIRK2 channels, the primary GIRK subunit expressed in the brain. Furthermore, using planar lipid bilayers, we show that although cholesterol did not affect the unitary conductance of GIRK2, it significantly enhanced the frequency of channel openings. Last, combining computational and functional approaches, we identified two putative cholesterol-binding sites in the transmembrane domain of GIRK2. These findings establish that cholesterol plays a critical role in modulating GIRK activity in the brain. Because up-regulation of GIRK function can reduce neuronal activity, our findings may lead to novel approaches for prevention and therapy of cholesterol-driven neurodegenerative disease. PMID:28213520

  15. BcsTx3 is a founder of a novel sea anemone toxin family of potassium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    Orts, Diego J B; Moran, Yehu; Cologna, Camila T; Peigneur, Steve; Madio, Bruno; Praher, Daniela; Quinton, Loic; De Pauw, Edwin; Bicudo, José E P W; Tytgat, Jan; de Freitas, José C

    2013-10-01

    Sea anemone venoms have become a rich source of peptide toxins which are invaluable tools for studying the structure and functions of ion channels. In this work, BcsTx3, a toxin found in the venom of a Bunodosoma caissarum (population captured at the Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago, Brazil) was purified and biochemically and pharmacologically characterized. The pharmacological effects were studied on 12 different subtypes of voltage-gated potassium channels (K(V)1.1-K(V)1.6; K(V)2.1; K(V)3.1; K(V)4.2; K(V)4.3; hERG and Shaker IR) and three cloned voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms (Na(V)1.2, Na(V)1.4 and BgNa(V)1.1) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. BcsTx3 shows a high affinity for Drosophila Shaker IR channels over rKv1.2, hKv1.3 and rKv1.6, and is not active on NaV channels. Biochemical characterization reveals that BcsTx3 is a 50 amino acid peptide crosslinked by four disulfide bridges, and sequence comparison allowed BcsTx3 to be classified as a novel type of sea anemone toxin acting on K(V) channels. Moreover, putative toxins homologous to BcsTx3 from two additional actiniarian species suggest an ancient origin of this newly discovered toxin family. © 2013 FEBS.

  16. Cholesterol up-regulates neuronal G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel activity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Durdagi, Serdar; Noskov, Sergei; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2017-04-14

    Hypercholesterolemia is a well known risk factor for the development of neurodegenerative disease. However, the underlying mechanisms are mostly unknown. In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that cholesterol-driven effects on physiology and pathophysiology derive from its ability to alter the function of a variety of membrane proteins including ion channels. Yet, the effect of cholesterol on G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels expressed in the brain is unknown. GIRK channels mediate the actions of inhibitory brain neurotransmitters. As a result, loss of GIRK function can enhance neuron excitability, whereas gain of GIRK function can reduce neuronal activity. Here we show that in rats on a high-cholesterol diet, cholesterol levels in hippocampal neurons are increased. We also demonstrate that cholesterol plays a critical role in modulating neuronal GIRK currents. Specifically, cholesterol enrichment of rat hippocampal neurons resulted in enhanced channel activity. In accordance, elevated currents upon cholesterol enrichment were also observed in Xenopus oocytes expressing GIRK2 channels, the primary GIRK subunit expressed in the brain. Furthermore, using planar lipid bilayers, we show that although cholesterol did not affect the unitary conductance of GIRK2, it significantly enhanced the frequency of channel openings. Last, combining computational and functional approaches, we identified two putative cholesterol-binding sites in the transmembrane domain of GIRK2. These findings establish that cholesterol plays a critical role in modulating GIRK activity in the brain. Because up-regulation of GIRK function can reduce neuronal activity, our findings may lead to novel approaches for prevention and therapy of cholesterol-driven neurodegenerative disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. The lysosomal potassium channel TMEM175 adopts a novel tetrameric architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changkeun; Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong

    2017-07-19

    TMEM175 is a lysosomal K+ channel that is important for maintaining the membrane potential and pH stability in lysosomes1. It contains two homologous copies of a six-transmembrane-helix (6-TM) domain, which has no sequence homology to the canonical tetrameric K+ channels and lacks the TVGYG selectivity filter motif found in these channels2, 3, 4. The prokaryotic TMEM175 channel, which is present in a subset of bacteria and archaea, contains only a single 6-TM domain and functions as a tetramer. Here, we present the crystal structure of a prokaryotic TMEM175 channel from Chamaesiphon minutus, CmTMEM175, the architecture of which represents a completelymore » different fold from that of canonical K+ channels. All six transmembrane helices of CmTMEM175 are tightly packed within each subunit without undergoing domain swapping. The highly conserved TM1 helix acts as the pore-lining inner helix, creating an hourglass-shaped ion permeation pathway in the channel tetramer. Three layers of hydrophobic residues on the carboxy-terminal half of the TM1 helices form a bottleneck along the ion conduction pathway and serve as the selectivity filter of the channel. Mutagenesis analysis suggests that the first layer of the highly conserved isoleucine residues in the filter is primarily responsible for channel selectivity. Thus, the structure of CmTMEM175 represents a novel architecture of a tetrameric cation channel whose ion selectivity mechanism appears to be distinct from that of the classical K+ channel family.« less

  18. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Stabilization of ion selectivity filter by pore loop ion pairs in an inwardly rectifying potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Yu, M; Jan, Y N; Jan, L Y

    1997-02-18

    Ion selectivity is critical for the biological functions of voltage-dependent cation channels and is achieved by specific ion binding to a pore region called the selectivity filter. In voltage-gated K+, Na+ and Ca2+ channels, the selectivity filter is formed by a short polypeptide loop (called the H5 or P region) between the fifth and sixth transmembrane segments, donated by each of the four subunits or internal homologous domains forming the channel. While mutagenesis studies on voltage-gated K+ channels have begun to shed light on the structural organization of this pore region, little is known about the physical and chemical interactions that maintain the structural stability of the selectivity filter. Here we show that in an inwardly rectifying K+ (IRK) channel, IRK1, short range interactions of an ion pair in the H5 pore loop are crucial for pore structure and ion permeation. The two residues, a glutamate and an arginine, appear to form exposed salt bridges in the tetrameric channel. Alteration or disruption of such ion pair interactions dramatically alters ion selectivity and permeation. Since this ion pair is conserved in all IRK channels, it may constitute a general mechanism for maintaining the stability of the pore structure in this channel superfamily.

  20. Potassium channels in the regulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis: pharmacotherapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Burg, E D; Remillard, C V; Yuan, J X-J

    2008-03-01

    Maintaining the proper balance between cell apoptosis and proliferation is required for normal tissue homeostasis; when this balance is disrupted, disease such as pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) can result. Activity of K(+) channels plays a major role in regulating the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) population in the pulmonary vasculature, as they are involved in cell apoptosis, survival and proliferation. PASMCs from PAH patients demonstrate many cellular abnormalities linked to K(+) channels, including decreased K(+) current, downregulated expression of various K(+) channels, and inhibited apoptosis. K(+) is the major intracellular cation, and the K(+) current is a major determinant of cell volume. Apoptotic volume decrease (AVD), an early hallmark and prerequisite of programmed cell death, is characterized by K(+) and Cl(-) efflux. In addition to its role in AVD, cytosolic K(+) can be inhibitory toward endogenous caspases and nucleases and can suppress mitochondrial cytochrome c release. In PASMC, K(+) channel activation accelerates AVD and enhances apoptosis, while K(+) channel inhibition decelerates AVD and inhibits apoptosis. Finally, inhibition of K(+) channels, by increasing cytosolic [Ca(2+)] as a result of membrane depolarization-mediated opening of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, leads to PASMC contraction and proliferation. The goals of this review are twofold: (1) to elucidate the role of K(+) ions and K(+) channels in the proliferation and apoptosis of PASMC, with an emphasis on abnormal cell growth in human and animal models of PAH, and (2) to elaborate upon the targeting of K(+) flux pathways for pharmacological treatment of pulmonary vascular disease.

  1. Kv4 Potassium Channels Modulate Hippocampal EPSP-Spike Potentiation and Spatial Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truchet, Bruno; Manrique, Christine; Sreng, Leam; Chaillan, Franck A.; Roman, Francois S.; Mourre, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Kv4 channels regulate the backpropagation of action potentials (b-AP) and have been implicated in the modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP). Here we showed that blockade of Kv4 channels by the scorpion toxin AmmTX3 impaired reference memory in a radial maze task. In vivo, AmmTX3 intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion increased and…

  2. Heme impairs the ball-and-chain inactivation of potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Nirakar; Goradia, Nishit; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Schönherr, Roland; Friedrich, Manfred; Plass, Winfried; Kappl, Reinhard; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2013-01-01

    Fine-tuned regulation of K+ channel inactivation enables excitable cells to adjust action potential firing. Fast inactivation present in some K+ channels is mediated by the distal N-terminal structure (ball) occluding the ion permeation pathway. Here we show that Kv1.4 K+ channels are potently regulated by intracellular free heme; heme binds to the N-terminal inactivation domain and thereby impairs the inactivation process, thus enhancing the K+ current with an apparent EC50 value of ∼20 nM. Functional studies on channel mutants and structural investigations on recombinant inactivation ball domain peptides encompassing the first 61 residues of Kv1.4 revealed a heme-responsive binding motif involving Cys13:His16 and a secondary histidine at position 35. Heme binding to the N-terminal inactivation domain induces a conformational constraint that prevents it from reaching its receptor site at the vestibule of the channel pore. PMID:24082096

  3. Stimulatory actions of a novel thiourea derivative on large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Nan; Chern, Jyh-Haur; Shen, Santai; Chen, Hwei-Hisen; Hsu, Ying-Ting; Lee, Chih-Chin; Chan, Ming-Huan; Lai, Ming-Chi; Shie, Feng-Shiun

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we examine whether an anti-inflammatory thiourea derivative, compound #326, actions on ion channels. The effects of compound #326 on Ca 2+ -activated K + channels were evaluated by patch-clamp recordings obtained in cell-attached, inside-out or whole-cell configuration. In pituitary GH 3 cells, compound #326 increased the amplitude of Ca 2+ -activated K + currents (I K(Ca) ) with an EC 50 value of 11.6 μM, which was reversed by verruculogen, but not tolbutamide or TRAM-34. Under inside-out configuration, a bath application of compound #326 raised the probability of large-conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + (BK Ca ) channels. The activation curve of BK Ca channels was shifted to less depolarised potential with no modification of the gating charge of the curve; consequently, the difference of free energy was reduced in the presence of this compound. Compound #326-stimulated activity of BK Ca channels is explained by a shortening of mean closed time, despite its inability to alter single-channel conductance. Neither delayed-rectifier nor erg-mediated K + currents was modified. Compound #326 decreased the peak amplitude of voltage-gated Na + current with no clear change in the overall current-voltage relationship of this current. In HEK293T cells expressing α-hSlo, compound #326 enhanced BK Ca channels effectively. Intriguingly, the inhibitory actions of compound #326 on interleukin 1β in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia were significantly reversed by verruculogen, whereas BK Ca channel inhibitors suppressed the expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase. The BK Ca channels could be an important target for compound #326 if similar in vivo results occur, and the multi-functionality of BK Ca channels in modulating microglial immunity merit further investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Interactions of drugs and toxins with permeant ions in potassium, sodium, and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhorov, B S

    2011-07-01

    Ion channels in cell membranes are targets for a multitude of ligands including naturally occurring toxins, illicit drugs, and medications used to manage pain and treat cardiovascular, neurological, autoimmune, and other health disorders. In the past decade, the x-ray crystallography revealed 3D structures of several ion channels in their open, closed, and inactivated states, shedding light on mechanisms of channel gating, ion permeation and selectivity. However, atomistic mechanisms of the channel modulation by ligands are poorly understood. Increasing evidence suggest that cationophilic groups in ion channels and in some ligands may simultaneously coordinate permeant cations, which form indispensible (but underappreciated) components of respective receptors. This review describes ternary ligand-metal-channel complexes predicted by means of computer-based molecular modeling. The models rationalize a large body of experimental data including paradoxes in structure-activity relationships, effects of mutations on the ligand action, sensitivity of the ligand action to the nature of current-carrying cations, and action of ligands that bind in the ion-permeation pathway but increase rather than decrease the current. Recent mutational and ligand-binding experiments designed to test the models have confirmed the ternary-complex concept providing new knowledge on physiological roles of metal ions and atomistic mechanisms of action of ion channel ligands.

  5. Inhibition of HERG potassium channels by domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yan; Chen, Wanjuan; Lin, Zuoxian; Sun, Hongmao; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Zhiyuan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide were widely used environmental chemicals with potent activity on blockade of HERG channels. But the mechanism of their action is not clear. The kinetics of block of HERG channels by domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide was studied in order to characterize the inhibition of HERG currents by these quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). Domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide inhibited HERG channel currents in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values of 9 nM and 5 nM, respectively. Block of HERG channel by domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide was found to be voltage-dependent and use-dependent. Domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide caused substantial negative shift of the activation curves, accelerated activated process, but had no effects on the deactivation and reactivation processes. The docking models implied that these two compounds bound to PAS domain of HERG channels and inhibited its function. Our data demonstrated that domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide blocked the HERG channel with a preference for the activated channel state. PMID:24846011

  6. Inhibition of HERG potassium channels by domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan; Chen, Wanjuan; Lin, Zuoxian; Sun, Hongmao; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Li, Zhiyuan

    2014-08-15

    Domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide were widely used environmental chemicals with potent activity on blockade of human ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) channels. But the mechanism of their action is not clear. The kinetics of block of HERG channels by domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide was studied in order to characterize the inhibition of HERG currents by these quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). Domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide inhibited HERG channel currents in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values of 9nM and 5nM, respectively. Block of HERG channel by domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide was voltage-dependent and use-dependent. Domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide caused substantial negative shift of the activation curves, accelerated activated process, but had no effects on the deactivation and reactivation processes. The docking models implied that these two compounds bound to PAS domain of HERG channels and inhibited its function. Our data demonstrated that domiphen bromide and didecyl dimethylammonium bromide blocked the HERG channel with a preference for the activated channel state. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Apical Ca2+-activated potassium channels in mouse parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Almassy, Janos; Won, Jong Hak; Begenisich, Ted B; Yule, David I

    2012-02-01

    Ca(2+) activation of Cl and K channels is a key event underlying stimulated fluid secretion from parotid salivary glands. Cl channels are exclusively present on the apical plasma membrane (PM), whereas the localization of K channels has not been established. Mathematical models have suggested that localization of some K channels to the apical PM is optimum for fluid secretion. A combination of whole cell electrophysiology and temporally resolved digital imaging with local manipulation of intracellular [Ca(2+)] was used to investigate if Ca(2+)-activated K channels are present in the apical PM of parotid acinar cells. Initial experiments established Ca(2+)-buffering conditions that produced brief, localized increases in [Ca(2+)] after focal laser photolysis of caged Ca(2+). Conditions were used to isolate K(+) and Cl(-) conductances. Photolysis at the apical PM resulted in a robust increase in K(+) and Cl(-) currents. A localized reduction in [Ca(2+)] at the apical PM after photolysis of Diazo-2, a caged Ca(2+) chelator, resulted in a decrease in both K(+) and Cl(-) currents. The K(+) currents evoked by apical photolysis were partially blocked by both paxilline and TRAM-34, specific blockers of large-conductance "maxi-K" (BK) and intermediate K (IK), respectively, and almost abolished by incubation with both antagonists. Apical TRAM-34-sensitive K(+) currents were also observed in BK-null parotid acini. In contrast, when the [Ca(2+)] was increased at the basal or lateral PM, no increase in either K(+) or Cl(-) currents was evoked. These data provide strong evidence that K and Cl channels are similarly distributed in the apical PM. Furthermore, both IK and BK channels are present in this domain, and the density of these channels appears higher in the apical versus basolateral PM. Collectively, this study provides support for a model in which fluid secretion is optimized after expression of K channels specifically in the apical PM.

  8. Molecular characterization of voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv) and its importance in functional dynamics in bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rishi Kumar; Swain, Dilip Kumar; Singh, Vijay; Anand, Mukul; Choudhury, Soumen; Yadav, Sarvajeet; Saxena, Atul; Garg, Satish Kumar

    2018-03-26

    Present study was undertaken to characterize the voltage gated potassium channel (K v 1.1) in bull spermatozoa using sixty four ejaculates collected from four Hariana bulls. Functional characterization was undertaken using a selective blocker of Kv channel, 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) while molecular presence of Kv on bull spermatozoa by immunoblotting and indirect immunofluorescence. Three sets of 100 μL diluted sperm samples namely-negative control (100 μL of sperm dilution medium (SDM) containing 10 × 10 6  cells), vehicle control (99 μL of SDM containing 10 × 10 6  cells, and DMSO- 1  μL) and 4-AP treatment group (99 μL of SDM containing 10 × 10 6  cells, and drug 1 μL 4-AP) were used in the study. Immunoblotting identified a single band of 56 kDa corresponding to Kv1.1 in Hariana bull spermatozoa. Immunolocalization showed the positive immunoreactivity at head, middle piece and principal piece of the spermatozoa for Kv 1.1. Blocking of Kv using 4-AP resulted in significant (p < 0.05) reduction in sperm progressive motility, per cent capacitated spermatozoa (B-pattern) and acrosome reacted (AR-pattern) spermatozoa, while significant (P < 0.05) increase in per cent swollen spermatozoa. Blocking of Kv channels resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) increased percentage of spermatozoa with lower mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Computer assisted semen analysis (CASA) of motion and kinematic parameters in 4-AP treated spermatozoa indicated reduction in sperm motion parameters like LIN, STR, VSL and VAP and higher ALH, VCL, and BCF indicating hyperactivity of spermatozoa. Based on our findings, it may be concluded that voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv) are present on bull spermatozoa and these are associated with functional dynamics of spermatozoa. However, based on our limited study, it is not possible to deduce that how these channels are associated with induction of hyperactivity. Therefore, further studies

  9. Increasing small conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channel activity reverses ischemia-induced impairment of long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Orfila, J E; Shimizu, K; Garske, A K; Deng, G; Maylie, J; Traystman, R J; Quillinan, N; Adelman, J P; Herson, P S

    2014-10-01

    Global cerebral ischemia following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) causes injury to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and impairs cognition. Small conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels type 2 (SK2), expressed in CA1 pyramidal neurons, have been implicated as potential protective targets. Here we showed that, in mice, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) was impaired as early as 3 h after recovery from CA/CPR and LTP remained impaired for at least 30 days. Treatment with the SK2 channel agonist 1-Ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (1-EBIO) at 30 min after CA provided sustained protection from plasticity deficits, with LTP being maintained at control levels at 30 days after recovery from CA/CPR. Minimal changes in glutamate release probability were observed at delayed times after CA/CPR, implicating post-synaptic mechanisms. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated that CA/CPR did not cause a loss of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor mRNA at 7 or 30 days after CA/CPR. Similarly, no change in synaptic NMDA receptor protein levels was observed at 7 or 30 days after CA/CPR. Further, patch-clamp experiments demonstrated no change in functional synaptic NMDA receptors at 7 or 30 days after CA/CPR. Electrophysiology recordings showed that synaptic SK channel activity was reduced for the duration of experiments performed (up to 30 days) and that, surprisingly, treatment with 1-EBIO did not prevent the CA/CPR-induced loss of synaptic SK channel function. We concluded that CA/CPR caused alterations in post-synaptic signaling that were prevented by treatment with the SK2 agonist 1-EBIO, indicating that activators of SK2 channels may be useful therapeutic agents to prevent ischemic injury and cognitive impairments. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Slow inactivation in voltage gated potassium channels is insensitive to the binding of pore occluding peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Carolina; González, Vivian; Naranjo, David

    2005-08-01

    Voltage gated potassium channels open and inactivate in response to changes of the voltage across the membrane. After removal of the fast N-type inactivation, voltage gated Shaker K-channels (Shaker-IR) are still able to inactivate through a poorly understood closure of the ion conduction pore. This, usually slower, inactivation shares with binding of pore occluding peptide toxin two important features: i), both are sensitive to the occupancy of the pore by permeant ions or tetraethylammonium, and ii), both are critically affected by point mutations in the external vestibule. Thus, mutual interference between these two processes is expected. To explore the extent of the conformational change involved in Shaker slow inactivation, we estimated the energetic impact of such interference. We used kappa-conotoxin-PVIIA (kappa-PVIIA) and charybdotoxin (CTX) peptides that occlude the pore of Shaker K-channels with a simple 1:1 stoichiometry and with kinetics 100-fold faster than that of slow inactivation. Because inactivation appears functionally different between outside-out patches and whole oocytes, we also compared the toxin effect on inactivation with these two techniques. Surprisingly, the rate of macroscopic inactivation and the rate of recovery, regardless of the technique used, were toxin insensitive. We also found that the fraction of inactivated channels at equilibrium remained unchanged at saturating kappa-PVIIA. This lack of interference with toxin suggests that during slow inactivation the toxin receptor site remains unaffected, placing a strong geometry-conservative constraint on the possible structural configurations of a slow inactivated K-channel. Such a constraint could be fulfilled by a concerted rotation of the external vestibule.

  11. Intermediate-Conductance-Ca2-Activated K Channel Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel (IKCa1) is Upregulated and Promotes Cell Proliferation in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Zhan, Ping; Nie, Dan; Fan, Lingye; Lin, Hairui; Gao, Lanyang; Mao, Xiguang

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating data point to intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (IKCa1) as a key player in controlling cell cycle progression and proliferation of human cancer cells. However, the role that IKCa1 plays in the growth of human cervical cancer cells is largely unexplored. Material/Methods In this study, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemical staining, and RT-PCR were first used for IKCa1protein and gene expression assays in cervical cancer tissues and HeLa cells. Then, IKCa1 channel blocker and siRNA were employed to inhibit the functionality of IKCa1 and downregulate gene expression in HeLa cells, respectively. After these treatments, we examined the level of cell proliferation by MTT method and measured IKCa1 currents by conventional whole-cell patch clamp technique. Cell apoptosis was assessed using the Annexin V-FITC/Propidium Iodide (PI) double-staining apoptosis detection kit. Results We demonstrated that IKCa1 mRNA and protein are preferentially expressed in cervical cancer tissues and HeLa cells. We also showed that the IKCa1 channel blocker, clotrimazole, and IKCa1 channel siRNA can be used to suppress cervical cancer cell proliferation and decrease IKCa1 channel current. IKCa1 downregulation by specific siRNAs induced a significant increase in the proportion of apoptotic cells in HeLa cells. Conclusions IKCa1 is overexpressed in cervical cancer tissues, and IKCa1 upregulation in cervical cancer cell linea enhances cell proliferation, partly by reducing the proportion of apoptotic cells. PMID:28280257

  12. The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 is an important modulator of hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Sevelsted Møller, Linda; Fialla, Annette Dam; Schierwagen, Robert; Biagini, Matteo; Liedtke, Christian; Laleman, Wim; Klein, Sabine; Reul, Winfried; Koch Hansen, Lars; Rabjerg, Maj; Singh, Vikrant; Surra, Joaquin; Osada, Jesus; Reinehr, Roland; de Muckadell, Ove B. Schaffalitzky; Köhler, Ralf; Trebicka, Jonel

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 controls different cellular processes such as proliferation and volume homeostasis. We investigated the role of KCa3.1 in experimental and human liver fibrosis. KCa3.1 gene expression was investigated in healthy and injured human and rodent liver. Effect of genetic depletion and pharmacological inhibition of KCa3.1 was evaluated in mice during carbon tetrachloride induced hepatic fibrogenesis. Transcription, protein expression and localisation of KCa3.1 was analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Hemodynamic effects of KCa3.1 inhibition were investigated in bile duct-ligated and carbon tetrachloride intoxicated rats. In vitro experiments were performed in rat hepatic stellate cells and hepatocytes. KCa3.1 expression was increased in rodent and human liver fibrosis and was predominantly observed in the hepatocytes. Inhibition of KCa3.1 aggravated liver fibrosis during carbon tetrachloride challenge but did not change hemodynamic parameters in portal hypertensive rats. In vitro, KCa3.1 inhibition leads to increased hepatocyte apoptosis and DNA damage, whereas proliferation of hepatic stellate cells was stimulated by KCa3.1 inhibition. Our data identifies KCa3.1 channels as important modulators in hepatocellular homeostasis. In contrast to previous studies in vitro and other tissues this channel appears to be anti-fibrotic and protective during liver injury. PMID:27354175

  13. Structural Basis for Calcium and Magnesium Regulation of a Large Conductance Calcium-activated Potassium Channel with β1 Subunits*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao-Wen; Hou, Pan-Pan; Guo, Xi-Ying; Zhao, Zhi-Wen; Hu, Bin; Li, Xia; Wang, Lu-Yang; Ding, Jiu-Ping; Wang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels, composed of pore-forming α subunits and auxiliary β subunits, play important roles in diverse physiological activities. The β1 is predominately expressed in smooth muscle cells, where it greatly enhances the Ca2+ sensitivity of BK channels for proper regulation of smooth muscle tone. However, the structural basis underlying dynamic interaction between BK mSlo1 α and β1 remains elusive. Using macroscopic ionic current recordings in various Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations, we identified two binding sites on the cytosolic N terminus of β1, namely the electrostatic enhancing site (mSlo1(K392,R393)-β1(E13,T14)), increasing the calcium sensitivity of BK channels, and the hydrophobic site (mSlo1(L906,L908)-β1(L5,V6,M7)), passing the physical force from the Ca2+ bowl onto the enhancing site and S6 C-linker. Dynamic binding of these sites affects the interaction between the cytosolic domain and voltage-sensing domain, leading to the reduction of Mg2+ sensitivity. A comprehensive structural model of the BK(mSlo1 α-β1) complex was reconstructed based on these functional studies, which provides structural and mechanistic insights for understanding BK gating. PMID:24764303

  14. Targeting cardiac potassium channels for state-of-the-art drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kenneth B

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac K(+) channels play a critical role in maintaining the normal electrical activity of the heart by setting the cell resting membrane potential and by determining the shape and duration of the action potential. Drugs that block the rapid (IKr) and slow (IKs) components of the delayed rectifier K(+) current have been widely used as class III antiarrhythmic agents. In addition, drugs that selectively target the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier current (IKur) and the acetylcholine-gated inward rectifier current (IKAch) have shown efficacy in the treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation. In order to meet the future demand for new antiarrhythmic agents, novel approaches for cardiac K(+) channel drug discovery will need to be developed. Further, K(+) channel screening assays utilizing primary and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes will be essential for evaluating the cardiotoxicity of potential drug candidates. In this review, the author provides a brief background on the structure, function and pharmacology of cardiac voltage-gated and inward rectifier K(+) channels. He then focuses on describing and evaluating current technologies, such as ion flux and membrane potential-sensitive dye assays, used for cardiac K(+) channel drug discovery. Cardiac K(+) channels will continue to represent significant clinical targets for drug discovery. Although fluorescent high-throughput screening (HTS) assays and automated patch clamp systems will remain the workhorse technologies for identifying lead compounds, innovations in the areas of microfluidics, micropatterning and biosensor fabrication will allow further growth of technologies using primary and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

  15. Mechanism for selectivity-inactivation coupling in KcsA potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wayland W. L.; McCoy, Jason G.; Thompson, Ameer N.; Nichols, Colin G.; Nimigean, Crina M.

    2011-01-01

    Structures of the prokaryotic K+ channel, KcsA, highlight the role of the selectivity filter carbonyls from the GYG signature sequence in determining a highly selective pore, but channels displaying this sequence vary widely in their cation selectivity. Furthermore, variable selectivity can be found within the same channel during a process called C-type inactivation. We investigated the mechanism for changes in selectivity associated with inactivation in a model K+ channel, KcsA. We found that E71A, a noninactivating KcsA mutant in which a hydrogen-bond behind the selectivity filter is disrupted, also displays decreased K+ selectivity. In E71A channels, Na+ permeates at higher rates as seen with and flux measurements and analysis of intracellular Na+ block. Crystal structures of E71A reveal that the selectivity filter no longer assumes the “collapsed,” presumed inactivated, conformation in low K+, but a “flipped” conformation, that is also observed in high K+, high Na+, and even Na+ only conditions. The data reveal the importance of the E71-D80 interaction in both favoring inactivation and maintaining high K+ selectivity. We propose a molecular mechanism by which inactivation and K+ selectivity are linked, a mechanism that may also be at work in other channels containing the canonical GYG signature sequence. PMID:21402935

  16. Functional and molecular identification of a TASK-1 potassium channel regulating chloride secretion through CFTR channels in the shark rectal gland: implications for cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Telles, Connor J.; Decker, Sarah E.; Motley, William W.; Peters, Alexander W.; Mehr, Ali Poyan; Frizzell, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    In the shark rectal gland (SRG), apical chloride secretion through CFTR channels is electrically coupled to a basolateral K+ conductance whose type and molecular identity are unknown. We performed studies in the perfused SRG with 17 K+ channel inhibitors to begin this search. Maximal chloride secretion was markedly inhibited by low-perfusate pH, bupivicaine, anandamide, zinc, quinidine, and quinine, consistent with the properties of an acid-sensitive, four-transmembrane, two-pore-domain K+ channel (4TM-K2P). Using PCR with degenerate primers to this family, we identified a TASK-1 fragment in shark rectal gland, brain, gill, and kidney. Using 5′ and 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR and genomic walking, we cloned the full-length shark gene (1,282 bp), whose open reading frame encodes a protein of 375 amino acids that was 80% identical to the human TASK-1 protein. We expressed shark and human TASK-1 cRNA in Xenopus oocytes and characterized these channels using two-electrode voltage clamping. Both channels had identical current-voltage relationships (outward rectifying) and a reversal potential of −90 mV. Both were inhibited by quinine, bupivicaine, and acidic pH. The pKa for current inhibition was 7.75 for shark TASK-1 vs. 7.37 for human TASK-1, values similar to the arterial pH for each species. We identified this protein in SRG by Western blot and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy and detected the protein in SRG and human airway cells. Shark TASK-1 is the major K+ channel coupled to chloride secretion in the SRG, is the oldest 4TM 2P family member identified, and is the first TASK-1 channel identified to play a role in setting the driving force for chloride secretion in epithelia. The detection of this potassium channel in mammalian lung tissue has implications for human biology and disease. PMID:27653983

  17. Functional and molecular identification of a TASK-1 potassium channel regulating chloride secretion through CFTR channels in the shark rectal gland: implications for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Telles, Connor J; Decker, Sarah E; Motley, William W; Peters, Alexander W; Mehr, Ali Poyan; Frizzell, Raymond A; Forrest, John N

    2016-12-01

    In the shark rectal gland (SRG), apical chloride secretion through CFTR channels is electrically coupled to a basolateral K + conductance whose type and molecular identity are unknown. We performed studies in the perfused SRG with 17 K + channel inhibitors to begin this search. Maximal chloride secretion was markedly inhibited by low-perfusate pH, bupivicaine, anandamide, zinc, quinidine, and quinine, consistent with the properties of an acid-sensitive, four-transmembrane, two-pore-domain K + channel (4TM-K2P). Using PCR with degenerate primers to this family, we identified a TASK-1 fragment in shark rectal gland, brain, gill, and kidney. Using 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR and genomic walking, we cloned the full-length shark gene (1,282 bp), whose open reading frame encodes a protein of 375 amino acids that was 80% identical to the human TASK-1 protein. We expressed shark and human TASK-1 cRNA in Xenopus oocytes and characterized these channels using two-electrode voltage clamping. Both channels had identical current-voltage relationships (outward rectifying) and a reversal potential of -90 mV. Both were inhibited by quinine, bupivicaine, and acidic pH. The pKa for current inhibition was 7.75 for shark TASK-1 vs. 7.37 for human TASK-1, values similar to the arterial pH for each species. We identified this protein in SRG by Western blot and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy and detected the protein in SRG and human airway cells. Shark TASK-1 is the major K + channel coupled to chloride secretion in the SRG, is the oldest 4TM 2P family member identified, and is the first TASK-1 channel identified to play a role in setting the driving force for chloride secretion in epithelia. The detection of this potassium channel in mammalian lung tissue has implications for human biology and disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Persistent anterograde amnesia following limbic encephalitis associated with antibodies to the voltage-gated potassium channel complex.

    PubMed

    Butler, Christopher R; Miller, Thomas D; Kaur, Manveer S; Baker, Ian W; Boothroyd, Georgie D; Illman, Nathan A; Rosenthal, Clive R; Vincent, Angela; Buckley, Camilla J

    2014-04-01

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with antibodies to the voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKC) is a potentially reversible cause of cognitive impairment. Despite the prominence of cognitive dysfunction in this syndrome, little is known about patients' neuropsychological profile at presentation or their long-term cognitive outcome. We used a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery to evaluate cognitive function longitudinally in 19 patients with VGKC-LE. Before immunotherapy, the group had significant impairment of memory, processing speed and executive function, whereas language and perceptual organisation were intact. At follow-up, cognitive impairment was restricted to the memory domain, with processing speed and executive function having returned to the normal range. Residual memory function was predicted by the antibody titre at presentation. The results show that, despite broad cognitive dysfunction in the acute phase, patients with VGKC-LE often make a substantial recovery with immunotherapy but may be left with permanent anterograde amnesia.

  19. [Possible role of the potential-dependent potassium channels in the generation of responses of the pacinian corpuscles].

    PubMed

    Akoev, G N; Krylov, B V; Tsoĭ, S L

    1988-01-01

    Action of TEA (20 mM) and 4-AP (5 mM) on mechano- and electrically excitable membranes of the Pacinian corpuscles was studied by means of the air gap technique in constantly perfused preparations. Extracellular recordings of receptor and action potentials have shown that application of TEA causes prolongation of the receptor potential and inhibition of its amplitude by 40%. 4-AP has no effect on the mechanosensitive membrane. TEA and 4-AP induce a 2-3 fold increase of the action potential duration in the first Ranvier node. The computations based on the Dodge model help revealing that inhibition of voltage-sensitive potassium channels which participate in the first-order coding of the intact receptor accounts for this increase.

