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Sample records for a-v block complicated

  1. Massive hemothorax: A rare complication after supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Katyal, Surabhi; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Plexus block is the preferred anesthesia plan for upper limb surgeries. Among the known complications, hematoma formation following the vascular trauma is often occur but this complication is frequently underreported. We present a case where a massive hemothorax developed post operatively in a patient who underwent resection of giant cell tumor of the right hand radius bone followed by arthroplasty under brachial plexus block using supraclavicular approach. This case report attempts to highlight the essence of remaining vigilant postoperatively for first initial days after brachial plexus block, especially after failed or multiple attempts. Ultrasound guided technique in combination with nerve stimulator has proven to be more reliable and safer than traditional techniques.

  2. Caesarean delivery complicated by unintentional subdural block and conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Khanna, Ashish K; Barsoum, Sabri

    2013-01-01

    Combined spinal epidural (CSE) can provide excellent labor analgesia. Subdural block is also a potential but rare complication of attempted epidural placement during a CSE procedure, which may present as a block that is usually patchy in nature, with a component of sensory and/or motor deficit and a variable duration of action. In addition, a conversion disorder or a functional neurological disorder has been described with epidural and spinal anesthesia in obstetric patients. In this clinical report, we describe a 33-year-old G4P3 at 40 weeks gestation that received an unintentional subdural block as part of her labor analgesia and after an uneventful caesarean delivery presented with a conversion disorder. The rarity of the association between a subdural block and a conversion disorder complicated by the fact that the neurological deficit produced by the subdural block and that produced by a conversion disorder are similar in distribution made the clinical presentation and diagnosis a challenge for the obstetric anesthesia team. A functional neurological disorder of this nature complicating a subdural block in an obstetric anesthesia clinical practice has not been described so far.

  3. Massive hemothorax: A rare complication after supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Katyal, Surabhi; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Plexus block is the preferred anesthesia plan for upper limb surgeries. Among the known complications, hematoma formation following the vascular trauma is often occur but this complication is frequently underreported. We present a case where a massive hemothorax developed post operatively in a patient who underwent resection of giant cell tumor of the right hand radius bone followed by arthroplasty under brachial plexus block using supraclavicular approach. This case report attempts to highlight the essence of remaining vigilant postoperatively for first initial days after brachial plexus block, especially after failed or multiple attempts. Ultrasound guided technique in combination with nerve stimulator has proven to be more reliable and safer than traditional techniques. PMID:25886347

  4. Complete A-V block: incidental or a part of cor triatriatum dexter.

    PubMed

    Guler, Y; Akgun, T; Toprak, C; Guler, A; Esen, A M

    2014-05-01

    Cor triatriatum dexter (CTD) is an extremely rare cardiac anomaly in which the right atrium is divided into two distinct chambers by a membrane. The persistence of the right valve of sinus venosus results in a complete septation of the right atrium. This anomaly is frequently associated with other right-sided cardiac abnormalities. Its clinical manifestation and the need for intervention are determined by the number and the size of the fenestrations on the membrane, associated cardiac anomalies and arrhythmias. We describe a case of CTD in a patient with complete atrioventricular (A-V) block.

  5. Case of Neurological Complication Following Subarachnoid Block in a Patient with Unsuspected Coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Arun; Nagappa, C. Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Subarachnoid block (SAB) is an extensively used regional anesthesia technique for many surgeries. Neurological complications are rare following spinal anesthesia. We are reporting neurological complication in a patient the following appendectomy under SAB with unsuspected coagulopathy. The complication was noticed early and managed conservatively with a high dose of intravenous steroid and improved drastically in a short period. PMID:28298799

  6. Skin and mucosal ischemia as a complication after inferior alveolar nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Aravena, Pedro Christian; Valeria, Camila; Nuñez, Nicolás; Perez-Rojas, Francisco; Coronado, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    The anesthetic block of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) is one of the most common techniques used in dental practice. The local complications are due to the failures on the anesthetic block or to anatomic variations in the tap site such as intravascular injection, skin ischemia and ocular problems. The aim of this article is to present a case and discuss the causes of itching and burning sensation, blanching, pain and face ischemia in the oral cavity during the IAN block. PMID:28182074

  7. Wenckebach second-degree A-V block in top-ranking athletes: an old problem revisited.

    PubMed

    Zeppilli, P; Fenici, R; Sassara, M; Pirrami, M M; Caselli, G

    1980-09-01

    The occurrence of Wenckebach second-degree (Mobitz I) A-V block in apparently normal persons still provides a puzzle for the cardiologist, as the benign nature of this event has been recently questioned. This problem becomes more intriguing when Wenckebach A-V block is encountered in asymptomatic top-ranking athletes, because of medico-legal implications. We report 10 cases of highly-trained athletes, including three with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) features, with a spontaneous or induced Wenckebach second-degree A-V block. Previous ECGs of six subjects, dating from a maximum of 6 years to a minimum of 18 months, were available. Deterioration of A-V conduction has never been documented and all six cases have remained asymptomatic for the whole follow-up period. Athletes have been submitted to a protocol study consisting of ECG recording at rest, during, and after vagal and sympathetic reflex maneuvers, drug administration (isoproterenol and atropine), submaximal and maximal exercise. Nine subjects have been considered to have "normal" responses of the A-V node to provocative tests, since conduction disturbances were improved or normalized by reflex sympathetic stimulations and were completely normalized by autonomic drug administration and exercise. One athlete showed "abnormal" responses to tests. In order to give a conclusive prognostic and medico-legal assessment, we advised him to submit to an invasive electrophysiological investigation. Wenckebach second-degree A-V block in athletes may be a more common finding than so far described, especially when a systematic search is made. In our opinion, this event can still be considered a vagally-induced benign feature of athlete's heart, provided that an immediate improvement of A-V conduction is obtained in response to reflex sympathetic maneuvers, and that a complete normalization after sympathomimetic and vagolytic drug administration and physical exercise is observed. The clinical histories of our athletes and the

  8. Simple hydrazone building blocks for complicated functional materials.

    PubMed

    Tatum, Luke A; Su, Xin; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: The ability to selectively and effectively control various molecular processes via specific stimuli is a hallmark of the complexity of biological systems. The development of synthetic structures that can mimic such processes, even on the fundamental level, is one of the main goals of supramolecular chemistry. Having this in mind, there has been a foray of research in the past two decades aimed at developing molecular architectures, whose properties can be modulated using external inputs. In most cases, reversible conformational, configurational, or translational motions, as well as bond formation or cleavage reactions have been used in such modulations, which are usually initiated using inputs including, irradiation, metalation, or changes in pH. This research activity has led to the development of a diverse array of impressive adaptive systems that have been used in showcasing the potential of molecular switches and machines. That being said, there are still numerous obstacles to be tackled in the field, ranging from difficulties in getting molecular switches to communicate and work together to complications in integrating and interfacing them with surfaces and bulk materials. Addressing these challenges will necessitate the development of creative new approaches in the field, the improvement of the currently available materials, and the discovery of new molecular switches. This Account will describe how our quest to design new molecular switches has led us to the development of structurally simple systems that can be used for complicated functions. Our focus on the modular and tunable hydrazone functional group was instigated by the desire to simplify the structure and design of molecular switches in order to circumvent multistep synthesis. We hypothesized that by avoiding this synthetic bottleneck, which is one of the factors that hinder fast progress in the field, we can expedite the development and deployment of our adaptive materials. It should be

  9. [Subdural, extra-arachnoid block as a complication of stellate ganglion block: documentation with ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Kapral, S; Krafft, P; Gosch, M; Fridrich, P; Weinstabl, C

    1997-10-01

    We present a patient who developed a high central neural block after stellate-ganglion-blockade. The underlying pathophysiology was assessed via sonographic imaging. Stellate ganglion block was performed in a 19-year old patient according to the standard technique. Multiple aspiration tests were negative and a test dose of 3 ml bupivacaine 0.25% was injected. After a 3 min interval another 5 ml were injected. Two minutes after the local anaesthetic administration the patient reported nausea and sensations in the upper extremity. Spontaneous respiration efforts stopped, and the patient became unconscious. Tracheal intubation was performed, and the patient was ventilated in a controlled mode for two hours. Heart rate as well as blood pressure remained within the normal range. Neurologic recovery occurred rapidly and extubation was performed about two and a half hours after the event. Our sonographic studies demonstrated a local anaesthetic depot directly at the root of C 6, with a mean diameter of 10 mm and a length of 5 to 6 cm (about a third smaller than expected). Sonographic studies and clinical symptoms of our patient are most likely to occur with a subdural extra-arachnoidal block. Ultrasonographic guided puncture enhances the patient's safety by the opportunity to directly visualise transverse process, nerval root as well as local anaesthetic depot. In case of depot formation directly at the nerval root, injection may be stopped and the needle repositioned. Furthermore, direct visualisation of the great vessels (A. vertebralis) prevents intravascular injection and haematoma formation.

  10. Severe mitochondrial cytopathy with complete A-V block, PEO, and mtDNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Marín-García, José; Goldenthal, Michael J; Flores-Sarnat, Laura; Sarnat, Harvey B

    2002-09-01

    We describe a 17-year-old male with neurologic and cardiovascular disorders characterized by complete atrioventricular block and a mitochondrial cytopathy with clinical, structural, biochemical, and molecular features shared by chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia and Kearns-Sayre syndrome. The patient's manifestations included progressive external ophthalmoplegia, bilateral ptosis, muscle weakness, delayed development, and progressive hearing loss with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions, including an abundant 11-kb novel deletion and reduced specific activities of respiratory complexes I, III, and IV present in skeletal muscle. Ultrastructural analysis of biopsied muscle revealed a heterogenous mixture of normal and abnormal mitochondria with unusual cristae. This unique mitochondrial DNA deletion, which eliminates the origin of mitochondrial DNA replication for the light strand, may be responsible for generating an intermediate clinical phenotype.

  11. Preservation of pre-excitation despite acute myocardial infarction complicated by complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Boroomand, K.; Armstrong, P. W.

    1978-01-01

    In a 53-year-old man with ventricular pre-excitation (normal PR interval, QRS interval of 0.12 seconds and delta-waves) acute inferior wall myocardial infarction was complicated by, successively, first-degree atrioventricular block, second-degree atrioventricular block (Wenckebach type) and complete heart block. The QRS pattern of pre-excitation was preserved throughout these events. The classification of ventricular pre-excitation is reviewed and the correlation between the various electrocardiographic patterns (the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and its variants and the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome) and the anomalous conduction pathways of Kent, James and Mahaim are discussed. In this case the best possible explanation for preservation of pre-excitation during complete heart block was the existence of accessory fibres of Mahaim. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:679113

  12. The subtalar distraction bone block arthrodesis following the late complications of calcaneal fractures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schepers, T

    2013-03-01

    The late complications following a displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures includes painful arthrosis for which a subtalar fusion might be considered. In case of malalignment due to loss of height and varus deformity a reconstructive arthrodesis is necessary. The primary aim of the current review study was to assess the functional outcome of the subtalar distraction bone block arthrodesis in the management of late complications of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures. The literature was searched for studies in which a subtalar distraction bone block arthrodesis was used in the management of persistent complaints following a displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures, after its first description in 1988 up to November 1st 2011. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Coleman Methodology Score. Twenty-one studies reporting on 456 patients were identified. In 93 percent the procedure was a salvage procedures following the late complications of a calcaneal fracture (372 cases). Duration of follow-up ranged from 21 to 108 months (average 40 months). Union rates were reported with an overall average of 96% (range 83-100%). The average modified AOFAS score (maximum 94 points) was 73 points at final follow-up (range 64-83 points). Six studies reported pre- and post-reconstruction AOFAS outcome scores with an average increase of 44.2 points. Wound complications occurred in approximately 6%. With the exception of one study all were level 4 retrospective case series, with an average Coleman Methodology Score of 55 (range 41-79) points. The subtalar distraction bone block arthrodesis is a technically demanding procedure which, in the right hands, provides an overall good result. This is reflected in a significant increase in outcome scores post-operatively. Although most complications are considered minor, there are several pitfalls which should be recognized and avoided. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An unforeseen complication arising from inferior alveolar nerve block: is anemia possible?

    PubMed

    Ezirganli, Seref; Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz

    2013-11-01

    Complications after administration of local anesthesia for dental procedures are well recognized. We present here 2 cases of patients with anemic areas on their faces resulting from inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The precise cause of this complication is unknown; however, it may be derived from anastomosis of the maxillary artery, rapid injection of local anesthetic solution, misdirection of the needle, and spread of the solution to the upper region of the mandible. Although neurologic occurrences resulting from IANB are rare, dentists should keep in mind that certain dental procedures such as administering IANB could cause anemic areas on the face. Henceforth, dentists should consider the possibility of anemia after administration of IANB and pay attention to avoid complications during the procedure.

  14. Complete heart block as a rare complication of treatment with chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Reuss-Borst, M; Berner, B; Wulf, G; Müller, G A

    1999-06-01

    Antimalarials are well established disease modifying antirheumatic drugs. A rare and underappreciated treatment difficulty is cardiac complication, in particular conduction disturbances. We describe 2 more patients that developed complete heart block after high dose, longterm treatment. Patient 1, a 73-year-old woman with longstanding rheumatoid arthritis, had taken chloroquine (250 mg/day) for 12 years when she developed complete heart block requiring a permanent pacemaker. Patient 2, a 40-year-old woman with discoid lupus erythematosus, was taking chloroquine from 1979 until 1996. Depending on the clinical disease activity, she intermittently increased the dose from 250 to 750 mg/day. In 1994, she developed complete heart block and a permanent pacemaker had to be implanted. Intensive investigations in both cases did not reveal another underlying cause for conduction disturbances; the atrioventricular block was probably due in both cases to chloroquine related cardiac toxicity. This toxicity seems to be restricted to longterm, high dose treatment; however, it should be kept in mind in patients with preexisting conduction disturbances during longterm treatment.

  15. Factors Associated With Risk of Neurologic Complications After Peripheral Nerve Blocks: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sondekoppam, Rakesh V; Tsui, Ban C H

    2017-02-01

    The onset of neurologic complications after regional anesthesia is a complex process and may result from an interaction of host, agent, and environmental risk factors. The purpose of this systematic review was examine the qualitative evidence relating to various risk factors implicated in neurologic dysfunction after peripheral nerve block (PNB). The MEDLINE, OVID, and EMBASE databases were primary sources for literature. Cochrane, LILACS, DARE, IndMed, ERIC, NHS, and HTA via Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD; York University) databases were searched for additional unique results. Randomized controlled studies, case-control studies, cohort studies, retrospective reviews, and case reports/case series reporting neurologic outcomes after PNB were included. Relevant, good-quality systematic reviews were also eligible. Human and animal studies evaluating factors important for neurologic outcomes were assessed separately. Information on study design, outcomes, and quality was extracted and reviewed independently by the 2 review authors. An overall rating of the quality of evidence was assigned using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) criteria. Relevant full-text articles were separated based on type (prospective, retrospective, and nonhuman studies). Strengths of association were defined as high, moderate, inconclusive, or inadequate based on study quality and direction of association. The evidence from 77 human studies was reviewed to assess various host, agent, and environmental factors that have been implicated as possible risks. Most of the available evidence regarding the injurious effects of the 3 cardinal agents of mechanical insult, pressure, and neurotoxicity was extracted from animal studies (42 studies). Among the risk factors investigated in humans, block type had a strong association with neurologic outcome. Intraneural injection, which seems to occur commonly with PNBs, showed an inconsistent direction of

  16. Feto-maternal outcome in pregnancies complicated by isolated fetal congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed

    Roy, K K; Subbaiah, M; Kumar, S; Sharma, J B; Singh, N

    2014-08-01

    A retrospective analysis of eleven pregnancies complicated by isolated fetal congenital complete heart block (CCHB) in anti-SSA/Ro antibody positive women was carried out at a tertiary hospital in India to study the perinatal outcome. The mean gestational age at the time of detection of fetal CCHB was 24.5 ± 3.1weeks. Six mothers were asymptomatic; two had Sjögren's syndrome and three had systemic lupus erythematosus. Oral dexamethasone was given to all the patients after the diagnosis was made. There was one case of intrauterine death. Seven (63.6%) neonates needed a permanent pacemaker. There was no significant difference in the perinatal outcome in asymptomatic women with fetal CCHB and in women with connective tissue disorder and fetal CCHB. To conclude, fetal CCHB is associated with high morbidity but the presence of underlying connective disorder in the mother does not worsen the prognosis of the affected neonate.

  17. Long-term neurological complications associated with surgery and peripheral nerve blockade: outcomes after 1065 consecutive blocks.

    PubMed

    Watts, S A; Sharma, D J

    2007-02-01

    Peripheral nerve blockade is gaining popularity as an analgesic option for both upper or lower limb surgery. Published evidence supports the improved efficacy of regional techniques when compared to conventional opioid analgesia. The incidence of neurological deficit after surgery associated with peripheral nerve block is unclear. This paper reports on neurological outcomes occurring after 1065 consecutive peripheral nerve blocks over a one-year period from a single institution. All patients receiving peripheral nerve blocks for surgery were prospectively followed for up to 12 months to determine the incidence and probable cause of any persistent neurological deficit. Formal independent neurological review and testing was undertaken as indicated. Thirteen patients reported symptoms that warranted further investigation. A variety of probable causes were identified, with peripheral nerve block being implicated in two cases (one resolved at nine months and one remaining persistent). Overall incidence of block-related neuropathy was 0.22%. Persistent postoperative neuropathy is a rare but serious complication of surgery associated with peripheral nerve block. Formal follow-up of all such blocks is recommended to assess causality and allow for early intervention.

  18. Efficacy and complications associated with a modified inferior alveolar nerve block technique. A randomized, triple-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Montserrat-Bosch, Marta; Nogueira-Magalhães, Pedro; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the efficacy and complication rates of two different techniques for inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB). Study Design: A randomized, triple-blind clinical trial comprising 109 patients who required lower third molar removal was performed. In the control group, all patients received an IANB using the conventional Halsted technique, whereas in the experimental group, a modified technique using a more inferior injection point was performed. Results: A total of 100 patients were randomized. The modified technique group showed a significantly higher onset time in the lower lip and chin area, and was frequently associated to a lingual electric discharge sensation. Three failures were recorded, 2 of them in the experimental group. No relevant local or systemic complications were registered. Conclusions: Both IANB techniques used in this trial are suitable for lower third molar removal. However, performing an inferior alveolar nerve block in a more inferior position (modified technique) extends the onset time, does not seem to reduce the risk of intravascular injections and might increase the risk of lingual nerve injuries. Key words:Dental anesthesia, inferior alveolar nerve block, lidocaine, third molar, intravascular injection. PMID:24608204

  19. Intermediate acting non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents and risk of postoperative respiratory complications: prospective propensity score matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Grosse-Sundrup, Martina; Henneman, Justin P; Sandberg, Warren S; Bateman, Brian T; Uribe, Jose Villa; Nguyen, Nicole Thuy; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Martinez, Elizabeth A; Kurth, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during general anesthesia increases the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Design Prospective, propensity score matched cohort study. Setting General teaching hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 2006-10. Participants 18 579 surgical patients who received intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during surgery were matched by propensity score to 18 579 reference patients who did not receive such agents. Main outcome measures The main outcome measures were oxygen desaturation after extubation (hemoglobin oxygen saturation <90% with a decrease in oxygen saturation after extubation of >3%) and reintubations requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit within seven days of surgery. We also evaluated effects on these outcome variables of qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission (train-of-four ratio) and reversal of neuromuscular blockade with neostigmine to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade. Results The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents was associated with an increased risk of postoperative desaturation less than 90% after extubation (odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.51) and reintubation requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit (1.40, 1.09 to 1.80). Qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission did not decrease this risk and neostigmine reversal increased the risk of postoperative desaturation to values less than 90% (1.32, 1.20 to 1.46) and reintubation (1.76, 1.38 to 2.26). Conclusion The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during anesthesia was associated with an increased risk of clinically meaningful respiratory complications. Our data suggest that the strategies used in our trial to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade should be revisited. PMID:23077290

  20. The role of cardiac resynchronization therapy for arterial switch operations complicated by complete heart block.

    PubMed

    Mah, Douglas Y; Alexander, Mark E; Banka, Puja; Abrams, Dominic J; Triedman, John K; Walsh, Edward P; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Mayer, John E; Cecchin, Frank

    2013-09-01

    As mortality in patients with D-loop transposition of the great arteries (D-TGA) has decreased after the arterial switch operation (ASO), the focus has shifted to higher risk groups and outcomes that impact long-term morbidity and mortality, such as left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. We sought to examine the perioperative factors associated with LV dysfunction in patients with D-TGA and ventricular septal defects (VSD) after ASO. A retrospective study was made of all patients with D-TGA/VSD who underwent ASO/VSD closure from 2001 to 2011. Patients with prematurity, L-looped ventricles, and straddling atrioventricular valves were excluded. The primary endpoint was moderate or severe LV dysfunction measured by echocardiogram 2 months or more after surgery. A total of 112 patients underwent ASO/VSD closure at a median age of 5 days. Median time of follow-up was 6.5 months, with no mortality noted. Six patients (8%) were noted to have at least moderate LV dysfunction. Risk factors were heart block requiring pacemaker placement (p<0.001) and length of intensive care unit admission (p=0.04). All 6 patients with heart block had an epicardial lead on the right ventricular free wall; 4 had moderate or severe LV dysfunction and underwent upgrade to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT); median time from initial pacemaker to CRT was 5 months. With a median follow-up of 5 months after CRT, LV function improved to normal (2 patients) or mild dysfunction (2 patients). Left ventricular dysfunction after surgical repair for D-TGA/VSD is low, with heart block and pacemaker insertion playing a significant role. The LV function improved after patients were upgraded to a CRT device. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy and complications associated with a modified inferior alveolar nerve block technique. A randomized, triple-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Montserrat-Bosch, Marta; Figueiredo, Rui; Nogueira-Magalhães, Pedro; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2014-07-01

    To compare the efficacy and complication rates of two different techniques for inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANB). A randomized, triple-blind clinical trial comprising 109 patients who required lower third molar removal was performed. In the control group, all patients received an IANB using the conventional Halsted technique, whereas in the experimental group, a modified technique using a more inferior injection point was performed. A total of 100 patients were randomized. The modified technique group showed a significantly higher onset time in the lower lip and chin area, and was frequently associated to a lingual electric discharge sensation. Three failures were recorded, 2 of them in the experimental group. No relevant local or systemic complications were registered. Both IANB techniques used in this trial are suitable for lower third molar removal. However, performing an inferior alveolar nerve block in a more inferior position (modified technique) extends the onset time, does not seem to reduce the risk of intravascular injections and might increase the risk of lingual nerve injuries.

  2. Complications with allogeneic, cancellous bone blocks in vertical alveolar ridge augmentation: prospective clinical case study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Draenert, Florian G; Kämmerer, Peer W; Berthold, Michael; Neff, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Vertical bone augmentation in dental implantology is an indication for cancellous allogeneic bone blocks (ABB). However, these materials may lead to adverse reactions, which are known well in orthopedics but rarely published. Therefore, in this study, we performed an evaluation of the use of ABB in vertical bone augmentation in clinical dental implantology. The prospective clinical study included 20 cases with vertical augmentation using ABB and subsequent or simultaneous placement of implants in the lateral maxilla and mandible. Follow-up included panoramic radiography, tissue healing, and peri-implantitis. Because of the limited number of patients, the report was planned to be descriptive only. Loss of ABB or peri-implantitis of more than 30% of the intraosseous implant length was deemed to indicate failure. The study was cancelled after six cases because of an unexpectedly high number of complications (5 of 6; 83%). The average surveillance time was 1460 days. Three types of unsatisfying outcome were observed: type I, early complete loss of the augmentation with soft tissue defects after 3 to 8 weeks (n = 2); type II, early soft tissue maceration (up to 8 weeks) without loss of coverage and complete early bone healing with later peri-implantitis and bone loss after prosthetic loading (6 months or later; n = 2); and type III, complication-free bone healing with subsequent peri-implantitis after prosthetic loading (6 months or later; n = 1). Complications were observed in vertical augmentation with ABB and implant placement. After careful consideration, literature data were found to support these results and also suggest that tissue level implants may be advantageous in vertical bone augmentation with ABB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Retrospective analysis of risk factors and predictors of intraoperative complications in neuraxial blocks at Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu-UNESP.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ivan Dias Fernandes; Grando, Marcela Miguel; Vianna, Pedro Thadeu Galvão; Braz, José Reinaldo Cerqueira; Castiglia, Yara Marcondes Machado; Vane, Luís Antônio; Módolo, Norma Sueli Pinheiro; do Nascimento, Paulo; Amorim, Rosa Beatriz; Rodrigues, Geraldo Rolim; Braz, Leandro Gobbo; Ganem, Eliana Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular changes associated with neuraxial blocks are a cause of concern due to their frequency and because some of them can be considered physiological effects triggered by the sympathetic nervous system blockade. The objective of this study was to evaluate intraoperative cardiovascular complications and predictive factors associated with neuraxial blocks in patients ≥ 18 years of age undergoing non-obstetric procedures over an 18-year period in a tertiary university hospital--HCFMB-UNESP. A retrospective analysis of the following complications was undertaken: hypertension, hypotension, sinus bradycardia, and sinus tachycardia. These complications were correlated with anesthetic technique, physical status (ASA), age, gender, and preoperative co-morbidities. The Tukey test for comparisons among proportions and logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. 32,554 patients underwent neuraxial blocks. Intraoperative complications mentioned included hypotension (n=4,109), sinus bradycardia (n=1,107), sinus tachycardia (n=601), and hypertension (n=466). Hypotension was seen more often in patients undergoing continuous subarachnoid anesthesia (29.4%, OR=2.39), ≥ 61 years of age, and female (OR=1.27). Intraoperative hypotension and bradycardia were the complications observed more often. Hypotension was related to anesthetic technique (CSA), increased age, and female. Tachycardia and hypertension may not have been directly related to neuraxial blocks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Susceptibility of the genitofemoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves to complications from lumbar sympathetic blocks: is there a morphological reason?

    PubMed

    Feigl, G C; Dreu, M; Ulz, H; Breschan, C; Maier, C; Likar, R

    2014-06-01

    Interference with the function of the genitofemoral nerve (GFN) and lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) represents a significant complication of lumbar sympathetic blocks (LSBs). The nerve topography of the lumbar sympathetic trunk (LST) was investigated to find a possible morphological reason for this. A total of 118 cadavers embalmed by Thiel's method were investigated. The nerves were dissected from their innervation area to their paravertebral origins. Distances of the GFN and the LFCN to the LST were measured at levels L2/3, L3/4, and L4/5, which are the most common levels for LSB. Two hundred and thirteen sides were assessable for the GFN and 151 sides for the LFCN. In 186 cases, the whole GFN (in 20 cases, its femoral branch only) approached the medial margin of the psoas major (PM) and passed the LST laterally at the level of L3/4 and a distance of 0-28 mm (mean distance 8.5 mm; sd 6.7 mm) and ran dorsally between the PM and the vertebral body of L3, reaching the intervertebral foramen L2/3. In three cases, the GFN fused with the LFCN. In 55 cases, the GFN-LST distance was 0-13 mm at L4/5 and in 19 cases, 9-19 mm at L2/3. The LFCN approached the lateral margin of the PM and entered the intervertebral foramen at L2/3 in 141 cases. There is a higher risk of LSB affecting the GFN at L3/4 or L4/5 during neurolysis of the LST due to its topography. The LFCN rarely shows a strong relation to the LST and only when fused with the GFN. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Aortocavitary fistula as a complication of infective endocarditis and subsequent complete heart block in a patient with severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    Galeas, Jose N.; Perez, Irving E.; Villablanca, Pedro A.; Chahal, Harjit; Jackson, Robert; Taub, Cynthia C.

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis has different presentations depending on the involvement of valvular and perivalvular structures, and it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Aortocavitary fistula is a rare complication. We introduce the case of a 48-year-old female with native valve endocarditis, complicated by aortocavitary fistula to the right atrium, and consequently presented with syncope. PMID:26653694

  6. Tricuspid valve endocarditis complicated by Mobitz type II heart block – a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Agu, Chidozie Charles; Salhan, Divya; Bakhit, Ahmed; Basheer, Hiba; Basunia, Md; Bhattarai, Bikash; Oke, Vikram; Schmidt, Marie Frances; Dufresne, Alix

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a middle-aged male who manifested with low-grade fever and lower back pain. MRI and bone scan of the spine were suggestive of vertebral osteomyelitis. Blood cultures were persistently positive for Enterococcus faecalis and echocardiogram revealed tricuspid valve endocarditis. There was no history of IV drug use and urine toxicology was negative. EKG showed Mobitz type II AV block and a transesophageal echocardiogram revealed no valve ring or septal abscesses. The heart block persisted despite antibiotic therapy and an epicardial pacemaker was placed. This is a rare presentation of high-grade AV block with tricuspid endocarditis in the absence of echocardiographic evidence of perivalvular extension of infection. Also, unique in this case is the finding of E. faecalis hematogenous vertebral osteomyelitis. PMID:26653699

  7. IgGs and Mabs against the beta2-adrenoreceptor block A-V conduction in mouse hearts: A possible role in the pathogenesis of ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Ariel L; Fernández-Gómez, Rodolfo; Peter, Jean-Christophe; Mobini, Reza; Hoebeke, Johan; Mijares, Alfredo

    2006-06-01

    Autoantibodies against beta-adrenoceptors might be involved in different cardiomyopathic diseases such as idopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, Chagas' disease and ventricular arrhythmias. To study the effects of such antibodies on the whole heart, we made use of a new technique allowing the measurement of Ca++ transients as well as action potentials in Langendorff preparations of mouse hearts. Mouse antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop of the beta2-adrenoceptor induced conduction blocks which could be washed away by the beta2-adrenoceptor inverse agonist ICI118,551, confirming the specificity and non-toxicity of these events. These results were confirmed by the use of a monoclonal antibody, monospecific for the beta2-adrenoceptor and the beta2-specific full agonist, clenbuterol. Both increased slightly, but significantly, the beating frequency but their main effect was the production of conduction blocks. In contrast, a monoclonal antibody, monospecific for the beta1-adrenoceptor, highly increased the beating frequency without interfering with the conduction. Our results suggest that stimulation of the beta2-adrenoceptor by anti-receptor antibodies in the conduction tissues leads to conduction disturbances, probably mediated by coupling to a different pathway than the classical Gs pathway. They confirm that anti-beta2 adrenoceptor antibodies could be responsible for ventricular arrhythmias.

  8. Complication rates associated with transvenous pacemaker implantation in dogs with high-grade atrioventricular block performed during versus after normal business hours.

    PubMed

    Ward, J L; DeFrancesco, T C; Tou, S P; Atkins, C E; Griffith, E H; Keene, B W

    2015-01-01

    Transvenous pacemaker implantation in dogs is associated with a relatively high complication rate. At our institution, pacemaker implantation in dogs with high-grade atrioventricular block (HG-AVB) frequently is performed as an after-hours emergency. Among dogs with HG-AVB, the rate of major complications is higher when pacemakers are implanted after hours (AH) compared to during business hours (BH). Client-owned dogs with HG-AVB that underwent transvenous pacemaker implantation between January 2002 and December 2012 at the North Carolina State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Retrospective medical record review. Two-year follow-up was required for complications analysis. Major complications occurred in 14/79 dogs (18%) and included lead dislodgement, lead or generator infection, lead or generator migration, and pacing failure. Incidence of major complications was significantly higher AH (10/36, 28%) compared to BH (4/43, 9%; P = .041), and all infectious complications occurred AH. Median survival time for all dogs was 27 months and did not differ between AH and BH groups for either all-cause (P = .70) or cardiac (P = .40) mortality. AH dogs were younger than BH dogs (P = .010), but there were no other clinically relevant differences between BH and AH groups in terms of demographic, clinical, or procedural variables. At our institution, AH transvenous pacemaker placement is associated with a higher rate of major complications (especially infections) compared to BH placement. This difference may be because of a variety of human factor differences AH versus BH. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Surgical treatment of an Echinococcus cyst of the interventricular septum complicated by septic endocarditis, complete atrioventricular block, and rupture into the Valsalva sinus.

    PubMed

    Beselia, Kakha; Nachkepia, Merab; Gigilashvili, Kakhaber; Keshelava, Grigol; Janashia, Giorgi; Imnadze, Guram

    2010-05-01

    A 40-year-old man was emergently hospitalized because of high fever, a transient ischemic attack, and complete atrioventricular block. The diagnosis was endocarditis, cyst of the interventricular septum (IVS), and complete atrioventricular block. A temporary pacemaker was introduced, and the patient underwent surgery that included IVS cystectomy, ventricular septum plication, and aortic valve replacement. A permanent pacemaker was implanted during the early postoperative period. The patient was discharged from the medical center on day 9 after primary surgery. At the 4-month postoperative follow-up, the patient was found to be in normal condition. Patients with high temperature, heart rhythm and conduction disorders, and dyspnea of unknown etiology might be harboring Echinococcus despite the absence of primary liver or lung damage. Urgent surgical treatment is necessary even on suspicion of complicated hydatid damage to the heart.

  10. Magnetocardiography-Guided Management of an Unusual Case of Isoimmune Complete Atrioventricular Block Complicated by Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bibhuti; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Ovadia, Mark; Strasburger, Janette F.; Johnsrude, Christopher; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2008-01-01

    A fetus who was diagnosed at 25 weeks of gestation with isoimmune AV block presented at 34 weeks with a precipitous fall in ventricular rate and periods of tachycardia. Magnetocardiography revealed the tachycardia to be ventricular. After delivery, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia continued. The baby then successfully paced, and at higher ventricular rates the tachycardia resolved. Five years later the child has normal ventricular function and is doing well. PMID:18765944

  11. Magnetocardiography-guided management of an unusual case of isoimmune complete atrioventricular block complicated by ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Das, Bibhuti; Cuneo, Bettina F; Ovadia, Mark; Strasburger, Janette F; Johnsrude, Christopher; Wakai, Ronald T

    2008-01-01

    A fetus who was diagnosed at 25 weeks of gestation with isoimmune AV block presented at 34 weeks with a precipitous fall in ventricular rate and periods of tachycardia. Magnetocardiography revealed the tachycardia to be ventricular. After delivery, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia continued. The baby then successfully paced, and at higher ventricular rates the tachycardia resolved. Five years later the child has normal ventricular function and is doing well.

  12. [Neurological complications associated with ultrasound-guided interscalene and supraclavicular block in elective surgery of the shoulder and arm. Prospective observational study in a university hospital].

    PubMed

    Bilbao Ares, A; Sabaté, A; Porteiro, L; Ibáñez, B; Koo, M; Pi, A

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative neurological symptoms after performing interscalene block varies between 4 and 16%. The majority of cases are resolved spontaneously within a year, but some patients have their symptoms permanently. Our objective was to assess the incidence of postoperative neurological symptoms after performing the ultrasound-assisted interscalene and supraclavicular anaesthetic blocks. A prospective and observational study was conducted on consecutive patients who had undergone upper extremity surgery with an interscalene or supraclavicular block as an isolated technique, or as a complement to general anaesthesia. Seven days after the intervention, a telephone interview was conducted that focused on the detection of neurological symptoms in the operated limb. Further serial interviews were conducted on patients with symptoms (after the first, the third and the sixth month, and one year after surgery) until resolution of symptoms. Neurological evaluation was offered to those patients with persistent symptoms after one year. A total of 121 patients were included, on whom 96 interscalene blocks and 22 supraclavicular blocks were performed. Postoperative neurological symptoms were detected in 9.9% (95% CI, 5-15%) of patients during the first week. No significant differences were observed between interscalene (9%) and supraclavicular block (14%). After 3 months the symptoms persisted in 9 patients (7.4%), with symptoms remaining in 4 patients (3.3%) after 1.5 years. Electromyogram was performed on 3 patients who tested positive for nerve damage. A high incidence of postoperative neurological symptoms was observed, and a worrying percentage of permanence of them. There were no significant differences in incidence according to the type of block, or any features of the patient or the anaesthesia technique that were associated with the incidence of these symptoms, except a marginal relationship with age. These complications must be clearly explained to the

  13. [Neurological complication after a vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Case report of possible differential diagnoses of a neurological deficit].

    PubMed

    Ehrenberg, R; Bucher, M; Graf, B

    2009-08-01

    A 72-year-old man with an obliteration of the brachial artery received a vertical infraclavicular block (VIP) for vascular surgery but 20 h after the operation a complete paresis of the affected extremity occurred. A new vascular obliteration could be excluded. During the diagnostic examination the patient noticed a snapping noise in the cervical column when moving his head and an abrupt recovery of the neurological deficits occurred. The radiological diagnostic provided no indication of cerebral ischemia or lesions of the brachial plexus. An additional diagnostic finding was a profound herniated vertebral disc with compression of the myelon. Fortunately, the neurological deficits completely returned to normal.

  14. Autonomic dysreflexia in a tetraplegic patient due to a blocked urethral catheter: spinal cord injury patients with lesions above T-6 require prompt treatment of an obstructed urinary catheter to prevent life-threatening complications of autonomic dysreflexia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Manchester Triage System is commonly used as the triage system in emergency departments of the UK. As per the Manchester Triage System, patients presenting with retention of urine to the accident and emergency department are categorized to yellow, which denotes that the ideal maximum time to first contact with a treating clinician will be 60 min. Cervical spinal cord injury patients, in whom urinary catheter is blocked, may develop suddenly headache, sweating, high blood pressure, cardiac dysrhythmia, convulsions, intracranial bleed, and acute neurogenic pulmonary oedema as a result of autonomic dysreflexia due to a distended bladder. Case presentation A 46-year-old male with C-6 tetraplegia developed urinary retention because of a blocked catheter. He was seen immediately on arrival in the spinal injuries unit. The blocked catheter was removed and a new catheter was about to be inserted. Then this patient said that the ceiling lights were very bright and glaring. Five milligrams of Nifedipine was given sublingually. This patient started having fits involving his head, face, neck and shoulders with loss of consciousness. A 14-French silicone Foley catheter was inserted per urethra without any delay and 300 ml of clear urine was drained. This patient recovered consciousness within 5 min. Computed tomography of the brain revealed no focal cerebral or cerebellar abnormality. There was no intra-cranial haemorrhage. Conclusion This case illustrates that spinal cord injury patients with lesion above T-6, who develop retention of urine because of a blocked catheter, may look apparently well, but these patients can develop suddenly life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia. Therefore, spinal cord injury patients, who present to the accident and emergency department or spinal units with a blocked urinary catheter, should be seen urgently although their vital signs may be stable on arrival. Increasing the awareness of staff in emergency departments regarding

  15. Extrafascial injection for interscalene brachial plexus block reduces respiratory complications compared with a conventional intrafascial injection: a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Palhais, N; Brull, R; Kern, C; Jacot-Guillarmod, A; Charmoy, A; Farron, A; Albrecht, E

    2016-04-01

    Hemidiaphragmatic paresis after ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block is reported to occur in up to 100% of patients. We tested the hypothesis that an injection lateral to the brachial plexus sheath reduces the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis compared with a conventional intrafascial injection, while providing similar analgesia. Forty ASA I-III patients undergoing elective shoulder and clavicle surgery under general anaesthesia were randomized to receive an ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for analgesia, using 20 ml bupivacaine 0.5% with epinephrine 1:200 000 injected either between C5 and C6 within the interscalene groove (conventional intrafascial injection), or 4 mm lateral to the brachial plexus sheath (extrafascial injection). The primary outcome was incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis (diaphragmatic excursion reduction >75%), measured by M-mode ultrasonography, before and 30 min after the procedure. Secondary outcomes were forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and peak expiratory flow. Additional outcomes included time to first opioid request and pain scores at 24 h postoperatively (numeric rating scale, 0-10). The incidences of hemidiaphragmatic paresis were 90% (95% CI: 68-99%) and 21% (95% CI: 6-46%) in the conventional and extrafascial injection groups, respectively (P<0.0001). Other respiratory outcomes were significantly better preserved in the extrafascial injection group. The mean time to first opioid request was similar between groups (conventional: 802 min [95% CI: 620-984 min]; extrafascial: 973 min [95% CI: 791-1155 min]; P=0.19) as were pain scores at 24 h postoperatively (conventional: 1.6 [95% CI: 0.9-2.2]; extrafascial: 1.6 [95% CI: 0.8-2.4]; P=0.97). Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block with an extrafascial injection reduces the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis and impact on respiratory function while providing similar analgesia, when compared with a

  16. Recovery of paramyxovirus simian virus 5 with a V protein lacking the conserved cysteine-rich domain: the multifunctional V protein blocks both interferon-beta induction and interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    He, Biao; Paterson, Reay G; Stock, Nicola; Durbin, Joan E; Durbin, Russell K; Goodbourn, Stephen; Randall, Richard E; Lamb, Robert A

    2002-11-10

    The V protein of the Paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) is a multifunctional protein containing an N-terminal 164 residue domain that is shared with the P protein and a distinct C-terminal domain that is cysteine-rich and which is highly conserved among Paramyxoviruses. We report the recovery from Vero cells [interferon (IFN) nonproducing cells] of a recombinant SV5 (rSV5) that lacks the V protein C-terminal specific domain (rSV5VDeltaC). In Vero cells rSV5VDeltaC forms large plaques and grows at a rate and titer similar to those of rSV5. In BHK or CV-1 cells rSV5VDeltaC forms small plaques and grows poorly. However, even when grown in Vero cells rSV5VDeltaC reverts to pseudo-wild-type virus in four to five passages, indicating the importance of the V protein for successful replication of SV5. Whereas rSV5 grows in many cell types with minimal cytopathic effect (CPE), rSV5VDeltaC causes extensive CPE in the same cell types. To overcome the antiviral state induced by IFN, many viruses have evolved mechanisms to counteract the effects of IFN by blocking the production of IFN and abrogating IFN signaling. Whereas rSV5 blocks IFN signaling by mediating the degradation of STAT1, rSV5VDeltaC does not cause the degradation of STAT1 and IFN signaling occurs through formation of the ISGF3 transcription complex. Furthermore, we find that rSV5 infection of cells prevents production of IFN-beta. The transcription factor IRF-3 which is required for transcription of the IFN-beta gene is not translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in rSV5-infected cells. In contrast, in rSV5VDeltaC-infected cells IRF-3 is localized predominantly in the nucleus and IFN-beta is produced. By using ectopic expression of IRF-3, it was shown that after dsRNA treatment and expression of the V protein IRF-3 remained in the cytoplasm, whereas after dsRNA treatment and expression of the P protein (which lacks the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain) IRF-3 was localized predominantly in the nucleus. Thus

  17. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB. PMID:27366387

  18. [Auriculoventricular blocks in the acute phase of myocardial infarction. Course and prognosis. Apropos of 90 cases].

