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Sample records for a1 adenosinergic agonist

  1. Involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the adenosinergic modulation of the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine and methamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Justinova, Zuzana; Ferre, Sergi; Segal, Pavan N; Antoniou, Katerina; Solinas, Marcello; Pappas, Lara A; Highkin, Jena L; Hockemeyer, Jorg; Munzar, Patrik; Goldberg, Steven R

    2003-12-01

    Adenosine, by acting on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, is known to antagonistically modulate dopaminergic neurotransmission. We have recently reported that nonselective adenosine receptor antagonists (caffeine and 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine) can partially substitute for the discriminative-stimulus effects of methamphetamine. In the present study, by using more selective compounds, we investigated the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors in the adenosinergic modulation of the discriminative-stimulus effects of both cocaine and methamphetamine. The effects of the A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; 0.01-0.1 mg/kg) and antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (CPT; 1.3-23.7 mg/kg) and the A2A receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS 21680; 0.03-0.18 mg/kg) and antagonist 3-(3-hydroxypropyl)-8-(3-methoxystyryl)-7-methyl-1-propargylxanthin phosphate disodium salt (MSX-3; 1-56 mg/kg) were evaluated in rats trained to discriminate either 1 mg/kg methamphetamine or 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline under a fixed-ratio 10 schedule of food presentation. The A1 and A2A receptor antagonists (CPT and MSX-3) both produced high levels of drug-lever selection when substituted for either methamphetamine or cocaine and significantly shifted dose-response curves of both psychostimulants to the left. Unexpectedly, the A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 also produced drug-appropriate responding (although at lower levels) when substituted for the cocaine-training stimulus, and both CGS 21680 and the A1 receptor agonist CPA significantly shifted the cocaine dose-response curve to the left. In contrast, both agonists did not produce significant levels of drug-lever selection when substituted for the methamphetamine-training stimulus and failed to shift the methamphetamine dose-response curve. Therefore, adenosine A1 and A2A receptors appear to play important but differential roles in the modulation of the

  2. Functional interaction and cross-tolerance between ethanol and Δ9-THC: possible modulation by mouse cerebellar adenosinergic A1/GABAergic-A receptors.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2014-08-15

    We have previously shown a functional motor interaction between ethanol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) that involved cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAergic A receptor modulation. We now report the development of cross-tolerance between intracerebellar Δ(9)-THC and intraperitoneal ethanol using ataxia as the test response in male CD-1 mice. The drugs [Δ(9)-THC (20 μg), N(6)-cyclohexyladenosine, CHA (12 ng), muscimol (20 ng)] used in the study were directly microinfused stereotaxically via guide cannulas into the cerebellum except ethanol. Δ(9)-THC, infused once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last infusion by acute ethanol (2g/kg) and Rotorod evaluation, virtually abolished ethanol ataxia indicating development of cross-tolerance. The cross-tolerance was also observed when the order of ethanol and Δ(9)-THC treatment was reversed, i.e., ethanol injected once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last ethanol injection by Δ(9)-THC infusion. The cross-tolerance appeared within 24-48 h, lasted over 72 h and was maximal in 5-day ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-treated animals. Finally, tolerance in chronic ethanol/Δ(9)-THC/-treated animals developed not only to ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-induced ataxia, respectively, but also to the ataxia potentiating effect of CHA and muscimol, indicating modulation by cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAA receptors. A practical implication of these results could be that marijuana smokers may experience little or no negative effects such as ataxia following alcohol consumption. Clinically, such antagonism of ethanol-induced ataxia can be observed in marijuana users thereby encouraging more alcohol consumption and thus may represent a risk factor for the development of alcoholism in this segment of population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenosinergic signaling in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev

    2016-05-01

    Despite the introduction of at least 20 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) into clinical practice over the past decades, about one third of all epilepsies remain refractory to conventional forms of treatment. In addition, currently used AEDs have been developed to suppress neuronal hyperexcitability, but not necessarily to address pathogenic mechanisms involved in epilepsy development or progression (epileptogenesis). For those reasons endogenous seizure control mechanisms of the brain may provide alternative therapeutic opportunities. Adenosine is a well characterized endogenous anticonvulsant and seizure terminator of the brain. Several lines of evidence suggest that endogenous adenosine-mediated seizure control mechanisms fail in chronic epilepsy, whereas therapeutic adenosine augmentation effectively prevents epileptic seizures, even those that are refractory to conventional AEDs. New findings demonstrate that dysregulation of adenosinergic mechanisms are intricately involved in the development of epilepsy and its comorbidities, whereas adenosine-associated epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in epileptogenesis. The first goal of this review is to discuss how maladaptive changes of adenosinergic mechanisms contribute to the expression of seizures (ictogenesis) and the development of epilepsy (epileptogenesis) by focusing on pharmacological (adenosine receptor dependent) and biochemical (adenosine receptor independent) mechanisms as well as on enzymatic and transport based mechanisms that control the availability (homeostasis) of adenosine. The second goal of this review is to highlight innovative adenosine-based opportunities for therapeutic intervention aimed at reconstructing normal adenosine function and signaling for improved seizure control in chronic epilepsy. New findings suggest that transient adenosine augmentation can have lasting epigenetic effects with disease modifying and antiepileptogenic outcome. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled

  4. AMP is an adenosine A1 receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Rittiner, Joseph E; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Frye, Stephen V; Zylka, Mark J

    2012-02-17

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5'-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A(2B) receptor (A(2B)R) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A(1)R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A(1)R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A(1)R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A(1)R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine.

  5. AMP Is an Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist*

    PubMed Central

    Rittiner, Joseph E.; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5′-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A1R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A1R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A1R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A1R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine. PMID:22215671

  6. Adenosine-A1 Receptor Agonist Induced Hyperalgesic Priming Type II

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of the transition to chronic pain that we have termed Type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to Type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, Type II hyperalgesic priming differs from Type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced Type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced Type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the Type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. PMID:26588695

  7. Potentiation of adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA-induced antinociception by paeoniflorin in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Da-Zhi; Zhao, Fei-Li; Liu, Jing; Ji, Xin-Quan; Ye, Yang; Zhu, Xing-Zu

    2006-08-01

    The effect of paeoniflorin (PF), a major constituent isolated from Paeony radix, on N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a selective adenosine A1 receptor (A1 receptor) agonist, induced antinociception was examined in mice. In the tail-pressure test, CPA (0.05, 0.1, 0.2 mg/kg, s.c.) could induce antinociception in a dose-dependent manner. PF (5, 10, 20 mg/kg, s.c.) alone failed to exhibit any antinociceptive effect in mice; however, pretreatment of PF (20 mg/kg, s.c.) could significantly enhance CPA-induced antinociception. Additionally, pretreatment of 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.25 mg/kg, s.c.), a selective A1 receptor antagonist, could antagonize the antinociceptive effect of combining CPA with PF. Furthermore, in the competitive binding experiments, PF did not displace the binding of [3H]-8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine ([3H]-DPCPX) but displaced that of [3H]-2-Chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine ([3H]-CCPA, a selective A1 receptor agonist) to the membrane preparation of rat cerebral cortex. These results suggested that PF might selectively increase the binding and antinociceptive effect of CPA by binding with A1 receptor.

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) against organophosphate intoxication.

    PubMed

    Bueters, Tjerk J H; Groen, Bas; Danhof, Meindert; IJzerman, Ad P; Van Helden, Herman P M

    2002-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether reduction of central acetylcholine (ACh) accumulation by adenosine receptor agonists could serve as a generic treatment against organophosphate (OP) poisoning. The OPs studied were tabun ( O-ethyl- N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), sarin (isopropylmethylphosphonofluoridate), VX ( O-ethyl- S-2-diisopropylaminoethylmethylphosphonothiolate) and parathion ( O, O-diethyl- O-(4-nitrophenyl)phosphorothioate). The efficacy of the adenosine A(1) receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) against an OP intoxication was examined on the basis of the occurrence of clinical symptoms that are directly associated with such intoxication. CPA (1-2 mg/kg) effectively attenuated the cholinergic symptoms and prevented mortality in lethally tabun- or sarin-intoxicated rats. In contrast, CPA (2 mg/kg) proved to be ineffective against VX or parathion intoxication. Intracerebral microdialysis studies revealed that survival of sarin-poisoned and CPA-treated animals coincided with a minor elevation of extracellular ACh concentrations in the brain relative to the baseline value, whereas an 11-fold increase in transmitter levels was observed in animals not treated with CPA. In VX-intoxicated rats, however, the ACh amounts increased 18-fold, irrespective of treatment with CPA. The striatal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity following a lethal sarin intoxication was completely abolished in the vehicle-treated animals, whereas 10% and 60% AChE activity remained in animals treated with 2 mg/kg CPA 1 min after or 2 min prior to the poisoning, respectively. In VX-intoxicated animals the AChE activity in the brain was strongly reduced (striatum 10%, hippocampus 1%) regardless of the CPA treatment. These results demonstrate that CPA is highly effective against tabun or sarin poisoning, but fails to protect against VX or parathion. Survival and attenuation of clinical signs in tabun- or sarin-poisoned animals are associated with a

  9. Macrophage A2A Adenosinergic Receptor Modulates Oxygen-Induced Augmentation of Murine Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Franco R.; Eto, Yoshiki; Chau, Eric; Avalos, Claudia; Waickman, Adam T.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Mock, Jason R.; Files, Daniel C.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; Powell, Jonathan; Horton, Maureen; King, Landon S.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Exacerbating factors increasing the risk of ARDS remain unknown. Supplemental oxygen is often necessary in both mild and severe lung disease. The potential effects of supplemental oxygen may include augmentation of lung inflammation by inhibiting anti-inflammatory pathways in alveolar macrophages. We sought to determine oxygen-derived effects on the anti-inflammatory A2A adenosinergic (ADORA2A) receptor in macrophages, and the role of the ADORA2A receptor in lung injury. Wild-type (WT) and ADORA2A−/− mice received intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (IT LPS), followed 12 hours later by continuous exposure to 21% oxygen (control mice) or 60% oxygen for 1 to 3 days. We measured the phenotypic endpoints of lung injury and the alveolar macrophage inflammatory state. We tested an ADORA2A-specific agonist, CGS-21680 hydrochloride, in LPS plus oxygen-exposed WT and ADORA2A−/− mice. We determined the specific effects of myeloid ADORA2A, using chimera experiments. Compared with WT mice, ADORA2A−/− mice exposed to IT LPS and 60% oxygen demonstrated significantly more histologic lung injury, alveolar neutrophils, and protein. Macrophages from ADORA2A−/− mice exposed to LPS plus oxygen expressed higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and cosignaling molecules. CGS-21680 prevented the oxygen-induced augmentation of lung injury after LPS only in WT mice. Chimera experiments demonstrated that the transfer of WT but not ADORA2A−/− bone marrow cells into irradiated ADORA2A−/− mice reduced lung injury after LPS plus oxygen, demonstrating myeloid ADORA2A protection. ADORA2A is protective against lung injury after LPS and oxygen. Oxygen after LPS increases macrophage activation to augment lung injury by inhibiting the ADORA2A pathway. PMID:23349051

  10. Hypothermia in mouse is caused by adenosine A1 and A3 receptor agonists and AMP via three distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Jain, Shalini; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Wan, Tina C; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Auchampach, John A; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gavrilova, Oksana; Reitman, Marc L

    2017-03-01

    Small mammals have the ability to enter torpor, a hypothermic, hypometabolic state, allowing impressive energy conservation. Administration of adenosine or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) can trigger a hypothermic, torpor-like state. We investigated the mechanisms for hypothermia using telemetric monitoring of body temperature in wild type and receptor knock out (Adora1 -/- , Adora3 -/- ) mice. Confirming prior data, stimulation of the A 3 adenosine receptor (AR) induced hypothermia via peripheral mast cell degranulation, histamine release, and activation of central histamine H 1 receptors. In contrast, A 1 AR agonists and AMP both acted centrally to cause hypothermia. Commonly used, selective A 1 AR agonists, including N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), N 6 -cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), and MRS5474, caused hypothermia via both A 1 AR and A 3 AR when given intraperitoneally. Intracerebroventricular dosing, low peripheral doses of Cl-ENBA [(±)-5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N 6 -endo-norbornyladenosine], or using Adora3 -/- mice allowed selective stimulation of A 1 AR. AMP-stimulated hypothermia can occur independently of A 1 AR, A 3 AR, and mast cells. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP cause regulated hypothermia that was characterized by a drop in total energy expenditure, physical inactivity, and preference for cooler environmental temperatures, indicating a reduced body temperature set point. Neither A 1 AR nor A 3 AR was required for fasting-induced torpor. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP trigger regulated hypothermia via three distinct mechanisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Homeostatic action of adenosine A3 and A1 receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Streitová, Denisa; Vacek, Antonín

    2008-07-01

    Two adenosine receptor agonists, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), which selectively activate adenosine A3 and A1 receptors, respectively, were tested for their ability to influence proliferation of granulocytic and erythroid cells in femoral bone marrow of mice using morphological criteria. Agonists were given intraperitoneally to mice in repeated isomolar doses of 200 nmol/kg. Three variants of experiments were performed to investigate the action of the agonists under normal resting state of mice and in phases of cell depletion and subsequent regeneration after treatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. In the case of granulopoiesis, IB-MECA 1) increased by a moderate but significant level proliferation of cells under normal resting state; 2) strongly increased proliferation of cells in the cell depletion phase; but 3) did not influence cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. CPA did not influence cell proliferation under normal resting state and in the cell depletion phase, but strongly suppressed the overshooting cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. The stimulatory effect of IB-MECA on cell proliferation of erythroid cells was observed only when this agonist was administered during the cell depletion phase. CPA did not modulate erythroid proliferation in any of the functional states investigated, probably due to the lower demand for cell production as compared with granulopoiesis. The results indicate opposite effects of the two adenosine receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic cells and suggest the plasticity and homeostatic role of the adenosine receptor expression.

  12. Role of A1 and A2A adenosine receptor agonists in adipose tissue inflammation induced by obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    DeOliveira, Caroline Candida; Paiva Caria, Cintia Rabelo E; Ferreira Gotardo, Erica Martins; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Gambero, Alessandra

    2017-03-15

    Adenosine receptors are expressed in adipose tissue and control physiological and pathological events such as lipolysis and inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), a potent and selective A 1 adenosine receptor agonist; 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS-21680), an A 2A adenosine receptor agonist; and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), a potent non-selective adenosine receptor agonist on adipose tissue inflammatory alterations induced by obesity in mice. Swiss mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 12 weeks and agonists were administered in the last two weeks. Body weight, adiposity and glucose homeostasis were evaluated. Inflammation in adipose tissue was assessed by evaluation of adipokine production and macrophage infiltration. Adenosine receptor signaling in adipose tissue was also evaluated. Mice that received CGS21680 presented an improvement in glucose homeostasis in association with systemically reduced inflammatory markers (TNF-α, PAI-1) and in the visceral adipose tissue (TNF-α, MCP-1, macrophage infiltration). Activation of p38 signaling was found in adipose tissue of this group of mice. NECA-treated mice presented some improvements in glucose homeostasis associated with an observed weight loss. Mice that received CPA presented only a reduction in the ex vivo basal lipolysis rate measured within visceral adipose tissue. In conclusion, administration of the A 2A receptor agonist to obese mice resulted in improvements in glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue inflammation, corroborating the idea that new therapeutics to treat obesity could emerge from these compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Adenosinergic Immunosuppression by Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Requires Co-Operation with T cells.

    PubMed

    Kerkelä, Erja; Laitinen, Anita; Räbinä, Jarkko; Valkonen, Sami; Takatalo, Maarit; Larjo, Antti; Veijola, Johanna; Lampinen, Milla; Siljander, Pia; Lehenkari, Petri; Alfthan, Kaija; Laitinen, Saara

    2016-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have the capacity to counteract excessive inflammatory responses. MSCs possess a range of immunomodulatory mechanisms, which can be deployed in response to signals in a particular environment and in concert with other immune cells. One immunosuppressive mechanism, not so well-known in MSCs, is mediated via adenosinergic pathway by ectonucleotidases CD73 and CD39. In this study, we demonstrate that adenosine is actively produced from adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) by CD73 on MSCs and MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). Our results indicate that although MSCs express CD39 at low level and it colocalizes with CD73 in bulge areas of membranes, the most efficient adenosine production from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires co-operation of MSCs and activated T cells. Highly CD39 expressing activated T cells produce AMP from ATP and MSCs produce adenosine from AMP via CD73 activity. Furthermore, adenosinergic signaling plays a role in suppression of T cell proliferation in vitro. In conclusion, this study shows that adenosinergic signaling is an important immunoregulatory mechanism of MSCs, especially in situations where ATP is present in the extracellular environment, like in tissue injury. An efficient production of immunosuppressive adenosine is dependent on the concerted action of CD39-positive immune cells with CD73-positive cells such as MSCs or their EVs. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  14. Interaction of valerian extracts of different polarity with adenosine receptors: identification of isovaltrate as an inverse agonist at A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lacher, Svenja K; Mayer, Ralf; Sichardt, Kathrin; Nieber, Karen; Müller, Christa E

    2007-01-15

    A series of extracts of valerian roots (Valeriana officinalis L.) was prepared with solvents of different polarity. Polar as well as nonpolar extracts were found to interact with adenosine A(1) receptors. While polar extracts activated A(1) receptors (partial agonistic activity), nonpolar extracts showed antagonistic or inverse agonistic activity at A(1) receptors, as demonstrated by GTPgammaS binding assays at human recombinant A(1) receptors stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Guided by radioligand binding assays, fractionation of a lipophilic petroleum ether:diethyl ether (1:1) extract led to the isolation of isovaltrate, which was characterized as a potent, highly efficacious inverse agonist at adenosine A(1) receptors (K(i) rat A(1): 2.05 microM). In experiments at rat brain slices measuring post-synaptic potentials (PSPs) in cortical neurons, isovaltrate at least partly reversed the reduction in the PSPs induced by the adenosine A(1) receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). Isovaltrate may serve as a new lead structure for the development of inverse agonists at adenosine A(1) receptors. The common use of hydrophilic, but not lipophilic valerian extracts as mild sleep-inducing agents is consistent with the opposite actions of hydrophilic and lipophilic extracts on adenosine receptors.

  15. Interaction of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and opioid receptors in spinal cord nociceptive reflexes.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Zepeda, Guillermo; Herrero, Juan F

    2013-08-14

    We previously observed that the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) is a very effective antinociceptive agent on intact but not on spinalized adult rats with inflammation. Since a close connection between opioid and adenosine A1 receptors has been described, we studied a possible relationship between these systems in the spinal cord. CPA-mediated antinociception was challenged by the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dimethylxanthine (CPT) and by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone on male adult Wistar rats with carrageenan-induced inflammation. Withdrawal reflexes activated by noxious mechanical and electrical stimulation were recorded using the single motor technique in intact and sham-spinalized animals. CPA was very effective in intact and sham spinalized rats but not in spinalized animals. Full reversal of CPA antinociception was observed with i.v. 1mg/kg of naloxone but not with 20mg/kg of CPT i.v. in responses to noxious mechanical and electrical stimulation. CPT fully prevented CPA from any antinociceptive action whereas naloxone did not modify CPA activity. These results suggest a centrally-mediated action, since CPA depressed the wind-up phenomenon which is derived of the activity of spinal cord neurons. The present study provides strong in vivo evidence of an antinociceptive activity mediated by the adenosine A1 receptor system in the spinal cord, linked to an activation of opioid receptors in adult animals with inflammation. © 2013.

  16. The 5-HT2A/1A agonist psilocybin disrupts modal object completion associated with visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Kometer, Michael; Cahn, B Rael; Andel, David; Carter, Olivia L; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2011-03-01

    Recent findings suggest that the serotonergic system and particularly the 5-HT2A/1A receptors are implicated in visual processing and possibly the pathophysiology of visual disturbances including hallucinations in schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. To investigate the role of 5-HT2A/1A receptors in visual processing the effect of the hallucinogenic 5-HT2A/1A agonist psilocybin (125 and 250 μg/kg vs. placebo) on the spatiotemporal dynamics of modal object completion was assessed in normal volunteers (n = 17) using visual evoked potential recordings in conjunction with topographic-mapping and source analysis. These effects were then considered in relation to the subjective intensity of psilocybin-induced visual hallucinations quantified by psychometric measurement. Psilocybin dose-dependently decreased the N170 and, in contrast, slightly enhanced the P1 component selectively over occipital electrode sites. The decrease of the N170 was most apparent during the processing of incomplete object figures. Moreover, during the time period of the N170, the overall reduction of the activation in the right extrastriate and posterior parietal areas correlated positively with the intensity of visual hallucinations. These results suggest a central role of the 5-HT2A/1A-receptors in the modulation of visual processing. Specifically, a reduced N170 component was identified as potentially reflecting a key process of 5-HT2A/1A receptor-mediated visual hallucinations and aberrant modal object completion potential. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of central and peripheral adenosine receptors in the cardiovascular responses to intraperitoneal injections of adenosine A1 and A2A subtype receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Charles W; Karcz-Kubicha, Marzena; Thorndike, Eric B; Müller, Christa E; Tella, Srihari R; Ferré, Sergi; Goldberg, Steven R

    2005-03-01

    1. The cardiovascular effects of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and the adenosine A2A receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680) were investigated in rats implanted with telemetry transmitters for the measurement of blood pressure and heart rate. 2. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA led to dose-dependent decreases in both blood pressure and heart rate. These effects of 0.3 mg kg(-1) CPA were antagonized by i.p. injections of the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethyl-xanthine (CPT), but not by i.p. injections of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 3-(3-hydroxypropyl)-8-(m-methoxystyryl)-7-methyl-1-propargylxanthine phosphate disodium salt (MSX-3). Injections (i.p.) of the peripherally acting nonselective adenosine antagonist 8-sulfophenyltheophylline (8-SPT) and the purported nonselective adenosine antagonist caffeine also antagonized the cardiovascular effects of CPA. 3. The adenosine A2A agonist CGS 21680 given i.p. produced a dose-dependent decrease in blood pressure and an increase in heart rate. These effects of 0.5 mg kg(-1) CGS 21680 were antagonized by i.p. injections of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3, but not by i.p. injections of the antagonists CPT, 8-SPT or caffeine. 4. Central administration (intracerebral ventricular) of CGS 21680 produced an increase in heart rate, but no change in blood pressure. MSX-3 given i.p. antagonized the effects of the central injection of CGS 21680. 5. These results suggest that adenosine A1 receptor agonists produce decreases in blood pressure and heart rate that are mediated by A1 receptors in the periphery, with little or no contribution of central adenosine A1 receptors to those effects. 6. The heart rate increasing effect of adenosine A2A agonists appears to be mediated by adenosine A2A receptors in the central nervous system. The blood pressure decreasing

  18. Electrophysiologic effects of a novel selective adenosine A1 agonist (CVT-510) on atrioventricular nodal conduction in humans.

    PubMed

    Lerman, B B; Ellenbogen, K A; Kadish, A; Platia, E; Stein, K M; Markowitz, S M; Mittal, S; Slotwiner, D J; Scheiner, M; Iwai, S; Belardinelli, L; Jerling, M; Shreeniwas, R; Wolff, A A

    2001-07-01

    CVT-510, N-(3(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl)-6-aminopurine riboside, is a selective A(1)-adenosine receptor agonist with potential potent antiarrhythmic effects in tachycardias involving the atrioventricular (AV) node. This study, the first in humans, was designed to determine the effects of CVT-510 on AV nodal conduction and hemodynamics. Patients in sinus rhythm with normal AV nodal function at electrophysiologic study (n = 32) received a single intravenous bolus of CVT-510. AH and HV intervals were measured during sinus rhythm and during atrial pacing at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the bolus. Increasing doses of CVT-510 (0.3 to 10 microg/kg) caused a dose-dependent increase in the AH interval. At 1 minute, a dose of 10 microg/kg increased the AH interval during sinus rhythm from 93 +/- 23 msec to 114 +/- 37 msec, p = 0.01 and from 114 +/- 31 msec to 146 +/- 44 msec during atrial pacing at 600 msec, p = 0.003). The AH interval returned to baseline by 20 minutes. CVT-510 at doses of 0.3 to 10 microg/kg had no effect on sinus rate, HV interval, or systemic blood pressure, and was not associated with serious adverse effects. At doses of 15 and 30 microg/kg, CVT-510 produced transient second/third degree AV heart block in all four patients treated. One of these patients also had a prolonged sedative effect that was reversed with aminophylline. CVT-510 promptly prolongs AV nodal conduction and does not affect sinus rate or blood pressure. Selective stimulation of the A(1)-adenosine receptor by CVT-510 may be useful for immediate control of heart rate in atrial fibrillation/flutter and to convert paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia to sinus rhythm, while avoiding vasodilatation mediated by the A(2)-adenosine receptor, as well as the vasodepressor and negative inotropic effects associated with beta-adrenergic receptor blockade and/or calcium channel blockers.

  19. Significant Correlation between TLR2 Agonist Activity and TNF-α Induction in J774.A1 Macrophage Cells by Different Medicinal Mushroom Products.

    PubMed

    Coy, Catherine; Standish, Leanna J; Bender, Geoff; Lu, Hailing

    2015-01-01

    In the US market, there is a variety of mushroom preparations available, even within the same species of mushroom. Nonetheless, little is known about whether species or the various extraction methods affect biological activity and potency of the immune modulatory activity of mushroom extracts. After discovering that protein-bound polysaccharide-K, a hot water extract from Trametes versicolor, was a potent Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 agonist that stimulates both innate and adaptive immunity, this study was initiated to evaluate whether other medicinal mushroom products also have TLR2 agonist activity and immune-enhancing potential as measured by the induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in J774.A1 murine macrophage cells. Furthermore, the products were divided by extraction method and species to determine whether these factors affect their immunomodulatory activity. The results showed that the majority (75%) of mushroom products tested had TLR2 agonist activity and that there was a significant correlation between TLR2 agonist activity and TNF-α induction potential in the mushroom products analyzed. In addition, the data demonstrated that hot water mushroom extracts are more potent than ground mushroom products in activating TLR2 and inducing TNF-α. These data provide evidence that extraction methods may affect the biological activity of mushroom products; thus, further studies are warranted to investigate the structural differences between various mushroom products.

  20. The Effects of Adenosinergic Modulation on Cytokine Levels in a Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizure Model.

    PubMed

    Dede, Fazilet; Karadenizli, Sabriye; Özsoy, Özgür Doğa; Eraldemir, Fatma Ceyla; Şahin, Deniz; Ateş, Nurbay

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested that the adenosinergic system and cytokines play a role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Although the role of the adenosinergic system in the modulation of seizure activity is well known, the mechanism of this modulation needs to be described in detail. We performed this study to determine the contribution of the proinflammatory cytokines to the generalized seizure activity during adenosine and caffeine treatment. We induced generalized tonic-clonic seizures with the administration of 60 mg/kg pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in male Wistar Albino rats. Adenosine (500 mg/kg) or caffeine (5 mg/kg) was administered before PTZ injection. We monitored seizure activity and then determined the TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels in the cortical and thalamic brain regions of rats by ELISA. Adenosine pretreatment significantly extended seizure latency (p < 0.05), but did not affect seizure duration and entry time to stage 4 seizure. Caffeine pretreatment did not change seizure latency and seizure duration. PTZ treatment did not change brain cytokine levels significantly (p > 0.05) compared to the control group. Whereas adenosine pretreatment decreased brain TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels significantly (p < 0.05), caffeine pretreatment reduced brain cytokine levels slightly but nonsignificantly (p > 0.05). Our results show that there is a clear relation between adenosinergic system and brain tissue cytokine levels. Our findings indicated that TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 participate in the pathogenesis of generalized seizures, and the inhibition of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 with adenosinergic modulation may decrease seizure severity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. The amphiphilic peptide adenoregulin enhances agonist binding to A1-adenosine receptors and [35S]GTP gamma S to brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Moni, R W; Romero, F S; Daly, J W

    1995-08-01

    1. Adenoregulin is an amphilic peptide isolated from skin mucus of the tree frog, Phyllomedusa bicolor. Synthetic adenoregulin enhanced the binding of agonists to several G-protein-coupled receptors in rat brain membranes. 2. The maximal enhancement of agonist binding, and in parentheses, the concentration of adenoregulin affording maximal enhancement were as follows: 60% (20 microM) for A1-adenosine receptors, 30% (100 microM) for A2a-adenosine receptors, 20% (2 microM) for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, and 30% (10 microM) for 5HT1A receptors. High affinity agonist binding for A1-, alpha 2-, and 5HT1A-receptors was virtually abolished by GTP gamma S in the presence of adenoregulin, but was only partially abolished in its absence. Magnesium ions increased the binding of agonists to receptors and reduced the enhancement elicited by adenoregulin. 3. The effect of adenoregulin on binding of N6-cyclohexyladenosine ([3H]CHA) to A1-receptors was relatively slow and was irreversible. Adenoregulin increased the Bmax value for [3H]CHA binding sites, and the proportion of high affinity states, and slowed the rate of [3H]CHA dissociation. Binding of the A1-selective antagonist, [3H]DPCPX, was maximally enhanced by only 13% at 2 microM adenoregulin. Basal and A1-adenosine receptor-stimulated binding of [35S]GTP gamma S were maximally enhanced 45% and 23%, respectively, by 50 microM adenoregulin. In CHAPS-solubilized membranes from rat cortex, the binding of both [3H]CHA and [3H]DPCPX were enhanced by adenoregulin. Binding of [3H]CHA to membranes from DDT1 MF-2 cells was maximally enhanced 17% at 20 microM adenoregulin. In intact DDT1 MF-2 cells, 20 microM adenoregulin did not potentiate the inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation mediated via the adenosine A1 receptor. 4. It is proposed that adenoregulin enhances agonist binding through a mechanism involving enhancement of guanyl nucleotide exchange at G-proteins, resulting in a conversion of receptors into a high affinity state

  2. Involvement of cholinergic and adenosinergic systems on the branchial immune response of experimentally infected silver catfish with Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, M D; Souza, C F; Doleski, P H; Moreira, K L S; da Veiga, M L; da Rocha, M I U M; Santos, R C V; Baldisserotto, B

    2018-01-01

    It has been recognized that the cholinergic and adenosinergic systems have an essential role in immune and inflammatory responses during bacterial fish pathogens, such as the enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and adenosine deaminase (ADA), which are responsible for catalysis of the anti-inflammatory molecules acetylcholine (ACh) and adenosine (Ado) respectively. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the cholinergic and adenosinergic systems on the immune response and inflammatory process in gills of experimentally infected Rhamdia quelen with Streptococcus agalactiae. Acetylcholinesterase activity decreased, while ACh levels increased in gills of infected animals compared to uninfected animals. On the other hand, a significant increase in ADA activity with a concomitant decrease in Ado levels was observed in infected animals compared to uninfected animals. Based on this evidence, we concluded that infection by S. agalactiae in silver catfish alters the cholinergic and adenosinergic systems, suggesting the involvement of AChE and ADA activities on immune and inflammatory responses, regulating the ACh and Ado levels. In summary, the downregulation of AChE activity exerts an anti-inflammatory profile in an attempt to reduce or prevent the tissue damage, while the upregulation of ADA activity exerts a pro-inflammatory profile, contributing to disease pathophysiology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Identification of novel thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives as human A1 and A2A adenosine receptor antagonists/inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Varano, Flavia; Catarzi, Daniela; Falsini, Matteo; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Pasquini, Silvia; Varani, Katia; Colotta, Vittoria

    2018-07-23

    In this study a new set of thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives was synthesized. These derivatives bear different substituents at positions 2 and 5 of the thiazolopyrimidine core while maintaining a free amino group at position-7. The new compounds were tested for their affinity and potency at human (h) A 1 , A 2A , A 2B and A 3 adenosine receptors expressed in CHO cells. The results reveal that the higher affinity of these new set of thiazolopyrimidines is toward the hA 1 and hA 2A adenosine receptors subtypes and is tuned by the substitution pattern at both the 2 and 5 positions of the thiazolopyrimidine nucleus. Functional studies evidenced that the compounds behaved as dual A 1 /A 2A antagonists/inverse agonists. Compound 3, bearing a 5-((2-methoxyphenyl) methylamino) group and a phenyl moiety at position 2, displayed the highest affinity (hA 1 K i  = 10.2 nM; hA 2A K i  = 4.72 nM) and behaved as a potent A 1 /A 2A antagonist/inverse agonist (hA 1 IC 50  = 13.4 nM; hA 2A IC 50  = 5.34 nM). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A comparison of an A1 adenosine receptor agonist (CVT-510) with diltiazem for slowing of AV nodal conduction in guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Snowdy, Stephen; Liang, Hui Xiu; Blackburn, Brent; Lum, Robert; Nelson, Marek; Wang, Lisa; Pfister, Jürg; Sharma, Bhavender P; Wolff, Andrew; Belardinelli, Luiz

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacological properties (i.e. the AV nodal depressant, vasodilator, and inotropic effects) of two AV nodal blocking agents belonging to different drug classes; a novel A1 adenosine receptor (A1 receptor) agonist, N-(3(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl)-6-aminopurine riboside (CVT-510), and the prototypical calcium channel blocker diltiazem.In the atrial-paced isolated heart, CVT-510 was approximately 5 fold more potent to prolong the stimulus-to-His bundle (S–H interval), a measure of slowing AV nodal conduction (EC50=41 nM) than to increase coronary conductance (EC50=200 nM). At concentrations of CVT-510 (40 nM) and diltiazem (1 μM) that caused equal prolongation of S–H interval (∼10 ms), diltiazem, but not CVT-510, significantly reduced left ventricular developed pressure (LVP) and markedly increased coronary conductance. CVT-510 shortened atrial (EC50=73 nM) but not the ventricular monophasic action potentials (MAP).In atrial-paced anaesthetized guinea-pigs, intravenous infusions of CVT-510 and diltiazem caused nearly equal prolongations of P–R interval. However, diltiazem, but not CVT-510, significantly reduced mean arterial blood pressure.Both CVT-510 and diltiazem prolonged S–H interval, i.e., slowed AV nodal conduction. However, the A1 receptor-selective agonist CVT-510 did so without causing the negative inotropic, vasodilator, and hypotensive effects associated with diltiazem. Because CVT-510 did not affect the ventricular action potential, it is unlikely that this agonist will have a proarrythmic action in ventricular myocardium. PMID:10051130

  5. The antinociceptive effects of the systemic adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA in the absence and in the presence of spinal cord sensitization.

    PubMed

    Curros-Criado, M Mar; Herrero, Juan F

    2005-12-01

    Adenosine A1 receptor agonists are effective antinociceptive agents in neuropathic and inflammatory pain, though they appear to be weak analgesics in acute nociception. Important discrepancies are observed on the effectiveness and potency of adenosine analogues when comparing different studies, probably due to the use of different ligands, models of antinociception, routes of administration and types of sensitization. We studied the systemic antinociceptive effects of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) in spinal cord neuronal responses from adult male rats in acute nociception and in sensitization due to arthritis and neuropathy. The experiments showed that CPA was effective in the three experimental conditions, with a similar potency in reducing responses to noxious mechanical stimulation (ID50s: 20 +/- 1.2 microg/kg in acute nociception, 18 +/- 1.1 microg/kg in arthritis, 17.4 +/- 2 microg/kg in neuropathy). The phenomenon of wind-up was also dose-dependently reduced by CPA in the three experimental situations although the main action was seen in arthritis. Depression of blood pressure by CPA was not dose-dependent. We conclude that systemic CPA is a potent and effective analgesic in sensitization due to arthritis and neuropathy but also in acute nociception. The effect is independent of the cardiovascular activity and is centrally mediated since wind-up was inhibited.

  6. Central or Peripheral Delivery of an Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist Improves Mechanical Allodynia in a Mouse Model of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Katz, N. K.; Ryals, J. M.; Wright, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8-weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of painful

  7. The Adenosinergic System as a Therapeutic Target in the Vasculature: New Ligands and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Diniz, Carmen

    2017-05-06

    adenosinergic players as attractive therapeutic targets for cardiovascular pathologies, namely hypertension, heart failure or stroke. Nevertheless, several aspects are still to be explored, creating new challenges to be addressed in future studies, particularly the development of strategies able to circumvent the predicted side effects of these therapies.

  8. A New Drug Design Targeting the Adenosinergic System for Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Lin, Chia-I; Liu, Eric Minwei; Lin, Chun-Jung; Chen, Wan-Ping; Shen, Yuh-Chiang; Chen, Hui-Mei; Chen, Jhih-Bin; Lai, Hsing-Lin; Yang, Chieh-Wen; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Wu, Yu-Shuo; Chang, Chen; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Fang, Jim-Min; Lin, Yun-Lian; Chern, Yijuang

    2011-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion in the Huntingtin (Htt) gene. The expanded CAG repeats are translated into polyglutamine (polyQ), causing aberrant functions as well as aggregate formation of mutant Htt. Effective treatments for HD are yet to be developed. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report a novel dual-function compound, N 6-(4-hydroxybenzyl)adenine riboside (designated T1-11) which activates the A2AR and a major adenosine transporter (ENT1). T1-11 was originally isolated from a Chinese medicinal herb. Molecular modeling analyses showed that T1-11 binds to the adenosine pockets of the A2AR and ENT1. Introduction of T1-11 into the striatum significantly enhanced the level of striatal adenosine as determined by a microdialysis technique, demonstrating that T1-11 inhibited adenosine uptake in vivo. A single intraperitoneal injection of T1-11 in wildtype mice, but not in A2AR knockout mice, increased cAMP level in the brain. Thus, T1-11 enters the brain and elevates cAMP via activation of the A2AR in vivo. Most importantly, addition of T1-11 (0.05 mg/ml) to the drinking water of a transgenic mouse model of HD (R6/2) ameliorated the progressive deterioration in motor coordination, reduced the formation of striatal Htt aggregates, elevated proteasome activity, and increased the level of an important neurotrophic factor (brain derived neurotrophic factor) in the brain. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of T1-11 for treating HD. Conclusions/Significance The dual functions of T1-11 enable T1-11 to effectively activate the adenosinergic system and subsequently delay the progression of HD. This is a novel therapeutic strategy for HD. Similar dual-function drugs aimed at a particular neurotransmitter system as proposed herein may be applicable to other neurotransmitter systems (e.g., the dopamine receptor/dopamine transporter and the serotonin receptor

  9. Thermal nociception is decreased by hypocretin-1 and an adenosine A1 receptor agonist microinjected into the pontine reticular formation of Sprague Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sarah L; Watson, Christopher J; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2010-06-01

    Clinical and preclinical data concur that sleep disruption causes hyperalgesia, but the brain mechanisms through which sleep and pain interact remain poorly understood. Evidence that pontine components of the ascending reticular activating system modulate sleep and nociception encouraged the present study testing the hypothesis that hypocretin-1 (orexin-A) and an adenosine receptor agonist administered into the pontine reticular nucleus, oral part (PnO) each alter thermal nociception. Adult male rats (n = 23) were implanted with microinjection guide tubes aimed for the PnO. The PnO was microinjected with saline (control), hypocretin-1, the adenosine A(1) receptor agonist N(6)-p-sulfophenyladenosine (SPA), the hypocretin receptor-1 antagonist N-(2-Methyl-6-benzoxazolyl)-N''-1,5-naphthyridin-4-yl-urea (SB-334867), and hypocretin-1 plus SB-334867. As an index of antinociceptive behavior, the latency (in seconds) to paw withdrawal away from a thermal stimulus was measured following each microinjection. Compared to control, antinociception was significantly increased by hypocretin-1 and by SPA. SB-334867 increased nociceptive responsiveness, and administration of hypocretin-1 plus SB-334867 blocked the antinociception caused by hypocretin-1. These results suggest for the first time that hypocretin receptors in rat PnO modulate nociception. Widely distributed and overlapping neural networks regulate states of sleep and pain. Specifying the brain regions and neurotransmitters through which pain and sleep interact is an essential step for developing adjunctive therapies that diminish pain without disrupting states of sleep and wakefulness. Copyright (c) 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardiovascular effects of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) decisive for its therapeutic efficacy in sarin poisoning.

    PubMed

    Joosen, Marloes J A; Bueters, Tjerk J H; van Helden, Herman P M

    2004-01-01

    Mortality and occurrence of cholinergic symptoms upon sarin intoxication (144 micro g/kg s.c., approximately 2 x LD50) in rats is completely prevented by treatment with the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 2 mg/kg i.m.). Previously, we have shown that CPA treatment altered the distribution of sarin into the brain, presumably through its cardiovascular side effects. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of the cardiodepressant effects of CPA to its therapeutic efficacy against sarin intoxication. Intramuscular treatment of rats with 0.5 and 2.0 mg/kg CPA 1 min after sarin poisoning attenuated most cholinergic symptoms and prevented mortality, which seemed to be directly associated with an immediate strong and long-lasting bradycardia and hypotension caused by CPA. Treatment with lower doses of CPA (0.1 and 0.05 mg/kg i.m.) caused similar levels of bradycardia and hypotension, albeit a few minutes later than at the higher doses of CPA. Upon sarin intoxication, this was correlated with increased incidence of cholinergic symptoms and decreased survival rates. Pretreatment with the peripheral adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8- p-sulphophenyltheophylline (8-PST, 20 mg/kg i.p.) counteracted the cardiodepressant effects of 0.05 mg/kg CPA almost completely, thereby nearly abolishing its therapeutic efficacy against sarin poisoning. In conclusion, the present results strongly indicate that bradycardia and hypotension induced by the peripheral adenosine A1 receptor play a prominent role in the therapeutic efficacy of CPA in cases of sarin poisoning.

  11. Adenosine A1 Receptors in Mouse Pontine Reticular Formation Depress Breathing, Increase Anesthesia Recovery Time, and Decrease Acetylcholine Release

    PubMed Central

    Gettys, George C.; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Methods Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX), or SPA and DPCPX. Results First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (−18%), tidal volume (−12%) and minute ventilation (−16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). DPCPX alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, decrease in RoRR, and decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and DPCPX blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Conclusions Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing. PMID:23263018

  12. Adenosine A(1) receptors in mouse pontine reticular formation depress breathing, increase anesthesia recovery time, and decrease acetylcholine release.

    PubMed

    Gettys, George C; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2013-02-01

    Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and the time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after a PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine, or SPA and 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine. First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (-18%), tidal volume (-12%), and minute ventilation (-16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, a decrease in RoRR, and a decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing.

  13. From molecule to behavior: Brain aromatase (cyp19a1b) characterization, expression analysis and its relation with social status and male agonistic behavior in a Neotropical cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Ramallo, Martín R; Morandini, Leonel; Birba, Agustina; Somoza, Gustavo M; Pandolfi, Matías

    2017-03-01

    The enzyme aromatase, responsible for the conversion of C19 androgens to C18 estrogens, exists as two paralogue copies in teleost fish: Cyp19a1a mostly expressed in the gonads, referred as gonadal aromatase, and Cyp19a1b, mostly expressed in the brain, accordingly known as brain aromatase. The neural localization of Cyp19a1b is greatly contained within the social behavior network and mesolimbic reward system in fish, suggesting a strong role of estrogen synthesis in the regulation of social behavior. In this work we aimed to analyze the variation in cyp19a1b expression in brain and pituitary of males of a highly social cichlid, Cichlasoma dimerus (locally known as chanchita), and its relation with inter-individual variability in agonistic behavior in a communal social environment. We first characterized chanchita's cyp19a1b mRNA and deduced amino acid sequence, which showed a high degree of conservation when compared to other teleost brain aromatase sequences, and its tissue expression patterns. Within the brain, Cyp19a1b was solely detected at putative radial glial cells of the forebrain, close to the brain ventricles. We then studied the relative expression levels of cyp19a1b by Real Time PCR in the brain and pituitary of males of different social status, territorial vs. non-territorial, and its relationship with an index of agonistic behavior. We found that even though, brain aromatase expression did not differ between types of males, pituitary cyp19a1b expression levels positively correlated with the index of agonistic behavior. This suggests a novel role of the pituitary in the regulation of social behavior by local estrogen synthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY354740 and the D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol reduce locomotor hyperactivity but fail to rescue spatial working memory in GluA1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Thomas; Bygrave, Alexei M; Chen, Jingkai; Fernando, Anushka; Jackson, Stephanie; Barkus, Chris; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H; Harrison, Paul J; Gilmour, Gary; Bannerman, David M; Sanderson, David J

    2017-04-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists have been suggested as potential anti-psychotics, at least in part, based on the observation that the agonist LY354740 appeared to rescue the cognitive deficits caused by non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists, including spatial working memory deficits in rodents. Here, we tested the ability of LY354740 to rescue spatial working memory performance in mice that lack the GluA1 subunit of the AMPA glutamate receptor, encoded by Gria1, a gene recently implicated in schizophrenia by genome-wide association studies. We found that LY354740 failed to rescue the spatial working memory deficit in Gria1 -/- mice during rewarded alternation performance in the T-maze. In contrast, LY354740 did reduce the locomotor hyperactivity in these animals to a level that was similar to controls. A similar pattern was found with the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol, with no amelioration of the spatial working memory deficit in Gria1 -/- mice, even though the same dose of haloperidol reduced their locomotor hyperactivity. These results with LY354740 contrast with the rescue of spatial working memory in models of glutamatergic hypofunction using non-competitive NMDAR antagonists. Future studies should determine whether group II mGluR agonists can rescue spatial working memory deficits with other NMDAR manipulations, including genetic models and other pharmacological manipulations of NMDAR function. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Activation of adenosine A(1) receptors alters behavioral and biochemical parameters in hyperthyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Fontella, Fernanda Urruth; Bonan, Carla Denise; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Dalmaz, Carla; Sarkis, João José Freitas

    2006-02-28

    Adenosine acting on A(1) receptors has been related with neuroprotective and neuromodulatory actions, protection against oxidative stress and decrease of anxiety and nociceptive signaling. Previous studies demonstrated an inhibition of the enzymes that hydrolyze ATP to adenosine in the rat central nervous system after hyperthyroidism induction. Manifestations of hyperthyroidism include increased anxiety, nervousness, high O(2) consumption and physical hyperactivity. Here, we investigated the effects of administration of a specific agonist of adenosine A(1) receptor (N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine; CPA) on nociception, anxiety, exploratory response, locomotion and brain oxidative stress of hyperthyroid rats. Hyperthyroidism was induced by daily intraperitoneal injections of l-thyroxine (T4) for 14 days. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus and exploratory behavior, locomotion and anxiety were analyzed by open-field and plus-maze tests. We verified the total antioxidant reactivity (TAR), lipid peroxide levels by the thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) reaction and the free radicals content by the DCF test. Our results demonstrated that CPA reverted the hyperalgesia induced by hyperthyroidism and decreased the exploratory behavior, locomotion and anxiety in hyperthyroid rats. Furthermore, CPA decreased lipid peroxidation in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of control rats and in cerebral cortex of hyperthyroid rats. CPA also increased the total antioxidant reactivity in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of control and hyperthyroid rats, but the production of free radicals verified by the DCF test was changed only in cerebral cortex. These results suggest that some of the hyperthyroidism effects are subjected to regulation by adenosine A(1) receptor, demonstrating the involvement of the adenosinergic system in this pathology.

  16. Adenosinergic modulation of the discriminative-stimulus effects of methamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Munzar, Patrik; Justinova, Zuzana; Kutkat, Scott W; Ferré, Sergi; Goldberg, Steven R

    2002-06-01

    A(1) and A(2A) adenosine receptors are co-localized with dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors, respectively, and their stimulation attenuates dopaminergic functioning. To test whether adenosine antagonists with different selectivities for A(1) and A(2A) receptors mimic the discriminative-stimulus effects of dopamine releaser methamphetamine. Effects of the A(1) antagonist DPCPX, the preferential A(2A) antagonist DMPX and the non-selective adenosine antagonist caffeine were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats trained to discriminate 1.0 mg/kg, IP, methamphetamine from saline under a fixed-ratio 10 schedule of food presentation. The A(1) antagonist DPCPX (1.0-10.0 mg/kg) failed to substitute for methamphetamine. However, 5.6 mg/kg DPCPX shifted the methamphetamine dose-response curve to the left. The A(2A) antagonist DMPX (1.8-18.0 mg/kg) produced about 70% methamphetamine-appropriate responding and the non-selective antagonist caffeine (3.0-56.0 mg/kg) about 50% methamphetamine-appropriate responding at the highest tested doses. Both DMPX (5.6 mg/kg) and caffeine (30.0 mg/kg) shifted the methamphetamine dose-response curve to the left. Methamphetamine-like effects of DMPX were blocked fully by the D(2) antagonist spiperone (0.18 mg/kg) and partially by the D(1) antagonist SCH-23390 (0.018 mg/kg). Antagonism at A(2A) adenosine receptors directly mimics the discriminative-stimulus effects of methamphetamine through the interaction with dopamine receptors. Antagonism at A(1) adenosine receptors potentiates effects of lower methamphetamine doses and thus plays a rather indirect, modulatory role.

  17. β2 Agonists.

    PubMed

    Billington, Charlotte K; Penn, Raymond B; Hall, Ian P

    2017-01-01

    History suggests β agonists, the cognate ligand of the β 2 adrenoceptor, have been used as bronchodilators for around 5,000 years, and β agonists remain today the frontline treatment for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The β agonists used clinically today are the products of significant expenditure and over 100 year's intensive research aimed at minimizing side effects and enhancing therapeutic usefulness. The respiratory physician now has a therapeutic toolbox of long acting β agonists to prophylactically manage bronchoconstriction, and short acting β agonists to relieve acute exacerbations. Despite constituting the cornerstone of asthma and COPD therapy, these drugs are not perfect; significant safety issues have led to a black box warning advising that long acting β agonists should not be used alone in patients with asthma. In addition there are a significant proportion of patients whose asthma remains uncontrolled. In this chapter we discuss the evolution of β agonist use and how the understanding of β agonist actions on their principal target tissue, airway smooth muscle, has led to greater understanding of how these drugs can be further modified and improved in the future. Research into the genetics of the β 2 adrenoceptor will also be discussed, as will the implications of individual DNA profiles on the clinical outcomes of β agonist use (pharmacogenetics). Finally we comment on what the future may hold for the use of β agonists in respiratory disease.

  18. Oral tremor induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine is suppressed by the adenosine A2A antagonists MSX-3 and SCH58261, but not the adenosine A1 antagonist DPCPX.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lyndsey E; Galtieri, Daniel J; Brennum, Lise T; Sager, Thomas N; Hockemeyer, Jörg; Müller, Christa E; Hinman, James R; Chrobak, James J; Salamone, John D

    2010-02-01

    Tremulous jaw movements in rats, which can be induced by dopamine (DA) antagonists, DA depletion, and cholinomimetics, have served as a useful model for studies of tremor. Although adenosine A(2A) antagonists can reduce the tremulous jaw movements induced by DA antagonists and DA depletion, there are conflicting reports about the interaction between adenosine antagonists and cholinomimetic drugs. The present studies investigated the ability of adenosine antagonists to reverse the tremorogenic effect of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine. While the adenosine A(2A) antagonist MSX-3 was incapable of reversing the tremulous jaw movements induced by the 4.0mg/kg dose of pilocarpine, both MSX-3 and the adenosine A(2A) antagonist SCH58261 reversed the tremulous jaw movements elicited by 0.5mg/kg pilocarpine. Systemic administration of the adenosine A(1) antagonist DPCPX failed to reverse the tremulous jaw movements induced by either an acute 0.5mg/kg dose of the cholinomimetic pilocarpine or the DA D2 antagonist pimozide, indicating that the tremorolytic effects of adenosine antagonists may be receptor subtype specific. Behaviorally active doses of MSX-3 and SCH 58261 showed substantial in vivo occupancy of A(2A) receptors, but DPCPX did not. The results of these studies support the use of adenosine A(2A) antagonists for the treatment of tremor. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Alterations in the adenosine metabolism and CD39/CD73 adenosinergic machinery cause loss of Treg cell function and autoimmunity in ADA-deficient SCID

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha V.; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Jofra Hernandez, Raisa; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Clavenna, Daniela; Sanvito, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro L.; Gagliani, Nicola; Carlucci, Filippo; Tabucchi, Antonella; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Villa, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine acts as anti-inflammatory mediator on the immune system and has been described in regulatory T cell (Treg)–mediated suppression. In the absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA), adenosine and other purine metabolites accumulate, leading to severe immunodeficiency with recurrent infections (ADA-SCID). Particularly ADA-deficient patients with late-onset forms and after enzyme replacement therapy (PEG-ADA) are known to manifest immune dysregulation. Herein we provide evidence that alterations in the purine metabolism interfere with Treg function, thereby contributing to autoimmune manifestations in ADA deficiency. Tregs isolated from PEG-ADA–treated patients are reduced in number and show decreased suppressive activity, whereas they are corrected after gene therapy. Untreated murine ADA−/− Tregs show alterations in the plasma membrane CD39/CD73 ectonucleotidase machinery and limited suppressive activity via extracellular adenosine. PEG-ADA–treated mice developed multiple autoantibodies and hypothyroidism in contrast to mice treated with bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. Tregs isolated from PEG-ADA–treated mice lacked suppressive activity, suggesting that this treatment interferes with Treg functionality. The alterations in the CD39/CD73 adenosinergic machinery and loss of function in ADA-deficient Tregs provide new insights into a predisposition to autoimmunity and the underlying mechanisms causing defective peripheral tolerance in ADA-SCID. Trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00598481/NCT00599781. PMID:22184407

  20. Alterations in the adenosine metabolism and CD39/CD73 adenosinergic machinery cause loss of Treg cell function and autoimmunity in ADA-deficient SCID.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Clavenna, Daniela; Sanvito, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro L; Gagliani, Nicola; Carlucci, Filippo; Tabucchi, Antonella; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Villa, Anna; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-02-09

    Adenosine acts as anti-inflammatory mediator on the immune system and has been described in regulatory T cell (Treg)-mediated suppression. In the absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA), adenosine and other purine metabolites accumulate, leading to severe immunodeficiency with recurrent infections (ADA-SCID). Particularly ADA-deficient patients with late-onset forms and after enzyme replacement therapy (PEG-ADA) are known to manifest immune dysregulation. Herein we provide evidence that alterations in the purine metabolism interfere with Treg function, thereby contributing to autoimmune manifestations in ADA deficiency. Tregs isolated from PEG-ADA-treated patients are reduced in number and show decreased suppressive activity, whereas they are corrected after gene therapy. Untreated murine ADA(-/-) Tregs show alterations in the plasma membrane CD39/CD73 ectonucleotidase machinery and limited suppressive activity via extracellular adenosine. PEG-ADA-treated mice developed multiple autoantibodies and hypothyroidism in contrast to mice treated with bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. Tregs isolated from PEG-ADA-treated mice lacked suppressive activity, suggesting that this treatment interferes with Treg functionality. The alterations in the CD39/CD73 adenosinergic machinery and loss of function in ADA-deficient Tregs provide new insights into a predisposition to autoimmunity and the underlying mechanisms causing defective peripheral tolerance in ADA-SCID.