  20. Lower Gene Expression for KCNS3 Potassium Channel Subunit in Parvalbumin-Containing Neurons in the Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Danko; Arion, Dominique; Enwright, John F.; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Minabe, Yoshio; Corradi, John P.; Lewis, David A.; Hashimoto, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    Objective In schizophrenia, alterations in markers of cortical GABA neurotransmission are prominent in parvalbumin-containing neurons. Parvalbumin neurons selectively express KCNS3, the gene encoding the Kv9.3 potassium channel α-subunit. Kv9.3 subunits are present in voltage-gated potassium channels that contribute to the precise detection of coincident excitatory synaptic inputs to parvalbumin neurons. This distinctive feature of parvalbumin neurons appears important for the synchronization of cortical neural networks in γ-oscillations. Because impaired prefrontal cortical γ-oscillations are thought to underlie the cognitive impairments in schizophrenia, the authors investigated whether KCNS3 mRNA levels are altered in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia subjects. Method KCNS3 mRNA expression was evaluated by in situ hybridization in 22 matched pairs of schizophrenia and comparison subjects and by microarray analyses of pooled samples of individually dissected neurons that were labeled with Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA), a parvalbumin neuron-selective marker, in a separate cohort of 14 pairs. Effects of chronic antipsychotic treatments on KCNS3 expression were tested in the prefrontal cortex of antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. Results By in situ hybridization, KCNS3 mRNA levels were 23% lower in schizophrenia subjects. At the cellular level, both KCNS3 mRNA-expressing neuron density and KCNS3 mRNA level per neuron were significantly lower. By microarray, KCNS3 mRNA levels were lower by 40% in VVA-labeled neurons from schizophrenia subjects. KCNS3 mRNA levels were not altered in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. Conclusions These findings reveal lower KCNS3 expression in prefrontal cortical parvalbumin neurons in schizophrenia, providing a molecular basis for compromised detection of coincident synaptic inputs to parvalbumin neurons that could contribute to altered γ-oscillations and impaired cognition in schizophrenia. PMID:24170294

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of the renal potassium channel, ROMK, leads to type II Bartter syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Brighid M; Mackie, Timothy D; Subramanya, Arohan R; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2017-08-04

    Type II Bartter syndrome is caused by mutations in the renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) channel, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease are poorly defined. To rapidly screen for ROMK function, we developed a yeast expression system and discovered that yeast cells lacking endogenous potassium channels could be rescued by WT ROMK but not by ROMK proteins containing any one of four Bartter mutations. We also found that the mutant proteins were significantly less stable than WT ROMK. However, their degradation was slowed in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor or when yeast cells contained mutations in the CDC48 or SSA1 gene, which is required for endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD). Consistent with these data, sucrose gradient centrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that most ROMK protein was ER-localized. To translate these findings to a more relevant cell type, we measured the stabilities of WT ROMK and the ROMK Bartter mutants in HEK293 cells. As in yeast, the Bartter mutant proteins were less stable than the WT protein, and their degradation was slowed in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, we discovered that low-temperature incubation increased the steady-state levels of a Bartter mutant, suggesting that the disease-causing mutation traps the protein in a folding-deficient conformation. These findings indicate that the underlying pathology for at least a subset of patients with type II Bartter syndrome is linked to the ERAD pathway and that future therapeutic strategies should focus on correcting deficiencies in ROMK folding. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Repression of a potassium channel by nuclear hormone receptor and TGF-β signaling modulates insulin signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Park, Donha; Jones, Karen L; Lee, Hyojin; Snutch, Terrance P; Taubert, Stefan; Riddle, Donald L

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling acts through Smad proteins to play fundamental roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and metabolism. The Receptor associated Smads (R-Smads) interact with DNA and other nuclear proteins to regulate target gene transcription. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans R-Smad DAF-8 partners with the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-69, a C. elegans ortholog of mammalian hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α HNF4α), to repress the exp-2 potassium channel gene and increase insulin secretion. We find that NHR-69 associates with DAF-8 both in vivo and in vitro. Functionally, daf-8 nhr-69 double mutants show defects in neuropeptide secretion and phenotypes consistent with reduced insulin signaling such as increased expression of the sod-3 and gst-10 genes and a longer life span. Expression of the exp-2 gene, encoding a voltage-gated potassium channel, is synergistically increased in daf-8 nhr-69 mutants compared to single mutants and wild-type worms. In turn, exp-2 acts selectively in the ASI neurons to repress the secretion of the insulin-like peptide DAF-28. Importantly, exp-2 mutation shortens the long life span of daf-8 nhr-69 double mutants, demonstrating that exp-2 is required downstream of DAF-8 and NHR-69. Finally, animals over-expressing NHR-69 specifically in DAF-28-secreting ASI neurons exhibit a lethargic, hypoglycemic phenotype that is rescued by exogenous glucose. We propose a model whereby DAF-8/R-Smad and NHR-69 negatively regulate the transcription of exp-2 to promote neuronal DAF-28 secretion, thus demonstrating a physiological crosstalk between TGF-β and HNF4α-like signaling in C. elegans. NHR-69 and DAF-8 dependent regulation of exp-2 and DAF-28 also provides a novel molecular mechanism that contributes to the previously recognized link between insulin and TGF-β signaling in C. elegans.

  3. The effect of nitrazepam on depression and curiosity in behavioral tests in mice: The role of potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Nikoui, Vahid; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Azhand, Pardis; Zolfaghari, Samira; Amiri, Shayan; Foroohandeh, Mehrdad; Motevalian, Manijeh; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Bakhtiarian, Azam

    2016-11-15

    Evidence show that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors are involved in depression, so the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrazepam as agonist of GABA A receptors on depression and curiosity in male mice and the role of potassium channel in antidepressant-like response. For this purpose, we studied the antidepressant-like properties of fluoxetine, nitrazepam, glibenclamide, and cromakalim by both forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). Animals were injected by various doses of nitrazepam (0.05, 0.1, and 0.5mg/kg). Nitrazepam at dose of 0.5mg/kg significantly decreased the immobility time compared to control group in both FST and TST. Fluoxetine also showed such a response. Co-administration of nitrazepam (0.05mg/kg) with glibenclamide in TST (1mg/kg) and in FST (0.3, 1mg/kg) also showed antidepressant-like response. Beside, cromakalim (0.1mg/kg) could reverse the antidepressant-like effect of nitrazepam (0.5mg/kg) in both FST and TST, while cromakalim and glibenclamide alone could not change the immobility time compared to control group (P>0.05). The hole-board test revealed that nitrazepam at doses of 0.5 and 0.1mg/kg could increase the activity of the animal's head-dipping and boost the curiosity and exploration behavior of mice. The results of this study revealed that nitrazepam may possess antidepressant-like properties and this effect is dependent to potassium channels in both FST and TST. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Repression of a Potassium Channel by Nuclear Hormone Receptor and TGF-β Signaling Modulates Insulin Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donha; Jones, Karen L.; Lee, Hyojin; Snutch, Terrance P.; Taubert, Stefan; Riddle, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling acts through Smad proteins to play fundamental roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and metabolism. The Receptor associated Smads (R-Smads) interact with DNA and other nuclear proteins to regulate target gene transcription. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans R-Smad DAF-8 partners with the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-69, a C. elegans ortholog of mammalian hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α HNF4α), to repress the exp-2 potassium channel gene and increase insulin secretion. We find that NHR-69 associates with DAF-8 both in vivo and in vitro. Functionally, daf-8 nhr-69 double mutants show defects in neuropeptide secretion and phenotypes consistent with reduced insulin signaling such as increased expression of the sod-3 and gst-10 genes and a longer life span. Expression of the exp-2 gene, encoding a voltage-gated potassium channel, is synergistically increased in daf-8 nhr-69 mutants compared to single mutants and wild-type worms. In turn, exp-2 acts selectively in the ASI neurons to repress the secretion of the insulin-like peptide DAF-28. Importantly, exp-2 mutation shortens the long life span of daf-8 nhr-69 double mutants, demonstrating that exp-2 is required downstream of DAF-8 and NHR-69. Finally, animals over-expressing NHR-69 specifically in DAF-28–secreting ASI neurons exhibit a lethargic, hypoglycemic phenotype that is rescued by exogenous glucose. We propose a model whereby DAF-8/R-Smad and NHR-69 negatively regulate the transcription of exp-2 to promote neuronal DAF-28 secretion, thus demonstrating a physiological crosstalk between TGF-β and HNF4α-like signaling in C. elegans. NHR-69 and DAF-8 dependent regulation of exp-2 and DAF-28 also provides a novel molecular mechanism that contributes to the previously recognized link between insulin and TGF-β signaling in C. elegans. PMID:22359515

  5. A heme-binding domain controls regulation of ATP-dependent potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Mark J.; Kapetanaki, Sofia M.; Chernova, Tatyana; Jamieson, Andrew G.; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Mitcheson, John S.; Davies, Noel W.; Schmid, Ralf; Raven, Emma L.; Storey, Nina M.

    2016-01-01

    Heme iron has many and varied roles in biology. Most commonly it binds as a prosthetic group to proteins, and it has been widely supposed and amply demonstrated that subtle variations in the protein structure around the heme, including the heme ligands, are used to control the reactivity of the metal ion. However, the role of heme in biology now appears to also include a regulatory responsibility in the cell; this includes regulation of ion channel function. In this work, we show that cardiac KATP channels are regulated by heme. We identify a cytoplasmic heme-binding CXXHX16H motif on the sulphonylurea receptor subunit of the channel, and mutagenesis together with quantitative and spectroscopic analyses of heme-binding and single channel experiments identified Cys628 and His648 as important for heme binding. We discuss the wider implications of these findings and we use the information to present hypotheses for mechanisms of heme-dependent regulation across other ion channels. PMID:27006498

  6. Regulation of vascular large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels by Nrf2 signalling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xiao-Li; Sun, Xiaojing; Chai, Qiang; Li, Jingchao; Thompson, Benjamin; Shen, Win-Kuang; Lu, Tong; Lee, Hon-Chi

    2017-07-01

    BK channels are major ionic determinants of vasodilation. BK channel function is impaired in diabetic vessels due to accelerated proteolysis of its beta-1 (BK-β1) subunits in response to increased oxidative stress. The nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signalling pathway has emerged as a master regulator of cellular redox status, and we hypothesized that it plays a central role in regulating BK channel function in diabetic vessels. We found that Nrf2 expression was markedly reduced in db/db diabetic mouse aortas, and this was associated with significant downregulation of BK-β1. In addition, the muscle ring finger protein 1 (MuRF1), a known E-3 ligase targeting BK-β1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, was significantly augmented. These findings were reproduced by knockdown of Nrf2 by siRNA in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells. In contrast, adenoviral transfer of Nrf2 gene in these cells downregulated MuRF1 and upregulated BK-β1 expression. Activation of Nrf2 by dimethyl fumarate preserved BK-β1 expression and protected BK channel and vascular function in db/db coronary arteries. These results indicate that expression of BK-β1 is closely regulated by Nrf2 and vascular BK channel function can be restored by Nrf2 activation. Nrf2 should be considered a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of diabetic vasculopathy.

  7. Glycosylation affects rat Kv1.1 potassium channel gating by a combined surface potential and cooperative subunit interaction mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Itaru; Wang, Hong-Gang; Sutachan, Jhon J; Zhu, Jing; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza; Thornhill, William B

    2003-01-01

    The effect of glycosylation on Kv1.1 potassium channel function was investigated in mammalian cells stably transfected with Kv1.1 or Kv1.1N207Q. Macroscopic current analysis showed that both channels were expressed but Kv1.1N207Q, which was not glycosylated, displayed functional differences compared with wild-type, including slowed activation kinetics, a positively shifted V1/2, a shallower slope for the conductance versus voltage relationship, slowed C-type inactivation kinetics, and a reduced extent of and recovery from C-type inactivation. Kv1.1N207Q activation properties were also less sensitive to divalent cations compared with those of Kv1.1. These effects were largely due to the lack of trans-Golgi added sugars, such as galactose and sialic acid, to the N207 carbohydrate tree. No apparent change in ionic current deactivation kinetics was detected in Kv1.1N207Q compared with wild-type. Our data, coupled with modelling, suggested that removal of the N207 carbohydrate tree had two major effects. The first effect slowed the concerted channel transition from the last closed state to the open state without changing the voltage dependence of its kinetics. This effect contributed to the G-V curve depolarization shift and together with the lower sensitivity to divalent cations suggested that the carbohydrate tree and its negatively charged sialic acids affected the negative surface charge density on the channel's extracellular face that was sensed by the activation gating machinery. The second effect reduced a cooperativity factor that slowed the transition from the open state to the closed state without changing its voltage dependence. This effect accounted for the shallower G-V slope, and contributed to the depolarized G-V shift, and together with the inactivation changes it suggested that the carbohydrate tree also affected channel conformations. Thus N-glycosylation, and particularly terminal sialylation, affected Kv1.1 gating properties both by altering the

  8. The N-terminal domain of Slack determines the formation and trafficking of Slick/Slack heteromeric sodium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haijun; Kronengold, Jack; Yan, Yangyang; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Brown, Maile R; Ma, Liqun; Ferreira, Gonzalo; Yang, Youshan; Bhattacharjee, Arin; Sigworth, Fred J; Salkoff, Larry; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2009-04-29

    Potassium channels activated by intracellular Na(+) ions (K(Na)) play several distinct roles in regulating the firing patterns of neurons, and, at the single channel level, their properties are quite diverse. Two known genes, Slick and Slack, encode K(Na) channels. We have now found that Slick and Slack subunits coassemble to form heteromeric channels that differ from the homomers in their unitary conductance, kinetic behavior, subcellular localization, and response to activation of protein kinase C. Heteromer formation requires the N-terminal domain of Slack-B, one of the alternative splice variants of the Slack channel. This cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Slack-B also facilitates the localization of heteromeric K(Na) channels to the plasma membrane. Immunocytochemical studies indicate that Slick and Slack-B subunits are coexpressed in many central neurons. Our findings provide a molecular explanation for some of the diversity in reported properties of neuronal K(Na) channels.

  9. GW9508 inhibits insulin secretion by activating ATP-sensitive potassium channels in rat pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu-Feng; Wang, Li; Zha, Dingjun; Qiao, Li; Lu, Lianjun; Yu, Jun; Qu, Ping; Sun, Qiang; Qiu, Jianhua; Chen, Chen

    2013-01-01

    GW9508 is an agonist of G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) that is expressed in pancreatic β-cells and is reported to regulate insulin secretion. However, the effects of GW9508 on pancreatic β-cells in primary culture have not been well investigated. This study measured the acute effects of GW9508 on insulin secretion from rat pancreatic islets in primary culture, and the insulin secretion-related events such as the changes in membrane potential, ATP-sensitive potassium currents (KATP currents), and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) of rat islet β-cells were also recorded. GW9508 (10-40 μM) did not influence basal insulin levels at 2 mM glucose, but it (above 20 μM) significantly inhibited 5 and 15 mM glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). GW9508 did not inhibit insulin secretion stimulated by tolbutamide, the closer of KATP channels. GW9508 activated KATP channels and blocked the membrane depolarization and the increase in [Ca(2+)]i that were stimulated by glucose. GW9508 itself stimulated a transient increase in [Ca(2+)]i, which was fully blocked by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin or by inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) activity with U73122. GW9508-induced activation of KATP channels was only partly inhibited by U73122 treatment. In conclusion, although it stimulates a transient release of Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores via activation of PLC, GW9508 inhibits GSIS by activating KATP channels probably in a distal step to GPR40 activation in rat β-cells.

  10. The signature sequence of voltage-gated potassium channels projects into the external vestibule.

    PubMed

    Aiyar, J; Rizzi, J P; Gutman, G A; Chandy, K G

    1996-12-06

    A highly conserved motif, GYGD, contributes to the formation of the ion selectivity filter in voltage-gated K+ channels and is thought to interact with the scorpion toxin residue, Lys27. By probing the pore of the Kv1.3 channel with synthetic kaliotoxin-Lys27 mutants, each containing a non-natural lysine analog of a different length, and using mutant cycle analysis, we determined the spatial locations of Tyr400 and Asp402 in the GYGD motif, relative to His404 located at the base of the outer vestibule. Our data indicate that the terminal amines of the shorter Lys27 analogs lie close to His404 and to Asp402, while Lys27 itself interacts with Tyr400. Based on these data, we developed a molecular model of this region of the channel. The junction between the outer vestibule and the pore is defined by a ring ( approximately 8-9-A diameter) formed from alternating Asp402 and His404 residues. Tyr400 lies 4-6 A deeper into the pore, and its interaction with kaliotoxin-Lys27 is in competition with K+ ions. Studies with dimeric Kv1.3 constructs suggest that two Tyr400 residues in the tetramer are sufficient to bind K+ ions. Thus, at least part of the K+ channel signature sequence extends into a shallow trough at the center of a wide external vestibule.

  11. Expression and function of native potassium channel (KVα1) subunits in terminal arterioles of rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, A; Dedman, A M; Beech, D J

    2001-01-01

    In this study we investigated the expression and function of the KVα1 subfamily of voltage-gated K+ channels in terminal arterioles from rabbit cerebral circulation.K+ current was measured from smooth muscle cells within intact freshly isolated arteriolar fragments. Current activated on depolarisation positive of about –45 mV and a large fraction of this current was blocked by 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP) or 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), inhibitors of KV channels. Expression of cRNA encoding KV1.6 in Xenopus oocytes also generated a 4-AP-sensitive K+ current with a threshold for activation near –45 mV.Immunofluorescence labelling revealed KV1.2 to be specifically localised to endothelial cells, and KV1.5 and KV1.6 to plasma membranes of smooth muscle cells.KV channel current in arteriolar fragments was blocked by correolide (which is specific for the KVα1 family of KV channels) but was resistant to recombinant agitoxin-2 (rAgTX2; which inhibits KV1.6 but not KV1.5). Heterologously expressed KV2.1 was resistant to correolide, and KV1.6 was blocked by rAgTX2.Arterioles that were mildly preconstricted and depolarised by 0.1–0.3 nm endothelin-1 constricted further in response to 3,4-DAP, 4-AP or correolide, but not to rAgTX2.We suggest that KVα1 channels are expressed in smooth muscle cells of terminal arterioles, underlie a major part of the voltage-dependent K+ current, and have a physiological function to oppose vasoconstriction. KVα1 complexes without KV1.5 appear to be uncommon. PMID:11483700

  12. cAMP-dependent kinase does not modulate the Slack sodium-activated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Nuwer, Megan O; Picchione, Kelly E; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2009-09-01

    The Slack gene encodes a Na(+)-activated K(+) channel and is expressed in many different types of neurons. Like the prokaryotic Ca(2+)-gated K(+) channel MthK, Slack contains two 'regulator of K(+) conductance' (RCK) domains within its carboxy terminal, domains likely involved in Na(+) binding and channel gating. It also contains multiple consensus protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites and although regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation, modulation by PKA has not been determined. To test if PKA directly regulates Slack, nystatin-perforated patch whole-cell currents were recorded from a human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cell line stably expressing Slack. Bath application of forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator, caused a rapid and complete inhibition of Slack currents however, the inactive homolog of forskolin, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin caused a similar effect. In contrast, bath application of 8-bromo-cAMP did not affect the amplitude nor the activation kinetics of Slack currents. In excised inside-out patch recordings, direct application of the PKA catalytic subunit to patches did not affect the open probability of Slack channels nor was open probability affected by direct application of protein phosphatase 2B. Preincubation of cells with the protein kinase A inhibitor KT5720 also did not change current density. Finally, mutating the consensus phosphorylation site located between RCK domain 1 and domain 2 from serine to glutamate did not affect current activation kinetics. We conclude that unlike PKC, phosphorylation by PKA does not acutely modulate the function and gating activation kinetics of Slack channels.

  13. Electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) reveals water and phosphate interactions with the KcsA potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, John A.; Focia, Pamela J.; Gross, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for the study of naturally occurring paramagnetic metal centers. The technique has been used to study copper complexes, hemes, enzyme mechanisms, micellar water content, and water permeation profiles in membranes, among other applications. In the present study, we combine ESEEM spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and X-ray crystallography in order to evaluate the technique's potential as a structural tool to describe the native environment of membrane proteins. Using the KcsA potassium channel as a model system, we demonstrate that deuterium ESEEM can detect water permeation along the lipid-exposed surface of the KcsA outer helix. We further demonstrate that 31P ESEEM is able to identify channel residues that interact with the phosphate head group of the lipid bilayer. In combination with X-ray crystallography, the 31P data may be used to define the phosphate interaction surface of the protein. The results presented here establish ESEEM as a highly informative technique for SDSL studies of membrane proteins. PMID:20092291

  14. Gap-junction coupling and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in human β -cell clusters: Effects on emergent dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loppini, A.; Pedersen, M. G.; Braun, M.; Filippi, S.

    2017-09-01

    The importance of gap-junction coupling between β cells in pancreatic islets is well established in mouse. Such ultrastructural connections synchronize cellular activity, confine biological heterogeneity, and enhance insulin pulsatility. Dysfunction of coupling has been associated with diabetes and altered β -cell function. However, the role of gap junctions between human β cells is still largely unexplored. By using patch-clamp recordings of β cells from human donors, we previously estimated electrical properties of these channels by mathematical modeling of pairs of human β cells. In this work we revise our estimate by modeling triplet configurations and larger heterogeneous clusters. We find that a coupling conductance in the range 0.005 -0.020 nS/pF can reproduce experiments in almost all the simulated arrangements. We finally explore the consequence of gap-junction coupling of this magnitude between β cells with mutant variants of the ATP-sensitive potassium channels involved in some metabolic disorders and diabetic conditions, translating studies performed on rodents to the human case. Our results are finally discussed from the perspective of therapeutic strategies. In summary, modeling of more realistic clusters with more than two β cells slightly lowers our previous estimate of gap-junction conductance and gives rise to patterns that more closely resemble experimental traces.

  15. [Role of calcium activated-potassium channels in the injury to rat alveolar macrophages induced by quartz].

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Sun, Jingzhi; Yang, Li; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Zhenglun; Yang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of calcium activated-potassium channels (KCa) in the injury to rat alveolar macrophages induced by quartz. The experiments were conducted on a rat alveolar macrophage cell line (NR8383) in vitro, where crystal silica (100 üg/ml) and amorphous silica (100 üg/ml) were used as the test substances and the cells without any treatment as negative controls. At first the effects of two kinds of quartz were compared. Then KCa special inhibitors (Paxilline for BK, Tram-34 for IK, Apamin for SK) were added in different doses to the in vitro test system with 100 üg/ml crystal quartz as matrix, to observe the function of such channels. Cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) were tested. Comparing to the negative control group, cell viability reduced, LDH leakage, IL-1β and TNF-α release increased significantly in the amorphous quartz group, furthermore, the effects by crystal quartz were much more serious than those by amorphous quartz, with a statistical significance (P < 0.01). Comparing to the crystal quartz group, IK blockers (Tram-34) led to increase in cell viability significantly, with a statistical significance (P < 0.01); all the KCa specific blockers (Paxilline, Tram-34, Apamin) could reduce LDH leakage and IL-1β release, with a statistical significance (P < 0.05); meanwhile, BK and IK blockers (Paxilline,Tram-34) were able to reduce TNF-α release,with a statistical significance (P < 0.05).Reduction of IL-1β and TNF-α by Tram-34 was dose-dependent, but not so in the other two blockers. Blocking calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa) could reduce cell membrane damage as well as IL-1β and TNF-α release induced by crystal quartz in the rat alveolar macrophages cell line in vitro, which might serve as a signal in the early regulation of inflammatory responses by quartz.

  16. Phenformin has a direct inhibitory effect on the ATP-sensitive potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Qadeer; Thomas, Alison; Khambra, Tapsi; Tinker, Andrew

    2010-05-25

    The biguanides, phenformin and metformin, are used in the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus, as well as being routinely used in studies investigating AMPK activity. We used the patch-clamp technique and rubidium flux assays to determine the role of these drugs in ATP-sensitive K+ channel (K(ATP)) regulation in cell lines expressing the cloned components of K(ATP) and the current natively expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Phenformin but not metformin inhibits a number of variants of K(ATP) including the cloned equivalents of currents present in vascular and non-vascular smooth muscle (Kir6.1/SUR2B and Kir6.2/SUR2B) and pancreatic beta-cells (Kir6.2/SUR1). However it does not inhibit the current potentially present in cardiac myocytes (Kir6.2/SUR2A). The highest affinity interaction is seen with Kir6.1/SUR2B (IC50=0.55 mM) and it also inhibits the current in native vascular smooth muscle cells. The extent and rate of inhibition are similar to that seen with the known K(ATP) blocker PNU 37883A. Additionally, phenformin inhibited the current elicited through the Kir6.2DeltaC26 (functional without SUR) channel with an IC50 of 1.78 mM. Phenformin reduced the open probability of Kir6.1/SUR2B channels by approximately 90% in inside-out patches. These findings suggest that phenformin interacts directly with the pore-forming Kir6.0 subunit however the sulphonylurea receptor is able to significantly modulate the affinity. It is likely to block from the intracellular side of the channel in a manner analogous to that of PNU 37883A. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of UV-B Induced Apoptosis in Corneal Epithelial Cells by Potassium Channel Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Ubels, John L.; Schotanus, Mark P.; Bardolph, Susan L.; Haarsma, Loren D.; Koetje, Leah R.; Louters, Julienne R.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether prevention of K+ loss can protect human corneal-limbal epithelial (HCLE) cells from UV-B induced apoptosis. Immunostaining for activated caspase-3 of HCLE cells exposed to 150 – 200 mJ/cm2 UV-B demonstrated induction of apoptosis 6 hrs after exposure. The number of apoptotic cells was decreased by incubation in medium with 25 or 100 mM K+. If this protection is due to a reduction of UV induced K+ loss then K+ channel blockers should also protect HCLE cells from UV-B. Caspase-8 activity induced by exposure to UV-B at 150 mJ/cm2 was significantly reduced when the cells were incubated in 0.3 µM BDS-I or 0.05–1 mM quinidine. Caspase-3 was also activated by UV-B and a reduction in activity was observed after incubation in 0.1–0.3 µM BDS-I and 0.1–1mM quinidine. Induction of DNA fragmentation, as measured by the TUNEL assay, was decreased by treatment with 0.3 µM BDS-I and 0.01–0.05 mM quinidine. Patch-clamp recording showed activation of K+ channels after exposure to UV-B and a decrease in outward K+ current was observed following application of BDS-I. Quinidine did not block K+ currents in HCLE cells, suggesting that the protective effect of quinidine occurs by a mechanism other than via K+ channels. The effect of the K+ channel blocker BDS-1 on HCLE cells exposed to UV-B confirms that preventing K+ efflux protects corneal epithelial cells from apoptosis. This suggests the elevated [K+] in tears may protect the corneal epithelium from effects of ambient UV-B. PMID:19874821

  18. Inhibition of UV-B induced apoptosis in corneal epithelial cells by potassium channel modulators.

    PubMed

    Ubels, John L; Schotanus, Mark P; Bardolph, Susan L; Haarsma, Loren D; Koetje, Leah R; Louters, Julienne R

    2010-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether prevention of K(+) loss can protect human corneal-limbal epithelial (HCLE) cells from UV-B induced apoptosis. Immunostaining for activated caspase-3 of HCLE cells exposed to 150-200 mJ/cm(2) UV-B demonstrated induction of apoptosis 6 h after exposure. The number of apoptotic cells was decreased by incubation in medium with 25 or 100 mM K(+). If this protection is due to a reduction of UV-induced K(+) loss then K(+) channel blockers should also protect HCLE cells from UV-B. Caspase-8 activity induced by exposure to UV-B at 150 mJ/cm(2) was significantly reduced when the cells were incubated in 0.3 microM BDS-I or 0.05-1 mM quinidine. Caspase-3 was also activated by UV-B and a reduction in activity was observed after incubation in 0.1-0.3 microM BDS-I and 0.1-1 mM quinidine. Induction of DNA fragmentation, as measured by the TUNEL assay, was decreased by treatment with 0.3 microM BDS-I and 0.01-0.05 mM quinidine. Patch-clamp recording showed activation of K(+) channels after exposure to UV-B and a decrease in outward K(+) current was observed following application of BDS-I. Quinidine did not block K(+) currents in HCLE cells, suggesting that the protective effect of quinidine occurs by a mechanism other than via K(+) channels. The effect of the K(+) channel blocker BDS-1 on HCLE cells exposed to UV-B confirms that preventing K(+) efflux protects corneal epithelial cells from apoptosis. This suggests the elevated [K(+)] in tears may protect the corneal epithelium from effects of ambient UV-B. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of adenosine triphosphate-dependent potassium channels in canine penile erection.

    PubMed

    de Miranda Cará, Alister; Fregonesi, Adriano; Antunes, Edson; De Nucci, Gilberto; Rodrigues Netto, Nelson

    2004-09-01

    To define the physiologic role and hemodynamic features of nitric oxide (NO) and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent K(+) (K(ATP)) channel in canine penile erection. Mongrel dogs were anesthetized, and penile erection was induced by electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve. Changes in the intracavernous pressure (ICP) were measured with a transducer. The basal ICP was 12.8 +/- 5.0 mm Hg. Pelvic nerve stimulation (5 to 20 V, 5 to 15 Hz, for 1-minute intervals) significantly increased the ICP to 86.2 +/- 11.4 mm Hg (n = 5, P <0.05). Treatment with the NO synthase inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 mg/kg intravenously) abolished this increase (15.4 +/- 5.0 mm Hg, n = 5). Intracavernous injection of the K(ATP) channel opener cromakalim (3 and 10 microg) increased the ICP (103 +/- 14.4 mm Hg and 106 +/- 12.1 mm Hg, respectively; n = 4). This response was abolished by the prior intracavernous injection of the selective K(ATP) channel-specific blocker glibenclamide (10 mg). Glibenclamide did not affect the increase in ICP induced by electric stimulation of the pelvic nerve (88 +/- 24.2 mm Hg). Our results indicate that relaxation of canine cavernous smooth muscle and penile tumescence are mediated by NO. The failure of glibenclamide to affect the increase in ICP induced by pelvic nerve stimulation suggests that ATP-dependent K(+) channels probably do not play a physiologic role in canine penile erection.

  20. Mechanism of Cd[superscript 2+] Coordination during Slow Inactivation in Potassium Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Raghuraman, H.; Cordero-Morales, Julio F.; Jogini, Vishwanath

    2012-10-09

    In K{sup +} channels, rearrangements of the pore outer vestibule have been associated with C-type inactivation gating. Paradoxically, the crystal structure of Open/C-type inactivated KcsA suggests these movements to be modest in magnitude. In this study, we show that under physiological conditions, the KcsA outer vestibule undergoes relatively large dynamic rearrangements upon inactivation. External Cd{sup 2+} enhances the rate of C-type inactivation in an cysteine mutant (Y82C) via metal-bridge formation. This effect is not present in a non-inactivating mutant (E71A/Y82C). Tandem dimer and tandem tetramer constructs of equivalent cysteine mutants in KcsA and Shaker K{sup +} channels demonstrate that thesemore » Cd{sup 2+} metal bridges are formed only between adjacent subunits. This is well supported by molecular dynamics simulations. Based on the crystal structure of Cd{sup 2+}-bound Y82C-KcsA in the closed state, together with electron paramagnetic resonance distance measurements in the KcsA outer vestibule, we suggest that subunits must dynamically come in close proximity as the channels undergo inactivation.« less

  1. Functional expression of potassium channels in cardiomyocytes derived from embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, S.R.; Sadraei, H.; Nematollahi, M.; Karbalaie, K.; Karamali, F.; Salamian, A.; Baharvand, H.; Nasr-Esfahani, M. H.

    2012-01-01

    Royan B1 stem cell can be differentiated to specialized cell types including cardiomyocytes. This developmental change is accompanied with expression of various K+ channel types. The aim of this study was to detect functional expression of K+ currents from stem cell stage and one week and two weeks after differentiation into cardiomyocyte. Mouse stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (ES-cardiomyocytes) were isolated to single cell suspension for K+ current recording using whole cell patch-clamp technique. The predominant depolarizing current in ES-cardiomyocytes was a tetraethylammonium (TEA) (10 mM) sensitive current which was partially blocked by nifedipine (1 μM) and attenuated by increasing concentration of EGTA (10 mM) in the pipette solution. Pharmacology and electrophysiological properties of this oscillatory sustained current very well matched with characteristics of Ca2+ activated K+ current. In addition there was another kind of sustained outward K+ current which was resistance to TEA but was inhibited by 3,4-diaminopyridine. The characteristic features of this current indicate that this current was due to activation of delayed rectifier K+ channels. RT-PCR study also confirmed expression of these two types of K+ channels in ES-cardiomyocytes. Therefore, present study shows functional expression of two types of K+ ionic current in ES-cardiomyocytes. PMID:23181074

  2. Deafness and permanently reduced potassium channel gene expression and function in hypothyroid Pit1dw mutants

    PubMed Central

    Mustapha, Mirna; Fang, Qing; Gong, Tzy-Wen; Dolan, David F.; Raphael, Yehoash; Camper, Sally A.; Duncan, R. Keith

    2012-01-01

    The absence of thyroid hormone (TH) during late gestation and early infancy can cause irreparable deafness in both humans and rodents. A variety of rodent models have been utilized in an effort to identify the underlying molecular mechanism. Here, we characterize a mouse model of secondary hypothyroidism, pituitary transcription factor 1 (Pit1dw), which has profound, congenital deafness that is rescued by oral TH replacement. These mutants have tectorial membrane abnormalities, including a prominent Hensen's stripe, elevated β-tectorin composition, and disrupted striated-sheet matrix. They lack distortion product otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic responses, and exhibit reduced endocochlear potentials, suggesting defects in outer hair cell function and potassium recycling. Auditory system and hair cell physiology, histology and anatomy studies reveal novel defects of hormone deficiency related to deafness: (1) permanently impaired expression of KCNJ10 in the stria vascularis of Pit1dw mice, which likely contributes to the reduced endocochlear potential, (2) significant outer hair cell loss in the mutants, which may result from cellular stress induced by the lower KCNQ4 expression and current levels in Pit1dw mutant outer hair cells and (3) sensory and strial cell deterioration, which may have implications for thyroid hormone dysregulation in age related hearing impairment. In summary, we suggest that these defects in outer hair cell and strial cell function are important contributors to the hearing impairment in Pit1dw mice. PMID:19176829

  3. Fluoxetine Protection in Decompression Sickness in Mice is Enhanced by Blocking TREK-1 Potassium Channel with the "spadin" Antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Nicolas; Lambrechts, Kate; De Maistre, Sébastien; Royal, Perrine; Mazella, Jean; Borsotto, Marc; Heurteaux, Catherine; Abraini, Jacques; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    In mice, disseminated coagulation, inflammation, and ischemia induce neurological damage that can lead to death. These symptoms result from circulating bubbles generated by a pathogenic decompression. Acute fluoxetine treatment or the presence of the TREK-1 potassium channel increases the survival rate when mice are subjected to an experimental dive/decompression protocol. This is a paradox because fluoxetine is a blocker of TREK-1 channels. First, we studied the effects of an acute dose of fluoxetine (50 mg/kg) in wild-type (WT) and TREK-1 deficient mice (knockout homozygous KO and heterozygous HET). Then, we combined the same fluoxetine treatment with a 5-day treatment protocol with spadin, in order to specifically block TREK-1 activity (KO-like mice). KO and KO-like mice were regarded as antidepressed models. In total, 167 mice (45 WTcont 46 WTflux 30 HETflux and 46 KOflux) constituting the flux-pool and 113 supplementary mice (27 KO-like 24 WTflux2 24 KO-likeflux 21 WTcont2 17 WTno dive) constituting the spad-pool were included in this study. Only 7% of KO-TREK-1 treated with fluoxetine (KOflux) and 4% of mice treated with both spadin and fluoxetine (KO-likeflux) died from decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms. These values are much lower than those of WT control (62%) or KO-like mice (41%). After the decompression protocol, mice showed significant consumption of their circulating platelets and leukocytes. Spadin antidepressed mice were more likely to exhibit DCS. Nevertheless, mice which had both blocked TREK-1 channels and fluoxetine treatment were better protected against DCS. We conclude that the protective effect of such an acute dose of fluoxetine is enhanced when TREK-1 is inhibited. We confirmed that antidepressed models may have worse DCS outcomes, but concomitant fluoxetine treatment not only decreased DCS severity but increased the survival rate.