    PubMed

    Hannachi, N; Derbel, F; Ben Ismail, M

    1988-03-01

    The objective is to study the clinical and electrocardiographic characteristics as well as the course of myocardial infarction complicated by atrio-ventricular block (AVB), and to propose a management to acute myocardial infarction with A-V block. This study concerns 90 patients (78 men and 12 women), with a mean age of 58 years. The overall frequency of AVB is 7.6 p. cent. The infarction is most of the time found posteriorly (51 p. cent of the cases). Syncopes are essentially seen in complete AVB (81 p. cent) and with deep antero-septal necrosis (73 p. cent). Heart failure is especially the complication of anterior (73 p. cent) and deep septal (78 p. cent) necrosis. The mortality of myocardial infarction complicated by A-V block (41 p. cent) is higher than that of uncomplicated necroses (15 p. cent). The prognosis is usually favorable in posteriorly located infarctions where the A-V block is usually regressive and benign while it is much more severe in other locations where the conduction disorders associated with severe myocardial lesions. Temporary and/or permanent electrosystolic stimulation must be well codified in its indications which should be broadened, especially in case of anterior or deep septal necrosis.

  19. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... To receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy complications Complications of pregnancy are health problems that ... pregnancy. Expand all | Collapse all Health problems before pregnancy Before pregnancy, make sure to talk to your ...

  20. Differential Clinical Implications of High-Degree Atrioventricular Block Complicating ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction according to the Location of Infarction in the Era of Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The clinical implication of high-degree (second- and third-degree) atrioventricular block (HAVB) complicating ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is ripe for investigation in this era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We sought to address the incidence, predictors and prognosis of HAVB according to the location of infarct in STEMI patients treated with primary PCI. Subjects and Methods A total of 16536 STEMI patients (anterior infarction: n=9354, inferior infarction: n=7692) treated with primary PCI were enrolled from a multicenter registry. We compared in-hospital mortality between patients with HAVB and those without HAVB with anterior or inferior infarction, separately. Multivariate analyses were performed to unearth predictors of HAVB and to identify whether HAVB is independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Results STEMI patients with HAVB showed higher in-hospital mortality than those without HAVB in both anterior (hazard ratio [HR]=9.821, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.946-19.503, p<0.001) and inferior infarction (HR=2.819, 95% CI: 2.076-3.827, p<0.001). In multivariate analyses, HAVB was associated with increased in-hospital mortality in anterior myocardial infarction (HR=19.264, 95% CI: 5.804-63.936, p<0.001). However, HAVB in inferior infarction was not an independent predictor of increased in-hospital mortality (HR=1.014, 95% CI: 0.547-1.985, p=0.901). Conclusion In this era of primary PCI, the prognostic impact of HAVB is different according to the location of infarction. Because of recent improvements in reperfusion strategy, the negative prognostic impact of HAVB in inferior STEMI is no longer prominent. PMID:27275168

  1. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  2. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  3. [Treatment of type 2 diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients of qi-yin deficiency complicated phlegm-dampness blocking collaterals syndrome by internal application of qigui mixture and external application of qigui huoxue lotion: a clinical study].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Sun, Bing; Ban, Bo; Zhang, Mei; Sun, Hai-Ling; Li, Ping; Li, Yan-Ying; Zhang, Yan-Hong

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of internal application of Qigui Mixture (QM) and external application of Qigui Huoxue Lotion (QHL) in treating type 2 diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DNP) patients of qi-yin deficiency complicated phlegm-dampness blocking collaterals syndrome (QYD-PDBCS), and to primarily discuss its mechanism. Totally 62 DPN patients of QYD-PDBCS were randomly assigned to the treatment group (31 cases) and the control group (31 cases). All patients received routine comprehensive therapy. Patients in the control group took Mecobalamine Tablet, 500 microg each time, 3 times per day. Patients in the treatment group additionally took QM, 200 mL per day, twice daily. Besides, they had foot bath in QHL 10 - 15 min every evening for 3 months. The efficacy was assessed by Chinese medical symptom integrals and Toronto clinical scoring system (TCSS) before treatment, 2 and 3 months after treatment. The nerve conduction velocity was determined; the serum levels of total antioxidant capacity (T- AOC), malondialdehyde (MDA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were detected 2 and 3 months after treatment. The total effective rates of Chinese medical symptom integrals and TCSS score were obviously higher in the treatment group than in the control group (P < 0.05). The nerve conduction velocity was significantly improved in the treatment group, when compared with before treatment (P < 0.01). There was statistical difference in the nerve conduction velocity difference of right median nerve motor branch, bilateral tibial nerve motor branches, bilateral common peroneal nerve motor branches, bilateral ulnar nerve sensory branches, and left tibial nerve sensory branch (P < 0.05). Compared with before treatment, serum levels of T-AOC and SOD significantly increased, and the level of MDA decreased significantly in the treatment group after 2 and 3 months of treatment (P < 0.01). But only the SOD level increased significantly in the control group (P < 0.01). There was no statistical

  4. Complicated Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-5. 5th ed. Arlington, Va.: American Psychiatric Association; ... al. Complicated grief and related bereavement issues for DSM-5. Depression and Anxiety. 2011;28:103. Coping ...

  5. Diphtheria Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  6. Potential for Infra-Nodal Heart Block and Cardiogenic Shock With Propofol Administration

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Nicholas; Lim, Michael J.; Ferreira, Scott W.; Mehdirad, Ali A.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of infra-nodal complete heart block and cardiogenic shock in a previously healthy 64-year-old man after administration of 180 mg of intravenous Propofol. Although bradycardia, hypotension, and heart block are commonly seen with propofol administration, such findings are transient and respond quickly to administration of vagolytic or sympathomimetic agents suggesting an AV nodal mechanism of heart block. Sustained left ventricular systolic dysfunction and cardiogenic shock by an alternative, non-autonomic mechanism has also been described in the setting of Propofol administration. Our case is the first to note sustained complete infra-nodal heart block in this setting. Early recognition of such a complication, restoration of atrio-ventricular (A-V) synchrony with dual chamber pacing, and aggressive circulatory support is essential in bridging such patients to recovery.

  7. Horner's Syndrome after Superficial Cervical Plexus Block.

    PubMed

    Flores, Stefan; Riguzzi, Christine; Herring, Andrew A; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks are becoming more essential for the management of acute pain in the emergency department (ED). With increased block frequency comes unexpected complications that require prompt recognition and treatment. The superficial cervical plexus block (SCPB) has been recently described as a method for ED management of clavicle fracture pain. Horner's syndrome (HS) is a rare and self-limiting complication of regional anesthesia in neck region such as brachial and cervical plexus blocks. Herein we describe the first reported case of a HS after an ultrasound-guided SCPB performed in the ED and discuss the complex anatomy of the neck that contributes to the occurrence of this complication.

  8. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  9. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  10. Paracervical Block Anesthesia in Labour

    PubMed Central

    Van Praagh, Ian G. L.; Povey, W. G.

    1966-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of paracervical block anesthesia were studied in 153 patients in the first stage of labour. Transient decrease in uterine activity was noted in 77 patients. There was no acceleration in cervical dilatation following the block. The duration of action of the block in 80 primiparas was 31 to 120 minutes in 69, and over 120 minutes in five. In the 73 multiparas, 53 of the blocks lasted 31 to 90 minutes, eight from 90 to 120 minutes, and two over 120 minutes. The results were good in 66 primiparas and 54 multiparas. The blocks failed in four primiparas and six multiparas. Twenty-six infants had low Apgar scores, but in none could this be related to the paracervical block. There were no significant fetal or maternal complications. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5903165

  11. Neuromuscular block.

    PubMed

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them specially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are specially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of special interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors.

  12. Block People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rayma

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an activity in which students in an after-school art class drew one another on pieces of 2-by-4 scrap lumber in order to create a class portrait in three dimensions. Stresses that the portraits on the wood blocks were done in-the-round, or each side was covered. (CMK)

  13. Block Busters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noblitt, Bill

    1994-01-01

    A number of college publications editors and designers share their secrets for coping with writer's block and other forms of creative anxiety. Suggested techniques include a change of scenery, guarding one's time, sharing ideas with others, thorough research, and organization. (MSE)

  14. Erotic complications.

    PubMed

    Slochower, J

    1999-12-01

    The author argues that erotic transference-countertransference dynamics present particular complexities when they develop between gender constellations other than male analyst and female patient. She addresses the dynamics of a complicated erotic transference in concert with an aversive countertransference response as it evolved between a female analyst and female patient. The intense erotic transference that developed defied classification as either maternallerotic or oedipallerotic, and instead included both features in a rapidly shifting process that was difficult to address analytically. The analyst's confused, often aversive, response to her patient's erotic wishes ultimately revealed a subtle re-enactment involving split-off and erotised experiences of emotional penetration and scrutiny. When these issues were addressed, the erotic transference dissolved, and the analyst's experience of her patient shifted rather dramatically. It is suggested that complex erotic transference sometimes contains within it evidence of previously repressed object experiences that were not primarily sexual in nature.

  15. Comparative evaluation of continuous intercostal nerve block or epidural analgesia on the rate of respiratory complications, intensive care unit, and hospital stay following traumatic rib fractures: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Britt, Todd; Sturm, Ryan; Ricardi, Rick; Labond, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Background Thoracic trauma accounts for 10%–15% of all trauma admissions. Rib fractures are the most common injury following blunt thoracic trauma. Epidural analgesia improves patient outcomes but is not without problems. The use of continuous intercostal nerve blockade (CINB) may offer superior pain control with fewer side effects. This study’s objective was to compare the rate of pulmonary complications when traumatic rib fractures were treated with CINB vs epidurals. Methods A hospital trauma registry provided retrospective data from 2008 to 2013 for patients with 2 or more traumatic rib fractures. All subjects were admitted and were treated with either an epidural or a subcutaneously placed catheter for continuous intercostal nerve blockade. Our primary outcome was a composite of either pneumonia or respiratory failure. Secondary outcomes included total hospital days, total ICU days, and days on the ventilator. Results 12.5% (N=8) of the CINB group developed pneumonia or had respiratory failure compared to 16.3% (N=7) in the epidural group. No statistical difference (P=0.58) in the incidence of pneumonia or vent dependent respiratory failure was observed. There was a significant reduction (P=0.05) in hospital days from 9.72 (SD 9.98) in the epidural compared to 6.98 (SD 4.67) in the CINB group. The rest of our secondary outcomes showed no significant difference. Conclusion This study did not show a difference in the rate of pneumonia or ventilator-dependent respiratory failure in the CINB vs epidural groups. It was not sufficiently powered. Our data supports a reduction in hospital days when CINB is used vs epidural. CINB may have advantages over epidurals such as fewer complications, fewer contraindications, and a shorter time to placement. Further studies are needed to confirm these statements. PMID:26604819

  16. Hillslope-derived blocks retard river incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobe, Charles M.; Tucker, Gregory E.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-05-01

    The most common detachment-limited river incision models ignore the effects of sediment on fluvial erosion, yet steep reaches of mountain rivers often host clusters of large (>1 m) blocks. We argue that this distribution of blocks is a manifestation of an autogenic negative feedback in which fast vertical river incision steepens adjacent hillslopes, which deliver blocks to the channel. Blocks inhibit incision by shielding the bed and enhancing form drag. We explore this feedback with a 1-D channel-reach model in which block delivery by hillslopes depends on the river incision rate. Results indicate that incision-dependent block delivery can explain the block distribution in Boulder Creek, Colorado. The proposed negative feedback may significantly slow knickpoint retreat, channel adjustment, and landscape response compared to rates predicted by current theory. The influence of hillslope-derived blocks may complicate efforts to extract base level histories from river profiles.

  17. Block copolymer structures in nano-pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Marco; Guo, Xiaohu; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2010-03-01

    We present results of coarse-grained computer modelling of block copolymer systems in cylindrical and spherical nanopores on Cell Dynamics Simulation. We study both cylindrical and spherical pores and systematically investigate structures formed by lamellar, cylinders and spherical block copolymer systems for various pore radii and affinity of block copolymer blocks to the pore walls. The obtained structures include: standing lamellae and cylinders, ``onions,'' cylinder ``knitting balls,'' ``golf-ball,'' layered spherical, ``virus''-like and mixed morphologies with T-junctions and U-type defects [1]. Kinetics of the structure formation and the differences with planar films are discussed. Our simulations suggest that novel porous nano-containers can be formed by confining block copolymers in pores of different geometries [1,2]. [4pt] [1] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, Polymer 49, 2797 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 214902 (2009).

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation for a skydiver after aortic valve replacement for pure aortic regurgitation and resection of the ascending aorta complicated by active infective endocarditis and heart block requiring a pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Tonja R.; DeJong, Sandra; Bilbrey, Tim; Carbone, Pasquale; Campbell, Mark; Parker, Robert D.; Lira, Alessandra; Amarante, Diogo; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    A professional skydiver underwent aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement complicated by infective endocarditis with root abscess and pacemaker implantation. He then enrolled in the Baylor Heart and Vascular Hospital cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program as part of its specificity of testing and exercise training facility. He performed specific skydiving cardiovascular and muscular strength tests at the beginning and the end of the CR program. His pacemaker was interrogated to ascertain any arrhythmias or lead displacement over the course of the CR program. Daily exercise training was customized to match the physical demands of skydiving, including two sessions at iFLY Dallas. Upon completion of the daily exercise sessions, the patient performed a simulated free-fall drop test. He then performed a true jump at Dallas Skydive Center and subsequently traveled to Arizona for a skydiving competition, where he performed 35 true jumps with no adverse events or symptoms. This case illustrates how CR, tailored to a patient's specific needs, can aid in the return to rigorous activity. PMID:28405096

  19. Lateral approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, DK; Sahu, Anjana

    2010-01-01

    A lateral approach described by Volker Hempel and Dr. Dilip Kotharihas been further studied, evaluated and described in detail in the present study. The aim of this study was to evaluate lateral approach of supraclavicular brachial plexus block, mainly in terms of successes rate and complication rate. The study was conducted in secondary level hospital and tertiary level hospital from 2004 to 2008. It was a prospective nonrandomized open-level study. Eighty-two patients of both sexes, aged between 18 and 65 years with ASA Grade I and II scheduled to undergo elective major surgery of the upper limb below the midarm, were selected for this new lateral approach of brachial plexus block. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, any complications and need for supplement anaesthesia were observed. Success and complication rate were calculated in percentage. Average onset and duration of sensory and motor block was calculated as mean ± SD and percentage. Out of 82 patients, 75 (92%) have got successful block with no significant complication in any case. PMID:20885867

  20. Complications of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bladé, Joan; Rosiñol, Laura

    2007-12-01

    Multiple myeloma, also known as myeloma or plasma cell myeloma, is a progressive hematologic disease. Complications of multiple myeloma include renal insufficiency, hematologic complications (anemia, bone marrow failure, bleeding disorders), infections, bone complications (pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, hyercalcemia), and neurologic complications (spinal cord and nerve root compression, intracranial plasmacytomas, leptomeningeal involvement, among others). This article reviews these various complications connected to multiple myeloma, examining their various causes and possible treatment.

  1. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  2. Pulmonary complications from ophthalmic preparations.

    PubMed

    Prakash, U B; Rosenow, E C

    1990-04-01

    Topical beta-adrenergic blocking agents are commonly used to treat glaucoma. Exacerbations of asthma and bronchospasm caused by topical beta-adrenergic ophthalmic preparations are well known. We describe a 67-year-old woman who had aspiration pneumonitis characterized by a nodular infiltrate in the right middle lobe of the lung and nocturnal coughing after beginning topical application of an ointment (Lacri-Lube) for treatment of xerophthalmia. Bronchial washing demonstrated lipid-laden pulmonary alveolar macrophages. After the use of Lacri-Lube was discontinued, her cough and the chest roentgenographic abnormality totally disappeared. We postulate that the topical ophthalmic preparation, which contains mineral oil and petrolatum, drained into the nasopharynx, trachea, and bronchial tree through the nasolacrimal duct and caused lipoid pneumonitis from aspiration of the oil contents. To our knowledge, this is the first report of pulmonary complications caused by Lacri-Lube. We briefly review the pulmonary complications, including pulmonary edema, apnea from paralysis of respiratory muscles, bronchospasm from non-beta-adrenergic blocking drugs, and electrolyte abnormalities, attributable to topically and systemically administered ophthalmic medications.

  3. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  4. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  5. Eye Complications in IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  6. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... that only affects the colon). LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF CROHN’S DISEASE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION The most common complication of Crohn’s disease, obstruction may arise from swelling and the formation ...

  7. Tube Thoracostomy: Complications and Its Management

    PubMed Central

    Kesieme, Emeka B.; Dongo, Andrew; Ezemba, Ndubueze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Jebbin, Nze; Kesieme, Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended. PMID:22028963

  8. Risks and complications in rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rettinger, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Rhinoplasty is regarded to be associated with many risks as the expectations of patient and physician are not always corresponding. Besides of postoperative deformities many other risks and complications have to be considered. Reduction-rhinoplasty e.g. can cause breathing disturbances which are reported in 70% of all revision-rhinoplasty-patients. One has to be aware however that scars and loss of mucosal-sensation can also give the feeling of a “blocked nose”. The main risks of autogenous transplants are dislocation and resorption, while alloplasts can cause infection and extrusion. In this respect silicone implants can have a complication rate between 5-20%. Less complications are reported with other materials like Gore-Tex. Complications of skin and soft tissues can be atrophy, fibrosis, numbness, cysts originating from displaced mucosa or subcutaneous granulomas caused by ointment material. Postoperative swelling depends mainly on the osteotomy technique. Percutaneous osteotomies cause less trauma, but may result in visible scars. Infections are rare but sometimes life-threatening (toxic-shock-syndrome). The risk is higher, when sinus surgery and rhinoplasty are combined. Osteotomies can also cause injuries of the orbital region. Necrosis of eye-lids by infections and blindness by central artery occlusion are known. There are reports on various other risks like rhinoliquorrhea, brain damage, fistulas between sinus-cavernosus and carotid artery, aneurysms and thrombosis of the cavernous sinus. Discoloration of incisors are possible by damage of vessels and nerves. Rhinoplasty can also become a court-case in dissatisfied patients, a situation that may be called a “typical complication of rhinoplasty”. It can be avoided by proper patient selection and consideration of psychological disturbances. Postoperative deformities are considered as main risks of rhinoplasty, causing revision surgery in 5% to 15% of the cases. The analysis of postoperative

  9. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  10. Complications of Strabismus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Olitsky, Scott E.; Coats, David K.

    2015-01-01

    All surgeries carry risks of complications, and there is no way to avoid ever having a complication. Strabismus surgery is no different in this regard. There are methods to reduce the risk of a complication during or after surgery, and these steps should always be taken. When a complication occurs, it is important to first recognize it and then manage it appropriately to allow for the best outcome possible. This article will discuss some of the more common and/or most devastating complications that can occur during or after strabismus surgery as well as thoughts on how to avoid them and manage them should they happen. PMID:26180463

  11. [Complications of urinary calculi].

    PubMed

    Joual, A; Fekak, H; Rabii, R; el Moussasoui, A; Benjelloun, S

    1996-01-01

    Urinary stones is a frequent disease whose renal complications can engage both functional and vital prognosis. We report 769 complicated cases observed 10 years. The diagnosis was made by intravenous urography and ultrasonography. 607 cases were mechanical complications, 582 hydronephrosis, 25 anuria, 262 were infectious complications, 82 chronic pyelonephritis, 60 pyonephrosis, 10 perinephric abscess. Treatment included adapted antibiotic therapy, ureteral catheter in case of anuria ; surgical extraction of the stone nephrectomy was performed in 100 patients. Results were generally good. 9 patients had endstage chronic renal failure. The high frequency of urinary stone complications is due to the fact that most patients consult late. The diagnosis must obviously be made.

  12. Complications of prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Zapała, Lukasz; Cordeiro, Ernesto; Antoniewicz, Artur; Dimitriadis, Georgios; De Reijke, Theo

    2013-07-01

    Biopsy of the prostate is a common procedure with minor complications that are usually self-limited. However, if one considers that millions of men undergo biopsy worldwide, one realizes that although complication rate is low, the number of patients suffering from biopsy complications should not be underestimated and can be a clinically relevant problem for healthcare professionals. In this review, the authors present diagnosis and management of postbiopsy of prostate complications. Bleeding is the most common complication observed after prostate biopsy, but the use of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not an absolute contraindication to prostate biopsy. Emerging resistance to ciprofloxacin is the most probable cause of the increasing risk of infectious complications after prostate biopsy. Even though extremely rare, fatal complications are possible and were described in case reports.

  13. To Block or Not to Block? The Complicated Territory of Social Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVey, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Online social networking is more than just a passing fad; it's a phenomenon that unifies people of all ages across the Internet and around the world. The most popular social networking sites are Facebook and MySpace--both founded in the United States. However, the United States does not have a corner on the market. Hi-5 is rooted in Asia, Skyrock…

  14. Learning with Large Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how large hollow blocks can meet many preschool children's learning needs through creative dramatic play, and also gives some guidelines on how these blocks can be constructed by parents and teachers. (BB)

  15. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... 314. This combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, most pain relievers used for surgical procedures block activity in ...

  16. Living with Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Block First-degree heart block may ... whether you need ongoing care for your condition. Living With a Pacemaker People who have third-degree ...

  17. Arrange Time into Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepeda, Sally J.

    1999-01-01

    Block scheduling can help high school principals become staff-development leaders. It gives teachers more time to help individual students and contributes to improved achievement, attendance, and graduation rates. This paper describes the results of research on block scheduling in urban high schools and concludes that block scheduling can support…

  18. Blocked Tear Duct

    MedlinePlus

    Blocked tear duct Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff When you have a blocked tear duct, your tears can't drain normally, leaving you ... in the tear drainage system. A blocked tear duct is common in newborns. The condition usually gets ...

  19. From global to heavy-light: 5-point conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkalaev, Konstantin; Belavin, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    We consider Virasoro conformal blocks in the large central charge limit. There are different regimes depending on the behavior of the conformal dimensions. The most simple regime is reduced to the global sl(2,C) conformal blocks while the most complicated one is known as the classical conformal blocks. Recently, Fitzpatrick, Kaplan, and Walters showed that the two regimes are related through the intermediate stage of the so-called heavy-light semiclassical limit. We study this idea in the particular case of the 5-point conformal block. To find the 5-point global block we use the projector technique and the Casimir operator approach. Furthermore, we discuss the relation between the global and the heavy-light limits and construct the heavy-light block from the global block. In this way we reproduce our previous results for the 5-point perturbative classical block obtained by means of the monodromy method.

  20. [Complications of operative hysteroscopy].

    PubMed

    Agostini, A; Bretelle, F; Cravello, L; Ronda, I; Roger, V; Blanc, B

    2003-05-24

    Assess the prevalence and severity of the various complications of operative hysteroscopy, the context in which they occur and the treatments proposed. A single-center observational study from 1/1/90 to 1/1/99 including 2,116 surgical hysteroscopies (resection of a fibroma (782) or polyp (422), section of a septate uterus (199), synechia uteri (90) and endometrectomy (623)). There were 74 complications (3.5%). The most frequent was uterine perforation (34 cases (1.61%)). There were 13 cases of haemorrhage (0.61%), 16 cases of post-surgical fever (0.76%) and 11 metabolic complications (0.47%). Synechia uteri was the surgical intervention with the greatest risk of complications. The complications of surgical hysteroscopy are rare and relatively benign. Uterine perforation appears to predominate. In our study, the risk of complication was enhanced in the case of synechia uteri.

  1. The Space Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ciba-Geigy Corporation's "Space Block," technically known as TDT-177-51 Ren Shape epoxy model block, is a two-foot by two-foot by five- inch plastic block from which master models of the Space Shuttle protective tiles are cut by NC machines. Space Block is made of epoxy resin with low viscosity and slow curing time, enabling the large block to cure uniformly without cracking. Rockwell International uses master models of Shuttle tiles to check accuracy of NC machines accurately by comparing model dimensions with specifications. New epoxy resins are attracting broad interest as a replacement for traditional materials used in modeling auto, aerospace or other parts.

  2. Quadriplegia: Urological Complications

    PubMed Central

    Fenster, Howard N.; Scarrow, Gayle D.

    1989-01-01

    Unlike the general public, quadriplegics are prone to various urological complications as a direct/indirect result of spinal cord lesions. These complications include neurogenic bladder, urinary tract infections, renal and bladder calculi, obstructive uropathy, renal failure, and bladder neoplasms. A significant portion of upper urinary tract disease, including pyelonephritis, hypernephrosis, and calculi are usually secondary to neurogenic bladder related to detrusor sphincter dysfunction. These complications will be discussed in some detail in the following report. PMID:21248886

  3. Complications of Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Keswani, Anjeni; Peters, Anju T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic rhinitis involves inflammation of the upper airways. An association with comorbid conditions, such as rhinosinusitis, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, has been commonly observed in epidemiologic studies. The underlying pathogenesis of these disorders may be similar. Complications of rhinitis include sleep disturbances, learning impairment, and decreased quality of life. It is vital to recognize the complications of rhinitis so that treatment strategies can address rhinitis as well as its comorbidities and complications in a coordinated manner.

  4. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  5. Postpancreatectomy Complications and Management.

    PubMed

    Malleo, Giuseppe; Vollmer, Charles M

    2016-12-01

    Although mortality rates after pancreatectomy have decreased, the incidence of postoperative morbidity remains high. The major procedure-related complications are pancreatic fistula, delayed gastric emptying, and postpancreatectomy hemorrhage. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery defined leading complications in a standardized fashion, allowing unbiased comparison of operative results and management strategies. Risk factors for postoperative complications have been investigated and quantitative scoring systems established to estimate patient-specific risks. Management of postpancreatectomy complications has shifted from an operative to a conservative approach. Nevertheless, postoperative morbidities may have a profound impact on patient recovery and length of hospital stay and are associated with increased hospital costs.

  6. [Complications of body piercing].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, L; Madrid, C; Odman-Jaques, M; Yersin, B; Carnon, P N

    2014-03-19

    The trend of body piercing has grown in popularity in the past decade within the general population and especially among young adults. Complications of body piercing include local inflammation and infections, but severe complications are also possible and largely underestimated. People are usually not aware of the risks before making a piercing, and their medical history, medication and comorbidities are largely neglected by the people who realise the piercing. This article presents a review of the complications that a primary care physician may observe, for a patient who wishes to make a piercing, or presents complications due to the implementation of such a device.

  7. Neurologic Complications and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Welch, Kevin C

    2015-10-01

    Risk is inherent with all surgical procedures. Most endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is uncomplicated. Among the many complications inherent with ESS are the neurologic complications, which include cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, traumatic soft tissue and vascular injuries, infection, and seizures. Despite intense review of a patient's preoperative scans, use of stereotactic image guidance, and an expert understanding of anatomy, neurologic complications occur. An understanding of these complications and how to manage them can help to reduce long-term patient injury as well as help prevent recurrence.

  8. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  9. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    PubMed

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  10. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes. PMID:21318011

  11. COMPLICATIONS IN HIP ARTHROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Marcos Emílio Kuschnaroff; Hoffmann, Rafael Barreiros; de Araújo, Lúcio Cappelli Toledo; Dani, William Sotau; José Berral, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of complications in a series of consecutive cases of hip arthroscopy; to assess the progression of the sample through a learning curve; and to recognize the causes of complications in arthroscopic hip operations. Method: 150 consecutive cases that underwent hip arthroscopy between May 2004 and December 2008 were evaluated. The complications encountered were classified in three ways: organic system affected, severity and groups of 50 consecutive cases. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and Fisher's exact test. Results: We observed 15 complications in this study (10%): ten were neurological, two were osteoarticular, one was vascular-ischemic and two were cutaneous. In the classification of severity, three were classified as major, 12 as intermediate and none as minor. The incidence of complications over the course of the learning curve did not present any statistically significant difference (p = 0.16). Conclusions: Hip arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that involves low morbidity, but which presents complications in some cases. These complications are frequently neurological and transitory, and mainly occur because of joint traction. The complication rate did not decrease with progression of our sample. PMID:27022521

  12. Pregnancy Complications: Shoulder Dystocia

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe cases, which are rare, this can cause brain damage and even death. Complications for the mother include: Heavy bleeding after ... severe cases, which are rare, this can cause brain damage and even death. Complications for the mother include: Heavy bleeding after ...

  13. Complications in percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Kyriazis, Iason; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Özsoy, Mehmet; Vasilas, Marinos; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2015-08-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is generally considered a safe technique offering the highest stone-free rates after the first treatment as compared to the other minimal invasive lithotripsy techniques. Still, serious complications although rare should be expected following this percutaneous procedure. In this work, the most common and important complications associated with PCNL are being reviewed focusing on the perioperative risk factors, current management, and preventing measures that need to be taken to reduce their incidence. In addition, complication reporting is being criticized given the absence of a universal consensus on PCNL complications description. Complications such as perioperative bleeding, urine leak from nephrocutaneous fistula, pelvicalyceal system injury, and pain are individually graded as complications by various authors and are responsible for a significant variation in the reported overall PCNL complication rate, rendering comparison of morbidity between studies almost impossible. Due to the latter, a universally accepted grading system specialized for the assessment of PCNL-related complications and standardized for each variation of PCNL technique is deemed necessary.

  14. A "Needling" Complication.

    PubMed

    Banerji, John S; Govier, Fred E

    2016-11-01

    Intracavernosal injection therapy with vasoactive agents for treatment of erectile dysfunction has been around for more than 3 decades since its advent in the early 1980s. Common complications include ecchymosis and hematoma at the site of injection, priapism, and fibrosis. We describe a rare but potentially dangerous complication of breakage of needle during administering of injections, and discuss its successful retrieval.

  15. Laparoscopic CBD exploration using a V-shaped choledochotomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Soo Ho; Lee, Jun Suh; Hong, Tae Ho

    2015-05-12

    Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE) is a treatment modality for choledocholithiasis. The advantages of this technique are that it is less invasive than conventional open surgery and it permits single-stage management; however, other technical difficulties limit its use. The aim of this article is to introduce our novel technique for LCBDE, which may overcome some of the limitations of conventional LCBDE. Since December 2013, ten patients have undergone LCBDE using a V-shaped choledochotomy (V-CBD). After the confluence of the cystic duct and the CBD were exposed, a V-shaped incision was made along the medial wall of the cystic duct and the lateral wall of the common hepatic duct, which comprise two sides of Calot's triangle. The choledochoscope was inserted into the lumen of the CBD through a V-shaped incision, and all CBD stones were retrieved using a basket or a Fogarty balloon catheter or were irrigated with saline. After CBD clearance was confirmed using the choledochoscope, the choledochotomy was closed with the bard absorbable suture material known as V-loc. The diameter of the CBD ranged from 8 to 30 mm, and the mean size of the stones was 11.6 ± 8.4 mm. The mean operative time was 97.8 ± 30.3 min, and the mean length of the postoperative hospital stay was 6.0 ± 4.6 days. All patients recovered without any postoperative complications, except for one patient who developed postoperative pancreatitis. No conversions to laparotomy were observed, and there were no recurrent stones and no need of T-tube insertion. This report suggests that our novel technique, known as V-CBD, may represent a feasible and straightforward procedure for treating choledocholithiasis, especially when the CBD is not dilated.

  16. Infectious complications of regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Horlocker, Terese T; Wedel, Denise J

    2008-09-01

    Although individual cases have been reported in the literature, serious infections of the central nervous system (CNS) such as arachnoiditis, meningitis, and abscess following spinal or epidural anesthesia are rare. However, recent epidemiologic series from Europe suggest that the frequency of infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques may be increasing. Importantly, while meningitis and epidural abscess are both complications of neuraxial block, the risk factors and causative organisms are disparate. For example, staphylococcus is the organism most commonly associated epidural abscess; often these infections occurred in patients with impaired immunity. Conversely, meningitis follows dural puncture, and is typically caused by alpha-hemolytic streptococci, with the source of the organism the nasopharynx of the proceduralist. In order to reduce the risk of serious infection following neuraxial blockade, the clinician must be knowledgeable in the pathogenesis of CNS infections, patient selection, and use of meticulous aseptic technique. Finally, since delay in the diagnosis may result in morbidity and even death, it is crucial to be aware of the presenting signs and symptoms of meningitis and epidural abscess.

  17. Horner’s Syndrome after Superficial Cervical Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Stefan; Riguzzi, Christine; Herring, Andrew A.; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks are becoming more essential for the management of acute pain in the emergency department (ED). With increased block frequency comes unexpected complications that require prompt recognition and treatment. The superficial cervical plexus block (SCPB) has been recently described as a method for ED management of clavicle fracture pain. Horner’s syndrome (HS) is a rare and self-limiting complication of regional anesthesia in neck region such as brachial and cervical plexus blocks. Herein we describe the first reported case of a HS after an ultrasound-guided SCPB performed in the ED and discuss the complex anatomy of the neck that contributes to the occurrence of this complication. PMID:25987922

  18. Concrete Block Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Calif. 42 1 •1 90 NEW LEGEND 80 A VIBORG, DENMARK, BLOCKS A VIBORG, DENMARK, ASPHALTIC CONCRETE AFTER 00 MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA, BLOCKS VIBRATION MEAN ...the load-distributing characteristics of the Mlock pavements. *. 45 -, , - t 171 LEGENDT 0 CONCRETE BASE, MEAN OF 8 TESTS,9 KNAPTON (1978) I RANGE OF...45 to 60 min. 90. Table 11 summarizes the results of these tests. The mean penetration of water through the block pavements with a slope of I per

  19. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  20. [Electrotherapy complications in women].

    PubMed

    Polewczyk, Anna; Kutarski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    In recent years we can observe an increase of frequency of electrotherapy complications. Analysis of this complications with gender differences consideration is rarely found in the literature. Probably, there is some kind of discrepancy in qualification for implantation of pacemakers and more complex systems in women and men. According to the most reports--ICD and CRT systems are seldom implanted in female, but this phenomena is connected rather with less indications to this types in women. Next problem is a lack of uniform classification of electrotherapy complications- it also makes the assessment of gender differences difficult. The most applied is the division of the early and late and also infectious and noninfectious abnormalities. Comparative analysis revealed more frequent prevalence of infectious complications in male, nevertheless, clinical course is probably more severe in female. Among noninfectious complications late perforations are significantly more often found in women, whereas lead dislodgment, lead dependent tricuspid dysfunction, intracardiac abrasion and venous occlusion probably occur with similar frequency in male and female, but it requires further investigations. TLE safety and efficacy gender differences are also rarely described in the literature. Some publications reveal more frequent complication rates in women, but others do not seem to prove this phenomena. Undoubtedly electrotherapy complications in women and methods of their treatment should be further investigated basing on bigger, more representative study groups.

  1. Complications following hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    As the number of liver resections in the United States has increased, operations are more commonly performed on older patients with multiple comorbidities. The advent of effective chemotherapy and techniques such as portal vein embolization, have compounded the number of increasingly complex resections taking up to 75% of healthy livers. Four potentially devastating complications of liver resection include postoperative hemorrhage, venous thromboembolism, bile leak, and post-hepatectomy liver failure. The risk factors and management of these complications are herein explored, stressing the importance of identifying preoperative factors that can decrease the risk for these potentially fatal complications.

  2. Atrial Fibrillation: Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Complications Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... two major complications—stroke and heart failure. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Click to enlarge image This illustration ...

  3. Pregnancy Complications: Bacterial Vaginosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Pregnancy complications > Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy Bacterial vaginosis and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... page It's been added to your dashboard . Bacterial vaginosis (also called BV or vaginitis) is an infection ...

  4. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Photos of Pertussis Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy and Whooping Cough Clinicians Disease Specifics Treatment Clinical Features Clinical Complications ...

  5. Complications of Circumcision

    PubMed Central

    Krill, Aaron J.; Palmer, Lane S.; Palmer, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, circumcision is a commonly performed procedure. It is a relatively safe procedure with a low overall complication rate. Most complications are minor and can be managed easily. Though uncommon, complications of circumcision do represent a significant percentage of cases seen by pediatric urologists. Often they require surgical correction that results in a significant cost to the health care system. Severe complications are quite rare, but death has been reported as a result in some cases. A thorough and complete preoperative evaluation, focusing on bleeding history and birth history, is imperative. Proper selection of patients based on age and anatomic considerations as well as proper sterile surgical technique are critical to prevent future circumcision-related adverse events. PMID:22235177

  6. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Lymphedema? What Causes Lymphedema What is the Lymphatic System? Signs and Symptoms Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage ... is Lymphedema? What Causes Lymphedema What is the Lymphatic System? Signs and Symptoms Infection and Other Complications NLN ...

  7. Infection and Other Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Lymphedema? What Causes Lymphedema What is the Lymphatic System? Signs and Symptoms Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage ... is Lymphedema? What Causes Lymphedema What is the Lymphatic System? Signs and Symptoms Infection and Other Complications NLN ...

  8. Complications of Mumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Serology Publications and Resources Multimedia MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Complications of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  9. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    PubMed

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chickenpox (Varicella) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Chickenpox (Varicella) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chickenpox Home About Chickenpox Signs & Symptoms Complications Transmission Prevention & ...

  11. Bundle Branch Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... your heart to pump blood efficiently through your circulatory system. There's no specific treatment for bundle branch block itself. However, any underlying health condition that caused bundle branch block, such as heart disease, will need to be treated. In most people, ...