  1. The 5-HT1A/1B-receptor agonist eltoprazine increases both catecholamine release in the prefrontal cortex and dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and decreases motivation for reward and "waiting" impulsivity, but increases "stopping" impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Korte, S Mechiel; Prins, Jolanda; Van den Bergh, Filip S; Oosting, Ronald S; Dupree, Rudy; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Westphal, Koen G C; Olivier, Berend; Denys, Damiaan A; Garland, Alexis; Güntürkün, Onur

    2017-01-05

    The 5-HT 1A/1B -receptor agonist eltoprazine has a behavioral drug signature that resembles that of a variety of psychostimulant drugs, despite the differences in receptor binding profile. These psychostimulants are effective in treating impulsivity disorders, most likely because they increase norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) levels in the prefrontal cortex. Both amphetamine and methylphenidate, however, also increase dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which has a significant role in motivation, pleasure, and reward. How eltoprazine affects monoamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and the NAc is unknown. It is also unknown whether eltoprazine affects different forms of impulsivity and brain reward mechanisms. Therefore, in the present study, we investigate the effects of eltoprazine in rats in the following sequence: 1) the activity of the monoaminergic systems using in vivo microdialysis, 2) motivation for reward measured using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure, and finally, 3) "waiting" impulsivity in the delay-aversion task, and the "stopping" impulsivity in the stop-signal task. The microdialysis studies clearly showed that eltoprazine increased DA and NE release in both the mPFC and OFC, but only increased DA concentration in the NAc. In contrast, eltoprazine decreased 5-HT release in the mPFC and NAc (undetectable in the OFC). Remarkably, eltoprazine decreased impulsive choice, but increased impulsive action. Furthermore, brain stimulation was less rewarding following eltoprazine treatment. These results further support the long-standing hypothesis that "waiting" and "stopping" impulsivity are regulated by distinct neural circuits, because 5-HT 1A/1B -receptor activation decreases impulsive choice, but increases impulsive action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Discrimination between olfactory receptor agonists and non-agonists.

    PubMed

    Topin, Jérémie; de March, Claire A; Charlier, Landry; Ronin, Catherine; Antonczak, Serge; Golebiowski, Jérôme

    2014-08-11

    A joint approach combining free-energy calculations and calcium-imaging assays on the broadly tuned human 1G1 olfactory receptor is reported. The free energy of binding of ten odorants was computed by means of molecular-dynamics simulations. This state function allows separating the experimentally determined eight agonists from the two non-agonists. This study constitutes a proof-of-principle for the computational deorphanization of olfactory receptors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Agonist-induced modulation of inverse agonist efficacy at the beta 2-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Chidiac, P; Nouet, S; Bouvier, M

    1996-09-01

    Sustained stimulation of several G protein-coupled receptors is known to lead to a reduction in the signaling efficacy. This phenomenon, named agonist-induced desensitization, has been best studied for the beta 2-adrenergic receptor (AR) and is characterized by a decreased efficacy of beta-adrenergic agonists to stimulate the adenylyl cyclase activity. Recently, several beta-adrenergic ligands were found to inhibit the spontaneous agonist-independent activity of the beta 2AR. These compounds, termed inverse agonists, have different inhibitory efficacies, ranging from almost neutral antagonists to full inverse agonists. The current study was undertaken to determine whether, as is the case for agonists, desensitization can affect the efficacies of inverse agonists. Agonist-promoted desensitization of the human beta 2AR expressed in Sf9 cells potentiated the inhibitory actions of the inverse agonists, with the extent of the potentiation being inversely proportional to their intrinsic activity. For example, desensitization increased the inhibitory action of the weak inverse agonist labetalol by 29%, whereas inhibition of the spontaneous activity by the strong inverse agonist timolol was not enhanced by the desensitizing stimuli. Interestingly, dichloroisoproterenol acted stochastically as either a weak partial agonist or a weak inverse agonist in control conditions but always behaved as an inverse agonist after desensitization. These data demonstrate that like for agonists, the efficacies of inverse agonists can be modulated by a desensitizing treatment. Also, the data show that the initial state of the receptor can determine whether a ligand behaves as a partial agonist or an inverse agonist.

  4. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  5. The epileptogenic spectrum of opiate agonists.

    PubMed

    Snead, O C; Bearden, L J

    1982-11-01

    The present authors gave mu, delta, kappa, epsilon and sigma opiate receptor agonists intracerebroventricularly to rats both singly and in combination while monitoring the electroencephalogram from cortical and depth electrodes. Dose-response curves were plotted with naloxone against the changes produced by each agonist, and the effect of a number of anticonvulsant drugs on agonist-induced seizures was ascertained. Each opiate agonist produced a different seizure pattern with a different naloxone dose-response curve and anticonvulsant profile. The order of convulsive potency was epsilon greater than delta greater than mu greater than sigma much greater than kappa. Petit mal-like seizure activity was unique to the delta agonist, leucine-enkephalin, while only the mu agonist, morphine produced generalized convulsive seizures. These experiments raise the possibility that opiate systems in the brain may be involved in the pathogenesis of a wide spectrum of seizure disorders.

  6. Bitter taste receptor agonists alter mitochondrial function and induce autophagy in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shi; Sharma, Pawan; Shah, Sushrut D; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2017-07-01

    Airway remodeling, including increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, is a hallmark feature of asthma and COPD. We previously identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) on human ASM cells and demonstrated that known TAS2R agonists could promote ASM relaxation and bronchodilation and inhibit mitogen-induced ASM growth. In this study, we explored cellular mechanisms mediating the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists on human ASM cells. Pretreatment of ASM cells with TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine resulted in inhibition of cell survival, which was largely reversed by bafilomycin A1, an autophagy inhibitor. Transmission electron microscope studies demonstrated the presence of double-membrane autophagosomes and deformed mitochondria. In ASM cells, TAS2R agonists decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation. Inhibiting dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1) reversed TAS2R agonist-induced mitochondrial membrane potential change and attenuated mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Furthermore, the expression of mitochondrial protein BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) and mitochondrial localization of DLP1 were significantly upregulated by TAS2R agonists. More importantly, inhibiting Bnip3 mitochondrial localization by dominant-negative Bnip3 significantly attenuated cell death induced by TAS2R agonist. Collectively the TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine modulate mitochondrial structure and function, resulting in ASM cell death. Furthermore, Bnip3 plays a central role in TAS2R agonist-induced ASM functional changes via a mitochondrial pathway. These findings further establish the cellular mechanisms of antimitogenic effects of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and pathways that can be targeted to mitigate airway remodeling as well as bronchoconstriction in obstructive airway diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological

  7. Opioid-receptor subtype agonist-induced enhancements of sucrose intake are dependent upon sucrose concentration.

    PubMed

    Ruegg, H; Yu, W Z; Bodnar, R J

    1997-07-01

    Selective mu ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO)), delta1 ([D-Pen2, D-Pen5]-enkephalin (DPDPE)), delta2 ([D-Ala2, Glu4]-Deltorphin (Delt II)), kappa1 (U50488H) and kappa3 (naloxone benzoylhydrazone (NalBzOH)) opioid agonists each stimulate food intake in rats. Whereas studies with selective opioid antagonists implicate mu and kappa1 receptors in the mediation of sucrose intake, studies with selective opioid agonists implicate mu and delta receptors in the mediation of saccharin intake. The present study determined if specific delta1, delta2, kappa1, kappa3 and mu opioid-receptor subtype agonists produced similar alterations in sucrose intake as a function of sucrose concentration (0.5%, 2.5%, 10%) across a 1-h time-course. Each of these agonists significantly increased sucrose intake with variations in pattern, magnitude, and consistency as a function of sucrose concentration. Whereas the mu opioid agonist, DAMGO, and the delta1 opioid agonist, DPDPE, each enhanced sucrose intake at higher (2.5%, 10%), but not lower (0.5%), concentrations, the delta2 opioid agonist, Delt II, increased sucrose intake at lower (0.5%, 2.5%), but not higher (10%), concentrations. Kappa opioid agonists produced less consistent effects. The kappa1 opioid agonist, U50488H, increased sucrose intake at high (10%) concentrations and decreased sucrose intake at low (0.5%) concentrations, and the kappa3 opioid agonist, NalBzOH, inconsistently increased sucrose intake at the 0.5% (20 microg) and 10% (1 microg) concentrations. Thus, these data further implicate mu, delta1, and delta2 opioid mediation of palatable intake, particularly of its orosensory characteristics.

  8. Beta-agonists and animal welfare

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of beta-agonists in animal feed is a high profile topic within the U.S. as consumers and activist groups continue to question its safety. The only beta-agonist currently available for use in swine is ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC). This is available as Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health – FDA a...

  9. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  11. New thrombopoietin receptor agonists for platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Homeida, S; Ebdon, C; Batty, P; Jackson, B; Kolade, S; Bateman, C; Peng, Y Y; Stasi, R

    2012-04-01

    Since thrombopoietin (TPO) was cloned in 1994, TPO receptor (TPO-R) agonists have been developed which have shown significant clinical activity in various conditions characterized by thrombocytopenia. First-generation TPO-R agonists were recombinant forms of human TPO. The clinical development of these molecules was discontinued after one of them, pegylated recombinant human megakaryocyte growth and development factor, was associated with the development of neutralizing autoantibodies cross-reacting with endogenous TPO. Second-generation TPO-R agonists are now available, which present no sequence homology to endogenous TPO. Two of these new agents, romiplostim and eltrombopag, have been granted marketing authorization for use in patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia unresponsive to conventional treatments. Clinical trials with TPO-R agonists are also ongoing in other thrombocytopenias, such as hepatitis C virus-related thrombocytopenia and the myelodysplastic syndromes. Copyright 2012 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  12. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, EE; Doležal, V

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5′-γ−thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Filtration and scintillation proximity assays measured equilibrium binding as well as binding kinetics of [35S]GTPγS and [3H]GDP to a mixture of G-proteins as well as individual classes of G-proteins upon binding of structurally different agonists to the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. KEY RESULTS Agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. GTPγS (1 µM) changed the competition curves to monophasic with low affinity and 50 µM GDP produced a similar effect. Depletion of membrane-bound GDP increased the proportion of agonist high-affinity sites. Carbachol accelerated the dissociation of [3H]GDP from membranes. The inverse agonist N-methylscopolamine slowed GDP dissociation and GTPγS binding without changing affinity for GDP. Carbachol affected both GDP association with and dissociation from Gi/o G-proteins but only its dissociation from Gs/olf G-proteins. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings suggest the existence of a low-affinity agonist-receptor conformation complexed with GDP-liganded G-protein. Also the negative cooperativity between GDP and agonist binding at the receptor/G-protein complex determines agonist efficacy. GDP binding reveals differences in action of agonists versus inverse agonists as well as differences in activation of Gi/o versus Gs/olf G-proteins that are not identified by conventional GTPγS binding. PMID:20958290

  13. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, E E; Doležal, V

    2011-03-01

    Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5'-γ-thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. Filtration and scintillation proximity assays measured equilibrium binding as well as binding kinetics of [³⁵S]GTPγS and [³H]GDP to a mixture of G-proteins as well as individual classes of G-proteins upon binding of structurally different agonists to the M₂ muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Agonists displayed biphasic competition curves with the antagonist [³H]-N-methylscopolamine. GTPγS (1 µM) changed the competition curves to monophasic with low affinity and 50 µM GDP produced a similar effect. Depletion of membrane-bound GDP increased the proportion of agonist high-affinity sites. Carbachol accelerated the dissociation of [³H]GDP from membranes. The inverse agonist N-methylscopolamine slowed GDP dissociation and GTPγS binding without changing affinity for GDP. Carbachol affected both GDP association with and dissociation from G(i/o) G-proteins but only its dissociation from G(s/olf) G-proteins. These findings suggest the existence of a low-affinity agonist-receptor conformation complexed with GDP-liganded G-protein. Also the negative cooperativity between GDP and agonist binding at the receptor/G-protein complex determines agonist efficacy. GDP binding reveals differences in action of agonists versus inverse agonists as well as differences in activation of G(i/o) versus G(s/olf) G-proteins that are not identified by conventional GTPγS binding. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Long-term studies of dopamine agonists.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Jean P

    2002-02-26

    Dopamine agonists have long been used as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). In more recent years these drugs have also been proved safe and effective as initial therapy in lieu of levodopa in the treatment of PD. Long-term levodopa therapy is associated with motor complications, including fluctuating response patterns and dyskinesia. By initially introducing a dopamine agonist as symptomatic drug therapy, it may be possible to postpone the use of levodopa and delay or prevent the development of motor complications. Recently, four clinical trials have explored this hypothesis by comparing the long-term response and side effects of levodopa with dopamine agonist therapy. The drugs studied have included ropinirole, pramipexole, cabergoline, and pergolide. In each of these projects, the occurrence of motor complications, such as wearing off and dyskinesia, was significantly less in the subjects assigned to initiation of therapy with a dopamine agonist. The addition of levodopa could be postponed by many months or even several years. Therefore, these long-term studies of dopamine agonists support the initiation of a dopamine agonist instead of levodopa in an effort to postpone levodopa-related motor complications. This therapeutic approach may be particularly appropriate in PD patients with a long treatment horizon on the basis of age and general good health. The extension phase of the long-term study comparing pramipexole with levodopa is ongoing, and follow-up information may help to establish the value of this treatment strategy.

  15. Adverse Effects of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Filippatos, Theodosios D.; Panagiotopoulou, Thalia V.; Elisaf, Moses S.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a class of injective anti-diabetic drugs that improve glycemic control and many other atherosclerosis-related parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the use of this relatively new class of drugs may be associated with certain adverse effects. Concerns have been expressed regarding the effects of these drugs on pancreatic and thyroid tissue, since animal studies and analyses of drug databases indicate an association of GLP-1 receptor agonists with pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, and thyroid cancer. However, several meta-analyses failed to confirm a cause-effect relation between GLP-1 receptor agonists and the development of these adverse effects. One benefit of GLP-1 receptor agonists is that they do not cause hypoglycemia when combined with metformin or thiazolidinediones, but the dose of concomitant sulphonylurea or insulin may have to be decreased to reduce the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. On the other hand, several case reports have linked the use of these drugs, mainly exenatide, with the occurrence of acute kidney injury, primarily through hemodynamic derangement due to nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The most common symptoms associated with the use of GLP-1 receptor agonists are gastrointestinal symptoms, mainly nausea. Other common adverse effects include injection site reactions, headache, and nasopharyngitis, but these effects do not usually result in discontinuation of the drug. Current evidence shows that GLP-1 receptor agonists have no negative effects on the cardiovascular risk of patients with T2D. Thus, GLP-1 receptor agonists appear to have a favorable safety profile, but ongoing trials will further assess their cardiovascular effects. The aim of this review is to analyze critically the available data regarding adverse events of GLP-1 receptor agonists in different anatomic systems published in Pubmed and Scopus. Whenever possible, certain differences between GLP-1

  16. Update in TSH Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of the TSH receptor (TSHR) as a major regulator of thyroid function is well understood, but TSHRs are also expressed in multiple normal extrathyroidal tissues, and the physiological roles of TSHRs in these tissues are unclear. Moreover, TSHRs play a major role in several pathological conditions including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and thyroid tumors. Small molecule, “drug-like” TSHR agonists, neutral antagonists, and inverse agonists may be useful as probes of TSHR function in extrathyroidal tissues and as leads to develop drugs for several diseases of the thyroid. In this Update, we review the most recent findings regarding the development and use of these small molecule TSHR ligands. PMID:23019348

  17. Reciprocity of agonistic support in ravens.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Orlaith N; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative behaviour through reciprocation or interchange of valuable services in primates has received considerable attention, especially regarding the timeframe of reciprocation and its ensuing cognitive implications. Much less, however, is known about reciprocity in other animals, particularly birds. We investigated patterns of agonistic support (defined as a third party intervening in an ongoing conflict to attack one of the conflict participants, thus supporting the other) in a group of 13 captive ravens, Corvus corax. We found support for long-term, but not short-term, reciprocation of agonistic support. Ravens were more likely to support individuals who preened them, kin and dominant group members. These results suggest that ravens do not reciprocate on a calculated tit-for-tat basis, but aid individuals from whom reciprocated support would be most useful and those with whom they share a good relationship. Additionally, dyadic levels of agonistic support and consolation (postconflict affiliation from a bystander to the victim) correlated strongly with each other, but we found no evidence to suggest that receiving agonistic support influences the victim's likelihood of receiving support (consolation) after the conflict ends. Our findings are consistent with an emotionally mediated form of reciprocity in ravens and provide additional support for convergent cognitive evolution in birds and mammals.

  18. 5-Functionalized indazoles as glucocorticoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mei; Carr, Grant; Deorazio, Russell J; Friedrich, Thomas D; Dobritsa, Svetlana; Fitzpatrick, Kevin; Guzzo, Peter R; Kitchen, Douglas B; Lynch, Michael A; Peace, Denise; Sajad, Mohammed; Usyatinsky, Alexander; Wolf, Mark A

    2010-05-15

    An indazole based series of glucocorticoid receptor agonists is reported. The SAR exploration of this scaffold yielded compounds with nanomolar affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor with indications of selectivity for the preferred transrepression mechanism; in vivo efficacy was observed in the mouse LPS induced TNFalpha model for compound 28. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reciprocity of agonistic support in ravens

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Orlaith N.; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative behaviour through reciprocation or interchange of valuable services in primates has received considerable attention, especially regarding the timeframe of reciprocation and its ensuing cognitive implications. Much less, however, is known about reciprocity in other animals, particularly birds. We investigated patterns of agonistic support (defined as a third party intervening in an ongoing conflict to attack one of the conflict participants, thus supporting the other) in a group of 13 captive ravens, Corvus corax. We found support for long-term, but not short-term, reciprocation of agonistic support. Ravens were more likely to support individuals who preened them, kin and dominant group members. These results suggest that ravens do not reciprocate on a calculated tit-for-tat basis, but aid individuals from whom reciprocated support would be most useful and those with whom they share a good relationship. Additionally, dyadic levels of agonistic support and consolation (postconflict affiliation from a bystander to the victim) correlated strongly with each other, but we found no evidence to suggest that receiving agonistic support influences the victim’s likelihood of receiving support (consolation) after the conflict ends. Our findings are consistent with an emotionally mediated form of reciprocity in ravens and provide additional support for convergent cognitive evolution in birds and mammals. PMID:22298910

  20. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Navas, Frank; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Bruce Wisely, G

    2009-08-15

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  1. Modification of kindled amygdaloid seizures by opiate agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Albertson, T E; Joy, R M; Stark, L G

    1984-03-01

    The effects of 19 opiate agonists and antagonists on kindled amygdaloid seizures in the rat were studied. The mu agonists tended to reduce the length of elicited afterdischarges and behavioral ranks, while markedly increasing postictal electroencephalogram spikes and behavioral arrest time. These effects were reversed by naloxone. The kappa agonists reduced behavioral rank and variably reduced afterdischarge length with a concomitant lengthening of postictal behavioral arrest time and number of electroencephalogram spikes. The putative sigma agonist, SKF 10,047, reduced afterdischarge durations only at the higher doses tested. The decreases found after the sigma agonists in postictal electroencephalogram spiking and time of behavioral arrest were not reversed by naloxone. Only the lower doses of normeperidine were found to decrease seizure thresholds. The mixed agonist/antagonists (MAA) cyclazocine and cyclorphan markedly increased seizure threshold and reduced afterdischarge duration and behavioral rank. Only the MAA pentazocine tended to increase threshold but not suprathreshold afterdischarge durations. The order of ability to modify the ictal events was MAA (selected) greater than kappa agonists greater than mu agonists greater than sigma agonists. The increase in postictal events (behavior arrest and spikes) was caused most effectively by pretreatment with mu agonist greater than kappa agonist greater than selected MAA greater than sigma agonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. [Dopamine agonists--clinical applications beyond Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Kuran, Włodzimierz

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary experience and results of clinical trials concerning dopamine agonist application in the treatment of many different diseases (apart from Parkinson's disease) are presented in the paper. A basic clinical recommendation for agonists is restless legs syndrome. In this syndrome almost all agonists give a considerable subjective and objective improvement. Treatment of atypical parkinsonism (MSA, PSP, CBD) in the majority of patients is ineffective. The author also presents promising results of treatment with agonists in such diverse diseases as hyperkinetic syndromes, cocaine dependence, drug-resistant depression and erectile dysfunction (apomorphine). Dopamine partial agonists (e.g. aripiprazol) are recommended in the modern treatment of schizophrenia.

  3. Anxiolytic Effect of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation Is Abolished by Adenosine A1 Receptor Inhibition in Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk Rats.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Zsolt; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Ari, Csilla

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health problems worldwide, but the exact pathophysiology remains largely unknown. It has been demonstrated previously that administration of exogenous ketone supplement KSMCT (ketone salt/KS + medium chain triglyceride/MCT oil) by intragastric gavage for 7 days decreased the anxiety level in genetically absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. To investigate the potential role of the adenosinergic system in the pathomechanism of anxiety we tested whether the inhibition of adenosine A 1 receptors (A 1 Rs) influence the anxiolytic effect of the exogenous ketone supplement. As A 1 Rs may mediate such an effect, in the present study we used a specific A 1 R antagonist, DPCPX (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine) to test whether it modulates the anxiolytic effect of sub-chronically (7 days) applied KSMCT in the previously tested animal model by using elevated plus maze (EPM) test. We administered KSMCT (2.5 g/kg/day) alone by intragastric gavage and in combination with intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected of DPCPX in two doses (lower: 0.15 mg/kg, higher: 0.25 mg/kg). Control groups represented i.p saline and water gavage with or without i.p. DPCPX administration (2.5 g/kg/day). After treatments, the level of blood glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), as well as body weight were recorded. KSMCT alone significantly increased the time spent in the open arms and decreased the time spent in the closed arms, supporting our previous results. Injection of lower dose of DPCPX decreased, while higher dose of DPCPX abolished the effect of KSMCT administration on EPM. Blood βHB levels were significantly increased after administration of KSMCT, while DPCPX did not change the KSMCT induced increase in blood βHB levels. These results demonstrate that A 1 R inhibition modified (decreased) the anti-anxiety effect of KSMCT administration implying that the adenosinergic system, likely via A 1 Rs, may modulate the

  4. AMPK and PPARδ agonists are exercise mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Narkar, Vihang A.; Downes, Michael; Yu, Ruth T.; Embler, Emi; Wang, Yong-Xu; Banayo, Ester; Mihaylova, Maria M.; Nelson, Michael C.; Zou, Yuhua; Juguilon, Henry; Kang, Heonjoong; Shaw, Reuben; Evans, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The benefits of endurance exercise on general health make it desirable to identify orally active agents that would mimic or potentiate the effects of exercise to treat metabolic diseases. Although certain natural compounds, such as reseveratrol, have endurance-enhancing activities, their exact metabolic targets remain elusive. We therefore tested the effect of pathway-specific drugs on endurance capacities of mice in a treadmill running test. We found that PPARβ/δ agonist and exercise training synergistically increase oxidative myofibers and running endurance in adult mice. Because training activates AMPK and PGC1α, we then tested whether the orally active AMPK agonist AICAR might be sufficient to overcome the exercise requirement. Unexpectedly, even in sedentary mice, 4 weeks of AICAR treatment alone induced metabolic genes and enhanced running endurance by 44%. These results demonstrate that AMPK-PPARδ pathway can be targeted by orally active drugs to enhance training adaptation or even to increase endurance without exercise. PMID:18674809

  5. Evaluation of partial beta-adrenoceptor agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, B J; Grove, A

    1997-01-01

    A partial beta-adrenoceptor (beta-AR) agonist will exhibit opposite agonist and antagonist activity depending on the prevailing degree of adrenergic tone or the presence of a beta-AR agonist with higher intrinsic activity. In vivo partial beta-AR agonist activity will be evident at rest with low endogenous adrenergic tone, as for example with chronotropicity (beta 1/beta 2), inotropicity (beta 1) or peripheral vasodilatation and finger tremor (beta 2). beta-AR blocking drugs which have partial agonist activity may exhibit a better therapeutic profile when used for hypertension because of maintained cardiac output without increased systemic vascular resistance, along with an improved lipid profile. In the presence of raised endogenous adrenergic tone such as exercise or an exogenous full agonist, beta-AR subtype antagonist activity will become evident in terms of effects on exercise induced heart rate (beta 1) and potassium (beta 2) responses. Reduction of exercise heart rate will occur to a lesser degree in the case of a beta-adrenoceptor blocker with partial beta 1-AR agonist activity compared with a beta-adrenoceptor blocker devoid of partial agonist activity. This may result in reduced therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of angina on effort when using beta-AR blocking drugs with partial beta 1-AR agonist activity. Effects on exercise hyperkalaemia are determined by the balance between beta 2-AR partial agonist activity and endogenous adrenergic activity. For predominantly beta 2-AR agonist such as salmeterol and salbutamol, potentiation of exercise hyperkalaemia occurs. For predominantly beta 2-AR antagonists such as carteolol, either potentiation or attenuation of exercise hyperkalaemia occurs at low and high doses respectively. beta 2-AR partial agonist activity may also be expressed as antagonism in the presence of an exogenous full agonist, as for example attenuation of fenoterol induced responses by salmeterol. Studies are required to investigate whether

  6. Signal Use by Octopuses in Agonistic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheel, David; Godfrey-Smith, Peter; Lawrence, Matthew

    2016-02-08

    Cephalopods show behavioral parallels to birds and mammals despite considerable evolutionary distance [1, 2]. Many cephalopods produce complex body patterns and visual signals, documented especially in cuttlefish and squid, where they are used both in camouflage and a range of interspecific interactions [1, 3-5]. Octopuses, in contrast, are usually seen as solitary and asocial [6, 7]; their body patterns and color changes have primarily been interpreted as camouflage and anti-predator tactics [8-12], though the familiar view of the solitary octopus faces a growing list of exceptions. Here, we show by field observation that in a shallow-water octopus, Octopus tetricus, a range of visible displays are produced during agonistic interactions, and these displays correlate with the outcome of those interactions. Interactions in which dark body color by an approaching octopus was matched by similar color in the reacting octopus were more likely to escalate to grappling. Darkness in an approaching octopus met by paler color in the reacting octopus accompanied retreat of the paler octopus. Octopuses also displayed on high ground and stood with spread web and elevated mantle, often producing these behaviors in combinations. This study is the first to document the systematic use of signals during agonistic interactions among octopuses. We show prima facie conformity of our results to an influential model of agonistic signaling [13]. These results suggest that interactions have a greater influence on octopus evolution than has been recognized and show the importance of convergent evolution in behavioral traits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Beta2-adrenoceptor agonists for dysmenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Fedorowicz, Zbys; Nasser, Mona; Jagannath, Vanitha A; Beaman, Jessica H; Ejaz, Kiran; van Zuuren, Esther J

    2012-05-16

    Dysmenorrhoea is a common gynaecological complaint that can affect as many as 50% of premenopausal women, 10% of whom suffer severely enough to be rendered incapacitated for one to three days during each menstrual cycle. Primary dysmenorrhoea is where women suffer from menstrual pain but lack any pathology in their pelvic anatomy. Beta2-adrenoceptor agonists have been used in the treatment of women with primary dysmenorrhoea but their effects are unclear. To determine the effectiveness and safety of beta2-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea. We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register; CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 8); MEDLINE; EMBASE; PsycINFO and the EBM Reviews databases. The last search was on 22 August 2011. Randomised controlled trials comparing beta2-adrenoceptor agonists with placebo or no treatment, each other or any other conventional treatment in women of reproductive age with primary dysmenorrhoea. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Five trials involving 187 women with an age range of 15 to 40 years were included. Oral isoxsuprine was compared with placebo in two trials; terbutaline oral spray, ritodrine chloride and oral hydroxyphenyl-orciprenalin were compared with placebo in a further three trials. Clinical diversity in the studies in terms of the interventions being evaluated, assessments at different time points and the use of different assessment tools mitigated against pooling of outcome data across studies in order to provide a summary estimate of effect for any of the comparisons. Only one study, with unclear risk of bias, reported pain relief with a combination of isoxsuprine, acetaminophen and caffeine. None of the other studies reported any significant clinical difference in effectiveness between the intervention and placebo. Adverse effects were reported with all of these medications in up to a quarter of the

  8. Sulfoximines as potent RORγ inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Ouvry, Gilles; Bihl, Franck; Bouix-Peter, Claire; Christin, Olivier; Defoin-Platel, Claire; Deret, Sophie; Feret, Christophe; Froude, David; Hacini-Rachinel, Feriel; Harris, Craig S; Hervouet, Catherine; Lafitte, Guillaume; Luzy, Anne-Pascale; Musicki, Branislav; Orfila, Danielle; Parnet, Veronique; Pascau, Coralie; Pascau, Jonathan; Pierre, Romain; Raffin, Catherine; Rossio, Patricia; Spiesse, Delphine; Taquet, Nathalie; Thoreau, Etienne; Vatinel, Rodolphe; Vial, Emmanuel; Hennequin, Laurent F

    2018-05-01

    Progress in the identification of suitable RORγ inverse agonists as clinical candidates has been hampered by the high lipophilicity that seems required for high potency on this nuclear receptor. In this context, we decided to focus on the replacement of the hydroxymethyl group found on known modulators to determine if more polarity could be tolerated in this position. SAR of the replacement of this moiety is presented in this article leading to the identification of sulfoximine derivatives as potent modulators with pharmacological activity in the in vivo mouse Imiquimod psoriasis model. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sports doping: emerging designer and therapeutic β2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Georgakopoulos, C; Sterk, S; Nielen, M W F

    2013-10-21

    Beta2-adrenergic agonists, or β2-agonists, are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptom-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. The use of β2-agonists is prohibited in sports by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) due to claimed anabolic effects, and also, is prohibited as growth promoters in cattle fattening in the European Union. This paper reviews the last seven-year (2006-2012) literature concerning the development of novel β2-agonists molecules either by modifying the molecule of known β2-agonists or by introducing moieties producing indole-, adamantyl- or phenyl urea derivatives. New emerging β2-agonists molecules for future therapeutic use are also presented, intending to emphasize their potential use for doping purposes or as growth promoters in the near future. © 2013.

  10. Agonist-Directed Desensitization of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy; Jin, Yan; Sun, Haiyan; Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Fang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists with reduced tachyphylaxis may offer new therapeutic agents with improved tolerance profile. However, receptor desensitization assays are often inferred at the single signaling molecule level, thus ligand-directed desensitization is poorly understood. Here we report a label-free biosensor whole cell assay with microfluidics to determine ligand-directed desensitization of the β2AR. Together with mechanistic deconvolution using small molecule inhibitors, the receptor desensitization and resensitization patterns under the short-term agonist exposure manifested the long-acting agonism of salmeterol, and differentiated the mechanisms of agonist-directed desensitization between a full agonist epinephrine and a partial agonist pindolol. This study reveals the cellular mechanisms of agonist-selective β2AR desensitization at the whole cell level. PMID:21541288

  11. Therapeutic perspectives for melatonin agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Delagrange, P; Atkinson, J; Boutin, J A; Casteilla, L; Lesieur, D; Misslin, R; Pellissier, S; Pénicaud, L; Renard, P

    2003-04-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone synthesized in the pineal gland during the dark period in all species, including humans. The diversity and differences in melatonin receptor distribution in the brain and extracerebral organs suggest multiple functional roles for melatonin. Administration of melatonin agonists reduces neophobia and treatment with a melatonin antagonist during the dark period reverses the anxiolytic-like effect of endogenous melatonin. Chronic treatment with agonists prevents various perturbations induced by chronic mild stress. Melatonin in vivo directly constricts cerebral arterioles in rats and decreases the lower limit of cerebral blood flow autoregulation, suggesting that melatonin may diminish the risk of hypoperfusion-induced cerebral ischemia. At the extracerebral level, melatonin regulates intestinal motility in rats. The intestinal postprandial motor response is shorter in the dark phase than in the light phase and this reduction is reversed in animals pretreated with a melatonin antagonist. Moreover, melatonin reduces the duration of cholecystokinin excitomotor effect. Endogenous melatonin may modulate intestinal motility to coordinate intestinal functions such as digestion and transit and control the metabolism of the animal. An adipocyte melatonin binding site may also participate in this control. Melatonin is involved in a wide range of physiological functions. The question remains as to whether evolution, adaptation and diurnal life have modified the physiological role of melatonin in humans. Moreover, the functional role of each of the receptor subtypes has to be characterized to design selective ligands to treat specific diseases.

  12. TOXICITY OF AHR AGONISTS TO FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are exceptionally sensitive to the lethal toxicity of chemicals that act as arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Toxicity characterizations based on 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, generally the most potent AhR agonist, support the toxicity equiva...

  13. Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Researches suggest that two agonists can bind to the same binding site of an important transmembrane protein and elicit a biological response through strikingly different binding interactions. Evidence is provided which suggests two possible types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist binding like acetlycholine (cholinergic) or like nicotine…

  14. Dopamine agonists in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Pavese, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine agonists are highly effective as adjunctive therapy to levodopa in advanced Parkinson's disease and have rapidly gained popularity as a monotherapy in the early stages of Parkinson's disease for patients less than 65-70 years old. In the latter case, dopamine agonists are about as effective as levodopa but patients demonstrate a lower tendency to develop motor complications. However, dopamine agonists lose efficacy over time and the number of patients remaining on agonist monotherapy decreases to less than 50% after 3 years of treatment. Thus, after a few years of treatment the majority of patients who started on dopamine agonists will be administered levodopa, in a combined dopaminergic therapy, in order to achieve a better control of motor symptoms.

  15. Differential agonist and inverse agonist profile of antipsychotics at D2L receptors coupled to GIRK potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Castro-Fernandez, Annabelle; Cussac, Didier

    2007-03-01

    The D(2) dopaminergic receptor represents a major target of antipsychotic drugs. Using the coupling of the human D(2long) (hD(2L)) receptor to G protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium (GIRK) channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we examined the activity of antipsychotic agents of different classes - typical, atypical, and a "new generation" of compounds, exhibiting a preferential D(2) and 5-HT(1A) receptor profile. When the hD(2L) receptor was coexpressed with GIRK channels, a series of reference compounds exhibited full agonist (dopamine, and quinpirole), partial agonist (apomorphine, (-)3-PPP, and (+)-UH232) or inverse agonist (raclopride, and L741626) properties. Sarizotan exhibited only very weak partial agonist action. At higher levels of receptor cRNA injected per oocyte, both partial agonist activity and inverse agonist properties were generally more pronounced. The inverse agonist action of L741626 was reversed by interaction with sarizotan, thus confirming the constitutive activity of wild-type hD(2L) receptors in the oocyte expression system. When antipsychotic agents were tested for their actions at the hD(2L) receptor, typical (haloperidol) as well as atypical (nemonapride, ziprasidone, and clozapine) compounds acted as inverse agonists. In contrast, among D(2)/5-HT(1A) antipsychotics, only SLV313 and F15063 behaved as inverse agonists, whilst the other members of this group (bifeprunox, SSR181507 and the recently marketed antipsychotic, aripiprazole) exhibited partial agonist properties. Thus, the X. laevis oocyte expression system highlights markedly different activity of antipsychotics at the hD(2L) receptor. These differential properties may translate to distinct therapeutic potential of these compounds.

  16. Nicotine receptor partial agonists for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kate; Stead, Lindsay F; Lancaster, Tim

    2008-07-16

    Nicotine receptor partial agonists may help people to stop smoking by a combination of maintaining moderate levels of dopamine to counteract withdrawal symptoms (acting as an agonist) and reducing smoking satisfaction (acting as an antagonist). Varenicline was developed as a nicotine receptor partial agonist from cytisine, a drug widely used in central and eastern Europe for smoking cessation. The first trial reports of varenicline were released in 2006, and further trials have now been published or are currently are underway. The primary objective of this review is to assess the efficacy and tolerability of nicotine receptor partial agonists, including varenicline and cytisine, for smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's specialised register for trials, using the terms ('varenicline' or 'cytisine' or 'Tabex' or 'nicotine receptor partial agonist') and 'smoking' in the title or abstract, or as keywords. We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL using MeSH terms and free text, and we contacted authors of trial reports for additional information where necessary. The latest search was in March 2008. We included randomized controlled trials which compared the treatment drug with placebo. We also included comparisons with bupropion and nicotine patches where available. We excluded trials which did not report a minimum follow-up period of six months from start of treatment. We extracted data in duplicate on the type of participants, the dose and duration of treatment, the outcome measures, the randomization procedure, concealment of allocation, and completeness of follow up. The main outcome measured was abstinence from smoking after at least six months from the beginning of treatment. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence, and preferred biochemically validated rates where they were reported. Where appropriate we performed meta-analysis to produce a risk ratio, using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model. We found

  17. Nicotine receptor partial agonists for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kate; Stead, Lindsay F; Lancaster, Tim

    2011-02-16

    Nicotine receptor partial agonists may help people to stop smoking by a combination of maintaining moderate levels of dopamine to counteract withdrawal symptoms (acting as an agonist) and reducing smoking satisfaction (acting as an antagonist). Varenicline was developed as a nicotine receptor partial agonist from cytisine, a drug widely used in central and eastern Europe for smoking cessation. The first trial reports of varenicline were released in 2006, and further trials have now been published or are currently underway. The primary objective of this review is to assess the efficacy and tolerability of nicotine receptor partial agonists, including varenicline and cytisine, for smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's specialised register for trials, using the terms ('varenicline' or 'cytisine' or 'Tabex' or 'nicotine receptor partial agonist') and 'smoking' in the title or abstract, or as keywords. We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL using MeSH terms and free text, and we contacted authors of trial reports for additional information where necessary. The latest search was in September 2010. We included randomized controlled trials which compared the treatment drug with placebo. We also included comparisons with bupropion and nicotine patches where available. We excluded trials which did not report a minimum follow-up period of six months from start of treatment. We extracted data on the type of participants, the dose and duration of treatment, the outcome measures, the randomization procedure, concealment of allocation, and completeness of follow up.The main outcome measured was abstinence from smoking after at least six months from the beginning of treatment. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence, and preferred biochemically validated rates where they were reported. Where appropriate we performed meta-analysis to produce a risk ratio, using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model. We found 11 trials of

  18. Nicotine receptor partial agonists for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kate; Stead, Lindsay F; Lancaster, Tim

    2010-12-08

    Nicotine receptor partial agonists may help people to stop smoking by a combination of maintaining moderate levels of dopamine to counteract withdrawal symptoms (acting as an agonist) and reducing smoking satisfaction (acting as an antagonist). Varenicline was developed as a nicotine receptor partial agonist from cytisine, a drug widely used in central and eastern Europe for smoking cessation. The first trial reports of varenicline were released in 2006, and further trials have now been published or are currently underway. The primary objective of this review is to assess the efficacy and tolerability of nicotine receptor partial agonists, including varenicline and cytisine, for smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's specialised register for trials, using the terms ('varenicline' or 'cytisine' or 'Tabex' or 'nicotine receptor partial agonist') and 'smoking' in the title or abstract, or as keywords. We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL using MeSH terms and free text, and we contacted authors of trial reports for additional information where necessary. The latest search was in September 2010. We included randomized controlled trials which compared the treatment drug with placebo. We also included comparisons with bupropion and nicotine patches where available. We excluded trials which did not report a minimum follow-up period of six months from start of treatment. We extracted data on the type of participants, the dose and duration of treatment, the outcome measures, the randomization procedure, concealment of allocation, and completeness of follow up.The main outcome measured was abstinence from smoking after at least six months from the beginning of treatment. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence, and preferred biochemically validated rates where they were reported. Where appropriate we performed meta-analysis to produce a risk ratio, using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model. We found 11 trials of

  19. Dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome: implications for patient care.

    PubMed

    Nirenberg, Melissa J

    2013-08-01

    Dopamine agonists are effective treatments for a variety of indications, including Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, but may have serious side effects, such as orthostatic hypotension, hallucinations, and impulse control disorders (including pathological gambling, compulsive eating, compulsive shopping/buying, and hypersexuality). The most effective way to alleviate these side effects is to taper or discontinue dopamine agonist therapy. A subset of patients who taper a dopamine agonist, however, develop dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome (DAWS), which has been defined as a severe, stereotyped cluster of physical and psychological symptoms that correlate with dopamine agonist withdrawal in a dose-dependent manner, cause clinically significant distress or social/occupational dysfunction, are refractory to levodopa and other dopaminergic medications, and cannot be accounted for by other clinical factors. The symptoms of DAWS include anxiety, panic attacks, dysphoria, depression, agitation, irritability, suicidal ideation, fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, generalized pain, and drug cravings. The severity and prognosis of DAWS is highly variable. While some patients have transient symptoms and make a full recovery, others have a protracted withdrawal syndrome lasting for months to years, and therefore may be unwilling or unable to discontinue DA therapy. Impulse control disorders appear to be a major risk factor for DAWS, and are present in virtually all affected patients. Thus, patients who are unable to discontinue dopamine agonist therapy may experience chronic impulse control disorders. At the current time, there are no known effective treatments for DAWS. For this reason, providers are urged to use dopamine agonists judiciously, warn patients about the risks of DAWS prior to the initiation of dopamine agonist therapy, and follow patients closely for withdrawal symptoms during dopamine agonist taper.

  20. Relamorelin: A Novel Gastrocolokinetic Synthetic Ghrelin Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Acosta, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic ghrelin agonists, predominantly small molecules, are being developed as prokinetic agents that may prove useful in the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders. Relamorelin (RM-131) is a pentapeptide synthetic ghrelin analog that activates the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS)-1a (also called the ghrelin) receptor with approximately 6-fold greater potency than natural ghrelin. The ability of relamorelin to stimulate growth hormone (GH) release is comparable to that of native ghrelin. Relamorelin has enhanced efficacy and plasma stability compared to native ghrelin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and potential indications for relamorelin. Relamorelin is administered subcutaneously, dosed daily or twice daily. Relamorelin is being studied for the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal motility disorders. Phase IIA pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated acceleration of gastric emptying in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 DM (T2DM) and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. In a phase IIA study in patients with diabetic gastroparesis, relamorelin accelerated gastric emptying and significantly improved vomiting frequency compared to placebo and improved other symptoms of gastroparesis in a pre-specified subgroup of patients with vomiting at baseline. In patients with chronic idiopathic constipation with defined transit profile at baseline, relamorelin relieved constipation and accelerated colonic transit compared to placebo. These characteristics suggest that this new ghrelin analog shows great promise to relieve patients with upper or lower gastrointestinal motility disorders. PMID:25545036

  1. Tyraminergic modulation of agonistic outcomes in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Momohara, Yuto; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2018-05-01

    Octopamine, a biogenic amine, modulates various behaviors, ranging from locomotion and aggression to learning and memory in invertebrates. Several studies recently demonstrated that tyramine, the biological precursor of octopamine, also affects behaviors independent of octopamine. Here we investigated the involvement of tyramine in agonistic interaction of the male crayfish Procambarus clarkii. When male crayfish fight, larger animals (3-7% difference in body length) are more likely to win. By contrast, direct injection of tyramine or octopamine counteracted the physical advantage of larger animals. Tyramine or octopamine-injected naive large animals were mostly beaten by untreated smaller naive animals. This pharmacological effect was similar to the loser effect in which subordinate larger animals are frequently beaten by smaller animals. Furthermore, loser effects were partly eliminated by either injection of epinastine, an octopamine blocker, or yohimbine, a tyramine blocker, and significantly diminished by injection of a mixture of both blockers. We also observed that tyramine levels in the subesophageal ganglion were remarkably increased in subordinate crayfish after losing a fight. These results suggest that tyramine modulates aggressive levels of crayfish and contributes to the loser effect in parallel with octopamine.

  2. Partial agonist therapy in schizophrenia: relevance to diminished criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Gavaudan, Gilles; Magalon, David; Cohen, Julien; Lançon, Christophe; Léonetti, Georges; Pélissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure

    2010-11-01

    Pathological gambling (PG), classified in the DSM-IV among impulse control disorders, is defined as inappropriate, persistent gaming for money with serious personal, family, and social consequences. Offenses are frequently committed to obtain money for gambling. Pathological gambling, a planned and structured behavioral disorder, has often been described as a complication of dopamine agonist treatment in patients with Parkinson's disease. It has never been described in patients with schizophrenia receiving dopamine agonists. We present two patients with schizophrenia, previously treated with antipsychotic drugs without any suggestion of PG, who a short time after starting aripiprazole, a dopamine partial agonist, developed PG and criminal behavior, which totally resolved when aripiprazole was discontinued. Based on recent advances in research on PG and adverse drug reactions to dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease, we postulate a link between aripiprazole and PG in both our patients with schizophrenia and raise the question of criminal responsibility. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs.

  4. Mechanisms of inverse agonist action at D2 dopamine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, David J; Strange, Philip G

    2005-01-01

    Mechanisms of inverse agonist action at the D2(short) dopamine receptor have been examined. Discrimination of G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled forms of the receptor by inverse agonists was examined in competition ligand-binding studies versus the agonist [3H]NPA at a concentration labelling both G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled receptors. Competition of inverse agonists versus [3H]NPA gave data that were fitted best by a two-binding site model in the absence of GTP but by a one-binding site model in the presence of GTP. Ki values were derived from the competition data for binding of the inverse agonists to G-protein-uncoupled and -coupled receptors. Kcoupled and Kuncoupled were statistically different for the set of compounds tested (ANOVA) but the individual values were different in a post hoc test only for (+)-butaclamol. These observations were supported by simulations of these competition experiments according to the extended ternary complex model. Inverse agonist efficacy of the ligands was assessed from their ability to reduce agonist-independent [35S]GTPγS binding to varying degrees in concentration–response curves. Inverse agonism by (+)-butaclamol and spiperone occurred at higher potency when GDP was added to assays, whereas the potency of (−)-sulpiride was unaffected. These data show that some inverse agonists ((+)-butaclamol, spiperone) achieve inverse agonism by stabilising the uncoupled form of the receptor at the expense of the coupled form. For other compounds tested, we were unable to define the mechanism. PMID:15735658

  5. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    DOEpatents

    Pandit, Jayvardhan [Mystic, CT; Jancarik, Jarmila [Walnut Creek, CA; Kim, Sung-Hou [Moraga, CA; Koths, Kirston [El Cerrito, CA; Halenbeck, Robert [San Rafael, CA; Fear, Anna Lisa [Oakland, CA; Taylor, Eric [Oakland, CA; Yamamoto, Ralph [Martinez, CA; Bohm, Andrew [Armonk, NY

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  6. Trial Watch: Toll-like receptor agonists for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Eggermont, Alexander; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have long been known for their ability to initiate innate immune responses upon exposure to conserved microbial components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and double-stranded RNA. More recently, this family of pattern recognition receptors has been attributed a critical role in the elicitation of anticancer immune responses, raising interest in the development of immunochemotherapeutic regimens based on natural or synthetic TLR agonists. In spite of such an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation, only three TLR agonists are currently licensed by FDA for use in cancer patients: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that operates as a mixed TLR2/TLR4 agonist; monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), a derivative of Salmonella minnesota that functions as a potent agonist of TLR4; and imiquimod, a synthetic imidazoquinoline that activates TLR7. One year ago, in the August and September issues of OncoImmunology , we described the main biological features of TLRs and discussed the progress of clinical studies evaluating the safety and therapeutic potential of TLR agonists in cancer patients. Here, we summarize the latest developments in this exciting area of research, focusing on preclinical studies that have been published during the last 13 mo and clinical trials launched in the same period to investigate the antineoplastic activity of TLR agonists.

  7. Differential effects of AMPK agonists on cell growth and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Emma E.; Coelho, Paula P.; Blagih, Julianna; Griss, Takla; Viollet, Benoit; Jones, Russell G.

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of cellular energy status, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is believed to act in opposition to the metabolic phenotypes favored by proliferating tumor cells. Consequently, compounds known to activate AMPK have been proposed as cancer therapeutics. However, the extent to which the anti-neoplastic properties of these agonists are mediated by AMPK is unclear. Here we examined the AMPK-dependence of six commonly used AMPK agonists (metformin, phenformin, AICAR, 2DG, salicylate and A-769662) and their influence on cellular processes often deregulated in tumor cells. We demonstrate that the majority of these agonists display AMPK-independent effects on cell proliferation and metabolism with only the synthetic activator, A-769662, exerting AMPK-dependent effects on these processes. We find that A-769662 promotes an AMPK-dependent increase in mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity (SRC). Finally, contrary to the view of AMPK activity being tumor suppressive, we find A-769662 confers a selective proliferative advantage to tumor cells growing under nutrient deprivation. Our results indicate that many of the anti-growth properties of these agonists cannot be attributed to AMPK activity in cells, and thus any observed effects using these agonists should be confirmed using AMPK-deficient cells. Ultimately, our data urge caution, not only regarding the type of AMPK agonist proposed for cancer treatment, but also the context in which they are used. PMID:25241895

  8. Differential effects of AMPK agonists on cell growth and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vincent, E E; Coelho, P P; Blagih, J; Griss, T; Viollet, B; Jones, R G

    2015-07-01

    As a sensor of cellular energy status, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is believed to act in opposition to the metabolic phenotypes favored by proliferating tumor cells. Consequently, compounds known to activate AMPK have been proposed as cancer therapeutics. However, the extent to which the anti-neoplastic properties of these agonists are mediated by AMPK is unclear. Here we examined the AMPK dependence of six commonly used AMPK agonists (metformin, phenformin, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR), 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), salicylate and A-769662) and their influence on cellular processes often deregulated in tumor cells. We demonstrate that the majority of these agonists display AMPK-independent effects on cell proliferation and metabolism with only the synthetic activator, A-769662, exerting AMPK-dependent effects on these processes. We find that A-769662 promotes an AMPK-dependent increase in mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. Finally, contrary to the view of AMPK activity being tumor suppressive, we find that A-769662 confers a selective proliferative advantage to tumor cells growing under nutrient deprivation. Our results indicate that many of the antigrowth properties of these agonists cannot be attributed to AMPK activity in cells, and thus any observed effects using these agonists should be confirmed using AMPK-deficient cells. Ultimately, our data urge caution not only regarding the type of AMPK agonist proposed for cancer treatment but also the context in which they are used.

  9. Retinoid agonist isotretinoin ameliorates obstructive renal injury.

    PubMed

    Schaier, Matthias; Jocks, Thomas; Grone, Hermann-Josef; Ritz, Eberhard; Wagner, Juergen

    2003-10-01

    Interstitial fibrosis is a major cause of end stage renal failure. Retinoids, which are involved in tissue repair and fibrosis, inhibit inflammatory and proliferative pathways. Therefore, we studied the dose dependent effects of the retinoid receptor agonist isotretinoin 13-cis retinoic acid in the unilateral ureteral obstruction model (UUO). Sham operated control rats were compared with UUO rats treated with vehicle (UUO-Veh), or low (5 mg/kg body weight (UUO-LD) or high (25 mg/kg) (UUO-HD) dose isotretinoin. Kidneys were evaluated using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistology 7 days after UUO. Renal injury and fibrosis were quantified by immunostaining and expression measurements of the genes involved in renal fibrosis. In UUO-Veh kidneys the interstitial area was expanded 5-fold but only 3-fold in UUO-HD and 3.5-fold in UUO-LD rats. Interstitial cell counts were 3-fold higher in UUO-Veh rats but significantly less in UUO-HD or UUO-LD animals. Tubular and interstitial cell proliferation was significantly higher in UUO-Veh rats compared with sham operated control plus vehicle animals but less so in UUO-LD and UUO-HD rats. In UUO-Veh rats interstitial infiltration by monocytes/macrophages was higher compared with unobstructed controls. It was significantly less after isotretinoin treatment. In UUO-Veh rats mRNA for procollagen I, and transforming growth factor-beta1 and II receptor was significantly increased. It was significantly less after treatment with isotretinoin. Fibronectin and collagen I immunostaining was also decreased by isotretinoin. Since isotretinoin limits proliferation, inflammation and fibrosis after UUO, retinoids should be further investigated as potentially promising therapeutic agents for renal disease.

  10. Exploring the binding energy profiles of full agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Nargis; Ma, Qianyun; Wu, Guanzhao; Jiang, Tao; Yu, Rilei

    2017-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) belong to the Cys-loop receptor family and are important drug targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the precise determinants of the binding efficacies of ligands for these receptors are unclear. Therefore, in this study, the binding energy profiles of various ligands (full agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists) were quantified by docking those ligands with structural ensembles of the α7 nAChR exhibiting different degrees of C-loop closure. This approximate treatment of interactions suggested that full agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists of the α7 nAChR possess distinctive binding energy profiles. Results from docking revealed that ligand binding efficacy may be related to the capacity of the ligand to stabilize conformational states with a closed C loop.

  11. Autocrine selection of a GLP-1R G-protein biased agonist with potent antidiabetic effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiang; Nieto, Ainhoa; Cistrone, Philip A; Xie, Jia; He, LinLing; Yea, Kyungmoo; Jones, Teresa; Turn, Rachel; Di Stefano, Peter S; Griffin, Patrick R; Dawson, Philip E; McDonald, Patricia H; Lerner, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have emerged as treatment options for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). GLP-1R signals through G-protein-dependent, and G-protein-independent pathways by engaging the scaffold protein β-arrestin; preferential signalling of ligands through one or the other of these branches is known as 'ligand bias'. Here we report the discovery of the potent and selective GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonist, P5. We identified P5 in a high-throughput autocrine-based screening of large combinatorial peptide libraries, and show that P5 promotes G-protein signalling comparable to GLP-1 and Exendin-4, but exhibited a significantly reduced β-arrestin response. Preclinical studies using different mouse models of T2DM demonstrate that P5 is a weak insulin secretagogue. Nevertheless, chronic treatment of diabetic mice with P5 increased adipogenesis, reduced adipose tissue inflammation as well as hepatic steatosis and was more effective at correcting hyperglycaemia and lowering haemoglobin A1c levels than Exendin-4, suggesting that GLP-1R G-protein-biased agonists may provide a novel therapeutic approach to T2DM.