  4. ATP-sensitive potassium currents from channels formed by Kir6 and a modified cardiac mitochondrial SUR2 variant

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T; Shi, Nian-Qing; Makielski, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP) are found in both the sarcoplasmic reticulum (sarcKATP) and the inner membrane of mitochondria (mitoKATP). SarcKATP are composed of a pore containing subunit Kir6.2 and a regulatory sulfonylurea receptor subunit (SUR2), but the composition of mitoKATP remains unclear. An unusual intra-exonic splice variant of SUR2 (SUR2A-55) was previously identified in mitochondria of mammalian heart and brain, and by analogy with sarcKATP we proposed SUR2A-55 as a candidate regulatory subunit of mitoKATP. Although SUR2A-55 lacks the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD) and 2 transmembrane domains (TMD), it has a hybrid TMD and retains the second NBD. It resembles a hemi-ABC transporter suggesting it could multimerize to function as a regulatory subunit. A putative mitochondrial targeting signal in the N-terminal domain of SUR2A-55 was removed by truncation and when co-expressed with Kir6.1 and Kir6.2 it targeted to the plasma membrane and yielded KATP currents. Single channel conductance, mean open time, and burst open time of SUR2A-55 based KATP was similar to the full-length SUR2A based KATP. However, the SUR2A-55 KATP were 70-fold less sensitive to block by ATP, and twice as resistant to intracellular Ca2+ inhibition compared with the SUR2A KATP, and were markedly insensitive to KATP drugs, pinacidil, diazoxide, and glybenclamide. These results suggest that the SUR2A-55 based channels would tend to be open under physiological conditions and in ischemia, and could account for cardiac and mitochondrial phenotypes protective for ischemia. PMID:24037327

  5. Role of Kir6.2 subunits of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in endotoxemia-induced cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction is well-described in endotoxemia and diagnosed in up to 60% of patients with endotoxic shock. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are critical to cardiac function. This study investigates the role of Kir6.2 subunits of KATP channels on cardiac dysfunction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia. Methods Kir6.2 subunits knockout (Kir6.2−/−) and wild-type (WT) mice were injected with LPS to induce endotoxemia. Cardiac function was monitored by echocardiography. Left ventricles were taken for microscopy (both light and electron) and TUNEL examination. Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in both serum and left ventricular tissues were determined. Results Compared to WT, Kir6.2−/− mice showed significantly declined cardiac function 360 min after LPS administration, aggravated myocardial damage and elevated serum LDH and CK activities. Apoptotic cells were obviously increased in heart tissues from Kir6.2−/− mice at 90, 180 and 360 min. TNF-α expression in both serum and heart tissues of Kir6.2−/− mice was significantly increased. Conclusions We conclude that Kir6.2 subunits are critical in resistance to endotoxemia-induced cardiac dysfunction through reducing myocardial damage by inhibition of apoptosis and inflammation. KATP channels blockers are extensively used in the treatment of diabetes, their potential role should therefore be considered in the clinic when patients treated with antidiabetic sulfonylureas are complicated by endotoxemia. PMID:23659427

  6. Catalytic mechanism and substrate specificity of the β-subunit of the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel

    PubMed Central

    Tipparaju, Srinivas M.; Barski, Oleg A.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2008-01-01

    The β-subunits of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are members of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. These proteins regulate inactivation and membrane localization of Kv1 and Kv4 channels. The Kvβ proteins bind to pyridine nucleotides with high affinity; however, their catalytic properties remain unclear. Here we report that recombinant rat Kvβ2 catalyzes the reduction of a wide range of aldehydes and ketones. The rate of catalysis was slower (0.06 to 0.2 min−1) than that of other AKRs, but displayed the expected hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration, with no evidence of allosteric cooperativity. Catalysis was prevented by site-directed substitution of Tyr-90 with phenylalanine, indicating that the acid-base catalytic residue, identified in other AKRs, has a conserved function in Kvβ2. The protein catalyzed the reduction of a broad range of carbonyls including aromatic carbonyls, electrophilic aldehydes and prostaglandins, phospholipid and sugar aldehydes. Little or no activity was detected with carbonyl steroids. Initial velocity profiles were consistent with an ordered bi-bi rapid-equilibrium mechanism in which NADPH binding precedes carbonyl binding. Significant primary kinetic isotope effects (2.0 – 3.1) were observed under single and multiple turnover conditions, indicating that the bond-breaking chemical step is rate-limiting. Structure-activity relationships with a series of para-substituted benzaldehydes indicated that the electronic interactions predominate during substrate binding and that no significant charge develops during the transition state. These data strengthen the view that Kvβ proteins are catalytically-active AKRs that impart redox-sensitivity to Kv channels. PMID:18672894

  7. Two inwardly rectifying potassium channels, Irk1 and Irk2, play redundant roles in Drosophila renal tubule function

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yipin; Baum, Michel; Huang, Chou-Long

    2015-01-01

    Inwardly rectifying potassium channels play essential roles in renal physiology across phyla. Barium-sensitive K+ conductances are found on the basolateral membrane of a variety of insect Malpighian (renal) tubules, including Drosophila melanogaster. We found that barium decreases the lumen-positive transepithelial potential difference in isolated perfused Drosophila tubules and decreases fluid secretion and transepithelial K+ flux. In those insect species in which it has been studied, transcripts from multiple genes encoding inwardly rectifying K+ channels are expressed in the renal (Malpighian) tubule. In Drosophila melanogaster, this includes transcripts of the Irk1, Irk2, and Irk3 genes. The role of each of these gene products in renal tubule function is unknown. We found that simultaneous knockdown of Irk1 and Irk2 in the principal cell of the fly tubule decreases transepithelial K+ flux, with no additive effect of Irk3 knockdown, and decreases barium sensitivity of transepithelial K+ flux by ∼50%. Knockdown of any of the three inwardly rectifying K+ channels individually has no effect, nor does knocking down Irk3 simultaneously with Irk1 or Irk2. Irk1/Irk2 principal cell double-knockdown tubules remain sensitive to the kaliuretic effect of cAMP. Inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase with ouabain and Irk1/Irk2 double knockdown have additive effects on K+ flux, and 75% of transepithelial K+ transport is due to Irk1/Irk2 or ouabain-sensitive pathways. In conclusion, Irk1 and Irk2 play redundant roles in transepithelial ion transport in the Drosophila melanogaster renal tubule and are additive to Na+/K+-ATPase-dependent pathways. PMID:26224687

  8. Relevance of lysine snorkeling in the outer transmembrane domain of small viral potassium ion channels.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Manuela; Henkes, Leonhard M; Tayefeh, Sascha; Hertel, Brigitte; Greiner, Timo; Van Etten, James L; Baumeister, Dirk; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Kast, Stefan M; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-07-17

    Transmembrane domains (TMDs) are often flanked by Lys or Arg because they keep their aliphatic parts in the bilayer and their charged groups in the polar interface. Here we examine the relevance of this so-called "snorkeling" of a cationic amino acid, which is conserved in the outer TMD of small viral K(+) channels. Experimentally, snorkeling activity is not mandatory for Kcv(PBCV-1) because K29 can be replaced by most of the natural amino acids without any corruption of function. Two similar channels, Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325), lack a cytosolic N-terminus, and neutralization of their equivalent cationic amino acids inhibits their function. To understand the variable importance of the cationic amino acids, we reanalyzed molecular dynamics simulations of Kcv(PBCV-1) and N-terminally truncated mutants; the truncated mutants mimic Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325). Structures were analyzed with respect to membrane positioning in relation to the orientation of K29. The results indicate that the architecture of the protein (including the selectivity filter) is only weakly dependent on TMD length and protonation of K29. The penetration depth of Lys in a given protonation state is independent of the TMD architecture, which leads to a distortion of shorter proteins. The data imply that snorkeling can be important for K(+) channels; however, its significance depends on the architecture of the entire TMD. The observation that the most severe N-terminal truncation causes the outer TMD to move toward the cytosolic side suggests that snorkeling becomes more relevant if TMDs are not stabilized in the membrane by other domains.

  9. Allosteric effects of erythromycin pretreatment on thioridazine block of hERG potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Crumb, W J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The prevalence of concurrent use of two or more drugs that block human ether-a-go-go-related gene product (hERG) K+ channels is not uncommon, but is not well characterized. This study defined the effects of concurrent exposure of two hERG-blocking drugs on hERG current amplitude. Experiments were conducted to determine if concomitant exposure to two potent pore hERG blockers, thioridazine and terfenadine and a weak hERG blocker, erythromycin, would result in an additive, synergistic or inhibitory effect. Experimental Approach hERG currents from stably transfected HEK cells were measured using the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp method at physiological temperatures. Concentration–response relationships for thioridazine or terfenadine were obtained with cells pre-exposed to erythromycin. Key Results Pre-exposure of cells to erythromycin resulted in an approximately 14–22-fold rightward shift in the hERG concentration–response curve for thioridazine and terfenadine respectively. This reduction in affinity was not the result of a change in the voltage-dependent characteristics of the channel. Results suggest an external binding site for erythromycin. Conclusions and Implications Pretreatment with erythromycin induced an approximately 14–22-fold reduction in hERG affinity for pore-binding drugs at concentrations of erythromycin, which by themselves only block hERG by 10% or less. These results suggest distinct, allosterically linked binding sites on opposite sides of the hERG channel. Occupancy of the external site by erythromycin reduces the affinity of the pore binding site. Furthermore, these results suggest that co-administration of erythromycin may provide some reduction in cardiac liability of potent hERG-blocking drugs. PMID:24417241

  10. Allosteric effects of erythromycin pretreatment on thioridazine block of hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Crumb, W J

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of concurrent use of two or more drugs that block human ether-a-go-go-related gene product (hERG) K(+) channels is not uncommon, but is not well characterized. This study defined the effects of concurrent exposure of two hERG-blocking drugs on hERG current amplitude. Experiments were conducted to determine if concomitant exposure to two potent pore hERG blockers, thioridazine and terfenadine and a weak hERG blocker, erythromycin, would result in an additive, synergistic or inhibitory effect. hERG currents from stably transfected HEK cells were measured using the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp method at physiological temperatures. Concentration-response relationships for thioridazine or terfenadine were obtained with cells pre-exposed to erythromycin. Pre-exposure of cells to erythromycin resulted in an approximately 14-22-fold rightward shift in the hERG concentration-response curve for thioridazine and terfenadine respectively. This reduction in affinity was not the result of a change in the voltage-dependent characteristics of the channel. Results suggest an external binding site for erythromycin. Pretreatment with erythromycin induced an approximately 14-22-fold reduction in hERG affinity for pore-binding drugs at concentrations of erythromycin, which by themselves only block hERG by 10% or less. These results suggest distinct, allosterically linked binding sites on opposite sides of the hERG channel. Occupancy of the external site by erythromycin reduces the affinity of the pore binding site. Furthermore, these results suggest that co-administration of erythromycin may provide some reduction in cardiac liability of potent hERG-blocking drugs. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. The Role of Kv7/M Potassium Channels in Controlling Ectopic Firing in Nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Barkai, Omer; Goldstein, Robert H; Caspi, Yaki; Katz, Ben; Lev, Shaya; Binshtok, Alexander M

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nociceptive neurons encode and convey injury-inducing stimuli toward the central nervous system. In normal conditions, tight control of nociceptive resting potential prevents their spontaneous activation. However, in many pathological conditions the control of membrane potential is disrupted, leading to ectopic, stimulus-unrelated firing of nociceptive neurons, which is correlated to spontaneous pain. We have investigated the role of K V 7/M channels in stabilizing membrane potential and impeding spontaneous firing of nociceptive neurons. These channels generate low voltage-activating, noninactivating M-type K + currents (M-current, I M ), which control neuronal excitability. Using perforated-patch recordings from cultured, rat nociceptor-like dorsal root ganglion neurons, we show that inhibition of M-current leads to depolarization of nociceptive neurons and generation of repetitive firing. To assess to what extent the M-current, acting at the nociceptive terminals, is able to stabilize terminals' membrane potential, thus preventing their ectopic activation, in normal and pathological conditions, we built a multi-compartment computational model of a pseudo-unipolar unmyelinated nociceptive neuron with a realistic terminal tree. The modeled terminal tree was based on the in vivo structure of nociceptive peripheral terminal, which we assessed by in vivo multiphoton imaging of GFP-expressing nociceptive neuronal terminals innervating mice hind paw. By modifying the conductance of the K V 7/M channels at the modeled terminal tree (terminal g K V 7/M ) we have found that 40% of the terminal g K V 7/M conductance is sufficient to prevent spontaneous firing, while ~75% of terminal g K V 7/M is sufficient to inhibit stimulus induced activation of nociceptive neurons. Moreover, we showed that terminal M-current reduces susceptibility of nociceptive neurons to a small fluctuations of membrane potentials. Furthermore, we simulated how the interaction between

  12. Dihydropyrazolopyrimidines containing benzimidazoles as K(V)1.5 potassium channel antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, John; Finlay, Heather J; Atwal, Karnail; Kover, Alexander; Prol, Joseph; Yan, Lin; Bhandaru, Rao; Vaccaro, Wayne; Huynh, Tram; Huang, Christine S; Conder, Marylee; Jenkins-West, Tonya; Sun, Huabin; Li, Danshi; Levesque, Paul

    2009-09-15

    Dihydropyrazolopyrimidines with a C6 heterocycle substituent were found to have high potency for block of K(V)1.5. Investigation of the substitution in the benzimidazole ring and the substituent in the 5-position of the dihydropyrazolopyrimidine ring produced 31a with an IC50 for K(V)1.5 block of 0.030muM without significant block of other cardiac ion channels. This compound also showed good bioavailability in rats and robust pharmacodynamic effects in a rabbit model.

  13. Potassium channels modulate the action but not the synthesis of hydrogen sulfide in rat corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Abd Elmoneim, H; Sharabi, F; Mohy El Din, M; Louedec, L; Norel, X; Senbel, A

    2017-11-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a newly-introduced gasotransmitter in penile tissues. However, its exact mechanism of action in mediating penile erection is not fully elucidated. The major aim of this study was to examine the role of different K + channels in mediating the responses to H 2 S in the corpus cavernosum. Tension studies using isolated rat corpus cavernosum strips were conducted. Endogenous H 2 S production was measured using polarographic technique. Results are expressed as mean±SEM. l-Cysteine (10 -2 M) stimulated rat corpus cavernosum to produce H 2 S. Blockade of CSE by BCA (10 -3 M) reduced the concentration of H 2 S produced from rat corpus cavernosum significantly. Addition of TEA (10 -2 M) or 4-AP (10 -3 M) didn't have a significant effect on the concentration of H 2 S produced. l-Cysteine (10 -6 -10 -2 M) elicited a concentration-dependent relaxation response which was significantly reduced by blockade of CSE using BCA (10 -3 M). TEA (10 -2 M), 4-AP (10 -3 M) and TEA (10 -4 M) attenuated l-cysteine-induced relaxation significantly. At 10 -4 M, l-cysteine resulted in percentage relaxation of 1.55±0.63, 10.94±1.93 and 1.93±0.80 in presence of TEA (10 -2 M), 4-AP (10 -3 M) and TEA (10 -4 M) respectively compared to 23.78±2.71 as control. Both glibenclamide (10 -5 M) and BaCl 2 (3×10 -5 M) failed to reduce these relaxations significantly. H 2 S-induced relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum may be mediated - at least in part - through BK ca and K V channels not by K ATP and K ir channels. It also seems that K + -channels do not contribute to the synthesis of H 2 S. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Barium Site in a Potassium Channel by X-Ray Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youxing; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2000-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data were collected from frozen crystals (100°K) of the KcsA K+ channel equilibrated with solutions containing barium chloride. Difference electron density maps (Fbarium − Fnative, 5.0 Å resolution) show that Ba2+ resides at a single location within the selectivity filter. The Ba2+ blocking site corresponds to the internal aspect (adjacent to the central cavity) of the “inner ion” position where an alkali metal cation is found in the absence of the blocking Ba2+ ion. The location of Ba2+ with respect to Rb+ ions in the pore is in good agreement with the findings on the functional interaction of Ba2+ with K+ (and Rb+) in Ca2+-activated K+ channels (Neyton, J., and C. Miller. 1988. J. Gen. Physiol. 92:549–567). Taken together, these structural and functional data imply that at physiological ion concentrations a third ion may interact with two ions in the selectivity filter, perhaps by entering from one side and displacing an ion on the opposite side. PMID:10694255

  15. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 mutant potassium channel alters neuronal excitability and causes locomotor deficits in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Issa, Fadi A; Mazzochi, Christopher; Mock, Allan F; Papazian, Diane M

    2011-05-04

    Whether changes in neuronal excitability can cause neurodegenerative disease in the absence of other factors such as protein aggregation is unknown. Mutations in the Kv3.3 voltage-gated K(+) channel cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13), a human autosomal-dominant disease characterized by locomotor impairment and the death of cerebellar neurons. Kv3.3 channels facilitate repetitive, high-frequency firing of action potentials, suggesting that pathogenesis in SCA13 is triggered by changes in electrical activity in neurons. To investigate whether SCA13 mutations alter excitability in vivo, we expressed the human dominant-negative R420H mutant subunit in zebrafish. The disease-causing mutation specifically suppressed the excitability of Kv3.3-expressing, fast-spiking motor neurons during evoked firing and fictive swimming and, in parallel, decreased the precision and amplitude of the startle response. The dominant-negative effect of the mutant subunit on K(+) current amplitude was directly responsible for the reduced excitability and locomotor phenotype. Our data provide strong evidence that changes in excitability initiate pathogenesis in SCA13 and establish zebrafish as an excellent model system for investigating how changes in neuronal activity impair locomotor control and cause cell death.

  16. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 13 Mutant Potassium Channel Alters Neuronal Excitability and Causes Locomotor Deficits in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Fadi A.; Mazzochi, Christopher; Mock, Allan F.; Papazian, Diane M.

    2011-01-01

    Whether changes in neuronal excitability can cause neurodegenerative disease in the absence of other factors such as protein aggregation is unknown. Mutations in the Kv3.3 voltage-gated K+ channel cause spinocerebellar ataxia type-13 (SCA13), a human autosomal dominant disease characterized by locomotor impairment and the death of cerebellar neurons. Kv3.3 channels facilitate repetitive, high-frequency firing of action potentials, suggesting that pathogenesis in SCA13 is triggered by changes in electrical activity in neurons. To investigate whether SCA13 mutations alter excitability in vivo, we expressed the human dominant negative R420H mutant subunit in zebrafish. The disease-causing mutation specifically suppressed the excitability of Kv3.3-expressing, fast-spiking motor neurons during evoked firing and fictive swimming and, in parallel, decreased the precision and amplitude of the startle response. The dominant negative effect of the mutant subunit on K+ current amplitude was directly responsible for the reduced excitability and locomotor phenotype. Our data provide strong evidence that changes in excitability initiate pathogenesis in SCA13 and establish zebrafish as an excellent model system for investigating how changes in neuronal activity impair locomotor control and cause cell death. PMID:21543613

  17. [Cardioprotective effects of fluorine-containing activator of adenosine triphosphate-dependent potassium channels flokalin].

    PubMed

    Strutyns'kyĭ, R B

    2009-01-01

    In experiments on isolated Langendorff perfused hearts of guinea pig with modeling of ischemia (20 min) and reperfusion (40 min) the cardioprotective effects of drug form of new fluorine-containing K(ATP) channels opener flokalin were shown. Preliminary preischemic perfusion of isolated heart with new form of flokalin (5 M) for 5 minutes significantly improved the recovery of contractive function of ischemic myocardium at reperfusion. In particular, it considerably reduced time of ischemic heart contract recovery from the beginning of reperfusion. Recovery of systolic and developed pressure was improved and the increasing of end-diastolic pressure in left ventricle of heart was prevented. Vasodilatoric and antiarrhythmic properties of new drug form of flokalin can assist to it's cardioprotective effects. The vasoconstriction of coronary vessels was prevented and number of extrasystoles at reperfusion of ischemic heart was decreased.

  18. Shear stress triggers insertion of voltage-gated potassium channels from intracellular compartments in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Boycott, Hannah E; Barbier, Camille S M; Eichel, Catherine A; Costa, Kevin D; Martins, Raphael P; Louault, Florent; Dilanian, Gilles; Coulombe, Alain; Hatem, Stéphane N; Balse, Elise

    2013-10-08

    Atrial myocytes are continuously exposed to mechanical forces including shear stress. However, in atrial myocytes, the effects of shear stress are poorly understood, particularly with respect to its effect on ion channel function. Here, we report that shear stress activated a large outward current from rat atrial myocytes, with a parallel decrease in action potential duration. The main ion channel underlying the increase in current was found to be Kv1.5, the recruitment of which could be directly observed by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, in response to shear stress. The effect was primarily attributable to recruitment of intracellular pools of Kv1.5 to the sarcolemma, as the response was prevented by the SNARE protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide and the calcium chelator BAPTA. The process required integrin signaling through focal adhesion kinase and relied on an intact microtubule system. Furthermore, in a rat model of chronic hemodynamic overload, myocytes showed an increase in basal current despite a decrease in Kv1.5 protein expression, with a reduced response to shear stress. Additionally, integrin beta1d expression and focal adhesion kinase activation were increased in this model. This data suggests that, under conditions of chronically increased mechanical stress, the integrin signaling pathway is overactivated, leading to increased functional Kv1.5 at the membrane and reducing the capacity of cells to further respond to mechanical challenge. Thus, pools of Kv1.5 may comprise an inducible reservoir that can facilitate the repolarization of the atrium under conditions of excessive mechanical stress.

  19. Investigating the potassium interactions with the palytoxin induced channels in Na+/K+ pump.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Antônio M; Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G; Infantosi, Antonio F C; Teixeira, Hewerson Z; Duarte, Mário A

    2009-02-01

    K(+) has been appointed as the main physiological inhibitor of the palytoxin (PTX) effect on the Na(+)/K(+) pump. This toxin acts opening monovalent cationic channels through the Na(+)/K(+) pump. We investigate, by means of computational modeling, the kinetic mechanisms related with K(+) interacting with the complex PTX-Na(+)/K(+) pump. First, a reaction model, with structure similar to Albers-Post model, describing the functional cycle of the pump, was proposed for describing K(+) interference on the complex PTX-Na(+)/K(+) pump in the presence of intracellular ATP. A mathematic model was derived from the reaction model and it was possible to solve numerically the associated differential equations and to simulate experimental maneuvers about the PTX induced currents in the presence of K(+) in the intra- and extracellular space as well as ATP in the intracellular. After the model adjusting to the experimental data, a Monte Carlo method for sensitivity analysis was used to analyze how each reaction parameter acts during each experimental maneuver involving PTX. For ATP and K(+) concentrations conditions, the simulations suggest that the enzyme substate with ATP bound to its high-affinity sites is the main substate for the PTX binding. The activation rate of the induced current is limited by the K(+) deocclusion from the PTX-Na(+)/K(+) pump complex. The K(+) occlusion in the PTX induced channels in the enzymes with ATP bound to its low-affinity sites is the main mechanism responsible for the reduction of the enzyme affinity to PTX.

  20. Adrenaline reveals the torsadogenic effect of combined blockade of potassium channels in anaesthetized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Michael, G; Kane, K A; Coker, S J

    2008-08-01

    Torsade de pointes (TdP) can be induced in several species by a reduction in cardiac repolarizing capacity. The aim of this study was to assess whether combined I(Kr) and I(Ks) blockade could induce TdP in anaesthetized guinea pigs and whether short-term variability (STV) or triangulation of action potentials could predict TdP. Experiments were performed in open-chest, pentobarbital-anaesthetized, adrenaline-stimulated male Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs, which received three consecutive i.v. infusions of either vehicle, the I(Kr) blocker E-4031 (3, 10 and 30 nmol kg(-1) min(-1)), the I(Ks) blocker HMR1556 (75, 250, 750 nmol kg(-1) min(-1)) or E-4031 and HMR1556 combined. Phenylephrine-stimulated guinea pigs were also treated with the K(+) channel blockers in combination. Arterial blood pressure, ECGs and epicardial monophasic action potential (MAP) were recorded. TdP was observed in 75% of adrenaline-stimulated guinea pigs given the K(+) channel blockers in combination, but was not observed in guinea pigs treated with either I(K) blocker alone, or in phenylephrine-stimulated guinea pigs. Salvos and ventricular tachycardia occurred with adrenaline but not with phenylephrine. No changes in STV or triangulation of the MAP signals were observed before TdP. Combined blockade of both I(Kr) and I(Ks) plus the addition of adrenaline were required to induce TdP in anaesthetized guinea pigs. This suggests that there must be sufficient depletion of repolarization reserve and an appropriate trigger for TdP to occur.

  1. Dendritic small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels activated by action potentials suppress EPSPs and gate spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Scott L; To, Minh-Son

    2017-01-01

    Small conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) are present in spines and can be activated by backpropagating action potentials (APs). This suggests they may play a critical role in spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP). Consistent with this idea, EPSPs in both cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons were suppressed by preceding APs in an SK-dependent manner. In cortical pyramidal neurons EPSP suppression by preceding APs depended on their precise timing as well as the distance of activated synapses from the soma, was dendritic in origin, and involved SK-dependent suppression of NMDA receptor activation. As a result SK channel activation by backpropagating APs gated STDP induction during low-frequency AP-EPSP pairing, with both LTP and LTD absent under control conditions but present after SK channel block. These findings indicate that activation of SK channels in spines by backpropagating APs plays a key role in regulating both EPSP amplitude and STDP induction. PMID:29058675

  2. Voltage-Sensitive Potassium Channels of the BK Type and Their Coding Genes Are Alcohol Targets in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Dopico, Alex M; Bukiya, Anna N; Bettinger, Jill C

    2017-12-05

    Among all members of the voltage-gated, TM6 ion channel superfamily, the proteins that constitute calcium- and voltage-gated potassium channels of large conductance (BK) and their coding genes are unique for their involvement in ethanol-induced disruption of normal physiology and behavior. Moreover, in vitro studies document that BK activity is modified by ethanol with an EC 50 ~23 mM, which is near blood alcohol levels considered legal intoxication in most states of the USA (0.08 g/dL = 17.4 mM). Following a succinct introduction to our current understanding of BK structure and function in central neurons, with a focus on neural circuits that contribute to the neurobiology of alcohol use disorders (AUD), we review the modifications in organ physiology by alcohol exposure via BK and the different molecular elements that determine the ethanol response of BK in alcohol-naïve systems, including the role of an ethanol-recognizing site in the BK-forming slo1 protein, modulation of accessory BK subunits, and their coding genes. The participation of these and additional elements in determining the response of a system or an organism to protracted ethanol exposure is consequently analyzed, with insights obtained from invertebrate and vertebrate models. Particular emphasis is put on the role of BK and coding genes in different forms of tolerance to alcohol exposure. We finally discuss genetic results on BK obtained in invertebrate organisms and rodents in light of possible extrapolation to human AUD.

  3. Effects of the Kv7 voltage-activated potassium channel inhibitor linopirdine in rat models of hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Nassoiy, Sean P; Babu, Favin S; LaPorte, Heather M; Byron, Kenneth L; Majetschak, Matthias

    2018-04-27

    Recently, we demonstrated that Kv7 voltage-activated potassium channel inhibitors reduce fluid resuscitation requirements in short-term rat models of hemorrhagic shock. The aim of the present study was to further delineate the therapeutic potential and side effect profile of the Kv7 channel blocker linopirdine in various rat models of severe hemorrhagic shock over clinically relevant time periods. Intravenous administration of linopirdine, either before (1 or 3 mg/kg) or after (3 mg/kg) a 40% blood volume hemorrhage, did not affect blood pressure and survival in lethal hemorrhage models without fluid resuscitation. A single bolus of linopirdine (3 mg/kg) at the beginning of fluid resuscitation after hemorrhagic shock transiently reduced early fluid requirements in spontaneously breathing animals that were resuscitated for 3.5 hours. When mechanically ventilated rats were resuscitated after hemorrhagic shock with normal saline (NS) or with linopirdine-supplemented (10, 25 or 50 μg/mL) NS for 4.5 hours, linopirdine significantly and dose-dependently reduced fluid requirements by 14%, 45% and 55%, respectively. Lung and colon wet/dry weight ratios were reduced with linopirdine (25/50 μg/mL). There was no evidence for toxicity or adverse effects based on measurements of routine laboratory parameters and inflammation markers in plasma and tissue homogenates. Our findings support the concept that linopirdine-supplementation of resuscitation fluids is a safe and effective approach to reduce fluid requirements and tissue edema formation during resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. SK2 potassium channel overexpression in basolateral amygdala reduces anxiety, stress-induced corticosterone secretion and dendritic arborization.

    PubMed

    Mitra, R; Ferguson, D; Sapolsky, R M

    2009-09-01

    The basolateral amygdala is critical for generation of anxiety. In addition, exposure to both stress and glucocorticoids induces anxiety. Demonstrated ability of the amygdala to change in response to stress and glucocorticoids could thus be important therapeutic target for anxiety management. Several studies have reported a relationship between anxiety and dendritic arborization of the amygdaloid neurons. In this study we employed a gene therapeutic approach to reduce anxiety and dendritic arborization of the amygdala neurons. Specifically, we overexpressed SK2 potassium channel in the basolateral amygdala using a herpes simplex viral system. Our choice of therapeutic cargo was guided by the indications that activation of the amygdala might underlie anxiety and that SK2 could reduce neuronal activation by exerting inhibitory influence on action potentials. We report that SK2 overexpression reduced anxiety and stress-induced corticosterone secretion at a systemic level. SK2 overexpression also reduced dendritic arborization of the amygdala neurons. Hence, SK2 is a potential gene therapy candidate molecule that can be used against stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders such as anxiety.