  12. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  13. Diabetes Complications in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Buckloh, Lisa M.; Lochrie, Amanda S.; Antal, Holly; Milkes, Amy; Canas, J. Atilio; Hutchinson, Sally; Wysocki, Tim

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Youth with type 1 diabetes face long-term risks of health complications of the disease. Little is known about patients’ and parents’ knowledge, acquisition of information, and family communication regarding these complications. This paper reports qualitative analyses of parental focus-group discussions of this topic. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A total of 47 participants (30 mothers, 14 fathers, and 3 others) representing 33 children between the ages of 8 and 18 years with type 1 diabetes participated in 1 of 13 focus groups. Open-ended questions focused on the type and amount of information about long-term complications presented to parents by health care professionals at different time points, as well as the way that information was presented. Questions also elicited details about parent-child communication and exposure to misconceptions about diabetes complications. RESULTS—Qualitative analysis of the transcribed focus groups revealed that participants experienced significant anxiety about diabetes complications, with a shift from concern about daily management tasks to concern about long-term complications over time. Participants desired a flexible, collaborative educational approach, especially regarding the timing and type of information, relative to the child's age and duration of diabetes. Many parents wanted more sensitive communication and emotional support from health care providers. Motivating children appeared to be a particular challenge; family burnout with regard to diabetes care over time was reported. Knowledge was gained in many ways, yet misinformation was uncommon. CONCLUSIONS—Obtaining information about long-term complications is an important process that changes over the course of the disease and with the child's developmental level. More research is needed, especially regarding youth knowledge, learning, and beliefs about diabetes complications. PMID:18509210

  14. Early complications. Respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Zwischenberger, J B; Alpard, S K; Bidani, A

    1999-08-01

    Pulmonary complications following thoracic surgery are common and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Respiratory failure after pneumonectomy occurs in approximately 5% to 15% of cases and significantly increases patient mortality. Strategies for ventilator support are based on the nature of the underlying complication and the pathophysiology of respiratory failure. This article describes the cause and pathophysiology of respiratory failure and pulmonary embolus postpneumonectomy. Diagnosis, management, and innovative therapies are also reviewed.

  15. On complicity theory.

    PubMed

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value.

  16. [Complications of cesarean deliveries].

    PubMed

    Valgeirsdottir, Heiddis; Hardardottir, Hildur; Bjarnadottir, Ragnheidur I

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the rate of complications which accompany cesarean sections at Landspitali University Hospital (LSH). All deliveries by cesarean section from July 1st 2001 to December 31st 2002 were examined in a retrospective manner. Information was collected from maternity records regarding the operation and its complications if they occurred, during or following the operation. During this period 761 women delivered by cesarean section at LSH. The overall complication rate was 35,5%. The most common complications were; blood loss > or =1000 ml (16.5%), post operative fever (12.2%), extension from the uterine incision (7.2%) and need for blood transfusion (4.3%). Blood transfusion was most common in women undergoing cesarean section after attempted instrumental vaginal delivery (20%). Fever and extension from the uterine incision were most common in women undergoing cesarean section after full cervical dilation without attempt of instrumental delivery (19,4%). These complications were least likely to occur if the patient underwent an elective cesarean section. Complications following cesarean section are common, especially if labor is advanced. Each indication for an operative delivery should be carefully weighed and the patient informed accordingly.

  17. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  18. Complications in Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent developments in hip arthroscopic techniques and technology have made it possible in many cases to avoid open surgical dislocation for treating a variety of pathology in the hip. Although early reports suggest favourable results’ using hip arthroscopy and it has been shown to be a relatively safe procedure, complications do exist and can sometimes lead to significant morbidity. Methods This is a review article. The aim of this manuscript is to present the most frequent and/or serious complications that could occur at or following hip arthroscopy and some guidelines to avoid these complications. Conclusion Most complications of hip arthroscopy are minor or transient but serious complications can occur as well. A lot of complication e.g. acetabular labral puncture go unreported. Appropriate education and training, precise and meticulous surgical technique with correct instrumentation, the right indication in the right patient and adherence to advice from mentors and experienced colleagues are all essential factors for a successful outcome. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066747

  19. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  20. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies.

  1. Paravertebral Block Plus Thoracic Wall Block versus Paravertebral Block Alone for Analgesia of Modified Radical Mastectomy: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nai-Liang; Yu, Ben-Long; Hung, Chen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Paravertebral block placement was the main anesthetic technique for modified radical mastectomy in our hospital until February 2014, when its combination with blocks targeting the pectoral musculature was initiated. We compared the analgesic effects of paravertebral blocks with or without blocks targeting the pectoral musculature for modified radical mastectomy. Methods We retrospectively collected data from a single surgeon and anesthesiologist from June 1, 2012, to May 31, 2015. Intraoperative sedatives and analgesic requirements, time to the first analgesic request, postoperative analgesic doses, patient satisfaction, and complications were compared. Results Fifty-four patients received a paravertebral block alone (PECS 0), and 46 received a paravertebral block combined with blocks targeting the pectoral musculature (PECS 1). The highest intraoperative effect–site concentration of propofol was significantly lower in the PECS 1 group than in the PECS 0 group [2.3 (1.5, 2.8) vs 2.5 (1.5, 4) μg/mL, p = 0.0014]. The intraoperative rescue analgesic dose was significantly lower in the PECS 1 group [0 (0, 25) vs 0 (0, 75) mg of ketamine, p = 0.0384]. Furthermore, the PECS 1 group had a significantly longer time to the first analgesic request [636.5 (15, 720) vs 182.5 (14, 720) min, p = 0.0001]. After further adjustment for age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification, chronic pain history, incidence of a superficial cervical plexus block placement, and operation duration, blocks targeting the pectoral musculature were determined to be the only significant factor (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.23–0.58; p < 0.0001). Very few patients used potent analgesics including morphine and ketorolac; the cumulative use of morphine or ketorolac was similar in the study groups. However, the incidence of all analgesic use, namely morphine, ketorolac, acetaminophen, and celecoxib, was

  2. Treating Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The death of a loved one is one of life’s greatest, universal stressors to which most bereaved individuals successfully adapt without clinical intervention. For a minority of bereaved individuals, grief is complicated by superimposed problems and healing does not occur. The resulting syndrome of complicated grief causes substantial distress and functional impairment even years after a loss, yet knowing when and how to intervene can be a challenge. OBJECTIVE To discuss the differential diagnosis, risk factors for and management of complicated grief based on available evidence and clinical observations. EVIDENCE REVIEW MEDLINE was searched from January 1990 to October 2012. Additional citations were procured from references of select research and review articles. Available treatment studies targeting complicated grief were included. RESULTS A strong research literature led to inclusion of complicated grief in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) (termed persistent complex bereavement disorder as a subtype of other specified trauma and stressor-related disorders), although it is a condition for which more research is formally recommended, and there is still ongoing discussion about the optimal name and diagnostic criteria for the disorder. Reliable screening instruments are available, and the estimated prevalence rate is 7% of bereaved people. Randomized controlled data support the efficacy of a targeted psychotherapy including elements that foster resolution of complicating problems and facilitate the natural healing process. Preliminary studies suggest antidepressant medications may be helpful. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Individuals with complicated grief have greater risk of adverse health outcomes, should be diagnosed and assessed for suicide risk and comorbid conditions such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, and should be considered for treatment. PMID:23917292

  3. A Difluorobenzoxadiazole Building Block for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Li, Yunke; Hunt, Adrian; Zhang, Jianquan; Yao, Huatong; Li, Zhengke; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Fei; Ade, Harald; Yan, He

    2016-03-02

    A difluorobenzoxadiazole building block is synthesized and utilized to construct a conjugated polymer leading to high-performance thick-film polymer solar cells with a V(OC) of 0.88 V and a power conversion efficiency of 9.4%. This new building block can be used in many possible polymer structures for various organic electro-nic applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Beautiful Blocks of Bedrock

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-01

    This image captured by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft targets a 3-kilometer diameter crater that occurs within the ejecta blanket of the much older Bakhuysen Crater, a 150-kilometer diameter impact crater in Noachis Terra. Impact craters are interesting because they provide a mechanism to uplift and expose underlying bedrock, allowing for the study of the subsurface and the geologic past. An enhanced color image shows the wall of the crater, which exposes layering as well as blocks of rock. There is a distinctive large block in the upper left of the crater wall, generally referred to as a "mega-block." It is an angular, light-toned, highly fragmented block, about 100 meters across. Several smaller light-toned blocks are also in the crater wall, possibly of the same rock type as the "mega-block." Ejecta blocks are thrown outward during the initial excavation of a crater, or are deposited as part of the ground-hugging flows of which the majority of the ejecta blanket is comprised. Through images like these, we are able to study the deeper subsurface of Mars that is not otherwise exposed. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20728

  5. Smallest fullerene-like silicon cage stabilized by a V{sub 2} unit

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hong-Guang E-mail: zhengwj@iccas.ac.cn; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Jiao; Zhang, Zeng-Guang; Zheng, Wei-Jun E-mail: zhengwj@iccas.ac.cn

    2014-01-14

    We conducted a combined anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory study on V{sub 2}Si{sub 20} cluster. Our results show that the V{sub 2}Si{sub 20} cluster has an elongated dodecahedron cage structure with a V{sub 2} unit encapsulated inside the cage. It is the smallest fullerene-like silicon cage and can be used as building block to make cluster-assembled materials, such as pearl-chain style nanowires.

  6. Smallest fullerene-like silicon cage stabilized by a V2 unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hong-Guang; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Jiao; Zhang, Zeng-Guang; Zheng, Wei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a combined anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory study on V2Si20 cluster. Our results show that the V2Si20 cluster has an elongated dodecahedron cage structure with a V2 unit encapsulated inside the cage. It is the smallest fullerene-like silicon cage and can be used as building block to make cluster-assembled materials, such as pearl-chain style nanowires.

  7. [Surgical complications of pancreatectomy].

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, A

    2008-01-01

    The mortality for pancreatectomy has decreased to a very low level in recent years but morbidity remains high. The most frequent post-operative complications of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) are delayed gastric emptying (DGE) in 20% and pancreatic fistula (PF) in 10-15%. DGE is associated with other abdominal complications in half the cases; these must be delineated by CT scan and specifically treated. Isolated DGE usually resolves within three weeks with the use of nasogastric suction and pro-kinetic drugs. FP following PD may be preventable with the use of temporary trans-jejunal intubation of Wirsung's duct or by intussusception of the pancreatic margin into the jejunal lumen. FP occurring after PD will heal with conservative management (total parenteral nutrition, peripancreatic drainage, somatostatin analogues) in 80-90% of cases but secondary complications such as peritonitis, arterial erosion and pseudo-aneurysm may be life-threatening. Early hemorrhage (in the first 48-72 hours) must be treated by re-operation. Late hemorrhage (usually secondary to PF) and ischemic complications are rare (3% and 1% respectively), difficult to treat, and associated with high mortality. PF is also the main complication of distal pancreatectomy and enucleation of pancreatic tumors (10-20% and 30% respectively). These PF resolve with conservative treatment in more than 95% of cases but may justify an ERCP sphincterotomy if drainage is prolonged. After medial pancreatectomy, PF occurs in 20-30% of cases, arising from either of the two transected pancreatic surfaces.

  8. [Fibroids and pregnancy: complications].

    PubMed

    Zeghal, Dorra; Ayachi, Amira; Mahjoub, Sami; Boulahya, Ghassen; Zakraoui, Aymen; Ben Hmid, Rim; Zouari, Faouzia

    2012-04-01

    To study the maternal and fetal morbidity in the association fibroid and pregnancy and the management in this case. A retrospective study of 80 cases of fibroids associated to pregnancy. These cases were taken from the department "C" of gynecology and obstetrics in the center of maternity and neonatology of Tunis. We studied 80 cases of fibroid associated to pregnancy in our study. The mean age of the patients was 32 years old. 45 % of the patients were primipares. The interstitial fibroids (68 %) are the most frequent. The average number of fibroid is 1, 7 in each pregnancy. The aseptic necrobiosis is the most frequent complication of the fibroid whereas for the mother the main complications are the premature delivery, the premature rupture of membranes and the placenta praevia during the third term of pregnancy. The dystocic presentations are more frequent than in the general population, responsible of a higher rate of caesarian sections. The delivery hemorrhage constitutes the most frequent complication of the post partum. The fetal prognosis is globally good with a morbidity dominated by growth restrictions but with no superior mortality rate. The myomectomy was practiced during the caesarian section in 3 cases, the abstention being the rule for the other patients. The association fibroid and pregnancy is not rare, the complications are frequent that is why it is considered as a high risk pregnancy. An early detection of the complications and a prevention of delivery hemorrhage would reduce the maternal and fetal morbidity.

  9. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  10. Psoas Versus Femoral Blocks: A Registry Analysis of Risks and Benefits.

    PubMed

    Bomberg, Hagen; Huth, Andrea; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Kessler, Paul; Wulf, Hinnerk; Standl, Thomas; Gottschalk, André; Döffert, Jens; Hering, Werner; Birnbaum, Jürgen; Spies, Claudia; Kutter, Bernd; Winckelmann, Jörg; Burgard, Gerald; Vicent, Oliver; Koch, Thea; Sessler, Daniel I; Volk, Thomas; Raddatz, Alexander

    2017-08-11

    Psoas blocks are an alternative to femoral nerve blocks and have the potential advantage of blocking the entire lumbar plexus. However, the psoas muscle is located deeply, making psoas blocks more difficult than femoral blocks. In contrast, while femoral blocks are generally easy to perform, the inguinal region is prone to infection. We thus tested the hypothesis that psoas blocks are associated with more insertion-related complications than femoral blocks but have fewer catheter-related infections. We extracted 22,434 surgical cases from the German Network for Regional Anesthesia registry (2007-2014) and grouped cases as psoas (n = 7593) and femoral (n = 14,841) blocks. Insertion-related complications (including single-shot blocks and catheter) and infectious complications (including only catheter) in each group were compared with χ tests. The groups were compared with multivariable logistic models, adjusted for potential confounding factors. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, psoas blocks were associated with more complications than femoral blocks including vascular puncture 6.3% versus 1.1%, with an adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 3.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-4.6; P < 0.001), and multiple skin punctures 12.6% versus 7.7%, with an aOR of 2.6 (95% CI, 2.1-3.3; P <0.001). Psoas blocks were also associated with fewer catheter-related infections: 0.3% versus 0.9% (aOR of 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; P = 0.016), and with improved patient satisfaction (mean ± SD 0- to 10-point scale score, 9.6 ± 1.2 vs 8.4 ± 2.9; P < 0.001). Results from a propensity-matched sensitivity analysis were similar. Psoas blocks are associated with more insertion-related complications but fewer infectious complications. ID NCT02846610.

  11. Regional ophthalmic anesthesia: safe techniques and avoidance of complications.

    PubMed

    Troll, G F

    1995-03-01

    In the last decade, anesthesiologists have become increasingly involved in administering regional eye blocks, while providing care for patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. This article describes the two major approaches to regional eye block, namely retrobulbar and peribulbar, with special consideration given to relevant orbital anatomy and technical guidelines. Potential complications, ocular and systemic, with their risk factors, are reviewed. Anesthesiologists wishing to acquire skill in administering safe regional blockade are encouraged to familiarize themselves with regional anatomy and specific guidelines suggested herein.

  12. Do not use epinephrine in digital blocks: myth or truth?

    PubMed

    Wilhelmi, B J; Blackwell, S J; Miller, J H; Mancoll, J S; Dardano, T; Tran, A; Phillips, L G

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role for epinephrine augmentation of digital block anesthesia by safely prolonging its duration of action and providing a temporary hemostatic effect. After obtaining approval from the review board of the authors' institution, 60 digital block procedures were performed in a prospective randomized double-blinded study. The digital blocks were performed using the dorsal approach. All anesthetics were delivered to treat either posttraumatic injuries or elective conditions. Of the 60 digital block procedures, 31 were randomized to lidocaine with epinephrine and 29 to plain lidocaine. Of the procedures performed using lidocaine with epinephrine, one patient required an additional injection versus five of the patients who were given plain lidocaine (p = 0.098). The need for control of bleeding required digital tourniquet use in 20 of 29 block procedures with plain lidocaine and in 9 of 31 procedures using lidocaine with epinephrine (p < 0.002). Two patients experienced complications after plain lidocaine blocks, while no complications occurred after lidocaine with epinephrine blocks (p = 0.23). By prolonging lidocaine's duration of action, epinephrine may prevent the need for an additional injection and prolong post-procedure pain relief. This study demonstrated that the temporary hemostatic effect of epinephrine decreased the need for, and thus the potential risk of, using a digital tourniquet (p < 0.002). As the temporary vasoconstrictor effect is reversible, the threat of complication from vasoconstrictor-induced ischemia is theoretical.

  13. [Complications of tubal sterilization].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, W E

    1986-05-01

    In Europe and the US, tubal sterilization by laparoscopy has become the most widely used technique for female sterilization. The overall rate of intra- and postoperative complications differs between 0.145% and 0.85% in the numerous studies which have been done. This means 1 severe complication in 120-700 laparoscopic sterilizations. The lethality of tubal sterilization by laparoscopy lies between 3-10 deaths/100,000 interventions. The so-called "post-tubal ligation syndrome" is a rare complication. The overall pregnancy rate after tubal sterilization is 3-10/1000 women. The rate of ectopic pregnancy is very high and varies between 13.6% and 90%. Only 5% of the sterilized women show dissatisfaction. Several factors are relevant with regard to psychological sequelae and must be considered before tubal sterilization can be performed. 1 of the most important is the individual comprehensive counselling of the female or the couple prior to the sterilization.

  14. Unusual complication after genioplasty.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Rafael Linard; Sá, Carlos Diego Lopes; Esses, Diego Felipe Silveira; Becker, Otávio Emmel; Soares, Eduardo Costa Studart; de Oliveira, Rogerio Belle

    2014-01-01

    Facial beauty depends on shape, proportion, and harmony between the facial thirds. The chin is one of the most important components of the inferior third and has an important role on the definition of facial aesthetic and harmony in both frontal and lateral views. There are 2 principal therapeutic approaches that one can choose to treat mental deformities, alloplastic implants, and mental basilar ostectomy, also known as genioplasty. The latest is more commonly used because of great versatility in the correction of three-dimensional deformities of the chin and smaller taxes of postoperative complications. Possible transoperative and postoperative complications of genioplasty include mental nerve lesion, bleeding, damage to tooth roots, bone resorption of the mobilized segment, mandibular fracture, ptosis of the lower lip, and failure to stabilize the ostectomized segment. The study presents 2 cases of displacement of the osteotomized segment after genioplasty associated with facial trauma during postoperative orthognathic surgery followed by rare complications with no reports in the literature.

  15. Osteoarticular complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero, J D; Reguera, J M; Fernández-Nebro, A; Cabrera-Franquelo, F

    1991-01-01

    Two hundred and sixty three patients with a diagnosis of brucellosis between January 1984 and December 1987 were studied prospectively. Sixty five patients (25%) developed osteoarticular complications. These patients had a more prolonged course than those with no complications. Spondylitis in 38 (58%) and sacroiliitis in 29 (45%) were the most prevalent. There were no significant laboratory, serological, or bacteriological differences between patients with and without osteoarticular complications. At diagnosis 47 patients (72%) showed radiographic abnormalities, commonly in axial sites but rarely in peripheral sites. Radionuclide bone scan was positive with no radiographic abnormalities in 17 (26%) of cases. Fifty seven patients received medical treatment alone, 51 (89%) being cured with a single course of treatment. Treatment failed or there was a relapse in six patients (11%), of whom five had spondylitis. Eight of the 65 patients (12%), all of whom had spondylitis and paravertebral or epidural abscesses, also required surgical treatment. Images PMID:1994863

  16. Phenol block for hip flexor muscle spasticity under ultrasonic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Koyama, H; Murakami, K; Suzuki, T; Suzaki, K

    1992-11-01

    Hip flexor spasticity, which is often associated with central nervous system (CNS) diseases, is a major impediment in rehabilitation. In order to cope with this problem, lumbar nerve blocking techniques developed by Meelhuysen and major and minor psoas muscle blocking techniques developed by Awad have been used in combination with physical therapies. Based on these techniques, we conducted major and minor psoas muscle phenol block (motor point block or intramuscular nerve block) under ultrasonic monitoring. Phenol block was conducted in nine patients with cerebral infarction (13 blocking procedures) and three with spinal cord injuries (six blocking procedures) while keeping them in a lateral position with the operation side upside. The beginning of the femoral nerves and part of the lumbar artery were visualized by ultrasound in some patients. As a result of the improvement of hip flexor spasticity, the range of hip joint motion (determined by the Mundale technique, prone hip extension and Thomas test) improved shortly after blocking. When physical therapy was conducted after blocking, improvement of skin care management was observed in eight cases, ability to keep in a stable sitting position in nine, improvement of a standing posture in three, increases in the ability to walk in two and alleviation of pain in three. Although nerve block is reported to result in hematoma, decreases in muscle force, pain, cystic/rectal disorders and hypogonadism, we have observed no such complication in our patients.

  17. Resolving writer's block.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, P.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Writer's block, or a distinctly uncomfortable inability to write, can interfere with professional productivity. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To identify writer's block and to outline suggestions for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Once the diagnosis has been established, a stepwise approach to care is recommended. Mild blockage can be resolved by evaluating and revising expectations, conducting a task analysis, and giving oneself positive feedback. Moderate blockage can be addressed by creative exercises, such as brainstorming and role-playing. Recalcitrant blockage can be resolved with therapy. Writer's block can be prevented by taking opportunities to write at the beginning of projects, working with a supportive group of people, and cultivating an ongoing interest in writing. CONCLUSIONS: Writer's block is a highly treatable condition. A systematic approach can help to alleviate anxiety, build confidence, and give people the information they need to work productively. PMID:9481467

  18. What Causes Heart Block?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... acquired heart block. Coronary heart disease , also called coronary artery disease. Myocarditis (MI-o-kar-DI-tis), or inflammation ...

  19. Block copolymer battery separator

    DOEpatents

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  20. Mid-Career Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    Considers typical reactions of midcareer employees to blocked opportunity; reasons for correcting these attitudes; ways of motivating these employees; methods of rekindling midcareer employees' interest in their jobs; encouraging competition; job switching; self-development programs; and supervisory attitudes. (CT)

  1. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... is less serious than Mobitz type II. The animation below shows how your heart's electrical system works. ... block. Click the "start" button to play the animation. Written and spoken explanations are provided with each ...

  2. Using the Stern Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Margaret

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from "Experimenting with Numbers" by Margaret Stern demonstrate the use of Stern Blocks to develop the conceptual base on which learning disabled students can build further mathematical skills. (DB)

  3. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  4. Blocked tear duct

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby may have an eye infection called conjunctivitis . ... increase the chance of other infections, such as conjunctivitis. ... be prevented. Proper treatment of nasal infections and conjunctivitis may reduce the risk of having a blocked ...

  5. Mid-Career Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    Considers typical reactions of midcareer employees to blocked opportunity; reasons for correcting these attitudes; ways of motivating these employees; methods of rekindling midcareer employees' interest in their jobs; encouraging competition; job switching; self-development programs; and supervisory attitudes. (CT)

  6. Recipient block TMA technique.

    PubMed

    Mirlacher, Martina; Simon, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    New high-throughput screening technologies have led to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. One way to prioritize the leads obtained in such studies is to analyze a large number of tissues for candidate gene expression. The TMA methodology is now an established and frequently used tool for high-throughput tissue analysis. The recipient block technology is the "classical" method of TMA making. In this method, minute cylindrical tissue punches typically measuring 0.6 mm in diameter are removed from donor tissue blocks and are transferred into empty "recipient" paraffin blocks. Up to 1,000 different tissues can be analyzed in one TMA block. The equipment is affordable and easy to use in places where basic skills in histology are available.

  7. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  9. Complications of hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Clarke-Pearson, Daniel L; Geller, Elizabeth J

    2013-03-01

    Hysterectomy is the most common gynecologic procedure performed in the United States, with more than 600,000 procedures performed each year. Complications of hysterectomy vary based on route of surgery and surgical technique. The objective of this article is to review risk factors associated with specific types of complications associated with benign hysterectomy, methods to prevent and recognize complications, and appropriate management of complications. The most common complications of hysterectomy can be categorized as infectious, venous thromboembolic, genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) tract injury, bleeding, nerve injury, and vaginal cuff dehiscence. Infectious complications after hysterectomy are most common, ranging from 10.5% for abdominal hysterectomy to 13.0% for vaginal hysterectomy and 9.0% for laparoscopic hysterectomy. Venous thromboembolism is less common, ranging from a clinical diagnosis rate of 1% to events detected by more sensitive laboratory methods of up to 12%. Injury to the GU tract is estimated to occur at a rate of 1-2% for all major gynecologic surgeries, with 75% of these injuries occurring during hysterectomy. Injury to the GI tract after hysterectomy is less common, with a range of 0.1-1%. Bleeding complications after hysterectomy also are rare, with a median range of estimated blood loss of 238-660.5 mL for abdominal hysterectomy, 156-568 mL for laparoscopic hysterectomy, and 215-287 mL for vaginal hysterectomy, with transfusion only being more likely after laparoscopic compared to vaginal hysterectomy (odds ratio 2.07, confidence interval 1.12-3.81). Neuropathy after hysterectomy is a rare but significant event, with a rate of 0.2-2% after major pelvic surgery. Vaginal cuff dehiscence is estimated at a rate of 0.39%, and it is more common after total laparoscopic hysterectomy (1.35%) compared with laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (0.28%), total abdominal hysterectomy (0.15%), and total vaginal hysterectomy (0

  10. Complications in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Frischer, Jason S; Rymeski, Beth

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal pediatric surgery is a diverse field that encompasses many different procedures. The pullthrough for Hirschsprung disease, the posterior sagittal anorectoplasty for anorectal malformations including complex cloaca reconstructions and the ileal pouch anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis present some of the most technically challenging procedures pediatric surgeons undertake. Many children prevail successfully following these surgical interventions, however, a small number of patients suffer from complications following these procedures. Anticipated postoperative problems are discussed along with medical and surgical strategies for managing these complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparison between caudal block versus splash block for postoperative analgesia following inguinal herniorrhaphy in children

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jun Kong; Hwang, Kan Taeck; Choi, Bo Yoon

    2011-01-01

    Background We wanted to determine the postoperative analgesic efficacy of preincisional caudal epidural block versus instillation (splash block) following inguinal herniorrhaphy in children. Methods Thirty children (age range: 1-7 years) who were scheduled to undergo inguinal herniorrhaphy were divided into 2 groups: the caudal block group and the splash block group with 15 children in each group. Tracheal intubation was performed. Fifteen children received caudal block with 1.0 ml/kg of 0.25% ropivacaine (Group 1). Caudal block was performed using the loss of resistance method via the sacral hiatus. Fifteen children in Group 2 received local instillation (splash block) in the surgical site with up to 0.4 ml/kg of 0.25% ropivacaine. The patients were observed for 90 minutes in the postanesthesia care unit and then they were transferred to the ward. The pain scores were taken 4 times. We assessed pain using the Faces pain scores. Results There were no significant differences between the groups regarding the pain scores at 10, 30 and 60 minutes upon entering the postanesthesia care unit. The pain scores of Group 1 were slightly lower at the last evaluation point when compared to that of Group 2. One patient in Group 1 required supplemental postoperative intravenous (IV) tramadol, while all the other patients in both groups did not require supplemental IV tramadol. The intraoperative requirement for sevoflurane was decreased in Group 1 as compared to that of Group 2. There were no major complications related to either type of block. Conclusions We conclude that a splash block can have a similar analgesic effect as that of a caudal block for the postoperative herniorrhaphy pain of children. PMID:21602975

  12. View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and southwest guard tower, looking from cell block eight roof - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from cell block two into the "Death Row" exercise yard - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  15. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page What research is being done? The ...

  16. [Septic complications of gonorrhea].

    PubMed

    Ebner, H; Gebhart, W

    1976-09-01

    Septic gonococcal complications consist in intermittent fever, arthralgia and skin lesions. In recent years predominantly females suffering from this disease were observed. This diagnosis is made by the demonstration of gonococcal infection combined with the above mentioned clinical symptoms. A further confirmation is possible by blood culture and the demonstration of gonococci in skin lesions or joint fluid.

  17. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  18. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  19. Complicating Visual Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daiello, Vicki; Hathaway, Kevin; Rhoades, Mindi; Walker, Sydney

    2006-01-01

    Arguing for complicating the study of visual culture, as advocated by James Elkins, this article explicates and explores Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and pedagogy in view of its implications for art education practice. Subjectivity, a concept of import for addressing student identity and the visual, steers the discussion informed by pedagogical…

  20. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K

    2015-10-09

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman's physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up.

  1. Hypoglycemia: The neglected complication

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Jagat Jyoti; Venkataraman, Subramanium; Bantwal, Ganapathi; Shaikh, Shehla; Saboo, Banshi; Das, Ashok Kumar; Ramachandran, Ambady

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is an important complication of glucose-lowering therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Attempts made at intensive glycemic control invariably increases the risk of hypoglycemia. A six-fold increase in deaths due to diabetes has been attributed to patients experiencing severe hypoglycemia in comparison to those not experiencing severe hypoglycemia Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia can lead to impairment of the counter-regulatory system with the potential for development of hypoglycemia unawareness. The short- and long-term complications of diabetes related hypoglycemia include precipitation of acute cerebrovascular disease, myocardial infarction, neurocognitive dysfunction, retinal cell death and loss of vision in addition to health-related quality of life issues pertaining to sleep, driving, employment, recreational activities involving exercise and travel. There is an urgent need to examine the clinical spectrum and burden of hypoglycemia so that adequate control measures can be implemented against this neglected life-threatening complication. Early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens with minimal or no risk of hypoglycemia and appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major ways forward to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia and thereby prevent long-term complications. PMID:24083163

  2. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  3. Axillary arteriovenous fistula after axillary plexus block.

    PubMed

    Gong, Dao-Jun; Yuan, Hai-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Heng

    2013-08-01

    This report presents the case of a 51-year-old man who had an axillary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) as a complication of an axillary plexus block that was performed for internal fixation for a right forefinger phalanx fracture 4 years previously. While performing the axillary plexus block, a 22-gauge needle was placed inside the axillary sheath by observing the pulsations of the axillary artery. A pulsatile mass was found in the right axilla 1 day after the block was performed. Apart from this soft mass, the patient had no symptoms of vascular nerve damage. As the mass gradually increased in size, it became painful. During the past 3 months, in particular, the patient experienced repeated attacks of intermittent sharp pain and requested surgery. Digital subtraction angiography, performed 4 years after the axillary block, showed a tumor-like dilation was developing in both the right axillary artery and vein, almost simultaneously. Thus, the diagnosis of AVF was confirmed. The false aneurysm sac was excised and lateral repair of the axillary artery and vein was carried out under general anesthesia. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. The possible occurrence of an AVF after axillary plexus block should be kept in mind, because early diagnosis and treatment are necessary to avoid development of AVF and false aneurysm.

  4. Impression block with orientator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilin, V. I.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tool review, namely the impression block, applied to check the shape and size of the top of fish as well as to determine the appropriate tool for fishing operation was realized. For multiple application and obtaining of the impress depth of 3 cm and more, the standard volumetric impression blocks with fix rods are used. However, the registered impress of fish is not oriented in space and the rods during fishing are in the extended position. This leads to rods deformation and sinking due to accidental impacts of impression block over the borehole irregularity and finally results in faulty detection of the top end of fishing object in hole. The impression blocks with copy rods and fixed magnetic needle allow estimating the object configuration and fix the position of magnetic needle determining the position of the top end of object in hole. However, the magnetic needle fixation is realized in staged and the rods are in extended position during fishing operations as well as it is in standard design. The most efficient tool is the impression block with copy rods which directs the examined object in the borehole during readings of magnetic needles data from azimuth plate and averaging of readings. This significantly increases the accuracy of fishing toll direction. The rods during fishing are located in the body and extended only when they reach the top of fishing object.

  5. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  6. Essential regional nerve blocks for the dermatologist: part 1.

    PubMed

    Davies, T; Karanovic, S; Shergill, B

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this two-part series is to provide an up-to-date review of essential regional nerve blocks for dermatological practice. In Part 1, we give a concise overview of local anaesthetics and their potential complications, as well as the relevant anatomy and cutaneous innervation of the face and scalp. This culminates in a step-by-step practical guide to performing each nerve block.

  7. Pupillary block glaucoma associated with a secondary piggyback intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shane K; Lanciano, Ralph C; Sulewski, Michael E

    2007-10-01

    A 53-year-old woman developed pupillary block glaucoma associated with iris capture of a piggyback intraocular lens (IOL) that was treated with laser peripheral iridotomy. The piggyback IOL was repositioned by dilating the iris pharmacologically and reclining the patient. The IOL maintained its proper position behind the iris with the use of low-concentration pilocarpine eyedrops. Pupillary block glaucoma can occur as a complication of secondary piggyback IOL implantation.

  8. Late-presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Bana Agha; Mesned, Abdu Rahman; Mohamad, Tagelden; Kabbani, Mohamad S.

    2015-01-01

    Late presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery is a rare complication and its management is well defined once the initial diagnosis in made timely and appropriately. In this report we described a child who underwent atrioventricular septal defect repair with a normal sinus rhythm during the postoperative period, as well as during the first 2 years of follow up. She subsequently developed complete heart block with bradycardia that required insertion of a pacemaker. Here we discuss this unusual late-presenting complication, possible risk factors, and management. PMID:26778907

  9. Vascular complications of transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Laws, E R

    1999-08-01

    Vascular complication of transsphenoidal surgery can lead to mortality and serious morbidity. In a series of 3,061 transsphenoidal operations for pituitary disease, 24 such complications were encountered, seven of which were fatal. The anatomic substrate for such complications is discussed, along with technical aspects of surgery and other methods for the avoidance of vascular complications.

  10. Bereavement and Complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Glickman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bereavement is a common experience in adults age 60 and older. Loss of a loved one usually leads to acute grief characterized by yearning and longing, decreased interest in ongoing activities, and frequent thoughts of the deceased. For most, acute grief naturally evolves into a state of integrated grief, where the bereaved is able to reengage with everyday activities and find interest or pleasure. About 7% of bereaved older adults, however, will develop the mental health condition of Complicated Grief (CG). In CG, the movement from acute to integrated grief is derailed, and grief symptoms remain severe and impairing. This article reviews recent publications on the diagnosis of CG, risk factors for the condition, and evidenced-based treatments for CG. Greater attention to complicated grief detection and treatment in older adults is needed. PMID:24068457

  11. Gastrointestinal Complications of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Malhi, Harmeet; Acosta, Andres

    2017-05-01

    Obesity usually is associated with morbidity related to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are many gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases for which obesity is the direct cause (eg, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) or is a significant risk factor, such as reflux esophagitis and gallstones. When obesity is a risk factor, it may interact with other mechanisms and result in earlier presentation or complicated diseases. There are increased odds ratios or relative risks of several gastrointestinal complications of obesity: gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, erosive gastritis, gastric cancer, diarrhea, colonic diverticular disease, polyps, cancer, liver disease including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallstones, acute pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. Gastroenterologists are uniquely poised to participate in the multidisciplinary management of obesity as physicians caring for people with obesity-related diseases, in addition to their expertise in nutrition and endoscopic interventions. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastrointestinal Complications of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Malhi, Harmeet; Acosta, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Obesity usually is associated with morbidity related to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are many gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases for which obesity is the direct cause (eg, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) or is a significant risk factor, such as reflux esophagitis and gallstones. When obesity is a risk factor, it may interact with other mechanisms and result in earlier presentation or complicated diseases. There are increased odds ratios or relative risks of several gastrointestinal complications of obesity: gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, erosive gastritis, gastric cancer, diarrhea, colonic diverticular disease, polyps, cancer, liver disease including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallstones, acute pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. Gastroenterologists are uniquely poised to participate in the multidisciplinary management of obesity as physicians caring for people with obesity-related diseases, in addition to their expertise in nutrition and endoscopic interventions. PMID:28192107

  13. Avoiding medicolegal complications.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Peter B; Saxton, James W; Finkelstein, Maggie M

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopy can cause complications, even in the best of hands. Lawsuits are rare but more likely to be pursued when there is poor communication with patients and family before or after an event occurs. The likelihood of a suit (and of its success) can be minimized by practicing within accepted standards; by careful objective documentation of the education and consent process, and of the events themselves; and by a systematized approach to event management.

  14. 31 CFR 547.302 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 547.302 Section 547.302 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 547.302 Blocked account; blocked property. The terms blocked account and blocked property shall mean any account or property subject to the prohibitions in § 547.201...

  15. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Louise E; Ormesher, Laura; Tower, Clare; Greer, Ian A

    2015-11-30

    There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage) and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction). Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question.

  16. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  17. Neurologic complications of immunizations.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, S L; Snead, O C

    1986-12-01

    Although there does appear to be at least a temporal relationship between pertussis immunization and serious acute neurologic illness, data to suggest that children with stable preexisting neurologic disease or positive family history of neurologic disease are at increased risk for complications of pertussis immunizations are inconclusive. Furthermore, there are no firm statistical data concerning the incidence of pertussis vaccine-related encephalopathy. Rather, the literature on pertussis vaccine complications is replete with anecdotal reports and retrospective studies with a number of questionable conclusions drawn from this inadequate data base. Unfortunately, these conclusions have been sensationalized and exploited with litigious fervor to the point that the practice of pertussis immunization is being questioned in the United States. A number of points should be reiterated: pertussis is a dangerous and deadly disease, as seen in the epidemic in Great Britain; pertussis immunization is effective in protecting against the disease; and there is no conclusive proof that the incidence of complications from pertussis vaccination of children with seizure disorders or other preexisting stable neurologic abnormalities is higher, because appropriate studies have not been done to define such a risk. We would do well to keep these facts in mind in order to avoid a disaster similar to the pertussis epidemic in Great Britain. Pertussis vaccination should be given to all children except those with allergic hypersensitivity, a progressive neurologic disorder, or an adverse reaction to a previous pertussis dose.

  18. Keratomycosis complicating pterygium excision.

    PubMed

    Merle, Harold; Guyomarch, Jérôme; Joyaux, Jean-Christophe; Dueymes, Maryvonne; Donnio, Angélique; Desbois, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a case of keratomycosis that appeared after the exeresis of a pterygium. A 48-year-old patient had been referred with a red right eye associated with an abscess of the cornea along the ablation zone of the pterygium. The surgery had been performed a month beforehand. The abscess was 6 mm high and 4 mm wide. The authors instigated a treatment that included amphotericin B (0.25%) after noticing a clinical aspect evoking a fungal keratitis and finding several septate filaments on direct examination. On day 10, a Fusarium dimerum was isolated on Sabouraud agar. After 15 days of treatment, the result was favorable and the size of the ulceration as well as the size of the abscess had progressively decreased. The antifungal treatment was definitively stopped at 14 weeks. Infectious-related complications of the pterygium surgery are rare and are essentially caused by bacterial agents. Secondary infections by fungus are rare. There have been two previous cases reported: one that appeared 15 years after radiotherapy and another that appeared at 3 weeks post surgery, consecutive to the use of mitomycin C. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of a keratomycosis due to F. dimerum reported that complicated the exeresis of a pterygium without the use of an adjuvant antihealing treatment. Pterygium surgery is a common procedure; nevertheless, ophthalmologists need to be aware of the existence of potential infectious complications.

  19. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  20. [Ultrasound for peripheral neural block].

    PubMed

    Kefalianakis, F

    2005-03-01

    Ultrasound is well established in medicine. Unfortunately, ultrasound is still rarely used in the area of anesthesia. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the possibilities and limitations of ultrasound in regional anesthesia. The basic principles of ultrasound are the piezoelectric effect and the behaviour of acoustic waveforms in human tissue. Ultrasound imaging in medicine uses high frequency pulses of sound waves (2.5-10 MHz). The following images are built up from the reflected sounds. The ultrasound devices used in regional anesthesia (commonly by 10 MHz) deliver a two-dimensional view. The main step for a successful regional anaesthesia is to identify the exact position of the nerve. In addition, specific surface landmarks and the use of peripheral nerve stimulator help to detect the correct position of the needle. Nerves are demonstrated as an composition of hyperechogenic (white) and hypoechogenic (black) areas. The surrounding hyperechogenic parts are epi- and perineurium, the dark hypoechogenic part is the neural tissue. The composition of peripheral nerves are always similar, but the quantities of each part, of surrounding perineurium and nerval structures, differ. Further the imaging of nerves is significantly influenced by the angle of beam to the nerve and the surrounding anatomic structures. Only experience and correct interpretation make the ultrasound a valid method in clinical practice. Correct interpretation has to be learned by standardized education. Three examples of peripheral nerve blocks are described. The detection of nerves and the visualization of the correct spread of local anesthetics to the nerves are the main principles of effective ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, whereas closest proximity of the needle to the target nerve is not necessary. The described examples of ultrasound guidance for nerval block illustrates the specific procedures with reduced probability of nerval irritation, high success and low rate of

  1. Neuropsychological Correlates of Complicated Grief in Older Spousally Bereaved Adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Across many research domains, evidence for complicated grief as a distinct psychopathology continues to grow. Previous research from neuropsychology has shown an increased attentional bias to emotionally relevant stimuli in those suffering from complicated grief. This study furthers our understanding of the characteristics that distinguish complicated grief. We expand on previous research by (a) testing older adults, (b) excluding those with comorbid major depressive disorder, (c) using participant-chosen grief-related stimuli, and (d) using a married, nonbereaved control group. Methods. We recruited 76 older adults in 3 groups: spousally bereaved with complicated grief, spousally bereaved with noncomplicated grief, and nonbereaved controls. Performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, Digit Span Backwards, and the emotional counting Stroop was examined. Results. Results indicate longer reaction time across 3 blocks of grief-related words in the complicated grief group but no difference across 3 blocks of the neutral words. The 3 groups performed comparably on the other neurocognitive tasks, indicating no cognitive differences in working memory or set shifting between groups. Furthermore, these effects of complicated grief generalize to older adults and appear independent of major depression. Discussion. Complicated grief has cognitive interference as a neuropsychological component highlighting it as distinct from noncomplicated grief. PMID:23551907

  2. Neuropsychological correlates of complicated grief in older spousally bereaved adults.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mary-Frances; Arizmendi, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Across many research domains, evidence for complicated grief as a distinct psychopathology continues to grow. Previous research from neuropsychology has shown an increased attentional bias to emotionally relevant stimuli in those suffering from complicated grief. This study furthers our understanding of the characteristics that distinguish complicated grief. We expand on previous research by (a) testing older adults, (b) excluding those with comorbid major depressive disorder, (c) using participant-chosen grief-related stimuli, and (d) using a married, nonbereaved control group. We recruited 76 older adults in 3 groups: spousally bereaved with complicated grief, spousally bereaved with noncomplicated grief, and nonbereaved controls. Performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, Digit Span Backwards, and the emotional counting Stroop was examined. Results indicate longer reaction time across 3 blocks of grief-related words in the complicated grief group but no difference across 3 blocks of the neutral words. The 3 groups performed comparably on the other neurocognitive tasks, indicating no cognitive differences in working memory or set shifting between groups. Furthermore, these effects of complicated grief generalize to older adults and appear independent of major depression. Complicated grief has cognitive interference as a neuropsychological component highlighting it as distinct from noncomplicated grief.

