Science.gov

Sample records for a-type x-ray diffraction

  1. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  2. Coherent x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitney, John Allen

    Conventional x-ray diffraction has historically been done under conditions such that the measured signal consists of an incoherent addition of scattering which is coherent only on a length scale determined by the properties of the beam. The result of the incoherent summation is a statistical averaging over the whole illuminated volume of the sample, which yields certain kinds of information with a high degree of precision and has been key to the success of x-ray diffraction in a variety of applications. Coherent x-ray scattering techniques, such as coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD) and x-ray intensity fluctuation spectroscopy (XIFS), attempt to reduce or eliminate any incoherent averaging so that specific, local structures couple to the measurement without being averaged out. In the case of XIFS, the result is analogous to dynamical light scattering, but with sensitivity to length scales less than 200 nm and time scales from 10-3 s to 103 s. When combined with phase retrieval, CXD represents an imaging technique with the penetration, in situ capabilities, and contrast mechanisms associated with x-rays and with a spatial resolution ultimately limited by the x-ray wavelength. In practice, however, the spatial resolution of CXD imaging is limited by exposure to about 100 A. This thesis describes CXD measurements of the binary alloy Cu3Au and the adaptation of phase retrieval methods for the reconstruction of real-space images of Cu3Au antiphase domains. The theoretical foundations of CXD are described in Chapter 1 as derived from the kinematical formulation for x-ray diffraction and from the temporal and spatial coherence of radiation. The antiphase domain structure of Cu 3Au is described, along with the associated reciprocal-space structure which is measured by CXD. CXD measurements place relatively stringent requirements on the coherence properties of the beam and on the detection mechanism of the experiment; these requirements and the means by which they have been

  3. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  4. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  5. X-ray Diffraction, Big and Small

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-30

    A conventional X-ray diffraction instrument left is the size of a large refrigerator, in contrast to the compact size of the Chemistry and Mineralogy CheMin instrument on NASA Curiosity rover top right.

  6. X-ray Diffraction Gratings for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerels, Frits

    2010-12-01

    Over the past year, we have celebrated the tenth anniversary of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. Both carry powerful, novel diffraction grating spectrometers, which have opened true X-ray spectroscopy for astrophysics. I will describe the design and operation of these instruments, as the background to some of the beautiful results they have produced. But these designs do not exhaust the versatility and essential simplicity of diffraction grating spectrometers, and I will discuss applications for the International X-ray Observatory IXO.

  7. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  8. X-ray filter for x-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sinsheimer, John Jay; Conley, Raymond P.; Bouet, Nathalie C. D.

    Technologies are described for apparatus, methods and systems effective for filtering. The filters may comprise a first plate. The first plate may include an x-ray absorbing material and walls defining first slits. The first slits may include arc shaped openings through the first plate. The walls of the first plate may be configured to absorb at least some of first x-rays when the first x-rays are incident on the x-ray absorbing material, and to output second x-rays. The filters may comprise a second plate spaced from the first plate. The second plate may include the x-ray absorbing material and wallsmore » defining second slits. The second slits may include arc shaped openings through the second plate. The walls of the second plate may be configured to absorb at least some of second x-rays and to output third x-rays.« less

  9. Two-photon x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stohr, J.

    The interference pattern of a circular photon source has long been used to define the optical diffraction limit. Here we show the breakdown of conventional x-ray diffraction theory for the fundamental case of a “source”, consisting of a back-illuminated thin film in a circular aperture. When the conventional spontaneous x-ray scattering by atoms in the film is replaced at high incident intensity by stimulated resonant scattering, the film becomes the source of cloned photon twins and the diffraction pattern becomes self-focused beyond the diffraction limit. Furthermore, the case of cloned photon pairs is compared to and distinguished from entangled photonmore » pairs or biphotons.« less

  10. Two-photon x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Stohr, J.

    2017-01-11

    The interference pattern of a circular photon source has long been used to define the optical diffraction limit. Here we show the breakdown of conventional x-ray diffraction theory for the fundamental case of a “source”, consisting of a back-illuminated thin film in a circular aperture. When the conventional spontaneous x-ray scattering by atoms in the film is replaced at high incident intensity by stimulated resonant scattering, the film becomes the source of cloned photon twins and the diffraction pattern becomes self-focused beyond the diffraction limit. Furthermore, the case of cloned photon pairs is compared to and distinguished from entangled photonmore » pairs or biphotons.« less

  11. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  12. X-ray diffraction on radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schiferl, D.; Roof, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray diffraction studies on radioactive materials are discussed with the aim of providing a guide to new researchers in the field. Considerable emphasis is placed on the safe handling and loading of not-too-exotic samples. Special considerations such as the problems of film blackening by the gamma rays and changes induced by the self-irradiation of the sample are covered. Some modifications of common diffraction techniques are presented. Finally, diffraction studies on radioactive samples under extreme conditions are discussed, with primary emphasis on high-pressure studies involving diamond-anvil cells.

  13. X-Ray Diffraction on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Eggert, J H; Wark, J

    2012-02-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently a 192 beam, 1.6 MJ laser. NIF Ramp-Compression Experiments have already made the relevant exo-planet pressure range from 1 to 50 Mbar accessible. We Proposed to Study Carbon Phases by X-Ray Diffraction on NIF. Just a few years ago, ultra-high pressure phase diagrams for materials were very 'simple'. New experiments and theories point out surprising and decidedly complex behavior at the highest pressures considered. High pressures phases of aluminum are also predicted to be complex. Recent metadynamics survey of carbon proposed a dynamic pathway among multiple phases. We need to develop diagnostics andmore » techniques to explore this new regime of highly compressed matter science. X-Ray Diffraction - Understand the phase diagram/EOS/strength/texture of materials to 10's of Mbar. Strategy and physics goals: (1) Powder diffraction; (2) Begin with diamond; (3) Continue with metals etc.; (4) Explore phase diagrams; (5) Develop liquid diffraction; and (6) Reduce background/improve resolution.« less

  14. Studies on X-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Huijie

    This dissertation includes three main parts: studies on coherence requirements for the diffraction microscopy experiments, ice formation on frozen-hydrated sample during data collection, and centering of the diffraction data sets. These three subjects are all in support of our groups overall goal of high resolution 3D imaging of frozen hydrated eukaryotic cells via x-ray diffraction microscopy. X-ray diffraction microscopy requires coherent illumination. However, the actual degree of coherence at some beamlines has never been tested. In research on coherence, our first aim is to determine the transverse coherence width at the sample plane at BL 9.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An analytical calculation of the coherence at the sample plane is presented. Experimental diffraction patterns of pinhole-pair samples were also taken at the beamline to determine the coherence. Due to the irregular shape of the pinholes and other optics complexity, it was very difficult to fit the data with known theoretical equations as it was traditionally done with 1D data. However, we found out that the auto-correlation function shows clearly three spots. Theoretical calculation have been carried out to show that the degree of coherence can be obtained from the intensities of the three spots. These results are compared with the results from the analytical calculation. We then perform a simulation, showing the required transverse coherence width for reconstructing samples with a given size. Ice accumulation has been a major problem in X-ray diffraction microscopy with frozen hydrated samples. Since the ice structure is different from point to point, we cannot subtract the scattering from ice, nor assume a completely "empty" region outside the finite support constraint area as required for reconstruction. Ice forms during the sample preparation and transfer. However, from the tests we did in September 2007, we found that the ice layer thickens

  15. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of nanoengineered polymeric capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhina, S.; Pastorino, L.; Di Lisa, D.; Kiiamov, A. G.; Faizullina, A. R.; Tayurskii, D. A.; Iannotta, S.; Erokhin, V.

    2017-10-01

    For the first time, nanoengineered polymeric capsules and their architecture have been studied with coherent X-ray diffraction imaging technique. The use of coherent X-ray diffraction imaging technique allowed us to analyze the samples immersed in a liquid. We report about the significant difference between polymeric capsule architectures under dry and liquid conditions.

  16. X-ray diffraction from shock-loaded polycrystals.

    PubMed

    Swift, Damian C

    2008-01-01

    X-ray diffraction was demonstrated from shock-compressed polycrystalline metals on nanosecond time scales. Laser ablation was used to induce shock waves in polycrystalline foils of Be, 25-125 microm thick. A second laser pulse was used to generate a plasma x-ray source by irradiation of a Ti foil. The x-ray source was collimated to produce a beam of controllable diameter, which was directed at the Be sample. X-rays were diffracted from the sample, and detected using films and x-ray streak cameras. The diffraction angle was observed to change with shock pressure. The diffraction angles were consistent with the uniaxial (elastic) and isotropic (plastic) compressions expected for the loading conditions used. Polycrystalline diffraction will be used to measure the response of the crystal lattice to high shock pressures and through phase changes.

  17. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging with nanofocused illumination.

    PubMed

    Schroer, C G; Boye, P; Feldkamp, J M; Patommel, J; Schropp, A; Schwab, A; Stephan, S; Burghammer, M; Schöder, S; Riekel, C

    2008-08-29

    Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging is an x-ray microscopy technique with the potential of reaching spatial resolutions well beyond the diffraction limits of x-ray microscopes based on optics. However, the available coherent dose at modern x-ray sources is limited, setting practical bounds on the spatial resolution of the technique. By focusing the available coherent flux onto the sample, the spatial resolution can be improved for radiation-hard specimens. A small gold particle (size <100 nm) was illuminated with a hard x-ray nanobeam (E=15.25 keV, beam dimensions approximately 100 x 100 nm2) and is reconstructed from its coherent diffraction pattern. A resolution of about 5 nm is achieved in 600 s exposure time.

  18. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimentalmore » fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.« less

  19. Cryogenic X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy for Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Enju; Wiegart, Lutz; Pernot, Petra; Howells, Malcolm; Timmins, Joanna; Zontone, Federico; Madsen, Anders

    2009-11-01

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is well suited for nondestructive, high-resolution biological imaging, especially for thick samples, with the high penetration power of x rays and without limitations imposed by a lens. We developed nonvacuum, cryogenic (cryo-) XDM with hard x rays at 8 keV and report the first frozen-hydrated imaging by XDM. By preserving samples in amorphous ice, the risk of artifacts associated with dehydration or chemical fixation is avoided, ensuring the imaging condition closest to their natural state. The reconstruction shows internal structures of intact D. radiodurans bacteria in their natural contrast.

  20. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; ...

    2016-07-26

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifyingin situchamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable,more » for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.« less

  1. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment.

    PubMed

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O

    2016-09-01

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifying in situ chamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  2. Remote X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The legacy of planetary X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) began in 1960 when W. Parish proposed an XRD instrument for deployment on the moon. The instrument was built and flight qualified, but the Lunar XRD program was cancelled shortly before the first human landing in 1969. XRF chemical data have been collected in situ by surface landers on Mars (Viking 1 & 2, Pathfinder) and Venus (Venera 13 & 14). These highly successful experiments provide critical constraints on our current understanding of surface processes and planetary evolution. However, the mineralogy, which is more critical to planetary surface science than simple chemical analysis, will remain unknown or will at best be imprecisely constrained until X-ray diffraction (XRD) data are collected. Recent progress in X-ray detector technology allows the consideration of simultaneous XRD (mineralogic analysis) and high-precision XRF (elemental analysis) in systems miniaturized to the point where they can be mounted on fixed landers or small robotic rovers. There is a variety of potential targets for XRD/XRF equipped landers within the solar system, the most compelling of which are the poles of the moon, the southern highlands of Mars and Europa.

  3. Dynamical diffraction imaging (topography) with X-ray synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, M.; Steiner, B. W.; Dobbyn, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    By contrast to electron microscopy, which yields information on the location of features in small regions of materials, X-ray diffraction imaging can portray minute deviations from perfect crystalline order over larger areas. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray optics technology uses a highly parallel incident beam to eliminate ambiguities in the interpretation of image details; scattering phenomena previously unobserved are now readily detected. Synchrotron diffraction imaging renders high-resolution, real-time, in situ observations of materials under pertinent environmental conditions possible.

  4. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; ...

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffractionmore » microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.« less

  5. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning

    SciTech Connect

    Scarborough, Nicole M.; Godaliyadda, G. M. Dilshan P.; Ye, Dong Hye

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction,more » significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Furthermore, by usingin situtwo-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure

  6. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, Nicole M; Godaliyadda, G M Dilshan P; Ye, Dong Hye; Kissick, David J; Zhang, Shijie; Newman, Justin A; Sheedlo, Michael J; Chowdhury, Azhad U; Fischetti, Robert F; Das, Chittaranjan; Buzzard, Gregery T; Bouman, Charles A; Simpson, Garth J

    2017-01-01

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction, significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Using in situ two-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure on the crystal by

  7. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning

    PubMed Central

    Scarborough, Nicole M.; Godaliyadda, G. M. Dilshan P.; Ye, Dong Hye; Kissick, David J.; Zhang, Shijie; Newman, Justin A.; Sheedlo, Michael J.; Chowdhury, Azhad U.; Fischetti, Robert F.; Das, Chittaranjan; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Bouman, Charles A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2017-01-01

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction, significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Using in situ two-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure on the crystal by

  8. Dynamic X-ray diffraction sampling for protein crystal positioning

    DOE PAGES

    Scarborough, Nicole M.; Godaliyadda, G. M. Dilshan P.; Ye, Dong Hye; ...

    2017-01-01

    A sparse supervised learning approach for dynamic sampling (SLADS) is described for dose reduction in diffraction-based protein crystal positioning. Crystal centering is typically a prerequisite for macromolecular diffraction at synchrotron facilities, with X-ray diffraction mapping growing in popularity as a mechanism for localization. In X-ray raster scanning, diffraction is used to identify the crystal positions based on the detection of Bragg-like peaks in the scattering patterns; however, this additional X-ray exposure may result in detectable damage to the crystal prior to data collection. Dynamic sampling, in which preceding measurements inform the next most information-rich location to probe for image reconstruction,more » significantly reduced the X-ray dose experienced by protein crystals during positioning by diffraction raster scanning. The SLADS algorithm implemented herein is designed for single-pixel measurements and can select a new location to measure. In each step of SLADS, the algorithm selects the pixel, which, when measured, maximizes the expected reduction in distortion given previous measurements. Ground-truth diffraction data were obtained for a 5 µm-diameter beam and SLADS reconstructed the image sampling 31% of the total volume and only 9% of the interior of the crystal greatly reducing the X-ray dosage on the crystal. Furthermore, by usingin situtwo-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy measurements as a surrogate for diffraction imaging with a 1 µm-diameter beam, the SLADS algorithm enabled image reconstruction from a 7% sampling of the total volume and 12% sampling of the interior of the crystal. When implemented into the beamline at Argonne National Laboratory, without ground-truth images, an acceptable reconstruction was obtained with 3% of the image sampled and approximately 5% of the crystal. The incorporation of SLADS into X-ray diffraction acquisitions has the potential to significantly minimize the impact of X-ray exposure

  9. Coherent X-ray diffraction from collagenous soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Wenger, Marco P E; Bean, Richard J; Bozec, Laurent; Horton, Michael A; Robinson, Ian K

    2009-09-08

    Coherent X-ray diffraction has been applied in the imaging of inorganic materials with great success. However, its application to biological specimens has been limited to some notable exceptions, due to the induced radiation damage and the extended nature of biological samples, the last limiting the application of most part of the phasing algorithms. X-ray ptychography, still under development, is a good candidate to overcome such difficulties and become a powerful imaging method for biology. We describe herein the feasibility of applying ptychography to the imaging of biological specimens, in particular collagen rich samples. We report here speckles in diffraction patterns from soft animal tissue, obtained with an optimized small angle X-ray setup that exploits the natural coherence of the beam. By phasing these patterns, dark field images of collagen within tendon, skin, bone, or cornea will eventually be obtained with a resolution of 60-70 nm. We present simulations of the contrast mechanism in collagen based on atomic force microscope images of the samples. Simulations confirmed the 'speckled' nature of the obtained diffraction patterns. Once inverted, the patterns will show the disposition and orientation of the fibers within the tissue, by enhancing the phase contrast between protein and no protein regions of the sample. Our work affords the application of the most innovative coherent X-ray diffraction tools to the study of biological specimens, and this approach will have a significant impact in biology and medicine because it overcomes many of the limits of current microscopy techniques.

  10. Efficient modeling of Bragg coherent x-ray nanobeam diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Holt, M. V.; Allain, M.; ...

    2015-07-02

    X-ray Bragg diffraction experiments that utilize tightly focused coherent beams produce complicated Bragg diffraction patterns that depend on scattering geometry, characteristics of the sample, and properties of the x-ray focusing optic. In this paper, we use a Fourier-transform-based method of modeling the 2D intensity distribution of a Bragg peak and apply it to the case of thin films illuminated with a Fresnel zone plate in three different Bragg scattering geometries. Finally, the calculations agree well with experimental coherent diffraction patterns, demonstrating that nanodiffraction patterns can be modeled at nonsymmetric Bragg conditions with this approach—a capability critical for advancing nanofocused x-raymore » diffraction microscopy.« less

  11. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando

    2014-03-15

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signalmore » from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.« less

  12. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Lawrence, Robert M.; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; ...

    2015-08-20

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ~700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ~40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is a pertinent step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  13. Resonance energy shifts during nuclear Bragg diffraction of x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, J.; Brown, G.S.; Brown, D.E.

    1989-10-09

    We have observed dramatic changes in the time distribution of synchrotron x rays resonantly scattered from {sup 57}Fe nuclei in a crystal of yttrium iron garnet, which depend on the deviation angle of the incident radiation from the Bragg angle. These changes are caused by small shifts in the effective energies of the hyperfine-split nuclear resonances, an effect of dynamical diffraction for the coherently excited nuclei in the crystal. The very high brightness of the synchro- tron x-ray source allows this effect to be observed in a 15-min measurement.

  14. Three-dimensional x-ray diffraction nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, Andrei Y.; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Muddle, Barry C.

    2008-08-01

    A novel approach to x-ray diffraction data analysis for non-destructive determination of the shape of nanoscale particles and clusters in three-dimensions is illustrated with representative examples of composite nanostructures. The technique is insensitive to the x-rays coherence, which allows 3D reconstruction of a modal image without tomographic synthesis and in-situ analysis of large (over a several cubic millimeters) volume of material with a spatial resolution of few nanometers, rendering the approach suitable for laboratory facilities.

  15. Enhancing resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Noh, Do Young; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong

    2016-12-14

    Achieving a resolution near 1 nm is a critical issue in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) for applications in materials and biology. Albeit with various advantages of CDI based on synchrotrons and newly developed x-ray free electron lasers, its applications would be limited without improving resolution well below 10 nm. Here, we review the issues and efforts in improving CDI resolution including various methods for resolution determination. Enhancing diffraction signal at large diffraction angles, with the aid of interference between neighboring strong scatterers or templates, is reviewed and discussed in terms of increasing signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, we discuss errors in image reconstruction algorithms-caused by the discreteness of the Fourier transformations involved-which degrade the spatial resolution, and suggest ways to correct them. We expect this review to be useful for applications of CDI in imaging weakly scattering soft matters using coherent x-ray sources including x-ray free electron lasers.

  16. MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction X-Ray Fluorescence (CheMin) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Blake, Dave; Harris, William; Morookian, John Michael; Randall, Dave; Reder, Leonard J.; Sarrazin, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Chemistry and Mineralogy Xray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) (CheMin) Instrument, an element of the landed Curiosity rover payload, which landed on Mars in August of 2012. The scientific goal of the MSL mission is to explore and quantitatively assess regions in Gale Crater as a potential habitat for life - past or present. The CheMin instrument will receive Martian rock and soil samples from the MSL Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system, and process it utilizing X-Ray spectroscopy methods to determine mineral composition. The Chemin instrument will analyze Martian soil and rocks to enable scientists to investigate geophysical processes occurring on Mars. The CheMin science objectives and proposed surface operations are described along with the CheMin hardware with an emphasis on the system engineering challenges associated with developing such a complex instrument.

  17. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, B. R., E-mail: maddox3@llnl.gov; Akin, M. C., E-mail: akin1@llnl.gov; Teruya, A.

    2016-08-15

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from themore » sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 7} molybdenum Kα photons.« less

  18. Incoherent Diffractive Imaging via Intensity Correlations of Hard X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, Anton; Ayyer, Kartik; Chapman, Henry N.; Röhlsberger, Ralf; von Zanthier, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    Established x-ray diffraction methods allow for high-resolution structure determination of crystals, crystallized protein structures, or even single molecules. While these techniques rely on coherent scattering, incoherent processes like fluorescence emission—often the predominant scattering mechanism—are generally considered detrimental for imaging applications. Here, we show that intensity correlations of incoherently scattered x-ray radiation can be used to image the full 3D arrangement of the scattering atoms with significantly higher resolution compared to conventional coherent diffraction imaging and crystallography, including additional three-dimensional information in Fourier space for a single sample orientation. We present a number of properties of incoherent diffractive imaging that are conceptually superior to those of coherent methods.

  19. Wavefront aberrations of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams.

    PubMed

    Liao, Keliang; Hong, Youli; Sheng, Weifan

    2014-10-01

    The effects of dynamical diffraction in x-ray diffractive optics with large numerical aperture render the wavefront aberrations difficult to describe using the aberration polynomials, yet knowledge of them plays an important role in a vast variety of scientific problems ranging from optical testing to adaptive optics. Although the diffraction theory of optical aberrations was established decades ago, its application in the area of x-ray dynamical diffraction theory (DDT) is still lacking. Here, we conduct a theoretical study on the aberration properties of x-ray dynamical diffraction beams. By treating the modulus of the complex envelope as the amplitude weight function in the orthogonalization procedure, we generalize the nonrecursive matrix method for the determination of orthonormal aberration polynomials, wherein Zernike DDT and Legendre DDT polynomials are proposed. As an example, we investigate the aberration evolution inside a tilted multilayer Laue lens. The corresponding Legendre DDT polynomials are obtained numerically, which represent balanced aberrations yielding minimum variance of the classical aberrations of an anamorphic optical system. The balancing of classical aberrations and their standard deviations are discussed. We also present the Strehl ratio of the primary and secondary balanced aberrations.

  20. Illicit drug detection using energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, E. J.; Griffiths, J. A.; Koutalonis, M.; Gent, C.; Pani, S.; Horrocks, J. A.; George, L.; Hardwick, S.; Speller, R.

    2009-05-01

    Illicit drugs are imported into countries in myriad ways, including via the postal system and courier services. An automated system is required to detect drugs in parcels for which X-ray diffraction is a suitable technique as it is non-destructive, material specific and uses X-rays of sufficiently high energy to penetrate parcels containing a range of attenuating materials. A database has been constructed containing the measured powder diffraction profiles of several thousand materials likely to be found in parcels. These include drugs, cutting agents, packaging and other innocuous materials. A software model has been developed using these data to predict the diffraction profiles which would be obtained by X-ray diffraction systems with a range of suggested detector (high purity germanium, CZT and scintillation), source and collimation options. The aim of the model was to identify the most promising system geometries, which was done with the aid of multivariate analysis (MVA). The most promising systems were constructed and tested. The diffraction profiles of a range of materials have been measured and used to both validate the model and to identify the presence of drugs in sample packages.

  1. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  2. X-ray Diffraction from Membrane Protein Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, M.S.; DePonte, D.P.; Shapiro, D.A.; Kirian, R.A.; Wang, X.; Starodub, D.; Marchesini, S.; Weierstall, U.; Doak, R.B.; Spence, J.C.H.; Fromme, P.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins constitute >30% of the proteins in an average cell, and yet the number of currently known structures of unique membrane proteins is <300. To develop new concepts for membrane protein structure determination, we have explored the serial nanocrystallography method, in which fully hydrated protein nanocrystals are delivered to an x-ray beam within a liquid jet at room temperature. As a model system, we have collected x-ray powder diffraction data from the integral membrane protein Photosystem I, which consists of 36 subunits and 381 cofactors. Data were collected from crystals ranging in size from 100 nm to 2 μm. The results demonstrate that there are membrane protein crystals that contain <100 unit cells (200 total molecules) and that 3D crystals of membrane proteins, which contain <200 molecules, may be suitable for structural investigation. Serial nanocrystallography overcomes the problem of x-ray damage, which is currently one of the major limitations for x-ray structure determination of small crystals. By combining serial nanocrystallography with x-ray free-electron laser sources in the future, it may be possible to produce molecular-resolution electron-density maps using membrane protein crystals that contain only a few hundred or thousand unit cells. PMID:21190672

  3. Discovery and development of x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yeuncheol; Yin, Ming; Datta, Timir

    2013-03-01

    In 1912 Max Laue at University of Munich reasoned x-rays to be short wavelength electromagnetic waves and figured interference would occur when scattered off crystals. Arnold Sommerfeld, W. Wien, Ewald and others, raised objections to Laue's idea, but soon Walter Friedrich succeeded in recording x-ray interference patterns off copper sulfate crystals. But the Laue-Ewald's 3-dimensional formula predicted excess spots. Fewer spots were observed. William Lawrence Bragg then 22 year old studying at Cambridge University heard the Munich results from father William Henry Brag, physics professor at Univ of Leeds. Lawrence figured the spots are 2-d interference of x-ray wavelets reflecting off successive atomic planes and derived a simple eponymous equation, the Bragg equation d*sin(theta) = n*lamda. 1913 onward the Braggs dominated the crystallography. Max Laue was awarded the physics Nobel in 1914 and the Braggs shared the same in 1915. Starting with Rontgen's first ever prize in 1901, the importance of x-ray techniques is evident from the four out of a total 16 physics Nobels between 1901-1917. We will outline the historical back ground and importance of x-ray diffraction giving rise to techniques that even in 2013, remain work horses in laboratories all over the globe.

  4. Coherent X-ray diffraction from collagenous soft tissues

    PubMed Central

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Wenger, Marco P. E.; Bean, Richard J.; Bozec, Laurent; Horton, Michael A.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2009-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction has been applied in the imaging of inorganic materials with great success. However, its application to biological specimens has been limited to some notable exceptions, due to the induced radiation damage and the extended nature of biological samples, the last limiting the application of most part of the phasing algorithms. X-ray ptychography, still under development, is a good candidate to overcome such difficulties and become a powerful imaging method for biology. We describe herein the feasibility of applying ptychography to the imaging of biological specimens, in particular collagen rich samples. We report here speckles in diffraction patterns from soft animal tissue, obtained with an optimized small angle X-ray setup that exploits the natural coherence of the beam. By phasing these patterns, dark field images of collagen within tendon, skin, bone, or cornea will eventually be obtained with a resolution of 60–70 nm. We present simulations of the contrast mechanism in collagen based on atomic force microscope images of the samples. Simulations confirmed the ‘speckled’ nature of the obtained diffraction patterns. Once inverted, the patterns will show the disposition and orientation of the fibers within the tissue, by enhancing the phase contrast between protein and no protein regions of the sample. Our work affords the application of the most innovative coherent X-ray diffraction tools to the study of biological specimens, and this approach will have a significant impact in biology and medicine because it overcomes many of the limits of current microscopy techniques. PMID:19706395

  5. Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah FORGE X-Ray Diffraction Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nash, Greg; Jones, Clay

    2018-02-07

    This dataset contains X-ray diffraction (XRD) data taken from wells and outcrops as part of the DOE GTO supported Utah FORGE project located near Roosevelt Hot Springs. It contains an Excel spreadsheet with the XRD data, a text file with sample site names, types, and locations in UTM, Zone 12, NAD83 coordinates, and a GIS shapefile of the sample locations with attributes.

  6. X-ray diffraction microscopy on frozen hydrated specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Johanna

    X-rays are excellent for imaging thick samples at high resolution because of their large penetration depth compared to electrons and their short wavelength relative to visible light. To image biological material, the absorption contrast of soft X-rays, especially between the carbon and oxygen K-shell absorption edges, can be utilized to give high contrast, high resolution images without the need for stains or labels. Because of radiation damage and the desire for high resolution tomography, live cell imaging is not feasible. However, cells can be frozen in vitrified ice, which reduces the effect of radiation damage while maintaining their natural hydrated state. X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is an imaging technique which eliminates the limitations imposed by current focusing optics simply by removing them entirely. Far-field coherent diffraction intensity patterns are collected on a pixelated detector allowing every scattered photon to be collected within the limits of the detector's efficiency and physical size. An iterative computer algorithm is then used to invert the diffraction intensity into a real space image with both absorption and phase information. This technique transfers the emphasis away from fabrication and alignment of optics, and towards data processing. We have used this method to image a pair of freeze-dried, immuno-labeled yeast cells to the highest resolution (13 nm) yet obtained for a whole eukaryotic cell. We discuss successes and challenges in working with frozen hydrated specimens and efforts aimed at high resolution imaging of vitrified eukaryotic cells in 3D.

  7. Neutron and X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Advanced Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Tiley, Jaimie; Wang, Yandong

    2010-01-01

    The selection of articles in the special topic 'Neutron and X-Ray Studies of Advanced Materials' is based on the materials presented during the TMS 2009 annual meeting in San Francisco, CA, February 15-19, 2009. The development of ultrabrilliant third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources, together with advances in X-ray optics, has created intense X-ray microbeams, which provide the best opportunities for in-depth understanding of mechanical behavior in a broad spectrum of materials. Important applications include ultrasensitive elemental detection by X-ray fluorescence/absorption and microdiffraction to identify phase and strain with submicrometer spatial resolution. X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly exciting application compared with alternativemore » probes of crystalline structure, orientation, and strain. X-ray microdiffraction is nondestructive with good strain resolution, competitive or superior spatial resolution in thick samples, and with the ability to probe below the sample surface. Moreover, the high-energy X-ray diffraction technique provides an effective tool for characterizing the mechanical and functional behavior in various environments (temperature, stress, and magnetic field). At the same time, some neutron diffraction instruments constructed mainly for the purpose of engineering applications can be found at nearly all neutron facilities. The first generation-dedicated instruments designed for studying in-situ mechanical behavior have been commissioned and used, and industrial standards for reliable and repeatable measurements have been developed. Furthermore, higher penetration of neutron beams into most engineering materials provides direct measurements on the distribution of various stresses (i.e., types I, II, and III) beneath the surface up to several millimeters, even tens of millimeters for important industrial components. With X-ray and neutron measurements, it is possible to characterize material behavior at different length

  8. Fabricating Blazed Diffraction Gratings by X-Ray Lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis; Hartley, Frank; Wilson, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Gray-scale x-ray lithography is undergoing development as a technique for fabricating blazed diffraction gratings. As such, gray-scale x-ray lithography now complements such other grating-fabrication techniques as mechanical ruling, holography, ion etching, laser ablation, laser writing, and electron-beam lithography. Each of these techniques offers advantages and disadvantages for implementing specific grating designs; no single one of these techniques can satisfy the design requirements for all applications. Gray-scale x-ray lithography is expected to be advantageous for making gratings on steeper substrates than those that can be made by electron-beam lithography. This technique is not limited to sawtooth groove profiles and flat substrates: various groove profiles can be generated on arbitrarily shaped (including highly curved) substrates with the same ease as sawtooth profiles can be generated on flat substrates. Moreover, the gratings fabricated by this technique can be made free of ghosts (spurious diffraction components attributable to small spurious periodicities in the locations of grooves). The first step in gray-scale x-ray lithography is to conformally coat a substrate with a suitable photoresist. An x-ray mask (see Figure 1) is generated, placed between the substrate and a source of collimated x-rays, and scanned over the substrate so as to create a spatial modulation in the exposure of the photoresist. Development of the exposed photoresist results in a surface corrugation that corresponds to the spatial modulation and that defines the grating surface. The grating pattern is generated by scanning an appropriately shaped x-ray area mask along the substrate. The mask example of Figure 1 would generate a blazed grating profile when scanned in the perpendicular direction at constant speed, assuming the photoresist responds linearly to incident radiation. If the resist response is nonlinear, then the mask shape can be modified to account for the

  9. Diffraction effects on angular response of X-ray collimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.; Barrus, D. M.; Fenimore, E.

    1976-01-01

    Angular responses have been measured for X-ray collimators with half-widths ranging from minutes of arc down to 10 arcsec. In the seconds-of-arc range, diffraction peaks at off-axis angles can masquerade as side lobes of the collimator angular response. Measurements and qualitative physical arguments lead to a rule of thumb for collimator design; namely, the angle of first minimum in the Fraunhofer single-slit diffraction pattern should be less than one-fourth of the collimator geometrical full-width at half-maximum intensity.

  10. Borman effect in resonant diffraction of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshko, A. P.

    2013-08-01

    A dynamic theory of resonant diffraction (occurring when the energy of incident radiation is close to the energy of the absorption edge of an element in the composition of a given substance) of synchronous X-rays is developed in the two-wave approximation in the coplanar Laue geometry for large grazing angles in perfect crystals. A sharp decrease in the absorption coefficient in the substance with simultaneously satisfied diffraction conditions (Borman effect) is demonstrated, and the theoretical and first experimental results are compared. The calculations reveal the possibility of applying this approach in analyzing the quadrupole-quadrupole contribution to the absorption coefficient.

  11. Diffraction enhanced kinetic depth X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, A.

    An increasing number of fields would benefit from a single analytical probe that can characterise bulk objects that vary in morphology and/or material composition. These fields include security screening, medicine and material science. In this study the X-ray region is shown to be an effective probe for the characterisation of materials. The most prominent analytical techniques that utilise X-radiation are reviewed. The study then focuses on methods of amalgamating the three dimensional power of kinetic depth X-ray (KDFX) imaging with the materials discrimination of angular dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), thus providing KDEX with a much needed material specific counterpart. A knowledge of the sample position is essential for the correct interpretation of diffraction signatures. Two different sensor geometries (i.e. circumferential and linear) that are able to collect end interpret multiple unknown material diffraction patterns and attribute them to their respective loci within an inspection volume are investigated. The circumferential and linear detector geometries are hypothesised, simulated and then tested in an experimental setting with the later demonstrating a greater ability at discerning between mixed diffraction patterns produced by differing materials. Factors known to confound the linear diffraction method such as sample thickness and radiation energy have been explored and quantified with a possible means of mitigation being identified (i.e. via increasing the sample to detector distance). A series of diffraction patterns (following the linear diffraction approach) were obtained from a single phantom object that was simultaneously interrogated via KDEX imaging. Areas containing diffraction signatures matched from a threat library have been highlighted in the KDEX imagery via colour encoding and match index is inferred by intensity. This union is the first example of its kind and is called diffraction enhanced KDEX imagery. Finally an additional

  12. X-ray diffraction from nonuniformly stretched helical molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prodanovic, Momcilo; Irving, Thomas C.; Mijailovich, Srboljub M.

    2016-04-18

    The fibrous proteins in living cells are exposed to mechanical forces interacting with other subcellular structures. X-ray fiber diffraction is often used to assess deformation and movement of these proteins, but the analysis has been limited to the theory for fibrous molecular systems that exhibit helical symmetry. However, this approach cannot adequately interpret X-ray data from fibrous protein assemblies where the local strain varies along the fiber length owing to interactions of its molecular constituents with their binding partners. To resolve this problem a theoretical formulism has been developed for predicting the diffraction from individual helical molecular structures nonuniformly strainedmore » along their lengths. This represents a critical first step towards modeling complex dynamical systems consisting of multiple helical structures using spatially explicit, multi-scale Monte Carlo simulations where predictions are compared with experimental data in a `forward' process to iteratively generate ever more realistic models. Here the effects of nonuniform strains and the helix length on the resulting magnitude and phase of diffraction patterns are quantitatively assessed. Examples of the predicted diffraction patterns of nonuniformly deformed double-stranded DNA and actin filaments in contracting muscle are presented to demonstrate the feasibly of this theoretical approach.« less

  13. Soft x-ray coherent diffraction imaging on magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Lee, James; Mishra, Shrawan; Parks, Daniel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shapiro, David; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Steve; Stxm Team At Als Collaboration; Soft X-Ray Microscopy Group At Als Collaboration; Soft X-ray scattering at ALS, LBL Team

    2014-03-01

    Coherent soft X-rays diffraction imaging enable coherent magnetic resonance scattering at transition metal L-edge to be probed so that magnetic domains could be imaged with very high spatial resolution with phase contrast, reaching sub-10nm. One of the overwhelming advantages of using coherent X-rays is the ability to resolve phase contrast images with linearly polarized light with both phase and absorption contrast comparing to real-space imaging, which can only be studied with circularly polarized light with absorption contrast only. Here we report our first results on high-resolution of magnetic domains imaging of CoPd multilayer thin film with coherent soft X-ray ptychography method. We are aiming to resolve and understand magnetic domain wall structures with the highest obtainable resolution here at Advanced Light Source. In principle types of magnetic domain walls could be studied so that Neel or Bloch walls can be distinguished by imaging. This work at LBNL was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy (contract no. DE-AC02- 05CH11231).

  14. Diamond-anvil cell for radial x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Chesnut, G N; Schiferl, D; Streetman, B D; Anderson, W W

    2006-06-28

    We have designed a new diamond-anvil cell capable of radial x-ray diffraction to pressures of a few hundred GPa. The diffraction geometry allows access to multiple angles of Ψ, which is the angle between each reciprocal lattice vector g(hkl) and the compression axis of the cell. At the 'magic angle', Ψ≈54.7°, the effects of deviatoric stresses on the interplanar spacings, d(hkl), are significantly reduced. Because the systematic errors, which are different for each d(hkl), are significantly reduced, the crystal structures and the derived equations of state can be determined reliably. At other values of Ψ, the effects of deviatoric stresses on the diffraction pattern could eventually be used to determine elastic constants.

  15. X-ray diffraction studies of shocked lunar analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanss, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction experiments on shocked rock and mineral analogs of particular significance to lunar geology are described. Materials naturally shocked by meteorite impact, nuclear-shocked, or artificially shocked in a flat plate accelerator were utilized. Four areas were outlined for investigation: powder diffractometer studies of shocked single crystal silicate minerals (quartz, orthoclase, oligoclase, pyroxene), powder diffractometer studies of shocked polycrystalline monomineralic samples (dunite), Debye-Scherrer studies of single grains of shocked granodiorite, and powder diffractometer studies of shocked whole rock samples. Quantitative interpretation of peak shock pressures experienced by materials found in lunar or terrestrial impact structures is presented.

  16. Ultrafast molecular processes mapped by femtosecond x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaesser, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    X-ray diffraction with a femtosecond time resolution allows for mapping photoinduced structural dynamics on the length scale of a chemical bond and in the time domain of atomic and molecular motion. In a pump-probe approach, a femtosecond excitation pulse induces structural changes which are probed by diffracting a femtosecond hard x-ray pulse from the excited sample. The transient angular positions and intensities of diffraction peaks give insight into the momentary atomic or molecular positions and into the distribution of electronic charge density. The simultaneous measurement of changes on different diffraction peaks is essential for determining atom positions and charge density maps with high accuracy. Recent progress in the generation of ultrashort hard x-ray pulses (Cu Kα, wavelength λ=0.154 nm) in laser-driven plasma sources has led to the implementation of the powder diffraction and the rotating crystal method with a time resolution of 100 fs. In this contribution, we report new results from powder diffraction studies of molecular materials. A first series of experiments gives evidence of a so far unknown concerted transfer of electrons and protons in ammonium sulfate [(NH4)2SO4], a centrosymmetric structure. Charge transfer from the sulfate groups results in the sub-100 fs generation of a confined electron channel along the c-axis of the unit cell which is stabilized by transferring protons from the adjacent ammonium groups into the channel. Time-dependent charge density maps display a periodic modulation of the channel's charge density by low-frequency lattice motions with a concerted electron and proton motion between the channel and the initial proton binding site. A second study addresses atomic rearrangements and charge dislocations in the non-centrosymmetric potassium dihydrogen phosphate [KH2PO4, KDP]. Photoexcitation generates coherent low-frequency motions along the LO and TO phonon coordinates, leaving the average atomic positions unchanged

  17. Diffractive-refractive optics: X-ray splitter.

    PubMed

    Hrdý, Jaromír

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of splitting a thin (e.g. undulator) X-ray beam based on diffraction-refraction effects is discussed. The beam is diffracted from a crystal whose diffracting surface has the shape of a roof with the ridge lying in the plane of diffraction. The crystal is cut asymmetrically. One half of the beam impinges on the left-hand part of the roof and the other half impinges on the right-hand side of the roof. Owing to refraction the left part of the beam is deviated to the left whereas the right part is deviated to the right. The device proposed consists of two channel-cut crystals with roof-like diffraction surfaces; the crystals are set in a dispersive position. The separation of the beams after splitting is calculated at a distance of 10 m from the crystals for various asymmetry and inclination angles. It is shown that such a splitting may be utilized for long beamlines. Advantages and disadvantages of this method are discussed.

  18. A new theory for X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Fewster, Paul F

    2014-05-01

    This article proposes a new theory of X-ray scattering that has particular relevance to powder diffraction. The underlying concept of this theory is that the scattering from a crystal or crystallite is distributed throughout space: this leads to the effect that enhanced scatter can be observed at the `Bragg position' even if the `Bragg condition' is not satisfied. The scatter from a single crystal or crystallite, in any fixed orientation, has the fascinating property of contributing simultaneously to many `Bragg positions'. It also explains why diffraction peaks are obtained from samples with very few crystallites, which cannot be explained with the conventional theory. The intensity ratios for an Si powder sample are predicted with greater accuracy and the temperature factors are more realistic. Another consequence is that this new theory predicts a reliability in the intensity measurements which agrees much more closely with experimental observations compared to conventional theory that is based on `Bragg-type' scatter. The role of dynamical effects (extinction etc.) is discussed and how they are suppressed with diffuse scattering. An alternative explanation for the Lorentz factor is presented that is more general and based on the capture volume in diffraction space. This theory, when applied to the scattering from powders, will evaluate the full scattering profile, including peak widths and the `background'. The theory should provide an increased understanding of the reliability of powder diffraction measurements, and may also have wider implications for the analysis of powder diffraction data, by increasing the accuracy of intensities predicted from structural models.

  19. An image focusing means by using an opaque object to diffract x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.; Weaver, H. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for focusing and imaging x-rays. An opaque sphere is used as a diffractive imaging element to diffract x-rays from an object so that the divergent x-ray wavefronts are transformed into convergent wavefronts and are brought to focus to form an image of the object with a large depth of field.

  20. Characterization of X-Ray Diffraction System with a Microfocus X-Ray Source and a Polycapillary Optic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Marshall, Joy K.; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor

    2000-01-01

    We present here an optimized microfocus x-ray source and polycapillary optic system designed for diffraction of small protein crystals. The x-ray beam is formed by a 5.5mm focal length capillary collimator coupled with a 40 micron x-ray source operating at 46Watts. Measurements of the x-ray flux, the divergence and the spectral characteristics of the beam are presented, This optimized system provides a seven fold greater flux than our recently reported configuration [M. Gubarev, et al., J. of Applied Crystallography (2000) 33, in press]. We now make a comparison with a 5kWatts rotating anode generator (Rigaku) coupled with confocal multilayer focusing mirrors (Osmic, CMF12- 38Cu6). The microfocus x-ray source and polycapillary collimator system delivers 60% of the x-ray flux from the rotating anode system. Additional ways to improve our microfocus x-ray system, and thus increase the x-ray flux will be discussed.

  1. Simultaneous X-ray fluorescence and scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron XFM beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Michael W. M.; Phillips, Nicholas W.; van Riessen, Grant A.

    2016-08-11

    Owing to its extreme sensitivity, quantitative mapping of elemental distributionsviaX-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) has become a key microanalytical technique. The recent realisation of scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXDM) meanwhile provides an avenue for quantitative super-resolved ultra-structural visualization. The similarity of their experimental geometries indicates excellent prospects for simultaneous acquisition. Here, in both step- and fly-scanning modes, robust, simultaneous XFM-SXDM is demonstrated.

  2. The first X-ray diffraction measurements on Mars.

    PubMed

    Bish, David; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Sarrazin, Philippe; Bristow, Thomas; Achilles, Cherie; Dera, Przemyslaw; Chipera, Steve; Crisp, Joy; Downs, R T; Farmer, Jack; Gailhanou, Marc; Ming, Doug; Morookian, John Michael; Morris, Richard; Morrison, Shaunna; Rampe, Elizabeth; Treiman, Allan; Yen, Albert

    2014-11-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory landed in Gale crater on Mars in August 2012, and the Curiosity rover then began field studies on its drive toward Mount Sharp, a central peak made of ancient sediments. CheMin is one of ten instruments on or inside the rover, all designed to provide detailed information on the rocks, soils and atmosphere in this region. CheMin is a miniaturized X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) instrument that uses transmission geometry with an energy-discriminating CCD detector. CheMin uses onboard standards for XRD and XRF calibration, and beryl:quartz mixtures constitute the primary XRD standards. Four samples have been analysed by CheMin, namely a soil sample, two samples drilled from mudstones and a sample drilled from a sandstone. Rietveld and full-pattern analysis of the XRD data reveal a complex mineralogy, with contributions from parent igneous rocks, amorphous components and several minerals relating to aqueous alteration. In particular, the mudstone samples all contain one or more phyllosilicates consistent with alteration in liquid water. In addition to quantitative mineralogy, Rietveld refinements also provide unit-cell parameters for the major phases, which can be used to infer the chemical compositions of individual minerals and, by difference, the composition of the amorphous component.

  3. Acemetacin cocrystal structures by powder X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Bolla, Geetha; Chernyshev, Vladimir; Nangia, Ashwini

    2017-05-01

    Cocrystals of acemetacin drug (ACM) with nicotinamide (NAM), p -aminobenzoic acid (PABA), valerolactam (VLM) and 2-pyridone (2HP) were prepared by melt crystallization and their X-ray crystal structures determined by high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction. The powerful technique of structure determination from powder data (SDPD) provided details of molecular packing and hydrogen bonding in pharmaceutical cocrystals of acemetacin. ACM-NAM occurs in anhydrate and hydrate forms, whereas the other structures crystallized in a single crystalline form. The carboxylic acid group of ACM forms theacid-amide dimer three-point synthon R 3 2 (9) R 2 2 (8) R 3 2 (9) with three different syn amides (VLM, 2HP and caprolactam). The conformations of the ACM molecule observed in the crystal structures differ mainly in the mutual orientation of chlorobenzene fragment and the neighboring methyl group, being anti (type I) or syn (type II). ACM hydrate, ACM-NAM, ACM-NAM-hydrate and the piperazine salt of ACM exhibit the type I conformation, whereas ACM polymorphs and other cocrystals adopt the ACM type II conformation. Hydrogen-bond interactions in all the crystal structures were quantified by calculating their molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces. Hirshfeld surface analysis of the cocrystal surfaces shows that about 50% of the contribution is due to a combination of strong and weak O⋯H, N⋯H, Cl⋯H and C⋯H interactions. The physicochemical properties of these cocrystals are under study.

  4. Acemetacin cocrystal structures by powder X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Bolla, Geetha

    2017-01-01

    Cocrystals of acemetacin drug (ACM) with nicotinamide (NAM), p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), valerolactam (VLM) and 2-pyridone (2HP) were prepared by melt crystallization and their X-ray crystal structures determined by high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction. The powerful technique of structure determination from powder data (SDPD) provided details of molecular packing and hydrogen bonding in pharmaceutical cocrystals of acemetacin. ACM–NAM occurs in anhydrate and hydrate forms, whereas the other structures crystallized in a single crystalline form. The carboxylic acid group of ACM forms theacid–amide dimer three-point synthon R 3 2(9)R 2 2(8)R 3 2(9) with three different syn amides (VLM, 2HP and caprolactam). The conformations of the ACM molecule observed in the crystal structures differ mainly in the mutual orientation of chlorobenzene fragment and the neighboring methyl group, being anti (type I) or syn (type II). ACM hydrate, ACM—NAM, ACM–NAM-hydrate and the piperazine salt of ACM exhibit the type I conformation, whereas ACM polymorphs and other cocrystals adopt the ACM type II conformation. Hydrogen-bond interactions in all the crystal structures were quantified by calculating their molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces. Hirshfeld surface analysis of the cocrystal surfaces shows that about 50% of the contribution is due to a combination of strong and weak O⋯H, N⋯H, Cl⋯H and C⋯H interactions. The physicochemical properties of these cocrystals are under study. PMID:28512568

  5. Biological imaging by soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, David

    We have developed a microscope for soft x-ray diffraction imaging of dry or frozen hydrated biological specimens. This lensless imaging system does not suffer from the resolution or specimen thickness limitations that other short wavelength microscopes experience. The microscope, currently situated at beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source, can collect diffraction data to 12 nm resolution with 750 eV photons and 17 nm resolution with 520 eV photons. The specimen can be rotated with a precision goniometer through an angle of 160 degrees allowing for the collection of nearly complete three-dimensional diffraction data. The microscope is fully computer controlled through a graphical user interface and a scripting language automates the collection of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional data. Diffraction data from a freeze-dried dwarf yeast cell, Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying the CLN3-1 mutation, was collected to 12 run resolution from 8 specimen orientations spanning a total rotation of 8 degrees. The diffraction data was phased using the difference map algorithm and the reconstructions provide real space images of the cell to 30 nm resolution from each of the orientations. The agreement of the different reconstructions provides confidence in the recovered, and previously unknown, structure and indicates the three dimensionality of the cell. This work represents the first imaging of the natural complex refractive contrast from a whole unstained cell by the diffraction microscopy method and has achieved a resolution superior to lens based x-ray tomographic reconstructions of similar specimens. Studies of the effects of exposure to large radiation doses were also carried out. It was determined that the freeze-dried cell suffers from an initial collapse, which is followed by a uniform, but slow, shrinkage. This structural damage to the cell is not accompanied by a diminished ability to see small features in the specimen. Preliminary measurements on frozen

  6. Parts per Million Powder X-ray Diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Justin A.; Schmitt, Paul D.; Toth, Scott J.; ...

    2015-10-14

    Here in this paper we demonstrate the use of second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy-guided synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) for the detection of trace crystalline active pharmaceutical ingredients in a common polymer blend. The combined instrument is capable of detecting 100 ppm crystalline ritonavir in an amorphous hydroxypropyl methylcellulose matrix with a high signal-to-noise ratio (>5000). The high spatial resolution afforded by SHG microscopy allows for the use of a minibeam collimator to reduce the total volume of material probed by synchrotron PXRD. The reduction in probed volume results in reduced background from amorphous material. The ability to detect lowmore » crystalline loading has the potential to improve measurements in the formulation pipeline for pharmaceutical solid dispersions, for which even trace quantities of crystalline active ingredients can negatively impact the stability and bioavailability of the final drug product.« less

  7. Powder X-ray diffraction laboratory, Reston, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Dulong, Frank T.; Jackson, John C.; Folger, Helen W.

    2014-01-01

    The powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) laboratory is managed jointly by the Eastern Mineral and Environmental Resources and Eastern Energy Resources Science Centers. Laboratory scientists collaborate on a wide variety of research problems involving other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science centers and government agencies, universities, and industry. Capabilities include identification and quantification of crystalline and amorphous phases, and crystallographic and atomic structure analysis for a wide variety of sample media. Customized laboratory procedures and analyses commonly are used to characterize non-routine samples including, but not limited to, organic and inorganic components in petroleum source rocks, ore and mine waste, clay minerals, and glassy phases. Procedures can be adapted to meet a variety of research objectives.

  8. Automated X-Ray Diffraction of Irradiated Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rodman, John; Lin, Yuewei; Sprouster, David; ...

    2017-10-26

    Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) and small-angle Xray scattering (SAXS) characterization techniques used on unirradiated and irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels yield large amounts of data. Machine learning techniques, including PCA, offer a novel method of analyzing and visualizing these large data sets in order to determine the effects of chemistry and irradiation conditions on the formation of radiation induced precipitates. In order to run analysis on these data sets, preprocessing must be carried out to convert the data to a usable format and mask the 2-D detector images to account for experimental variations. Once the data has been preprocessed, itmore » can be organized and visualized using principal component analysis (PCA), multi-dimensional scaling, and k-means clustering. In conclusion, from these techniques, it is shown that sample chemistry has a notable effect on the formation of the radiation induced precipitates in reactor pressure vessel steels.« less

  9. Preparation and X-ray diffraction studies of curium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. K.; Haire, R. G.

    1985-10-01

    Curium hydrides were prepared by reaction of curium-248 metal with hydrogen and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. Several of the syntheses resulted in a hexagonal compound with average lattice parameters of a0 = 0.3769(8) nm and c0 = 0.6732(12) nm. These products are considered to be CmH 3-δ by analogy with the behavior of lanthanide-hydrogen and lighter actinide-hydrogen systems. Face-centered cubic products with an average lattice parameter of a0 = 0.5322(4) nm were obtained from other curium hydride preparations. This parameter is slightly smaller than that reported previously for cubic curium dihydride, CmH 2+ x (B. M. Bansal and D. Damien, Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Lett., 6, 603, 1970). The present results established a continuation of typical heavy trivalent lanthanide-like behavior of the transuranium actinide-hydrogen systems through curium.

  10. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  11. Planar techniques for fabricating X-ray diffraction gratings and zone plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. I.; Anderson, E. H.; Hawryluk, A. M.; Schattenburg, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The state of current planar techniques in the fabrication of Fresnel zone plates and diffraction gratings is reviewed. Among the fabrication techniques described are multilayer resist techniques; scanning electron beam lithography; and holographic lithography. Consideration is also given to: X-ray lithography; ion beam lithography; and electroplating. SEM photographs of the undercut profiles obtained in a type AZ 135OB photoresistor by holographic lithography are provided.