  5. Calcitriol inhibits Ether-a go-go potassium channel expression and cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Becerra, Rocio; Diaz, Lorenza, E-mail: lorenzadiaz@gmail.com; Camacho, Javier

    2010-02-01

    Antiproliferative actions of calcitriol have been shown to occur in many cell types; however, little is known regarding the molecular basis of this process in breast carcinoma. Ether-a-go-go (Eag1) potassium channels promote oncogenesis and are implicated in breast cancer cell proliferation. Since calcitriol displays antineoplastic effects while Eag1 promotes tumorigenesis, and both factors antagonically regulate cell cycle progression, we investigated a possible regulatory effect of calcitriol upon Eag1 as a mean to uncover new molecular events involved in the antiproliferative activity of this hormone in human breast tumor-derived cells. RT real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that calcitriol suppressed Eag1 expressionmore » by a vitamin D receptor (VDR)-dependent mechanism. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation, which was potentiated by astemizole, a nonspecific Eag1 inhibitor. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot demonstrated that Eag1 and VDR abundance was higher in invasive-ductal carcinoma than in fibroadenoma, and immunoreactivity of both proteins was located in ductal epithelial cells. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism involved in the antiproliferative effects of calcitriol and highlight VDR as a cancer therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment and prevention.« less

  6. Small-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel and Recurrent Ventricular Fibrillation in Failing Rabbit Ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Su-Kiat; Chang, Po-Cheng; Maruyama, Mitsunori; Turker, Isik; Shinohara, Tetsuji; Shen, Mark J.; Chen, Zhenhui; Shen, Changyu; Rubart-von der Lohe, Michael; Lopshire, John C.; Ogawa, Masahiro; Weiss, James N.; Lin, Shien-Fong; Ai, Tomohiko; Chen, Peng-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Fibrillation-defibrillation episodes in failing ventricles may be followed by action potential duration (APD) shortening and recurrent spontaneous ventricular fibrillation (SVF). Objective We hypothesized that activation of apamin-sensitive small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels are responsible for the postshock APD shortening in failing ventricles. Methods and Results A rabbit model of tachycardia-induced heart failure was used. Simultaneous optical mapping of intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potential (Vm) was performed in failing and non-failing ventricles. Three failing ventricles developed SVF (SVF group), 9 did not (no-SVF group). None of the 10 non-failing ventricles developed SVF. Increased pacing rate and duration augmented the magnitude of APD shortening. Apamin (1 μmol/L) eliminated recurrent SVF, increased postshock APD80 in SVF group from 126±5 ms to 153±4 ms (p<0.05), in no-SVF group from147±2 ms to 162±3 ms (p<0.05) but did not change of APD80 in non-failing group. Whole cell patch-clamp studies at 36°C showed that the apamin-sensitive K+ current (IKAS) density was significantly larger in the failing than in the normal ventricular epicardial myocytes, and epicardial IKAS density is significantly higher than midmyocardial and endocardial myocytes. Steady-state Ca2+ response of IKAS was leftward-shifted in the failing cells compared with the normal control cells, indicating increased Ca2+ sensitivity of IKAS in failing ventricles. The Kd was 232 ± 5 nM for failing myocytes and 553 ± 78 nM for normal myocytes (p = 0.002). Conclusions Heart failure heterogeneously increases the sensitivity of IKAS to intracellular Ca2+, leading to upregulation of IKAS, postshock APD shortening and recurrent SVF. PMID:21350217

  7. Quantitative autoradiography of the binding sites for ( sup 125 I) iodoglyburide, a novel high-affinity ligand for ATP-sensitive potassium channels in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Gackenheimer, S.L.; Mais, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    We have developed a high specific activity ligand for localization of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the brain. When brain sections were incubated with ({sup 125}I)iodoglyburide (N-(2-((((cyclohexylamino)carbonyl)amino)sulfonyl)ethyl)-5-{sup 125}I-2- methoxybenzamide), the ligand bound to a single site with a KD of 495 pM and a maximum binding site density of 176 fmol/mg of tissue. Glyburide was the most potent inhibitor of specific ({sup 125}I)iodoglyburide binding to rat forebrain sections whereas iodoglyburide and glipizide were slightly less potent. The binding was also sensitive to ATP which completely inhibited binding at concentrations of 10 mM. Autoradiographic localization of ({sup 125}I)iodoglyburide binding indicated a broadmore » distribution of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel in the brain. The highest levels of binding were seen in the globus pallidus and ventral pallidum followed by the septohippocampal nucleus, anterior pituitary, the CA2 and CA3 region of the hippocampus, ventral pallidum, the molecular layer of the cerebellum and substantia nigra zona reticulata. The hilus and dorsal subiculum of the hippocampus, molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, cerebral cortex, lateral olfactory tract nucleus, olfactory tubercle and the zona incerta contained relatively high levels of binding. A lower level of binding (approximately 3- to 4-fold) was found throughout the remainder of the brain. These results indicate that the ATP-sensitive potassium channel has a broad presence in the rat brain and that a few select brain regions are enriched in this subtype of neuronal potassium channels.« less

  8. An improved synthesis of pyran-3,5-dione: application to the synthesis of ABT-598, a potassium channel opener, via Hantzsch reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenke; Wayne, Gregory S; Lallaman, John E; Chang, Sou-Jen; Wittenberger, Steven J

    2006-02-17

    Ketoester 1 is cyclized to give pyran-3,5-dione 2 in 78% yield using a parallel addition of ketoester 1 and base NaO(t)Bu in refluxing THF. Compared to the previously reported procedures, these optimized conditions have significantly increased the yield of this transformation and the quality of pyran 2 and prove to be suitable for large-scale preparation. An application of 2 to the synthesis of ABT-598, a potassium channel opener, is demonstrated.

  9. Acid sensitive background potassium channels K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 undergo rapid dynamin-dependent endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Mant, Alexandra; Williams, Sarah E; O'Kelly, Ita

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensitive, two-pore domain potassium channels, K2P3.1 and K2P9.1, are implicated in cardiac and nervous tissue responses to hormones, neurotransmitters and drugs. K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 leak potassium from the cell at rest and directly impact membrane potential. Hence altering channel number on the cell surface drives changes in cellular electrical properties. The rate of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 delivery to and recovery from the plasma membrane determines both channel number at the cell surface and potassium leak from cells. This study examines the endocytosis of K2P3.1 and K2P9.1. Plasma membrane biotinylation was used to follow the fate of internalized GFP-tagged rat K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 transiently expressed in HeLa cells. Confocal fluorescence images were analyzed using Imaris software, which revealed that both channels are endocytosed by a dynamin-dependent mechanism and over the course of 60 min, move progressively toward the nucleus. Endogenous endocytosis of human K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 was examined in the lung carcinoma cell line, A549. Endogenous channels are endocytosed over a similar time-scale to the channels expressed transiently in HeLa cells. These findings both validate the use of recombinant systems and identify an endogenous model system in which K2P3.1 and K2P9.1 trafficking can be further studied. PMID:23807092

  10. The Shaping of Two Distinct Dendritic Spikes by A-Type Voltage-Gated K(+) Channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungchil; Tang, Cha-Min; Yang, Sunggu

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic ion channels have been a subject of intense research in neuroscience because active ion channels in dendrites shape input signals. Ca(2+)-permeable channels including NMDA receptors (NMDARs) have been implicated in supralinear dendritic integration, and the IA conductance in sublinear integration. Despite their essential roles in dendritic integration, it has remained uncertain whether these conductance coordinate with, or counteract, each other in the process of dendritic integration. To address this question, experiments were designed in hippocampal CA1 neurons with a recent 3D digital holography system that has shown excellent performance for spatial photoactivation. The results demonstrated a role of IA as a key modulator for two distinct dendritic spikes, low- and high-threshold Ca(2+) spikes, through a preferential action of IA on Ca(2+)-permeable channel-mediated currents, over fast AMPAR-mediated currents. It is likely that the rapid kinetics of IA provides feed-forward inhibition to counteract the regenerative Ca(2+) channel-mediated dendritic excitability. This research reveals one dynamic ionic mechanism of dendritic integration, and may contribute to a new understanding of neuronal hyperexcitability embedded in several neural diseases such as epilepsy, fragile X syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody limbic encephalitis: a case illustrating the neuropsychiatric and PET/CT features with clinical and imaging follow-up.

    PubMed

    Celliers, Liesl; Hung, Te-Jui; Al-Ogaili, Zeyad; Moschilla, Girolamo; Knezevic, Wally

    2016-12-01

    To illustrate the neuropsychiatric and imaging findings in a confirmed case of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody limbic encephalitis. Case report and review of the literature. A 64-year-old man presented with several months' history of obsessive thoughts and compulsions associated with faciobrachial dystonic seizures. He had no significant past medical and psychiatric history. Physical examinations revealed only mildly increased tone in the left upper limb. Bedside cognitive testing was normal. Positron-emission tomography showed intense symmetrical uptake in the corpus striatum. No underlying malignancy was identified on whole body imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, lumbar puncture and electroencephalogram were normal. Serum voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies were strongly positive. The patient had a favourable response to antiepileptic drugs, oral steroids and immunotherapy. Voltage-gated potassium channel limbic encephalitis characteristically presents with neuropsychiatric symptoms and temporal lobe seizures. Positron-emission tomography-computed tomography can be a useful adjunct to the clinical and biochemical work-up. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  12. Novel selective positive modulator of calcium-activated potassium channels exerts beneficial effects in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 2

    PubMed Central

    Kasumu, AW; Hougaard, C; Rode, F; Jacobsen, TA; Sabatier, JM; Eriksen, BL; Strøbæk, D; Liang, X; Egorova, P; Vorontsova, D; Christophersen, P; Rønn, LCB; Bezprozvanny, I

    2012-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine expansion within the Ataxin-2 (Atxn2) protein. Purkinje cells (PC) of the cerebellum fire irregularly and eventually die in SCA2. We show here that the type 2 small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SK2) play a key role in control of normal PC activity. Using cerebellar slices from transgenic SCA2 mice we demonstrate that SK channel modulators restore regular pacemaker activity of SCA2 PCs. Furthermore, we also show that oral delivery of a novel selective positive modulator of SK2/3 channels (NS13001) alleviates behavioural and neuropathological phenotypes of aging SCA2 transgenic mice. We conclude that SK2 channels constitute a novel target for SCA2 treatment and that the developed selective SK2/3 modulator NS13001 holds promise as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of SCA2 and possibly other cerebellar ataxias. PMID:23102227

  13. Negative inotropic effect of carbachol and interaction between acetylcholine receptor-operated potassium channel (K.ACh channel) and GTP binding protein in mouse isolated atrium--a novel methodological trial.

    PubMed

    Okada, Muneyoshi; Noma, Chihiro; Yamawaki, Hideyuki; Hara, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Interaction between acetylcholine receptor-operated potassium channel (K.ACh channel) and GTP binding protein was examined by an immunoprecipitation-Western blotting system in mouse isolated atrium. The carbachol-induced negative inotropic action in indomethacin-pretreated mouse atrium was significantly inhibited by a K.ACh channel blocker, tertiapin or atropine. Kir3.1 K.ACh channel (Kir3.1) was immunoprecipitated with a mouse anti-Kir3.1 antibody. Coprecipitating Gβ with Kir3.1, detected by Western blotting, was significantly augmented by carbachol. Atropine, but not tertiapin, significantly inhibited the carbachol-induced coprecipitating Gβ with Kir3.1. The data indicate that immunoprecipitation with Kir3.1 and Western blotting of Gβ system is a useful method for assessing interaction between K.ACh channel and GTP binding protein in mouse atrium.

  14. The Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Subfamily KQT Member 4 (KCNQ4) Displays Parallel Evolution in Echolocating Bats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Han, Naijian; Franchini, Lucía F.; Xu, Huihui; Pisciottano, Francisco; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel; Zhang, Shuyi

    2012-01-01

    Bats are the only mammals that use highly developed laryngeal echolocation, a sensory mechanism based on the ability to emit laryngeal sounds and interpret the returning echoes to identify objects. Although this capability allows bats to orientate and hunt in complete darkness, endowing them with great survival advantages, the genetic bases underlying the evolution of bat echolocation are still largely unknown. Echolocation requires high-frequency hearing that in mammals is largely dependent on somatic electromotility of outer hair cells. Then, understanding the molecular evolution of outer hair cell genes might help to unravel the evolutionary history of echolocation. In this work, we analyzed the molecular evolution of two key outer hair cell genes: the voltage-gated potassium channel gene KCNQ4 and CHRNA10, the gene encoding the α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. We reconstructed the phylogeny of bats based on KCNQ4 and CHRNA10 protein and nucleotide sequences. A phylogenetic tree built using KCNQ4 amino acid sequences showed that two paraphyletic clades of laryngeal echolocating bats grouped together, with eight shared substitutions among particular lineages. In addition, our analyses indicated that two of these parallel substitutions, M388I and P406S, were probably fixed under positive selection and could have had a strong functional impact on KCNQ4. Moreover, our results indicated that KCNQ4 evolved under positive selection in the ancestral lineage leading to mammals, suggesting that this gene might have been important for the evolution of mammalian hearing. On the other hand, we found that CHRNA10, a gene that evolved adaptively in the mammalian lineage, was under strong purifying selection in bats. Thus, the CHRNA10 amino acid tree did not show echolocating bat monophyly and reproduced the bat species tree. These results suggest that only a subset of hearing genes could underlie the evolution of echolocation. The present work continues to

  15. Relationship between glial potassium regulation and axon excitability: a role for glial Kir4.1 channels.

    PubMed

    Bay, Virginia; Butt, Arthur M

    2012-04-01

    Uptake of K(+) released by axons during action potential propagation is a major function of astrocytes. Here, we demonstrate the importance of glial inward rectifying potassium channels (Kir) in regulating extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)) and axonal electrical activity in CNS white matter of the mouse optic nerve. Increasing optic nerve stimulation frequency from 1 Hz to 10-35 Hz for 120 s resulted in a rise in [K(+)](o) and consequent decay in the compound action potential (CAP), a measure of reduced axonal activity. On cessation of high frequency stimulation, rapid K(+) clearance resulted in a poststimulus [K(+)](o) undershoot, followed by a slow recovery of [K(+)](o) and the CAP, which were more protracted with increasing stimulation frequency. Blockade of Kir (100 μM BaCl(2)) slowed poststimulus recovery of [K(+)](o) and the CAP at all stimulation frequencies, indicating a primary function of glial Kir was redistributing K(+) to the extracellular space to offset active removal by Na(+)-K(+) pumps. At higher levels of axonal activity, Kir blockade also increased [K(+)](o) accumulation, exacerbating the decline in the CAP and impeding its subsequent recovery. In the Kir4.1-/- mouse, astrocytes displayed a marked reduction of inward currents and were severely depolarized, resulting in retarded [K(+)](o) regulation and reduced CAP. The results demonstrate the importance of glial Kir in K(+) spatial buffering and sustaining axonal activity in the optic nerve. Glial Kir have increasing importance in K(+) clearance at higher levels of axonal activity, helping to maintain the physiological [K(+)](o) ceiling and ensure the fidelity of signaling between the retina and brain. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Immunomodulatory effects of diclofenac in leukocytes through the targeting of Kv1.3 voltage-dependent potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Villalonga, Núria; David, Miren; Bielańska, Joanna; González, Teresa; Parra, David; Soler, Concepció; Comes, Núria; Valenzuela, Carmen; Felipe, Antonio

    2010-09-15

    Kv1.3 plays a crucial role in the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes and macrophages. While Kv1.3 is responsible for the voltage-dependent potassium current in T-cells, in macrophages this K(+) current is generated by the association of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5. Patients with autoimmune diseases show a high number of effector memory T cells that are characterized by a high expression of Kv1.3 and Kv1.3 antagonists ameliorate autoimmune disorders in vivo. Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used in patients who suffer from painful autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we show that diclofenac impairs immune response via a mechanism that involves Kv1.3. While diclofenac inhibited Kv1.3 expression in activated macrophages and T-lymphocytes, Kv1.5 remained unaffected. Diclofenac also decreased iNOS levels in Raw 264.7 cells, impairing their activation in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS-induced macrophage migration and IL-2 production in stimulated Jurkat T-cells were also blocked by pharmacological doses of diclofenac. These effects were mimicked by Margatoxin, a specific Kv1.3 inhibitor, and Charybdotoxin, which blocks both Kv1.3 and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca)3.1). Because Kv1.3 is a very good target for autoimmune therapies, the effects of diclofenac on Kv1.3 are of high pharmacological relevance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of vascular calcification by block of intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels with TRAM-34.

    PubMed

    Freise, Christian; Querfeld, Uwe

    2014-07-01

    Vascular calcifications are a hallmark of advanced cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. A key event is the transition of contractile vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) into an osteoblast-like phenotype, promoting a coordinated process of vascular remodeling resembling bone mineralization. Intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa3.1) are expressed in various tissues including VSMC. Aiming for novel therapeutic targets in vascular calcification, we here studied effects of KCa3.1-inhibition on VSMC calcification by the specific KCa3.1 inhibitor TRAM-34. Calcification in the murine VSMC cell line MOVAS-1 and primary rat VSMC was induced by calcification medium (CM) containing elevated levels of PO4(3-) and Ca(2+). Cell signaling, calcification markers, and release of nitric oxide and alkaline phosphatase were assessed by luciferase reporter plasmids, RT-PCR and specific enzymatic assays, respectively. KCa3.1 gene silencing was achieved by siRNA experiments. TRAM-34 at 10nmol/l, decreased CM-induced calcification and induced NO release of VSMC accompanied by decreased TGF-β signaling. The CM-induced mRNA expressions of osterix, osteocalcin, matrix-metalloproteinases (MMP)-2/-9 were reduced by TRAM-34 while osteopontin expression was increased. Further, TRAM-34 attenuated the CM- and TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB and reduced the release of MMP-2/-9 by VSMC. Finally, TRAM-34 abrogated CM-induced apoptosis and KCa3.1 gene silencing protected VSMC from CM-induced onset of calcification. In summary, TRAM-34 interferes with calcification relevant signaling of NF-κB and TGF-β thereby blocking the phenotypic transition/calcification of VSMC. We conclude that the results provide a rationale for further studies regarding a possible therapeutic role of KCa3.1 inhibition by TRAM-34 or other inhibitors in vascular calcification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The voltage-gated potassium channel subfamily KQT member 4 (KCNQ4) displays parallel evolution in echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Han, Naijian; Franchini, Lucía F; Xu, Huihui; Pisciottano, Francisco; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel; Zhang, Shuyi

    2012-05-01

    Bats are the only mammals that use highly developed laryngeal echolocation, a sensory mechanism based on the ability to emit laryngeal sounds and interpret the returning echoes to identify objects. Although this capability allows bats to orientate and hunt in complete darkness, endowing them with great survival advantages, the genetic bases underlying the evolution of bat echolocation are still largely unknown. Echolocation requires high-frequency hearing that in mammals is largely dependent on somatic electromotility of outer hair cells. Then, understanding the molecular evolution of outer hair cell genes might help to unravel the evolutionary history of echolocation. In this work, we analyzed the molecular evolution of two key outer hair cell genes: the voltage-gated potassium channel gene KCNQ4 and CHRNA10, the gene encoding the α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit. We reconstructed the phylogeny of bats based on KCNQ4 and CHRNA10 protein and nucleotide sequences. A phylogenetic tree built using KCNQ4 amino acid sequences showed that two paraphyletic clades of laryngeal echolocating bats grouped together, with eight shared substitutions among particular lineages. In addition, our analyses indicated that two of these parallel substitutions, M388I and P406S, were probably fixed under positive selection and could have had a strong functional impact on KCNQ4. Moreover, our results indicated that KCNQ4 evolved under positive selection in the ancestral lineage leading to mammals, suggesting that this gene might have been important for the evolution of mammalian hearing. On the other hand, we found that CHRNA10, a gene that evolved adaptively in the mammalian lineage, was under strong purifying selection in bats. Thus, the CHRNA10 amino acid tree did not show echolocating bat monophyly and reproduced the bat species tree. These results suggest that only a subset of hearing genes could underlie the evolution of echolocation. The present work continues to

  19. Genetic variations in the pancreatic ATP-sensitive potassium channel, beta-cell dysfunction, and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, D A; Potapov, V A; Khodirev, D C; Shamkhalova, M S; Shestakova, M V; Nosikov, V V

    2009-03-01

    The KCNJ11 and ABCC8 genes encode the components of the pancreatic ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel, which regulates insulin secretion by beta-cells and hence could be involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The KCNJ11 E23K and ABCC8 exon 31 variants have been studied in 127 Russian T2D patients and 117 controls using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) approach. The KCNJ11 E23 variant and the ABCC8 exon 31 allele A were associated with higher risk of T2D [Odds ratio (OR) of 1.53 (P=0.023) and 2.41 (P=1.95 x 10(-5))], respectively. Diabetic carriers of the ABCC8 G/G variant had reduced 2 h glucose compared to A/A+A/G (P=0.031). The G/G genotype of ABCC8 was also significantly associated with increased both fasting and 2 h serum insulin in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. A HOMA-beta value characterizing the beta-cell homeostasis was higher in the non-diabetic carriers homozygous for G/G (98.0+/-46.9) then for other genotypes (HOMA-beta = 85.6+/-45.5 for A/A+A/G, P=0.0015). The KCNJ11 E23K and ABCC8 exon 31 variants contribute to susceptibility to T2D diabetes, glucose intolerance and altered insulin secretion in a Russian population.

  20. Evidence for the Involvement of Potassium Channel Inhibition in the Antidepressant-Like Effects of Hesperidin in the Tail Suspension Test in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Franciele; Filho, Carlos Borges; Giacomeli, Renata; Alvater, Elza Eliza Tenório; Fabbro, Lucian Del; Antunes, Michele da Silva; de Gomes, Marcelo Gomes; Goes, André Tiago Rossito; Souza, Leandro Cattelan; Boeira, Silvana Peterini

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The administration of hesperidin elicits an antidepressant-like effect in mice by a mechanism dependent on an interaction with the l-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway, whose stimulation is associated with the activation of potassium (K+) channels. Thus, this study investigated the involvement of different types of K+ channels in the antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin in the mice tail suspension test (TST). The intracerebroventricular administration of tetraethylammonium (TEA, a nonspecific blocker of K+ channels), glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker), charybdotoxin (a large- and intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K+ channel blocker) or apamin (a small-conductance calcium-activated K+ channel blocker) combined with a subeffective dose of hesperidin (0.01 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) was able to produce a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the mice TST. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effect elicited by an effective dose of hesperidin (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) in TST was abolished by the treatment of mice with pharmacological compounds K+ channel openers (cromakalim and minoxidil). Results showed that the antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin in TST may involve, at least in part, the modulation of neuronal excitability through inhibition of K+ channels and may act through a mechanism dependent on the inhibition of l-arginine-NO pathway. PMID:25647144

  1. Associations of two-pore domain potassium channels and triple negative breast cancer subtype in The Cancer Genome Atlas: systematic evaluation of gene expression and methylation.

    PubMed

    Dookeran, Keith A; Zhang, Wei; Stayner, Leslie; Argos, Maria

    2017-09-12

    It is unclear whether 2-pore domain potassium channels are novel molecular markers with differential expression related to biologically aggressive triple-negative type breast tumors. Our objective was to systematically evaluate associations of 2-pore domain potassium channel gene expression and DNA methylation with triple-negative subtype in The Cancer Genome Atlas invasive breast cancer dataset. Methylation and expression data for all fifteen 2-pore domain potassium family genes were examined for 1040 women, and associations with triple-negative subtype (vs. luminal A) were evaluated using age/race adjusted generalized-linear models, with Bonferroni-corrected significance thresholds. Subtype associated CpG loci were evaluated for functionality related to expression using Spearman's correlation. Overexpression of KCNK5, KCNK9 and KCNK12, and underexpression of KCNK6 and KCNK15, were significantly associated with triple-negative subtype (Bonferroni-corrected p < 0.0033). A total of 195 (114 hypomethylated and 81 hypermethylated) CpG loci were found to be significantly associated with triple-negative subtype (Bonferroni-corrected p < 8.22 × 10 -8 ). Significantly negatively correlated expression patterns that were differentially observed in triple-negative vs. luminal A subtype were demonstrated for: KCNK2 (gene body: cg04923840, cg13916421), KCNK5 (gene body: cg05255811, cg18705155, cg09130674, cg21388745, cg00859574) and KCNK9 (TSS1500: cg21415530, cg12175729; KCNK9/TRAPPC9 intergenic region: cg17336929, cg25900813, cg03919980). CpG loci listed for KCNK5 and KCNK9 all showed relative hypomethylation for probability of triple-negative vs. luminal A subtype. Triple-negative subtype was associated with distinct 2-pore domain potassium channel expression patterns. Both KCNK5 and KCNK9 overexpression appeared to be functionally related to CpG loci hypomethylation.

  2. Altered Potassium Ion Channel Function as a Possible Mechanism of Increased Blood Pressure in Rats Fed Thermally Oxidized Palm Oil Diets.

    PubMed

    Nkanu, Etah E; Owu, Daniel U; Osim, Eme E

    2017-12-27

    Intake of thermally oxidized palm oil leads to cytotoxicity and alteration of the potassium ion channel function. This study investigated the effects of fresh and thermally oxidized palm oil diets on blood pressure and potassium ion channel function in blood pressure regulation. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups of eight rats. Control group received normal feed; fresh palm oil (FPO) and thermally oxidized palm oil (TPO) groups were fed a diet mixed with 15% (weight/weight) fresh palm oil and five times heated palm oil, respectively, for 16 weeks. Blood pressure was measured; blood samples, hearts, and aortas were collected for biochemical and histological analyses. Thermally oxidized palm oil significantly elevated basal mean arterial pressure (MAP). Glibenclamide (10 -5 mmol/L) and tetraethylammonium (TEA; 10 -3 mmol/L) significantly raised blood pressure in TPO compared with FPO and control groups. Levcromakalim (10 -6 mmol/L) significantly (p < .01) reduced MAP by 32.0% in FPO and by 5.4% in TPO. NS1619 (10 mmol/L) significantly (p < .01) decreased MAP by 19.5% in FPO and by 8% in TPO. The TPO significantly (p < 0.01) increased the tissue levels of peroxide, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol while catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly (p < .01) decreased compared with control and FPO groups. Histological alterations were prominent in aortas and hearts of rats in the TPO group. These results suggest that prolonged consumption of repeatedly heated palm oil increases MAP probably due to the attenuation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (K ATP ) and large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium (BK Ca ) channels, tissue peroxidation, and altered histological structures of the heart and blood vessels.

  3. The conserved potassium channel filter can have distinct ion binding profiles: structural analysis of rubidium, cesium, and barium binding in NaK2K.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yee Ling; Zeng, Weizhong; Sauer, David Bryant; Jiang, Youxing

    2014-08-01

    Potassium channels are highly selective for K(+) over the smaller Na(+). Intriguingly, they are permeable to larger monovalent cations such as Rb(+) and Cs(+) but are specifically blocked by the similarly sized Ba(2+). In this study, we used structural analysis to determine the binding profiles for these permeant and blocking ions in the selectivity filter of the potassium-selective NaK channel mutant NaK2K and also performed permeation experiments using single-channel recordings. Our data revealed that some ion binding properties of NaK2K are distinct from those of the canonical K(+) channels KcsA and MthK. Rb(+) bound at sites 1, 3, and 4 in NaK2K, as it does in KcsA. Cs(+), however, bound predominantly at sites 1 and 3 in NaK2K, whereas it binds at sites 1, 3, and 4 in KcsA. Moreover, Ba(2+) binding in NaK2K was distinct from that which has been observed in KcsA and MthK, even though all of these channels show similar Ba(2+) block. In the presence of K(+), Ba(2+) bound to the NaK2K channel at site 3 in conjunction with a K(+) at site 1; this led to a prolonged block of the channel (the external K(+)-dependent Ba(2+) lock-in state). In the absence of K(+), however, Ba(2+) acts as a permeating blocker. We found that, under these conditions, Ba(2+) bound at sites 1 or 0 as well as site 3, allowing it to enter the filter from the intracellular side and exit from the extracellular side. The difference in the Ba(2+) binding profile in the presence and absence of K(+) thus provides a structural explanation for the short and prolonged Ba(2+) block observed in NaK2K. © 2014 Lam et al.

  4. Blockade of ATP-sensitive potassium channels prevents the attenuation of the exercise pressor reflex by tempol in rats with ligated femoral arteries.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Katsuya; Stone, Audrey J; Stocker, Sean D; Kaufman, Marc P

    2012-08-01

    We reported previously that tempol attenuated the exercise pressor and muscle mechanoreceptor reflexes in rats whose femoral arteries were ligated, whereas tempol did not attenuate these reflexes in rats whose femoral arteries were freely perfused. Although the mechanism whereby tempol attenuated these reflexes in rats whose femoral artery was ligated was independent of its ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species, its nature remains unclear. An alternative explanation for the tempol-induced attenuation of these reflexes involves ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP)) and calcium-activated potassium channels (BK(Ca)), both of which are opened by tempol. We tested the likelihood of this explanation by measuring the effects of either glibenclamide (0.1 mg/kg), which blocks K(ATP) channels, or iberiotoxin (20 or 40 μg/kg), which blocks BK(Ca) channels, on the tempol-induced attenuation of the exercise pressor and muscle mechanoreceptor reflexes in decerebrated rats whose femoral arteries were ligated. We found that glibenclamide prevented the tempol-induced attenuation of both reflexes, whereas iberiotoxin did not. We also found that the amount of protein comprising the pore of the K(ATP) channel in the dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs whose femoral artery was ligated was significantly greater than that in the dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs whose femoral arteries were freely perfused. In contrast, the amounts of protein comprising the BK(Ca) channel in the dorsal root ganglia innervating the ligated and freely perfused hindlimbs were not different. We conclude that tempol attenuated both reflexes by opening K(ATP) channels, an effect that hyperpolarized muscle afferents stimulated by static contraction or tendon stretch.

  5. Blockade of ATP-sensitive potassium channels prevents the attenuation of the exercise pressor reflex by tempol in rats with ligated femoral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Katsuya; Stone, Audrey J.; Stocker, Sean D.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that tempol attenuated the exercise pressor and muscle mechanoreceptor reflexes in rats whose femoral arteries were ligated, whereas tempol did not attenuate these reflexes in rats whose femoral arteries were freely perfused. Although the mechanism whereby tempol attenuated these reflexes in rats whose femoral artery was ligated was independent of its ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species, its nature remains unclear. An alternative explanation for the tempol-induced attenuation of these reflexes involves ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP) and calcium-activated potassium channels (BKCa), both of which are opened by tempol. We tested the likelihood of this explanation by measuring the effects of either glibenclamide (0.1 mg/kg), which blocks KATP channels, or iberiotoxin (20 or 40 μg/kg), which blocks BKCa channels, on the tempol-induced attenuation of the exercise pressor and muscle mechanoreceptor reflexes in decerebrated rats whose femoral arteries were ligated. We found that glibenclamide prevented the tempol-induced attenuation of both reflexes, whereas iberiotoxin did not. We also found that the amount of protein comprising the pore of the KATP channel in the dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs whose femoral artery was ligated was significantly greater than that in the dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs whose femoral arteries were freely perfused. In contrast, the amounts of protein comprising the BKCa channel in the dorsal root ganglia innervating the ligated and freely perfused hindlimbs were not different. We conclude that tempol attenuated both reflexes by opening KATP channels, an effect that hyperpolarized muscle afferents stimulated by static contraction or tendon stretch. PMID:22636679

  6. The conserved potassium channel filter can have distinct ion binding profiles: Structural analysis of rubidium, cesium, and barium binding in NaK2K

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Yee Ling; Zeng, Weizhong; Sauer, David Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Potassium channels are highly selective for K+ over the smaller Na+. Intriguingly, they are permeable to larger monovalent cations such as Rb+ and Cs+ but are specifically blocked by the similarly sized Ba2+. In this study, we used structural analysis to determine the binding profiles for these permeant and blocking ions in the selectivity filter of the potassium-selective NaK channel mutant NaK2K and also performed permeation experiments using single-channel recordings. Our data revealed that some ion binding properties of NaK2K are distinct from those of the canonical K+ channels KcsA and MthK. Rb+ bound at sites 1, 3, and 4 in NaK2K, as it does in KcsA. Cs+, however, bound predominantly at sites 1 and 3 in NaK2K, whereas it binds at sites 1, 3, and 4 in KcsA. Moreover, Ba2+ binding in NaK2K was distinct from that which has been observed in KcsA and MthK, even though all of these channels show similar Ba2+ block. In the presence of K+, Ba2+ bound to the NaK2K channel at site 3 in conjunction with a K+ at site 1; this led to a prolonged block of the channel (the external K+-dependent Ba2+ lock-in state). In the absence of K+, however, Ba2+ acts as a permeating blocker. We found that, under these conditions, Ba2+ bound at sites 1 or 0 as well as site 3, allowing it to enter the filter from the intracellular side and exit from the extracellular side. The difference in the Ba2+ binding profile in the presence and absence of K+ thus provides a structural explanation for the short and prolonged Ba2+ block observed in NaK2K. PMID:25024267

  7. The mechanism of gentisic acid-induced relaxation of the guinea pig isolated trachea: the role of potassium channels and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Cunha, J F; Campestrini, F D; Calixto, J B; Scremin, A; Paulino, N

    2001-03-01

    We examined some of the mechanisms by which the aspirin metabolite and the naturally occurring metabolite gentisic acid induced relaxation of the guinea pig trachea in vitro. In preparations with or without epithelium and contracted by histamine, gentisic acid caused concentration-dependent and reproducible relaxation, with mean EC(50) values of 18 microM and E(max) of 100% (N = 10) or 20 microM and E(max) of 92% (N = 10), respectively. The relaxation caused by gentisic acid was of slow onset in comparison to that caused by norepinephrine, theophylline or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The relative rank order of potency was: salbutamol 7.9 > VIP 7.0 > gentisic acid 4.7 > theophylline 3.7. Gentisic acid-induced relaxation was markedly reduced (24 +/- 7.0, 43 +/- 3.9 and 78 +/- 5.6%) in preparations with elevated potassium concentration in the medium (20, 40 or 80 mM, respectively). Tetraethylammonium (100 microM), a nonselective blocker of the potassium channels, partially inhibited the relaxation response to gentisic acid, while 4-AP (10 microM), a blocker of the voltage potassium channel, inhibited gentisic acid-induced relaxation by 41 +/- 12%. Glibenclamide (1 or 3 microM), at a concentration which markedly inhibited the relaxation induced by the opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, levcromakalim, had no effect on the relaxation induced by gentisic acid. Charybdotoxin (0.1 or 0.3 microM), a selective blocker of the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, caused rightward shifts (6- and 7-fold) of the gentisic acid concentration-relaxation curve. L-N(G)-nitroarginine (100 microM), a NO synthase inhibitor, had no effect on the relaxant effect of gentisic acid, and caused a slight displacement to the right in the relaxant effect of the gentisic acid curve at 300 microM, while methylene blue (10 or 30 microM) or ODQ (1 microM), the inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase, all failed to affect gentisic acid-induced relaxation. D-(P)-Cl-Phe(6),Leu(17

  8. Emerging Role of Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel in the Regulation of Cell Viability Following Potassium Ions Challenge in HEK293 Cells and Pharmacological Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Domenico; Mele, Antonietta; Calzolaro, Sara; Cannone, Gianluigi; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Dinardo, Maria Maddalena; Latorre, Ramon; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidences suggest that Ca2+activated-K+-(BK) channel is involved in the regulation of cell viability. The changes of the cell viability observed under hyperkalemia (15 mEq/L) or hypokalemia (0.55 mEq/L) conditions were investigated in HEK293 cells expressing the hslo subunit (hslo-HEK293) in the presence or absence of BK channel modulators. The BK channel openers(10-11-10-3M) were: acetazolamide(ACTZ), Dichlorphenamide(DCP), methazolamide(MTZ), bendroflumethiazide(BFT), ethoxzolamide(ETX), hydrochlorthiazide(HCT), quercetin(QUERC), resveratrol(RESV) and NS1619; and the BK channel blockers(2x10-7M-5x10-3M) were: tetraethylammonium(TEA), iberiotoxin(IbTx) and charybdotoxin(ChTX). Experiments on cell viability and channel currents were performed using cell counting kit-8 and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Hslo whole-cell current was potentiated by BK channel openers with different potency and efficacy in hslo-HEK293. The efficacy ranking of the openers at -60 mV(Vm) was BFT> ACTZ >DCP ≥RESV≥ ETX> NS1619> MTZ≥ QUERC; HCT was not effective. Cell viability after 24 h of incubation under hyperkalemia was enhanced by 82+6% and 33+7% in hslo-HEK293 cells and HEK293 cells, respectively. IbTx, ChTX and TEA enhanced cell viability in hslo-HEK293. BK openers prevented the enhancement of the cell viability induced by hyperkalemia or IbTx in hslo-HEK293 showing an efficacy which was comparable with that observed as BK openers. BK channel modulators failed to affect cell currents and viability under hyperkalemia conditions in the absence of hslo subunit. In contrast, under hypokalemia cell viability was reduced by -22+4% and -23+6% in hslo-HEK293 and HEK293 cells, respectively; the BK channel modulators failed to affect this parameter in these cells. In conclusion, BK channel regulates cell viability under hyperkalemia but not hypokalemia conditions. BFT and ACTZ were the most potent drugs either in activating the BK current and in preventing the cell

  9. Reversible antisense inhibition of Shaker-like Kv1.1 potassium channel expression impairs associative memory in mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Meiri, N; Ghelardini, C; Tesco, G; Galeotti, N; Dahl, D; Tomsic, D; Cavallaro, S; Quattrone, A; Capaccioli, S; Bartolini, A; Alkon, D L

    1997-04-29

    Long-term memory is thought to be subserved by functional remodeling of neuronal circuits. Changes in the weights of existing synapses in networks might depend on voltage-gated potassium currents. We therefore studied the physiological role of potassium channels in memory, concentrating on the Shaker-like Kv1.1, a late rectifying potassium channel that is highly localized within dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal and dentate gyrus granular cells. Repeated intracerebroventricular injection of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide to Kv1.1 reduces expression of its particular intracellular mRNA target, decreases late rectifying K+ current(s) in dentate granule cells, and impairs memory but not other motor or sensory behaviors, in two different learning paradigms, mouse passive avoidance and rat spatial memory. The latter, hippocampal-dependent memory loss occurred in the absence of long-term potentiation changes recorded both from the dentate gyrus or CA1. The specificity of the reversible antisense targeting of mRNA in adult animal brains may avoid irreversible developmental and genetic background effects that accompany transgenic "knockouts".