  12. On the mechanism for PPAR agonists to enhance ABCA1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Masaki; Tsujita, Maki; Hossain, Mohammad Anwar; Akita, Nobukatsu; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Staels, Bart; Suzuki, Shogo; Fukutomi, Tatsuya; Kimura, Genjiro; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), a major regulator of high density lipoprotein (HDL) biogenesis, is known to be up-regulated by the transcription factor liver X receptor (LXR) α, and expression is further enhanced by activation of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs). We investigated this complex regulatory network using specific PPAR agonists: four fibrates (fenofibrate, bezafibrate, gemfibrozil and LY518674), a PPAR δ agonist (GW501516) and a PPAR γ agonist (pioglitazone). All of these compounds increased the expression of LXRs, PPARs and ABCA1 mRNAs, and associated apoA-I-mediated lipid release in THP-1 macrophage, WI38 fibroblast and mouse fibroblast. When mouse fibroblasts lacking expression of PPAR α were examined, the effects of fenofibrate and LY518674 were markedly diminished while induction by other ligands were retained. The PPAR α promoter was activated by all of these compounds in an LXR α-dependent manner, and partially in a PPAR α-dependent manner, in mouse fibroblast. The LXR responsive element (LXRE)-luciferase activity was enhanced by all the compounds in an LXR α-dependent manner in mouse fibroblast. This activation was exclusively PPAR α-dependent by fenofibrate and LY518674, but nonexclusively by the others. We conclude that PPARs and LXRs are involved in the regulation of ABCA1 expression and HDL biogenesis in a cooperative signal transduction pathway. PMID:19201410

  13. A Rationally Designed Agonist Defines Subfamily IIIA Abscisic Acid Receptors As Critical Targets for Manipulating Transpiration.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Aditya S; Peterson, Francis C; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Merilo, Ebe; Verstraeten, Inge; Park, Sang-Youl; Elzinga, Dezi; Kaundal, Amita; Helander, Jonathan; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Otani, Masato; Wu, Kevin; Jensen, Davin R; Kollist, Hannes; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R

    2017-11-17

    Increasing drought and diminishing freshwater supplies have stimulated interest in developing small molecules that can be used to control transpiration. Receptors for the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) have emerged as key targets for this application, because ABA controls the apertures of stomata, which in turn regulate transpiration. Here, we describe the rational design of cyanabactin, an ABA receptor agonist that preferentially activates Pyrabactin Resistance 1 (PYR1) with low nanomolar potency. A 1.63 Å X-ray crystallographic structure of cyanabactin in complex with PYR1 illustrates that cyanabactin's arylnitrile mimics ABA's cyclohexenone oxygen and engages the tryptophan lock, a key component required to stabilize activated receptors. Further, its sulfonamide and 4-methylbenzyl substructures mimic ABA's carboxylate and C6 methyl groups, respectively. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements show that cyanabactin's compact structure provides ready access to high ligand efficiency on a relatively simple scaffold. Cyanabactin treatments reduce Arabidopsis whole-plant stomatal conductance and activate multiple ABA responses, demonstrating that its in vitro potency translates to ABA-like activity in vivo. Genetic analyses show that the effects of cyanabactin, and the previously identified agonist quinabactin, can be abolished by the genetic removal of PYR1 and PYL1, which form subclade A within the dimeric subfamily III receptors. Thus, cyanabactin is a potent and selective agonist with a wide spectrum of ABA-like activities that defines subfamily IIIA receptors as key target sites for manipulating transpiration.

  14. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  15. LXR agonist treatment of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm restores cholesterol efflux and triggers apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ceroi, Adam; Masson, David; Roggy, Anne; Roumier, Christophe; Chagué, Cécile; Gauthier, Thierry; Philippe, Laure; Lamarthée, Baptiste; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Bonnefoy, Francis; Perruche, Sylvain; Biichle, Sabeha; Preudhomme, Claude; Macintyre, Elisabeth; Lagrost, Laurent; Garnache-Ottou, Francine; Saas, Philippe

    2016-12-08

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) neoplasm (BPDCN) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with a poor prognosis that derives from PDCs. No consensus for optimal treatment modalities is available today and the full characterization of this leukemia is still emerging. We identified here a BPDCN-specific transcriptomic profile when compared with those of acute myeloid leukemia and T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as well as the transcriptomic signature of primary PDCs. This BPDCN gene signature identified a dysregulation of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis, some of them being liver X receptor (LXR) target genes. LXR agonist treatment of primary BPDCN cells and BPDCN cell lines restored LXR target gene expression and increased cholesterol efflux via the upregulation of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. LXR agonist treatment was responsible for limiting BPDCN cell proliferation and inducing intrinsic apoptotic cell death. LXR activation in BPDCN cells was shown to interfere with 3 signaling pathways associated with leukemic cell survival, namely: NF-κB activation, as well as Akt and STAT5 phosphorylation in response to the BPDCN growth/survival factor interleukin-3. These effects were increased by the stimulation of cholesterol efflux through a lipid acceptor, the apolipoprotein A1. In vivo experiments using a mouse model of BPDCN cell xenograft revealed a decrease of leukemic cell infiltration and BPDCN-induced cytopenia associated with increased survival after LXR agonist treatment. This demonstrates that cholesterol homeostasis is modified in BPDCN and can be normalized by treatment with LXR agonists which can be proposed as a new therapeutic approach. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. LXR agonist treatment of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm restores cholesterol efflux and triggers apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ceroi, Adam; Masson, David; Roggy, Anne; Roumier, Christophe; Chagué, Cécile; Gauthier, Thierry; Philippe, Laure; Lamarthée, Baptiste; Angelot-Delettre, Fanny; Bonnefoy, Francis; Perruche, Sylvain; Biichle, Sabeha; Preudhomme, Claude; Macintyre, Elisabeth; Lagrost, Laurent; Garnache-Ottou, Francine

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) neoplasm (BPDCN) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with a poor prognosis that derives from PDCs. No consensus for optimal treatment modalities is available today and the full characterization of this leukemia is still emerging. We identified here a BPDCN-specific transcriptomic profile when compared with those of acute myeloid leukemia and T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as well as the transcriptomic signature of primary PDCs. This BPDCN gene signature identified a dysregulation of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis, some of them being liver X receptor (LXR) target genes. LXR agonist treatment of primary BPDCN cells and BPDCN cell lines restored LXR target gene expression and increased cholesterol efflux via the upregulation of adenosine triphosphate–binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. LXR agonist treatment was responsible for limiting BPDCN cell proliferation and inducing intrinsic apoptotic cell death. LXR activation in BPDCN cells was shown to interfere with 3 signaling pathways associated with leukemic cell survival, namely: NF-κB activation, as well as Akt and STAT5 phosphorylation in response to the BPDCN growth/survival factor interleukin-3. These effects were increased by the stimulation of cholesterol efflux through a lipid acceptor, the apolipoprotein A1. In vivo experiments using a mouse model of BPDCN cell xenograft revealed a decrease of leukemic cell infiltration and BPDCN-induced cytopenia associated with increased survival after LXR agonist treatment. This demonstrates that cholesterol homeostasis is modified in BPDCN and can be normalized by treatment with LXR agonists which can be proposed as a new therapeutic approach. PMID:27702801

  17. Evaluation of AhR-agonists and AhR-agonist activity in sediments of Liaohe River protected areas, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Ke, Xin; Gui, Shaofeng; Wu, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Chunyong; Zhang, Haijun

    2017-02-15

    A total of 9 sediment samples of Liaohe River protected areas were collected to evaluate aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists (AhR-agonists) and AhR-agonist activity via chemical analysis and in vitro H4IIE cell bioassay. Results indicated that bioassay-derived 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (Bio-TEQs) ranged from 89.1 to 251.1pg/g dry weight. Concentrations of 16 EPA polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 12 dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) ranged from 256.8 to 560.1ng/g, 79.2 to 416.2pg/g, and 199.6 to 538.4pg/g, respectively. According to potency balance analysis, TEQ chem s based on PAHs, PCBs, and PCDD/Fs could contribute 16.56% to 26.11% of Bio-TEQs. This could be explained by the potential existence of unidentified AhR-agonists and the potential non-additive interactions among AhR-agonists in sediment extracts. Through the different contributions to Bio-TEQs, this study confirms that PCDD/Fs were the main pollutants that induced significantly AhR-agonist activity in sediments of Liaohe River protected areas. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Fixed ratio combinations of glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists with basal insulin: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liakopoulou, Paraskevi; Liakos, Aris; Vasilakou, Despoina; Athanasiadou, Eleni; Bekiari, Eleni; Kazakos, Kyriakos; Tsapas, Apostolos

    2017-06-01

    Basal insulin controls primarily fasting plasma glucose but causes hypoglycaemia and weight gain, whilst glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists induce weight loss without increasing risk for hypoglycaemia. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials to investigate the efficacy and safety of fixed ratio combinations of basal insulin with glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists. We searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library as well as conference abstracts up to December 2016. We assessed change in haemoglobin A 1c , body weight, and incidence of hypoglycaemia and gastrointestinal adverse events. We included eight studies with 5732 participants in the systematic review. Switch from basal insulin to fixed ratio combinations with a glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonist was associated with 0.72% reduction in haemoglobin A 1c [95% confidence interval -1.03 to -0.41; I 2  = 93%] and 2.35 kg reduction in body weight (95% confidence interval -3.52 to -1.19; I 2  = 93%), reducing also risk for hypoglycaemia [odds ratio 0.70; 95% confidence interval 0.57 to 0.86; I 2  = 85%] but increasing incidence of nausea (odds ratio 6.89; 95% confidence interval 3.73-12.74; I 2  = 79%). Similarly, switching patients from treatment with a glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonist to a fixed ratio combination with basal insulin was associated with 0.94% reduction in haemoglobin A 1c (95% confidence interval -1.11 to -0.77) and an increase in body weight by 2.89 kg (95% confidence interval 2.17-3.61). Fixed ratio combinations of basal insulin with glucagon like peptide 1 receptor agonists improve glycaemic control whilst balancing out risk for hypoglycaemia and gastrointestinal side effects.

  19. Agonists and antagonists for P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Costanzi, Stefano; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Besada, Pedro; Shin, Dae Hong; Ko, Hyojin; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Mamedova, Liaman

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has identified nucleotide agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 receptors. Selective non-nucleotide antagonists have been reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2X2/3/P2X3 and P2X7 receptors. For example, the dinucleotide INS 37217 (Up4dC) potently activates the P2Y2 receptor, and the non-nucleotide antagonist A-317491 is selective for P2X2/3/P2X3 receptors. Nucleotide analogues in which the ribose moiety is substituted by a variety of novel ring systems, including conformation-ally locked moieties, have been synthesized as ligands for P2Y receptors. The focus on conformational factors of the ribose-like moiety allows the inclusion of general modifications that lead to enhanced potency and selectivity. At P2Y1,2,4,11 receptors, there is a preference for the North conformation as indicated with (N)-methanocarba analogues. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2500 inhibited ADP-induced human platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.95 nM. MRS2365, an (N)-methanocarba analogue of 2-MeSADP, displayed potency (EC50) of 0.4 nM at the P2Y1 receptor, with >10 000-fold selectivity in comparison to P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. At P2Y6 receptors there is a dramatic preference for the South conformation. Three-dimensional structures of P2Y receptors have been deduced from structure activity relationships (SAR), mutagenesis and modelling studies. Detailed three-dimensional structures of P2X receptors have not yet been proposed. PMID:16805423

  20. Subchronic intermittent caffeine administration to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats sensitizes turning behaviour in response to dopamine D(1) but not D(2) receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; Pinna, Annalisa; Morelli, Micaela

    2005-12-01

    The effects of caffeine, an antagonist of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors, are significantly influenced by modifications in dopamine transmission. Administration of caffeine to unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats induces ipsilateral turning behaviour in rats never exposed to a dopamine receptor agonist, whereas contralateral turning is elicited if rats are repeatedly primed with a dopamine receptor agonist. In this study, rats unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine and subchronically treated with an intermittent administration of caffeine (15 mg/kg) or vehicle, were administered, 3 days after discontinuations of the treatment, with the dopamine D(1) receptor agonist 1-phenyl 1,2,3,4,5-tetrahydro(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,8-diolhydrochloride (SKF 38393), the D(2)/D(3) receptor agonist quinpirole, the D(2) receptor agonist R(-)-propylnorapomorphine or the dopamine precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine. Administration of SKF 38393 (1.5 mg/kg) or L-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (6 mg/kg), but not quinpirole (0.15 mg/kg) or R(-)-propylnorapomorphine (0.01 mg/kg), induced a significantly higher contralateral turning behaviour in rats subchronically treated with caffeine than in vehicle-pretreated rats. The results show that repeated intermittent caffeine exposure enhances the motor stimulant effects elicited by dopamine agonists by a preferential sensitization of dopamine D(1) receptors.

  1. Choline as an agonist: determination of its agonistic potency on cholinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Ulus, I H; Millington, W R; Buyukuysal, R L; Kiran, B K

    1988-07-15

    These experiments examined the potency of choline as a cholinergic agonist at both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in rat brain and peripheral tissues. Choline stimulated the contraction of isolated smooth muscle preparations of the stomach fundus, urinary bladder and trachea and reduced the frequency of spontaneous contractions of the right atrium at high micromolar and low millimolar concentrations. The potency of choline to elicit a biological response varied markedly among these tissues; EC50 values ranged between 0.41 mM in the fundus to 14.45 mM in the atrium. Choline also displaced [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding in a concentration-dependent manner although, again, its potency varied among different brain regions (Ki = 1.2 to 3.5 mM) and peripheral tissues (Ki = 0.28 to 3.00 mM). Choline exhibited a comparable affinity for nicotinic receptors. It stimulated catecholamine release from the vascularly perfused adrenal gland (EC50 = 1.3 mM) and displaced L-[3H]nicotine binding to membrane preparations of brain and peripheral tissues (Ki = 0.38 to 1.17 mM). However, the concentration of choline required to bind to cholinergic receptors in most tissues was considerably higher than serum levels either in controls (8-13 microM) or following the administration of choline chloride (200 microM). These results clearly demonstrate that choline is a weak cholinergic agonist. Its potency is too low to account for the central nervous system effects produced by choline administration, although the direct activation of cholinergic receptors in several peripheral tissues may explain some of its side effects.

  2. The role of the adenosinergic system in lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Della Latta, Veronica; Cabiati, Manuela; Rocchiccioli, Silvia; Del Ry, Silvia; Morales, Maria-Aurora

    2013-10-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is a retaliatory metabolite that is expressed in conditions of injury or stress. During these conditions ATP is released at the extracellular level and is metabolized to adenosine. For this reason, adenosine is defined as a "danger signal" for cells and organs, in addition to its important role as homeostatic regulator. Its physiological functions are mediated through interaction with four specific transmembrane receptors called ADORA1, ADORA2A, ADORA2B and ADORA3. In the lungs of mice and humans all four adenosine receptors are expressed with different roles, having pro- and anti-inflammatory roles, determining bronchoconstriction and regulating lung inflammation and airway remodeling. Adenosine receptors can also promote differentiation of lung fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, typical of the fibrotic event. This last function suggests a potential involvement of adenosine in the fibrotic lung disease processes, which are characterized by different degrees of inflammation and fibrosis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the pathology with the highest degree of fibrosis and is of unknown etiology and burdened by lack of effective treatments in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnesium ions and opioid agonists in vincristine-induced neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bujalska, Magdalena; Makulska-Nowak, Helena; Gumułka, Stanisław W

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is difficult to treat. Classic analgesics (i.e., opioid receptor agonists) usually possess low activity. Therefore other agents such as antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and corticosteroids are used. It is commonly known that NMDA antagonists increase analgesic activity of opioids. Unfortunately, clinical use of NMDA antagonists is limited because of the relatively frequent occurrence of adverse effects e.g., memory impairment, psychomimetic effects, ataxia and motor in-coordination. Magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) are NMDA receptor blockers in physiological conditions. Therefore, in this study the effect of opioid receptor agonists and the influence of Mg(2+) on the action of opioid agonists in vincristine-induced hyperalgesia were examined. Opioid agonists such as morphine (5 mg/kg, ip), and fentanyl (0.0625 mg/kg, ip), as well as the partial agonist buprenorphine (0.075 mg/kg, ip) administered alone on 5 consecutives days did not modify the hyperalgesia in vincristine rats. In contrast, pretreatment with a low dose of magnesium sulfate (30 mg/kg, ip) resulted in a progressive increase of the analgesic action of all three investigated opioids. After discontinuation of drug administration, the effect persisted for several days.

  4. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin.more » This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.« less

  5. Identification of benzothiazole derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists present in tire extracts.

    PubMed

    He, Guochun; Zhao, Bin; Denison, Michael S

    2011-08-01

    Leachate from rubber tire material contains a complex mixture of chemicals previously shown to produce toxic and biological effects in aquatic organisms. The ability of these leachates to induce Ah receptor (AhR)-dependent cytochrome P4501A1 expression in fish indicated the presence of AhR active chemicals, but the responsible chemicals and their direct interaction with the AhR signaling pathway were not examined. Using a combination of AhR-based bioassays, we have demonstrated the ability of tire extract to stimulate both AhR DNA binding and AhR-dependent gene expression and confirmed that the responsible chemicals were metabolically labile. The application of CALUX (chemical-activated luciferase gene expression) cell bioassay-driven toxicant identification evaluation not only revealed that tire extract contained a variety of known AhR-active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons but also identified 2-methylthiobenzothiazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole as AhR agonists. Analysis of a structurally diverse series of benzothiazoles identified many that could directly stimulate AhR DNA binding and transiently activate the AhR signaling pathway and identified benzothiazoles as a new class of AhR agonists. In addition to these compounds, the relatively high AhR agonist activity of a large number of fractions strongly suggests that tire extract contains a large number of physiochemically diverse AhR agonists whose identities and toxicological/biological significances are unknown. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  6. Identification of Benzothiazole Derivatives and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonists Present in Tire Extracts

    PubMed Central

    He, Guochun; Zhao, Bin; Denison, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Leachate from rubber tire material contains a complex mixture of chemicals previously shown to produce toxic and biological effects in aquatic organisms. While the ability of these leachates to induce Ah receptor (AhR)-dependent cytochrome P4501A1 expression in fish indicated the presence of AhR active chemicals, the responsible chemical(s) and their direct interaction with the AhR signaling pathway were not examined. Using a combination of AhR-based bioassays, we have demonstrated the ability of tire extract to stimulate both AhR DNA binding and AhR-dependent gene expression and confirmed that the responsible chemical(s) was metabolically labile. The application of CALUX (Chemical-Activated LUciferase gene eXpression) cell bioassay-driven toxicant identification evaluation not only revealed that tire extract contained a variety of known AhR-active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, but also identified 2-methylthiobenzothiazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole as AhR agonists. Analysis of a structurally diverse series of benzothiazoles identified many that could directly stimulate AhR DNA binding and transiently activate the AhR signaling pathway and identified benzothiazoles as a new class of AhR agonists. In addition to these compounds, the relatively high AhR agonist activity of a large number of fractions strongly suggests that tire extract contains a large number of physiochemically diverse AhR agonists whose identities and toxicological/biological significances are unknown. PMID:21590714

  7. [Effects of GLP-1 receptor agonists on carbohydrate metabolism control].

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, José Carlos; Colomo, Natalia; Tinahones, Francisco José

    2014-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a new group of drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). In the present article, we review the available evidence on the efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonists as glucose-lowering agents, their place in therapeutic algorithms, and the clinical factors associated with a favorable treatment response. Finally, we describe the clinical characteristics of patients who may benefit from these drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation by strongly agonistic nucleotidic phosphoantigens.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Morgane; Alguacil, Javier; Gu, Siyi; Mehtougui, Asmaa; Adams, Erin J; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Champagne, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells can sense through their TCR tumor cells producing the weak endogenous phosphorylated antigen isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), or bacterially infected cells producing the strong agonist hydroxyl dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (HDMAPP). The recognition of the phosphoantigen is dependent on its binding to the intracellular B30.2 domain of butyrophilin BTN3A1. Most studies have focused on pyrophosphate phosphoantigens. As triphosphate nucleotide derivatives are naturally co-produced with IPP and HDMAPP, we analyzed their specific properties using synthetic nucleotides derived from HDMAPP. The adenylated, thymidylated and uridylated triphosphate derivatives were found to activate directly Vγ9Vδ2 cell lines as efficiently as HDMAPP in the absence of accessory cells. These antigens were inherently resistant to terminal phosphatases, but apyrase, when added during a direct stimulation of Vγ9Vδ2 cells, abrogated their stimulating activity, indicating that their activity required transformation into strong pyrophosphate agonists by a nucleotide pyrophosphatase activity which is present in serum. Tumor cells can be sensitized with nucleotide phosphoantigens in the presence of apyrase to become stimulatory, showing that this can occur before their hydrolysis into pyrophosphates. Whereas tumors sensitized with HDMAPP rapidly lost their stimulatory activity, sensitization with nucleotide derivatives, in particular with the thymidine derivative, induced long-lasting stimulating ability. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, binding of some nucleotide derivatives to BTN3A1 intracellular domain was found to occur with an affinity similar to that of IPP, but much lower than that of HDMAPP. Thus, nucleotide phosphoantigens are precursors of pyrophosphate antigens which can deliver strong agonists intracellularly resulting in prolonged and strengthened activity.

  9. Estradiol and ERβ agonists enhance recognition memory, and DPN, an ERβ agonist, alters brain monoamines

    PubMed Central

    Jacome, Luis F.; Gautreaux, Claris; Inagaki, Tomoko; Mohan, Govini; Alves, Stephen; Lubbers, Laura S.; Luine, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Effects of estradiol benzoate (EB), ERα-selective agonist, propyl pyrazole triol (PPT) and ERβ-selective agonists, diarylpropionitrile (DPN) and Compound 19 (C-19) on memory were investigated in OVX rats using object recognition (OR) and placement (OP) memory tasks. Treatments were acute (behavior 4 h later) or sub chronic (daily injections for 2 days with behavior 48 h later). Objects were explored in sample trials (T1), and discrimination between sample (old) and new object/location in recognition trials (T2) was examined after 2–4 h inter-trial delays. Subjects treated sub chronically with EB, DPN, and C-19, but not PPT, discriminated between old and new objects and objects in old and new locations, suggesting that, at these doses and duration of treatments, estrogenic interactions with ERβ contributes to enhancements in recognition memory. Acute injections of DPN, but not PPT, immediately after T1, also enhanced discrimination for both tasks (C19 was not investigated). Effects of EB, DPN and PPT on anxiety and locomotion, measured on elevated plus maze and open field, did not appear to account for the mnemonic enhancements. Monoamines and metabolites were measured following DPN treatment in subjects that did not receive behavioral testing. DPN was associated with alterations in monoamines in several brain areas: indexed by the metabolite, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), or the MHPG/norepinephrine (NE) ratio, NE activity was increased by 60–130% in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and ventral hippocampus, and NE activity was decreased by 40–80% in the v. diagonal bands and CA1. Levels of the dopamine (DA) metabolite, homovanillic acid (HVA), increased 100% in the PFC and decreased by 50% in the dentate gyrus following DPN treatment. The metabolite of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), was increased in the PFC and CA3, by approximately 20%. No monoaminergic changes were noted in striatum or medial septum. Results suggest that ER

  10. Structure/function relationships of calcitonin analogues as agonists, antagonists, or inverse agonists in a constitutively activated receptor cell system.

    PubMed

    Pozvek, G; Hilton, J M; Quiza, M; Houssami, S; Sexton, P M

    1997-04-01

    The structure/function relationship of salmon calcitonin (sCT) analogues was investigated in heterologous calcitonin receptor (CTR) expression systems. sCT analogues with progressive amino-terminal truncations intermediate of sCT-(1-32) to sCT-(8-32) were examined for their ability to act as agonists, antagonists, or inverse agonists. Two CTR cell clones, B8-H10 and G12-E12, which express approximately 5 million and 25,000 C1b receptors/cell, respectively, were used for this study. The B8-H10 clone has an approximately 80-fold increase in basal levels of intracellular cAMP due to constitutive activation of the overexpressed receptor. In whole-cell competition binding studies, sCT-(1-32) was more potent than any of its amino-terminally truncated analogues in competition for 125I-sCT binding. In cAMP accumulation studies, sCT-(1-32) and modified analogues sCT-(2-32) and sCT-(3-32) had agonist activities. SDZ-216-710, with an amino-terminal truncation of four amino acids, behaved as a partial agonist/antagonist, whereas amino-terminal truncations of six or seven amino acid residues produced a 16-fold reduction in basal cAMP levels and attenuated the response to the agonist sCT-(1-32) in the constitutively active CTR system. This inverse agonist effect was insensitive to pertussis toxin inhibition. In contrast, the inverse agonist activity of these peptides was not observed in the nonconstitutively active CTR system, in which sCT analogues with amino-terminal truncations of four or more amino acids behaved as neutral competitive antagonists. These results suggest that the inverse agonist activity is mediated by stabilization of the inactive state of the receptor, which does not couple to G protein, and attenuates basal signaling initiated by ligand-independent activation of the effector adenylyl cyclase.

  11. Reconstitution of high affinity. cap alpha. /sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding by fusion with a pertussis toxin substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.H.; Neubig, R.R.

    1986-03-05

    High affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ adrenergic agonist binding is thought to occur via a coupling of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptor with N/sub i/, the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide binding protein. Human platelet membranes pretreated at pH 11.5 exhibit a selective inactivation of agonist binding and N/sub i/. To further study the mechanism of agonist binding, alkali treated membranes (ATM) were mixed with membranes pretreated with 10 ..mu..M phenoxybenzamine to block ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors (POB-M). The combined membrane pellet was incubated in 50% polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote membrane-membrane fusion and assayed for binding to the ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonistmore » (/sup 3/H)UK 14,304 (UK) and the antagonist (/sup 3/H) yohimbine. PEG treatment resulted in a 2-4 fold enhancement of UK binding whereas yohimbine binding was unchanged. No enhancement of UK binding was observed in the absence of PEG treatment. The reconstitution was dependent on the addition of POB-M. They found that a 1:1 ratio of POB-M:ATM was optimal. Reconstituted binding was inhibited by GppNHp. Fusion of rat C6 glioma cell membranes, which do not contain ..cap alpha../sub 2/ receptors, also enhanced agonist binding to ATM. Fusion of C6 membranes from cells treated with pertussis toxin did not enhance (/sup 3/H) UK binding. These data show that a pertussis toxin sensitive membrane component, possibly N/sub i/, can reconstitute high affinity ..cap alpha../sub 2/ agonist binding.« less

  12. A selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ agonist promotes reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, William R.; Shenk, Jennifer L.; Snaith, Mike R.; Russell, Caroline S.; Plunket, Kelli D.; Bodkin, Noni L.; Lewis, Michael C.; Winegar, Deborah A.; Sznaidman, Marcos L.; Lambert, Millard H.; Xu, H. Eric; Sternbach, Daniel D.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Hansen, Barbara C.; Willson, Timothy M.

    2001-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are dietary lipid sensors that regulate fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. The hypolipidemic effects of the fibrate drugs and the antidiabetic effects of the glitazone drugs in humans are due to activation of the α (NR1C1) and γ (NR1C3) subtypes, respectively. By contrast, the therapeutic potential of the δ (NR1C2) subtype is unknown, due in part to the lack of selective ligands. We have used combinatorial chemistry and structure-based drug design to develop a potent and subtype-selective PPARδ agonist, GW501516. In macrophages, fibroblasts, and intestinal cells, GW501516 increases expression of the reverse cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 and induces apolipoprotein A1-specific cholesterol efflux. When dosed to insulin-resistant middle-aged obese rhesus monkeys, GW501516 causes a dramatic dose-dependent rise in serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol while lowering the levels of small-dense low density lipoprotein, fasting triglycerides, and fasting insulin. Our results suggest that PPARδ agonists may be effective drugs to increase reverse cholesterol transport and decrease cardiovascular disease associated with the metabolic syndrome X. PMID:11309497

  13. Use of ß-adrenergic agonists in hybrid catfish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ractopamine hydrochloride (RH) is a potent ß-adrenergic agonist that has been used in some species of fish to improve growth performance and dress out characteristics. While this metabolic modifier has been shown to have positive effects on growth of fish, little research has focused on the mechani...

  14. PPARgamma agonists inhibit TGF-beta-PKA signaling in glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rong; Xu, Gang; Liu, Xiao-cheng; Han, Min; Jiang, Jing-jing; Huang, Qian; He, Yong; Yao, Ying

    2010-01-01

    To study the probable mechanisms of the anti-glomerulosclerosis effects induced by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonists in rat intraglomerular mesangial cells (MCs). Cells were transfected with the pTAL-PPRE-tk-Luc(+) plasmid and then treated with different concentrations of PPARgamma agonist, either troglitazone or telmisartan, for the indicated times. Promega luciferase assays were subsequently used for the detection of PPARgamma activation. Protein expression levels were assessed by Western blot, and PepTag assays were used for the non-radioactive detection of protein kinase A (PKA) activity. The deposition of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and p-cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (pCREB) were analyzed by confocal laser scanning. Both troglitazone and telmisartan remarkably inhibit the PKA activation and pCREB expression that is stimulated by TGF-beta. The PPARgamma agonists also inhibited alpha-SMA and collagen IV protein expression by blocking PKA activation. PPARgamma ligands effectively suppress the activation of MCs and the accumulation of collagen IV stimulated by TGF-beta in vitro. The renal protection provided by PPARgamma agonists is partly mediated via their blockade of TGF-beta/PKA signaling.

  15. Synthetic RORγt Agonists Enhance Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mi Ra; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Doebelin, Christelle; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D.; Novick, Scott J.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2016-01-01

    The T cell specific RORγ isoform RORγt has been shown to be the key lineage-defining transcription factor to initiate the differentiation program of TH17 and Tc17 cells, cells that have demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy. RORγt controls gene networks that enhance immunity including increased IL17 production and decreased immune suppression. Both synthetic and putative endogenous agonists of RORγt have been shown to increase the basal activity of RORγt enhancing TH17 cell proliferation. Here we show that activation of RORγt using synthetic agonists drives proliferation of TH17 cells while decreasing levels of the immune checkpoint protein PD-1, a mechanism that should enhance anti-tumor immunity while blunting tumor associated adaptive immune resistance. Interestingly, putative endogenous agonists drive proliferation of TH17 cells but do not repress PD-1. These findings suggest that synthetic agonists of RORγt should activate TC17/TH17 cells (with concomitant reduction in the Tregs population), repress PD-1, and produce IL17 in situ (a factor associated with good prognosis in cancer). Enhanced immunity and blockage of immune checkpoints has transformed cancer treatment, thus such a molecule would provide a unique approach for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26785144

  16. Muscarinic agonists for the treatment of cognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sellin, Angela K; Shad, Mujeeb; Tamminga, Carol

    2008-11-01

    It is widely accepted that cholinergic activity at muscarinic receptors is required to maintain cognitive functions, including learning and memory. Memory domains are especially impaired in schizophrenia, which may explain difficulties in psychosocial rehabilitation of individuals with this illness. However, little is known about the mechanism of this impairment. To understand our current knowledge, we reviewed the literature since 1990 via a PubMed search for the terms "muscarinic", "schizophrenia", "cognition", "memory", "learning", and "agonist" in combination. We found 89 basic science/laboratory studies, case reports/series, case-control studies, cross-sectional studies, standardized controlled animal trials, standardized controlled human trials, and reviews. Although further research is required to fully understand the neuropharmacology of the cholinergic system in cognitive function in schizophrenia, we have examined the data currently available. In general, these data suggest that agonist activity at acetylcholine muscarinic type 1 (M1) receptors would enhance memory and learning in schizophrenia. We present an overview of likely side effects of muscarinic agonists. We outline the anticholinergic activity of several available antipsychotics and review the available M1 muscarinic agonists.

  17. Effect of beta-agonists on LAM progression and treatment.

    PubMed

    Le, Kang; Steagall, Wendy K; Stylianou, Mario; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Darling, Thomas N; Vaughan, Martha; Moss, Joel

    2018-01-30

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare disease of women, is associated with cystic lung destruction resulting from the proliferation of abnormal smooth muscle-like LAM cells with mutations in the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) genes TSC1 and/or TSC2 The mutant genes and encoded proteins are responsible for activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is inhibited by sirolimus (rapamycin), a drug used to treat LAM. Patients who have LAM may also be treated with bronchodilators for asthma-like symptoms due to LAM. We observed stabilization of forced expiratory volume in 1 s over time in patients receiving sirolimus and long-acting beta-agonists with short-acting rescue inhalers compared with patients receiving only sirolimus. Because beta-agonists increase cAMP and PKA activity, we investigated effects of PKA activation on the mTOR pathway. Human skin TSC2 +/- fibroblasts or LAM lung cells incubated short-term with isoproterenol (beta-agonist) showed a sirolimus-independent increase in phosphorylation of S6, a downstream effector of the mTOR pathway, and increased cell growth. Cells incubated long-term with isoproterenol, which may lead to beta-adrenergic receptor desensitization, did not show increased S6 phosphorylation. Inhibition of PKA blocked the isoproterenol effect on S6 phosphorylation. Thus, activation of PKA by beta-agonists increased phospho-S6 independent of mTOR, an effect abrogated by beta-agonist-driven receptor desensitization. In agreement, retrospective clinical data from patients with LAM suggested that a combination of bronchodilators in conjunction with sirolimus may be preferable to sirolimus alone for stabilization of pulmonary function.

  18. Progesterone receptor isoforms, agonists and antagonists differentially reprogram estrogen signaling

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E.; Zarnke, Allison L.; Laine, Muriel; Al Abosy, Rose; Chang, Ya-Fang; Dembo, Anna G.; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Vadhi, Raga; Qiu, Xintao; Rao, Prakash; Santhamma, Bindu; Nair, Hareesh B.; Nickisch, Klaus J.; Long, Henry W.; Becker, Lev; Brown, Myles; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2018-01-01

    Major roadblocks to developing effective progesterone receptor (PR)-targeted therapies in breast cancer include the lack of highly-specific PR modulators, a poor understanding of the pro- or anti-tumorigenic networks for PR isoforms and ligands, and an incomplete understanding of the cross talk between PR and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Through genomic analyses of xenografts treated with various clinically-relevant ER and PR-targeting drugs, we describe how the activation or inhibition of PR differentially reprograms estrogen signaling, resulting in the segregation of transcriptomes into separate PR agonist and antagonist-mediated groups. These findings address an ongoing controversy regarding the clinical utility of PR agonists and antagonists, alone or in combination with tamoxifen, for breast cancer management. Additionally, the two PR isoforms PRA and PRB, bind distinct but overlapping genomic sites and interact with different sets of co-regulators to differentially modulate estrogen signaling to be either pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Of the two isoforms, PRA inhibited gene expression and ER chromatin binding significantly more than PRB. Differential gene expression was observed in PRA and PRB-rich patient tumors and PRA-rich gene signatures had poorer survival outcomes. In support of antiprogestin responsiveness of PRA-rich tumors, gene signatures associated with PR antagonists, but not PR agonists, predicted better survival outcomes. The better patient survival associated with PR antagonists versus PR agonists treatments was further reflected in the higher in vivo anti-tumor activity of therapies that combine tamoxifen with PR antagonists and modulators. This study suggests that distinguishing common effects observed due to concomitant interaction of another receptor with its ligand (agonist or antagonist), from unique isoform and ligand-specific effects will inform the development of biomarkers for patient selection and translation of PR

  19. GLP-1 agonists for type 2 diabetes: pharmacokinetic and toxicological considerations.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, Maria J; Knop, Filip K; Christensen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists (GLP-1-RA) have emerged as a new treatment option for type 2 diabetes. The GLP-1-RA are administered subcutaneously and differ substantially in pharmacokinetic profiles. This review describes the pharmacokinetics and safety aspects of the currently available GLP-1 receptor agonists, liraglutide (based on the structure of native GLP-1), exenatide twice daily and exenatide once weekly (based on exendin-4) in relation to the kinetics and toxicology of native GLP-1. The review is based on electronic literature searches and legal documents in the form of assessment reports from the European Medicines Agency and the United States Food and Drug Administration. GLP-1-based therapy combines several unique mechanisms of action and have the potential to gain widespread use in the fight against diabetes and obesity. The difference in chemical structure have strong implications for key pharmacokinetic parameters such as absorption and clearance, and eventually the safety and efficacy of the individual GLP-1-RA. The main safety concerns are pancreatitis and neoplasms, for which there are no identifiable differences in risk between the available agents. Antibody formation and injection site reactions are more frequent with the exendin-4-based compounds. The efficacy with regard to Hb(A1c) reduction is superior with the longer-acting agonists, whereas the shorter-acting GLP-1-RA seems to provide greater postprandial glucose control and lower tolerability as a possible consequence of less induction of tachyphylaxis. The future place of these agents will depend on the added safety and efficacy data in the several ongoing cardiovascular outcome trials.

  20. Illegal use of beta-adrenergic agonists: European Community.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, H A; Noordam, M Y; van Dooren-Flipsen, M M; Schilt, R; Roos, A H

    1998-01-01

    The use of veterinary medicinal products within the European Community is governed by a series of directives and regulations that describe the requirements for safety, quality, and efficacy of these products. Veterinary therapeutic use of beta-agonists has only been approved in the case of clenbuterol for bronchodilatation in horses and calves and for tocolysis in cows. No beta-agonists have been permitted in the European Community for growth-promoting purposes in farm animals. Surveillance for the presence of residues of veterinary agents in food-producing animals and meat is regulated by the Directive 86/469/EEC containing specific guidelines for sampling procedures on farms and in slaughterhouses. The level and frequency of sampling is dependent on the category of compounds and animal species. When positive samples have been identified (above certain action levels), sampling intensity is increased. Results of monitoring programs in EU member states during 1992 and 1993 for the occurrence of residues of beta-agonists in food-producing animals vary substantially with respect to the percentages of positive samples, ranging from 0 to 7%. The variability is partly explained by differences in sampling strategies, detection methods, and action levels applied. Identification of the proper matrices for sampling and detection of beta-agonists is important. In the case of clenbuterol, hair and choroid retinal tissue are appropriate tissues because clenbuterol accumulates in these matrices. A clear decrease in the use of clenbuterol in cattle has been observed in The Netherlands, Germany, Northern Ireland, and Spanish Basque Country over the last 3 yr. This is partly due to intensified surveillance activities at farms and slaughterhouses by governmental agencies and production sector organizations. There are data on human intoxication following consumption of liver or meat from cattle treated with beta-agonists. At the concentrations of clenbuterol measured in contaminated

  1. The effects of PPARδ agonist and zinc on ovariectomized rats' vagina.

    PubMed

    Takacs, Peter; Jaramillo, Sindy; Zhang, Yanping; Datar, Ram; Williams, Anthony; Olczyk, Joseph; Candiotti, Keith; Medina, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to measure the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPARδ) agonist GW501516 (GW) and zinc sulfate (ZS) on ovariectomized rats' vaginal histomorphology and collagen expression. Two weeks after ovariectomy, rats received daily treatment with vaginal suppositories containing placebo, ZS, GW, ZS with GW, or estradiol for 2 weeks. Macroscopic measurements were taken and the midsection of the vagina was used for histology. Immunofluorescence was performed with antibodies against collagen I, III, and anti-actin or collagen I and V and anti-actin. Gene expression analysis of 3 collagen genes was performed by qRT-PCR. Macroscopic measurements revealed that the genital hiatus was narrower in the ZS and ZS with GW groups, and the vagina was significantly longer in the animals treated with GW, ZS with GW, and estradiol compared to the placebo group. Microscopic measurements of the vaginal layers showed that the lamina propria and the vaginal muscularis were significantly thicker in the ZS and ZS with GW group compared to the placebo.The ratio of vaginal Col1a1/Col3a1 mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated by ZS with GW compared to placebo, whereas the ratio of vaginal Col1a1/Col5a1 expression was significantly up-regulated by ZS, GW, and ZS with GW. The ratio of vaginal collagen I/III protein expression was significantly up-regulated by ZS and ZS with GW, whereas the ratio of vaginal collagen I/V expression was significantly up-regulated by estradiol, ZS, and ZS with GW compared to control. Vaginal suppositories containing zinc and PPARδ agonist significantly altered the vagina of ovariectomized rats.

  2. Microbiome-Derived Tryptophan Metabolites and Their Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Agonist and Antagonist Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Un-Ho; Lee, Syng-Ook; Sridharan, Gautham; Lee, Kyongbum; Davidson, Laurie A.; Jayaraman, Arul; Chapkin, Robert S.; Alaniz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The tryptophan metabolites indole, indole-3-acetate, and tryptamine were identified in mouse cecal extracts and fecal pellets by mass spectrometry. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonist and antagonist activities of these microbiota-derived compounds were investigated in CaCo-2 intestinal cells as a model for understanding their interactions with colonic tissue, which is highly aryl hydrocarbon (Ah)–responsive. Activation of Ah-responsive genes demonstrated that tryptamine and indole 3-acetate were AHR agonists, whereas indole was an AHR antagonist that inhibited TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin)–induced CYP1A1 expression. In contrast, the tryptophan metabolites exhibited minimal anti-inflammatory activities, whereas TCDD decreased phorbol ester-induced CXCR4 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4] gene expression, and this response was AHR dependent. These results demonstrate that the tryptophan metabolites indole, tryptamine, and indole-3-acetate modulate AHR-mediated responses in CaCo-2 cells, and concentrations of indole that exhibit AHR antagonist activity (100–250 μM) are detected in the intestinal microbiome. PMID:24563545

  3. New PPARγ partial agonist improves obesity-induced metabolic alterations and atherosclerosis in LDLr(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jacqueline C; César, Fernanda A; de Oliveira, Edson M; Turato, Walter M; Tripodi, Gustavo L; Castilho, Gabriela; Machado-Lima, Adriana; de Las Heras, Beatriz; Boscá, Lisardo; Rabello, Marcelo M; Hernandes, Marcelo Z; Pitta, Marina G R; Pitta, Ivan R; Passarelli, Marisa; Rudnicki, Martina; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P

    2016-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) regulates multiple pathways involved in the pathogenesis of obesity and atherosclerosis. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of GQ-177, a new thiazolidinedione, on diet-induced obesity and atherosclerosis. The intermolecular interaction between PPARγ and GQ-177 was examined by virtual docking and PPAR activation was determined by reporter gene assay identifying GQ-177 as a partial and selective PPARγ agonist. For the evaluation of biological activity of GQ-177, low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLr(-/-)) C57/BL6 mice were fed either a high fat diabetogenic diet (diet-induced obesity), or a high fat atherogenic diet, and treated with vehicle, GQ-177 (20mg/kg/day), pioglitazone (20mg/kg/day, diet-induced obesity model) or rosiglitazone (15mg/kg/day, atherosclerosis model) for 28 days. In diet-induced obesity mice, GQ-177 improved insulin sensitivity and lipid profile, increased plasma adiponectin and GLUT4 mRNA in adipose tissue, without affecting body weight, food consumption, fat accumulation and bone density. Moreover, GQ-177 enhanced hepatic mRNA levels of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. In the atherosclerosis mice, GQ-177 inhibited atherosclerotic lesion progression, increased plasma HDL and mRNA levels of PPARγ and ATP-binding cassette A1 in atherosclerotic lesions. GQ-177 acts as a partial PPARγ agonist that improves obesity-associated insulin resistance and dyslipidemia with atheroprotective effects in LDLr(-/-) mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Potent and Site-Selective Agonist of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Junichiro; Mio, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Otsuka, Shinya; Mori, Yasuo; Uesugi, Motonari

    2015-12-23

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family that is expressed primarily on sensory neurons. This chemosensor is activated through covalent modification of multiple cysteine residues with a wide range of reactive compounds including allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a spicy component of wasabi. The present study reports on potent and selective agonists of TRPA1, discovered through screening 1657 electrophilic molecules. In an effort to validate the mode of action of hit molecules, we noted a new TRPA1-selective agonist, JT010 (molecule 1), which opens the TRPA1 channel by covalently and site-selectively binding to Cys621 (EC50 = 0.65 nM). The results suggest that a single modification of Cys621 is sufficient to open the TRPA1 channel. The TRPA1-selective probe described herein might be useful for further mechanistic studies of TRPA1 activation.

  5. Human muscle fascicle behavior in agonist and antagonist isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Emilie M; Longo, Stefano; Seynnes, Olivier R; Narici, Marco V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare, at a given level of electromyographic (EMG) activity, the behavior of dorsiflexor and plantarflexor muscles as assessed via their architecture (pennation angle and fiber length) during agonist or antagonist isometric contractions. Real-time ultrasonography and EMG activity of gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were obtained while young males performed ramp isometric contractions in dorsi- and plantarflexion. For both muscles, at a similar level of EMG activity, fiber length was longer, and pennation angle was smaller, during antagonist than during agonist contractions. These results indicate that, at similar levels of EMG activity, GM and TA muscles elicit a higher mechanical output while acting as an antagonist. These findings have important implications for muscle function testing. They show that estimation of antagonistic force using the common method based on the EMG/net torque relationship yields underestimated values. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Structure of an agonist-bound ionotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Yelshanskaya, Maria V; Li, Minfen; Sobolevsky, Alexander I

    2014-08-29

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate most excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and function by opening their ion channel in response to binding of agonist glutamate. Here, we report a structure of a homotetrameric rat GluA2 receptor in complex with partial agonist (S)-5-nitrowillardiine. Comparison of this structure with the closed-state structure in complex with competitive antagonist ZK 200775 suggests conformational changes that occur during iGluR gating. Guided by the structures, we engineered disulfide cross-links to probe domain interactions that are important for iGluR gating events. The combination of structural information, kinetic modeling, and biochemical and electrophysiological experiments provides insight into the mechanism of iGluR gating. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Gingerols: a novel class of vanilloid receptor (VR1) agonists

    PubMed Central

    Dedov, Vadim N; Tran, Van H; Duke, Colin C; Connor, Mark; Christie, MacDonald J; Mandadi, Sravan; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2002-01-01

    Gingerols, the pungent constituents of ginger, were synthesized and assessed as agonists of the capsaicin-activated VR1 (vanilloid) receptor. [6]-Gingerol and [8]-gingerol evoked capsaicin-like intracellular Ca2+ transients and ion currents in cultured DRG neurones. These effects of gingerols were blocked by capsazepine, the VR1 receptor antagonist. The potency of gingerols increased with increasing size of the side chain and with the overall hydrophobicity in the series. We conclude that gingerols represent a novel class of naturally occurring VR1 receptor agonists that may contribute to the medicinal properties of ginger, which have been known for centuries. The gingerol structure may be used as a template for the development of drugs acting as moderately potent activators of the VR1 receptor. PMID:12411409

  8. Newspapers and Newspaper Ink Contain Agonists for the Ah Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E. S.; Zhao, Bin; Timme-Laragy, Alicia; Jung, Dawoon; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Ligand-dependent activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway leads to a diverse array of biological and toxicological effects. The best-studied ligands for the AhR include polycyclic and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, the most potent of which is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, as new AhR ligands are identified and characterized, their structural and physiochemical diversity continues to expand. Our identification of AhR agonists in crude extracts from diverse materials raises questions as to the magnitude and extent of human exposure to AhR ligands through normal daily activities. We have found that solvent extracts of newspapers from countries around the world stimulate the AhR signaling pathway. AhR agonist activity was observed for dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethanol, and water extracts of printed newspaper, unprinted virgin paper, and black printing ink, where activation of luciferase reporter gene expression was transient, suggesting that the AhR active chemical(s) was metabolically labile. DMSO and ethanol extracts also stimulated AhR transformation and DNA binding, and also competed with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR. In addition, DMSO extracts of printed newspaper induced cytochrome P450 1A associated 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Although the responsible bioactive chemical(s) remain to be identified, our results demonstrate that newspapers and printing ink contain relatively potent metabolically labile agonists of the AhR. Given the large amount of recycling and reprocessing of newspapers throughout the world, release of these easily extractable AhR agonists into the environment should be examined and their potential effects on aquatic organisms assessed. PMID:18203687

  9. Adenosine A2A receptor agonists with potent antiplatelet activity.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Fuentes, Manuel; Caballero, Julio; Palomo, Iván; Hinz, Sonja; El-Tayeb, Ali; Müller, Christa E

    2018-05-01

    Selected adenosine A 2A receptor agonists (PSB-15826, PSB-12404, and PSB-16301) have been evaluated as new antiplatelet agents. In addition, radioligand-binding studies and receptor-docking experiments were performed in order to explain their differential biological effects on a molecular level. Among the tested adenosine derivatives, PSB-15826 was the most potent compound to inhibit platelet aggregation (EC 50 0.32 ± 0.05 µmol/L) and platelet P-selectin cell-surface localization (EC 50 0.062 ± 0.2 µmol/L), and to increase intraplatelets cAMP levels (EC 50 0.24 ± 0.01 µmol/L). The compound was more active than CGS21680 (EC 50 0.97±0.07 µmol/L) and equipotent to NECA (EC 50 0.31 ± 0.05 µmol/L) in platelet aggregation induced by ADP. In contrast to the results from cAMP assays, K i values determined in radioligand-binding studies were not predictive of the A 2A agonists' antiplatelet activity. Docking studies revealed the key molecular determinants of this new family of adenosine A 2A receptor agonists: differences in activities are related to π-stacking interactions between the ligands and the residue His264 in the extracellular loop of the adenosine A 2A receptor which may result in increased residence times. In conclusion, these results provide an improved understanding of the requirements of antiplatelet adenosine A 2A receptor agonists.

  10. A Human Platelet Calcium Calculator Trained by Pairwise Agonist Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei Yan; Diamond, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Since platelet intracellular calcium mobilization [Ca(t)]i controls granule release, cyclooxygenase-1 and integrin activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure, blood clotting simulations require prediction of platelet [Ca(t)]i in response to combinatorial agonists. Pairwise Agonist Scanning (PAS) deployed all single and pairwise combinations of six agonists (ADP, convulxin, thrombin, U46619, iloprost and GSNO used at 0.1, 1, and 10xEC50; 154 conditions including a null condition) to stimulate platelet P2Y1/P2Y12 GPVI, PAR1/PAR4, TP, IP receptors, and guanylate cyclase, respectively, in Factor Xa-inhibited (250 nM apixaban), diluted platelet rich plasma that had been loaded with the calcium dye Fluo-4 NW. PAS of 10 healthy donors provided [Ca(t)]i data for training 10 neural networks (NN, 2-layer/12-nodes) per donor. Trinary stimulations were then conducted at all 0.1x and 1xEC50 doses (160 conditions) as was a sampling of 45 higher ordered combinations (four to six agonists). The NN-ensemble average was a calcium calculator that accurately predicted [Ca (t)]i beyond the single and binary training set for trinary stimulations (R = 0.924). The 160 trinary synergy scores, a normalized metric of signaling crosstalk, were also well predicted (R = 0.850) as were the calcium dynamics (R = 0.871) and high-dimensional synergy scores (R = 0.695) for the 45 higher ordered conditions. The calculator even predicted sequential addition experiments (n = 54 conditions, R = 0.921). NN-ensemble is a fast calcium calculator, ideal for multiscale clotting simulations that include spatiotemporal concentrations of ADP, collagen, thrombin, thromboxane, prostacyclin, and nitric oxide. PMID:25723389

  11. Pharmacological Studies of NOP Receptor Agonists as Novel Analgesics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    found in hot-chili peppers that evokes pain sensation by activating at the TRPV1 . TRPV1 and the up-regulation of its expression have been strongly...via nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptors. Br J Pharmacol 137:1355-1361. Knotkova H, Pappagallo M, Szallasi A (2008) Capsaicin ( TRPV1 Agonist) therapy...Szallasi A, Cortright DN, Blum CA, Eid SR (2007). The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 : 10 years from channel cloning to antagonist proof of concept. Nat Rev Drug

  12. Improving the developability profile of pyrrolidine progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Kallander, Lara S.; Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.

    2010-09-17

    The previously reported pyrrolidine class of progesterone receptor partial agonists demonstrated excellent potency but suffered from serious liabilities including hERG blockade and high volume of distribution in the rat. The basic pyrrolidine amine was intentionally converted to a sulfonamide, carbamate, or amide to address these liabilities. The evaluation of the degree of partial agonism for these non-basic pyrrolidine derivatives and demonstration of their efficacy in an in vivo model of endometriosis is disclosed herein.

  13. Mixed Kappa/Mu Opioid Receptor Agonists: The 6β-Naltrexamines

    PubMed Central

    Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Neal, Adrian P.; Bradbury, Faye A.; Purington, Lauren C.; Aceto, Mario D.; Harris, Louis S.; Lewis, John W.; Traynor, John R.; Husbands, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Ligands from the naltrexamine series have consistently demonstrated agonist activity at kappa opioid receptors (KOR), with varying activity at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Various 6β-cinnamoylamino derivatives were made with the aim of generating ligands with a KOR agonist/MOR partial agonist profile, as ligands with this activity may be of interest as treatment agents for cocaine abuse. The ligands all displayed the desired high affinity, non-selective binding in vitro and in the functional assays were high efficacy KOR agonists with some partial agonist activity at MOR. Two of the new ligands (12a, 12b) have been evaluated in vivo, with 12a acting as a KOR agonist, and therefore somewhat similar to the previously evaluated analogues 3–6, while 12b displayed predominant MOR agonist activity. PMID:19253970

  14. Targeting GLP-1 receptor trafficking to improve agonist efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ben; Buenaventura, Teresa; Kanda, Nisha; Chabosseau, Pauline; Owen, Bryn M; Scott, Rebecca; Goldin, Robert; Angkathunyakul, Napat; Corrêa, Ivan R; Bosco, Domenico; Johnson, Paul R; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Marchetti, Piero; Shapiro, A M James; Cochran, Blake J; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C; Inoue, Asuka; Tan, Tricia; Rutter, Guy A; Tomas, Alejandra; Bloom, Stephen R

    2018-04-23

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation promotes insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells, causes weight loss, and is an important pharmacological target in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Like other G protein-coupled receptors, the GLP-1R undergoes agonist-mediated endocytosis, but the functional and therapeutic consequences of modulating GLP-1R endocytic trafficking have not been clearly defined. Here, we investigate a series of biased GLP-1R agonists with variable propensities for GLP-1R internalization and recycling. Compared to a panel of FDA-approved GLP-1 mimetics, compounds that retain GLP-1R at the plasma membrane produce greater long-term insulin release, which is dependent on a reduction in β-arrestin recruitment and faster agonist dissociation rates. Such molecules elicit glycemic benefits in mice without concomitant increases in signs of nausea, a common side effect of GLP-1 therapies. Our study identifies a set of agents with specific GLP-1R trafficking profiles and the potential for greater efficacy and tolerability as T2D treatments.