  12. X-ray diffraction and X-ray standing-wave study of the lead stearate film structure

    SciTech Connect

    Blagov, A. E.; Dyakova, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2016-05-15

    A new approach to the study of the structural quality of crystals is proposed. It is based on the use of X-ray standing-wave method without measuring secondary processes and considers the multiwave interaction of diffraction reflections corresponding to different harmonics of the same crystallographic reflection. A theory of multiwave X-ray diffraction is developed to calculate the rocking curves in the X-ray diffraction scheme under consideration for a long-period quasi-one-dimensional crystal. This phase-sensitive method is used to study the structure of a multilayer lead stearate film on a silicon substrate. Some specific structural features are revealed for the surface layer ofmore » the thin film, which are most likely due to the tilt of the upper layer molecules with respect to the external normal to the film surface.« less

  13. A new theory for X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fewster, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a new theory of X-ray scattering that has particular relevance to powder diffraction. The underlying concept of this theory is that the scattering from a crystal or crystallite is distributed throughout space: this leads to the effect that enhanced scatter can be observed at the ‘Bragg position’ even if the ‘Bragg condition’ is not satisfied. The scatter from a single crystal or crystallite, in any fixed orientation, has the fascinating property of contributing simultaneously to many ‘Bragg positions’. It also explains why diffraction peaks are obtained from samples with very few crystallites, which cannot be explained with the conventional theory. The intensity ratios for an Si powder sample are predicted with greater accuracy and the temperature factors are more realistic. Another consequence is that this new theory predicts a reliability in the intensity measurements which agrees much more closely with experimental observations compared to conventional theory that is based on ‘Bragg-type’ scatter. The role of dynamical effects (extinction etc.) is discussed and how they are suppressed with diffuse scattering. An alternative explanation for the Lorentz factor is presented that is more general and based on the capture volume in diffraction space. This theory, when applied to the scattering from powders, will evaluate the full scattering profile, including peak widths and the ‘background’. The theory should provide an increased understanding of the reliability of powder diffraction measurements, and may also have wider implications for the analysis of powder diffraction data, by increasing the accuracy of intensities predicted from structural models. PMID:24815975

  14. Micro X-ray diffraction analysis of thin films using grazing-exit conditions.

    PubMed

    Noma, T; Iida, A

    1998-05-01

    An X-ray diffraction technique using a hard X-ray microbeam for thin-film analysis has been developed. To optimize the spatial resolution and the surface sensitivity, the X-ray microbeam strikes the sample surface at a large glancing angle while the diffracted X-ray signal is detected with a small (grazing) exit angle. Kirkpatrick-Baez optics developed at the Photon Factory were used, in combination with a multilayer monochromator, for focusing X-rays. The focused beam size was about 10 x 10 micro m. X-ray diffraction patterns of Pd, Pt and their layered structure were measured. Using a small exit angle, the signal-to-background ratio was improved due to a shallow escape depth. Under the grazing-exit condition, the refraction effect of diffracted X-rays was observed, indicating the possibility of surface sensitivity.

  15. Detecting rare, abnormally large grains by x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Boyce, Brad L.; Furnish, Timothy Allen; Padilla, H. A.; ...

    2015-07-16

    Bimodal grain structures are common in many alloys, arising from a number of different causes including incomplete recrystallization and abnormal grain growth. These bimodal grain structures have important technological implications, such as the well-known Goss texture which is now a cornerstone for electrical steels. Yet our ability to detect bimodal grain distributions is largely confined to brute force cross-sectional metallography. The present study presents a new method for rapid detection of unusually large grains embedded in a sea of much finer grains. Traditional X-ray diffraction-based grain size measurement techniques such as Scherrer, Williamson–Hall, or Warren–Averbach rely on peak breadth andmore » shape to extract information regarding the average crystallite size. However, these line broadening techniques are not well suited to identify a very small fraction of abnormally large grains. The present method utilizes statistically anomalous intensity spikes in the Bragg peak to identify regions where abnormally large grains are contributing to diffraction. This needle-in-a-haystack technique is demonstrated on a nanocrystalline Ni–Fe alloy which has undergone fatigue-induced abnormal grain growth. In this demonstration, the technique readily identifies a few large grains that occupy <0.00001 % of the interrogation volume. Finally, while the technique is demonstrated in the current study on nanocrystalline metal, it would likely apply to any bimodal polycrystal including ultrafine grained and fine microcrystalline materials with sufficiently distinct bimodal grain statistics.« less

  16. Sequential x-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM x-ray optics testing beamline at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Stoupin, Stanislav, E-mail: sstoupin@aps.anl.gov; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Trakhtenberg, Emil

    2016-07-27

    We report progress on implementation and commissioning of sequential X-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM Optics Testing Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source to accommodate growing needs of strain characterization in diffractive crystal optics and other semiconductor single crystals. The setup enables evaluation of strain in single crystals in the nearly-nondispersive double-crystal geometry. Si asymmetric collimator crystals of different crystallographic orientations were designed, fabricated and characterized using in-house capabilities. Imaging the exit beam using digital area detectors permits rapid sequential acquisition of X-ray topographs at different angular positions on the rocking curve of a crystal under investigation. Results on sensitivity andmore » spatial resolution are reported based on experiments with high-quality Si and diamond crystals. The new setup complements laboratory-based X-ray topography capabilities of the Optics group at the Advanced Photon Source.« less

  17. X-ray Diffraction Study of Molybdenum to 900 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Coppari, F.; Smith, R.; Eggert, J.; Boehly, T.; Collins, G. W.; Duffy, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a transition metal that is important as a high-pressure standard. Its equation of state, structure, and melting behavior have been explored extensively in both experimental and theoretical studies. Melting data up to the Mbar pressure region from static compression experiments in the diamond anvil cell [Errandonea et al. 2004] are inconsistent with shock wave sound velocity measurements [Hixson et al., 1989]. There are also conflicting reports as to whether body-centered cubic (BCC) Mo transforms to a face-centered cubic (FCC), hexagonal close packed (HCP) or double hexagonal close packed (DHCP) structure at either high pressure or high pressure and temperature conditions [Belonoshko et al. 2008, Mikhaylushkin et al., 2008 and Cazorla et al., 2008]. Recently, a phase transition from BCC to the DHCP phase at 660 GPa and 0 K was predicted using the particle swam optimization (PSO) method (Wang et al, 2013). Here we report an x-ray diffraction study of dynamically compressed molybdenum. Experiments were conducted using the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Mo targets were either ramp or shock compressed using a laser drive. In ramp loading, the sample is compressed sufficiently slowly that a shock wave does not form. This results in lower temperatures, keeping the sample in the solid state to higher pressures. X-ray diffraction measurements were performed using quasi-monochromatic x-rays from a highly ionized He-α Cu source and image plate detectors. Upon ramp compression, we found no evidence of phase transition in solid Mo up to 900 GPa. The observed peaks can be assigned to the (110) and (200) or (220) reflections of BCC Mo up to the highest pressure, indicating that Mo does not melt under ramp loading to maximum pressure reached. Under shock loading, we did not observe any evidence for the solid-solid phase transformation around 210 GPa as reported in previous work (Hixson et al, 1989). The BCC

  18. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  19. THE EFFECT OF SATELLITE LINES FROM THE X-RAY SOURCE ON X-RAY DIFFRACTION PEAKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses the development of a method for relating reactivity to crystallite size and strain parameters obtained by the Warren-Averbach technique. EPA has been using crystallite size and strain data obtained from x-ray diffraction (XRD) peak profile analysis to predic...

  20. Spectral feature variations in x-ray diffraction imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Scott D.; Greenberg, Joel A.

    2016-05-01

    Materials with different atomic or molecular structures give rise to unique scatter spectra when measured by X-ray diffraction. The details of these spectra, though, can vary based on both intrinsic (e.g., degree of crystallinity or doping) and extrinsic (e.g., pressure or temperature) conditions. While this sensitivity is useful for detailed characterizations of the material properties, these dependences make it difficult to perform more general classification tasks, such as explosives threat detection in aviation security. A number of challenges, therefore, currently exist for reliable substance detection including the similarity in spectral features among some categories of materials combined with spectral feature variations from materials processing and environmental factors. These factors complicate the creation of a material dictionary and the implementation of conventional classification and detection algorithms. Herein, we report on two prominent factors that lead to variations in spectral features: crystalline texture and temperature variations. Spectral feature comparisons between materials categories will be described for solid metallic sheet, aqueous liquids, polymer sheet, and metallic, organic, and inorganic powder specimens. While liquids are largely immune to texture effects, they are susceptible to temperature changes that can modify their density or produce phase changes. We will describe in situ temperature-dependent measurement of aqueous-based commercial goods in the temperature range of -20°C to 35°C.

  1. Preparation and X-Ray diffraction studies of curium hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.K.; Maire, R.G.

    Curium hydrides were prepared by reaction of curium-248 metal with hydrogen and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. Several of the syntheses resulted in a hexagonal compound with average lattice parameters of a/sub 0/ = 0.3769(8) nm and c/sub 0/ = 0.6732(12) nm. These products are considere to be CmH/sub 3//sup -//sub 8/ by analogy with the behavior of lanthanide-hydrogen and lighter actinide-hydrogen systems. Face-centered cubic products with an average lattice parameter of a/sub 0/ = 0.5322(4) nm were obtained from other curium hydride preparations. This parameter is slightly smaller than that reported previously for cubic curium dihydride, CmH /SUB 2-x/more » (B.M. Bansal and D. Damien. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Lett. 6 603, 1970). The present results established a continuation of typical heavy trivalent lanthanidelike behavior of the transuranium actinide-hydrogen systems through curium.« less

  2. Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Kirz, Janos; ...

    2009-11-01

    We report the first image of an intact, frozen hydrated eukaryotic cell using x-ray diffraction microscopy, or coherent x-ray diffraction imaging. By plunge freezing the specimen in liquid ethane and maintaining it below -170 °C, artifacts due to dehydration, ice crystallization, and radiation damage are greatly reduced. In this example, coherent diffraction data using 520 eV x rays were recorded and reconstructed to reveal a budding yeast cell at a resolution better than 25 nm. This demonstration represents an important step towards high resolution imaging of cells in their natural, hydrated state, without limitations imposed by x-ray optics.

  3. X-ray diffraction-based electronic structure calculations and experimental x-ray analysis for medical and materials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahato, Dip Narayan

    This thesis includes x-ray experiments for medical and materials applications and the use of x-ray diffraction data in a first-principles study of electronic structures and hyperfine properties of chemical and biological systems. Polycapillary focusing lenses were used to collect divergent x rays emitted from conventional x-ray tubes and redirect them to form an intense focused beam. These lenses are routinely used in microbeam x-ray fluorescence analysis. In this thesis, their potential application to powder diffraction and focused beam orthovoltage cancer therapy has been investigated. In conventional x-ray therapy, very high energy (˜ MeV) beams are used, partly to reduce the skin dose. For any divergent beam, the dose is necessarily highest at the entry point, and decays exponentially into the tissue. To reduce the skin dose, high energy beams, which have long absorption lengths, are employed, and rotated about the patient to enter from different angles. This necessitates large expensive specialized equipment. A focused beam could concentrate the dose within the patient. Since this is inherently skin dose sparing, lower energy photons could be employed. A primary concern in applying focused beams to therapy is whether the focus would be maintained despite Compton scattering within the tissue. To investigate this, transmission and focal spot sizes as a function of photon energy of two polycapillary focusing lenses were measured. The effects of tissue-equivalent phantoms of different thicknesses on the focal spot size were studied. Scatter fraction and depth dose were calculated. For powder diffraction, the polycapillary optics provide clean Gaussian peaks, which result in angular resolution that is much smaller than the peak width due to the beam convergence. Powder diffraction (also called coherent scatter) without optics can also be used to distinguish between tissue types that, because they have different nanoscale structures, scatter at different angles

  4. Combined synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a fluorescing metal foil.

    PubMed

    Kappen, P; Arhatari, B D; Luu, M B; Balaur, E; Caradoc-Davies, T

    2013-06-01

    This study realizes the concept of simultaneous micro-X-ray computed tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a synchrotron beamline. A thin zinc metal foil was placed in the primary, monochromatic synchrotron beam to generate a divergent wave to propagate through the samples of interest onto a CCD detector for tomographic imaging, thus removing the need for large beam illumination and high spatial resolution detection. Both low density materials (kapton tubing and a piece of plant) and higher density materials (Egyptian faience) were investigated, and elemental contrast was explored for the example of Cu and Ni meshes. The viability of parallel powder diffraction using the direct beam transmitted through the foil was demonstrated. The outcomes of this study enable further development of the technique towards in situ tomography∕diffraction studies combining micrometer and crystallographic length scales, and towards elemental contrast imaging and reconstruction methods using well defined fluorescence outputs from combinations of known fluorescence targets (elements).

  5. X-Ray Diffraction and the Discovery of the Structure of DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouse, David T.

    2007-01-01

    A method is described for teaching the analysis of X-ray diffraction of DNA through a series of steps utilizing the original methods used by James Watson, Francis Crick, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin. The X-ray diffraction pattern led to the conclusion of the basic helical structure of DNA and its dimensions while basic chemical principles…

  6. Thermal x-ray diffraction and near-field phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Classen, Anton; Peng, Tao; Medvedev, Nikita; Wang, Fenglin; Chapman, Henry N.; Shih, Yanhua

    2017-10-01

    Using higher-order coherence of thermal light sources, the resolution power of standard x-ray imaging techniques can be enhanced. In this work, we applied the higher-order measurement to far-field x-ray diffraction and near-field phase contrast imaging (PCI), in order to achieve superresolution in x-ray diffraction and obtain enhanced intensity contrast in PCI. The cost of implementing such schemes is minimal compared to the methods that achieve similar effects by using entangled x-ray photon pairs.

  7. Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of Meteorites in Thin Section: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Lanzirotti, A.; Xirouchakis, D.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray diffraction is the pre-eminent technique for mineral identification and structure determination, but is difficult to apply to grains in thin section, the standard meteorite preparation. Bright focused X-ray beams from synchrotrons have been used extensively in mineralogy and have been applied to extraterrestrial particles. The intensity and small spot size achievable in synchrotron X-ray beams makes them useful for study of materials in thin sections. Here, we describe Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (SXRD) in thin section as done at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and cite examples of its value for studies of meteorites in thin section.

  8. Three Dimensional Variable-Wavelength X-Ray Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Cha, W.; Ulvestad, A.; Allain, M.; ...

    2016-11-23

    Here, we present and demonstrate a formalism by which three-dimensional (3D) Bragg x-ray coherent diffraction imaging (BCDI) can be implemented without moving the sample by scanning the energy of the incident x-ray beam. This capability is made possible by introducing a 3D Fourier transform that accounts for x-ray wavelength variability. We also demonstrate the approach by inverting coherent Bragg diffraction patterns from a gold nanocrystal measured with an x-ray energy scan. Furthermore, variable-wavelength BCDI will expand the breadth of feasible in situ 3D strain imaging experiments towards more diverse materials environments, especially where sample manipulation is difficult.

  9. Thermal x-ray diffraction and near-field phase contrast imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Zheng; Classen, Anton; Peng, Tao; ...

    2017-12-27

    Using higher-order coherence of thermal light sources, the resolution power of standard x-ray imaging techniques can be enhanced. Here in this work, we applied the higher-order measurement to far-field x-ray diffraction and near-field phase contrast imaging (PCI), in order to achieve superresolution in x-ray diffraction and obtain enhanced intensity contrast in PCI. The cost of implementing such schemes is minimal compared to the methods that achieve similar effects by using entangled x-ray photon pairs.

  10. Three Dimensional Variable-Wavelength X-Ray Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, W.; Ulvestad, A.; Allain, M.; Chamard, V.; Harder, R.; Leake, S. J.; Maser, J.; Fuoss, P. H.; Hruszkewycz, S. O.

    2016-11-01

    We present and demonstrate a formalism by which three-dimensional (3D) Bragg x-ray coherent diffraction imaging (BCDI) can be implemented without moving the sample by scanning the energy of the incident x-ray beam. This capability is made possible by introducing a 3D Fourier transform that accounts for x-ray wavelength variability. We demonstrate the approach by inverting coherent Bragg diffraction patterns from a gold nanocrystal measured with an x-ray energy scan. Variable-wavelength BCDI will expand the breadth of feasible in situ 3D strain imaging experiments towards more diverse materials environments, especially where sample manipulation is difficult.

  11. Three Dimensional Variable-Wavelength X-Ray Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cha, W; Ulvestad, A; Allain, M; Chamard, V; Harder, R; Leake, S J; Maser, J; Fuoss, P H; Hruszkewycz, S O

    2016-11-25

    We present and demonstrate a formalism by which three-dimensional (3D) Bragg x-ray coherent diffraction imaging (BCDI) can be implemented without moving the sample by scanning the energy of the incident x-ray beam. This capability is made possible by introducing a 3D Fourier transform that accounts for x-ray wavelength variability. We demonstrate the approach by inverting coherent Bragg diffraction patterns from a gold nanocrystal measured with an x-ray energy scan. Variable-wavelength BCDI will expand the breadth of feasible in situ 3D strain imaging experiments towards more diverse materials environments, especially where sample manipulation is difficult.

  12. Coherent X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Chloroplasts from Cyanidioschyzon merolae by Using X-Ray Free Electron Laser.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Inui, Yayoi; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a lens-less technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with the dimensions of submicrometer to micrometer at a resolution of several tens of nanometers. We conducted cryogenic CXDI experiments at 66 K to visualize the internal structures of frozen-hydrated chloroplasts of Cyanidioschyzon merolae using X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) as a coherent X-ray source. Chloroplast dispersed specimen disks at a number density of 7/(10×10 µm(2)) were flash-cooled with liquid ethane without staining, sectioning or chemical labeling. Chloroplasts are destroyed at atomic level immediately after the diffraction by XFEL pulses. Thus, diffraction patterns with a good signal-to-noise ratio from single chloroplasts were selected from many diffraction patterns collected through scanning specimen disks to provide fresh specimens into the irradiation area. The electron density maps of single chloroplasts projected along the direction of the incident X-ray beam were reconstructed by using the iterative phase-retrieval method and multivariate analyses. The electron density map at a resolution of 70 nm appeared as a C-shape. In addition, the fluorescence image of proteins stained with Flamingo™ dye also appeared as a C-shape as did the autofluorescence from Chl. The similar images suggest that the thylakoid membranes with an abundance of proteins distribute along the outer membranes of chloroplasts. To confirm the present results statistically, a number of projection structures must be accumulated through high-throughput data collection in the near future. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of XFEL-CXDI experiments in the structural analyses of cellular organelles. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of zinc oxide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, S. J.

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) exhibits a plethora of physical properties potentially advantageous in many roles and is why it one of the most studied semiconductor compounds. When doped or in its intrinsic state ZnO demonstrates a multitude of electronic, optical and magnetic properties in a large variety of manufacturable morphologies. Thus it is inherently important to understand why these properties arise and the impact potentially invasive sample preparation methods have for both the function and durability of the material and its devices. Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI) is a recently established non-destructive technique which can probe the whole three dimensional structure of small crystalline materials and has the potential for sub angstrom strain resolution. The iterative methods employed to overcome the `phase problem' are described fully. CXDI studies of wurtzite ZnO crystals in the rod morphology with high aspect ratio are presented. ZnO rods synthesised via Chemical Vapour Transport Deposition were studied in post growth state and during in-situ modification via metal evaporation processing and annealing. Small variations in post growth state were observed, the physical origin of which remains unidentified. The doping of a ZnO crystal with Iron, Nickel and Cobalt by thermal evaporation and subsequent annealing was studied. The evolution of diffusing ions into the crystal lattice from was not observed, decomposition was found to be the dominant process. Improvements in experimental technique allowed multiple Bragg reflections from a single ZnO crystal to be measured for the first time. Large aspect ratio ZnO rods were used to probe the coherence properties of the incident beam. The longitudinal coherence function of the illuminating radiation was mapped using the visibility of the interference pattern at each bragg reflection and an accurate estimate of the longitudinal coherence length obtained, xi(L) = 0.66pm 0.02 mu m. The consequences for data analysis

  14. X-ray Diffraction Crystal Calibration and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Haugh; Richard Stewart; Nathan Kugland

    2009-06-05

    National Security Technologies’ X-ray Laboratory is comprised of a multi-anode Manson type source and a Henke type source that incorporates a dual goniometer and XYZ translation stage. The first goniometer is used to isolate a particular spectral band. The Manson operates up to 10 kV and the Henke up to 20 kV. The Henke rotation stages and translation stages are automated. Procedures have been developed to characterize and calibrate various NIF diagnostics and their components. The diagnostics include X-ray cameras, gated imagers, streak cameras, and other X-ray imaging systems. Components that have been analyzed include filters, filter arrays, grazing incidencemore » mirrors, and various crystals, both flat and curved. Recent efforts on the Henke system are aimed at characterizing and calibrating imaging crystals and curved crystals used as the major component of an X-ray spectrometer. The presentation will concentrate on these results. The work has been done at energies ranging from 3 keV to 16 keV. The major goal was to evaluate the performance quality of the crystal for its intended application. For the imaging crystals we measured the laser beam reflection offset from the X-ray beam and the reflectivity curves. For the curved spectrometer crystal, which was a natural crystal, resolving power was critical. It was first necessary to find sources of crystals that had sufficiently narrow reflectivity curves. It was then necessary to determine which crystals retained their resolving power after being thinned and glued to a curved substrate.« less

  15. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; ...

    2011-05-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  16. Local terahertz field enhancement for time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Kozina, M.; Pancaldi, M.; Bernhard, C.; ...

    2017-02-20

    We report local field strength enhancement of single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses in an ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment. We show that patterning the sample with gold microstructures increases the THz field without changing the THz pulse shape or drastically affecting the quality of the x-ray diffraction pattern. Lastly, we find a five-fold increase in THz-induced x-ray diffraction intensity change in the presence of microstructures on a SrTiO 3 thin-film sample.

  17. High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction of Macromolecules with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stojanoff, Vivian; Boggon, Titus; Helliwell, John R.; Judge, Russell; Olczak, Alex; Snell, Edward H.; Siddons, D. Peter; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We recently combined synchrotron-based monochromatic X-ray diffraction topography methods with triple axis diffractometry and rocking curve measurements: high resolution X-ray diffraction imaging techniques, to better understand the quality of protein crystals. We discuss these methods in the light of results obtained on crystals grown under different conditions. These non destructive techniques are powerful tools in the characterization of the protein crystals and ultimately will allow to improve, develop, and understand protein crystal growth. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging methods will be discussed in detail in light of recent results obtained on Hen Egg White Lysozyme crystals and other proteins.

  18. Local terahertz field enhancement for time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kozina, M.; Pancaldi, M.; Bernhard, C.

    We report local field strength enhancement of single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses in an ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment. We show that patterning the sample with gold microstructures increases the THz field without changing the THz pulse shape or drastically affecting the quality of the x-ray diffraction pattern. Lastly, we find a five-fold increase in THz-induced x-ray diffraction intensity change in the presence of microstructures on a SrTiO 3 thin-film sample.

  19. Dynamical effects in Bragg coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of finite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, A. G.; Yefanov, O. M.; Nosik, V. L.; Bushuev, V. A.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2017-08-01

    We present simulations of Bragg coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) data from finite crystals in the frame of the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction. The developed approach is based on a numerical solution of modified Takagi-Taupin equations and can be applied for modeling of a broad range of x-ray diffraction experiments with finite three-dimensional crystals of arbitrary shape also in the presence of strain. We performed simulations for nanocrystals of a cubic and hemispherical shape of different sizes and provided a detailed analysis of artifacts in the Bragg CXDI reconstructions introduced by the dynamical diffraction. Based on our theoretical analysis we developed an analytical procedure to treat effects of refraction and absorption in the reconstruction. Our results elucidate limitations for the kinematical approach in the Bragg CXDI and suggest a natural criterion to distinguish between kinematical and dynamical cases in coherent x-ray diffraction on a finite crystal.

  20. Resolution enhancement in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging by overcoming instrumental noise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Sunam; Kang, Hyon Chol; Hwu, Yeukuang; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Liang, Keng San; Noh, Do Young

    2014-11-17

    We report that reference objects, strong scatterers neighboring weak phase objects, enhance the phase retrieval and spatial resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CDI). A CDI experiment with Au nano-particles exhibited that the reference objects amplified the signal-to-noise ratio in the diffraction intensity at large diffraction angles, which significantly enhanced the image resolution. The interference between the diffracted x-ray from reference objects and a specimen also improved the retrieval of the phase of the diffraction signal. The enhancement was applied to image NiO nano-particles and a mitochondrion and confirmed in a simulation with a bacteria phantom. We expect that the proposed method will be of great help in imaging weakly scattering soft matters using coherent x-ray sources including x-ray free electron lasers.

  1. Real-time X-ray Diffraction: Applications to Materials Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosemeier, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    With the high speed growth of materials it becomes necessary to develop measuring systems which also have the capabilities of characterizing these materials at high speeds. One of the conventional techniques of characterizing materials was X-ray diffraction. Film, which is the oldest method of recording the X-ray diffraction phenomenon, is not quite adequate in most circumstances to record fast changing events. Even though conventional proportional counters and scintillation counters can provide the speed necessary to record these changing events, they lack the ability to provide image information which may be important in some types of experiment or production arrangements. A selected number of novel applications of using X-ray diffraction to characterize materials in real-time are discussed. Also, device characteristics of some X-ray intensifiers useful in instantaneous X-ray diffraction applications briefly presented. Real-time X-ray diffraction experiments with the incorporation of image X-ray intensification add a new dimension in the characterization of materials. The uses of real-time image intensification in laboratory and production arrangements are quite unlimited and their application depends more upon the ingenuity of the scientist or engineer.

  2. X-Ray Sum Frequency Diffraction for Direct Imaging of Ultrafast Electron Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, Jérémy R.; Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2018-06-01

    X-ray diffraction from molecules in the ground state produces an image of their charge density, and time-resolved x-ray diffraction can thus monitor the motion of the nuclei. However, the density change of excited valence electrons upon optical excitation can barely be monitored with regular diffraction techniques due to the overwhelming background contribution of the core electrons. We present a nonlinear x-ray technique made possible by novel free electron laser sources, which provides a spatial electron density image of valence electron excitations. The technique, sum frequency generation carried out with a visible pump and a broadband x-ray diffraction pulse, yields snapshots of the transition charge densities, which represent the electron density variations upon optical excitation. The technique is illustrated by ab initio simulations of transition charge density imaging for the optically induced electronic dynamics in a donor or acceptor substituted stilbene.

  3. Characterization of polycrystalline materials using synchrotron X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, W.; King, A.; Herbig, M.; Reischig, P.; Marrow, J.; Babout, L.; Lauridsen, E. M.; Proudhon, H.; Buffière, J. Y.

    2010-12-01

    The combination of synchrotron radiation x-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offers new possibilities for in-situ observation of deformation and damage mechanisms in the bulk of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (i.e., cracks, porosities) can be detected using propagation based phase contrast imaging, a 3-D imaging mode exploiting the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. Furthermore, for some classes of polycrystalline materials, one may use a 3-D variant of x-ray diffraction imaging, termed x-ray diffraction contrast tomography. X-ray diffraction contrast tomography provides access to the 3-D shape, orientation, and elastic strain state of the individual grains from polycrystalline sample volumes containing up to thousand grains. Combining both imaging modalities, one obtains a comprehensive description of the materials microstructure at the micrometer length scale. Repeated observation during (interrupted) mechanical tests provide unprecedented insight into crystallographic and grain microstructure related aspects of polycrystalline deformation and degradation mechanisms.

  4. Dynamical scattering in coherent hard x-ray nanobeam Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pateras, A.; Park, J.; Ahn, Y.; Tilka, J. A.; Holt, M. V.; Kim, H.; Mawst, L. J.; Evans, P. G.

    2018-06-01

    Unique intensity features arising from dynamical diffraction arise in coherent x-ray nanobeam diffraction patterns of crystals having thicknesses larger than the x-ray extinction depth or exhibiting combinations of nanoscale and mesoscale features. We demonstrate that dynamical scattering effects can be accurately predicted using an optical model combined with the Darwin theory of dynamical x-ray diffraction. The model includes the highly divergent coherent x-ray nanobeams produced by Fresnel zone plate focusing optics and accounts for primary extinction, multiple scattering, and absorption. The simulation accurately reproduces the dynamical scattering features of experimental diffraction patterns acquired from a GaAs/AlGaAs epitaxial heterostructure on a GaAs (001) substrate.

  5. Unified Theory for Decoding the Signals from X-Ray Florescence and X-Ray Diffraction of Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chung, Frank H

    2017-05-01

    For research and development or for solving technical problems, we often need to know the chemical composition of an unknown mixture, which is coded and stored in the signals of its X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray fluorescence gives chemical elements, whereas XRD gives chemical compounds. The major problem in XRF and XRD analyses is the complex matrix effect. The conventional technique to deal with the matrix effect is to construct empirical calibration lines with standards for each element or compound sought, which is tedious and time-consuming. A unified theory of quantitative XRF analysis is presented here. The idea is to cancel the matrix effect mathematically. It turns out that the decoding equation for quantitative XRF analysis is identical to that for quantitative XRD analysis although the physics of XRD and XRF are fundamentally different. The XRD work has been published and practiced worldwide. The unified theory derives a new intensity-concentration equation of XRF, which is free from the matrix effect and valid for a wide range of concentrations. The linear decoding equation establishes a constant slope for each element sought, hence eliminating the work on calibration lines. The simple linear decoding equation has been verified by 18 experiments.

  6. X-Ray Diffraction Wafer Mapping Method for Rhombohedral Super-Hetero-Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yoonjoon; Choi, Sang Hyouk; King, Glen C.; Elliott, James R.; Dimarcantonio, Albert L.

    2010-01-01

    A new X-ray diffraction (XRD) method is provided to acquire XY mapping of the distribution of single crystals, poly-crystals, and twin defects across an entire wafer of rhombohedral super-hetero-epitaxial semiconductor material. In one embodiment, the method is performed with a point or line X-ray source with an X-ray incidence angle approximating a normal angle close to 90 deg, and in which the beam mask is preferably replaced with a crossed slit. While the wafer moves in the X and Y direction, a narrowly defined X-ray source illuminates the sample and the diffracted X-ray beam is monitored by the detector at a predefined angle. Preferably, the untilted, asymmetric scans are of {440} peaks, for twin defect characterization.

  7. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Robert M.; Cohen, Isadore

    1990-01-01

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  8. Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

    1988-04-26

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

  9. A portable X-ray diffraction apparatus for in situ analyses of masters' paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eveno, Myriam; Duran, Adrian; Castaing, Jacques

    2010-09-01

    It is rare that the analyses of materials in paintings can be carried out by taking micro-samples. Valuable works of art are best studied in situ by non-invasive techniques. For that purpose, a portable X-ray diffraction and fluorescence apparatus has been designed and constructed at the C2RMF. This apparatus has been used for paintings of Rembrandt, Leonardo da Vinci, Van Gogh, Mantegna, etc. Results are given to illustrate the performance of X-ray diffraction, especially when X-ray fluorescence does not bring sufficient information to conclude.

  10. In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, David M [Voorheesville, NY; Gibson, Walter M [Voorheesville, NY; Huang, Huapeng [Latham, NY

    2007-06-26

    An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

  11. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stefano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11–13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy. PMID:20368463

  12. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; ...

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  13. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; ...

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore » resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  14. Combining operando synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy and scanning X-ray diffraction to study lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Patrick; Hess, Michael; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eller, Jens; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    We present an operando study of a lithium ion battery combining scanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) simultaneously for the first time. This combination of techniques facilitates the investigation of dynamic processes in lithium ion batteries containing amorphous and/or weakly attenuating active materials. While amorphous materials pose a challenge for diffraction techniques, weakly attenuating material systems pose a challenge for attenuation-contrast tomography. Furthermore, combining SXRD and SRXTM can be used to correlate processes occurring at the atomic level in the crystal lattices of the active materials with those at the scale of electrode microstructure. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we investigate a silicon powder electrode in lithium metal half-cell configuration. Combining SXRD and SRXTM, we are able to (i) quantify the dissolution of the metallic lithium electrode and the expansion of the silicon electrode, (ii) better understand the formation of the Li15Si4 phase, and (iii) non-invasively probe kinetic limitations within the silicon electrode. A simple model based on the 1D diffusion equation allows us to qualitatively understand the observed kinetics and demonstrates why high-capacity electrodes are more prone to inhomogeneous lithiation reactions. PMID:27324109

  15. Combining operando synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy and scanning X-ray diffraction to study lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, Patrick; Hess, Michael; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Eller, Jens; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-06-01

    We present an operando study of a lithium ion battery combining scanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) simultaneously for the first time. This combination of techniques facilitates the investigation of dynamic processes in lithium ion batteries containing amorphous and/or weakly attenuating active materials. While amorphous materials pose a challenge for diffraction techniques, weakly attenuating material systems pose a challenge for attenuation-contrast tomography. Furthermore, combining SXRD and SRXTM can be used to correlate processes occurring at the atomic level in the crystal lattices of the active materials with those at the scale of electrode microstructure. To demonstrate the benefits of this approach, we investigate a silicon powder electrode in lithium metal half-cell configuration. Combining SXRD and SRXTM, we are able to (i) quantify the dissolution of the metallic lithium electrode and the expansion of the silicon electrode, (ii) better understand the formation of the Li15Si4 phase, and (iii) non-invasively probe kinetic limitations within the silicon electrode. A simple model based on the 1D diffusion equation allows us to qualitatively understand the observed kinetics and demonstrates why high-capacity electrodes are more prone to inhomogeneous lithiation reactions.

  16. Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Diffraction Techniques Applied to Insect Flight Muscle.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki

    2018-06-13

    X-ray fiber diffraction is a powerful tool used for investigating the molecular structure of muscle and its dynamics during contraction. This technique has been successfully applied not only to skeletal and cardiac muscles of vertebrates but also to insect flight muscle. Generally, insect flight muscle has a highly ordered structure and is often capable of high-frequency oscillations. The X-ray diffraction studies on muscle have been accelerated by the advent of 3rd-generation synchrotron radiation facilities, which can generate brilliant and highly oriented X-ray beams. This review focuses on some of the novel experiments done on insect flight muscle by using synchrotron radiation X-rays. These include diffraction recordings from single myofibrils within a flight muscle fiber by using X-ray microbeams and high-speed diffraction recordings from the flight muscle during the wing-beat of live insects. These experiments have provided information about the molecular structure and dynamic function of flight muscle in unprecedented detail. Future directions of X-ray diffraction studies on muscle are also discussed.

  17. In Situ Mineralogical Analysis of Planetary Materials Using X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D.; Vaniman, D.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Remote observations of Mars have led scientists to believe that its early climate was similar to that of the early Earth, having had abundant liquid water and a dense atmosphere. One of the most fascinating questions of recent times is whether simple bacterial life developed on Mars (as it did on the Earth) during this early element period. Analyses of SNC meteorites have broadened considerably our knowledge of the chemistry of certain types of Martian rocks, underscoring the tantalizing possibility of early hydrothermal systems and even of ancient bacterial life. Detailed analyses of SNC meteorites in Terrestrial laboratories utilize the most sophisticated organic, isotopic and microscopic techniques in existence. Indeed; it is unlikely that the key biogenic indicators used in McKay et al (ibid) could be identified by a remote instrument on the surface of Mars. As a result, it is probable that any robotic search for evidence of an ancient Martian biosphere will have as its focus the identification of key minerals in likely host rocks rather than the direct detection of organic or isotopic biomarkers. Even on a sample return mission, mineralogical screening will be utilized to choose the most likely candidate rocks. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is the only technique that can provide a direct determination of the crystal structures of the phases present within a sample. When many different crystalline phases are present, quantitative analysis is better constrained if used in conjunction with a determination of elemental composition, obtainable by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using the same X-ray source as for XRD. For planetary surface analysis, a remote instrument combining XRD and XRF could be used for mineralogical characterization of both soils and rocks. We are designing a remote XRD/XRF instrument with this objective in mind. The instrument concept pays specific attention to constraints in sample preparation, weight, volume, power, etc. Based on the geometry of a

  18. Fabrication of high-resolution x-ray diffractive optics at King's College London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, Pambos S.; Anastasi, Peter A. F.; Burge, Ronald E.; Popova, Katia

    1995-09-01

    The fabrication of high resolution x-ray diffractive optics, and Fresnel zone plates (ZPs) in particular, is a very demanding multifaceted technological task. The commissioning of more (and brighter) synchrotron radiation sources, has increased the number of x-ray imaging beam lines world wide. The availability of cheaper and more effective laboratory x-ray sources, has further increased the number of laboratories involved in x-ray imaging. The result is an ever increasing demand for x-ray optics with a very wide range of specifications, reflecting the particular type of x-ray imaging performed at different laboratories. We have been involved in all aspects of high resolution nanofabrication for a number of years, and we have explored many different methods of lithography, which, although unorthodox, open up possibilities, and increase our flexibility for the fabrication of different diffractive optical elements, as well as other types of nanostructures. The availability of brighter x-ray sources, means that the diffraction efficiency of the ZPs is becoming of secondary importance, a trend which will continue in the future. Resolution, however, is important and will always remain so. Resolution is directly related to the accuracy af pattern generation, as well as the ability to draw fine lines. This is the area towards which we have directed most of our efforts so far.

  19. Applications of synchrotron x-ray diffraction topography to fractography

    SciTech Connect

    Bilello, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Fractographs have been taken using a variety of probes each of which produces different types of information. Methods which have been used to examine fracture surfaces include: (a) optical microscopy, particularly interference contrast methods, (b) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), (c) SEM with electron channelling, (d) SEM with selected-area electron channelling, (e) Berg-Barrett (B-B) topography, and now (f) synchrotron x-radiation fractography (SXRF). This review concentrated on the role that x-ray methods can play in such studies. In particular, the ability to nondestructively assess the subsurface microstructure associated with the fracture to depths of the order of 5 to 10 ..mu..m becomesmore » an important attribute for observations of a large class of semi-brittle metals, semiconductors and ceramics.« less

  20. Difficult macromolecular structures determined using X-ray diffraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Santoyo, Alejandra

    2012-07-01

    Macromolecular crystallography has been, for the last few decades, the main source of structural information of biological macromolecular systems and it is one of the most powerful techniques for the analysis of enzyme mechanisms and macromolecular interactions at the atomic level. In addition, it is also an extremely powerful tool for drug design. Recent technological and methodological developments in macromolecular X-ray crystallography have allowed solving structures that until recently were considered difficult or even impossible, such as structures at atomic or subatomic resolution or large macromolecular complexes and assemblies at low resolution. These developments have also helped to solve the 3D-structure of macromolecules from twin crystals. Recently, this technique complemented with cryo-electron microscopy and neutron crystallography has provided the structure of large macromolecular machines with great precision allowing understanding of the mechanisms of their function.

  1. X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of crystallinity in hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Girardin, E; Millet, P; Lodini, A

    2000-02-01

    To standardize industrial implant production and make comparisons between different experimental results, we have to be able to quantify the crystallinity of hydroxyapatite. Methods of measuring crystallinity ratio were developed for various HA samples before and after plasma spraying. The first series of methods uses X-ray diffraction. The advantage of these methods is that X-ray diffraction equipment is used widely in science and industry. In the second series, a neutron diffraction method is developed and the results recorded are similar to those obtained by the modified X-ray diffraction methods. The advantage of neutron diffraction is the ability to obtain measurements deep inside a component. It is a nondestructive method, owing to the very low absorption of neutrons in most materials. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction From Two-Dimensional Protein Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Matthias; Carlson, David B.; Hunter, Mark

    2014-02-28

    Here we present femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D) protein crystals using an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL). To date it has not been possible to acquire x-ray diffraction from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permits a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy methodology at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we observed Bragg diffraction to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples that were maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promisemore » for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.« less

  3. Apparatus for use in examining the lattice of a semiconductor wafer by X-ray diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. L.; Porter, W. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved apparatus for examining the crystal lattice of a semiconductor wafer utilizing X-ray diffraction techniques was presented. The apparatus is employed in a method which includes the step of recording the image of a wafer supported in a bent configuration conforming to a compound curve, produced through the use of a vacuum chuck provided for an X-ray camera. The entire surface thereof is illuminated simultaneously by a beam of incident X-rays which are projected from a distant point-source and satisfy conditions of the Bragg Law for all points on the surface of the water.

  4. Single-pulse coherent diffraction imaging using soft x-ray laser.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyon Chol; Kim, Hyung Taek; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Chan; Yu, Tae Jun; Lee, Seong Ku; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, I Jong; Sung, Jae Hee; Janulewicz, Karol A; Lee, Jongmin; Noh, Do Young

    2012-05-15

    We report a coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) using a single 8 ps soft x-ray laser pulse at a wavelength of 13.9 nm. The soft x-ray pulse was generated by a laboratory-scale intense pumping laser providing coherent x-ray pulses up to the level of 10(11) photons/pulse. A spatial resolution below 194 nm was achieved with a single pulse, and it was shown that a resolution below 55 nm is feasible with improved detector capability. The single-pulse CDI might provide a way to investigate dynamics of nanoscale molecules or particles.

  5. Ultrahigh vacuum/high pressure chamber for surface x-ray diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, P.; Peters, K.; Alvarez, J.; Ferrer, S.

    1999-02-01

    We describe an ultrahigh vacuum chamber that can be internally pressurized to several bars and that is designed to perform surface x-ray diffraction experiments on solid-gas interfaces. The chamber has a cylindrical beryllium window that serves as the entrance and exit for the x rays. The sample surface can be ion bombarded with an ancillary ion gun and annealed to 1200 K.

  6. Thermal expansion in UO 2 determined by high-energy X-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Guthrie, M.; Benmore, C. J.; Skinner, L. B.; ...

    2016-06-24

    In this study, we present crystallographic analyses of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on polycrystalline UO 2 up to the melting temperature. The Rietveld refinements of our X-ray data are in agreement with previous measurements, but are systematically located around the upper bound of their uncertainty, indicating a slightly steeper trend of thermal expansion compared to established values. This observation is consistent with recent first principles calculations.

  7. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1984-08-10

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  8. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder X-ray diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Pawloski, Gayle A.

    1986-01-01

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  9. The effect of laser radiation on the diffraction of X-rays in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, V. N.; Chuprunov, E. V.; Khokhlov, A. F.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of laser radiation on the intensity of the X-ray diffraction peaks of KDP, ADP, and CuSO4-5H2O crystals was studied experimentally. This intensity was found to increase as a function of the laser beam power. This result suggests that it is possible to use laser beams to control X-ray intensity in the crystals considered.

  10. Diffraction and Imaging Study of Imperfections of Protein Crystals with Coherent X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.

    2004-01-01

    High angular-resolution x-ray diffraction and phase contrast x-ray imaging were combined to study defects and perfection of protein crystals. Imperfections including line defects, inclusions and other microdefects were observed in the diffraction images of a uniformly grown lysozyme crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <110> growth front and have been found to originate mostly in a central growth area and occasionally in outer growth regions. Slow dehydration led to the broadening of a fairly symmetric 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.6, which was primarily attributed to the dehydration-induced microscopic effects that are clearly shown in diffraction images. X-ray imaging and diffraction characterization of the quality of apoferritin crystals will also be discussed in the presentation.

  11. Materials identification using a small-scale pixellated x-ray diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flynn, D.; Crews, C.; Drakos, I.; Christodoulou, C.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Speller, R. D.

    2016-05-01

    A transmission x-ray diffraction system has been developed using a pixellated, energy-resolving detector (HEXITEC) and a small-scale, mains operated x-ray source (Amptek Mini-X). HEXITEC enables diffraction to be measured without the requirement of incident spectrum filtration, or collimation of the scatter from the sample, preserving a large proportion of the useful signal compared with other diffraction techniques. Due to this efficiency, sufficient molecular information for material identification can be obtained within 5 s despite the relatively low x-ray source power. Diffraction data are presented from caffeine, hexamine, paracetamol, plastic explosives and narcotics. The capability to determine molecular information from aspirin tablets inside their packaging is demonstrated. Material selectivity and the potential for a sample classification model is shown with principal component analysis, through which each different material can be clearly resolved.

  12. Titration of a Solid Acid Monitored by X-Ray Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Epstein, Paul

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is described to introduce students to an important class of solid-state reactions while reinforcing concepts of titration by using a pH meter and a powder X-ray diffractometer. The experiment was successful in teaching students the abstract concepts of solid-state structure and diffraction by applying the diffraction concepts learned…

  13. Diffraction based method to reconstruct the spectrum of the Thomson scattering x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zhijun; Yan, Lixin; Zhang, Zhen; Zhou, Zheng; Zheng, Lianmin; Wang, Dong; Tian, Qili; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zan; Zhang, Jie; Du, Yingchao; Hua, Jianfei; Shi, Jiaru; Pai, Chihao; Lu, Wei; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Huaibi; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2017-04-01

    As Thomson scattering x-ray sources based on the collision of intense laser and relativistic electrons have drawn much attention in various scientific fields, there is an increasing demand for the effective methods to reconstruct the spectrum information of the ultra-short and high-intensity x-ray pulses. In this paper, a precise spectrum measurement method for the Thomson scattering x-ray sources was proposed with the diffraction of a Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) crystal and was demonstrated at the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source. The x-ray pulse is diffracted by a 15 mm (L) ×15 mm (H)× 1 mm (D) HOPG crystal with 1° mosaic spread. By analyzing the diffraction pattern, both x-ray peak energies and energy spectral bandwidths at different polar angles can be reconstructed, which agree well with the theoretical value and simulation. The higher integral reflectivity of the HOPG crystal makes this method possible for single-shot measurement.

  14. Diffraction based method to reconstruct the spectrum of the Thomson scattering x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhijun; Yan, Lixin; Zhang, Zhen; Zhou, Zheng; Zheng, Lianmin; Wang, Dong; Tian, Qili; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zan; Zhang, Jie; Du, Yingchao; Hua, Jianfei; Shi, Jiaru; Pai, Chihao; Lu, Wei; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Huaibi; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2017-04-01

    As Thomson scattering x-ray sources based on the collision of intense laser and relativistic electrons have drawn much attention in various scientific fields, there is an increasing demand for the effective methods to reconstruct the spectrum information of the ultra-short and high-intensity x-ray pulses. In this paper, a precise spectrum measurement method for the Thomson scattering x-ray sources was proposed with the diffraction of a Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) crystal and was demonstrated at the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source. The x-ray pulse is diffracted by a 15 mm (L) ×15 mm (H)× 1 mm (D) HOPG crystal with 1° mosaic spread. By analyzing the diffraction pattern, both x-ray peak energies and energy spectral bandwidths at different polar angles can be reconstructed, which agree well with the theoretical value and simulation. The higher integral reflectivity of the HOPG crystal makes this method possible for single-shot measurement.

  15. Collection of X-ray diffraction data from macromolecular crystals

    PubMed Central

    Dauter, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Diffraction data acquisition is the final experimental stage of the crystal structure analysis. All subsequent steps involve mainly computer calculations. Optimally measured and accurate data make the structure solution and refinement easier and lead to more faithful interpretation of the final models. Here, the important factors in data collection from macromolecular crystals are discussed and strategies appropriate for various applications, such as molecular replacement, anomalous phasing, atomic-resolution refinement etc., are presented. Criteria useful for judging the diffraction data quality are also discussed. PMID:28573573

  16. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Nanocrystalline Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stel'makh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evidence obtained for a variety of nanocrystalline materials suggest that the crystallographic structure of a very small size particle deviates from that in the bulk crystals. In this paper we show the effect of the surface of nanocrystals on their structure by the analysis of generation and distribution of macro- and micro-strains at high pressures and their dependence on the grain size in nanocrystalline powders of Sic. We studied the structure of Sic nanocrystals by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique using synchrotron and neutron sources and hydrostatic or isostatic pressure conditions. The diffraction measurements were done in HASYLAB at DESY using a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) in the energy dispersive geometry in the diffraction vector range up to 3.5 - 4/A and under pressures up to 50 GPa at room temperature. In-situ high pressure neutron diffraction measurements were done at LANSCE in Los Alamos National Laboratory using the HIPD and HIPPO diffractometers with the Paris-Edinburgh and TAP-98 cells, respectively, in the diffraction vector range up to 26 Examination of the response of the material to external stresses requires nonstandard methodology of the materials characterization and description. Although every diffraction pattern contains a complete information on macro- and micro-strains, a high pressure experiment can reveal only those factors which contribute to the characteristic diffraction patterns of the crystalline phases present in the sample. The elastic properties of powders with the grain size from several nm to micrometers were examined using three methodologies: (l), the analysis of positions and widths of individual Bragg reflections (used for calculating macro- and micro-strains generated during densification) [I], (2). the analysis of the dependence of the experimental apparent lattice parameter, alp, on the diffraction vector Q [2], and (3), the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) technique [3]. The results

  17. X-ray diffraction and X-ray K absorption near edge studies of copper (II) complexes with amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Malviya, Varsha; Kame, Rashmi; Malviya, P. K.

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis of copper (II) complexes [CuL1L2X].nH2O, where n=1, 2,3 (X=Cl,Br,NO3) (L1is 2,2’-bipyridine and L2 is L-tyrosine) by the chemical root method. The XRD data for the samples have been recorded. EXAFS spectra have also been recorded at the K-edge of Cu using the dispersive beam line BL-8 at 2.5 Gev Indus-2 Synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore, India. XRD and EXAFS data have been analysed using the computer software. X-ray diffraction studies of all complexes indicate their crystalline nature. Lattice parameter, bond length, particle size have been determined from XRD data.

  18. X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging Study of Imperfections of Crystallized Lysozyme with Coherent X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Zheng-Wei; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Phase-sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging and high angular-resolution diffraction combined with phase contrast radiographic imaging are employed to characterize defects and perfection of a uniformly grown tetragonal lysozyme crystal in symmetric Laue case. The fill width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 4 4 0 rocking curve measured from the original crystal is approximately 16.7 arcseconds, and defects, which include point defects, line defects, and microscopic domains, have been clearly observed in the diffraction images of the crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <110> growth front, and they have been found to originate mostly at a central growth area and occasionally at outer growth regions. Individual point defects trapped at a crystal nucleus are resolved in the images of high sensitivity to defects. Slow dehydration has led to the broadening of the 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.4. A significant change of the defect structure and configuration with drying has been revealed, which suggests the dehydration induced migration and evolution of dislocations and lattice rearrangements to reduce overall strain energy. The sufficient details of the observed defects shed light upon perfection, nucleation and growth, and properties of protein crystals.

  19. Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrot, I. M.; Urban, V.; Gardner, K. H.; Forsyth, V. T.

    2005-08-01

    The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar® or Twaron®.

  20. Reconstructive colour X-ray diffraction imaging--a novel TEDDI imaging method.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Olivier; Jacques, Simon; Sochi, Taha; Barnes, Paul

    2009-09-01

    Tomographic Energy-Dispersive Diffraction Imaging (TEDDI) enables a unique non-destructive mapping of the interior of bulk objects, exploiting the full range of X-ray signals (diffraction, fluorescence, scattering, background) recorded. By analogy to optical imaging, a wide variety of features (structure, composition, orientation, strain) dispersed in X-ray wavelengths can be extracted and colour-coded to aid interpretation. The ultimate aim of this approach is to realise real-time high-definition colour X-ray diffraction imaging, on the timescales of seconds, so that one will be able to 'look inside' optically opaque apparatus and unravel the space/time-evolution of the materials chemistry taking place. This will impact strongly on many fields of science but there are currently two barriers to this goal: speed of data acquisition (a 2D scan currently takes minutes to hours) and loss of image definition through spatial distortion of the X-ray sampling volume. Here we present a data-collection scenario and reconstruction routine which overcomes the latter barrier and which has been successfully applied to a phantom test object and to real materials systems such as a carbonating cement block. These procedures are immediately transferable to the promising technology of multi-energy-dispersive-detector-arrays which are planned to deliver the other breakthrough, that of one-two orders of magnitude improvement in data acquisition rates, that will be needed to realise real-time high-definition colour X-ray diffraction imaging.

  1. Influence of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of nuclear graphite: An X-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Bouwman, W. G.; Schut, H.; van Staveren, T. O.; Heijna, M. C. R.; Pappas, C.

    2017-04-01

    Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructure of nuclear graphite have been investigated by X-ray diffraction on virgin and low doses (∼ 1.3 and ∼ 2.2 dpa), high temperature (750° C) irradiated samples. The diffraction patterns were interpreted using a model, which takes into account the turbostratic disorder. Besides the lattice constants, the model introduces two distinct coherent lengths in the c-axis and the basal plane, that characterise the volumes from which X-rays are scattered coherently. The methodology used in this work allows to quantify the effect of irradiation damage on the microstructure of nuclear graphite seen by X-ray diffraction. The results show that the changes of the deduced structural parameters are in agreement with previous observations from electron microscopy, but not directly related to macroscopic changes.

  2. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; ...