  10. Reversible antisense inhibition of Shaker-like Kv1.1 potassium channel expression impairs associative memory in mouse and rat

    PubMed Central

    Meiri, Noam; Ghelardini, Carla; Tesco, Giuseppina; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Dahl, Dennis; Tomsic, Daniel; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; Quattrone, Alessandro; Capaccioli, Sergio; Bartolini, Alessandro; Alkon, Daniel L.

    1997-01-01

    Long-term memory is thought to be subserved by functional remodeling of neuronal circuits. Changes in the weights of existing synapses in networks might depend on voltage-gated potassium currents. We therefore studied the physiological role of potassium channels in memory, concentrating on the Shaker-like Kv1.1, a late rectifying potassium channel that is highly localized within dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal and dentate gyrus granular cells. Repeated intracerebroventricular injection of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotide to Kv1.1 reduces expression of its particular intracellular mRNA target, decreases late rectifying K+ current(s) in dentate granule cells, and impairs memory but not other motor or sensory behaviors, in two different learning paradigms, mouse passive avoidance and rat spatial memory. The latter, hippocampal-dependent memory loss occurred in the absence of long-term potentiation changes recorded both from the dentate gyrus or CA1. The specificity of the reversible antisense targeting of mRNA in adult animal brains may avoid irreversible developmental and genetic background effects that accompany transgenic “knockouts”. PMID:9114006

  11. Cortical effect of oxaliplatin associated with sustained neuropathic pain: exacerbation of cortical activity and down-regulation of potassium channel expression in somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Dubacq, Sophie; Roualle-de-Rouville, Marie; Sordoillet, Vallier; Rivals, Isabelle; Pezet, Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum-based chemotherapy drug that has gained importance in the treatment of advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. Its dose-limiting side effect is the production of chronic peripheral neuropathy. Using a modified model of oxaliplatin-induced sensory neuropathy, we investigated plastic changes at the cortical level as possible mechanisms underlying the chronicity of pain sensation in this model. Changes in gene expression were studied using DNA microarray which revealed that when oxaliplatin-treated animals displayed clinical neuropathic pain symptoms, including mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity, approximately 900 were down-regulated in the somatosensory cortex. Because of the known role of potassium channels in neuronal excitability, the study further focussed on the down-regulation of these channels as the possible molecular origin of cortical hyperexcitability. Quantification of the magnitude of neuronal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in cortical neurons as a marker of neuronal activity revealed a 10-fold increase induced by oxaliplatin treatment, suggesting that neurons of cortical areas involved in transmission of painful stimuli undergo a chronic cortical excitability. We further demonstrated, using cortical injection of lentiviral vector shRNA against Kv2.2, that down-regulation of this potassium channel in naive animals induced a sustained thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity. In conclusion, although the detailed mechanisms leading to this cortical excitability are still unknown, our study demonstrated that a cortical down regulation of potassium channels could underlie pain chronicity in this model of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir4.1 is responsible for the native inward potassium conductance of satellite glial cells in sensory ganglia.

    PubMed

    Tang, X; Schmidt, T M; Perez-Leighton, C E; Kofuji, P

    2010-03-17

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) surround primary afferent neurons in sensory ganglia, and increasing evidence has implicated the K(+) channels of SGCs in affecting or regulating sensory ganglion excitability. The inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channel Kir4.1 is highly expressed in several types of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS) where it has been implicated in extracellular K(+) concentration buffering. Upon neuronal activity, the extracellular K(+) concentration increases, and if not corrected, causes neuronal depolarization and uncontrolled changes in neuronal excitability. Recently, it has been demonstrated that knockdown of Kir4.1 expression in trigeminal ganglia leads to neuronal hyperexcitability in this ganglia and heightened nociception. Thus, we investigated the contribution of Kir4.1 to the membrane K(+) conductance of SGCs in neonatal and adult mouse trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Whole cell patch clamp recordings were performed in conjunction with immunocytochemistry and quantitative transcript analysis in various mouse lines. We found that in wild-type mice, the inward K(+) conductance of SGCs is blocked almost completely with extracellular barium, cesium and desipramine, consistent with a conductance mediated by Kir channels. We then utilized mouse lines in which genetic ablation led to partial or complete loss of Kir4.1 expression to assess the role of this channel subunit in SGCs. The inward K(+) currents of SGCs in Kir4.1+/- mice were decreased by about half while these currents were almost completely absent in Kir4.1-/- mice. These findings in combination with previous reports support the notion that Kir4.1 is the principal Kir channel type in SGCs. Therefore Kir4.1 emerges as a key regulator of SGC function and possibly neuronal excitability in sensory ganglia. Copyright (c) 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. P2Y2 receptor activation decreases blood pressure via intermediate conductance potassium channels and connexin 37

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez Rieg, J. A.; Burt, J. M.; Ruth, P.; Rieg, T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Nucleotides are important paracrine regulators of vascular tone. We previously demonstrated that activation of P2Y2 receptors causes an acute, NO-independent decrease in blood pressure, indicating this signalling pathway requires an endothelial-derived hyperpolarization (EDH) response. To define the mechanisms by which activation of P2Y2 receptors initiates EDH and vasodilation, we studied intermediate-conductance (KCa3.1, expressed in endothelial cells) and big-conductance potassium channels (KCa1.1, expressed in smooth muscle cells) as well as components of the myoendothelial gap junction, connexins 37 and 40 (Cx37, Cx40), all hypothesized to be part of the EDH response. Methods We compared the effects of a P2Y2/4 receptor agonist in wild-type (WT) mice and in mice lacking KCa3.1, KCa1.1, Cx37 or Cx40 under anaesthesia, while monitoring intra-arterial blood pressure and heart rate. Results Acute activation of P2Y2/4 receptors (0.01–3 mg kg−1 body weight i.v.) caused a biphasic blood pressure response characterized by a dose-dependent and rapid decrease in blood pressure in WT (maximal response % of baseline at 3 mg kg−1: −38 ± 1%) followed by a consecutive increase in blood pressure (+44 ± 11%). The maximal responses in KCa3.1−/− and Cx37−/− were impaired (−13 ± 5, +17 ± 7 and −27 ± 1, +13 ± 3% respectively), whereas the maximal blood pressure decrease in response to acetylcholine at 3 µg kg−1 was not significantly different (WT: −53 ± 3%; KCa3.1−/−: −52 ± 3; Cx37−/−: −53 ± 3%). KCa1.1−/− and Cx40−/− showed an identical biphasic response to P2Y2/4 receptor activation compared to WT. Conclusions The data suggest that the P2Y2/4 receptor activation elicits blood pressure responses via distinct mechanisms involving KCa3.1 and Cx37. PMID:25545736

  14. The potassium channel interacting protein 3 (DREAM/KChIP3) heterodimerizes with and regulates calmodulin function.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Pradeep L; Craig, Theodore A; Atanasova, Elena A; Cui, Gaofeng; Owen, Barbara A; Bergen, H Robert; Mer, Georges; Kumar, Rajiv

    2012-11-16

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM/KChIP3), a neuronal EF-hand protein, modulates pain, potassium channel activity, and binds presenilin 1. Using affinity capture of neuronal proteins by immobilized DREAM/KChIP3 in the presence and absence of calcium (Ca(2+)) followed by mass spectroscopic identification of interacting proteins, we demonstrate that in the presence of Ca(2+), DREAM/KChIP3 interacts with the EF-hand protein, calmodulin (CaM). The interaction of DREAM/KChIP3 with CaM does not occur in the absence of Ca(2+). In the absence of Ca(2+), DREAM/KChIP3 binds the EF-hand protein, calcineurin subunit-B. Ca(2+)-bound DREAM/KChIP3 binds CaM with a dissociation constant of ∼3 μM as assessed by changes in DREAM/KChIP3 intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of CaM. Two-dimensional (1)H,(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra reveal changes in chemical shifts and line broadening upon the addition of CaM to (15)N DREAM/KChIP3. The amino-terminal portion of DREAM/KChIP3 is required for its binding to CaM because a construct of DREAM/KChIP3 lacking the first 94 amino-terminal residues fails to bind CaM as assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy. The addition of Ca(2+)-bound DREAM/KChIP3 increases the activation of calcineurin (CN) by calcium CaM. A DREAM/KChIP3 mutant incapable of binding Ca(2+) also stimulates calmodulin-dependent CN activity. The shortened form of DREAM/KChIP3 lacking the NH(2)-terminal amino acids fails to activate CN in the presence of calcium CaM. Our data demonstrate the interaction of DREAM/KChIP3 with the important EF-hand protein, CaM, and show that the interaction alters CN activity.

  15. The Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 3 (DREAM/KChIP3) Heterodimerizes with and Regulates Calmodulin Function*

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Pradeep L.; Craig, Theodore A.; Atanasova, Elena A.; Cui, Gaofeng; Owen, Barbara A.; Bergen, H. Robert; Mer, Georges; Kumar, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM/KChIP3), a neuronal EF-hand protein, modulates pain, potassium channel activity, and binds presenilin 1. Using affinity capture of neuronal proteins by immobilized DREAM/KChIP3 in the presence and absence of calcium (Ca2+) followed by mass spectroscopic identification of interacting proteins, we demonstrate that in the presence of Ca2+, DREAM/KChIP3 interacts with the EF-hand protein, calmodulin (CaM). The interaction of DREAM/KChIP3 with CaM does not occur in the absence of Ca2+. In the absence of Ca2+, DREAM/KChIP3 binds the EF-hand protein, calcineurin subunit-B. Ca2+-bound DREAM/KChIP3 binds CaM with a dissociation constant of ∼3 μm as assessed by changes in DREAM/KChIP3 intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of CaM. Two-dimensional 1H,15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra reveal changes in chemical shifts and line broadening upon the addition of CaM to 15N DREAM/KChIP3. The amino-terminal portion of DREAM/KChIP3 is required for its binding to CaM because a construct of DREAM/KChIP3 lacking the first 94 amino-terminal residues fails to bind CaM as assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy. The addition of Ca2+-bound DREAM/KChIP3 increases the activation of calcineurin (CN) by calcium CaM. A DREAM/KChIP3 mutant incapable of binding Ca2+ also stimulates calmodulin-dependent CN activity. The shortened form of DREAM/KChIP3 lacking the NH2-terminal amino acids fails to activate CN in the presence of calcium CaM. Our data demonstrate the interaction of DREAM/KChIP3 with the important EF-hand protein, CaM, and show that the interaction alters CN activity. PMID:23019329

  16. Activation of ATP-dependent potassium channels is a trigger but not a mediator of ischaemic preconditioning in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Rainer; Gres, Petra; Heusch, Gerd

    2003-05-01

    1. Activation of ATP-dependent potassium channels (K(ATP)) is involved in ischaemic preconditioning (IP). In isolated buffer-perfused rabbit hearts, activation of mitochondrial K(ATP)--through a generation of free radicals--acted as a trigger rather than a mediator of IP; the isolated buffer-perfused heart preparation, however, favours free radical generation. In contrast, in vivo studies in rats and dogs suggested that activation of K(ATP) acts as a mediator of IP's protection. A detailed analysis on the role of K(ATP) in IP's protection in vivo by varying the time and dose of K(ATP) blocker administration is, however, lacking. 2. In 54 enflurane-anaesthetized pigs, the left anterior descending coronary artery was perfused by an extracorporeal circuit. Infarct size (IS, %, TTC) following 90 min sustained low-flow ischaemia and 120 min reperfusion was 26.6+/-3.5 (s.e.m.) (n=8). IP with one cycle of 10 min ischaemia and 15 min reperfusion reduced IS to 6.5+/-2.1 (n=7, P<0.05). Blockade of K(ATP) with glibenclamide (0.5 mg kg(-1) i.v., 50 microg min(-1) continuous infusion) starting 10 min before or immediately following the preconditioning ischaemia abolished IS reduction by IP (20.7+/-2.7, n=7 and 21.9+/-6.6, n=6, respectively) while having no effect on IS per se (22.2+/-5.2, n=7), supporting a trigger role of K(ATP) in IP. In contrast, starting glibenclamide following the preconditioning ischaemia 10 min prior to the sustained ischaemia did not prevent IS reduction by IP (3.7+/-2.3, n=6), even when its bolus dose was increased to 1.5 mg kg(-1) (26.6+/-3.8 with IP vs 37.5+/-2.9 without IP; n=7 and 6 respectively, P<0.05), thereby refuting a mediator role of K(ATP) in IP. 3. In conclusion, activation of K(ATP) in the immediate reperfusion following the preconditioning ischaemia is pivotal for triggering IP.

  17. Calcium-activated potassium channel SK1 is widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and sensory organs of adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Cabo, R; Zichichi, R; Viña, E; Guerrera, M C; Vázquez, G; García-Suárez, O; Vega, J A; Germanà, A

    2013-10-25

    Sensory cells contain ion channels involved in the organ-specific transduction mechanisms that convert different types of stimuli into electric energy. Here we focus on small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 1 (SK1) which plays an important role in all excitable cells acting as feedback regulators in after-hyperpolarization. This study was undertaken to analyze the pattern of expression of SK1 in the zebrafish peripheral nervous system and sensory organs using RT-PRC, Westernblot and immunohistochemistry. Expression of SK1 mRNA was observed at all developmental stages analyzed (from 10 to 100 days post fertilization, dpf), and the antibody used identified a protein with a molecular weight of 70kDa, at 100dpf (regarded to be adult). Cell expressing SK1 in adult animals were neurons of dorsal root and cranial nerve sensory ganglia, sympathetic neurons, sensory cells in neuromasts of the lateral line system and taste buds, crypt olfactory neurons and photoreceptors. Present results report for the first time the expression and the distribution of SK1 in the peripheral nervous system and sensory organs of adult zebrafish, and may contribute to set zebrafish as an interesting experimental model for calcium-activated potassium channels research. Moreover these findings are of potential interest because the potential role of SK as targets for the treatment of neurological diseases and sensory disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Activation of endothelial and epithelial KCa2.3 calcium-activated potassium channels by NS309 relaxes human small pulmonary arteries and bronchioles

    PubMed Central

    Kroigaard, Christel; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Gorm; Laursen, Britt E; Pilegaard, Hans; Köhler, Ralf; Simonsen, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Small (KCa2) and intermediate (KCa3.1) conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa) may contribute to both epithelium- and endothelium-dependent relaxations, but this has not been established in human pulmonary arteries and bronchioles. Therefore, we investigated the expression of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels, and hypothesized that activation of these channels would produce relaxation of human bronchioles and pulmonary arteries. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Channel expression and functional studies were conducted in human isolated small pulmonary arteries and bronchioles. KCa2 and KCa3.1 currents were examined in human small airways epithelial (HSAEpi) cells by whole-cell patch clamp techniques. RESULTS While KCa2.3 expression was similar, KCa3.1 protein was more highly expressed in pulmonary arteries than bronchioles. Immunoreactive KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 proteins were found in both endothelium and epithelium. KCa currents were present in HSAEpi cells and sensitive to the KCa2.3 blocker UCL1684 and the KCa3.1 blocker TRAM-34. In pulmonary arteries contracted by U46619 and in bronchioles contracted by histamine, the KCa2.3/ KCa3.1 activator, NS309, induced concentration-dependent relaxations. NS309 was equally potent in relaxing pulmonary arteries, but less potent in bronchioles, than salbutamol. NS309 relaxations were blocked by the KCa2 channel blocker apamin, while the KCa3.1 channel blocker, charybdotoxin failed to reduce relaxation to NS309 (0.01–1 µM). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 channels are expressed in the endothelium of human pulmonary arteries and epithelium of bronchioles. KCa2.3 channels contributed to endo- and epithelium-dependent relaxations suggesting that these channels are potential targets for treatment of pulmonary hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:22506557

  19. Modulation of voltage-dependent and inward rectifier potassium channels by 15-epi-lipoxin-A4 in activated murine macrophages: implications in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Cristina; Prieto, Patricia; Macías, Álvaro; Pimentel-Santillana, María; de la Cruz, Alicia; Través, Paqui G; Boscá, Lisardo; Valenzuela, Carmen

    2013-12-15

    Potassium channels modulate macrophage physiology. Blockade of voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv) by specific antagonists decreases macrophage cytokine production and inhibits proliferation. In the presence of aspirin, acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 loses the activity required to synthesize PGs but maintains the oxygenase activity to produce 15R-HETE from arachidonate. This intermediate product is transformed via 5-LOX into epimeric lipoxins, termed 15-epi-lipoxins (15-epi-lipoxin A4 [e-LXA4]). Kv have been proposed as anti-inflammatory targets. Therefore, we studied the effects of e-LXA4 on signaling and on Kv and inward rectifier potassium channels (Kir) in mice bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). Electrophysiological recordings were performed in these cells by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Treatment of BMDM with e-LXA4 inhibited LPS-dependent activation of NF-κB and IκB kinase β activity, protected against LPS activation-dependent apoptosis, and enhanced the accumulation of the Nrf-2 transcription factor. Moreover, treatment of LPS-stimulated BMDM with e-LXA4 resulted in a rapid decrease of Kv currents, compatible with attenuation of the inflammatory response. Long-term treatment of LPS-stimulated BMDM with e-LXA4 significantly reverted LPS effects on Kv and Kir currents. Under these conditions, e-LXA4 decreased the calcium influx versus that observed in LPS-stimulated BMDM. These effects were partially mediated via the lipoxin receptor (ALX), because they were significantly reverted by a selective ALX receptor antagonist. We provide evidence for a new mechanism by which e-LXA4 contributes to inflammation resolution, consisting of the reversion of LPS effects on Kv and Kir currents in macrophages.

  20. Nitroxyl inhibits overt pain-like behavior in mice: role of cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Staurengo-Ferrari, Larissa; Zarpelon, Ana C; Longhi-Balbinot, Daniela T; Marchesi, Mario; Cunha, Thiago M; Alves-Filho, José C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ferreira, Sergio H; Casagrande, Rubia; Miranda, Katrina M; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2014-08-01

    Several lines of evidence have indicated that nitric oxide (NO) plays complex and diverse roles in modulation of pain/analgesia. However, the roles of charged and uncharged congeners of NO are less well understood. In the present study, the antinociceptive effect of the nitroxyl (HNO) donor, Angeli's salt (Na2N2O3; AS) was investigated in models of overt pain-like behavior. Moreover, whether the antinociceptive effect of nitroxyl was dependent on the activation of cGMP (cyclic guanosine monophosphate)/PKG (protein kinase G)/ATP-sensitive potassium channels was addressed. The antinociceptive effect of AS was evaluated on phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ)- and acetic acid-induced writhings and via the formalin test. In addition, pharmacological treatments targeting guanylate cyclase (ODQ), PKG (KT5923) and ATP-sensitive potassium channel (glybenclamide) were used. PBQ and acetic acid induced significant writhing responses over 20min. The nociceptive response in these models were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by subcutaneous pre-treatment with AS. Furthermore, AS also inhibited both phases of the formalin test. Subsequently, the inhibitory effect of AS in writhing and flinching responses were prevented by ODQ, KT5823 and glybenclamide, although these inhibitors alone did not alter the writhing score. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-cysteine, an HNO scavenger, confirmed that the antinociceptive effect of AS depends on HNO. The present study demonstrates the efficacy of a nitroxyl donor and its analgesic mechanisms in overt pain-like behavior by activating the cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive potassium channel (K(+)) signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

  1. Activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase stimulates cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium channels via a ROS/calmodulin/CaMKII signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yongping; Zhang, Dai-Min; Lin, Yu-Fung

    2011-03-29

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is recognized as an important signaling component in diverse cell types. PKG may influence the function of cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels, an ion channel critical for stress adaptation in the heart; however, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to address this issue. Single-channel recordings of cardiac K(ATP) channels were performed in both cell-attached and inside-out patch configurations using transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells and rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes. We found that Kir6.2/SUR2A (the cardiac-type K(ATP)) channels were activated by cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-attached patches obtained from HEK293 cells, an effect mimicked by the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP whereas abolished by selective PKG inhibitors. Intriguingly, direct application of PKG moderately reduced rather than augmented Kir6.2/SUR2A single-channel currents in excised, inside-out patches. Moreover, PKG stimulation of Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells was abrogated by ROS/H(2)O(2) scavenging, antagonism of calmodulin, and blockade of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), respectively. Exogenous H(2)O(2) also concentration-dependently stimulated Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells, and its effect was prevented by inhibition of calmodulin or CaMKII. PKG stimulation of K(ATP) channels was confirmed in intact ventricular cardiomyocytes, which was ROS- and CaMKII-dependent. Kinetically, PKG appeared to stimulate these channels by destabilizing the longest closed state while stabilizing the long open state and facilitating opening transitions. The present study provides novel evidence that PKG exerts dual regulation of cardiac K(ATP) channels, including marked stimulation resulting from intracellular signaling mediated by ROS (H(2)O(2) in particular), calmodulin

  2. Blueberry juice causes potent relaxation of rat aortic rings via the activation of potassium channels and the H₂S pathway.

    PubMed

    Horrigan, Louise A; Holohan, Catherine A; Lawless, Gráinne A; Murtagh, Melissa A; Williams, Carmel T; Webster, Christina M

    2013-02-26

    The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of blueberry juice on healthy rat aortic rings, and to explore the roles of potassium channels and of the hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) pathway in mediating the effects of blueberry juice. Firstly, the antioxidant capacity of blueberry juice was compared to other popular juice drinks using the Folin-Ciocalteu and the DPPH assays. Blueberry juice had significantly higher total polyphenol content than any of the other drinks studied (p < 0.01). The effect of blueberry juice on noradrenaline-contracted aortic rings was then observed, and the juice caused significant inhibition of noradrenaline-induced contractions (p < 0.01). Voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv) blockers 4-aminopyridine (1 mM) and 3,4-diaminopyridine (1 mM), as well as the cystathionine γ-lysase (CSE) inhibitor d,l-propargylglycine (2 mM) were then utilised to elucidate the role of Kv channels and the CSE/H(2)S pathway. Kv channel blocker 3,4-diaminopyridine caused significant blockade at 1/100 and 1/50 dilutions of juice (p < 0.01), whilst 4-aminopyridine caused significant blockade of the 1/100 dilution of blueberry juice (p < 0.05). In addition, d,l-propargylglycine potently inhibited the effect of 1/100 and 1/50 dilutions of blueberry juice (p < 0.01). This study indicates that blueberry juice has potent vasorelaxing properties, and thus may be a useful dietary agent for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. This study also provides strong evidence that Kv channels and the CSE/H(2)S pathway may be responsible, at least in part, for mediating the effects of blueberry juice.

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase regulates the human inward rectifier potassium KIR2.3 channel, stably expressed in HEK 293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, De-Yong; Zhang, Yan-Hui; Sun, Hai-Ying; Lau, Chu-Pak; Li, Gui-Rong

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The detailed molecular modulation of inward rectifier potassium channels (including the KIR2.3 channel) is not fully understood. The present study was designed to determine whether human KIR2.3 (KIR2.3) channels were regulated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Whole-cell patch voltage-clamp, immunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis and site-directed mutagenesis were employed to determine the potential PTK phosphorylation of Kir2.3 current in HEK 293 cells stably expressing Kir2.3 gene. KEY RESULTS The broad-spectrum PTK inhibitor genistein (10 µM) and the selective epidermal growth factor (EGF) kinase inhibitor AG556 (10 µM) reversibly decreased KIR2.3 current and the effect was reversed by the protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, orthovanadate (1 mM). Although EGF (100 ng·mL−1) and orthovanadate enhanced KIR2.3 current, this effect was antagonized by AG556. However, the Src-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2 (10 µM) did not inhibit KIR2.3 current. Tyrosine phosphorylation of KIR2.3 channels was decreased by genistein or AG556, and was increased by EGF or orthovanadate. The decrease of tyrosine phosphorylation of KIR2.3 channels by genistein or AG556 was reversed by orthovanadate or EGF. Interestingly, the response of KIR2.3 channels to EGF or AG556 was lost in the KIR2.3 Y234A mutant channel. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These results demonstrate that the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase up-regulates the KIR2.3 channel via phosphorylation of the Y234 residue of the WT protein. This effect may be involved in the endogenous regulation of cellular electrical activity. PMID:21486282

  4. Epigenetic regulation of Kcna3-encoding Kv1.3 potassium channel by cereblon contributes to regulation of CD4+ T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ah; Park, Sang-Heon; Jeong, Sang Phil; Han, Min-Hee; Lee, Cho-Rong; Lee, Kwang Min; Kim, Namhee; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Choi, Murim; Ye, Michael; Jung, Guhung; Lee, Won-Woo; Eom, Soo Hyun; Park, Chul-Seung; Park, Sung-Gyoo

    2016-01-01

    The role of cereblon (CRBN) in T cells is not well understood. We generated mice with a deletion in Crbn and found cereblon to be an important antagonist of T-cell activation. In mice lacking CRBN, CD4+ T cells show increased activation and IL-2 production on T-cell receptor stimulation, ultimately resulting in increased potassium flux and calcium-mediated signaling. CRBN restricts T-cell activation via epigenetic modification of Kcna3, which encodes the Kv1.3 potassium channel required for robust calcium influx in T cells. CRBN binds directly to conserved DNA elements adjacent to Kcna3 via a previously uncharacterized DNA-binding motif. Consequently, in the absence of CRBN, the expression of Kv1.3 is derepressed, resulting in increased Kv1.3 expression, potassium flux, and CD4+ T-cell hyperactivation. In addition, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in T-cell–specific Crbn-deficient mice was exacerbated by increased T-cell activation via Kv1.3. Thus, CRBN limits CD4+ T-cell activation via epigenetic regulation of Kv1.3 expression. PMID:27439875

  5. Complementary functions of SK and Kv7/M potassium channels in excitability control and synaptic integration in rat hippocampal dentate granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Aparicio, Pedro; Murphy, Ricardo; Storm, Johan F

    2014-01-01

    The dentate granule cells (DGCs) form the most numerous neuron population of the hippocampal memory system, and its gateway for cortical input. Yet, we have only limited knowledge of the intrinsic membrane properties that shape their responses. Since SK and Kv7/M potassium channels are key mechanisms of neuronal spiking and excitability control, afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and synaptic integration, we studied their functions in DGCs. The specific SK channel blockers apamin or scyllatoxin increased spike frequency (excitability), reduced early spike frequency adaptation, fully blocked the medium-duration AHP (mAHP) after a single spike or spike train, and increased postsynaptic EPSP summation after spiking, but had no effect on input resistance (Rinput) or spike threshold. In contrast, blockade of Kv7/M channels by XE991 increased Rinput, lowered the spike threshold, and increased excitability, postsynaptic EPSP summation, and EPSP–spike coupling, but only slightly reduced mAHP after spike trains (and not after single spikes). The SK and Kv7/M channel openers 1-EBIO and retigabine, respectively, had effects opposite to the blockers. Computational modelling reproduced many of these effects. We conclude that SK and Kv7/M channels have complementary roles in DGCs. These mechanisms may be important for the dentate network function, as CA3 neurons can be activated or inhibition recruited depending on DGC firing rate. PMID:24366266

  6. APETx4, a Novel Sea Anemone Toxin and a Modulator of the Cancer-Relevant Potassium Channel KV10.1

    PubMed Central

    Moreels, Lien; Peigneur, Steve; Galan, Diogo T.; De Pauw, Edwin; Béress, Lászlo; Waelkens, Etienne; Pardo, Luis A.; Quinton, Loïc; Tytgat, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The human ether-à-go-go channel (hEag1 or KV10.1) is a cancer-relevant voltage-gated potassium channel that is overexpressed in a majority of human tumors. Peptides that are able to selectively inhibit this channel can be lead compounds in the search for new anticancer drugs. Here, we report the activity-guided purification and electrophysiological characterization of a novel KV10.1 inhibitor from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima. Purified sea anemone fractions were screened for inhibitory activity on KV10.1 by measuring whole-cell currents as expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using the two-microelectrode voltage clamp technique. Fractions that showed activity on Kv10.1 were further purified by RP-HPLC. The amino acid sequence of the peptide was determined by a combination of MALDI- LIFT-TOF/TOF MS/MS and CID-ESI-FT-ICR MS/MS and showed a high similarity with APETx1 and APETx3 and was therefore named APETx4. Subsequently, the peptide was electrophysiologically characterized on KV10.1. The selectivity of the toxin was investigated on an array of voltage-gated ion channels, including the cardiac human ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium channel (hERG or Kv11.1). The toxin inhibits KV10.1 with an IC50 value of 1.1 μM. In the presence of a similar toxin concentration, a shift of the activation curve towards more positive potentials was observed. Similar to the effect of the gating modifier toxin APETx1 on hERG, the inhibition of Kv10.1 by the isolated toxin is reduced at more positive voltages and the peptide seems to keep the channel in a closed state. Although the peptide also induces inhibitory effects on other KV and NaV channels, it exhibits no significant effect on hERG. Moreover, APETx4 induces a concentration-dependent cytotoxic and proapoptotic effect in various cancerous and noncancerous cell lines. This newly identified KV10.1 inhibitor can be used as a tool to further characterize the oncogenic channel KV10.1 or as a scaffold for the design

  7. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-11-15

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract.

  8. Immunolocalization of hyperpolarization-activated cationic HCN1 and HCN3 channels in the rat nephron: regulation of HCN3 by potassium diets.

    PubMed

    López-González, Zinaeli; Ayala-Aguilera, Cosete; Martinez-Morales, Flavio; Galicia-Cruz, Othir; Salvador-Hernández, Carolina; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Medeiros, Mara; Hernández, Ana Maria; Escobar, Laura I

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cationic and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) comprise four homologous subunits (HCN1-HCN4). HCN channels are found in excitable and non-excitable tissues in mammals. We have previously shown that HCN2 may transport ammonium (NH4 (+)), besides sodium (Na(+)), in the rat distal nephron. In the present work, we identified HCN1 and HCN3 in the proximal tubule (PT) and HCN3 in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH) of the rat kidney. Immunoblot assays detected HCN1 (130 kDa) and HCN3 (90 KDa) and their truncated proteins C-terminal HCN1 (93 KDa) and N-terminal HCN3 (65 KDa) in enriched plasma membranes from cortex (CX) and outer medulla (OM), as well as in brush-border membrane vesicles. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed apical localization of HCN1 and HCN3 in the PT. HCN3 was also found at the basolateral membrane of TALH. We evaluated chronic changes in mineral dietary on HCN3 protein abundance. Animals were fed with three different diets: sodium-deficient (SD) diet, potassium-deficient (KD) diet, and high-potassium (HK) diet. Up-regulation of HCN3 was observed in OM by KD and in CX and OM by HK; the opposite effect occurred with the N-terminal truncated HCN3 in CX (KD) and OM (HK). SD diet did not produce any change. Since HCN channels activate with membrane hyperpolarization, our results suggest that HCN channels may play a role in the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, contributing to Na(+), K(+), and acid-base homeostasis in the rat kidney.

  9. Inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir) in central nervous system glia: a special role for Kir4.1 in glial functions.

    PubMed

    Butt, Arthur M; Kalsi, Amanpreet

    2006-01-01

    Glia in the central nervous system (CNS) express diverse inward rectifying potassium channels (Kir). The major function of Kir is in establishing the high potassium (K+) selectivity of the glial cell membrane and strongly negative resting membrane potential (RMP), which are characteristic physiological properties of glia. The classical property of Kir is that K+ flows inwards when the RMP is negative to the equilibrium potential for K+ (E(K)), but at more positive potentials outward currents are inhibited. This provides the driving force for glial uptake of K+ released during neuronal activity, by the processes of "K+ spatial buffering" and "K+ siphoning", considered a key function of astrocytes, the main glial cell type in the CNS. Glia express multiple Kir channel subtypes, which are likely to have distinct functional roles related to their differences in conductance, and sensitivity to intracellular and extracellular factors, including pH, ATP, G-proteins, neurotransmitters and hormones. A feature of CNS glia is their specific expression of the Kir4.1 subtype, which is a major K+ conductance in glial cell membranes and has a key role in setting the glial RMP. It is proposed that Kir4.1 have a primary function in K+ regulation, both as homomeric channels and as heteromeric channels by co-assembly with Kir5.1 and probably Kir2.0 subtypes. Significantly, Kir4.1 are also expressed by oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the CNS, and the genetic ablation of Kir4.1 results in severe hypomyelination. Hence, Kir, and in particular Kir4.1, are key regulators of glial functions, which in turn determine neuronal excitability and axonal conduction.