  3. Continuous postoperative analgesia via quadratus lumborum block - an alternative to transversus abdominis plane block.

    PubMed

    Visoiu, Mihaela; Yakovleva, Nataliya

    2013-10-01

    Different transversus abdominis plane blocks techniques cause variations in postoperative analgesia characteristics. We report the use of unilateral quadratus lumborum catheter for analgesia following colostomy closure. The catheter was placed under direct ultrasound visualization and had good outcomes: low pain scores and minimal use of rescue analgesic medication. No complications were reported in this pediatric patient. More studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this regional anesthesia technique.

  4. A Place for Block Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of block play--including its contributions to perceptual, fine motor, and cognitive development--and components of a good preschool block play area. Recommends unit blocks complemented by stacking blocks, toys, beads, cubes, and Brio wooden toys. Makes recommendations for space, size, locations and connections to other…

  5. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  6. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  7. Hawaii Census 2000 Blocks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data layer represents Census 2000 demographic data derived from the PL94-171 redistricting files and SF3. Census geographic entities include blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Tiger line files are the source of the geometry representing the Census blocks. Attributes include total population counts, racial/ethnic, and poverty/income information. Racial/ethnic classifications are represented in units of blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Poverty and income data are represented in units of blockgroups and tracts. Percentages of each racial/ethnic group have been calculated from the population counts. Total Minority counts and percentages were compiled from each racial/ethnic non-white category. Categories compiled to create the Total Minority count includes the following: African American, Asian, American Indian, Pacific Islander, White Hispanic, Other and all mixed race categories. The percentage poverty attribute represents the percent of the population living at or below poverty level. The per capita income attribute represents the sum of all income within the geographic entity, divided by the total population of that entity. Special fields designed to be used for EJ analysis have been derived from the PL data and include the following: Percentage difference of block, blockgroup and total minority from the state and county averages, percentile rank for each percent total minority within state and county entitie

  8. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  9. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  10. Flattening basic blocks.

    SciTech Connect

    Utke, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2006-01-01

    The application of cross country elimination strategies requires access to the computational graph or at least subgraphs for certain scopes, e.g. a basic block. Under the presence of aliased variables the construction of these (sub)graphs encounters ambiguities. We propose an algorithm to construct ambiguity free subgraphs.

  11. Transscalene brachial plexus block: a new posterolateral approach for brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang C; Fath, Erwin; Wirtz, Sebastian; Bey, Tareg

    2007-09-01

    Depending on the approach to the upper brachial plexus, severe complications have been reported. We describe a novel posterolateral approach for brachial plexus block which, from an anatomical and theoretical point of view, seems to offer advantages. Twenty-seven patients were scheduled to undergo elective major surgery of the upper arm or shoulder using this new transscalene brachial plexus block. The success rate was 85.2% for surgery. Two patients required additional analgesia with IV sufentanil. In two others, regional anesthesia was inadequate. The side effects of this technique included reversible recurrent laryngeal nerve blockade in two patients and a reversible Horner syndrome in one patient. Further studies are needed to compare the transscalene brachial plexus block with other approaches to the brachial plexus.

  12. Unexpected motor weakness following quadratus lumborum block for gynaecological laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wikner, M

    2017-02-01

    Quadratus lumborum block has recently been described as an effective and long-lasting analgesic strategy for various abdominal operations, including gynaecological laparoscopy. Despite evidence that the analgesic effect is mediated by indirect paravertebral block and that local anaesthetic spreads to the lumbar paravertebral space, there have been no reports to date of lower limb motor weakness. We present a patient with unilateral hip flexion and knee extension weakness leading to unplanned overnight admission following lateral quadratus lumborum block with 20 ml levobupivacaine 0.25%. The L2 dermatomal sensory loss and hip flexion weakness suggested spread to either the L2 paravertebral space or to the lumbar plexus, causing weakness of the psoas and iliacus muscles and possibly the quadriceps. The duration of motor block was approximately 18 h. This complication should be considered when performing the block, especially in the setting of day-case surgery.

  13. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  14. Pregnancy complicated with agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Sun, Jiang-Li; Zhang, Zheng-Liang; Pei, Hong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Pregnancy is a complicated physiological process. Physiological leukocytosis often takes place and it is primarily related to the increased circulation of neutrophils, especially during the last trimester of pregnancy. Noncongenital agranulocytosis during pregnancy is rare and reported only occasionally, while in most of the cases, the agranulocytosis has already occurred prior to pregnancy or induced by identified factors such as antibiotics, antithyroid agents, or cytotoxic agents. Gestation-induced agranulocytosis has not been reported, so we present a case of gestation-induced agranulocytosis in this article. Patients concern: In this case, we present a Chinese woman (aged 25) in her 38th week of the first gestation who had the complication of agranulocytosis. No abnormality was detected in regular examinations before pregnancy and in the first trimester. Since the last trimester of pregnancy, the patient began to suffer from agranulocytosis and intermittent fever, the maximum being temperature 38.8°C. At admission, the neutrophil granulocytes were 0.17 × 109 L−1 and the bone marrow biopsy showed that agranulocytosis was detected, but the levels of red blood cell and megalokaryocyte were normal. In addition, antinuclear antibodies were detected at a dilution of 1:40, but anti-dsDNA, antiphospholipid antibody, and neutrophil granulocyte antibody were negative. Diagnoses: The patient was empirically treated as having pneumonia. Interventions: We tried to use granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, γ-globulin, glucocorticoids, antibiotics, and antifungi agents to treat the patient, but her symptoms were not alleviated until the patient had a cesarean section. Outcomes: After 24 hours of cesarean section, the temperature and neutrophil granulocyte returned to normal. After a year of follow-up, we found that the patient and the baby were healthy. Lessons: Agranulocytosis during pregnancy seems to be associated with immunosuppression

  15. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Sonja E; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30-48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23-129/mm). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84-228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis.

  16. Unexpected complication of colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Ramesh; Pee, Leon

    2017-01-16

    The authors present a rare case of a 71-year-old man presenting with large bowel obstruction after attempted colonoscopy. The procedure was impossible to complete due to a tight sigmoid stricture and the patient presented with an acute abdomen the following day. He was managed conservatively and discharged before returning for an elective laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy. The potential differentials of an acute abdomen post-colonoscopy are discussed and the literature reviewed on this rare complication. Finally, the authors review whether there is pressure on endoscopists to 'complete' colonoscopies (by achieving caecal intubation) based on regulatory indices in quality, and how this might have to be disregarded in unfavourable circumstances.

  17. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis.

  18. [Complications of hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    The most common and serious complications of haemorrhoids include perianal thrombosis and incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids with subsequent thrombosis. They are characterised by severe pain in the perianal region possibly with bleeding. In a short history of the perianal thrombosis, acute surgical incision or excision is indicated, which can result in rapid relief of the painful symptoms. In incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids, emergency haemorrhoidectomy may also be indicated. Segmental haemorrhoidectomy in the most affected quadrants followed by further elective surgery for haemorrhoids in the next stage is preferred.

  19. Complications of Macular Peeling

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  20. Complications associated with orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    While most patients undergo orthognathic surgery for aesthetic purposes, aesthetic improvements are most often followed by postoperative functional complications. Therefore, patients must carefully decide whether their purpose of undergoing orthognathic surgery lies on the aesthetic side or the functional side. There is a wide variety of complications associated with orthognathic surgery. There should be a clear distinction between malpractice and complications. Complications can be resolved without any serious problems if the cause is detected early and adequate treatment provided. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must have a full understanding of the types, causes, and treatment of complications, and should deliver this information to patients who develop these complications. PMID:28280704

  1. Locked-in syndrome during stellate ganglion block.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, A; Dash, Hh

    2010-07-01

    Intra-arterial injection of a local anaesthetic during stellate ganglion blockade may cause life-threatening complications. The usual complications are apnoea, unconsciousness and seizures. However, occasionally an unusual complication, 'locked-in' syndrome, has also been reported. In this syndrome the patients remain conscious despite their inability to move, breathe or speak. Here we describe a patient who developed features akin to the locked-in syndrome along with severe hypotension and bradycardia, after an injection of only 2 ml of lignocaine during a stellate ganglion block.

  2. Complications in periocular rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Mack, William P

    2010-08-01

    Thorough preoperative evaluation with meticulous surgical planning to achieve facial aesthetic balance between the forehead, eyelids, and midface is imperative to avoid or decrease potential functional and/or cosmetic complications in cosmetic periocular surgery. Before performing surgery, the physician should be aware of the patient's history of dry eyes, previous facial trauma, previous injection of Botox Cosmetic, history of previous laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, and past facial surgery. A full evaluation should be performed on the upper eyelid/brow region to assess for the presence of brow ptosis, brow/eyelid asymmetry, dermatochalasis/pseudodermatochalasis, eyelid ptosis, and deep superior sulcus. On the lower eyelid/cheek examination, special attention should be directed to the diagnosis of underlying negative vector, dry eyes, prominent eyes, lower lid retraction, ectropion, lateral canthal dystopia, lower eyelid laxity, scleral show, and lagophthalmos, with a rejuvenation goal that focuses on obtaining a youthful fullness through repositioning and reinforcing efforts to avoid the negative effects of hollowness. Intraoperative and postoperative medical and surgical management of cosmetic periocular surgery complications focus on decreasing the risk of postoperative ptosis, lagophthalmos, lid retraction, and lid asymmetry, with special attention to limiting the risk of visual loss secondary to orbital hemorrhage. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Complications of Gastroesophageal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Paul H.; Ippoliti, Andrew F.; Simmons, Daniel H.; Maloney, James V.

    1988-01-01

    An edited summary of an Interdepartmental Conference arranged by the Department of Medicine of the UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles. The Director of Conferences is William M. Pardridge, MD, Professor of Medicine. Several specialists have recently recognized that gastrointestinal reflux causes complications resulting in significant disease. It causes discomfort, indigestion, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and carcinoma of the esophagus. Pediatricians attribute many early pulmonary problems, and even some sudden deaths in infants, to the reflux of gastric contents. Otolaryngologists now recognize that many cases of nonbacterial, nonspecific pharyngitis and laryngitis are due to the reflux of gastrc acid secretions. Contact granuloma and cancer of the larynx may, in some instances, be secondary to nocturnal reflux. Thoracic surgeons and pulmonologists believe chronic tracheobronchitis and some cases of pulmonary disease are attributable to recurrent bathing of the respiratory epithelium by aspirated gastric contents. An awareness of the many complications of gastrointestinal reflux should lead to a multidisciplined attack on the factors responsible for these diseases. Images PMID:3043898

  4. Restoration of Complicated Epicanthus

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yoon Jae; Han, Kyung Eun; Park, Bo Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We had reported the surgical outcome of reverse skin redraping technique for restoration of previously performed epicanthoplasty. In this study, we introduce a modified reverse skin redraping technique that added mini-epicanthoplasty in patients with unsatisfactory results after epicanthoplasty. Methods Three hundred twenty-four patients (288 female and 36 male patients) who had unsatisfied results with previous epicanthoplasty and that were treated with our modified restoration surgery were included in this study. Results The mean preoperative interepicanthal distance was 33.6 mm, and the mean postoperative interepicanthal distance was 36.9 mm; the mean difference in the interepicanthal distance before and after restoration surgery was 3.3 mm. Satisfactory aesthetic results were obtained with improvements in areas of asymmetry, overexposure of the caruncle, and the appearance of the previous scar. Only minor complications developed in 15 patients (4.6%) that were resolved with minor revisions. No severe complications requiring reoperations were noted. Conclusions Our modified method involving reverse skin redraping and mini-epicanthoplasty is simple and reproducible and is useful for resolution of unsatisfactory results to obtain a naturally shaped epicanthus. PMID:28177970

  5. Lagophthalmos after v2 maxillary nerve block.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit A; Nedeljkovic, Srdjan S

    2014-04-01

    We report a previously undescribed complication associated with percutaneous maxillary nerve blockade. After the procedure, the patient reported an inability to close her ipsilateral eye (lagophthalmos). The patient had received 5 mL of 0.5% lidocaine for skin anesthesia. After needle placement was confirmed fluoroscopically, a combination of 80 mg methylprednisolone (2 mL) and 0.25% bupivacaine (3 mL) was administered. Symptoms resolved within 40 minutes. The likely cause was local anesthetic effect on the zygomatic branches of the facial nerve. When subcutaneous local anesthetic is given for maxillary block, smaller volumes should be considered. Doctors and patients should be aware of this complication, which may require treatment with artificial tears or patching of the eye to prevent corneal injury.

  6. NCCN Evidence Blocks.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Robert W; Jonasch, Eric

    2016-05-01

    NCCN has developed a series of Evidence Blocks: graphics that provide ratings for each recommended treatment regimen in terms of efficacy, toxicity, quality and consistency of the supporting data, and affordability. The NCCN Evidence Blocks are currently available in 10 tumor types within the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines). At a glance, patients and providers can understand how a given treatment was assessed by the NCCN Guidelines Panel and get a sense of how a given treatment may match individual needs and preferences. Robert W. Carlson, MD, CEO of NCCN, described the reasoning behind this new feature and how the tool is used, and Eric Jonasch, MD, Professor of Genitourinary Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and Vice Chair of the NCCN Kidney Cancer Panel, described its applicability in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  7. Thermal blocking of preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Rose; Tranberg, Anders E-mail: anders.tranberg@uis.no

    2015-04-01

    The parametric resonance responsible for preheating after inflation will end when self-interactions of the resonating field and interactions of this field with secondary degrees of freedom become important. In many cases, the effect may be quantified in terms of an effective mass and the resulting shifting out of the spectrum of the strongest resonance band. In certain curvaton models, such thermal blocking can even occur before preheating has begun, delaying or even preventing the decay of the curvaton. We investigate numerically to what extent this thermal blocking is realised in a specific scenario, and whether the effective mass is well approximated by the perturbative leading order thermal mass. We find that the qualitative behaviour is well reproduced in this approximation, and that the end of preheating can be confidently estimated.

  8. Feature-accelerated block matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Bo; Orchard, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    We study the relationship between local features and block matching in this paper. We show that the use of many features can greatly improve the block matching results by introducing several fast block matching algorithms. The first algorithm is pixel decimation-based. We show that pixels with larger gradient magnitude have larger motion compensation error. Therefore for pixel decimation-based fast block matching, it benefits to subsample the block by selecting pixels with the largest gradient magnitude. Such a gradient-assisted adaptive pixel selection strategy greatly outperforms two other subsampling procedures proposed in previous literature. Fast block matching can achieve the optimal performance obtained using full search. We present a family of such fast block matching algorithm using various local features, such as block mean and variance. Our algorithm reduces more than 80 percent computation, while achieving the same performance as the full search. This present a brand new approach toward fast block matching algorithm design.

  9. Recovery from blocking between outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Miller, Ralph R

    2005-10-01

    Contemporary associative learning research largely focuses on cue competition phenomena that occur when 2 cues are paired with a common outcome. Little research has been conducted to investigate similar phenomena occurring when a single cue is trained with 2 outcomes. Three conditioned lick suppression experiments with rats assessed whether treatments known to alleviate blocking between cues would also attenuate blocking between outcomes. In Experiment 1, conditioned responding recovered from blocking between outcomes when a long retention interval was interposed between training and testing. Experiment 2 obtained recovery from blocking between outcomes when the blocking outcome was extinguished after the blocking treatment. In Experiment 3, a recovery from blocking between outcomes occurred when a reminder stimulus was presented in a novel context prior to testing. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that blocking of outcomes, like blocking of cues, appears to be caused by a deficit in the expression of an acquired association.

  10. Liquid blocking check valve

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, John T.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid blocking check valve useful particularly in a pneumatic system utilizing a pressurized liquid fill chamber. The valve includes a floatable ball disposed within a housing defining a chamber. The housing is provided with an inlet aperture disposed in the top of said chamber, and an outlet aperture disposed in the bottom of said chamber in an offset relation to said inlet aperture and in communication with a cutaway side wall section of said housing.

  11. Intraocular radiation blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, P.T.; Ho, T.K.; Fastenberg, D.M.; Hyman, R.A.; Stroh, E.M.; Packer, S.; Perry, H.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Iodine-based liquid radiographic contrast agents were placed in normal and tumor-bearing (Greene strain) rabbit eyes to evaluate their ability to block iodine-125 radiation. This experiment required the procedures of tumor implantation, vitrectomy, air-fluid exchange, and 125I plaque and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chip implantation. The authors quantified the amount of radiation attenuation provided by intraocularly placed contrast agents with in vivo dosimetry. After intraocular insertion of a blocking agent or sham blocker (saline) insertion, episcleral 125I plaques were placed across the eye from episcleral TLD dosimeters. This showed that radiation attenuation occurred after blocker insertion compared with the saline controls. Then computed tomographic imaging techniques were used to describe the relatively rapid transit time of the aqueous-based iohexol compared with the slow transit time of the oil-like iophendylate. Lastly, seven nontumor-bearing eyes were primarily examined for blocking agent-related ocular toxicity. Although it was noted that iophendylate induced intraocular inflammation and retinal degeneration, all iohexol-treated eyes were similar to the control eyes at 7 and 31 days of follow-up. Although our study suggests that intraocular radiopaque materials can be used to shield normal ocular structures during 125I plaque irradiation, a mechanism to keep these materials from exiting the eye must be devised before clinical application.

  12. [Echinococcosis complicated by paecilomycosis].

    PubMed

    Streliaeva, A V; Sadykov, R V; Lazareva, N B; Samylina, I A; Sadykov, V M; Chebyshev, N V

    2010-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-six echinococcosis patients aged 17 to 70 years were examined for paecilomycosis. Seventy-five subjects of different ages who were considered to be clinically healthy were prepared as a control. Of them who had physiological parameters of blood fungi, 24 subjects, including 9 subjects aged 17 to 23 years and 15 subjects aged 15 to 30 years, were eligible. The other examinees were patients with paecilomycosis of varying stages. Nizoral, fluconazole, diflucan, orungal, mycosyst, and teknazol, which have been tested by the authors, are proposed for use in paecilomycosis-complicated echinococcosis prior to and after surgery. It is advisable to use one fungicide. In this respect, the authors have conducted clinical trials that have yielded positive results.

  13. Neurologic Complications of Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Rajat

    2017-03-01

    Neurologic disturbances including encephalopathy, seizures, and focal deficits complicate the course 10-30% of patients undergoing organ or stem cell transplantation. While much or this morbidity is multifactorial and often associated with extra-cerebral dysfunction (e.g., graft dysfunction, metabolic derangements), immunosuppressive drugs also contribute significantly. This can either be through direct toxicity (e.g., posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome from calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus in the acute postoperative period) or by facilitating opportunistic infections in the months after transplantation. Other neurologic syndromes such as akinetic mutism and osmotic demyelination may also occur. While much of this neurologic dysfunction may be reversible if related to metabolic factors or drug toxicity (and the etiology is recognized and reversed), cases of multifocal cerebral infarction, hemorrhage, or infection may have poor outcomes. As transplant patients survive longer, delayed infections (such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy) and post-transplant malignancies are increasingly reported.

  14. Complications of endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, C; Luigiano, C; Cennamo, V; Ferrara, F; Pellicano, R; Polifemo, A M; Tarantino, I; Barresi, L; Morace, C; Consolo, P; D'Imperio, N

    2011-06-01

    Since its development in the 1980s, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has undergone a great deal of technological modifications. EUS has become an important tool in the evaluation of patients with various clinical disorders and is increasingly being utilized in many centers. EUS has been evolving over the years; EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) for cytological and/or histological diagnosis has become standard practice and a wide array of interventional and therapeutic procedures are performed under EUS guidance for diseases which otherwise would have needed surgery, with its associated morbidities. EUS shares the risks and complications of other endoscopic procedures. This article addresses the specific adverse effects and risks associated with EUS, EUS-FNA and interventional EUS, namely perforation, bleeding, pancreatitis and infection. Measures to help minimizing these risks will also be discussed.

  15. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  16. Complications in neonatal surgery.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Caty, Michael G

    2016-12-01

    Neonatal surgery is recognized as an independent discipline in general surgery, requiring the expertise of pediatric surgeons to optimize outcomes in infants with surgical conditions. Survival following neonatal surgery has improved dramatically in the past 60 years. Improvements in pediatric surgical outcomes are in part attributable to improved understanding of neonatal physiology, specialized pediatric anesthesia, neonatal critical care including sophisticated cardiopulmonary support, utilization of parenteral nutrition and adjustments in fluid management, refinement of surgical technique, and advances in surgical technology including minimally invasive options. Nevertheless, short and long-term complications following neonatal surgery continue to have profound and sometimes lasting effects on individual patients, families, and society. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Capsular Block Syndrome Following Combined Cataract and Vitrectomy Surgery in a Patient With Intraocular Gas.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Diamond M; Casey, Richard; Tsui, Irena

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of the rare complication of capsular block syndrome following combined cataract and vitrectomy surgery in a patient with intraocular gas.

  18. [Complications of plateletpheresis procedures].

    PubMed

    García Gala, J M; Rodríguez-Vicente, P; Martínez Revuelta, E; Alonso García, A; Sanzo Lombardero, C; Alvarez Ferrando, A

    1998-10-01

    Thrombopheresis procedures have been recently expanded with the development or different programmes. Taking into account that this reasonably safe procedure is not devoid of complications, it would be desirable to select those individuals with lower risk of suffering adverse side effects as donors. The thrombopheresis procedures performed in our hospital between 1986 and 1997 were analysed in order to establish the useful guidelines for such selection. All the thrombopheresis procedures performed in the Asturias Central Hospital blood bank in the 1986-1987 period were analysed. The first procedure per donor, along with all data referred to adverse effects appearing during thrombopheresis, were collected. Sex, age, body, weight, blood cells count (before and after thrombopheresis) and serum calcium levels (before and after thrombopheresis) were taken as variables with predictive value for adverse effects. With regard to the procedure, the model of cell separator, the duration of the procedure, the amount and type of anticoagulant solution and the prophylactic use of calcium ions were assessed. A total number of 1,024 thrombophereses were analysed. Some types of adverse effect were seen in 259 instances (25.3%). Of these, 70.3%, were mild, 29.3% moderate and 0.4% severe. The commonest adverse effect was perioral paraesthesia. Of the different variables studied, female sex and low weight acquired predictive value with respect to the occurrence of adverse effects. Prophylactic administration of calcium did not prevent the appearance of complications. The thrombopheresis procedures may present adverse side effects in a high percentage of cases, which, although mostly mild, require specialised personnel for identification and management. Males weighing over 70 kg are less prone to suffer such effects. Oral administration of calcium before the apheresis does not prevent the adverse reactions.

  19. [Transient Horner's syndrome after single shot paravertebral block].

    PubMed

    Gölboyu, Birzat Emre; Ekinci, Mürsel; Baysal, Pınar Karaca; Yeksan, Ayşe Nur; Çelik, Erkan Cem; Bilgi, Zeynep; Aksun, Murat

    2017-05-17

    Thoracic paravertebral block can provide analgesia for unilateral chest surgery and is associated with a low complication rate. Horner syndrome also referred to as oculosympathetic paresis, is a classic neurologic constellation of ipsilateral blepharoptosis, pupillary miosis, and facial anhidrosis resulting from disruption of the sympathetic pathway supplying the head, eye, and neck. We present a patient with an ipsilateral transient Horner syndrome after ultrasound guided single shot of 15mL 0.25% levobupivacaine for thoracic paravertebral block at T5-6 level. It should be kept in mind that even a successful ultrasound guided single shot thoracic paravertebral block can be complicated with Horner syndrome due to unpredictable distribution of the local anesthetic. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are used to support ship when it is repositioned to paint inaccessible areas masked by original support blocks. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Carpentry Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. Replacement of the quadricuspid aortic valve: strategy to avoid complete heart block.

    PubMed

    Pirundini, Paul A; Balaguer, Jorge M; Lilly, Kevin J; Gorsuch, William Brian; Taft, Margaret Byrne; Cohn, Lawrence H; Rizzo, Robert J

    2006-06-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valves are rarely encountered by the cardiac surgeon during aortic valve replacement. The most common location for the supranumerary cusp is between the noncoronary and the right coronary cusp, located over the membranous septum, which can potentially increase the risk of complete heart block after valve replacement. We present three quadricuspid aortic valve replacements, one of which was complicated by complete heart block postoperatively. We suggest a strategy to possibly avoid this complication.

  2. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, Nihat; Kara, Necip; Pekel, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problem that induces ernestful complications and it causes significant morbidity owing to specific microvascular complications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as, ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy. It can affect children, young people and adults and is becoming more common. Ocular complications associated with DM are progressive and rapidly becoming the world’s most significant cause of morbidity and are preventable with early detection and timely treatment. This review provides an overview of five main ocular complications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathy and papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surface diseases. PMID:25685281

  3. Postoperative complications of spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Swann, Matthew C; Hoes, Kathryn S; Aoun, Salah G; McDonagh, David L

    2016-03-01

    A variety of surgical approaches are available for the treatment of spine diseases. Complications can arise intraoperatively, in the immediate postoperative period, or in a delayed fashion. These complications may lead to severe or even permanent morbidity if left unrecognized and untreated [1-4]. Here we review a range of complications in the early postoperative period from more benign complications such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) to more feared complications leading to permanent loss of neurological function or death [5]. Perioperative pain management is covered in a separate review (Chapter 8).

  4. MISR Center Block Time Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

      MISR Center Block Time Tool The misr_time tool calculates the block center times for ... in Exelis Visual Information Solutions IDL programming language. It can be run either with a licensed version of the IDL package or by ...

  5. How Is Heart Block Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... second-degree heart block, you may need a pacemaker . A pacemaker is a small device that's placed under the ... third-degree heart block, you will need a pacemaker. In an emergency, a temporary pacemaker might be ...

  6. Thoracic interfascial nerve block for breast surgery in a pregnant woman: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seok-Hwa; Kim, Bum June; Song, Seunghyun; Yoon, Yeomyung

    2017-01-01

    Regional anesthesia for non-obstetric surgery in parturients is a method to decrease patient and fetal risk during general anesthesia. Thoracic interfascial nerve block can be used as an analgesic technique for surgical procedures of the thorax. The Pecs II block is an interfascial block that targets not only the medial and lateral pectoral nerves, but also the lateral cutaneous branch of the intercostal nerve. Pecto-intercostal fascial block (PIFB) targets the anterior cutaneous branch of the intercostal nerve. The authors successfully performed a modified Pecs II block and PIFB without complications in a parturient who refused general anesthesia for breast surgery. PMID:28367293

  7. Dermatological complications of obesity.

    PubMed

    García Hidalgo, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a health problem of considerable magnitude in the Western world. Dermatological changes have been reported in patients with obesity, including: acanthosis nigricans and skin tags (due to insulin resistance); hyperandrogenism; striae due to over extension; stasis pigmentation due to peripheral vascular disease; lymphedema; pathologies associated with augmented folds; morphologic changes in the foot anatomy due to excess load; and complications that may arise from hospitalization. Acanthosis nigricans plaques can be managed by improved control of hyperinsulinemia; the vitamin D3 analog calcipitriol has also been shown to be effective. Skin tags can be removed by snipping with curved scissors, by cryotherapy or by electrodesiccation. Hyperandrogenism, a result of increased production of endogenous androgens due to increased volumes of adipose tissue (which synthesizes testosterone) and hyperinsulinemia (which increases the production of ovarian androgens) needs to be carefully assessed to ensure disorders such as virilizing tumors and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are treated appropriately. Treatment of hyperandrogenism should be centred on controlling insulin levels; weight loss, oral contraceptive and antiandrogenic therapies are also possible treatment options. The etiology of striae distensae, also known as stretch marks, is yet to be defined and treatment options are unsatisfactory at present; striae rubra and alba have been treated with a pulsed dye laser with marginal success. The relationship between obesity and varicose veins is controversial; symptoms are best prevented by the use of elastic stockings. Itching and inflammation associated with stasis pigmentation, the result of red blood cells escaping into the tissues, can be treated with corticosteroids. Lymphedema is associated with dilatation of tissue channels, reduced tissue oxygenation and provides a culture medium for bacterial growth. Lymphedema treatment is directed towards reducing the

  8. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  9. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  10. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  11. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  12. Building Curriculum during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Blocks are not just for play! In this article, Nicole Andrews describes observing the interactions of three young boys enthusiastically engaged in the kindergarten block center of their classroom, using blocks in a building project that displayed their ability to use critical thinking skills, physics exploration, and the development of language…

  13. How Artists Overcome Creative Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Six practicing artists were interviewed about how they overcome creative blocks. Their responses indicated that feelings of self-doubt, fear, and depression accompany blocks but that relaxing and working on new directions and playing ideas off a supportive person helped to overcome such blocks. (DB)

  14. Solving DAEs using block method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abasi, Naghmeh; Suleiman, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Zarina Bibi

    2013-04-01

    This paper is on solving semi-explicit index-one Differential Algebraic Equations (DAEs). The block method suggested computes the solutions of the DAE at 2-point simultaneously. The numerical results obtained are compared with non-block backward differentiation method (BDF). The comparison of the numerical results confirms that the block method developed is more efficient and accurate.

  15. On Post-Hoc Blocking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonett, Douglas G.

    1982-01-01

    Post-hoc blocking and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) both employ a concomitant variable to increase statistical power relative to the completely randomized design. It is argued that the advantages attributed to the block design are not always valid and that there are circumstances when the ANCOVA would be preferred to post-hoc blocking.…

  16. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  17. Thermoablation of Liver Metastases: Efficacy of Temporary Celiac Plexus Block

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, A.N. Schaefer, M.; Werk, M.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Cho, C.; Ricke, J.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of celiac plexus block during thermoablation of liver metastases. Methods. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent thermoablation therapy of liver tumors by laser-induced thermotherapy. Twenty-nine patients received a temporary celiac plexus block, 26 patients acted as control group. In both groups fentanyl and midazolam were administered intravenously upon request of the patient. The duration of the intervention, consumption of opiates, and individual pain sensations were documented. Results. No complications resulting from the celiac plexus block were recorded. Celiac plexus block significantly reduced the amount of pain medication used during thermoablation therapy of liver tumors (with block, 2.45 {mu}g fentanyl per kg body weight; without block, 3.58 {mu}g fentanyl per kg body weight, p < 0.05; midazolam consumption was not reduced) in patients with metastases {<=}5 mm from the liver capsule. For metastases farther away from the capsule no significant differences in opiate consumption were seen. Celiac plexus block reduced the time for thermoablation significantly (178 min versus 147 min, p < 0.05) no matter how far the metastases were from the liver capsule. Average time needed to set the block was 12 min (range 9-15 min); additional costs for the block were marginal. As expected (as pain medications were given according to individual patients' needs) pain indices did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion. In patients with liver metastases {<=}5 mm from the liver capsule, celiac plexus block reduces the amount of opiates necessary, simplifying patient monitoring. In addition celiac plexus block reduces intervention time, with positive effects on overall workflow for all patients.

  18. Treatment of laser complications.

    PubMed

    Alster, Tina S; Khoury, Randa R

    2009-12-01

    Modern lasers and light-based sources that were developed based on the theory of selective photothermolysis are capable of destroying specific tissue targets while minimizing the risk of scarring and pigmentary changes. This is accomplished through the use of a wavelength and pulse duration that is best absorbed by a specific chromophore such as melanin or hemoglobin. However, not all lasers and light sources adhere to this principle. Continuous wave (CW) lasers are least selective and may produce unwanted tissue damage and scarring through heat conduction to normal skin. Quasi-CW lasers limit excessive thermal destruction by delivery of a series of brief laser pulses but still pose a higher risk of nonspecific tissue damage and thermal injury. The pulsed and Q-switched (QS) systems adhere most closely to the principles of selective photothermolysis and result in the highest degree of selective destruction with the lowest risk of scarring from excessive thermal diffusion. Certainly, any laser system potentially can result in scarring and tissue damage when used incorrectly; therefore, adequate operator education and skill are essential. Side effects and complications that occur as a consequence of laser treatment can be significantly reduced if diagnosed and treated in an expeditious manner. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  19. Myocardial complications of immunisations.

    PubMed

    Helle, E P; Koskenvuo, K; Heikkilä, J; Pikkarainen, J; Weckström, P

    1978-10-01

    Immunisation may induce myocardial complications. In this pilot study clinical, electrocardiographic, chemical and immunological findings have been studied during a six weeks' follow-up after routine immunisation (mumps, polio, tetanus, smallpox, diphtheria and type A meningococcal disease) among 234 Finnish conscripts at the beginning of their military service. Serial pattern of ECG changes suggestive of myocarditis was recorded in eight of the 234 conscripts one to two weeks after vaccination against smallpox and diphtheria. Changes were mainly minor ST segment elevations and T wave inversions and usually they disappeared in a few weeks. The ECG positives more often had a history of atopy, and their mean body temperatures and heart rates after the vaccinations were higher than among the other subjects (p less than 0.01). However, clinical myocarditis was never noted, nor were immunological or enzymological changes different among the ECG positives. Thus in 3% of the study population, evidence of postvaccinal myocarditis was noted, based on serial ECG patterns, but without any other evidence of cardiac disease.

  20. Complications of donor apheresis.

    PubMed

    Winters, Jeffrey L

    2006-07-01

    A decreasing blood donor pool in the presence of increasing blood transfusion demands has resulted in the need to maximally utilize each blood donor. This has led to a trend in the increasing use of automated blood collections. While apheresis donation shares many reactions and injuries with whole blood donation, because of the differences, unique complications also exist. Overall, evidence in the literature suggests that the frequency of reactions to apheresis donation is less than that seen in whole blood donation, though the risk of reactions requiring hospitalization is substantially greater. The most common apheresis-specific reaction is hypocalcemia due to citrate anticoagulation, which, while usually mild, has the potential for severely injuring the donor. Other reactions to apheresis donation are uncommon (e.g., hypotension) or rare (e.g., air embolism). More worrisome, and in need of additional study, are the long-term effects of apheresis donation. Recent evidence suggests that repeated apheresis platelet donations may adversely effect thrombopoiesis as well as bone mineralization. Granulocyte donation has also been implicated in unexpected long-term consequences.

  1. COMPLICATIONS OF TATTOOING

    PubMed Central

    Lubeck, Glenn; Epstein, Ervin

    1952-01-01

    Pathologic consequence of tattooing is relatively rare, but in light of the great number of persons in military service, where tattooing seems to be popular, consideration of the complications seems worth while. Four unusual cases of patients with cutaneous lesions in tattoos are reported. One patient had Boeck's sarcoid, in which the cutaneous eruption was limited solely to the tattooed areas on the body and involved all the various colors of the tattoo. The cutaneous eruption was only a single manifestation of generalized sarcoidosis. Another patient had secondary syphilis with the cutaneous lesions involving multi-colored tattoos, including the red areas. These tattoos were applied in Hawaii, and presumably the red dye was not the usual cinnabar (mercuric sulfide). As a general rule, the cutaneous lesions of secondary syphilis do not involve the red areas because of the treponomicidal action of mercuric sulfide. In the third case the characteristic eruption of discoid lupus erythematosus was present. It began over the red areas of a tattoo on the patient's forearm. It has been stated that mercuric sulfide is a photo-sensitizing agent, and it is believed that this explains the localization of the eruption in this case. The fourth patient had eruption, caused by mercury sensitivity, in an area of tattoo. The eruption was noted soon after the tattooing was done, and it persisted for seven years. PMID:14905289

  2. Neurovascular complications of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Daras, M; Tuchman, A J; Koppel, B S; Samkoff, L M; Weitzner, I; Marc, J

    1994-08-01

    Use of cocaine in the USA, has reached epidemic proportions since 1983, when "crack" was introduced, its higher potency compared with cocaine HCl has been associated with a tremendous increase in the incidence of strokes. This study reports our experience with 55 cases of neurovascular events (25 ischemic and 30 hemorrhagic) related to cocaine use in 54 patients. Only 15 patients had other risk factors for stroke. Twenty six patients smoked "crack", 10 snorted cocaine and 12 injected it intravenously. Strokes occurred within 3 h of cocaine use in 15 patients with infarcts and 17 with hemorrhages. Ten infarcts occurred after an overnight binge. Of the hemorrhage group 9 were subarachnoid, 16 intracerebral (8 basal ganglia, 7 hemispheric and one brain stem) and 5 intraventricular. Computerized tomography (CT) showed an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, as well as one of the vein of Galen. Four aneurysms and 3 AVMs were identified on angiography. CT revealed 15 infarcts; it was normal in 7 patients with pure motor hemiparesis and in 3 with findings consistent with anterior spinal artery infarction. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the cerebrovascular complications. A sudden rise in systemic arterial pressure may cause hemorrhages, frequently in association with an underlying aneurysm or AVM. Vasospasm, arteritis, myocardial infarction with cardiac arrhythmias and increased platelet aggregation may provoke infarcts.

  3. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  4. Hematologic Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This paper specifically reviews the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations,; however care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters in order to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  5. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; ...

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T]ℓ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock spacemore » exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.« less

  6. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T] also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.

  7. Solar power building block

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, W.T.

    1982-04-20

    A building unit for exterior walls and the like comprising a molded block of glass having a recess in the side face which is to face the exterior, the recess having a side wall and an open outer end on which a fresnel lens is disposed, the inner end of the recess having a solar cell disposed therein so that sunlight passing through the fresnel lens impinges on the solar cell for the generation of electric power together with a battery disposed within a cavity molded in the block connected by a circuit to the solar cell for storing the generated electric power for subsequent use as needed in a residence or the like. A further embodiment has attached to the interior wall a black painted duct containing vertical radiant fins. This unit contains a ''window'' through which the concentrated radiation is directed by the lens arrangement of the side walls and front lens to create a highly energetic radiant impingement upon the black duct heating it. Air flowing vertically in the duct is used for heating of interior air or removal of superheated interior air by using the force of the rising air for an '' air cooling'' effect.

  8. Humanoid by ROBO-BLOCK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimi, Hirofumi; Koike, Minoru; Takeuchi, Seiichi; Douhara, Noriyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Humanoid by ROBO-BLOCK (robot block system) and the rational formula of robots were proposed. ROBO-BLOCK is composed of servo motors, the parts for servomotor rotor, the brackets for servomotor fixation, the board parts and the controllers. A robot can be assembled easily by ROBO-BLOCK. Meanwhile, it is convenient when the structure of the robot can be described easily as a character. The whole structure of the robot is expressed as rational formula of the robot to show molecule structure in chemistry. ROBO-BLOCK can be useful for not only the research but also the education. Creative student experiment was done in the college of industrial technology.

  9. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient.