  15. LHRH Agonists for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer: 2012

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, Herbert; Shore, Neal D

    2012-01-01

    The most recent guidelines on prostate cancer screening from the American Urological Association (2009), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (2011), and the European Association of Urology (2011), as well as treatment and advances in disease monitoring, have increased the androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) population and the duration of ADT usage as the first-line treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. According to the European Association of Urology, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists have become the leading therapeutic option for ADT because they avoid the physical and psychological discomforts associated with orchiectomy. However, GnRH agonists display several shortcomings, including testosterone (T) surge (“clinical flare”) and microsurges. T surge delays the intended serologic endpoint of T suppression and may exacerbate clinical symptoms. Furthermore, ADT manifests an adverse-event spectrum that can impact quality of life with its attendant well-documented morbidities. Strategies to improve ADT tolerability include a holistic management approach, improved diet and exercise, and more specific monitoring to detect and prevent T depletion toxicities. Intermittent ADT, which allows hormonal recovery between treatment periods, has become increasingly utilized as a methodology for improving quality of life while not diminishing chronic ADT efficacy, and may also provide healthcare cost savings. This review assesses the present and potential future role of GnRH agonists in prostate cancer and explores strategies to minimize the adverse-event profile for patients receiving ADT. PMID:23172994

  16. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Appraisal of unimodal cues during agonistic interactions in Maylandia zebra

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ammar, Imen; Fernandez, Marie S.A.; Boyer, Nicolas; Attia, Joël; Fonseca, Paulo J.; Amorim, M. Clara P.; Beauchaud, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    Communication is essential during social interactions including animal conflicts and it is often a complex process involving multiple sensory channels or modalities. To better understand how different modalities interact during communication, it is fundamental to study the behavioural responses to both the composite multimodal signal and each unimodal component with adequate experimental protocols. Here we test how an African cichlid, which communicates with multiple senses, responds to different sensory stimuli in a social relevant scenario. We tested Maylandia zebra males with isolated chemical (urine or holding water coming both from dominant males), visual (real opponent or video playback) and acoustic (agonistic sounds) cues during agonistic interactions. We showed that (1) these fish relied mostly on the visual modality, showing increased aggressiveness in response to the sight of a real contestant but no responses to urine or agonistic sounds presented separately, (2) video playback in our study did not appear appropriate to test the visual modality and needs more technical prospecting, (3) holding water provoked territorial behaviours and seems to be promising for the investigation into the role of the chemical channel in this species. Our findings suggest that unimodal signals are non-redundant but how different sensory modalities interplay during communication remains largely unknown in fish. PMID:28785523

  18. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks comparedmore » to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.« less

  19. [The receptorial responsiveness method (RRM): a new possibility to estimate the concentration of pharmacologic agonists at their receptors].

    PubMed

    Pák, Krisztián; Kiss, Zsuzsanna; Erdei, Tamás; Képes, Zita; Gesztelyi, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the biggest challenge in terms of life expectancy in developed countries. Adenosine contributes to the adaptation of the heart to ischemia and hypoxia, because adenosine, in addition to its metabolite role in the nucleic acid metabolism, is the endogenous agonist of the ubiquitous adenosine receptor family. Adenosine receptor activation is beneficial in most cases, it improves the balance between energy supply and consumption, reduces injury caused by stressors and inhibits the unfavorable tissue remodeling. Pharmacological manipulation of cardioprotective effects evoked by adenosine is an important, although to date not sufficiently utilized endeavor that may have therapeutic and preventive implications in cardiovascular diseases. As the ligand binding site of adenosine receptors is accessible from the extracellular space, it is especially important to know the adenosine concentration of the interstitial fluid ([Ado](ISF)). However, in the functioning heart, [Ado](ISF) values range in an extremely wide interval, spanning from nano- to micromolar concentrations, as estimated by the commonly used methods. Our recently developed procedure, the receptorial responsiveness method (RRM), may resolve this problem in certain cases. RRM enables quantification of an acute increase in the concentration of a pharmacological agonist, uniquely in the microenvironment of the receptors of the given agonist. As a limitation, concentration of agonists with short half-life (just like adenosine) at their receptors can only be quantified with the equieffective concentration of a stable agonist exerting the same action. In a previous study using RRM, inhibition of the transmembrane nucleoside transport in the euthyroid guinea pig atrium produced an increase in [Ado](ISF) that was equieffective with 18.8 +/- 3 nM CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine, a stable, selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist). This finding is consistent with observations of others, i.e., in the

  20. Effects of adenosine receptor agonist on the rocuroniuminduced neuromuscular block and sugammadex-induced recovery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Beom; Lee, Sangseok; Choi, Hey Ran; In, Junyong; Chang, Young Jin; Kim, Ha Jung; Ro, Young Jin; Yang, Hong-Seuk

    2018-04-25

    Several types of receptors are found at neuromuscular presynaptic membranes. Presynaptic inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2A receptors mediate different modulatory functions on acetylcholine release. This study investigated whether adenosine A1 receptor agonist contributes to the first twitch tension (T1) of train-of-four (TOF) stimulation depression and TOF fade during rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade, and sugammadex-induced recovery. Phrenic nerve-diaphragm tissues were obtained from 30 adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Each tissue specimen was randomly allocated to either control group or 2-chloroadenosine (CADO, 10 μM) group. One hour of reaction time was allowed before initiating main experimental data collection. Loading and boost doses of rocuronium were sequentially administered until > 95% depression of the T1 was achieved. After confirming that there was no T1 twitch tension response, 15 min of resting time was allowed, after which sugammadex was administered. Recovery profiles (T1, TOF ratio [TOFR], and recovery index) were collected for 1 h and compared between groups. There were statistically significant differences on amount of rocuronium (actually used during experiment), TOFR changes during concentration-response of rocuronium (P = 0.04), and recovery profiles (P < 0.01) of CADO group comparing with the control group. However, at the initial phase of this experiment, dose-response of rocuronium in each group demonstrated no statistically significant differences (P = 0.12). The adenosine A1 receptor agonist (CADO) influenced the TOFR and the recovery profile. After activating adenosine receptor, sugammadex-induced recovery from rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block was delayed.

  1. Different skeletal effects of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α agonist fenofibrate and the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Syversen, Unni; Stunes, Astrid K; Gustafsson, Björn I; Obrant, Karl J; Nordsletten, Lars; Berge, Rolf; Thommesen, Liv; Reseland, Janne E

    2009-01-01

    Background All the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are found to be expressed in bone cells. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone has been shown to decrease bone mass in mice and thiazolidinediones (TZDs) have recently been found to increase bone loss and fracture risk in humans treated for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of the PPARα agonist fenofibrate (FENO) and the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone (PIO) on bone in intact female rats. Methods Rats were given methylcellulose (vehicle), fenofibrate or pioglitazone (35 mg/kg body weight/day) by gavage for 4 months. BMC, BMD, and body composition were measured by DXA. Histomorphometry and biomechanical testing of excised femurs were performed. Effects of the compounds on bone cells were studied. Results The FENO group had higher femoral BMD and smaller medullary area at the distal femur; while trabecular bone volume was similar to controls. Whole body BMD, BMC, and trabecular bone volume were lower, while medullary area was increased in PIO rats compared to controls. Ultimate bending moment and energy absorption of the femoral shafts were reduced in the PIO group, while similar to controls in the FENO group. Plasma osteocalcin was higher in the FENO group than in the other groups. FENO stimulated proliferation and differentiation of, and OPG release from, the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. Conclusion We show opposite skeletal effects of PPARα and γ agonists in intact female rats. FENO resulted in significantly higher femoral BMD and lower medullary area, while PIO induced bone loss and impairment of the mechanical strength. This represents a novel effect of PPARα activation. PMID:19331671

  2. Beta 2-adrenergic receptor agonists are novel regulators of macrophage activation in diabetic renal and cardiovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyunjin; Yu, Mi Ra; Kim, Hyun Joo; Lee, Ji Hye; Park, Byoung-Won; Wu, I-Hsien; Matsumoto, Motonobu; King, George L

    2017-07-01

    Macrophage activation is increased in diabetes and correlated with the onset and progression of vascular complications. To identify drugs that could inhibit macrophage activation, we developed a cell-based assay and screened a 1,040 compound library for anti-inflammatory effects. Beta2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists were identified as the most potent inhibitors of phorbol myristate acetate-induced tumor necrosis factor-α production in rat bone marrow macrophages. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, β2AR agonists inhibited diabetes-induced tumor necrosis factor-α production, which was prevented by co-treatment with a selective β2AR blocker. To clarify the underlying mechanisms, THP-1 cells and bone marrow macrophages were exposed to high glucose. High glucose reduced β-arrestin2, a negative regulator of NF-κB activation, and its interaction with IκBα. This subsequently enhanced phosphorylation of IκBα and activation of NF-κB. The β2AR agonists enhanced β-arrestin2 and its interaction with IκBα, leading to downregulation of NF-κB. A siRNA specific for β-arrestin2 reversed β2AR agonist-mediated inhibition of NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokine production. Treatment of Zucker diabetic fatty rats with a β2AR agonist for 12 weeks attenuated monocyte activation as well as pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses in the kidneys and heart. Thus, β2AR agonists might have protective effects against diabetic renal and cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Red Clover Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) and Estrogen Receptor (ER) Agonists Enhance Genotoxic Estrogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Many women consider botanical dietary supplements (BDSs) as safe alternatives to hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms. However, the effect of BDSs on breast cancer risk is largely unknown. In the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, P450 1B1 metabolizes estrogens to 4-hydroxylated catechols, which are oxidized to genotoxic quinones that initiate and promote breast cancer. In contrast, P450 1A1 catalyzed 2-hydroxylation represents a detoxification pathway. The current study evaluated the effects of red clover, a popular BDS used for women’s health, and its isoflavones, biochanin A (BA), formononetin (FN), genistein (GN), and daidzein (DZ), on estrogen metabolism. The methoxy estrogen metabolites (2-MeOE1, 4-MeOE1) were measured by LC-MS/MS, and CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Nonmalignant ER-negative breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and ER-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7) were derived from normal breast epithelial tissue and ER+ breast cancer tissue. Red clover extract (RCE, 10 μg/mL) and isoflavones had no effect on estrogen metabolism in MCF-10A cells. However, in MCF-7 cells, RCE treatments downregulated CYP1A1 expression and enhanced genotoxic metabolism (4-MeOE1/CYP1B1 > 2-MeOE1/CYP1A1). Experiments with the isoflavones showed that the AhR agonists (BA, FN) preferentially induced CYP1B1 expression as well as 4-MeOE1. In contrast, the ER agonists (GN, DZ) downregulated CYP1A1 expression likely through an epigenetic mechanism. Finally, the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 potentiated isoflavone-induced XRE-luciferase reporter activity and reversed GN and DZ induced downregulation of CYP1A1 expression. Overall, these studies show that red clover and its isoflavones have differential effects on estrogen metabolism in “normal” vs breast cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, the AhR agonists stimulate genotoxic metabolism, and the ER agonists downregulate the detoxification pathway. These data may suggest that especially breast

  4. Chloroquine, quinine, procaine, quinidine and clomipramine are prostaglandin agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Manku, M S; Horrobin, D F

    1976-11-01

    Chloroquine, quinine, procaine, quinidine and clomipramine behave as prostaglandin (PG) antagonists in a rat mesenteric vascular bed preparation. The ID50 concentrations were within the range of therapeutically effective human plasma levels in each case. Antagonism to PGE2 was studied in detail and seemed to be at least in part competitive. The drugs also antagonized the effects of PGs A1, A2, F2alpha and E1. Each drug also had weak prostaglandin agonist activity but only over a very narrow range of concentrations. It is possible that some of the clinical actions of these drugs may depend on blockade or imitation of natural PG effects. The findings suggest new approaches to the search for PG antagonists, a new screening technique for anti-inflammatory drugs and possible new uses for these established drugs. A preliminary study suggests that chloroquine may be successful in closing a patent ductus arteriosus in infants.

  5. Activation of single heteromeric GABAA receptor ion channels by full and partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Martin; Kristiansen, Uffe; Ebert, Bjarke; Frølund, Bente; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl; Smart, Trevor G

    2004-01-01

    The linkage between agonist binding and the activation of a GABAA receptor ion channel is yet to be resolved. This aspect was examined on human recombinant α1β2γ2S GABAA receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney cells using the following series of receptor agonists: GABA, isoguvacine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), isonipecotic acid, piperidine-4-sulphonic acid (P4S), imidazole-4-acetic acid (IAA), 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isothiazolol (thio-4-PIOL) and 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol (4-PIOL). Whole-cell concentration–response curves enabled the agonists to be categorized into four classes based upon their maximum responses. Single channel analyses revealed that the channel conductance of 25–27 pS was unaffected by the agonists. However, two open states were resolved from the open period distributions with mean open times reduced 5-fold by the weakest partial agonists. Using saturating agonist concentrations, estimates of the channel shutting rate, α, ranged from 200 to 600 s−1. The shut period distributions were described by three or four components and for the weakest partial agonists, the interburst shut periods increased whilst the mean burst durations and longest burst lengths were reduced relative to the full agonists. From the burst analyses, the opening rates for channel activation, β, and the total dissociation rates, k−1, for the agonists leaving the receptor were estimated. The agonist efficacies were larger for the full agonists (E ∼7−9) compared to the weak partial agonists (∼0.4–0.6). Overall, changes in agonist efficacy largely determined the different agonist profiles with contributions from the agonist affinities and the degree of receptor desensitization. From this we conclude that GABAA receptor activation does not occur in a switch-like manner since the agonist recognition sites are flexible, accommodating diverse agonist structures which differentially influence the opening and shutting rates of the ion

  6. Agonistic autoantibodies as vasodilators in orthostatic hypotension: a new mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Kem, David C; Reim, Sean; Khan, Muneer; Vanderlinde-Wood, Megan; Zillner, Caitlin; Collier, Daniel; Liles, Campbell; Hill, Michael A; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Aston, Christopher E; Yu, Xichun

    2012-02-01

    Agonistic autoantibodies to the β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors are a novel investigative and therapeutic target for certain orthostatic disorders. We have identified the presence of autoantibodies to β2-adrenergic and/or M3 muscarinic receptors by ELISA in 75% (15 of 20) of patients with significant orthostatic hypotension. Purified serum IgG from all 20 of the patients and 10 healthy control subjects were examined in a receptor-transfected cell-based cAMP assay for β2 receptor activation and β-arrestin assay for M3 receptor activation. There was a significant increase in IgG-induced activation of β2 and M3 receptors in the patient group compared with controls. A dose response was observed for both IgG activation of β2 and M3 receptors and inhibition of their activation with the nonselective β blocker propranolol and muscarinic blocker atropine. The antibody effects on β2 and/or M3 (via production of NO) receptor-mediated vasodilation were studied in a rat cremaster resistance arteriole assay. Infusion of IgG from patients with documented β2 and/or M3 receptor agonistic activity produced a dose-dependent vasodilation. Sequential addition of the β-blocker propranolol and the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester partially inhibited IgG-induced vasodilation (percentage of maximal dilatory response: from 57.7±10.4 to 35.3±4.6 and 24.3±5.8, respectively; P<0.01; n=3), indicating that antibody activation of vascular β2 and/or M3 receptors may contribute to systemic vasodilation. These data support the concept that circulating agonistic autoantibodies serve as vasodilators and may cause or exacerbate orthostatic hypotension.

  7. Informed consent to opioid agonist maintenance treatment: recommended ethical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Carter, Adrian; Hall, Wayne

    2008-02-01

    Some bioethicists have questioned whether opioid addicted individuals are able to provide free and informed consent to opioid agonist maintenance treatment. Conflicting motives for providing such treatment (e.g. improving the personal health of addicts and protecting public health and order) can also influence what individuals are required to consent to, and how that consent is obtained. We discuss both issues and attempt to specify the conditions for obtaining informed consent to agonist maintenance treatment for opioid addiction. We briefly review the neuroscientific literature on the effects of addiction on the autonomy and decision-making capacity of opioid dependent individuals, and ascertain how informed consent to the treatment of opioid addiction should be obtained. We also provide an ethical analysis of the competing social and medical forces that influence the consent process and make some recommendations on how to ensure that individuals enter maintenance treatment that is provided in an effective and ethical way. Our analysis shows that whilst the autonomy of opioid dependent individuals is impaired by their addiction, they do retain the ability to consent to treatment provided they are not in acute withdrawal or intoxication. These symptoms should have abated, either by supervised withdrawal or stabilisation on agonist maintenance, before they are asked to consent to a detailed treatment contract. Once stabilised, individuals should be provided with detailed information about the risks and benefits of all treatments, and restrictions and regulations under which they are provided. Informed consent is an important part of the treatment process that should be obtained in ways that increase the autonomy and decision-making capacity in opioid addicts.

  8. Heritable victimization and the benefits of agonistic relationships

    PubMed Central

    Lea, Amanda J.; Blumstein, Daniel T.; Wey, Tina W.; Martin, Julien G. A.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present estimates of heritability and selection on network traits in a single population, allowing us to address the evolutionary potential of social behavior and the poorly understood link between sociality and fitness. To evolve, sociality must have some heritable basis, yet the heritability of social relationships is largely unknown. Recent advances in both social network analyses and quantitative genetics allow us to quantify attributes of social relationships and estimate their heritability in free-living populations. Our analyses addressed a variety of measures (in-degree, out-degree, attractiveness, expansiveness, embeddedness, and betweenness), and we hypothesized that traits reflecting relationships controlled by an individual (i.e., those that the individual initiated or were directly involved in) would be more heritable than those based largely on the behavior of conspecifics. Identifying patterns of heritability and selection among related traits may provide insight into which types of relationships are important in animal societies. As expected, we found that variation in indirect measures was largely explained by nongenetic variation. Yet, surprisingly, traits capturing initiated interactions do not possess significant additive genetic variation, whereas measures of received interactions are heritable. Measures describing initiated aggression and position in an agonistic network are under selection (0.3 < |S| < 0.4), although advantageous trait values are not inherited by offspring. It appears that agonistic relationships positively influence fitness and seemingly costly or harmful ties may, in fact, be beneficial. Our study highlights the importance of studying agonistic as well as affiliative relationships to understand fully the connections between sociality and fitness. PMID:21115836

  9. Melatonin and Melatonin Agonists as Adjunctive Treatments in Bipolar Disorders.

    PubMed

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Etain, Bruno; Franchi, Jean-Arthur Micoulaud; Bellivier, Frank; Ritter, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorders (BD) present with abnormalities of circadian rhythmicity and sleep homeostasis, even during phases of remission. These abnormalities are linked to the underlying neurobiology of genetic susceptibility to BD. Melatonin is a pineal gland secreted neurohormone that induces circadian-related and sleep-related responses. Exogenous melatonin has demonstrated efficacy in treating primary insomnia, delayed sleep phase disorder, improving sleep parameters and overall sleep quality, and some psychiatric disorders like autistic spectrum disorders. In order to evaluate the efficacy of melatonin among patients with BD, this comprehensive review emphasizes the abnormal melatonin function in BD, the rationale of melatonin action in BD, the available data about the exogenous administration of melatonin, and melatonin agonists (ramelteon and tasimelteon), and recommendations of use in patients with BD. There is a scientific rationale to propose melatonin-agonists as an adjunctive treatment of mood stabilizers in treating sleep disorders in BD and thus to possibly prevent relapses when administered during remission phases. We emphasized the need to treat insomnia, sleep delayed latencies and sleep abnormalities in BD that are prodromal markers of an emerging mood episode and possible targets to prevent future relapses. An additional interesting adjunctive therapeutic effect might be on preventing metabolic syndrome, particularly in patients treated with antipsychotics. Finally, melatonin is well tolerated and has little dependence potential in contrast to most available sleep medications. Further studies are expected to be able to produce stronger evidence-based therapeutic guidelines to confirm and delineate the routine use of melatonin-agonists in the treatment of BD.

  10. Novel kinin B1 receptor agonists with improved pharmacological profiles.

    PubMed

    Côté, Jérôme; Savard, Martin; Bovenzi, Veronica; Bélanger, Simon; Morin, Josée; Neugebauer, Witold; Larouche, Annie; Dubuc, Céléna; Gobeil, Fernand

    2009-04-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that inducible kinin B1 receptors (B1R) may play beneficial and protecting roles in cardiovascular-related pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, and ischemic organ diseases. Peptide B1R agonists bearing optimized pharmacological features (high potency, selectivity and stability toward proteolysis) hold promise as valuable therapeutic agents in the treatment of these diseases. In the present study, we used solid-phase methodology to synthesize a series of novel peptide analogues based on the sequence of Sar[dPhe(8)]desArg(9)-bradykinin, a relatively stable peptide agonist with moderate affinity for the human B1R. We evaluated the pharmacological properties of these peptides using (1) in vitro competitive binding experiments on recombinant human B1R and B2R (for index of selectivity determination) in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK-293T cells), (2) ex vivo vasomotor assays on isolated human umbilical veins expressing endogenous human B1R, and (3) in vivo blood pressure tests using anesthetized lipopolysaccharide-immunostimulated rabbits. Key chemical modifications at the N-terminus, the positions 3 and 5 on Sar[dPhe(8)]desArg(9)-bradykinin led to potent analogues. For example, peptides 18 (SarLys[Hyp(3),Cha(5), dPhe(8)]desArg(9)-bradykinin) and 20 (SarLys[Hyp(3),Igl(5), dPhe(8)]desArg(9)-bradykinin) outperformed the parental molecule in terms of affinity, functional potency and duration of action in vitro and in vivo. These selective agonists should be valuable in future animal and human studies to investigate the potential benefits of B1R activation.

  11. Discovery of a highly potent series of TLR7 agonists.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter; Pryde, David C; Tran, Thien-Duc; Adam, Fiona M; Bish, Gerwyn; Calo, Frederick; Ciaramella, Guiseppe; Dixon, Rachel; Duckworth, Jonathan; Fox, David N A; Hay, Duncan A; Hitchin, James; Horscroft, Nigel; Howard, Martin; Laxton, Carl; Parkinson, Tanya; Parsons, Gemma; Proctor, Katie; Smith, Mya C; Smith, Nicholas; Thomas, Amy

    2011-10-01

    The discovery of a series of highly potent and novel TLR7 agonist interferon inducers is described. Structure-activity relationships are presented, along with pharmacokinetic studies of a lead molecule from this series of N9-pyridylmethyl-8-oxo-3-deazapurine analogues. A rationale for the very high potency observed is offered. An investigation of the clearance mechanism of this class of compounds in rat was carried out, resulting in aldehyde oxidase mediated oxidation being identified as a key component of the high clearance observed. A possible solution to this problem is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clenbuterol, a beta(2)-agonist, retards atrophy in denervated muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeman, Richard J.; Ludemann, Robert; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of a beta(2) agonist, clenbuterol, on the protein content as well as on the contractile strength and the muscle fiber cross-sectional area of various denervated muscles from rats were investigated. It was found that denervated soleus, anterior tibialis, and gastrocnemius muscles, but not the extensor digitorum longus, of rats treated for 2-3 weeks with clenbuterol contained 95-110 percent more protein than denervated controls. The twofold difference in the protein content of denervated solei was paralleled by similar changes in contractile strength and muscle fiber cross-sectional area.

  13. Potent and selective oxytocin receptor agonists without disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yusuke; Sakimura, Katsuya; Shimizu, Yuji; Nakayama, Masaharu; Terao, Yasuko; Yano, Takahiko; Asami, Taiji

    2017-06-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide involved in a wide variety of physiological actions, both peripherally and centrally. Many human studies have revealed the potential of OT to treat autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. OT interacts with the OT receptor (OTR) as well as vasopressin 1a and 1b receptors (V 1a R, V 1b R) as an agonist, and agonistic activity for V 1a R and V 1b R may have a negative impact on the therapeutic effects of OTR agonism in the CNS. An OTR-selective agonistic peptide, FE 202767, in which the structural differences from OT are a sulfide bond instead of a disulfide bond, and N-alkylglycine replacement for Pro at position 7, was reported. However, the effects of amino acid substitutions in OT have not been comprehensively investigated to compare OTR, V 1a R, and V 1b R activities. This led us to obtain a new OTR-selective analog by comprehensive amino acid substitutions of OT and replacement of the disulfide bond. A systematic amino acid scanning (Ala, Leu, Phe, Ser, Glu, or Arg) of desamino OT (dOT) at positions 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 8 revealed the tolerability for the substitution at positions 7 and 8. Further detailed study showed that trans-4-hydroxyproline (trans-Hyp) at position 7 and γ-methylleucine [Leu(Me)] at position 8 were markedly effective for improving receptor selectivity without decreasing the potency at the OTR. Subsequently, a combination of these amino acid substitutions with the replacement of the disulfide bond of dOT analogs with a sulfide bond (carba analog) or an amide bond (lactam analog) yielded several promising analogs, including carba-1-[trans-Hyp 7 ,Leu(Me) 8 ]dOT (14) with a higher potency (7.2pM) at OTR than that of OT and marked selectivity (>10,000-fold) over V 1a R and V 1b R. Hence, we investigated comprehensive modification of OT and obtained new OT analogs that exhibited high potency at OTR with marked selectivity. These OTR-selective agonists could be useful to investigate OTR-mediated effects on

  14. Binary agonist surface patterns prime platelets for downstream adhesion in flowing whole blood.

    PubMed

    Eichinger, Colin D; Hlady, Vladimir

    2017-04-28

    As platelets encounter damaged vessels or biomaterials, they interact with a complex milieu of surface-bound agonists, from exposed subendothelium to adsorbed plasma proteins. It has been shown that an upstream, surface-immobilized agonist is capable of priming platelets for enhanced adhesion downstream. In this study, binary agonists were integrated into the upstream position of flow cells and the platelet priming response was measured by downstream adhesion in flowing whole blood. A nonadditive response was observed in which platelets transiently exposed to two agonists exhibited greater activation and downstream adhesion than that from the sum of either agonist alone. Antibody blocking of one of the two upstream agonists eliminated nonadditive activation and downstream adhesion. Crosstalk between platelet activation pathways likely led to a synergistic effect which created an enhanced activation response in the platelet population. The existence of synergy between platelet priming pathways is a concept that has broad implications for the field of biomaterials hemocompatibility and platelet activity testing.

  15. Electrophysiological Perspectives on the Therapeutic Use of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Partial AgonistsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Trocmé-Thibierge, Caryn; Guendisch, Daniela; Al Rubaiy, Shehd Abdullah Abbas; Bloom, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    Partial agonist therapies rely variously on two hypotheses: the partial agonists have their effects through chronic low-level receptor activation or the partial agonists work by decreasing the effects of endogenous or exogenous full agonists. The relative significance of these activities probably depends on whether acute or chronic effects are considered. We studied nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes to test a model for the acute interactions between acetylcholine (ACh) and weak partial agonists. Data were best-fit to a basic competition model that included an additional factor for noncompetitive inhibition. Partial agonist effects were compared with the nAChR antagonist bupropion in prolonged bath application experiments that were designed to mimic prolonged drug exposure typical of therapeutic drug delivery. A primary effect of prolonged application of nicotine was to decrease the response of all nAChR subtypes to acute applications of ACh. In addition, nicotine, cytisine, and varenicline produced detectable steady-state activation of α4β2* [(α4)2(β2)3, (α4)3(β2)2, and (α4)2(β2)2α5)] receptor subtypes that was not seen with other test compounds. Partial agonists produced no detectable steady-state activation of α7 nAChR, but seemed to show small potentiation of ACh-evoked responses; however, “run-up” of α7 ACh responses was also sometimes observed under control conditions. Potential off-target effects of the partial agonists therefore included the modulation of α7 responses by α4β2 partial agonists and decreases in α4β2* responses by α7-selective agonists. These data indicate the dual effects expected for α4β2* partial agonists and provide models and insights for utility of partial agonists in therapeutic development. PMID:21285282

  16. Ghrelin and motilin receptor agonists: time to introduce bias into drug design.

    PubMed

    Sanger, G J

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin and motilin receptor agonists increase gastric motility and are attractive drug targets. However, 14 years after the receptors were described (18-24 years since ligands became available) the inactivity of the ghrelin agonist TZP-102 in patients with gastroparesis joins the list of unsuccessful motilin agonists. Fundamental questions must be asked. Pustovit et al., have now shown that the ghrelin agonist ulimorelin evokes prolonged increases in rat colorectal propulsion yet responses to other ghrelin agonists fade. Similarly, different motilin agonists induce short- or long-lasting effects in a cell-dependent manner. Together, these and other data create the hypothesis that the receptors can be induced to preferentially signal ('biased agonism') via particular pathways to evoke different responses with therapeutic advantages/disadvantages. Biased agonism has been demonstrated for ghrelin. Are motilin agonists which cause long-lasting facilitation of human stomach cholinergic function (compared with motilin) biased agonists (e.g., camicinal, under development for patients with gastric hypo-motility)? For ghrelin, additional complications exist because the therapeutic aims/mechanisms of action are uncertain, making it difficult to select the best (biased) agonist. Will ghrelin agonists be useful treatments of nausea and/or as suggested by Pustovit et al., chronic constipation? How does ghrelin increase gastric motility? As gastroparesis symptoms poorly correlate with delayed gastric emptying (yet gastro-prokinetic drugs can provide relief: e.g., low-dose erythromycin), would low doses of ghrelin and motilin agonists relieve symptoms simply by restoring neuromuscular rhythm? These questions on design and functions need addressing if ghrelin and motilin agonists are to reach patients as drugs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Development of novel neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) selective agonists with resistance to proteolytic degradation.

    PubMed

    Misu, Ryosuke; Oishi, Shinya; Yamada, Ai; Yamamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Fuko; Yamamoto, Koki; Noguchi, Taro; Ohno, Hiroaki; Okamura, Hiroaki; Ohkura, Satoshi; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2014-10-23

    Neurokinin B (NKB) regulates the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) via activation of the neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R). We evaluated the biological stability of NK3R selective agonists to develop novel NK3R agonists to regulate reproductive functions. On the basis of degradation profiles, several peptidomimetic derivatives were designed. The modification of senktide with (E)-alkene dipeptide isostere generated a novel potent NK3R agonist with high stability and prolonged bioactivity.

  18. Lack of cocaine-like discriminative-stimulus effects of σ-receptor agonists in rats.

    PubMed

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L; Tanda, Gianluigi; Katz, Jonathan L

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the effectiveness of selective σ-receptor (σR) agonists [1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), PRE-084] as reinforcers in rats trained to self-administer cocaine. Similar to cocaine, these drugs increased nucleus accumbens shell dopamine levels, and effects of DTG, but not PRE-084, on dopamine seemed to be mediated by σRs. In addition, σR antagonists blocked self-administration of σR agonists, but were inactive against reinforcing and neurochemical effects of cocaine. Thus, pharmacologically distinct mechanisms likely underlie the reinforcing and neurochemical effects of σR agonists and cocaine. This study further examined the cocaine-like effects of σR agonists in rats trained to discriminate injections of cocaine from saline to assess the similarity of their subjective effects. Standard dopamine-uptake inhibitors (WIN 35,428, methylphenidate), but neither σR agonist (PRE-084, DTG), produced full cocaine-like discriminative-stimulus effects. The lack of effects of σR agonists was obtained regardless of route of administration (intraperitoneal, subcutaneous, or intravenous) or pretreatment time (5 or 30 min before sessions). The present results demonstrate differences in the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine and selective σR agonists, indicating that an overlap of subjective effects is not necessary for σR agonist self-administration. The previously found differences in neurochemical effects of cocaine and σR agonists may contribute to their different subjective effects.

  19. Lack of Cocaine-Like Discriminative-Stimulus Effects of σ Receptor Agonists in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L.; Tanda, Gianluigi; Katz, Jonathan L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated effectiveness of selective sigma-receptor (σR) agonists (DTG, PRE-084) as reinforcers in rats trained to self-administer cocaine. Like cocaine, these drugs increased nucleus accumbens shell dopamine levels, and effects of DTG, but not PRE-084, on dopamine appeared to be mediated by σRs. Additionally, σR antagonists blocked self-administration of σR agonists, but were inactive against reinforcing and neurochemical effects of cocaine. Thus pharmacologically distinct mechanisms likely underlie the reinforcing and neurochemical effects of σR agonists and cocaine. The present study further examined the cocaine-like effects of σR agonists in rats trained to discriminate injections of cocaine from saline to assess the similarity of their subjective effects. Standard dopamine-uptake inhibitors (WIN 35,428, methylphenidate), but neither σR agonist (PRE-084, DTG) produced full cocaine-like discriminative-stimulus effects. The lack of effects of σR agonists was obtained regardless of route of administration (i.p., s.c. or i.v.) or pretreatment time (5- or 30-min before sessions). The present results demonstrate differences in the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine and selective σR agonists, indicating that an overlap of subjective effects is not necessary for σR agonist self-administration. The previously found differences in neurochemical effects of cocaine and σR agonists may contribute to their different subjective effects. PMID:21808192

  20. When Intensive Insulin Therapy (MDI) Fails in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Switching to GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Versus Insulin Pump.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ohad; Filetti, Sebastiano; Castañeda, Javier; Maranghi, Marianna; Glandt, Mariela

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with insulin, alone or with oral or injectable hypoglycemic agents, is becoming increasingly common in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, approximately 40% of patients fail to reach their glycemic targets with the initially prescribed regimen and require intensification of insulin therapy, which increases the risks of weight gain and hypoglycemia. Many of these patients eventually reach a state in which further increases in the insulin dosage fail to improve glycemic control while increasing the risks of weight gain and hypoglycemia. The recently completed OpT2mise clinical trial showed that continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is more effective in reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) than intensification of multiple daily injection (MDI) insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes who do not respond to intensive insulin therapy. CSII therapy may also be useful in patients who do not reach glycemic targets despite multidrug therapy with basal-bolus insulin and other agents, including glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists; current guidelines offer no recommendations for the treatment of such patients. Importantly, insulin and GLP-1 receptor agonists have complementary effects on glycemia and, hence, can be used either sequentially or in combination in the initial management of diabetes. Patients who have not previously failed GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy may show reduction in weight and insulin dose, in addition to moderate improvement in HbA1c, when GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy is added to MDI regimens. In subjects with long-standing type 2 diabetes who do not respond to intensive insulin therapies, switching from MDI to CSII and/or the addition of GLP-1 receptor agonists to MDI have the potential to improve glycemic control without increasing the risk of adverse events. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for

  1. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    PubMed Central

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25800870

  2. [GnRH-agonists in the therapy of endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, G; Spitz, J; Behrens, R

    1990-12-01

    Repeated application of GnRH agonists causes a reversible suppression of ovarian function. Suppression on estrogen release is the fundamental idea of this hormonal therapy of endometriosis. We treated twelve patients with histologically proved endometriosis with leuprolide acetate depot in a dose of 3.75 mg s.c. every 4 weeks over a period of 6 months. In the first week of therapy the estrogen level decreased to a post-menopausal niveau along with amenorrhoea during the entire period of therapy. Complaints previous to therapy such as dysmenorrhoea, pelvic pain and dyspareunia were relieved or completely disappeared after therapy. The clinical finding on palpation also diminished or disappeared. In addition to this finding pelvis copy showed a shift from severe endometriosis stage III and stage IV to stage I and stage II of the AFS classification 1985. Regular menstruation appeared in 5 to 9 weeks after the last application to all patients. Out of six cases of infertility, four patients became pregnant. Except for one case, typical menopausal symptoms appeared, such as flush, increased perspiration and sleeping disorders. During and after therapy we could not prove any changes in the lipid metabolism under estrogen therapy. Mineralization of the bone decreased under therapy by about 3%. Simultaneously, serum osteocalcin increased. Demineralization occurred with one exception within the normal range for the corresponding age. With identical efficiency but less side effects, we see therapy with GnRH agonists as an alternative to current hormonal therapy of endometriosis.

  3. The evolution of histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Lebois, Evan P; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W

    2011-01-01

    This article describes our efforts along with recent advances in the development, biological evaluation and clinical proof of concept of small molecule histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists. The H3 receptor is a presynaptic autoreceptor within the Class A GPCR family, but also functions as a heteroreceptor modulating levels of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate. Thus, H₃R has garnered a great deal of interest from the pharmaceutical industry for the possible treatment of obesity, epilepsy, sleep/wake, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, neuropathic pain and ADHD. Within the two main classes of H₃ ligands, both imidazole and non-imidazole derived, have shown sufficient potency and specificity which culminated with efficacy in preclinical models for various CNS disorders. Importantly, conserved elements have been identified within the small molecule H₃ ligand scaffolds that resulted in a highly predictive pharmacophore model. Understanding of the pharmacophore model has allowed several groups to dial H₃R activity into scaffolds designed for other CNS targets, and engender directed polypharmacology. Moreover, Abbott, GSK, Pfizer and several others have reported positive Phase I and/or Phase II data with structurally diverse H₃R antagonists/inverse agonists.

  4. Trial Watch: Toll-like receptor agonists in oncological indications.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Fernando; Vacchelli, Erika; Obrist, Florine; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle; Henrik Ter Meulen, Jan; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of enzymatically inactive, single membrane-spanning proteins that recognize a wide panel of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Besides constituting a crucial component of the innate immune response to bacterial and viral pathogens, TLRs appear to play a major role in anticancer immunosurveillance. In line with this notion, several natural and synthetic TLR ligands have been intensively investigated for their ability to boost tumor-targeting immune responses elicited by a variety of immunotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic interventions. Three of these agents are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or equivalent regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients: the so-called bacillus Calmette-Guérin, monophosphoryl lipid A, and imiquimod. However, the number of clinical trials testing the therapeutic potential of both FDA-approved and experimental TLR agonists in cancer patients is stably decreasing, suggesting that drug developers and oncologists are refocusing their interest on alternative immunostimulatory agents. Here, we summarize recent findings on the use of TLR agonists in cancer patients and discuss how the clinical evaluation of FDA-approved and experimental TLR ligands has evolved since the publication of our first Trial Watch dealing with this topic.

  5. Pharmacology and toxicology of Cannabis derivatives and endocannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Zaimovic, Amir; Gerra, Maria L; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Cippitelli, Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Somaini, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    For centuries Cannabis sativa and cannabis extracts have been used in natural medicine. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main active ingredient of Cannabis. THC seems to be responsible for most of the pharmacological and therapeutic actions of cannabis. In a few countries THC extracts (i.e. Sativex) or THC derivatives such as nabilone, and dronabinol are used in the clinic for the treatment of several pathological conditions like chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. On the other hand the severe side effects and the high abuse liability of these agents represent a serious limitation in their medical use. In addition, diversion in the use of these active ingredients for recreational purpose is a concern. Over recent years, alternative approaches using synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists or agents acting as activators of the endocannabinoid systems are under scrutiny with the hope to develop more effective and safer clinical applications. Likely, in the near future few of these new molecules will be available for clinical use. The present article review recent study and patents with focus on the cannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of central nervous system disorders with emphasis on agonists.

  6. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, John M; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A; Milner, Joshua D; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; McMurray, John S; Corry, David B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6.

  7. A Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 selective allosteric agonist

    PubMed Central

    Satsu, Hideo; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Guerrero, Miguel; Saldana, Adrian; Eberhart, Christina; Hodder, Peter; Cayanan, Charmagne; Schürer, Stephan; Bhhatarai, Barun; Roberts, Ed; Rosen, Hugh; Brown, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular probe tool compounds for the Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) are important for investigating the multiple biological processes in which the S1PR2 receptor has been implicated. Amongst these are NF-κB-mediated tumor cell survival and fibroblast chemotaxis to fibronectin. Here we report our efforts to identify selective chemical probes for S1PR2 and their characterization. We employed high throughput screening to identify two compounds which activate the S1PR2 receptor. SAR optimization led to compounds with high nanomolar potency. These compounds, XAX-162 and CYM-5520, are highly selective and do not activate other S1P receptors. Binding of CYM-5520 is not competitive with the antagonist JTE-013. Mutation of receptor residues responsible for binding to the zwitterionic headgroup of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) abolishes S1P activation of the receptor, but not activation by CYM-5520. Competitive binding experiments with radiolabeled S1P demonstrate that CYM-5520 is an allosteric agonist and does not displace the native ligand. Computational modeling suggests that CYM-5520 binds lower in the orthosteric binding pocket, and that co-binding with S1P is energetically well tolerated. In summary, we have identified an allosteric S1PR2 selective agonist compound. PMID:23849205

  8. The effects of the dopamine agonist rotigotine on hemispatial neglect following stroke.

    PubMed

    Gorgoraptis, Nikos; Mah, Yee-Haur; Machner, Bjoern; Singh-Curry, Victoria; Malhotra, Paresh; Hadji-Michael, Maria; Cohen, David; Simister, Robert; Nair, Ajoy; Kulinskaya, Elena; Ward, Nick; Greenwood, Richard; Husain, Masud

    2012-08-01

    Hemispatial neglect following right-hemisphere stroke is a common and disabling disorder, for which there is currently no effective pharmacological treatment. Dopamine agonists have been shown to play a role in selective attention and working memory, two core cognitive components of neglect. Here, we investigated whether the dopamine agonist rotigotine would have a beneficial effect on hemispatial neglect in stroke patients. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled ABA design was used, in which each patient was assessed for 20 testing sessions, in three phases: pretreatment (Phase A1), on transdermal rotigotine for 7-11 days (Phase B) and post-treatment (Phase A2), with the exact duration of each phase randomized within limits. Outcome measures included performance on cancellation (visual search), line bisection, visual working memory, selective attention and sustained attention tasks, as well as measures of motor control. Sixteen right-hemisphere stroke patients were recruited, all of whom completed the trial. Performance on the Mesulam shape cancellation task improved significantly while on rotigotine, with the number of targets found on the left side increasing by 12.8% (P = 0.012) on treatment and spatial bias reducing by 8.1% (P = 0.016). This improvement in visual search was associated with an enhancement in selective attention but not on our measures of working memory or sustained attention. The positive effect of rotigotine on visual search was not associated with the degree of preservation of prefrontal cortex and occurred even in patients with significant prefrontal involvement. Rotigotine was not associated with any significant improvement in motor performance. This proof-of-concept study suggests a beneficial role of dopaminergic modulation on visual search and selective attention in patients with hemispatial neglect following stroke.

  9. Electrophysiological actions of GABAB agonists and antagonists in rat dorso-lateral septal neurones in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bon, C; Galvan, M

    1996-06-01

    1. The actions of GABAB-receptor agonists and antagonists on rat dorso-lateral septal neurones in vitro were recorded with intracellular microelectrodes. 2. In the presence of 1 microM tetrodotoxin to prevent indirect neuronal effects caused by action potential-dependent neurotransmitter release, bath application of baclofen (0.1-30 microM) or SK&F 97541 (0.01-3 microM) evoked concentration-dependent hyperpolarizations which reversed close to the potassium equilibrium potential; the EC50S were 0.55 and 0.05 microM, respectively. No significant desensitization was observed during prolonged agonist exposure (< or = 10 min). 3. Hyperpolarizations induced by baclofen were antagonized in a competitive manner by the following GABAB-receptors antagonists (calculated pA2 values in parentheses): CGP 36742 (4.0), 2-OH saclofen (4.2), CGP 35348 (4.5), CGP 52432 (6.7) and CGP 55845A (8.3). Responses to SK&F 97541 were also antagonized by CGP 55845A (pA2 = 8.4). 4. The amplitude of the late, GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potential (i.p.s.p.) was reduced by the GABAB antagonists as follows (means +/- s.e.mean): CGP 55845A (1 microM) 91 +/- 5%, CGP 52432 (1 microM) 64 +/- 5%, CGP 35348 (100 microM) 82 +/- 5%, CGP 36742 (100 microM) 76 +/- 8%, and 2-OH saclofen (100 microM) 68 +/- 3%. 5. It is concluded that neurones in the rat dorso-lateral septal nucleus express conventional GABAB receptors, which are involved in the generation of slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. CGP 55845A is the most potent GABAB receptor antagonist described in this brain area.

  10. The effects of the dopamine agonist rotigotine on hemispatial neglect following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gorgoraptis, Nikos; Mah, Yee-Haur; Machner, Bjoern; Singh-Curry, Victoria; Malhotra, Paresh; Hadji-Michael, Maria; Cohen, David; Simister, Robert; Nair, Ajoy; Kulinskaya, Elena; Ward, Nick; Greenwood, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Hemispatial neglect following right-hemisphere stroke is a common and disabling disorder, for which there is currently no effective pharmacological treatment. Dopamine agonists have been shown to play a role in selective attention and working memory, two core cognitive components of neglect. Here, we investigated whether the dopamine agonist rotigotine would have a beneficial effect on hemispatial neglect in stroke patients. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled ABA design was used, in which each patient was assessed for 20 testing sessions, in three phases: pretreatment (Phase A1), on transdermal rotigotine for 7–11 days (Phase B) and post-treatment (Phase A2), with the exact duration of each phase randomized within limits. Outcome measures included performance on cancellation (visual search), line bisection, visual working memory, selective attention and sustained attention tasks, as well as measures of motor control. Sixteen right-hemisphere stroke patients were recruited, all of whom completed the trial. Performance on the Mesulam shape cancellation task improved significantly while on rotigotine, with the number of targets found on the left side increasing by 12.8% (P = 0.012) on treatment and spatial bias reducing by 8.1% (P = 0.016). This improvement in visual search was associated with an enhancement in selective attention but not on our measures of working memory or sustained attention. The positive effect of rotigotine on visual search was not associated with the degree of preservation of prefrontal cortex and occurred even in patients with significant prefrontal involvement. Rotigotine was not associated with any significant improvement in motor performance. This proof-of-concept study suggests a beneficial role of dopaminergic modulation on visual search and selective attention in patients with hemispatial neglect following stroke. PMID:22761293

  11. The hybrid molecule, VCP746, is a potent adenosine A2B receptor agonist that stimulates anti-fibrotic signalling.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Elizabeth A; Chuo, Chung Hui; Baltos, Jo-Anne; Ford, Leigh; Scammells, Peter J; Wang, Bing H; Christopoulos, Arthur; White, Paul J; May, Lauren T

    2016-10-01

    We have recently described the rationally-designed adenosine receptor agonist, 4-(5-amino-4-benzoyl-3-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)-N-(6-(9-((2R,3R,4S,5R)-3,4-dihydroxy-5-(hydroxylmethyl)tetrahydro-furan-2-yl)-9H-purin-6-ylamino)hexyl)benzamide (VCP746), a hybrid molecule consisting of an adenosine moiety linked to an adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) allosteric modulator moiety. At the A1AR, VCP746 mediated cardioprotection in the absence of haemodynamic side effects such as bradycardia. The current study has now identified VCP746 as an important pharmacological tool for the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR). The binding and function of VCP746 at the A2BAR was rigorously characterised in a heterologous expression system, in addition to examination of its anti-fibrotic signalling in cardiac- and renal-derived cells. In FlpInCHO cells stably expressing the human A2BAR, VCP746 was a high affinity, high potency A2BAR agonist that stimulated Gs- and Gq-mediated signal transduction, with an apparent lack of system bias relative to prototypical A2BAR agonists. The distinct agonist profile may result from an atypical binding mode of VCP746 at the A2BAR, which was consistent with a bivalent mechanism of receptor interaction. In isolated neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NCF), VCP746 stimulated potent inhibition of both TGF-β1- and angiotensin II-mediated collagen synthesis. Similar attenuation of TGF-β1-mediated collagen synthesis was observed in renal mesangial cells (RMC). The anti-fibrotic signalling mediated by VCP746 in NCF and RMC was selectively reversed in the presence of an A2BAR antagonist. Thus, we believe, VCP746 represents an important tool to further investigate the role of the A2BAR in cardiac (patho)physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. New Small Molecule Agonists to the Thyrotropin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M. Rejwan; Ma, Risheng; David, Martine; Morshed, Syed A.; Ohlmeyer, Michael; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Lau, Zerlina; Mezei, Mihaly; Davies, Terry F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Novel small molecular ligands (SMLs) to the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) have potential as improved molecular probes and as therapeutic agents for the treatment of thyroid dysfunction and thyroid cancer. Methods To identify novel SMLs to the TSHR, we developed a transcription-based luciferase-cAMP high-throughput screening system and we screened 48,224 compounds from a 100K library in duplicate. Results We obtained 62 hits using the cut-off criteria of the mean±three standard deviations above the baseline. Twenty molecules with the greatest activity were rescreened against the parent CHO-luciferase cell for nonspecific activation, and we selected two molecules (MS437 and MS438) with the highest potency for further study. These lead molecules demonstrated no detectible cross-reactivity with homologous receptors when tested against luteinizing hormone (LH)/human chorionic gonadotropin receptor and follicle stimulating hormone receptor–expressing cells. Molecule MS437 had a TSHR-stimulating potency with an EC50 of 13×10−8 M, and molecule MS438 had an EC50 of 5.3×10−8 M. The ability of these small molecule agonists to bind to the transmembrane domain of the receptor and initiate signal transduction was suggested by their activation of a chimeric receptor consisting of an LHR ectodomain and a TSHR transmembrane. Molecular modeling demonstrated that these molecules bound to residues S505 and E506 for MS438 and T501 for MS437 in the intrahelical region of transmembrane helix 3. We also examined the G protein activating ability of these molecules using CHO cells co-expressing TSHRs transfected with luciferase reporter vectors in order to measure Gsα, Gβγ, Gαq, and Gα12 activation quantitatively. The MS437 and MS438 molecules showed potent activation of Gsα, Gαq, and Gα12 similar to TSH, but neither the small molecule agonists nor TSH showed activation of the Gβγ pathway. The small molecules MS437 and MS438 also showed upregulation of

  13. Discriminative stimulus properties of indorenate, a serotonin agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Martínez, D N; López Cabrera, M; Sánchez, H; Ramírez, J I; Hong, E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether indorenate, a serotonin-receptor agonist, can exert discriminative control over operant responses, to establish the temporal course of discriminative control and to compare its stimulus properties to a (5-HT)IA receptor agonist. [3H]-8-hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). DESIGN: Prospective animal study. ANIMALS: Ten male Wistar rats. INTERVENTIONS: Rats were trained to press either of 2 levers for sucrose solution according to a fixed ratio schedule, which was gradually increased. Rats were given injections of either indorenate or saline solution during discrimination training. Once they had achieved an 83% accuracy rate, rats underwent generalization tests after having received a different dose of indorenate, the training dose of indorenate at various intervals before the test, various doses of 8-OH-DPT, or NAN-190 administered before indorenate or 8-OH-DPAT. OUTCOME MEASURES: Distribution of responses between the 2 levers before the first reinforcer of the session, response rate for all the responses in the session, and a discrimination index that expressed the drug-appropriate responses as a proportion of the total responses. RESULTS: Indorenate administration resulted in discriminative control over operant responses, maintained at fixed ratio 10, at a dose of 10.0 mg/kg (but not 3.0 mg/kg). When the interval between the administration of indorenate and the start of the session was varied, the time course of its cue properties followed that of its described effects on 5-HT turnover. In generalization tests, the discrimination index was a function of the dose of indorenate employed; moreover, administration of 8-OH-DPAT (from 0.1 to 1.0 mg/kg) fully mimicked the stimulus properties of indorenate in a dose-dependent way. The (5-HT)IA antagonist NAN-190 prevented the stimulus generalization from indorenate to 8-OH-DPAT. Also, NAN-190 antagonized the stimulus control of indorenate when administered 45 minutes before

  14. Sensitivity of GBM cells to cAMP agonist-mediated apoptosis correlates with CD44 expression and agonist resistance with MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Paul M; Filiz, Gulay; Mantamadiotis, Theo

    2016-12-01

    In some cell types, activation of the second messenger cAMP leads to increased expression of proapoptotic Bim and subsequent cell death. We demonstrate that suppression of the cAMP pathway is a common event across many cancers and that pharmacological activation of cAMP in glioblastoma (GBM) cells leads to enhanced BIM expression and apoptosis in specific GBM cell types. We identified the MAPK signaling axis as the determinant of cAMP agonist sensitivity in GBM cells, with high MAPK activity corresponding to cAMP resistance and low activity corresponding to sensitization to cAMP-induced apoptosis. Sensitive cells were efficiently killed by cAMP agonists alone, while targeting both the cAMP and MAPK pathways in resistant GBM cells resulted in efficient apoptosis. We also show that CD44 is differentially expressed in cAMP agonist-sensitive and -resistant cells. We thus propose that CD44 may be a useful biomarker for distinguishing tumors that may be sensitive to cAMP agonists alone or cAMP agonists in combination with other pathway inhibitors. This suggests that using existing chemotherapeutic compounds in combination with existing FDA-approved cAMP agonists may fast track trials toward improved therapies for difficult-to-treat cancers, such as GBM.

  15. Do agonistic motives matter more than anger? Three studies of cardiovascular risk in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ewart, Craig K; Elder, Gavin J; Smyth, Joshua M; Sliwinski, Martin J; Jorgensen, Randall S

    2011-09-01

    Three motivational profiles have been associated with recurring psychological stress in low-income youth and young adults: Striving to control others (agonistic striving), striving to control the self (transcendence striving), and not asserting control (dissipated striving). Agonistic striving has been associated with elevated ambulatory blood pressure during daily activities. Three studies tested the hypotheses that: (1) agonistic striving is associated with poor anger regulation, and (2) agonistic striving and poor anger regulation interactively elevate blood pressure. Motivational profiles, anger regulation, and ambulatory blood pressure were assessed in a multiethnic sample of 264 urban youth. (1) anger regulation/recovery during laboratory challenge; (2) anger/blood pressure during daily activities (48 hours). Replication of the profiles in distant cities showed they occur with similar frequency across differences of region, race, and gender. Analyses controlling for body size, race, and gender revealed that individuals with the agonistic striving profile had higher ambulatory pressure, especially during social encounters. They became more openly angry and aggressive when challenged but did not exhibit difficulty regulating anger in the laboratory, nor did they feel angrier during monitoring. However, individuals with the agonistic striving profile who did display poor anger regulation in the lab had the highest blood pressure; deficient self-regulatory capability amplified the positive association between agonistic striving and cardiovascular risk in both genders and all ethnic groups. Although anger is thought to increase cardiovascular risk, present findings suggest that anger and elevated blood pressure are coeffects of agonistic struggles to control others.

  16. Cancer immunotherapy: activating innate and adaptive immunity through CD40 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Gregory L.; Li, Yan; Long, Kristen B.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION CD40 is a promising therapeutic target for cancer immunotherapy. In patients with advanced solid malignancies, CD40 agonists have demonstrated some anti-tumor activity and a manageable toxicity profile. A 2nd generation of CD40 agonists has now been designed with optimized Fc receptor (FcR) binding based on preclinical evidence suggesting a critical role for FcR engagement in defining the potency of CD40 agonists in vivo. AREAS COVERED We provide a comprehensive review using PubMed and Google Patent databases on the current clinical status of CD40 agonists, strategies for applying CD40 agonists in cancer therapy, and the preclinical data that supports and is guiding the future development of CD40 agonists. EXPERT COMMENTARY There is a wealth of preclinical data that provide rationale on several distinct approaches for using CD40 agonists in cancer immunotherapy. This data illustrates the need to strategically combine CD40 agonists with other clinically active treatment regimens in order to realize the full potential of activating CD40 in vivo. Thus, critical to the success of this class of immune-oncology drugs, which have the potential to restore both innate and adaptive immunosurveillance, will be the identification of biomarkers for monitoring and predicting responses as well as informing mechanisms of treatment resistance. PMID:27927088

  17. Conformationally constrained farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists: Naphthoic acid-based analogs of GW 4064.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Jones, Stacey A; Kaldor, Istvan; Liu, Yaping; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Navas, Frank; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Wisely, G Bruce

    2008-08-01

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of stilbene replacements were prepared. The 6-substituted 1-naphthoic acid 1b was an equipotent FXR agonist with improved developability parameters relative to 1a. Analog 1b also reduced the severity of cholestasis in the ANIT acute cholestatic rat model.