  10. Specific and rapid effects of acoustic stimulation on the tonotopic distribution of Kv3.1b potassium channels in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Strumbos, J G; Polley, D B; Kaczmarek, L K

    2010-05-19

    Recent studies have demonstrated that total cellular levels of voltage-gated potassium channel subunits can change on a time scale of minutes in acute slices and cultured neurons, raising the possibility that rapid changes in the abundance of channel proteins contribute to experience-dependent plasticity in vivo. In order to investigate this possibility, we took advantage of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) sound localization circuit, which contains neurons that precisely phase-lock their action potentials to rapid temporal fluctuations in the acoustic waveform. Previous work has demonstrated that the ability of these neurons to follow high-frequency stimuli depends critically upon whether they express adequate amounts of the potassium channel subunit Kv3.1. To test the hypothesis that net amounts of Kv3.1 protein would be rapidly upregulated when animals are exposed to sounds that require high frequency firing for accurate encoding, we briefly exposed adult rats to acoustic environments that varied according to carrier frequency and amplitude modulation (AM) rate. Using an antibody directed at the cytoplasmic C-terminus of Kv3.1b (the adult splice isoform of Kv3.1), we found that total cellular levels of Kv3.1b protein-as well as the tonotopic distribution of Kv3.1b-labeled cells-was significantly altered following 30 min of exposure to rapidly modulated (400 Hz) sounds relative to slowly modulated (0-40 Hz, 60 Hz) sounds. These results provide direct evidence that net amounts of Kv3.1b protein can change on a time scale of minutes in response to stimulus-driven synaptic activity, permitting auditory neurons to actively adapt their complement of ion channels to changes in the acoustic environment. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. External Barium Affects the Gating of KCNQ1 Potassium Channels and Produces a Pore Block via Two Discrete Sites

    PubMed Central

    Gibor, Gilad; Yakubovich, Daniel; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    The pore properties and the reciprocal interactions between permeant ions and the gating of KCNQ channels are poorly understood. Here we used external barium to investigate the permeation characteristics of homomeric KCNQ1 channels. We assessed the Ba2+ binding kinetics and the concentration and voltage dependence of Ba2+ steady-state block. Our results indicate that extracellular Ba2+ exerts a series of complex effects, including a voltage-dependent pore blockade as well as unique gating alterations. External barium interacts with the permeation pathway of KCNQ1 at two discrete and nonsequential sites. (a) A slow deep Ba2+ site that occludes the channel pore and could be simulated by a model of voltage-dependent block. (b) A fast superficial Ba2+ site that barely contributes to channel block and mostly affects channel gating by shifting rightward the voltage dependence of activation, slowing activation, speeding up deactivation kinetics, and inhibiting channel inactivation. A model of voltage-dependent block cannot predict the complex impact of Ba2+ on channel gating in low external K+ solutions. Ba2+ binding to this superficial site likely modifies the gating transitions states of KCNQ1. Both sites appear to reside in the permeation pathway as high external K+ attenuates Ba2+ inhibition of channel conductance and abolishes its impact on channel gating. Our data suggest that despite the high degree of homology of the pore region among the various K+ channels, KCNQ1 channels display significant structural and functional uniqueness. PMID:15226366

  12. Vitamin K3 inhibits mouse uterine contraction in vitro via interference with the calcium transfer and the potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Xia; Lu, Li-Min; Wang, Li

    2016-08-05

    Previous studies have demonstrated vitamin K3 had a great relief to smooth muscle spastic disorders, but no researches have yet pinpointed its possible anti-contractile activity in the uterus. Here, we evaluated the effect of vitamin K3 on myometrial contractility and explored the possible mechanisms of vitamin K3 action. Myograph apparatus were used to record the changes in contractility of isolated mouse uterine strips in a tissue bath. Uterine strips were exposed to vitamin K3 or vehicle. Vitamin K3 suppressed spontaneous contractions in a concentration dependent manner. It significantly decreased the contractile frequency induced by PGF2ɑ but not their amplitude (expect 58.0 μM). Prior incubation with vitamin K3 reduced the effectiveness of PGF2ɑ-induced contraction. The antispasmodic effect of vitamin K3 was also sensitive to potassium channel blockers, such as tetraethylammonium, 4-aminopyridine, iberiotoxin) but not to the nitric oxide related pathway blockers. High concentrations (29.0, 58.0 μM) of vitamin K3 weakened the Ca(2+) dose response and inhibited phase 1 contraction (intracellular stored calcium release). These dates suggest that vitamin K3 specifically suppresses myometrial contractility by affecting calcium and potassium channels; thus, this approach has potential therapy for uterine contractile activity related disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Distribution of potassium ion and water permeable channels at perivascular glia in brain and retina of the Large(myd) mouse.

    PubMed

    Rurak, Jennifer; Noel, Geoffroy; Lui, Leona; Joshi, Bharat; Moukhles, Hakima

    2007-12-01

    The dystroglycan protein complex provides a link between the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Defective O-glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) severs this link leading to muscular dystrophies named dystroglycanopathies. These are characterized not only by muscle degeneration, but also by brain and ocular defects. In brain and retina, alpha-DG and ECM molecules are enriched around blood vessels where they may be involved in localizing the inwardly rectifying potassium channel, Kir4.1, and aquaporin channel, AQP4, to astrocytic endfeet. To investigate in vivo the role of ECM ligand-binding to glycosylated sites on alpha-DG in the polarized distribution of these channels, we used the Large(myd) mouse, an animal model for dystroglycanopathies. We found that Kir4.1 and AQP4 are lost from astrocytic endfeet in brain whereas significant labeling for these channels is detected at similar cell domains in retina. Furthermore, while both alpha- and beta1-syntrophins are lost from perivascular astrocytes in brain, labeling for beta1-syntrophin is found in retina of the Large(myd) mouse. These findings show that while ligand-binding to the highly glycosylated isoform of alpha-DG in concert with alpha- and beta1-syntrophins is crucial for the polarized distribution of Kir4.1 and AQP4 to functional domains in brain, distinct mechanisms may contribute to their localization in retina.

  14. Preparation, Functional Characterization, and NMR Studies of Human KCNE1, a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Accessory Subunit Associated With Deafness and Long QT Syndrome†

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Changlin; Vanoye, Carlos G.; Kang, Congbao; Welch, Richard C.; Kim, Hak Jun; George, Alfred L.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    KCNE1, also known as minK, is a member of the KCNE family of membrane proteins that modulate the function of KCNQ1 and certain other voltage-gated potassium channels (KV). Mutations in human KCNE1 cause congenital deafness and congenital long QT syndrome, an inherited predisposition to potentially life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Although its modulation of KCNQ1 function has been extensively characterized, many questions remain regarding KCNE1's structure and location within the channel complex. In this study KCNE1 was overexpressed in E. coli and purified. Micellar solutions of the protein were then microinjected into Xenopus oocytes expressing KCNQ1 channels, followed by electrophysiological recordings to test whether recombinant KCNE1 can co-assemble with the channel. Native-like modulation of channel properties was observed following injection of KCNE1 in lysomyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (LMPG) micelles, indicating that KCNE1 is not irreversibly misfolded and that LMPG is able to act as a vehicle for delivering membrane proteins into the membranes of viable cells. 1H,15N-TROSY NMR experiments indicated that LMPG micelles are well-suited for structural studies of KCNE1, leading to assignment of its backbone resonances and to relaxation studies. The chemical shift data confirmed that KCNE1's secondary structure includes several α-helices and demonstrated that its distal C-terminus is disordered. Surprisingly, for KCNE1 in LMPG micelles there appears to be a break in α-helicity at sites 59−61, near the middle of the transmembrane segment, a feature that is accompanied by increased local backbone mobility. Given that this segment overlaps with sites 57−59, which are known to play a critical role in modulating KCNQ1 channel activation kinetics, this unusual structural feature is likely of considerable functional relevance. PMID:17892302

  15. G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR3) channels play a primary role in the antinociceptive effect of oxycodone, but not morphine, at supraspinal sites

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Fujita, Masahide; Ono, Hiroko; Hongo, Yoshie; Kanbara, Tomoe; Ogawa, Koichi; Morioka, Yasuhide; Nishiyori, Atsushi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Kato, Akira; Hasegawa, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Oxycodone and morphine are μ-opioid receptor agonists prescribed to control moderate-to-severe pain. Previous studies suggested that these opioids exhibit different analgesic profiles. We hypothesized that distinct mechanisms mediate the differential effects of these two opioids and investigated the role of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR3 also known as GIRK) channels in their antinociceptive effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Opioid-induced antinociceptive effects were assessed in mice, using the tail-flick test, by i.c.v. and intrathecal (i.t.) administration of morphine and oxycodone, alone and following inhibition of KIR3.1 channels with tertiapin-Q (30 pmol per mouse, i.c.v. and i.t.) and KIR3.1-specific siRNA. The antinociceptive effects of oxycodone and morphine were also examined after tertiapin-Q administration in the mouse femur bone cancer and neuropathic pain models. KEY RESULTS The antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, after both i.c.v. and i.t. administrations, were markedly attenuated by KIR3.1 channel inhibition. In contrast, the antinociceptive effects of i.c.v. morphine were unaffected, whereas those induced by i.t. morphine were attenuated, by KIR3.1 channel inhibition. In the two chronic pain models, the antinociceptive effects of s.c. oxycodone, but not morphine, were inhibited by supraspinal administration of tertiapin-Q. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These results demonstrate that KIR3.1 channels play a primary role in the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, but not those of morphine, at supraspinal sites and suggest that supraspinal KIR3.1 channels are responsible for the unique analgesic profile of oxycodone. PMID:24117458

  16. The episodic ataxia type 1 mutation I262T alters voltage-dependent gating and disrupts protein biosynthesis of human Kv1.1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Han; Fu, Ssu-Ju; Huang, Jing-Jia; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-18

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential for setting neuronal membrane excitability. Mutations in human Kv1.1 channels are linked to episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). The EA1-associated mutation I262T was identified from a patient with atypical phenotypes. Although a previous report has characterized its suppression effect, several key questions regarding the impact of the I262T mutation on Kv1.1 as well as other members of the Kv1 subfamily remain unanswered. Herein we show that the dominant-negative effect of I262T on Kv1.1 current expression is not reversed by co-expression with Kvβ1.1 or Kvβ2 subunits. Biochemical examinations indicate that I262T displays enhanced protein degradation and impedes membrane trafficking of Kv1.1 wild-type subunits. I262T appears to be the first EA1 mutation directly associated with impaired protein stability. Further functional analyses demonstrate that I262T changes the voltage-dependent activation and Kvβ1.1-mediated inactivation, uncouples inactivation from activation gating, and decelerates the kinetics of cumulative inactivation of Kv1.1 channels. I262T also exerts similar dominant effects on the gating of Kv1.2 and Kv1.4 channels. Together our data suggest that I262T confers altered channel gating and reduced functional expression of Kv1 channels, which may account for some of the phenotypes of the EA1 patient.

  17. Long polyamines act as cofactors in PIP2 activation of inward rectifier potassium (Kir2.1) channels.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lai-Hua; John, Scott A; Ribalet, Bernard; Weiss, James N

    2005-12-01

    Phosphatidylinosital-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) acts as an essential factor regulating the activity of all Kir channels. In most Kir members, the dependence on PIP2 is modulated by other factors, such as protein kinases (in Kir1), G(betagamma) (in Kir3), and the sulfonylurea receptor (in Kir6). So far, however, no regulator has been identified in Kir2 channels. Here we show that polyamines, which cause inward rectification by selectively blocking outward current, also regulate the interaction of PIP2 with Kir2.1 channels to maintain channel availability. Using spermine and diamines as polyamine analogs, we demonstrate that both spontaneous and PIP2 antibody-induced rundown of Kir2.1 channels in excised inside-out patches was markedly slowed by long polyamines; in contrast, polyamines with shorter chain length were ineffective. In K188Q mutant channels, which have a low PIP2 affinity, application PIP2 (10 microM) was unable to activate channel activity in the absence of polyamines, but markedly activated channels in the presence of long diamines. Using neomycin as a measure of PIP2 affinity, we found that long polyamines were capable of strengthening either the wild type or K188Q channels' interaction with PIP2. The negatively charged D172 residue inside the transmembrane pore region was critical for the shift of channel-PIP2 binding affinity by long polyamines. Sustained pore block by polyamines was neither sufficient nor necessary for this effect. We conclude that long polyamines serve a dual role as both blockers and coactivators (with PIP2) of Kir2.1 channels.

  18. Potassium Counts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipps, John

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity to determine whether the radioactivity of a pure potassium salt is directly proportional to the amount of potassium in it and whether this could be used as a method of analysis for potassium in a solid. (MKR)

  19. A pharmacologically validated, high-capacity, functional thallium flux assay for the human Ether-à-go-go related gene potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Schmalhofer, William A; Swensen, Andrew M; Thomas, Brande S; Felix, John P; Haedo, Rodolfo J; Solly, Kelli; Kiss, Laszlo; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L

    2010-12-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel, human Ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG), represents the molecular component of IKr, one of the potassium currents involved in cardiac action potential repolarization. Inhibition of IKr increases the duration of the ventricular action potential, reflected as a prolongation of the QT interval in the electrocardiogram, and increases the risk for potentially fatal ventricular arrhythmias. Because hERG is an appropriate surrogate for IKr, hERG assays that can identify potential safety liabilities of compounds during lead identification and optimization have been implemented. Although the gold standard for hERG evaluation is electrophysiology, this technique, even with the medium capacity, automated instruments that are currently available, does not meet the throughput demands for supporting typical medicinal chemistry efforts in the pharmaceutical environment. Assays that could provide reliable molecular pharmacology data, while operating in high capacity mode, are therefore desirable. In the present study, we describe a high-capacity, 384- and 1,536-well plate, functional thallium flux assay for the hERG channel that fulfills these criteria. This assay was optimized and validated using different structural classes of hERG inhibitors. An excellent correlation was found between the potency of these agents in the thallium flux assay and in electrophysiological recordings of channel activity using the QPatch automated patch platform. Extension of this study to include 991 medicinal chemistry compounds from different internal drug development programs indicated that the thallium flux assay was a good predictor of in vitro hERG activity. These data suggest that the hERG thallium flux assay can play an important role in supporting drug development efforts.

  20. Slack Sodium-activated Potassium Channel Membrane Expression Requires p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gururaj, Sushmitha; Fleites, John; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2016-01-01

    p38 MAPK has long been understood as an inducible kinase under conditions of cellular stress, but there is now increasing evidence to support its role in the regulation of neuronal function. Several phosphorylation targets have been identified, an appreciable number of which are ion channels, implicating the possible involvement of p38 MAPK in neuronal excitability. The KNa channel Slack is an important protein to be studied as it is highly and ubiquitously expressed in DRG neurons and is important in the maintenance of their firing accommodation. We sought to examine if the Slack channel could be a substrate of p38 MAPK activity. First, we found that the Slack C-terminus contains two putative p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites that are highly conserved across species. Second, we show via electrophysiology experiments that KNa currents and further, Slack currents, are subject to tonic modulation by p38 MAPK. Third, biochemical approaches revealed that Slack channel regulation by p38 MAPK occurs through direct phosphorylation at the two putative sites of interaction, and mutating both sites prevented surface expression of Slack channels. Based on these results, we conclude that p38 MAPK is an obligate regulator of Slack channel function via the trafficking of channels into the membrane. The present study identifies Slack KNa channels as p38 MAPK substrates. PMID:26721627

  1. Gain-of-function mutation in the KCNMB1 potassium channel subunit is associated with low prevalence of diastolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, José M; Tomás, Marta; Vázquez, Esther; Orio, Patricio; Latorre, Ramón; Sentí, Mariano; Marrugat, Jaume; Valverde, Miguel A

    2004-04-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, present in almost 30% of adults. A key element in the control of vascular tone is the large-conductance, Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) (BK) channel. The BK channel in vascular smooth muscle is formed by an ion-conducting alpha subunit and a regulatory beta(1) subunit, which couples local increases in intracellular Ca(2+) to augmented channel activity and vascular relaxation. Our large population-based genetic epidemiological study has identified a new single-nucleotide substitution (G352A) in the beta(1) gene (KCNMB1), corresponding to an E65K mutation in the protein. This mutation results in a gain of function of the channel and is associated with low prevalence of moderate and severe diastolic hypertension. BK-beta(1E65K) channels showed increased Ca(2+) sensitivity, compared with wild-type channels, without changes in channel kinetics. In conclusion, the BK-beta(1E65K) channel might offer a more efficient negative-feedback effect on vascular smooth muscle contractility, consistent with a protective effect of the K allele against the severity of diastolic hypertension.

  2. Gain-of-function mutation in the KCNMB1 potassium channel subunit is associated with low prevalence of diastolic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Fernández, José M.; Tomás, Marta; Vázquez, Esther; Orio, Patricio; Latorre, Ramón; Sentí, Mariano; Marrugat, Jaume; Valverde, Miguel A.

    2004-01-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, present in almost 30% of adults. A key element in the control of vascular tone is the large-conductance, Ca2+-dependent K+ (BK) channel. The BK channel in vascular smooth muscle is formed by an ion-conducting α subunit and a regulatory β1 subunit, which couples local increases in intracellular Ca2+ to augmented channel activity and vascular relaxation. Our large population-based genetic epidemiological study has identified a new single-nucleotide substitution (G352A) in the β1 gene (KCNMB1), corresponding to an E65K mutation in the protein. This mutation results in a gain of function of the channel and is associated with low prevalence of moderate and severe diastolic hypertension. BK-β1E65K channels showed increased Ca2+ sensitivity, compared with wild-type channels, without changes in channel kinetics. In conclusion, the BK-β1E65K channel might offer a more efficient negative-feedback effect on vascular smooth muscle contractility, consistent with a protective effect of the K allele against the severity of diastolic hypertension. PMID:15057310

  3. An alcohol-sensing site in the calcium- and voltage-gated, large conductance potassium (BK) channel

    PubMed Central

    Bukiya, Anna N.; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Edwards, Justin; Singh, Aditya K.; Shivakumar, Bangalore; Dopico, Alex M.

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol alters BK (slo1) channel function leading to perturbation of physiology and behavior. Site(s) and mechanism(s) of ethanol–BK channel interaction are unknown. We demonstrate that ethanol docks onto a water-accessible site that is strategically positioned between the slo1 calcium-sensors and gate. Ethanol only accesses this site in presence of calcium, the BK channel’s physiological agonist. Within the site, ethanol hydrogen-bonds with K361. Moreover, substitutions that hamper hydrogen bond formation or prevent ethanol from accessing K361 abolish alcohol action without altering basal channel function. Alcohol interacting site dimensions are approximately 10.7 × 8.6 × 7.1 Å, accommodating effective (ethanol-heptanol) but not ineffective (octanol, nonanol) channel activators. This study presents: (i) to our knowledge, the first identification and characterization of an n-alkanol recognition site in a member of the voltage-gated TM6 channel superfamily; (ii) structural insights on ethanol allosteric interactions with ligand-gated ion channels; and (iii) a first step for designing agents that antagonize BK channel-mediated alcohol actions without perturbing basal channel function. PMID:24927535

  4. Calcium-activated SK potassium channels are key modulators of the pacemaker frequency in locus coeruleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Matschke, Lina A; Rinné, Susanne; Snutch, Terrance P; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Dolga, Amalia M; Decher, Niels

    2018-04-01

    The physiological, intrinsic activity of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is important for the control of sleep/wakefulness, cognition and autonomous body functions. Dysregulations of the LC-noradrenergic network contribute to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders and are key findings in early stages of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, identifying ion channels mediating the intrinsic pacemaking mechanism of LC neurons, which is in turn directly coupled to Ca 2+ homeostasis and cell survival signaling pathways, can help to foster our understanding of the vulnerability of these neurons in neurodegenerative diseases. Small-conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + (SK) channels regulate the intrinsic firing patterns in different central neurons and are essential regulators of the intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis. However, the role of SK channels for the intrinsic pacemaking of LC neurons in mice is still unclear. Therefore we performed qPCR expression analysis as well as patch clamp recordings of in vitro brainstem slices, for instance testing SK channel blockers and activators like apamin and NS309, respectively. Although we found a transcriptional expression of SK1, SK2 and SK3 channels, SK2 was the predominantly expressed subunit in mouse LC neurons. Using perforated-patch clamp experiments, we found that SK channels are essential regulators of the intrinsic pacemaking of LC neurons, mediating a large fraction of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in these cells. Consistent with a previous observation that a concerted action of L- and T-type Cav channels is essential for the pacemaking of LC neurons, we found that SK channel activation, and the respective AHP amplitude, is primarily coupled to Ca 2+ influx via these types of Ca 2+ channels. Our study identified SK2 channels as drug targets for the tuning of the pacemaker frequency in disorders involving a dysregulation of the LC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Natural and synthetic modulators of SK (K(ca)2) potassium channels inhibit magnesium-dependent activity of the kinase-coupled cation channel TRPM7.

    PubMed

    Chubanov, V; Mederos y Schnitzler, M; Meißner, M; Schäfer, S; Abstiens, K; Hofmann, T; Gudermann, T

    2012-06-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a TRP ion channel segment linked to an α-type protein kinase domain. TRPM7 is essential for proliferation and cell growth. Up-regulation of TRPM7 function is involved in anoxic neuronal death, cardiac fibrosis and tumour cell proliferation. The goal of this work was to identify non-toxic inhibitors of the TRPM7 channel and to assess the effect of blocking endogenous TRPM7 currents on the phenotype of living cells. We developed an aequorin bioluminescence-based assay of TRPM7 channel activity and performed a hypothesis-driven screen for inhibitors of the channel. The candidates identified were further assessed electrophysiologically and in cell biological experiments. TRPM7 currents were inhibited by modulators of small conductance Ca²⁺ -activated K⁺ channels (K(Ca)2.1-2.3; SK) channels, including the antimalarial plant alkaloid quinine, CyPPA, dequalinium, NS8593, SKA31 and UCL 1684. The most potent compound NS8593 (IC₅₀ 1.6 µM) specifically targeted TRPM7 as compared with other TRP channels, interfered with Mg²⁺ -dependent regulation of TRPM7 channel and inhibited the motility of cultured cells. NS8593 exhibited full and reversible block of native TRPM7-like currents in HEK 293 cells, freshly isolated smooth muscle cells, primary podocytes and ventricular myocytes. This study reveals a tight overlap in the pharmacological profiles of TRPM7 and K(Ca)2.1-2.3 channels. NS8593 acts as a negative gating modulator of TRPM7 and is well-suited to study functional features and cellular roles of endogenous TRPM7. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Common variants in the hERG (KCNH2) voltage-gated potassium channel are associated with altered fasting and glucose-stimulated plasma incretin and glucagon responses.

    PubMed

    Engelbrechtsen, Line; Mahendran, Yuvaraj; Jonsson, Anna; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Weeke, Peter E; Jørgensen, Marit E; Færch, Kristine; Witte, Daniel R; Holst, Jens J; Jørgensen, Torben; Grarup, Niels; Pedersen, Oluf; Vestergaard, Henrik; Torekov, Signe; Kanters, Jørgen K; Hansen, Torben

    2018-03-16

    Patients with long QT syndrome due to rare loss-of-function mutations in the human ether-á-go-go-related gene (hERG) have prolonged QT interval, risk of arrhythmias, increased secretion of insulin and incretins and impaired glucagon response to hypoglycemia. This is caused by a dysfunctional Kv11.1 voltage-gated potassium channel. Based on these findings in patients with rare variants in hERG, we hypothesized that common variants in hERG may also lead to alterations in glucose homeostasis. Subsequently, we aimed to evaluate the effect of two common gain-of-function variants in hERG (rs36210421 and rs1805123) on QT interval and plasma levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), insulin and glucagon during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We used two population-based cohorts for evaluation of the effect of common variants in hERG on QT-interval and circulation levels of incretins, insulin and glucagon. The Danish population-based Inter99 cohort (n = 5895) was used to assess the effect of common variants on QT-interval. The Danish ADDITION-PRO cohort was used (n = 1329) to study genetic associations with levels of GLP-1, GIP, insulin and glucagon during an OGTT. Carriers of either the minor A-allele of rs36210421 or the minor G-allele of rs1805123 had ~ 2 ms shorter QT interval per risk allele (p = 0.025 and p = 1.9 × 10 - 7 ). Additionally, both variants were associated with alterations in pancreatic and gut hormone release among carriers. The minor A- allele of rs36210421 was associated with increased GLP-1 and decreased GIP response to oral glucose stimulation, whereas the minor G-allele of rs1805123 is associated with decreased fasting plasma insulin and glucagon release. A genetic risk score combining the two gene variants revealed reductions in glucose-stimulated GIP, as well as suppressed glucagon response to increased glucose levels during an OGTT. Two common missense

  7. Chronic Inhibition of Renal Outer Medullary Potassium Channel Not Only Prevented but Also Reversed Development of Hypertension and End-Organ Damage in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Forrest, Michael J; Sharif-Rodriguez, Wanda; Forrest, Gail; Szeto, Daphne; Urosevic-Price, Olga; Zhu, Yonghua; Stevenson, Andra S; Zhou, Yuchen; Stribling, Sloan; Dajee, Maya; Walsh, Shawn P; Pasternak, Alexander; Sullivan, Kathleen A

    2017-02-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) channel mediates potassium recycling and facilitates sodium reabsorption through the Na + /K + /2Cl - cotransporter in the loop of Henle and potassium secretion at the cortical collecting duct. Evidence from the phenotype of humans and rodents with functional ROMK deficiency supports the contention that selective ROMK inhibitors (ROMKi) will represent a novel diuretic with potential of therapeutic benefit for hypertension. ROMKi have recently been synthesized by Merck & Co, Inc. The present studies were designed to examine the effects of ROMKi B on systemic hemodynamics, renal function and structure, and vascular function in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Four experimental groups-control, high-salt diet alone; ROMKi B 3 mg·kg - 1 ·d - 1 ; ROMKi B 10 mg·kg - 1 ·d - 1 ; and hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg·kg - 1 ·d - 1 -were included in prophylactic (from week 1 to week 9 on high-salt diet) and therapeutic studies (from week 5 to week 9 on high-salt diet), respectively. ROMKi B produced sustained blood pressure reduction and improved renal and vascular function and histological alterations induced by a high-salt diet. ROMKi B was superior to hydrochlorothiazide at reducing blood pressure. Furthermore, ROMKi B provided beneficial effects on both the plasma lipid profile and bone mineral density. Chronic ROMK inhibition not only prevented but also reversed the development of hypertension and end-organ damage in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Our findings suggest a potential utility of ROMKi B as a novel antihypertensive agent, particularly for the treatment of the salt-sensitive hypertension patient population. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Age-related attenuation of isoflurane preconditioning in human atrial cardiomyocytes: roles for mitochondrial respiration and sarcolemmal adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Mio, Yasushi; Bienengraeber, Martin W; Marinovic, Jasna; Gutterman, David D; Rakic, Mladen; Bosnjak, Zeljko J; Stadnicka, Anna

    2008-04-01

    Clinical trials suggest that anesthetic-induced preconditioning (APC) produces cardioprotection in humans, but the mechanisms of APC and significance of aging for APC in humans are not well understood. Here, the impact of age on the role of two major effectors of APC, mitochondria and sarcolemmal adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (sarcKATP) channels, in preconditioning of the human atrial myocardium were investigated. Right atrial appendages were obtained from adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery and assigned to mid-aged (MA) and old-aged (OA) groups. APC was induced by isoflurane in isolated myocardium and isolated cardiomyocytes. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption measurements, myocyte survival testing, and patch clamp techniques were used to investigate mitochondrial respiratory function and sarcKATP channel activity. After in vitro APC with isoflurane, the respiratory function of isolated mitochondria was better preserved after hypoxia-reoxygenation stress in MA than in OA. In isolated intact myocytes, APC significantly decreased oxidative stress-induced cell death in MA but not in OA, and isoflurane protection from cell death was attenuated by the sarcKATP channel inhibitor HMR-1098. Further, the properties of single sarcKATP channels were similar in MA and OA, and isoflurane sensitivity of pinacidil-activated whole cell KATP current was no different between MA and OA myocytes. Anesthetic-induced preconditioning with isoflurane decreases stress-induced cell death and preserves mitochondrial respiratory function to a greater degree in MA than in OA myocytes; however, sarcKATP channel activity is not differentially affected by isoflurane. Therefore, effectiveness of APC in humans may decrease with advancing age partly because of altered mitochondrial function of myocardial cells.

  9. Spinocerebellar ataxia-13 Kv3.3 potassium channels: arginine-to-histidine mutations affect both functional and protein expression on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Zhu, Jing; Thornhill, William B

    2013-09-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.3 is the causative gene of SCA13 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 13), an autosomal dominant neurological disorder. The four dominant mutations identified to date cause Kv3.3 channels to be non-functional or have altered gating properties in Xenopus oocytes. In the present paper, we report that SCA13 mutations affect functional as well as protein expression of Kv3.3 channels in a mammalian cell line. The reduced protein level of SCA13 mutants is caused by a shorter protein half-life, and blocking the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway increases the total protein of SCA13 mutants more than wild-type. SCA13 mutated amino acids are highly conserved, and the side chains of these residues play a critical role in the stable expression of Kv3.3 proteins. In addition, we show that mutant Kv3.3 protein levels could be partially rescued by treatment with the chemical chaperone TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide) and to a lesser extent with co-expression of Kv3.1b. Thus our results suggest that amino acid side chains of SCA13 positions affect the protein half-life and/or function of Kv3.3, and the adverse effect on protein expression cannot be fully rescued.

  10. A multiplatform strategy for the discovery of conventional monoclonal antibodies that inhibit the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3.

    PubMed

    Bednenko, Janna; Harriman, Rian; Mariën, Lore; Nguyen, Hai M; Agrawal, Alka; Papoyan, Ashot; Bisharyan, Yelena; Cardarelli, Joanna; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna; Clark, Ted; Pedersen, Darlene; Abdiche, Yasmina; Harriman, William; van der Woning, Bas; de Haard, Hans; Collarini, Ellen; Wulff, Heike; Colussi, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Identifying monoclonal antibodies that block human voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) is a challenging endeavor exacerbated by difficulties in producing recombinant ion channel proteins in amounts that support drug discovery programs. We have developed a general strategy to address this challenge by combining high-level expression of recombinant VGICs in Tetrahymena thermophila with immunization of phylogenetically diverse species and unique screening tools that allow deep-mining for antibodies that could potentially bind functionally important regions of the protein. Using this approach, we targeted human Kv1.3, a voltage-gated potassium channel widely recognized as a therapeutic target for the treatment of a variety of T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases. Recombinant Kv1.3 was used to generate and recover 69 full-length anti-Kv1.3 mAbs from immunized chickens and llamas, of which 10 were able to inhibit Kv1.3 current. Select antibodies were shown to be potent (IC 50 <10 nM) and specific for Kv1.3 over related Kv1 family members, hERG and hNav1.5.

  11. The Polarization of the G-Protein Activated Potassium Channel GIRK5 to the Vegetal Pole of Xenopus laevis Oocytes Is Driven by a Di-Leucine Motif

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Bello, Beatriz; Rangel-García, Claudia I.; Salvador, Carolina; Carrisoza-Gaytán, Rolando; Escobar, Laura I.

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium channels (known as GIRK or Kir3) form functional heterotetramers gated by G-βγ subunits. GIRK channels participate in heart rate modulation and neuronal postsynaptic inhibition in mammals. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, GIRK5 is a functional homomultimer. Previously, we found that phosphorylation of a tyrosine (Y16) at its N-terminus downregulates the surface expression of GIRK5. In this work, we elucidated the subcellular localization and trafficking of GIRK5 in oocytes. Several EGFP-GIRK5 chimeras were produced and an ECFP construct was used to identify the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Whereas GIRK5-WT was retained in the ER at the animal pole, the phospho-null GIRK5-Y16A was localized to the vegetal pole. Interestingly, a construct with an N-terminal Δ25 deletion produced an even distribution of the channel in the whole oocyte. Through an alanine-scan, we identified an acidic cluster/di-leucine sorting-signal recognition motif between E17 and I22. We quantified the effect of each amino acid residue within this di-leucine motif in determining the distribution of GIRK5 to the animal and vegetal poles. We found that Y16 and I22 contributed to functional expression and were dominant in the polarization of GIRK5. We thus conclude that the N-terminal acidic di-leucine motif of GIRK5 determines its retention and polarized trafficking within Xl oocytes. PMID:23717539

  12. The polarization of the G-protein activated potassium channel GIRK5 to the vegetal pole of Xenopus laevis oocytes is driven by a di-leucine motif.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Bello, Beatriz; Rangel-García, Claudia I; Salvador, Carolina; Carrisoza-Gaytán, Rolando; Escobar, Laura I

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium channels (known as GIRK or Kir3) form functional heterotetramers gated by G-βγ subunits. GIRK channels participate in heart rate modulation and neuronal postsynaptic inhibition in mammals. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, GIRK5 is a functional homomultimer. Previously, we found that phosphorylation of a tyrosine (Y16) at its N-terminus downregulates the surface expression of GIRK5. In this work, we elucidated the subcellular localization and trafficking of GIRK5 in oocytes. Several EGFP-GIRK5 chimeras were produced and an ECFP construct was used to identify the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Whereas GIRK5-WT was retained in the ER at the animal pole, the phospho-null GIRK5-Y16A was localized to the vegetal pole. Interestingly, a construct with an N-terminal Δ25 deletion produced an even distribution of the channel in the whole oocyte. Through an alanine-scan, we identified an acidic cluster/di-leucine sorting-signal recognition motif between E17 and I22. We quantified the effect of each amino acid residue within this di-leucine motif in determining the distribution of GIRK5 to the animal and vegetal poles. We found that Y16 and I22 contributed to functional expression and were dominant in the polarization of GIRK5. We thus conclude that the N-terminal acidic di-leucine motif of GIRK5 determines its retention and polarized trafficking within Xl oocytes.