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore » using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  3. Coherent x-ray zoom condenser lens for diffractive and scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takashi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2013-04-22

    We propose a coherent x-ray zoom condenser lens composed of two-stage deformable Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The lens delivers coherent x-rays with a controllable beam size, from one micrometer to a few tens of nanometers, at a fixed focal position. The lens is suitable for diffractive and scanning microscopy. We also propose non-scanning coherent diffraction microscopy for extended objects by using an apodized focused beam produced by the lens with a spatial filter. The proposed apodized-illumination method will be useful in highly efficient imaging with ultimate storage ring sources, and will also open the way to single-shot coherent diffraction microscopy of extended objects with x-ray free-electron lasers.

  4. Scanning force microscope for in situ nanofocused X-ray diffraction studies

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhe; Mastropietro, Francesca; Davydok, Anton; Langlais, Simon; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Furter, Jean-Jacques; Thomas, Olivier; Dupraz, Maxime; Verdier, Marc; Beutier, Guillaume; Boesecke, Peter; Cornelius, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    A compact scanning force microscope has been developed for in situ combination with nanofocused X-ray diffraction techniques at third-generation synchrotron beamlines. Its capabilities are demonstrated on Au nano-islands grown on a sapphire substrate. The new in situ device allows for in situ imaging the sample topography and the crystallinity by recording simultaneously an atomic force microscope (AFM) image and a scanning X-ray diffraction map of the same area. Moreover, a selected Au island can be mechanically deformed using the AFM tip while monitoring the deformation of the atomic lattice by nanofocused X-ray diffraction. This in situ approach gives access to the mechanical behavior of nanomaterials. PMID:25178002

  5. Long-Wavelength X-Ray Diffraction and Its Applications in Macromolecular Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Manfred S

    2017-01-01

    For many years, diffraction experiments in macromolecular crystallography at X-ray wavelengths longer than that of Cu-K α (1.54 Å) have been largely underappreciated. Effects caused by increased X-ray absorption result in the fact that these experiments are more difficult than the standard diffraction experiments at short wavelengths. However, due to the also increased anomalous scattering of many biologically relevant atoms, important additional structural information can be obtained. This information, in turn, can be used for phase determination, for substructure identification, in molecular replacement approaches, as well as in structure refinement. This chapter reviews the possibilities and the difficulties associated with such experiments, and it provides a short description of two macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beam lines dedicated to long-wavelength X-ray diffraction experiments.

  6. Submicron x-ray diffraction and its applications to problems in materials and environmental science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, N.; Celestre, R. S.; MacDowell, A. A.; Padmore, H. A.; Spolenak, R.; Valek, B. C.; Meier Chang, N.; Manceau, A.; Patel, J. R.

    2002-03-01

    The availability of high brilliance third generation synchrotron sources together with progress in achromatic focusing optics allows us to add submicron spatial resolution to the conventional century-old x-ray diffraction technique. The new capabilities include the possibility to map in situ, grain orientations, crystalline phase distribution, and full strain/stress tensors at a very local level, by combining white and monochromatic x-ray microbeam diffraction. This is particularly relevant for high technology industry where the understanding of material properties at a microstructural level becomes increasingly important. After describing the latest advances in the submicron x-ray diffraction techniques at the Advanced Light Source, we will give some examples of its application in material science for the measurement of strain/stress in metallic thin films and interconnects. Its use in the field of environmental science will also be discussed.

  7. Note: application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zhang, Bangmin; Brewe, Dale L; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G M; Venkatesan, T; Heald, Steve M

    2014-04-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  8. Correct interpretation of diffraction properties of quartz crystals for X-ray optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Rong; Gog, Thomas; Kim, Jungho

    Quartz has hundreds of strong Bragg reflections that may offer a great number of choices for making fixed-angle X-ray analyzers and polarizers at virtually any hard X-ray energies with selectable resolution. However, quartz crystals, unlike silicon and germanium, are chiral and may thus appear in two different forms of handedness that are mirror images. Furthermore, because of the threefold rotational symmetry along thecaxis, the {h 1h 2h 3L} and {h 2h 1h 3L} Bragg reflections may have quite different Darwin bandwidth, reflectivity and angular acceptance, although they have the same Bragg angle. The design of X-ray optics from quartz crystalsmore » therefore requires unambiguous determination of the orientation, handedness and polarity of the crystals. The Laue method and single-axis diffraction technique can provide such information, but the variety of conventions used in the literature to describe quartz structures has caused widespread confusion. The current studies give detailed guidelines for design and fabrication of quartz X-ray optics, with special emphasis on the correct interpretation of Laue patterns in terms of the crystallography and diffraction properties of quartz. Meanwhile, the quartz crystals examined were confirmed by X-ray topography to have acceptably low densities of dislocations and other defects, which is the foundation for developing high-resolution quartz-based X-ray optics.« less

  9. An X-ray diffractometer using mirage diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Tomoe; Jongsukswat, Sukswat; Ju, Dongying; Negishi, Riichirou; Hirano, Keiichi; Kawamura, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Some characteristics are reported of a triple-crystal diffractometer with a (+, −, +) setting of Si(220) using mirage diffraction. The first crystal is flat, while the second and third crystals are bent. Basically, the first crystal is used as a collimator, the second as a monochromator and the third as the sample. The third crystal also works as an analyzer. The advantages of this diffractometer are that its setup is easy, its structure is simple, the divergence angle from the second crystal is small and the energy resolution of the third crystal is high, of the order of sub-meV. PMID:25242911

  10. Diffraction crystal for sagittally focusing x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Ice, Gene E.; Sparks, Jr., Cullie J.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  11. Diffraction crystals for sagittally focusing x-rays

    DOEpatents

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1982-06-07

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  12. Absolute x-ray energy calibration and monitoring using a diffraction-based method

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Xinguo, E-mail: xhong@bnl.gov; Weidner, Donald J.; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2016-07-27

    In this paper, we report some recent developments of the diffraction-based absolute X-ray energy calibration method. In this calibration method, high spatial resolution of the measured detector offset is essential. To this end, a remotely controlled long-translation motorized stage was employed instead of the less convenient gauge blocks. It is found that the precision of absolute X-ray energy calibration (ΔE/E) is readily achieved down to the level of 10{sup −4} for high-energy monochromatic X-rays (e.g. 80 keV). Examples of applications to pair distribution function (PDF) measurements and energy monitoring for high-energy X-rays are presented.

  13. Correlation between protein sequence similarity and x-ray diffraction quality in the protein data bank.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui-Meng; Yin, Da-Chuan; Ye, Ya-Jing; Luo, Hui-Min; Geng, Li-Qiang; Li, Hai-Sheng; Guo, Wei-Hong; Shang, Peng

    2009-01-01

    As the most widely utilized technique to determine the 3-dimensional structure of protein molecules, X-ray crystallography can provide structure of the highest resolution among the developed techniques. The resolution obtained via X-ray crystallography is known to be influenced by many factors, such as the crystal quality, diffraction techniques, and X-ray sources, etc. In this paper, the authors found that the protein sequence could also be one of the factors. We extracted information of the resolution and the sequence of proteins from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), classified the proteins into different clusters according to the sequence similarity, and statistically analyzed the relationship between the sequence similarity and the best resolution obtained. The results showed that there was a pronounced correlation between the sequence similarity and the obtained resolution. These results indicate that protein structure itself is one variable that may affect resolution when X-ray crystallography is used.

  14. Diffractive-refractive optics: (+,-,-,+) X-ray crystal monochromator with harmonics separation.

    PubMed

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Mikulík, Petr; Oberta, Peter

    2011-03-01

    A new kind of two channel-cut crystals X-ray monochromator in dispersive (+,-,-,+) position which spatially separates harmonics is proposed. The diffracting surfaces are oriented so that the diffraction is inclined. Owing to refraction the diffracted beam is sagittally deviated. The deviation depends on wavelength and is much higher for the first harmonics than for higher harmonics. This leads to spatial harmonics separation. The idea is supported by ray-tracing simulation.

  15. Simulating Picosecond X-ray Diffraction from shocked crystals by Post-processing Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kimminau, G; Nagler, B; Higginbotham, A

    2008-06-19

    Calculations of the x-ray diffraction patterns from shocked crystals derived from the results of Non-Equilibrium-Molecular-Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented. The atomic coordinates predicted by the NEMD simulations combined with atomic form factors are used to generate a discrete distribution of electron density. A Fast-Fourier-Transform (FFT) of this distribution provides an image of the crystal in reciprocal space, which can be further processed to produce quantitative simulated data for direct comparison with experiments that employ picosecond x-ray diffraction from laser-irradiated crystalline targets.

  16. Framework for three-dimensional coherent diffraction imaging by focused beam x-ray Bragg ptychography.

    PubMed

    Hruszkewycz, Stephan O; Holt, Martin V; Tripathi, Ash; Maser, Jörg; Fuoss, Paul H

    2011-06-15

    We present the framework for convergent beam Bragg ptychography, and, using simulations, we demonstrate that nanocrystals can be ptychographically reconstructed from highly convergent x-ray Bragg diffraction. The ptychographic iterative engine is extended to three dimensions and shown to successfully reconstruct a simulated nanocrystal using overlapping raster scans with a defocused curved beam, the diameter of which matches the crystal size. This object reconstruction strategy can serve as the basis for coherent diffraction imaging experiments at coherent scanning nanoprobe x-ray sources.

  17. X-ray laser–induced electron dynamics observed by femtosecond diffraction from nanocrystals of Buckminsterfullerene

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Darmanin, Connie; Ryan, Rebecca A.; Putkunz, Corey T.; Martin, Andrew V.; Wood, David; Streltsov, Victor; Jones, Michael W. M.; Gaffney, Naylyn; Hofmann, Felix; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Williams, Sophie; Curwood, Evan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.; Quiney, Harry M.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) deliver x-ray pulses with a coherent flux that is approximately eight orders of magnitude greater than that available from a modern third-generation synchrotron source. The power density of an XFEL pulse may be so high that it can modify the electronic properties of a sample on a femtosecond time scale. Exploration of the interaction of intense coherent x-ray pulses and matter is both of intrinsic scientific interest and of critical importance to the interpretation of experiments that probe the structures of materials using high-brightness femtosecond XFEL pulses. We report observations of the diffraction of extremely intense 32-fs nanofocused x-ray pulses by a powder sample of crystalline C60. We find that the diffraction pattern at the highest available incident power significantly differs from the one obtained using either third-generation synchrotron sources or XFEL sources operating at low output power and does not correspond to the diffraction pattern expected from any known phase of crystalline C60. We interpret these data as evidence of a long-range, coherent dynamic electronic distortion that is driven by the interaction of the periodic array of C60 molecular targets with intense x-ray pulses of femtosecond duration. PMID:27626076

  18. Compact ultrahigh vacuum sample environments for x-ray nanobeam diffraction and imaging.

    PubMed

    Evans, P G; Chahine, G; Grifone, R; Jacques, V L R; Spalenka, J W; Schülli, T U

    2013-11-01

    X-ray nanobeams present the opportunity to obtain structural insight in materials with small volumes or nanoscale heterogeneity. The effective spatial resolution of the information derived from nanobeam techniques depends on the stability and precision with which the relative position of the x-ray optics and sample can be controlled. Nanobeam techniques include diffraction, imaging, and coherent scattering, with applications throughout materials science and condensed matter physics. Sample positioning is a significant mechanical challenge for x-ray instrumentation providing vacuum or controlled gas environments at elevated temperatures. Such environments often have masses that are too large for nanopositioners capable of the required positional accuracy of the order of a small fraction of the x-ray spot size. Similarly, the need to place x-ray optics as close as 1 cm to the sample places a constraint on the overall size of the sample environment. We illustrate a solution to the mechanical challenge in which compact ion-pumped ultrahigh vacuum chambers with masses of 1-2 kg are integrated with nanopositioners. The overall size of the environment is sufficiently small to allow their use with zone-plate focusing optics. We describe the design of sample environments for elevated-temperature nanobeam diffraction experiments demonstrate in situ diffraction, reflectivity, and scanning nanobeam imaging of the ripening of Au crystallites on Si substrates.

  19. Compact ultrahigh vacuum sample environments for x-ray nanobeam diffraction and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. G.; Chahine, G.; Grifone, R.; Jacques, V. L. R.; Spalenka, J. W.; Schülli, T. U.

    2013-11-01

    X-ray nanobeams present the opportunity to obtain structural insight in materials with small volumes or nanoscale heterogeneity. The effective spatial resolution of the information derived from nanobeam techniques depends on the stability and precision with which the relative position of the x-ray optics and sample can be controlled. Nanobeam techniques include diffraction, imaging, and coherent scattering, with applications throughout materials science and condensed matter physics. Sample positioning is a significant mechanical challenge for x-ray instrumentation providing vacuum or controlled gas environments at elevated temperatures. Such environments often have masses that are too large for nanopositioners capable of the required positional accuracy of the order of a small fraction of the x-ray spot size. Similarly, the need to place x-ray optics as close as 1 cm to the sample places a constraint on the overall size of the sample environment. We illustrate a solution to the mechanical challenge in which compact ion-pumped ultrahigh vacuum chambers with masses of 1-2 kg are integrated with nanopositioners. The overall size of the environment is sufficiently small to allow their use with zone-plate focusing optics. We describe the design of sample environments for elevated-temperature nanobeam diffraction experiments demonstrate in situ diffraction, reflectivity, and scanning nanobeam imaging of the ripening of Au crystallites on Si substrates.

  20. X-ray topography using the forward transmitted beam under multiple-beam diffraction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsusaka, Y., E-mail: tsusaka@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Takano, H.; Takeda, S.

    2016-02-15

    X-ray topographs are taken for a sapphire wafer with the [0001] surface normal, as an example, by forward transmitted synchrotron x-ray beams combined with two-dimensional electronic arrays in the x-ray detector having a spatial resolution of 1 μm. They exhibit no shape deformation and no position shift of the dislocation lines on the topographs. Since the topography is performed under multiple-beam diffraction conditions, the topographic images of a single diffraction (two-wave approximation condition) or plural diffractions (six-wave approximation condition) can be recorded without large specimen position changes. As usual Lang topographs, it is possible to determine the Burgers vector ofmore » each dislocation line. Because of high parallelism of the incoming x-rays and linear sensitivity of the electronic arrays to the incident x-rays, the present technique can be used to visualize individual dislocations in single crystals of the dislocation density as high as 1 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup −2}.« less

  1. Toward in situ x-ray diffraction imaging at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Nikulin, Andrei Y.; Gable, Brian M.; Muddle, Barry C.; Sakata, Osami

    2008-08-01

    We present the results of preliminary investigations determining the sensitivity and applicability of a novel x-ray diffraction based nanoscale imaging technique, including simulations and experiments. The ultimate aim of this nascent technique is non-destructive, bulk-material characterization on the nanometer scale, involving three dimensional image reconstructions of embedded nanoparticles and in situ sample characterization. The approach is insensitive to x-ray coherence, making it applicable to synchrotron and laboratory hard x-ray sources, opening the possibility of unprecedented nanometer resolution with the latter. The technique is being developed with a focus on analyzing a technologically important light metal alloy, Al-xCu (where x is 2.0-5.0 %wt). The mono- and polycrystalline samples contain crystallographically oriented, weakly diffracting Al2Cu nanoprecipitates in a sparse, spatially random dispersion within the Al matrix. By employing a triple-axis diffractometer in the non-dispersive setup we collected two-dimensional reciprocal space maps of synchrotron x-rays diffracted from the Al2Cu nanoparticles. The intensity profiles of the diffraction peaks confirmed the sensitivity of the technique to the presence and orientation of the nanoparticles. This is a fundamental step towards in situ observation of such extremely sparse, weakly diffracting nanoprecipitates embedded in light metal alloys at early stages of their growth.

  2. New software to model energy dispersive X-ray diffraction in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghammraoui, B.; Tabary, J.; Pouget, S.; Paulus, C.; Moulin, V.; Verger, L.; Duvauchelle, Ph.

    2012-02-01

    Detection of illicit materials, such as explosives or drugs, within mixed samples is a major issue, both for general security and as part of forensic analyses. In this paper, we describe a new code simulating energy dispersive X-ray diffraction patterns in polycrystalline materials. This program, SinFullscat, models diffraction of any object in any diffractometer system taking all physical phenomena, including amorphous background, into account. Many system parameters can be tuned: geometry, collimators (slit and cylindrical), sample properties, X-ray source and detector energy resolution. Good agreement between simulations and experimental data was obtained. Simulations using explosive materials indicated that parameters such as the diffraction angle or the energy resolution of the detector have a significant impact on the diffraction signature of the material inspected. This software will be a convenient tool to test many diffractometer configurations, providing information on the one that best restores the spectral diffraction signature of the materials of interest.

  3. Femtosecond X-ray coherent diffraction of aligned amyloid fibrils on low background graphene.

    PubMed

    Seuring, Carolin; Ayyer, Kartik; Filippaki, Eleftheria; Barthelmess, Miriam; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Ringler, Philippe; Pardini, Tommaso; Wojtas, David H; Coleman, Matthew A; Dörner, Katerina; Fuglerud, Silje; Hammarin, Greger; Habenstein, Birgit; Langkilde, Annette E; Loquet, Antoine; Meents, Alke; Riek, Roland; Stahlberg, Henning; Boutet, Sébastien; Hunter, Mark S; Koglin, Jason; Liang, Mengning; Ginn, Helen M; Millane, Rick P; Frank, Matthias; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N

    2018-05-09

    Here we present a new approach to diffraction imaging of amyloid fibrils, combining a free-standing graphene support and single nanofocused X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration from an X-ray free-electron laser. Due to the very low background scattering from the graphene support and mutual alignment of filaments, diffraction from tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) filaments and amyloid protofibrils is obtained to 2.7 Å and 2.4 Å resolution in single diffraction patterns, respectively. Some TMV diffraction patterns exhibit asymmetry that indicates the presence of a limited number of axial rotations in the XFEL focus. Signal-to-noise levels from individual diffraction patterns are enhanced using computational alignment and merging, giving patterns that are superior to those obtainable from synchrotron radiation sources. We anticipate that our approach will be a starting point for further investigations into unsolved structures of filaments and other weakly scattering objects.

  4. Coded diffraction system in X-ray crystallography using a boolean phase coded aperture approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, Samuel; Poveda, Juan; Arguello, Henry

    2018-03-01

    Phase retrieval is a problem present in many applications such as optics, astronomical imaging, computational biology and X-ray crystallography. Recent work has shown that the phase can be better recovered when the acquisition architecture includes a coded aperture, which modulates the signal before diffraction, such that the underlying signal is recovered from coded diffraction patterns. Moreover, this type of modulation effect, before the diffraction operation, can be obtained using a phase coded aperture, just after the sample under study. However, a practical implementation of a phase coded aperture in an X-ray application is not feasible, because it is computationally modeled as a matrix with complex entries which requires changing the phase of the diffracted beams. In fact, changing the phase implies finding a material that allows to deviate the direction of an X-ray beam, which can considerably increase the implementation costs. Hence, this paper describes a low cost coded X-ray diffraction system based on block-unblock coded apertures that enables phase reconstruction. The proposed system approximates the phase coded aperture with a block-unblock coded aperture by using the detour-phase method. Moreover, the SAXS/WAXS X-ray crystallography software was used to simulate the diffraction patterns of a real crystal structure called Rhombic Dodecahedron. Additionally, several simulations were carried out to analyze the performance of block-unblock approximations in recovering the phase, using the simulated diffraction patterns. Furthermore, the quality of the reconstructions was measured in terms of the Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR). Results show that the performance of the block-unblock phase coded apertures approximation decreases at most 12.5% compared with the phase coded apertures. Moreover, the quality of the reconstructions using the boolean approximations is up to 2.5 dB of PSNR less with respect to the phase coded aperture reconstructions.

  5. Hydrothermal formation of tobermorite studied by in situ X-ray diffraction under autoclave condition.

    PubMed

    Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Matsui, Kunio; Sato, Masugu

    2009-09-01

    Hydrothermal formation of tobermorite from a pre-cured cake has been investigated by transmission X-ray diffraction (XRD) using high-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly designed autoclave cell. The autoclave cell has a large and thin beryllium window for wide-angle X-ray diffraction; nevertheless, it withstands a steam pressure of more than 1.2 MPa, which enables in situ XRD measurements in a temperature range of 373 to 463 K under a saturated steam pressure. Formation and/or decomposition of several components has been successfully observed during 7.5 h of reaction time. From the intensity changes of the intermediate materials, namely non-crystalline C-S-H and hydroxylellestadite, two pathways for tobermorite formation have been confirmed. Thus, the newly developed autoclave cell can be used for the analyses of reaction mechanisms under specific atmospheres and temperatures.

  6. Cryogenic x-ray diffraction microscopy utilizing high-pressure cryopreservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Enju; Chushkin, Yuriy; van der Linden, Peter; Kim, Chae Un; Zontone, Federico; Carpentier, Philippe; Gruner, Sol M.; Pernot, Petra

    2014-10-01

    We present cryo x-ray diffraction microscopy of high-pressure-cryofixed bacteria and report high-convergence imaging with multiple image reconstructions. Hydrated D. radiodurans cells were cryofixed at 200 MPa pressure into ˜10-μm-thick water layers and their unstained, hydrated cellular environments were imaged by phasing diffraction patterns, reaching sub-30-nm resolutions with hard x-rays. Comparisons were made with conventional ambient-pressure-cryofixed samples, with respect to both coherent small-angle x-ray scattering and the image reconstruction. The results show a correlation between the level of background ice signal and phasing convergence, suggesting that phasing difficulties with frozen-hydrated specimens may be caused by high-background ice scattering.

  7. Hydrogen atoms in protein structures: high-resolution X-ray diffraction structure of the DFPase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen atoms represent about half of the total number of atoms in proteins and are often involved in substrate recognition and catalysis. Unfortunately, X-ray protein crystallography at usual resolution fails to access directly their positioning, mainly because light atoms display weak contributions to diffraction. However, sub-Ångstrom diffraction data, careful modeling and a proper refinement strategy can allow the positioning of a significant part of hydrogen atoms. Results A comprehensive study on the X-ray structure of the diisopropyl-fluorophosphatase (DFPase) was performed, and the hydrogen atoms were modeled, including those of solvent molecules. This model was compared to the available neutron structure of DFPase, and differences in the protein and the active site solvation were noticed. Conclusions A further examination of the DFPase X-ray structure provides substantial evidence about the presence of an activated water molecule that may constitute an interesting piece of information as regard to the enzymatic hydrolysis mechanism. PMID:23915572

  8. Structural studies of homoisoflavonoids: NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievänen, Elina; Toušek, Jaromír; Lunerová, Kamila; Marek, Jaromír; Jankovská, Dagmar; Dvorská, Margita; Marek, Radek

    2010-08-01

    In this article we present a detailed structural investigation for five homoisoflavonoids, molecules important from the pharmacological point of view. For studying the electron distribution as well as its influence on the physicochemical properties, NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and theoretical calculations have been used. Nuclear magnetic shieldings obtained by using DFT calculations for optimized molecular geometries are correlated with the experimentally determined chemical shifts. The theoretical data are well in agreement with the experimental values. The single crystal X-ray structures of homoisoflavonoid derivatives 1, 3, and 4 have been solved. The molecular geometries and crystal packing determined by X-ray diffraction are used for characterizing the intermolecular interactions. Electron distribution is crucial for the stability of radicals and hence the antioxidant efficiency of flavonoid structures. The hydrogen bonding governs the formation of complexes of homoisoflavonoids with biological targets.

  9. A-DNA and B-DNA: Comparing Their Historical X-Ray Fiber Diffraction Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Amand A.

    2008-01-01

    A-DNA and B-DNA are two secondary molecular conformations (among other allomorphs) that double-stranded DNA drawn into a fiber can assume, depending on the relative water content and other chemical parameters of the fiber. They were the first two forms to be observed by X-ray fiber diffraction in the early 1950s, respectively by Wilkins and…

  10. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K [Hinsdale, IL

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  11. Structural investigation of porcine stomach mucin by X-ray fiber diffraction and homology modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Veluraja, K., E-mail: veluraja@msuniv.ac.in; Vennila, K.N.; Umamakeshvari, K.

    Research highlights: {yields} Techniques to get oriented mucin fibre. {yields} X-ray fibre diffraction pattern for mucin. {yields} Molecular modeling of mucin based on X-ray fibre diffraction pattern. -- Abstract: The basic understanding of the three dimensional structure of mucin is essential to understand its physiological function. Technology has been developed to achieve orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules. X-ray fiber diffraction of partially orientated porcine stomach mucin molecules show d-spacing signals at 2.99, 4.06, 4.22, 4.7, 5.37 and 6.5 A. The high intense d-spacing signal at 4.22 A is attributed to the antiparallel {beta}-sheet structure identified in the fraction of themore » homology modeled mucin molecule (amino acid residues 800-980) using Nidogen-Laminin complex structure as a template. The X-ray fiber diffraction signal at 6.5 A reveals partial organization of oligosaccharides in porcine stomach mucin. This partial structure of mucin will be helpful in establishing a three dimensional structure for the whole mucin molecule.« less

  12. High-energy X-ray diffraction using the Pixium 4700 flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Daniels, J E; Drakopoulos, M

    2009-07-01

    The Pixium 4700 detector represents a significant step forward in detector technology for high-energy X-ray diffraction. The detector design is based on digital flat-panel technology, combining an amorphous Si panel with a CsI scintillator. The detector has a useful pixel array of 1910 x 2480 pixels with a pixel size of 154 microm x 154 microm, and thus it covers an effective area of 294 mm x 379 mm. Designed for medical imaging, the detector has good efficiency at high X-ray energies. Furthermore, it is capable of acquiring sequences of images at 7.5 frames per second in full image mode, and up to 60 frames per second in binned region of interest modes. Here, the basic properties of this detector applied to high-energy X-ray diffraction are presented. Quantitative comparisons with a widespread high-energy detector, the MAR345 image plate scanner, are shown. Other properties of the Pixium 4700 detector, including a narrow point-spread function and distortion-free image, allows for the acquisition of high-quality diffraction data at high X-ray energies. In addition, high frame rates and shutterless operation open new experimental possibilities. Also provided are the necessary data for the correction of images collected using the Pixium 4700 for diffraction purposes.

  13. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  14. Structural Order-Disorder Transformations Monitored by X-Ray Diffraction and Photoluminescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima, R. C.; Paris, E. C.; Leite, E. R.; Espinosa, J. W. M.; Souza, A. G.; Longo, E.

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the structural order-disorder transformation promoted by controlled heat treatment using X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques as tools to monitor the degree of structural order. The experiment was observed to be versatile and easily achieved with low cost which allowed producing…

  15. Mineralogy by X-ray Diffraction on Mars: The Chemin Instrument on Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Rampe, E. B.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    To obtain detailed mineralogy information, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity carries CheMin, the first X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument used on a planet other than Earth. CheMin has provided the first in situ XRD analyses of full phase assemblages on another planet.

  16. Angular rheology study of colloidal nanocrystals using Coherent X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Mengning; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2007-03-01

    A new method using coherent x-ray diffraction provides a way to investigate the rotational motion of a colloidal suspension of crystals in real time. Coherent x-ray diffraction uses the long coherence lengths of synchrotron sources to illuminate a nanoscale particle coherently over its spatial dimensions. The penetration of high energy x-rays into various media allows for in-situ measurements making it ideal for suspensions. This technique has been used to image the structure of nanocrystals for some time but also has the capability of providing information about the orientation and dynamics of crystals. The particles are imaged in a specific diffraction condition allowing us to determine their orientation and observe how they rotate in real time with exceptional resolution. Such sensitivity allows for the study of rotational Brownian motion of nanocrystals in various suspensions and conditions. We present a study of the angular rheology of alumina and TiO2 colloidal nanocrystals in media using coherent x-ray diffraction.

  17. In Situ 3D Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging of Shock Experiments: Possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, John

    2011-03-01

    In traditional coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI), a 2D or quasi-2D object is illuminated by a beam of coherent X-rays to produce a diffraction pattern, which is then manipulated via a process known as iterative phase retrieval to reconstruct an image of the original 2D sample. Recently, there have been dramatic advances in methods for performing fully 3D CXDI of a sample from a single diffraction pattern [Raines et al, Nature 463 214-7 (2010)], and these methods have been used to image samples tens of microns in size using soft X-rays. In this work, I explore the theoretical possibility of applying 3D CXDI techniques to the in situ imaging of the interaction between a shock front and a polycrystal, a far more stringent problem. A delicate trade-off is required between photon energy, spot size, imaging resolution, and the dimensions of the experimental setup. In this talk, I will outline the experimental and computational requirements for performing such an experiment, and I will present images and movies from simulations of one such hypothetical experiment, including both the time-resolved X-ray diffraction patterns and the time-resolved sample imagery.

  18. Observation of sagittal X-ray diffraction by surface acoustic waves in Bragg geometry.

    PubMed

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Evgenii, Emelin; Petsiuk, Andrei; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Erko, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    X-ray Bragg diffraction in sagittal geometry on a Y-cut langasite crystal (La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 ) modulated by Λ = 3 µm Rayleigh surface acoustic waves was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Owing to the crystal lattice modulation by the surface acoustic wave diffraction, satellites appear. Their intensity and angular separation depend on the amplitude and wavelength of the ultrasonic superlattice. Experimental results are compared with the corresponding theoretical model that exploits the kinematical diffraction theory. This experiment shows that the propagation of the surface acoustic waves creates a dynamical diffraction grating on the crystal surface, and this can be used for space-time modulation of an X-ray beam.

  19. Nanomodulated electron beams via electron diffraction and emittance exchange for coherent x-ray generation

    DOE PAGES

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.; Moncton, D. E.

    2018-01-19

    We present a new method for generation of relativistic electron beams with current modulation on the nanometer scale and below. The current modulation is produced by diffracting relativistic electrons in single crystal Si, accelerating the diffracted beam and imaging the crystal structure, then transferring the image into the temporal dimension via emittance exchange. The modulation period can be tuned by adjusting electron optics after diffraction. This tunable longitudinal modulation can have a period as short as a few angstroms, enabling production of coherent hard x-rays from a source based on inverse Compton scattering with total accelerator length of approximately tenmore » meters. Electron beam simulations from cathode emission through diffraction, acceleration, and image formation with variable magnification are presented along with estimates of the coherent x-ray output properties.« less

  20. Nanomodulated electron beams via electron diffraction and emittance exchange for coherent x-ray generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.; Moncton, D. E.

    We present a new method for generation of relativistic electron beams with current modulation on the nanometer scale and below. The current modulation is produced by diffracting relativistic electrons in single crystal Si, accelerating the diffracted beam and imaging the crystal structure, then transferring the image into the temporal dimension via emittance exchange. The modulation period can be tuned by adjusting electron optics after diffraction. This tunable longitudinal modulation can have a period as short as a few angstroms, enabling production of coherent hard x-rays from a source based on inverse Compton scattering with total accelerator length of approximately tenmore » meters. Electron beam simulations from cathode emission through diffraction, acceleration, and image formation with variable magnification are presented along with estimates of the coherent x-ray output properties.« less

  1. Observation of sagittal X-ray diffraction by surface acoustic waves in Bragg geometry1

    PubMed Central

    Vadilonga, Simone; Zizak, Ivo; Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Evgenii, Emelin; Petsiuk, Andrei; Leitenberger, Wolfram; Erko, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    X-ray Bragg diffraction in sagittal geometry on a Y-cut langasite crystal (La3Ga5SiO14) modulated by Λ = 3 µm Rayleigh surface acoustic waves was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Owing to the crystal lattice modulation by the surface acoustic wave diffraction, satellites appear. Their intensity and angular separation depend on the amplitude and wavelength of the ultrasonic superlattice. Experimental results are compared with the corresponding theoretical model that exploits the kinematical diffraction theory. This experiment shows that the propagation of the surface acoustic waves creates a dynamical diffraction grating on the crystal surface, and this can be used for space–time modulation of an X-ray beam. PMID:28381976

  2. Nanomodulated electron beams via electron diffraction and emittance exchange for coherent x-ray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.; Moncton, D. E.

    2018-01-01

    We present a new method for generation of relativistic electron beams with current modulation on the nanometer scale and below. The current modulation is produced by diffracting relativistic electrons in single crystal Si, accelerating the diffracted beam and imaging the crystal structure, then transferring the image into the temporal dimension via emittance exchange. The modulation period can be tuned by adjusting electron optics after diffraction. This tunable longitudinal modulation can have a period as short as a few angstroms, enabling production of coherent hard x-rays from a source based on inverse Compton scattering with total accelerator length of approximately ten meters. Electron beam simulations from cathode emission through diffraction, acceleration, and image formation with variable magnification are presented along with estimates of the coherent x-ray output properties.

  3. Investigation of Renal Stones by X-ray and Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Baeva, M.; Boianova, A.; Beskrovnyi, A. I.

    2007-04-23

    Renal stones were investigated by X-ray diffraction. The obtained results showed only one crystal phase in every sample. With the aim to verify eventual availability of second phase (under 3 volume %) the same renal stones were investigated by neutron diffraction. The neutron spectra proved that additional crystal phase was absent in the renal stones. The obtained results are scientific-practical, in aid of the medicine, especially in the case of renal stone disease.

  4. X-ray diffraction study of elemental thulium to 86 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravica, Michael; Romano, Edward; Quine, Zachary; Pravica, Walter

    2006-03-01

    We have studied the structures and equation of state of elemental thulium up to 86 GPa in a diamond anvil cell using angular-dispersive x-ray powder diffraction methods at the Advanced Photon Source. This is part of a study of phase transitions in the lanthanide-series metals using cyclohexane as a quasi-hydrostatic medium. We present evidence of a series of phase transitions that appear to follow the anticipated hcp ->Sm-type -> dhcp -> distorted fcc sequence of transitions and show the equation of state derived from the x-ray fit data.

  5. Spread spectrum phase modulation for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuesong; Jiang, Jing; Xiangli, Bin; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-09-21

    High dynamic range, phase ambiguity and radiation limited resolution are three challenging issues in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI), which limit the achievable imaging resolution. This paper proposes a spread spectrum phase modulation (SSPM) method to address the aforementioned problems in a single strobe. The requirements on phase modulator parameters are presented, and a practical implementation of SSPM is discussed via ray optics analysis. Numerical experiments demonstrate the performance of SSPM under the constraint of available X-ray optics fabrication accuracy, showing its potential to real CXDI applications.

  6. X-ray diffraction diagnostic design for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Maryum F.; House, Allen; Smith, R. F.; Ayers, Jay; Lamb, Zachary S.; Swift, David W.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the design considerations for Target Diffraction In-Situ (TARDIS), an x-ray diffraction diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility. A crystal sample is ramp-compressed to peak pressures between 10 and 30 Mbar and, during a pressure hold period, is probed with quasi-monochromatic x-rays emanating from a backlighter source foil. The crystal spectrography diffraction lines are recorded onto image plates. The crystal sample, filter, and image plates are packaged into one assembly, allowing for accurate and repeatable target to image plate registration. Unconverted laser light impinges upon the device, generating debris, the effects of which have been mitigated. Dimpled blast shields, high strength steel alloy, and high-z tungsten are used to shield and protect the image plates. A tapered opening was designed to provide adequate thickness of shielding materials without blocking the drive beams or x-ray source from reaching the crystal target. The high strength steel unit serves as a mount for the crystal target and x-ray source foil. A tungsten body contains the imaging components. Inside this sub-assembly, there are three image plates: a 160 degree field of view curved plate directly opposite the target opening and two flat plates for the top and bottom. A polycarbonate frame, coated with the appropriate filter material and embedded with registration features for image plate location, is inserted into the diagnostic body. The target assembly is metrologized and then the diagnostic assembly is attached.

  7. Vibrational spectra, powder X-ray diffractions and physical properties of cyanide complexes with 1-ethylimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Kiraz, Fulya Çetinkaya; Sayın, Elvan

    2015-10-01

    The heteronuclear tetracyanonickelate(II) complexes of the type [M(etim)Ni(CN)4]n (hereafter, abbreviated as M-Ni-etim, M = Mn(II), Fe(II) or Co(II); etim = 1-ethylimidazole, C5H8N2) were prepared in powder form and characterized by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermal (TG; DTG and DTA), and elemental analysis techniques. The structures of these complexes were elucidated using vibrational spectra and powder X-ray diffraction patterns with the peak assignment to provide a better understanding of the structures. It is shown that the spectra are consistent with a proposed crystal structure for these compounds derived from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. Vibrational spectra of the complexes were presented and discussed with respect to the internal modes of both the etim and the cyanide ligands. The C, H and N analyses were carried out for all the complexes. Thermal behaviors of these complexes were followed using TG, DTG and DTA curves in the temperature range 30-700 °C in the static air atmosphere. The FT-IR, Raman spectra, thermal and powder X-ray analyses revealed no significant differences between the single crystal and powder forms. Additionally, electrical and magnetic properties of the complexes were investigated. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, PXRD, thermal and elemental analyses results propose that these complexes are similar in structure to the Hofmann-type complexes.

  8. A laboratory based system for laue micro x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Lynch, P A; Stevenson, A W; Liang, D; Parry, D; Wilkins, S; Tamura, N

    2007-02-01

    A laboratory diffraction system capable of illuminating individual grains in a polycrystalline matrix is described. Using a microfocus x-ray source equipped with a tungsten anode and prefigured monocapillary optic, a micro-x-ray diffraction system with a 10 microm beam was developed. The beam profile generated by the ellipsoidal capillary was determined using the "knife edge" approach. Measurement of the capillary performance, indicated a beam divergence of 14 mrad and a useable energy bandpass from 5.5 to 19 keV. Utilizing the polychromatic nature of the incident x-ray beam and application of the Laue indexing software package X-Ray Micro-Diffraction Analysis Software, the orientation and deviatoric strain of single grains in a polycrystalline material can be studied. To highlight the system potential the grain orientation and strain distribution of individual grains in a polycrystalline magnesium alloy (Mg 0.2 wt % Nd) was mapped before and after tensile loading. A basal (0002) orientation was identified in the as-rolled annealed alloy; after tensile loading some grains were observed to undergo an orientation change of 30 degrees with respect to (0002). The applied uniaxial load was measured as an increase in the deviatoric tensile strain parallel to the load axis.

  9. Line x-ray source for diffraction enhanced imaging in clinical and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqin

    Mammography is one type of imaging modalities that uses a low-dose x-ray or other radiation sources for examination of breasts. It plays a central role in early detection of breast cancers. The material similarity of tumor-cell and health cell, breast implants surgery and other factors, make the breast cancers hard to visualize and detect. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), first proposed and investigated by D. Chapman is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source, which produced images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. It shows dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging when applied to the same phantom. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also on the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. This imaging method may improve image quality of mammography, other medical applications, industrial radiography for non-destructive testing and x-ray computed tomography. However, the size, and cost, of a synchrotron source limits the application of the new modality to be applicable at clinical levels. This research investigates the feasibility of a designed line x-ray source to produce intensity compatible to synchrotron sources. It is composed of a 2-cm in length tungsten filament, installed on a carbon steel filament cup (backing plate), as the cathode and a stationary oxygen-free copper anode with molybdenum coating on the front surface serves as the target. Characteristic properties of the line x-ray source were computationally studied and the prototype was experimentally investigated. SIMIION code was used to computationally study the electron trajectories emanating from the filament towards the molybdenum target. A Faraday cup on the prototype device, proof-of-principle, was used to measure the distribution of electrons on the target, which compares favorably to computational results. The intensities of characteristic x-ray for molybdenum

  10. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N; Spence, John C H; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-04-12

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.

  11. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C. H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-04-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.

  12. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; Kang, Yanyong; He, Yuanzheng; Liu, Wei; Ishchenko, Andrii; White, Thomas A.; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Han, Gye Won; Xu, Qingping; de Waal, Parker W.; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Wang, Meitian; Li, Dianfan; Caffrey, Martin; Chapman, Henry N.; Spence, John C.H.; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solved with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes. PMID:27070998

  13. Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J.; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Intense femtosecond X-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of Photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD/XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies. PMID:23413188

  14. Simultaneous femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction of photosystem II at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; Difiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Koglin, Jason E; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Zwart, Petrus H; White, William E; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D; Bogan, Michael J; Williams, Garth J; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K; Yachandra, Vittal K; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-04-26

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD-XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies.

  15. Microscopy of biological sample through advanced diffractive optics from visible to X-ray wavelength regime.

    PubMed

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cojoc, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina; Cabrini, Stefano; Coppey-Moisan, Maite; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Altissimo, Matteo

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this report is to demonstrate a unified version of microscopy through the use of advanced diffractive optics. The unified scheme derives from the technical possibility of realizing front wave engineering in a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and nanofabrication of phase diffractive elements (PDE) through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular, we will show applications, by using biological samples, ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy combined with X-ray fluorescence. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that besides focusing also perform other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity, and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of micro-beads surrounding a cell as an array of tweezers and for arraying and sorting microscopic size biological samples. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gauss mode conversion, which allows for trapping and transfering orbital angular momentum of light to micro-particles immersed in a fluid. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for diffractive optics implementation. High-resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in x-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field x-ray microscopy. Besides the topographic information, fluorescence allows detection of certain chemical elements (Cl, P, Sc, K) in the same setup, by changing the photon energy of the x-ray beam. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Nondestructive strain depth profiling with high energy X-ray diffraction: System capabilities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhan; Wendt, Scott; Cosentino, Nicholas; Bond, Leonard J.

    2018-04-01

    Limited by photon energy, and penetration capability, traditional X-ray diffraction (XRD) strain measurements are only capable of achieving a few microns depth due to the use of copper (Cu Kα1) or molybdenum (Mo Kα1) characteristic radiation. For deeper strain depth profiling, destructive methods are commonly necessary to access layers of interest by removing material. To investigate deeper depth profiles nondestructively, a laboratory bench-top high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) system was previously developed. This HEXRD method uses an industrial 320 kVp X-Ray tube and the Kα1 characteristic peak of tungsten, to produces a higher intensity X-ray beam which enables depth profiling measurement of lattice strain. An aluminum sample was investigated with deformation/load provided using a bending rig. It was shown that the HEXRD method is capable of strain depth profiling to 2.5 mm. The method was validated using an aluminum sample where both the HEXRD method and the traditional X-ray diffraction method gave data compared with that obtained using destructive etching layer removal, performed by a commercial provider. The results demonstrate comparable accuracy up to 0.8 mm depth. Nevertheless, higher attenuation capabilities in heavier metals limit the applications in other materials. Simulations predict that HEXRD works for steel and nickel in material up to 200 µm, but experiment results indicate that the HEXRD strain profile is not practical for steel and nickel material, and the measured diffraction signals are undetectable when compared to the noise.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiment of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Chiba-Kamoshida, Kaori; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-12-01

    Nattokinase is a single polypeptide chain composed of 275 amino acids (molecular weight 27,724) which displays strong fibrinolytic activity. Moreover, it can activate other fibrinolytic enzymes such as pro-urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. In the present study, native nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto was purified using gel-filtration chromatography and crystallized to give needle-like crystals which could be used for X-ray diffraction experiments. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=74.3, b=49.9, c=56.3 Å, β=95.2°. Diffraction images were processed to a resolution of 1.74 Å with an Rmerge of 5.2% (15.3% in the highest resolution shell) and a completeness of 69.8% (30.0% in the highest resolution shell). This study reports the first X-ray diffraction analysis of nattokinase.

  18. Apparatus for X-ray diffraction microscopy and tomography of cryo specimens

    DOE PAGES

    Beetz, T.; Howells, M. R.; Jacobsen, C.; ...

    2005-03-14

    An apparatus for diffraction microscopy of biological and materials science specimens is described. In this system, a coherent soft X-ray beam is selected with a pinhole, and the illuminated specimen is followed by an adjustable beamstop and CCD camera to record diffraction data from non-crystalline specimens. In addition, a Fresnel zone plate can be inserted to allow for direct imaging. The system makes use of a cryogenic specimen holder with cryotransfer capabilities to allow frozen hydrated specimens to be loaded. The specimen can be tilted over a range of ± 80 ° degrees for three-dimensional imaging; this is done bymore » computer-controlled motors, enabling automated alignment of the specimen through a tilt series. The system is now in use for experiments in soft X-ray diffraction microscopy.« less

  19. Rosalind Franklin's X-ray photo of DNA as an undergraduate optical diffraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J.; Braun, G.; Tierney, D.; Wessels, L.; Schmitzer, H.; Rossa, B.; Wagner, H. P.; Dultz, W.

    2018-02-01

    Rosalind Franklin's X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA molecules rendered the important clue that DNA has the structure of a double helix. The most famous X-ray photograph, Photo 51, is still printed in most Biology textbooks. We suggest two optical experiments for undergraduates that make this historic achievement comprehensible for students by using macromodels of DNA and visible light to recreate a diffraction pattern similar to Photo 51. In these macromodels, we replace the double helix both mathematically and experimentally with its two-dimensional (flat) projection and explain why this is permissible. Basic optical concepts are used to infer certain well-known characteristics of DNA from the diffraction pattern.

  20. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from an aerosolized beam of protein nanocrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Awel, Salah; Kirian, Richard A.; Wiedorn, Max O.; ...

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution Bragg diffraction from aerosolized single granulovirus nanocrystals using an X-ray free-electron laser is demonstrated. The outer dimensions of the in-vacuum aerosol injector components are identical to conventional liquid-microjet nozzles used in serial diffraction experiments, which allows the injector to be utilized with standard mountings. As compared with liquid-jet injection, the X-ray scattering background is reduced by several orders of magnitude by the use of helium carrier gas rather than liquid. Such reduction is required for diffraction measurements of small macromolecular nanocrystals and single particles. High particle speeds are achieved, making the approach suitable for use at upcoming high-repetition-rate facilities.

  1. Characterization of X80 and X100 Microalloyed Pipeline Steel Using Quantitative X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiskel, J. B.; Li, X.; Ivey, D. G.; Henein, H.

    2018-06-01

    Quantitative X-ray diffraction characterization of four (4) X80 and three (3) X100 microalloyed steels was undertaken. The effect of through-thickness position, processing parameters, and composition on the measured crystallite size, microstrain, and J index (relative magnitude of crystallographic texture) was determined. Microstructure analysis using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron-backscattered diffraction was also undertaken. The measured value of microstrain increased with increasing alloy content and decreasing cooling interrupt temperature. Microstructural features corresponding to crystallite size in the X80 steels were both above and below the detection limit for quantitative X-ray diffraction. The X100 steels consistently exhibited microstructure features below the crystallite size detection limit. The yield stress of each steel increased with increasing microstrain. The increase in microstrain from X80 to X100 is also associated with a change in microstructure from predominantly polygonal ferrite to bainitic ferrite.

  2. Synchrotron X-Ray Reciprocal Space Mapping, Topography and Diffraction Resolution Studies of Macromolecular Crystal Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggon, T. J.; Helliwell, J. R.; Judge, Russell A.; Siddons, D. P.; Snell, Edward H.; Stojanoff, V.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive study of microgravity and ground grown chicken egg white lysozyme crystals is presented using synchrotron X-ray reciprocal space mapping, topography techniques and diffraction resolution. Microgravity crystals displayed, on average, reduced intrinsic mosaicities but no differences in terms of stress over their earth grown counterparts. Topographic analysis revealed that in the microgravity case the majority of the crystal was contributing to the peak of the reflection at the appropriate Bragg angle. In the earth case at the diffraction peak only a small volume of the crystal contributed to the intensity. The techniques prove to be highly complementary with the reciprocal space mapping providing a quantitative measure of the crystal mosaicity and stress (or variation in lattice spacing) and topography providing a qualitative overall assessment of the crystal in terms of its X-ray diffraction properties. Structural data collection was also carried out both at the synchrotron and in the laboratory.

  3. Exploring coherent electron excitation and migration dynamics by electron diffraction with ultrashort X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D

    2017-10-04

    Exploring ultrafast charge migration is of great importance in biological and chemical reactions. We present a scheme to monitor attosecond charge migration in molecules by electron diffraction with spatial and temporal resolutions from ab initio numerical simulations. An ultraviolet pulse creates a coherent superposition of electronic states, after which a time-delayed attosecond X-ray pulse is used to ionize the molecule. It is found that diffraction patterns in the X-ray photoelectron spectra show an asymmetric structure, which is dependent on the time delay between the pump-probe pulses, encoding the information of molecular orbital symmetry and chemical bonding. We describe these phenomena by developing an electronic time-dependent ultrafast molecular photoionization model of a coherent superposition state. The periodical distortion of electron diffraction patterns illustrates the evolution of the electronic coherence, providing a tool for attosecond imaging of ultrafast molecular reaction processes.

  4. JMFA2—a graphically interactive Java program that fits microfibril angle X-ray diffraction data

    Treesearch

    Steve P. Verrill; David E. Kretschmann; Victoria L. Herian

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction techniques have the potential to decrease the time required to determine microfibril angles dramatically. In this paper, we discuss the latest version of a curve-fitting toll that permits us to reduce the time required to evaluate MFA X-ray diffraction patterns. Further, because this tool reflects the underlying physics more accurately than existing...

  5. Preliminary small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction studies of the BTB domain of lola protein from Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, K. M.; Nikolaeva, A. Yu.; Kachalova, G. S.; Bonchuk, A. N.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Popov, V. O.

    2017-11-01

    The Drosophila genome has several dozens of transcription factors (TTK group) containing BTB domains assembled into octamers. The LOLA protein belongs to this family. The purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of the BTB domain of this protein are reported. The crystallization conditions were found by the vapor-diffusion technique. A very low diffraction resolution (8.7 Å resolution) of the crystals was insufficient for the determination of the threedimensional structure of the BTB domain. The SAXS study demonstrated that the BTB domain of the LOLA protein exists as an octamer in solution.

  6. Analytical characterization of a new mobile X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction instrument combined with a pigment identification case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Voorde, Lien; Vekemans, Bart; Verhaeven, Eddy; Tack, Pieter; De Wolf, Robin; Garrevoet, Jan; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-08-01

    A new, commercially available, mobile system combining X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence has been evaluated which enables both elemental analysis and phase identification simultaneously. The instrument makes use of a copper or molybdenum based miniature X-ray tube and a silicon-Pin diode energy-dispersive detector to count the photons originating from the samples. The X-ray tube and detector are both mounted on an X-ray diffraction protractor in a Bragg-Brentano θ:θ geometry. The mobile instrument is one of the lightest and most compact instruments of its kind (3.5 kg) and it is thus very useful for in situ purposes such as the direct (non-destructive) analysis of cultural heritage objects which need to be analyzed on site without any displacement. The supplied software allows both the operation of the instrument for data collection and in-depth data analysis using the International Centre for Diffraction Data database. This paper focuses on the characterization of the instrument, combined with a case study on pigment identification and an illustrative example for the analysis of lead alloyed printing letters. The results show that this commercially available light-weight instrument is able to identify the main crystalline phases non-destructively, present in a variety of samples, with a high degree of flexibility regarding sample size and position.

  7. A Curved Image-Plate Detector System for High-Resolution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, P.; Haggerty, R; Yoon, W

    2009-01-01

    The developed curved image plate (CIP) is a one-dimensional detector which simultaneously records high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns over a 38.7 2{theta} range. In addition, an on-site reader enables rapid extraction, transfer and storage of X-ray intensity information in {le}30 s, and further qualifies this detector to study kinetic processes in materials science. The CIP detector can detect and store X-ray intensity information linearly proportional to the incident photon flux over a dynamical range of about five orders of magnitude. The linearity and uniformity of the CIP detector response is not compromised in the unsaturated regions of the image plate,more » regardless of saturation in another region. The speed of XRD data acquisition together with excellent resolution afforded by the CIP detector is unique and opens up wide possibilities in materials research accessible through X-ray diffraction. This article presents details of the basic features, operation and performance of the CIP detector along with some examples of applications, including high-temperature XRD.« less

  8. Coherent convergent-beam time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Spence, John C. H.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Li, Chufeng

    2014-01-01

    The use of coherent X-ray lasers for structural biology allows the use of nanometre diameter X-ray beams with large beam divergence. Their application to the structure analysis of protein nanocrystals and single particles raises new challenges and opportunities. We discuss the form of these coherent convergent-beam (CCB) hard X-ray diffraction patterns and their potential use for time-resolved crystallography, normally achieved by Laue (polychromatic) diffraction, for which the monochromatic laser radiation of a free-electron X-ray laser is unsuitable. We discuss the possibility of obtaining single-shot, angle-integrated rocking curves from CCB patterns, and the dependence of the resulting patterns on the focused beam coordinate when the beam diameter is larger or smaller than a nanocrystal, or smaller than one unit cell. We show how structure factor phase information is provided at overlapping interfering orders and how a common phase origin between different shots may be obtained. Their use in refinement of the phase-sensitive intensity between overlapping orders is suggested. PMID:24914153

  9. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction Study of Acoustoelectrically Amplified Phonons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Leroy Dean

    X-rays diffracted by nearly perfect crystals of n-type InSb have been investigated in the presence of intense acoustoelectrically (A.E.) amplified phonons. The fact that these phonons are nearly monochromatic and have a well defined propagation and polarization direction presents an excellent opportunity to investigate the nature of x -ray photon-phonon scattering in a diffracting crystal. The Debye-Waller factor which accounts for the attenuation of diffracted x-ray intensities due to thermal phonons is reflection dependent owing to its sin (theta)/(lamda) dependence. We have performed experiments comparing the (004) and (008) anomalously transmitted intensities as a function of A.E. amplified flux. The attenuation of both reflections due to the amplified phonons was the same in direct contradiction to an expected sin (theta)/(lamda) dependence. Some possible reasons for this failure are discussed. In a Bragg reflection scattering geometry, the intense monochromatic amplified phonons give rise to satellite peaks symmetrically located about the central elastic Brag peak in a rocking profile. We report in this thesis on the first observation of satellites in a thin crystal Laue transmission geometry. We have theoretically simulated the rocking profiles with some success. The A.E. amplification process in InSb is strongly favored for {110} propagation fast transverse (FT) phonons. In earlier experiments it was found that non-{110} FT phonons were also produced during the amplification process. We have developed a time resolved x-ray counting system which, in conjunction with a spatially resolved x-ray beam and a localized, traveling A.E. phonon distribution, allow the time evolution of the amplified distribution to be followed. We report on time resolved measurements for both the symmetric Bragg and Laue geometries from which we can determine when and where non-{110 } FT flux is generated and restrict the possible mechanisms for its generation.