  18. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, Esam E; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-07-01

    We mutated key amino acids of the human variant of the M1 muscarinic receptor that target ligand binding, receptor activation, and receptor-G protein interaction. We compared the effects of these mutations on the action of two atypical M1 functionally preferring agonists (N-desmethylclozapine and xanomeline) and two classical non-selective orthosteric agonists (carbachol and oxotremorine). Mutations of D105 in the orthosteric binding site and mutation of D99 located out of the orthosteric binding site decreased affinity of all tested agonists that was translated as a decrease in potency in accumulation of inositol phosphates and intracellular calcium mobilization. Mutation of D105 decreased the potency of the atypical agonist xanomeline more than that of the classical agonists carbachol and oxotremorine. Mutation of the residues involved in receptor activation (D71) and coupling to G-proteins (R123) completely abolished the functional responses to both classical and atypical agonists. Our data show that both classical and atypical agonists activate hM1 receptors by the same molecular switch that involves D71 in the second transmembrane helix. The principal difference among the studied agonists is rather in the way they interact with D105 in the orthosteric binding site. Furthermore, our data demonstrate a key role of D105 in xanomeline wash-resistant binding and persistent activation of hM1 by wash-resistant xanomeline. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Agonist-Antagonist Interaction at the Cholinergic Receptor of Denervated Diaphragm,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A study has been made of the cholinergic receptor induced by chronic denervation in the rat diaphragm. The agonists acetylcholine, carbachol and...muscle cells. Supramaximally effective doses of agonists caused desensitization of the preparation; however, there was no cross tachyphylaxis between acetylcholine and carbachol . (Author)

  20. Long-acting beta 2-agonists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn-Jones, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, the use of long-acting beta 2-agonists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been understated. There is now evidence that they may offer benefits beyond bronchodilation. This article reviews the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and looks at the place of long-acting beta 2-agonists as a first-line treatment option.

  1. The FXR agonist PX20606 ameliorates portal hypertension by targeting vascular remodelling and sinusoidal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Schwabl, Philipp; Hambruch, Eva; Seeland, Berit A; Hayden, Hubert; Wagner, Michael; Garnys, Lukas; Strobel, Bastian; Schubert, Tim-Lukas; Riedl, Florian; Mitteregger, Dieter; Burnet, Michael; Starlinger, Patrick; Oberhuber, Georg; Deuschle, Ulrich; Rohr-Udilova, Nataliya; Podesser, Bruno K; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Reiberger, Thomas; Kremoser, Claus; Trauner, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Steroidal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists demonstrated potent anti-fibrotic activities and lowered portal hypertension in experimental models. The impact of the novel non-steroidal and selective FXR agonist PX20606 on portal hypertension and fibrosis was explored in this study. In experimental models of non-cirrhotic (partial portal vein ligation, PPVL, 7days) and cirrhotic (carbon tetrachloride, CCl 4 , 14weeks) portal hypertension, PX20606 (PX,10mg/kg) or the steroidal FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA,10mg/kg) were gavaged. We then measured portal pressure, intrahepatic vascular resistance, liver fibrosis and bacterial translocation. PX decreased portal pressure in non-cirrhotic PPVL (12.6±1.7 vs. 10.4±1.1mmHg; p=0.020) and cirrhotic CCl 4 (15.2±0.5 vs. 11.8±0.4mmHg; p=0.001) rats. In PPVL animals, we observed less bacterial translocation (-36%; p=0.041), a decrease in lipopolysaccharide binding protein (-30%; p=0.024) and splanchnic tumour necrosis factor α levels (-39%; p=0.044) after PX treatment. In CCl 4 rats, PX decreased fibrotic Sirius Red area (-43%; p=0.005), hepatic hydroxyproline (-66%; p<0.001), and expression of profibrogenic proteins (Col1a1, α smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor β). CCl 4 -PX rats had significantly lower transaminase levels and reduced hepatic macrophage infiltration. Moreover, PX induced sinusoidal vasodilation (upregulation of cystathionase, dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH)1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), GTP-cyclohydrolase1) and reduced intrahepatic vasoconstriction (downregulation of endothelin-1, p-Moesin). In cirrhosis, PX improved endothelial dysfunction (decreased von-Willebrand factor) and normalized overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor and angiopoietins. While short-term 3-day PX treatment reduced portal pressure (-14%; p=0.041) by restoring endothelial function, 14week PX therapy additionally inhibited sinusoidal remodelling and decreased

  2. TSH and Thyrotropic Agonists: Key Actors in Thyroid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Johannes W.; Landgrafe, Gabi; Fotiadou, Elisavet H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the reader with an overview of our current knowledge of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid feedback from a cybernetic standpoint. Over the past decades we have gained a plethora of information from biochemical, clinical, and epidemiological investigation, especially on the role of TSH and other thyrotropic agonists as critical components of this complex relationship. Integrating these data into a systems perspective delivers new insights into static and dynamic behaviour of thyroid homeostasis. Explicit usage of this information with mathematical methods promises to deliver a better understanding of thyrotropic feedback control and new options for personalised diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and targeted therapy, also by permitting a new perspective on the conundrum of the TSH reference range. PMID:23365787

  3. INSIGHT AGONISTES: A READING OF SOPHOCLES'S OEDIPUS THE KING.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Eugene J

    2015-07-01

    In this reading of Sophocles's Oedipus the King, the author suggests that insight can be thought of as the main protagonist of the tragedy. He personifies this depiction of insight, calling it Insight Agonistes, as if it were the sole conflicted character on the stage, albeit masquerading at times as several other characters, including gods, sphinxes, and oracles. This psychoanalytic reading of the text lends itself to an analogy between psychoanalytic process and Sophocles's tragic hero. The author views insight as always transgressing against, always at war with a conservative, societal, or intrapsychic chorus of structured elements. A clinical vignette is presented to illustrate this view of insight. © 2015 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  4. Evidence for alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist activity of minoxidil.

    PubMed

    Sharma, N; Mehta, A A; Santani, D D; Goyal, R K

    1997-09-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to study the mechanism of action of minoxidil using various smooth muscle preparations. Minoxidil (4.7 x 10(-6) M to 4.7 x 10(-4) M) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of field stimulation-evoked responses in rat anococcygeus muscle and vas deferens. The inhibition produced by minoxidil was antagonized by yohimbine (2.5 x 10(-7) M). Minoxidil (1.4 x 10(-5) M to 4.7 x 10(-4) M) also produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in oestrogen-primed potassium chloride-depolarized rat uterus. These responses were blocked not only by yohimbine but also by glibenclamide (2.02 x 10(-8) M). Our results suggest that minoxidil possesses alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist activity in addition to potassium-channel-opening activity.

  5. Helminthosporic acid functions as an agonist for gibberellin receptor.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Sho; Jiang, Kai; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Asami, Tadao; Nakajima, Masatoshi

    2017-11-01

    Helminthosporol was isolated from a fungus, Helminthosporium sativum, as a natural plant growth regulator in 1963. It showed gibberellin-like bioactivity that stimulated the growth of the second leaf sheath of rice. After studying the structure-activity relationship between the compound and some synthesized analogs, it was found that helminthosporic acid (H-acid) has higher gibberellin-like activity and chemical stability than helminthosporol. In this study, we showed that (1) H-acid displays gibberellin-like activities not only in rice but also in Arabidopsis, (2) it regulates the expression of gibberellin-related genes, (3) it induces DELLA degradation through binding with a gibberellin receptor (GID1), and (4) it forms the GID1-(H-acid)-DELLA complex to transduce the gibberellin signal in the same manner as gibberellin. This work shows that the H-acid mode of action acts as an agonist for gibberellin receptor.

  6. Agonist-induced glycogenolysis in rabbit retinal slices and cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Ghazi, H.; Osborne, N. N.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of different putative retinal transmitters and/or modulators on glycogenolysis in rabbit retinal slices and in retinal Müller cell cultures were examined. 2. Incubation of rabbit retinal slices or primary retinal cultures (either 3-5 day-old or 25-30 day-old) in a buffer solution containing [3H]-glucose resulted in the accumulation of newly synthesized [3H]-glycogen. 3. Noradrenaline (NA), isoprenaline, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminetetralin (8-OH-DPAT) stimulated the hydrolysis of this newly formed 3H-polymer. The potency order of maximal stimulations was: VIP greater than NA greater than isoprenaline greater than 5-HT greater than 8-OH-DPAT. 4. The putative retinal transmitters, dopamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glycine and taurine and the muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCh) had no effect on [3H]-glycogen content. 5. The glycogenolytic effects of NA/isoprenaline and 5-HT/8-OH-DPAT appear to be mediated by beta-adrenoceptors and 5-HT1 receptors (possibly 5-HT1A), respectively while the VIP-induced response involved another receptor subtype. 6. Agonists which mediated [3H]-glycogen hydrolysis also stimulated an increase in adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) formation. Both responses are blocked to a similar extent by the same antagonists and so are probably mediated via the same receptor subtypes. Moreover, dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db cyclic AMP) promoted tritiated glycogen breakdown in the three retinal preparations. 7. Not all receptors linked to cyclic AMP production however promote glycogenolysis. Dopamine and apomorphine stimulated cyclic AMP formation via D1-receptors without influencing glycogenolysis. These receptors are exclusively associated with neurones. PMID:2568145

  7. Lorcaserin: an investigational serotonin 2C agonist for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Hurren, Kathryn M; Berlie, Helen D

    2011-11-01

    The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and adverse effects of the selective serotonin (5-HT) agonist lorcaserin are reviewed, with an emphasis on efficacy and safety data from Phase III clinical trials. Lorcaserin is highly selective for a subtype of 5-HT receptors important in appetite regulation, with low affinity for other 5-HT-receptor subtypes whose activation is thought to underlie serious cardiovascular adverse effects; such effects have been seen with nonselective serotonergic agents for weight loss (e.g., fenfluramine). In two Phase III trials of lorcaserin, the cumulative proportion of patients who achieved weight loss of ≥5% over 12 months was about 47% with lorcaserin use versus 20-25% among placebo users (p < 0.0001 for both trials). Lorcaserin was generally well tolerated in the clinical trials to date; nausea and vomiting, headache, and dizziness were the most commonly reported adverse effects. In two of the three Phase III trials to date, lorcaserin use was not found to increase the risk of cardiac valvulopathy; however, in the other Phase III trial, which focused on patients with diabetes, lorcaserin use was associated with an increased rate of new valvulopathy. In a carcinogenicity evaluation involving laboratory rats, lorcaserin was linked to the development of various malignancies, a finding with uncertain implications for its potential future use in humans. Lorcaserin, a 5-HT(2C) agonist, has demonstrated efficacy in patients who are obese or are overweight with associated comorbidities. Phase III trials have found that more than 35% of patients lost greater than 5% of their baseline weight. The maker of lorcaserin has indicated it will continue to seek U.S. marketing approval of the drug for the indications of long-term weight loss and weight-loss maintenance in specific patient populations.

  8. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  9. Concentric agonist-antagonist robots for minimally invasive surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Butler, Kaitlin; Epps, Zane H.; Rucker, Daniel Caleb

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel continuum robot design concept, Concentric Agonist-Antagonist Robots (CAAR), that uses push-pull, agonist-antagonist action of a pair of concentric tubes. The CAAR tubes are designed to have noncentral, offset neutral axes, and they are fixed together at their distal ends. Axial base translations then induce bending in the device. A CAAR segment can be created by selectively cutting asymmetric notches into the profile of two stock tubes, which relocates the neutral bending plane away from the center of the inner lumen. Like conventional concentric-tube robots (CTRs) based on counter-rotating precurved tubes, a CAAR can be made at very small scales and contain a large, open lumen. In contrast with CTRs, the CAAR concept has no elastic stability issues, offers a larger range of motion, and has lower overall stiffness. Furthermore, by varying the position of the neutral axes along the length of each tube, arbitrary, variable curvature actuation modes can be achieved. Precurving the tubes can additionally increase the workspace of a single segment. A single two-tube assembly can be used to create 3 degree-of-freedom (DOF) robot segments, and multiple segments can be deployed concentrically. Both additive manufacturing and traditional machining of stock tubes can create and customize the geometry and performance of the CAAR. In this paper, we explore the CAAR concept, provide kinematic and static models, and experimentally evaluate the model with a both a straight and a precurved CAAR. We conclude with a discussion of the significance and our plans for future work.

  10. Kappa Agonists as a Novel Therapy for Menopausal Hot Flashes

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Amy E.; Steiner, Robert A.; Chavkin, Charles; Clifton, Donald K.; Ferrara, Laura K.; Reed, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Postmenopausal hot flash etiology is poorly understood, making it difficult to develop and target ideal therapies. A network of hypothalamic estrogen-sensitive neurons producing Kisspeptin, Neurokinin B, and Dynorphin (KNDy neurons), located adjacent to the thermoregulatory center, regulate pulsatile secretion of GnRH and LH. Dynorphin may inhibit this system by binding kappa opioid receptors within the vicinity of KNDy neurons. We hypothesize that hot flashes are reduced by KNDy neuron manipulation. Methods A double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled pilot study evaluated the effect of a kappa agonist (KA).Hot flash frequency was the primary outcome. Twelve healthy postmenopausal women with moderate-severe hot flashes, ages 48-60 years, were randomized. Eight women with sufficient baseline hot flashes for statistical analysis completed all 3 interventions: placebo, standard Pentazocine/Naloxone (50/0.5 mg) or low-dose Pentazocine/Naloxone (25/0.25 mg). In an inpatient research setting, each participant received the 3 interventions, in randomized order, on 3 separate days. On each day, an intravenous catheter was inserted for luteinizing hormone (LH) blood sampling, and skin conductance and Holter monitors were placed. Subjective hot flash frequency and severity were recorded. Results Mean hot flash frequency 2-7 hours following therapy initiation was lower than that for placebo (KA standard-dose: 4.75 ± 0.67; KA low-dose: 4.50 ± 0.57; and placebo: 5.94 ± 0.78 hot flashes/5 hours; p =0.025). Hot flash intensity did not vary between interventions. LH pulsatility mirrored objective hot flashes in some, but not all women. Conclusions This pilot suggests that kappa agonists may affect menopausal vasomotor symptoms. PMID:25988798

  11. Rate constants of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors in rat brain medulla. Evaluation by competition kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, G.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    The method of competition kinetics, which measures the binding kinetics of an unlabeled ligand through its effect on the binding kinetics of a labeled ligand, was employed to investigate the kinetics of muscarinic agonist binding to rat brain medulla pons homogenates. The agonists studied were acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and oxotremorine, with N-methyl-4-(TH)piperidyl benzilate employed as the radiolabeled ligand. Our results suggested that the binding of muscarinic agonists to the high affinity sites is characterized by dissociation rate constants higher by 2 orders of magnitude than those of antagonists, with rather similar association rate constants. Our findings also suggest that isomerization ofmore » the muscarinic receptors following ligand binding is significant in the case of antagonists, but not of agonists. Moreover, it is demonstrated that in the medulla pons preparation, agonist-induced interconversion between high and low affinity bindings sites does not occur to an appreciable extent.« less

  12. Characterization of the hypothermic effects of imidazoline I2 receptor agonists in rats

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, David A; An, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Yanan; Pigini, Maria; Li, Jun-Xu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Imidazoline I2 receptors have been implicated in several CNS disorders. Although several I2 receptor agonists have been described, no simple and sensitive in vivo bioassay is available for studying I2 receptor ligands. This study examined I2 receptor agonist-induced hypothermia as a functional in vivo assay of I2 receptor agonism. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Different groups of rats were used to examine the effects of I2 receptor agonists on the rectal temperature and locomotion. The pharmacological mechanisms were investigated by combining I2 receptor ligands and different antagonists. KEY RESULTS All the selective I2 receptor agonists examined (2-BFI, diphenyzoline, phenyzoline, CR4056, tracizoline, BU224 and S22687, 3.2–56 mg·kg–1, i.p.) dose-dependently and markedly decreased the rectal temperature (hypothermia) in rats, with varied duration of action. Pharmacological mechanism of the observed hypothermia was studied by combining the I2 receptor agonists (2-BFI, BU224, tracizoline and diphenyzoline) with imidazoline I2 receptor/ α2 adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan, selective I1 receptor antagonist efaroxan, α2 adrenoceptor antagonist/5-HT1A receptor agonist yohimbine. Idazoxan but not yohimbine or efaroxan attenuated the hypothermic effects of 2-BFI, BU224, tracizoline and diphenyzoline, supporting the I2 receptor mechanism. In contrast, both idazoxan and yohimbine attenuated hypothermia induced by the α2 adrenoceptor agonist clonidine. Among all the I2 receptor agonists studied, only S22687 markedly increased the locomotor activity in rats. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Imidazoline I2 receptor agonists can produce hypothermic effects, which are primarily mediated by I2 receptors. These data suggest that I2 receptor agonist-induced hypothermia is a simple and sensitive in vivo assay for studying I2 receptor ligands. PMID:22324428

  13. Reverse Induced Fit-Driven MAS-Downstream Transduction: Looking for Metabotropic Agonists.

    PubMed

    Pernomian, Larissa; Gomes, Mayara S; de Paula da Silva, Carlos H Tomich; Rosa, Joaquin M C

    2017-01-01

    Protective effects of MAS activation have spurred clinical interests in developing MAS agonists. However, current bases that drive this process preclude that physiological concentrations of peptide MAS agonists induce an atypical signaling that does not reach the metabotropic efficacy of constitutive activation. Canonical activation of MAS-coupled G proteins is only achieved by supraphysiological concentrations of peptide MAS agonists or physiological concentrations of chemically modified analogues. These pleiotropic differences are because of two overlapped binding domains: one non-metabotropic site that recognizes peptide agonists and one metabotropic domain that recognizes modified analogues. It is feasible that supraphysiological concentrations of peptide MAS agonists undergo to chemical modifications required for binding to metabotropic domain. Receptor oligomerization enhances pharmacological parameters coupled to metabotropic signaling. The formation of receptor-signalosome complex makes the transduction of agonists more adaptive. Considering the recent identification of MAS-signalosome, we aimed to postulate the reverse induced fit hypothesis in which MAS-signalosome would trigger chemical modifications required for agonists bind to MAS metabotropic domain. Here we cover rational perspectives for developing novel metabotropic MAS agonists in the view of the reverse induced-fit hypothesis. Predicting a 3D model of MAS metabotropic domain may guide the screening of chemical modifications required for metabotropic efficacy. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening would select potential metabotropic MAS agonists from virtual libraries from human proteome. Rational perspectives that consider reverse induced fit hypothesis during MAS activation for developing metabotropic MAS agonists represents the best approach in providing MAS ligands with constitutive efficacy at physiological concentrations. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email

  14. Agonist activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site

    PubMed Central

    Gill, JasKiran K.; Savolainen, Mari; Young, Gareth T.; Zwart, Ruud; Sher, Emanuele; Millar, Neil S.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, such as acetylcholine, act at an extracellular “orthosteric” binding site located at the interface between two adjacent subunits. Here, we present evidence of potent activation of α7 nAChRs via an allosteric transmembrane site. Previous studies have identified a series of nAChR-positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that lack agonist activity but are able to potentiate responses to orthosteric agonists, such as acetylcholine. It has been shown, for example, that TQS acts as a conventional α7 nAChR PAM. In contrast, we have found that a compound with close chemical similarity to TQS (4BP-TQS) is a potent allosteric agonist of α7 nAChRs. Whereas the α7 nAChR antagonist metyllycaconitine acts competitively with conventional nicotinic agonists, metyllycaconitine is a noncompetitive antagonist of 4BP-TQS. Mutation of an amino acid (M253L), located in a transmembrane cavity that has been proposed as being the binding site for PAMs, completely blocks agonist activation by 4BP-TQS. In contrast, this mutation had no significant effect on agonist activation by acetylcholine. Conversely, mutation of an amino acid located within the known orthosteric binding site (W148F) has a profound effect on agonist potency of acetylcholine (resulting in a shift of ∼200-fold in the acetylcholine dose-response curve), but had little effect on the agonist dose-response curve for 4BP-TQS. Computer docking studies with an α7 homology model provides evidence that both TQS and 4BP-TQS bind within an intrasubunit transmembrane cavity. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that agonist activation of nAChRs can occur via an allosteric transmembrane site. PMID:21436053

  15. A1C

    MedlinePlus

    A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 ... A1C alone or in combination with other diabetes tests to make a diagnosis. They also use the ...

  16. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    ... every 3 or 6 months is recommended. Normal Results The following are the results when A1C is ... meaning of your specific test results. What Abnormal Results Mean An abnormal result means that you have ...

  17. The Role of Agonistic Striving in the Association Between Cortisol and High Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Ewart, Craig K; Elder, Gavin J; Jorgensen, Randall S; Fitzgerald, Sheila T

    2017-05-01

    A social action theory of chronic stress proposes that agonistic striving (seeking to influence or control others) impairs cardiovascular health by magnifying the impact of high adversity-induced cortisol levels on blood pressure. We tested three predictions of social action theory: (1) the social action theory taxonomy of regulatory strivings characterizes young adults from high-adversity neighborhoods; (2) high cortisol levels predict high blood pressure more reliably in the subgroup with the agonistic striving profile than in subgroups with other profiles; (3) the association of higher cortisol and higher blood pressure with agonistic striving is not explained by negative affect (depressive symptoms/dysphoria, anger, hostility). Participants were young adults (N = 198, mean [SD] age = 32 [3.4] years); 71% female; 65% black) from disadvantaged urban neighborhoods. Motive profiles (including agonistic strivings) were assessed using the Social Competence Interview. Cortisol levels were derived from saliva samples; blood pressure level was obtained during two days of ambulatory monitoring. Psychological measures of negative affect were assessed using questionnaires. The predicted taxonomy of regulatory strivings was replicated in this sample; the interaction between cortisol and motive profile was significant (F(2, 91) = 6.72, p = .002); analyses of simple effects disclosed that higher cortisol levels predicted higher ambulatory blood pressure only in individuals who exhibited agonistic striving. Depressive symptoms/dysphoria, trait anger, and hostility were not correlated with agonistic striving, cortisol, or blood pressure. Agonistic striving may represent a distinctive (and novel) social-cognitive mechanism of toxic stress and cardiovascular risk.

  18. Agemone mexicana flavanones; apposite inverse agonists of the β2-adrenergic receptor in asthma treatment.

    PubMed

    Eniafe, Gabriel O; Metibemu, Damilohun S; Omotuyi, Olaposi I; Ogunleye, Adewale J; Inyang, Olumide K; Adelakun, Niyi S; Adeniran, Yakubu O; Adewumi, Bamidele; Enejoh, Ojochenemi A; Osunmuyiwa, Joseph O; Shodehinde, Sidiqat A; Oyeneyin, Oluwatoba E

    2018-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease of the airway that poses a major threat to human health. With increase industrialization in the developed and developing countries, the incidence of asthma is on the rise. The β2-adrenergic receptor is an important target in designing anti-asthmatic drugs. The synthetic agonists of the β2-adrenergic receptor used over the years proved effective, but with indispensable side effects, thereby limiting their therapeutic use on a long-term scale. Inverse agonists of this receptor, although initially contraindicated, had been reported to have long-term beneficial effects. Phytochemicals from Agemone mexicana were screened against the human β2-adrenergic receptor in the agonist, inverse agonist, covalent agonist, and the antagonist conformations. Molecular docking of the phyto-constituents showed that the plant constituents bind better to the inverse agonist bound conformation of the protein, and revealed two flavanones; eriodictyol and hesperitin, with lower free energy (ΔG) values and higher affinities to the inverse agonist bound receptor than the co-crystallized ligand. Eriodictyol and hesperitin bind with the glide score of -10.684 and - 9.958 kcal/mol respectively, while the standard compound ICI-118551, binds with glide score of -9.503 kcal/mol. Further interaction profiling at the protein orthosteric site and ADME/Tox screening confirmed the drug-like properties of these compounds.

  19. Deprescribing benzodiazepine receptor agonists: Evidence-based clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Pottie, Kevin; Thompson, Wade; Davies, Simon; Grenier, Jean; Sadowski, Cheryl A; Welch, Vivian; Holbrook, Anne; Boyd, Cynthia; Swenson, Robert; Ma, Andy; Farrell, Barbara

    2018-05-01

    To develop an evidence-based guideline to help clinicians make decisions about when and how to safely taper and stop benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BZRAs); to focus on the highest level of evidence available and seek input from primary care professionals in the guideline development, review, and endorsement processes. The overall team comprised 8 clinicians (1 family physician, 2 psychiatrists, 1 clinical psychologist, 1 clinical pharmacologist, 2 clinical pharmacists, and 1 geriatrician) and a methodologist; members disclosed conflicts of interest. For guideline development, a systematic process was used, including the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. Evidence was generated by conducting a systematic review of BZRA deprescribing trials for insomnia, as well as performing a review of reviews of the harms of continued BZRA use and narrative syntheses of patient preferences and resource implications. This evidence and GRADE quality of evidence ratings were used to generate recommendations. The team refined guideline content and recommendations through consensus and synthesized clinical considerations to address front-line clinician questions. The draft guideline was reviewed by clinicians and stakeholders. We recommend that deprescribing (tapering slowly) of BZRAs be offered to elderly adults (≥ 65 years) who take BZRAs, regardless of duration of use, and suggest that deprescribing (tapering slowly) be offered to adults aged 18 to 64 who have used BZRAs for more than 4 weeks. These recommendations apply to patients who use BZRAs to treat insomnia on its own (primary insomnia) or comorbid insomnia where potential underlying comorbidities are effectively managed. This guideline does not apply to those with other sleep disorders or untreated anxiety, depression, or other physical or mental health conditions that might be causing or aggravating insomnia. Benzodiazepine receptor agonists are associated with harms

  20. Interaction of a radiolabeled agonist with cardiac muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Harden, T.K.; Meeker, R.B.; Martin, M.W.

    The interaction of a radiolabeled muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist, (methyl-/sup 3/H)oxotremorine acetate ((/sup 3/H)OXO), with a washed membrane preparation derived from rat heart, has been studied. In binding assays at 4 degrees C, the rate constants for association and dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO were 2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 and 5 X 10(-3) min-1, respectively, Saturation binding isotherms indicated that binding was to a single population of sites with a Kd of approximately 300 pM. The density of (/sup 3/H)OXO binding sites (90-100 fmol/mg of protein) was approximately 75% of that determined for the radiolabeled receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate.more » Both muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO with high affinity and Hill slopes of approximately one. Guanine nucleotides completely inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)OXO. This effect was on the maximum binding (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)OXO with no change occurring in the Kd; the order of potency for five nucleotides was guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio-triphosphate) greater than 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate greater than GTP greater than or equal to guanosine/diphosphate greater than GMP. The (/sup 3/H)OXO-induced interaction of muscarinic receptors with a guanine nucleotide binding protein was stable to solubilization. That is, membrane receptors that were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)OXO could be solubilized with digitonin, and the addition of guanine nucleotides to the soluble, (/sup 3/H)OXO-labeled complex resulted in dissociation of (/sup 3/H)OXO from the receptor. Pretreatment of membranes with relatively low concentrations of N-ethylmaleimide inhibited (/sup 3/H)OXO binding by 85% with no change in the Kd of (/sup 3/H)OXO, and with no effect on (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding.« less

  1. A novel TRPM8 agonist relieves dry eye discomfort.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jee Myung; Li, Fengxian; Liu, Qin; Rüedi, Marco; Wei, Edward Tak; Lentsman, Michael; Lee, Hyo Seok; Choi, Won; Kim, Seong Jin; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2017-06-26

    Physical cooling of the eye surface relieves ocular discomfort, but translating this event to drug treatment of dry eye discomfort not been studied. Here, we synthesized a water-soluble TRPM8 receptor agonist called cryosim-3 (C3, 1-diisopropylphosphorylnonane) which selectively activates TRPM8 (linked to cooling) but not TRPV1 or TRPA1 (linked to nociception) and tested C3 in subjects with mild forms of dry eye disease. A set of 1-dialkylphosphoryalkanes were tested for activation of TRPM8, TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors in transfected cells. The bioactivity profiles were compared by perioral, topical, and intravenous delivery to anesthetized rats. The selected lead candidate C3 or vehicle (water) was applied with a cotton gauze pad to upper eyelids of patients with dry eye disease (n = 30). Cooling sensation, tear film break-up time (TBUT), basal tear secretion, and corneal staining were evaluated. C3 was then applied four times daily for 2 weeks to patients using a pre-loaded single unit applicator containing 2 mg/mL of C3 in water (n = 20) or water only. TBUT, basal tear secretion, and corneal staining, and three questionnaires surveys of ocular discomfort (VAS scale, OSDI, and CVS symptoms) were analyzed before and at 1 and 2 weeks thereafter. C3 was a selective and potent TRPM8 agonist without TRPV1 or TRPA1 activity. In test animals, the absence of shaking behavior after C3 perioral administration made it the first choice for further study. C3 increased tear secretion in an animal model of dry eye disease and did not irritate when wiped on eyes of volunteers. C3 singly applied (2 mg/ml) produced significant cooling in <5 min, an effecting lasting 46 min with an increase in tear secretion for 60 min. C3 applied for 2 weeks also significantly increased basal tear secretion with questionnaire surveys of ocular discomfort indices clearly showing improvement of symptoms at 1 and 2 weeks. No complaints of irritation or pain were reported by any subject. C3

  2. Pharmacological characterization of the new histamine H4 receptor agonist VUF 8430

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Herman D; Adami, Maristella; Guaita, Elena; Werfel, Thomas; Smits, Rogier A; de Esch, Iwan JP; Bakker, Remko A; Gutzmer, Ralf; Coruzzi, Gabriella; Leurs, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We compare the pharmacological profiles of a new histamine H4 receptor agonist 2-(2-guanidinoethyl)isothiourea (VUF 8430) with that of a previously described H4 receptor agonist, 4-methylhistamine. Experimental approach: Radioligand binding and functional assays were performed using histamine H4 receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines. Compounds were also evaluated ex vivo in monocyte-derived dendritic cells endogenously expressing H4 receptors and in vivo in anaesthetized rats for gastric acid secretion activity. Key results: Both VUF 8430 and 4-methylhistamine were full agonists at human H4 receptors with lower affinity at rat and mouse H4 receptors. Both compounds induced chemotaxis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. VUF 8430 also showed reasonable affinity and was a full agonist at the H3 receptor. Agmatine is a metabolite of arginine, structurally related to VUF 8430, and was a H4 receptor agonist with micromolar affinity. At histamine H3 receptors, agmatine was a full agonist, whereas 4-methylhistamine was an agonist only at high concentrations. Both VUF 8430 and agmatine were inactive at H1 and H2 receptors, whereas 4-methylhistamine is as active as histamine at H2 receptors. In vivo, VUF 8430 only caused a weak secretion of gastric acid mediated by H2 receptors, whereas 4-methylhistamine, dimaprit, histamine and amthamine, at equimolar doses, induced 2.5- to 6-fold higher output than VUF 8430. Conclusions and implications: Our results suggest complementary use of 4-methylhistamine and VUF 8430 as H4 receptor agonists. Along with H4 receptor antagonists, both agonists can serve as useful pharmacological tools in studies of histamine H4 receptors. PMID:19413569

  3. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compoundmore » action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC{sub 50} values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-α-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC{sub 50} = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other.« less

  4. SGLT2 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists as second-line therapy in type 2 diabetes: patient selection and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gurgle, Holly E; White, Karen; McAdam-Marx, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the selection of second-line therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who are unable to achieve glycemic control with metformin therapy alone. Newer pharmacologic treatments for T2DM include glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. Both the classes of medication are efficacious, exhibit positive effects on weight, and are associated with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. The purpose of this review is to compare the clinical trial and real-world effectiveness data of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists versus sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors related to A1c reduction, weight loss, cost-effectiveness, cardiovascular outcomes, and safety in patients with T2DM. This review summarizes comparative evidence for providers who are determining which of the two classes may be the most appropriate for a specific patient.

  5. Agonist-Specific Recruitment of Arrestin Isoforms Differentially Modify Delta Opioid Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Perroy, Julie; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Smith, Monique L.; Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Bana, Alia; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-specific recruitment of arrestins facilitates functional selectivity of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. Here, we describe agonist-selective recruitment of different arrestin isoforms to the delta opioid receptor in mice. A high-internalizing delta opioid receptor agonist (SNC80) preferentially recruited arrestin 2 and, in arrestin 2 knock-outs (KOs), we observed a significant increase in the potency of SNC80 to inhibit mechanical hyperalgesia and decreased acute tolerance. In contrast, the low-internalizing delta agonists (ARM390, JNJ20788560) preferentially recruited arrestin 3 with unaltered behavioral effects in arrestin 2 KOs. Surprisingly, arrestin 3 KO revealed an acute tolerance to these low-internalizing agonists, an effect never observed in wild-type animals. Furthermore, we examined delta opioid receptor–Ca2+ channel coupling in dorsal root ganglia desensitized by ARM390 and the rate of resensitization was correspondingly decreased in arrestin 3 KOs. Live-cell imaging in HEK293 cells revealed that delta opioid receptors are in pre-engaged complexes with arrestin 3 at the cell membrane and that ARM390 strengthens this membrane interaction. The disruption of these complexes in arrestin 3 KOs likely accounts for the altered responses to low-internalizing agonists. Together, our results show agonist-selective recruitment of arrestin isoforms and reveal a novel endogenous role of arrestin 3 as a facilitator of resensitization and an inhibitor of tolerance mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Agonists that bind to the same receptor can produce highly distinct signaling events and arrestins are a major mediator of this ligand bias. Here, we demonstrate that delta opioid receptor agonists differentially recruit arrestin isoforms. We found that the high-internalizing agonist SNC80 preferentially recruits arrestin 2 and knock-out (KO) of this protein results in increased efficacy of SNC80. In contrast, low-internalizing agonists (ARM390 and JNJ20788560

  6. The Case for the Use of PPARγ Agonists as an Adjunctive Therapy for Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Serghides, Lena

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection associated with high mortality even when highly effective antiparasitic therapy is used. Adjunctive therapies that modify the pathophysiological processes caused by malaria are a possible way to improve outcome. This review focuses on the utility of PPARγ agonists as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of cerebral malaria. The current knowledge of PPARγ agonist use in malaria is summarized. Findings from experimental CNS injury and disease models that demonstrate the potential for PPARγ agonists as an adjunctive therapy for cerebral malaria are also discussed. PMID:21772838

  7. Mechanical stress activates NMDA receptors in the absence of agonists.

    PubMed

    Maneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Maki, Bruce; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Belin, Sophie; Popescu, Gabriela K; Sachs, Frederick; Hua, Susan Z

    2017-01-03

    While studying the physiological response of primary rat astrocytes to fluid shear stress in a model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), we found that shear stress induced Ca 2+ entry. The influx was inhibited by MK-801, a specific pore blocker of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) channels, and this occurred in the absence of agonists. Other NMDA open channel blockers ketamine and memantine showed a similar effect. The competitive glutamate antagonists AP5 and GluN2B-selective inhibitor ifenprodil reduced NMDA-activated currents, but had no effect on the mechanically induced Ca 2+ influx. Extracellular Mg 2+ at 2 mM did not significantly affect the shear induced Ca 2+ influx, but at 10 mM it produced significant inhibition. Patch clamp experiments showed mechanical activation of NMDAR and inhibition by MK-801. The mechanical sensitivity of NMDARs may play a role in the normal physiology of fluid flow in the glymphatic system and it has obvious relevance to TBI.

  8. Mechanical stress activates NMDA receptors in the absence of agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Maki, Bruce; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Belin, Sophie; Popescu, Gabriela K.; Sachs, Frederick; Hua, Susan Z.

    2017-01-01

    While studying the physiological response of primary rat astrocytes to fluid shear stress in a model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), we found that shear stress induced Ca2+ entry. The influx was inhibited by MK-801, a specific pore blocker of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) channels, and this occurred in the absence of agonists. Other NMDA open channel blockers ketamine and memantine showed a similar effect. The competitive glutamate antagonists AP5 and GluN2B-selective inhibitor ifenprodil reduced NMDA-activated currents, but had no effect on the mechanically induced Ca2+ influx. Extracellular Mg2+ at 2 mM did not significantly affect the shear induced Ca2+ influx, but at 10 mM it produced significant inhibition. Patch clamp experiments showed mechanical activation of NMDAR and inhibition by MK-801. The mechanical sensitivity of NMDARs may play a role in the normal physiology of fluid flow in the glymphatic system and it has obvious relevance to TBI. PMID:28045032

  9. Brexpiprazole: A Partial Dopamine Agonist for the Treatment of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Asli; Ekinci, Okan

    2018-01-31

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and debilitating mental disorder that affects the patient's and their family's life. The disease remains a complicated disorder that is challenging to treat, despite there being a large antipsychotic armamentarium. Brexpiprazole acts both as a partial agonist at the serotonin 5-HT1A and dopamine D2 receptors and as an antagonist at the serotonin 5- HT2A and noradrenaline alpha1B and alpha2C receptors, all with similar potency. This balanced receptor profile may produce promising antipsychotic effects on positive, negative and cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia with minimal adverse effects. This review summarizes the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic profile of brexpiprazole and the clinical trial information pertaining to its effectiveness and safety and tolerability, discusses its best clinical use, and compares its clinical profile to those of other widely used antipsychotic agents. Brexpiprazole demonstrated significant clinical efficacy and had good safety and tolerability in well-designed trials with patients with schizophrenia. This agent may be a useful treatment alternative. However, it will be valuable to consider a long-term observational study that includes an active comparator, especially other second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs), to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of brexpiprazole in the treatment of schizophrenia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. PPAR Agonists for the Prevention and Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Sowmya P; Reddy, Aravind T; Banno, Asoka; Reddy, Raju C

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common and most fatal of all malignancies worldwide. Furthermore, with more than half of all lung cancer patients presenting with distant metastases at the time of initial diagnosis, the overall prognosis for the disease is poor. There is thus a desperate need for new prevention and treatment strategies. Recently, a family of nuclear hormone receptors, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), has attracted significant attention for its role in various malignancies including lung cancer. Three PPARs, PPAR α , PPAR β / δ , and PPAR γ , display distinct biological activities and varied influences on lung cancer biology. PPAR α activation generally inhibits tumorigenesis through its antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. Activated PPAR γ is also antitumorigenic and antimetastatic, regulating several functions of cancer cells and controlling the tumor microenvironment. Unlike PPAR α and PPAR γ , whether PPAR β / δ activation is anti- or protumorigenic or even inconsequential currently remains an open question that requires additional investigation. This review of current literature emphasizes the multifaceted effects of PPAR agonists in lung cancer and discusses how they may be applied as novel therapeutic strategies for the disease.

  11. Triiodothyronine, beta-adrenergic receptors, agonist responses, and exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Martin, W H

    1993-07-01

    Although thyroid hormone excess results in increased beta-adrenergic receptor density or agonist responses in some cells of experimental animals, the role of these effects in contributing to clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism in human subjects is unclear. To shed further light on this issue, we characterized the effect of 2 weeks of excess triiodothyronine administration on cardiac and metabolic responses to graded-dose isoproterenol infusion, skeletal muscle beta-adrenergic receptor density, and physiologic determinants of exercise capacity in young healthy subjects. The slope of the heart rate response to isoproterenol was 36% greater (p < 0.05) after triiodothyronine administration. In addition, beta-adrenergic receptor density was increased (p < 0.01) in all types of skeletal muscle fibers. Maximal oxygen uptake during treadmill exercise declined 5% (p < 0.001) after triiodothyronine administration because of a decrease in the arteriovenous oxygen difference (p < 0.05). The plasma lactate response to submaximal exercise was 25% greater (p < 0.01) in the hyperthyroid state. These effects were paralleled by a decrement in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and a decrease in cross-sectional area of type 2A skeletal myocytes. Thus, thyroid hormone excess enhances cardiac beta-adrenergic sensitivity under in vivo conditions in human subjects. Nevertheless, exercise capacity is diminished in the hyperthyroid state, an effect that may be related to reduced skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and type 2A fiber atrophy.

  12. Pulmonary delivery of a GLP-1 receptor agonist, BMS-686117.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Mathias, Neil; Moench, Paul; Chi, Cecilia; Desikan, Sridhar; Hussain, Munir; Smith, Ronald L

    2009-01-21

    Alternate delivery route of therapeutic peptides is an attractive non-invasive option to patients who must chronically self-administer their medication through injections. In recent years, much attention has centered on pulmonary peptide delivery of peptide drugs such as insulin and GLP-1 mimetic peptides in the treatment of type II diabetes. In this study, we assessed the feasibility of delivering BMS-686117, an 11-mer GLP-1 receptor peptide agonist, to the lung in rats via intratracheal administration. The pharmacokinetic profiles of three spray-dried, prototype inhaled powder formulations, 80/20 BMS-686117/trehalose (I), 100% BMS-686117 (II), and 20/80 BMS-686117/mannitol (III), as well as a lyophilized BMS-686117 powder, were compared with intravenously and subcutaneously administered peptide. The spray-dried formulations were mostly spherical particles with narrow particle size distribution between 2 to 10 microm, which are better suited for inhalation delivery than the lyophilized, irregular shape powder with a wide particle size distribution between 2 to 100 microm. Prototype III exhibited the best physical characteristics and in vivo performance, with bioavailability of 45% relative to subcutaneous administration. The T(max) for lung delivered peptide formulations were almost twice as fast as subcutaneous injection, suggesting potential for rapid absorption and onset of action. This study demonstrated that pulmonary delivery is a promising, non-invasive route for the administration of BMS-686117.

  13. Triptans, serotonin agonists, and serotonin syndrome (serotonin toxicity): a review.

    PubMed

    Gillman, P Ken

    2010-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have suggested that fatal serotonin syndrome (SS) is possible with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and triptans: this warning affects millions of patients as these drugs are frequently given simultaneously. SS is a complex topic about which there is much misinformation. The misconception that 5-HT1A receptors can cause serious SS is still widely perpetuated, despite quality evidence that it is activation of the 5-HT2A receptor that is required for serious SS. This review considers SS involving serotonin agonists: ergotamine, lysergic acid diethylamide, bromocriptine, and buspirone, as well as triptans, and reviews the experimental foundation underpinning the latest understanding of SS. It is concluded that there is neither significant clinical evidence, nor theoretical reason, to entertain speculation about serious SS from triptans and SSRIs. The misunderstandings about SS exhibited by the FDA, and shared by the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (in relation to methylene blue), are an important issue with wide ramifications.

  14. Minireview: Challenges and Opportunities in Development of PPAR Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Bortolini, Michele; Tadayyon, Moh; Bopst, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The clinical impact of the fibrate and thiazolidinedione drugs on dyslipidemia and diabetes is driven mainly through activation of two transcription factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-α and PPAR-γ. However, substantial differences exist in the therapeutic and side-effect profiles of specific drugs. This has been attributed primarily to the complexity of drug-target complexes that involve many coregulatory proteins in the context of specific target gene promoters. Recent data have revealed that some PPAR ligands interact with other non-PPAR targets. Here we review concepts used to develop new agents that preferentially modulate transcriptional complex assembly, target more than one PPAR receptor simultaneously, or act as partial agonists. We highlight newly described on-target mechanisms of PPAR regulation including phosphorylation and nongenomic regulation. We briefly describe the recently discovered non-PPAR protein targets of thiazolidinediones, mitoNEET, and mTOT. Finally, we summarize the contributions of on- and off-target actions to select therapeutic and side effects of PPAR ligands including insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular actions, inflammation, and carcinogenicity. PMID:25148456

  15. Novel glucocorticoid receptor agonists in the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Coppola, Angelo; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids are the only drugs that effectively suppress the airway inflammation, but they can induce considerable systemic and adverse effects when they are administered chronically at high doses. Consequently, the pharmaceutical industry is still searching for newer entities with an improved therapeutic index. Herein, the authors review the research in the glucocorticoid field to identify ligands of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These ligands preferentially induce transrepression with little or no transactivating activity, in order to have a potent anti-inflammatory action and a low side-effects profile. Several agents have been synthesized, but few have been tested in experimental models of asthma. Furthermore, only three (BI-54903, GW870086X and AZD5423) have entered clinical development, although the development of at least one of them (BI-54903) was discontinued. The reason for the limited success so far obtained is that the model of transactivation versus transrepression is a too simplistic representation of GR activity. It is difficult to uncouple the therapeutic and harmful effects mediated by GR, but some useful information that might change the current perspective is appearing in the literature. The generation of gene expression 'fingerprints' produced by different GR agonists in target and off-target human tissues could be useful in identifying drug candidates with an improved therapeutic ratio.

  16. Agonist Binding to Chemosensory Receptors: A Systematic Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fierro, Fabrizio; Suku, Eda; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Cichon, Sven; Carloni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Human G-protein coupled receptors (hGPCRs) constitute a large and highly pharmaceutically relevant membrane receptor superfamily. About half of the hGPCRs' family members are chemosensory receptors, involved in bitter taste and olfaction, along with a variety of other physiological processes. Hence these receptors constitute promising targets for pharmaceutical intervention. Molecular modeling has been so far the most important tool to get insights on agonist binding and receptor activation. Here we investigate both aspects by bioinformatics-based predictions across all bitter taste and odorant receptors for which site-directed mutagenesis data are available. First, we observe that state-of-the-art homology modeling combined with previously used docking procedures turned out to reproduce only a limited fraction of ligand/receptor interactions inferred by experiments. This is most probably caused by the low sequence identity with available structural templates, which limits the accuracy of the protein model and in particular of the side-chains' orientations. Methods which transcend the limited sampling of the conformational space of docking may improve the predictions. As an example corroborating this, we review here multi-scale simulations from our lab and show that, for the three complexes studied so far, they significantly enhance the predictive power of the computational approach. Second, our bioinformatics analysis provides support to previous claims that several residues, including those at positions 1.50, 2.50, and 7.52, are involved in receptor activation. PMID:28932739

  17. Differential profile of typical, atypical and third generation antipsychotics at human 5-HT7a receptors coupled to adenylyl cyclase: detection of agonist and inverse agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Ailhaud, Marie-Christine; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Cussac, Didier

    2007-10-01

    5-HT(7) receptors are present in thalamus and limbic structures, and a possible role of these receptors in the pathology of schizophrenia has been evoked. In this study, we examined binding affinity and agonist/antagonist/inverse agonist properties at these receptors of a large series of antipsychotics, i.e., typical, atypical, and third generation compounds preferentially targeting D(2) and 5-HT(1A) sites. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity was measured in HEK293 cells stably expressing the human (h) 5-HT(7a) receptor isoform. 5-HT and 5-CT increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate level by about 20-fold whereas (+)-8-OH-DPAT, the antidyskinetic agent sarizotan, and the novel antipsychotic compound bifeprunox exhibited partial agonist properties at h5-HT(7a) receptors stimulating AC. Other compounds antagonized 5-HT-induced AC activity with pK (B) values which correlated with their pK (i) as determined by competition binding vs [(3)H]5-CT. The selective 5-HT(7) receptor ligand, SB269970, was the most potent antagonist. For antipsychotic compounds, the following rank order of antagonism potency (pK (B)) was ziprasidone > tiospirone > SSR181507 > or = clozapine > or = olanzapine > SLV-314 > SLV-313 > or = aripiprazole > or = chlorpromazine > nemonapride > haloperidol. Interestingly, pretreatment of HEK293-h5-HT(7a) cells with forskolin enhanced basal AC activity and revealed inverse agonist properties for both typical and atypical antipsychotics as well as for aripiprazole. In contrast, other novel antipsychotics exhibited diverse 5-HT(7a) properties; SLV-313 and SLV-314 behaved as quasi-neutral antagonists, SSR181507 acted as an inverse agonist, and bifeprunox as a partial agonist, as mentioned above. In conclusion, the differential properties of third generation antipsychotics at 5-HT(7) receptors may influence their antipsychotic profile.

  18. The estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 can act both as an agonist and an inverse agonist when estrogen receptor α AF-2 is modified

    PubMed Central

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Börjesson, Anna E.; Farman, Helen H.; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H.; Lagerquist, Marie K.; Andersson, Annica; Stubelius, Alexandra; Carlsten, Hans; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-01-01

    The bone-sparing effect of estrogen is primarily mediated via estrogen receptor (ER) α, which stimulates target gene transcription through two activation functions (AFs), AF-1 in the N-terminal and AF-2 in the ligand-binding domain. It was recently demonstrated that the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI) acts as an ER agonist in uterus of mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2. To evaluate the estrogen-like effects of ICI in different tissues, ovariectomized wild-type mice and mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2 (ERαAF-20) were treated with ICI, estradiol, or vehicle for 3 wk. Estradiol increased the trabecular and cortical bone mass as well as the uterine weight, whereas it reduced fat mass, thymus weight, and the growth plate height in wild-type but not in ERαAF-20 mice. Although ICI had no effect in wild-type mice, it exerted tissue-specific effects in ERαAF-20 mice. It acted as an ERα agonist on trabecular bone mass and uterine weight, whereas no effect was seen on cortical bone mass, fat mass, or thymus weight. Surprisingly, a pronounced inverse agonistic activity was seen on the growth plate height, resulting in enhanced longitudinal bone growth. In conclusion, ICI uses ERα AF-1 in a tissue-dependent manner in mice lacking ERαAF-2, resulting in no effect, agonistic activity, or inverse agonistic activity. We propose that ERα lacking AF-2 is constitutively active in the absence of ligand in the growth plate, enabling ICI to act as an inverse agonist. PMID:24395795

  19. The estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 can act both as an agonist and an inverse agonist when estrogen receptor α AF-2 is modified.

    PubMed

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Börjesson, Anna E; Farman, Helen H; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H; Lagerquist, Marie K; Andersson, Annica; Stubelius, Alexandra; Carlsten, Hans; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-01-21

    The bone-sparing effect of estrogen is primarily mediated via estrogen receptor (ER) α, which stimulates target gene transcription through two activation functions (AFs), AF-1 in the N-terminal and AF-2 in the ligand-binding domain. It was recently demonstrated that the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI) acts as an ER agonist in uterus of mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2. To evaluate the estrogen-like effects of ICI in different tissues, ovariectomized wild-type mice and mice with mutations in the ERα AF-2 (ERαAF-2(0)) were treated with ICI, estradiol, or vehicle for 3 wk. Estradiol increased the trabecular and cortical bone mass as well as the uterine weight, whereas it reduced fat mass, thymus weight, and the growth plate height in wild-type but not in ERαAF-2(0) mice. Although ICI had no effect in wild-type mice, it exerted tissue-specific effects in ERαAF-2(0) mice. It acted as an ERα agonist on trabecular bone mass and uterine weight, whereas no effect was seen on cortical bone mass, fat mass, or thymus weight. Surprisingly, a pronounced inverse agonistic activity was seen on the growth plate height, resulting in enhanced longitudinal bone growth. In conclusion, ICI uses ERα AF-1 in a tissue-dependent manner in mice lacking ERαAF-2, resulting in no effect, agonistic activity, or inverse agonistic activity. We propose that ERα lacking AF-2 is constitutively active in the absence of ligand in the growth plate, enabling ICI to act as an inverse agonist.

  20. A comparative safety review between GLP-1 receptor agonists and SGLT2 inhibitors for diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Consoli, Agostino; Formoso, Gloria; Baldassarre, Maria Pompea Antonia; Febo, Fabrizio

    2018-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RA) and sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) are of particular interest in type 2 diabetes treatment strategies, due to their efficacy in reducing HbA1c with a low risk of hypoglycaemia, to their positive effects on body weight and blood pressure and in light of their effects on cardiovascular risk and on nephroprotection emerged from the most recent cardiovascular outcome trials. Since it is therefore very likely that GLP-1RA and SGLT2i use will become more and more common, it is more and more important to gather and discuss information about their safety profile. Area Covered: adverse events and the safety concerns most often emerged in trials with GLP-1RA namely, exenatide long acting release (LAR), dulaglutide, liraglutide, semaglutide, lixisenatide or SGLT2i, namely empagliflozin, dapagliflozin, canagliflozin and SGLT2i with an attempt at comparing the safety profiles of molecules of these two classes. Expert opinion: GLP-1RA and SGLT2i, although each associated with different specific side effects, share a 'similar' safety profile and are both drugs relatively easy to handle. The potentially complementary mechanisms of action, the cardio and nephroprotective effects demonstrated by molecules of both classes, make these drugs potentially useful even in add on to each other.

  1. Perioperative use of selective alpha-2 agonists and antagonists in small animals

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Alpha-2 agonists are the only single class of anesthetic drugs that induce reliable, dose-dependent sedation, analgesia, and muscle relaxation in dogs and cats. Used at low doses, as adjuncts to injectable and inhalational anesthetics, selective alpha-2 agonists dramatically reduce the amount of anesthetic drug required to induce and maintain anesthesia. This reduction in anesthetic requirements is achieved without significant depression of pulmonary function and with limited effects on cardiovascular function. Selective alpha-2 agonists can also be used postoperatively to potentiate the analgesic effects of opioids and other drugs. Given the nearly ideal pharmacodynamic profile and reversibility of alpha-2 agonists, these drugs will play a central role in balanced approaches to anesthesia and the management of perioperative pain in healthy dogs and cats. PMID:15283516

  2. Structure and biological activity of endogenous and synthetic agonists of GPR119

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurenkov, I. N.; Ozerov, A. A.; Kurkin, D. V.; Logvinova, E. O.; Bakulin, D. A.; Volotova, E. V.; Borodin, D. D.

    2018-02-01

    A G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR119, is a promising pharmacological target for a new class of hypoglycaemic drugs with an original mechanism of action, namely, increase in the glucose-dependent incretin and insulin secretion. In 2005, the first ligands were found and in the subsequent years, a large number of GPR119 agonists were synthesized in laboratories in various countries; the safest and most promising agonists have entered phase I and II clinical trials as agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. The review describes the major endogenous GPR119 agonists and the main trends in the design and modification of synthetic structures for increasing the hypoglycaemic activity. The data on synthetic agonists are arranged according to the type of the central core of the molecules. The bibliography includes 104 references.