  10. Ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block vs continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for hip replacement in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bin; He, Miao; Cai, Guang-Yu; Zou, Tian-Xiao; Zhang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block are 2 traditional anesthesia methods in orthopedic surgeries, but it is controversial which method is better. The objective of this study was to compare the practicality, efficacy, and complications of the 2 modalities in hip replacement surgery in the elderly and to assess the utility of a novel cannula-over-needle set. Methods: In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical investigation, 60 elderly patients undergoing hip replacement were randomly assigned to receive either continuous femoral nerve block or continuous fascia iliaca compartment block. After ultrasound-guided nerve block, all patients received general anesthesia for surgery and postoperative analgesia through an indwelling cannula. Single-factor analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups. Results: There was a significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean visual analog scale scores (at rest) at 6 hours after surgery: 1.0 ± 1.3 in the femoral nerve block group vs 0.5 ± 0.8 in the fascia iliaca compartment block group (P < 0.05). The femoral nerve block group had better postoperative analgesia on the medial aspect of the thigh, whereas the fascia iliaca compartment block group had better analgesia on the lateral aspect of the thigh. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Conclusions: Both ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block with the novel cannula-over-needle provide effective anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for elderly hip replacement patients. PMID:27759633

  11. Unmasking accessory pathway conduction due to AV block following tricuspid valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Simmers, T.A.; Otterspoor, L.C.; Winter, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Atrioventricular block during radiofrequency (RF) ablation of an accessory pathway may be due to inadvertent RF damage or catheter pressure to the conduction system, or a pre-existent conduction defect. Conversely, block in the normal conduction system may unmask pre-excitation. We describe a case where total infra-Hisian block complicated tricuspid valve surgery, unmasking a hitherto undiagnosed left lateral accessory pathway. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696648

  12. Brucella Infection Associated with Complete Atrioventricular Block

    PubMed Central

    Bilici, Meki; Demir, Fikri; Yılmazer, Murat Muhtar; Bozkurt, Fatma; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The clinical spectrum of Brucella infection is quite diverse and characterized by multi-system involvement. Patients present with myocarditis, endocarditis, or pericarditis. Infective endocarditis is the most common cardiovascular complication in patients with brucellosis. Although conduction abnormalities are seen in cases with endocarditis, they are reported very rarely in the setting of cardiac Brucella infection. Case Report: An eight and a half-year-old male patient was referred to our clinic due to inadequate response to cotrimaxazole plus streptomycin treatment at the 15th day of admission. Although local hospital records on the patient showed a heart rate of 80 bpm, we determined a heart rate of 46 bpm. The electrocardiogram showed complete atrioventricular (AV) block. The average heart rate was determined as 48 bpm with 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring. The echocardiographic examination showed normal-sized heart chambers and the absence of valvular involvement. An agglutination test for brucellosis was found to be positive with a titer of 1/320. High fever, arthralgia, and splenomegaly regressed following doxycycline plus rifampicin therapy, but there was no improvement in the AV block. A permanent pacemaker was implanted because of the detection of an average heart rate of 48 bpm. Conclusion: Because cardiac failure and rhythm abnormalities are reported in the course of Brucella infection and may be associated with significant outcomes, cases with brucellosis should be evaluated carefully in terms of cardiac involvement. This report aims to draw attention to complete AV block as an extremely rare complication of Brucella infection. PMID:27761286

  13. Complicity and torture.

    PubMed

    Shue, Henry

    2017-04-01

    One of the great merits of On Complicity and Compromise is that it wades into specific swamps where ordinary theorists fear to slog. It is persuasive that in general it can be right sometimes to be complicit in wrongdoing by others through causally contributing to the wrongdoing, but not sharing its purpose, if by being involved one can reasonably expect to lessen the extent of the wrong that would otherwise be suffered by the victims. I focus on whether the book's general thesis is applicable to torture, which depends on what torture and the torture situation are in fact like. I focus on the case to which the chapter several times refers: the innovative CIA paradigm of torture. First, to the extent that the paradigm, which is predominantly mental, or psychological, torture succeeds in its goal of producing regression to a compliant state, the physician would be unable to rely on the torture victim's expressions of preferences or interests as authentically his own. Second, since disorientation plays such a large role in the CIA's style of torture (adopted at Guantanamo by the military), the authorities would refuse to allow a stable relationship to be built up with any one doctor by any victim, making comprehension of the victim's preferences difficult. Third, even if the doctor could somehow judge what the victim's genuine interests were, the control of the situation is much too totalistic to allow the physician any action independent of what the torture regime requires. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. [Hyponatremia - carbamazepine medication complications].

    PubMed

    Dedinská, I; Maňka, V; Ságová, I; Klimentová, A; Makovický, P; Polko, J; Sadloňová, J; Mokáň, M

    2012-01-01

    Hyponatremia can be defined like the low sodium concentration, lower that 135 mmol/l. It becomes really serious when the concentration is lower than 120 mmol/l. The most frequent causes of hyponatremia are: the extrarenal loss (GIT, skin, bleeding, sequestration), the renal loss (diuretics, nephritis with the salt loss, osmotical diuresis, the Addison disease), hypothyroidism, the lack of glucocorticoids, emotional stress, pain, pseudohyponatremia (incorrect taking, dyslipoproteinemia). There is fatigue, exhaustion, headache and vertigoes dominating in the clinical record file. By the deficit increasing a patient becomes delirious, comatose even with the shock development. It is necessary to separate sufficient supply of sodium from much more often reason, which is loss of sodium which can be caused by: excessive sweating, vomitting with the metabolical alkalosis development, diarrhoea with the metabolical acidosis development, renal losses (a phase of renal failure). Treatment of hyponatremia: intensive treatment starts at the level of plasmatic concentration of sodium under 120 mmol/l or when neurological symptoms of brain oedema are present. In the therapy it is necessary to avoid fast infusions of hypertonic saline solutions (3-5% NaCl solutions) because of the danger of the development of serious CNS complications (intracranial bleeding, etc.). It is recommended to adjust the plasmatic concentration of sodium up to 120 mmol/l during the first four hours and a subsequent correction should not be higher than 2 mmol per an hour. Treatment of the basic illness is very important. We present 2 case histories: a 74-year old female patient and a 69-year old female patient both with the hyponatremia caused by taking of carbamazepine. We want to inform and warn about not only a well known side effect during long-term treatment but about hyponatremia that arose within 48 hours after the start of taking medicine as well.

  15. [Psychiatric complications of abortion].

    PubMed

    Gurpegui, Manuel; Jurado, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The psychiatric consequences of induced abortion continue to be the object of controversy. The reactions of women when they became aware of conception are very variable. Pregnancy, whether initially intended or unintended, may provoke stress; and miscarriage may bring about feelings of loss and grief reaction. Therefore, induced abortion, with its emotional implications (of relief, shame and guilt) not surprisingly is a stressful adverse life event. METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS: There is agreement among researchers on the need to compare the mental health outcomes (or the psychiatric complications) with appropriate groups, including women with unintended pregnancies ending in live births and women with miscarriages. There is also agreement on the need to control for the potential confounding effects of multiple variables: demographic, contextual, personal development, previous or current traumatic experiences, and mental health prior to the obstetric event. Any psychiatric outcome is multi-factorial in origin and the impact of life events depend on how they are perceived, the psychological defence mechanisms (unconscious to a great extent) and the coping style. The fact of voluntarily aborting has an undeniable ethical dimension in which facts and values are interwoven. No research study has found that induced abortion is associated with a better mental health outcome, although the results of some studies are interpreted as or Some general population studies point out significant associations with alcohol or illegal drug dependence, mood disorders (including depression) and some anxiety disorders. Some of these associations have been confirmed, and nuanced, by longitudinal prospective studies which support causal relationships. With the available data, it is advisable to devote efforts to the mental health care of women who have had an induced abortion. Reasons of the woman's mental health by no means can be invoked, on empirical bases, for

  16. Complications of homograft tympanoplasty.

    PubMed

    Lesinski, S G

    1982-11-01

    The use of a homograft tympanic membrane with an attached malleus has provided an excellent alternative for reconstructing the severely damaged middle ear. I have limited homograft tympanoplasty to four specific indications: previous failure of standard tympanoplasty techniques, high risk of failure (total perforation, absent malleus, slag burns), reconstruction of radical mastoidectomy, and congenital aural atresia. Homograft tympanoplasty has provided a 94 per cent incidence of anatomic success in these severely damaged middle ears. Closure of the air-bone gap to within 25 dB. was accomplished in 85 per cent of these patients. Complications must be viewed in the perspective of the extensive disease in the middle ear that was being reconstructed. Only meticulous attention to surgical technique and postoperative care will provide the successes described by Wehrs, Marquet, Perkins, and others. The otologic surgeon is urged to observe the surgical techniques of homograft tympanoplasty rather than merely read about it. I believe that the transplant tympanic membrane should be used only when it provides an advantage over standard grafting techniques. Underlay fascia tympanoplasty yields excellent results in the majority of eardrum reconstructions. A final word about homograft tympanic membrane and ossicles. Although several "banks" for ear tissue are available in the United States, there are few established guidelines that these banks are required to follow. The otologic surgeon who uses homograft tissue must be guaranteed that the biologic product he is implanting in his patient is sterile, is anatomically perfect, has been stored in a chemically stable preservative, and has proven biologic effectiveness. Ear banks should be managed by surgeons who are using that tissue in their own patients, thus monitoring the tissue's quality. Each bank has a responsibility to donors, recipients, and surgeons to maintain the highest laboratory standards that will guarantee the

  17. Block loss for ATM video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Sze K.; Leon-Garcia, Alberto

    1993-10-01

    In BISDN, the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) requires all information to be represented as a sequence of standard data units called cells. Cell los is inherent in ATM networks due to the cell header corruption and buffer overflow in the network. Several studies have shown that cell losses are bursty for an ATM network. In this work, we encoded real video sequences with a variable bit-rate (VBR) version of the H.261 video encoder in order for us to determine the relationship between blocks in a video frame and the number of ATM cells generated. We then considered the impact of bursty cell losses on image block loss probability. Block loss distributions are given at different codec and channel parameters. We also obtained block loss results using a cell loss correction scheme. Three sequences were analyzed to obtain the cumulative block loss probability distribution. Similar maximum and minimum block loss probability values were obtained for each sequence. The block loss probability distribution varies according to the amount and type of motion present in each sequence. We show that the block loss is confined to one group of blocks (GOB). The maximum block loss probability can be two orders of magnitude larger than the channel cell loss probability. By using the cell loss correction scheme, block loss was reduced to a level equivalent to reducing cell loss probability by five orders of magnitude.

  18. Vascular complications of diabetes: mechanisms of injury and protective factors

    PubMed Central

    Rask-Madsen, Christian; King, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In patients with diabetes, atherosclerosis is the main reason for impaired life expectancy, and diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy are the largest contributors to end-stage renal disease and blindness, respectively. An improved therapeutic approach to combat diabetic vascular complications might include blocking mechanisms of injury as well as promoting protective or regenerating factors, for example by enhancing the action of insulin-regulated genes in endothelial cells, promoting gene programs leading to induction of antioxidant or anti-inflammatory factors, or improving the sensitivity to vascular cell survival factors. Such strategies could help prevent complications despite suboptimal metabolic control. PMID:23312281

  19. Block copolymer investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yufa, Nataliya A.

    The research presented in this thesis deals with various aspects of block copolymers on the nanoscale: their behavior at a range of temperatures, their use as scaffolds, or for creation of chemically striped surfaces, as well as the behavior of metals on block copolymers under the influence of UV light, and the healing behavior of copolymers. Invented around the time of World War II, copolymers have been used for decades due to their macroscopic properties, such as their ability to be molded without vulcanization, and the fact that, unlike rubber, they can be recycled. In recent years, block copolymers (BCPs) have been used for lithography, as scaffolds for nano-objects, to create a magnetic hard drive, as well as in photonic and other applications. In this work we used primarily atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), described in Chapter II, to conduct our studies. In Chapter III we demonstrate a new and general method for positioning nanoparticles within nanoscale grooves. This technique is suitable for nanodots, nanocrystals, as well as DNA. We use AFM and TEM to demonstrate selective decoration. In Chapters IV and V we use AFM and TEM to study the structure of polymer surfaces coated with metals and self-assembled monolayers. We describe how the surfaces were created, exhibit their structure on the nanoscale, and prove that their macroscopic wetting properties have been altered compared to the original polymer structures. Finally, Chapters VI and VII report out in-situ AFM studies of BCP at high temperatures, made possible only recently with the invention of air-tight high-temperature AFM imaging cells. We locate the transition between disordered films and cylinders during initial ordering. Fluctuations of existing domains leading to domain coarsening are also described, and are shown to be consistent with reptation and curvature minimization. Chapter VII deals with the healing of PS-b-PMMA following AFM-tip lithography or

  20. Neurosurgical complications after intranasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Toselli, R M; dePapp, A; Harbaugh, R E; Saunders, R L

    1991-05-01

    Intranasal ethmoidectomy is a common otolaryngological procedure. Despite the potential for serious intracranial complications, there is a paucity of reports describing the neurosurgical complications of the procedure. Two patients with intracranial complications of intranasal ethmoidectomy, and the relevant medical literature, are reviewed. The anatomy of the ethmoid air cells and their relation to the intracranial cavity are described. The importance of definitive, emergent repair with attention to the potential for vascular injury is discussed.

  1. Neurosurgical complications after intranasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Toselli, R M; dePapp, A; Harbaugh, R E; Saunders, R L

    1991-01-01

    Intranasal ethmoidectomy is a common otolaryngological procedure. Despite the potential for serious intracranial complications, there is a paucity of reports describing the neurosurgical complications of the procedure. Two patients with intracranial complications of intranasal ethmoidectomy, and the relevant medical literature, are reviewed. The anatomy of the ethmoid air cells and their relation to the intracranial cavity are described. The importance of definitive, emergent repair with attention to the potential for vascular injury is discussed. PMID:1865214

  2. Complications of endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, J A

    1987-11-01

    A consecutive series of 90 patients undergoing endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy was reviewed. There were 26 complications (29%) in 19 patients in this group. Eight complications (8%) including CSF leak, temporary blindness, and hemorrhage were considered major with the latter occurring most commonly. Synechiae were the most commonly occurring minor complications. Endoscopic nasal sinus surgery performed by inexperienced operators carries with it the same risks and complications as traditional intranasal sinus surgery. Any surgeon who does not routinely perform traditional intranasal ethmoidectomy should accrue endoscopic experience through appropriate didactic training and multiple cadaver dissections (akin to otologic training).

  3. [Epidural emphysema complicating bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Rouetbi, N; Ben Saad, A; Joobeur, S; Skhiri, N; Cheikh Mhamed, S; Mribah, H; El Kamel, A

    2012-12-01

    Epidural emphysema is an exceptional complication of bronchial asthma, revealed by an incidental finding in chest tomography. We report a case of a 21-year-old man admitted with asthma attack complicated by subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema. Chest tomography confirmed the mediastinal emphysema and also revealed the epidural emphysema within the vertebral canal. Neurological examination was negative. The patient showed complete recovery 10days after the onset of symptoms. The epidural emphysema is a rare complication during asthma attacks. The benignity of this complication should not require a systematic chest tomography.

  4. Predictive Factors Involved in Development of Postoperative Pulmonary Complications.

    PubMed

    Saraçoğlu, Ayten; Yavru, Ayşen; Küçükgöncü, Semra; Tüzüner, Filiz; Karadeniz, Meltem; Başaran, Burcu; Şentürk, Nüzhet Mert

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we applied the method of the multi-center Prospective Evaluation of a Risk Score for postoperative pulmonary Complications in Europe (PERISCOPE) study, which was designed to predict postoperative complications and funded by the European Society of Anaesthesiology, to patients in our institution with the aim of prospectively analyzing the postoperative risk factors of pulmonary complications. One hundred patients over 18 years of age who had emergency or elective non-thoracic or non-obstetric surgery under general anaesthesia or neuraxial blocks were included in the study. Collected data regarding the preoperative and postoperative period were filled in separate forms for all patients. A total of 11 patients developed pulmonary complications. We observed respiratory failure in 8 patients, pleural effusion in 3 patients, atelectasis in 5 patients, bronchospasm in 3 patients, and pneumothorax in 1 patient. In the univariate logistic regression model, patient age, gender, weight, rate of preoperative respiratory symptoms, cough test results, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) score, and the duration of surgery did not significantly increase the complication risk (p>0.05). However, in the univariate logistic regression model, the presence of respiratory symptoms increased the risk for complications approximately 5.34-fold (p=0.014). There was an increase in the possibility of complications in parallel with the increase in the duration of postoperative hospital stay (p=0.012). More respiratory symptoms (p=0.019) and longer hospital stay (6.5 vs. 3.5 days respectively, p=0.029) were recorded in patients with postoperative pulmonary complications. Considering patients undergoing non-thoracic or non-obstetric surgery, the prevalence of postoperative pulmonary complications is higher in patients diagnosed with respiratory symptoms in the preoperative period. These complications significantly extend the length of hospital stay.

  5. Non-intubated thoracoscopic surgery using internal intercostal nerve block, vagal block and targeted sedation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Hui; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chan, Kuang-Cheng; Chen, Ke-Cheng; Yie, Jr-Chi; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2014-10-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery using internal intercostal nerve block, vagal block and targeted sedation without endotracheal intubation is a promising technique for selected patients, but little is known about its feasibility and safety. We evaluated 109 patients with lung (105), mediastinal (3) or pleural (1) tumours treated using non-intubated thoracoscopic surgery. Internal, intercostal nerve block was performed at the T3-T8 intercostal level and vagal block was performed adjacent to the vagus nerve at the level of the lower trachea for right-sided operations and at the level of the aortopulmonary window for left-sided operations. Sedation was performed with propofol infusion to achieve a bispectral index value between 40 and 60. Thoracoscopic lobectomy was performed in 43 patients, wedge resection in 50, segmentectomy in 12 and mediastinal or pleural tumour excision in 4. Three patients (2.8%) required conversion to intubated one-lung ventilation because of vigorous mediastinal movement and dense diaphragmatic adhesions. Anaesthetic induction and operation had a median duration of 10.0 and 127.0 min, respectively. Operative complications developed in 13 patients with air leaks for more than 3 days and 1 patient required transfusion of blood products. The median postoperative chest drainage and hospital stay were 2.0 and 4.0 days, respectively. Non-intubated thoracoscopic surgery using internal intercostal nerve block, vagal block and targeted sedation is technically feasible and safe in surgical treatment of lung, mediastinal and pleural tumours in selected patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Atomic Basic Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  7. Radiation Blocking Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Biomedical Optical Company of America's Eagle 475 lens absorbs 100 percent of all photowavelengths considered hazardous to eye tissue, including ultraviolet and blue light, which are considered contributors to cataract and age-related macular degeneration. The lens absorbs hazardous wavelengths, but allows a higher percentage of visually useful areas of the spectrum to pass through. Polarization blocks out irritating glint and glare and heightens visual acuity. The Eagle 475 sunglasses are the latest in a series of spinoffs that originated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where two scientists developed a protective, welding curtain that filtered out harmful irradiance. The result was a commercial curtain that absorbs filters and scatters light, providing protection for personnel in welding areas. Further research focused on protective industrial glasses and later on consumer products.

  8. Rotating ice blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorbolo, Stephane; Adami, Nicolas; Grasp Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of ice discs released at the surface of a thermalized bath was investigated. As observed in some rare events in the Nature, the discs start spinning spontaneously. The motor of this motion is the cooling of the water close to the ice disc. As the density of water is maximum at 4°C, a downwards flow is generated from the surface of the ice block to the bottom. This flow generates the rotation of the disc. The speed of rotation depends on the mass of the ice disc and on the temperature of the bath. A model has been constructed to study the influence of the temperature of the bath. Finally, ice discs were put on a metallic plate. Again, a spontaneous rotation was observed. FNRS is thanked for financial support.

  9. Baroplastic Block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewlett, Sheldon A.

    2005-03-01

    Block copolymers with rubbery and glassy components have been observed to have pressure induced miscibility. These microphase-separated materials, termed baroplastics, were able to flow and be processed at temperatures below the Tg of the glassy component by simple compression molding and extrusion. Diblock and triblock copolymers of polystyrene and poly(butyl acrylate) or poly(2-ethyl hexyl acrylate) were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and processed at room temperature into well defined transparent objects. SAXS and SANS measurements demonstrated partial mixing between components as a result of pressure during processing. DSC results also show the presence of distinct domains even after several processing cycles. Their mechanical properties after processing were tested and compared with commercial thermoplastic elastomers.

  10. Blocking the Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autzen, Martin; Kouvaris, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Some severe constraints on asymmetric dark matter are based on the scenario that certain types of weakly interacting massive particles can form mini-black holes inside neutron stars that can lead to their destruction. A crucial element for the realization of this scenario is that the black hole grows after its formation (and eventually destroys the star) instead of evaporating. The fate of the black hole is dictated by the two opposite mechanics, i.e., accretion of nuclear matter from the center of the star and Hawking radiation that tends to decrease the mass of the black hole. We study how the assumptions for the accretion rate can in fact affect the critical mass beyond which a black hole always grows. We also study to what extent degenerate nuclear matter can impede Hawking radiation due to the fact that emitted particles can be Pauli blocked at the core of the star.

  11. Capsular block syndrome: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Mauricio; Velásquez, Luis F; Rojas, Sebastián; Montoya, Laura; Zuluaga, Katherine; Balparda, Kepa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the case of a patient who developed late capsular block syndrome and to review the current literature regarding this complication of phacoemulsification procedures. Methods The literature was reviewed to summarize the diagnosis, classification, use of diagnostic aids, and the current treatments for this complication. Results A 69-year-old patient complained of decreased visual acuity 11 months after undergoing phacoemulsification. She was found to have a secondary myopization. Anterior segment ultrabiomicroscopy confirmed the diagnosis of capsular block syndrome. The patient underwent neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy, which resulted in complete resolution of her symptoms. Conclusion Capsular block syndrome is a fairly rare complication of phacoemulsification procedures that, depending primarily on the timing of its occurrence following surgery, can develop into one of the three following possible clinical scenarios: intraoperatory, early postoperatory, and late postoperatory. In this patient, Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy was shown to be a safe and effective treatment option for this type of complication. PMID:25152612

  12. Microvascular complications associated with injection of cosmetic facelift dermal fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Prendes, Mark; Chang, Shu-Hong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-02-01

    Minimally-invasive cosmetic surgeries such as injection of subdermal fillers have become very popular in the past decade. Although rare, some complications may follow injections such as tissue necrosis and even blindness. There exist two hypothesis regarding source of these complications both of which include microvasculature. The first hypothesis is that fillers in between the tissue structures and compress microvasculature that causes blockage of tissue neutrition and oxygen exchange in the tissue. In another theory, it is hypothesized that fillers move inside major arteries and block the arteries/veins. In this paper, we study these hypotheses using optical coherence tomography and optical microangiography technologies with different hyaluronic-acid fillers in a mouse ear model. Based on our observations, the fillers eventually block arteries/veins if injected directly into them that eventually causes tissue necrosis.

  13. Transversus abdominis block: clinical uses, side effects, and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Sinclair, Alexander; Raffa, Robert B; Aldington, Dominic; Plavin, Stanford; Apfel, Christian C

    2013-04-01

    Poorly controlled acute pain during the postoperative setting after abdominal surgery can be detrimental to the patient. Current pain management practices for the postoperative abdominal surgery patient rely heavily on opioids, which are associated with many unwanted side effects. Recently, interest surrounding regional anesthesia has been growing owing to its demonstrated efficacy and safety outcomes. More specifically, the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block procedure has attracted attention owing to its ability to successfully block peripheral pain signaling in the abdomen, its ease of use, few complications, and its greater acceptability. A majority of the studies published has demonstrated the successful reduction in pain in many abdominal surgical procedures using local anesthetics during the TAP block. However, the short duration of the pain block causes the patient to still rely on other analgesics throughout the additional postoperative days. Preliminary studies using continuous infusion catheters placed in the TAP has been one of the ways to prolong the nerve block in the abdomen; however, technical and operational issues currently limit the widespread adoption of this method. In this review, current studies will be presented and summarized to update the field on the potential benefits of the TAP block procedure, in addition to providing insight into the future direction of the drugs that could be used for TAP block. © 2012 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  14. The definition of block "success" in the contemporary literature: are we speaking the same language?

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Faraj W; Brull, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A successful nerve block is the common goal that shapes modern regional anesthesia practice and research, yet the meaning of block "success" can be open to interpretation. For this Special Article, we reviewed all applicable randomized controlled trials published over the last decade to determine the most commonly used definitions of block success. We also sought to uncover which relevant indicators of block success are routinely reported in the contemporary literature. Twenty-two trials that explicitly designated the term block "success" as their primary outcome measure were identified. The most common definition of block success was the achievement of a surgical block within a designated period, used in half of the trials. Block success was inconsistently defined in the remaining 11 trials. Patient-related indicators of block success including postoperative pain and patient satisfaction were measured in only 4 trials, whereas anesthesiologist-related indicators such as block onset time and complications were reported most frequently. Surgeon- and hospital administrator-related indicators were not collected in any trial. We found that the definition of block success is highly variable in the contemporary regional anesthesia literature. Our findings underscore the clear and present need for a comprehensive definition of block success, whereas future research should endeavor to capture the indicators of block success that are important to all key perioperative stakeholders.

  15. Large Block Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W

    2001-12-01

    This report documents the Large-Block Test (LBT) conducted at Fran Ridge near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The LBT was a thermal test conducted on an exposed block of middle non-lithophysal Topopah Spring tuff (Tptpmn) and was designed to assist in understanding the thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes associated with heating and then cooling a partially saturated fractured rock mass. The LBT was unique in that it was a large (3 x 3 x 4.5 m) block with top and sides exposed. Because the block was exposed at the surface, boundary conditions on five of the six sides of the block were relatively well known and controlled, making this test both easier to model and easier to monitor. This report presents a detailed description of the test as well as analyses of the data and conclusions drawn from the test. The rock block that was tested during the LBT was exposed by excavation and removal of the surrounding rock. The block was characterized and instrumented, and the sides were sealed and insulated to inhibit moisture and heat loss. Temperature on the top of the block was also controlled. The block was heated for 13 months, during which time temperature, moisture distribution, and deformation were monitored. After the test was completed and the block cooled down, a series of boreholes were drilled, and one of the heater holes was over-cored to collect samples for post-test characterization of mineralogy and mechanical properties. Section 2 provides background on the test. Section 3 lists the test objectives and describes the block site, the site configuration, and measurements made during the test. Section 3 also presents a chronology of events associated with the LBT, characterization of the block, and the pre-heat analyses of the test. Section 4 describes the fracture network contained in the block. Section 5 describes the heating/cooling system used to control the temperature in the block and presents the thermal history of the block during the test

  16. [Complications caused by intravenous therapy].

    PubMed

    Quirós Luque, José María; Gago Fornells, Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Nursing professionals must know everything related to complications caused by intravenous therapy including the ways to prevent and solve these complications. We need not forget that nurses are the ones mainly responsible for the insertion, manipulation, removal and care of catheters.

  17. Complications of Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Mariña Naveiro; Naveiro Rilo, José Cesáreo; Paredes, Aida González; Aguilar Romero, María Teresa; Parra, Jorge Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To analyze the frequency of complications during laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and identify associated risk factors. Methods: A descriptive observational study was performed between January 2000 and December 2012 and included all gynecologic laparoscopies performed at our center. Variables were recorded for patient characteristics, indication for surgery, length of hospital stay (in days), major and minor complications, and conversions to laparotomy. To identify risk factors and variables associated with complications, crude and adjusted odds ratios were calculated with unconditional logistic regression. Results: Of all 2888 laparoscopies included, most were procedures of moderate difficulty (adnexal surgery) (54.2%). The overall frequency of major complications was 1.93%, and that of minor complications was 4.29%. The level of technical difficulty and existence of prior abdominal surgery were associated with a higher risk of major complications and conversions to laparotomy. Conclusion: Laparoscopic gynecologic surgery is associated with a low frequency of complications but is a procedure that is not without risk. Greater technical difficulty and prior surgery were factors associated with a higher frequency of complications. PMID:25392659

  18. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter Noninfectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Kappel, Joanne; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Pike, Pamela; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Noninfectious hemodialysis catheter complications include catheter dysfunction, catheter-related thrombus, and central vein stenosis. The definitions, causes, and treatment strategies for catheter dysfunction are reviewed below. Catheter-related thrombus is a less common but serious complication of catheters, requiring catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation. In addition, the risk factors, clinical manifestation, and treatment options for central vein stenosis are outlined. PMID:28270922

  19. [Renal complications due to desensitization].

    PubMed

    Drouet, M; Sabbah, A; Bonneau, J C; Le Sellin, J

    1986-04-01

    Two observations with induction of renal complications during immunotherapy are reported. For the first patient proteinuria and infections complications happened immediately after a rush immunotherapy with Yellow Jacket Venom Extract. For the second patient an "half-rush" immunotherapy with light doses of phleole extract (cumulative dose: 7 PNU) induced an immediate reaction with rhinitis, conjunctivitis and after 24 hours a macroscopic hematuria.

  20. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.; Sushinsky, G. F.; Chwirut, D. J.; Bechtoldt, C. J.; Ruff, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys are to be considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks have been taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and micro-structural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response. New fabrication techniques for reference blocks are discussed and ASTM activities are summarized.

  1. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  2. Workup and Management of Persistent Neuralgia following Nerve Block

    PubMed Central

    Weyker, Paul David; Webb, Christopher Allen-John; Pham, Thoha M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurological injuries following peripheral nerve blocks are a relatively rare yet potentially devastating complication depending on the type of lesion, affected extremity, and duration of symptoms. Medical management continues to be the treatment modality of choice with multimodal nonopioid analgesics as the cornerstone of this therapy. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who developed a clinical common peroneal and lateral sural cutaneous neuropathy following an uncomplicated popliteal sciatic nerve block. Workup with electrodiagnostic studies and magnetic resonance neurography revealed injury to both the femoral and sciatic nerves. Diagnostic studies and potential mechanisms for nerve injury are discussed. PMID:26904304

  3. Reliability computation from reliability block diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelson, P. O.; Eckstein, E. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Computer program computes system reliability for very general class of reliability block diagrams. Four factors are considered in calculating probability of system success: active block redundancy, standby block redundancy, partial redundancy, and presence of equivalent blocks in the diagram.

  4. 31 CFR 593.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 593.301 Section 593.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES TAYLOR...

  5. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  6. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  7. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  8. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  9. 31 CFR 542.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 542.301 Section 542.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SYRIAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  10. Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the west to the east. This photograph reveals the alignment of trees within the central path of the park. In addition, this photograph exposes broken bricks aligning tree beds - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  11. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  12. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  13. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS...

  14. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  15. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  16. 31 CFR 586.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 586.301 Section 586.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF...

  17. 31 CFR 587.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 587.301 Section 587.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF...

  18. 31 CFR 549.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 549.301 Section 549.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  19. 31 CFR 543.302 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 543.302 Section 543.302 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CôTE D'IVOIRE SANCTIONS...

  20. 31 CFR 558.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 558.301 Section 558.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOUTH SUDAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  1. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  2. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 552.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 552.301 Section 552.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  4. 31 CFR 552.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 552.301 Section 552.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  5. 31 CFR 545.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 545.301 Section 545.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN)...

  6. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  7. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  8. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  9. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  10. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  11. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  12. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  13. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General...

  14. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS...

  15. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  16. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  17. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  18. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  19. A Shifted Block Lanczos Algorithm 1: The Block Recurrence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, Roger G.; Lewis, John G.; Simon, Horst D.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we describe a block Lanczos algorithm that is used as the key building block of a software package for the extraction of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of large sparse symmetric generalized eigenproblems. The software package comprises: a version of the block Lanczos algorithm specialized for spectrally transformed eigenproblems; an adaptive strategy for choosing shifts, and efficient codes for factoring large sparse symmetric indefinite matrices. This paper describes the algorithmic details of our block Lanczos recurrence. This uses a novel combination of block generalizations of several features that have only been investigated independently in the past. In particular new forms of partial reorthogonalization, selective reorthogonalization and local reorthogonalization are used, as is a new algorithm for obtaining the M-orthogonal factorization of a matrix. The heuristic shifting strategy, the integration with sparse linear equation solvers and numerical experience with the code are described in a companion paper.

  20. A Shifted Block Lanczos Algorithm 1: The Block Recurrence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, Roger G.; Lewis, John G.; Simon, Horst D.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we describe a block Lanczos algorithm that is used as the key building block of a software package for the extraction of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of large sparse symmetric generalized eigenproblems. The software package comprises: a version of the block Lanczos algorithm specialized for spectrally transformed eigenproblems; an adaptive strategy for choosing shifts, and efficient codes for factoring large sparse symmetric indefinite matrices. This paper describes the algorithmic details of our block Lanczos recurrence. This uses a novel combination of block generalizations of several features that have only been investigated independently in the past. In particular new forms of partial reorthogonalization, selective reorthogonalization and local reorthogonalization are used, as is a new algorithm for obtaining the M-orthogonal factorization of a matrix. The heuristic shifting strategy, the integration with sparse linear equation solvers and numerical experience with the code are described in a companion paper.

  1. Characterizing the inverses of block tridiagonal, block Toeplitz matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffi, Nicholas M.; Hill, Judith C.; Reuter, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the inversion of block tridiagonal, block Toeplitz matrices and comment on the behaviour of these inverses as one moves away from the diagonal. Using matrix Möbius transformations, we first present an O(1) representation (with respect to the number of block rows and block columns) for the inverse matrix and subsequently use this representation to characterize the inverse matrix. There are four symmetry-distinct cases where the blocks of the inverse matrix (i) decay to zero on both sides of the diagonal, (ii) oscillate on both sides, (iii) decay on one side and oscillate on the other and (iv) decay on one side and grow on the other. This characterization exposes the necessary conditions for the inverse matrix to be numerically banded and may also aid in the design of preconditioners and fast algorithms. Finally, we present numerical examples of these matrix types.

  2. [Complications in brachial plexus surgery].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Fernando; Pinazzo, Samantha; Moragues, Rodrigo; Suarez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Although traumatic brachial plexus injuries are relatively rare in trauma patients, their effects on the functionality of the upper limb can be very disabling. The authors' objective was to assess the complications in a series of patients operated for brachial plexus injuries. This was a retrospective evaluation of patients operated on by the authors between August 2009 and March 2013. We performed 36 surgeries on 33 patients. The incidence of complications was 27.7%. Of these, only 1 (2.7%) was considered serious and associated with the procedure (iatrogenic injury of brachial artery). There was another serious complication (hypoxia in patients with airway injury) but it was not directly related to the surgical procedure. All other complications were considered minor (wound dehiscence, hematoma, infection). There was no mortality in our series. The complications in our series are similar to those reported in the literature. Serious complications (vascular, neural) are rare and represent less than 5% in all the different series. Given the rate of surgical complications and the poor functional perspective for a brachial plexus injury without surgery, we believe that surgery should be the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurological complications of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Hussein A.; Khan, Abid S.; Khan, Muhammad A.; Aldarmahi, Ahmed A.; Lodhi, Yousif

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review and analyze the neurological complications from bariatric surgery in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from January 2009 to December 2015. Important personal and clinical data were collected from the charts of the patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Data on follow up visit and remote complication if present, was also collected. All patients with neurological complications were reviewed in detail. The significant difference was calculated by using T-test and p-value<0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 451 patients underwent bariatric surgery, 15 cases had neurological complications (3%). Axonal polyneuropathy was the most frequent neurological complication, but cases of Wernicke syndrome, vitamin B12 deficiency, Guillain-Barre syndrome and copper deficiency were also identified. Fourteen patients (93.3%) had full recovery from the neurological signs and symptoms; one patient died. Conclusions: Bariatric surgery is not free of potential neurological complications. Complications may affect both central and peripheral nervous system and death is a possibility. Multidisciplinary care including consultation of different teams is highly recommended. PMID:27356656

  4. Complications of equine oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Padraic M; Hawkes, Claire; Townsend, Neil

    2008-12-01

    The vast majority of equine oral procedures are dental-related and, unless great care is taken, almost all such procedures have the potential to cause marked short- or long-term damage to other oral structures. This review of the more common complications of oral surgery begins at the rostral oral cavity with procedures of the incisors, and then moves caudally to deal with complications related to procedures of wolf teeth and cheek teeth, including salivary duct disruption and dental sinusitis. Finally, complications associated with maxillary and mandibular fractures are discussed.

  5. Gastrointestinal Complications After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Irene T.

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly being performed in the medically complicated obese population as convincing data continue to mount, documenting the success of surgery not only in achieving meaningful weight loss but also in correcting obesity-related illnesses. Several surgical procedures with varying degrees of success and complications are currently being performed. This article discusses the short- and long-term gastrointestinal complications for the 4 most common bariatric surgical procedures: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. PMID:27118949

  6. Neurological complications of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, David L; Berger, Miles; Mathew, Joseph P; Graffagnino, Carmelo; Milano, Carmelo A; Newman, Mark F

    2014-05-01

    As increasing numbers of elderly people undergo cardiac surgery, neurologists are frequently called upon to assess patients with neurological complications from the procedure. Some complications mandate acute intervention, whereas others need longer term observation and management. A large amount of published literature exists about these complications and guidance on best practice is constantly changing. Similarly, despite technological advances in surgical intervention and modifications in surgical technique to make cardiac procedures safer, these advances often create new avenues for neurological injury. Accordingly, rapid and precise neurological assessment and therapeutic intervention rests on a solid understanding of the evidence base and procedural variables.

  7. Early Complications of Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Schnee, Mark

    1987-01-01

    In cyclosporine-treated cardiac allograft recipients, rejection and infection are two principal early complications. The following report describes our approach to the diagnosis and management of rejection. Infectious complications are discussed elsewhere in this journal. Lymphoproliferative disorders have not been reported in our series of transplant recipients. Other early complications particularly related to cyclosporine immuno-suppressive therapy include systemic hypertension, renal insufficiency, hepatic toxicity, and pancreatitis. Each of these is illustrated by a representative group or patient profile. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1987; 14:257-261) Images PMID:15227308

  8. Airway complications after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Machuzak, Michael; Santacruz, Jose F; Gildea, Thomas; Murthy, Sudish C

    2015-01-01

    Airway complications after lung transplantation present a formidable challenge to the lung transplant team, ranging from mere unusual images to fatal events. The exact incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the type of event, and there is still evolution of a universal characterization of the airway findings. Management is also wide-ranging. Simple observation or simple balloon bronchoplasty is sufficient in many cases, but vigilance following more severe necrosis is required for late development of both anastomotic and nonanastomotic airway strictures. Furthermore, the impact of coexisting infection, rejection, and medical disease associated with high-level immunosuppression further complicates care.

  9. Management and complications of stomas.

    PubMed

    Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management.

  10. Masquerading bundle branch block: a variety of right bundle branch block with left anterior fascicular block.

    PubMed

    Elizari, Marcelo V; Baranchuk, Adrian; Chiale, Pablo A

    2013-01-01

    The so-called 'masquerading' type of right bundle branch block is caused by the simultaneous presence of a high-degree left anterior fascicular block often accompanied with severe left ventricular enlargement and/or fibrotic block in the anterolateral wall of the left ventricle. These conditions tend to reorient the terminal electrical forces of the QRS complex towards the left and upwards, in such a way that the characteristic slurred S wave in lead I becomes smaller or even disappears. In many cases of standard masquerading right bundle branch block, a small Q wave in lead I is present due to the initial forces of the left anterior fascicular block, which are oriented rightwards and inferiorly. However, in some cases, the Q wave in lead I also vanishes, and the mimicking of a left bundle branch block becomes perfect in standard leads. This is commonly associated with an inferior myocardial infarction or severe inferior fibrosis in cardiomyopathies. The typical QRS changes of right bundle branch block may eventually be concealed even in the right precordial leads; under such circumstances, the ECG diagnosis may be mistaken and the right bundle branch block totally missed. The masquerading right bundle branch block carries a poor prognosis, since it always implies the presence of a severe underlying heart disease.

  11. Iatrogenic Transient Complete Heart Block in a Preexisting LBBB

    PubMed Central

    Kalamkar, Prachi; Bonnet, Christopher A.; Bajwa, Omer A.