  10. X-ray plane-wave diffraction effects in a crystal with third-order nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Balyan, M. K., E-mail: mbalyan@ysu.am

    The two-wave dynamical diffraction in the Laue geometry has been theoretically considered for a plane X-ray wave in a crystal with a third-order nonlinear response to the external field. An analytical solution to the problem stated is found for certain diffraction conditions. A nonlinear pendulum effect is analyzed. The nonlinear extinction length is found to depend on the incident-wave intensity. A pendulum effect of a new type is revealed: the intensities of the transmitted and diffracted waves periodically depend on the incidentwave intensity at a fixed crystal thickness. The rocking curves and Borrmann nonlinear effect are numerically calculated.

  11. X-Ray Diffraction Study of the Internal Structure of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Boyd, Bemrose

    1951-01-01

    A Bragg X-ray spectrometer equipped with a volume-sensitive Geiger counter and Soller slits and employing filtered molybdenum Ka radiation was used to obtain a set of diffracted intensity curves as a Punction of angle for supercooled water. Diffracted intensity curves in the temperature region of 21 to -16 C were obtained. The minimum between the two main diffraction peaks deepened continuously with lowering temperature, indicating a gradual change in the internal structure of the water. No discontinuity in this trend was noted at the melting point. The internal structure of supercooled water was concluded to become progressively more ice-like as the temperature is lowered.

  12. Spectral x-ray diffraction using a 6 megapixel photon counting array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2015-03-01

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging.

  13. Spectral X-Ray Diffraction using a 6 Megapixel Photon Counting Array Detector.

    PubMed

    Muir, Ryan D; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R; Muir, J Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z; Battaile, Kevin P; Mulichak, Anne M; Toth, Scott J; Keefe, Lisa J; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-03-12

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging.

  14. How many photons are needed to reconstruct random objects in coherent X-ray diffractive imaging?

    PubMed

    Jahn, T; Wilke, R N; Chushkin, Y; Salditt, T

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the reconstructibility of coherent X-ray diffractive imaging diffraction patterns for a class of binary random `bitmap' objects. Combining analytical results and numerical simulations, the critical fluence per bitmap pixel is determined, for arbitrary contrast values (absorption level and phase shift), both for the optical near- and far-field. This work extends previous investigations based on information theory, enabling a comparison of the amount of information carried by single photons in different diffraction regimes. The experimental results show an order-of-magnitude agreement.

  15. Simulations of in situ x-ray diffraction from uniaxially compressed highly textured polycrystalline targets

    SciTech Connect

    McGonegle, David, E-mail: d.mcgonegle1@physics.ox.ac.uk; Wark, Justin S.; Higginbotham, Andrew

    2015-08-14

    A growing number of shock compression experiments, especially those involving laser compression, are taking advantage of in situ x-ray diffraction as a tool to interrogate structure and microstructure evolution. Although these experiments are becoming increasingly sophisticated, there has been little work on exploiting the textured nature of polycrystalline targets to gain information on sample response. Here, we describe how to generate simulated x-ray diffraction patterns from materials with an arbitrary texture function subject to a general deformation gradient. We will present simulations of Debye-Scherrer x-ray diffraction from highly textured polycrystalline targets that have been subjected to uniaxial compression, as maymore » occur under planar shock conditions. In particular, we study samples with a fibre texture, and find that the azimuthal dependence of the diffraction patterns contains information that, in principle, affords discrimination between a number of similar shock-deformation mechanisms. For certain cases, we compare our method with results obtained by taking the Fourier transform of the atomic positions calculated by classical molecular dynamics simulations. Illustrative results are presented for the shock-induced α–ϵ phase transition in iron, the α–ω transition in titanium and deformation due to twinning in tantalum that is initially preferentially textured along [001] and [011]. The simulations are relevant to experiments that can now be performed using 4th generation light sources, where single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from crystals compressed via laser-ablation can be obtained on timescales shorter than a phonon period.« less

  16. Simulations of in situ x-ray diffraction from uniaxially compressed highly textured polycrystalline targets

    DOE PAGES

    McGonegle, David; Milathianaki, Despina; Remington, Bruce A.; ...

    2015-08-11

    A growing number of shock compression experiments, especially those involving laser compression, are taking advantage of in situ x-ray diffraction as a tool to interrogate structure and microstructure evolution. Although these experiments are becoming increasingly sophisticated, there has been little work on exploiting the textured nature of polycrystalline targets to gain information on sample response. Here, we describe how to generate simulated x-ray diffraction patterns from materials with an arbitrary texture function subject to a general deformation gradient. We will present simulations of Debye-Scherrer x-ray diffraction from highly textured polycrystalline targets that have been subjected to uniaxial compression, as maymore » occur under planar shock conditions. In particular, we study samples with a fibre texture, and find that the azimuthal dependence of the diffraction patterns contains information that, in principle, affords discrimination between a number of similar shock-deformation mechanisms. For certain cases, we compare our method with results obtained by taking the Fourier transform of the atomic positions calculated by classical molecular dynamics simulations. Illustrative results are presented for the shock-induced α–ϵ phase transition in iron, the α–ω transition in titanium and deformation due to twinning in tantalum that is initially preferentially textured along [001] and [011]. In conclusion, the simulations are relevant to experiments that can now be performed using 4th generation light sources, where single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from crystals compressed via laser-ablation can be obtained on timescales shorter than a phonon period.« less

  17. Innovative diffraction gratings for high-resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, D.L.; Warwick, T.; Gullikson, E. M.

    2016-07-27

    High-resolution Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) requires diffraction gratings with very exacting characteristics. The gratings should provide both very high dispersion and high efficiency which are conflicting requirements and extremely challenging to satisfy in the soft x-ray region for a traditional grazing incidence geometry. To achieve high dispersion one should increase the groove density of a grating; this however results in a diffraction angle beyond the critical angle range and results in drastic efficiency loss. The problem can be solved by use of multilayer coated blazed gratings (MBG). In this work we have investigated the diffraction characteristics of MBGs viamore » numerical simulations and have developed a procedure for optimization of grating design for a multiplexed high resolution imaging spectrometer for RIXS spectroscopy to be built in sector 6 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). We found that highest diffraction efficiency can be achieved for gratings optimized for 4{sup th} or 5{sup th} order operation. Fabrication of such gratings is an extremely challenging technological problem. We present a first experimental prototype of these gratings and report its performance. High order and high line density gratings have the potential to be a revolutionary new optical element that should have great impact in the area of soft x-ray RIXS.« less

  18. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; ...

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecondmore » X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.« less

  19. The Scherrer equation and the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Francisco Tiago Leitão; Miranda, Marcus Aurélio Ribeiro; Morilla Dos Santos, Cássio; Sasaki, José Marcos

    2016-05-01

    The Scherrer equation is a widely used tool to determine the crystallite size of polycrystalline samples. However, it is not clear if one can apply it to large crystallite sizes because its derivation is based on the kinematical theory of X-ray diffraction. For large and perfect crystals, it is more appropriate to use the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. Because of the appearance of polycrystalline materials with a high degree of crystalline perfection and large sizes, it is the authors' belief that it is important to establish the crystallite size limit for which the Scherrer equation can be applied. In this work, the diffraction peak profiles are calculated using the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction for several Bragg reflections and crystallite sizes for Si, LaB6 and CeO2. The full width at half-maximum is then extracted and the crystallite size is computed using the Scherrer equation. It is shown that for crystals with linear absorption coefficients below 2117.3 cm(-1) the Scherrer equation is valid for crystallites with sizes up to 600 nm. It is also shown that as the size increases only the peaks at higher 2θ angles give good results, and if one uses peaks with 2θ > 60° the limit for use of the Scherrer equation would go up to 1 µm.

  20. Quantitative Imaging of Single Unstained Magnetotactic Bacteria by Coherent X-ray Diffraction Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiadong; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Qingjie; Yao, Shengkun; Zong, Yunbing; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Huaidong

    2015-06-16

    Novel coherent diffraction microscopy provides a powerful lensless imaging method to obtain a better understanding of the microorganism at the nanoscale. Here we demonstrated quantitative imaging of intact unstained magnetotactic bacteria using coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy combined with an iterative phase retrieval algorithm. Although the signal-to-noise ratio of the X-ray diffraction pattern from single magnetotactic bacterium is weak due to low-scattering ability of biomaterials, an 18.6 nm half-period resolution of reconstructed image was achieved by using a hybrid input-output phase retrieval algorithm. On the basis of the quantitative reconstructed images, the morphology and some intracellular structures, such as nucleoid, polyβ-hydroxybutyrate granules, and magnetosomes, were identified, which were also confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. With the benefit from the quantifiability of coherent diffraction imaging, for the first time to our knowledge, an average density of magnetotactic bacteria was calculated to be ∼1.19 g/cm(3). This technique has a wide range of applications, especially in quantitative imaging of low-scattering biomaterials and multicomponent materials at nanoscale resolution. Combined with the cryogenic technique or X-ray free electron lasers, the method could image cells in a hydrated condition, which helps to maintain their natural structure.

  1. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  2. Rapid feedback of chemical vapor deposition growth mechanisms by operando X-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, Aiden A.; Depond, Philip J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; ...

    2018-03-14

    An operando x-ray diffraction system is presented for elucidating optimal laser assisted chemical vapor deposition growth conditions. The technique is utilized to investigate deposition dynamics of boron-carbon materials using trimethyl borate precursor. Trimethyl borate exhibits vastly reduced toxicological and flammability hazards compared to existing precursors, but has previously not been applied to boron carbide growth. Crystalline boron-rich carbide material is produced in a narrow growth regime on addition of hydrogen during the growth phase at high temperature. Finally, the use of the operando x-ray diffraction system allows for the exploration of highly nonequilibrium conditions and rapid process control, which aremore » not possible using ex situ diagnostics.« less

  3. Nondestructive X-ray diffraction measurement of warpage in silicon dies embedded in integrated circuit packages.

    PubMed

    Tanner, B K; Danilewsky, A N; Vijayaraghavan, R K; Cowley, A; McNally, P J

    2017-04-01

    Transmission X-ray diffraction imaging in both monochromatic and white beam section mode has been used to measure quantitatively the displacement and warpage stress in encapsulated silicon devices. The displacement dependence with position on the die was found to agree well with that predicted from a simple model of warpage stress. For uQFN microcontrollers, glued only at the corners, the measured misorientation contours are consistent with those predicted using finite element analysis. The absolute displacement, measured along a line through the die centre, was comparable to that reported independently by high-resolution X-ray diffraction and optical interferometry of similar samples. It is demonstrated that the precision is greater than the spread of values found in randomly selected batches of commercial devices, making the techniques viable for industrial inspection purposes.

  4. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-07

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20 mol % ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  5. Anomalous x-ray diffraction on InAs/GaAs quantum dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulli, T. U.; Sztucki, M.; Chamard, V.; Metzger, T. H.; Schuh, D.

    2002-07-01

    Free-standing InAs quantum dots on a GaAs (001) substrate have been investigated using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. To suppress the strong scattering contribution from the GaAs substrate, we performed anomalous diffraction experiments at the superstructure (200) reflection, showing that the relative intensities from the dots and the substrate undergo a significant change with the x-ray energy below and above the As K edge. Since the signal from the substrate material can essentially be suppressed, this method is ideally suited for the investigation of strain, shape, and interdiffusion of buried quantum dots and quantum dots embedded in heteroepitaxial multilayers. In addition, we show that it can be used as a tool for studying wetting layers.

  6. Setup for in situ x-ray diffraction study of swift heavy ion irradiated materials.

    PubMed

    Kulriya, P K; Singh, F; Tripathi, A; Ahuja, R; Kothari, A; Dutt, R N; Mishra, Y K; Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D K

    2007-11-01

    An in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of the Pelletron accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre for in situ studies of phase change in swift heavy ion irradiated materials. A high vacuum chamber with suitable windows for incident and diffracted X-rays is integrated with the goniometer and the beamline. Indigenously made liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature sample cooling unit is installed. The snapshots of growth of particles with fluence of 90 MeV Ni ions were recorded using in situ XRD experiment, illustrating the potential of this in situ facility. A thin film of C60 was used to test the sample cooling unit. It shows that the phase of the C60 film transforms from a cubic lattice (at room temperature) to a fcc lattice at around T=255 K.

  7. Experimental Approaches for Solution X-Ray Scattering and Fiber Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Irving, T. C.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray scattering and diffraction from non-crystalline systems have gained renewed interest in recent years, as focus shifts from the structural chemistry information gained by high-resolution studies to the context of structural physiology at larger length scales. Such techniques permit the study of isolated macromolecules as well as highly organized macromolecular assemblies as a whole under near-physiological conditions. Time-resolved approaches, made possible by advanced synchrotron instrumentation, add a critical dimension to many of these investigations. This article reviews experimental approaches in non-crystalline x-ray scattering and diffraction that may be used to illuminate important scientific questions such as protein/nucleic acid folding and structure-function relationships in large macromolecular assemblies. PMID:18801437

  8. Big Sky and Greenhorn Drill Holes and CheMin X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-17

    The graph at right presents information from the NASA Curiosity Mars rover's onboard analysis of rock powder drilled from the "Big Sky" and "Greenhorn" target locations, shown at left. X-ray diffraction analysis of the Greenhorn sample inside the rover's Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument revealed an abundance of silica in the form of noncrystalline opal. The broad hump in the background of the X-ray diffraction pattern for Greenhorn, compared to Big Sky, is diagnostic of opal. The image of Big Sky at upper left was taken by the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera the day the hole was drilled, Sept. 29, 2015, during the mission's 1,119th Martian day, or sol. The Greenhorn hole was drilled, and the MAHLI image at lower left was taken, on Oct. 18, 2015 (Sol 1137). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20272

  9. 3D coherent X-ray diffractive imaging of an Individual colloidal crystal grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, A.; Meijer, J.-M.; Sprung, M.; Petukhov, A. V.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    Self-assembled colloidal crystals represent an important model system to study nucleation phenomena and solid-solid phase transitions. They are attractive for applications in photonics and sensorics. We present results of a coherent x-ray diffractive imaging experiment performed on a single colloidal crystal grain. The full three-dimensional (3D) reciprocal space map measured by an azimuthal rotational scan contained several orders of Bragg reflections together with the coherent interference signal between them. Applying the iterative phase retrieval approach, the 3D structure of the crystal grain was reconstructed and positions of individual colloidal particles were resolved. We identified an exact stacking sequence of hexagonal close-packed layers including planar and linear defects. Our results open up a breakthrough in applications of coherent x-ray diffraction for visualization of the inner 3D structure of different mesoscopic materials, such as photonic crystals. Present address: University of California - San Diego, USA.

  10. BX90: A new diamond anvil cell design for X-ray diffraction and optical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, I.; Prakapenka, V.; Kantor, A.; Dera, P.; Kurnosov, A.; Sinogeikin, S.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Dubrovinsky, L.

    2012-12-01

    We present a new design of a universal diamond anvil cell, suitable for different kinds of experimental studies under high pressures. Main features of the cell are an ultimate 90-degrees symmetrical axial opening and high stability, making the presented cell design suitable for a whole range of techniques from optical absorption to single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies, also in combination with external resistive or double-side laser heating. Three examples of the cell applications are provided: a Brillouin scattering of neon, single-crystal X-ray diffraction of α-Cr2O3, and resistivity measurements on the (Mg0.60Fe0.40)(Si0.63Al0.37)O3 silicate perovskite.

  11. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  12. Crystallographic texture of straight-rolled ?-uranium foils via neutron and X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Einhorn, J. R.; Steiner, M. A.; Vogel, S. C.

    The texture of recrystallized straight-rolled ?-uranium foils, a component in prospective irradiation target designs for medical isotope production, has been measured by neutron diffraction, as well as X-ray diffraction using both Cu and Mo sources. Variations in the penetration depth of neutron and X-ray radiation allow for determination of both the bulk and surface textures. The bulk ?-uranium foil texture is similar to the warm straight-rolled plate texture, with the addition of a notable splitting of the (001) poles along the transverse direction. The surface texture of the foils is similar to the bulk, with an additional (001) texture componentmore » that is oriented between the rolling and normal directions. Differences between the surface and bulk textures are expected to arise from shear forces during the rolling process and the influence that distinct strain histories have on subsequent texture evolution during recrystallization.« less

  13. Crystallographic texture of straight-rolled ?-uranium foils via neutron and X-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Einhorn, J. R.; Steiner, M. A.; Vogel, S. C.; ...

    2017-05-25

    The texture of recrystallized straight-rolled ?-uranium foils, a component in prospective irradiation target designs for medical isotope production, has been measured by neutron diffraction, as well as X-ray diffraction using both Cu and Mo sources. Variations in the penetration depth of neutron and X-ray radiation allow for determination of both the bulk and surface textures. The bulk ?-uranium foil texture is similar to the warm straight-rolled plate texture, with the addition of a notable splitting of the (001) poles along the transverse direction. The surface texture of the foils is similar to the bulk, with an additional (001) texture componentmore » that is oriented between the rolling and normal directions. Differences between the surface and bulk textures are expected to arise from shear forces during the rolling process and the influence that distinct strain histories have on subsequent texture evolution during recrystallization.« less

  14. Rapid feedback of chemical vapor deposition growth mechanisms by operando X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Aiden A.; Depond, Philip J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael

    An operando x-ray diffraction system is presented for elucidating optimal laser assisted chemical vapor deposition growth conditions. The technique is utilized to investigate deposition dynamics of boron-carbon materials using trimethyl borate precursor. Trimethyl borate exhibits vastly reduced toxicological and flammability hazards compared to existing precursors, but has previously not been applied to boron carbide growth. Crystalline boron-rich carbide material is produced in a narrow growth regime on addition of hydrogen during the growth phase at high temperature. Finally, the use of the operando x-ray diffraction system allows for the exploration of highly nonequilibrium conditions and rapid process control, which aremore » not possible using ex situ diagnostics.« less

  15. Solution to the Phase Problem Using Multibeam X-Ray Diffraction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qun

    Multi-beam x-ray diffraction, especially the asymmetry effect in the virtual Bragg scattering case, has been proved to provide useful phase information on the structure factors that are involved in the scattering process. A perturbation theory has been developed to provide an analytical expression for the diffracted wave field in virtual Bragg scattering situations, which explains the physical origin of the asymmetry effect. Two experiments on the (202) reflection of benzil, using 3.5 keV x-rays, have shown that the asymmetry effect is visible in a mosaic non-centrosymmetric organic crystal. The results do not depend on the shape of the crystal, hence proving that the method is universally applicable. A practical method to obtain arbitrary values of the phase triplet, based on the perturbation theory, has been developed and shown to work in the case of non-centrosymmetric crystals like benzil.

  16. Crystallographic Characterization of Extraterrestrial Materials by Energy-Scanning X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagiya, Kenji; Mikouchi, Takashi; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Terada, Yasuko; Yagi, Naoto; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Hirata, Arashi; Kurokawa, Ayaka; Zolensky, Michael E. (Principal Investigator)

    2016-01-01

    We have continued our long-term project using X-ray diffraction to characterize a wide range of extraterrestrial samples. The stationary sample method with polychromatic X-rays is advantageous because the irradiated area of the sample is always same and fixed, meaning that all diffraction spots occur from the same area of the sample, however, unit cell parameters cannot be directly obtained by this method though they are very important for identification of mineral and for determination of crystal structures. In order to obtain the cell parameters even in the case of the sample stationary method, we apply energy scanning of a micro-beam of monochromatic SR at SPring-8.

  17. Equation of state for technetium from X-ray diffraction and first-principle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, Daniel S.; Kim, Eunja; Siska, Emily M.; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Lavina, Barbara; Forster, Paul M.

    2016-08-01

    The ambient temperature equation of state (EoS) of technetium metal has been measured by X-ray diffraction. The metal was compressed using a diamond anvil cell and using a 4:1 methanol-ethanol pressure transmitting medium. The maximum pressure achieved, as determined from the gold pressureEquation of state for technetium from X-ray diffraction and first-principle calculations scale, was 67 GPa. The compression data shows that the HCP phase of technetium is stable up to 67 GPa. The compression curve of technetium was also calculated using first-principles total-energy calculations. Utilizing a number of fitting strategies to compare the experimental and theoretical data it is determined that the Vinet equation of state with an ambient isothermal bulk modulus of B0T=288 GPa and a first pressure derivative of B‧=5.9(2) best represent the compression behavior of technetium metal.

  18. Setup for in situ x-ray diffraction study of swift heavy ion irradiated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Singh, F.; Tripathi, A.; Ahuja, R.; Kothari, A.; Dutt, R. N.; Mishra, Y. K.; Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D. K.

    2007-11-01

    An in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of the Pelletron accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre for in situ studies of phase change in swift heavy ion irradiated materials. A high vacuum chamber with suitable windows for incident and diffracted X-rays is integrated with the goniometer and the beamline. Indigenously made liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature sample cooling unit is installed. The snapshots of growth of particles with fluence of 90MeV Ni ions were recorded using in situ XRD experiment, illustrating the potential of this in situ facility. A thin film of C60 was used to test the sample cooling unit. It shows that the phase of the C60 film transforms from a cubic lattice (at room temperature) to a fcc lattice at around T =255K.

  19. Buckskin Drill Hole and CheMin X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-17

    The graph at right presents information from the NASA Curiosity Mars rover's onboard analysis of rock powder drilled from the "Buckskin" target location, shown at left. X-ray diffraction analysis of the Buckskin sample inside the rover's Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument revealed the presence of a silica-containing mineral named tridymite. This is the first detection of tridymite on Mars. Peaks in the X-ray diffraction pattern are from minerals in the sample, and every mineral has a diagnostic set of peaks that allows identification. The image of Buckskin at left was taken by the rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on July 30, 2015, and is also available at PIA19804. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20271

  20. Method for characterizing mask defects using image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns

    DOEpatents

    Hau-Riege, Stefan Peter [Fremont, CA

    2007-05-01

    The invention applies techniques for image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns on the three-dimensional imaging of defects in EUVL multilayer films. The reconstructed image gives information about the out-of-plane position and the diffraction strength of the defect. The positional information can be used to select the correct defect repair technique. This invention enables the fabrication of defect-free (since repaired) X-ray Mo--Si multilayer mirrors. Repairing Mo--Si multilayer-film defects on mask blanks is a key for the commercial success of EUVL. It is known that particles are added to the Mo--Si multilayer film during the fabrication process. There is a large effort to reduce this contamination, but results are not sufficient, and defects continue to be a major mask yield limiter. All suggested repair strategies need to know the out-of-plane position of the defects in the multilayer.

  1. Thermoluminescence and X-ray diffraction studies on sliced ancient porcelain samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, P. L.; Yang, B.

    1999-09-01

    The thermal activation characteristics (TACs) of the sensitivity of the '110°C' peak in 14 sliced ancient Chinese porcelain samples are studied. Comparing with the TACs of natural quartz and synthetic mullite, the relation between the TACs and the composition of the sample is discussed with reference to the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra. It is suggested that in some cases, contribution of the porcelain components other than quartz to the TACs is not negligible.

  2. X-ray diffraction studies of phase transformations in heavy-metal fluoride glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, N. P.; Doremus, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry studies of the crystallization properties of five ZrF4-based glass compositions have indicated that the crystalline phase in Zr-Ba-La-Pb fluoride glass is beta-BaZrF6; no such identification of crystal phases was obtainable, however, for the other glasses. Reversible polymorphic phase transformations occur in Zr-Ba-La-Li and Zr-Ba-La-Na fluoride glasses, upon heating to higher temperatures.

  3. X-Ray Diffraction Study of Elemental Erbium to 65 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, M.G.; Lipinska-Kalita, K.; Quine, Z.

    2006-02-02

    We have investigated phase transitions in elemental erbium in a diamond anvil cell up to 65 GPa using x-ray powder diffraction methods. We present preliminary evidence of a series of phase transitions that appear to follow the expected hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc sequence. In particular, we believe that we have evidence for the predicted dhcp {yields} distorted fcc transition between 43 GPa and 65 GPa.

  4. X-ray diffraction study of elemental erbium to 70 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravica, Michael G.; Romano, Edward; Quine, Zachary

    2005-12-01

    We have investigated phase transitions in elemental erbium in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to 70GPa using angular-dispersive x-ray powder diffraction methods. We present evidence of a series of phase transitions that appear to follow the anticipated hcp→Sm-type→doublehcp(dhcp)→distorted fcc sequence. In particular, we present evidence for the predicted dhcp→distorted fcc transition above 63GPa . Equation of state data are also presented up to 70GPa .

  5. Measurement and Interpretation of Diffuse Scattering in X-Ray Diffraction for Macromolecular Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Michael E.

    X-ray diffraction from macromolecular crystals includes both sharply peaked Bragg reflections and diffuse intensity between the peaks. The information in Bragg scattering reflects the mean electron density in the unit cells of the crystal. The diffuse scattering arises from correlations in the variations of electron density that may occur from one unit cell to another, and therefore contains information about collective motions in proteins.

  6. A scheme for lensless X-ray microscopy combining coherent diffraction imaging and differential corner holography.

    PubMed

    Capotondi, F; Pedersoli, E; Kiskinova, M; Martin, A V; Barthelmess, M; Chapman, H N

    2012-10-22

    We successfully use the corners of a common silicon nitride supporting window in lensless X-ray microscopy as extended references in differential holography to obtain a real space hologram of the illuminated object. Moreover, we combine this method with the iterative phasing techniques of coherent diffraction imaging to enhance the spatial resolution on the reconstructed object, and overcome the problem of missing areas in the collected data due to the presence of a beam stop, achieving a resolution close to 85 nm.

  7. Imaging fully hydrated whole cells by coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Daewoong; Park, Jaehyun; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Naitow, Hisashi; Kunishima, Naoki; Yoshida, Takashi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale imaging of biological specimens in their native condition is of long-standing interest, in particular with direct, high resolution views of internal structures of intact specimens, though as yet progress has been limited. Here we introduce wet coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy capable of imaging fully hydrated and unstained biological specimens. Whole cell morphologies and internal structures better than 25 nm can be clearly visualized without contrast degradation.

  8. Probing multi-scale mechanical damage in connective tissues using X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Fabio; Hofmann, Felix; Smith, Andrew J; Thompson, Mark S

    2016-11-01

    The accumulation of microstructural collagen damage following repetitive loading is linked to painful and debilitating tendon injuries. As a hierarchical, semi-crystalline material, collagen mechanics can be studied using X-ray diffraction. The aim of the study was to describe multi-structural changes in tendon collagen following controlled plastic damage (5% permanent strain). We used small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to interrogate the spacing of collagen molecules within a fibril, and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) to measure molecular strains under macroscopic loading. Simultaneous recordings of SAXS and WAXS patterns, together with whole-tissue strain in physiologically hydrated rat-tail tendons were made during increments of in situ tensile loading. Results showed that while tissue level modulus was unchanged, fibril modulus decreased significantly, and molecular modulus significantly increased. Further, analysis of higher order SAXS peaks suggested structural changes in the gap and overlap regions, possibly localising the damage to molecular cross-links. Our results provide new insight into the fundamental damage processes at work in collagenous tissues and point to new directions for their mitigation and repair. This article reports the first in situ loading synchrotron studies on mechanical damage in collagenous tissues. We provide new insight into the nano- and micro-structural mechanisms of damage processes. Pre-damaged tendons showed differential alteration of moduli at macro, micro and nano-scales as measured using X-ray scattering techniques. Detailed analysis of higher order diffraction peaks suggested damage is localised to molecular cross-links. The results are consistent with previous X-ray scattering studies of tendons and also with recent thermal stability studies on damaged material. Detailed understanding of damage mechanisms is essential in the development of new therapies promoting tissue repair. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc

  9. AUSPEX: a graphical tool for X-ray diffraction data analysis.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Andrea; Parkhurst, James; Emsley, Paul; Nicholls, Robert A; Vollmar, Melanie; Evans, Gwyndaf; Murshudov, Garib N

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, AUSPEX, a new software tool for experimental X-ray data analysis, is presented. Exploring the behaviour of diffraction intensities and the associated estimated uncertainties facilitates the discovery of underlying problems and can help users to improve their data acquisition and processing in order to obtain better structural models. The program enables users to inspect the distribution of observed intensities (or amplitudes) against resolution as well as the associated estimated uncertainties (sigmas). It is demonstrated how AUSPEX can be used to visually and automatically detect ice-ring artefacts in integrated X-ray diffraction data. Such artefacts can hamper structure determination, but may be difficult to identify from the raw diffraction images produced by modern pixel detectors. The analysis suggests that a significant portion of the data sets deposited in the PDB contain ice-ring artefacts. Furthermore, it is demonstrated how other problems in experimental X-ray data caused, for example, by scaling and data-conversion procedures can be detected by AUSPEX.

  10. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J., E-mail: haughmj@nv.doe.gov; Jacoby, K. D.; Wu, M.

    2014-11-15

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals thatmore » we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.« less

  11. Measuring the X-ray Resolving Power of Bent Potassium Acid Phthalate Diffraction Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals thatmore » we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a dual goniometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.« less

  12. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION STUDIES ON A HOMOLOGOUS SERIES OF SATURATED PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES.

    PubMed

    ELBERS, P F; VERVERGAERT, P H

    1965-05-01

    Three homologous saturated phosphatidylcholines were studied by electron microscopy after tricomplex fixation. The results are compared with those obtained by x-ray diffraction analysis of the same and some other homologous compounds, in the dry crystalline state and after tricomplex fixation. By electron microscopy alternating dark and light bands are observed which are likely to correspond to phosphatide double layers. X-Ray diffraction reveals the presence of lamellar structures of regular spacing. The layer spacings obtained by both methods are in good agreement. From the electron micrographs the width of the polar parts of the double layers can be derived directly. The width of the carboxylglycerylphosphorylcholine moiety of the layers is found by extrapolating the x-ray diffraction data to zero chain length of the fatty acids. When from this width the contribution of the carboxylglyceryl part of the molecules is subtracted, again we find good agreement with the electron microscope measurements. An attempt has been made to account for the different layer spacings measured in terms of orientation of the molecules within the double layers.

  13. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5⅓:2⅓:2⅓ ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  14. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    SciTech Connect

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    In this paper, we present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional datamore » cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. Finally, we demonstrate this 'big data' approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.« less

  15. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  16. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    DOE PAGES

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    2016-08-09

    In this paper, we present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional datamore » cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. Finally, we demonstrate this 'big data' approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.« less

  17. X-ray induced chemical reaction revealed by in-situ X-ray diffraction and scanning X-ray microscopy in 15 nm resolution (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Mingyuan; Liu, Wenjun; Bock, David; De Andrade, Vincent; Yan, Hanfei; Huang, Xiaojing; Marschilok, Amy; Takeuchi, Esther; Xin, Huolin; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-09-01

    The detection sensitivity of synchrotron-based X-ray techniques has been largely improved due to the ever increasing source brightness, which have significantly advanced ex-situ and in-situ research for energy materials, such as lithium-ion batteries. However, the strong beam-matter interaction arisen from the high beam flux can significantly modify the material structure. The parasitic beam-induced effect inevitably interferes with the intrinsic material property, which brings difficulties in interpreting experimental results, and therefore requires comprehensive evaluation. Here we present a quantitative in-situ study of the beam-effect on one electrode material Ag2VO2PO4 using four different X-ray probes with different radiation dose rate. The material system we reported exhibits interesting and reversible radiation-induced thermal and chemical reactions, which was further evaluated under electron microscopy to illustrate the underlying mechanism. The work we presented here will provide a guideline in using synchrotron X-rays to distinguish the materials' intrinsic behavior from extrinsic structure changed induced by X-rays, especially in the case of in-situ and operando study where the materials are under external field of either temperature or electric field.

  18. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction from a crystal with subsurface defects

    SciTech Connect

    Gaevskii, A. Yu., E-mail: transilv@mail.ru; Golentus, I. E.

    2015-03-15

    The diffraction of X rays incident on a crystal surface under grazing angles under conditions of total external reflection has been investigated. An approach is proposed in which exact solutions to the dynamic problem of grazing-incidence diffraction in an ideal crystal are used as initial functions to calculate the diffuse component of diffraction in a crystal with defects. The diffuse component of diffraction is calculated for a crystal with surface defects of a dilatation-center type. Exact formulas of the continuum theory which take into account the mirror-image forces are used for defect-induced atomic displacements. Scattering intensity maps near Bragg peaksmore » are constructed for different scan modes, and the conditions for detecting primarily the diffuse component are determined. The results of dynamic calculations of grazing-incidence diffraction in defect-containing crystals are compared with calculations in the kinematic approximation.« less

  19. PREFACE: XTOP 2004 -- 7th Biennial Conference on High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holý, Vaclav

    2005-05-01

    The 7th Biennial Conference on High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging (XTOP 2004) was held in the Prague suburb of Pruhonice, Czech Republic, during 7-10 September 2004. It was organized by the Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association in cooperation with the Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Masaryk University, Brno, and Charles University, Prague. XTOP 2004 took place just after EPDIC IX (European Powder Diffraction Conference) organised in Prague by the same Association during 2-5 September 2004. The Organizing Committee was supported by an International Programme Committee including about 20 prominent scientists from several European and overseas countries, whose helpful suggestions for speakers are acknowledged. The conference was sponsored by the International Union of Crystallography and by several industrial sponsors; this sponsorship allowed us to support about 20 students and young scientists. In total, 147 official delegates and 8 accompanying persons from 16 countries of three continents attended our conference. The scientific programme of the conference was divided into 11 half-day sessions and 2 poster sessions. The participants presented 147 accepted contributions; of these 9 were 45-minute long invited talks, 34 were 20-minute oral presentations and 104 were posters. All posters were displayed for the whole meeting to ensure maximum exposure and interaction between delegates. We followed the very good experience from the previous conference, XTOP 2002, and also organized pre-conference tutorial lectures presented by experts in the field: `Imaging with hard synchrotron radiation' (J Härtwig, Grenoble), `High-resolution x-ray diffractometry: determination of strain and composition' (J Stangl, Linz), `X-ray grazing-incidence scattering from surfaces and nanostructures' (U Pietsch, Potsdam) and `Hard x-ray optics' (J Hrdý, Prague). According to the recommendation of the International Program Committee

  20. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J. R.; Krenner, Hubert J.; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length). PMID:25294979

  1. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of lead tin telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Spal, Richard; Simchick, Richard; Fripp, Archibald

    1991-01-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction images of two directly comparable crystals of lead tin telluride, one Bridgman-grown on Space Shuttle STS 61A and the other terrestrially Bridgman-grown under similar conditions from identical material, present different subgrain structure. In the terrestrial, sample 1 the appearance of an elaborate array of subgrains is closely associated with the intrusion of regions that are out of diffraction in all of the various images. The formation of this elaborate subgrain structure is inhibited by growth in microgravity.

  2. Disentangling atomic-layer-specific x-ray absorption spectra by Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Kato, Yukako; Hashimoto, Mie; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    In order to investigate the electronic and magnetic structures of each atomic layer at subsurface, we have proposed a new method, Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy, which is the combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) techniques. We have measured a series of Ni LMM AED patterns of the Ni film grown on Cu(001) surface for various thicknesses. Then we deduced a set of atomic-layer-specific AED patterns in a numerical way. Furthermore, we developed an algorithm to disentangle XANES spectra from different atomic layers using these atomic-layer-specific AED patterns. Surface and subsurface core level shift were determined for each atomic layer.

  3. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J R; Krenner, Hubert J; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length).

  4. Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction Study of the Structure and Dehydration Behavior of Sepiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, J. E.; Bish, D. L.; Heaney, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    Sepiolite is a hydrous Mg-silicate clay mineral with fibrous morphology that typically occurs as fine-grained, poorly crystalline masses. It occurs in a wide variety of geological environments and has been mined for centuries because of its many uses, e.g. in the pharmaceutical, fertilizer, and pesticide industries. Its versatile functionality derives from the large surface area and microporosity that are characteristic of the material. In recent years, sepiolite has received considerable attention with regard to the adsorption of organics, for use as a support for catalysts, as a molecular sieve, and as an inorganic membrane for ultrafiltration. Because of its fine-grained and poorly crystalline nature, it has not been possible to study sepiolite's crystal structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods, and consequently many details of the structure are still not well known. In this study, Rietveld refinements using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were used to investigate the crystal structure and dehydration behavior of sepiolite from Durango, Mexico. The room- temperature (RT) sepiolite structure in air compares well with previous models but reveals an additional zeolitic water site. The RT structure under vacuum retained only ~1/8 of the zeolitic water and the volume decreased 1.3%. Real-time, temperature-resolved synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements were used to investigate the behavior of the sepiolite structure from 300 to 925 K. Rietveld refinements revealed that most of the zeolitic water is lost by ~390 K, accompanied by a decrease in the a and c unit-cell parameters. Above ~600 K the sepiolite structure folds as one-half of the crystallographically bound water is lost. Rietveld refinements of the "anhydrous" sepiolite structure reveal that, in general, unit-cell parameters a, b, â and volume steadily decrease with increasing temperature; there is an obvious change in slope at ~820 K suggesting a phase

  5. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-05-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the `diffraction before destruction' scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles.

  6. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the ‘diffraction before destruction’ scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles. PMID:24763651

  7. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption and X-Ray Photoelectron Diffraction Studies of the Structural Environment of Ge-Si Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrucci, P.; Gunnella, R.; Pinto, N.; Bernardini, R.; de Crescenzi, M.; Sacchi, M.

    Near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) are powerful techniques for the qualitative study of the structural and electronic properties of several systems. The recent development of a multiple scattering approach to simulating experimental spectra opened a friendly way to the study of structural environments of solids and surfaces. This article reviews recent X-ray absorption experiments using synchrotron radiation which were performed at Ge L edges and core level electron diffraction measurements obtained using a traditional X-ray source from Ge core levels for ultrathin Ge films deposited on silicon substrates. Thermodynamics and surface reconstruction have been found to play a crucial role in the first stages of Ge growth on Si(001) and Si(111) surfaces. Both techniques show the occurrence of intermixing processes even for room-temperature-grown Ge/Si(001) samples and give a straightforward measurement of the overlayer tetragonal distortion. The effects of Sb as a surfactant on the Ge/Si(001) interface have also been investigated. In this case, evidence of layer-by-layer growth of the fully strained Ge overlayer with a reduced intermixing is obtained when one monolayer of Sb is predeposited on the surface.

  8. Peculiarities of section topograms for the multiple diffraction of X rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, V. G., E-mail: kohnvict@yandex.ru; Smirnova, I. A.

    The distortion of interference fringes on the section topograms of single crystal due to the multiple diffraction of X rays has been investigated. The cases of the 220 and 400 reflections in a silicon crystal in the form of a plate with a surface oriented normally to the [001] direction are considered both theoretically and experimentally. The same section topogram exhibits five cases of multiple diffraction at small azimuthal angles for the 400 reflection and MoK{sub α} radiation, while the topogram for the 220 reflection demonstrates two cases of multiple diffraction. All these cases correspond to different combinations of reciprocalmore » lattice vectors. Exact theoretical calculations of section topograms for the aforementioned cases of multiple diffraction have been performed for the first time. The section topograms exhibit two different distortion regions. The distortions in the central region of the structure are fairly complex and depend strongly on the azimuthal angle. In the tails of the multiple diffraction region, there is a shift of two-beam interference fringes, which can be observed even with a laboratory X-ray source.« less

  9. Imaging whole Escherichia coli bacteria by using single-particle x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jianwei; Hodgson, Keith O.; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Legros, Mark A.; Nishino, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    We report the first experimental recording, to our knowledge, of the diffraction pattern from intact Escherichia coli bacteria using coherent x-rays with a wavelength of 2 Å. By using the oversampling phasing method, a real space image at a resolution of 30 nm was directly reconstructed from the diffraction pattern. An R factor used for characterizing the quality of the reconstruction was in the range of 5%, which demonstrated the reliability of the reconstruction process. The distribution of proteins inside the bacteria labeled with manganese oxide has been identified and this distribution confirmed by fluorescence microscopy images. Compared with lens-based microscopy, this diffraction-based imaging approach can examine thicker samples, such as whole cultured cells, in three dimensions with resolution limited only by radiation damage. Looking forward, the successful recording and reconstruction of diffraction patterns from biological samples reported here represent an important step toward the potential of imaging single biomolecules at near-atomic resolution by combining single-particle diffraction with x-ray free electron lasers.

  10. A study of X-ray multiple diffraction by means of section topography.

    PubMed

    Kohn, V G; Smirnova, I A

    2015-09-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental study are presented for the question of how the X-ray multiple diffraction in a silicon single crystal influences the interference fringes of section topography for the 400 reflection in the Laue case. Two different cases of multiple diffraction are discovered for zero and very small values of the azimuthal angle for the sample in the form of a plate with the surface normal to the 001 direction. The cases are seen on the same topogram without rotation of the crystal. Accurate computer simulations of the section topogram for the case of X-ray multiple diffraction are performed for the first time. It is shown that the structure of interference fringes on the section topogram in the region of multiple diffraction becomes more complicated. It has a very sharp dependence on the azimuthal angle. The experiment is carried out using a laboratory source under conditions of low resolution over the azimuthal angle. Nevertheless, the characteristic inclination of the interference fringes on the tails of the multiple diffraction region is easily seen. This phenomenon corresponds completely to the computer simulations.

  11. Digital Image Correlation of 2D X-ray Powder Diffraction Data for Lattice Strain Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongjia; Sui, Tan; Daisenberger, Dominik; Fong, Kai Soon

    2018-01-01

    High energy 2D X-ray powder diffraction experiments are widely used for lattice strain measurement. The 2D to 1D conversion of diffraction patterns is a necessary step used to prepare the data for full pattern refinement, but is inefficient when only peak centre position information is required for lattice strain evaluation. The multi-step conversion process is likely to lead to increased errors associated with the ‘caking’ (radial binning) or fitting procedures. A new method is proposed here that relies on direct Digital Image Correlation analysis of 2D X-ray powder diffraction patterns (XRD-DIC, for short). As an example of using XRD-DIC, residual strain values along the central line in a Mg AZ31B alloy bar after 3-point bending are calculated by using both XRD-DIC and the conventional ‘caking’ with fitting procedures. Comparison of the results for strain values in different azimuthal angles demonstrates excellent agreement between the two methods. The principal strains and directions are calculated using multiple direction strain data, leading to full in-plane strain evaluation. It is therefore concluded that XRD-DIC provides a reliable and robust method for strain evaluation from 2D powder diffraction data. The XRD-DIC approach simplifies the analysis process by skipping 2D to 1D conversion, and opens new possibilities for robust 2D powder diffraction data analysis for full in-plane strain evaluation. PMID:29543728

  12. Risk and benefit of diffraction in Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonow, Wilhelm; Rammlmair, Dieter

    2016-11-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence mapping (μ-EDXRF) is a fast and non-destructive method for chemical quantification and therefore used in many scientific fields. The combination of spatial and chemical information is highly valuable for understanding geological processes. Problems occur with crystalline samples due to diffraction, which appears according to Bragg's law, depending on the energy of the X-ray beam, the incident angle and the crystal parameters. In the spectra these peaks can overlap with element peaks suggesting higher element concentrations. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of diffraction, the possibility of diffraction removal and potential geoscientific applications for X-ray mapping. In this work the μ-EDXRF M4 Tornado from Bruker was operated with a Rh-tube and polychromatic beam with two SDD detectors mounted each at ± 90° to the tube. Due to the polychromatic beam the Bragg condition fits for several mineral lattice planes. Since diffraction depends on the angle, it is shown that a novel correction approach can be applied by measuring from two different angles and calculating the minimum spectrum of both detectors gaining a better limit of quantification for this method. Furthermore, it is possible to use the diffraction information for separation of differently oriented crystallites within a monomineralic aggregate and obtain parameters like particle size distribution for the sample, as it is done by thin section image analysis in cross-polarized light. Only with μ-EDXRF this can be made on larger samples without preparation of thin sections.

  13. Characterization of ion beam sputtered deposited W/Si multilayers by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction and x-ray reflectivity technique

    SciTech Connect

    Dhawan, Rajnish, E-mail: rajnish@rrcat.gov.in; Rai, Sanjay

    2016-05-23

    W/Si multilayers four samples have been deposited on silicon substrate using ion beam sputtering system. Thickness of tungsten (W) varies from around 10 Å to 40 Å while the silicon (Si) thickness remains constant at around 30 Å in multilayers [W-Si]{sub x4}. The samples have been characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and X-ray reflectivity technique (XRR). GIXRD study shows the crystalline behaviour of W/Si multilayer by varying W thickness and it is found that above 20 Å the W film transform from amorphous to crystalline phase and X-ray reflectivity data shows that the roughnesses of W increases onmore » increasing the W thicknesses in W/Si multilayers.« less

  14. Integrating macromolecular X-ray diffraction data with the graphical user interface iMOSFLM

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Harold R; Battye, T Geoff G; Kontogiannis, Luke; Johnson, Owen; Leslie, Andrew GW

    2017-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the overwhelmingly dominant source of structural information for biological macromolecules, providing fundamental insights into biological function. Collection of X-ray diffraction data underlies the technique, and robust and user-friendly software to process the diffraction images makes the technique accessible to a wider range of scientists. iMosflm/MOSFLM (www.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/harry/imosflm) is a software package designed to achieve this goal. The graphical user interface (GUI) version of MOSFLM (called iMosflm) is designed to guide inexperienced users through the steps of data integration, while retaining powerful features for more experienced users. Images from almost all commercially available X-ray detectors can be handled. Although the program only utilizes two-dimensional profile fitting, it can readily integrate data collected in “fine phi-slicing” mode (where the rotation angle per image is less than the crystal mosaic spread by a factor of at least 2) that is commonly employed with modern very fast readout detectors. The graphical user interface provides real-time feedback on the success of the indexing step and the progress of data processing. This feedback includes the ability to monitor detector and crystal parameter refinement and to display the average spot shape in different regions of the detector. Data scaling and merging tasks can be initiated directly from the interface. Using this protocol, a dataset of 360 images with ~2000 reflections per image can be processed in approximately four minutes. PMID:28569763

  15. Microstructural characterisation of proton irradiated niobium using X-ray diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Argha; Gayathri, N.; Neogy, S.; Mukherjee, P.

    2018-04-01

    The microstructural parameters in pure Nb, irradiated with 5 MeV proton beam have been evaluated as a function of dose using X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. In order to assess the microstructural changes in the homogeneous region and in the peak damage region of the damage energy deposition profile, X-ray diffraction patterns have been collected using two different geometries (Bragg-Brentano and parallel beam geometries). Different X-ray line profile analysis like Williamson-Hall (W-H) analysis, modified W-H analysis, double-Voigt analysis, modified Rietveld technique and convolutional multiple whole profile fitting have been employed to extract the microstructural parameters like coherent domain size, microstrain within the domain, dislocation density and arrangement of dislocations. The coherent domain size decreases drastically along with increase in microstrain and dislocation density in the first dose for both the geometries. With increasing dose, a decreasing trend in microstrain associated with decrease in dislocation density is observed for both the geometries. This is attributed to the formation of defect clusters due to irradiation which with increasing dose collapse to dislocation loops to minimise the strain in the matrix. This is corroborated with the observation of black dots and loops in the TEM images. No significant difference is observed in the trend of microstructural parameters between the homogeneous and peak damage region of the damage profile.

  16. DynAMITe: a prototype large area CMOS APS for breast cancer diagnosis using x-ray diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, A.; Anaxagoras, T.; Esposito, M.; Allinson, N.; Speller, R.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray diffraction studies are used to identify specific materials. Several laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies were made for breast cancer diagnosis. Ideally a large area, low noise, linear and wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required to perform x-ray diffraction measurements. Recently, digital detectors based on Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology have been used in x-ray diffraction studies. Two APS detectors, namely Vanilla and Large Area Sensor (LAS), were developed by the Multidimensional Integrated Intelligent Imaging (MI-3) consortium to cover a range of scientific applications including x-ray diffraction. The MI-3 Plus consortium developed a novel large area APS, named as Dynamically Adjustable Medical Imaging Technology (DynAMITe), to combine the key characteristics of Vanilla and LAS with a number of extra features. The active area (12.8 × 13.1 cm2) of DynaMITe offers the ability of angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). The current study demonstrates the feasibility of using DynaMITe for breast cancer diagnosis by identifying six breast-equivalent plastics. Further work will be done to optimize the system in order to perform ADXRD for identification of suspicious areas of breast tissue following a conventional mammogram taken with the same sensor.

  17. Diffraction grating transmission efficiencies for XUV and soft X rays. [for HEAO-B extrasolar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Van Speybroeck, L. P.; Delvaille, J. P.; Epstein, A.; Kaellne, E.; Bachrach, R. Z.; Dijkstra, J.; Lantward, L.

    1977-01-01

    The manufacture and properties of a grating intended for extrasolar X-ray studies are described. The manufacturing process uses a split laser beam exposing an interference pattern on the photoresist-coated glass plated with a nickel parting layer. The grating, supporting structure, and mounting frame are electrodeposited on the nickel parting layer, and the final product is lifted from the glass substrate by selective etching of the nickel. A model was derived which relates the number of counts received in a given order m as a function of photon wavenumber. A 4-deg beam line was used to measure the efficiencies of gold transmission gratings for diffraction of X-rays in the range of 45 to 275 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with model calculations.

  18. Theory of time-resolved x-ray photoelectron diffraction from transient conformational molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuru, Shota; Sako, Tokuei; Fujikawa, Takashi; Yagishita, Akira

    2017-04-01

    We formulate x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) from molecules undergoing photochemical reactions induced by optical laser pulses, and then apply the formula to the simulation of time-dependent XPD profiles from both dissociating I2 molecules and bending C S2 molecules. The dependence of nuclear wave-packet motions on the intensity and shape of the optical laser pulses is examined. As a result, the XPD simulations based on such nuclear wave-packet calculations are observed to exhibit characteristic features, which are compared with the XPD profiles due to classical trajectories of nuclear motions. The present study provides a methodology toward creating "molecular movies" of ultrafast photochemical reactions by means of femtosecond XPD with x-ray free-electron lasers.

  19. Diffraction data of core-shell nanoparticles from an X-ray free electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xuanxuan; Chiu, Chun -Ya; Wang, Hsiang -Ju; ...

    2017-04-11

    X-ray free-electron lasers provide novel opportunities to conduct single particle analysis on nanoscale particles. Coherent diffractive imaging experiments were performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Laboratory, exposing single inorganic core-shell nanoparticles to femtosecond hard-X-ray pulses. Each facetted nanoparticle consisted of a crystalline gold core and a differently shaped palladium shell. Scattered intensities were observed up to about 7 nm resolution. Analysis of the scattering patterns revealed the size distribution of the samples, which is consistent with that obtained from direct real-space imaging by electron microscopy. Furthermore, scattering patterns resulting from single particles were selected and compiledmore » into a dataset which can be valuable for algorithm developments in single particle scattering research.« less

  20. X-ray diffraction results from Mars Science Laboratory: mineralogy of Rocknest at Gale crater.

    PubMed

    Bish, D L; Blake, D F; Vaniman, D T; Chipera, S J; Morris, R V; Ming, D W; Treiman, A H; Sarrazin, P; Morrison, S M; Downs, R T; Achilles, C N; Yen, A S; Bristow, T F; Crisp, J A; Morookian, J M; Farmer, J D; Rampe, E B; Stolper, E M; Spanovich, N

    2013-09-27

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity scooped samples of soil from the Rocknest aeolian bedform in Gale crater. Analysis of the soil with the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) x-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument revealed plagioclase (~An57), forsteritic olivine (~Fo62), augite, and pigeonite, with minor K-feldspar, magnetite, quartz, anhydrite, hematite, and ilmenite. The minor phases are present at, or near, detection limits. The soil also contains 27 ± 14 weight percent x-ray amorphous material, likely containing multiple Fe(3+)- and volatile-bearing phases, including possibly a substance resembling hisingerite. The crystalline component is similar to the normative mineralogy of certain basaltic rocks from Gusev crater on Mars and of martian basaltic meteorites. The amorphous component is similar to that found on Earth in places such as soils on the Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii.