  3. D1 receptor agonist improves sleep-wake parameters in experimental parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Hyacinthe, Carole; Barraud, Quentin; Tison, François; Bezard, Erwan; Ghorayeb, Imad

    2014-03-01

    Both excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deregulation are part of Parkinson's disease (PD) non-motor symptoms and may complicate dopamine replacement therapy. We report here that dopamine agonists act differentially on sleep architecture in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine macaque monkey. Continuous sleep and wake electroencephalographic monitoring revealed no effect of the selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist quinpirole on EDS, whereas the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF38393 efficiently alleviated EDS and restored REM sleep to baseline values. The present results question the relevance of abandoning D1 receptor agonist treatment in PD as it might actually improve sleep-related disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR (PPAR) AGONISTS AS PROMISING NEW MEDICATIONS FOR DRUG ADDICTION: PRECLINICAL EVIDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Foll, Bernard Le; Ciano, Patricia Di; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Goldberg, Steven R.; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This review examines the growing literature on the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in addiction. There are two subtypes of PPAR receptors that have been studied in addiction: PPAR-α and PPAR-γ. The role of each PPAR subtype in common models of addictive behavior, mainly pre-clinical models, is summarized. In particular, studies are reviewed that investigated the effects of PPAR-α agonists on relapse, sensitization, conditioned place preference, withdrawal and drug intake, and effects of PPAR-γ agonists on relapse, withdrawal and drug intake. Finally, studies that investigated the effects of PPAR agonists on neural pathways of addiction are reviewed. Taken together this preclinical data indicates that PPAR agonists are promising new medications for drug addiction treatment. PMID:23614675

  5. Discovery of novel acetanilide derivatives as potent and selective beta3-adrenergic receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tatsuya; Onda, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Masahiko; Matsui, Tetsuo; Takasu, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Mitsuaki

    2009-06-01

    In the search for potent and selective human beta3-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists as potential drugs for the treatment of obesity and noninsulin-dependent (type II) diabetes, a novel series of acetanilide-based analogues were prepared and their biological activities were evaluated at the human beta3-, beta2-, and beta1-ARs. Among these compounds, 2-pyridylacetanilide (2f), pyrimidin-2-ylacetanilide (2u), and pyrazin-2-ylacetanilide (2v) derivatives exhibited potent agonistic activity at the beta3-AR with functional selectivity over the beta1- and beta2-ARs. In particular, compound 2u was found to be the most potent and selective beta3-AR agonist with an EC(50) value of 0.11 microM and no agonistic activity for either the beta1- or beta2-AR. In addition, 2f, 2u, and 2v showed significant hypoglycemic activity in a rodent diabetic model.

  6. Effects of oxytocin on serotonin 1B agonist-induced autism-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Sarah K; Gray, Andrew C; Woehrle, Nancy S

    2016-11-01

    Social impairments in autism remain poorly understood and without approved pharmacotherapies. Novel animals models are needed to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate novel treatments for the social deficits in autism. Recently, serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1B) agonist challenge in mice was shown to induce autism-like behaviors including perseveration, reduced prepulse inhibition, and delayed alternation deficits. However, the effects of 5-HT1B agonists on autism-related social behaviors in mice remain unknown. Here, we examine the effects of 5-HT1B agonist challenge on sociability and preference for social novelty in mice. We also examine the effects of 5-HT1B agonist treatment on average rearing duration, a putative rodent measure of non-selective attention. Non-selective attention is an associated feature of autism that is also not well understood. We show that 5-HT1B receptor activation reduces sociability, preference for social novelty, and rearing in mice. In addition, we examine the ability of oxytocin, an off-label treatment for the social impairments in autism, to reverse 5-HT1B agonist-induced social and attention deficits in mice. We show that oxytocin restores social novelty preference in mice treated with a 5-HT1B agonist. We also show that oxytocin attenuates 5-HT1B agonist-induced sociability and rearing deficits in mice. Our results suggest that 5-HT1B agonist challenge provides a useful pharmacological mouse model for aspects of autism, and implicate 5-HT1B in autism social and attention deficits. Moreover, our findings suggest that oxytocin may treat the social deficits in autism through a mechanism involving 5-HT1B. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential agonist sensitivity of glycine receptor α2 subunit splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul S; Harvey, Robert J; Smart, Trevor G

    2004-01-01

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) α2A and α2B splice variants differ by a dual, adjacent amino acid substitution from α2AV58,T59 to α2BI58,A59 in the N-terminal extracellular domain. Comparing the effects of the GlyR agonists, glycine, β-alanine and taurine, on the GlyR α2 isoforms, revealed a significant increase in potency for all three agonists at the α2B variant. The sensitivities of the splice variants to the competitive antagonist, strychnine, and to the biphasic modulator Zn2+, were comparable. In contrast, the allosteric inhibitor picrotoxin was more potent on GlyR α2A compared to GlyR α2B receptors. Coexpression of α2A or α2B subunits with the GlyR β subunit revealed that the higher agonist potencies observed with the α2B homomer were retained for the α2Bβ heteromer. The identical sensitivity to strychnine combined with a reduction in the maximum current induced by the partial agonist taurine at the GlyR α2A homomer, suggested that the changed sensitivity to agonists is in accordance with a modulation of agonist efficacy rather than agonist affinity. An effect on agonist efficacy was also supported by using a structural model of the GlyR, localising the region of splice variation to the proposed docking region between GlyR loop 2 and the TM2-3 loop, an area associated with channel activation. The existence of a spasmodic mouse phenotype linked to a GlyR α1A52S mutation, the equivalent position to the source of the α2 splice variation, raises the possibility that the GlyR α2 splice variants may be responsible for distinct roles in neuronal function. PMID:15302677

  8. Evaluation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists on interleukin-5-induced eosinophil differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven G; Hill, Mike; Oliveria, John-Paul; Watson, Brittany M; Baatjes, Adrian J; Dua, Benny; Howie, Karen; Campbell, Heather; Watson, Rick M; Sehmi, Roma; Gauvreau, Gail M

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists have been suggested as novel therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory lung disease, such as allergic asthma. Treatment with PPAR agonists has been shown to inhibit airway eosinophilia in murine models of allergic asthma, which can occur through several mechanisms including attenuated generation of chemoattractants (e.g. eotaxin) and decreased eosinophil migrational responses. In addition, studies report that PPAR agonists can inhibit the differentiation of several cell types. To date, no studies have examined the effects of PPAR agonists on interleukin-5 (IL-5) -induced eosinophil differentiation from haemopoietic progenitor cells. Non-adherent mononuclear cells or CD34+ cells isolated from the peripheral blood of allergic subjects were grown for 2 weeks in Methocult® cultures with IL-5 (10 ng/ml) and IL-3 (25 ng/ml) in the presence of 1–1000 nm PPARα agonist (GW9578), PPARβ/δ agonist (GW501516), PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) or diluent. The number of eosinophil/basophil colony-forming units (Eo/B CFU) was quantified by light microscopy. The signalling mechanism involved was assessed by phosphoflow. Blood-extracted CD34+ cells cultured with IL-5 or IL-5 + IL-3 formed Eo/B CFU, which were significantly inhibited by rosiglitazone (100 nm, P < 0·01) but not GW9578 or GW501516. In addition, rosglitazone significantly inhibited IL-5-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. We observed an inhibitory effect of rosiglitazone on eosinophil differentiation in vitro, mediated by attenuation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signalling pathway. These findings indicate that the PPARγ agonist can attenuate tissue eosinophilia by interfering with local differentiative responses. PMID:24628018

  9. Evaluation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists on interleukin-5-induced eosinophil differentiation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven G; Hill, Mike; Oliveria, John-Paul; Watson, Brittany M; Baatjes, Adrian J; Dua, Benny; Howie, Karen; Campbell, Heather; Watson, Rick M; Sehmi, Roma; Gauvreau, Gail M

    2014-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists have been suggested as novel therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory lung disease, such as allergic asthma. Treatment with PPAR agonists has been shown to inhibit airway eosinophilia in murine models of allergic asthma, which can occur through several mechanisms including attenuated generation of chemoattractants (e.g. eotaxin) and decreased eosinophil migrational responses. In addition, studies report that PPAR agonists can inhibit the differentiation of several cell types. To date, no studies have examined the effects of PPAR agonists on interleukin-5 (IL-5) -induced eosinophil differentiation from haemopoietic progenitor cells. Non-adherent mononuclear cells or CD34(+) cells isolated from the peripheral blood of allergic subjects were grown for 2 weeks in Methocult(®) cultures with IL-5 (10 ng/ml) and IL-3 (25 ng/ml) in the presence of 1-1000 nm PPARα agonist (GW9578), PPARβ/δ agonist (GW501516), PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) or diluent. The number of eosinophil/basophil colony-forming units (Eo/B CFU) was quantified by light microscopy. The signalling mechanism involved was assessed by phosphoflow. Blood-extracted CD34(+) cells cultured with IL-5 or IL-5 + IL-3 formed Eo/B CFU, which were significantly inhibited by rosiglitazone (100 nm, P < 0·01) but not GW9578 or GW501516. In addition, rosglitazone significantly inhibited IL-5-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. We observed an inhibitory effect of rosiglitazone on eosinophil differentiation in vitro, mediated by attenuation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signalling pathway. These findings indicate that the PPARγ agonist can attenuate tissue eosinophilia by interfering with local differentiative responses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cardiac implications for the use of β2-adrenoceptor agonists for the management of muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Peter; Chen, Lu; Parsonage, William A

    2006-01-01

    There are proposals for the implementation of β2-adrenoceptor agonists for the management of muscle wasting diseases. The idea has been initiated by studies in animal models which show that β2-adrenoceptor agonists cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle. Their use in clinical practice will also need an understanding of possible effects of activation of human heart β2-adrenoceptors. Consequences could include an increased probability of arrhythmias in susceptible patients. PMID:16432500

  11. TLR9 agonist protects mice from radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhrajit; Bhanja, Payel; Liu, Laibin; Alfieri, Alan A; Yu, Dong; Kandimalla, Ekambar R; Agrawal, Sudhir; Guha, Chandan

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS) is due to the clonogenic loss of crypt cells and villi depopulation, resulting in disruption of mucosal barrier, bacterial invasion, inflammation and sepsis. Intestinal macrophages could recognize invading bacterial DNA via TLR9 receptors and transmit regenerative signals to the neighboring crypt. We therefore investigated whether systemic administration of designer TLR9 agonist could ameliorate RIGS by activating TLR9. Male C57Bl6 mice were distributed in four experimental cohorts, whole body irradiation (WBI) (8.4-10.4 Gy), TLR9 agonist (1 mg/kg s.c.), 1 h pre- or post-WBI and TLR9 agonist+WBI+iMyd88 (pretreatment with inhibitory peptide against Myd88). Animals were observed for survival and intestine was harvested for histological analysis. BALB/c mice with CT26 colon tumors in abdominal wall were irradiated with 14 Gy single dose of whole abdominal irradiation (AIR) for tumor growth study. Mice receiving pre-WBI TLR9 agonist demonstrated improvement of survival after 10.4 Gy (p<0.03), 9.4 Gy (p<0.008) and 8.4 Gy (p<0.002) of WBI, compared to untreated or iMyd88-treated controls. Post-WBI TLR9 agonist mitigates up to 8.4 Gy WBI (p<0.01). Histological analysis and xylose absorption test demonstrated significant structural and functional restitution of the intestine in WBI+TLR9 agonist cohorts. Although, AIR reduced tumor growth, all animals died within 12 days from RIGS. TLR9 agonist improved the survival of mice beyond 28 days post-AIR (p<0.008) with significant reduction of tumor growth (p<0.0001). TLR9 agonist treatment could serve both as a prophylactic or mitigating agent against acute radiation syndrome and also as an adjuvant therapy to increase the therapeutic ratio of abdominal Radiation Therapy for Gastro Intestinal malignancies.

  12. Rational design of orally-active, pyrrolidine-based progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Scott K.; Washburn, David G.; Frazee, James S.

    2010-09-03

    Using the X-ray crystal structure of an amide-based progesterone receptor (PR) partial agonist bound to the PR ligand binding domain, a novel PR partial agonist class containing a pyrrolidine ring was designed. Members of this class of N-alkylpyrrolidines demonstrate potent and highly selective partial agonism of the progesterone receptor, and one of these analogs was shown to be efficacious upon oral dosing in the OVX rat model of estrogen opposition.

  13. Do Agonistic Motives Matter More Than Anger? Three Studies of Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ewart, Craig K.; Elder, Gavin J.; Smyth, Joshua M.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Jorgensen, Randall S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Three motivational profiles have been associated with recurring psychological stress in low-income youth and young adults: Striving to control others (agonistic striving), striving to control the self (transcendence striving), and not asserting control (dissipated striving); Agonistic Striving has been associated with elevated ambulatory blood pressure during daily activities. Three studies tested the hypotheses that: (1) Agonistic Striving is associated with poor anger regulation, and (2) Agonistic Striving and poor anger regulation interactively elevate blood pressure. Design Motivational profiles, anger regulation, and ambulatory blood pressure were assessed in a multiethnic sample of 264 urban youth. Main outcome measures (1) Anger regulation/recovery during laboratory challenge; (2) anger / blood pressure during daily activities (48 hours). Results and conclusion Replication of the profiles in distant cities showed they occur with similar frequency across differences of region, race, and gender. Analyses controlling for body size, race, and gender revealed that individuals with the Agonistic Striving profile had higher ambulatory pressure, especially during social encounters. They became more openly angry and aggressive when challenged, but did not exhibit difficulty regulating anger in the laboratory, nor did they feel more angry during monitoring. However, individuals with the Agonistic Striving profile who did display poor anger regulation in the lab had the highest blood pressure; deficient self-regulatory capability amplified the positive association between Agonistic Striving and cardiovascular risk in both genders and all ethnic groups. Although anger is thought to increase cardiovascular risk, present findings suggest that anger and elevated blood pressure are co-effects of agonistic struggles to control others. PMID:21534673

  14. Systematic review: cardiovascular safety profile of 5-HT(4) agonists developed for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Tack, J; Camilleri, M; Chang, L; Chey, W D; Galligan, J J; Lacy, B E; Müller-Lissner, S; Quigley, E M M; Schuurkes, J; De Maeyer, J H; Stanghellini, V

    2012-04-01

    The nonselective 5-HT(4) receptor agonists, cisapride and tegaserod have been associated with cardiovascular adverse events (AEs). To perform a systematic review of the safety profile, particularly cardiovascular, of 5-HT(4) agonists developed for gastrointestinal disorders, and a nonsystematic summary of their pharmacology and clinical efficacy. Articles reporting data on cisapride, clebopride, prucalopride, mosapride, renzapride, tegaserod, TD-5108 (velusetrag) and ATI-7505 (naronapride) were identified through a systematic search of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase and Toxfile. Abstracts from UEGW 2006-2008 and DDW 2008-2010 were searched for these drug names, and pharmaceutical companies approached to provide unpublished data. Retrieved articles on pharmacokinetics, human pharmacodynamics and clinical data with these 5-HT(4) agonists, are reviewed and summarised nonsystematically. Articles relating to cardiac safety and tolerability of these agents, including any relevant case reports, are reported systematically. Two nonselective 5-HT(4) agonists had reports of cardiovascular AEs: cisapride (QT prolongation) and tegaserod (ischaemia). Interactions with, respectively, the hERG cardiac potassium channel and 5-HT(1) receptor subtypes have been suggested to account for these effects. No cardiovascular safety concerns were reported for the newer, selective 5-HT(4) agonists prucalopride, velusetrag, naronapride, or for nonselective 5-HT(4) agonists with no hERG or 5-HT(1) affinity (renzapride, clebopride, mosapride). 5-HT(4) agonists for GI disorders differ in chemical structure and selectivity for 5-HT(4) receptors. Selectivity for 5-HT(4) over non-5-HT(4) receptors may influence the agent's safety and overall risk-benefit profile. Based on available evidence, highly selective 5-HT(4) agonists may offer improved safety to treat patients with impaired GI motility. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Systematic review: cardiovascular safety profile of 5-HT4 agonists developed for gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tack, J; Camilleri, M; Chang, L; Chey, W D; Galligan, J J; Lacy, B E; Müller-Lissner, S; Quigley, E M M; Schuurkes, J; Maeyer, J H; Stanghellini, V

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The nonselective 5-HT4 receptor agonists, cisapride and tegaserod have been associated with cardiovascular adverse events (AEs). Aim To perform a systematic review of the safety profile, particularly cardiovascular, of 5-HT4 agonists developed for gastrointestinal disorders, and a nonsystematic summary of their pharmacology and clinical efficacy. Methods Articles reporting data on cisapride, clebopride, prucalopride, mosapride, renzapride, tegaserod, TD-5108 (velusetrag) and ATI-7505 (naronapride) were identified through a systematic search of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase and Toxfile. Abstracts from UEGW 2006–2008 and DDW 2008–2010 were searched for these drug names, and pharmaceutical companies approached to provide unpublished data. Results Retrieved articles on pharmacokinetics, human pharmacodynamics and clinical data with these 5-HT4 agonists, are reviewed and summarised nonsystematically. Articles relating to cardiac safety and tolerability of these agents, including any relevant case reports, are reported systematically. Two nonselective 5-HT4 agonists had reports of cardiovascular AEs: cisapride (QT prolongation) and tegaserod (ischaemia). Interactions with, respectively, the hERG cardiac potassium channel and 5-HT1 receptor subtypes have been suggested to account for these effects. No cardiovascular safety concerns were reported for the newer, selective 5-HT4 agonists prucalopride, velusetrag, naronapride, or for nonselective 5-HT4 agonists with no hERG or 5-HT1 affinity (renzapride, clebopride, mosapride). Conclusions 5-HT4 agonists for GI disorders differ in chemical structure and selectivity for 5-HT4 receptors. Selectivity for 5-HT4 over non-5-HT4 receptors may influence the agent's safety and overall risk–benefit profile. Based on available evidence, highly selective 5-HT4 agonists may offer improved safety to treat patients with impaired GI motility. PMID:22356640

  16. Ipragliflozin Add-on Therapy to a GLP-1 Receptor Agonist in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes (AGATE): A 52-Week Open-Label Study.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Nakao, Ikko; Sakatani, Taishi

    2018-06-20

    Few data are available regarding ipragliflozin treatment in combination with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ipragliflozin in combination with GLP-1 receptor agonists in Japanese patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This multicenter study (consisting of three periods: a 4-week washout period, a 6-week observation period, and a 52-week open-label treatment period) included patients aged ≥ 20 years who received a stable dose/regimen of a GLP-1 receptor agonist either solely or in combination therapy with a sulfonylurea for ≥ 6 weeks, with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of ≥ 7.5% and a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) of ≥ 126 mg/dL. Ipragliflozin treatment was given at a fixed dose of 50 mg/day for 20 weeks, followed by 50 or 100 mg/day for 32 weeks. Changes from baseline in glycemic control and other parameters were examined; safety was also assessed. The mean changes in HbA1c and body weight from baseline to end of treatment were - 0.92% and - 2.69 kg, respectively, in all ipragliflozin-treated patients (n = 103). Overall, sustained reductions from baseline were observed for HbA1c, FPG, self-monitored blood glucose, and body weight during the 52-week treatment. The dose increase of ipragliflozin to 100 mg/day resulted in better glycemic control and weight reduction for patients in whom the 50-mg dose was insufficient. Overall, 46.6% (48/103) of patients experienced drug-related adverse events. The most common drug-related treatment-emergent adverse events were pollakiuria (9.7%), hypoglycemia (8.7%), constipation (6.8%), and thirst (5.8%). Combined therapy with ipragliflozin and GLP-1 receptor agonists/sulfonylureas was significantly efficacious in reducing glycemic parameters in patients with T2DM with inadequate glycemic control, and no major safety concerns were identified. The results from this study suggest

  17. Generalized concentration addition: a method for examining mixtures containing partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Howard, Gregory J; Webster, Thomas F

    2009-08-07

    Environmentally relevant toxic exposures often consist of simultaneous exposure to multiple agents. Methods to predict the expected outcome of such combinations are critical both to risk assessment and to an accurate judgment of whether combinations are synergistic or antagonistic. Concentration addition (CA) has commonly been used to assess the presence of synergy or antagonism in combinations of similarly acting chemicals, and to predict effects of combinations of such agents. CA has the advantage of clear graphical interpretation: Curves of constant joint effect (isoboles) must be negatively sloped straight lines if the mixture is concentration additive. However, CA cannot be directly used to assess combinations that include partial agonists, although such agents are of considerable interest. Here, we propose a natural extension of CA to a functional form that may be applied to mixtures including full agonists and partial agonists. This extended definition, for which we suggest the term "generalized concentration addition," encompasses linear isoboles with slopes of any sign. We apply this approach to the simple example of agents with dose-response relationships described by Hill functions with slope parameter n=1. The resulting isoboles are in all cases linear, with negative, zero and positive slopes. Using simple mechanistic models of ligand-receptor systems, we show that the same isobole pattern and joint effects are generated by modeled combinations of full and partial agonists. Special cases include combinations of two full agonists and a full agonist plus a competitive antagonist.

  18. The Therapeutic Potential of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Agonists as Analgesics without Abuse Liability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although mu opioid (MOP) receptor agonists are the most commonly used analgesics for the treatment of moderate to severe pain in the clinic, the side effects of MOP agonists such as abuse liability limit their value as a medication. Research to identify novel analgesics without adverse effects is pivotal to advance the health care of humans. The nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor, the fourth opioid receptor subtype, mediates distinctive actions in nonhuman primates which suggests the possibility that activity at this receptor may result in strong analgesia in the absence of virtually all of the side effects associated with MOP agonists. The present review highlights the recent progress of pharmacological studies of NOP-related ligands in primates. Selective NOP agonists, either peptidic or nonpeptidic, produce full analgesia in various assays in primates, when delivered systemically or intrathecally. Yet small molecule NOP agonists do not serve as reinforcers, indicating a lack of abuse liability. Given that NOP agonists have low abuse liability and that coactivation of NOP and MOP receptors produces synergistic antinociception, it is worth developing bifunctional NOP/MOP ligands. The outcomes of these studies and recent developments provide new perspectives to establish a translational bridge for understanding the biobehavioral functions of NOP receptors in primates and for facilitating the development of NOP-related ligands as a new generation of analgesics without abuse liability in humans. PMID:23421672

  19. Cholinergic agonists increase intracellular calcium concentration in guinea pig vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Han, W; Zhang, S; Han, D; Jiang, S; Yang, W

    2001-07-01

    To better understand the cholinergic receptors in vestibular hair cells (VHC) and their subtypes, and to investigate the effects of cholinergic agonists on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in guinea pig VHCs. VHCs were isolated from guinea pig crista ampullaris by enzymatic and mechanical methods. The effect of cholinergic agonists on [Ca2+]i was examined using laser scanning confocal microscopy and the Ca2+ sensitive dye Fluo-3. The results showed that the addition of acetylcholine (ACh) and carbachol (CCh), muscamic and nicotinic agonists, induced [Ca2+]i increases in all the VHCs, whereas acetylcholine bromide (ACh-Br), a nicotinic agonist, induced the [Ca2+]i increase in only a small percentage of VHCs. The ACh or CCh-induced Ca2+ response could be partially suppressed by atropine. In the presence of 0.1 mmol/L atropine, the amplitudes of ACh or CCh-induced [Ca2+]i responses became significantly smaller than those in atropine free medium (P < 0.01). The results suggest the existence of cholinergic receptors in guinea pig VHCs. It is the muscamic agonists rather than nicontic receptors that dominate [Ca2+]i variation. Atropine can suppress muscamic agonist-induced Ca2+ responses.

  20. β-Agonist-mediated Relaxation of Airway Smooth Muscle Is Protein Kinase A-dependent*

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Sarah J.; Deshpande, Deepak A.; Tiegs, Brian C.; Misior, Anna M.; Yan, Huandong; Hershfeld, Alena V.; Rich, Thomas C.; Panettieri, Reynold A.; An, Steven S.; Penn, Raymond B.

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled β-agonists are effective at reversing bronchoconstriction in asthma, but the mechanism by which they exert this effect is unclear and controversial. PKA is the historically accepted effector, although this assumption is made on the basis of associative and not direct evidence. Recent studies have asserted that exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), not PKA, mediates the relaxation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) observed with β-agonist treatment. This study aims to clarify the role of PKA in the prorelaxant effects of β-agonists on ASM. Inhibition of PKA activity via expression of the PKI and RevAB peptides results in increased β-agonist-mediated cAMP release, abolishes the inhibitory effect of isoproterenol on histamine-induced intracellular calcium flux, and significantly attenuates histamine-stimulated MLC-20 phosphorylation. Analyses of ASM cell and tissue contraction demonstrate that PKA inhibition eliminates most, if not all, β-agonist-mediated relaxation of contracted smooth muscle. Conversely, Epac knockdown had no effect on the regulation of contraction or procontractile signaling by isoproterenol. These findings suggest that PKA, not Epac, is the predominant and physiologically relevant effector through which β-agonists exert their relaxant effects. PMID:24973219

  1. β-Agonist-mediated relaxation of airway smooth muscle is protein kinase A-dependent.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sarah J; Deshpande, Deepak A; Tiegs, Brian C; Misior, Anna M; Yan, Huandong; Hershfeld, Alena V; Rich, Thomas C; Panettieri, Reynold A; An, Steven S; Penn, Raymond B

    2014-08-15

    Inhaled β-agonists are effective at reversing bronchoconstriction in asthma, but the mechanism by which they exert this effect is unclear and controversial. PKA is the historically accepted effector, although this assumption is made on the basis of associative and not direct evidence. Recent studies have asserted that exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), not PKA, mediates the relaxation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) observed with β-agonist treatment. This study aims to clarify the role of PKA in the prorelaxant effects of β-agonists on ASM. Inhibition of PKA activity via expression of the PKI and RevAB peptides results in increased β-agonist-mediated cAMP release, abolishes the inhibitory effect of isoproterenol on histamine-induced intracellular calcium flux, and significantly attenuates histamine-stimulated MLC-20 phosphorylation. Analyses of ASM cell and tissue contraction demonstrate that PKA inhibition eliminates most, if not all, β-agonist-mediated relaxation of contracted smooth muscle. Conversely, Epac knockdown had no effect on the regulation of contraction or procontractile signaling by isoproterenol. These findings suggest that PKA, not Epac, is the predominant and physiologically relevant effector through which β-agonists exert their relaxant effects. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Targeted Delivery of LXR Agonist Using a Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Lim, Reyna K V; Yu, Shan; Cheng, Bo; Li, Sijia; Kim, Nam-Jung; Cao, Yu; Chi, Victor; Kim, Ji Young; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Schultz, Peter G; Tremblay, Matthew S; Kazane, Stephanie A

    2015-11-18

    Liver X receptor (LXR) agonists have been explored as potential treatments for atherosclerosis and other diseases based on their ability to induce reverse cholesterol transport and suppress inflammation. However, this therapeutic potential has been hindered by on-target adverse effects in the liver mediated by excessive lipogenesis. Herein, we report a novel site-specific antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that selectively delivers a LXR agonist to monocytes/macrophages while sparing hepatocytes. The unnatural amino acid para-acetylphenylalanine (pAcF) was site-specifically incorporated into anti-CD11a IgG, which binds the α-chain component of the lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed on nearly all monocytes and macrophages. An aminooxy-modified LXR agonist was conjugated to anti-CD11a IgG through a stable, cathepsin B cleavable oxime linkage to afford a chemically defined ADC. The anti-CD11a IgG-LXR agonist ADC induced LXR activation specifically in human THP-1 monocyte/macrophage cells in vitro (EC50-27 nM), but had no significant effect in hepatocytes, indicating that payload delivery is CD11a-mediated. Moreover, the ADC exhibited higher-fold activation compared to a conventional synthetic LXR agonist T0901317 (Tularik) (3-fold). This novel ADC represents a fundamentally different strategy that uses tissue targeting to overcome the limitations of LXR agonists for potential use in treating atherosclerosis.

  3. Metformin sensitizes triple-negative breast cancer to proapoptotic TRAIL receptor agonists by suppressing XIAP expression.

    PubMed

    Strekalova, Elena; Malin, Dmitry; Rajanala, Harisha; Cryns, Vincent L

    2017-06-01

    Despite robust antitumor activity in diverse preclinical models, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor agonists have not demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials, underscoring the need to identify agents that enhance their activity. We postulated that the metabolic stress induced by the diabetes drug metformin would sensitize breast cancer cells to TRAIL receptor agonists. Human triple (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2)-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines were treated with TRAIL receptor agonists (monoclonal antibodies or TRAIL peptide), metformin, or the combination. The effects on cell survival, caspase activation, and expression of TRAIL receptors and the antiapoptotic protein XIAP were determined. In addition, XIAP was silenced by RNAi in TNBC cells and the effects on sensitivity to TRAIL were determined. The antitumor effects of metformin, TRAIL, or the combination were evaluated in an orthotopic model of metastatic TNBC. Metformin sensitized diverse TNBC cells to TRAIL receptor agonists. Metformin selectively enhanced the sensitivity of transformed breast epithelial cells to TRAIL receptor agonist-induced caspase activation and apoptosis with little effect on untransformed breast epithelial cells. These effects of metformin were accompanied by robust reductions in the protein levels of XIAP, a negative regulator of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Silencing XIAP in TNBC cells mimicked the TRAIL-sensitizing effects of metformin. Metformin also enhanced the antitumor effects of TRAIL in a metastatic murine TNBC model. Our findings indicate that metformin enhances the activity of TRAIL receptor agonists, thereby supporting the rationale for additional translational studies combining these agents.

  4. Evaluation of novel synthetic TLR7/8 agonists as vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alyson J; Li, Yufeng; Bazin, Hélène G; St-Jean, Julien R; Larocque, Daniel; Evans, Jay T; Baldridge, Jory R

    2016-08-05

    Small-molecule adjuvants that boost and direct adaptive immunity provide a powerful means to increase the effectiveness of vaccines. Through rational design several novel imidazoquinoline and oxoadenine TLR7/8 agonists, each with unique molecular modifications, were synthesized and assessed for their ability to augment adaptive immunity. All agonists bound human TLR7 and TLR8 and induced maturation of both human mDCs and pDCs. All agonists prompted production of type I interferon and/or proinflammatory cytokines, albeit with varying potencies. In most in vitro assays, the oxoadenine class of agonists proved more potent than the imidazoquinolines. Therefore, an optimized oxoadenine TLR7/8 agonist that demonstrated maximal activity in the in vitro assays was further assessed in a vaccine study with the CRM197 antigen in a porcine model. Antigen-specific antibody production was greatly enhanced in a dose dependent manner, with antibody titers increased 800-fold compared to titers from pigs vaccinated with the non-adjuvanted vaccine. Moreover, pigs vaccinated with antigen containing the highest dose of adjuvant promoted a 13-fold increase in the percentage of antigen-specific CD3(+)/CD8(+) T cells over pigs vaccinated with antigen alone. Together this work demonstrates the promise of these novel TLR7/8 agonists as effective human vaccine adjuvants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of novel synthetic TLR7/8 agonists as vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alyson J.; Li, Yufeng; Bazin, Hélène G.; St-Jean, Julien R.; Larocque, Daniel; Evans, Jay T.; Baldridge, Jory R.

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule adjuvants that boost and direct adaptive immunity provide a powerful means to increase the effectiveness of vaccines. Through rational design several novel imidazoquinoline and oxoadenine TLR7/8 agonists, each with unique molecular modifications, were synthesized and assessed for their ability to augment adaptive immunity. All agonists bound human TLR7 and TLR8 and induced maturation of both human mDCs and pDCs. All agonists prompted production of type I interferon and/or proinflammatory cytokines, albeit with varying potencies. In most in vitro assays, the oxoadenine class of agonists proved more potent than the imidazoquinolines. Therefore, an optimized oxoadenine TLR7/8 agonist that demonstrated maximal activity in the in vitro assays was further assessed in a vaccine study with the CRM197 antigen in a porcine model. Antigen-specific antibody production was greatly enhanced in a dose dependent manner, with antibody titers increased 800-fold compared to titers from pigs vaccinated with the non-adjuvanted vaccine. Moreover, pigs vaccinated with antigen containing the highest dose of adjuvant promoted a 13-fold increase in the percentage of antigen-specific CD3+/CD8+ T cells over pigs vaccinated with antigen alone. Together this work demonstrates the promise of these novel TLR7/8 agonists as effective human vaccine adjuvants. PMID:27402566

  6. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Agonistic Behaviour in Juvenile Crocodilians

    PubMed Central

    Brien, Matthew L.; Lang, Jeffrey W.; Webb, Grahame J.; Stevenson, Colin; Christian, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined agonistic behaviour in seven species of hatchling and juvenile crocodilians held in small groups (N = 4) under similar laboratory conditions. Agonistic interactions occurred in all seven species, typically involved two individuals, were short in duration (5–15 seconds), and occurred between 1600–2200 h in open water. The nature and extent of agonistic interactions, the behaviours displayed, and the level of conspecific tolerance varied among species. Discrete postures, non-contact and contact movements are described. Three of these were species-specific: push downs by C. johnstoni; inflated tail sweeping by C. novaeguineae; and, side head striking combined with tail wagging by C. porosus. The two long-snouted species (C. johnstoni and G. gangeticus) avoided contact involving the head and often raised the head up out of the way during agonistic interactions. Several behaviours not associated with aggression are also described, including snout rubbing, raising the head up high while at rest, and the use of vocalizations. The two most aggressive species (C. porosus, C. novaeguineae) appeared to form dominance hierarchies, whereas the less aggressive species did not. Interspecific differences in agonistic behaviour may reflect evolutionary divergence associated with morphology, ecology, general life history and responses to interspecific conflict in areas where multiple species have co-existed. Understanding species-specific traits in agonistic behaviour and social tolerance has implications for the controlled raising of different species of hatchlings for conservation, management or production purposes. PMID:24349018

  7. Agonist-induced Ca2+ Sensitization in Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Artamonov, Mykhaylo V.; Momotani, Ko; Stevenson, Andra; Trentham, David R.; Derewenda, Urszula; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.; Read, Paul W.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Somlyo, Avril V.

    2013-01-01

    Many agonists, acting through G-protein-coupled receptors and Gα subunits of the heterotrimeric G-proteins, induce contraction of smooth muscle through an increase of [Ca2+]i as well as activation of the RhoA/RhoA-activated kinase pathway that amplifies the contractile force, a phenomenon known as Ca2+ sensitization. Gα12/13 subunits are known to activate the regulator of G-protein signaling-like family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs), which includes PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG) and leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG). However, their contributions to Ca2+-sensitized force are not well understood. Using permeabilized blood vessels from PRG(−/−) mice and a new method to silence LARG in organ-cultured blood vessels, we show that both RhoGEFs are activated by the physiologically and pathophysiologically important thromboxane A2 and endothelin-1 receptors. The co-activation is the result of direct and independent activation of both RhoGEFs as well as their co-recruitment due to heterodimerization. The isolated recombinant C-terminal domain of PRG, which is responsible for heterodimerization with LARG, strongly inhibited Ca2+-sensitized force. We used photolysis of caged phenylephrine, caged guanosine 5′-O-(thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) in solution, and caged GTPγS or caged GTP loaded on the RhoA·RhoGDI complex to show that the recruitment and activation of RhoGEFs is the cause of a significant time lag between the initial Ca2+ transient and phasic force components and the onset of Ca2+-sensitized force. PMID:24106280

  8. Radiolabelled D2 agonists as prolactinoma imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, C.A.

    1989-08-01

    During the past year, further studies on mAChR were conducted. These studies included verification of the difference in pituitary distribution based on ligand charge. The pituitary localization of TRB. A neutral mAChR ligand, was verified. The lack of QNB blockade of TRB uptake was tested by blockage with scopolamine, another mAChR antagonist and by testing the effect in a different strain of rat. Neither scopolamine or change of rat strain had any effect. We concluded that TRB uptake in pituitary is not a receptor-mediated process. Further studies were conducted with an additional quaternized mAChR ligand: MQNB. Pituitary localization of MQNB,more » like MTRB, could be blocked by pretreatment with QNB. We have tentatively concluded that permanent charge on a mAChR antagonist changes the mechanism of uptake in the pituitary. Time course studies and the effects of DES on myocardial uptake are reported. A brief report on preliminary results of evaluation of quaternized mAChR ligands in the heart is included. In a limited series of such ligands, we have observed a single binding site and a difference in B{sub max} values: QNB competition studies yield larger B{sub max} values than studies with {sup 3}H-NMS. Progress in the synthesis of D{sub 2} agonists includes solving a synthetic problem and preparation of the cold'' analogue of N-0437 using procedures applicable to eventual synthesis with {sup 11}C-CH{sub 3}I. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.« less

  9. A RETINOIC ACID β2-RECEPTOR AGONIST EXERTS CARDIOPROTECTIVE EFFECTS.

    PubMed

    Marino, Alice; Sakamoto, Takuya; Tang, Xiao-Han; Gudas, Lorraine J; Levi, Roberto

    2018-06-15

    We previously discovered that oral treatment with AC261066, a synthetic selective agonist for the retinoic acid β2-receptor (RARβ2), decreases oxidative stress in the liver, pancreas, and kidney of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Since hyperlipidemic states are causally associated with myocardial ischemia and oxidative stress, we have now investigated the effects of AC261066 in an ex-vivo ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury model in hearts of two prototypic dysmetabolic mice. We found that a 6-week oral treatment with AC261066 in both genetically hypercholesterolemic (ApoE-/-) and obese (HFD-fed) wild-type mice exerts protective effects when their hearts are subsequently subjected to I/R ex vivo in the absence of added drug. In ApoE-/- mice this cardioprotection ensued without hyperlipidemic changes. Cardioprotection consisted of an attenuation of infarct size, diminution of norepinephrine (NE) spillover, and alleviation of reperfusion arrhythmias. This cardioprotection was associated with a reduction in oxidative stress and mast cell (MC) degranulation. We suggest that the reduction in myocardial injury and adrenergic activation, and the antiarrhythmic effects result from decreased formation of oxygen radicals and toxic aldehydes known to elicit the release of MC-derived renin, promoting the activation of local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) leading to enhanced NE release and reperfusion arrhythmias. Because these beneficial effects of AC261066 occurred at the ex-vivo level following oral drug treatment, our data suggest that AC261066 could be viewed as a therapeutic means to reduce I/R injury of the heart, and potentially also considered in the treatment of other cardiovascular ailments such as chronic arrhythmias, and cardiac failure. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Long-term management of type 2 diabetes with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Hamish; Nayar, Rahul; Rajeswaran, Chinnadorai; Jandhyala, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Continuously reducing excess blood glucose is a primary goal for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Most patients with T2D require glucose-lowering medications to achieve and maintain adequate glycemic control; however, treatment failure may occur, limiting treatment options. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are an emerging therapeutic class that can be prescribed for patients instead of basal insulin after the failure of oral therapies. Recent studies have focused on the durability and tolerability of long-term GLP-1RA therapy. This review summarizes the key efficacy and safety findings from prospective phase 3 clinical studies of at least 76 weeks' duration for the GLP-1RAs currently approved in the United States and the European Union (albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide twice daily [BID], exenatide once weekly [QW], liraglutide, and lixisenatide). Currently, most of the long-term data are from uncontrolled extension studies, and continuous patient benefit has been observed for up to 3 years with multiple GLP-1RAs. Four-year comparative data demonstrated a longer time to treatment failure for exenatide BID than for sulfonylurea, and 3-year comparative extension data demonstrated greater glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reductions and weight loss with exenatide QW than with insulin glargine. Currently, the longest extension study for a GLP-1RA is the DURATION-1 study of exenatide QW, with >7 years of clinical data available. Data from DURATION-1 demonstrated that continuous HbA1c reductions and weight loss were observed for the patients continuing on the treatment, with no unexpected adverse events. Taken together, these data support GLP-1RAs as a long-term noninsulin treatment option after the failure of oral therapies.

  11. Importance of agonists in alpha-adrenoceptor classification and localisation of alpha1-adrenoceptors in human prostate.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J C; Naghadeh, M A; Pediani, J D; Mackenzie, J F; Daly, C J

    1999-01-01

    alpha-Adrenoceptor blocker drugs are commonly used in the clinical (non-surgical) treatment of BPH. alpha1-adrenoceptors were originally sub-divided using agonists but, subsequently, were sub-divided using only antagonists in ligand-ligand interactions, which did not require agonists at all. Ultimately, proof that adrenoceptors are functional receptors for the natural ligands, noradrenaline and adrenaline, requires that agonists be used. The earlier excitement engendered by finding varying agonist potency series in different tissues has not been revisited to place it in the context of current concepts of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. This review will consider the advantages and limitations of different agonists for the study of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes including 'extreme' examples where the archetypal alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine activates alpha2-adrenoceptors and others where UK14304, often the alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist of choice, activates alpha1-adrenoceptors. New work will also be presented showing the interaction between agonists and the fluorescent alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist QAPB. This introduces the novel point of view of studying the displacement of antagonists by agonists. Possible errors in antagonist classification arising from complexity in the actions of agonists and the recently developed method of fluorescent ligand binding on isolated living human prostatic smooth muscle cells will be discussed.

  12. Cholecystokinin type B receptor antagonist PD-136,450 is a partial secretory agonist in the stomach and a full agonist in the pancreas of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schmassmann, A; Garner, A; Flogerzi, B; Hasan, M Y; Sanner, M; Varga, L; Halter, F

    1994-01-01

    Gastrin (cholecystokinin type B (CCK-B)) receptor antagonists may help to elucidate the physiological role of gastrin, have therapeutic potential as acid antisecretory drugs, and may be of use as adjuvant therapy for gastrin sensitive tumours. In binding studies, the gastrin receptor antagonist PD-136,450 had at least 1000 fold greater affinity for gastrin (CCK-B) than CCK-A receptors. In this study the biological activity of PD-136,450 was evaluated in conscious and anaesthetised rats. PD-136,450 antagonised gastrin stimulated acid secretion after subcutaneous (IC50: 0.28 mumol/kg; conscious rats) and intravenous (IC50: 0.17 mumol/kg; anaesthetised rats) administration. In basal secreting fistula animals, the compound stimulated acid output to 30 (5)% of the maximal response to gastrin. Stimulant activity was not caused by gastrin release. As an agonist PD-136,450 was about 350 times less potent than gastrin-17 on a molar basis. In addition, PD-136,450 was a powerful agonist of pancreatic secretion in anaesthetised rats. The specific gastrin antagonist L-365,260 inhibited the (partial) agonist activity of PD-136,450 in the stomach and the specific CCK-A receptor antagonist L-364,718 inhibited the agonist activity of PD-136,450 in the pancreas. It is concluded that the agonist effect of PD-136,450 is mediated via interaction with the gastrin (CCK-B) receptor in the stomach and the CCK-A receptor in the pancreas. PMID:8307482

  13. Cigarette smoke exposure inhibits contact hypersensitivity via the generation of platelet activating factor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Petrache, Irina; Van Demark, Mary J; Rashid, Badri M.; Ocana, Jesus A.; Tang, Yuxuan; Yi, Qiaofang; Turner, Matthew J.; Konger, Raymond L.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have established that pro-oxidative stressors suppress host immunity due to their ability to generate oxidized lipids with PAF-receptor (PAF-R) agonist activity. Although exposure to the pro-oxidative stressor cigarette smoke (CS) is known to exert immunomodulatory effects, little is known regarding the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in these events. The current studies sought to determine the role of PAF-R signaling in CS-mediated immunomodulatory effects. We demonstrate that CS exposure induces the generation of a transient PAF-R agonistic activity in the blood of mice. CS exposure inhibits contact hypersensitivity in a PAF-R-dependent manner as PAF-R-deficient mice were resistant to these effects. Blocking PAF-R agonist production either by systemic antioxidants or treatment with serum PAF-acetyl hydrolase enzyme blocked both the CS-mediated generation of PAF-R-agonists and PAF-R dependent inhibition of CHS reactions, indicating a role for oxidized glycerophosphocholines with PAF-R agonistic activity in this process. In addition, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition did not block PAF-R agonist production but prevented CS-induced inhibition of CHS. This suggests that COX-2 acts downstream of the PAF-R in mediating CS-induced systemic immunosuppression. Moreover, CS-exposure induced a significant increase in the expression of the regulatory T cell reporter gene in FoxP3EGFP mice but not in FoxP3EGFP mice on a PAF-R-deficient background. Finally, Treg depletion via anti-CD25 antibodies blocked CS-mediated inhibition of CHS, indicating the potential involvement of Tregs in CS-mediated systemic immunosuppression. These studies provide the first evidence that the pro-oxidative stressor CS can modulate cutaneous immunity via the generation of PAF-R agonists produced through lipid oxidation. PMID:23355733

  14. Extrinsic factors regulate partial agonist efficacy of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Farroni, Jeffrey S; McCool, Brian A

    2004-08-09

    Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in many adult forebrain regions consist of alpha2 + beta heteromeric channels. This subunit composition is distinct from the alpha1 + beta channels found throughout the adult spinal cord. Unfortunately, the pharmacology of forebrain alpha2beta receptors are poorly defined compared to 'neonatal' alpha2 homomeric channels or 'spinal' alpha1beta heteromers. In addition, the pharmacologic properties of native alpha2beta glycine receptors have been generally distinct from receptors produced by heterologous expression. To identify subtype-specific pharmacologic tools for the forebrain alpha2beta receptors, it is important to identify a heterologous expression system that closely resembles these native glycine-gated chloride channels. While exploring pharmacological properties of alpha2beta glycine receptors compared to alpha2-homomers, we found that distinct heterologous expression systems appeared to differentially influence partial agonist pharmacology. The beta-amino acid taurine possessed 30-50% efficacy for alpha2-containing receptor isoforms when expressed in HEK 293 cells. However, taurine efficacy was dramatically reduced in L-cell fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained for beta-alanine. The efficacy of these partial agonists was also strongly reduced by the beta subunit. There were no significant differences in apparent strychnine affinity values calculated from concentration-response data between expression systems or subunit combinations. Nor did relative levels of expression correlate with partial agonist efficacy when compared within or between several different expression systems. Finally, disruption of the tubulin cytoskeleton reduced the efficacy of partial agonists in a subunit-dependent, but system-independent, fashion. Our results suggest that different heterologous expression systems can dramatically influence the agonist pharmacology of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. In the systems examine here

  15. Comparative Gene Expression Profiles Induced by PPARγ and PPARα/γ Agonists in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rogue, Alexandra; Lambert, Carine; Jossé, Rozenn; Antherieu, Sebastien; Spire, Catherine; Claude, Nancy; Guillouzo, André

    2011-01-01

    Background Several glitazones (PPARγ agonists) and glitazars (dual PPARα/γ agonists) have been developed to treat hyperglycemia and, simultaneously, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, respectively. However, most have caused idiosyncratic hepatic or extrahepatic toxicities through mechanisms that remain largely unknown. Since the liver plays a key role in lipid metabolism, we analyzed changes in gene expression profiles induced by these two types of PPAR agonists in human hepatocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Primary human hepatocytes and the well-differentiated human hepatoma HepaRG cells were exposed to different concentrations of two PPARγ (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) and two PPARα/γ (muraglitazar and tesaglitazar) agonists for 24 h and their transcriptomes were analyzed using human pangenomic Agilent microarrays. Principal Component Analysis, hierarchical clustering and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis® revealed large inter-individual variability in the response of the human hepatocyte populations to the different compounds. Many genes involved in lipid, carbohydrate, xenobiotic and cholesterol metabolism, as well as inflammation and immunity, were regulated by both PPARγ and PPARα/γ agonists in at least a number of human hepatocyte populations and/or HepaRG cells. Only a few genes were selectively deregulated by glitazars when compared to glitazones, indicating that PPARγ and PPARα/γ agonists share most of their target genes. Moreover, some target genes thought to be regulated only in mouse or to be expressed in Kupffer cells were also found to be responsive in human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. Conclusions/Significance This first comprehensive analysis of gene regulation by PPARγ and PPARα/γ agonists favor the conclusion that glitazones and glitazars share most of their target genes and induce large differential changes in gene profiles in human hepatocytes depending on hepatocyte donor, the compound class and/or individual compound, thereby

  16. Find novel dual-agonist drugs for treating type 2 diabetes by means of cheminformatics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Ma, Ying; Wang, Run-Ling; Xu, Wei-Ren; Wang, Shu-Qing; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the world as well as the increasing reports about the adverse side effects of the existing diabetes treatment drugs have made developing new and effective drugs against the disease a very high priority. In this study, we report ten novel compounds found by targeting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) using virtual screening and core hopping approaches. PPARs have drawn increasing attention for developing novel drugs to treat diabetes due to their unique functions in regulating glucose, lipid, and cholesterol metabolism. The reported compounds are featured with dual functions, and hence belong to the category of dual agonists. Compared with the single PPAR agonists, the dual PPAR agonists, formed by combining the lipid benefit of PPARα agonists (such as fibrates) and the glycemic advantages of the PPARγ agonists (such as thiazolidinediones), are much more powerful in treating diabetes because they can enhance metabolic effects while minimizing the side effects. This was observed in the studies on molecular dynamics simulations, as well as on absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, that these novel dual agonists not only possessed the same function as ragaglitazar (an investigational drug developed by Novo Nordisk for treating type 2 diabetes) did in activating PPARα and PPARγ, but they also had more favorable conformation for binding to the two receptors. Moreover, the residues involved in forming the binding pockets of PPARα and PPARγ among the top ten compounds are explicitly presented, and this will be very useful for the in-depth conduction of mutagenesis experiments. It is anticipated that the ten compounds may become potential drug candidates, or at the very least, the findings reported here may stimulate new strategies or provide useful insights for designing new and more powerful dual-agonist drugs for treating type 2 diabetes.

  17. Antimitogenic effect of bitter taste receptor agonists on airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Panebra, Alfredo; Pera, Tonio; Tiegs, Brian C; Hershfeld, Alena; Kenyon, Lawrence C; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2016-02-15

    Airway remodeling is a hallmark feature of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical studies and animal models have demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and ASM thickness is correlated with severity of the disease. Current medications control inflammation and reverse airway obstruction effectively but have limited effect on remodeling. Recently we identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2R) on ASM cells, and activation with known TAS2R agonists resulted in ASM relaxation and bronchodilation. These studies suggest that TAS2R can be used as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. To further establish their effectiveness, in this study we aimed to determine the effects of TAS2R agonists on ASM growth and promitogenic signaling. Pretreatment of healthy and asthmatic human ASM cells with TAS2R agonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of ASM proliferation. The antimitogenic effect of TAS2R ligands was not dependent on activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or high/intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels. Immunoblot analyses revealed that TAS2R agonists inhibit growth factor-activated protein kinase B phosphorylation without affecting the availability of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, suggesting TAS2R agonists block signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists involved inhibition of induced transcription factors (activator protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, E2 factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells) and inhibition of expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes, suggesting a direct inhibition of cell cycle progression. Collectively, these findings establish the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and signaling pathways that can be targeted to reduce or prevent airway remodeling as well as

  18. Self-Administration of Cocaine Induces Dopamine-Independent Self-Administration of Sigma Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Mereu, Maddalena; Soto, Paul L; Tanda, Gianluigi; Katz, Jonathan L

    2013-01-01

    Sigma1 receptors (σ1Rs) are intracellularly mobile chaperone proteins implicated in several disease processes, as well as psychiatric disorders and substance abuse. Here we report that although selective σ1R agonists (PRE-084, (+)-pentazocine) lacked reinforcing effects in drug-naive rats, over the course of 28 experimental sessions, which was more than sufficient for acquisition of cocaine self-administration, responding was not maintained by either σ1R agonist. In contrast, after subjects self-administered cocaine σ1R agonists were readily self-administered. The induced reinforcing effects were long lasting; a response for which subjects had no history of reinforcement was newly conditioned with both σ1R agonists, extinguished when injections were discontinued, and reconditioned when σ1R agonists again followed responses. Experience with food reinforcement was ineffective as an inducer of σ1R agonist reinforcement. Although a variety of dopamine receptor antagonists blocked cocaine self-administration, consistent with its dopaminergic mechanism, PRE-084 self-administration was entirely insensitive to these drugs. Conversely, the σR antagonist, BD1063, blocked PRE-084 self-administration but was inactive against cocaine. In microdialysis studies i.v. PRE-084 did not significantly stimulate dopamine at doses that were self-administered in rats either with or without a cocaine self-administration experience. The results indicate that cocaine experience induces reinforcing effects of previously inactive σ1R agonists, and that the mechanism underlying these reinforcing effects is dopamine independent. It is further suggested that induced σ1R mechanisms may have an essential role in treatment-resistant stimulant abuse, suggesting new approaches for the development of effective medications for stimulant abuse. PMID:23187725

  19. Self-administration of cocaine induces dopamine-independent self-administration of sigma agonists.

    PubMed

    Hiranita, Takato; Mereu, Maddalena; Soto, Paul L; Tanda, Gianluigi; Katz, Jonathan L

    2013-03-01

    Sigma(1) receptors (σ(1)Rs) are intracellularly mobile chaperone proteins implicated in several disease processes, as well as psychiatric disorders and substance abuse. Here we report that although selective σ(1)R agonists (PRE-084, (+)-pentazocine) lacked reinforcing effects in drug-naive rats, over the course of 28 experimental sessions, which was more than sufficient for acquisition of cocaine self-administration, responding was not maintained by either σ(1)R agonist. In contrast, after subjects self-administered cocaine σ(1)R agonists were readily self-administered. The induced reinforcing effects were long lasting; a response for which subjects had no history of reinforcement was newly conditioned with both σ(1)R agonists, extinguished when injections were discontinued, and reconditioned when σ(1)R agonists again followed responses. Experience with food reinforcement was ineffective as an inducer of σ(1)R agonist reinforcement. Although a variety of dopamine receptor antagonists blocked cocaine self-administration, consistent with its dopaminergic mechanism, PRE-084 self-administration was entirely insensitive to these drugs. Conversely, the σR antagonist, BD1063, blocked PRE-084 self-administration but was inactive against cocaine. In microdialysis studies i.v. PRE-084 did not significantly stimulate dopamine at doses that were self-administered in rats either with or without a cocaine self-administration experience. The results indicate that cocaine experience induces reinforcing effects of previously inactive σ(1)R agonists, and that the mechanism underlying these reinforcing effects is dopamine independent. It is further suggested that induced σ(1)R mechanisms may have an essential role in treatment-resistant stimulant abuse, suggesting new approaches for the development of effective medications for stimulant abuse.