    2016-01-01

    Catheter induced cardiac arrhythmia is a well-known complication encountered during pulmonary artery or cardiac catheterization. Injury to the cardiac conducting system often involves the right bundle branch which in a patient with preexisting left bundle branch block can lead to fatal arrhythmia including asystole. Such a complication during central venous cannulation is rare as it usually does not enter the heart. The guide wire or the cannula itself can cause such an injury during central venous cannulation. The length of the guide wire, its rigidity, and lack of set guidelines for its insertion make it theoretically more prone to cause such an injury. We report a case of LBBB that went into transient complete heart block following guide wire insertion during a central venous cannulation procedure. PMID:27478653

  12. Region 9 Census Block 2010

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Geography:The TIGER Line Files are feature classes and related database files (.) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) Database (MTDB). The MTDB represents a seamless national file with no overlaps or gaps between parts, however, each TIGER Line File is designed to stand alone as an independent data set, or they can be combined to cover the entire nation. Census Blocks are statistical areas bounded on all sides by visible features, such as streets, roads, streams, and railroad tracks, and/or by non visible boundaries such as city, town, township, and county limits, and short line-of-sight extensions of streets and roads. Census blocks are relatively small in area; for example, a block in a city bounded by streets. However, census blocks in remote areas are often large and irregular and may even be many square miles in area. A common misunderstanding is that data users think census blocks are used geographically to build all other census geographic areas, rather all other census geographic areas are updated and then used as the primary constraints, along with roads and water features, to delineate the tabulation blocks. As a result, all 2010 Census blocks nest within every other 2010 Census geographic area, so that Census Bureau statistical data can be tabulated at the block level and aggregated up t

  13. Block Transfer Agreement Evaluation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastedo, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate for the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) the effectiveness of block transfer agreements (BTAs) in the BC Transfer System and recommend steps to be taken to improve their effectiveness. Findings of this study revealed that institutions want to expand block credit transfer;…

  14. Writing Blocks and Tacit Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    1993-01-01

    A review of the literature on writing block looks at two kinds: inability to write in a timely, fluent fashion, and reluctance by academicians to assist others in writing. Obstacles to fluent writing are outlined, four historical trends in treating blocks are discussed, and implications are examined. (MSE)

  15. The Effectiveness of Block Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creamean, Sharon Lightle; Horvath, Robert Jeffery

    This report describes a program for the exploration of block scheduling. The targeted population consists of high school students in a growing, middle-class community, located in a suburban setting of a large mid-western city. The historical background of block scheduling is documented through data gathered using attendance reports, student…

  16. Foreign Language on the Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    The guide is designed to address concerns of North Carolina second/foreign language teachers and school administrators as they plan and implement block class scheduling. The first section outlines the rationale and special considerations for block scheduling, and offers some typical schedule options. North Carolina's instructional time…

  17. Building Minds by Block Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montopoli, Linda

    Noting that the process of playing with blocks supports the groundwork for learning in every area of a child's growth, this paper discusses specific uses of building blocks in the early childhood curriculum to develop a child's physical, social, emotional, artistic, language, scientific and mathematics growth. The paper outlines the contributions…

  18. Temporal Evaluation of Neurosensory Complications After Mandibular Third Molar Extraction: Current Problems for Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Masaya; Hiraoka, Yujiro; Hasegawa, Takumi; Komori, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective study aimed to report the incidence of neurosensory complications after third molar extraction and also to identify current problems and discuss appropriate management of these complications. Method: Patients who underwent extraction of deeply impacted mandibular third molars under general anesthesia were included. The following epidemiological data were retrospectively gathered from medical charts: type of neurosensory complication, treatment for complication, and outcome. Results: A total 369 mandibular third molars were extracted in 210 patients under general anesthesia during this study period. Thirty-one of the 369 teeth (8.4%) in 31 patients had neurosensory complications during the first postoperative week resulting from inferior alveolar nerve damage. Neurosensory complications lasting from 1 to 3 months postoperatively included 17 cases of hypoesthesia and 8 of dysesthesia in 19 patients. Five cases of hypoesthesia and 4 of dysesthesia in 5 patients persisted over 1 year postoperatively. Sixteen of 369 teeth (4.3%) in 16 patients had persistent neurosensory complications after third molar extraction under general anesthesia. Stellate ganglion block was performed in 4 patients. Early initiation of stellate ganglion block (within 2 weeks postoperatively) produced better outcomes than late stellate ganglion block (over 6 months postoperatively). Conclusion: Refractory neurosensory complications after third molar extraction often combine both hypoesthesia and dysesthesia. Current problems in diagnosis and treatment included delayed detection of dysesthesia and the lack of uniform timing of stellate ganglion block. In the future, routinely inquiring about dysesthesia and promptly providing affected patients with information about stellate ganglion block might produce better outcomes. PMID:28217188

  19. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys were considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. Some RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks were taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and microstructural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response.

  20. Prevention of complications in dermatosurgery.

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Buljan, Marija; Cavka, Vlatka; Di Biagio, Nevena Skroza; Sebetić, Klaudija; Poduje, Sanja

    2008-01-01

    Dermatosurgery has become ever more popular and important in recent years, mostly due to the increasing prevalence of skin malignancies. It also encompasses a wide variety of methods to remove or modify skin tissue for numerous cosmetic reasons. Nowadays, many dermatologists provide complete dermatologic care for their patients, including surgery. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the possible complications and to be able to manage them properly. Complications in cutaneous surgery are not very often, but they can be serious and worrisome including bleeding, infections, allergic reactions, syncope, wound dehiscence, necrosis, and others. In this article special attention is given to bleeding, which is the most common complication in this field. The best way to reduce the number of possible complications is to recognize patients at risk. Thus, complete history and physical examination are required before performing any dermatosurgical operation.

  1. Complications in Pediatric Facial Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Mimi T.; Losee, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of pediatric facial fractures, little has been published on the complications of these fractures. The existing literature is highly variable regarding both the definition and the reporting of adverse events. Although the incidence of pediatric facial fractures is relative low, they are strongly associated with other serious injuries. Both the fractures and their treatment may have long-term consequence on growth and development of the immature face. This article is a selective review of the literature on facial fracture complications with special emphasis on the complications unique to pediatric patients. We also present our classification system to evaluate adverse outcomes associated with pediatric facial fractures. Prospective, long-term studies are needed to fully understand and appreciate the complexity of treating children with facial fractures and determining the true incidence, subsequent growth, and nature of their complications. PMID:22110803

  2. Ambulatory surgical management of breast carcinoma using paravertebral block.

    PubMed Central

    Weltz, C R; Greengrass, R A; Lyerly, H K

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors describe an initial experience using paravertebral block for ambulatory or short-stay operations for breast cancer. BACKGROUND: Rising hospital costs have focused attention on limiting the length of stay for patients undergoing surgical treatment of breast cancer. Thus far, ambulatory surgery has been limited by side effects and complications of general anesthesia. Paravertebral block offers the potential benefit of effective analgesia, with limited postoperative nausea and vomiting. METHODS: The medical records of the first 15 patients with breast cancer who underwent 16 major operations for the treatment of breast cancer using paravertebral block were reviewed. Patients were either discharged directly from the recovery room or after overnight hospital admission. The effectiveness of anesthesia, surgical outcome, patient satisfaction, and hospital costs are reviewed. RESULTS: Paravertebral block achieved effective anesthesia for cancer operations of the breast and axilla; conversion to general anesthesia or supplementation with local anesthesia was not required. There was one postoperative hemorrhage, there were two seromas, and there was one superficial wound infection. Sensory block persisted for an average of 23 hours. Postoperative pain was effectively controlled, in fact, nine patients required no postoperative narcotic for pain control. Nausea and vomiting transiently afflicted three patients and prompted overnight observation in one patient originally scheduled for immediate discharge. Fourteen patients (93%) rated their experience as "very satisfactory." CONCLUSION: Breast operations for the surgical management of breast cancer using paravertebral block can be performed safely, with great patient satisfaction, and with potential for significant cost savings. PMID:7618963

  3. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Stalin

    2013-01-01

    This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:23762661

  4. [Postoperative complications in plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Vogt, P M

    2009-09-01

    Plastic surgery covers a broad spectrum of diseases and conditions in the areas of reconstructive surgery, hand, burn and aesthetic surgery. Besides acquired defects or malformations an increasing number of patients are being treated for surgical or multimodal complications. In a considerable number of patients plastic and reconstructive surgery remains the only therapeutic alternative after other therapy has failed. Therefore complication management in plastic surgery is of utmost importance for a successful outcome. In addition patient expectations in the results of plastic surgery as a discipline of invention and problem solving are steadily increasing. This challenge is reflected in clinical patient management by intensive research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Patients in plastic surgery are recruited from all age groups of either gender, involving traumatic and oncologic as well as congenital and aesthetic disorders. The demographics of aging, multimorbidity and obesity pose new challenges to plastic surgery. Although age over 70 years is not an independent risk factor per se for complications in plastic surgery, e.g. for complex free flap transfer, medical problems are present at a higher rate, which is to be expected in this age group. Risk factors such as alcoholism and coronary heart diseases seem to be independent predictors of perioperative complications. Therefore older patients can also benefit from plastic surgery and recurrent operations by the corresponding risk and complication management. Complication management necessitates careful patient selection, estimation of operative risks and patient-adapted selection of procedures. In addition to expertise in plastic surgery a thorough knowledge of non-surgical and surgical back-up procedures for technical incidents as well as vascular circulatory and wound healing disorders is required to deal successfully with complications in plastic surgery. This article presents these specific

  5. The management of complicated glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Clement, C I; Goldberg, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Complicated glaucomas present considerable diagnostic and management challenges. Response to treatment can be unpredictable or reduced compared with other glaucomas. However, target intraocular pressure and preservation of vision may be achieved with selected medical, laser and surgical treatment. The evidence for such treatment is expanding and consequently affords clinicians a better understanding of established and novel techniques. Herein we review the mechanisms involved in the development of complicated glaucoma and the current evidence supporting its management. PMID:21150026

  6. [Multiple complications after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Manrique, J; Rossich, E; Hernández Sierra, A

    2004-01-01

    This is the case of a 32-year-old male patient, diagnosed with end stage renal disease secondary to a focal and segmental glomerulonephritis. After four years of haemodialysis, he received a renal graft from a cadaveric donor. During the following sixteen years, he developped many different complications. In the early post-transplant period, he developed a severe acute tubular necrosis and two episodes of acute rejection took place, both of them with later recovery. Among the outstanding infectious complications were a virus herpes zoster dorsal infection and a Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial pneumonia. Twelve months later, a series of severe digestive complications took place: cholecystitis that required cholecystectomy, pancreatic pseudocyst which required laparotomy because of an abdominal complication, two separate episodes of upper digestive bleeding that finally required gastric surgery, and an hemorrhagic subphrenic abscess that required a second laparotomy. Currently he has developed a calcified chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, metabolic complications must be mentioned carbohydrate intolerance, cataracts and an avascular bone necrosis, all of them closely related to the immunosuppressive therapy. In spite of these multiple complications, he mantains a good renal function and his quality of life is acceptable.

  7. The genetics of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Emma; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-05-01

    The rising global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality that is attributable to the complications of chronic hyperglycaemia. These complications include blindness, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Current therapeutic options for chronic hyperglycaemia reduce, but do not eradicate, the risk of these complications. Success in defining new preventative and therapeutic strategies hinges on an improved understanding of the molecular processes involved in the development of these complications. This Review explores the role of human genetics in delivering such insights, and describes progress in characterizing the sequence variants that influence individual predisposition to diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Numerous risk variants for microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported, but very few have shown robust replication. Furthermore, only limited evidence exists of a difference in the repertoire of risk variants influencing macrovascular disease between those with and those without diabetes. Here, we outline the challenges associated with the genetic analysis of diabetic complications and highlight ongoing efforts to deliver biological insights that can drive translational benefits.

  8. Pulmonary Complications due to Esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Shirinzadeh, Abulfazl; Talebi, Yashar

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma is the scourge of human beings. Pulmonary complications in patients who have undergone operation are common (20-30% of cases) and there are no suitable tools and ways to predict these complications. During a period of 10 years, from March 1998 to February 2007, 200 patients (150 male and 50 female) underwent Esophagectomy due to esophageal carcinoma in thoracic surgery ward retrospectively. Complications include the length of hospitalization, mechanical ventilation, morbidity and mortality. Patients' risk factors include age, preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, stage of the disease and preoperative spirometry condition. WE GROUPED OUR PATIENTS INTO THREE CATEGORIES: Normal (FEV1 ≥ 80% predicted), mildly impaired (FEV1 65% to 79% predicted), more severely impaired (FEV1 < 65% predicted).Although almost all patients had radiographic pulmonary abnormalities, significant pulmonary complications occurred in 40 patients (20%) which underwent Esophagectomy. Pleural effusion and atelectasia in 160 patients (80%). 24 patients needed chest-tube insertion. 20 patients (10%) developed ARDS. 14 patients (7%) developed chylothorax. 20 patients (10%) of patients died during their postoperative hospital stay. 30 patients (15%) required mechanical ventilation for greater than 48 hours. We reviewed a number of preoperative clinical variables to determine whether they contributed to postoperative pulmonary complications as well as other outcomes. In general, age, impaired pulmonary function especially in those patients with FEV1 less than 65% predicted was associated with prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS). In fact pulmonary complications rate after Esophagectomy are high and there was associated mortality and morbidity.

  9. Third molar complications requiring hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Martin; Morbach, Thomas; Kleis, Wilfried; Wagner, Wilfried

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe demographic and clinical patterns of subjects hospitalized with complications associated with third molars (M3). The investigation was designed as a prospective cohort study composed of subjects admitted to hospital for management of M3-associated complications. The predictor variable was "clinical status of the M3" defined as (A) prophylactic M3 removal, (B) nonelective M3 removal, or (C) M3 present at the time of admission. Outcome variables were infection parameters, treatment costs, length of hospital stay, and days of disability. Postoperative complications (A and B) were compared to complications based on pericoronitis (C). Complications due to prophylactic removal (A) were compared to those arising from pericoronitis or from the removal of symptomatic teeth (B and C). From January 2003 to December 2004, 45 deep space infections, 6 mandibular fractures, 2 lingual nerve injuries, 1 parapharyngeal tooth luxation, and 1 osteomyelitis were noticed. Fifteen complications resulted from prophylactic surgery (A), 25 from nonelective removal (B), and 15 from pericoronitis (C). Direct treatment costs were 147,000 euro (A: 42,000 euro; B: 74,000 euro; C: 31,000 euro). In 10 of the 15 patients of group C, deep space involvement resulted immediately from the first episode of pericoronitis. Neither clinical markers of infection nor economic parameters showed significant differences between the groups. Within the catchment area of our institution, the majority of third molar-related hospitalizations resulted from diseased third molars or their removal.

  10. Enhanced A-V nodal conduction (Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome) by congenitally hypoplastic A-V node.

    PubMed

    Ometto, R; Thiene, G; Corrado, D; Vincenzi, M; Rossi, L

    1992-11-01

    The basic anatomical substrate of enhanced A-V nodal conduction, manifesting or not as Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome, is still a controversial issue. We describe the case of a 34-year-old man who presented episodes of ventricular fibrillation. Electrophysiological studies showed that the AH interval was 55 ms, and increased by only 20 ms at paced cycle lengths of 300 ms; atrial pacing induced atrial fibrillation, with a shortest RR interval of 240 ms. Despite verapamil therapy, this patient died suddenly at home. Histological study disclosed a severe A-V node hypoplasia that was evidently congenital in nature; the rest of the conduction system was normal, and no accessory A-V pathways were present. We suggest that enhanced A-V nodal conduction in this patient was due to the developmental defect in the A-V node; this abnormality caused a loss of specific impulse-delaying function, and thus allowed rapid, unfiltered atrial impulses to reach the lower A-V junction and ventricles.

  11. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This instructor guide together with a student guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The instructor guide is a resource for planning and managing individualized, competency-based instruction in six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units with some units having several…

  12. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This student guide together with an instructor guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The student guide contains self-contained instructional material that students can study at their own pace most of the time. Six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units, with some units…

  13. Block Curricula: A Guide to Teaching with Unit Blocks and Hollow Blocks in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Phyllis; Tiedemann, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for preschool teachers was designed for use with wooden unit and hollow blocks to foster a variety of math, science, language, and social skills. Following an introduction to the curriculum and a discussion of cooperative learning and stages of block building, the guide is divided into three parts. Part 1 of the guide,…

  14. Composite Block Polymer-Microfabricated Silicon Nanoporous Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Nuxoll, Eric E.; Hillmyer, Marc A.; Wang, Ruifang; Leighton, C.

    2009-01-01

    Block polymers offer an attractive route to densely-packed, monodisperse nanoscale pores. However, their fragility as thin films complicates their use as membranes. By integrating a block polymer film with a thin (100 μm) silicon substrate, we have developed a composite membrane providing both nanoscale size exclusion and fast transport of small molecules. Here we describe the fabrication of this membrane, evaluate its mechanical integrity, and demonstrate its transport properties for model solutes of large and small molecular weight. The ability to block large molecules without hindering smaller ones, coupled with the potential for surface modification of the polymer and the MEMS style of the support make this composite membrane an attractive candidate for interfacing implantable sensing and drug delivery devices with biological hosts. PMID:20160882

  15. Sub-tenon's block: a national United Kingdom survey.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Shashi B; Murray, Philip I

    2008-01-01

    A survey was undertaken to ascertain current practices in ophthalmic regional anesthesia with an emphasis on sub-Tenon's block. Despite its increasing use, there are currently no guidelines for its explicit management. An anonymized postal questionnaire survey was sent to 173 consultant anesthesiologist members of the British Ophthalmic Anaesthesia Society. Sub-Tenon's blocks were regularly performed by 87.8% of respondents. The majority used a blunt metal cannula via the inferonasal quadrant. Local anesthetic was placed post-equatorially by 58% of respondents and deep posteriorly by 16.7%; 18% used vasopressors. There was no agreement for aseptic precautions, international normalized ratio, platelet levels, or venous access. Complications included vascular and muscular injuries, a case of fainting, and several cases of dysrhythmias. Current United Kingdom guidelines for monitoring patients were not being followed. These results show a need for robust national guidelines, especially in view of increasing use, indications, and potential risks of sub-Tenon's block.

  16. Snell's Law with Large Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, John J.

    2007-03-01

    The introductory physics lab curriculum usually has one experiment devoted to the study of the refraction of light. The most obvious way to study the refraction of light is to lay a transparent block down on the lab bench and aim a laser beam horizontally at the block so that it refracts twice—inward upon entering the block and outward upon exiting. The vendors that provide us with lab equipment (Sargent-Welch, PASCO, Fisher Scientific, and Frey Scientific to name a few) sell acrylic blocks for this very purpose, but these are either too small or they are too expensive. If students are going to measure angles of incidence and refraction, the blocks should be larger than the typical student protractor, which has a radius of 3 in (≈ 7½ cm). These blocks are just not large enough. They are generally not thick enough either so that the beam from a typical laser passes over them and not through them. The vendors mentioned above do sell blackboard optics kits that contain, among other parts, three blocks that are large enough—on the order of 10 to 20 cm. Unfortunately, these kits cost more than 1000.

  17. 31 CFR 560.322 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... name of the Government of Iran, any Iranian financial institution, or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 560.211, or in which the Government of Iran, an...

  18. 31 CFR 560.322 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... name of the Government of Iran, any Iranian financial institution, or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 560.211, or in which the Government of Iran, an...

  19. 31 CFR 570.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Government of Libya or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 570.201, or in which the Government of Libya or such person has an interest, and with respect to which...

  20. 31 CFR 570.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Government of Libya or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 570.201, or in which the Government of Libya or such person has an interest, and with respect to which...

  1. 31 CFR 570.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Government of Libya or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 570.201, or in which the Government of Libya or such person has an interest, and with respect to which...

  2. 31 CFR 570.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Government of Libya or any other person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to § 570.201, or in which the Government of Libya or such person has an interest, and with respect to which...

  3. 1-2-3 Blocks: Beginning Block Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Evelyn

    This book discusses ways that blocks can be used with young children to help them develop different intellectual, motor, and social skills. The book is divided into four sections organized by block type: (1) unit blocks; (2) hollow blocks; (3) table blocks; and (4) homemade blocks. Each section describes the block type, gives reasons for using the…

  4. Placenta associated pregnancy complications in pregnancies complicated with placenta previa.

    PubMed

    Baumfeld, Yael; Herskovitz, Reli; Niv, Zehavi Bar; Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Weintraub, Adi Y

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine the hypothesis that pregnancies complicated with placenta previa have an increased risk of placental insufficiency associated pregnancy complications (IUGR, preeclampsia, placental abruption and perinatal mortality). Our study included all deliveries that occurred at Soroka University Medical Center (Beer Sheva, Israel) between January 1998 and December 2013. Of them 1,249 were complicated by placenta previa and represented our study group. A composite outcome was created to include conditions associated with placental insufficiency. It included hypertensive disorders (i.e. gestational hypertension, mild and severe preeclampsia, HELLP and eclampsia), small for gestational age neonates and placental abruption. Patients with pregnancy complicated by placenta previa had significantly different obstetrical characteristics including bad obstetric history (8% vs. 4%, p < 0.001), recurrent abortions (11% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). Patients with placenta previa had higher rates of vaginal bleeding in the second half of pregnancy (3% vs. 0%, p < 0.001), gestational diabetes (8% vs. 5.5%, p < 0.001), placental abruption (10% vs. 1%, p < 0.001), adherent placenta (4% vs. 0.5%, p < 0.001), preterm delivery (52% vs. 8%, p < 0.001), with a median gestational age of 36 vs. 39 weeks, p < 0.001. The composite outcome was significantly more prevalent in the placenta previa group (21% vs. 13%, p < 0,001). Our study demonstrated an increased rate of placental insufficiency associated complications in women with placenta previa. This is of clinical relevance and suggests that a careful surveillance for women with placenta previa may help in minimizing maternal, fetal and neonatal complications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  6. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-03-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  7. Ultrasound-guided peripheral and truncal blocks in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Delvi, Mohamed Bilal

    2011-04-01

    Ultrasound has added a feather in the cap of the anesthesiologists as real-time nerve localization and drug deposition around the nerve structure under real-time guidance is now a reality, as the saying "seeing is believing" has been proven true with the advent of ultrasound in anesthesia. Pediatric patients are a unique group regarding their anatomical and physiological features in comparison with adults; regional blocks in adults with the anatomical landmark and surface marking are almost uniform across the adult population. The landmark technique in pediatric patients is not reliable in all patients due to the variability in the age and size; the advent of ultrasound in assisting nerve localization has changed the way regional blocks are achieved in children and the range of blocks performed on adults can now be performed on pediatric patients; with advances in the technology and dexterity of ultrasound equipment, the chances of success of blocks has increased with a smaller dose of the local anesthetic in comparison to the traditional methods. Anesthesiologists are now able to perform blocks with more accuracy and avoid complications like intravascular injection and injury to the pleura and peritoneum during routine practice with the assistance of high-frequency transducers and top of the range portable ultrasound machines; catheters can be inserted to provide a continuous analgesia in the postoperative period. This review article describes the common peripheral blocks in pediatric patients; the readers are encouraged to gain experience by attending workshops, hands-on practice under supervision, and conduct random controlled trials pertaining to ultrasound-guided blocks in the pediatric age group. The recent literature is encouraging and further research is promising; a wide range of blocks being described in detail by many prominent experts from all over the world.

  8. [Psoriasis: development and fatal complications].

    PubMed

    Roth, P E; Grosshans, E; Bergoend, H

    1991-01-01

    In a retrospective study we tried to evaluate the number of severe psoriasis with a lethal outcome observed in France in a 20-year period from 1965 to 1985. Among 992 psoriatic in-patients on care during this period in the Dermatology Clinic of Strasbourg, 7 died of different complications directly related to the skin disease or its therapy; 39 further cases could be gathered through different departments of dermatology of France. Patients who died had generalized psoriasis (13 cases), psoriatic erythroderma (15 cases) and generalized pustular psoriasis (18 cases); 18 (39 p. 100) also had psoriatic polyarthritis. Circumstances leading to death (table I) were metabolic disorders, related to erythroderma in most cases, non-specific complications (infections, amyloidosis) or complications of specific treatments (methotrexate, etretinate, corticosteroids, mechlorethamine). A comprehensive review of the literature over a century showed that only 72 lethal psoriasis cases have been reported: this rather low number may be due to the fact that some rare pathologies, such as visceral amyloidosis (12 cases) (table III) and fatal complications of methotrexate therapy (38 cases) (table V), paradoxically are more often published than non-specific complications occurring in severe psoriasis, such as cardiovascular failure or cachexy in erythrodermic patients. However, the review of the literature shows, as our own inquiry, the poor prognosis of generalized pustular forms and of psoriasis-associated polyarthropathies: among 42 lethal cases where enough data were available, 23 (55 p. 100) had psoriatic polyarthritis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Survival and complications in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Borgna-Pignatti, C; Cappellini, M D; De Stefano, P; Del Vecchio, G C; Forni, G L; Gamberini, M R; Ghilardi, R; Origa, R; Piga, A; Romeo, M A; Zhao, H; Cnaan, A

    2005-01-01

    The life expectancy of patients with thalassemia major has significantly increased in recent years, as reported by several groups in different countries. However, complications are still frequent and affect the patients' quality of life. In a recent study from the United Kingdom, it was found that 50% of the patients had died before age 35. At that age, 65% of the patients from an Italian long-term study were still alive. Heart disease is responsible for more than half of the deaths. The prevalence of complications in Italian patients born after 1970 includes heart failure in 7%, hypogonadism in 55%, hypothyroidism in 11%, and diabetes in 6%. Similar data were reported in patients from the United States. In the Italian study, lower ferritin levels were associated with a lower probability of experiencing heart failure and with prolonged survival. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are common and affect virtually all patients. Hepatitis C virus antibodies are present in 85% of multitransfused Italian patients, 23% of patients in the United Kingdom, 35% in the United States, 34% in France, and 21% in India. Hepatocellular carcinoma can complicate the course of hepatitis. A survey of Italian centers has identified 23 such cases in patients with a thalassemia syndrome. In conclusion, rates of survival and complication-free survival continue to improve, due to better treatment strategies. New complications are appearing in long-term survivors. Iron overload of the heart remains the main cause of morbidity and mortality.

  10. Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes ... a Volunteer American Diabetes Month® American Diabetes Association Alert Day® Become a Member Advocacy Home Take Action ...

  11. Potential use of aldose reductase inhibitors to prevent diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Zenon, G J; Abobo, C V; Carter, B L; Ball, D W

    1990-06-01

    Reviewed are (1) the biochemical basis and pathophysiology of diabetic complications and (2) the structure-activity relationships, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials, and adverse effects of aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs). ARIs are a new class of drugs potentially useful in preventing diabetic complications, the most widely studied of which have been cataracts and neuropathy. ARIs inhibit aldose reductase, the first, rate-limiting enzyme in the polyol metabolic pathway. In nonphysiological hyperglycemia the activity of hexokinase becomes saturated while that of aldose reductase is enhanced, resulting in intracellular accumulation of sorbitol. Because sorbitol does not readily penetrate the cell membrane it can persist within cells, which may lead to diabetic complications. ARIs are a class of structurally dissimilar compounds that include carboxylic acid derivatives, flavonoids, and spirohydantoins. The major pharmacologic action of an ARI involves competitive binding to aldose reductase and consequent blocking of sorbitol production. ARIs delay cataract formation in animals, but the role of aldose reductase in cataract formation in human diabetics has not been established. The adverse effects of ARIs include hypersensitivity reactions. Although the polyol pathway may not be solely responsible for diabetic complications, studies suggest that therapy with ARIs could be beneficial. Further research is needed to determine the long-term impact and adverse effects of ARIs in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  12. Atrioventricular block during fetal life

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lindsey E.; Simpson, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular (AV) block occurs in approximately 1 in 20,000 live births and is known to result in significant mortality and morbidity both during fetal life and postnatally. Complete AV block can occur as a result of an immune or a non-immune mediated process. Immune mediated AV block is a multifactorial disease, but is associated with the trans-placental passage of maternal autoantibodies (anti-Ro/SSA and/or anti-La/SSB). These autoantibodies attach to and subsequently damage the cardiomyocytes and conduction tissue in susceptible fetuses. In this report, we examine the evidence in reference to means of assessment, pathophysiology, and potential prenatal therapy of atrioventricular block. PMID:26136631

  13. The Building Blocks of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Betty O.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses teaching techniques for teaching about rocks, minerals, and the differences between them. Presents a model-building activity that uses plastic building blocks to build crystal and rock models. (YDS)

  14. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... to the eardrum) and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  15. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  16. The Building Blocks of Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Betty O.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses teaching techniques for teaching about rocks, minerals, and the differences between them. Presents a model-building activity that uses plastic building blocks to build crystal and rock models. (YDS)

  17. Sequential exposure to a combination of stressors blocks memory reconsolidation in Lymnaea.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Shawn Xavier; Lukowiak, Ken

    2015-03-01

    Stress alters the formation of long-term memory (LTM) in Lymnaea. When snails are exposed to more than one stressor, however, how the memory is altered becomes complicated. Here, we investigated how multiple stressors applied in a specific pattern affect an aspect of memory not often studied in regards to stress - reconsolidation. We hypothesized that the application of a sequence of stressors would block the reconsolidation process. Reconsolidation occurs following activation of a previously formed memory. Sequential crowding and handling were used as the stressors to block reconsolidation. When the two stressors were sequentially presented immediately following memory activation, reconsolidation was blocked. However, if the sequential presentation of the stressors was delayed for 1 h after memory activation, reconsolidation was not blocked. That is, LTM was observed. Finally, presentation of either stressor alone did not block reconsolidation. Thus, stressors can block reconsolidation, which may be preferable to pharmacological manipulations. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

  19. [Surgery in complicated colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kreisler, Esther; Biondo, Sebastiano; Martí-Ragué, Joan

    2006-07-01

    Colorectal cancer continues to have a serious social impact. A large proportion of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. Approximately one-third of patients with colorectal cancer will undergo emergency surgery for a complicated tumor, with a high risk of mortality and poorer long-term prognosis. The most frequent complications are obstruction and perforation, while massive hemorrhage is rare. The curative potential of surgery, whether urgent or elective, depends on how radical the resection is, among other factors. In the literature on the management of urgent colorectal disease, there are few references to the oncological criteria for resection. Uncertainly about the optimal treatment has led to wide variability in the treatment of this entity. The present article aims to provide a critical appraisal of the controversies surrounding the role of surgery and its impact on complicated colorectal cancer.

  20. Neurological complications of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R H; Marshall, W C; Chessells, J M

    1977-01-01

    We have reviewed the neurological complications not directly attributable to leukaemic infiltration in a group of 438 children with leukaemia or lymphoma. 61 children had one or more complications due chiefly to bleeding, infection, or drug toxicity. Early death from intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 1% of children with lymphoblastic leukaemia and 7% of children with myeloblastic leukaemia. Measles and chicken pox were the most serious infective complications; one child remains severely retarded after presumed measles encephalitis, one child with chicken pox died, and a second remains disabled. 2 additional cases of measles encephalitis and one of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy are described. Drugs which caused neurotoxicity included vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, L-asparaginase, and phenothiazines, but most problems were caused by methotrexate. Methotrexate toxicity was more prevalent and more serious in children who had had previous central nervous system leukaemia. We conclude that viral infections and methotrexate pose the greatest neurological hazards to children with leukaemia. PMID:596922

  1. Complications of third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Bouloux, Gary F; Steed, Martin B; Perciaccante, Vincent J

    2007-02-01

    This article addresses the incidence of specific complications and, where possible, offers a preventive or management strategy. Injuries of the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves are significant issues that are discussed separately in this text. Surgical removal of third molars is often associated with postoperative pain, swelling, and trismus. Factors thought to influence the incidence of complications after third molar removal include age, gender, medical history, oral contraceptives, presence of pericoronitis, poor oral hygiene, smoking, type of impaction, relationship of third molar to the inferior alveolar nerve, surgical time, surgical technique, surgeon experience, use of perioperative antibiotics, use of topical antiseptics, use of intra-socket medications, and anesthetic technique. Complications that are discussed further include alveolar osteitis, postoperative infection, hemorrhage, oro-antral communication, damage to adjacent teeth, displaced teeth, and fractures.

  2. Complications in pediatric hepatobiliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Grisotti, Gabriella; Cowles, Robert A

    2016-12-01

    This review highlights the complications and their risk factors encountered in pediatric hepatobiliary surgery, specifically in the context of pediatric hepatic resection, excision of choledochal cyst, and the Kasai hepatoportoenterostomy procedure for biliary atresia as well as other procedures potentially affecting the biliary tree. With the understanding that these are relatively rare procedures, case reports and small case series are included in addition to larger series when available. The review focuses on publications in English over the past 15 years. Complications included both surgery-specific pathology, such as biliary stricture after excision of choledochal cyst, and disease-specific entities, such as malnutrition in biliary atresia. This review may be useful when considering a particular procedure or in the discussion thereof with a patient and family. Additionally, it illuminates the need for additional work with larger patient databases to refine and expand our knowledge of these complications and precipitating risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers.

  4. Psychological complications of pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Mitchell, Elisha R

    2011-12-01

    Psychological complications associated with pediatric obesity include low self-esteem, depression, body dissatisfaction, loss-of-control eating, unhealthy and extreme weight control behaviors, impaired social relationships, obesity stigma, and decreased health-related quality of life. Bioecological models offer a framework for understanding the interaction between pediatric obesity and psychological complications and illustrate system-level approaches for prevention and intervention. As the medical setting is often the first point of contact for families, pediatricians are instrumental in the identification and referral of children with psychological complications. Motivational interviewing, patient talking points, brief screening measures, and referral resources are important tools in this process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Complications of injectable fillers, part 2: vascular complications.

    PubMed

    DeLorenzi, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    Accidental intra-arterial filler injection may cause significant tissue injury and necrosis. Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers, currently the most popular, are the focus of this article, which highlights complications and their symptoms, risk factors, and possible treatment strategies. Although ischemic events do happen and are therefore important to discuss, they seem to be exceptionally rare and represent a small percentage of complications in individual clinical practices. However, the true incidence of this complication is unknown because of underreporting by clinicians. Typical clinical findings include skin blanching, livedo reticularis, slow capillary refill, and dusky blue-red discoloration, followed a few days later by blister formation and finally tissue slough. Mainstays of treatment (apart from avoidance by meticulous technique) are prompt recognition, immediate treatment with hyaluronidase, topical nitropaste under occlusion, oral acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), warm compresses, and vigorous massage. Secondary lines of treatment may involve intra-arterial hyaluronidase, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and ancillary vasodilating agents such as prostaglandin E1. Emergency preparedness (a "filler crash cart") is emphasized, since early intervention is likely to significantly reduce morbidity. A clinical summary chart is provided, organized by complication presentation.

  6. Comparative analysis between direct Conventional Mandibular nerve block and Vazirani-Akinosi closed mouth Mandibular nerve block technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sobhan; Tripathy, Ramanupam; Sabhlok, Samrat; Panda, Pankaj Kumar; Patnaik, Satyabrata

    2012-11-01

    Introduction: Over the years different techniques have been developed for achieving mandibular nerve anaesthesia. The main aim of our study was to carry out comparison and clinical efficacy of mandibular nerve anaesthesia by Direct Conventional technique with that of Vazirani-Akinosi mandibular nerve block technique.Materials and Methods: 50 adult patients requiring surgical extraction of premolars, mandibular first, second and third molars were selected randomly to receive Direct Conventional technique and Vazirani- Akinosi technique for nerve block alternatively.Results: No statistically significant differences were observed regarding complete lip anaesthesia at 5 minutes and 10 minutes, nerves anaesthetized with single injection, effectiveness of anaesthesia, supplementary injections and complications in both the techniques. However, onset of lip anaesthesia was found to be faster in Vazirani-Akinosi technique, patients experienced less pain during the Vazirani-Akinosi technique as compared to the Direct Conventional technique. Post injection complication complications were less in the VaziraniAkinosi Technique.Conclusions: Except for faster onset of lip anaesthesia, less pain during injection and fewer post injection complications in Vazirani-Akinosi technique all other parameters were of same efficacy as Direct Conventional technique. This has strong clinical applications as in cases with limited mouth opening, apprehensive patients Vazirani-Akinosi technique is the indicated technique of choice.

  7. [Superior gluteal nerve: a new block on the block?

    PubMed

    Sá, Miguel; Graça, Rita; Reis, Hugo; Cardoso, José Miguel; Sampaio, José; Pinheiro, Célia; Machado, Duarte

    2017-05-24

    The superior gluteal nerve is responsible for innervating the gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and tensor fascia latae muscles, all of which can be injured during surgical procedures. We describe an ultrasound-guided approach to block the superior gluteal nerve which allowed us to provide efficient analgesia and anesthesia for two orthopedic procedures, in a patient who had significant risk factors for neuraxial techniques and deep peripheral nerve blocks. An 84-year-old female whose regular use of clopidogrel contraindicated neuraxial techniques or deep peripheral nerve blocks presented for urgent bipolar hemiarthroplasty in our hospital. Taking into consideration the surgical approach chosen by the orthopedic team, we set to use a combination of general anesthesia and superficial peripheral nerve blocks (femoral, lateral cutaneous of thigh and superior gluteal nerve) for the procedure. A month and a half post-discharge the patient was re-admitted for debriding and correction of suture dehiscence; we performed the same blocks and light sedation. She remained comfortable in both cases, and reported no pain in the post-operative period. Deep understanding of anatomy and innervation empowers anesthesiologists to solve potentially complex cases with safer, albeit creative, approaches. The relevance of this block in this case arises from its innervation of the gluteus medius muscle and posterolateral portion of the hip joint. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an ultrasound-guided superior gluteal nerve block with an analgesic and anesthetic goal, which was successfully achieved. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Complications After Cosmetic Surgery Tourism.

    PubMed

    Klein, Holger J; Simic, Dario; Fuchs, Nina; Schweizer, Riccardo; Mehra, Tarun; Giovanoli, Pietro; Plock, Jan A

    2017-04-01

    Cosmetic surgery tourism characterizes a phenomenon of people traveling abroad for aesthetic surgery treatment. Problems arise when patients return with complications or need of follow-up care. To investigate the complications of cosmetic surgery tourism treated at our hospital as well as to analyze arising costs for the health system. Between 2010 and 2014, we retrospectively included all patients presenting with complications arising from cosmetic surgery abroad. We reviewed medical records for patients' characteristics including performed operations, complications, and treatment. Associated cost expenditure and Diagnose Related Groups (DRG)-related reimbursement were analyzed. In total 109 patients were identified. All patients were female with a mean age of 38.5 ± 11.3 years. Most procedures were performed in South America (43%) and Southeast (29.4%) or central Europe (24.8%), respectively. Favored procedures were breast augmentation (39.4%), abdominoplasty (11%), and breast reduction (7.3%). Median time between the initial procedure abroad and presentation was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 9) for early, 81.5 days (IQR, 69.5) for midterm, and 4.9 years (IQR, 9.4) for late complications. Main complications were infections (25.7%), wound breakdown (19.3%), and pain/discomfort (14.7%). The majority of patients (63.3%) were treated conservatively; 34.8% became inpatients with a mean hospital stay of 5.2 ± 3.8 days. Overall DRG-related reimbursement premiums approximately covered the total costs. Despite warnings regarding associated risks, cosmetic surgery tourism has become increasingly popular. Efficient patients' referral to secondary/tertiary care centers with standardized evaluation and treatment can limit arising costs without imposing a too large burden on the social healthcare system. 4.

  9. Pulmonary Complications due to Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shirinzadeh, Abulfazl; Talebi, Yashar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal carcinoma is the scourge of human beings. Pulmonary complications in patients who have undergone operation are common (20-30% of cases) and there are no suitable tools and ways to predict these complications. Methods During a period of 10 years, from March 1998 to February 2007, 200 patients (150 male and 50 female) underwent Esophagectomy due to esophageal carcinoma in thoracic surgery ward retrospectively. Complications include the length of hospitalization, mechanical ventilation, morbidity and mortality. Patients’ risk factors include age, preoperative chemo-radiotherapy, stage of the disease and preoperative spirometry condition. Results We grouped our patients into three categories: Normal (FEV1 ≥ 80% predicted), mildly impaired (FEV1 65% to 79% predicted), more severely impaired (FEV1 < 65% predicted).Although almost all patients had radiographic pulmonary abnormalities, significant pulmonary complications occurred in 40 patients (20%) which underwent Esophagectomy. Pleural effusion and atelectasia in 160 patients (80%). 24 patients needed chest-tube insertion. 20 patients (10%) developed ARDS. 14 patients (7%) developed chylothorax. 20 patients (10%) of patients died during their postoperative hospital stay. 30 patients (15%) required mechanical ventilation for greater than 48 hours. Conclusion We reviewed a number of preoperative clinical variables to determine whether they contributed to postoperative pulmonary complications as well as other outcomes. In general, age, impaired pulmonary function especially in those patients with FEV1 less than 65% predicted was associated with prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS). In fact pulmonary complications rate after Esophagectomy are high and there was associated mortality and morbidity. PMID:24250962

  10. Intracranial complications of transnasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Freije, J E; Donegan, J O

    1991-06-01

    The transnasal approach to the ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses is a well-established technique for treating nasal polyposis and chronic sinusitis. The literature supports the effectiveness and safety of this procedure when performed by experienced surgeons. Although various authors allude to catastrophic complications of intranasal ethmoidectomy, there are few case reports of complications involving significant morbidity or mortality. The potential for serious intracranial trauma is present during ethmoid surgery, especially during an intranasal approach due to limited exposure and difficulty in identifying surgical landmarks, but with renewed interest in this approach utilizing endoscopic instrumentation, the risks may be reduced.