  1. Determination of the absolute chirality of tellurium using resonant diffraction with circularly polarized x-rays.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Collins, S P; Lovesey, S W; Matsumami, M; Moriwaki, T; Shin, S

    2010-03-31

    Many proteins, sugars and pharmaceuticals crystallize into two forms that are mirror images of each other (enantiomers) like our right and left hands. Tellurium is one enantiomer having a space group pair, P3(1)21 (right-handed screw) and P3(2)21 (left-handed screw). X-ray diffraction with dispersion correction terms has been playing an important role in determining the handedness of enantiomers for a long time. However, this approach is not applicable for an elemental crystal such as tellurium or selenium. We have demonstrated that positive and negative circularly polarized x-rays at the resonant energy of tellurium can be used to absolutely distinguish right from left tellurium. This method is applicable to chiral motifs that occur in biomolecules, liquid crystals, ferroelectrics and antiferroelectrics, multiferroics, etc.

  2. Reactor for nano-focused x-ray diffraction and imaging under catalytic in situ conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, M.-I.; Fernández, S.; Hofmann, J. P.; Gao, L.; Chahine, G. A.; Leake, S. J.; Djazouli, H.; De Bortoli, Y.; Petit, L.; Boesecke, P.; Labat, S.; Hensen, E. J. M.; Thomas, O.; Schülli, T.

    2017-09-01

    A reactor cell for in situ studies of individual catalyst nanoparticles or surfaces by nano-focused (coherent) x-ray diffraction has been developed. Catalytic reactions can be studied in flow mode in a pressure range of 10-2-103 mbar and temperatures up to 900 °C. This instrument bridges the pressure and materials gap at the same time within one experimental setup. It allows us to probe in situ the structure (e.g., shape, size, strain, faceting, composition, and defects) of individual nanoparticles using a nano-focused x-ray beam. Here, the setup was used to observe strain and facet evolution of individual model Pt catalysts during in situ experiments. It can be used for heating other (non-catalytically active) nanoparticles (e.g., nanowires) in inert or reactive gas atmospheres or vacuum as well.

  3. Reactor for nano-focused x-ray diffraction and imaging under catalytic in situ conditions.

    PubMed

    Richard, M-I; Fernández, S; Hofmann, J P; Gao, L; Chahine, G A; Leake, S J; Djazouli, H; De Bortoli, Y; Petit, L; Boesecke, P; Labat, S; Hensen, E J M; Thomas, O; Schülli, T

    2017-09-01

    A reactor cell for in situ studies of individual catalyst nanoparticles or surfaces by nano-focused (coherent) x-ray diffraction has been developed. Catalytic reactions can be studied in flow mode in a pressure range of 10 -2 -10 3 mbar and temperatures up to 900 °C. This instrument bridges the pressure and materials gap at the same time within one experimental setup. It allows us to probe in situ the structure (e.g., shape, size, strain, faceting, composition, and defects) of individual nanoparticles using a nano-focused x-ray beam. Here, the setup was used to observe strain and facet evolution of individual model Pt catalysts during in situ experiments. It can be used for heating other (non-catalytically active) nanoparticles (e.g., nanowires) in inert or reactive gas atmospheres or vacuum as well.

  4. Data preparation and evaluation techniques for x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Marchesini, Stefano; Shapiro, David; Turner, Joshua J; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-08-30

    The post-experiment processing of X-ray Diffraction Microscopy data is often time-consuming and difficult. This is mostly due to the fact that even if a preliminary result has been reconstructed, there is no definitive answer as to whether or not a better result with more consistently retrieved phases can still be obtained. We show here that the first step in data analysis, the assembly of two-dimensional diffraction patterns from a large set of raw diffraction data, is crucial to obtaining reconstructions of highest possible consistency. We have developed software that automates this process and results in consistently accurate diffraction patterns. We have furthermore derived some criteria of validity for a tool commonly used to assess the consistency of reconstructions, the phase retrieval transfer function, and suggest a modified version that has improved utility for judging reconstruction quality.

  5. SU-E-I-77: X-Ray Coherent Scatter Diffraction Pattern Modeling in GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, A; Samei, E; Harrawood, B; Sahbaee, P; Chawla, A; Tan, Z; Brady, D

    2012-06-01

    To model X-ray coherent scatter diffraction patterns in GEANT4 for simulating experiments involving material detection through diffraction pattern measurement. Although coherent scatter cross-sections are modeled accurately in GEANT4, diffraction patterns for crystalline materials are not yet included. Here we describe our modeling of crystalline diffraction patterns in GEANT4 for specific materials and the validation of the results against experimentally measured data. Coherent scatter in GEANT4 is currently based on Hubbell's non-relativistic form factor tabulations from EPDL97. We modified the form-factors by introducing an interference function that accounts for the angular dependence between the Rayleigh-scattered photons and the photon wavelength. The modified form factors were used to replace the inherent form-factors in GEANT4. The simulation was tested using monochromatic and polychromatic x-ray beams (separately) incident on objects containing one or more elements with modified form-factors. The simulation results were compared against the experimentally measured diffraction images of corresponding objects using an in-house x-ray diffraction imager for validation. The comparison was made using the following metrics: number of diffraction rings, radial distance, absolute intensity, and relative intensity. Sharp diffraction pattern rings were observed in the monochromatic simulations at locations consistent with the angular dependence of the photon wavelength. In the polychromatic simulations, the diffraction patterns exhibited a radial blur consistent with the energy spread of the polychromatic spectrum. The simulated and experimentally measured patterns showed identical numbers of rings with close agreement in radial distance, absolute and relative intensities (barring statistical fluctuations). No significant change was observed in the execution time of the simulations. This work demonstrates the ability to model coherent scatter diffraction in GEANT4 in

  6. Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction: Applications for Laser-Irradiated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wark, Justin S.

    2009-09-10

    Over the past few years short pulse x-ray diffraction at the nanosecond and picosecond level has become an established technique in many high-power laser laboratories for interrogating the lattice response of laser-perturbed and shocked matter, and is now finding applications in diagnosing the state of crystalline materials subject to quasi-isentropic compression. We review some of the previous results obtained in this area, for example the direct observation of coherent phonons, the first direct confirmation of the alpha-epsilon transition in shocked iron, and recent measurements indicating that the strength of matter can be measured at shock pressures exceeding a Mbar. Themore » majority of sources used to date have been laser-plasma based, with some work being performed using 3{sup rd} generation synchrotron sources. However, the development of 4{sup th} generation x-ray free-electron lasers, such as LCLS, afford many new opportunities, with pulse lengths in the femtosecond regime. The extremely low divergence and monochromatic nature of the LCLS beam make it well suited to study compressed polycrystalline matter, especially samples with small grain sizes. At extremely short pulse lengths, such that the pulse is shorter than an x-ray extinction depth traversal time, the diffraction process itself becomes time-dependent, and in certain cases the full wave-field solution will be required, particularly if the matter itself is being rapidly perturbed, as will occur if the intense x-ray radiation is used to create warm dense matter, as in recent experiments on FLASH at DESY.« less

  7. X-ray diffraction analysis of residual stresses in textured ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobročka, E.; Novák, P.; Búc, D.; Harmatha, L.; Murín, J.

    2017-02-01

    Residual stresses are commonly generated in thin films during the deposition process and can influence the film properties. Among a number of techniques developed for stress analysis, X-ray diffraction methods, especially the grazing incidence set-up, are of special importance due to their capability to analyze the stresses in very thin layers as well as to investigate the depth variation of the stresses. In this contribution a method combining multiple {hkl} and multiple χ modes of X-ray diffraction stress analysis in grazing incidence set-up is used for the measurement of residual stress in strongly textured ZnO thin films. The method improves the precision of the stress evaluation in textured samples. Because the measurements are performed at very low incidence angles, the effect of refraction of X-rays on the measured stress is analyzed in details for the general case of non-coplanar geometry. It is shown that this effect cannot be neglected if the angle of incidence approaches the critical angle. The X-ray stress factors are calculated for hexagonal fiber-textured ZnO for the Reuss model of grain-interaction and the effect of texture on the stress factors is analyzed. The texture in the layer is modelled by Gaussian distribution function. Numerical results indicate that in the process of stress evaluation the Reuss model can be replaced by much simpler crystallite group method if the standard deviation of Gaussian describing the texture is less than 6°. The results can be adapted for fiber-textured films of various hexagonal materials.

  8. Inorganic pyrophosphatase crystals from Thermococcus thioreducens for X-ray and neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ronny C; Coates, Leighton; Blakeley, Matthew P; Tomanicek, Steve J; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; García-Ruiz, Juan M; Ng, Joseph D

    2012-12-01

    Inorganic pyrophosphatase (IPPase) from the archaeon Thermococcus thioreducens was cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in restricted geometry, resulting in large crystal volumes exceeding 5 mm3. IPPase is thermally stable and is able to resist denaturation at temperatures above 348 K. Owing to the high temperature tolerance of the enzyme, the protein was amenable to room-temperature manipulation at the level of protein preparation, crystallization and X-ray and neutron diffraction analyses. A complete synchrotron X-ray diffraction data set to 1.85 Å resolution was collected at room temperature from a single crystal of IPPase (monoclinic space group C2, unit-cell parameters a=106.11, b=95.46, c=113.68 Å, α=γ=90.0, β=98.12°). As large-volume crystals of IPPase can be obtained, preliminary neutron diffraction tests were undertaken. Consequently, Laue diffraction images were obtained, with reflections observed to 2.1 Å resolution with I/σ(I) greater than 2.5. The preliminary crystallographic results reported here set in place future structure-function and mechanism studies of IPPase.

  9. Simultaneous, single-pulse, synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction under gas gun loading

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D.; Luo, S. N., E-mail: sluo@pims.ac.cn; Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031

    We develop a mini gas gun system for simultaneous, single-pulse, x-ray diffraction and imaging under high strain-rate loading at the beamline 32-ID of the Advanced Photon Source. In order to increase the reciprocal space covered by a small-area detector, a conventional target chamber is split into two chambers: a narrowed measurement chamber and a relief chamber. The gas gun impact is synchronized with synchrotron x-ray pulses and high-speed cameras. Depending on a camera’s capability, multiframe imaging and diffraction can be achieved. The proof-of-principle experiments are performed on single-crystal sapphire. The diffraction spots and images during impact are analyzed to quantifymore » lattice deformation and fracture; fracture is dominated by splitting cracks followed by wing cracks, and diffraction peaks are broadened likely due to mosaic spread. Our results demonstrate the potential of such multiscale measurements for studying high strain-rate phenomena at dynamic extremes.« less

  10. Simultaneous, single-pulse, synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction under gas gun loading

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D.; Huang, J. W.; Zeng, X. L.

    We develop a mini gas gun system for simultaneous, single-pulse, x-ray diffraction and imaging under high strain-rate loading at the beamline 32-ID of the Advanced Photon Source. In order to increase the reciprocal space covered by a small-area detector, a conventional target chamber is split into two chambers: a narrowed measurement chamber and a relief chamber. The gas gun impact is synchronized with synchrotron x-ray pulses and high-speed cameras. Depending on a camera’s capability, multiframe imaging and diffraction can be achieved. The proof-of-principle experiments are performed on single-crystal sapphire. The diffraction spots and images during impact are analyzed to quantifymore » lattice deformation and fracture; diffraction peak broadening is largely caused by fracture-induced strain inhomogeneity. Finally, our results demonstrate the potential of such multiscale measurements for revealing and understanding high strain-rate phenomena at dynamic extremes.« less

  11. Simultaneous, single-pulse, synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction under gas gun loading

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, D.; Huang, J. W.; Zeng, X. L.; ...

    2016-05-23

    We develop a mini gas gun system for simultaneous, single-pulse, x-ray diffraction and imaging under high strain-rate loading at the beamline 32-ID of the Advanced Photon Source. In order to increase the reciprocal space covered by a small-area detector, a conventional target chamber is split into two chambers: a narrowed measurement chamber and a relief chamber. The gas gun impact is synchronized with synchrotron x-ray pulses and high-speed cameras. Depending on a camera’s capability, multiframe imaging and diffraction can be achieved. The proof-of-principle experiments are performed on single-crystal sapphire. The diffraction spots and images during impact are analyzed to quantifymore » lattice deformation and fracture; diffraction peak broadening is largely caused by fracture-induced strain inhomogeneity. Finally, our results demonstrate the potential of such multiscale measurements for revealing and understanding high strain-rate phenomena at dynamic extremes.« less

  12. Diffraction and imaging study of imperfections of crystallized lysozyme with coherent X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray diffraction imaging and high-angular-resolution diffraction combined with phase-contrast radiographic imaging were employed to characterize defects and perfection of a uniformly grown tetragonal lysozyme crystal in the symmetric Laue case. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 4 4 0 rocking curve measured from the original crystal was approximately 16.7 arcsec and imperfections including line defects, inclusions and other microdefects were observed in the diffraction images of the crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the <1 1 0> growth front and have been found to originate mostly in a central growth area and occasionally in outer growth regions. Inclusions of impurities or formations of foreign particles in the central growth region are resolved in the images with high sensitivity to defects. Slow dehydration led to the broadening of a fairly symmetric 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.6, which was primarily attributed to the dehydration-induced microscopic effects that are clearly shown in X-ray diffraction images. The details of the observed defects and the significant change in the revealed microstructures with drying provide insight into the nature of imperfections, nucleation and growth, and the properties of protein crystals.

  13. KOTOBUKI-1 apparatus for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakasako, Masayoshi; Takayama, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Shirahama, Keiya; Yamamoto, Masaki; Hikima, Takaaki; Yonekura, Koji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Inui, Yayoi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa; Hoshi, Takahiko

    2013-09-01

    We have developed an experimental apparatus named KOTOBUKI-1 for use in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments of frozen-hydrated non-crystalline particles at cryogenic temperature. For cryogenic specimen stage with small positional fluctuation for a long exposure time of more than several minutes, we here use a cryogenic pot cooled by the evaporation cooling effect for liquid nitrogen. In addition, a loading device is developed to bring specimens stored in liquid nitrogen to the specimen stage in vacuum. The apparatus allows diffraction data collection for frozen-hydrated specimens at 66 K with a positional fluctuation of less than 0.4 μm and provides an experimental environment to easily exchange specimens from liquid nitrogen storage to the specimen stage. The apparatus was developed and utilized in diffraction data collection of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of μm from material and biological sciences, such as metal colloid particles and chloroplast, at BL29XU of SPring-8. Recently, it has been applied for single-shot diffraction data collection of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of sub-μm using X-ray free electron laser at BL3 of SACLA.

  14. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis of zeolite NaA membranes on porous alumina tubes.

    PubMed

    Kyotani, Tomohiro

    2006-07-01

    Zeolite NaA-type membranes hydrothermally synthesized on porous alumina tubes, for dehydration process, were characterized by grazing incidence 2 theta scan X-ray diffraction analysis (GIXRD). The fine structure of the membrane was studied fractionally for surface layer and for materials embedded in the porous alumina tube. The thickness of the surface layer on the porous alumina tube in the membranes used in this study was approximately 2-3 microm as determined from transmission electron microscopy with focused ion beam thin-layer specimen preparation technique (FIB-TEM). To discuss the effects of the membrane surface morphology on the GIXRD measurements, CaA-type membrane prepared by ion exchange from the NaA-type membrane and surface-damaged NaA-type membrane prepared by water leaching were also studied. For the original NaA-type membrane, 2 theta scan GIXRD patterns could be clearly measured at X-ray incidence angles (alpha) ranging from 0.1 to 2.0 deg in increments of 0.1 deg. The surface layers of the 2 - 3 microm on the porous alumina tube correspond to the alpha values up to ca. 0.2 deg. For the CaA-type and the surface-damaged NaA-type membranes, however, diffraction patterns from the surface layer could not be successfully detected and the others were somewhat broad. For all the three samples, diffraction intensities of both zeolite and alumina increased with depth (X-ray incidence angle, alpha) in the porous alumina tube region. The depth profile analysis of the membranes based on the GIXRD first revealed that amount of zeolite crystal embedded in the porous alumina tube is much larger than that in the surface layer. Thus, the 2 theta scan GIXRD is a useful method to study zeolite crystal growth mechanism around (both inside and outside) the porous alumina support during hydrothermal synthesis and to study water permeation behavior in the dehydration process.

  15. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Thomas D.; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205; Lyubimov, Artem Y.

    A highly X-ray-transparent, silicon nitride-based device has been designed and fabricated to harvest protein microcrystals for high-resolution X-ray diffraction data collection using microfocus beamlines and XFELs. Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming themore » challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called ‘fixed-target’ sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.« less

  16. Analysis of energy dispersive x-ray diffraction profiles for material identification, imaging and system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Emily Jane

    2008-12-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of low angle X-ray scatter measurements taken with an energy dispersive system for substance identification, imaging and system control. Diffraction measurements were made on illicit drugs, which have pseudo- crystalline structures and thus produce diffraction patterns comprising a se ries of sharp peaks. Though the diffraction profiles of each drug are visually characteristic, automated detection systems require a substance identification algorithm, and multivariate analysis was selected as suitable. The software was trained with measured diffraction data from 60 samples covering 7 illicit drugs and 5 common cutting agents, collected with a range of statistical qual ities and used to predict the content of 7 unknown samples. In all cases the constituents were identified correctly and the contents predicted to within 15%. Soft tissues exhibit broad peaks in their diffraction patterns. Diffraction data were collected from formalin fixed breast tissue samples and used to gen erate images. Maximum contrast between healthy and suspicious regions was achieved using momentum transfer windows 1.04-1.10 and 1.84-1.90 nm_1. The resulting images had an average contrast of 24.6% and 38.9% compared to the corresponding transmission X-ray images (18.3%). The data was used to simulate the feedback for an adaptive imaging system and the ratio of the aforementioned momentum transfer regions found to be an excellent pa rameter. Investigation into the effects of formalin fixation on human breast tissue and animal tissue equivalents indicated that fixation in standard 10% buffered formalin does not alter the diffraction profiles of tissue in the mo mentum transfer regions examined, though 100% unbuffered formalin affects the profile of porcine muscle tissue (a substitute for glandular and tumourous tissue), though fat is unaffected.

  17. Coherent Soft X-ray Diffraction Imaging of Coliphage PR772 at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Data Explorer

    Reddy, Hemanth, K.N.

    2017-01-05

    A dataset of coherent soft X-ray diffraction images of Coliphage PR772 virus, collected at the Atomic Molecular Optics (AMO) beamline with pnCCD detectors in the LAMP instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

  18. Kinetic products in coordination networks: ab initio X-ray powder diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Martí-Rujas, Javier; Kawano, Masaki

    2013-02-19

    Porous coordination networks are materials that maintain their crystal structure as molecular "guests" enter and exit their pores. They are of great research interest with applications in areas such as catalysis, gas adsorption, proton conductivity, and drug release. As with zeolite preparation, the kinetic states in coordination network preparation play a crucial role in determining the final products. Controlling the kinetic state during self-assembly of coordination networks is a fundamental aspect of developing further functionalization of this class of materials. However, unlike for zeolites, there are few structural studies reporting the kinetic products made during self-assembly of coordination networks. Synthetic routes that produce the necessary selectivity are complex. The structural knowledge obtained from X-ray crystallography has been crucial for developing rational strategies for design of organic-inorganic hybrid networks. However, despite the explosive progress in the solid-state study of coordination networks during the last 15 years, researchers still do not understand many chemical reaction processes because of the difficulties in growing single crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction: Fast precipitation can lead to kinetic (metastable) products, but in microcrystalline form, unsuitable for single crystal X-ray analysis. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) routinely is used to check phase purity, crystallinity, and to monitor the stability of frameworks upon guest removal/inclusion under various conditions, but rarely is used for structure elucidation. Recent advances in structure determination of microcrystalline solids from ab initio XRPD have allowed three-dimensional structure determination when single crystals are not available. Thus, ab initio XRPD structure determination is becoming a powerful method for structure determination of microcrystalline solids, including porous coordination networks. Because of the great interest across scientific

  19. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Measurements for In Situ Planetary Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansford, G.; Hill, K. S.; Talboys, D.; Vernon, D.; Ambrosi, R.; Bridges, J.; Hutchinson, I.; Marinangeli, L.

    2011-12-01

    The ESA/NASA ExoMars mission, due for launch in 2018, has a combined X-ray fluorescence/diffraction instrument, Mars-XRD, as part of the onboard analytical laboratory. The results of some XRF (X-ray fluorescence) and XRD (X-ray diffraction) tests using a laboratory chamber with representative performance are reported. A range of standard geological reference materials and analogues were used in these tests. The XRD instruments are core components of the forthcoming NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and ESA/NASA ExoMars missions and will provide the first demonstrations of the capabilities of combined XRD/XRF instrumentation in situ on an extraterrestrial planetary surface. The University of Leicester team is part of the Italy-UK collaboration that is responsible for building the ExoMars X-ray diffraction instrument, Mars-XRD [1,2]. Mars-XRD incorporates an Fe-55 radioisotope source and three fixed-position charge-coupled devices (CCDs) to simultaneously acquire an X-ray fluorescence spectrum and a diffraction pattern providing a measurement of both elemental and mineralogical composition. The CCDs cover an angular range of 2θ = 6° to 73° enabling the analysis of a wide range of geologically important minerals including phyllosilicates, feldspars, oxides, carbonates and evaporites. The identification of hydrous minerals may help identify past Martian hydrothermal systems capable of preserving traces of life. Here we present some initial findings from XRF and XRD tests carried out at the University of Leicester using an Fe-55 source and X-ray sensitive CCD. The XRF/XRD test system consists of a single CCD on a motorised arm, an Fe-55 X-ray source, a collimator and a sample table which approximately replicate the reflection geometry of the Mars-XRD instrument. It was used to test geological reference standard materials and Martian analogues. This work was funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council, UK. References [1] Marinangeli, L., Hutchinson, I

  20. Integrating macromolecular X-ray diffraction data with the graphical user interface iMosflm.

    PubMed

    Powell, Harold R; Battye, T Geoff G; Kontogiannis, Luke; Johnson, Owen; Leslie, Andrew G W

    2017-07-01

    X-ray crystallography is the predominant source of structural information for biological macromolecules, providing fundamental insights into biological function. The availability of robust and user-friendly software to process the collected X-ray diffraction images makes the technique accessible to a wider range of scientists. iMosflm/MOSFLM (http://www.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/harry/imosflm) is a software package designed to achieve this goal. The graphical user interface (GUI) version of MOSFLM (called iMosflm) is designed to guide inexperienced users through the steps of data integration, while retaining powerful features for more experienced users. Images from almost all commercially available X-ray detectors can be handled using this software. Although the program uses only 2D profile fitting, it can readily integrate data collected in the 'fine phi-slicing' mode (in which the rotation angle per image is less than the crystal mosaic spread by a factor of at least 2), which is commonly used with modern very fast readout detectors. The GUI provides real-time feedback on the success of the indexing step and the progress of data processing. This feedback includes the ability to monitor detector and crystal parameter refinement and to display the average spot shape in different regions of the detector. Data scaling and merging tasks can be initiated directly from the interface. Using this protocol, a data set of 360 images with ∼2,000 reflections per image can be processed in ∼4 min.

  1. Filming nuclear dynamics of iodine using x-ray diffraction at the LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew; Natan, Adi; Glownia, James; Cryan, James; Bucksbaum, Phil

    2017-04-01

    We will provide an overview of our analysis of the nuclear dynamics of iodine. At the LCLS, we pumped a gas cell of iodine with a weak 520nm, 50 fs pulse, and the nuclear dynamics are then probed with 9 keV, 40 fs x-rays with variable time delay. This allows us to simultaneously image nuclear wavepackets on the dissociating A state, on the bound B state, and even Raman wavepackets in the ground electronic state. We will explain at length how we isolate each of these signals using a Legendre decomposition of our x-ray data and the selection rules for each of the transitions. Likewise, we will discuss how we convert the x-ray diffraction patterns into real-space movies of the nuclear dynamics. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Science Program. Use of LCLS supported under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-76F00515.

  2. Calculation of effective penetration depth in X-ray diffraction for pharmaceutical solids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jodi; Saw, Robert E; Kiang, Y-H

    2010-09-01

    The use of the glancing incidence X-ray diffraction configuration to depth profile surface phase transformations is of interest to pharmaceutical scientists. The Parratt equation has been used to depth profile phase changes in pharmaceutical compacts. However, it was derived to calculate 1/e penetration at glancing incident angles slightly below the critical angle of condensed matter and is, therefore, applicable to surface studies of materials such as single crystalline nanorods and metal thin films. When the depth of interest is 50-200 microm into the surface, which is typical for pharmaceutical solids, the 1/e penetration depth, or skin depth, can be directly calculated from an exponential absorption law without utilizing the Parratt equation. In this work, we developed a more relevant method to define X-ray penetration depth based on the signal detection limits of the X-ray diffractometer. Our definition of effective penetration depth was empirically verified using bilayer compacts of varying known thicknesses of mannitol and lactose.

  3. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton

    Here, serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solvedmore » with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.« less

  4. X-ray laser diffraction for structure determination of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, X. Edward; Gao, Xiang; Barty, Anton; ...

    2016-04-12

    Here, serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) using an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is a recent advancement in structural biology for solving crystal structures of challenging membrane proteins, including G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which often only produce microcrystals. An XFEL delivers highly intense X-ray pulses of femtosecond duration short enough to enable the collection of single diffraction images before significant radiation damage to crystals sets in. Here we report the deposition of the XFEL data and provide further details on crystallization, XFEL data collection and analysis, structure determination, and the validation of the structural model. The rhodopsin-arrestin crystal structure solvedmore » with SFX represents the first near-atomic resolution structure of a GPCR-arrestin complex, provides structural insights into understanding of arrestin-mediated GPCR signaling, and demonstrates the great potential of this SFX-XFEL technology for accelerating crystal structure determination of challenging proteins and protein complexes.« less

  5. Plutonium-uranium mixed oxide characterization by coupling micro-X-ray diffraction and absorption investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, C.; Martin, M.; Kuri, G.; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C.

    2011-09-01

    Plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The potential differences of metal redox state and microstructural developments of the matrix before and after irradiation are commonly analysed by electron probe microanalysis. In this work the structure and next-neighbor atomic environments of Pu and U oxide features within unirradiated homogeneous MOX and irradiated (60 MW d kg -1) MOX samples was analysed by micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (μ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The grain properties, chemical bonding, valences and stoichiometry of Pu and U are determined from the experimental data gained for the unirradiated as well as for irradiated fuel material examined in the center of the fuel as well as in its peripheral zone (rim). The formation of sub-grains is observed as well as their development from the center to the rim (polygonization). In the irradiated sample Pu remains tetravalent (>95%) and no (<5%) Pu(V) or Pu(VI) can be detected while the fuel could undergo slight oxidation in the rim zone. Any slight potential plutonium oxidation is buffered by the uranium dioxide matrix while locally fuel cladding interaction could also affect the redox of the fuel.

  6. Ab initio simulation of diffractometer instrumental function for high-resolution X-ray diffraction1

    PubMed Central

    Mikhalychev, Alexander; Benediktovitch, Andrei; Ulyanenkova, Tatjana; Ulyanenkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of the X-ray diffractometer instrumental function for a given optics configuration is important both for planning experiments and for the analysis of measured data. A fast and universal method for instrumental function simulation, suitable for fully automated computer realization and describing both coplanar and noncoplanar measurement geometries for any combination of X-ray optical elements, is proposed. The method can be identified as semi-analytical backward ray tracing and is based on the calculation of a detected signal as an integral of X-ray intensities for all the rays reaching the detector. The high speed of calculation is provided by the expressions for analytical integration over the spatial coordinates that describe the detection point. Consideration of the three-dimensional propagation of rays without restriction to the diffraction plane provides the applicability of the method for noncoplanar geometry and the accuracy for characterization of the signal from a two-dimensional detector. The correctness of the simulation algorithm is checked in the following two ways: by verifying the consistency of the calculated data with the patterns expected for certain simple limiting cases and by comparing measured reciprocal-space maps with the corresponding maps simulated by the proposed method for the same diffractometer configurations. Both kinds of tests demonstrate the agreement of the simulated instrumental function shape with the measured data. PMID:26089760

  7. X-Ray Diffraction on Mars: Scientific Discoveries Made by the CheMin Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Blake, D. F.; Ming, D. W.; Bristow, T. F.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity landed in Gale crater in August 2012 with the goal to identify and characterize habitable environments on Mars. Curiosity has been studying a series of sedimentary rocks primarily deposited in fluviolacustrine environments approximately 3.5 Ga. Minerals in the rocks and soils on Mars can help place further constraints on these ancient aqueous environments, including pH, salinity, and relative duration of liquid water. The Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument on Curiosity uses a Co X-ray source and charge-coupled device detector in transmission geometry to collect 2D Debye-Scherrer ring patterns of the less than 150 micron size fraction of drilled rock powders or scooped sediments. With an angular range of approximately 2.52deg 20 and a 20 resolution of approximately 0.3deg, mineral abundances can be quantified with a detection limit of approximately 1-2 wt. %. CheMin has returned quantitative mineral abundances from 16 mudstone, sandstone, and aeolian sand samples so far. The mineralogy of these samples is incredibly diverse, suggesting a variety of depositional and diagenetic environments and different source regions for the sediments. Results from CheMin have been essential for reconstructing the geologic history of Gale crater and addressing the question of habitability on ancient Mars.

  8. In situ x-ray surface diffraction chamber for pulsed laser ablation film growth studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tischler, J. Z.; Eres, G.; Lowndes, D. H.; Larson, B. C.; Yoon, M.; Chiang, T.-C.; Zschack, Paul

    2000-06-01

    Pulsed laser deposition is highly successful for growing complex films such as oxides for substrate buffer layers and HiTc oxide superconductors. A surface diffraction chamber has been constructed to study fundamental aspects of non-equilibrium film growth using pulsed laser deposition. Due to the pulsed nature of the ablating laser, the deposited atoms arrive on the substrate in short sub-millisecond pulses. Thus monitoring the surface x-ray diffraction following individual laser pulses (with resolution down to ˜1 ms) provides direct information on surface kinetics and the aggregation process during film growth. The chamber design, based upon a 2+2 surface diffraction geometry with the modifications necessary for laser ablation, is discussed, and initial measurements on homo-epitaxial growth of SrTiO3 are presented.

  9. Data preparation and evaluation techniques for x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; ...

    2010-01-01

    The post-experiment processing of X-ray Diffraction Microscopy data is often time-consuming and difficult. This is mostly due to the fact that even if a preliminary result has been reconstructed, there is no definitive answer as to whether or not a better result with more consistently retrieved phases can still be obtained. In addition, we show here that the first step in data analysis, the assembly of two-dimensional diffraction patterns from a large set of raw diffraction data, is crucial to obtaining reconstructions of highest possible consistency. We have developed software that automates this process and results in consistently accurate diffractionmore » patterns. We have furthermore derived some criteria of validity for a tool commonly used to assess the consistency of reconstructions, the phase retrieval transfer function, and suggest a modified version that has improved utility for judging reconstruction quality.« less

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of parakeet (Psittacula krameri) haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Jaimohan, S M; Naresh, M D; Arumugam, V; Mandal, A B

    2009-10-01

    Birds often show efficient oxygen management in order to meet the special demands of their metabolism. However, the structural studies of avian haemoglobins (Hbs) are inadequate for complete understanding of the mechanism involved. Towards this end, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies have been carried out for parakeet Hb. Parakeet Hb was crystallized as the met form in low-salt buffered conditions after extracting haemoglobin from crude blood by microcentrifugation and purifying the sample by column chromatography. Good-quality crystals were grown from 10% PEG 3350 and a crystal diffracted to about 2.8 A resolution. Preliminary diffraction data showed that the Hb crystal belonged to the monoclinic system (space group C2), with unit-cell parameters a = 110.68, b = 64.27, c = 56.40 A, beta = 109.35 degrees . Matthews volume analysis indicated that the crystals contained a half-tetramer in the asymmetric unit.

  11. Real-time x-ray diffraction measurements of shocked polycrystalline tin and aluminum.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Dane V; Macy, Don; Stevens, Gerald

    2008-11-01

    A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35 ns pulse. The characteristic K(alpha) lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic K(beta) line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3 x 6 mm(2) spot and 1 degrees full width half maximum angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5 degrees . A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device camera through a coherent fiber-optic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1 mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic aluminum lattice with no phase transformation.

  12. X-ray diffraction analysis of residual stress in zirconia dental composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahkarami, Masoud

    Dental restoration ceramic is a complex system to be characterized. Beside its essential biocompatibility, and pleasant appearance, it requires being mechanically strong in a catastrophic loading environment. Any design is restricted with geometry boundary and material property limits. Inspired by natural teeth, a multilayer ceramic is a smart way of achieving an enhanced restoration. Bi-layers of zirconia core covered by porcelain are known as one of the best multilayer restorations. Residual stresses may be introduced into a bi-layer dental ceramic restoration during its entire manufacturing process due to thermal expansion and elastic property mismatch. It is impossible to achieve a free of residual stresses bi-layer zirconia-porcelain restoration. The idea is to take the advantage of residual stress in design in such a way to prevent the crack initiation and progression. The hypothesis is a compressive residual stress at external contact surface would be enabling the restoration to endure a greater tensile stress. Optimizing the layers thickness, manufacturing process, and validating 3D simulations require development of new techniques of thickness, residual stresses and phase transformation measurement. In the present work, a combined mirco-tomography and finite element based method were adapted for thickness measurement. Two new 2D X-ray diffraction based techniques were adapted for phase transformation area mapping and combined phase transformation and residual stress measurement. Concerning the complex geometry of crown, an efficient method for X-ray diffraction data collection mapping on a given curved surface was developed. Finally a novel method for 3D dimensional x-ray diffraction data collection and visualization were introduced.

  13. In situ x-ray diffraction observation of multiple texture turnovers in sputtered Cr films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. B.; Rek, Z. U.; Yalisove, S. M.; Bilello, J. C.

    2004-11-01

    A series of Cr films were deposited onto native oxides of (100) Si substrates via a confocal deposition geometry in a magnetron sputter chamber. The film growth chamber was incorporated with an in situ x-ray diffraction system, which allowed the collection of x-ray diffraction data on the growing film in a quasi real time fashion without interruption of film deposition. The in situ x-ray diffraction, coupled with other ex situ characterization techniques, was used to study structural evolutions of the Cr films deposited at various Ar pressures. It was observed that the evolution of the crystallographic structures of Cr films was very sensitive to both deposition conditions and film thickness. With the confocal deposition geometry, the Cr films developed various types of out-of-plane textures. In addition to the (110) and (100) types of textures commonly reported for vapor deposited Cr films, the (111) and (112) types of textures were also observed. The film deposited at low Ar pressure (2 mTorr) developed strong (111) type texture. With the increase in either Ar pressure or film thickness, the Cr films tended to develop (112) and (100) types of texture. At high Ar pressures (>10 mTorr), several changes in texture type with increasing film thickness were observed. The sequence can be described as (110)-->(112)-->(100). The strong tendency for these films to ultimately assume the (100) type of texture could be related to significant rises in substrate temperatures during the late stages of film growth with high Ar pressures. The observation of the multiple texture type changes suggests that the evolution of Cr films is controlled by complex growth kinetics. The competitive growth of grains with different orientations can be altered not only by controllable deposition parameters such as Ar pressure, but also by the variations of in situ film attributes (e.g., residual stress and substrate temperature) occurring concurrently with film growth.

  14. Recent advances in continuum plasticity: phenomenological modeling and experimentation using X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmiston, John Kearney

    This work explores the field of continuum plasticity from two fronts. On the theory side, we establish a complete specification of a phenomenological theory of plasticity for single crystals. The model serves as an alternative to the popular crystal plasticity formulation. Such a model has been previously proposed in the literature; the new contribution made here is the constitutive framework and resulting simulations. We calibrate the model to available data and use a simple numerical method to explore resulting predictions in plane strain boundary value problems. Results show promise for further investigation of the plasticity model. Conveniently, this theory comes with a corresponding experimental tool in X-ray diffraction. Recent advances in hardware technology at synchrotron sources have led to an increased use of the technique for studies of plasticity in the bulk of materials. The method has been successful in qualitative observations of material behavior, but its use in quantitative studies seeking to extract material properties is open for investigation. Therefore in the second component of the thesis several contributions are made to synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments, in terms of method development as well as the quantitative reporting of constitutive parameters. In the area of method development, analytical tools are developed to determine the available precision of this type of experiment—a crucial aspect to determine if the method is to be used for quantitative studies. We also extract kinematic information relating to intragranular inhomogeneity which is not accessible with traditional methods of data analysis. In the area of constitutive parameter identification, we use the method to extract parameters corresponding to the proposed formulation of plasticity for a titanium alloy (HCP) which is continuously sampled by X-ray diffraction during uniaxial extension. These results and the lessons learned from the efforts constitute early reporting

  15. Laboratory manual: mineral X-ray diffraction data retrieval/plot computer program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hauff, Phoebe L.; VanTrump, George

    1976-01-01

    The Mineral X-Ray Diffraction Data Retrieval/Plot Computer Program--XRDPLT (VanTrump and Hauff, 1976a) is used to retrieve and plot mineral X-ray diffraction data. The program operates on a file of mineral powder diffraction data (VanTrump and Hauff, 1976b) which contains two-theta or 'd' values, and intensities, chemical formula, mineral name, identification number, and mineral group code. XRDPLT is a machine-independent Fortran program which operates in time-sharing mode on a DEC System i0 computer and the Gerber plotter (Evenden, 1974). The program prompts the user to respond from a time-sharing terminal in a conversational format with the required input information. The program offers two major options: retrieval only; retrieval and plot. The first option retrieves mineral names, formulas, and groups from the file by identification number, by the mineral group code (a classification by chemistry or structure), or by searches based on the formula components. For example, it enables the user to search for minerals by major groups (i.e., feldspars, micas, amphiboles, oxides, phosphates, carbonates) by elemental composition (i.e., Fe, Cu, AI, Zn), or by a combination of these (i.e., all copper-bearing arsenates). The second option retrieves as the first, but also plots the retrieved 2-theta and intensity values as diagrammatic X-ray powder patterns on mylar sheets or overlays. These plots can be made using scale combinations compatible with chart recorder diffractograms and 114.59 mm powder camera films. The overlays are then used to separate or sieve out unrelated minerals until unknowns are matched and identified.

  16. Comparison of dissimilarity measures for cluster analysis of X-ray diffraction data from combinatorial libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Yuma; Kusne, A. Gilad; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2017-12-01

    Machine learning techniques have proven invaluable to manage the ever growing volume of materials research data produced as developments continue in high-throughput materials simulation, fabrication, and characterization. In particular, machine learning techniques have been demonstrated for their utility in rapidly and automatically identifying potential composition-phase maps from structural data characterization of composition spread libraries, enabling rapid materials fabrication-structure-property analysis and functional materials discovery. A key issue in development of an automated phase-diagram determination method is the choice of dissimilarity measure, or kernel function. The desired measure reduces the impact of confounding structural data issues on analysis performance. The issues include peak height changes and peak shifting due to lattice constant change as a function of composition. In this work, we investigate the choice of dissimilarity measure in X-ray diffraction-based structure analysis and the choice of measure's performance impact on automatic composition-phase map determination. Nine dissimilarity measures are investigated for their impact in analyzing X-ray diffraction patterns for a Fe-Co-Ni ternary alloy composition spread. The cosine, Pearson correlation coefficient, and Jensen-Shannon divergence measures are shown to provide the best performance in the presence of peak height change and peak shifting (due to lattice constant change) when the magnitude of peak shifting is unknown. With prior knowledge of the maximum peak shifting, dynamic time warping in a normalized constrained mode provides the best performance. This work also serves to demonstrate a strategy for rapid analysis of a large number of X-ray diffraction patterns in general beyond data from combinatorial libraries.

  17. Capability of X-ray diffraction for the study of microstructure of metastable thin films

    PubMed Central

    Rafaja, David; Wüstefeld, Christina; Dopita, Milan; Motylenko, Mykhaylo; Baehtz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Metastable phases are often used to design materials with outstanding properties, which cannot be achieved with thermodynamically stable compounds. In many cases, the metastable phases are employed as precursors for controlled formation of nanocomposites. This contribution shows how the microstructure of crystalline metastable phases and the formation of nanocomposites can be concluded from X-ray diffraction experiments by taking advantage of the high sensitivity of X-ray diffraction to macroscopic and microscopic lattice deformations and to the dependence of the lattice deformations on the crystallographic direction. The lattice deformations were determined from the positions and from the widths of the diffraction lines, the dependence of the lattice deformations on the crystallographic direction from the anisotropy of the line shift and the line broadening. As an example of the metastable system, the supersaturated solid solution of titanium nitride and aluminium nitride was investigated, which was prepared in the form of thin films by using cathodic arc evaporation of titanium and aluminium in a nitrogen atmosphere. The microstructure of the (Ti,Al)N samples under study was tailored by modifying the [Al]/[Ti] ratio in the thin films and the surface mobility of the deposited species. PMID:25485125

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiment of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Chiba-Kamoshida, Kaori; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Morimoto, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Nattokinase is a single polypeptide chain composed of 275 amino acids (molecular weight 27 724) which displays strong fibrinolytic activity. Moreover, it can activate other fibrinolytic enzymes such as pro-urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. In the present study, native nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto was purified using gel-filtration chromatography and crystallized to give needle-like crystals which could be used for X-ray diffraction experiments. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 49.9, c = 56.3 Å, β = 95.2°. Diffraction images were processed to a resolution of 1.74 Å with an R merge of 5.2% (15.3% in the highest resolution shell) and a completeness of 69.8% (30.0% in the highest resolution shell). This study reports the first X-ray diffraction analysis of nattokinase. PMID:21139221

  19. Dynamic X-ray diffraction imaging of the ferroelectric response in bismuth ferrite

    DOE PAGES

    Laanait, Nouamane; Saenrang, Wittawat; Zhou, Hua; ...

    2017-03-21

    In this study, X-ray diffraction imaging is rapidly emerging as a powerful technique by which one can capture the local structure of crystalline materials at the nano- and meso-scale. Here, we present investigations of the dynamic structure of epitaxial monodomain BiFeO 3 thin-films using a novel full-field Bragg diffraction imaging modality. By taking advantage of the depth penetration of hard X-rays and their exquisite sensitivity to the atomic structure, we imaged in situ and in operando, the electric field-driven structural responses of buried BiFeO 3 epitaxial thin-films in micro-capacitor devices, with sub-100 nm lateral resolution. These imaging investigations were carriedmore » out at acquisition frame rates that reached up to 20 Hz and data transfer rates of 40 MB/s, while accessing diffraction contrast that is sensitive to the entire three-dimensional unit cell configuration. We mined these large datasets for material responses by employing matrix decomposition techniques, such as independent component analysis. We found that this statistical approach allows the extraction of the salient physical properties of the ferroelectric response of the material, such as coercive fields and transient spatiotemporal modulations in their piezoelectric response, and also facilitates their decoupling from extrinsic sources that are instrument specific.« less

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of royal palm tree (Roystonea regia) peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Leandra; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Zamorano, Laura S.

    2007-09-01

    The purification, crystallization, X-ray diffraction data acquisition and molecular-replacement results of royal palm tree (R. regia) peroxidase are described. Royal palm tree peroxidase (RPTP), which was isolated from Roystonea regia leaves, has an unusually high stability that makes it a promising candidate for diverse applications in industry and analytical chemistry [Caramyshev et al. (2005 ▶), Biomacromolecules, 6, 1360–1366]. Here, the purification and crystallization of this plant peroxidase and its X-ray diffraction data collection are described. RPTP crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.8 Å. The crystals belong to themore » trigonal space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.83, c = 92.24 Å, and contain one protein molecule per asymmetric unit. The V{sub M} value and solvent content are 4.07 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and 69.8%, respectively.« less

  1. X-ray diffraction and TGA kinetic analyses for chemical looping combustion applications.

    PubMed

    Tijani, Mansour Mohammedramadan; Aqsha, Aqsha; Mahinpey, Nader

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis and characterization of supported metal-based oxygen carriers were carried out to provide information related to the use of oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion processes. The Cu, Co, Fe, Ni metals supported with Al 2 O 3 , CeO 2 , TiO 2 , ZrO 2 were prepared using the wetness impregnation technique. Then, the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) characterization of oxidized and reduced samples was obtained and presented. The kinetic analysis using Thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) of the synthesized samples was conducted. The kinetics of reduction reaction of all samples were estimated and explained.

  2. [Study of selegiline and related compounds with x-ray diffraction].

    PubMed

    Simon, K; Böcskei, Z; Török, Z

    1992-09-01

    Selegiline and its parent compounds were studied by X-ray diffraction. It was established that the racemates of primary and secondary amines (p-fluoro-amphetamine, methamphetamine, p-fluoro-methamphetamine) hydrochloride do not form racemic compounds but crystalline as conglomerates, at the same time tertiary amines like selegiline and p-fluoro-selegiline hydrochlorides do. The crystalline structure of five enantiomeric hydrochlorides were determined, the CPhe-C-C-N torsion angle is anti-periplanar in all cases but in p-fluoro-amphetamine where it is gauche.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of red clover necrotic mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stanton L.; Guenther, Richard H.; Sit, Tim L.

    2010-11-12

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a species that belongs to the Tombusviridae family of plant viruses with a T = 3 icosahedral capsid. RCNMV virions were purified and were crystallized for X-ray analysis using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Self-rotation functions and systematic absences identified the space group as I23, with two virions in the unit cell. The crystals diffracted to better than 4 {angstrom} resolution but were very radiation-sensitive, causing rapid decay of the high-resolution reflections. The data were processed to 6 {angstrom} in the analysis presented here.

  4. Final Report for X-ray Diffraction Sample Preparation Method Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, T. M.; Meznarich, H. K.; Valero, T.

    WRPS-1500790, “X-ray Diffraction Saltcake Sample Preparation Method Development Plan/Procedure,” was originally prepared with the intent of improving the specimen preparation methodology used to generate saltcake specimens suitable for XRD-based solid phase characterization. At the time that this test plan document was originally developed, packed powder in cavity supports with collodion binder was the established XRD specimen preparation method. An alternate specimen preparation method less vulnerable, if not completely invulnerable to preferred orientation effects, was desired as a replacement for the method.

  5. The statistical kinematical theory of X-ray diffraction as applied to reciprocal-space mapping

    PubMed

    Nesterets; Punegov

    2000-11-01

    The statistical kinematical X-ray diffraction theory is developed to describe reciprocal-space maps (RSMs) from deformed crystals with defects of the structure. The general solutions for coherent and diffuse components of the scattered intensity in reciprocal space are derived. As an example, the explicit expressions for intensity distributions in the case of spherical defects and of a mosaic crystal were obtained. The theory takes into account the instrumental function of the triple-crystal diffractometer and can therefore be used for experimental data analysis.

  6. Scanning three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy using a high-energy microbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y., E-mail: y-hayashi@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Hirose, Y.; Seno, Y.

    2016-07-27

    A scanning three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope apparatus with a high-energy microbeam was installed at the BL33XU Toyota beamline at SPring-8. The size of the 50 keV beam focused using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors was 1.3 μm wide and 1.6 μm high in full width at half maximum. The scanning 3DXRD method was tested for a cold-rolled carbon steel sheet sample. A three-dimensional orientation map with 37 {sup 3} voxels was obtained.

  7. [Study on bamboo treated with gamma rays by X-ray diffraction].

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng-Bo; Fei, Ben-Hua; Jiang, Ze-Hui; Yu, Zi-Xuan; Tian, Gen-Lin; Yang, Quan-Wen

    2011-06-01

    The microfibril angle and crystallinity of bamboo treated with gamma rays were tested by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The result indicated that crystallinity in bamboo increased when irradiation dose was less than 100 kGy, while the irradiation dose was raised to about 100 kGy, crystallinity in bamboo reduced. But during the whole irradiation process, the influence on microfibril angle was not obvious, so it was not the dominant factors on variation in physical-mechanical properties of bamboo during the process of irradiation.

  8. Structural alterations of thin actin filaments in muscle contraction by synchrotron X-ray fiber diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Katsuzo; Sugimoto, Yasunobu; Takezawa, Yasunori; Ueno, Yutaka; Minakata, Shiho; Oshima, Kanji; Matsuo, Tatsuhito; Kobayashi, Takakazu

    2007-01-01

    Strong evidence has been accumulated that the conformational changes of the thin actin filaments are occurring and playing an important role in the entire process of muscle contraction. The conformational changes and the mechanical properties of the thin actin filaments we have found by X-ray fiber diffraction on skeletal muscle contraction are explored. Recent studies on the conformational changes of regulatory proteins bound to actin filaments upon activation and in the force generation process are also described. Finally, the roles of structural alterations and dynamics of the actin filaments are discussed in conjunction with the regulation mechanism and the force generation mechanism.

  9. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K [Hinsdale, IL

    2008-12-23

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  10. Rietveld Refinement on X-Ray Diffraction Patterns of Bioapatite in Human Fetal Bones

    PubMed Central

    Meneghini, Carlo; Dalconi, Maria Chiara; Nuzzo, Stefania; Mobilio, Settimio; Wenk, Rudy H.

    2003-01-01

    Bioapatite, the main constituent of mineralized tissue in mammalian bones, is a calcium-phosphate-based mineral that is similar in structure and composition to hydroxyapatite. In this work, the crystallographic structure of bioapatite in human fetuses was investigated by synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction (XRD) and microdiffraction (μ-XRD) techniques. Rietveld refinement analyses of XRD and μ-XRD data allow for quantitative probing of the structural modifications of bioapatite as functions of the mineralization process and gestational age. PMID:12609904

  11. X-ray diffraction of molybdenum under shock compression to 450 GPa

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jue; Coppari, Federica; Smith, Raymond F.; ...

    2015-11-20

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a body-centered-cubic (bcc) transition metal that has widespread technological applications. Although the bcc transition elements are used as test cases for understanding the behavior of metals under extreme conditions, the melting curves and phase transitions of these elements have been the subject of stark disagreements in recent years. Here we use x-ray diffraction to examine the phase stability and melting behavior of Mo under shock loading to 450 GPa. The bcc phase of Mo remains stable along the Hugoniot until 380 GPa. Here, our results do not support previous claims of a shallow melting curve for molybdenum.

  12. Thermal effects on domain orientation of tetragonal piezoelectrics studied by in situ x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wonyoung; King, Alexander H.; Bowman, Keith J.

    2006-06-01

    Thermal effects on domain orientation in tetragonal lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and lead titanate (PT) have been investigated by using in situ x-ray diffraction with an area detector. In the case of a soft PZT, it is found that the texture parameter called multiples of a random distribution (MRD) initially increases with temperature up to approximately 100°C and then falls to unity at temperatures approaching the Curie temperature, whereas the MRD of hard PZT and PT initially undergoes a smaller increase or no change. The relationship between the mechanical strain energy and domain wall mobility with temperature is discussed.

  13. Phase transition sequence in ferroelectric Aurivillius compounds investigated by single crystal X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boullay, P.; Tellier, J.; Mercurio, D.; Manier, M.; Zuñiga, F. J.; Perez-Mato, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    The investigation of the phase transition sequence in SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) and SrBi2Nb2O9 (SBN) is reported using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. By monitoring specific reflections as a function of temperature, sensitive either to the superstructure formation or to polar displacements, it was possible to check the existence or not of an intermediate phase. This latter was confirmed in SBT, but within experimental accuracy could not be detected in SBN.

  14. Massive Submandibular Sialolith: Complete Radiographic Registration and Biochemical Analysis through X-Ray Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Mattos, Mayara Jessica; Ferrari, Francine; dos Reis Neto, José Manoel; Carta Gambus, Luiz Carlos; Couto Souza, Paulo Henrique; Berti-Couto, Soraya de Azambuja

    2014-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is a pathologic condition that affects 60 million people per year, which is caused by the presence of calcified structures, named sialoliths, inside the salivary glands and their salivary ducts. Despite the large incidence of sialolithiasis, its etiology is still unknown. In the present case report, a 47-year-old female patient, presenting with local pain and hampered mouth opening, underwent a surgical approach for the removal of a 20 mm sialolith, which was further analyzed through X-ray diffraction. In parallel, a radiographic registration of 8 years, covering all the period for sialolith formation, is presented along the case report. PMID:25258693

  15. Massive Submandibular Sialolith: Complete Radiographic Registration and Biochemical Analysis through X-Ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Franco, Ademir; de Carvalho Mattos, Mayara Jessica; Ferrari, Francine; Dos Reis Neto, José Manoel; Carta Gambus, Luiz Carlos; Couto Souza, Paulo Henrique; Berti-Couto, Soraya de Azambuja

    2014-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is a pathologic condition that affects 60 million people per year, which is caused by the presence of calcified structures, named sialoliths, inside the salivary glands and their salivary ducts. Despite the large incidence of sialolithiasis, its etiology is still unknown. In the present case report, a 47-year-old female patient, presenting with local pain and hampered mouth opening, underwent a surgical approach for the removal of a 20 mm sialolith, which was further analyzed through X-ray diffraction. In parallel, a radiographic registration of 8 years, covering all the period for sialolith formation, is presented along the case report.