  20. Antimitogenic effect of bitter taste receptor agonists on airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Panebra, Alfredo; Pera, Tonio; Tiegs, Brian C.; Hershfeld, Alena; Kenyon, Lawrence C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a hallmark feature of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical studies and animal models have demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and ASM thickness is correlated with severity of the disease. Current medications control inflammation and reverse airway obstruction effectively but have limited effect on remodeling. Recently we identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2R) on ASM cells, and activation with known TAS2R agonists resulted in ASM relaxation and bronchodilation. These studies suggest that TAS2R can be used as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. To further establish their effectiveness, in this study we aimed to determine the effects of TAS2R agonists on ASM growth and promitogenic signaling. Pretreatment of healthy and asthmatic human ASM cells with TAS2R agonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of ASM proliferation. The antimitogenic effect of TAS2R ligands was not dependent on activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or high/intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K+ channels. Immunoblot analyses revealed that TAS2R agonists inhibit growth factor-activated protein kinase B phosphorylation without affecting the availability of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, suggesting TAS2R agonists block signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists involved inhibition of induced transcription factors (activator protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, E2 factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells) and inhibition of expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes, suggesting a direct inhibition of cell cycle progression. Collectively, these findings establish the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and signaling pathways that can be targeted to reduce or prevent airway remodeling as well as

  1. PPAR agonists regulate brain gene expression: relationship to their effects on ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Laura B; Most, Dana; Blednov, Yuri A; Harris, R Adron

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that act as ligand-activated transcription factors. Although prescribed for dyslipidemia and type-II diabetes, PPAR agonists also possess anti-addictive characteristics. PPAR agonists decrease ethanol consumption and reduce withdrawal severity and susceptibility to stress-induced relapse in rodents. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms facilitating these properties have yet to be investigated. We tested three PPAR agonists in a continuous access two-bottle choice (2BC) drinking paradigm and found that tesaglitazar (PPARα/γ; 1.5 mg/kg) and fenofibrate (PPARα; 150 mg/kg) decreased ethanol consumption in male C57BL/6J mice while bezafibrate (PPARα/γ/β; 75 mg/kg) did not. We hypothesized that changes in brain gene expression following fenofibrate and tesaglitazar treatment lead to reduced ethanol drinking. We studied unbiased genomic profiles in areas of the brain known to be important for ethanol dependence, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and amygdala, and also profiled gene expression in liver. Genomic profiles from the non-effective bezafibrate treatment were used to filter out genes not associated with ethanol consumption. Because PPAR agonists are anti-inflammatory, they would be expected to target microglia and astrocytes. Surprisingly, PPAR agonists produced a strong neuronal signature in mouse brain, and fenofibrate and tesaglitazar (but not bezafibrate) targeted a subset of GABAergic interneurons in the amygdala. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) revealed co-expression of treatment-significant genes. Functional annotation of these gene networks suggested that PPAR agonists might act via neuropeptide and dopaminergic signaling pathways in the amygdala. Our results reveal gene targets through which PPAR agonists can affect alcohol consumption behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential effects of subtype-specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists on early and late hippocampal LTP.

    PubMed

    Kroker, Katja S; Rast, Georg; Rosenbrock, Holger

    2011-12-05

    Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in several neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, Tourette's syndrome, schizophrenia, depression, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and anxiety. Currently, approaches selectively targeting the activation of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are in clinical development for treatment of memory impairment of Alzheimer's disease patients. These are α4β2 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists which are believed to enhance cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, respectively. In order to gain a better insight into the mechanistic role of these two nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in learning and memory, we investigated the effects of the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist TC-1827 and the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist SSR180711 on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a widely accepted cellular experimental model of memory formation. Generally, LTP is distinguished in an early and a late form, the former being protein-synthesis independent and the latter being protein-synthesis dependent. TC-1827 was found to increase early LTP in a bell-shaped dose dependent manner, but did not affect late LTP. In contrast, the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist SSR180711 showed enhancing effects on both early and late LTP in a bell-shaped manner. Furthermore, SSR180711 not only increased early LTP, but also transformed it into late LTP, which was not observed with the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist. Therefore, based on these findings α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (partial) agonists appear to exhibit stronger efficacy on memory improvement than α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists inhibit neurogenic inflammations in guinea pig airways.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Shigemi; Morimoto, Hiroshi; Ohori, Makoto; Yamada, Yumi; Abe, Toshio; Arisaka, Osamu

    2005-09-01

    Although neurogenic inflammation via the activation of C fibers in the airway must have an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma, their regulatory mechanism remains uncertain. The pharmacological profiles of endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists on the activation of C fibers in airway tissues were investigated and the mechanisms how cannabinoids regulate airway inflammatory reactions were clarified. The effects of endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists on electrical field stimulation-induced bronchial smooth muscle contraction, capsaicin-induced bronchoconstriction and capsaicin-induced substance P release in guinea pig airway tissues were investigated. The influences of cannabinoid receptor antagonists and K+ channel blockers to the effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on these respiratory reactions were examined. Both endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists, anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide, inhibited electrical field stimulation-induced guinea pig bronchial smooth muscle contraction, but not neurokinin A-induced contraction. A cannabinoid CB2 antagonist, SR 144528, reduced the inhibitory effect of endogenous agonists, but not a cannabinoid CB1 antagonist, SR 141716A. Inhibitory effects of agonists were also reduced by the pretreatment of large conductance Ca2+ -activated K+ channel (maxi-K+ channel) blockers, iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin, but not by other K+ channel blockers, dendrotoxin or glibenclamide. Anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide blocked the capsaicin-induced release of substance P-like immunoreactivity from guinea pig airway tissues. Additionally, intravenous injection of palmitoylethanolamide dose-dependently inhibited capsaicin-induced guinea pig bronchoconstriction, but not neurokinin A-induced reaction. However, anandamide did not reduce capsaicin-induced guinea pig bronchoconstriction. These findings suggest that endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists inhibit the activation of C fibers via cannabinoid CB2 receptors and

  4. A molecular characterization of the agonist binding site of a nematode cys-loop GABA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Mark D; Kwaka, Ariel; Callanan, Micah K; Nusrat, Humza; Desaulniers, Jean-Paul; Forrester, Sean G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cys-loop GABA receptors represent important targets for human chemotherapeutics and insecticides and are potential targets for novel anthelmintics (nematicides). However, compared with insect and mammalian receptors, little is known regarding the pharmacological characteristics of nematode Cys-loop GABA receptors. Here we have investigated the agonist binding site of the Cys-loop GABA receptor UNC-49 (Hco-UNC-49) from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Experimental Approach We used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology to measure channel activation by classical GABA receptor agonists on Hco-UNC-49 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, along with site-directed mutagenesis and in silico homology modelling. Key Results The sulphonated molecules P4S and taurine had no effect on Hco-UNC-49. Other classical Cys-loop GABAA receptor agonists tested on the Hco-UNC-49B/C heteromeric channel had a rank order efficacy of GABA > trans-4-aminocrotonic acid > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid (IMA) > (R)-(−)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [R(−)-GABOB] > (S)-(+)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [S(+)-GABOB] > guanidinoacetic acid > isonipecotic acid > 5-aminovaleric acid (DAVA) (partial agonist) > β-alanine (partial agonist). In silico ligand docking revealed some variation in binding between agonists. Mutagenesis of a key serine residue in binding loop C to threonine had minimal effects on GABA and IMA but significantly increased the maximal response to DAVA and decreased twofold the EC50 for R(−)- and S(+)-GABOB. Conclusions and Implications The pharmacological profile of Hco-UNC-49 differed from that of vertebrate Cys-loop GABA receptors and insect resistance to dieldrin receptors, suggesting differences in the agonist binding pocket. These findings could be exploited to develop new drugs that specifically target GABA receptors of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25850584

  5. Feasibility of a randomized single-blind crossover trial to assess the effects of the second-generation slow-release dopamine agonists pramipexole and ropinirole on cued recall memory in idiopathic mild or moderate Parkinson's disease without cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Thomas A; Edelstyn, Nicola M J; Longshaw, Laura; Sim, Julius; Watts, Keira; Mayes, Andrew R; Murray, Michael; Ellis, Simon J

    2018-01-01

    The aim was to assess the feasibility of a single-centre, single-blind, randomized, crossover design to explore the effects of two slow-release dopamine agonists, ropinirole and pramipexole, on cued recall in Parkinson's disease. As the design required a switch from the prescribed agonist (pramipexole-to-ropinirole, or ropinirole-to-pramipexole), the primary objectives were to (a) examine the efficacy of processes and procedures used to manage symptoms during the washout period and (b) to use cued recall estimates to inform a power calculation for a definitive trial. Secondary objectives were to assess consent and missing data rates, acceptability of clinical support for the OFF sessions, experience of the OFF sessions and of agonist switching, barriers-to-participation for patients and informal caregivers. Patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to two treatment arms and stabilized on each agonist for 6 weeks. The arms differed only in the sequence in which the agonists were administered. Cued recall was assessed ON medication and, following a washout period resulting in 93.75% agonist elimination, OFF medication. A total of 220 patients were screened: 145 were excluded and 75 invitations to participate were sent to eligible patients. Fifty-three patients declined, 22 consented and 16 completed the study. There were no serious adverse events, and rates of non-serious adverse events were equivalent between the agonists. Using the largest standard deviation (SD) of the ON-OFF difference cued recall score (inflated by ~25% to give a conservative estimate of the SD in a definitive trial) and assuming an effect of at least 10% of the observed range of OFF medication cued recall scores for either agonist to be clinically important, a main trial requires a sample size of just under 150 patients. The consent and missing data rates were 29 and 27% respectively. The washout period and the preparation for the OFF sessions were acceptable, and the sessions were manageable

  6. Modulatory effect of the 5-HT1A agonist buspirone and the mixed non-hallucinogenic 5-HT1A/2A agonist ergotamine on psilocybin-induced psychedelic experience.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Thomas; Preller, Katrin H; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-04-01

    The mixed serotonin (5-HT) 1A/2A/2B/2C/6/7 receptor agonist psilocybin dose-dependently induces an altered state of consciousness (ASC) that is characterized by changes in sensory perception, mood, thought, and the sense of self. The psychological effects of psilocybin are primarily mediated by 5-HT2A receptor activation. However, accumulating evidence suggests that 5-HT1A or an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors may contribute to the overall effects of psilocybin. Therefore, we used a double-blind, counterbalanced, within-subject design to investigate the modulatory effects of the partial 5-HT1A agonist buspirone (20mg p.o.) and the non-hallucinogenic 5-HT2A/1A agonist ergotamine (3mg p.o.) on psilocybin-induced (170 µg/kg p.o.) psychological effects in two groups (n=19, n=17) of healthy human subjects. Psychological effects were assessed using the Altered State of Consciousness (5D-ASC) rating scale. Buspirone significantly reduced the 5D-ASC main scale score for Visionary Restructuralization (VR) (p<0.001), which was mostly driven by a reduction of the VR item cluster scores for elementary and complex visual hallucinations. Further, buspirone also reduced the main scale score for Oceanic Boundlessness (OB) including derealisation and depersonalisation phenomena at a trend level (p=0.062), whereas ergotamine did not show any effects on the psilocybin-induced 5D-ASC main scale scores. The present finding demonstrates that buspirone exerts inhibitory effects on psilocybin-induced effects, presumably via 5-HT1A receptor activation, an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, or both. The data suggest that the modulation of 5-HT1A receptor activity may be a useful target in the treatment of visual hallucinations in different psychiatric and neurological diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  7. Imidazopyridine CB2 agonists: optimization of CB2/CB1 selectivity and implications for in vivo analgesic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Trotter, B Wesley; Nanda, Kausik K; Burgey, Christopher S; Potteiger, Craig M; Deng, James Z; Green, Ahren I; Hartnett, John C; Kett, Nathan R; Wu, Zhicai; Henze, Darrell A; Della Penna, Kimberly; Desai, Reshma; Leitl, Michael D; Lemaire, Wei; White, Rebecca B; Yeh, Suzie; Urban, Mark O; Kane, Stefanie A; Hartman, George D; Bilodeau, Mark T

    2011-04-15

    A new series of imidazopyridine CB2 agonists is described. Structural optimization improved CB2/CB1 selectivity in this series and conferred physical properties that facilitated high in vivo exposure, both centrally and peripherally. Administration of a highly selective CB2 agonist in a rat model of analgesia was ineffective despite substantial CNS exposure, while administration of a moderately selective CB2/CB1 agonist exhibited significant analgesic effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a bivalent micro opiate and adenosine A1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Smitha C; Ghosh, Nandita; By, Youlet; Berthault, Aurélie; Virolleaud, Marie-Alice; Carrega, Louis; Chouraqui, Gaëlle; Commeiras, Laurent; Condo, Jocelyne; Attolini, Mireille; Gaudel-Siri, Anouk; Ruf, Jean; Parrain, Jean-Luc; Rodriguez, Jean; Guieu, Régis

    2009-12-01

    The cross talk between different membrane receptors is the source of increasing research. We designed and synthesized a new hetero-bivalent ligand that has antagonist properties on both A(1) adenosine and mu opiate receptors with a K(i) of 0.8+/-0.05 and 0.7+/-0.03 microM, respectively. This hybrid molecule increases cAMP production in cells that over express the mu receptor as well as those over expressing the A(1) adenosine receptor and reverses the antalgic effects of mu and A(1) adenosine receptor agonists in animals.

  9. Alcohol Screening among Opioid Agonist Patients in a Primary Care Clinic and an Opioid Treatment Program.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Jan; Muench, John; Wiest, Katharina; Croff, Raina; Rieckman, Traci; McCarty, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Problem alcohol use is associated with adverse health and economic outcomes, especially among people in opioid agonist treatment. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) are effective in reducing alcohol use; however, issues involved in SBIRT implementation among opioid agonist patients are unknown. To assess identification and treatment of alcohol use disorders, we reviewed clinical records of opioid agonist patients screened for an alcohol use disorder in a primary care clinic (n = 208) and in an opioid treatment program (n = 204) over a two-year period. In the primary care clinic, 193 (93%) buprenorphine patients completed an annual alcohol screening and six (3%) had elevated AUDIT scores. In the opioid treatment program, an alcohol abuse or dependence diagnosis was recorded for 54 (27%) methadone patients. Practitioner focus groups were completed in the primary care (n = 4 physicians) and the opioid treatment program (n = 11 counselors) to assess experience with and attitudes towards screening opioid agonist patients for alcohol use disorders. Focus groups suggested that organizational, structural, provider, patient, and community variables hindered or fostered alcohol screening. Alcohol screening is feasible among opioid agonist patients. Effective implementation, however, requires physician training and systematic changes in workflow.

  10. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-05-03

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations.

  11. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors

    PubMed Central

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Reducing Na+ in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na+-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na+ sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na+ increased cell surface [3H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na+ by Cs+ or NH4+ inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na+ over Cs+. Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations. PMID:27138239

  12. Antinociceptive action of NOP and opioid receptor agonists in the mouse orofacial formalin test.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, A; Ruzza, C; Bianco, S; Trapella, C; Calo', G

    2017-08-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) modulates several biological functions, including pain transmission via selective activation of a specific receptor named NOP. The aim of this study was the investigation of the antinociceptive properties of NOP agonists and their interaction with opioids in the trigeminal territory. The orofacial formalin (OFF) test in mice was used to investigate the antinociceptive potential associated to the activation of NOP and opioid receptors. Mice subjected to OFF test displayed the typical biphasic nociceptive response and sensitivity to opioid and NSAID drugs. Mice knockout for the NOP gene displayed a robust pronociceptive phenotype. The NOP selective agonist Ro 65-6570 (0.1-1mgkg -1 ) and morphine (0.1-10mgkg -1 ) elicited dose dependent antinociceptive effects in the OFF with the alkaloid showing larger effects; the isobologram analysis of their actions demonstrated an additive type of interaction. The mixed NOP/opioid receptor agonist cebranopadol elicited potent (0.01-0.1mgkg -1 ) and robust antinociceptive effects. In the investigated dose range, all drugs did not modify the motor performance of the mice in the rotarod test. Collectively the results of this study demonstrated that selective NOP agonists and particularly mixed NOP/opioid agonists are worthy of development as innovative drugs to treat painful conditions of the trigeminal territory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Virtual identification of novel PPARα/γ dual agonists by scaffold hopping of saroglitazar.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wen-Qing; Jing, Zhi; Liu, Xin; Feng, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Ya-Ya; Wang, Shu-Qing; Xu, Wei-Ren; Liu, Jian-Wen; Cheng, Xian-Chao

    2017-10-28

    The thiazolidinedione class PPARγ agonists as antidiabetic agents are restricted in clinical use because of the side effects such as edema, weight gain, and heart failure. The single and selective agonism of PPARγ is the main cause of side effects. The multi-target cooperative PPARα/γ dual agonist development is a hot topic in the antidiabetic medicinal chemistry field. Saroglitazar is the first approved PPARα/γ dual agonist, available in India for the treatment of diabetic dyslipidemia. It got rid of these side effects. With the aim of finding more protent PPARα/γ dual agonists, the scaffold hopping was used to replace α-o phenylpropionic acid skeleton of saroglitazar with L-tyrosine skeleton. Then, the structural modification was carried out designing 72 compounds. Considering the importance of chirality, opposite configuration of 72 compounds was also studied. 12 compounds with better -cdocker energy were screened by molecular docking. Subsequently, the pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity evaluated by ADMET prediction, 11 of them showed better properties. Comp#L-17-1 and comp#L-3-1 were regarded as representatives to study the binding stability by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulation results of comp#L-17-1-PPARs (α, γ) and comp#L-3-1-PPARs (α, γ) provided structure reference for the research and development of novel PPARα/γ dual agonists.

  14. Small-molecule agonists for the thyrotropin receptor stimulate thyroid function in human thyrocytes and mice

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Susanne; Huang, Wenwei; Titus, Steve; Krause, Gerd; Kleinau, Gunnar; Alberobello, Anna Teresa; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel T.; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Celi, Francesco S.; Gavrilova, Oksana; Thomas, Craig J.; Raaka, Bruce M.; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2009-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors (7TMRs) are prominent drug targets. However, small-molecule ligands for 7-transmembrane-spanning receptors for which the natural ligands are large, heterodimeric glycoprotein hormones, like thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; thyrotropin), have only recently been reported, and none are approved for human use. We have used quantitative high-throughput screening to identify a small-molecule TSH receptor (TSHR) agonist that was modified to produce a second agonist with increased potency. We show that these agonists are highly selective for human TSHR versus other glycoprotein hormone receptors and interact with the receptor's serpentine domain. A binding pocket within the transmembrane domain was defined by docking into a TSHR homology model and was supported by site-directed mutagenesis. In primary cultures of human thyrocytes, both TSH and the agonists increase mRNA levels for thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase, sodium iodide symporter, and deiodinase type 2, and deiodinase type 2 enzyme activity. Moreover, oral administration of the agonist stimulated thyroid function in mice, resulting in increased serum thyroxine and thyroidal radioiodide uptake. Thus, we discovered a small molecule that activates human TSHR in vitro, is orally active in mice, and could be a lead for development of drugs to use in place of recombinant human TSH in patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:19592511

  15. Modulation Effect of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonists on Lipid Droplet Proteins in Liver.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Ming-Liang; Zhong, Yuan; Wang, Chen; Jia, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists are used for treating hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism of action of these agonists is still under investigation. The lipid droplet-associated proteins FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5, regulated directly by PPARγ and PPARα, are associated with hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the expression levels of FSP27/CIDEC and LSDP5 and the regulation of these proteins by consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) or administration of PPAR agonists. Mice with diet-induced obesity were treated with the PPARγ or PPARα agonist, pioglitazone or fenofibrate, respectively. Liver tissues from db/db diabetic mice and human were also collected. Interestingly, FSP27/CIEDC was expressed in mouse and human livers and was upregulated in obese C57BL/6J mice. Fenofibrate treatment decreased hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD diet. In mice, LSDP5 was not detected, even in the context of insulin resistance or treatment with PPAR agonists. However, LSDP5 was highly expressed in humans, with elevated expression observed in the fatty liver. We concluded that fenofibrate greatly decreased hepatic TG content and FSP27/CIDEC protein expression in mice fed an HFD, suggesting a potential regulatory role for fenofibrate in the amelioration of hepatic steatosis.

  16. New-generation 5-HT4 receptor agonists: potential for treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Noriaki; Wong, Banny S; Camilleri, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility is an important mechanism in functional GI disorders (FGIDs) including constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and gastroparesis. 5-hydroxytryptamine(4) (5-HT(4)) receptors are targets for the treatment of GI motility disorders. However, older 5-HT(4) receptor agonists had limited clinical success because they were associated with changes in the function of the cardiac HERG potassium channel. We conducted a PubMed search using the following key words alone or in combination: 5-HT(4), safety, toxicity, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical trial, cardiac, hERG, arrhythmia, potassium current, elderly, prucalopride, ATI-7505, and velusetrag (TD-5108), to review mechanisms of action, clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability of three new-generation 5-HT(4) receptor agonists. Prucalopride, ATI-7505, and velusetrag (TD-5108) are highly selective, high-affinity 5-HT(4) receptor agonists that are devoid of action on other receptors within their therapeutic range. Their efficacy has been demonstrated in pharmacodynamic studies which demonstrate acceleration of colonic transit and, to a variable degree, in clinical trials that significantly relieve chronic constipation. Currently available evidence shows that the new 5-HT(4) receptor agonists have safe cardiac profiles. New-generation 5-HT(4) receptor agonists and future drugs targeting organ-specific splice variants are promising approaches to treat GI dysmotility, particularly colonic diseases.

  17. GnRH agonist versus GnRH antagonist in ovarian stimulation: is the emperor naked?

    PubMed

    Orvieto, R; Rabinson, J; Meltzer, S; Homburg, R; Anteby, E; Zohav, E

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of type of GnRH-analog used during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) on the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. All consecutive women aged < or = 35 years admitted to our IVF unit from January 2001 to December 2004 were enrolled in the study. Only patients undergoing up to their third IVF cycle attempt were included. Ovarian stimulation characteristics, number of oocytes retrieved, number of embryos transferred, and clinical pregnancy rate were compared between women given GnRH-agonist or GnRH-antagonist during COH. Four hundred and eighty-seven consecutive IVF cycles were evaluated, 226 in the agonist group and 261 in the antagonist group. A clinical pregnancy was achieved in 93 patients in the agonist group (pregnancy rate 41.2% per cycle) and 66 patients in the antagonist grup (pregnancy rate 25.3%); this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01). The agonist group also used significantly more gonadotropin ampoules, required longer stimulation, and had higher estradiol levels on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin administration. The midluteal long GhRH-agonist suppressive protocol should be the protocol of choice in young patients in their first three IVF cycle attempts.

  18. Combined ovulation triggering with GnRH agonist and hCG in IVF patients.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Kurdija, Kristijan; Orešković, Slavko; Čehić, Ermin; Pavičić-Baldani, Dinka; Škrgatić, Lana

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the review is to analyse the combination of a gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist with a human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) trigger, for final oocyte maturation in in vitro fertilisation (IVF) cycles. The concept being a ''dual trigger'' combines a single dose of the GnRH agonist with a reduced or standard dosage of hCG at the time of triggering. The use of a GnRH agonist with a reduced dose of hCG in high responders demonstrated luteal phase support with improved pregnancy rates, similar to those after conventional hCG and a low risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). The administration of a GnRH agonist and a standard hCG in normal responders, demonstrated significantly improved live-birth rates and a higher number of embryos of excellent quality, or cryopreserved embryos. The concept of the ''double trigger" represents a combination of a GnRH agonist and a standard hCG, when used 40 and 34 h prior to ovum pick-up, respectively. The use of the ''double trigger" has been successfully offered in the treatment of empty follicle syndrome and in patients with a history of immature oocytes retrieved or with low/poor oocytes yield. Further prospective studies are required to confirm the aforementioned observations prior to clinical implementation.

  19. Identification of novel selective V2 receptor non-peptide agonists.

    PubMed

    Del Tredici, Andria L; Vanover, Kim E; Knapp, Anne E; Bertozzi, Sine M; Nash, Norman R; Burstein, Ethan S; Lameh, Jelveh; Currier, Erika A; Davis, Robert E; Brann, Mark R; Mohell, Nina; Olsson, Roger; Piu, Fabrice

    2008-10-30

    Peptides with agonist activity at the vasopressin V(2) receptor are used clinically to treat fluid homeostasis disorders such as polyuria and central diabetes insipidus. Of these peptides, the most commonly used is desmopressin, which displays poor bioavailability as well as potent activity at the V(1b) receptor, with possible stress-related adverse effects. Thus, there is a strong need for the development of small molecule chemistries with selective V(2) receptor agonist activity. Using the functional cell-based assay Receptor Selection and Amplification Technology (R-SAT((R))), a screening effort identified three small molecule chemotypes (AC-94544, AC-88324, and AC-110484) with selective agonist activity at the V(2) receptor. One of these compounds, AC-94544, displayed over 180-fold selectivity at the V(2) receptor compared to related vasopressin and oxytocin receptors and no activity at 28 other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). All three compounds also showed partial agonist activity at the V(2) receptor in a cAMP accumulation assay. In addition, in a rat model of central diabetes insipidus, AC-94544 was able to significantly reduce urine output in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AC-94544, AC-88324, and AC-110484 represent novel opportunities for the treatment of disorders associated with V(2) receptor agonist deficiency.

  20. Evolution of the Bifunctional Lead μ Agonist / δ Antagonist Containing the Dmt-Tic Opioid Pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Peng, Xuemei; Neumeyer, John L

    2010-02-17

    Based on a renewed importance recently attributed to bi- or multifunctional opioids, we report the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of some analogues derived from our lead μ agonist / δ antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Bzl. Our previous studies focused on the importance of the C-teminal benzyl function in the induction of such bifunctional activity. The introduction of some substituents in the para position of the phenyl ring (-Cl, -CH(3), partially -NO(2), inactive -NH(2)) was found to give a more potent μ agonist / antagonist effect associated with a relatively unmodified δ antagonist activity (pA(2) = 8.28-9.02). Increasing the steric hindrance of the benzyl group (using diphenylmethyl and tetrahydroisoquinoline functionalities) substantially maintained the μ agonist and δ antagonist activities of the lead compound. Finally and quite unexpectedly D-Tic2, considered as a wrong opioid message now; inserted into the reference compound in lieu of L-Tic, provided a μ agonist / δ agonist better than our reference ligand (H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph) and was endowed with the same pharmacological profile.

  1. Behavioural and biochemical responses following activation of midbrain dopamine pathways by receptor selective neurokinin agonists.

    PubMed

    Elliott, P J; Mason, G S; Stephens-Smith, M; Hagan, R M

    1991-06-01

    Preferential activation of mesolimbic and nigro-striatal dopamine (DA) pathways by receptor-selective and peptidase-resistant neurokinin (NK) agonists is reported. The DA cell body region of the mesolimbic pathway appears to be activated by NK agonists selective for NK-1 and NK-3 receptors whereas the DA cell bodies in the substantia nigra are under an excitatory NK-2 receptor-mediated influence. Stimulation of the mesolimbic DA pathway by NK-1 (Ava[L-Pro9,N-Me-Leu10]SP (7-11) [GR73632]) or NK-3 (Senktide) agonists increase locomotor activity. Additional studies showed that this elevated motor response observed after intra-VTA infusion of GR73632 was accompanied by a corresponding increase in DA turnover in the terminal fields of this pathway. Similarly, unilateral activation of the nigro-striatal DA pathway by NK-2 selective agonists (Ava (D-Pro9) SP (7-11) [GR51667] or [Lys3,Gly8,R-Lac-Leu9]NKA (3-10) [GR64349]) elicit contralateral rotational activity and an increase in DA turnover in the ipsilateral striatum. The rotational response was attenuated by prior administration of an NK-2 antagonist (cyclo (Gln, Trp, Phe, Gly, Leu, Met)] L-659877]) into the nigra. Peripheral injection of haloperidol, a DA antagonist, also blocked the NK-2 agonist induced rotations.

  2. The therapeutic potential of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists for pain control.

    PubMed

    Decker, M W; Meyer, M D; Sullivan, J P

    2001-10-01

    Due to the limitations of currently available analgesics, a number of novel alternatives are currently under investigation, including neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists. During the 1990s, the discovery of the antinociceptive properties of the potent nAChR agonist epibatidine in rodents sparked interest in the analgesic potential of this class of compounds. Although epibatidine also has several mechanism-related toxicities, the identification of considerable nAChR diversity suggested that the toxicities and therapeutic actions of the compound might be mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. Consistent with this view, a number of novel nAChR agonists with antinociceptive activity and improved safety profiles in preclinical models have now been identified, including A-85380, ABT-594, DBO-83, SIB-1663 and RJR-2403. Of these, ABT-594 is the most advanced and is currently in Phase II clinical evaluation. Nicotinically-mediated antinociception has been demonstrated in a variety of rodent pain models and is likely mediated by the activation of descending inhibitory pathways originating in the brainstem with the predominant high-affinity nicotine site in brain, the alpha4beta2 subtype, playing a critical role. Thus, preclinical findings suggest that nAChR agonists have the potential to be highly efficacious treatments in a variety of pain states. However, clinical proof-of-principle studies will be required to determine if nAChR agonists are active in pathological pain.

  3. Identification of PPARgamma Partial Agonists of Natural Origin (I): Development of a Virtual Screening Procedure and In Vitro Validation

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Laura; Sala, Esther; Castell-Auví, Anna; Cedó, Lidia; Liedl, Klaus R.; Wolber, Gerhard; Muehlbacher, Markus; Mulero, Miquel; Pinent, Montserrat; Ardévol, Anna; Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there are successful examples of the discovery of new PPARγ agonists, it has recently been of great interest to identify new PPARγ partial agonists that do not present the adverse side effects caused by PPARγ full agonists. Consequently, the goal of this work was to design, apply and validate a virtual screening workflow to identify novel PPARγ partial agonists among natural products. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed a virtual screening procedure based on structure-based pharmacophore construction, protein-ligand docking and electrostatic/shape similarity to discover novel scaffolds of PPARγ partial agonists. From an initial set of 89,165 natural products and natural product derivatives, 135 compounds were identified as potential PPARγ partial agonists with good ADME properties. Ten compounds that represent ten new chemical scaffolds for PPARγ partial agonists were selected for in vitro biological testing, but two of them were not assayed due to solubility problems. Five out of the remaining eight compounds were confirmed as PPARγ partial agonists: they bind to PPARγ, do not or only moderately stimulate the transactivation activity of PPARγ, do not induce adipogenesis of preadipocyte cells and stimulate the insulin-induced glucose uptake of adipocytes. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated that our virtual screening protocol was successful in identifying novel scaffolds for PPARγ partial agonists. PMID:23226391

  4. 3D-Pharmacophore Identification for κ-Opioid Agonists Using Ligand-Based Drug-Design Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi

    A selective κ-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist might act as a powerful analgesic without the side effects of μ-opioid receptor-selective drugs such as morphine. The eight classes of known KOR agonists have different chemical structures, making it difficult to construct a pharmacophore model that takes them all into account. Here, we summarize previous efforts to identify the pharmacophore for κ-opioid agonists and propose a new three-dimensional pharmacophore model that encompasses the κ-activities of all classes. This utilizes conformational sampling of agonists by high-temperature molecular dynamics and pharmacophore extraction through a series of molecular superpositions.

  5. Lorcaserin: a novel serotonin 2C agonist for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Stefanie C; Luon, Darren; Baker, William L

    2013-07-01

    Obesity has become an epidemic in the United States and its prevalence continues to increase. Adjunctive treatment with pharmacotherapy is often reserved for individuals who fail to achieve their intended weight goals with diet and exercise alone. Current approved therapies for weight loss include phentermine, diethylpropion, orlistat, and phentermine/topiramate. The objective of this paper was to review the place of lorcaserin, a novel serotonin 2C agonist, which was FDA approved in July 2012. Unlike contemporary lipase inhibitors and sympathomimetic amines, lorcaserin is purported to reduce food consumption and increase satiety. A systematic review of the literature for all relevant articles was performed through January 2013 using MEDLINE, Web of Science, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts using key words related to lorcaserin. Three phase III clinical studies have been published evaluating the efficacy and safety of lorcaserin in various obese populations. A higher proportion of patients receiving lorcaserin (∼47%) lost more than 5% body weight from baseline in comparison with the placebo group (∼25%; p < 0.05 in all studies). Those receiving the recommended dose of lorcaserin 10 mg twice daily lost on average ∼6 kg of body weight from baseline versus ∼3 kg with placebo. Patients with diabetes mellitus also saw significant reductions in their HbA1c with lorcaserin (∼0.9%) versus placebo (∼0.4%; p < 0.001). Lorcaserin is generally well tolerated with the most commonly experienced adverse events being nausea, dizziness, headache, upper respiratory tract infections, and nasopharyngitis. Cardiovascular evaluations showed no appreciable increase in valvulopathy with lorcaserin use versus placebo. For now, pharmacists should continue to recommend the use of lorcaserin as a complement to, not in lieu of, ongoing lifestyle and behavioral modification.

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists versus insulin glargine for type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Xin; Gou, Jian-Feng; Tian, Jin-Hui; Yan, Xiang; Yang, Lin

    2010-01-01

    the metaanalysis suggest that insulin glargine was significantly better in reducing the fasting blood glucose (mean difference [MD] [95% CI], 1.31 [1.04 to 1.58]; P < 0.001), but exhibits greater incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia (risk ratio [RR] [95% CI], 0.40 [0.23 to 0.71]; P = 0.002) and influenza (RR [95% CI], 0.56 [0.32 to 0.98]; P = 0.04). GLP-1 receptor agonists are more conducive to reducing weight (MD [95% CI], −3.96 [−5.14 to -2.77]; P < 0.001), postprandial blood glucose (after breakfast, P < 0.001; after dinner, P < 0.001), and LDL-C (MD [95% CI], −0.18 [−0.28 to −0.08]; P < 0.001), but have significantly more gastrointestinal adverse effects (eg, nausea/ vomiting, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between GLP-1 receptor agonists and insulin glargine in reducing glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (MD [95% CI], −0.03 [−0.13 to 0.08]) and the overall incidence of hypoglycemia (RR [95% CI], 0.69 [0.42 to 1.14]). Conclusions: Compared with insulin glargine, GLP-1 receptor agonists did not have a significant difference in regard to reducing HbA1c levels and they were significantly associated with decreased weight but increased gastrointestinal adverse events. It remains unclear whether GLP-1 receptor agonists influence mortality or diabetes-associated complications in patients with T2DM. More trials with longer follow-up are needed to determine the exact long-term efficacy and safety profiles of this new class of hypoglycemic drugs. PMID:24688145

  7. Structure-guided development of dual β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Dietmar; Stanek, Markus; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Aiming to discover dual-acting β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor ligands, a structure-guided approach for the evolution of GPCR agonists that address multiple targets was elaborated. Starting from GPCR crystal structures, we describe the design, synthesis and biological investigation of a defined set of compounds leading to the identification of the benzoxazinone (R)-3, which shows agonist properties at the adrenergic β2 receptor and substantial G protein-promoted activation at the D2 receptor. This directed approach yielded molecular probes with tuned dual activity. The congener desOH-3 devoid of the benzylic hydroxyl function was shown to be a β2 adrenergic antagonist/D2 receptor agonist with Ki values in the low nanomolar range. The compounds may serve as a promising starting point for the investigation and treatment of neurological disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists potentiate a slow afterdepolarization in CNS neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that, in the rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN), metabotropic glutamate receptor (met-GluR) agonists evoked a slow depolarization accompanied by an increase in membrane conductance and burst firing. We have speculated that the burst firing elicited by met-GluR agonists may be due to activation or enhancement of a non-specific cation current, which exists in some DLSN neurons. Now we report that a slow afterdepolarization (sADP) mediated by a non-specific cation current was potentiated by both 1S,3R-ACPD and quisqualate. In addition, met-GluR agonists unmask a sADP in DLSN neurons which did not show a sADP under control conditions. Our data suggest that a non-specific cation current can be potentiated by activation of the met-GluR.

  9. The four As associated with pathological Parkinson disease gamblers: anxiety, anger, age, and agonists

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Michael A; Chang, Yu Ling; Munson, Sarah K; Jacobson, Charles E; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Skidmore, Frank M; Okun, Michael S; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have related pathological gambling in PD to dopamine agonist therapy. A mail-in survey was sent to PD patients seen at the University of Florida Movement Disorders Center to determine gambling frequency and behavior, and any lifestyle or environmental factors associated with compulsive gambling in PD. 462 surveys were sent and 127 completed surveys were returned, of which ten were from patients who met criteria for compulsive gambling. All ten were taking dopamine agonists coincident with the compulsive gambling. Compulsive gamblers were younger, and psychological distress measures revealed that compulsive gamblers exhibited higher levels of anxiety, anger, and confusion. Thus in this cohort, we have uncovered the several characteristics of the most likely PD compulsive gambler, namely: (young) age, “angry”, “anxious”, and using a (dopamine) agonist. PMID:19300546

  10. The four As associated with pathological Parkinson disease gamblers: anxiety, anger, age, and agonists.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael A; Chang, Yu Ling; Munson, Sarah K; Jacobson, Charles E; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Skidmore, Frank M; Okun, Michael S; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2007-02-01

    Several studies have related pathological gambling in PD to dopamine agonist therapy. A mail-in survey was sent to PD patients seen at the University of Florida Movement Disorders Center to determine gambling frequency and behavior, and any lifestyle or environmental factors associated with compulsive gambling in PD. 462 surveys were sent and 127 completed surveys were returned, of which ten were from patients who met criteria for compulsive gambling. All ten were taking dopamine agonists coincident with the compulsive gambling. Compulsive gamblers were younger, and psychological distress measures revealed that compulsive gamblers exhibited higher levels of anxiety, anger, and confusion. Thus in this cohort, we have uncovered the several characteristics of the most likely PD compulsive gambler, namely: (young) age, "angry", "anxious", and using a (dopamine) agonist.

  11. Cyclic AMP agonist inhibition increases at low levels of histamine release from human basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, R.S.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between the intensity of the signal for antigen-induced immunoglobulin E-mediated histamine release from human basophils and the concentration of agonist needed to inhibit release has been determined. The agonists, prostaglandin E1, dimaprit, fenoterol, isobutylmethylxanthine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, all act by increasing the cyclic AMP level. Each agonist was 10- to 1000-fold more potent (relative ID50) at low levels of histamine release (5-10% of total histamine) than at high levels (50-80%). Thus, the inhibitory potential of a drug is a function of the concentration of antigen used to initiate the response. Our results are now more in accordmore » with the inhibitory profile of these drugs in human lung tissue. It is suggested that in vivo release is likely to be low and that this is the level at which to evaluate drugs in vitro.« less

  12. Nitric oxide donor beta2-agonists: furoxan derivatives containing the fenoterol moiety and related furazans.

    PubMed

    Buonsanti, M Federica; Bertinaria, Massimo; Stilo, Antonella Di; Cena, Clara; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2007-10-04

    The structure of fenoterol, a beta2-adrenoceptor agonist used in therapy, has been joined with furoxan NO-donor moieties to give new NO-donor beta2-agonists. The furazan analogues, devoid of the property to release NO, were also synthesized for comparison. All the compounds retained beta2-agonistic activity at micromolar or submicromolar concentration when tested on guinea pig tracheal rings precontracted with carbachol. Among the furoxan derivatives, the NO contribution to trachea relaxation was evident with product 15b at micromolar concentrations. All the new NO-donor hybrids were able to dilate rat aortic strips precontracted with phenylephrine. Both furoxan and furazan derivatives displayed antioxidant activity greater than that of fenoterol.

  13. Assembly of high-affinity insulin receptor agonists and antagonists from peptide building blocks

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Lauge; Brissette, Renee E.; Spetzler, Jane C.; Pillutla, Renuka C.; Østergaard, Søren; Lennick, Michael; Brandt, Jakob; Fletcher, Paul W.; Danielsen, Gillian M.; Hsiao, Ku-Chuan; Andersen, Asser S.; Dedova, Olga; Ribel, Ulla; Hoeg-Jensen, Thomas; Hansen, Per Hertz; Blume, Arthur J.; Markussen, Jan; Goldstein, Neil I.

    2003-01-01

    Insulin is thought to elicit its effects by crosslinking the two extracellular α-subunits of its receptor, thereby inducing a conformational change in the receptor, which activates the intracellular tyrosine kinase signaling cascade. Previously we identified a series of peptides binding to two discrete hotspots on the insulin receptor. Here we show that covalent linkage of such peptides into homodimers or heterodimers results in insulin agonists or antagonists, depending on how the peptides are linked. An optimized agonist has been shown, both in vitro and in vivo, to have a potency close to that of insulin itself. The ability to construct such peptide derivatives may offer a path for developing agonists or antagonists for treatment of a wide variety of diseases. PMID:12684539

  14. Antagonism of methoxyflurane-induced anesthesia in rats by benzodiazepine inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Miller, D W; Yourick, D L; Tessel, R E

    1989-11-28

    Injection of the partial benzodiazepine inverse agonist Ro15-4513 (1-32 mg/kg i.p.) or nonconvulsant i.v. doses of the full benzodiazepine inverse agonist beta-CCE immediately following cessation of exposure of rats to an anesthetic concentration of methoxyflurane significantly antagonized the duration of methoxyflurane anesthesia as measured by recovery of the righting reflex and/or pain sensitivity. This antagonism was inhibited by the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro15-1788 at doses which alone did not alter the duration of methoxyflurane anesthesia. In addition, high-dose Ro15-4513 pretreatment (32 mg/kg) antagonized the induction and duration of methoxyflurane anesthesia but was unable to prevent methoxyflurane anesthesia or affect the induction or duration of anesthesia induced by the dissociative anesthetic ketamine (100 mg/kg). These findings indicate that methoxyflurane anesthesia can be selectively antagonized by the inverse agonistic action of Ro15-4513 and beta-CCE.

  15. Clinical use of deslorelin (GnRH agonist) in companion animals: a review.

    PubMed

    Lucas, X

    2014-10-01

    Over the years, many contraceptive medications have been developed for companion animals, but many secondary adverse effects have limited their use. A major advancement was achieved with the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues, mainly GnRH agonists, which mimic the effects of native GnRH. The development of effective low-dose, slow-release implants with potent agonists such as deslorelin (Suprelorin®, Virbac) have allowed their use to become widespread in recent years, with many potential benefits in companion animals. While the major application of deslorelin was initially male contraception, due to its two differing actions, either the stimulation of oestrus or the sterilization of fertility, its use has been increasing in the bitch as well. The aim of this study is to review the applications of deslorelin GnRH agonist implants in companion animal, such as dogs, cats and some exotic pets. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Interaction between the mu-agonist dermorphin and the delta-agonist [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin in supraspinal antinociception and delta-opioid receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Negri, L.; Improta, G.; Lattanzi, R.; Potenza, R. L.; Luchetti, F.; Melchiorri, P.

    1995-01-01

    1. In rats, the interaction between the mu-opioid agonist dermorphin and the delta-opioid agonist [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin was studied in binding experiments to delta-opioid receptors and in the antinociceptive test to radiant heat. 2. When injected i.c.v., doses of [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin higher than 20 nmol produced antinociception in the rat tail-flick test to radiant heat. Lower doses were inactive. None of the doses tested elicited the maximum achievable response. This partial antinociception was accomplished with an in vivo occupancy of more than 97% of brain delta-opioid receptors and of 17% of mu-opioid receptors. Naloxone (0.1 mg kg-1, s.c.), and naloxonazine (10 mg kg-1, i.v., 24 h before), but not the selective delta-opioid antagonist naltrindole, antagonized the antinociception. 3. In vitro competitive inhibition studies in rat brain membranes showed that [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin displaced [3H]-naltrindole from two delta-binding sites of high and low affinity. The addition of 100 microM Gpp[NH]p produced a three fold increase in the [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin Ki value for both binding sites. The addition of 10 nM dermorphin increased the Ki value of the delta-agonist for the high affinity site five times. When Gpp[NH]p was added to the incubation medium together with 10 nM dermorphin, the high affinity Ki of the delta-agonist increased 15 times. 4. Co-administration into the rat brain ventricles of subanalgesic doses of dermorphin and [D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin resulted in synergistic antinociceptive responses. 5. Pretreatment with naloxone or with the non-equilibrium mu-antagonists naloxonazine and beta-funaltrexamine completely abolished the antinociceptive response of the mu-delta agonist combinations. 6. Pretreatment with the delta-opioid antagonists naltrindole and DALCE reduced the antinociceptive response of the dermorphin-[D-Ala2, Glu4]deltorphin combinations to a value near that observed after the mu-agonist alone. At the dosage used, naltrindole

  17. Structural insights into selective agonist actions of tamoxifen on human estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Biswas, Pradip Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Tamoxifen-an anti-estrogenic ligand in breast tissues used as a first-line treatment in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers-is associated with the development of resistance followed by resumption of tumor growth in about 30 % of cases. Whether tamoxifen assists in proliferation in such cases or whether any ligand-independent pathway to transcription exists is not fully understood; also, no ERα mutants have been detected so far that could lead to tamoxifen resistance. Using in silico conformational analysis of the ERα ligand binding domain (LBD), in the absence and presence of selective agonist (diethylstilbestrol; DES), antagonist (Faslodex; ICI), and selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM; 4-hydroxy tamoxifen; 4-OHT) ligands, we have elucidated ligand-responsive structural modulations of the ERα-LBD dimer in its agonist and antagonist complexes to address the issue of "tamoxifen resistance". DES and ICI were found to stabilize the dimer in their agonist and antagonist conformations, respectively. The ERα-LBD dimer without the presence of any bound ligand also led to a stable structure in agonist conformation. However, binding of 4-OHT to the antagonist structure led to a flexible conformation allowing the protein to visit conformations populated by agonists as was evident from principal component analysis and radius of gyration plots. Further, the relaxed conformations of the 4-OHT bound protein exhibited a diminished size of the co-repressor binding pocket in the LBD, thus signaling a partial blockage of the co-repressor binding motif. Thus, the ability of 4-OHT-bound ERα-LBD to assume flexible conformations visited by agonists and reduced co-repressor binding surface at the LBD provide crucial structural insights into tamoxifen-resistance that complement our existing understanding.

  18. Flow-injection chemiluminescence method to detect a β2 adrenergic agonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangbin; Tang, Yuhai; Shang, Jian; Wang, Zhongcheng; Yu, Hua; Du, Wei; Fu, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    A new method for the detection of β2 adrenergic agonists was developed based on the chemiluminescence (CL) reaction of β2 adrenergic agonist with potassium ferricyanide-luminol CL. The effect of β2 adrenergic agonists including isoprenaline hydrochloride, salbutamol sulfate, terbutaline sulfate and ractopamine on the CL intensity of potassium ferricyanide-luminol was discovered. Detection of the β2 adrenergic agonist was carried out in a flow system. Using uniform design experimentation, the influence factors of CL were optimized. The optimal experimental conditions were 1 mmol/L of potassium ferricyanide, 10 µmol/L of luminol, 1.2 mmol/L of sodium hydroxide, a flow speed of 2.6 mL/min and a distance of 1.2 cm from 'Y2 ' to the flow cell. The linear ranges and limit of detection were 10-100 and 5 ng/mL for isoprenaline hydrochloride, 20-100 and 5 ng/mL for salbutamol sulfate, 8-200 and 1 ng/mL for terbutaline sulfate, 20-100 and 4 ng/mL for ractopamine, respectively. The proposed method allowed 200 injections/h with excellent repeatability and precision. It was successfully applied to the determination of three β2 adrenergic agonists in commercial pharmaceutical formulations with recoveries in the range of 96.8-98.5%. The possible CL reaction mechanism of potassium ferricyanide-luminol-β2 adrenergic agonist was discussed from the UV/vis spectra. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The potency of different serotonergic agonists in counteracting opioid evoked cardiorespiratory disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Dutschmann, M.; Waki, H.; Manzke, T.; Simms, A. E.; Pickering, A. E.; Richter, D. W.; Paton, J. F. R.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin receptor (5-HTR) agonists that target 5-HT4(a)R and 5-HT1AR can reverse μ-opioid receptor (μ-OR)-evoked respiratory depression. Here, we have tested whether such rescuing by serotonin agonists also applies to the cardiovascular system. In working heart–brainstem preparations in situ, we have recorded phrenic nerve activity, thoracic sympathetic chain activity (SCA), vascular resistance and heart rate (HR) and in conscious rats, diaphragmatic electromyogram, arterial blood pressure (BP) and HR via radio-telemetry. In addition, the distribution of 5-HT4(a)R and 5-HT1AR in ponto-medullary cardiorespiratory networks was identified using histochemistry. Systemic administration of the μ-OR agonist fentanyl in situ decreased HR, vascular resistance, SCA and phrenic nerve activity. Subsequent application of the 5-HT1AR agonist 8-OH-DPAT further enhanced bradycardia, but partially compensated the decrease in vascular resistance, sympathetic activity and restored breathing. By contrast, the 5-HT4(a)R agonist RS67333 further decreased vascular resistance, HR and sympathetic activity, but partially rescued breathing. In conscious rats, administration of remifentanyl caused severe respiratory depression, a decrease in mean BP accompanied by pronounced bradyarrhythmia. 8-OH-DPAT restored breathing and prevented the bradyarrhythmia; however, BP and HR remained below baseline. In contrast, RS67333 further suppressed cardiovascular functions in vivo and only partially recovered breathing in some cases. The better recovery of μ-OR cardiorespiratory disturbance by 5-HT1AR than 5-HT4(a)R is supported by the finding that 5-HT1AR was more densely expressed in key brainstem nuclei for cardiorespiratory control compared with 5-HT4(a)R. We conclude that during treatment of severe pain, 5-HT1AR agonists may provide a useful tool to counteract opioid-mediated cardiorespiratory disturbances. PMID:19651661

  20. Co-administration of delta- and mu-opioid receptor agonists promotes peripheral opioid receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Cicely L.; Honda, Christopher N.

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of peripheral opioid analgesia following tissue injury or inflammation in animal models is well-documented, but clinical results of peripheral opioid therapy remain inconsistent. Previous studies in the central nervous system have shown that co-administration of μ- and δ-opioid receptor agonists can enhance analgesic outcomes; however, less is known about the functional consequences of opioid receptor interactions in the periphery. The present study examines the effects of intraplantar injection of the μ- and δ-opioid receptor agonists, morphine and deltorphin, alone and in combination on behavioral tests of nociception in naïve rats and on potassium-evoked release of CGRP from sciatic nerves of naïve rats. Neither drug alone affected nociceptive behaviors or CGRP release. Two separate measures of mechanical nociceptive sensitivity remained unchanged after co-administration of the two drugs. In contrast, when deltorphin was co-injected with morphine, dose-dependent and peripherally-restricted increases in paw withdrawal latencies to radiant heat were observed. Similarly, concentration-dependent inhibition of CGRP release was observed when deltorphin and morphine were administered in sequence prior to potassium stimulation. However, no inhibition was observed when morphine was administered prior to deltorphin. All combined opioid effects were blocked by co-application of antagonists. Deltorphin exposure also enhanced the in vivo and in vitro effects of another μ-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO. Together, these results suggest that under normal conditions, δ-opioid receptor agonists enhance the effect of μ-opioid receptor agonists in the periphery, and local co-administration of δ- and μ-opioid receptor agonists may improve results of peripheral opioid therapy for the treatment of pain. PMID:20970925

  1. Ligand-based receptor tyrosine kinase partial agonists: New paradigm for cancer drug discovery?

    PubMed

    Riese, David J

    2011-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are validated targets for oncology drug discovery and several RTK antagonists have been approved for the treatment of human malignancies. Nonetheless, the discovery and development of RTK antagonists has lagged behind the discovery and development of agents that target G-protein coupled receptors. In part, this is because it has been difficult to discover analogs of naturally-occurring RTK agonists that function as antagonists. AREAS COVERED: Here we describe ligands of ErbB receptors that function as partial agonists for these receptors, thereby enabling these ligands to antagonize the activity of full agonists for these receptors. We provide insights into the mechanisms by which these ligands function as antagonists. We discuss how information concerning these mechanisms can be translated into screens for novel small molecule- and antibody-based antagonists of ErbB receptors and how such antagonists hold great potential as targeted cancer chemotherapeutics. EXPERT OPINION: While there have been a number of important key findings into this field, the identification of the structural basis of ligand functional specificity is still of the greatest importance. While it is true that, with some notable exceptions, peptide hormones and growth factors have not proven to be good platforms for oncology drug discovery; addressing the fundamental issues of antagonistic partial agonists for receptor tyrosine kinases has the potential to steer oncology drug discovery in new directions. Mechanism based approaches are now emerging to enable the discovery of RTK partial agonists that may antagonize both agonist-dependent and -independent RTK signaling and may hold tremendous promise as targeted cancer chemotherapeutics.

  2. Peroxidative metabolism of beta2-agonists salbutamol and fenoterol and their analogues.

    PubMed

    Reszka, Krzysztof J; McGraw, Dennis W; Britigan, Bradley E

    2009-06-01

    Phenolic beta(2)-adrenoreceptor agonists salbutamol, fenoterol, and terbutaline relax smooth muscle cells that relieve acute airway bronchospasm associated with asthma. Why their use sometimes fails to relieve bronchospasm and why the drugs appear to be less effective in patients with severe asthma exacerbations remains unclear. We show that in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, both myeloperoxidase, secreted by activated neutrophils present in inflamed airways, and lactoperoxidase, which is naturally present in the respiratory system, catalyze oxidation of these beta(2)-agonists. Azide, cyanide, thiocyanate, ascorbate, glutathione, and methimazole inhibited this process, while methionine was without effect. Inhibition by ascorbate and glutathione was associated with their oxidation to corresponding radical species by the agonists' derived phenoxyl radicals. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we detected free radical metabolites from beta(2)-agonists by spin trapping with 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). Formation of these radicals was inhibited by pharmacologically relevant concentrations of methimazole and dapsone. In alkaline buffers, radicals from fenoterol and its structural analogue, metaproteronol, were detected by direct EPR. Analysis of these spectra suggests that oxidation of fenoterol and metaproterenol, but not terbutaline, causes their transformation through intramolecular cyclization by addition of their amino nitrogen to the aromatic ring. Together, these results indicate that phenolic beta(2)-agonists function as substrates for airway peroxidases and that the resulting products differ in their structural and functional properties from their parent compounds. They also suggest that these transformations can be modulated by pharmacological approaches using appropriate peroxidase inhibitors or alternative substrates. These processes may affect therapeutic efficacy and also play a role in adverse reactions of the beta(2)-agonists.