  11. Sigmoid Volvulus Complicating Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Erin; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Pieracci, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    Background. Sigmoid volvulus is a rare complication of pregnancy and the puerperium. Case. A 19-year-old patient, gravida 1 para 0 at 41 0/7 weeks of gestation, admitted for late-term induction of labor underwent an uncomplicated primary low transverse cesarean delivery for arrest of descent. Her postoperative period was complicated by sudden onset of abdominal pain and the ultimate diagnosis of sigmoid volvulus. Conclusion. Prompt surgical evaluation of an acute abdomen in the postpartum period is essential; delayed diagnosis and treatment can lead to significant maternal morbidity and mortality. PMID:28251004

  12. [Intestinal complications from vascular prostheses].

    PubMed

    Fernández, C; Calvete, J; García, J; Buch, E; Castells, P; Lledó, S

    1993-01-01

    Secondary FAE is a rare complication, usually located at the duodenum. The typical clinical presentation is like a digestive hemorrhage or a sepsis. We report two cases of FAE with atypical manifestations. The first case presented a lower digestive hemorrhage produced by the fistulization to the sigma. The second case appeared like an intestinal obliteration caused by the full emigration of a prosthesis to the jejunum. We wish to remark the importance of the clinical suspicion of a FAE (Key of diagnosis), and the sparing relevance of the complementary examinations and the urgency of a surgical treatment in order to avoid the high rate of morbi-mortality associated with this complication.

  13. Gastrointestinal complications of mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Slater, D N; Bleehen, S S; Beck, S

    1984-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is an uncommon T-cell lymphoma which characteristically involves the skin. Two patients with MF are described who developed fatal complications secondary to involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. One developed malabsorption due to small intestinal involvement; the other had a massive haemorrhage from an ulcerated nodule of tumour in the stomach. The potential for extracutaneous spread is discussed, and it is emphasized that bowel infiltration should be considered in any patient with MF who develops gastrointestinal symptoms or complications. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:6737393

  14. Complications from international surgery tourism.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Mark M; Alizadeh, Kaveh

    2011-08-01

    Medical tourism is an increasing trend, particularly in cosmetic surgery. Complications resulting from these procedures can be quite disruptive to the healthcare industry in the United States since patients often seek treatment and have no compensation recourse from insurance. Despite the increasing number of plastic surgery patients seeking procedures abroad, there have been little reported data concerning outcomes, follow-up, or complication rates. Through a survey of American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) members, the authors provide data on trends to help define the scope of the problem.

  15. Intracraneal complications after raquis surgery.

    PubMed

    Sierra, J J; Malillos, M

    2017-07-07

    Intracraneal bleeding is a rare complication after raquis surgery. It is believed to occur as a drop in the intracraneal pressure after a loss of CSF secondary to an iatrogenic dural tear. We report a patient who after surgery for lumbar stenosis presented a subarachnoid haemorrhage, an intraparenchymal haematoma, and a subdural haematoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature with such complications after this type of surgery. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Complicated grief in late life

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief (CG) is a syndrome that affects 10% to 20% of grievers regardless of age, although proportionally more will face the death of loved ones in late life, CG is characterized by preoccupying and disabling symptoms that can persist for decades such as an inability to accept the death, intense yearning or avoidance, frequent reveries, deep sadness, crying, somatic distress, social withdrawal, and suicidal ideation. This syndrome is distinct from major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, but CG maybe comorbid with each. This communication will focus on the impact of CG in late life (over age 60) and will include a case vignette for illustrating complicated grief therapy. PMID:22754292

  17. Surgical Complications of Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, Leroy R.; Gandhi, Shobhana Anil; Gandhi, Anil Krishnakumar

    1977-01-01

    Complications of gynecological surgery are considerable and when reviewed in detail are almost frightening. There is no substitute for experience and intimate knowledge of the intricate pelvic structures in health and disease. Anyone who is active in the field is sooner or later going to experience some difficulty whether it be due to his miscalculation or to innate conditions in the patient which are beyond his/her control. It is the responsibility of the pelvic surgeon to recognize the complication and apply proper corrective measures. The patient should not be given false hopes of sure success nor should she be deprived of whatever hope for success does exist. PMID:572875

  18. Managing complications in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Paolo; Cordoba, Juan; Farges, Oliver; Valla, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. This life-threatening condition usually arises from complications of cirrhosis. While variceal bleeding is the most acute and probably best studied, several other complications of liver cirrhosis are more insidious in their onset but nevertheless more important for the long-term management and outcome of these patients. This review summarizes the topics discussed during the UEG-EASL Hepatology postgraduate course of the United European Gastroenterology Week 2013 and discusses emergency surgical conditions in cirrhotic patients, the management of hepatic encephalopathy, ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, coagulation disorders, and liver cancer. PMID:25653862

  19. Venous complications of pancreatitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Yashant; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-31

    Pancreatitis is notorious to cause vascular complications. While arterial complications include pseudoaneurysm formation with a propensity to bleed, venous complications can be quite myriad. Venous involvement in pancreatitis often presents with thrombosis. From time to time case reports and series of unusual venous complications associated with pancreatitis have, however, been described. In this article, we review multitudinous venous complications in the setting of pancreatitis and propose a system to classify pancreatitis associated venous complications.

  20. Laparoscopic-assisted Tranversus Abdominis Plane (TAP) Block Versus Ultrasonography-guided Transversus Abdominis Plane Block in Postlaparoscopic Cholecystectomy Pain Relief: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Niranjan T; Sistla, Sarath C; Kundra, Pankaj; Ali, S Manwar; Dhanapal, Baskaran; Galidevara, Indira

    2017-08-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block for postoperative analgesia in laparoscopic cholecystectomy is usually given under ultrasound guidance. Laparoscopic-assisted TAP block has been suggested as an alternative to ultrasonogram (USG)-guided block as it is less time consuming and does not need extra equipments. This study was done to compare the efficacy of both the techniques. We conducted a randomized controlled trial between October 2012 and June 2014 involving adult patients with symptomatic gall stone disease. Patients were randomly assigned to laparoscopic or ultrasound-guided TAP block. Both groups were compared for amount of opioid consumption, postoperative pain scores, postoperative nausea and vomiting, bowel movements, peak expiratory flow rate, and time taken for administering the block. We included 60 adult patients in our study. The groups were comparable with respect to demographic characteristics, symptomatology, comorbidities, and intraoperative complications. Amount of opioid consumption and postoperative pain relief were comparable between the 2 groups. The time taken for laparoscopy-assisted block was shorter when compared with the time taken for USG-guided block (P≤0.05). Postoperative nausea and vomiting, bowel movements, and peak expiratory flow rate were comparable between the 2 groups. Laparoscopy-assisted TAP block is faster and equally efficacious when compared with USG-guided block and has a definite role in centers where ultrasound is not available in operating rooms.

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Following Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Block

    PubMed Central

    Guirguis, Maged; Karroum, Rami; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Mounir-Soliman, Loran

    2012-01-01

    Background Brachial plexus blocks have become very common for patients undergoing upper extremity surgery. We report a case in which the patient developed ipsilateral phrenic nerve paralysis and acute respiratory failure following supraclavicular nerve block. Case Report A 61-year-old female diabetic, morbidly obese patient presented for a repeat debridement of necrotizing fasciitis on her left arm. She received a left-sided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Within a few minutes, the patient began to experience acute dyspnea, anxiety, and oxygen saturation of 90%. Breath sounds were diminished in the left hemithorax. Arterial blood gases revealed evidence of acute respiratory acidosis. The chest x-ray was normal. After induction, we intubated the patient. Subsequent arterial blood gases showed marked improvement in respiratory acidosis. We believed left phrenic nerve paralysis to be the cause of the distress. The patient was extubated in the surgical intensive care unit the following day, and infusion of ropivacaine 0.2% was started. The catheter was removed afterward secondary to its occlusion. Conclusion Phrenic nerve injury leading to respiratory distress is a rare complication of supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Anesthesiologists should be ready for emergency intubation when performing this kind of block. PMID:22778683

  2. Ticagrelor therapy and atrioventricular block: Do we need to worry?

    PubMed

    De Maria, Elia; Borghi, Ambra; Modonesi, Letizia; Cappelli, Stefano

    2017-05-16

    Ticagrelor is a potent, direct P2Y12 antagonist with rapid onset of action and intense platelet inhibition, indicated in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). This drug is usually well tolerated, but some patients experience serious adverse effects: Major bleeding; gastrointestinal disturbances; dyspnoea; ventricular pauses > 3 s. Given the unexpected high incidence of bradyarrhythmias, a PLATO substudy monitored this side effect, showing that ticagrelor was associated with an increase in the rate of sinus bradycardia and sinus arrest compared to clopidogrel. This side effect was usually transient, asymptomatic and not associated with higher incidence of severe atrioventricular (AV) block or pacemaker needs. A panel of experts from Food and Drug Administration did not consider bradyarrhythmias a serious problem in clinical practice and, accordingly, current labeling of the drug does not give any precaution or contraindication regarding this issue. However, recently some articles have described ACS patients with high-degree, life-threatening, AV block requiring drug discontinuation and, in some cases, pacemaker implantation. In this paper, we describe and discuss five published case reports of severe AV block following ticagrelor therapy and two other cases managed in our Hospital. The analysis of literature suggests that, although rarely, ticagrelor can be associated with life-threatening AV block. Caution and careful monitoring are required especially in patients with already compromised conduction system and/or treated with AV blocking agents. Future studies, with long-term rhythm monitoring, would help to define the outcome of patients at higher risk of developing this complication.

  3. PSA block for maxillary molar's anesthesia - an obsolete technique?

    PubMed

    Padhye, Mukul; Gupta, Savina; Chandiramani, Girish; Bali, Rati

    2011-12-01

    Routine use of posterior superior alveolar (PSA) nerve block or maxillary infiltration for the removal of maxillary molars has been validated. The present study was undertaken to determine the relative contribution of posterior superior alveolar (PSA) block in cases of anesthesia required for maxillary molars. One hundred patients requiring removal of maxillary second and third molars were enrolled. These patients were divided into 2 groups. One group received infiltration for anesthesia and other group received PSA nerve block using lignocaine with vasoconstrictor. All extractions were performed using a consistent technique of intraalveolar extraction. Data relating to the pain during extraction obtained on a visual analog scale and a verbal response scale, requirement of repeated injection for anesthesia, efficacy of these injections in localized infections, and requirement of rescue analgesics 3 hours after extraction. Statistical data confirmed clinical equivalence between infiltration and PSA nerve block. Considering the difficulty in mastering the technique of PSA nerve block, and the possibility of more complications associated with it (compared with infiltration); it may not be necessary for anesthesia of maxillary molars. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [En block hysterectomy. Institutional experience of 6 years].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Ambas Argüelles, M; Juárez García, L; Castelazo Morales, E

    1997-06-01

    On block hysterectomy is defined as the removal of the gravid uterus with its gestational content in situ. The described indications for the realization of this procedure are neoplastic process as the most frequent cause; septic process, persistent trophoblastic diseases, and hemorrhage due to anomalous placentation. This is a retrospective, descriptive study of twelve cases of on block hysterectomy collected from January 1989 to December 1994 at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología. An average age of 33.4 years was found. The number of pregnancies for this patients in average was found to be 4.1. The gestational age was established between 9 to 29 weeks. Four patients with a 4 or more previous miscarriage background. There were two reported cases having a multiple gestation. Among the complications found, there were three cases of hipovolemic shock and one with abcess of vaginal cupula. The average days of hospitalization was 5.3 days. We found no mortality at all in this study, and the histopathologic correlation accorded in 100% of the cases. In this five year review, 12 cases of on block hysterectomy were found, being the most frequent reason for it's realization the persistent trophoblastic diseases; severe hemorrhage in second place, and serious infection process in third. The observed complications were derived from the hemodynamic compromise of each patient. Even though on block hysterectomy is one rarely seen procedure, it most be in mind as an alternative therapeutical instance it most be carried out in third level institutions, with technology and human resources capable of solving any complication derived from this kind of surgery.

  5. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  6. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  7. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  8. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients’ experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  9. Not to Complicate Matters, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    The writer discusses the current academic enthrallment with complicating seemingly every aspect of every event or phenomenon, arguing that the fashion elevates confusion from a transitional stage into an end goal. Rather than scholarly clarification, says Jacoby, people celebrate the fact that everything can be "problematized," rejoicing in…

  10. Complicating the Concept of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Levitt, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues against a simple, reified view of culture as a set of ideas and norms belonging to a group or nation, and considers the implications of a more complicated concept for discussion of world culture and the global/local nexus. Most anthropologists define culture as the making of meaning, with an emphasis on the process itself as…

  11. Inflammatory duodenal necrosis complicating gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Dina; Lee, Geraint J.; Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Drake, David

    2016-01-01

    Babies with gastroschisis have an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that can lead to short bowel syndrome, a long-term parenteral nutrition requirement, and its associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent duodenal ischemia and necrosis associated with gastroschisis in the absence of NEC totalis. PMID:27695214

  12. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

    2013-05-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome.

  13. Third-trimester pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Newfield, Emily

    2012-03-01

    Complications arising in the third trimester often challenge the clinician to balance the concern for maternal well-being with the consequences of infant prematurity. The most serious and challenging antepartum issues relate to preterm labor and birth, hypertensive disorders, and bleeding events. This article guides the practitioner through decision-making and management of these problems.

  14. The complication of pneumatic retinopexy.

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, G F; Tornambe, P E; Brinton, D A; Flood, T P; Green, S; Grizzard, W S; Hammer, M E; Leff, S R; Mascuilli, L; Morgan, C M

    1990-01-01

    There have been 26 published series with a total of 1274 detachments operated with pneumatic retinopexy. Eighty percent were reattached with a single procedure and 98% with reoperations. New breaks occurred in 13% and PVR in 4%. The complications published in 101 papers on pneumatic retinopexy in the last 5 years are analyzed as to frequency, prevention, management, and results. PMID:2095021

  15. A Rare Complication of Septorhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Septoplasty and septorhinoplasty are common procedures. A 28-year-old woman underwent the procedure and presented postoperatively with headache and vomiting and had developed a large pneumocephalus. We describe the case in detail and analyze the possible causes and ways to prevent such a complication. PMID:25587507

  16. Not to Complicate Matters, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    The writer discusses the current academic enthrallment with complicating seemingly every aspect of every event or phenomenon, arguing that the fashion elevates confusion from a transitional stage into an end goal. Rather than scholarly clarification, says Jacoby, people celebrate the fact that everything can be "problematized," rejoicing in…

  17. Anatomic Variation of Subclavian Artery Visualized on Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Arunima; Banerjee, Sumantra Sarathi

    2014-01-01

    Use of ultrasonography for performance of nerve and plexus blocks has made the process simpler and safer. However, at times, variant anatomy of the visualized structures can lead to failure of blocks or complications such as intravascular injections. This is especially true in case of novice operators. We report a case of a variant branch of subclavian artery, possibly the dorsal scapular artery passing through the brachial plexus nerve bundles in the supraclavicular area. Since this variation in anatomy was visualized in the scout scan prior to the performance of the block, it was possible to avoid any accidental puncture. Hence, a thorough knowledge of the ultrasound anatomy is important in order to identify various aberrations and variations. It is also prudent to perform a preliminary scan, prior to performance of the block to localize the target area and avoid any inadvertent complications. PMID:25143765

  18. Development and potential clinical impairment of ultra-short-acting neuromuscular blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Lien, C A

    2011-12-01

    Developing a non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent that, like succinylcholine, has a rapid onset and a short duration of effect remains a goal of ongoing research. While rocuronium fills a portion of this need, the large doses required for rapid intubation render it a much longer-acting neuromuscular blocking agent. Postoperative residual neuromuscular block (NMB) is an increasingly recognized complication of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents. This occurs because of dosing choices for neuromuscular blocking agents and anticholinesterases as well as insensitivity of typically used monitors of depth of NMB. While antagonism of NMB is necessary with partial recovery, it is unnecessary with more complete recovery. Even when monitoring with an accelerograph, reversal of NMB is complicated. In addition to the pharmacodynamics of the individual neuromuscular blocking agents, factors such as timing of anticholinesterase administration, dose of anticholinesterase, concomitant medications, electrolyte abnormalities, and hepatic or renal disease can influence the degree of reversal. Sugammadex works differently than anticholinesterases and, when administered in appropriate doses, can reverse even profound block induced with vecuronium or rocuronium. Two new fumarate neuromuscular blocking agents have a rapid onset of effect and can be reversed at any time by administration of cysteine, which could significantly reduce the risk of postoperative residual NMB.

  19. Contemporary prostate biopsy complication rates in community-based urology practice.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Paul R; Rommel, F M; Theodoran, Chris G; Hong, Robert D; Del Terzo, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate whether the increased number of rectal perforations associated with contemporary transrectal ultrasound-guided, 12-core prostate biopsy, with a periprostatic block, is associated with a greater rate of postprocedural complications. We prospectively studied 1000 patients undergoing contemporary transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy and compared the rates of complicated urinary tract infection and significant rectal bleeding with the rates in our previous report of complications using a then-standard, 6-core biopsy technique, without a periprostatic block. Three patients developed complicated urinary tract infections, two of which were with ciprofloxacin-resistant organisms. This was not a significant different statistically from our earlier report. Seven patients had significant rectal bleeding requiring endoscopic intervention. This rate also was not significantly different statistically from our earlier report. Our infection and rectal bleeding complications associated with contemporary transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy were low. We experienced a small, nonstatistically significant, increase in the complicated urinary tract infection rate and a small, nonstatistically significant, increase in the rectal bleeding rate in association with the transition from an eight-core, no periprostatic block, technique to the contemporary technique.

  20. Bier block regional anesthesia and casting for forearm fractures: safety in the pediatric emergency department setting.

    PubMed

    Aarons, Chad E; Fernandez, Meagan D; Willsey, Matt; Peterson, Bret; Key, Charles; Fabregas, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Bier block regional anesthesia was first described in 1908; however, it is uncommonly used for fears of cardiac and neurological complications. Although recent studies have documented safe usage in an adult population, no study to date has investigated its use in a pediatric setting. In addition, most emergency departments feel that splint placement is safer than casting after acute forearm fracture reduction in the pediatric population. However, to our knowledge there is no such study that documents the complication rates associated with immediate casting. The goal of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of Bier block regional anesthesia and immediate cast application after closed reduction of pediatric forearm fractures. A retrospective review was conducted of patients treated for forearm fractures in a 2-year period at a major metropolitan pediatric hospital. Rates of complications and length and costs of the 2 procedures were analyzed. A total of 600 patients were treated with Bier block regional anesthesia and 645 were treated with conscious sedation for displaced fractures of the forearm in the 2-year study period. No complications requiring admission were seen in either group. No patient experienced compartment syndrome or a need for readmission secondary to cast application. 2.2% and 4.3% (P=0.0382) of patients in the Bier block and sedation groups, respectively, needed their cast bivalved secondary to swelling. The average time from initiation of procedural sedation to discharge was 1 hour and 42 minutes, whereas the time to discharge from initiation of Bier block regional anesthesia was 47 minutes (P<0.0001). The average cost for a patient treated with procedural sedation was $6313, whereas the average cost for the Bier block regional anesthesia group was $4956. Bier block regional anesthesia is a safe, efficient, and cost-effective method of reducing pediatric forearm fractures. Immediate cast application can be used without fear of major

  1. Morphologies of block copolymers composed of charged and neutral blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajeev; Goswami, Monojoy; Mays, Jimmy; Sumpter, Bobby G; Wang, Xiaojun

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews current experimental observations and theoretical calculations devoted towards understanding micro-phase separation in charged block copolymer systems. We discuss bulk morphologies in melt and in solution, as well as some of the new emerging research directions. Overall, a comprehensive picture is beginning to emerge on the fundamental role of electrostatics in the microphase separation of charged block copolymers. This understanding provides exciting new insight that may be used to direct targeted structures that endow the materials with desired properties that can have tremendous potential in technological applications.

  2. Various semiclassical limits of torus conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkalaev, Konstantin; Geiko, Roman; Rappoport, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    We study four types of one-point torus blocks arising in the large central charge regime. There are the global block, the light block, the heavy-light block, and the linearized classical block, according to different regimes of conformal dimensions. It is shown that the blocks are not independent being connected to each other by various links. We find that the global, light, and heavy-light blocks correspond to three different contractions of the Virasoro algebra. Also, we formulate the c-recursive representation of the one-point torus blocks which is relevant in the semiclassical approximation.

  3. Block Matching for Object Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gyaourova, A; Kamath, C; Cheung, S

    2003-10-13

    Models which describe road traffic patterns can be helpful in detection and/or prevention of uncommon and dangerous situations. Such models can be built by the use of motion detection algorithms applied to video data. Block matching is a standard technique for encoding motion in video compression algorithms. We explored the capabilities of the block matching algorithm when applied for object tracking. The goal of our experiments is two-fold: (1) to explore the abilities of the block matching algorithm on low resolution and low frame rate video and (2) to improve the motion detection performance by the use of different search techniques during the process of block matching. Our experiments showed that the block matching algorithm yields good object tracking results and can be used with high success on low resolution and low frame rate video data. We observed that different searching methods have small effect on the final results. In addition, we proposed a technique based on frame history, which successfully overcame false motion caused by small camera movements.

  4. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer

  5. Automatic blocking of nested loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Robert; Dongarra, Jack J.

    1990-01-01

    Blocked algorithms have much better properties of data locality and therefore can be much more efficient than ordinary algorithms when a memory hierarchy is involved. On the other hand, they are very difficult to write and to tune for particular machines. The reorganization is considered of nested loops through the use of known program transformations in order to create blocked algorithms automatically. The program transformations used are strip mining, loop interchange, and a variant of loop skewing in which invertible linear transformations (with integer coordinates) of the loop indices are allowed. Some problems are solved concerning the optimal application of these transformations. It is shown, in a very general setting, how to choose a nearly optimal set of transformed indices. It is then shown, in one particular but rather frequently occurring situation, how to choose an optimal set of block sizes.

  6. Toy Blocks and Rotational Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varieschi, Gabriele U.; Jully, Isabel R.

    2005-09-01

    Have you ever observed a child playing with toy blocks? A favorite game is to build towers and then make them topple like falling trees. To the eye of a trained physicist this should immediately look like an example of the physics of "falling chimneys," when tall structures bend and break in mid-air while falling to the ground. The game played with toy blocks can actually reproduce well what is usually seen in photographs of falling towers, such as the one that appeared on the cover of the September 1976 issue of The Physics Teacher. In this paper we describe how we performed and analyzed these simple but interesting experiments with toy blocks.

  7. Carbon-carbon cylinder block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials, such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  8. Contrasting reduced overshadowing and blocking.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Miller, Ralph R

    2007-07-01

    Preexposure of a cue without an outcome (X-) prior to compound pairings with the outcome (XZ-->O) can reduce overshadowing of a target cue (Z). Moreover, pairing a cue with an outcome (X-->O) before compound training can enhance its ability to compete with another cue (i.e., blocking). Four experiments were conducted in a conditioned bar-press suppression preparation with rats to determine whether spacing of the X- or X-->O trials would differentially affect reduced overshadowing and blocking. Experiment 1a showed that reduced overshadowing was larger with massed trials than with spaced trials. Experiment 1b found that blocking was larger with spaced trials than with massed trials. Experiments 2a and 2b indicated that these effects of trial spacing were both mediated by the associative status of the context at test. The results are interpreted in the framework of contemporary learning theories.

  9. To block or not to block - what is the impact?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proper design of biological experiments involves significant advance thought, attention, and planning of the following items: • A block design should be employed in any circumstance in which the researcher expects some level of spatial or temporal variation among observations. • The most informed ch...

  10. Block by Block: The Challenges of Urban Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    guns led to the obsolescence of the protective city wall and to the capa - bility to defend within individual city buildings and blocks of buildings. The...Chubut 23. Santa Cruz TERRITORIO NACIONAL 24. Tierra del Fuego CAPITAL FEDERAL 15. Buenos Aires (city) lagoa dosPatos Antofagasta SANTIAGO Puerto Montt

  11. Unintentional subdural injection: a complication of neuraxial anesthesia/analgesia.

    PubMed

    Hoftman, Nir

    2011-06-01

    Unintentional subdural injection during neuraxial anesthesia/analgesia continues to be a challenge for anesthesiologists. This unusual complication is often poorly recognized, with the diagnosis made in retrospect, or not at all. The clinical presentation of these regional blocks can be heterogeneous, ranging from restricted, patchy, or unilateral sensory blockade all the way to extensive and even life-threatening motor and autonomic nervous system depression. Prompt diagnosis using clinical algorithms and radiographic imaging is crucial for the early discontinuation of the offending catheter. Supportive care is mandatory in cases involving severe depression of consciousness, motor function, and/or sympathetic tone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A complicated multisystem flare of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Webster, Philip; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Lightstone, Liz

    2017-02-08

    We report a case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a young woman who became pregnant amid a severe flare. She continued to have active disease in the face of aggressive treatments complicated by several side effects of immunosuppressive drugs including recurrent sepsis and gestational diabetes. Her fetus was at risk for congenital heart block during the second and third trimesters. Despite an extremely guarded prognosis, she delivered a healthy baby girl. This case highlights the complexities of SLE management during pregnancy. We discuss the therapeutic options available in pregnancy, and highlight the importance of cross-specialty multidisciplinary care in these women.

  13. Second-degree heart block associated with envenomation by Vipera berus.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R S

    1988-01-01

    Evenomation by the common European adder (Vipera berus) is well known for its significant morbidity but low mortality. Cardiac complications tend to take second place to the systemic upset and usually only comprise non-specific ECG changes. This case illustrates many of the classical features of adder bite but it is also the first account of heart block as a complication. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3408530

  14. Exhaust apparatus for a v-type internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Y.; Deguchi, R.; Matsuoka, H.; Hanafusa, T.

    1988-03-22

    An exhaust apparatus adapted for connection to a V-type internal combustion engine in an automobile having a first cylinder bank away from the passenger compartment of the automobile and a second cylinder bank proximate the passenger compartment of the automobile, is described comprising: a first exhaust manifold connected to the first cylinder bank; a second exhaust manifold connected to the second cylinder bank; a catalytic converter; and means for connecting the first and second exhaust manifolds to the catalytic convertor.

  15. Block LancZos PACKage

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Osni

    2005-05-01

    BLZPACK (for Block LancZos PACKage) is a standard Fortran 77 implementation of the block Lanczos algorithm intended for the solution of the standard eigenvalue problem Ax=ux or the generalized eigenvalue problem Ax=uBx, where A and B are real, sparse symmetric matrices, u and eigenvalue and x and eigenvector. The development of this eigensolver was motivated by the need to solve large, sparse, generalized problems from free vibration analyses in structural engineering. Several upgrades were performed afterwards aiming at the solution of eigenvalues problems from a wider range of applications.

  16. Passive acoustic emissions from particulates in a V-blender.

    PubMed

    Crouter, Allison; Briens, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory agencies are recommending the development of process analytical technologies (PAT) to improve the efficiency and product quality during pharmaceutical manufacturing. The objective of the research was to investigate the potential application of passive acoustic emission monitoring of a V-blender. Trials were conducted with sugar spheres, lactose or MCC in a V-blender. Vibrations from acoustic emissions were measured using PCB Piezotronics accelerometers with ICP signal conditioners. A wavelet filter was applied to the measured acoustic emissions to remove vibrations from the tumbling motion of the V-shell, allowing a focus on information about particle motion and interactions within the V-shell. The ideal sensor location was determined to be the lid of one of the V-shell arms due to the impact of the tumbling particles on the lid and transmission of the vibrations from other particle motion within the V-shell. The amplitude of vibrations increased with particle size due to larger particle momentum before a collision. The fill level and the V-shell scale also influenced the measured vibrations as particle motion was affected which in turn affected momentum. Changes in particle flowability could be detected through variations in the measured acoustic emissions. The measured vibrations from passive acoustic emissions reflected particle motion and interactions within a V-blender demonstrating potential as a monitoring method.

  17. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Catherine Hy; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig's angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk.

  18. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief

    PubMed Central

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide. PMID:22754290

  19. Medical complications associated with earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Susan A; VanRooyen, Michael J

    2012-02-25

    Major earthquakes are some of the most devastating natural disasters. The epidemiology of earthquake-related injuries and mortality is unique for these disasters. Because earthquakes frequently affect populous urban areas with poor structural standards, they often result in high death rates and mass casualties with many traumatic injuries. These injuries are highly mechanical and often multisystem, requiring intensive curative medical and surgical care at a time when the local and regional medical response capacities have been at least partly disrupted. Many patients surviving blunt and penetrating trauma and crush injuries have subsequent complications that lead to additional morbidity and mortality. Here, we review and summarise earthquake-induced injuries and medical complications affecting major organ systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Retinal complications after bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Filipe, J A; Pinto, A M; Rosas, V; Castro-Correia, J

    Bungee jumping is becoming a popular sport in the Western world with some cases of ophthalmic complications being reported in recent literature. The authors reported a case of a 23-year-old healthy female who presented retinal complications following a bungee jumping. Her fundi showed superficial retinal hemorrhages in the right eye and a sub-internal limiting membrane hemorrhage affecting the left eye. A general examination, including a full neurological examination, was normal and laboratorial investigations were all within normal values. More studies are necessary to identify risk factors and the true incidence of related ocular lesions, but until then, we think this sport activity should be desencouraged, especially to those that are not psychological and physically fit.

  1. [Infectious complications of biological therapy].

    PubMed

    Holub, M; Rozsypal, H; Chalupa, P

    2011-02-01

    Biological treatment represents a significant progress in the therapy of many serious diseases. Together with the growing knowledge of pathophysiology and subsequent development of new therapeutic agents, this progress will definitely lead to further expansion of biologics. Since biologics interfere with many mechanisms of host defence, which may sometimes be compromised by them, increased risk of infectious complications must be taken into account. Patients treated with biologics are prone to classical virulent infections (e.g. listeriosis, legionellosis and tuberculosis) and opportunistic infections such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Furthermore, suppression of the immune response that is caused by biologics may lead to reactivation of latent infections such as tuberculosis or viral hepatitis B. Therefore, the knowledge of basic mechanisms by which biologics modify the immune response is important for a rapid clinical diagnosis of possible aetiology of infectious complications.

  2. Complicated grief after perinatal loss.

    PubMed

    Kersting, Anette; Wagner, Birgit

    2012-06-01

    The loss of an infant through stillbirth, miscarriage, or neonatal death is recognized as a traumatic life event. Predictors of development of complicated grief after prenatal loss include lack of social support, pre-existing relationship difficulties, or absence of surviving children, as well as ambivalent attitudes or heightened perception of the reality of the pregnancy. Risk of complicated grief was found to be especially high after termination of a pregnancy due to fetal abnormality. Studies have revealed that men and women show different patterns of grief, potentially exacerbating decline in a relationship. Although it is clear that prenatal loss has a large psychological impact, it is concluded that there is a substantial lack of randomized controlled studies in this field of research.

  3. Suicide bereavement and complicated grief.

    PubMed

    Tal Young, Ilanit; Iglewicz, Alana; Glorioso, Danielle; Lanouette, Nicole; Seay, Kathryn; Ilapakurti, Manjusha; Zisook, Sidney

    2012-06-01

    Losing a loved to suicide is one is one of life's most painful experiences. The feelings of loss, sadness, and loneliness experienced after any death of a loved one are often magnified in suicide survivors by feelings of quilt, confusion, rejection, shame, anger, and the effects of stigma and trauma. Furthermore, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk of developing major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidal behaviors, as well as a prolonged form of grief called complicated grief. Added to the burden is the substantial stigma, which can keep survivors away from much needed support and healing resources. Thus, survivors may require unique supportive measures and targeted treatment to cope with their loss. After a brief description of the epidemiology and circumstances of suicide, we review the current state of research on suicide bereavement, complicated grief in suicide survivors, and grief treatment for survivors of suicide.

  4. Evaluating Complications of Chronic Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Phillip; Pereyra, Charles A.; Breslin, Adam; Melville, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a relatively common diagnosis throughout the US. In patients with an otherwise unremarkable medical history the treatment is typically supportive, requiring only clinical evaluation. We present the case of a 25-year-old male with a history of chronic sinusitis that was brought to our emergency department with new-onset seizure. Three days before he had presented to his usual care facility with two days of headache and fever and was discharged stating headache, subjective fever, and neck stiffness. After further investigation he was diagnosed with a mixed anaerobic epidural abscess. The evaluation and management of chronic sinusitis are based on the presence of symptoms concerning for complication. Prompt investigation of complicated sinusitis is essential in preventing debilitating and fatal sequelae. Our case study underscores the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:28163938

  5. Painless thyroiditis complicated by acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takatoshi; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Tajima, Naoko

    2010-01-01

    The serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level is decreased in acromegalic patients. Although this phenomenon is thought to be caused by the enhanced secretion of somatostatin which suppresses TSH production, it has not yet been proven. We describe a 60-year-old woman with acromegaly who showed a low concentration of TSH. We diagnosed her as painless thyroiditis based on an increased level of thyroglobulin, depressed radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU), normal vascularity and mild swelling of the thyroid, and normal T3, T4, free T3 and free T4 levels. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of acromegaly complicated by painless thyroiditis. The differential diagnosis between central hypothyroidism and painless thyroiditis is so important. Since it is difficult to diagnose precisely based on only the data of a low level of TSH and normal levels of thyroid hormones, we consider that measurement of thyroglobulin and RAIU is necessary when the complication of painless thyroiditis is suspected.

  6. Gastrointestinal complications postthoracotomy and postvagotomy.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Naunheim, K S

    1998-08-01

    Postthoracotomy gastrointestinal complications, although relatively uncommon, can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is necessary to identify patients who are at high risk for gastrointestinal complications during the preoperative evaluation. Appropriate stress ulcer prophylaxis should be provided to high-risk patients, and enteral feeds should be initiated as early in the postoperative course as possible. Postoperative hypotension and massive blood transfusions can be avoided with early reexploration in the case of postoperative hemorrhage. Finally, unexplained abdominal pain must not be ignored; a high index of suspicion should be maintained, with early and liberal use of diagnostic tools such as standard radiography, CT, endoscopy, and angiography. Consultation should be requested from a surgeon experienced in abdominal catastrophes. Early laparotomy with aggressive operative management can be lifesaving therapy but must be not applied in a cavalier fashion, as many of these disorders can and should be managed conservatively.

  7. [Prevention of complications of IUDs].

    PubMed

    Henrion, R

    1980-11-01

    Complications resulting from IUD use are essentially of 4 types: 1) uterine perforation, either at the time of insertion or by translocation of the device. Perforations can be avoided by exercising the utmost attention at time of insertion, and by choosing the proper time of insertion, usually postmentruation. It is also imperative that the IUD be right for the uterine cavity size; 2) pelvic infection, the most serious of IUD complications, since it can, however rarely, cause death; it is absolutely necessary to observe the strictest asepsy during IUD insertion; 3) menorrhagia, which, when severe, can cause anemia. Women with heavy menstrual flow should not wear an IUD; and, 4) ectopic pregnancy, which usually ends in spontaneous abortion, but which can cause infection.

  8. Complications of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Wu, Xiujuan; Zhu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated disorder in the peripheral nervous system with a wide spectrum of complications. A good understanding of the complications of GBS assists clinicians to recognize and manage the complications properly thereby reducing the mortality and morbidity of GBS patients. Herein, we systemically review the literature on complications of GBS, including short-term complications and long-term complications. We summarize the frequency, severity, clinical manifestations, managements and possible mechanisms of different kinds of complications, and point out the flaws of current studies as well as demonstrate the further investigations needed.

  9. Complications in endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy: an update.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, J A

    1989-07-01

    A previous publication by this author discussing complications of endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy indicated an overall complication rate of 29% in 90 patients (17% in 150 ethmoidectomies). Compared to published complications rates for traditional intranasal ethmoidectomy (2.7% to 3.7%), 17% is alarming and of concern. The complication results in 300 ethmoidectomies performed on 180 patients are presented. The overall complication rate was 9.3%. Only two further complications have occurred since the first reported series: a cerebrospinal fluid leak and one case of subcutaneous emphysema. Methods and techniques that have led to the reduction of complications are briefly discussed. Endoscopic ethmoidectomy is a valid, safe procedure in experienced hands.

  10. [Mechanical complication of central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Koja, Hiroki; Tokumine, Joho; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is a procedure with a high success rate. However, life-threatening complications are occasionally caused by mechanical injury during the catheterization process. Therefore, surgeons should have sufficient knowledge of the potential complications and the effective use of preventative measures when performing catheterization. We herein review and discuss the mechanical complications previously reported to have occurred in association with central venous catheterization. Comprehensive knowledge about various complication-inducing factors, the ability to make a quick and accurate diagnosis of such complications, and sufficient skill to prevent worsening of these complications can thus help patients from suffering lethal complications due to central venous catheterization.

  11. Abdominal Complications after Severe Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    abdominal compartment syndrome, schemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic ulcer disease and astritis requiring laparotomy, small bowel obstruction, rimary fungal...complications in- luded trauma exploratory laparotomy, abdominal com- artment syndrome, ischemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic lcer disease and gastritis, large...70%); 13 for other compli- ations, such as biliary or perineal conditions (26%); and 4 or feeding access (8%). For the civilians, 2 had trauma

  12. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  13. Prevalence Estimates of Complicated Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Julia C; Pedersen, Rolf; Marra, Christina M; Kerani, Roxanne P; Golden, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    We reviewed 68 cases of possible neurosyphilis among 573 syphilis cases in King County, WA, from 3rd January 2012 to 30th September 2013; 7.9% (95% confidence interval, 5.8%-10.5%) had vision or hearing changes, and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 2.2%-5.4%) had both symptoms and objective confirmation of complicated syphilis with either abnormal cerebrospinal fluid or an abnormal ophthalmologic examination.

  14. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  15. Permanent makeup: indications and complications.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2008-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, simulating makeup, have become very popular in the last decades; the technique of micropigmentation consists of implantation of pigment into the skin using a tattoo pen. The procedure can also be used to camouflage vitiligo, to mask scars, and as an adjunct to reconstructive surgery. Risks and complications include infections, allergic reactions, scarring, fanning, fading, and dissatisfaction about color and shape. Lasers offer the best cosmetic result for removal of unwanted tattoos.

  16. [Neurologic complications by cocaine abuse].

    PubMed

    Casas Parera, I; Gatto, E; Fernández Pardal, M M; Micheli, F; Pikielny, R; Melero, M; Gnocci, C; Giannaula, R; Paradiso, G; Cersósimo, G

    1994-01-01

    Argentina is facing an increase in cocaine use by adolescents and young adults from every socioeconomic background. It is calculated that up to 10% of all cocaine passing through this country is locally sold and consumed. Nevertheless, local information describing common cocaine-related neurological events is scarce. From August 1988 to March 1993, 13 patients were evaluated with neurological disease associated with cocaine abuse. Among these 13 patients (Table 1), the mean age was 29; 70% were men. Patients most commonly used the nasal route (snorting). Concomitant abuse of other intoxicants, especially alcohol, was frequent (85%). The major neurological complications included one or more seizures (n = 7), ischemic stroke (n = 2) (Fig. 1-2), hemorrhagic stroke (n = 2) associated with arteriovenous malformation (Fig. 3a-b), memory disturbances (n = 1) and paroxysmal dystonia (n = 1). Psychiatric complaints were present in all patients. Mortality was not observed. There was no correlation between the appearance of complications and the amount of cocaine used, or prior experience with this drug. Only one of the 7 patients with seizures had a previous history of seizures. All had generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and one had concomitant absence episodes. Cocaine modulates central neurotransmitters and has direct cerebrovascular effects. The neurological complications appear to be related to cocaine hyperadrenergic effects, striatal dopaminergic receptor hypersensitivity and perhaps vasculitis. Structural changes in the brain of long-term cocaine abusers could explain the persistence of neurologic symptoms after drug withdrawl.