  16. X-ray diffraction study of elemental erbium to 70 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael G.; Romano, Edward; Quine, Zachary

    2005-12-01

    We have investigated phase transitions in elemental erbium in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to 70 GPa using angular-dispersive x-ray powder diffraction methods. We present evidence of a series of phase transitions that appear to follow the anticipated hcp{yields}Sm-type{yields}double hcp (dhcp){yields}distorted fcc sequence. In particular, we present evidence for the predicted dhcp{yields}distorted fcc transition above 63 GPa. Equation of state data are also presented up to 70 GPa.

  17. On-the-fly segmentation approaches for x-ray diffraction datasets for metallic glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Fang; Williams, Travis; Hattrick-Simpers, Jason; ...

    2017-08-30

    Investment in brighter sources and larger detectors has resulted in an explosive rise in the data collected at synchrotron facilities. Currently, human experts extract scientific information from these data, but they cannot keep pace with the rate of data collection. Here, we present three on-the-fly approaches—attribute extraction, nearest-neighbor distance, and cluster analysis—to quickly segment x-ray diffraction (XRD) data into groups with similar XRD profiles. An expert can then analyze representative spectra from each group in detail with much reduced time, but without loss of scientific insights. As a result, on-the-fly segmentation would, therefore, result in accelerated scientific productivity.

  18. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction of crystals formed in water-plasticized amorphous lactose.

    PubMed

    Jouppila, K; Kansikas, J; Roos, Y H

    1998-01-01

    Effects of storage time and relative humidity on crystallization and crystal forms produced from amorphous lactose were investigated. Crystallization was observed from time-dependent loss of sorbed water and increasing intensities of peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns. The rate of crystallization increased with increasing storage relative humidity. Lactose crystallized mainly as alpha-lactose monohydrate and anhydrous crystals with alpha- and beta-lactose in a molar ratio of 5:3. The results suggested that the crystal form was defined by the early nucleation process. The crystallization data are important in modeling of crystallization phenomena and prediction of stability of lactose-containing food and pharmaceutical materials.

  19. Retrieval of the atomic displacements in the crystal from the coherent X-ray diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Minkevich, A A; Köhl, M; Escoubas, S; Thomas, O; Baumbach, T

    2014-07-01

    The retrieval of spatially resolved atomic displacements is investigated via the phases of the direct(real)-space image reconstructed from the strained crystal's coherent X-ray diffraction pattern. It is demonstrated that limiting the spatial variation of the first- and second-order spatial displacement derivatives improves convergence of the iterative phase-retrieval algorithm for displacements reconstructions to the true solution. This approach is exploited to retrieve the displacement in a periodic array of silicon lines isolated by silicon dioxide filled trenches.

  20. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B., E-mail: balwants@rrcat.gov.in; Kashyap, Y. S.

    2016-05-23

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  1. Fixture for supporting and aligning a sample to be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Green, L.A.; Heck, J.L. Jr.

    1985-04-23

    A fixture is provided for supporting and aligning small samples of material on a goniometer for x-ray diffraction analysis. A sample-containing capillary is accurately positioned for rotation in the x-ray beam by selectively adjusting the fixture to position the capillary relative to the x and y axes thereof to prevent wobble and position the sample along the z axis or the axis of rotation. By employing the subject fixture relatively small samples of materials can be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus previously limited to the analysis of much larger samples.

  2. Fixture for supporting and aligning a sample to be analyzed in an X-ray diffraction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Green, Lanny A.; Heck, Jr., Joaquim L.

    1987-01-01

    A fixture is provided for supporting and aligning small samples of material on a goniometer for X-ray diffraction analysis. A sample-containing capillary is accurately positioned for rotation in the X-ray beam by selectively adjusting the fixture to position the capillary relative to the x and y axes thereof to prevent wobble and position the sample along the z axis or the axis of rotation. By employing the subject fixture relatively small samples of materials can be analyzed in an X-ray diffraction apparatus previously limited to the analysis of much larger samples.

  3. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce; Nachtegaal, M.

    2012-10-15

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  4. In situ study of maize starch gelatinization under ultra-high hydrostatic pressure using X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Gu, Qinfen; Hemar, Yacine

    2013-08-14

    The gelatinization of waxy (very low amylose) and high-amylose maize starches by ultra-high hydrostatic pressure (up to 6 GPa) was investigated in situ using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction on samples held in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The starch pastes, made by mixing starch and water in a 1:1 ratio, were pressurized and measured at room temperature. X-ray diffraction pattern showed that at 2.7 GPa waxy starch, which displayed A-type XRD pattern at atmospheric pressure, exhibited a faint B-type-like pattern. The B-type crystalline structures of high-amylose starch were not affected even when 1.5 GPa pressure was applied. However, both waxy and high-amylose maize starches can be fully gelatinized at 5.9 GPa and 5.1 GPa, respectively. In the case of waxy maize starch, upon release of pressure (to atmospheric pressure) crystalline structure appeared as a result of amylopectin aggregation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of processing on the microstructure of finger millet by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dharmaraj, Usha; Parameswara, P; Somashekar, R; Malleshi, Nagappa G

    2014-03-01

    Finger millet is one of the important minor cereals, and carbohydrates form its major chemical constituent. Recently, the millet is processed to prepare hydrothermally treated (HM), decorticated (DM), expanded (EM) and popped (PM) products. The present research aims to study the changes in the microstructure of carbohydrates using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Processing the millet brought in significant changes in the carbohydrates. The native millet exhibited A-type pattern of X-ray diffraction with major peaks at 2θ values of 15.3, 17.86 and 23.15°, whereas, all other products showed V-type pattern with single major peak at 2θ values ranging from 19.39 to 19.81°. The corresponding lattice spacing and the number of unit cells in a particular direction of reflection also reduced revealing that crystallinity of starch has been decreased depending upon the processing conditions. Scanning electron microscopic studies also revealed that the orderly pattern of starch granules changed into a coherent mass due to hydrothermal treatment, while high temperature short time treatment rendered a honey-comb like structure to the product. However, the total carbohydrates and non-starch polysaccharide contents almost remained the same in all the products except for DM and EM, but the individual carbohydrate components changed significantly depending on the type of processing.

  6. TAKASAGO-6 apparatus for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological non-crystalline particles using X-ray free electron laser at SACLA

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a technique for structure analyses of non-crystalline particles with dimensions ranging from micrometer to sub-micrometer. We have developed a diffraction apparatus named TAKASAGO-6 for use in single-shot CXDI experiments of frozen-hydrated non-crystalline biological particles at cryogenic temperature with X-ray free electron laser pulses provided at a repetition rate of 30 Hz from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser. Specimen particles are flash-cooled after being dispersed on thin membranes supported by specially designed disks. The apparatus is equipped with a high-speed translation stage with a cryogenic pot for raster-scanning of the disks at a speedmore » higher than 25 μm/33 ms. In addition, we use devices assisting the easy transfer of cooled specimens from liquid-nitrogen storages to the cryogenic pot. In the current experimental procedure, more than 20 000 diffraction patterns can be collected within 1 h. Here we report the key components and performance of the diffraction apparatus. Based on the efficiency of the diffraction data collection and the structure analyses of metal particles, biological cells, and cellular organelles, we discuss the future application of this diffraction apparatus for structure analyses of biological specimens.« less

  7. TAKASAGO-6 apparatus for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological non-crystalline particles using X-ray free electron laser at SACLA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Takayama, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Shirahama, Keiya; Torizuka, Yasufumi; Manoda, Masahiro; Nakasako, Masayoshi; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a technique for structure analyses of non-crystalline particles with dimensions ranging from micrometer to sub-micrometer. We have developed a diffraction apparatus named TAKASAGO-6 for use in single-shot CXDI experiments of frozen-hydrated non-crystalline biological particles at cryogenic temperature with X-ray free electron laser pulses provided at a repetition rate of 30 Hz from the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser. Specimen particles are flash-cooled after being dispersed on thin membranes supported by specially designed disks. The apparatus is equipped with a high-speed translation stage with a cryogenic pot for raster-scanning of the disks at a speed higher than 25 μm/33 ms. In addition, we use devices assisting the easy transfer of cooled specimens from liquid-nitrogen storages to the cryogenic pot. In the current experimental procedure, more than 20 000 diffraction patterns can be collected within 1 h. Here we report the key components and performance of the diffraction apparatus. Based on the efficiency of the diffraction data collection and the structure analyses of metal particles, biological cells, and cellular organelles, we discuss the future application of this diffraction apparatus for structure analyses of biological specimens.

  8. Specimen preparation for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological cells and cellular organelles by using the X-ray free-electron laser at SACLA

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Okajima, Koji; Fukuda, Asahi; Oide, Mao; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) allows internal structures of biological cells and cellular organelles to be analyzed. CXDI experiments have been conducted at 66 K for frozen-hydrated biological specimens at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser facility (SACLA). In these cryogenic CXDI experiments using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses, specimen particles dispersed on thin membranes of specimen disks are transferred into the vacuum chamber of a diffraction apparatus. Because focused single XFEL pulses destroy specimen particles at the atomic level, diffraction patterns are collected through raster scanning the specimen disks to provide fresh specimen particles in the irradiation area. The efficiency of diffraction data collection in cryogenic experiments depends on the quality of the prepared specimens. Here, detailed procedures for preparing frozen-hydrated biological specimens, particularly thin membranes and devices developed in our laboratory, are reported. In addition, the quality of the frozen-hydrated specimens are evaluated by analyzing the characteristics of the collected diffraction patterns. Based on the experimental results, the internal structures of the frozen-hydrated specimens and the future development for efficient diffraction data collection are discussed. PMID:27359147

  9. Specimen preparation for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological cells and cellular organelles by using the X-ray free-electron laser at SACLA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Okajima, Koji; Fukuda, Asahi; Oide, Mao; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-07-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) allows internal structures of biological cells and cellular organelles to be analyzed. CXDI experiments have been conducted at 66 K for frozen-hydrated biological specimens at the SPring-8 Angstrom Compact Free-Electron Laser facility (SACLA). In these cryogenic CXDI experiments using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses, specimen particles dispersed on thin membranes of specimen disks are transferred into the vacuum chamber of a diffraction apparatus. Because focused single XFEL pulses destroy specimen particles at the atomic level, diffraction patterns are collected through raster scanning the specimen disks to provide fresh specimen particles in the irradiation area. The efficiency of diffraction data collection in cryogenic experiments depends on the quality of the prepared specimens. Here, detailed procedures for preparing frozen-hydrated biological specimens, particularly thin membranes and devices developed in our laboratory, are reported. In addition, the quality of the frozen-hydrated specimens are evaluated by analyzing the characteristics of the collected diffraction patterns. Based on the experimental results, the internal structures of the frozen-hydrated specimens and the future development for efficient diffraction data collection are discussed.

  10. Fabrication and testing of a newly designed slit system for depth-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Sinsheimer, John; Bouet, Nathalie; Ghose, Sanjit; ...

    2016-10-06

    A new system of slits called `spiderweb slits' have been developed for depth-resolved powder or polycrystalline X-ray diffraction measurements. The slits act on diffracted X-rays to select a particular gauge volume of sample, while absorbing diffracted X-rays from outside of this volume. Although the slit geometry is to some extent similar to that of previously developed conical slits or spiral slits, this new design has advantages over the previous ones in use for complex heterogeneous materials and in situ and operando diffraction measurements. For example, the slits can measure a majority of any diffraction cone for any polycrystalline material, overmore » a continuous range of diffraction angles, and work for X-ray energies of tens to hundreds of kiloelectronvolts. In addition, the design is generated and optimized using ray-tracing simulations, and fabricated through laser micromachining. The first prototype was successfully tested at the X17A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and shows similar performance to simulations, demonstrating gauge volume selection for standard powders, for all diffraction peaks over angles of 2–10°. A similar, but improved, design will be implemented at the X-ray Powder Diffraction beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II.« less

  11. Molybdenum cell for x-ray diffraction measurements of fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Kozaburo; Katoh, Masahiro; Inui, Masanori

    2004-03-01

    We have developed a sample cell for x-ray diffraction measurements of fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and high pressures. All parts of the cell are made of molybdenum which is resistant to the chemical corrosion of alkali metals. Single crystalline molybdenum disks electrolytically thinned down to 40 μm were used as the walls of the cell through which x rays pass. The crystal orientation of the disks was controlled in order to reduce the background from the cell. All parts of the cell were assembled and brazed together using a high-temperature Ru-Mo alloy. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements have been successfully carried out for fluid rubidium up to 1973 K and 16.2 MPa. The obtained S(Q) demonstrates the applicability of the molybdenum cell to x-ray diffraction measurements of fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and high pressures.

  12. Observation of electromigration in a Cu thin line by in situ coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Furukawa, Hayato; Kubo, Hideto; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2009-06-01

    Electromigration (EM) in a 1-μm-thick Cu thin line was investigated by in situ coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM). Characteristic x-ray speckle patterns due to both EM-induced voids and thermal deformation in the thin line were observed in the coherent x-ray diffraction patterns. Both parts of the voids and the deformation were successfully visualized in the images reconstructed from the diffraction patterns. This result not only represents the first demonstration of the visualization of structural changes in metallic materials by in situ CXDM but is also an important step toward studying the structural dynamics of nanomaterials using x-ray free-electron lasers in the near future.

  13. Development of an adaptable coherent x-ray diffraction microscope with the emphasis on imaging hydrated specimens.

    PubMed

    Nam, Daewoong; Park, Jaehyun; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Shimada, Hiroki; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a versatile coherent x-ray diffraction microscope capable of imaging biological specimens in solution. The microscope is a flexible platform accommodating various conditions, from low vacuum (10(-2) Pa) to helium gas filled ambient pressure. This flexibility greatly expands the application area, from in situ materials science to biology systems in their native state, by significantly relaxing restrictions to the sample environment. The coherent diffraction microscope has been used successfully to image a yeast cell immersed in buffer solution. We believe that the design of this coherent diffraction microscope can be directly adapted to various platforms such as table top soft x-ray laser, synchrotron x-ray sources, and x-ray free electron laser with minor relevant adjustments.

  14. Development of an adaptable coherent x-ray diffraction microscope with the emphasis on imaging hydrated specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Daewoong; Park, Jaehyun; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Shimada, Hiroki; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a versatile coherent x-ray diffraction microscope capable of imaging biological specimens in solution. The microscope is a flexible platform accommodating various conditions, from low vacuum (10-2 Pa) to helium gas filled ambient pressure. This flexibility greatly expands the application area, from in situ materials science to biology systems in their native state, by significantly relaxing restrictions to the sample environment. The coherent diffraction microscope has been used successfully to image a yeast cell immersed in buffer solution. We believe that the design of this coherent diffraction microscope can be directly adapted to various platforms such as table top soft x-ray laser, synchrotron x-ray sources, and x-ray free electron laser with minor relevant adjustments.

  15. Non-conventional applications of a noninvasive portable X-ray diffraction/fluorescence instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Giacomo; Sarrazin, Philippe; Heginbotham, Arlen

    2016-11-01

    Noninvasive techniques have become widespread in the cultural heritage analytical domain. The popular handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) devices give the elemental composition of all the layers that X-rays can penetrate, but no information on how atoms are bound together or at which depth they are located. A noninvasive portable X-ray powder diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) device may offer a solution to these limitations, since it can provide information on the composition of crystalline materials. This paper introduces applications of XRD beyond simple phase recognition. The two fundamental principles for XRD are: (1) the crystallites should be randomly oriented, to ensure proper intensity to all the diffraction peaks, and (2) the material should be positioned exactly in the focal plane of the instrument, respecting its geometry, as any displacement of the sample would results in 2 θ shifts of the diffraction peaks. In conventional XRD, the sample is ground and set on the properly positioned sample holder. Using a noninvasive portable instrument, these two requirements are seldom fulfilled. The position, size and orientation of a given crystallite within a layered structure depend on the object itself. Equation correlating the displacement (distance from the focal plane) versus peak shift (angular difference in 2 θ from the standard value) is derived and used to determine the depth at which a given substance is located. The quantitative composition of two binary Cu/Zn alloys, simultaneously present, was determined measuring the cell volume and using Vegard's law. The analysis of the whole object gives information on the texture and possible preferred orientations of the crystallites, which influences the peak intensity. This allows for the distinction between clad and electroplated daguerreotypes in the case of silver and between ancient and modern gilding for gold. Analyses of cross sections can be carried out successfully. Finally, beeswax, used in

  16. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetric studies at low scan rates

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Haruhiko; Hatta, Ichiro; Koynova, Rumiana; Tenchov, Boris

    1992-01-01

    The phase transitions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) in excess water have been examined by low-angle time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetry at low scan rates. The lamellar subgel/lamellar liquid-crystalline (Lc → Lα), lamellar gel/lamellar liquid-crystalline (Lβ → Lα), and lamellar liquid-crystalline/lamellar gel (Lα → Lβ) phase transitions proceed via coexistence of the initial and final phases with no detectable intermediates at scan rates 0.1 and 0.5°C/min. At constant temperature within the region of the Lβ → Lα transition the ratio of the two coexisting phases was found to be stable for over 30 min. The state of stable phase coexistence was preceded by a 150-s relaxation taking place at constant temperature after termination of the heating scan in the transition region. While no intermediate structures were present in the coexistence region, a well reproducible multipeak pattern, with at least four prominent heat capacity peaks separated in temperature by 0.4-0.5°C, has been observed in the cooling transition (Lα → Lβ) by calorimetry. The multipeak pattern became distinct with an increase of incubation time in the liquid-crystalline phase. It was also clearly resolved in the x-ray diffraction intensity versus temperature plots recorded at slow cooling rates. These data suggest that the equilibrium state of the Lα phase of hydrated DPPE is represented by a mixture of domains that differ in thermal behavior, but cannot be distinguished structurally by x-ray scattering. Imagesp689-aFIGURE 9 PMID:19431820

  17. Three-dimensional coherent X-ray diffractive imaging of whole frozen-hydrated cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Rui; Chen, Chien-Chun; Huang, Zhifeng; Jiang, Huaidong; Chen, Allan L.; Raines, Kevin S.; Pryor Jr, Alan; Nam, Daewoong; Wiegart, Lutz; Song, Changyong; Madsen, Anders; Chushkin, Yuriy; Zontone, Federico; Bradley, Peter J.; Miao, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    A structural understanding of whole cells in three dimensions at high spatial resolution remains a significant challenge and, in the case of X-rays, has been limited by radiation damage. By alleviating this limitation, cryogenic coherent diffractive imaging (cryo-CDI) can in principle be used to bridge the important resolution gap between optical and electron microscopy in bio-imaging. Here, the first experimental demonstration of cryo-CDI for quantitative three-dimensional imaging of whole frozen-hydrated cells using 8 keV X-rays is reported. As a proof of principle, a tilt series of 72 diffraction patterns was collected from a frozen-hydrated Neospora caninum cell and the three-dimensional mass density of the cell was reconstructed and quantified based on its natural contrast. This three-dimensional reconstruction reveals the surface and internal morphology of the cell, including its complex polarized sub-cellular structure. It is believed that this work represents an experimental milestone towards routine quantitative three-dimensional imaging of whole cells in their natural state with spatial resolutions in the tens of nanometres. PMID:26306199

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru; Abramchik, Yu. A., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru; Zhukhlistova, N. E., E-mail: ugama@yandex.ru

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp.more » gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.« less

  19. Taking Snapshots of Photosynthetic Water Oxidation Using Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction and Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Jan; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Koroidov, Sergey; Echols, Nathaniel; Hattne, Johan; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Gul, Sheraz; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Gildea, Richard J.; Han, Guangye; Hellmich, Julia; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Brewster, Aaron S.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Glöckner, Carina; Lampe, Alyssa; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Gallo, Erik; Uhlig, Jens; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; Skinner, David E.; Bogan, Michael J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Glatzel, Pieter; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Adams, Paul D.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-01-01

    The dioxygen we breathe is formed from water by its light-induced oxidation in photosystem II. O2 formation takes place at a catalytic manganese cluster within milliseconds after the photosystem II reaction center is excited by three single-turnover flashes. Here we present combined X-ray emission spectra and diffraction data of 2 flash (2F) and 3 flash (3F) photosystem II samples, and of a transient 3F′ state (250 μs after the third flash), collected under functional conditions using an X-ray free electron laser. The spectra show that the initial O-O bond formation, coupled to Mn-reduction, does not yet occur within 250 μs after the third flash. Diffraction data of all states studied exhibit an anomalous scattering signal from Mn but show no significant structural changes at the present resolution of 4.5 Å. This study represents the initial frames in a molecular movie of the structural changes during the catalytic reaction in photosystem II. PMID:25006873

  20. Taking snapshots of photosynthetic water oxidation using femtosecond X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Jan; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Koroidov, Sergey; Echols, Nathaniel; Hattne, Johan; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Gul, Sheraz; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Gildea, Richard J.; Han, Guangye; Hellmich, Julia; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Brewster, Aaron S.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Glöckner, Carina; Lampe, Alyssa; Difiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Gallo, Erik; Uhlig, Jens; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; Skinner, David E.; Bogan, Michael J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Glatzel, Pieter; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Adams, Paul D.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-07-01

    The dioxygen we breathe is formed by light-induced oxidation of water in photosystem II. O2 formation takes place at a catalytic manganese cluster within milliseconds after the photosystem II reaction centre is excited by three single-turnover flashes. Here we present combined X-ray emission spectra and diffraction data of 2-flash (2F) and 3-flash (3F) photosystem II samples, and of a transient 3F’ state (250 μs after the third flash), collected under functional conditions using an X-ray free electron laser. The spectra show that the initial O-O bond formation, coupled to Mn reduction, does not yet occur within 250 μs after the third flash. Diffraction data of all states studied exhibit an anomalous scattering signal from Mn but show no significant structural changes at the present resolution of 4.5 Å. This study represents the initial frames in a molecular movie of the structural changes during the catalytic reaction in photosystem II.

  1. Radiation-induced melting in coherent X-ray diffractive imaging at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarenko, O.; Nikulin, A. Y.; Moser, H. O.; Yang, P.; Sakata, O.

    2011-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction techniques play an increasingly significant role in the imaging of nanoscale structures, ranging from metallic and semiconductor to biological objects. In material science, X-rays are usually considered to be of a low-destructive nature, but under certain conditions they can cause significant radiation damage and heat loading on the samples. The qualitative literature data concerning the tolerance of nanostructured samples to synchrotron radiation in coherent diffraction imaging experiments are scarce. In this work the experimental evidence of a complete destruction of polymer and gold nanosamples by the synchrotron beam is reported in the case of imaging at 1–10 nm spatial resolution. Numerical simulations based on a heat-transfer model demonstrate the high sensitivity of temperature distribution in samples to macroscopic experimental parameters such as the conduction properties of materials, radiation heat transfer and convection. However, for realistic experimental conditions the calculated rates of temperature rise alone cannot explain the melting transitions observed in the nanosamples. Comparison of these results with the literature data allows a specific scenario of the sample destruction in each particular case to be presented, and a strategy for damage reduction to be proposed. PMID:21685675

  2. Study of gold nanoparticle synthesis by synchrotron x-ray diffraction and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhongying; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Le; Moeendarbari, Sina; Hao, Yaowu; Cai, Zhonghou; Cheng, Xuemei

    Gold nanoparticles have a wide range of potential applications, including therapeutic agent delivery, catalysis, and electronics. Recently a new process of hollow nanoparticle synthesis was reported, the mechanism of which was hypothesized to involve electroless deposition around electrochemically evolved hydrogen bubbles. However, the growth mechanism still needs experimental evidence. We report investigation of this synthesis process using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and fluorescence measurements performed at beamline 2-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). A series of gold nanoparticle samples with different synthesis time (50-1200 seconds) were deposited using a mixture electrolyte solution of Na3Au(SO3)2 and H4N2NiO6S2 on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. The 2D mapping of fluorescence intensity and comparison of x-ray diffraction peaks of the samples have provided valuable information on the growth mechanism. Work at Bryn Mawr College and University of Texas at Arlington is supported by NSF Grants (1207085 and 1207377) and use of the APS at Argonne National Laboratory is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. Depth profiling of ion-induced damage in D9 alloy using X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S.; Gayathri, N.; Mukherjee, P.

    2018-04-01

    The ion-induced depthwise damage profile in 35 MeV α-irradiated D9 alloy samples with doses of 5 × 1015 He2+/cm2, 6.4 × 1016 He2+/cm2 and 2 × 1017 He2+/cm2 has been assessed using X-ray diffraction technique. The microstructural characterisation has been done along the depth from beyond the stopping region (peak damage region) to the homogeneous damage region (surface) as simulated from SRIM. The parameters such as domain size and microstrain have been evaluated using two different X-ray diffraction line profile analysis techniques. The results indicate that at low dose the damage profile shows a prominent variation as a function of depth but, with increasing dose, it becomes more homogeneous along the depth. This suggests that enhanced defect diffusion and their annihilation in pre-existing and newly formed sinks play a significant role in deciding the final microstructure of the irradiated sample as a function of depth.

  4. In-situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction study of zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Ferrari, S.; Kumar, R. S.; Grinblat, F.; ...

    2016-04-23

    We have studied the high-pressure structural behavior of zinc ferrite (ZnFe 2O 4) nanoparticles by powder X-ray diffraction measurements up to 47 GPa. We found that the cubic spinel structure of ZnFe 2O 4 remains up to 33 GPa and a phase transition is induced beyond this pressure. The high-pressure phase is indexed to an orthorhombic CaMn 2O 4-type structure. Upon decompression the low- and high-pressure phases coexist. The compressibility of both structures was also investigated. We have observed that the lattice parameters of the high-pressure phase behave anisotropically upon compression. Further, we predict possible phase transition around 55 GPa.more » For comparison, we also studied the compression behavior of magnetite (Fe 3O 4) nanoparticles by X-ray diffraction up to 23 GPa. Spinel-type ZnFe 2O 4 and Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles have a bulk modulus of 172 (20) GPa and 152 (9) GPa, respectively. Lastly, this indicates that in both cases the nanoparticles do not undergo a Hall-Petch strengthening.« less

  5. X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Metal Deposition in Group D Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Fayne L.; Thomas, John W.; Appleman, Milo D.; Goodman, Stewart H.; Donohue, Jerry

    1966-01-01

    Tucker, Fayne L. (University of Southern California, Los Angeles), John W. Thomas, Milo D. Appleman, Stewart H. Goodman, and Jerry Donohue. X-ray diffraction studies on metal deposition in group D streptococci. J. Bacteriol. 92:1311–1314. 1966.—Streptococcus faecalis N83 and S. faecium K6A reduced several compounds of Group VI elements to the elemental form, but reduced none of several compounds tested containing elements of other groups. The elemental tellurium deposited by S. faecium K6A was in general of a larger particle size than that deposited by S. faecalis N83 as judged from X-ray diffraction analysis. The particle size of the deposited tellurium was correlated with the blackness of the precipitate produced by cells growing in the presence of tellurite. A black and gray variation was observed in S. faecium K6A which was considered to be due to particle size, the amount of tellurium present, and the location of the deposited tellurium. The gray color of S. faecium K6A was not due to the presence of any oxidized tellurium products. PMID:4958879

  6. In-situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction study of zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, S.; Kumar, R. S.; Grinblat, F.

    We have studied the high-pressure structural behavior of zinc ferrite (ZnFe 2O 4) nanoparticles by powder X-ray diffraction measurements up to 47 GPa. We found that the cubic spinel structure of ZnFe 2O 4 remains up to 33 GPa and a phase transition is induced beyond this pressure. The high-pressure phase is indexed to an orthorhombic CaMn 2O 4-type structure. Upon decompression the low- and high-pressure phases coexist. The compressibility of both structures was also investigated. We have observed that the lattice parameters of the high-pressure phase behave anisotropically upon compression. Further, we predict possible phase transition around 55 GPa.more » For comparison, we also studied the compression behavior of magnetite (Fe 3O 4) nanoparticles by X-ray diffraction up to 23 GPa. Spinel-type ZnFe 2O 4 and Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles have a bulk modulus of 172 (20) GPa and 152 (9) GPa, respectively. Lastly, this indicates that in both cases the nanoparticles do not undergo a Hall-Petch strengthening.« less

  7. Structure of phospholipid-cholesterol membranes: an x-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Sanat; Raghunathan, V A

    2005-06-01

    We have studied the phase behavior of mixtures of cholesterol with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and dilauroyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DLPE), using x-ray diffraction techniques. Phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol mixtures are found to exhibit a modulated phase for cholesterol concentrations around 15 mol % at temperatures below the chain melting transition. Lowering the relative humidity from 98% to 75% increases the temperature range over which it exists. An electron density map of this phase in DPPC-cholesterol mixtures, calculated from the x-ray diffraction data, shows bilayers with a periodic height modulation, as in the ripple phase observed in many PCs in between the main- and pretransitions. However, these two phases differ in many aspects, such as the dependence of the modulation wavelength on the cholesterol content and thermodynamic stability at reduced humidities. This modulated phase is found to be absent in DLPE-cholesterol mixtures. At higher cholesterol contents the gel phase does not occur in any of these three systems, and the fluid lamellar phase is observed down to the lowest temperature studied (5 degrees C).

  8. Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction Study of the Structure and Dehydration Behavior of Sepiolite

    SciTech Connect

    Post,J.; Bish, D.; Heaney, P.

    2007-01-01

    Rietveld refinements using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were used to study the crystal structure and dehydration behavior of sepiolite from Durango, Mexico. The room-temperature (RT) sepiolite structure in air compares well with previous models but reveals an additional zeolitic H{sub 2}O site. The RT structure under vacuum retained only {approx}1/8 of the zeolitic H{sub 2}O and the volume decreased by 1.3%. Real-time, temperature-resolved synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements were used to investigate the behavior of the sepiolite structure from 300 to 925 K. Rietveld refinements revealed that most of the zeolitic H{sub 2}O is lost bymore » {approx}390 K, accompanied by a decrease in the a and c unit-cell parameters. Above {approx}600 K the sepiolite structure folds as one-half of the crystallographically bound H{sub 2}O is lost. Rietveld refinements of the 'anhydrous' sepiolite structure reveal that, in general, unit-cell parameters a and b and volume steadily decrease with increasing temperature; there is an obvious change in slope at {approx}820 K suggesting a phase transformation coinciding with the loss of the remaining bound H{sub 2}O molecule.« less

  9. Three-dimensional coherent X-ray diffractive imaging of whole frozen-hydrated cells

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Rui; Chen, Chien -Chun; ...

    2015-09-01

    Here, a structural understanding of whole cells in three dimensions at high spatial resolution remains a significant challenge and, in the case of X-rays, has been limited by radiation damage. By alleviating this limitation, cryogenic coherent diffractive imaging (cryo-CDI) can in principle be used to bridge the important resolution gap between optical and electron microscopy in bio-imaging. Here, the first experimental demonstration of cryo-CDI for quantitative three-dimensional imaging of whole frozen-hydrated cells using 8 Kev X-rays is reported. As a proof of principle, a tilt series of 72 diffraction patterns was collected from a frozen-hydrated Neospora caninum cell and themore » three-dimensional mass density of the cell was reconstructed and quantified based on its natural contrast. This three-dimensional reconstruction reveals the surface and internal morphology of the cell, including its complex polarized sub-cellular structure. Finally, it is believed that this work represents an experimental milestone towards routine quantitative three-dimensional imaging of whole cells in their natural state with spatial resolutions in the tens of nanometres.« less

  10. On the measurement of austenite in supermartensitic stainless steel by X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tolchard, Julian Richard, E-mail: tolchard@material.ntnu.no; Sømme, Astri; Solberg, Jan Ketil

    2015-01-15

    Sections of a 13Cr supermartensitic stainless steel were investigated to determine the optimum sample preparation for measurement of the austenite content by X-ray diffraction. The surface of several samples was mechanically ground or polished using media of grit sizes in the range 1–120 μm. The strained surface layer was afterwards removed stepwise by electropolishing, and the austenite content measured at each step. It was found that any level of mechanical grinding or polishing results in a reduction of the measured austenite fraction relative to the true bulk value, and that coarser grinding media impart greater damage and greater reduction inmore » the measured austenite content. The results thus highlight the importance of the electropolishing step in preparation of such samples, but suggest that the American Society for Testing and Materials standard E975-03 substantially overestimates the amount of material which needs to be removed to recover the true “bulk” content. - Highlights: • Quantitative Rietveld analysis of austenite/martensite ratio in supermartensitic stainless steels • Critical evaluation of sample preparation for residual austenite measurements by X-ray diffraction • Highlighting of the importance of electropolishing as a final preparation step.« less

  11. Three-dimensional coherent X-ray diffractive imaging of whole frozen-hydrated cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Xu, Rui; Chen, Chien-Chun; Huang, Zhifeng; Jiang, Huaidong; Chen, Allan L; Raines, Kevin S; Pryor, Alan; Nam, Daewoong; Wiegart, Lutz; Song, Changyong; Madsen, Anders; Chushkin, Yuriy; Zontone, Federico; Bradley, Peter J; Miao, Jianwei

    2015-09-01

    A structural understanding of whole cells in three dimensions at high spatial resolution remains a significant challenge and, in the case of X-rays, has been limited by radiation damage. By alleviating this limitation, cryogenic coherent diffractive imaging (cryo-CDI) can in principle be used to bridge the important resolution gap between optical and electron microscopy in bio-imaging. Here, the first experimental demonstration of cryo-CDI for quantitative three-dimensional imaging of whole frozen-hydrated cells using 8 keV X-rays is reported. As a proof of principle, a tilt series of 72 diffraction patterns was collected from a frozen-hydrated Neospora caninum cell and the three-dimensional mass density of the cell was reconstructed and quantified based on its natural contrast. This three-dimensional reconstruction reveals the surface and internal morphology of the cell, including its complex polarized sub-cellular structure. It is believed that this work represents an experimental milestone towards routine quantitative three-dimensional imaging of whole cells in their natural state with spatial resolutions in the tens of nanometres.

  12. Shape and Size of Microfine Aggregates: X-ray Microcomputed Tomgraphy vs. Laser Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan,S.; Garboczi, E.; Fowler, D.

    Microfine rock aggregates, formed naturally or in a crushing process, pass a No. 200 ASTM sieve, so have at least two orthogonal principal dimensions less than 75 {mu}m, the sieve opening size. In this paper, for the first time, we capture true 3-D shape and size data of several different types of microfine aggregates, using X-ray microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT) with a voxel size of 2 {mu}m. This information is used to generate shape analyses of various kinds. Particle size distributions are also generated from the {mu}CT data and quantitatively compared to the results of laser diffraction, which is the leadingmore » method for measuring particle size distributions of sub-millimeter size particles. By taking into account the actual particle shape, the differences between {mu}CT and laser diffraction can be qualitatively explained.« less

  13. Structure of rare-earth chalcogenide glasses by neutron and x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Drewitt, James W. E.; Salmon, Philip S.; Zeidler, Anita; ...

    2017-04-28

    The method of neutron diffraction with isomorphic substitution was used to measure the structure of the rare-earth chalcogenide glasses (R 2X 3) 0.07(Ga 2X 3) 0.33(GeX 2) 0.60 with R = La or Ce and X = S or Se. X-ray diffraction was also used to measure the structure of the sulphide glass. The results are consistent with networks that are built from GeX 4 and GaX 4 tetrahedra, and give R-S and R-Se coordination numbers of 8.0(2) and 8.5(4), respectively. The minimum nearest-neighbour R-R distance associated with rare-earth clustering is discussed.

  14. Structure of rare-earth chalcogenide glasses by neutron and x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Drewitt, James W. E.; Salmon, Philip S.; Zeidler, Anita

    The method of neutron diffraction with isomorphic substitution was used to measure the structure of the rare-earth chalcogenide glasses (R 2X 3) 0.07(Ga 2X 3) 0.33(GeX 2) 0.60 with R = La or Ce and X = S or Se. X-ray diffraction was also used to measure the structure of the sulphide glass. The results are consistent with networks that are built from GeX 4 and GaX 4 tetrahedra, and give R-S and R-Se coordination numbers of 8.0(2) and 8.5(4), respectively. The minimum nearest-neighbour R-R distance associated with rare-earth clustering is discussed.

  15. Liquid contrabands classification based on energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and hybrid discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YangDai, Tianyi; Zhang, Li

    2016-02-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with hybrid discriminant analysis (HDA) has been utilized for classifying the liquid materials for the first time. The XRD spectra of 37 kinds of liquid contrabands and daily supplies were obtained using an EDXRD test bed facility. The unique spectra of different samples reveal XRD's capability to distinguish liquid contrabands from daily supplies. In order to create a system to detect liquid contrabands, the diffraction spectra were subjected to HDA which is the combination of principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Experiments based on the leave-one-out method demonstrate that HDA is a practical method with higher classification accuracy and lower noise sensitivity than the other methods in this application. The study shows the great capability and potential of the combination of XRD and HDA for liquid contrabands classification.

  16. Neutron and X-ray Microbeam Diffraction Studies around a Fatigue-Crack Tip after Overload

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sooyeol; Barabash, Rozaliya; Chung, Jin-Seok

    2008-01-01

    An in-situ neutron diffraction technique was used to investigate the lattice-strain distributions and plastic deformation around a crack tip after overload. The lattice-strain profiles around a crack tip were measured as a function of the applied load during the tensile loading cycles after overload. Dislocation densities calculated from the diffraction peak broadening were presented as a function of the distance from the crack tip. Furthermore, the crystallographic orientation variations were examined near a crack tip using polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction combined with differential aperture microscopy. Crystallographic tilts are considerably observed beneath the surface around a crack tip, and these are consistentmore » with the high dislocation densities near the crack tip measured by neutron peak broadening.« less

  17. An X-ray diffraction method for semiquantitative mineralogical analysis of Chilean nitrate ore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, J.C.; Ericksent, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    Computer analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data provides a simple method for determining the semiquantitative mineralogical composition of naturally occurring mixtures of saline minerals. The method herein described was adapted from a computer program for the study of mixtures of naturally occurring clay minerals. The program evaluates the relative intensities of selected diagnostic peaks for the minerals in a given mixture, and then calculates the relative concentrations of these minerals. The method requires precise calibration of XRD data for the minerals to be studied and selection of diffraction peaks that minimize inter-compound interferences. The calculated relative abundances are sufficiently accurate for direct comparison with bulk chemical analyses of naturally occurring saline mineral assemblages.

  18. An x-ray diffraction method for semiquantitative mineralogical analysis of chilean nitrate ore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, C.; George, J.; Ericksen, E.

    1997-01-01

    Computer analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data provides a simple method for determining the semiquantitative mineralogical composition of naturally occurring mixtures of saline minerals. The method herein described was adapted from a computer program for the study of mixtures of naturally occurring clay minerals. The program evaluates the relative intensities of selected diagnostic peaks for the minerals in a given mixture, and then calculates the relative concentrations of these minerals. The method requires precise calibration of XRD data for the minerals to be studied and selection of diffraction peaks that minimize inter-compound interferences. The calculated relative abundances are sufficiently accurate for direct comparison with bulk chemical analyses of naturally occurring saline mineral assemblages.

  19. Study of Inverse Ni-based Photonic Crystal using the Microradian X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilieva, A. V.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Lukashin, A. V.; Tretyakov, Yu D.; Petukhov, A. V.; Byelov, D.; Chernyshov, D.; Okorokov, A. I.; Bouwman, W. G.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2010-10-01

    Inverse photonic nickel-based crystal films formed by electrocrystallization of metal inside the voids of polymer artificial opal have been studied using the microradian X-ray diffraction. Analysis of the diffraction images agrees with an face-centred cubic (FCC) structure with the lattice constant a0 = 650 ± 10 nm and indicates two types of stacking sequences coexisting in the crystal (twins of ABCABC... and ACBACB... ordering motifs), the ratio between them being 4:5 The transverse structural correlation length Ltran is 2.4 ± 0.1 μm, which corresponds to a sample thickness of 6 layers. The in-plane structural correlation length Llong is 3.4 ± 0.2 μm, and the structure mosaic is of order of 10°.

  20. Coherent X-Ray Diffraction Imaging and Characterization of Strain in Silicon-on-Insulator Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Gang; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Reiche, Manfred; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) has emerged in the last decade as a promising high resolution lens-less imaging approach for the characterization of various samples. It has made significant technical progress through developments in source, algorithm and imaging methodologies thus enabling important scientific breakthroughs in a broad range of disciplines. In this report, we will introduce the principles of forward scattering CDI and Bragg geometry CDI (BCDI), with an emphasis on the latter. BCDI exploits the ultra-high sensitivity of the diffraction pattern to the distortions of crystalline lattice. Its ability of imaging strain on the nanometer scale in three dimensions is highly novel. We will present the latest progress on the application of BCDI in investigating the strain relaxation behavior in nanoscale patterned strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) materials, aiming to understand and engineer strain for the design and implementation of new generation semiconductor devices. PMID:24955950

  1. The new HMI beamline MAGS: an instrument for hard X-ray diffraction at BESSY.

    PubMed

    Dudzik, Esther; Feyerherm, Ralf; Diete, Wolfgang; Signorato, Riccardo; Zilkens, Christopher

    2006-11-01

    The Hahn-Meitner-Institute Berlin is operating the new hard X-ray diffraction beamline MAGS at the Berlin synchrotron radiation source BESSY. The beamline is intended to complement the existing neutron instrumentation at the Berlin Neutron Scattering Centre. The new beamline uses a 7 T multipole wiggler to produce photon fluxes in the 10(11)-10(12) photons s(-1) (100 mA)(-1) (0.1% bandwidth)(-1) range at energies from 4 to 30 keV at the experiment. It has active bendable optics to provide flexible horizontal and vertical focusing and to compensate the large heat load from the wiggler source. The experimental end-station consists of a six-circle Huber diffractometer which can be used with an additional (polarization) analyser and different sample environments. The beamline is intended for single-crystal diffraction and resonant magnetic scattering experiments for the study of ordering phenomena, phase transitions and materials science.

  2. Microscopic stress characterisation of functional iron-based alloys by white X-ray microbeam diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, E. P.; Sato, S.; Fujieda, S.; Shinoda, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Sato, M.; Suzuki, S.

    2018-01-01

    Microscopic residual stress evolution in an austenite (γ) grain during a shape-memory process in an Fe-Mn-Si-Cr alloy was investigated using the white X-ray microbeam diffraction technique. The stresses were measured on a coarse grain, which had an orientation near <144>, parallel to the tensile loading direction with a high Schmid factor for a martensitic transformation. The magnitude of the residual stresses in a grain of the sample, which was subjected to a 23 % tensile strain and subsequent shape-recovery heating, was found to be very small and comparable to that prior to tensile deformation. Measurements of the recovery strain and microstructural analyses using electron backscatter diffraction suggested that the low residual stresses could be attributed to the significant shape recovery caused by a highly reversible martensitic transformation in the grain with a particular orientation.

  3. Deformation of a bismuth ferrite nanocrystal imaged by coherent X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Marcus C.; Pietraszewski, Adam; Kenny, Anthony; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Perovskite materials that contain transition metal-oxides often exhibit multifunctional properties with considerable utility in a device setting. BiFeO3 is a multiferroic perovskite material that exhibits room temperature anti-ferromagnetic and ferroelectric ordering. Optical excitation of BiFeO3 crystals results in an elastic structural deformation of the lattice with a fast response on the pico-second time scale. Here we report on dynamic optical excitation coupled with Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction measurements to investigate the structural properties of BiFeO3 nanoscale crystals. A continuous distortion of the diffraction speckle pattern was observed with increasing illumination. This was attributed to strain resulting from photo-induced lattice deformation.

  4. Fabrication and testing of a newly designed slit system for depth-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sinsheimer, John; Bouet, Nathalie; Ghose, Sanjit

    2016-10-06

    A new system of slits called `spiderweb slits' have been developed for depth-resolved powder or polycrystalline X-ray diffraction measurements. The slits act on diffracted X-rays to select a particular gauge volume of sample, while absorbing diffracted X-rays from outside of this volume. Although the slit geometry is to some extent similar to that of previously developed conical slits or spiral slits, this new design has advantages over the previous ones in use for complex heterogeneous materials andin situandoperandodiffraction measurements. For example, the slits can measure a majority of any diffraction cone for any polycrystalline material, over a continuous range ofmore » diffraction angles, and work for X-ray energies of tens to hundreds of kiloelectronvolts. The design is generated and optimized using ray-tracing simulations, and fabricated through laser micromachining. The first prototype was successfully tested at the X17A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and shows similar performance to simulations, demonstrating gauge volume selection for standard powders, for all diffraction peaks over angles of 2–10°. A similar, but improved, design will be implemented at the X-ray Powder Diffraction beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II.« less

  5. X-ray diffraction patterns and diffracted intensity of Kα spectral lines of He-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Arun; Khatri, Indu; Singh, A. K.; Sharma, Rinku; Mohan, Man

    2017-09-01

    In the present paper, we have calculated fine-structure energy levels related to the configurations 1s2s, 1s2p, 1s3s and 1s3p by employing GRASP2K code. We have also computed radiative data for transitions from 1s2p 1 P1o, 1s2p 3 P2o, 1s2p 3 P1o and 1s2s 3S1 to the ground state 1s2. We have made comparisons of our presented energy levels and transition wavelengths with available results compiled by NIST and good agreement is achieved. We have also provided X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of Kα spectral lines, namely w, x, y and z of Cu XXVIII, Kr XXXV and Mo with diffraction angle and maximum diffracted intensity which is not published elsewhere in the literature. We believe that our presented results may be beneficial in determination of the order parameter, X-ray crystallography, solid-state drug analysis, forensic science, geological and medical applications.

  6. Simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with synchrotron undulator sources.

    PubMed

    Tang, M X; Zhang, Y Y; E, J C; Luo, S N

    2018-05-01

    Polychromatic synchrotron undulator X-ray sources are useful for ultrafast single-crystal diffraction under shock compression. Here, simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with realistic undulator sources are reported, based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Purely elastic deformation, elastic-plastic two-wave structure, and severe plastic deformation under different impact velocities are explored, as well as an edge release case. Transmission-mode diffraction simulations consider crystallographic orientation, loading direction, incident beam direction, X-ray spectrum bandwidth and realistic detector size. Diffraction patterns and reciprocal space nodes are obtained from atomic configurations for different loading (elastic and plastic) and detection conditions, and interpretation of the diffraction patterns is discussed.

  7. Simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with synchrotron undulator sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M. X.; Zhang, Y. Y.; E, J. C.

    Polychromatic synchrotron undulator X-ray sources are useful for ultrafast single-crystal diffraction under shock compression. Here, simulations of X-ray diffraction of shock-compressed single-crystal tantalum with realistic undulator sources are reported, based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Purely elastic deformation, elastic–plastic two-wave structure, and severe plastic deformation under different impact velocities are explored, as well as an edge release case. Transmission-mode diffraction simulations consider crystallographic orientation, loading direction, incident beam direction, X-ray spectrum bandwidth and realistic detector size. Diffraction patterns and reciprocal space nodes are obtained from atomic configurations for different loading (elastic and plastic) and detection conditions, and interpretation of themore » diffraction patterns is discussed.« less

  8. Multiple defocused coherent diffraction imaging: method for simultaneously reconstructing objects and probe using X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Makoto; Shimomura, Kei; Suzuki, Akihiro; Burdet, Nicolas; Takahashi, Yukio

    2016-05-30

    The sample size must be less than the diffraction-limited focal spot size of the incident beam in single-shot coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) based on a diffract-before-destruction scheme using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). This is currently a major limitation preventing its wider applications. We here propose multiple defocused CXDI, in which isolated objects are sequentially illuminated with a divergent beam larger than the objects and the coherent diffraction pattern of each object is recorded. This method can simultaneously reconstruct both objects and a probe from the coherent X-ray diffraction patterns without any a priori knowledge. We performed a computer simulation of the prposed method and then successfully demonstrated it in a proof-of-principle experiment at SPring-8. The prposed method allows us to not only observe broad samples but also characterize focused XFEL beams.

  9. X-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction studies of crystallographic grains in nanocrystalline FePd:Cu thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, M.; Perzanowski, M.; Polit, A.; Zabila, Y.; Zarzycki, A.; Dobrowolska, A.; Marszalek, M.

    2011-03-01

    FePd alloys have recently attracted considerable attention as candidates for ultrahigh density magnetic storage media. In this paper we investigate FePd thin alloy film with a copper admixture composed of nanometer-sized grains. [Fe(0.9 nm)/Pd(1.1 nm)/Cu(d nm)]×5 multilayers were prepared by thermal deposition at room temperature in UHV conditions on Si(100) substrates covered by 100 nm SiO2. The thickness of the copper layer has been changed from 0 to 0.4 nm. After deposition, the multilayers were rapidly annealed at 600 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere, which resulted in the creation of the FePd:Cu alloy. The structure of alloy films obtained this way was determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD), glancing angle x-ray diffraction, and x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The measurements clearly showed that the L10 FePd:Cu nanocrystalline phase has been formed during the annealing process for all investigated copper compositions. This paper concentrates on the crystallographic grain features of FePd:Cu alloys and illustrates that the EXAFS technique, supported by XRD measurements, can help to extend the information about grain size and grain shape of poorly crystallized materials. We show that, using an appropriate model of the FePd:Cu grains, the comparison of EXAFS and XRD results gives a reasonable agreement.

  10. Theoretical study of the properties of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes. I

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    A detailed and comprehensive theoretical description of X-ray diffraction moiré fringes for a bicrystal specimen is given on the basis of a calculation by plane-wave dynamical diffraction theory. Firstly, prior to discussing the main subject of the paper, a previous article [Yoshimura (1997 ▸). Acta Cryst. A53, 810–812] on the two-dimensionality of diffraction moiré patterns is restated on a thorough calculation of the moiré interference phase. Then, the properties of moiré fringes derived from the above theory are explained for the case of a plane-wave diffraction image, where the significant effect of Pendellösung intensity oscillation on the moiré pattern when the crystal is strained is described in detail with theoretically simulated moiré images. Although such plane-wave moiré images are not widely observed in a nearly pure form, knowledge of their properties is essential for the understanding of diffraction moiré fringes in general. PMID:25970298

  11. Thermal expansion behavior study of Co nanowire array with in situ x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Guang; Cai, Quan; Jiang, Longsheng; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Kunhao; Cheng, Weidong; Xing, Xueqing; Chen, Zhongjun; Wu, Zhonghua

    2008-10-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption fine structure techniques were used to study the structural change of ordered Co nanowire array with temperature. The results show that the Co nanowires are polycrystalline with hexagonal close packed structure without phase change up until 700 °C. A nonlinear thermal expansion behavior has been found and can be well described by a quadratic equation with the first-order thermal expansion coefficient of 4.3×10-6/°C and the second-order thermal expansion coefficient of 5.9×10-9/°C. The mechanism of this nonlinear thermal expansion behavior is discussed.

  12. Towards shot-noise limited diffraction experiments with table-top femtosecond hard x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Marcel; Hauf, Christoph; Weisshaupt, Jannick; Salvador, Antonio-Andres Hernandez; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Table-top laser-driven hard x-ray sources with kilohertz repetition rates are an attractive alternative to large-scale accelerator-based systems and have found widespread applications in x-ray studies of ultrafast structural dynamics. Hard x-ray pulses of 100 fs duration have been generated at the Cu K α wavelength with a photon flux of up to 10 9 photons per pulse into the full solid angle, perfectly synchronized to the sub-100-fs optical pulses from the driving laser system. Based on spontaneous x-ray emission, such sources display a particular noise behavior which impacts the sensitivity of x-ray diffraction experiments. We present a detailed analysis of the photon statistics and temporal fluctuations of the x-ray flux, together with experimental strategies to optimize the sensitivity of optical pump/x-ray probe experiments. We demonstrate measurements close to the shot-noise limit of the x-ray source.