  13. Structural Analysis and Deletion Mutagenesis Define Regions of QUIVER/SLEEPLESS that Are Responsible for Interactions with Shaker-Type Potassium Channels and Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meilin; Liu, Clifford Z; Joiner, William J

    2016-01-01

    Ly6 proteins are endogenous prototoxins found in most animals. They show striking structural and functional parallels to snake α-neurotoxins, including regulation of ion channels and cholinergic signaling. However, the structural contributions of Ly6 proteins to regulation of effector molecules is poorly understood. This question is particularly relevant to the Ly6 protein QUIVER/SLEEPLESS (QVR/SSS), which has previously been shown to suppress excitability and synaptic transmission by upregulating potassium (K) channels and downregulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in wake-promoting neurons to facilitate sleep in Drosophila. Using deletion mutagenesis, co-immunoprecipitations, ion flux assays, surface labeling and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that only loop 2 is required for many of the previously described properties of SSS in transfected cells, including interactions with K channels and nAChRs. Collectively our data suggest that QVR/SSS, and by extension perhaps other Ly6 proteins, target effector molecules using limited protein motifs. Mapping these motifs may be useful in rational design of drugs that mimic or suppress Ly6-effector interactions to modulate nervous system function.

  14. Electrophysiological and molecular analysis of Kv7/KCNQ potassium channels in the inferior colliculus of adult guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Navarro-López, Juan; Jiménez-Díaz, Lydia; Géranton, Sandrine M; Ashmore, Jonathan F

    2009-03-01

    Neurons located in the inferior colliculus (IC) are on the path which processes acoustic information converging from the peripheral auditory system and to be sent through ascending pathways to superior structures. Previous in vitro recordings from early stage animals suggest that voltage-gated K channels underlie distinct neuronal discharge patterns observed in the IC. In this study, using reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we show the presence of a voltage-gated K channel family (Kv7/KCNQ) in the central nucleus of the IC (ICc) of the adult guinea pig. Whole-cell recordings from neurons in the nucleus were also made in slices from mature animals, and the action of specific openers and blockers demonstrated on the firing patterns. Our results indicate that mRNA from all members of the Kv7 family of channels are expressed in the ICc, but at different levels, and provide evidence that these channels can modulate neuronal excitability in this nucleus.

  15. In vitro recovery of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in β-cells from patients with congenital hyperinsulinism of infancy.

    PubMed

    Powell, Philippa D; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Flanagan, Sarah E; Ellard, Sian; Rooman, Raoul; Hussain, Khalid; Skae, Mars; Clayton, Peter; de Lonlay, Pascale; Dunne, Mark J; Cosgrove, Karen E

    2011-04-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism in infancy (CHI) is characterized by unregulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells; severe forms are associated with defects in ABCC8 and KCNJ11 genes encoding sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) and Kir6.2 subunits, which form ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels in β-cells. Diazoxide therapy often fails in the treatment of CHI and may be a result of reduced cell surface expression of K(ATP) channels. We hypothesized that conditions known to facilitate trafficking of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) and other proteins in recombinant expression systems might increase surface expression of K(ATP) channels in native CHI β-cells. Tissue was isolated during pancreatectomy from eight patients with CHI and from adult cadaver organ donors. Patients were screened for mutations in ABCC8 and KCNJ11. Isolated β-cells were maintained at 37°C or 25°C and in the presence of 1) phorbol myristic acid, forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, 2) BPDZ 154, or 3) 4-phenylbutyrate. Surface expression of functional channels was assessed by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Mutations in ABCC8 were detected for all patients tested (n = 7/8) and included three novel mutations. In five of eight patients, no changes in K(ATP) channel activity were observed under different cell culture conditions. However, in three patients, in vitro recovery of functional K(ATP) channels occurred. Here, we report the first cases of recovery of defective K(ATP) channels in human β-cells using modified cell culture conditions. Our study establishes the principle that chemical modification of K(ATP) channel subunit trafficking could be of benefit for the future treatment of CHI.

  16. Preliminary Studies of Acute Cadmium Administration Effects on the Calcium-Activated Potassium (SKCa and BKCa) Channels and Na+/K+-ATPase Activity in Isolated Aortic Rings of Rats.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Dalton V; Almenara, Camila C P; Broseghini-Filho, Gilson Brás; Teixeira, Ariane Calazans; da Silva, David Chaves F; Angeli, Jhuli K; Padilha, Alessandra S

    2017-09-13

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant closely linked with cardiovascular diseases that seems to involve endothelium dysfunction and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Knowing that NO causes dilatation through the activation of potassium channels and Na + /K + -ATPase, we aimed to determine whether acute cadmium administration (10 μM) alters the participation of K + channels, voltage-activated calcium channel, and Na + /K + -ATPase activity in vascular function of isolated aortic rings of rats. Cadmium did not modify the acetylcholine-induced relaxation. After L-NAME addition, the relaxation induced by acetylcholine was abolished in presence or absence of cadmium, suggesting that acutely, this metal did not change NO release. However, tetraethylammonium (a nonselective K + channels blocker) reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation but this effect was lower in the preparations with cadmium, suggesting a decrease of K + channels function in acetylcholine response after cadmium incubation. Apamin (a selective blocker of small Ca 2+ -activated K + channels-SK Ca ), iberiotoxin (a selective blocker of large-conductance Ca 2+ -activated K + channels-BK Ca ), and verapamil (a blocker of calcium channel) reduced the endothelium-dependent relaxation only in the absence of cadmium. Finally, cadmium decreases Na + /K + -ATPase activity. Our results provide evidence that the cadmium acute incubation unaffected the calcium-activated potassium channels (SK Ca and BK Ca ) and voltage-calcium channels on the acetylcholine vasodilatation. In addition, acute cadmium incubation seems to reduce the Na + /K + -ATPase activity.

  17. Integrative Approach for Computationally Inferring Interactions between the Alpha and Beta Subunits of the Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel (BK): a Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    González, Janneth; Gálvez, Angela; Morales, Ludis; Barreto, George E.; Capani, Francisco; Sierra, Omar; Torres, Yolima

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional models of the alpha- and beta-1 subunits of the calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) were predicted by threading modeling. A recursive approach comprising of sequence alignment and model building based on three templates was used to build these models, with the refinement of non-conserved regions carried out using threading techniques. The complex formed by the subunits was studied by means of docking techniques, using 3D models of the two subunits, and an approach based on rigid-body structures. Structural effects of the complex were analyzed with respect to hydrogen-bond interactions and binding-energy calculations. Potential interaction sites of the complex were determined by referencing a study of the difference accessible surface area (DASA) of the protein subunits in the complex. PMID:23492851

  18. Increase of the cytotoxic effect of Bothrops jararacussu venom on mouse extensor digitorum longus and soleus by potassium channel blockers and by Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tomaz, Marcelo A; Fernandes, Fabrício F A; El-Kik, Camila Z; Moraes, Raphael A M; Calil-Elias, Sabrina; Saturnino-Oliveira, Jeison; Martinez, Ana Maria B; Ownby, Charlotte L; Melo, Paulo A

    2008-09-15

    We investigated the myotoxicity of Bothrops jararacussu crude venom and other cytolytic agents on mouse isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles, which present distinct properties: EDL is a fast-twitch, white muscle with predominantly glycolytic fibers, while SOL is slow-twitch, red muscle with predominantly oxidative fibers. Muscles were exposed to B. jararacussu crude venom (25 microg/ml) and other crotaline venoms (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus; Crotalus viridis viridis; Crotalus durissus terrificus) at the same concentration. Basal creatine kinase (CK) release to bathing solution was 0.43+/-0.06 for EDL and 0.29+/-0.06 for SOL (U g(-)(1) h(-)(1), n=36 for each muscle). Sixty minutes after exposure to B. jararacussu venom, EDL presented higher increase in the rate of CK release than SOL, respectively, 13.2+/-1.5 and 2.9+/-0.7 U g(-)(1)h(-)(1), n=10-12. Muscle denervation, despite decreasing CK content, did not affect sensitivities to B. jararacussu venom. Ouabain and potassium channel blockers (TEA; clotrimazole; glibenclamide) increased the rate of CK release by B. jararacussu in EDL and SOL muscles, decreasing and almost abolishing the different sensitivity. When we exposed EDL or SOL muscles to Naja naja, Apis mellifera venoms (25 microg/ml), or Triton X-100 (0.01%), they showed similar rate of CK release. Our present data suggest that a mechanism involving intracellular calcium regulation or potassium channels may participate in the different sensitivity of EDL and SOL to B. jararacussu venom.

  19. Effects of Ginkgo biloba extracts with mirodenafil on the relaxation of corpus cavernosal smooth muscle and the potassium channel activity of corporal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Jun; Han, Deok Hyun; Lim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Tae Hun; Chae, Mee Ree; Chung, Kyung Jin; Kam, Sung Chul; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Park, Jong Kwan; Lee, Sung Won

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of a combination of Ginkgo biloba extracts (GBE) and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors on the muscular tone of the corpus cavernosum and potassium channel activity of corporal smooth muscle cells. Strips of corpus cavernosum from male New Zealand white rabbits were mounted in organ baths for isometric tension studies. After contraction with 1×10⁻⁵ mol l⁻¹ norepinephrine, GBE (0.01-1 mg ml⁻¹) and mirodenafil (0.01-100 nmol l⁻¹) were added together into the organ bath. In electrophysiological studies, whole-cell currents were recorded by the conventional patch-clamp technique in cultured smooth muscle cells of the human corpus cavernosum. The corpus cavernosum was relaxed in response to GBE in a dose-dependent manner (from 0.64%±8.35% at 0.01 mg ml⁻¹ to 52.28% ± 11.42% at 1 mg ml⁻¹). After pre-treatment with 0.03 mg ml⁻¹ of GBE, the relaxant effects of mirodenafil were increased at all concentrations. After tetraethylammonium (TEA) (1 mmol l⁻¹) administration, the increased effects were inhibited (P<0.01). Extracellular administration of GBE increased the whole-cell K(+) outward currents in a dose-dependent fashion. The increase of the outward current was inhibited by 1 mmol l⁻¹ TEA. These results suggest that GBE could increase the relaxant potency of mirodenafil even at a minimally effective dose. The K(+) flow through potassium channels might be one of the mechanisms involved in this synergistic relaxation.

  20. Involvement of soluble guanylate cyclase and calcium-activated potassium channels in the long-lasting hyporesponsiveness to phenylephrine induced by nitric oxide in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Terluk, M R; da Silva-Santos, J E; Assreuy, J

    2000-05-01

    Excessive nitric oxide (NO) production by inducible NO synthase has been implicated in the hyporesponsiveness to vasoconstrictors present in septic shock. Here we show that a brief incubation (30 min) of rat aorta rings with NO donors renders the vessels hyporesponsive to phenylephrine for several hours. Contraction of rings without endothelium by phenylephrine (0.1 nM to 100 microM) was decreased by 50-60% after incubation (30 min) with sodium nitroprusside (3-300 microM) or S-nitroso-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP; 70-200 microM). This decrease was characterized by reductions in maximal response and rightwards shifts of phenylephrine concentration/response curves, present even 130 min after NO donor removal. Soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitors methylene blue ( 10 microM) and 1H-(1,2,4)-oxadiazol-(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 1 microM) or the potassium channel blockers TEA (tetraethylammonium; 10 mM) and charybdotoxin (100 nM) inhibited the hyporesponsiveness to phenylephrine induced by the NO donors. In contrast, 4-aminopyridine (1 mM) and glibenclamide (10 microM) had no effect. Our results show that incubation with NO donors reproduces the hyporesponsiveness to phenylephrine and that NO alone accounts for most, if not all, the refractoriness to vasoconstrictors present in septic shock. In addition, soluble guanylate cyclase activation and opening of potassium channels, more specifically the calcium-activated subtype, play a predominant role in this NO-induced hyporesponsiveness to phenylephrine in the rat aorta.

  1. Homozygous Missense N629D hERG (KCNH2) Potassium Channel Mutation Causes Developmental Defects in the Right Ventricle and its Outflow Tract and Embryonic Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Guo Qi; Zhao, Xian; Lees-Miller, James P.; Quinn, F. Russell; Li, Pin; Rancourt, Derrick E.; London, Barry; Cross, James C.; Duff, Henry J.

    2009-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the human ERG1 potassium channel (hERG1) frequently underlie the Long QT2 Syndrome. The role of the ERG potassium channel in cardiac development was elaborated in an in vivo model of a homozygous, loss of function, LQT2 Syndrome mutation. The hERG N629D mutation was introduced into the orthologous mouse gene, mERG, by homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells. Intact homozygous embryos showed abrupt cessation of the heart beat. N629D/N629D embryos die in utero by E11.5. Their developmental defects include: altered looping architecture; poorly developed bulbus cordis; distorted aortic sac and branchial arches. N629D/N629D myocytes from E9.5 embryos manifested complete loss of IKr function, depolarized resting potential, prolonged action potential duration (LQT), failure to repolarize and propensity to oscillatory arrhythmias. N629D/N629D myocytes manifest calcium oscillations and increased SR Ca+2 – content. While the N629D/N629D protein is synthesized it is mainly located intracellularly; whereas +/+ mERG protein is mainly in plasmalemma. N629D/N629D embryos show robust apoptosis in cranio-facial regions, particularly in the first branchial arch and to a lesser extent in the cardiac outflow tract. Since deletion of Hand2 produces apoptosis, in similar regions and with a similar final developmental phenotype, Hand2 expression was evaluated. Robust decrease in Hand2 expression was observed in the secondary heart field in N629D/N629D embryos. In conclusion, loss of IKr function in N629D/N629D cardiovascular system leads to defects in cardiac ontogeny in the first branchial arch, outflow tract and the right ventricle. PMID:18948620

  2. Differential Potassium Channel Gene Regulation in BXD Mice Reveals Novel Targets for Pharmacogenetic Therapies to Reduce Heavy Alcohol Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Rinker, Jennifer A.; Fulmer, Diana B.; Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Smith, Maren L.; Williams, Robert W.; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Randall, Patrick K.; Chandler, L. Judson; Miles, Michael F.; Becker, Howard C.; Mulholland, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) dependence is a chronic relapsing brain disorder partially influenced by genetics and characterized by an inability to regulate harmful levels of drinking. Emerging evidence has linked genes that encode KV7, KIR, and KCa2 K+ channels with variation in alcohol-related behaviors in rodents and humans. This led us to experimentally test relations between K+ channel genes and escalation of drinking in a chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure model of dependence in BXD recombinant inbred strains of mice. Transcript levels for K+ channel genes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) covary with voluntary ethanol drinking in a non-dependent cohort. Transcripts that encode KV7 channels covary negatively with drinking in non-dependent BXD strains. Using a pharmacological approach to validate the genetic findings, C57BL/6J mice were allowed intermittent access to ethanol to establish baseline consumption before they were treated with retigabine, an FDA-approved KV7 channel positive modulator. Systemic administration significantly reduced drinking, and consistent with previous evidence, retigabine was more effective at reducing voluntary consumption in high-drinking than low-drinking subjects. We evaluated the specific K+ channel genes that were most sensitive to CIE exposure and identified a gene subset in the NAc and PFC dysregulated in the alcohol-dependent BXD cohort. CIE-induced modulation of nine genes in the NAc and six genes in the PFC covaried well with the changes in drinking induced by ethanol dependence. Here we identified novel candidate genes in the NAc and PFC that are regulated by ethanol dependence and correlate with voluntary drinking in non-dependent and dependent BXD mice. The findings that Kcnq expression correlate with drinking and that retigabine reduces consumption suggest that KV7 channels could be pharmacogenetic targets to treat individuals with alcohol addiction. PMID:27432260

  3. Expression and function of Kv1.1 potassium channels in human atria from patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Glasscock, Edward; Voigt, Niels; McCauley, Mark D.; Sun, Qiang; Li, Na; Chiang, David Y.; Zhou, Xiao-Bo; Molina, Cristina E.; Thomas, Dierk; Schmidt, Constanze; Skapura, Darlene G.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv1.1 channels encoded by the Kcna1 gene are traditionally regarded as being neural-specific with no known expression or intrinsic functional role in the heart. However, recent studies in mice reveal low-level Kv1.1 expression in heart and cardiac abnormalities associated with Kv1.1-deficiency suggesting that the channel may have a previously unrecognized cardiac role. Therefore, this study tests the hypothesis that Kv1.1 channels are associated with arrhythmogenesis and contribute to intrinsic cardiac function. In intra-atrial burst pacing experiments, Kcna1-null mice exhibited increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation (AF). The atria of Kcna1-null mice showed minimal Kv1 family ion channel remodeling and fibrosis as measured by qRT-PCR and Masson’s trichrome histology, respectively. Using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and immunoblotting, KCNA1 mRNA and protein were detected in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes and human atria for the first time. Patients with chronic AF (cAF) showed no changes in KCNA1 mRNA levels relative to controls; however, they exhibited increases in atrial Kv1.1 protein levels, not seen in paroxysmal AF patients. Patch-clamp recordings of isolated human atrial myocytes revealed significant dendrotoxin-K (DTX-K)-sensitive outward current components that were significantly increased in cAF patients, reflecting a contribution by Kv1.1 channels. The concomitant increases in Kv1.1 protein and DTX-K-sensitive currents in atria of cAF patients suggest that the channel contributes to the pathological mechanisms of persistent AF. These findings provide evidence of an intrinsic cardiac role of Kv1.1 channels and indicate that they may contribute to atrial repolarization and AF susceptibility. PMID:26162324

  4. Expression and function of Kv1.1 potassium channels in human atria from patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Glasscock, Edward; Voigt, Niels; McCauley, Mark D; Sun, Qiang; Li, Na; Chiang, David Y; Zhou, Xiao-Bo; Molina, Cristina E; Thomas, Dierk; Schmidt, Constanze; Skapura, Darlene G; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated Kv1.1 channels encoded by the Kcna1 gene are traditionally regarded as being neural-specific with no known expression or intrinsic functional role in the heart. However, recent studies in mice reveal low-level Kv1.1 expression in heart and cardiac abnormalities associated with Kv1.1-deficiency suggesting that the channel may have a previously unrecognized cardiac role. Therefore, this study tests the hypothesis that Kv1.1 channels are associated with arrhythmogenesis and contribute to intrinsic cardiac function. In intra-atrial burst pacing experiments, Kcna1-null mice exhibited increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation (AF). The atria of Kcna1-null mice showed minimal Kv1 family ion channel remodeling and fibrosis as measured by qRT-PCR and Masson's trichrome histology, respectively. Using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and immunoblotting, KCNA1 mRNA and protein were detected in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes and human atria for the first time. Patients with chronic AF (cAF) showed no changes in KCNA1 mRNA levels relative to controls; however, they exhibited increases in atrial Kv1.1 protein levels, not seen in paroxysmal AF patients. Patch-clamp recordings of isolated human atrial myocytes revealed significant dendrotoxin-K (DTX-K)-sensitive outward current components that were significantly increased in cAF patients, reflecting a contribution by Kv1.1 channels. The concomitant increases in Kv1.1 protein and DTX-K-sensitive currents in atria of cAF patients suggest that the channel contributes to the pathological mechanisms of persistent AF. These findings provide evidence of an intrinsic cardiac role of Kv1.1 channels and indicate that they may contribute to atrial repolarization and AF susceptibility.

  5. Genomics analysis of potassium channel genes in songbirds reveals molecular specializations of brain circuits for the maintenance and production of learned vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A fundamental question in molecular neurobiology is how genes that determine basic neuronal properties shape the functional organization of brain circuits underlying complex learned behaviors. Given the growing availability of complete vertebrate genomes, comparative genomics represents a promising approach to address this question. Here we used genomics and molecular approaches to study how ion channel genes influence the properties of the brain circuitry that regulates birdsong, a learned vocal behavior with important similarities to human speech acquisition. We focused on potassium (K-)Channels, which are major determinants of neuronal cell excitability. Starting with the human gene set of K-Channels, we used cross-species mRNA/protein alignments, and syntenic analysis to define the full complement of orthologs, paralogs, allelic variants, as well as novel loci not previously predicted in the genome of zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). We also compared protein coding domains in chicken and zebra finch orthologs to identify genes under positive selective pressure, and those that contained lineage-specific insertions/deletions in functional domains. Finally, we conducted comprehensive in situ hybridizations to determine the extent of brain expression, and identify K-Channel gene enrichments in nuclei of the avian song system. Results We identified 107 K-Channel finch genes, including 6 novel genes common to non-mammalian vertebrate lineages. Twenty human genes are absent in songbirds, birds, or sauropsids, or unique to mammals, suggesting K-Channel properties may be lineage-specific. We also identified specific family members with insertions/deletions and/or high dN/dS ratios compared to chicken, a non-vocal learner. In situ hybridization revealed that while most K-Channel genes are broadly expressed in the brain, a subset is selectively expressed in song nuclei, representing molecular specializations of the vocal circuitry. Conclusions Together

  6. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to isoflurane-induced sensitization of cardiac sarcolemmal adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel to pinacidil.

    PubMed

    An, Jianzhong; Stadnicka, Anna; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Bosnjak, Zeljko J

    2004-03-01

    Myocardial protection by volatile anesthetics involves activation of cardiac adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels. The authors have previously shown that isoflurane enhances sensitivity of the sarcolemmal K(ATP) channel to the opener, pinacidil. Because reactive oxygen species seem to be mediators in anesthetic preconditioning, the authors investigated whether they contribute to the mechanism of the sensitization effect by isoflurane. Ventricular myocytes were isolated from guinea pig hearts for the whole cell patch clamp recordings of the sarcolemmal K(ATP) channel current (I(KAPT)). Free radical scavengers N-acetyl-L-cysteine, carnosine, superoxide dismutase, and catalase were used to investigate whether reactive oxygen species mediate isoflurane facilitation of the channel opening by pinacidil. A possible role of the mitochondrial K(ATP) channels was tested using a blocker of these channels, 5-hydroxydecanoate. The mean density (+/- SEM) of I(KAPT) elicited by pinacidil (20 microM) was 18.9 +/- 1.8 pA/pF (n = 11). In the presence of isoflurane (0.55 mM), the density of pinacidil-activated I(KAPT) increased to 38.5 +/- 2.4 pA/pF (n = 9). Concurrent application of isoflurane and N-acetyl-L-cysteine decreased the sensitization effect by isoflurane in a concentration-dependent manner, whereby the densities of I(KAPT) were 32.6 +/- 1.4 (n = 6), 26.2 +/- 2.3 (n = 6), and 19.4 +/- 2.1 pA/pF (n = 8) at 100, 250, and 500 microM N-acetyl-L-cysteine, respectively. Concurrent application of isoflurane and carnosine (100 microM), superoxide dismutase (100 U/ml), or catalase (100 U/ml) attenuated the densities of I(KAPT) to 27.9 +/- 2.6, 27.2 +/- 2.9, and 25.9 +/- 2.2 pA/pF, respectively. None of the scavengers affected activation of I(KAPT) by pinacidil alone. 5-Hydroxydecanoate (100 microM) did not alter the sensitization effect by isoflurane, and the density of I(KAPT) in this group was 37.1 +/- 3.8 pA/pF (n= 6). These results suggest that reactive

  7. Recruitment of Gβγ controls the basal activity of G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels: crucial role of distal C terminus of GIRK1

    PubMed Central

    Kahanovitch, Uri; Tsemakhovich, Vladimir; Berlin, Shai; Rubinstein, Moran; Styr, Boaz; Castel, Ruth; Peleg, Sagit; Tabak, Galit; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ivanina, Tatiana; Dascal, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK, or Kir3) channels are important mediators of inhibitory neurotransmission via activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GIRK channels are tetramers comprising combinations of subunits (GIRK1–4), activated by direct binding of the Gβγ subunit of Gi/o proteins. Heterologously expressed GIRK1/2 exhibit high, Gβγ-dependent basal currents (Ibasal) and a modest activation by GPCR or coexpressed Gβγ. Inversely, the GIRK2 homotetramers exhibit low Ibasal and strong activation by Gβγ. The high Ibasal of GIRK1 seems to be associated with its unique distal C terminus (G1-dCT), which is not present in the other subunits. We investigated the role of G1-dCT using electrophysiological and fluorescence assays in Xenopus laevis oocytes and protein interaction assays. We show that expression of GIRK1/2 increases the plasma membrane level of coexpressed Gβγ (a phenomenon we term ‘Gβγ recruitment’) but not of coexpressed Gαi3. All GIRK1-containing channels, but not GIRK2 homomers, recruited Gβγ to the plasma membrane. In biochemical assays, truncation of G1-dCT reduces the binding between the cytosolic parts of GIRK1 and Gβγ, but not Gαi3. Nevertheless, the truncation of G1-dCT does not impair activation by Gβγ. In fluorescently labelled homotetrameric GIRK1 channels and in the heterotetrameric GIRK1/2 channel, the truncation of G1-dCT abolishes Gβγ recruitment and decreases Ibasal. Thus, we conclude that G1-dCT carries an essential role in Gβγ recruitment by GIRK1 and, consequently, in determining its high basal activity. Our results indicate that G1-dCT is a crucial part of a Gβγ anchoring site of GIRK1-containing channels, spatially and functionally distinct from the site of channel activation by Gβγ. PMID:25384780

  8. TWIK-1 and TREK-1 are potassium channels contributing significantly to astrocyte passive conductance in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Xu, Guangjin; Xie, Minjie; Zhang, Xuexin; Schools, Gary P; Ma, Liqun; Kimelberg, Harold K; Chen, Haijun

    2009-07-01

    Expression of a linear current-voltage (I-V) relationship (passive) K(+) membrane conductance is a hallmark of mature hippocampal astrocytes. However, the molecular identifications of the K(+) channels underlying this passive conductance remain unknown. We provide the following evidence supporting significant contribution of the two-pore domain K(+) channel (K(2P)) isoforms, TWIK-1 and TREK-1, to this conductance. First, both passive astrocytes and the cloned rat TWIK-1 and TREK-1 channels expressed in CHO cells conduct significant amounts of Cs(+) currents, but vary in their relative P(Cs)/P(K) permeability, 0.43, 0.10, and 0.05, respectively. Second, quinine, which potently inhibited TWIK-1 (IC(50) = 85 microm) and TREK-1 (IC(50) = 41 microm) currents, also inhibited astrocytic passive conductance by 58% at a concentration of 200 microm. Third, a moderate sensitivity of passive conductance to low extracellular pH (6.0) supports a combined expression of acid-insensitive TREK-1, and to a lesser extent, acid-sensitive TWIK-1. Fourth, the astrocyte passive conductance showed low sensitivity to extracellular Ba(2+), and extracellular Ba(2+) blocked TWIK-1 channels at an IC(50) of 960 microm and had no effect on TREK-1 channels. Finally, an immunocytochemical study showed colocalization of TWIK-1 and TREK-1 proteins with the astrocytic markers GLAST and GFAP in rat hippocampal stratum radiatum. In contrast, another K(2P) isoform TASK-1 was mainly colocalized with the neuronal marker NeuN in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and was expressed at a much lower level in astrocytes. These results support TWIK-1 and TREK-1 as being the major components of the long-sought K(+) channels underlying the passive conductance of mature hippocampal astrocytes.

  9. Blue light activates potassium-efflux channels in flexor cells from Samanea saman motor organs via two mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Suh, S; Moran, N; Lee, Y

    2000-07-01

    Light-induced leaflet movement of Samanea saman depends on the regulation of membrane transporters in motor cells. Blue light (BL) stimulates leaflet opening by inducing K(+) release from the flexor motor cells. To elucidate the mechanism of K(+)-efflux (K(D))-channel regulation by light, flexor motor cell protoplasts were patch-clamped in a cell-attached configuration during varying illumination. Depolarization elicited outward currents through single open K(D) channels. Changes in cell membrane potential (E(M)) were estimated by applying voltage ramps and tracking the change of the apparent reversal potential of K(D)-channel current. BL shifted E(M) in a positive direction (i.e. depolarized the cell) by about 10 mV. Subsequent red light pulse followed by darkness shifted E(M) oppositely (i.e. hyperpolarized the cell). The BL-induced shifts of E(M) were not observed in cells pretreated with a hydrogen-pump inhibitor, suggesting a contribution by hydrogen-pump to the shift. BL also increased K(D)-channel activity in a voltage-independent manner as reflected in the increase of the mean net steady-state patch conductance at a depolarization of 40 mV relative to the apparent reversal potential (G(@40)). G(@40) increased by approximately 12 pS without a change of the single-channel conductance, possibly by increasing the probability of channel opening. Subsequent red-light and darkness reversed the change in G(@40). Thus, K(+) efflux, a determining factor for the cell-volume decrease of flexor cells, is regulated by BL in a dual manner via membrane potential and by an independent signaling pathway.

  10. Role for germline mutations and a rare coding single nucleotide polymorphism within the KCNJ5 potassium channel in a large cohort of sporadic cases of primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Meena; Xu, Shengxin; Massimo, Gianmichele; Wolley, Martin; Gordon, Richard D; Stowasser, Michael; O'Shaughnessy, Kevin M

    2014-04-01

    Primary aldosteronism (autonomous aldosterone production with suppressed renin) plays an important pathophysiological role in what has been previously labeled as essential hypertension. Besides the recently described germline mutations in the KCNJ5 potassium channel associated with familial primary aldosteronism, somatic mutations in the same channel have been identified within aldosterone-producing adenomas. In this study, we have resequenced the flanking and coding region of KCNJ5 in peripheral blood DNA from 251 white subjects with primary aldosteronism to look for rare variants that might be important for the pathophysiology of sporadic primary aldosteronism. We have identified 3 heterozygous missense mutations (R52H, E246K, and G247R) in the cohort and found that 12 (5% of the cohort) were carriers for the rare nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism rs7102584 causing E282Q substitution of KCNJ5. By expressing the channels in Xenopus oocytes and human adrenal H295R cells, we have shown that the R52H, E246K, and E282Q substitutions are functional, but the G247R mutation is indistinguishable from wild type. Although the functional substitutions are remote from the selectivity filter, they affect the inward-rectification, the ability of the KCNJ5 channels to conduct Na(+) currents and ATII-induced aldosterone release from the H295R cell line. Together these data suggest that germline variation in the KCNJ5 gene has a role to play in the common sporadic form as well as the much rarer syndromic forms of primary aldosteronism.

  11. A founder mutation of the potassium channel KCNQ1 in long QT syndrome: implications for estimation of disease prevalence and molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Piippo, K; Swan, H; Pasternack, M; Chapman, H; Paavonen, K; Viitasalo, M; Toivonen, L; Kontula, K

    2001-02-01

    We took advantage of the genetic isolate of Finns to characterize a common long QT syndrome (LQTS) mutation, and to estimate the prevalence of LQTS. The LQTS is caused by mutations in different ion channel genes, which vary in their molecular nature from family to family. The potassium channel gene KCNQ1 was sequenced in two unrelated Finnish patients with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), followed by genotyping of 114 LQTS probands and their available family members. The functional properties of the mutation were studied using a whole-cell patch-damp technique. We identified a novel missense mutation (G589D or KCNQ1-Fin) in the C-terminus of the KCNQ1 subunit. The voltage threshold of activation for the KCNQ1-Fin channel was markedly increased compared to the wild-type channel. This mutation was present in homozygous form in two siblings with JLNS, and in heterozygous form in 34 of 114 probands with Romano-Ward syndrome (RWS) and 282 family members. The mean (+/- SD) rate-corrected QT intervals of the heterozygous subjects (n = 316) and noncarriers (n = 423) were 460 +/- 40 ms and 410 +/- 20 ms (p < 0.001), respectively. A single missense mutation of the KCNQ1 gene accounts for 30% of Finnish cases with LQTS, and it may be associated with both the RWS and JLNS phenotypes of the syndrome. The relative enrichment of this mutation most likely represents a founder gene effect. These circumstances provide an excellent opportunity to examine how genetic and nongenetic factors modify the LQTS phenotype.

  12. The role of adenosine triphosphate-regulated potassium channels in propofol-induced beneficial effect on contractile function of hypercholesterolemic isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Sule; Eminoglu, Ozlem; Akgun, Aylin; Guven, Hulya; Tuncok, Yesim

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the role of adenosine triphosphate-regulated potassium (KATP) channels in the propofol-induced changes in the contractile function of hypercholesterolemic rabbit hearts. This study was carried out in the Department of Pharmacology Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey during the period January to December 2003. Twenty-two isolated rabbit hearts were grouped into 4. Group I (n=6) were infused with 50 microM propofol during a 60 minutes perfusion. Group II (n=6) were also infused with 100 microM propofol over the same period. Group III (n=5) was perfused with solutions containing 10 microM glybenclamide and group IV (n=5) 100 microM diazoxide for 5 minutes before and during a 60 minutes infusion with 100 microM propofol. The 50 microM propofol infusion decreased left ventricular pressure (LVP) significantly (p<0.05) but it did not change dP/dt max and dP/dt min. The 100 microM propofol infusion caused a significant increase in LVP at 20 minutes. Furthermore, a 100 microM propofol infusion resulted in a significant increase in maximal positive left ventricular pressure (dP/dt max) and maximal negative left ventricular pressure (dP/dt min) compared to baseline (p<0.05). The increase in dP/dtmax and dP/dt min induced by 100 microM propofol was inhibited by glybenclamide (p<0.05), a KATP channel blocker, but was not affected by diazoxide (p>0.05), a KATP channel opener. The activation of KATP channels seems to be one of the mechanisms by which propofol induced beneficial effect on contractility of myocardium in hypercholesterolemic rabbit hearts.