  17. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  18. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  19. Coronary events complicating infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Roux, Virginie; Salaun, Erwan; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Hubert, Sandrine; Bohbot, Yohann; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Barral, Pierre-Antoine; Rusinaru, Dan; Gouriet, Frederique; Lavoute, Cecile; Haentjens, Julie; Di Biscegli, Mathieu; Dehaene, Aurelie; Renard, Sebastien; Casalta, Anne-Claire; Pradier, Julie; Avierinos, Jean-Francois; Riberi, Alberto; Lambert, Marc; Collart, Frederic; Jacquier, Alexis; Thuny, Franck; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Lepidi, Hubert; Raoult, Didier; Habib, Gilbert

    2017-06-22

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are a rare complication of infective endocarditis (IE). Only case reports and small studies have been published to date. We report the largest series of ACS in IE. The aim of our study was to describe the incidence and mechanisms of ACS associated with IE, to assess their prognostic impact and to describe their management. In a bicentre prospective observational cohort study, all patients with a definite diagnosis of IE were prospectively included. The incidence, mechanism and prognosis of patients with ACS were studied. Among 1210 consecutive patients with definite IE, 26 patients (2.2%) developed an ACS. Twenty-three patients (88%) had a coronary embolism. Two patients had coronary compression by an abscess or a pseudoaneurysm and one patient had an obstruction of his bioprosthesis and left coronary ostium by a large vegetation. Nineteen (73%) patients with ACS developed heart failure and this complication was 2.5 times more frequent than in patients without ACS (p<0.0001). In the ACS population, mortality rate was twice than the population without ACS. ACS is a rare complication of IE but is associated with an increased risk of heart failure and high mortality rate. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Oxidative stress and diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Giacco, Ferdinando; Brownlee, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development of diabetes complications, both microvascular and cardiovascular. The metabolic abnormalities of diabetes cause mitochondrial superoxide overproduction in endothelial cells of both large and small vessels, and also in the myocardium. This increased superoxide production causes the activation of five major pathways involved in the pathogenesis of complications: polyol pathway flux, increased formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), increased expression of the receptor for AGEs and its activating ligands, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, and overactivity of the hexosamine pathway. It also directly inactivates two critical antiatherosclerotic enzymes, eNOS and prostacyclin synthase. Through these pathways, increased intracellular ROS cause defective angiogenesis in response to ischemia, activate a number of pro-inflammatory pathways, and cause long-lasting epigenetic changes which drive persistent expression of proinflammatory genes after glycemia is normalized (‘hyperglycemic memory’). Atherosclerosis and cardiomyopathy in type 2 diabetes are caused in part by pathway-selective insulin resistance, which increases mitochondrial ROS production from free fatty acids and by inactivation of anti-atherosclerosis enzymes by ROS. Overexpression of superoxide dismutase in transgenic diabetic mice prevents diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiomyopathy. The aim of this review is to highlight advances in understanding the role of metabolite-generated ROS in the development of diabetic complications. PMID:21030723

  1. Thromboembolic complications of thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Min, T; Benjamin, S; Cozma, L

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of hyperthyroidism. Early recognition and prompt treatment are essential. Atrial fibrillation can occur in up to 40% of patients with thyroid storm. Studies have shown that hyperthyroidism increases the risk of thromboembolic events. There is no consensus with regard to the initiation of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation in severe thyrotoxicosis. Anticoagulation is not routinely initiated if the risk is low on a CHADS2 score; however, this should be considered in patients with thyroid storm or severe thyrotoxicosis with impending storm irrespective of the CHADS2 risk, as it appears to increase the risk of thromboembolic episodes. Herein, we describe a case of thyroid storm complicated by massive pulmonary embolism. Diagnosis of thyroid storm is based on clinical findings. Early recognition and prompt treatment could lead to a favourable outcome.Hypercoagulable state is a recognised complication of thyrotoxicosis.Atrial fibrillation is strongly associated with hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm.Anticoagulation should be considered for patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and atrial fibrillation irrespective of the CHADS2 score.Patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and clinical evidence of thrombosis should be immediately anticoagulated until hyperthyroidism is under control.

  2. [Immediate complications in thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Pomata, M; Ragazzo, G; Pisano, G; Farina, G P

    1990-06-01

    The Authors report the results of a series of 502 thyroid operations (bilateral in 322 cases [64%] and unilateral in 180 cases [36%]), with the aim to evaluate the incidence of early complications and to establish when they were more likely to occur. Preoperative diagnosis was based on scintigraphic scan recently combined to ultrasonography with fine needle biopsy. In all patients a pre and postoperative control of vocal cords motility was performed. Intraoperative identification of recurrent laryngeal nerve was the rule. Complications include a single case of mortality due to cerebral haemorrhage, 2 cases of monolateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis, 4 cases of transient dysphonia, 8 cases of temporary hypoparathyroidism, 5 cases of postoperative bleeding. In three patients a temporary tracheostomy was needed. Thyrotoxic storm did not occur and wound infections were negligible. The various thyroid diseases and their different biological behavior are responsible of the risk factors, local and general ones, which the surgeon must recognize. Diagnostic accuracy, meticulous surgical technique and the best treatment at the first approach are the main factors to prevent complications in thyroid surgery.

  3. Morbid obesity and perioperative complications.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Andrea; Schumann, Roman

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 30% of the general surgical population presents with obesity, and the perioperative implications remain concerning. This review provides recent insights regarding morbid obesity and perioperative complications. Cardiovascular risk including cardiac arrest and myocardial infarction varies by type of surgery and is not always correlated with BMI. Functional status rather than associated comorbidities is an important component for risk assessment of obese patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. Just as for cardiac complications, pulmonary outcomes are influenced by the concurrence of obesity and the metabolic syndrome and/or sleep apnea rather than by BMI alone. New evidence suggests that continuous positive airway pressure treatment before surgery may reduce postoperative complications. Clinical Practice Guidelines for thromboembolic prophylaxis in bariatric patients are available. A comprehensive understanding of the obesity survival paradox has remained elusive. Postoperative surgical infections remain a leading problem related to obesity. Further research and evidence are needed for the development of accepted perioperative pathways to address obesity and related comorbidities including sleep disordered breathing and metabolic syndrome as well as evidence-based strategies to reduce surgical infections. Rather than BMI alone, an improved index for obesity risk assessment is needed.

  4. A Posterior TAP Block Provides More Effective Analgesia Than a Lateral TAP Block in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama, Sakatoshi; Ueshima, Hironobu; Sakai, Ryomi; Otake, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background. There are a few papers that compared the lateral transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with the posterior TAP block. Our study aimed to compare retrospectively the quality of analgesia after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery using the lateral TAP block with general anesthesia versus the posterior TAP block with general anesthesia. Method. Sixty-seven adult female patients were included in this retrospective study. Of these patients, thirty-four patients received the lateral TAP block with general anesthesia (lat. TAP group), and the rest of thirty-three patients received the posterior TAP block with general anesthesia (pos. TAP group). Pain scores both at rest and at movement and the use of additional analgesic drugs were recorded in the postoperative care unit within twenty-four hours after the operation. Postoperative complications were noted. Results. Patients who received pos. TAP reported lower visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores in all points, within twenty-four hours after the operation, than patients who received lat. TAP. Moreover, with the use of additional analgesic drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting during the first twenty-four hours after surgery was lower in the pos. TAP group than in the lat. TAP group. Conclusion. The posterior TAP block provided more effective analgesia than the lateral TAP block in patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. PMID:26941794

  5. Conjugated block copolymers: A building block for high-performance organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Changhe

    State-of-the-art organic photovoltaics rely on kinetically trapped, partially phase-separated structures of donor/acceptor mixtures to create a high interfacial area for exciton dissociation and networks of bicontinuous phases for charge transport. Nevertheless, intrinsic structural disorder and weak intermolecular interactions in polymer blends limit the performance and stability of organic electronic devices. We demonstrate a potential strategy to control morphology and donor/acceptor heterojunctions through conjugated block copolymer poly(3-hexylthiophene)- block-poly((9,9-dioctylfluorene)-2,7-diyl-alt-[4,7-bis(thiophen-5-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole]-2',2''-diyl) (P3HT-b-PFTBT). Block copolymers can self-assemble into well-ordered nanostructures ideal for photovoltaic applications. When utilized as the photovoltaic active layer, P3HT-b-PFTBT block copolymer devices demonstrate thermal stability and photoconversion efficiency of 3% well beyond devices composed of the constituent polymer blends. Resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSOXS) is used to elucidate the structural origin for efficient block copolymer photovoltaics. Energy tuning in soft X-ray ranges gives RSOXS chemical sensitivity to characterize organic thin films with compositionally similar phases or complicated multiphase systems. RSOXS reveals that the remarkable performance of P3HT-b-PFTBT devices is due to self-assembly into nanoscale in-plane lamellar morphology, which not only establishes an equilibrium microstructure amenable for exciton dissociation but also provides pathways for efficient charge transport. Furthermore, we find evidence that covalent control of donor/acceptor interfaces in block copolymers has the potential to promote charge separation and optimize the photoconversion process by limiting charge recombination. To visualize the nanostructure in organic thin films, we introduce low energy-loss energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) as an important alternative

  6. Illiteracy and diabetic foot complications.

    PubMed

    Al-Kaabi, Juma M; Al Maskari, Fatma; Cragg, Paul; Afandi, Bachar; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is especially common in the United Arab Emirates. Its complications in patients residing in the region have yet to be fully explored. This study reports on foot problems in our diabetic patients, with emphasis on the impact of illiteracy on foot care and complications due to diabetes. Adults were randomly recruited from the Diabetes Center at Tawam-John Hopkins affiliated hospital. A questionnaire addressing foot care and problems was completed for all patients. In addition, an examination was performed by a trained nurse, an endocrinologist, and a podiatrist. Four hundred twenty-two adults with type 2 (93%) or type 1 (7%) diabetes were enrolled; 67% were females. Patients' mean age was 52 ± 13 years and duration of diabetes ≥ 1 year. Illiterate patients were 51% and were less likely to practice foot care (p=0.002), recognize foot risk factors (p=0.004), use proper footwear (p=0.010), and being physically active (p<0.001). In addition, they were more likely to have diabetic complications, such as neuropathy (p=0.027), eye disease (p=0.032), hypertension (p<0.001), obesity (p=0.003), increased body fat percentage (p<0.001), reduced capillary refill time (p=0.002), reduced monofilament (p=0.003), and reduced vibration (p<0.001). Logistic regression analysis revealed literates [OR=2.4, CI=1.1-5.4, p=0.031], female gender [OR=2.7, CI=1.1-6.2, p=0.023], and history of foot ulcer [OR=6.0, CI=2.1-17.2, p=0.001] were predictors of practicing foot care. Illiteracy invoked significant challenges to diabetic attentiveness and imposed increased foot complications. Physicians should realize that illiterate patients are vulnerable and require effective strategies to improve their education about the disease and reduce their diabetic complications. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Periodontal ligament and intraosseous anesthetic injection techniques: alternatives to mandibular nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Moore, Paul A; Cuddy, Michael A; Cooke, Matthew R; Sokolowski, Chester J

    2011-09-01

    and Overview. The provision of mandibular anesthesia traditionally has relied on nerve block anesthetic techniques such as the Halsted, the Gow-Gates and the Akinosi-Vazirani methods. The authors present two alternative techniques to provide local anesthesia in mandibular teeth: the periodontal ligament (PDL) injection and the intraosseous (IO) injection. The authors also present indications for and complications associated with these techniques. The PDL injection and the IO injection are effective anesthetic techniques for managing nerve block failures and for providing localized anesthesia in the mandible. Dentists may find these techniques to be useful alternatives to nerve block anesthesia.

  8. Blocks and Bridges: Learning Artistic Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Explores research about creative thinking and outlines various processes that students go through when they attempt an art assignment. Describes the blocks to creative thinking that non-art majors have experienced, such as cultural blocks, conceptual and perceptual blocks, and social blocks. Discusses the instructional conditions important for…

  9. Planning Block Play Experiences for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Betty Ruth

    Playing with blocks can facilitate the creative, social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development of young children. This article presents information and activities concerning block play and its role in young children's experience. Topics covered include: (1) types of blocks; (2) selection of blocks and accessories; (3) planning of the…

  10. Teaching Numeracy, Language, and Literacy with Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newburger, Abigail; Vaughan, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    By enhancing the block play in classrooms, teachers can help children acquire the emerging skills they need--with numbers, vocabulary, and reading--for kindergarten readiness. Newburger and Vaughan provide a theoretical foundation describing why and how to use blocks, and give guidance on selecting blocks and block safety. With chapters on the…

  11. Calibrator Blocks For Computerized Tomography (CT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, H. Peter

    1990-01-01

    Sets of calibrator blocks developed for use with industrial computerized tomography (CT) systems. Set of blocks (or number of stacked sets of blocks) placed on object table of CT system and scanned in usual way. Blocks include holes of known size, shape, and location. Appearance of holes in output image of CT system used to verify operation of system.

  12. β-adrenoceptor blocking agents and lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Harms, H. H.; De Vente, J.; Zaagsma, J.

    1982-01-01

    1 The pharmacological characteristics of β-adrenoceptor subtypes on adipocytes of various mammalian species, including man, are reviewed. 2 Rat adipocytes possess a homogeneous population of β-adrenoceptors with properties that clearly distinguish them from `classic' β1- and β2-adrenoceptors, although they share certain features with both. Thus, rat adipocyte β-adrenoceptors should be considered as non-β1-non-β2 receptors, like the atypical β-adrenoceptors found on erythrocytes of turkey, chicken and frog. 3 Preliminary data suggest that adipocyte β-adrenoceptors of guinea pig and swine are different from `classic' β1- and β2-adrenoceptors as well, whereas in the dog and possibly in the cat, a mixture of β1- and β2-receptors mediates catecholamine induced lipolysis. 4 Human adipocyte β-adrenoceptors probably also consist of at least two subtypes. Insufficient data are available to decide if these β-adrenoceptors are identical with `classic' β1- and β2-receptors, or share some hybrid characteristics with rat adipocyte β-adrenoceptors. 5 In vivo studies in animals as well as in man, tend to corroborate in vitro results. Cardioselective β-adrenoceptor blocking agents, like atenolol, metoprolol and practolol are not as effective in blocking catecholamine induced lipolysis as non-cardioselective agents like propranolol and pindolol. The relatively low potency of cardioselective β-adrenoceptor blocking agents is found using either isoprenaline, adrenaline or exercise as the agonist, suggesting that β2-adrenoceptors are involved. On the other hand, cardioselective agents, though less effective than non-cardioselective compounds, have a significant inhibitory effect on catecholamine induced lipolysis at doses that have only minimal effect on other β2-adrenoceptor mediated responses, which argues for participation of β1-adrenoceptors. 6 Thus, human in vitro and in vivo data are consistent with, but not proof of the hypothesis that a mixture of β1

  13. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  14. Hawaii Census 2000 Block Groups

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data layer represents Census 2000 demographic data derived from the PL94-171 redistricting files and SF3. Census geographic entities include blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Tiger line files are the source of the geometry representing the Census blocks. Attributes include total population counts, racial/ethnic, and poverty/income information. Racial/ethnic classifications are represented in units of blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Poverty and income data are represented in units of blockgroups and tracts. Percentages of each racial/ethnic group have been calculated from the population counts. Total Minority counts and percentages were compiled from each racial/ethnic non-white category. Categories compiled to create the Total Minority count includes the following: African American, Asian, American Indian, Pacific Islander, White Hispanic, Other and all mixed race categories. The percentage poverty attribute represents the percent of the population living at or below poverty level. The per capita income attribute represents the sum of all income within the geographic entity, divided by the total population of that entity. Special fields designed to be used for EJ analysis have been derived from the PL data and include the following: Percentage difference of block, blockgroup and total minority from the state and county averages, percentile rank for each percent total minority within state and county entitie

  15. Building Blocks for Personal Brands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the four essential building blocks for personal brands: (1) name; (2) message; (3) channels; and (4) bridges. However, outstanding building materials can only take a person so far. The author emphasizes that vision, determination, faith, a sense of humor, and humility are also required.

  16. Preschoolers' Thinking during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccolo, Diana L.; Test, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Children build foundations for mathematical thinking in early play and exploration. During the preschool years, children enjoy exploring mathematical concepts--such as patterns, shape, spatial relationships, and measurement--leading them to spontaneously engage in mathematical thinking during play. Block play is one common example that engages…

  17. A conformal block Farey tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Alexander; Maxfield, Henry; Ng, Gim Seng

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the constraints of crossing symmetry on CFT correlation functions. Four point conformal blocks are naturally viewed as functions on the upper-half plane, on which crossing symmetry acts by PSL(2, Z ) modular transformations. This allows us to construct a unique, crossing symmetric function out of a given conformal block by averaging over PSL(2, Z ). In some two dimensional CFTs the correlation functions are precisely equal to the modular average of the contributions of a finite number of light states. For example, in the two dimensional Ising and tri-critical Ising model CFTs, the correlation functions of identical operators are equal to the PSL(2, Z ) average of the Virasoro vacuum block; this determines the 3 point function coefficients uniquely in terms of the central charge. The sum over PSL(2, Z ) in CFT2 has a natural AdS3 interpretation as a sum over semi-classical saddle points, which describe particles propagating along rational tangles in the bulk. We demonstrate this explicitly for the correlation function of certain heavy operators, where we compute holographically the semi-classical conformal block with a heavy internal operator.

  18. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Blocks Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Nayyer; Fahlgren, Anna; Fällman, Maria

    2016-12-01

    Neutrophils are essential components of immunity and are rapidly recruited to infected or injured tissue. Upon their activation, neutrophils release granules to the cell's exterior, through a process called degranulation. These granules contain proteins with antimicrobial properties that help combat infection. The enteropathogenic bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis successfully persists as an extracellular bacterium during infection by virtue of its translocation of virulence effectors (Yersinia outer proteins [Yops]) that act in the cytosol of host immune cells to subvert phagocytosis and proinflammatory responses. Here, we investigated the effect of Y. pseudotuberculosis on neutrophil degranulation upon cell contact. We found that virulent Y. pseudotuberculosis was able to prevent secondary granule release. The blocking effect was general, as the release of primary and tertiary granules was also reduced. Degranulation of secondary granules was also blocked in primed neutrophils, suggesting that this mechanism could be an important element of immune evasion. Further, wild-type bacteria conferred a transient block on neutrophils that prevented their degranulation upon contact with plasmid-cured, avirulent Y. pseudotuberculosis and Escherichia coli Detailed analyses showed that the block was strictly dependent on the cooperative actions of the two antiphagocytic effectors, YopE and YopH, suggesting that the neutrophil target structures constituting signaling molecules needed to initiate both phagocytosis and general degranulation. Thus, via these virulence effectors, Yersinia can impair several mechanisms of the neutrophil's antimicrobial arsenal, which underscores the power of its virulence effector machinery. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Enduring and Diagnosing Reader's Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melanson, Lisa Stapleton

    1990-01-01

    Describes a condition called "reader's block" whereby the mind fails to comprehend the meaning of the text because of digressing thoughts. Suggests that "freereading," like freewriting, can help to clarify thoughts. Argues that it is not necessary to read things correctly the first time through. (PRA)

  20. Ultrasound improves the success rate of a tibial nerve block at the ankle.

    PubMed

    Redborg, Kirsten E; Antonakakis, John G; Beach, Michael L; Chinn, Christopher D; Sites, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    The tibial nerve provides the majority of sensation to the foot. Although multiple techniques have been described, there exists little evidence-based medicine evaluating different techniques for blocking the tibial nerve at the ankle. We hypothesized that an ultrasound (US)-guided tibial nerve block at the ankle would prove more successful than a conventional approach based on surface landmarks. Eighteen healthy volunteers were prospectively randomized into this controlled and blinded study. Each subject was placed prone, and one ankle was randomly assigned to receive either an US-guided tibial nerve block (group US) or a traditional landmark-based tibial nerve block (group LM). The subject's other ankle then received the alternate approach. All blocks were performed with 5 mL of 3% chloroprocaine. We evaluated sensory and motor blocks. A successful block was defined as complete loss of sensation to both ice and pinprick at 5 cutaneous sites. Secondary outcome variables included performance times, number of needle passes, participant satisfaction, and presence of any complications. At 30 mins, the block was complete in 72% of participants in group US as compared with 22% in group LM. At all times, the proportion of complete blocks was higher in group US. Ultrasound-guided blocks took longer on average to perform than traditional blocks (159 vs 79 secs; P < 0.001). There were more needle redirects in group US, with 8 subjects requiring 3 or more redirects versus none in group LM. Subjects preferred the US block 78% of the time (95% confidence interval, 52%-95%). In healthy volunteers, US guidance results in a more successful tibial nerve block at the ankle than does a traditional approach using surface landmarks.

  1. Radiotherapy as a cause of complete atrioventricular block in Hodgkin's disease: an electrophysiological-pathological correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.I.; Bharati, S.; Glass, J.; Lev, M.

    1981-04-01

    A 20-year-old man contracted Hodgkin's disease and was treated with mantle radiotherapy. Heart block developed 11 years later. Electrocardiograms revealed predominant atrioventricular (AV) block and occasional AV conduction. Intracardiac electrograms demonstrated that the site of AV block was above the level of the His bundle. A permanent transvenous pacemaker was implanted. Seven months later the patient died of complications from cryptococcal meningitis. Pathological study of the heart revealed marked arteriosclerosis with fibrosis of the epicardium, myocardium, and endocardium. Examination of the conduction system revealed extensive arteriolosclerosis of the sinoatrial node and its approaches. In addition, there was marked fibrosis of the approaches to the AV node, the AV bundle, and both bundle branches. There was no evidence of Hodgkin's disease. This case documents the rare occurrence of AV block due to tissue destruction by radiotherapy. There was a good correlation between block proximal to the His bundle recording site and fibrosis of the approaches to the AV node.

  2. Radiotherapy as a cause of complete atrioventricular block in Hodgkin's disease. An electrophysiological-pathological correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.I.; Bharati, S.; Glass, J.; Lev, M.

    1981-04-01

    A 20-year-old man contracted Hodgkin's disease and was treated with mantle radiotherapy. Heart block developed 11 years later. Electrocardiograms revealed predominant atrioventricular (AV) block and occasional AV conduction. Intracardiac electrograms demonstrated that the site of AV block was above the level of the His bundle. A permanent transvenous pacemaker was implanted. Seven months later the patient died of complications from cryptococcal meningitis. Pathological study of the heart revealed marked arteriosclerosis with fibrosis of the epicardium, myocardium, and endocardium. Examination of the conduction system revealed extensive arteriolosclerosis of the sinoatrial node and its approaches. In addition, there was marked fibrosis of the approaches to the AV node, the AV bundle, and both bundle branches. There was no evidence of Hodgkin's disease. This case documents the rare occurrence of AV block due to tissue destruction by radiotherapy. There was a good correlation between block proximal to the His bundle recording site and fibrosis of the approaches to the AV node.

  3. Congenital fetal heart block: a potential therapeutic role for intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    David, Anna L; Ataullah, Ifat; Yates, Rob; Sullivan, Ian; Charles, Peter; Williams, David

    2010-08-01

    Congenital heart block affects 2% of all mothers with anti-Ro/La antibodies, can cause heart failure in utero, and has a 20% mortality rate in the first 3 years of life. Maternal fluorinated steroids to prevent or reverse congenital heart block can cause pregnancy complications. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been given with maternal steroids to prevent the recurrence of congenital heart block, although its efficacy is unproven. We report the use of IVIG to prevent progression of 2:1 congenital heart block with intermittent complete heart block. After two maternal infusions of IVIG (0.4 g/kg) at 31 weeks of gestation, the fetal heart rate reverted to long periods of sinus rhythm, which was sustained until postnatal life. Our case supports investigating IVIG in the prevention or treatment of this life-threatening condition.

  4. [Patient whose surgery was postponed due to complete atrioventricular block on arrival at operating theater].

    PubMed

    Kato, Azusa; Koitabashi, Toshiya; Kato, Takao; Agata, Hideharu; Ouchi, Takashi; Serita, Ryohei

    2011-06-01

    An 86-year-old woman with low cardiac function was scheduled to undergo hip fracture surgery. Preoperative electrocardiogram showed complete left bundle brunch block, first degree atrioventricular block, left axis deviation and bigeminy. However, her electrocardiogram had changed to complete atrioventricular block on arrival at operating theater. ACC/AHA guideline on perioperative cardiovascular evaluation and care for non cardiac surgery indicates the assessment of both the urgency of the surgery and cardiac complications. Because complete atrioventricular block is classified to "active cardiac conditions", we decided to postpone the surgery for more detailed evaluation and treatment of cardiac conditions. In spite of the discontinuation of digoxin and carvegilol, complete atrioventricular block continued for a week, and the permanent pacemaker was inserted. The surgery was performed 2 weeks following the insertion of the pacemaker without any problems under combined general and lumbar epidural anesthesia.

  5. Ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block vs continuous fascia iliaca compartment block for hip replacement in the elderly: A randomized controlled clinical trial (CONSORT).

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; He, Miao; Cai, Guang-Yu; Zou, Tian-Xiao; Zhang, Na

    2016-10-01

    Continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block are 2 traditional anesthesia methods in orthopedic surgeries, but it is controversial which method is better. The objective of this study was to compare the practicality, efficacy, and complications of the 2 modalities in hip replacement surgery in the elderly and to assess the utility of a novel cannula-over-needle set. In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical investigation, 60 elderly patients undergoing hip replacement were randomly assigned to receive either continuous femoral nerve block or continuous fascia iliaca compartment block. After ultrasound-guided nerve block, all patients received general anesthesia for surgery and postoperative analgesia through an indwelling cannula. Single-factor analysis of variance was used to compare the outcome variables between the 2 groups. There was a significant difference between the 2 groups in the mean visual analog scale scores (at rest) at 6 hours after surgery: 1.0 ± 1.3 in the femoral nerve block group vs 0.5 ± 0.8 in the fascia iliaca compartment block group (P < 0.05). The femoral nerve block group had better postoperative analgesia on the medial aspect of the thigh, whereas the fascia iliaca compartment block group had better analgesia on the lateral aspect of the thigh. There were no other significant differences between the groups. Both ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block with the novel cannula-over-needle provide effective anesthesia and postoperative analgesia for elderly hip replacement patients.

  6. Disrupted Prefrontal Activity during Emotion Processing in Complicated Grief: an fMRI Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Arizmendi, Brian; Kaszniak, Alfred W.; O’Connor, Mary-Frances

    2015-01-01

    Complicated Grief, marked by a persistent and intrusive grief lasting beyond the expected period of adaptation, is associated with a relative inability to disengage from idiographic loss-relevant stimuli (O’Connor & Arizmendi, 2014). In other populations, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating the neural networks associated with this bias consistently implicate the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during emotion regulation. In the present study, twenty-eight older adults were categorized into three groups based on grief severity: Complicated Grief (n=8), Non-Complicated Grief (n=9), and Nonbereaved, married controls (n=11). Using a block design, all participants completed 8 blocks (20 stimuli per block) of the ecStroop task during fMRI data acquisition. Differences in neural activity during grief-related (as opposed to neutral) stimuli across groups were examined. Those with Complicated Grief showed an absence of increased rostral ACC (rACC) and fronto-cortical recruitment relative to Nonbereaved controls. Activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (x=6, y=54, z=−10) was significantly elevated in the Non-Complicated Grief group when compared to Nonbereaved controls. Post hoc analysis evidenced activity in the dorsal ACC in the Complicated Grief and Nonbereaved groups late in the task. These findings, supported by behavioral data, suggest a relative inability to recruit the regions necessary for successful completion of this emotional task in those with Complicated Grief. This deficit was not observed in recruitment of the orbitofrontal cortex and the rACC during processing of idiographic semantic stimuli in Non-Complicated Grief. PMID:26434802

  7. Disrupted prefrontal activity during emotion processing in complicated grief: An fMRI investigation.

    PubMed

    Arizmendi, Brian; Kaszniak, Alfred W; O'Connor, Mary-Frances

    2016-01-01

    Complicated Grief, marked by a persistent and intrusive grief lasting beyond the expected period of adaptation, is associated with a relative inability to disengage from idiographic loss-relevant stimuli (O'Connor and Arizmendi, 2014). In other populations, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating the neural networks associated with this bias consistently implicate the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during emotion regulation. In the present study, twenty-eight older adults were categorized into three groups based on grief severity: Complicated Grief (n=8), Non-Complicated Grief (n=9), and Nonbereaved, married controls (n=11). Using a block design, all participants completed 8 blocks (20 stimuli per block) of the ecStroop task during fMRI data acquisition. Differences in neural activity during grief-related (as opposed to neutral) stimuli across groups were examined. Those with Complicated Grief showed an absence of increased rostral ACC (rACC) and fronto-cortical recruitment relative to Nonbereaved controls. Activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (x=6, y=54, z=-10) was significantly elevated in the Non-Complicated Grief group when compared to Nonbereaved controls. Post hoc analysis evidenced activity in the dorsal ACC in the Complicated Grief and Nonbereaved groups late in the task. These findings, supported by behavioral data, suggest a relative inability to recruit the regions necessary for successful completion of this emotional task in those with Complicated Grief. This deficit was not observed in recruitment of the orbitofrontal cortex and the rACC during processing of idiographic semantic stimuli in Non-Complicated Grief. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pourfour Du Petit syndrome after interscalene block

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappji; Pai, Rohini B.; Rao, Raghavendra P.

    2013-01-01

    Interscalene block is commonly associated with reversible ipsilateral phrenic nerve block, recurrent laryngeal nerve block, and cervical sympathetic plexus block, presenting as Horner's syndrome. We report a very rare Pourfour Du Petit syndrome which has a clinical presentation opposite to that of Horner's syndrome in a 24-year-old male who was given interscalene block for open reduction and internal fixation of fracture upper third shaft of left humerus. PMID:23956726

  9. Reversible atrioventricular blocks in thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Atri, Sudhir Kumar; Chugh, S N; Goya, Sandeep; Chugh, Kiran

    2011-03-01

    Atrioventricular blocks or sinoatrial blocks are rarely described in patients with thyrotoxicosis or thyroid storm. The mechanism of these blocks remains obscure. Thyroid storm, being an emergency situation requires early diagnosis and management because if left untreated, it may prove fatal. Usually patients with AV blocks require pacing (temporary or permanent). Here we describe a case who developed AV blocks, did not undergo pacing, but recovered only on antithyroid treatment.

  10. Pourfour Du Petit syndrome after interscalene block.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappji; Pai, Rohini B; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2013-04-01

    Interscalene block is commonly associated with reversible ipsilateral phrenic nerve block, recurrent laryngeal nerve block, and cervical sympathetic plexus block, presenting as Horner's syndrome. We report a very rare Pourfour Du Petit syndrome which has a clinical presentation opposite to that of Horner's syndrome in a 24-year-old male who was given interscalene block for open reduction and internal fixation of fracture upper third shaft of left humerus.

  11. [Why and how to perform an ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block: A step-by-step approach].

    PubMed

    Nohuz, E; El Drayi, B; Triki, A; Grossmannova, K; Boudier, B; Koffi, K; Albaut, M; Dualé, C

    2016-12-01

    Used in clinical practice as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen, the transversus abdominis plane block (TAP block) is a relative novel procedure in which local anaesthetic agents are injected into the anatomic neurofascial space between the internal oblique and the transversus abdominis muscle. It allows a significantly prolonged duration of analgesia during the early postoperative stage in abdominal surgery. This regional anesthesia technique provides analgesia to the skin, muscles of the anterior abdominal wall and parietal peritoneum in order to decrease the incision-related pain. Thus, it reduces postoperative opiate requirements and opioids-related side effects (nausea, vomiting, delayed resumption of intestinal transit, drowsiness, respiratory depression, urine retention). Additionally, the TAP block appears particularly interesting when neuraxial techniques or opioids are contraindicated. Moreover, the ultrasound-guided procedure provides a significant success rate of this block and additionally avoids major complications. We describe our technique of ultrasound-guided TAP block and discuss its indications, contraindication and potential complications.

  12. [Evaluation of the bite block wedged between the maxillary and mandibular molars].

    PubMed

    Katoh, H; Nishiyama, J; Takiguchi, M; Yamamoto, M; Fujita, K; Yamasaki, Y

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare our original bite block (T-X Block) wedged between the maxillary and mandibular molars, with the standard gum bite block, in 200 patients whose tracheas were intubated. During emergence from isoflurane anesthesia, no trouble occurred in T-X Block group (n = 100). On the other hand, lip damage and ejection of the bite block were found in 11 and 10 cases, respectively, in gum bite block group (n = 100). As another study, an opening between the maxillary and mandibular incisor edges was measured with T-X Block placed in twenty patients under general anesthesia. The inter-incisal distances in one way of using it as a smaller wedge and in the other way as a bigger one were 21.6 +/- 2.4 and 25.2 +/- 2.6 mm, respectively. Those values were significantly larger than thickness of the gum bite block. T-X Block is very useful because its use causes no complications and makes it easier to insert a naso-gastric tube as well as to clean the oral cavity with suction by giving a larger opening of the mouth.

  13. [Quadratus lumborum block: are we aware of its side effects? A report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Sá, Miguel; Cardoso, José Miguel; Reis, Hugo; Esteves, Marta; Sampaio, José; Gouveia, Isabel; Carballada, Pilar; Pinheiro, Célia; Machado, Duarte

    2017-05-23

    The quadratus lumborum block was initially described in 2007 and aims at blocking the same nerves as the ones involved on the Transverse Abdominis Plane block, while accomplishing some visceral enervation as well due to closer proximity with the neuroaxis and sympathetic trunk. Given its versatility, we have successfully used it in a wide range of procedures. We report two cases where we believe the dispersion of local anesthetic is likely to have led to a previously undescribed complication. We report two cases in which we performed a quadratus lumborum type II block and general anesthesia for total gastrectomy and right hemicolectomy. There were no noteworthy events while performing the block and inducing general anesthesia, but within 30-40min serious hypotension and tachycardia were noted. As other motives for hypotension were ruled out, the event was interpreted as block-induced sympatholysis due to cephalad dispersion of the local anesthetic to the paravertebral and epidural space, and successfully managed with ephedrine and increase of the crystalloid infusion rate. The quadratus Lumborum block is safe to execute and provides effective abdominal wall and visceral analgesia. However, the possibility of eliciting undesired episodes should prompt caution when performing this block and practitioners should thereafter remain vigilant. Questions regarding ideal dosing, volumes, timing of block and pertinence of catheters remain to be answered. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Subarachnoid block for caesarean section in severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sujata; Salhotra, Rashmi

    2011-04-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension constitutes a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing nations and it complicates about 6-8% of pregnancies. Severe preeclampsia poses a dilemma for the anesthesiologist especially in emergency situations where caesarean deliveries are planned for uninvestigated or partially investigated parturients. This article is aimed to review the literature with regards to the type of anesthesia for such situations. A thorough search of literature was conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, and Google to retrieve the articles. Studies on parturients with severe preeclampsia, undergoing caesarean section, were included in this article. There is growing evidence to support the use of subarachnoid block in such situations when the platelet counts are >80,000 mm(-3). Better hemodynamic stability with the use of low-dose local anesthetic along with additives and better neonatal outcomes has been found with the use of subarachnoid block when compared to general anesthesia.

  15. Nerve stimulator-guided thoracic paravertebral block for gynecomastia surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jadon, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) is gaining popularity for female breast surgeries due to various advantages like less nausea and vomiting and better post-operative pain relief, which helps in early ambulation and discharge from the hospital. Use of nerve stimulator during this block has further enhanced its success and safety profile. Male breast surgery is usually done either under general anaesthesia or local infiltrative anaesthesia combining with intravenous sedation. We postulated that the advantages of TPVB could be helpful for early mobilization and discharge of minor breast surgery in male patients. However, to our knowledge, there is no such report suggestive of TPVB for exclusive male breast surgery. We used nerve stimulator-guided TPVB for gynecomastia surgery in two patients where general anaesthesia was not feasible. Both patients had successful block and showed good post-operative recovery and were discharged on the same day. They had long post-operative pain relief without any block-related complication. A case report of two such cases of gynecomastia surgery (male breast surgery) done under TPVB is presented. PMID:22923833

  16. Nerve stimulator-guided thoracic paravertebral block for gynecomastia surgery.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Ashok

    2012-05-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) is gaining popularity for female breast surgeries due to various advantages like less nausea and vomiting and better post-operative pain relief, which helps in early ambulation and discharge from the hospital. Use of nerve stimulator during this block has further enhanced its success and safety profile. Male breast surgery is usually done either under general anaesthesia or local infiltrative anaesthesia combining with intravenous sedation. We postulated that the advantages of TPVB could be helpful for early mobilization and discharge of minor breast surgery in male patients. However, to our knowledge, there is no such report suggestive of TPVB for exclusive male breast surgery. We used nerve stimulator-guided TPVB for gynecomastia surgery in two patients where general anaesthesia was not feasible. Both patients had successful block and showed good post-operative recovery and were discharged on the same day. They had long post-operative pain relief without any block-related complication. A case report of two such cases of gynecomastia surgery (male breast surgery) done under TPVB is presented.

  17. The clinical spectrum of autoimmune congenital heart block

    PubMed Central

    Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Izmirly, Peter M.; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Buyon, Jill P.; Khamashta, Munther A.

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune congenital heart block (CHB) is an immune-mediated acquired disease that is associated with the placental transference of maternal antibodies specific for Ro and La autoantigens. The disease develops in a fetal heart without anatomical abnormalities that could otherwise explain the block, and which is usually diagnosed in utero, but also at birth or within the neonatal period. Autoantibody-mediated damage of fetal conduction tissues causes inflammation and fibrosis and leads to blockage of signal conduction at the atrioventricular (AV) node. Irreversible complete AV block is the principal cardiac manifestation of CHB, although some babies might develop other severe cardiac complications, such as endocardial fibroelastosis or valvular insufficiency, even in the absence of cardiac block. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology, classification and management of women whose pregnancies are affected by autoimmune CHB, with a particular focus on the autoantibodies associated with autoimmune CHB and how we should test for these antibodies and diagnose this disease. Without confirmed effective preventive or therapeutic strategies and further research on the aetiopathogenic mechanisms, autoimmune CHB will remain a severe life-threatening disorder. PMID:25800217

  18. Caudal Epidural Block: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Caudal epidural block is a commonly used technique for surgical anesthesia in children and chronic pain management in adults. It is performed by inserting a needle through the sacral hiatus to gain entrance into the sacral epidural space. Using conventional blind technique, the failure rate of caudal epidural block in adults is high even in experienced hands. This high failure rate could be attributed to anatomic variations that make locating sacral hiatus difficult. With the advent of fluoroscopy and ultrasound in guiding needle placement, the success rate of caudal epidural block has been markedly improved. Although fluoroscopy is still considered the gold standard when performing caudal epidural injection, ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be highly effective in accurately guiding the needle entering the caudal epidural space and produce comparative treatment outcome as fluoroscopy. Except intravascular and intrathecal injection, ultrasonography could be as effective as fluoroscopy in preventing complications during caudal epidural injection. The relevant anatomy and techniques in performing the caudal epidural block will be briefly reviewed in this article. PMID:28337460

  19. Design of a V/STOL technology airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabinsky, J. M.; Burnham, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    A two-engine three-fan V/STOL airplane was designed to demonstrate and develop the technology for operational V/STOL and STO-VL aircraft having safe engine-out characteristics. Engine-out requirements, integration of propulsion and aerodynamic controls, and propulsion installation are the major factors affecting the configuration. Use of variable pitch fans enhances the control system providing a responsive and versatile airplane. The ability to operate over the entire flight spectrum from zero speed to M = 0.8 is required to demonstrate operational capability with a V/STOL system.

  20. Pregnancy complications in Sioux Indians.

    PubMed

    Petersen, L P; Leonardson, G; Wingert, R I; Stanage, W; Gergen, J; Gilmore, H T

    1984-10-01

    The poor health status of Sioux Indians residing on reservations in South Dakota has been recognized for many years. The present report documents evidence of a high incidence of socioeconomic health-related disorders and pregnancy-related complications by comparing 342 pregnant white women and 405 pregnant Sioux Indian women. In collaboration with the Aberdeen Area Indian Health Service, beginning in 1976, a program was initiated to identify, assess risks, and provide patient management for pregnant Sioux Indians. This prenatal consultative program has proved effective in the reduction of fetal and infant mortality.