  13. Towards shot-noise limited diffraction experiments with table-top femtosecond hard x-ray sources

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Marcel; Hauf, Christoph; Weisshaupt, Jannick; Salvador, Antonio-Andres Hernandez; Woerner, Michael; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Table-top laser-driven hard x-ray sources with kilohertz repetition rates are an attractive alternative to large-scale accelerator-based systems and have found widespread applications in x-ray studies of ultrafast structural dynamics. Hard x-ray pulses of 100 fs duration have been generated at the Cu Kα wavelength with a photon flux of up to 109 photons per pulse into the full solid angle, perfectly synchronized to the sub-100-fs optical pulses from the driving laser system. Based on spontaneous x-ray emission, such sources display a particular noise behavior which impacts the sensitivity of x-ray diffraction experiments. We present a detailed analysis of the photon statistics and temporal fluctuations of the x-ray flux, together with experimental strategies to optimize the sensitivity of optical pump/x-ray probe experiments. We demonstrate measurements close to the shot-noise limit of the x-ray source. PMID:28795079

  14. Synchrotron Radial X-ray Diffraction Studies of Deformation of Polycrystalline MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J.; Tsujino, N.; Mohiuddin, A.; Karato, S. I.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray diffraction analyses have been used for decades to study mechanical properties of polycrystalline samples during in-situ high-pressure deformation. When polycrystalline materials are deformed, stresses develop in grains and lead to lattice distortion. Using X-ray diffraction we can estimate the lattice strain for each (hkl) diffraction plans and calculate the applied stress for each (hkl), using [Singh, 1993] relation. However, this method doesn't take into account plastic anisotropy. As a results of plastic anisotropy present in the material, stress estimated from this method can be largely differ depending on (hkl) diffraction planes [Karato, 2009]. Studying the stress estimate for each (hkl) plane, might help us distinguish dominant deformation mechanisms activated during deformation such as diffusion (we will observe small stress variation as a function of (hkl) diffraction planes) or dislocation creep (we will observe a stress variation as a function of (hkl) diffraction planes that could also give us clues on potential slip system activity). In this study we observed stress evolution in MgO polycrystalline samples deformed under mantle pressure and temperature for (200) and (220) diffraction planes. Using a range MgO grain sizes we were able to control the active deformation mechanism (for e.g. diffusion creep or dislocation creep). For coarse-grained specimens, we observed strong (hkl) dependence of radial strain indicating the operation of dislocation creep. The observed (hkl) dependence changes with pressure suggesting a change in the slip system: at pressures higher than 27 GPa, (200) shows larger stress estimate than (220). In contrast, at lower pressures, (220) shows larger stress estimate than (200). This might indicate a slip system transition in MgO occurring under lower mantle conditions. From {110} plane to {100} plane. This is in good agreement with theoretical predictions and numerical calculation [Amodeo et al., 2012] and has an important

  15. Comparison of a CCD and an APS for soft X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Graeme; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Clark, A.; Dhesi, S. S.; Maneuski, D.; Marchal, J.; Steadman, P.; Tartoni, N.; Turchetta, R.

    2011-12-01

    We compare a new CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) to a Princeton Instruments PIXIS-XO: 2048B Charge Coupled Device (CCD) with soft X-rays tested in a synchrotron beam line at the Diamond Light Source (DLS). Despite CCDs being established in the field of scientific imaging, APS are an innovative technology that offers advantages over CCDs. These include faster readout, higher operational temperature, in-pixel electronics for advanced image processing and reduced manufacturing cost. The APS employed was the Vanilla sensor designed by the MI3 collaboration and funded by an RCUK Basic technology grant. This sensor has 520 x 520 square pixels, of size 25 μm on each side. The sensor can operate at a full frame readout of up to 20 Hz. The sensor had been back-thinned, to the epitaxial layer. This was the first time that a back-thinned APS had been demonstrated at a beam line at DLS. In the synchrotron experiment soft X-rays with an energy of approximately 708 eV were used to produce a diffraction pattern from a permalloy sample. The pattern was imaged at a range of integration times with both sensors. The CCD had to be operated at a temperature of -55°C whereas the Vanilla was operated over a temperature range from 20°C to -10°C. We show that the APS detector can operate with frame rates up to two hundred times faster than the CCD, without excessive degradation of image quality. The signal to noise of the APS is shown to be the same as that of the CCD at identical integration times and the response is shown to be linear, with no charge blooming effects. The experiment has allowed a direct comparison of back thinned APS and CCDs in a real soft x-ray synchrotron experiment.

  16. X-ray microtomography experiments using a diffraction tube and a focusing multilayer-mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurker, N.; Nell, R.; Backfrieder, W.; Kandutsch, J.; Sarg, K.; Prevrhal, S.; Nentwich, C.

    1994-10-01

    A first-generation (i.e. translate-rotate) micro X-ray transmission computed tomography system has been developed, which utilizes a standard 2.2 kW long-fine-focus diffraction tube with Cu-anode as the X-ray source, a spherical W/C multilayer-mirror to condense and spectrally select the CuKα-radiation (8.04 keV) from the tube and a scintillation counter to detect the X-ray photons; in the present configuration the optical system demagnifies the original source size in the direction parallel to the imaged object slice by a factor of 5, where a small slit captures the radiation and thus gives an intense microscopic (pseudo-) source of monochromatic X-radiation in close vicinity of the scanned specimen. The system provides tomographic images of small objects (up to 25 mm in diameter) reconstructed as 128 × 128 matrices with resolutions between ˜ 20 and 200 μm in ≥ 10 min. The software package which is available for image reconstruction includes filtered backprojection, correcting backprojection (ART, MART) and a new type of weighted backprojection, which turns out to be a simplified version of MART (SMART). A dedicated scan- and reconstruction-procedure demonstrates the feasibility to image selected regions-of-interest within the investigated specimen slice with (up to 1 order of magnitude) higher spatial resolution than their surroundings without major artefacts (Zoom-CT). The hard-and software-components of this CT-system are discussed, several examples are given and perspectives of further development are outlined.

  17. Membrane lateral compressibility determined by NMR and x-ray diffraction: effect of acyl chain polyunsaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, B W; Strey, H H; Gawrisch, K

    1997-01-01

    The elastic area compressibility modulus, Ka, of lamellar liquid crystalline bilayers was determined by a new experimental approach using 2H-NMR order parameters of lipid hydrocarbon chains together with lamellar repeat spacings measured by x-ray diffraction. The combination of NMR and x-ray techniques yields accurate determination of lateral area per lipid molecule. Samples of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated phospholipids were equilibrated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 20,000 solutions in water at concentrations from 0 to 55 wt % PEG at 30 degrees C. This procedure is equivalent to applying 0 to 8 dyn/cm lateral pressure to the bilayers. The resulting reductions in area per lipid were measured with a resolution of +/-0.2 A2 and the fractional area decrease was proportional to applied lateral pressure. For 1,2-dimyristoyl(d54)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-stearoyl(d35)-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC-d35), and 1-stearoyl(d35)-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SDPC-d35) cross-sectional areas per molecule in excess water of 59.5, 61.4, and 69.2 A2 and bilayer elastic area compressibility moduli of 141, 221, and 121 dyn/cm were determined, respectively. Combining NMR and x-ray results enables the determination of compressibility differences between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbon chains. In mixed-chain SOPC-d35 both chains have similar compressibility moduli; however, in mixed-chain polyunsaturated SDPC-d35, the saturated stearic acid chain appears to be far less compressible than the polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic acid chain. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 PMID:9336191

  18. Elasticity and Anelasticity of Materials from Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.; Smith, J.; Lin, C.; Bai, L.; Rod, E.; Shen, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, area detectors, and sample environment control have enabled many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to develop and assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research, and considerable time has been invested in developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data. In this talk we will outline recently developed capabilities at HPCAT for studying elasticity and anelasticity of minerals using fast compression and cyclic compression-decompression. A few recent studies will be highlighted. For example, with fast x-ray area detectors having millisecond time resolution, accurate thermal equations of state of materials at temperatures up to 1000K and megabar pressures can be collected in a matter of seconds using membrane-driven diamond anvil cells (DAC), yielding unprecedented time and pressure resolution of true isotherms. Short duration of the experiments eliminates temperature variation during the experiments and in general allows volume measurements at higher pressures and temperatures. Alternatively, high-frequency (kilohertz range) radial diffraction measurements in a panoramic DAC combined with fast, precise cyclic loading/unloading by piezo drive could provide the short time scale necessary for studying rheology of minerals from the elastic response and lattice relaxation as a function of pressure, temperature and strain rate. Finally, we consider some possible future applications for time-resolved high-pressure, high-temperature research of mantle minerals.

  19. An x-ray diffraction study of microstructural deformation induced by cyclic loading of selected steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourspring, Patrick Michael

    X-ray double crystal diffractometry (XRDCD) and X-ray scanning diffractometry (XRSD) were used to assess cyclic microstructural deformation in a face centered cubic (fcc) steel (AISI304) and a body centered cubic (bcc) steel (SA508 class 2). The objectives of the investigation were to determine if X-ray diffraction could be used effectively to monitor cyclic microstructural deformation in polycrystalline Fe alloys and to study the distribution of the microstructural deformation induced by cyclic loading in these alloys. The approach used in the investigation was to induce fatigue damage in a material and to characterize the resulting microstructural deformation at discrete fractions of the fatigue life of the material. Also, characterization of microstructural deformation was carried out to identify differences in the accumulation of damage from the surface to the bulk, focusing on the following three regions: near surface (0-10 mum), subsurface (10-300 mum), and bulk. Characterization of the subsurface region was performed only on the AISI304 material because of the limited availability of the SA508 material. The results from the XRDCD data indicate a measurable change induced by fatigue from the initial state to subsequent states of both the AISI304 and the SA508 materials. The results from the XRSD data show similar but less coherent trends than the results from the XRDCD data. Therefore, the XRDCD technique was shown to be sensitive to the microstructural deformation caused by fatigue in steels; thus, the technique can be used to monitor fatigue damage in steels. In addition, for the AISI304 material, the level of cyclic microstructural deformation in the bulk material was found to be greater than the level in the near surface material. In contrast, previous investigations have shown that the deformation is greater in the near surface than the bulk for Al alloys and bcc Fe alloys.

  20. Selenium single-wavelength anomalous diffraction de novo phasing using an X-ray-free electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Hunter, Mark S.; Yoon, Chun Hong; DeMirci, Hasan; ...

    2016-11-04

    Structural information about biological macromolecules near the atomic scale provides important insight into the functions of these molecules. To date, X-ray crystallography has been the predominant method used for macromolecular structure determination. However, challenges exist when solving structures with X-rays, including the phase problem and radiation damage. X-ray-free electron lasers (X-ray FELs) have enabled collection of diffraction information before the onset of radiation damage, yet the majority of structures solved at X-ray FELs have been phased using external information via molecular replacement. De novo phasing at X-ray FELs has proven challenging due in part to per-pulse variations in intensity andmore » wavelength. Here we report the solution of a selenobiotinyl-streptavidin structure using phases obtained by the anomalous diffraction of selenium measured at a single wavelength (Se-SAD) at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Finally, our results demonstrate Se-SAD, routinely employed at synchrotrons for novel structure determination, is now possible at X-ray FELs.« less

  1. Macromolecular structures probed by combining single-shot free-electron laser diffraction with synchrotron coherent X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kim, Sunam; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangsoo; Nam, Daewoong; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Noh, Do Young; Miyashita, Osamu; Tama, Florence; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Tono, Kensuke; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Hasnain, S Samar; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong

    2014-05-02

    Nanostructures formed from biological macromolecular complexes utilizing the self-assembly properties of smaller building blocks such as DNA and RNA hold promise for many applications, including sensing and drug delivery. New tools are required for their structural characterization. Intense, femtosecond X-ray pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers enable single-shot imaging allowing for instantaneous views of nanostructures at ambient temperatures. When combined judiciously with synchrotron X-rays of a complimentary nature, suitable for observing steady-state features, it is possible to perform ab initio structural investigation. Here we demonstrate a successful combination of femtosecond X-ray single-shot diffraction with an X-ray free-electron laser and coherent diffraction imaging with synchrotron X-rays to provide an insight into the nanostructure formation of a biological macromolecular complex: RNA interference microsponges. This newly introduced multimodal analysis with coherent X-rays can be applied to unveil nano-scale structural motifs from functional nanomaterials or biological nanocomplexes, without requiring a priori knowledge.

  2. Macroscopic X-ray Powder Diffraction Scanning: Possibilities for Quantitative and Depth-Selective Parchment Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vanmeert, Frederik; De Nolf, Wout; Dik, Joris; Janssens, Koen

    2018-06-05

    At or below the surface of painted works of art, valuable information is present that provides insights into an object's past, such as the artist's technique and the creative process that was followed or its conservation history but also on its current state of preservation. Various noninvasive techniques have been developed over the past 2 decades that can probe this information either locally (via point analysis) or on a macroscopic scale (e.g., full-field imaging and raster scanning). Recently macroscopic X-ray powder diffraction (MA-XRPD) mapping using laboratory X-ray sources was developed. This method can visualize highly specific chemical distributions at the macroscale (dm 2 ). In this work we demonstrate the synergy between the quantitative aspects of powder diffraction and the noninvasive scanning capability of MA-XRPD highlighting the potential of the method to reveal new types of information. Quantitative data derived from a 15th/16th century illuminated sheet of parchment revealed three lead white pigments with different hydrocerussite-cerussite compositions in specific pictorial elements, while quantification analysis of impurities in the blue azurite pigment revealed two distinct azurite types: one rich in barite and one in quartz. Furthermore, on the same artifact, the depth-selective possibilities of the method that stem from an exploitation of the shift of the measured diffraction peaks with respect to reference data are highlighted. The influence of different experimental parameters on the depth-selective analysis results is briefly discussed. Promising stratigraphic information could be obtained, even though the analysis is hampered by not completely understood variations in the unit cell dimensions of the crystalline pigment phases.

  3. Mesoscale Science with High Energy X-ray Diffraction Microscopy at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Spatially resolved diffraction of monochromatic high energy (> 50 keV) x-rays is used to map microstructural quantities inside of bulk polycrystalline materials. The non-destructive nature of High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) measurements allows tracking of responses as samples undergo thermo-mechanical or other treatments. Volumes of the order of a cubic millimeter are probed with micron scale spatial resolution. Data sets allow direct comparisons to computational models of responses that frequently involve long-ranged, multi-grain interactions; such direct comparisons have only become possible with the development of HEDM and other high energy x-ray methods. Near-field measurements map the crystallographic orientation field within and between grains using a computational reconstruction method that simulates the experimental geometry and matches orientations in micron sized volume elements to experimental data containing projected grain images in large numbers of Bragg peaks. Far-field measurements yield elastic strain tensors through indexing schemes that sort observed diffraction peaks into sets associated with individual crystals and detect small radial motions in large numbers of such peaks. Combined measurements, facilitated by a new end station hutch at Advanced Photon Source beamline 1-ID, are mutually beneficial and result in accelerated data reduction. Further, absorption tomography yields density contrast that locates secondary phases, void clusters, and cracks, and tracks sample shape during deformation. A collaboration led by the Air Force Research Laboratory and including the Advanced Photon Source, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Carnegie Mellon University, Petra-III, and Cornell University and CHESS is developing software and hardware for combined measurements. Examples of these capabilities include tracking of grain boundary migrations during thermal annealing, tensile deformation of zirconium, and combined measurements of nickel

  4. The devitrification of a LAS glass matrix studied by X-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocherullé, Jean; Bénard-Rocherullé, Patricia

    2002-06-01

    The crystallisation kinetics of a Li 0.6Al 0.1Si 0.6O 1.65 glass matrix has been performed by means of X-ray powder diffraction. Data diffraction have shown the simultaneous formation of two crystalline phases Li 2SiO 3 and Li 0.6Al 0.6Si 2.4O 6 (so-called virgilite) for heat treatments conducted at 700 and 750 °C. The kinetic parameters of crystallisation have been determined for each phase from several time-dependent X-ray diffraction studies. The two values of the Avrami exponent, close to 1.5, suggest that crystallisation is controlled by a diffusion process, the nucleation being non-existent in the temperature range from 700 to 750 °C. With regard to the activation energy of the overall crystallisation phenomenon, the values obtained, close to 175 kJ mol -1, provide to this glass a relative ability to crystallise compared to others glasses from MSiAlO systems, where M is an alkaline-earth or a rare-earth element. With respect to the Li 0.6Al 0.6Si 2.4O 6 phase, long time heat treatments at 750 °C have revealed a phase transition from the hexagonal symmetry to the tetragonal one. The corresponding value of the Avrami exponent (i.e., 1) suggests a diffusionless transformation with a one-dimensional growth.

  5. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; ...

    2015-08-11

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called `fixed-target' sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessarymore » to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. In addition, the features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.« less

  6. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called `fixed-target' sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessarymore » to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. In addition, the features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.« less

  7. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called `fixed-target' sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary tomore » fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.« less

  8. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called ‘fixed-target’ sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs. PMID:26457423

  9. Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Study of Structure and Growth of Adsorbed Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and scanning-tunneling -microscopy (STM) experiments reveal a new commensurate monolayer structure of 10CB (decylcyanobiphenyl) molecules adsorbed on the (0001) graphite surface. Our results are consistent with two generic structures for nCB monolayers on surfaces of hexagonal symmetry. The monolayer d spacing of the new phase inferred by STM is 10% layer than that obtained by x-ray diffraction on the same sample. We suggest that part of this discrepancy results from a systematic error introduced in calibration of the STM length scale against the graphite substrate. For multilayer nCB films, we find that a polycrystalline structure is formed and most of the adsorbed molecules are aligned with their long axis perpendicular to the graphite surface. Synchrotron x-ray scattering has been used to investigate the structure and growth of xenon physisorbed on the Ag(111) surface using a specially designed ultra -high vacuum (UHV) chamber. For growth under quasi-equilibrium conditions, the bulk Xe-Xe spacing is reached at monolayer completion and solid films of thickness >= 220 A are observed in which an 'ABC' stacking sequence predominates. Under kinetic growth conditions, intensity oscillations at the Xe anti-Bragg position of the specular rod are observed as a function of time, indicating layer -by-layer growth. Analysis of the specular reflectivity at different coverages yields the fractional layer occupancies and the spacing between the Ag(111) surface and first Xe layer. We have conducted a series of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) 'kinetic isotherm' experiments on both xenon and hexane rm(C_6H_{14 }) films adsorbed on the Ag(111) surface. Our preliminary results show that under the pressure and temperature range accessible to the experiments, all of the Xe kinetic isotherms fall on a universal curve which is concave upward. However, the hexane kinetic isotherms have a qualitatively different shape (S-like) at the higher

  10. Development of low temperature and high magnetic field X-ray diffraction facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shahee, Aga; Sharma, Shivani; Singh, K.

    2015-06-24

    The current progress of materials science regarding multifunctional materials (MFM) has put forward the challenges to understand the microscopic origin of their properties. Most of such MFMs have magneto-elastic correlations. To investigate the underlying mechanism it is therefore essential to investigate the structural properties in the presence of magnetic field. Keeping this in view low temperature and high magnetic field (LTHM) powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), a unique state-of-art facility in the country has been developed at CSR Indore. This setup works on symmetric Bragg Brentano geometry using a parallel incident x-ray beam from a rotating anode source working at 17more » kW. Using this one can do structural studies at non-ambient conditions i.e. at low- temperatures (2-300 K) and high magnetic field (+8 to −8 T). The available scattering angle ranges from 5° to 115° 2θ with a resolution better than 0.1°. The proper functioning of the setup has been checked using Si sample. The effect of magnetic field on the structural properties has been demonstrated on Pr{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} sample. Clear effect of field induced phase transition has been observed. Moreover, the effect of zero field cooled and field cooled conditions is also observed.« less

  11. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Schuren, Jay C.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models. PMID:23556825

  12. Diffracting aperture based differential phase contrast for scanning X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kaulich, Burkhard; Polack, Francois; Neuhaeusler, Ulrich; Susini, Jean; di Fabrizio, Enzo; Wilhein, Thomas

    2002-10-07

    It is demonstrated that in a zone plate based scanning X-ray microscope, used to image low absorbing, heterogeneous matter at a mesoscopic scale, differential phase contrast (DPC) can be implemented without adding any additional optical component to the normal scheme of the microscope. The DPC mode is simply generated by an appropriate positioning and alignment of microscope apertures. Diffraction from the apertures produces a wave front with a non-uniform intensity. The signal recorded by a pinhole photo diode located in the intensity gradient is highly sensitive to phase changes introduced by the specimen to be recorded. The feasibility of this novel DPC technique was proven with the scanning X-ray microscope at the ID21 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation facility (ESRF) operated at 6 keV photon energy. We observe a differential phase contrast, similar to Nomarski's differential interference contrast for the light microscope, which results in a tremendous increase in image contrast of up to 20 % when imaging low absorbing specimen.

  13. X-ray diffraction, Raman, and photoacoustic studies of ZnTe nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersching, K.; Campos, C. E. M.; de Lima, J. C.; Grandi, T. A.; Souza, S. M.; da Silva, D. L.; Pizani, P. S.

    2009-06-01

    Nanocrystalline ZnTe was prepared by mechanical alloying. X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy techniques were used to study the structural, chemical, optical, and thermal properties of the as-milled powder. An annealing of the mechanical alloyed sample at 590 °C for 6 h was done to investigate the optical properties in a defect-free sample (close to bulk form). The main crystalline phase formed was the zinc-blende ZnTe, but residual trigonal tellurium and hexagonal ZnO phases were also observed for both as-milled and annealed samples. The structural parameters, phase fractions, average crystallite sizes, and microstrains of all crystalline phases were obtained from Rietveld analyses of the X-ray patterns. Raman results corroborate the XRD results, showing the longitudinal optical phonons of ZnTe (even at third order) and those modes of trigonal Te. Nonradiative surface recombination and thermal bending heat transfer mechanisms were proposed from photoacoustic analysis. An increase in effective thermal diffusivity coefficient was observed after annealing and the carrier diffusion coefficient, the surface recombination velocity, and the recombination time parameters remained the same.

  14. Impurity precipitation in atomized particles evidenced by nano x-ray diffraction computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnin, Anne; Wright, Jonathan P.; Tucoulou, Rémi; Palancher, Hervé

    2014-08-01

    Performances and physical properties of high technology materials are influenced or even determined by their initial microstructure and by the behavior of impurity phases. Characterizing these impurities and their relations with the surrounding matrix is therefore of primary importance but it unfortunately often requires a destructive approach, with the risk of misinterpreting the observations. The improvement we have done in high resolution X-ray diffraction computed tomography combined with the use of an X-ray nanoprobe allows non-destructive crystallographic description of materials with microscopic heterogeneous microstructure (with a grain size between 10 nm and 10 μm). In this study, the grain localization in a 2D slice of a 20 μm solidified atomized γU-Mo particle is shown and a minority U(C,O) phase (1 wt. %) with sub-micrometer sized grains was characterized inside. Evidence is presented showing that the onset of U(C,O) grain crystallization can be described by a precipitation mechanism since one single U-Mo grain has direct orientation relationship with more than one surrounding U(C,O) grains.

  15. Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Olivine from Comet Wild 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed a collection of the Comet Wild 2 coma grains returned by the NASA Stardust Mission, using micro-area Laue diffraction equipment. The purpose of the diffraction experiment is to permit the structure refinement of olivine including site occupancies. In addition to the intrinsic importance of the olivine structures for revealing the thermal history of Wild 2 materials, we wish to test reports that olivine recovered after hypervelocity capture in silica aerogel has undergone a basic structural change due to capture heating [1]. The diffraction equipment placed at beam line BL- 4B1 of PF, KEK was developed with a micropinhole and an imaging plate (Fuji Co. Ltd.) using the Laue method combined with polychromatic X-ray of synchrotron radiation operated at energy of 2.5 GeV. The incident beam is limited to 1.6 m in diameter by a micropinhole set just upstream of the sample [2, 3]. It is essential to apply a microbeam to obtain diffracted intensities with high signal to noise ratios. This equipment has been successfully applied to various extraterrestrial materials, including meteorites and interplanetary dust particles [4]. The Laue pattern of the sample C2067,1,111,4 (Fig. 1) was successfully taken on an imaging plate after a 120 minute exposure (Fig. 2).

  16. Three dimensional X-ray Diffraction Contrast Tomography Reconstruction of Polycrystalline Strontium Titanate during Sintering and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syha, M.; Rheinheimer, W.; Loedermann, B.; Graff, A.; Trenkle, A.; Baeurer, M.; Weygand, D.; Ludwig, W.; Gumbsch, P.

    The microstructural evolution of polycrystalline strontium titanate was investigated in three dimensions (3D) using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) before and after ex-situ annealing at 1600°C. Post-annealing, the specimen was additionally subjected to phase contrast tomography (PCT) in order to finely resolve the porosities. The resulting microstructure reconstructions were studied with special emphasis on morphology and interface orientation during microstructure evolution. Subsequently, cross-sections of the specimen were studied using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Corresponding cross-sections through the 3D reconstruction were identified and the quality of the reconstruction is validated with special emphasis on the spatial resolution at the grain boundaries, the size and location of pores contained in the material and the accuracy of the orientation determination.

  17. Non-destructive in situ study of "Mad Meg" by Pieter Bruegel the Elder using mobile X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Voorde, Lien; Van Pevenage, Jolien; De Langhe, Kaat; De Wolf, Robin; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Vandenabeele, Peter; Martens, Maximiliaan P. J.

    2014-07-01

    "Mad Meg", a figure of Flemish folklore, is the subject of a famous oil-on-panel painting by the Flemish renaissance artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder, exhibited in the Museum Mayer van den Bergh (Antwerp, Belgium). This article reports on the in situ chemical characterization of this masterpiece by using currently available state-of-the-art portable analytical instruments. The applied non-destructive analytical approach involved the use of a) handheld X-ray fluorescence instrumentation for retrieving elemental information and b) portable X-ray fluorescence/X-ray diffraction instrumentation and laser-based Raman spectrometers for obtaining structural/molecular information. Next to material characterization of the used pigments and of the different preparation layers of the painting, also the verification of two important historical iconographic hypotheses is performed concerning the economic way of painting by Brueghel, and whether or not he used blue smalt pigment for painting the boat that appears towards the top of the painting. The pigments identified are smalt pigment (65% SiO2 + 15% K2O + 10% CoO + 5% Al2O3) for the blue color present in all blue areas of the painting, probably copper resinate for the green colors, vermillion (HgS) as red pigment and lead white is used to form different colors. The comparison of blue pigments used on different areas of the painting gives no differences in the elemental fingerprint which confirms the existing hypothesis concerning the economic painting method by Bruegel.

  18. Sodium storage mechanisms of bismuth in sodium ion batteries: An operando X-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hui; Ma, Wensheng; Yang, Wanfeng; Wang, Jiawei; Niu, Jiazheng; Luo, Fakui; Peng, Zhangquan; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the sodium (Na) chemistry is crucial for development of high-performance sodium ion batteries (SIBs). Nanostructured bismuth (Bi) has shown great potentials as an anode in SIBs, however, the Na storage mechanisms of Bi are still unclear. Herein, the operando X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was utilized to probe the Na storage mechanisms of three Bi anodes (sputtered Bi film, nanoporous Bi and commercial Bi). Despite different morphologies and sizes, all the Bi anodes follow the same two-step reversible alloying/dealloying mechanisms (Bi ↔ NaBi ↔ Na3Bi) during the discharge/charge processes, associated with two voltage plateaus. As for the intercalation/deintercalation mechanism proposed for nanostructured Bi anodes in SIBs, we rationalize the reason why only the Bi phase is detected in the discharged/charged samples under ex-situ XRD conditions through addressing the stability issue of the Na-Bi system (NaBi and Na3Bi).

  19. Spectroscopic and x-ray diffraction analyses of asbestos in the World Trade Center dust:

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, Gregg A.; Clark, Roger N.; Sutley, Stephen J.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Brownfield, Isabelle; Livo, Keith E.; Morath, Laurie C.

    2009-01-01

    On September 17 and 18, 2001, samples of settled dust and airfall debris were collected from 34 sites within a 1-km radius of the WTC collapse site, including a sample from an indoor location unaffected by rainfall, and samples of insulation from two steel beams at Ground Zero. Laboratory spectral and x-ray diffraction analyses of the field samples detected trace levels of serpentine minerals, including chrysotile asbestos, in about two-thirds of the dust samples at concentrations at or below ~1 wt%. One sample of a beam coating material contained up to 20 wt% chrysotile asbestos. Analyses indicate that trace levels of chrysotile were distributed with the dust radially to distances greater than 0.75 km from Ground Zero. The chrysotile content of the dust is variable and may indicate that chrysotile asbestos was not distributed uniformly during the three collapse events.

  20. Dynamic X-ray diffraction observation of shocked solid iron up to 170 GPa

    PubMed Central

    Denoeud, Adrien; Ozaki, Norimasa; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Uranishi, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Yoshihiko; Kodama, Ryosuke; Brambrink, Erik; Ravasio, Alessandra; Bocoum, Maimouna; Boudenne, Jean-Michel; Harmand, Marion; Guyot, François; Mazevet, Stephane; Riley, David; Makita, Mikako; Sano, Takayoshi; Sakawa, Youichi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Gregori, Gianluca; Koenig, Michel; Morard, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the iron phase diagram under high pressure and temperature is crucial for the determination of the composition of the cores of rocky planets and for better understanding the generation of planetary magnetic fields. Here we present X-ray diffraction results from laser-driven shock-compressed single-crystal and polycrystalline iron, indicating the presence of solid hexagonal close-packed iron up to pressure of at least 170 GPa along the principal Hugoniot, corresponding to a temperature of 4,150 K. This is confirmed by the agreement between the pressure obtained from the measurement of the iron volume in the sample and the inferred shock strength from velocimetry deductions. Results presented in this study are of the first importance regarding pure Fe phase diagram probed under dynamic compression and can be applied to study conditions that are relevant to Earth and super-Earth cores. PMID:27357672

  1. X-ray diffraction of solid tin to 1.2 TPa

    SciTech Connect

    Lazicki, A.; Rygg, J. R.; Coppari, F.

    2015-08-12

    In this study, we report direct in situ measurements of the crystal structure of tin between 0.12 and 1.2 TPa, the highest stress at which a crystal structure has ever been observed. Using angle-dispersive powder x-ray diffraction, we find that dynamically compressed Sn transforms to the body-centered-cubic (bcc) structure previously identified by ambient-temperature quasistatic-compression studies and by zero-kelvin density-functional theory predictions between 0.06 and 0.16 TPa. However, we observe no evidence for the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) phase found by those studies to be stable above 0.16 TPa. Instead, our results are consistent with bcc up to 1.2 TPa. We conjecturemore » that at high temperature bcc is stabilized relative to hcp due to differences in vibrational free energy.« less

  2. Validating a Model for Welding Induced Residual Stress Using High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, J. C.; Budrow, C. J.; Pagan, D. C.; Ruff, J. P. C.; Park, J.-S.; Okasinski, J.; Beaudoin, A. J.; Miller, M. P.

    2017-05-01

    Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) provides a pathway to advance performance in structures through the use of physically-based models to better understand how manufacturing processes influence product performance. As one particular challenge, consider that residual stresses induced in fabrication are pervasive and directly impact the life of structures. For ICME to be an effective strategy, it is essential that predictive capability be developed in conjunction with critical experiments. In the present work, simulation results from a multi-physics model for gas metal arc welding are evaluated through x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. A test component was designed with intent to develop significant gradients in residual stress, be representative of real-world engineering application, yet remain tractable for finely spaced strain measurements with positioning equipment available at synchrotron facilities. The experimental validation lends confidence to model predictions, facilitating the explicit consideration of residual stress distribution in prediction of fatigue life.

  3. Purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abramchik, Yu. A., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru; Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: espiov@ibch.ru; Zhukhlistova, N. E., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru

    2015-07-15

    Crystals of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 0.99 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 74.1 Å, b = 110.2 Å, c = 88.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 111.08°. The crystal contains six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamermore » is the biological active form of E. coli. purine nucleoside phosphorylase.« less

  4. Validating a Model for Welding Induced Residual Stress Using High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Mach, J. C.; Budrow, C. J.; Pagan, D. C.; ...

    2017-03-15

    Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) provides a pathway to advance performance in structures through the use of physically-based models to better understand how manufacturing processes influence product performance. As one particular challenge, consider that residual stresses induced in fabrication are pervasive and directly impact the life of structures. For ICME to be an effective strategy, it is essential that predictive capability be developed in conjunction with critical experiments. In the present paper, simulation results from a multi-physics model for gas metal arc welding are evaluated through x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. A test component was designed with intent to developmore » significant gradients in residual stress, be representative of real-world engineering application, yet remain tractable for finely spaced strain measurements with positioning equipment available at synchrotron facilities. Finally, the experimental validation lends confidence to model predictions, facilitating the explicit consideration of residual stress distribution in prediction of fatigue life.« less

  5. Static strength of molybdenum to 92 GPa under radial X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, L.; Tu, P.; Li, B.; Wu, S. Y.; Hao, J. B.; Bai, L. G.; Li, X. D.; Liu, J.

    2018-06-01

    The high-pressure strength of molybdenum (Mo) to 92 GPa has been studied by radial X-ray diffraction (RXRD) technique. The ratio of t/G is found to decrease above ˜24 GPa, showing the yield of Mo which is caused by plastic deformation at this pressure. Combined with high-pressure shear modulus, it was found that the differential stress corresponding to the yield of Mo at 24 GPa due to plastic deformation is 1.73 GPa. The second increase of t values occurs after ˜66 GPa, suggesting the strength of Mo with a differential stress of ˜1.93 GPa. In addition, the maximum difference stress of molybdenum at 87 GPa is 3.01 GPa.

  6. Sub-Millisecond Time Resolved X-ray Surface Diffraction During Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tischler, J. Z.; Larson, B. C.; Eres, Gyula; Rouleau, C. M.; Lowndes, D. H.; Yoon, M.; Zschack, P.

    2001-03-01

    The initial crystallization and evolution of the SrTiO3 (001) surface during homoeptaxial pulsed laser deposition growth of SrTiO3 was studied using time resolved surface x-ray diffraction with a time resolution down to 200 μ s. Measurements performed at the UNICAT undulator line at the Advanced Photon Source indicated prompt formation of epitaxial SrTiO3 bi-layers down to our limiting time resolution. The subsequent evolution of the surface occurred on a much greater time scale, and was studied both by measurements of surface truncation rod intensities and by measurements of diffuse scattering near the rod. The effect of temperature and correlation with in-plane order will also be discussed.

  7. Monitoring nonadiabatic avoided crossing dynamics in molecules by ultrafast X-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2017-05-26

    We examine time-resolved X-ray diffraction from molecules in the gas phase which undergo nonadiabatic avoided-crossing dynamics involving strongly coupled electrons and nuclei. Several contributions to the signal are identified, representing (in decreasing strength) elastic scattering, contributions of the electronic coherences created by nonadiabatic couplings in the avoided crossing regime, and inelastic scattering. The former probes the charge density and delivers direct information on the evolving molecular geometry. The latter two contributions are weaker and carry spatial information through the transition charge densities (off-diagonal elements of the charge-density operator). Furthermore, simulations are presented for the nonadiabatic harpooning process in the excitedmore » state of sodium fluoride.« less

  8. Scanning X-ray diffraction on cardiac tissue: automatized data analysis and processing.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Jan David; Bernhardt, Marten; Markus, Andrea; Alves, Frauke; Burghammer, Manfred; Salditt, Tim

    2017-11-01

    A scanning X-ray diffraction study of cardiac tissue has been performed, covering the entire cross section of a mouse heart slice. To this end, moderate focusing by compound refractive lenses to micrometer spot size, continuous scanning, data acquisition by a fast single-photon-counting pixel detector, and fully automated analysis scripts have been combined. It was shown that a surprising amount of structural data can be harvested from such a scan, evaluating the local scattering intensity, interfilament spacing of the muscle tissue, the filament orientation, and the degree of anisotropy. The workflow of data analysis is described and a data analysis toolbox with example data for general use is provided. Since many cardiomyopathies rely on the structural integrity of the sarcomere, the contractile unit of cardiac muscle cells, the present study can be easily extended to characterize tissue from a diseased heart.

  9. Plasma synthesis, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of nanosized iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneva, Daniela; Zaharieva, Katerina; Grabis, Janis; Mitov, Ivan; Vissokov, Gheorghi

    2010-06-01

    In this article synthesis and study of iron oxide nanopowders are described. The synthesis of sample 1 and sample 2—iron oxides—was carried out by electric arc plasma cutting of ordinary steel. The sample 3 was prepared by evaporation of Fe2O3/FeO mixture in radio-frequency nitrogen plasma. The characterization of the as prepared iron oxide nanoproducts was achieved by means of Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The presence of different phases of iron oxide with a basic phase Fe3 - xO4 (magnetite), additional Fe1 - xO (wüstite) and α or γ-Fe2O3 (hematite or maghemite) with superparamagnetic particles for sample 1 and sample 2 and Fe3 - xO4 (magnetite) for sample 3 is observed.

  10. X-ray Diffraction Study of Aluminum Carbide Powder to 50 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, C.; Ma, Y; Chyu, M

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure and equation of state (EOS) of aluminum carbide (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) have been determined directly up to 50.1 GPa at room temperature by the synchrotron x-ray diffraction techniques. The results indicate that Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} remained in rhombohedral structure under all tested pressure-temperature conditions and exhibited anisotropic compressibility, with the c-axis more compressible than the a-axis. Fitting the experimental data to third order Birch-Murnaghan EOS yields a bulk modulus of K{sub OT} = 233 {+-} 6 GPa with its pressure derivative K{sub OT}{prime} = 3.4 {+-} 0.4, while the second-order EOS yields K{sub OT} = 223 {+-}more » 2 GPa.« less

  11. Study of Initial Stages of Ball-Milling of Cu Powder Using X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayathri, N.; Mukherjee, Paramita

    2018-04-01

    The initial stage of size refinement of Cu powder is studied using detailed X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis to understand the mechanism of formation of nanomaterials during the ball-milling process. The study was restricted to samples obtained for milling time up to 240 min to understand the deformation mechanism at the early stages of ball milling. Various model based approaches for the analysis of the XRD were used to study the evolution of the microstructural parameters such as domain size and microstrain along the different crystallographic planes. It was seen that the domain size saturates at a low value along the (311) plane whereas the size along the (220) and (200) plane is still higher. The r.m.s microstrain showed a non-monotonic change along the different crystallographic directions up to the milling time of 240 min.

  12. Compressibility of Cs2SnBr6 by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guan; Huang, Shengxuan; Niu, Jingjing; Qin, Shan; Wu, Xiang; Ding, Hongrui; Lu, Anhuai

    2018-07-01

    Cs2SnBr6, one promising material applied in perovskite solar cells, has been investigated up to 20 GPa by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Both experimental data demonstrate that no phase transition occurs up to 20 GPa. By fitting the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, we have obtained V0 = 1288 (14) Å3, K0 = 11 (1) GPa and K0‧ = 7 (1). The ultralow value of bulk modulus K0 demonstrates the soft nature of Cs2SnBr6. Combining calculated values with experimental results, we find that x coordinate of Sn (x,0,0) atoms increases and Snsbnd Br bond lengths get shortened on compression. We have assigned vibrational peaks of Cs2SnBr6 in Raman measurements, and all the three Raman bands present nonlinear correlations with pressure.

  13. Quantitative x-ray diffraction mineralogy of Los Angeles basin core samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; McIntyre, Brandie R.; Edwards, Brian D.; Lakota, Orion I.

    2006-01-01

    This report contains X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of mineralogy for 81 sediment samples from cores taken from three drill holes in the Los Angeles Basin in 2000-2001. We analyzed 26 samples from Pier F core, 29 from Pier C core, and 26 from the Webster core. These three sites provide an offshore-onshore record across the Southern California coastal zone. This report is designed to be a data repository; these data will be used in further studies, including geochemical modeling as part of the CABRILLO project. Summary tables quantify the major mineral groups, whereas detailed mineralogy is presented in three appendices. The rationale, methodology, and techniques are described in the following paper.

  14. Uranium Hydridoborates: Synthesis, Magnetism, and X-ray/Neutron Diffraction Structures.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, H; Gackstatter, A; Kupfer, T; Radacki, K; Franke, S; Meyer, K; Fucke, K; Lemée-Cailleau, M-H

    2015-08-17

    While uranium hydridoborate complexes containing the [BH4](-) moiety have been well-known in the literature for many years, species with functionalized borate centers remained considerably rare. We were now able to prepare several uranium hydridoborates (1-4) with amino-substituted borate moieties with high selectivity by smooth reaction of [Cp*2UMe2] (Cp* = C5Me5) and [Cp'2UMe2] (Cp' = 1,2,4-tBu3C5H2) with the aminoborane H2BN(SiMe3)2. A combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, deuteration experiments, magnetic SQUID measurements, and X-ray/neutron diffraction studies was used to verify the anticipated molecular structures and oxidation states of 1-4 and helped to establish a linear tridentate coordination mode of the borate anions.

  15. X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermal characterization of partially hydrolyzed guar gum.

    PubMed

    Mudgil, Deepak; Barak, Sheweta; Khatkar, B S

    2012-05-01

    Guar gum was hydrolyzed using cellulase from Aspergillus niger at 5.6 pH and 50°C temperature. Hydrolyzed guar gum sample was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, dilute solution viscometry and rotational viscometry. Viscometry analysis of native guar gum showed a molecular weight of 889742.06, whereas, after enzymatic hydrolysis, the resultant product had a molecular weight of 7936.5. IR spectral analysis suggests that after enzymatic hydrolysis of guar gum there was no major transformation of functional group. Thermal analysis revealed no major change in thermal behavior of hydrolyzed guar gum. It was shown that partial hydrolysis of guar gum could be achieved by inexpensive and food grade cellulase (Aspergillus niger) having commercial importance and utilization as a functional soluble dietary fiber for food industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Crystallization Dynamics of Organolead Halide Perovskite by Real-Time X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Shibata, Yosei; Koganezawa, Tomoyuki; Murakami, Takurou N; Sugita, Takeshi; Tanigaki, Nobutaka; Chikamatsu, Masayuki

    2015-08-12

    We analyzed the crystallization process of the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite by observing real-time X-ray diffraction immediately after combining a PbI2 thin film with a CH3NH3I solution. A detailed analysis of the transformation kinetics demonstrated the fractal diffusion of the CH3NH3I solution into the PbI2 film. Moreover, the perovskite crystal was found to be initially oriented based on the PbI2 crystal orientation but to gradually transition to a random orientation. The fluctuating characteristics of the crystallization process of perovskites, such as fractal penetration and orientational transformation, should be controlled to allow the fabrication of high-quality perovskite crystals. The characteristic reaction dynamics observed in this study should assist in establishing reproducible fabrication processes for perovskite solar cells.

  17. X-ray diffraction evidence for myelin disorder in brain from humans with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chia, L S; Thompson, J E; Moscarello, M A

    1984-09-05

    Wide-angle X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the lipid phase transition temperature of myelin from brain tissue of humans with Alzheimer's disease was about 12 degrees C lower than that of normal age-matched controls, indicating differences in the physical organization of the myelin lipid bilayer. Elevated levels of malondialdehyde and conjugated diene were found in brain tissue from humans with Alzheimer's disease, indicating an increased amount of lipid peroxidation over the controls. An increase in myelin disorder and in lipid peroxidation can both be correlated with aging in human brain, but the changes in myelin from humans with Alzheimer's disease are more pronounced than in normal aging. These changes might represent severe or accelerated aging.

  18. Transmission in situ and operando high temperature X-ray powder diffraction in variable gaseous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlicker, Lukas; Doran, Andrew; Schneppmüller, Peter; Gili, Albert; Czasny, Mathias; Penner, Simon; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2018-03-01

    This work describes a device for time-resolved synchrotron-based in situ and operando X-ray powder diffraction measurements at elevated temperatures under controllable gaseous environments. The respective gaseous sample environment is realized via a gas-tight capillary-in-capillary design, where the gas flow is achieved through an open-end 0.5 mm capillary located inside a 0.7 mm capillary filled with a sample powder. Thermal mass flow controllers provide appropriate gas flows and computer-controlled on-the-fly gas mixing capabilities. The capillary system is centered inside an infrared heated, proportional integral differential-controlled capillary furnace allowing access to temperatures up to 1000 °C.

  19. Compact low power infrared tube furnace for in situ X-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, A.; Schlicker, L.; Beavers, C. M.; Bhat, S.; Bekheet, M. F.; Gurlo, A.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a compact, low power, infrared heated tube furnace for in situ powder X-ray diffraction experiments. Our silicon carbide (SiC) based furnace design exhibits outstanding thermal performance in terms of accuracy control and temperature ramping rates while simultaneously being easy to use, robust to abuse and, due to its small size and low power, producing minimal impact on surrounding equipment. Temperatures in air in excess of 1100 °C can be controlled at an accuracy of better than 1%, with temperature ramping rates up to 100 °C/s. The complete "add-in" device, minus power supply, fits in a cylindrical volume approximately 15 cm long and 6 cm in diameter and resides as close as 1 cm from other sensitive components of our experimental synchrotron endstation without adverse effects.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of crotoxin B from Crotalus durissus collilineatus venom

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, G. H. M.; Fernandes, C. A. H.; Corrêa, L. C.; Santos-Filho, N. A.; Soares, A. M.; Fontes, M. R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Crotoxin B is a basic phospholipase A2 found in the venom of several Crotalus durissus ssp. rattlesnakes and is one of the subunits that constitute crotoxin, the main component of the venom of these snakes. This heterodimeric toxin is related to important envenomation effects such as neurological disorders, myotoxicity and renal failure. Although crotoxin was first crystallized in 1938, the first structural data only became available in 2007 (for crotoxin B from C. durissus terrificus) and showed an ambiguous result for the biological assembly, which could be either dimeric or tetrameric. In this work, the crystallization, X-ray diffraction data collection at 2.2 Å resolution and molecular-replacement solution of a dimeric complex formed by two crotoxin B isoforms from C. durissus collilineatus venom is presented. PMID:19851009

  1. Preliminary morphological and X-ray diffraction studies of the crystals of the DNA cetyltrimethylammonium salt.

    PubMed

    Osica, V D; Pyatigorskaya, T L; Polyvtsev, O F; Dembo, A T; Kliya, M O; Vasilchenko, V N; Verkin, B I; Sukharevskya, B Y

    1977-04-01

    Double-stranded DNA molecules (molecular weight 2.5 X 10(5) - 5 X 10(5) daltons) have been crystallized from water-salt solutions as cetyltrimethylammonium salts (CTA-DNA). Variation of crystallization conditions results in a production of different types of CTA-DNA crystals: spherulits, dendrites, needle-shaped and faceted rhombic crystals, the latter beeing up to 0.3 mm on a side. X-ray diffraction data indicate that DNA molecules in the crystals form a hexagonal lattice which parameters vary slightly with the morphological type of the crystal. Comparison of the melting curves of the DNA preparation before and after crystallization suggests that DNA molecules are partially fractionated in the course of crystallization. Crystals of the CTA-DNA-proflavine complex have also been obtained.

  2. Preliminary morphological and X-ray diffraction studies of the crystals of the DNA cetyltrimethylammonium salt.

    PubMed Central

    Osica, V D; Pyatigorskaya, T L; Polyvtsev, O F; Dembo, A T; Kliya, M O; Vasilchenko, V N; Verkin, B I; Sukharevskya, B Y

    1977-01-01

    Double-stranded DNA molecules (molecular weight 2.5 X 10(5) - 5 X 10(5) daltons) have been crystallized from water-salt solutions as cetyltrimethylammonium salts (CTA-DNA). Variation of crystallization conditions results in a production of different types of CTA-DNA crystals: spherulits, dendrites, needle-shaped and faceted rhombic crystals, the latter beeing up to 0.3 mm on a side. X-ray diffraction data indicate that DNA molecules in the crystals form a hexagonal lattice which parameters vary slightly with the morphological type of the crystal. Comparison of the melting curves of the DNA preparation before and after crystallization suggests that DNA molecules are partially fractionated in the course of crystallization. Crystals of the CTA-DNA-proflavine complex have also been obtained. Images PMID:866188

  3. Equation of state for technetium from X-ray diffraction and first-principle calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Mast, Daniel S.; Kim, Eunja; Siska, Emily M.; ...

    2016-03-20

    Here, the ambient temperature equation of state (EoS) of technetium metal has been measured by X-ray diffraction. The metal was compressed using a diamond anvil cell and using a 4:1 methanol-ethanol pressure transmitting medium. The maximum pressure achieved, as determined from the gold pressure scale, was 67 GPa. The compression data shows that the HCP phase of technetium is stable up to 67 GPa. The compression curve of technetium was also calculated using first-principles total-energy calculations. Utilizing a number of fitting strategies to compare the experimental and theoretical data it is determined that the Vinet equation of state with anmore » ambient isothermal bulk modulus of B 0T = 288 GPa and a first pressure derivative of B' = 5.9(2) best represent the compression behavior of technetium metal.« less

  4. Toward Sodium X-Ray Diffraction in the High-Pressure Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, X.; Polsin, D. N.; Rygg, J. R.; Boehly, T. R.; Crandall, L.; Henderson, B. J.; Hu, S. X.; Huff, M.; Saha, R.; Collins, G. W.; Smith, R.; Eggert, J.; Lazicki, A. E.; McMahon, M.

    2017-10-01

    We are working to quasi-isentropically compress sodium into the terapascal regime to test theoretical predictions that sodium transforms to an electride. A series of hydrodynamic simulations have been performed to design experiments to investigate the structure and optical properties of sodium at pressures up to 500 GPa. We show preliminary results where sodium samples, sandwiched between diamond plates and lithium-fluoride windows, are ramp compressed by a gradual increase in the drive-laser intensity. The low sound speed in sodium makes it particularly susceptible to forming a shock; therefore, it is difficult to compress without melting the sample. Powder x-ray diffraction is used to provide information on the structure of sodium at these high pressures. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of hydrides in Zircaloy-4 during thermomechanical cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N.; Koss, Donald A.; Motta, Arthur T.; ...

    2017-02-20

    The d-spacing evolution of both in-plane and out-of-plane hydrides has been studied using in situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction during thermo-mechanical cycling of cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4. The structure of the hydride precipitates is such that the δ{111} d-spacing of the planes aligned with the hydride platelet face is greater than the d-spacing of the 111 planes aligned with the platelet edges. Upon heating from room temperature, the δ{111} planes aligned with hydride plate edges exhibit bi-linear thermally-induced expansion. In contrast, the d-spacing of the (111) plane aligned with the hydride plate face initially contracts upon heating. Furthermore, these experimental resultsmore » can be understood in terms of a reversal of stress state associated with precipitating or dissolving hydride platelets within the α-zirconium matrix.« less

  6. Positron annihilation and X-ray diffraction studies on tin oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabakar, K.; Abhaya, S.; Krishnan, R.; Kalavathi, S.; Dash, S.; Jayapandian, J.; Amarendra, G.

    2009-04-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy along with glancing incidence X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate tin oxide thin films grown on Si by pulsed laser deposition. The films were prepared at room temperature and at 670 K under oxygen partial pressure. As-grown samples are amorphous and are found to contain large concentration of open volume sites (vacancy defects). Post-deposition annealing of as-grown samples at 970 K is found to drastically reduce the number of open volume sites and the film becomes crystalline. However, film grown under elevated temperature and under partial pressure of oxygen is found to exhibit a lower S-parameter, indicating lower defect concentration. Based on the analysis of experimental positron annihilation results, the defect-sensitive S-parameter and the overlayer thickness of tin oxide thin films are deduced. S- W correlation plots exhibit distinct positron trapping defect states in three samples.

  7. Soft x-ray resonant diffraction study of magnetic structure in magnetoelectric Y-type hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kimura, T.

    2018-05-01

    The effect of magnetic field on the magnetic structure associated with magnetoelectric properties in a Y-type hexaferrite, Ba1.3Sr0.7CoZnFe11AlO22, was investigated by utilizing the soft x-ray resonant diffraction technique. In this hexaferrite, the so-called alternating longitudinal conical phase is stabilized at room temperature and zero magnetic field. Below room temperature, however, this phase is transformed into the so-called transverse conical phase by applying an in-plane magnetic field (≈ 0.3 T). The transverse conical phase persists even after removing the magnetic field. The magnetoelectricity, which is magnetically-induced electric polarization, observed in the hexaferrite is discussed in terms of the temperature-dependent magnetic structure at zero field.

  8. An Improved X-ray Diffraction Method For Cellulose Crystallinity Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Xiaohui; Bowden, Mark E.; Brown, Elvie E.

    2015-06-01

    We show in this work a modified X-ray diffraction method to determine cellulose crystallinity index (CrI). Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) dervided from bleached wood pulp was used as a model substrate. Rietveld refinement was applied with consideration of March-Dollase preferred orientation at the (001) plane. In contrast to most previous methods, three distinct amorphous peaks identified from new model samples which are used to calculate CrI. A 2 theta range from 10° to 75° was found to be more suitable to determine CrI and crystallite structural parameters such as d-spacing and crystallite size. This method enables a more reliable measurement ofmore » CrI of cellulose and may be applicable to other types of cellulose polymorphs.« less

  9. High-temperature/high-pressure x-ray diffraction: Recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Schiferl, D.; Johnson, S.W.; Zinn, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed two Merrill-Bassett diamond-anvil cells for specialized high-temperature uses. The first is constructed largely of rhenium to provide uniform, constant P and T on the order of 20 GPa at 1200 K for extended periods. The second is for single-crystal x-ray diffraction, but can be heated to 630 K at 20 GPa to grow single-crystal samples which cannot be produced at room temperature. With this cell, the crystal structure of /var epsilon/-O/sub 2/ was shown to be monoclinic with a = 3.649 A, b = 5.493 A, c = 7.701 A, and /Beta/ = 116.11/degree/ at 19.7 GPa.more » 15 refs.« less

  10. Validating a Model for Welding Induced Residual Stress Using High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mach, J. C.; Budrow, C. J.; Pagan, D. C.

    Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) provides a pathway to advance performance in structures through the use of physically-based models to better understand how manufacturing processes influence product performance. As one particular challenge, consider that residual stresses induced in fabrication are pervasive and directly impact the life of structures. For ICME to be an effective strategy, it is essential that predictive capability be developed in conjunction with critical experiments. In the present paper, simulation results from a multi-physics model for gas metal arc welding are evaluated through x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. A test component was designed with intent to developmore » significant gradients in residual stress, be representative of real-world engineering application, yet remain tractable for finely spaced strain measurements with positioning equipment available at synchrotron facilities. Finally, the experimental validation lends confidence to model predictions, facilitating the explicit consideration of residual stress distribution in prediction of fatigue life.« less

  11. A gold cyano complex in nitromethane: MD simulation and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Probst, Michael; Injan, Natcha; Megyes, Tünde; Bako, Imre; Balint, Szabolcz; Limtrakul, Jumras; Nazmutdinov, Renat; Mitev, Pavlin D; Hermansson, Kersti

    2012-06-29

    The solvation structure around the dicyanoaurate(I) anion (Au(CN) 2 - ) in a dilute nitromethane (CH 3 NO 2 ) solution is presented from X-ray diffraction measurements and molecular dynamics simulation (NVT ensemble, 460 nitromethane molecules at room temperature). The simulations are based on a new solute-solvent force-field fitted to a training set of quantum-chemically derived interaction energies. Radial distribution functions from experiment and simulation are in good agreement. The solvation structure has been further elucidated from MD data. Several shells can be identified. We obtain a solvation number of 13-17 nitromethane molecules with a strong preference to be oriented with their methyl groups towards the solute.

  12. A gold cyano complex in nitromethane: MD simulation and X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Michael; Injan, Natcha; Megyes, Tünde; Bako, Imre; Balint, Szabolcz; Limtrakul, Jumras; Nazmutdinov, Renat; Mitev, Pavlin D.; Hermansson, Kersti

    2012-01-01

    The solvation structure around the dicyanoaurate(I) anion (Au(CN)2−) in a dilute nitromethane (CH3NO2) solution is presented from X-ray diffraction measurements and molecular dynamics simulation (NVT ensemble, 460 nitromethane molecules at room temperature). The simulations are based on a new solute–solvent force-field fitted to a training set of quantum-chemically derived interaction energies. Radial distribution functions from experiment and simulation are in good agreement. The solvation structure has been further elucidated from MD data. Several shells can be identified. We obtain a solvation number of 13–17 nitromethane molecules with a strong preference to be oriented with their methyl groups towards the solute. PMID:25540462

  13. Advances in CCD detector technology for x-ray diffraction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorson, Timothy A.; Durst, Roger D.; Frankel, Dan; Bordwell, Rex L.; Camara, Jose R.; Leon-Guerrero, Edward; Onishi, Steven K.; Pang, Francis; Vu, Paul; Westbrook, Edwin M.

    2004-01-01

    Phosphor-coupled CCDs are established as one of the most successful technologies for x-ray diffraction. This application demands that the CCD simultaneously achieve both the highest possible sensitivity and high readout speeds. Recently, wafer-scale, back illuminated devices have become available which offer significantly higher quantum efficiency than conventional devices (the Fairchild Imaging CCD 486 BI). However, since back thinning significantly changes the electrical properties of the CCD the high speed operation of wafer-scale, back-illuminated devices is not well understood. Here we describe the operating characteristics (including noise, linearity, full well capacity and CTE) of the back-illuminated CCD 486 at readout speeds up to 4 MHz.

  14. Uranium oxidation kinetics monitored by in-situ X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalkind, S.; Rafailov, G.; Halevy, I.; Livneh, T.; Rubin, A.; Maimon, H.; Schweke, D.

    2017-03-01

    The oxidation kinetics of U-0.1 wt%Cr at oxygen pressures of 150 Torr and the temperature range of 90-150 °C was studied by means of in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). A "breakaway" in the oxidation kinetics is found at ∼0.25 μm, turning from a parabolic to a linear rate law. At the initial stage of oxidation the growth plane of UO2(111) is the prominent one. As the oxide thickens, the growth rate of UO2(220) plane increases and both planes grow concurrently. The activation energies obtained for the oxide growth are Qparabolic = 17.5 kcal/mol and Qlinear = 19 kcal/mol. Enhanced oxidation around uranium carbide (UC) inclusions is clearly observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM studies on chromium (III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Dwivedi, Jagrati; Shukla, Kritika

    2015-06-01

    Five Chromium (III) complexes have been prepared using Schiff base ligands which derived from benzoin and five different amino acids (H2N-R). Samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, UV-VIS and SEM method. X-Ray diffraction pattern analyzed that all chromium (III) complexes have hexagonal structure and crystalline, in nature, using Bruker D8 Advance instrument. Using VERTAX 70, FTIR spectroscopy reveals that Samples have (C=N), (C-O), (M-N) and (M-O) bonds in the range of 4000-400cm-1. UV-VIS spectroscopy give information that samples absorb the visible light which is in the range of 380-780nm. For this, Lambda 960 spectrometer used. SEM is designed for studying of the solid objects, using JEOL JSM 5600 instrument.

  16. High-pressure x-ray diffraction study on lithium borohydride using a synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, S.; Nakayama, A.; Kikegawa, T.

    2008-07-01

    Lithium borohydride (LiBH4) was compressed up to 10 GPa using a diamond-anvil-cell to investigate its high-pressure structure. In-situ x-ray diffraction profiles indicated a pressure-induced transformation at 1.1 GPa, which was consistent with the previous experimental observation such as Raman scattering spectroscopy. The high-pressure phase was indexed on a tetragonal symmetry of P42/mmc, which was not corresponding some structural models proposed by previous calculation studies. An unknown substance (presumably another Li-B-H compound), which was contained in the starting material, also transformed into its high-pressure phase at 0.6 GPa without any relation to the transformation of LiBH4.

  17. Characterization of natural puya sand extract of Central Kalimantan by using X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suastika, K. G.; Karelius, K.; Sudyana, I. N.

    2018-03-01

    Start Zircon sand extraction in this study use natural sand material from Kereng Pangi village of Central Kalimantan, also known as Puya sand. There are only three ways to extract the Puya sand. The first is magnetic separation, the second is immersion in HCl, and the third is reaction with NaOH. In addition, sample of each extraction step is analyzed with X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Then based on the quantitative analysis using X'Pert Highscore Plus software, the samples are identified mostly as zircon (ZrSiO4) and silica (SiO2). Moreover, after the immersion process with HCl, the silica compound goes down and the zircon compound climbs to 74%. In the reaction process with NaOH zircon compound content further to increase to 88%.

  18. Strategies for Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction of Phase Transitions with Laser Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Laura Robin; Eggert, J. H.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P. M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Palmer, N.; Petre, R. B.; Rygg, J. R.; Sorce, C.; Collins, G. W.; Boehly, T. R.

    2017-10-01

    As part of a program to document kinetics of phase transitions under laser-driven dynamic compression, we are designing a platform to make multiple x-ray diffraction measurements during a single laser experiment. Our plans include experimental development at Omega-EP and eventual implementation at NIF. We will present our strategy for designing a robust platform that can effectively document a wide variety of phase transformations by utilizing both streaked and multiple-frame imaging detectors. Preliminary designs utilize a novel CMOS detector designed by Sandia National Lab. Our initial experiments include scoping studies that will focus on photometrics and shielding requirements in the high EMP environment close to the target. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, LLNL-ABS-734470.

  19. X-Ray diffraction, spectroscopy and thermochemical characterization of the pharmaceutical paroxetine nitrate salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Paulo S.; de Melo, Cristiane C.; Ayala, Alejandro P.; Ellena, Javier

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive solid state study of Paroxetine nitrate hydrate, (PRX+·NO3-)H2O, is reported. This salt was characterized by a combination of methods, including Single crystal X-ray diffraction, Thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Solubility measurements. (PRX+·NO3-)H2O crystallizes in the monoclinic C2 space group (Z‧ = 1) and its packing was analyzed in details, showing that the main supramolecular motif consists in a C22(4) chain formed by charge-assisted N+-H⋯O- hydrogen bonds. The salt formation and conformation features were also accuracy established via FTIR spectra. In comparison with the pharmaceutical approved (PRX+ṡCl-)ṡ0.5H2O, (PRX+ṡNO3-)ṡH2O showed a decrease of 24 °C in the drug melting peak and a slight reduction in its water solubility value.

  20. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J.

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot.more » Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.« less

  1. Calibration of CryojetHT and Cobra Plus Cryosystems used in X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P., E-mail: dudka@crys.ras.ru; Verin, I. A.; Smirnova, E. S.

    CryoJetHT (Oxford Instruments) and Cobra Plus (Oxford Cryosystems) cryosystems, which are used for sample cooling in X-ray diffraction experiments, have been calibrated. It is shown that the real temperature in the vicinity of the sample differs significantly (the deviation is as high as 8–10 K at low temperatures) from the temperature recorded by authorized sensors of these systems. The calibration results are confirmed by measurements of the unit-cell parameters of GdFe{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} single crystal in the temperature range of its phase transition. It is shown that, to determine the real temperature of a sample, one must perform anmore » independent calibration of cryosystems rather than rely on their ratings.« less

  2. High pressure and high temperature in situ X-ray diffraction studies in the Paris-Edinburgh cell using a laboratory X-ray source†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulemonde, Pierre; Goujon, Céline; Laversenne, Laetitia; Bordet, Pierre; Bruyère, Rémy; Legendre, Murielle; Leynaud, Olivier; Prat, Alain; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a new laboratory experimental set-up to study in situ the pressure-temperature phase diagram of a given pure element or compound, its associated phase transitions, or the chemical reactions involved at high pressure and high temperature (HP-HT) between different solids and liquids. This new tool allows laboratory studies before conducting further detailed experiments using more brilliant synchrotron X-ray sources or before kinetic studies. This device uses the diffraction of X-rays produced by a quasi-monochromatic micro-beam source operating at the silver radiation (λ(Ag)Kα 1, 2≈0.56 Å). The experimental set-up is based on a VX Paris-Edinburgh cell equipped with tungsten carbide or sintered diamond anvils and uses standard B-epoxy 5 or 7 mm gaskets. The diffracted signal coming from the compressed (and heated) sample is collected on an image plate. The pressure and temperature calibrations were performed by diffraction, using conventional calibrants (BN, NaCl and MgO) for determination of the pressure, and by crossing isochores of BN, NaCl, Cu or Au for the determination of the temperature. The first examples of studies performed with this new laboratory set-up are presented in the article: determination of the melting point of germanium and magnesium under HP-HT, synthesis of MgB2 or C-diamond and partial study of the P, T phase diagram of MgH2.

  3. High-resolution X-ray diffraction with no sample preparation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, S. M. R.; Degryse, P.; Shortland, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    It is shown that energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) implemented in a back-reflection geometry is extremely insensitive to sample morphology and positioning even in a high-resolution configuration. This technique allows high-quality X-ray diffraction analysis of samples that have not been prepared and is therefore completely non-destructive. The experimental technique was implemented on beamline B18 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Oxfordshire, UK. The majority of the experiments in this study were performed with pre-characterized geological materials in order to elucidate the characteristics of this novel technique and to develop the analysis methods. Results are presented that demonstrate phase identification, the derivation of precise unit-cell parameters and extraction of microstructural information on unprepared rock samples and other sample types. A particular highlight was the identification of a specific polytype of a muscovite in an unprepared mica schist sample, avoiding the time-consuming and difficult preparation steps normally required to make this type of identification. The technique was also demonstrated in application to a small number of fossil and archaeological samples. Back-reflection EDXRD implemented in a high-resolution configuration shows great potential in the crystallographic analysis of cultural heritage artefacts for the purposes of scientific research such as provenancing, as well as contributing to the formulation of conservation strategies. Possibilities for moving the technique from the synchrotron into museums are discussed. The avoidance of the need to extract samples from high-value and rare objects is a highly significant advantage, applicable also in other potential research areas such as palaeontology, and the study of meteorites and planetary materials brought to Earth by sample-return missions. PMID:28660862

  4. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305; Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305

    A microfluidic platform has been developed for the capture and X-ray analysis of protein microcrystals, affording a means to improve the efficiency of XFEL and synchrotron experiments. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressablemore » points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.« less

  5. Real-time direct and diffraction X-ray imaging of irregular silicon wafer breakage.

    PubMed

    Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Danilewsky, Andreas N

    2016-03-01

    Fracture and breakage of single crystals, particularly of silicon wafers, are multi-scale problems: the crack tip starts propagating on an atomic scale with the breaking of chemical bonds, forms crack fronts through the crystal on the micrometre scale and ends macroscopically in catastrophic wafer shattering. Total wafer breakage is a severe problem for the semiconductor industry, not only during handling but also during temperature treatments, leading to million-dollar costs per annum in a device production line. Knowledge of the relevant dynamics governing perfect cleavage along the {111} or {110} faces, and of the deflection into higher indexed {hkl} faces of higher energy, is scarce due to the high velocity of the process. Imaging techniques are commonly limited to depicting only the state of a wafer before the crack and in the final state. This paper presents, for the first time, in situ high-speed crack propagation under thermal stress, imaged simultaneously in direct transmission and diffraction X-ray imaging. It shows how the propagating crack tip and the related strain field can be tracked in the phase-contrast and diffracted images, respectively. Movies with a time resolution of microseconds per frame reveal that the strain and crack tip do not propagate continuously or at a constant speed. Jumps in the crack tip position indicate pinning of the crack tip for about 1-2 ms followed by jumps faster than 2-6 m s(-1), leading to a macroscopically observed average velocity of 0.028-0.055 m s(-1). The presented results also give a proof of concept that the described X-ray technique is compatible with studying ultra-fast cracks up to the speed of sound.

  6. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  7. I Situ Surface X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Electrochemically Deposited Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction has been used to determine the detailed atomic structure of electrochemically deposited lead, thallium, and bismuth monolayers on the silver (111) electrode surface. A review of our previously published lead and thallium monolayer results and the first in situ surface x-ray crystallographic study of the bismuth monolayer structure is presented. The crystallographic analysis of the bismuth Bragg rod intensities and the interference between the bismuth Bragg rod and silver crystal truncation rod scattering were used to determine the detailed atomic structure of the bismuth on silver (111) system at the liquid-solid interface. Our previous in situ x-ray diffraction studies showed that the bismuth monolayer lattice is rectangular and uniaxially incommensurate with the underlying hexagonal silver surface. A crystallographic analysis of the measured structure factor magnitudes reveals that the monolayer forms chains of atoms on the silver surface, similar to the bulk Bi(110)_{rh} plane, with a near neighbor distance of 3.12 +/- 0.01 A and a bond angle of 93 +/- 1^circ, consistent with the bulk Bi(110) _{rh} plane values. The crystallographic refinement also shows that the bismuth monolayer atoms are anisotropically disordered with a rms disorder of 0.25 +/- 0.03 A in the incommensurate direction and 0.09 +/- 0.03 A rms in the commnensurate direction. The interference between the Bi(20) Bragg rod and the Ag(10L)_ {h} crystal truncation rod scattering reveals that one set of bismuth atoms is registered near the bridge sites of the silver (111) surface while another set is registered near the 3-fold hollow sites. In addition, the Bi-Ag d-spacing (3.1 +/- 0.1 A) is found to be consistent with the bulk bismuth near neighbor distance. The bismuth z-direction rms disorder (1.01 +/- 0.08 A) is found to be dominated by the roughness of the underlying silver (sigma_{Ag} = 0.9 +/- 0.1 A rms). Using the estimated bismuth-bismuth spring constant of 1

  8. In situ X-ray diffraction measurement of shock-wave-driven twinning and lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; McGonegle, D.; Bolme, C.; Higginbotham, A.; Lazicki, A.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Rudd, R. E.; Sliwa, M.; Suggit, M.; Swift, D.; Tavella, F.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L.; Wark, J. S.

    2017-10-01

    Pressure-driven shock waves in solid materials can cause extreme damage and deformation. Understanding this deformation and the associated defects that are created in the material is crucial in the study of a wide range of phenomena, including planetary formation and asteroid impact sites, the formation of interstellar dust clouds, ballistic penetrators, spacecraft shielding and ductility in high-performance ceramics. At the lattice level, the basic mechanisms of plastic deformation are twinning (whereby crystallites with a mirror-image lattice form) and slip (whereby lattice dislocations are generated and move), but determining which of these mechanisms is active during deformation is challenging. Experiments that characterized lattice defects have typically examined the microstructure of samples after deformation, and so are complicated by post-shock annealing and reverberations. In addition, measurements have been limited to relatively modest pressures (less than 100 gigapascals). In situ X-ray diffraction experiments can provide insights into the dynamic behaviour of materials, but have only recently been applied to plasticity during shock compression and have yet to provide detailed insight into competing deformation mechanisms. Here we present X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond resolution that capture in situ, lattice-level information on the microstructural processes that drive shock-wave-driven deformation. To demonstrate this method we shock-compress the body-centred-cubic material tantalum—an important material for high-energy-density physics owing to its high shock impedance and high X-ray opacity. Tantalum is also a material for which previous shock compression simulations and experiments have provided conflicting information about the dominant deformation mechanism. Our experiments reveal twinning and related lattice rotation occurring on the timescale of tens of picoseconds. In addition, despite the common association between twinning

  9. Quantum Crystallography: Density Matrix-Density Functional Theory and the X-Ray Diffraction Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soirat, Arnaud J. A.

    Density Matrix Theory is a Quantum Mechanical formalism in which the wavefunction is eliminated and its role taken over by reduced density matrices. The interest of this is that, it allows one, in principle, to calculate any electronic property of a physical system, without having to solve the Schrodinger equation, using only two entities much simpler than an N-body wavefunction: first and second -order reduced density matrices. In practice, though, this very promising possibility faces the tremendous theoretical problem of N-representability, which has been solved for the former, but, until now, voids any hope of theoretically determining the latter. However, it has been shown that single determinant reduced density matrices of any order may be recovered from coherent X-ray diffraction data, if one provides a proper Quantum Mechanical description of the Crystallography experiment. A deeper investigation of this method is the purpose of this work, where we, first, further study the calculation of X-ray reduced density matrices N-representable by a single Slater determinant. In this context, we independently derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the uniqueness of the method. We then show how to account for electron correlation in this model. For the first time, indeed, we derive highly accurate, yet practical, density matrices approximately N-representable by correlated-determinant wavefunctions. The interest of such a result lies in the Quantum Mechanical validity of these density matrices, their property of being entirely obtainable from X-ray coherent diffraction data, their very high accuracy conferred by this known property of the N-representing wavefunction, as well as their definition as explicit functionals of the density. All of these properties are finally used in both a theoretical and a numerical application: in the former, we show that these density matrices may be used in the context of Density Functional Theory to highly accurately determine

  10. In situ X-ray diffraction measurement of shock-wave-driven twinning and lattice dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; McGonegle, D.; Bolme, C.

    We report that pressure-driven shock waves in solid materials can cause extreme damage and deformation. Understanding this deformation and the associated defects that are created in the material is crucial in the study of a wide range of phenomena, including planetary formation and asteroid impact sites, the formation of interstellar dust clouds, ballistic penetrators, spacecraft shielding and ductility in high-performance ceramics. At the lattice level, the basic mechanisms of plastic deformation are twinning (whereby crystallites with a mirror-image lattice form) and slip (whereby lattice dislocations are generated and move), but determining which of these mechanisms is active during deformation ismore » challenging. Experiments that characterized lattice defects have typically examined the microstructure of samples after deformation, and so are complicated by post-shock annealing and reverberations. In addition, measurements have been limited to relatively modest pressures (less than 100 gigapascals). In situ X-ray diffraction experiments can provide insights into the dynamic behaviour of materials, but have only recently been applied to plasticity during shock compression and have yet to provide detailed insight into competing deformation mechanisms. Here we present X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond resolution that capture in situ, lattice-level information on the microstructural processes that drive shock-wave-driven deformation. To demonstrate this method we shock-compress the body-centred-cubic material tantalum—an important material for high-energy-density physics owing to its high shock impedance and high X-ray opacity. Tantalum is also a material for which previous shock compression simulations and experiments have provided conflicting information about the dominant deformation mechanism. Our experiments reveal twinning and related lattice rotation occurring on the timescale of tens of picoseconds. In addition, despite the common

  11. In situ X-ray diffraction measurement of shock-wave-driven twinning and lattice dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; McGonegle, D.; Bolme, C.; ...

    2017-10-25

    We report that pressure-driven shock waves in solid materials can cause extreme damage and deformation. Understanding this deformation and the associated defects that are created in the material is crucial in the study of a wide range of phenomena, including planetary formation and asteroid impact sites, the formation of interstellar dust clouds, ballistic penetrators, spacecraft shielding and ductility in high-performance ceramics. At the lattice level, the basic mechanisms of plastic deformation are twinning (whereby crystallites with a mirror-image lattice form) and slip (whereby lattice dislocations are generated and move), but determining which of these mechanisms is active during deformation ismore » challenging. Experiments that characterized lattice defects have typically examined the microstructure of samples after deformation, and so are complicated by post-shock annealing and reverberations. In addition, measurements have been limited to relatively modest pressures (less than 100 gigapascals). In situ X-ray diffraction experiments can provide insights into the dynamic behaviour of materials, but have only recently been applied to plasticity during shock compression and have yet to provide detailed insight into competing deformation mechanisms. Here we present X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond resolution that capture in situ, lattice-level information on the microstructural processes that drive shock-wave-driven deformation. To demonstrate this method we shock-compress the body-centred-cubic material tantalum—an important material for high-energy-density physics owing to its high shock impedance and high X-ray opacity. Tantalum is also a material for which previous shock compression simulations and experiments have provided conflicting information about the dominant deformation mechanism. Our experiments reveal twinning and related lattice rotation occurring on the timescale of tens of picoseconds. In addition, despite the common

  12. Application of focused-beam flat-sample method to synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction with anomalous scattering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Katsuya, Y.; Matsushita, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM), which is a method for high-resolution and rapid synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements by combination of beam focusing optics, a flat shape sample and an area detector, was applied for diffraction experiments with anomalous scattering effect. The advantages of FFM for anomalous diffraction were absorption correction without approximation, rapid data collection by an area detector and good signal-to-noise ratio data by focusing optics. In the X-ray diffraction experiments of CoFe2O4 and Fe3O4 (By FFM) using X-rays near the Fe K absorption edge, the anomalous scattering effect between Fe/Co or Fe2+/Fe3+ can be clearly detected, due to the change of diffraction intensity. The change of observed diffraction intensity as the incident X-ray energy was consistent with the calculation. The FFM is expected to be a method for anomalous powder diffraction.

  13. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction study of skutterudite thermoelectrics

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, H.; Kirkham, M. J.; Watkins, T. R.; ...

    2016-02-17

    N- and p-type filled-skutterudite materials prepared for thermoelectric power generation modules were analyzed by neutron diffraction at the POWGEN beam line of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The skutterudite powders were processed by melt spinning, followed by ball milling and annealing. The n-type material consists of Ba–Yb–Co–Sb and the p-type material consists of Di–Fe–Ni–Sb or Di–Fe–Co–Sb (Di = didymium, an alloy of Pr and Nd). Powders for prototype module fabrication from General Motors and Marlow Industries were analyzed in this study. XRD and neutron diffraction studies confirm that both the n- and p-type materials have cubicmore » symmetry. Structural Rietveld refinements determined the lattice parameters and atomic parameters of the framework and filler atoms. The cage filling fraction was found to depend linearly on the lattice parameter, which in turn depends on the average framework atom size. Ultimately, this knowledge may allow the filling fraction of these skutterudite materials to be purposefully adjusted, thereby tuning the thermoelectric properties.« less

  14. Detection of nanoscale embedded layers using laboratory specular X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Beekman, Matt, E-mail: matt.beekman@oit.edu; Rodriguez, Gabriel; Atkins, Ryan

    Unusual specular X-ray diffraction patterns have been observed from certain thin film intergrowths of metal monochalcogenide (MX) and transition metal dichalcogenide (TX{sub 2}) structures. These patterns exhibit selective “splitting” or broadening of selected (00l) diffraction peaks, while other (00l) reflections remain relatively unaffected [Atkins et al., Chem. Mater. 24, 4594 (2012)]. Using a simplified optical model in the kinematic approximation, we illustrate that these peculiar and somewhat counterintuitive diffraction features can be understood in terms of additional layers of one of the intergrowth components, MX or TX{sub 2}, interleaved between otherwise “ideal” regions of MX-TX{sub 2} intergrowth. The interpretation ismore » in agreement with scanning transmission electron microscope imaging, which reveals the presence of such stacking “defects” in films prepared from non-ideal precursors. In principle, the effect can be employed as a simple, non-destructive laboratory probe to detect and characterize ultrathin layers of one material, e.g., 2-dimensional crystals, embedded between two slabs of a second material, effectively using the two slabs as a highly sensitive interferometer of their separation distance.« less

  15. Neutron and X-ray diffraction of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N. R.; Herman, H.; Singhal, S. P.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    ZrO2-7.8mol. pct. YO1.5, a fused powder, and ZrO2-8.7mol. pct. YO1.5, a prereacted powder, were plasma-sprayed onto steel substrates. Neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction of the as-received powder, the powder plasma sprayed into water, as-sprayed coatings, and coatings heat-treated for 10 and 100 h were carried out to study phase transformations and ordering of the oxygen ions on the oxygen sublattice. The as-received fused powder has a much lower monoclinic percentage than does the pre-reacted powder, this resulting in a much lower monoclinic percentage in the coating. Heat treatment increases the percentages of the cubic and monoclinic phases, while decreasing the tetragonal content. An ordered tetragonal phase is detected by the presence of extra neutron diffraction peaks. These phase transformations and ordering will result in volume changes. The implications of these transformations on the performance of partially stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings is discussed.

  16. A wavelet transform algorithm for peak detection and application to powder x-ray diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, John M; Dale, Darren; van Dover, R Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Peak detection is ubiquitous in the analysis of spectral data. While many noise-filtering algorithms and peak identification algorithms have been developed, recent work [P. Du, W. Kibbe, and S. Lin, Bioinformatics 22, 2059 (2006); A. Wee, D. Grayden, Y. Zhu, K. Petkovic-Duran, and D. Smith, Electrophoresis 29, 4215 (2008)] has demonstrated that both of these tasks are efficiently performed through analysis of the wavelet transform of the data. In this paper, we present a wavelet-based peak detection algorithm with user-defined parameters that can be readily applied to the application of any spectral data. Particular attention is given to the algorithm's resolution of overlapping peaks. The algorithm is implemented for the analysis of powder diffraction data, and successful detection of Bragg peaks is demonstrated for both low signal-to-noise data from theta-theta diffraction of nanoparticles and combinatorial x-ray diffraction data from a composition spread thin film. These datasets have different types of background signals which are effectively removed in the wavelet-based method, and the results demonstrate that the algorithm provides a robust method for automated peak detection.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of parakeet (Psittacula krameri) haemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Jaimohan, S. M.; Naresh, M. D.; Arumugam, V.; Mandal, A. B.

    2009-01-01

    Birds often show efficient oxygen management in order to meet the special demands of their metabolism. However, the structural studies of avian haemo­globins (Hbs) are inadequate for complete understanding of the mechanism involved. Towards this end, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies have been carried out for parakeet Hb. Parakeet Hb was crystallized as the met form in low-salt buffered conditions after extracting haemoglobin from crude blood by microcentrifugation and purifying the sample by column chromatography. Good-quality crystals were grown from 10% PEG 3350 and a crystal diffracted to about 2.8 Å resolution. Preliminary diffraction data showed that the Hb crystal belonged to the monoclinic system (space group C2), with unit-cell parameters a = 110.68, b = 64.27, c = 56.40 Å, β = 109.35°. Matthews volume analysis indicated that the crystals contained a half-tetramer in the asymmetric unit. PMID:19851014

  18. Conceptual Design for Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction in a Single Laser-Driven Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Laura Robin; Eggert, J. H.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P. M.; Palmer, N. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, G. W.; Sorce, C.

    2017-06-01

    Since X-ray diffraction is the most definitive method for identifying crystalline phases of a material, it is an important technique for probing high-energy-density materials during laser-driven compression experiments. We are developing a design for collecting several x-ray diffraction datasets during a single laser-driven experiment, with a goal of achieving temporal resolution better than 1ns. The design combines x-ray streak cameras, for a continuous temporal record of diffraction, with fast x-ray imagers, to collect several diffraction patterns with sufficient solid angle range and resolution to identify crystalline texture. Preliminary experiments will be conducted at the Omega laser and then implemented at the National Ignition Facility. We will describe the status of the conceptual design, highlighting tradeoffs in the design process. We will also discuss the technical issues that must be addressed in order to develop a successful experimental platform. These include: Facility-specific geometric constraints such as unconverted laser light and target alignment; EMP issues when electronic diagnostics are close to the target; X-ray source requirements; and detector capabilities. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL-ABS-725146.

  19. Observation of divergent-beam X-ray diffraction from a crystal of diamond using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Glazer, A M; Collins, S P; Zekria, D; Liu, J; Golshan, M

    2004-03-01

    In 1947 Kathleen Lonsdale conducted a series of experiments on X-ray diffraction using a divergent beam external to a crystal sample. Unlike the Kossel technique, where divergent X-rays are excited by the presence of fluorescing atoms within the crystal, the use of an external divergent source made it possible to study non-fluorescing crystals. The resulting photographs not only illustrated the complexity of X-ray diffraction from crystals in a truly beautiful way, but also demonstrated unprecedented experimental precision. This long-forgotten work is repeated here using a synchrotron radiation source and, once again, considerable merit is found in Lonsdale's technique. The results of this experiment suggest that, through the use of modern 'third-generation' synchrotron sources, divergent-beam diffraction could soon enjoy a renaissance for high-precision lattice-parameter determination and the study of crystal perfection.

  20. Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Munke, Anna; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J.; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucher, Maximilian; Chapman, Henry N.; Daurer, Benedikt J.; DeMirci, Hasan; Elser, Veit; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hantke, Max F.; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hogue, Brenda G.; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A.; Reddy, Hemanth K.N.; Lan, Ti-Yen; Larsson, Daniel S.D.; Liu, Haiguang; Loh, N. Duane; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Mancuso, Adrian P.; Mühlig, Kerstin; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nam, Daewoong; Nelson, Garrett; Nettelblad, Carl; Okamoto, Kenta; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; van der Schot, Gijs; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Song, Changyong; Svenda, Martin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Vartanyants, Ivan A.; Westphal, Daniel; Wiedorn, Max O.; Williams, Garth J.; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Yoon, Chun Hong; Zook, James

    2016-01-01

    Single particle diffractive imaging data from Rice Dwarf Virus (RDV) were recorded using the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). RDV was chosen as it is a well-characterized model system, useful for proof-of-principle experiments, system optimization and algorithm development. RDV, an icosahedral virus of about 70 nm in diameter, was aerosolized and injected into the approximately 0.1 μm diameter focused hard X-ray beam at the CXI instrument of LCLS. Diffraction patterns from RDV with signal to 5.9 Ångström were recorded. The diffraction data are available through the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) as a resource for algorithm development, the contents of which are described here. PMID:27478984

  1. Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Munke, Anna; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; ...

    2016-08-01

    Single particle diffractive imaging data from Rice Dwarf Virus (RDV) were recorded using the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). RDV was chosen as it is a well-characterized model system, useful for proof-of-principle experiments, system optimization and algorithm development. RDV, an icosahedral virus of about 70 nm in diameter, was aerosolized and injected into the approximately 0.1 μm diameter focused hard X-ray beam at the CXI instrument of LCLS. Diffraction patterns from RDV with signal to 5.9 Ångström were recorded. Here, the diffraction data are available through the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB)more » as a resource for algorithm development, the contents of which are described here.« less

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a chitin-binding domain of hyperthermophilic chitinase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa

    The expression, purification and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a chitin-binding domain of the chitinase from P. furiosus are reported. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the chitin-binding domain of chitinase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, are reported. The recombinant protein was prepared using an Escherichia coli overexpression system and was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 1.70 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The unit-cell parameters were determined to be a = b = 48.8, c = 85.0 Å.

  3. Time-spliced X-ray diffraction imaging of magnetism dynamics in a NdNiO3 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerlein, Kenneth R.

    2018-03-01

    Diffraction imaging of nonequilibrium dynamics at atomic resolution is becoming possible with X-ray free-electron lasers. However, there are unresolved problems with applying this method to objects that are confined in only one dimension. Here I show that reliable one-dimensional coherent diffraction imaging is possible by splicing together images recovered from different time delays in an optical pump X-ray probe experiment. The time and space evolution of antiferromagnetic order in a vibrationally excited complex oxide heterostructure is recovered from time-resolved measurements of a resonant soft X-ray diffraction peak. Midinfrared excitation of the substrate is shown to lead to a demagnetization front that propagates at a velocity exceeding the speed of sound, a critical observation for the understanding of driven phase transitions in complex condensed matter.

  4. Coherent diffraction of single Rice Dwarf virus particles using hard X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Munke, Anna; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Awel, Salah; Ayyer, Kartik; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J; Berntsen, Peter; Bielecki, Johan; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucher, Maximilian; Chapman, Henry N; Daurer, Benedikt J; DeMirci, Hasan; Elser, Veit; Fromme, Petra; Hajdu, Janos; Hantke, Max F; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hogue, Brenda G; Hosseinizadeh, Ahmad; Kim, Yoonhee; Kirian, Richard A; Reddy, Hemanth K N; Lan, Ti-Yen; Larsson, Daniel S D; Liu, Haiguang; Loh, N Duane; Maia, Filipe R N C; Mancuso, Adrian P; Mühlig, Kerstin; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nam, Daewoong; Nelson, Garrett; Nettelblad, Carl; Okamoto, Kenta; Ourmazd, Abbas; Rose, Max; van der Schot, Gijs; Schwander, Peter; Seibert, M Marvin; Sellberg, Jonas A; Sierra, Raymond G; Song, Changyong; Svenda, Martin; Timneanu, Nicusor; Vartanyants, Ivan A; Westphal, Daniel; Wiedorn, Max O; Williams, Garth J; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Yoon, Chun Hong; Zook, James

    2016-08-01

    Single particle diffractive imaging data from Rice Dwarf Virus (RDV) were recorded using the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). RDV was chosen as it is a well-characterized model system, useful for proof-of-principle experiments, system optimization and algorithm development. RDV, an icosahedral virus of about 70 nm in diameter, was aerosolized and injected into the approximately 0.1 μm diameter focused hard X-ray beam at the CXI instrument of LCLS. Diffraction patterns from RDV with signal to 5.9 Ångström were recorded. The diffraction data are available through the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) as a resource for algorithm development, the contents of which are described here.

  5. Time-spliced X-ray diffraction imaging of magnetism dynamics in a NdNiO3 thin film.

    PubMed

    Beyerlein, Kenneth R

    2018-02-27

    Diffraction imaging of nonequilibrium dynamics at atomic resolution is becoming possible with X-ray free-electron lasers. However, there are unresolved problems with applying this method to objects that are confined in only one dimension. Here I show that reliable one-dimensional coherent diffraction imaging is possible by splicing together images recovered from different time delays in an optical pump X-ray probe experiment. The time and space evolution of antiferromagnetic order in a vibrationally excited complex oxide heterostructure is recovered from time-resolved measurements of a resonant soft X-ray diffraction peak. Midinfrared excitation of the substrate is shown to lead to a demagnetization front that propagates at a velocity exceeding the speed of sound, a critical observation for the understanding of driven phase transitions in complex condensed matter.

  6. Application of powder X-ray diffraction in studying the compaction behavior of bulk pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Rebanta; Selbo, Jon; Amidon, Gregory E; Hawley, Michael

    2005-11-01

    This study investigates the effects of crystal lattice deformation on the powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns of compressed polycrystalline specimen (compacts/tablets) made from molecular, crystalline powders. The displacement of molecules and the corresponding adjustment of interplanar distances (d-spacings) between diffracting planes of PNU-288034 and PNU-177553, which have crystal habits with a high aspect ratio favoring preferred orientation during tableting, are demonstrated by shifts in the diffracted peak positions. The direction of shift in diffracted peak positions suggests a reduction of interplanar d-spacing in the crystals of PNU-288034 and PNU-177553 following compaction. There is also a general reduction of peak intensities following compression at the different compressive loads. The lattice strain representing the reduction in d-spacing is proportional to the original d-spacing of the uncompressed sample suggesting that, as with systems that obey a simple Hooke's law relationship, the further apart the planes of atoms/molecules within the lattice are, the easier it is for them to approach each other under compressive stresses. For a third model compound comprising more equant-shaped crystals of PNU-141659, the shift in diffracted peak positions are consistent with an expansion of lattice spacing after compression. This apparent anomaly is supported by the PXRD studies of the bulk powder consisting of fractured crystals where also, the shift in peak position suggests expansion of the lattice planes. Thus the crystals of PNU-141659 may be fracturing under the compressive loads used to produce the compacts. Additional studies are underway to relate the PXRD observations with the bulk tableting properties of these model compounds.

  7. Single-particle coherent diffractive imaging with a soft x-ray free electron laser: towards soot aerosol morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogan, Michael J.; Starodub, Dmitri; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.

    2010-10-01

    The first of its kind, the Free electron LASer facility in Hamburg, FLASH, produces soft x-ray pulses with unprecedented properties (10 fs, 6.8-47 nm, 1012 photons per pulse, 20 µm diameter). One of the seminal FLASH experiments is single-pulse coherent x-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI). CXDI utilizes the ultrafast and ultrabright pulses to overcome resolution limitations in x-ray microscopy imposed by x-ray-induced damage to the sample by 'diffracting before destroying' the sample on sub-picosecond timescales. For many lensless imaging algorithms used for CXDI it is convenient when the data satisfy an oversampling constraint that requires the sample to be an isolated object, i.e. an individual 'free-standing' portion of disordered matter delivered to the centre of the x-ray focus. By definition, this type of matter is an aerosol. This paper will describe the role of aerosol science methodologies used for the validation of the 'diffract before destroy' hypothesis and the execution of the first single-particle CXDI experiments being developed for biological imaging. FLASH CXDI now enables the highest resolution imaging of single micron-sized or smaller airborne particulate matter to date while preserving the native substrate-free state of the aerosol. Electron microscopy offers higher resolution for single-particle analysis but the aerosol must be captured on a substrate, potentially modifying the particle morphology. Thus, FLASH is poised to contribute significant advancements in our knowledge of aerosol morphology and dynamics. As an example, we simulate CXDI of combustion particle (soot) morphology and introduce the concept of extracting radius of gyration of fractal aggregates from single-pulse x-ray diffraction data. Future upgrades to FLASH will enable higher spatially and temporally resolved single-particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science and nanotechnology. Many of the methodologies described for FLASH will

  8. Microfluidic Chips for In Situ Crystal X-ray Diffraction and In Situ Dynamic Light Scattering for Serial Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, Yannig; Schubert, Robin; Kapis, Svetlana; Bourenkov, Gleb; Schneider, Thomas; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Chapman, Henry N; Heymann, Michael

    2018-04-24

    This protocol describes fabricating microfluidic devices with low X-ray background optimized for goniometer based fixed target serial crystallography. The devices are patterned from epoxy glue using soft lithography and are suitable for in situ X-ray diffraction experiments at room temperature. The sample wells are lidded on both sides with polymeric polyimide foil windows that allow diffraction data collection with low X-ray background. This fabrication method is undemanding and inexpensive. After the sourcing of a SU-8 master wafer, all fabrication can be completed outside of a cleanroom in a typical research lab environment. The chip design and fabrication protocol utilize capillary valving to microfluidically split an aqueous reaction into defined nanoliter sized droplets. This loading mechanism avoids the sample loss from channel dead-volume and can easily be performed manually without using pumps or other equipment for fluid actuation. We describe how isolated nanoliter sized drops of protein solution can be monitored in situ by dynamic light scattering to control protein crystal nucleation and growth. After suitable crystals are grown, complete X-ray diffraction datasets can be collected using goniometer based in situ fixed target serial X-ray crystallography at room temperature. The protocol provides custom scripts to process diffraction datasets using a suite of software tools to solve and refine the protein crystal structure. This approach avoids the artefacts possibly induced during cryo-preservation or manual crystal handling in conventional crystallography experiments. We present and compare three protein structures that were solved using small crystals with dimensions of approximately 10-20 µm grown in chip. By crystallizing and diffracting in situ, handling and hence mechanical disturbances of fragile crystals is minimized. The protocol details how to fabricate a custom X-ray transparent microfluidic chip suitable for in situ serial crystallography

  9. Quantitative analysis of crystalline pharmaceuticals in tablets by pattern-fitting procedure using X-ray diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Takehira, Rieko; Momose, Yasunori; Yamamura, Shigeo

    2010-10-15

    A pattern-fitting procedure using an X-ray diffraction pattern was applied to the quantitative analysis of binary system of crystalline pharmaceuticals in tablets. Orthorhombic crystals of isoniazid (INH) and mannitol (MAN) were used for the analysis. Tablets were prepared under various compression pressures using a direct compression method with various compositions of INH and MAN. Assuming that X-ray diffraction pattern of INH-MAN system consists of diffraction intensities from respective crystals, observed diffraction intensities were fitted to analytic expression based on X-ray diffraction theory and separated into two intensities from INH and MAN crystals by a nonlinear least-squares procedure. After separation, the contents of INH were determined by using the optimized normalization constants for INH and MAN. The correction parameter including all the factors that are beyond experimental control was required for quantitative analysis without calibration curve. The pattern-fitting procedure made it possible to determine crystalline phases in the range of 10-90% (w/w) of the INH contents. Further, certain characteristics of the crystals in the tablets, such as the preferred orientation, size of crystallite, and lattice disorder were determined simultaneously. This method can be adopted to analyze compounds whose crystal structures are known. It is a potentially powerful tool for the quantitative phase analysis and characterization of crystals in tablets and powders using X-ray diffraction patterns. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of a catalytic domain of hyperthermophilic chitinase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Shouhei; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Hirata, Kunio; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Uegaki, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a catalytic domain of chitinase (PF1233 gene) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is reported. The recombinant protein, prepared using an Escherichia coli expression system, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected at the undulator beamline BL44XU at SPring-8 to a resolution of 1.50 Å. The crystals belong to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 90.0, b = 92.8, c = 107.2 Å. PMID:16880559

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of the protealysin precursor belonging to the peptidase family M4

    SciTech Connect

    Gromova, T. Yu., E-mail: duk@img.ras.ru; Demidyuk, I. V.; Kostrov, S. V.

    2008-09-15

    A protealysin precursor (the enzyme of the peptidase family M4) was crystallized for the first time. The crystal-growth conditions were found, and single crystals of the protein with dimensions of 0.3-0.5 mm were grown. The preliminary X-ray diffraction study of the enzyme was performed. The protealysin precursor was shown to crystallize in two crystal modifications suitable for the X-ray diffraction study of the three-dimensional structure of the protein molecule at atomic resolution.

  12. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study on epitaxial-growth dynamics of III–V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahasi, Masamitu

    2018-05-01

    The application of in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to the molecular-beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of III–V semiconductors is overviewed along with backgrounds of the diffraction theory and instrumentation. X-rays are sensitive not only to the surface of growing films but also to buried interfacial structures because of their large penetration depth. Moreover, a spatial coherence length up to µm order makes X-rays widely applicable to the characterization of low-dimensional structures, such as quantum dots and wires. In situ XRD studies during growth were performed using an X-ray diffractometer, which was combined with an MBE chamber. X-ray reciprocal space mapping at a speed matching a typical growth rate was achieved using intense X-rays available from a synchrotron light source and an area detector. The importance of measuring the three-dimensional distribution of XRD intensity in a reciprocal space map is demonstrated for the MBE growth of two-, one-, and zero-dimensional structures. A large amount of information about the growth process of two-dimensional InGaAs/GaAs(001) epitaxial films has been provided by three-dimensional X-ray reciprocal mappings, including the anisotropic strain relaxation, the compositional inhomogeneity, and the evolution of surface and interfacial roughness. For one-dimensional GaAs nanowires grown in a Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid–solid mode, the relationship between the diameter of the nanowires and the formation of polytypes has been suggested on the basis of in situ XRD measurements. In situ three-dimensional X-ray reciprocal space mapping is also shown to be useful for determining the lateral and vertical sizes of self-assembled InAs/GaAs(001) quantum dots as well as their internal strain distributions during growth.

  13. Atoms in Action: Observing Atomic Motion with Dynamic in situ X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jordan Michael

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are rich in both structural diversity and application. These materials are comprised of metal atoms or clusters which are connected in a three-dimensional polymer-like network by bridging organic linker molecules. One of the major attractive features in MOFs is their permanent pore space which can potentially be used to adsorb or exchange foreign molecules from/with the surrounding environment. While MOFs are an active area of scientific interest, MOF materials are still relatively new, only 20 years old. As such, there is still much that needs to be understood about these materials before they can be effectively applied to widespread chemical problems like CO2 sequestration or low-pressure hydrogen fuel storage. One of the most important facets of MOF chemistry to understand in order to rationally design MOF materials with tailor-made properties is the relationship between the structural features in a MOF and the chemical and physical properties of that material. By examining in detail the atomic structure of a MOF with known properties under a variety of conditions, scientists can begin to unravel the guiding principles which govern these relationships. X-ray diffraction remains one of the most effective tools for determining the structure of a crystalline material with atomic resolution, and has been applied to the determination of MOF structures for years. Typically these experiments have been carried out using powder X-ray diffraction, but this technique lacks the high-resolution structural information found in single-crystal methods. Some studies have been reported which use specialized devices, sometimes called Environmental Control Cells, to study single crystalline MOFs under non-ambient chemical conditions in situ . However, these in situ studies are performed under static conditions. Even in cases where the ECC provides continued access to the local chemical environment during diffraction data collections, the

  14. X-Ray Diffraction for In-Situ Mineralogical Analysis of Planetesimals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D. F.; Dera, P.; Downs, R. T.; Taylor, J.

    2017-12-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a general purpose technique for definitive, quantitative mineralogical analysis. When combined with XRF data for sample chemistry, XRD analyses yield as complete a characterization as is possible by any spacecraft-capable techniques. The MSL CheMin instrument, the first XRD instrument flown in space, has been used to establish the quantitative mineralogy of the Mars global soil, to discover the first habitable environment on another planet, and to provide the first in-situ evidence of silicic volcanism on Mars. CheMin is now used to characterize the depositional and diagenetic environments associated with the mudstone sediments of lower strata of Mt. Sharp. Conventional powder XRD requires samples comprised of small grains presented in random orientations. In CheMin, sample cells are vibrated to cause loose powder to flow within the cell, driven by granular convection, which relaxes the requirement for fine grained samples. Nevertheless, CheMin still requires mechanisms to collect, crush, sieve and deliver samples before analysis. XTRA (Extraterrestrial Regolith Analyzer) is an evolution of CheMin intended to analyze fines in as-delivered surface regolith, without sample preparation. Fine-grained regolith coats the surfaces of most airless bodies in the solar system, and because this fraction is typically comminuted from the rocky regolith, it can often be used as a proxy for the surface as a whole. HXRD (Hybrid-XRD) is concept under development to analyze rocks or soils without sample preparation. Like in CheMin, the diffracted signal is collected with direct illumination CCD's. If the material is sufficiently fine-grained, a powder XRD pattern of the characteristic X-ray tube emission is obtained, similar to CheMin or XTRA. With coarse grained crystals, the white bremsstrahlung radiation of the tube is diffracted into Laue patterns. Unlike typical Laue applications, HXRD uses the CCD's capability to distinguish energy and analyze the

  15. Characterization of crystallographic properties of thin films using X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoo, Yeongseok

    2007-12-01

    Silver (Ag) has been recognized as one of promising candidates in Ultra-Large Scale Integrated (ULSI) applications in that it has the lowest bulk electrical resistivity of all pure metals and higher electromigration resistance than other interconnect materials. However, low thermal stability on Silicon Dioxide (Si02) at high temperatures (e.g., agglomeration) is considered a drawback for the Ag metallization scheme. Moreover, if a thin film is attached on a substrate, its properties may differ significantly from that of the bulk, since the properties of thin films can be significantly affected by the substrate. In this study, the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) and texture evolution of Ag thin films on different substrates were characterized using various analytical techniques. The experimental results showed that the CTE of the Ag thin film was significantly affected by underlying substrate and the surface roughness of substrate. To investigate the alloying effect for Ag meatallization, small amounts of Copper (Cu) were added and characterized using theta-2theta X-ray Diffraction (XRD) scan and pole figure analysis. These XRD techniques are useful for investigating the primary texture of a metal film, (111) in this study, which (111) is the notation of a specific plane in the orthogonal coordinate system. They revealed that the (111) textures of Ag and Ag(Cu) thin films were enhanced with increasing temperature. Comparison of texture profiles between Ag and Ag(Cu) thin films showed that Cu additions enhanced (111) texture in Ag thin films. Accordingly, the texture enhancement in Ag thin films by Cu addition was discussed. Strained Silicon-On-Insulator (SSOI) is being considered as a potential substrate for Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) technology since the induced strain results in a significant improvement in device performance. High resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used to characterize the perpendicular and parallel

  16. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    DOE PAGES

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; ...

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat formore » conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.« less

  17. Specific features of two diffraction schemes for a widely divergent X-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Avetyan, K. T.; Levonyan, L. V.; Semerjian, H. S.

    2015-03-15

    We investigated the specific features of two diffraction schemes for a widely divergent X-ray beam that use a circular diaphragm 30–50 μm in diameter as a point source of characteristic radiation. In one of the schemes, the diaphragm was set in front of the crystal (the diaphragm-crystal (d-c) scheme); in the other, it was installed behind the crystal (the crystal-diaphragm (c-d) scheme). It was established that the diffraction image in the c-d scheme is a topographic map of the investigated crystal area. In the d-c scheme at L = 2l (l and L are the distances between the crystal andmore » the diaphragm and between the photographic plate and the diaphragm, respectively), the branches of hyperbolas formed in this family of planes (hkl) by the characteristic K{sub α} and K{sub β} radiations, including higher order reflections, converge into one straight line. It is experimentally demonstrated that this convergence is very sensitive to structural inhomogeneities in the crystal under study.« less

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of restriction endonuclease EcoRII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpova, E. A.; Meehan, E.; Pusey, M. L.; Chen, L.

    1999-01-01

    Crystals of the restriction endonuclease EcoRII have been obtained by the vapor-diffusion technique in the presence of ammonium sulfate or polyethylene glycol. The best crystals were grown with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Crystals with dimensions of up to 0.6 x 0. 6 x 0.6 mm have been observed. The crystals diffract to about 4.0 A resolution at a cryo-temperature of 100 K using a rotating-anode X-ray source and a Rigaku R-AXIS IV imaging-plate detector. The space group has been determined to be either I23 or I2(1)3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 160.3 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees. The crystal asymmetric unit contains two protein molecules, and self-rotation function analysis shows a pseudo-twofold symmetry relating the two monomers. Attempts to improve the resolution of crystal diffraction and to search for heavy-atom derivatives are under way.

  19. High-energy x-ray diffraction from surfaces and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejral, U.; Müller, P.; Shipilin, M.; Gustafson, J.; Franz, D.; Shayduk, R.; Rütt, U.; Zhang, C.; Merte, L. R.; Lundgren, E.; Vonk, V.; Stierle, A.

    2017-11-01

    High-energy surface-sensitive x-ray diffraction (HESXRD) is a powerful high-energy photon technique (E > 70 keV) that has in recent years proven to allow a fast data acquisition for the 3D structure determination of surfaces and nanoparticles under in situ and operando conditions. The use of a large-area detector facilitates the direct collection of nearly distortion-free diffraction patterns over a wide q range, including crystal truncation rods perpendicular to the surface and large-area reciprocal space maps from epitaxial nanoparticles, which is not possible in the conventional low-photon energy approach (E =10 -20 keV ). Here, we present a comprehensive mathematical approach, explaining the working principle of HESXRD for both single-crystal surfaces and epitaxial nanostructures on single-crystal supports. The angular calculations used in conventional crystal truncation rod measurements at low-photon energies are adopted for the high-photon-energy regime, illustrating why and to which extent large reciprocal-space areas can be probed in stationary geometry with fixed sample rotation. We discuss how imperfections such as mosaicity and finite domain size aid in sampling a substantial part of reciprocal space without the need of rotating the sample. An exact account is given of the area probed in reciprocal space using such a stationary mode, which is essential for in situ or operando time-resolved experiments on surfaces and nanostructures.

  20. Sparse recovery of undersampled intensity patterns for coherent diffraction imaging at high X-ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Maddali, S.; Calvo-Almazan, I.; Almer, J.

    Coherent X-ray photons with energies higher than 50 keV offer new possibilities for imaging nanoscale lattice distortions in bulk crystalline materials using Bragg peak phase retrieval methods. However, the compression of reciprocal space at high energies typically results in poorly resolved fringes on an area detector, rendering the diffraction data unsuitable for the three-dimensional reconstruction of compact crystals. To address this problem, we propose a method by which to recover fine fringe detail in the scattered intensity. This recovery is achieved in two steps: multiple undersampled measurements are made by in-plane sub-pixel motion of the area detector, then this datamore » set is passed to a sparsity-based numerical solver that recovers fringe detail suitable for standard Bragg coherent diffraction imaging (BCDI) reconstruction methods of compact single crystals. The key insight of this paper is that sparsity in a BCDI data set can be enforced by recognising that the signal in the detector, though poorly resolved, is band-limited. This requires fewer in-plane detector translations for complete signal recovery, while adhering to information theory limits. Lastly, we use simulated BCDI data sets to demonstrate the approach, outline our sparse recovery strategy, and comment on future opportunities.« less