  13. Block and activation of the pace-maker channel in calf purkinje fibres: effects of potassium, caesium and rubidium.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D

    1982-08-01

    1. The effects of low concentrations of Cs(+) (0.01-3mM) on the fully activated I-V relation ī(f)(E) for the pace-maker current in calf Purkinje fibres have been investigated. The action of Cs(+) is two-fold: in the negative region of the I-V curve Cs(+) induces a channel blockade; on the other hand, at more positive potentials Cs(+) can produce the opposite effect, i.e. a current increase.2. Cs(+)-induced blockade is concentration- and voltage-dependent, as observed on other cation channels. Data in the far negative voltage range (about - 150 to - 50 mV) can be fitted by a simple block model (Woodhull, 1973), which gives a mean value of 0.71 for the fraction of membrane thickness (delta) crossed by Cs(+) ions before reaching the blocking site. The value of delta does not appear to be affected by either external Na or external K concentrations. Values for the dissociation constant of the blocking reaction at E = 0 mV (k(0)) are found in the range 0.5-3.7 mM. In the positive region of the ī(f)(E) relation the current depression caused by channel blockade vanishes. Unexpectedly, in this range the current can be observed to increase with Cs(+), and ī(f)(E) curves in different Cs(+) concentrations show cross-over.3. Changing external K(+) also produces similar cross-over phenomena. Investigation of this effect reveals that the increase in slope of the I-V curve on raising the external K(+) concentration follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and can be interpteted in terms of K(+)-induced channel activation. It is found that 44+/-6 mM-K(+) half-saturates the channel activating reaction.4. The Cs(+)-induced current increase is large in low-K(+) solutions and vanishes in high-K(+) solutions, suggesting a competition between Cs(+) and K(+) ions in their activating action. Increasing Na(+) also limits the Cs(+)-induced current increase.5. Rb(+) also blocks the i(f) channel, though less efficiently than Cs(+). The block caused by Rb(+) is, unlike that of Cs(+), nearly

  14. Block and activation of the pace-maker channel in calf Purkinje fibres: effects of potassium, caesium and rubidium

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Dario

    1982-01-01

    1. The effects of low concentrations of Cs+ (0·01-3mM) on the fully activated I-V relation īf(E) for the pace-maker current in calf Purkinje fibres have been investigated. The action of Cs+ is two-fold: in the negative region of the I-V curve Cs+ induces a channel blockade; on the other hand, at more positive potentials Cs+ can produce the opposite effect, i.e. a current increase. 2. Cs+-induced blockade is concentration- and voltage-dependent, as observed on other cation channels. Data in the far negative voltage range (about - 150 to - 50 mV) can be fitted by a simple block model (Woodhull, 1973), which gives a mean value of 0·71 for the fraction of membrane thickness (δ) crossed by Cs+ ions before reaching the blocking site. The value of δ does not appear to be affected by either external Na or external K concentrations. Values for the dissociation constant of the blocking reaction at E = 0 mV (k0) are found in the range 0·5-3·7 mM. In the positive region of the īf(E) relation the current depression caused by channel blockade vanishes. Unexpectedly, in this range the current can be observed to increase with Cs+, and īf(E) curves in different Cs+ concentrations show cross-over. 3. Changing external K+ also produces similar cross-over phenomena. Investigation of this effect reveals that the increase in slope of the I-V curve on raising the external K+ concentration follows Michaelis—Menten kinetics, and can be interpteted in terms of K+-induced channel activation. It is found that 44±6 mM-K+ half-saturates the channel activating reaction. 4. The Cs+-induced current increase is large in low-K+ solutions and vanishes in high-K+ solutions, suggesting a competition between Cs+ and K+ ions in their activating action. Increasing Na+ also limits the Cs+-induced current increase. 5. Rb+ also blocks the if channel, though less efficiently than Cs+. The block caused by Rb+ is, unlike that of Cs+, nearly voltage-independent, and is explained by assuming that the

  15. Cryo-EM structure of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel illuminates mechanisms of assembly and gating

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory M; Yoshioka, Craig; Rex, Emily A; Fay, Jonathan F; Xie, Qing; Whorton, Matthew R; Chen, James Z; Shyng, Show-Ling

    2017-01-01

    KATP channels are metabolic sensors that couple cell energetics to membrane excitability. In pancreatic β-cells, channels formed by SUR1 and Kir6.2 regulate insulin secretion and are the targets of antidiabetic sulfonylureas. Here, we used cryo-EM to elucidate structural basis of channel assembly and gating. The structure, determined in the presence of ATP and the sulfonylurea glibenclamide, at ~6 Å resolution reveals a closed Kir6.2 tetrameric core with four peripheral SUR1s each anchored to a Kir6.2 by its N-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD0). Intricate interactions between TMD0, the loop following TMD0, and Kir6.2 near the proposed PIP2 binding site, and where ATP density is observed, suggest SUR1 may contribute to ATP and PIP2 binding to enhance Kir6.2 sensitivity to both. The SUR1-ABC core is found in an unusual inward-facing conformation whereby the two nucleotide binding domains are misaligned along a two-fold symmetry axis, revealing a possible mechanism by which glibenclamide inhibits channel activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24149.001 PMID:28092267

  16. Cloning and functional characterization of inward-rectifying potassium (Kir) channels from Malpighian tubules of the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Piermarini, Peter M.; Rouhier, Matthew F.; Schepel, Matthew; Kosse, Christin; Beyenbach, Klaus W.

    2013-01-01

    Inward-rectifying K+ (Kir) channels play critical physiological roles in a variety of vertebrate cells/tissues, including the regulation of membrane potential in nerve and muscle, and the transepithelial transport of ions in osmoregulatory epithelia, such as kidneys and gills. It remains to be determined whether Kir channels play similar physiological roles in insects. In the present study, we sought to 1) clone the cDNAs of Kir channel subunits expressed in the renal (Malpighian) tubules of the mosquito Aedes aegypti, and 2) characterize the electrophysiological properties of the cloned Kir subunits when expressed heterologously in oocytes of Xenopus laevis. Here, we reveal that three Kir subunits are expressed abundantly in Aedes Malpighian tubules (AeKir1, AeKir2B, and AeKir3); each of their full-length cDNAs was cloned. Heterologous expression of the AeKir1 or the AeKir2B subunits in Xenopus oocytes elicits inward-rectifying K+ currents that are blocked by barium. Relative to the AeKir2B-expressing oocytes, the AeKir1-expressing oocytes 1) produce larger macroscopic currents, and 2) exhibit a modulation of their conductive properties by extracellular Na+. Attempts to functionally characterize the AeKir3 subunit in Xenopus oocytes were unsuccessful. Lastly, we show that in isolated Aedes Malpighian tubules, the cation permeability sequence of the basolateral membrane of principal cells (Tl+ > K+ > Rb+ > NH4+) is consistent with the presence of functional Kir channels. We conclude that in Aedes Malpighian tubules, Kir channels contribute to the majority of the barium-sensitive transepithelial transport of K+. PMID:23085358

  17. Characterization of SKT1, an Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel from Potato, by Heterologous Expression in Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Sabine; Talke, Ina; Ehrhardt, Thomas; Nast, Gabriele; Müller-Röber, Bernd

    1998-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a novel, inwardly rectifying K+ (K+in) channel protein, SKT1, was cloned from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). SKT1 is related to members of the AKT family of K+in channels previously identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and potato. Skt1 mRNA is most strongly expressed in leaf epidermal fragments and in roots. In electrophysiological, whole-cell, patch-clamp measurements performed on baculovirus-infected insect (Spodoptera frugiperda) cells, SKT1 was identified as a K+in channel that activates with slow kinetics by hyperpolarizing voltage pulses to more negative potentials than −60 mV. The pharmacological inhibitor Cs+, when applied externally, inhibited SKT1-mediated K+in currents half-maximally with an inhibitor concentration (IC50) of 105 μm. An almost identical high Cs+ sensitivity (IC50 = 90 μm) was found for the potato guard-cell K+in channel KST1 after expression in insect cells. SKT1 currents were reversibly activated by a shift in external pH from 6.6 to 5.5, which indicates a physiological role for pH-dependent regulation of AKT-type K+in channels. Comparative studies revealed generally higher current amplitudes for KST1-expressing cells than for SKT1-expressing insect cells, which correlated with a higher targeting efficiency of the KST1 protein to the insect cell's plasma membrane, as demonstrated by fusions to green fluorescence protein. PMID:9501121

  18. The role of potassium BK channels in anticonvulsant effect of cannabidiol in pentylenetetrazole and maximal electroshock models of seizure in mice.

    PubMed

    Shirazi-zand, Zahra; Ahmad-Molaei, Leila; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Naderi, Nima

    2013-07-01

    Cannabidiol is a nonpsychoactive member of phytocannabinoids that produces various pharmacological effects that are not mediated through putative CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptors and their related effectors. In this study, we examined the effect of the i.c.v. administration of potassium BK channel blocker paxilline alone and in combination with cannabidiol in protection against pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)- and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure in mice. In the PTZ-induced seizure model, i.c.v. administration of cannabidiol caused a significant increase in seizure threshold compared with the control group. Moreover, while i.c.v. administration of various doses of paxilline did not produce significant change in the PTZ-induced seizure threshold in mice, coadministration of cannabidiol and paxilline attenuated the antiseizure effect of cannabidiol in PTZ-induced tonic seizures. In the MES model of seizure, both cannabidiol and paxilline per se produced significant increase in percent protection against electroshock-induced seizure. However, coadministration of cannabidiol and paxilline did not produce significant interaction in their antiseizure effect in the MES test. The results of the present study showed a protective effect of cannabidiol in both PTZ and MES models of seizure. These results suggested a BK channel-mediated antiseizure action of cannabidiol in PTZ model of seizure. However, such an interaction might not exist in MES-induced convulsion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Amino Acid Properties of Trafficking Determinants in the Outer Pore-Forming Region of Kv1 Potassium Channels in Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Barbara; Zhu, Jing; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza; Thornhill, William B

    2017-03-01

    Different classes of Kv1 potassium channels have different trafficking patterns despite having very similar amino acid sequences. Two amino acids responsible for these differences have been identified in the outer pore turret region of Kv1.1 and Kv1.4. Here we tested a series of substitutions at these two determinants on Kv1.4. All P506 substitutions tested resulted in a significant decrease in surface protein, total protein, and protein half-life, indicating that proline is required at 506 to stabilize protein conformation and increase trafficking to the cell surface. All K533 substitutions tested had no effect on total protein, suggesting that the lysine at 533 is not important for maintaining Kv1.4 protein conformation. However, a basic or long polar amino acid, such as K, R, or Q, at this position favored high surface protein and efficient trafficking of Kv1.4, whereas an acidic or short amino acid, such as D, E, S, L, N, or H, at this position induced partial high endoplasmic reticulum-retention. This intracellular retention was not due to protein misfolding. We propose that these four prolines and four lysines in a Kv1.4 homotetramer might provide a binding site for a putative endoplasmic reticulum-export molecule to ensure high cell surface protein expression of the channel.

  20. Inhibitory effects of telmisartan on culture and proliferation of and Kv1.3 potassium channel expression in peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocytes from Xinjiang Kazakh patients with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sha-Sha; Zhang, Qiu-Bing; Yuan, Qing-Yan; He, Si-Li; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Activation of T lymphocytes, for which potassium channels are essential, is involved in the development of hypertension. In this study, we explored the inhibitory effects of telmisartan on the culture and proliferation of and Kv1.3 potassium channel expression in peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocytes derived from Xinjiang Kazakh patients with hypertension. Methods: CD4+ T-cell samples from hypertensive Kazakh patients and healthy Kazakh people were divided into healthy control, case control, telmisartan, and 4-aminopytidine groups. Changes in the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-17 in the blood of the healthy control and case control subjects were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocytes were first activated and proliferated in vitro and then incubated for 0, 24, and 48 h under various treatment conditions. Thereafter, changes in CD4+ T-lymphocytic proliferation were determined using Cell Counting Kit-8 and microscope photography. Changes in messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of the Kv1.3 potassium channel in CD4+ T lymphocytes were detected using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blots, respectively. Results: The IL-6 and IL-17 expression levels were significantly higher in the blood of the hypertensive Kazakh patients than in the healthy Kazakh people. Telmisartan inhibited T-lymphocytic proliferation, as well as the mRNA and protein expression of the Kv1.3 potassium channel in CD4+ T lymphocytes, and the inhibitory effects were time-dependent, with the strongest inhibition observed after 48 h and significantly weaker inhibition observed after 24 h of treatment. Conclusions: Telmisartan may potentially regulate hypertensive inflammatory responses by inhibiting T-lymphocytic proliferation and Kv1.3 potassium channel expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes. PMID:27765883

  1. Inhibitory effects of telmisartan on culture and proliferation of and Kv1.3 potassium channel expression in peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocytes from Xinjiang Kazakh patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sha-Sha; Zhang, Qiu-Bing; Yuan, Qing-Yan; He, Si-Li; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-10-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes, for which potassium channels are essential, is involved in the development of hypertension. In this study, we explored the inhibitory effects of telmisartan on the culture and proliferation of and Kv1.3 potassium channel expression in peripheral blood CD4 + T lymphocytes derived from Xinjiang Kazakh patients with hypertension. CD4 + T-cell samples from hypertensive Kazakh patients and healthy Kazakh people were divided into healthy control, case control, telmisartan, and 4-aminopytidine groups. Changes in the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-17 in the blood of the healthy control and case control subjects were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Peripheral blood CD4 + T lymphocytes were first activated and proliferated in vitro and then incubated for 0, 24, and 48 h under various treatment conditions. Thereafter, changes in CD4 + T-lymphocytic proliferation were determined using Cell Counting Kit-8 and microscope photography. Changes in messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of the Kv1.3 potassium channel in CD4 + T lymphocytes were detected using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blots, respectively. The IL-6 and IL-17 expression levels were significantly higher in the blood of the hypertensive Kazakh patients than in the healthy Kazakh people. Telmisartan inhibited T-lymphocytic proliferation, as well as the mRNA and protein expression of the Kv1.3 potassium channel in CD4 + T lymphocytes, and the inhibitory effects were time-dependent, with the strongest inhibition observed after 48 h and significantly weaker inhibition observed after 24 h of treatment. Telmisartan may potentially regulate hypertensive inflammatory responses by inhibiting T-lymphocytic proliferation and Kv1.3 potassium channel expression in CD4 + T lymphocytes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Effects of natural and synthetic isothiocyanate-based H2S-releasers against chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain: Role of Kv7 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Lucarini, Elena; Micheli, Laura; Mosca, Ilaria; Ambrosino, Paolo; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Martelli, Alma; Testai, Lara; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Calderone, Vincenzo; Ghelardini, Carla

    2017-07-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a crucial signaling molecule involved in several physiological and pathological processes. Nonetheless, the role of this gasotransmitter in the pathogenesis and treatment of neuropathic pain is controversial. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pain relieving profile of a series of slow releasing H 2 S donors (the natural allyl-isothiocyanate and the synthetics phenyl- and carboxyphenyl-isothiocyanate) in animal models of neuropathic pain induced by paclitaxel or oxaliplatin, anticancer drugs characterized by a dose-limiting neurotoxicity. The potential contribution of Kv7 potassium channels modulation was also studied. Mice were treated with paclitaxel (2.0 mg kg -1 ) i.p. on days 1, 3, 5 and 7; oxaliplatin (2.4 mg kg -1 ) was administered i.p. on days 1-2, 5-9, 12-14. Behavioral tests were performed on day 15. In both models, single subcutaneous administrations of H 2 S donors (1.33, 4.43, 13.31 μmol kg -1 ) reduced the hypersensitivity to cold non-noxious stimuli (allodynia-related measurement). The prototypical H 2 S donor NaHS was also effective. Activity was maintained after i.c.v. administrations. On the contrary, the S-lacking molecule allyl-isocyanate did not increase pain threshold; the H 2 S-binding molecule hemoglobin abolished the pain-relieving effects of isothiocyanates and NaHS. The anti-neuropathic properties of H 2 S donors were reverted by the Kv7 potassium channel blocker XE991. Currents carried by Kv7.2 homomers and Kv7.2/Kv7.3 heteromers expressed in CHO cells were potentiated by H 2 S donors. Sistemically- or centrally-administered isothiocyanates reduced chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain by releasing H 2 S. Activation of Kv7 channels largely mediate the anti-neuropathic effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A potassium channel beta subunit related to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily is encoded by the Drosophila hyperkinetic locus.

    PubMed Central

    Chouinard, S W; Wilson, G F; Schlimgen, A K; Ganetzky, B

    1995-01-01

    Genetic and physiological studies of the Drosophila Hyperkinetic (Hk) mutant revealed defects in the function or regulation of K+ channels encoded by the Shaker (Sh) locus. The Hk polypeptide, determined from analysis of cDNA clones, is a homologue of mammalian K+ channel beta subunits (Kv beta). Coexpression of Hk with Sh in Xenopus oocytes increases current amplitudes and changes the voltage dependence and kinetics of activation and inactivation, consistent with predicted functions of Hk in vivo. Sequence alignments show that Hk, together with mammalian Kv beta, represents an additional branch of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. These results are relevant to understanding the function and evolutionary origin of Kv beta. PMID:7542775

  4. TRPM4 inhibitor 9-phenanthrol activates endothelial cell intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in rat isolated mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Garland, C J; Smirnov, S V; Bagher, P; Lim, C S; Huang, C Y; Mitchell, R; Stanley, C; Pinkney, A; Dora, K A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Smooth muscle transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) channels play a fundamental role in the development of the myogenic arterial constriction that is necessary for blood flow autoregulation. As TRPM4 channels are present throughout the vasculature, we investigated their potential role in non-myogenic resistance arteries using the TRPM4 inhibitor 9-phenanthrol. Experimental Approach Pressure and wire myography were used to assess the reactivity of rat arteries, the latter in combination with measurements of smooth muscle membrane potential. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and endothelial cell (EC) calcium changes were assessed in pressurized vessels and patch clamp measurements made in isolated ECs. Key Results The TRPM4 inhibitor 9-phenanthrol reversibly hyperpolarized mesenteric arteries to circa EK and blocked α1-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. Hyperpolarization was abolished and vasoconstriction re-established by damaging the endothelium. In mesenteric and cerebral artery smooth muscle, 9-phenanthrol hyperpolarization was effectively blocked by the KCa3.1 inhibitor TRAM-34. 9-Phenanthrol did not increase mesenteric EC [Ca2+]i, and Na+ substitution with N-methyl-D-glucamine only increased the muscle resting potential by 10 mV. Immunolabelling for TRPM4 was restricted to the endothelium and perivascular tissue. Conclusions and Implications These data reveal a previously unrecognized action of the TRPM4 inhibitor 9-phenanthrol – the ability to act as an activator of EC KCa3.1 channels. They do not indicate a functionally important role for TRPM4 channels in the reactivity of non-myogenic mesenteric arteries. PMID:25323322

  5. Potassium uptake supporting plant growth in the absence of AKT1 channel activity: Inhibition by ammonium and stimulation by sodium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, E. P.; Hirsch, R. E.; Lewis, D. R.; Qi, Z.; Sussman, M. R.; Lewis, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    A transferred-DNA insertion mutant of Arabidopsis that lacks AKT1 inward-rectifying K+ channel activity in root cells was obtained previously by a reverse-genetic strategy, enabling a dissection of the K+-uptake apparatus of the root into AKT1 and non-AKT1 components. Membrane potential measurements in root cells demonstrated that the AKT1 component of the wild-type K+ permeability was between 55 and 63% when external [K+] was between 10 and 1,000 microM, and NH4+ was absent. NH4+ specifically inhibited the non-AKT1 component, apparently by competing for K+ binding sites on the transporter(s). This inhibition by NH4+ had significant consequences for akt1 plants: K+ permeability, 86Rb+ fluxes into roots, seed germination, and seedling growth rate of the mutant were each similarly inhibited by NH4+. Wild-type plants were much more resistant to NH4+. Thus, AKT1 channels conduct the K+ influx necessary for the growth of Arabidopsis embryos and seedlings in conditions that block the non-AKT1 mechanism. In contrast to the effects of NH4+, Na+ and H+ significantly stimulated the non-AKT1 portion of the K+ permeability. Stimulation of akt1 growth rate by Na+, a predicted consequence of the previous result, was observed when external [K+] was 10 microM. Collectively, these results indicate that the AKT1 channel is an important component of the K+ uptake apparatus supporting growth, even in the "high-affinity" range of K+ concentrations. In the absence of AKT1 channel activity, an NH4+-sensitive, Na+/H+-stimulated mechanism can suffice.

  6. Extracellular Mg2+ Modulates Slow Gating Transitions and the Opening of Drosophila Ether-à-Go-Go Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chih-Yung; Bezanilla, Francisco; Papazian, Diane M.

    2000-01-01

    We have characterized the effects of prepulse hyperpolarization and extracellular Mg2+ on the ionic and gating currents of the Drosophila ether-à-go-go K+ channel (eag). Hyperpolarizing prepulses significantly slowed channel opening elicited by a subsequent depolarization, revealing rate-limiting transitions for activation of the ionic currents. Extracellular Mg2+ dramatically slowed activation of eag ionic currents evoked with or without prepulse hyperpolarization and regulated the kinetics of channel opening from a nearby closed state(s). These results suggest that Mg2+ modulates voltage-dependent gating and pore opening in eag channels. To investigate the mechanism of this modulation, eag gating currents were recorded using the cut-open oocyte voltage clamp. Prepulse hyperpolarization and extracellular Mg2+ slowed the time course of ON gating currents. These kinetic changes resembled the results at the ionic current level, but were much smaller in magnitude, suggesting that prepulse hyperpolarization and Mg2+ modulate gating transitions that occur slowly and/or move relatively little gating charge. To determine whether quantitatively different effects on ionic and gating currents could be obtained from a sequential activation pathway, computer simulations were performed. Simulations using a sequential model for activation reproduced the key features of eag ionic and gating currents and their modulation by prepulse hyperpolarization and extracellular Mg2+. We have also identified mutations in the S3–S4 loop that modify or eliminate the regulation of eag gating by prepulse hyperpolarization and Mg2+, indicating an important role for this region in the voltage-dependent activation of eag. PMID:10694260

  7. A unique role for Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels in starburst amacrine cell signaling in mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Ozaita, Ander; Petit-Jacques, Jerome; Völgyi, Béla; Ho, Chi Shun; Joho, Rolf H; Bloomfield, Stewart A; Rudy, Bernardo

    2004-08-18

    Direction-selective retinal ganglion cells show an increased activity evoked by light stimuli moving in the preferred direction. This selectivity is governed by direction-selective inhibition from starburst amacrine cells occurring during stimulus movement in the opposite or null direction. To understand the intrinsic membrane properties of starburst cells responsible for direction-selective GABA release, we performed whole-cell recordings from starburst cells in mouse retina. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed prominent voltage-dependent K(+) currents. The currents were mostly blocked by 1 mm TEA, activated rapidly at voltages more positive than -20 mV, and deactivated quickly, properties reminiscent of the currents carried by the Kv3 subfamily of K+ channels. Immunoblots confirmed the presence of Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins in retina and immunohistochemistry revealed their expression in starburst cell somata and dendrites. The Kv3-like current in starburst cells was absent in Kv3.1-Kv3.2 knock-out mice. Current-clamp recordings showed that the fast activation of the Kv3 channels provides a voltage-dependent shunt that limits depolarization of the soma to potentials more positive than -20 mV. This provides a mechanism likely to contribute to the electrical isolation of individual starburst cell dendrites, a property thought essential for direction selectivity. This function of Kv3 channels differs from that in other neurons where they facilitate high-frequency repetitive firing. Moreover, we found a gradient in the intensity of Kv3.1b immunolabeling favoring proximal regions of starburst cells. We hypothesize that this Kv3 channel gradient contributes to the preference for centrifugal signal flow in dendrites underlying direction-selective GABA release from starburst amacrine cells

  8. Identification by differential display of a hypertonicity-inducible inward rectifier potassium channel highly expressed in chloride cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Itakura, M; Kashiwagi, M; Nakamura, N; Matsuki, T; Sakuta, H; Naito, N; Takano, K; Fujita, T; Hirose, S

    1999-04-16

    By using differential mRNA display to monitor the molecular alterations associated with adaptation of euryhaline eels to different salinities, we identified a cDNA fragment strongly induced in seawater eel gills. Cloning of a full-length cDNA and its expression in COS-7 cells indicated that the clone codes for an inward rectifier K+ channel (eKir) of 372 amino acid residues, which has two transmembrane segments and a typical pore-forming region (H5). Only low sequence similarities are present, except the H5 region, compared with other members of the inward rectifier K+ channel family (Kir). Consistent with this divergence in the amino acid sequence, a phylogenetic analysis indicated early divergence and independent evolution of eKir from other members; it is only distantly related to the Kir5.0 subfamily members. RNase protection analysis showed that eKir is highly expressed in the seawater eel gill, kidney, and posterior intestine but very weakly in freshwater eels. Immunohistochemistry of gill sections revealed dense localization of eKir in the chloride cells. Immunoelectron microscopy indicated that eKir is mainly present in the microtubular system in the chloride cell. This location and its salt-inducible nature suggest that the eKir channel cloned here is a novel member of the Kir5.0 subfamily of the Kir family and is implicated in osmoregulation.

  9. Blockade of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3 inhibits immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koo, G C; Blake, J T; Talento, A; Nguyen, M; Lin, S; Sirotina, A; Shah, K; Mulvany, K; Hora, D; Cunningham, P; Wunderler, D L; McManus, O B; Slaughter, R; Bugianesi, R; Felix, J; Garcia, M; Williamson, J; Kaczorowski, G; Sigal, N H; Springer, M S; Feeney, W

    1997-06-01

    The voltage activated K+ channel (Kv1.3) has recently been identified as the molecule that sets the resting membrane potential of peripheral human T lymphoid cells. In vitro studies indicate that blockage of Kv1.3 inhibits T cell activation, suggesting that Kv1.3 may be a target for immunosuppression. However, despite the in vitro evidence, there has been no in vivo demonstration that blockade of Kv1.3 will attenuate an immune response. The difficulty is due to species differences, as the channel does not set the membrane potential in rodent peripheral T cells. In this study, we show that the channel is present on peripheral T cells of miniswine. Using the peptidyl Kv1.3 inhibitor, margatoxin, we demonstrate that Kv1.3 also regulates the resting membrane potential, and that blockade of Kv1.3 inhibits, in vivo, both a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and an Ab response to an allogeneic challenge. In addition, prolonged Kv1.3 blockade causes reduced thymic cellularity and inhibits the thymic development of T cell subsets. These results provide in vivo evidence that Kv1.3 is a novel target for immunomodulation.

  10. The Caenorhabditis elegans Iodotyrosine Deiodinase Ortholog SUP-18 Functions through a Conserved Channel SC-Box to Regulate the Muscle Two-Pore Domain Potassium Channel SUP-9

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, Ignacio Perez; Ma, Long; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans gene sup-18 suppress the defects in muscle contraction conferred by a gain-of-function mutation in SUP-10, a presumptive regulatory subunit of the SUP-9 two-pore domain K+ channel associated with muscle membranes. We cloned sup-18 and found that it encodes the C. elegans ortholog of mammalian iodotyrosine deiodinase (IYD), an NADH oxidase/flavin reductase that functions in iodine recycling and is important for the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones that regulate metabolism. The FMN-binding site of mammalian IYD is conserved in SUP-18, which appears to require catalytic activity to function. Genetic analyses suggest that SUP-10 can function with SUP-18 to activate SUP-9 through a pathway that is independent of the presumptive SUP-9 regulatory subunit UNC-93. We identified a novel evolutionarily conserved serine-cysteine-rich region in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of SUP-9 required for its specific activation by SUP-10 and SUP-18 but not by UNC-93. Since two-pore domain K+ channels regulate the resting membrane potentials of numerous cell types, we suggest that the SUP-18 IYD regulates the activity of the SUP-9 channel using NADH as a coenzyme and thus couples the metabolic state of muscle cells to muscle membrane excitability. PMID:24586202

  11. Intermediate-conductance Calcium-activated Potassium Channel KCa3.1 and Chloride Channel Modulate Chemokine Ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Migration of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in non-excitable cells such as dendritic cells. Here, we examined the role of KCa3.1 and chloride channels in lymphatic chemokines-induced migration of dendritic cells. The amplitude and kinetics of CCL19/21-induced Ca2+ influx were associated with CCR7 expression levels, extracellular free Ca2+ and Cl−, and independent of extracellular K+. Chemokines, CCL19 and CCL21, and KCa3.1 activator, 1-EBIO, induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K+ efflux, which was blocked by TRAM-34, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward CRAC. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl− in the medium, and low dose of DIDS impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca2+ influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and chloride channel are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca2+ influx, and cell volume. PMID:25583444

  12. Ca2+-dependent potassium channels and cannabinoid signaling in the endothelium of apolipoprotein E knockout mice before plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Alexander I; Panasiuk, Olga; Okhai, Iryna; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Brandt, Karim J; Mach, François

    2018-02-01

    Endothelial Ca 2+ -dependent K + channels (K Ca ) regulate endothelial function. We also know that stimulation of type 2 cannabinoid (CB 2 ) receptors ameliorates atherosclerosis. However, whether atherosclerosis is accompanied by altered endothelial K Ca - and CB 2 receptor-dependent signaling is unknown. By utilizing an in situ patch-clamp approach, we directly evaluated the K Ca channel function and the CB 2 receptor-dependent electrical responses in the endothelium of aortic strips from young ApoE -/- and C57Bl/6 mice. In the ApoE -/- group, the resting membrane potential (-30.1±1.1mV) was less negative (p<0.05) compared to WT (-38.9±1.4mV) and voltage ramps generated an overall K Ca current of reduced amplitude. The peak hyperpolarization to 2μM Ach was not different between the groups. However, the sustained component was significantly reduced in ApoE -/- strips. In contrast, the peak hyperpolarization to 0.2μM Ach was increased in the ApoE -/- group, and SKA-31, a direct IK Ca /SK Ca channel opener, produced a hyperpolarization and whole-cell current of greater amplitude. The BK Ca opener NS1619 produced hyperpolarization that was enhanced in ApoE -/- group. N-arachidonoyl glycine, a BK Ca opener, produced a hyperpolarization of enhanced amplitude in ApoE -/- arteries. Selective CB 2 receptor agonist AM1241 (5μM) had no effect on endothelial membrane potential in WT group; however, in ApoE -/- group, it elicited hyperpolarization that was inhibited by a selective CB 2 receptor antagonist AM630. Conclusively, our data point to functional down-regulation of basal IK Ca activity in unstimulated endothelium of ApoE -/- mice. Direct and indirect IK Ca stimulation resulted in increased recruitment of the channels. In addition, our data point to up-regulation of endothelial BK Ca channels and CB 2 receptors in ApoE -/- arteries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fluoxetine Protection in Decompression Sickness in Mice is Enhanced by Blocking TREK-1 Potassium Channel with the “spadin” Antidepressant

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Nicolas; Lambrechts, Kate; De Maistre, Sébastien; Royal, Perrine; Mazella, Jean; Borsotto, Marc; Heurteaux, Catherine; Abraini, Jacques; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    In mice, disseminated coagulation, inflammation, and ischemia induce neurological damage that can lead to death. These symptoms result from circulating bubbles generated by a pathogenic decompression. Acute fluoxetine treatment or the presence of the TREK-1 potassium channel increases the survival rate when mice are subjected to an experimental dive/decompression protocol. This is a paradox because fluoxetine is a blocker of TREK-1 channels. First, we studied the effects of an acute dose of fluoxetine (50 mg/kg) in wild-type (WT) and TREK-1 deficient mice (knockout homozygous KO and heterozygous HET). Then, we combined the same fluoxetine treatment with a 5-day treatment protocol with spadin, in order to specifically block TREK-1 activity (KO-like mice). KO and KO-like mice were regarded as antidepressed models. In total, 167 mice (45 WTcont 46 WTflux 30 HETflux and 46 KOflux) constituting the flux-pool and 113 supplementary mice (27 KO-like 24 WTflux2 24 KO-likeflux 21 WTcont2 17 WTno dive) constituting the spad-pool were included in this study. Only 7% of KO-TREK-1 treated with fluoxetine (KOflux) and 4% of mice treated with both spadin and fluoxetine (KO-likeflux) died from decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms. These values are much lower than those of WT control (62%) or KO-like mice (41%). After the decompression protocol, mice showed significant consumption of their circulating platelets and leukocytes. Spadin antidepressed mice were more likely to exhibit DCS. Nevertheless, mice which had both blocked TREK-1 channels and fluoxetine treatment were better protected against DCS. We conclude that the protective effect of such an acute dose of fluoxetine is enhanced when TREK-1 is inhibited. We confirmed that antidepressed models may have worse DCS outcomes, but concomitant fluoxetine treatment not only decreased DCS severity but increased the survival rate. PMID:26909044

  14. Increased tolerance to stress in cardiac expressed gain-of-function of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel subunit Kir6.1.

    PubMed

    Henn, Matthew C; Janjua, M Burhan; Zhang, Haixia; Kanter, Evelyn M; Makepeace, Carol M; Schuessler, Richard B; Nichols, Colin G; Lawton, Jennifer S

    2016-12-01

    The adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (K ATP ) channel opener diazoxide (DZX) prevents myocyte volume derangement and reduced contractility secondary to stress. K ATP channels are composed of pore-forming (Kir6.1 or Kir6.2) and regulatory (sulfonylurea receptor, SUR1 or SUR2) subunits. Gain of function (GOF) of Kir6.1 subunits has been implicated in cardiac pathology in Cantu syndrome in humans (cardiomegaly, lymphedema, and pericardial effusions). We hypothesized that GOF of Kir6.1 subunits would result in altered myocyte response to stress. Isolated cardiac myocytes from wild type (WT) and transgenic Kir6.1GOF mice were exposed to Tyrode's physiologic solution for 20 min, test solution (Tyrode's or stress [hyperkalemic cardioplegia {CPG, known myocyte stress}] +/- K ATP channel opener DZX), followed by Tyrode's for 20 min. Myocyte volume and contractility were measured and compared. WT myocytes demonstrated significant swelling in response to stress, but significantly less swelling was seen in Kir6.1GOF myocytes. DZX prevented swelling secondary to CPG in WT but resulted in a nonsignificant reduction in swelling in Kir6.1GOF myocytes. Both WT and Kir6.1GOF myocytes demonstrated a reduction in contractility during stress, although this was only significant in Kir6.1GOF myocytes. DZX was not associated with an improvement in contractility in Kir6.1GOF myocytes following stress. Similar to previous results in Kir6.1(-/-) myocytes, Kir6.1GOF myocytes demonstrate resistance (less volume derangement) to stress of cardioplegia. Understanding the role of Kir6.1 in myocyte response to stress may aid in the treatment of patients with Cantu syndrome and warrants further investigation. Copyright ©