  3. Comparative Review of Approved Melatonin Agonists for the Treatment of Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Wilbur P Trey; McLin, Dewey E; Dressman, Marlene A; Neubauer, David N

    2016-09-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) are characterized by persistent or recurrent patterns of sleep disturbance related primarily to alterations of the circadian rhythm system or the misalignment between the endogenous circadian rhythm and exogenous factors that affect the timing or duration of sleep. These disorders collectively represent a significant unmet medical need, with a total prevalence in the millions, a substantial negative impact on quality of life, and a lack of studied treatments for most of these disorders. Activation of the endogenous melatonin receptors appears to play an important role in setting the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Therefore, melatonin agonists, which may be able to shift and/or stabilize the circadian phase, have been identified as potential therapeutic candidates for the treatment of CRSWDs. Currently, only one melatonin receptor agonist, tasimelteon, is approved for the treatment of a CRSWD: non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder (or non-24). However, three additional commercially available melatonin receptor agonists-agomelatine, prolonged-release melatonin, and ramelteon-have been investigated for potential use for treatment of CRSWDs. Data indicate that these melatonin receptor agonists have distinct pharmacologic profiles that may help clarify their clinical use in CRSWDs. We review the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of these melatonin agonists and summarize their efficacy profiles when used for the treatment of CRSWDs. Further studies are needed to determine the therapeutic potential of these melatonin agonists for most CRSWDs. © 2016 Vanda Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Pharmacotherapy published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  4. Definition of agonists and design of antagonists for alloreactive T cell clones using synthetic peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    de Koster, H S; Vermeulen, C J; Hiemstra, H S; Amons, R; Drijfhout, J W; Koning, F

    1999-04-01

    Alloreactive T cells form an important barrier for organ transplantation. To reduce the risk of rejection patients are given immunosuppressive drugs, which increase the chance of infection and the incidence of malignancies. It has been shown that a large proportion of alloreactive T cells specifically recognize peptides present in the groove of the allogeneic MHC molecule. This implies that it might be possible to modulate the alloresponse by peptides with antagonistic properties, thus preventing rejection without the side effects of general immunosuppression. Peptide antagonists can be designed on the basis of the original agonist, yet for alloreactive T cells these agonists are usually unknown. In this study we have used a dedicated synthetic peptide library to identify agonists for HLA-DR3-specific alloreactive T cell clones. Based on these agonists, altered peptide ligands (APL) were designed. Three APL could antagonize an alloreactive T cell clone in its response against the library-derived agonist as well as in its response against the original allodeterminant, HLA-DR3. This demonstrates that peptide libraries can be used to design antagonists for alloreactive T cells without knowledge about the nature of the actual allostimulatory peptide. Since the most potent agonists are selected, this strategy permits detection of potent antagonists. The results, however, also suggest that the degree of peptide dependency of alloreactive T cell clones may dictate whether a peptide antagonist can be found for such clones. Whether peptide antagonists will be valuable in the development of donor-patient-specific immunosuppression may therefore depend on the specificity of the in vivo-generated alloreactive T cells.

  5. Drugs for metabolic conditions and prostate cancer death in men on GnRH agonists.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Cecilia; Wong, Chloe; Garmo, Hans; Crawley, Danielle; Holmberg, Lars; Hammar, Niklas; Adolfsson, Jan; Stattin, Pär; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate whether drugs for metabolic conditions influence prostate cancer-specific mortality in men starting gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists, as it is unclear whether metabolic syndrome and its related drugs is affecting treatment response in men with prostate cancer on GnRH agonists. We selected all men receiving GnRH agonists as primary treatment in the Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe) (n = 9267). Use of drugs for metabolic conditions (i.e. anti-diabetes, anti-dyslipidaemia, and antihypertension) in relation to all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and prostate cancer-specific death were studied using multivariate Cox proportional hazard and Fine and Gray competing regression models. In all, 6322 (68%) men used at least one drug for a metabolic condition at GnRH agonist initiation: 46% on antihypertensive drugs only, 32% on drugs for dyslipidaemia and hypertension, and ~10% on drugs for more than two metabolic conditions. Cox models indicated a weak increased risk of prostate cancer death in men who were on drugs for hypertension only (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.23) or drugs for hyperglycaemia (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06-1.35) at GnRH agonist initiation. However, upon taking into account competing risk from CVD death, none of the drugs for metabolic conditions were associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer death. We did not find evidence for a better or worse response to GnRH agonists in men with prostate cancer who were also on drugs for hypertension, dyslipidaemia, or hyperglycaemia. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Potentiation of cytotoxic chemotherapy by growth hormone-releasing hormone agonists.

    PubMed

    Jaszberenyi, Miklos; Rick, Ferenc G; Popovics, Petra; Block, Norman L; Zarandi, Marta; Cai, Ren-Zhi; Vidaurre, Irving; Szalontay, Luca; Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Schally, Andrew V

    2014-01-14

    The dismal prognosis of malignant brain tumors drives the development of new treatment modalities. In view of the multiple activities of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), we hypothesized that pretreatment with a GHRH agonist, JI-34, might increase the susceptibility of U-87 MG glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells to subsequent treatment with the cytotoxic drug, doxorubicin (DOX). This concept was corroborated by our findings, in vivo, showing that the combination of the GHRH agonist, JI-34, and DOX inhibited the growth of GBM tumors, transplanted into nude mice, more than DOX alone. In vitro, the pretreatment of GBM cells with JI-34 potentiated inhibitory effects of DOX on cell proliferation, diminished cell size and viability, and promoted apoptotic processes, as shown by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide proliferation assay, ApoLive-Glo multiplex assay, and cell volumetric assay. Proteomic studies further revealed that the pretreatment with GHRH agonist evoked differentiation decreasing the expression of the neuroectodermal stem cell antigen, nestin, and up-regulating the glial maturation marker, GFAP. The GHRH agonist also reduced the release of humoral regulators of glial growth, such as FGF basic and TGFβ. Proteomic and gene-expression (RT-PCR) studies confirmed the strong proapoptotic activity (increase in p53, decrease in v-myc and Bcl-2) and anti-invasive potential (decrease in integrin α3) of the combination of GHRH agonist and DOX. These findings indicate that the GHRH agonists can potentiate the anticancer activity of the traditional chemotherapeutic drug, DOX, by multiple mechanisms including the induction of differentiation of cancer cells.

  7. Additive melanoma suppression with intralesional phospholipid conjugated TLR7 agonists and systemic IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tomoko; Chan, Michael; Norton, John T.; Wu, Christina C.N.; Yao, Shiyin; Cottam, Howard B.; Tawatao, Rommel I.; Corr, Maripat; Carson, Dennis A; Daniels, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective There remains a compelling need for the development of treatments for unresectable melanoma. Agents that stimulate the innate immune response could provide advantages for cell based therapies. However there are conflicting reports concerning whether Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling controls tumor growth. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the intralesional administration of a TLR7 agonist in melanoma therapy. Methods B16cOVA melanoma was implanted to TLR7−/− mice to evaluate the roles of stromal TLR7 on melanoma growth. To capitalize on the potential deleterious effects of TLR7 stimulation on tumor growth, we injected melanoma tumor nodules with a newly developed and potent TLR7 agonist. Results B16 melanoma nodules expanded more rapidly in mice deficient in TLR7- and MyD88- compared to TLR9-deficient and wild type mice. Repeated injections with low doses of unconjugated TLR7 agonist were more effective at attenuating nodule size than a single high dose injection. To improve efficacy we conjugated the agonist to phospholipid or polyethylene glycol-phospholipid, which retained TLR7 specificity. The phospholipid conjugate was indeed more effective in reducing lesion size. Furthermore intralesional administration of the phospholipid TLR7 agonist conjugate enhanced the anti-melanoma effects of systemic IL-2 treatment and prolonged the survival of mice compared to IL-2 alone. Conclusion TLR7/MyD88 signaling in the stroma is involved in melanoma growth. Intralesional administration of a TLR7 agonist reduces the growth of melanoma nodules and enhances the anti-melanoma effects of IL-2. PMID:21030882

  8. Toll-like receptor 7 agonists are potent and rapid bronchodilators in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Elad H.; Fryer, Allison D.; Jacoby, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Respiratory tract viral infections result in asthma exacerbations. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 is a receptor for viral single-stranded RNA and is expressed at high levels in the lungs. Objective Because TLR7 polymorphisms are associated with asthma, we examined the effects of TLR7 agonists in guinea pig airways. Methods We induced bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs in vivo by means of electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve or intravenous administration of acetylcholine and measured the effect of a TLR7 agonist administered intravenously. We induced contraction of airway smooth muscle in segments of isolated guinea pig tracheas in vitro and measured the effect of TLR7 agonists, antagonists, and pharmacologic inhibitors of associated signaling pathways administered directly to the bath. Results TLR7 agonists acutely inhibited bronchoconstriction in vivo and relaxed contraction of airway smooth muscle in vitro within minutes of administration. Airway relaxation induced by the TLR7 agonist R837 (imiquimod) was partially blocked with a TLR7 antagonist and was also blocked by inhibitors of large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels; prostaglandin synthesis; and nitric oxide generation. Another TLR7 agonist, 21-mer single-stranded phosphorothioated polyuridylic acid (PolyUs), mediated relaxation that was completely blocked by a TLR7 antagonist. Conclusions These data demonstrate a novel protective mechanism to limit bronchoconstriction and maintain airflow during respiratory tract viral infections. The fast time frame is inconsistent with canonical TLR7 signaling. R837 mediates bronchodilation by means of TLR7-dependent and TLR7-independent mechanisms, whereas PolyUs does so through only the TLR7-dependent mechanism. TLR7-independent mechanisms involve prostaglandins and large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels, whereas TLR7-dependent mechanisms involve nitric oxide. TLR7 is an attractive therapeutic target for its ability to

  9. Discovery of Peripheral κ-Opioid Receptor Agonists as Novel Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinya; Sugawara, Yuji; Inada, Hideaki; Tsuji, Riichiro; Inoue, Atsushi; Tanimura, Ryuji; Shimozono, Rieko; Konno, Mitsuhiro; Ohyama, Tomofumi; Higashi, Eriko; Sakai, Chizuka; Kawai, Koji

    2017-01-01

    κ-Opioid receptor agonists with high selectivity over the μ-opioid receptor and peripheral selectivity are attractive targets in the development of drugs for pain. We have previously attempted to create novel analgesics with peripheral selective κ-opioid receptor agonist on the basis of TRK-820. In this study, we elucidated the biological properties of 17-hydroxy-cyclopropylmethyl and 10α-hydroxy derivatives. These compounds were found to have better κ-opioid receptor selectivity and peripheral selectivity than TRK-820.

  10. Reports of pathological gambling, hypersexuality, and compulsive shopping associated with dopamine receptor agonist drugs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas J; Glenmullen, Joseph; Mattison, Donald R

    2014-12-01

    Severe impulse control disorders involving pathological gambling, hypersexuality, and compulsive shopping have been reported in association with the use of dopamine receptor agonist drugs in case series and retrospective patient surveys. These agents are used to treat Parkinson disease, restless leg syndrome, and hyperprolactinemia. To analyze serious adverse drug event reports about these impulse control disorders received by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and to assess the relationship of these case reports with the 6 FDA-approved dopamine receptor agonist drugs. We conducted a retrospective disproportionality analysis based on the 2.7 million serious domestic and foreign adverse drug event reports from 2003 to 2012 extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System. Cases were selected if they contained any of 10 preferred terms in the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) that described the abnormal behaviors. We used the proportional reporting ratio (PRR) to compare the proportion of target events to all serious events for the study drugs with a similar proportion for all other drugs. We identified 1580 events indicating impulse control disorders from the United States and 21 other countries:710 fordopamine receptor agonist drugs and 870 for other drugs. The dopamine receptor agonist drugs had a strong signal associated with these impulse control disorders (n = 710; PRR = 277.6, P < .001). The association was strongest for the dopamine agonists pramipexole (n = 410; PRR = 455.9, P < .001) and ropinirole (n = 188; PRR = 152.5, P < .001), with preferential affinity for the dopamine D3 receptor. A signal was also seen for aripiprazole, an antipsychotic classified as a partial agonist of the D3 receptor (n = 37; PRR = 8.6, P < .001). Our findings confirm and extend the evidence that dopamine receptor agonist drugs are associated with these specific impulse control disorders. At present

  11. Synthesis and pharmacological characterization of beta2-adrenergic agonist enantiomers: zilpaterol.

    PubMed

    Kern, Christopher; Meyer, Thorsten; Droux, Serge; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Miculka, Christian

    2009-03-26

    The beta-adrenergic agonist 1 (zilpaterol) is used as production enhancer in cattle. Binding experiments of separated enantiomers on recombinant human beta(2)-adrenergic and mu-opioid receptors and functional studies showed that the (-)-1 enantiomer accounts for essentially all the beta(2)-adrenergic agonist activity and that it exhibits less affinity toward the mu-opioid receptor than (+)-1, which is a mu-opioid receptor antagonist. X-ray crystallography revealed the absolute configuration of (-)-1 to be 6R,7R.

  12. A2A adenosine receptor agonists and their potential therapeutic applications. An update.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Angel

    2018-03-12

    In the last 20 years, an increasing interest of medicinal chemists on the development of potent and selective agonists and antagonists of adenosine receptors has been noticed due to the large impact they have shown in a variety of important biological processes and diseases. Among these, it should be mentioned vasodilation, inflammation, cancer, wound healing, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson disease, infectious diseases, and other CNS disorders. In this review, I will provide an update of the structures of the A2A agonists known, their selectivity versus other adenosine receptors, and their latest therapeutic applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Identification of potent, nonabsorbable agonists of the calcium-sensing receptor for GI-specific administration.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Steven M; Spearing, Paul K; Diaz, Caroline J; Cowan, David J; Jayawickreme, Channa; Chen, Grace; Rimele, Thomas J; Generaux, Claudia; Harston, Lindsey T; Roller, Shane G

    2017-10-15

    Modulation of gastrointestinal nutrient sensing pathways provides a promising a new approach for the treatment of metabolic diseases including diabetes and obesity. The calcium-sensing receptor has been identified as a key receptor involved in mineral and amino acid nutrient sensing and thus is an attractive target for modulation in the intestine. Herein we describe the optimization of gastrointestinally restricted calcium-sensing receptor agonists starting from a 3-aminopyrrolidine-containing template leading to the identification of GI-restricted agonist 19 (GSK3004774). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Light and Melatonin and other Melatonin Receptor Agonists on Human Circadian Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Emens, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Circadian (body clock) timing has a profound influence on mental health, physical health, and health behaviors. This review focuses on how light, melatonin and other melatonin receptor agonist drugs can be used to shift circadian timing in patients with misaligned circadian rhythms. A brief overview of the human circadian system is provided, followed by a discussion of patient characteristics and safety considerations that can influence the treatment of choice. The important features of light treatment, light avoidance, exogenous melatonin and other melatonin receptor agonists are reviewed, along with some of the practical aspects of light and melatonin treatment. PMID:26568121

  15. Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C in Patients Receiving Opioid Agonist Therapy: A Review of Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Norton, Brianna L; Akiyama, Matthew J; Zamor, Philippe J; Litwin, Alain H

    2018-06-01

    Injection drug use is the most common transmission route for hepatitis C. High rates of infection are observed among individuals on opioid agonist therapy. Although people who inject drugs carry the highest burden, few have initiated treatment. We present a comprehensive review of the evidence on the efficacy of HCV medications, drug-drug interactions, and barriers to and models of care. Studies have demonstrated comparable efficacy for individuals who are on opioid agonist therapy compared with those who are not. We propose that a strategy of treatment and cure-as-prevention is imperative in this population to curb the hepatitis C epidemic. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of p53 Stability and Apoptosis by a ROR Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjun; Solt, Laura A.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of p53 function leading to cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis is a promising strategy for development of anti-cancer therapeutic agents. Here, we describe a novel mechanism for stabilization of p53 protein expression via activation of the orphan nuclear receptor, RORα. We demonstrate that treatment of cancer cells with a newly described synthetic ROR agonist, SR1078, leads to p53 stabilization and induction of apoptosis. These data suggest that synthetic ROR agonists may hold utility in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22509368

  17. Regulation of p53 stability and apoptosis by a ROR agonist.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjun; Solt, Laura A; Kojetin, Douglas J; Burris, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    Activation of p53 function leading to cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis is a promising strategy for development of anti-cancer therapeutic agents. Here, we describe a novel mechanism for stabilization of p53 protein expression via activation of the orphan nuclear receptor, RORα. We demonstrate that treatment of cancer cells with a newly described synthetic ROR agonist, SR1078, leads to p53 stabilization and induction of apoptosis. These data suggest that synthetic ROR agonists may hold utility in the treatment of cancer.

  18. Discovery of 3-aryl-4-isoxazolecarboxamides as TGR5 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Evans, Karen A; Budzik, Brian W; Ross, Sean A; Wisnoski, David D; Jin, Jian; Rivero, Ralph A; Vimal, Mythily; Szewczyk, George R; Jayawickreme, Channa; Moncol, David L; Rimele, Thomas J; Armour, Susan L; Weaver, Susan P; Griffin, Robert J; Tadepalli, Sarva M; Jeune, Michael R; Shearer, Todd W; Chen, Zibin B; Chen, Lihong; Anderson, Donald L; Becherer, J David; De Los Frailes, Maite; Colilla, Francisco Javier

    2009-12-24

    A series of 3-aryl-4-isoxazolecarboxamides identified from a high-throughput screening campaign as novel, potent small molecule agonists of the human TGR5 G-protein coupled receptor is described. Subsequent optimization resulted in the rapid identification of potent exemplars 6 and 7 which demonstrated improved GLP-1 secretion in vivo via an intracolonic dose coadministered with glucose challenge in a canine model. These novel TGR5 receptor agonists are potentially useful therapeutics for metabolic disorders such as type II diabetes and its associated complications.

  19. Future possibilities in the prevention of breast cancer: Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Darcy V; Pike, Malcolm C

    2000-01-01

    The cyclic production of estrogen and progesterone by the premenopausal ovary accounts for the steep rise in breast cancer risk in premenopausal women. These hormones are breast cell mitogens. By reducing exposure to these ovarian hormones, agonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) given to suppress ovarian function may prove useful in cancer prevention. To prevent deleterious effects of hypoestrogenemia, the addition of low-dose hormone replacement to the LHRH agonist appears necessary. Pilot data with such an approach indicates it is feasible and reduces mammographic densities. PMID:11250719

  20. A Small Molecule Agonist of EphA2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibits Tumor Cell Migration In Vitro and Prostate Cancer Metastasis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hong; Miao, Hui; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Page, Phillip; Liu, Lili; Lindner, Daniel J.; Acharya, Chayan; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Ficker, Eckhard; Song, Jianxing; Wang, Bingcheng

    2012-01-01

    During tumor progression, EphA2 receptor can gain ligand-independent pro-oncogenic functions due to Akt activation and reduced ephrin-A ligand engagement. The effects can be reversed by ligand stimulation, which triggers the intrinsic tumor suppressive signaling pathways of EphA2 including inhibition of PI3/Akt and Ras/ERK pathways. These observations argue for development of small molecule agonists for EphA2 as potential tumor intervention agents. Through virtual screening and cell-based assays, we report here the identification and characterization of doxazosin as a novel small molecule agonist for EphA2 and EphA4, but not for other Eph receptors tested. NMR studies revealed extensive contacts of doxazosin with EphA2/A4, recapitulating both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions recently found in the EphA2/ephrin-A1 complex. Clinically used as an α1-adrenoreceptor antagonist (Cardura®) for treating hypertension and benign prostate hyperplasia, doxazosin activated EphA2 independent of α1-adrenoreceptor. Similar to ephrin-A1, doxazosin inhibited Akt and ERK kinase activities in an EphA2-dependent manner. Treatment with doxazosin triggered EphA2 receptor internalization, and suppressed haptotactic and chemotactic migration of prostate cancer, breast cancer, and glioma cells. Moreover, in an orthotopic xenograft model, doxazosin reduced distal metastasis of human prostate cancer cells and prolonged survival in recipient mice. To our knowledge, doxazosin is the first small molecule agonist of a receptor tyrosine kinase that is capable of inhibiting malignant behaviors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22916121

  1. 6'-Guanidinonaltrindole (6'-GNTI) is a G protein-biased κ-opioid receptor agonist that inhibits arrestin recruitment.

    PubMed

    Rives, Marie-Laure; Rossillo, Mary; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2012-08-03

    κ-Opioid receptor (KOR) agonists do not activate the reward pathway stimulated by morphine-like μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists and thus have been considered to be promising nonaddictive analgesics. However, KOR agonists produce other adverse effects, including dysphoria, diuresis, and constipation. The therapeutic promise of KOR agonists has nonetheless recently been revived by studies showing that their dysphoric effects require arrestin recruitment, whereas their analgesic effects do not. Moreover, KOR agonist-induced antinociceptive tolerance observed in vivo has also been proposed to be correlated to the ability to induce arrestin-dependent phosphorylation, desensitization, and internalization of the receptor. The discovery of functionally selective drugs that are therapeutically effective without the adverse effects triggered by the arrestin pathway is thus an important goal. We have identified such an extreme G protein-biased KOR compound, 6'-guanidinonaltrindole (6'-GNTI), a potent partial agonist at the KOR receptor for the G protein activation pathway that does not recruit arrestin. Indeed, 6'-GNTI functions as an antagonist to block the arrestin recruitment and KOR internalization induced by other nonbiased agonists. As an extremely G protein-biased KOR agonist, 6'-GNTI represents a promising lead compound in the search for nonaddictive opioid analgesic as its signaling profile suggests that it will be without the dysphoria and other adverse effects promoted by arrestin recruitment and its downstream signaling.

  2. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  3. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  4. Pharmacological Characterization of 30 Human Melanocortin-4 Receptor Polymorphisms with the Endogenous Proopiomelanocortin Derived Agonists, Synthetic Agonists, and the Endogenous Agouti-Related Protein (AGRP) Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhimin; Proneth, Bettina; Dirain, Marvin L.; Litherland, Sally A.; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in the central nervous system and has a role in regulating feeding behavior, obesity, energy homeostasis, male erectile response, and blood pressure. Since the report of the MC4R knockout mouse in 1997, the field has been searching for links between this genetic bio marker and human obesity and type 2 diabetes. More then 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified from human patients, both obese and non-obese controls. Many significant studies have been performed examining the pharmacological characteristics of these hMC4R SNPs in attempts to identify a molecular defects/insights that might link a genetic factor to the obese phenotype observed in patients possessing these mutations. Our laboratory has previously reported the pharmacological characterization of 40 of these polymorphic hMC4 receptors with multiple endogenous and synthetic ligands. The goal of the current study is to perform a similar comprehensive side-by-side characterization of 30 additional human hMC4R with single nucleotide polymorphisms using multiple endogenous agonists [α-, β, γ2-melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)], the antagonist agouti-related protein hAGRP(87-132), and synthetic agonists [NDP-MSH, MTII, and the tetrapeptide Ac-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH2 (JRH887-9)]. These in vitro data, in some cases, provide a putative molecular link between dysfunctional hMC4R's and human obesity. These 30 hMC4R SNPs include R7H, R18H, R18L, S36Y, P48S, V50M, F51L, E61K, I69T, D90N, S94R, G98R, I121T, A154D, Y157S, W174C, G181D, F202L, A219V, I226T, G231S, G238D, N240S, C271R, S295P, P299L, E308K, I317V, L325F and 750DelGA. All but the N240S hMC4R were identified in obese patients. Additionally, we have characterized a double I102T/V103I hMC4R. In addition to the pharmacological characterization, the hMC4R variants were evaluated for cell surface expression by flow

  5. Pharmacological characterization of 30 human melanocortin-4 receptor polymorphisms with the endogenous proopiomelanocortin-derived agonists, synthetic agonists, and the endogenous agouti-related protein antagonist.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhimin; Proneth, Bettina; Dirain, Marvin L; Litherland, Sally A; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2010-06-08

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in the central nervous system and has a role in regulating feeding behavior, obesity, energy homeostasis, male erectile response, and blood pressure. Since the report of the MC4R knockout mouse in 1997, the field has been searching for links between this genetic biomarker and human obesity and type 2 diabetes. More then 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified from human patients, both obese and nonobese controls. Many significant studies have been performed examining the pharmacological characteristics of these hMC4R SNPs in attempts to identify a molecular defects/insights that might link a genetic factor to the obese phenotype observed in patients possessing these mutations. Our laboratory has previously reported the pharmacological characterization of 40 of these polymorphic hMC4 receptors with multiple endogenous and synthetic ligands. The goal of the current study is to perform a similar comprehensive side-by-side characterization of 30 additional human hMC4R with single nucleotide polymorphisms using multiple endogenous agonists [alpha-, beta-, and gamma(2)-melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)], the antagonist agouti-related protein hAGRP(87-132), and synthetic agonists [NDP-MSH, MTII, and the tetrapeptide Ac-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-NH(2) (JRH887-9)]. These in vitro data, in some cases, provide a putative molecular link between dysfunctional hMC4R's and human obesity. These 30 hMC4R SNPs include R7H, R18H, R18L, S36Y, P48S, V50M, F51L, E61K, I69T, D90N, S94R, G98R, I121T, A154D, Y157S, W174C, G181D, F202L, A219 V, I226T, G231S, G238D, N240S, C271R, S295P, P299L, E308K, I317V, L325F, and 750DelGA. All but the N240S hMC4R were identified in obese patients. Additionally, we have characterized a double I102T/V103I hMC4R. In addition to the pharmacological characterization, the hMC4R variants were evaluated for cell surface

  6. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN RESIDUES OF AHR AGONISTS IN FISH AND CONCENTRATIONS IN WATER AND SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relationships between Residues of AhR Agonists in Fish and Concentrations in Water and Sediment. Cook, PM*, Burkhard, LP, Mount, DR, US-EPA, NHEERL, MED, Duluth, MN. The bioaccumulation visualization approach of Burkhard et al. (2002) can be effectively used to describe the bioa...

  7. THE MORPHOLOGICAL BASIS FOR OLFACTORY PERCEPTION OF STEROIDS DUING AGONISTIC BEHAVIOR IN LOBSTER: PRELIMINARY EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The morphological basis for olfactory perception of steroids during agonistic behavior in lobsters: preliminary experiments. Borsay Horowitz, DJ1, Kass-Simon, G2, Coglianese, D2, Martin, L2, Boseman, M2, Cromarty, S3, Randall, K3, Fini, A.3 1US EPA, NHEERL, ORD, Atlantic Ecology...

  8. NICOTINE EFFECTS ON THE ACTIVITY OF MICE EXPOSED PRENATALLY TO THE NICOTINIC AGONIST ANATOXIN-A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable research has shown long-lasting effects of early exposure in experimental animals to nicotine. Anatoxin-a is produced by cyanobacteria and has been shown to be a potent nicotinic agonist. This experiment evaluated the motor activity of adult mice, and their respons...

  9. Treatment of Obesity-Related Complications with Novel Classes of Naturally Occurring PPAR Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guri, Amir J.; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities has grown to epidemic proportions in the US and worldwide. Thus, developing safe and effective therapeutic approaches against these widespread and debilitating diseases is important and timely. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) α, γ, and δ through several classes of pharmaceuticals can prevent or treat a variety of metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including type II diabetes (T2D). Thus, PPARs represent important molecular targets for developing novel and better treatments for a wide range of debilitating and widespread obesity-related diseases and disorders. However, available PPAR γ agonistic drugs such as Avandia have significant adverse side effects, including weight gain, fluid retention, hepatotoxicity, and congestive heart failure. An alternative to synthetic agonists of PPAR γ is the discovery and development of naturally occurring and safer nutraceuticals that may be dual or pan PPAR agonists. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the health effects of three plant-derived PPAR agonists: abscisic acid (ABA), punicic acid (PUA), and catalpic acid (CAA) in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and metabolic diseases and disorders. PMID:21253508

  10. Treatment of Obesity-Related Complications with Novel Classes of Naturally Occurring PPAR Agonists.

    PubMed

    Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guri, Amir J; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities has grown to epidemic proportions in the US and worldwide. Thus, developing safe and effective therapeutic approaches against these widespread and debilitating diseases is important and timely. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) α, γ, and δ through several classes of pharmaceuticals can prevent or treat a variety of metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including type II diabetes (T2D). Thus, PPARs represent important molecular targets for developing novel and better treatments for a wide range of debilitating and widespread obesity-related diseases and disorders. However, available PPAR γ agonistic drugs such as Avandia have significant adverse side effects, including weight gain, fluid retention, hepatotoxicity, and congestive heart failure. An alternative to synthetic agonists of PPAR γ is the discovery and development of naturally occurring and safer nutraceuticals that may be dual or pan PPAR agonists. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the health effects of three plant-derived PPAR agonists: abscisic acid (ABA), punicic acid (PUA), and catalpic acid (CAA) in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and metabolic diseases and disorders.

  11. Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists for the prevention of cardiac complications among adults undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Dallas; Sankar, Ashwin; Beattie, W Scott; Wijeysundera, Duminda N

    2018-03-06

    The surgical stress response plays an important role on the pathogenesis of perioperative cardiac complications. Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists attenuate this response and may help prevent postoperative cardiac complications. To determine the efficacy and safety of α-2 adrenergic agonists for reducing mortality and cardiac complications in adults undergoing cardiac surgery and non-cardiac surgery. We searched CENTRAL (2017, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1950 to April Week 4, 2017), Embase (1980 to May 2017), the Science Citation Index, clinical trial registries, and reference lists of included articles. We included randomized controlled trials that compared α-2 adrenergic agonists (i.e. clonidine, dexmedetomidine or mivazerol) against placebo or non-α-2 adrenergic agonists. Included trials had to evaluate the efficacy and safety of α-2 adrenergic agonists for preventing perioperative mortality or cardiac complications (or both), or measure one or more relevant outcomes (i.e. death, myocardial infarction, heart failure, acute stroke, supraventricular tachyarrhythmia and myocardial ischaemia). Two authors independently assessed trial quality, extracted data and independently performed computer entry of abstracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. Adverse event data were gathered from the trials. We evaluated included studies using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool, and the quality of the evidence underlying pooled treatment effects using GRADE methodology. Given the clinical heterogeneity between cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, we analysed these subgroups separately. We expressed treatment effects as pooled risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 47 trials with 17,039 participants. Of these studies, 24 trials only included participants undergoing cardiac surgery, 23 only included participants undergoing non-cardiac surgery and eight only included participants undergoing vascular surgery. The α-2 adrenergic agonist studied

  12. A Small Molecule Inverse Agonist for the Human Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Susanne; Huang, Wenwei; Eliseeva, Elena; Titus, Steve; Thomas, Craig J.; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Small molecule inverse agonists for the TSH receptor (TSHR) may be used as probes of the role of basal (or agonist-independent or constitutive) signaling and may have therapeutic potential as orally active drugs to inhibit basal signaling in patients with thyroid cancer and in some patients with hyperthyroidism. We describe the first small-molecule ligand [1;2-(3-((2,6-dimethylphenoxy)methyl)-4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(furan-2-ylmethyl)-2,3-dihydroquinazolin-4(1H)-one] that exhibits inverse agonist properties at TSHR. 1 inhibits basal and TSH-stimulated signaling, measured as cAMP production, by TSHRs in HEK-EM 293 cells stably expressing wild-type TSHRs; the antagonism of TSH-mediated signaling is competitive. 1 also inhibits basal signaling by wild-type TSHRs, and four constitutively active mutants of TSHR expressed transiently in HEK-EM 293 cells. 1 was active under more physiologically relevant conditions in primary cultures of human thyrocytes expressing endogenous TSHRs where it inhibited basal levels of mRNA transcripts for thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase, sodium iodide symporter, and TSHR. These data serve as proof of principle that small, drug-like molecules can inhibit basal signaling by TSHR. We suggest that this small molecule is a lead compound for the development of higher-potency inverse agonists that can be used as probes of TSHR biology with therapeutic potential. PMID:20427476

  13. The War on Public Education: Agonist Democracy and the Fight for Schools as Public Things

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Kathleen Abowitz

    2018-01-01

    Agonistic critiques of democratic theory conceptualize democracy as a site of conflict and struggle; as the fight against privatization escalates, these critiques become more relevant for educational governance. Public education governance has, in addition, increasingly been the site of conflicts between federal, state and local levels, as…

  14. Agonistic Recognition in Education: On Arendt's Qualification of Political and Moral Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ljunggren, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Agonistic recognition in education has three interlinked modes of aesthetic experience and self-presentation where one is related to actions in the public realm; one is related to plurality in the way in which it comes into existence in confrontation with others; and one is related to the subject-self, disclosed by "thinking. Arendt"s conception…

  15. Recent Updates on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor δ Agonists for the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Ajmer S; Beniwal, Meenu; Pandita, Deepti; Sekhon, Bhupinder S; Lather, Viney

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a disorder described by reduced insulin sensitivity, overweight, hyperlipidaemia, high blood pressure and myocardial disorders, mainly due to high fat diet and lack of physical activity. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are type II nuclear hormone receptors that regulate a number of processes in living systems, such as metabolism of carbohydrates and fatty acids, growth and differentiation of cell, and inflammatory reactions. Alpha, gamma and delta are the three distinct isoforms of PPAR. The stimulation of PPARδ alters body's energy fuel preference from glucose to fat. The PPARδ isoform is expressed ubiquitously in all tissues, especially in those tissues which involved in metabolism of lipids like adipose tissue, liver, kidney, and muscle. Currently, PPARδ is an emerging therapeutic target for the pharmacological therapy of disorders associated with metabolic syndrome. Several PPARδ selective agonists had been reported in last ten years, many of them had been advanced into the late phase of clinical trials such as Endurobol (GW501516). However, no PPARδ agonists are yet approved for human use. The present work had been planned to cover wide variety of PPARδ agonists reported till now along with their potential role to tackle various metabolic disorders. The present review has been planned to focus mainly the most popular PPARδ agonists.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta agonist ameliorated inflammasome activation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Yeon, Jong Eun; Ko, Eun Jung; Yoon, Eileen L; Suh, Sang Jun; Kang, Keunhee; Kim, Hae Rim; Kang, Seoung Hee; Yoo, Yang Jae; Je, Jihye; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inflammasome activation and the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-δ agonist treatment in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice were classified according to control or high fat diet (HFD) with or without PPAR-δ agonist (GW) over period of 12 wk [control, HFD, HFD + lipopolysaccharide (LPS), HFD + LPS + GW group]. HepG2 cells were exposed to palmitic acid (PA) and/or LPS in the absence or presence of GW. RESULTS: HFD caused glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. In mice fed an HFD with LPS, caspase-1 and interleukin (IL)-1β in the liver were significantly increased. Treatment with GW ameliorated the steatosis and inhibited overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In HepG2 cells, PA and LPS treatment markedly increased mRNA of several nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family members (NLRP3, NLRP6, and NLRP10), caspase-1 and IL-1β. PA and LPS also exaggerated reactive oxygen species production. All of the above effects of PA and LPS were reduced by GW. GW also enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK-α. CONCLUSION: PPAR-δ agonist reduces fatty acid-induced inflammation and steatosis by suppressing inflammasome activation. Targeting the inflammasome by the PPAR-δ agonist may have therapeutic implication for NAFLD. PMID:26668503

  17. Conformationally constrained farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists: alternative replacements of the stilbene.

    PubMed

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; Miller, Aaron B; Navas, Frank; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Wisely, G Bruce

    2011-10-15

    To further explore the optimum placement of the acid moiety in conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064 1a, a series of stilbene replacements were prepared. The benzothiophene 1f and the indole 1g display the optimal orientation of the carboxylate for enhanced FXR agonist potency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Agonistic autoantibodies against the angiotensin AT1 receptor increase in unstable angina patients after stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miao; Sheng, Li; Huang, Peng; Li, Jun; Zhang, Chuan-Huan; Yang, Jun; Liao, Yu-Hua; Li, Liu-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Agonistic AT1 receptor autoantibodies have been described in patients with hypertension and preeclampsia. These autoantibodies could stimulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are involved in angiotensin II-induced vascular injury in cardiovascular disease. Hence, in this study, we explored the existence of agonistic AT1 receptor autoantibodies in unstable angina (UA) patients and the possible effects of them on the in-stent restenosis of these patients. A total of 95 UA patients and 98 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The serum of each patient was analyzed for the presence of AT1 receptor autoantibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Their effects on VSMC proliferation and c-fos and c-jun expression were studied in vitro. AT1 receptor autoantibodies were detected in 34/95 patients with UA. The incidence was 10.2% in the control group and rose to 47.37% after stent implantation. In vitro, this autoantibody had agonist-like activity, shown as stimulation of VSMC proliferation and upregulation of c-fos and c-jun expression. These effects were similar to that of angiotensin II and could be weakened partly by the AT1-receptor blocker valsartan. Our findings show that the autoantibody from UA patients has similar agonistic activity to angiotensin II and might play a role in the pathogenesis of in-stent restenosis in these patients.

  19. Profound and rapid reduction in body temperature induced by the melanocortin receptor agonists

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) plays a major role in body weight regulation and its agonist MTII has been widely used to study the role of MC4Rs in energy expenditure promotion and feeding reduction. Unexpectedly, we observed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of MTII induced a rapid red...

  20. Platelet-activating factor receptor agonists mediate xeroderma pigmentosum A photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongxue; Harrison, Kathleen A; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Murphy, Robert C; Rezania, Samin; Konger, Raymond L; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2012-03-16

    To date, oxidized glycerophosphocholines (Ox-GPCs) with platelet-activating factor (PAF) activity produced non-enzymatically have not been definitively demonstrated to mediate any known disease processes. Here we provide evidence that these Ox-GPCs play a pivotal role in the photosensitivity associated with the deficiency of the DNA repair protein xeroderma pigmentosum type A (XPA). It should be noted that XPA-deficient cells are known to have decreased antioxidant defenses. These studies demonstrate that treatment of human XPA-deficient fibroblasts with the pro-oxidative stressor ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation resulted in increased reactive oxygen species and PAF receptor (PAF-R) agonistic activity in comparison with gene-corrected cells. The UVB irradiation-generated PAF-R agonists were inhibited by antioxidants. UVB irradiation of XPA-deficient (Xpa-/-) mice also resulted in increased PAF-R agonistic activity and skin inflammation in comparison with control mice. The increased UVB irradiation-mediated skin inflammation and TNF-α production in Xpa-/- mice were blocked by systemic antioxidants and by PAF-R antagonists. Structural characterization of PAF-R-stimulating activity in UVB-irradiated XPA-deficient fibroblasts using mass spectrometry revealed increased levels of sn-2 short-chain Ox-GPCs along with native PAF. These studies support a critical role for PAF-R agonistic Ox-GPCs in the pathophysiology of XPA photosensitivity.

  1. Environmental enrichment improves novel object recognition and enhances agonistic behavior in male mice.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Gresa, Patricia; Pérez-Martinez, Asunción; Redolat, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an experimental paradigm in which rodents are housed in complex environments containing objects that provide stimulation, the effects of which are expected to improve the welfare of these subjects. EE has been shown to considerably improve learning and memory in rodents. However, knowledge about the effects of EE on social interaction is generally limited and rather controversial. Thus, our aim was to evaluate both novel object recognition and agonistic behavior in NMRI mice receiving EE, hypothesizing enhanced cognition and slightly enhanced agonistic interaction upon EE rearing. During a 4-week period half the mice (n = 16) were exposed to EE and the other half (n = 16) remained in a standard environment (SE). On PND 56-57, animals performed the object recognition test, in which recognition memory was measured using a discrimination index. The social interaction test consisted of an encounter between an experimental animal and a standard opponent. Results indicated that EE mice explored the new object for longer periods than SE animals (P < .05). During social encounters, EE mice devoted more time to sociability and agonistic behavior (P < .05) than their non-EE counterparts. In conclusion, EE has been shown to improve object recognition and increase agonistic behavior in adolescent/early adulthood mice. In the future we intend to extend this study on a longitudinal basis in order to assess in more depth the effect of EE and the consistency of the above-mentioned observations in NMRI mice. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  3. Identification of novel IP receptor agonists using historical ligand biased chemical arrays.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Stephen C; Charlton, Steven J; Cox, Brian; Fitch, Helen; Howson, Christopher D; Leblanc, Catherine; Meyer, Arndt; Rosethorne, Elizabeth M; Stanley, Emily

    2014-05-15

    By considering published structural information we have designed high throughput biaryl lipophilic acid arrays leveraging facile chemistry to expedite their synthesis. We rapidly identified multiple hits which were of suitable IP agonist potency. These relatively simple and strategically undecorated molecules present an ideal opportunity for optimization towards our target candidate profile. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Differences in acute anorectic effects of long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have both glucose- and weight-lowering effects. The brain is poised to mediate both of these actions since GLP-1Rs are present in key areas known to control weight and glucose. Although some research has been performed on the effects of ...

  5. Determination of beta-agonists in swine hair by μFIA and chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Luo, Yong; Shi, Bo; Gao, Zhigang; Du, Yuguang; Liu, Xianming; Zhao, Weijie; Lin, Bingcheng

    2015-04-01

    β-Agonists are a group of illegal feed additives. In this paper, it was found that the light emission produced by the oxidation of luminol by potassium ferricyanide was enhanced by the β-agonists (ractopamine, salbutamol, and terbutaline). Based on chemiluminescence phenomenon, a novel, rapid, and sensitive microflow injection analysis system on a microfluidic glass chip was established for determination of the β-agonists. The chip was fabricated from two glass plates (64 mm × 32 mm) with microchannels of 200 μm width and 100 μm depth. The detection limits were achieved at 2.0 × 10(-8) mol/L of ractopamine, 1.0 × 10(-8) mol/L of terbutaline and 5.0 × 10(-7) mol/L of salbutamol. In this report, our method was applied for determination of the β-agonists in swine hair from three different sources with satisfactory results. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Activation of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels by nicotinic and muscarinic agonists

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Gustav; Auerbach, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    The dose-response parameters of recombinant mouse adult neuromuscular acetylcholine receptor channels (nAChR) activated by carbamylcholine, nicotine, muscarine and oxotremorine were measured. Rate constants for agonist association and dissociation, and channel opening and closing, were estimated from single-channel kinetic analysis.The dissociation equilibrium constants were (mM): ACh (0.16)carbamylcholine (5.1)>oxotremorine M (0.6)>nicotine (0.5)>muscarine (0.15).Rat neuronal α4β2 nAChR can be activated by all of the agonists. However, detailed kinetic analysis was impossible because the recordings lacked clusters representing the activity of a single receptor complex. Thus, the number of channels in the patch was unknown and the activation rate constants could not be determined.Considering both receptor affinity and agonist efficacy, muscarine and oxotremorine are significant agonists of muscle-type nAChR. The results are discussed in terms of structure-function relationships at the nAChR transmitter binding site. PMID:10602325

  7. Design and Discovery of Functionally Selective Serotonin 2C (5-HT2C) Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianjun; McCorvy, John D; Giguere, Patrick M; Zhu, Hu; Kenakin, Terry; Roth, Bryan L; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-11-10

    On the basis of the structural similarity of our previous 5-HT 2C agonists with the melatonin receptor agonist tasimelteon and the putative biological cross-talk between serotonergic and melatonergic systems, a series of new (2,3-dihydro)benzofuran-based compounds were designed and synthesized. The compounds were evaluated for their selectivity toward 5-HT 2A , 5-HT 2B , and 5-HT 2C receptors in the calcium flux assay with the ultimate goal to generate selective 5-HT 2C agonists. Selected compounds were studied for their functional selectivity by comparing their transduction efficiency at the G protein signaling pathway versus β-arrestin recruitment. The most functionally selective compound (+)-7e produced weak β-arrestin recruitment and also demonstrated less receptor desensitization compared to serotonin in both calcium flux and phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis assays. We report for the first time that selective 5-HT 2C agonists possessing weak β-arrestin recruitment can produce distinct receptor desensitization properties.

  8. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists modulate neuropathic pain: a link to chemokines?

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Caroline M.; Miller, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain presents a widespread and intractable medical problem. While numerous pharmaceuticals are used to treat chronic pain, drugs that are safe for extended use and highly effective at treating the most severe pain do not yet exist. Chronic pain resulting from nervous system injury (neuropathic pain) is common in conditions ranging from multiple sclerosis to HIV-1 infection to type II diabetes. Inflammation caused by neuropathy is believed to contribute to the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines are key inflammatory mediators, several of which (MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, fractalkine, SDF-1 among others) have been linked to chronic, neuropathic pain in both human conditions and animal models. The important roles chemokines play in inflammation and pain make them an attractive therapeutic target. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a family of nuclear receptors known for their roles in metabolism. Recent research has revealed that PPARs also play a role in inflammatory gene repression. PPAR agonists have wide-ranging effects including inhibition of chemokine expression and pain behavior reduction in animal models. Experimental evidence suggests a connection between the pain ameliorating effects of PPAR agonists and suppression of inflammatory gene expression, including chemokines. In early clinical research, one PPARα agonist, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), shows promise in relieving chronic pain. If this link can be better established, PPAR agonists may represent a new drug therapy for neuropathic pain. PMID:25191225

  9. Characterizing novel metabolic pathways of melatonin receptor agonist agomelatine using metabolomic approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agomelatine (AGM), an analog of melatonin, is a potential agonist at melatonin receptors 1/2 and a selective antagonist at 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C receptors. AGM is widely used for the treatment of major depressive episodes in adults. However, multiple adverse effects associated with AGM have been re...

  10. beta-Adrenoceptor agonists enhance 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated behavioural responses.

    PubMed Central

    Cowen, P. J.; Grahame-Smith, D. G.; Green, A. R.; Heal, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The beta-adrenoceptor agonists, salbutamol, terbutaline and clenbuterol, were investigated for their effect on 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated (5-HT) hyperactivity. 2 The lipophilic beta-adrenoceptor agonist, clenbuterol (5 mg/kg) enhanced the behaviours induced by quipazine (25 mg/kg), including headweaving, forepaw treading and hind-limb abduction and thus increased automated activity recording. Clenbuterol (5 mg/kg) also enhanced the hyperactivity syndrome produced by the 5-HT agonist, 5-methoxy N,N-dimethyltryptamine (2 mg/kg) and the combination of tranylcypromine (10 mg/kg) and L-tryptophan (50 mg/kg). Salbutamol and terbutaline potentiated quipazine-induced hyperactivity only when given at the higher dose of 20 mg/kg. 3 The effect of clenbuterol in enhancing quipazine hyperactivity was blocked by the centrally acting beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, metoprolol (5 mg/kg), but not by the beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, butoxamine (5 mg/kg) or the peripherally acting beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, atenolol (5 mg/kg). 4 Clenbuterol (5 mg/kg) did not enhance the circling responses produced by methamphetamine (0.5 mg/kg) in unilateral nigrostriatal-lesioned rats. 5 The results suggest that beta-adrenoceptor agonists in common with some established antidepressant treatments produce enhancement of 5-HT-mediated behavioural responses. PMID:6124294

  11. Small-molecule agonists for the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Kiel, Dan; Teng, Min; Behrens, Carsten; Bhumralkar, Dilip; Kodra, János T.; Holst, Jens J.; Jeppesen, Claus B.; Johnson, Michael D.; de Jong, Johannes Cornelis; Jorgensen, Anker Steen; Kercher, Tim; Kostrowicki, Jarek; Madsen, Peter; Olesen, Preben H.; Petersen, Jacob S.; Poulsen, Fritz; Sidelmann, Ulla G.; Sturis, Jeppe; Truesdale, Larry; May, John; Lau, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 has important actions resulting in glucose lowering along with weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes. As a peptide hormone, GLP-1 has to be administered by injection. Only a few small-molecule agonists to peptide hormone receptors have been described and none in the B family of the G protein coupled receptors to which the GLP-1 receptor belongs. We have discovered a series of small molecules known as ago-allosteric modulators selective for the human GLP-1 receptor. These compounds act as both allosteric activators of the receptor and independent agonists. Potency of GLP-1 was not changed by the allosteric agonists, but affinity of GLP-1 for the receptor was increased. The most potent compound identified stimulates glucose-dependent insulin release from normal mouse islets but, importantly, not from GLP-1 receptor knockout mice. Also, the compound stimulates insulin release from perfused rat pancreas in a manner additive with GLP-1 itself. These compounds may lead to the identification or design of orally active GLP-1 agonists. PMID:17213325

  12. Dendritic cells tolerized with adenosine A2AR agonist attenuate acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Huang, Liping; Ye, Hong; Song, Steven P.; Bajwa, Amandeep; Lee, Sang Ju; Moser, Emily K.; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Kinsey, Gilbert R.; Day, Yuan J.; Linden, Joel; Lobo, Peter I.; Rosin, Diane L.; Okusa, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    DC-mediated NKT cell activation is critical in initiating the immune response following kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), which mimics human acute kidney injury (AKI). Adenosine is an important antiinflammatory molecule in tissue inflammation, and adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR) agonists protect kidneys from IRI through their actions on leukocytes. In this study, we showed that mice with A2AR-deficient DCs are more susceptible to kidney IRI and are not protected from injury by A2AR agonists. In addition, administration of DCs treated ex vivo with an A2AR agonist protected the kidneys of WT mice from IRI by suppressing NKT production of IFN-γ and by regulating DC costimulatory molecules that are important for NKT cell activation. A2AR agonists had no effect on DC antigen presentation or on Tregs. We conclude that ex vivo A2AR–induced tolerized DCs suppress NKT cell activation in vivo and provide a unique and potent cell-based strategy to attenuate organ IRI. PMID:23093781

  13. The Glycine Transport Inhibitor Sarcosine Is an Inhibitory Glycine Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai Xia; Lyons-Warren, Ariel; Thio, Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sarcosine is an endogenous amino acid that is a competitive inhibitor of the type I glycine transporter (GlyT1), an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) co-agonist, and an important intermediate in one-carbon metabolism. Its therapeutic potential for schizophrenia further underscores its clinical importance. The structural similarity between sarcosine and glycine and sarcosine's ability to serve as an NMDAR co-agonist led us to examine whether sarcosine is also an agonist at the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR). We examined this possibility using whole-cell recordings from cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons and found that sarcosine evoked a dose-dependent, strychnine sensitive, Cl- current that cross-inhibited glycine currents. Sarcosine evoked this current with Li+ in the extracellular solution to block GlyT1, in neurons treated with the essentially irreversible GlyT1 inhibitor N[3-(4′-fluorophenyl)-3-(4′-phenylphenoxy)propyl]sarcosine (NFPS), and in neurons plated in the absence of glia. These results indicate that the sarcosine currents did not result from GlyT1 inhibition or heteroexchange. We conclude that sarcosine is a GlyR agonist. PMID:19619564

  14. The glycine transport inhibitor sarcosine is an inhibitory glycine receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai Xia; Lyons-Warren, Ariel; Thio, Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Sarcosine is an endogenous amino acid that is a competitive inhibitor of the type I glycine transporter (GlyT1), an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) co-agonist, and an important intermediate in one-carbon metabolism. Its therapeutic potential for schizophrenia further underscores its clinical importance. The structural similarity between sarcosine and glycine and sarcosine's ability to serve as an NMDAR co-agonist led us to examine whether sarcosine is also an agonist at the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR). We examined this possibility using whole-cell recordings from cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons and found that sarcosine evoked a dose-dependent, strychnine sensitive, Cl(-) current that cross-inhibited glycine currents. Sarcosine evoked this current with Li(+) in the extracellular solution to block GlyT1, in neurons treated with the essentially irreversible GlyT1 inhibitor N[3-(4'-fluorophenyl)-3-(4'-phenylphenoxy)propyl]sarcosine (NFPS), and in neurons plated in the absence of glia. These results indicate that the sarcosine currents did not result from GlyT1 inhibition or heteroexchange. We conclude that sarcosine is a GlyR agonist.

  15. Differential Effects of Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist on Social Discrimination and Contextual Fear in Amygdala and Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 5 [mu]g/side) microinjected into the hippocampus or the amygdala would differentially affect memory processes in a neutral vs. an aversive task. In the aversive contextual fear task, WIN into the basolateral amygdala impaired fear acquisition/consolidation, but not retrieval.…

  16. Neurotransmitter agonists inhibit inositol phosphate formation in the brain of bupropione-treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.D.; Hungund, B.; Suckow, R.

    1986-03-05

    Bupropione is a chemically unique antidepressant whose mechanism of action is not known. In this study they have evaluated the effect of chronic treatment with bupropione on the receptor-mediated release of inositol phosphates (IP) from brain slices in rats. Animals were implanted with Alzet osmotic pumps that delivered bupropione at a constant rate (40mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks. Cross-chopped slices of cerebral cortex from control and drug-treated rats were prelabelled with myo-/sup 3/H-inositol in HEPES buffer containing 11 mM LiCl. Accumulation of IP was measured in the presence and absence of the following agonists: Carbamylcholine (100..mu..m); norepinephrine (5..mu..M) and serotonin (10..mu..M).more » All agonists stimulated release of IP from slices of control animals but appeared to inhibit IP release in bupropione-treated rats. These results indicate that a phospholipase C inhibitor may appear following the activation of this enzyme by the agonist, and that the agonist-induced formation of the apparent inhibitor may be markedly enhanced after treatment with bupropione.« less

  17. Preclinical evaluation of SMM-189, a cannabinoid receptor 2-specific inverse agonist

    PubMed Central

    Presley, Chaela; Abidi, Ammaar; Suryawanshi, Satyendra; Mustafa, Suni; Meibohm, Bernd; Moore, Bob M

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists and inverse agonists are emerging as new therapeutic options for a spectrum of autoimmune-related disease. Of particular interest, is the ability of CB2 ligands to regulate microglia function in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injury. We have previously reported the receptor affinity of 3′,5′-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-biphenyl-4-yl)-phenyl-methanone (SMM-189) and the characterization of the beneficial effects of SMM-189 in the mouse model of mild traumatic brain injury. Herein, we report the further characterization of SMM-189 as a potent and selective CB2 inverse agonist, which acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of CP 55,940. The ability of SMM-189 to regulate microglial activation, in terms of chemokine expression and cell morphology, has been determined. Finally, we have determined that SMM-189 possesses acceptable biopharmaceutical properties indicating that the triaryl class of CB2 inverse agonists are viable compounds for continued preclinical development for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic brain injury. PMID:26196013

  18. Preclinical evaluation of SMM-189, a cannabinoid receptor 2-specific inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Presley, Chaela; Abidi, Ammaar; Suryawanshi, Satyendra; Mustafa, Suni; Meibohm, Bernd; Moore, Bob M

    2015-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 agonists and inverse agonists are emerging as new therapeutic options for a spectrum of autoimmune-related disease. Of particular interest, is the ability of CB2 ligands to regulate microglia function in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injury. We have previously reported the receptor affinity of 3',5'-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-biphenyl-4-yl)-phenyl-methanone (SMM-189) and the characterization of the beneficial effects of SMM-189 in the mouse model of mild traumatic brain injury. Herein, we report the further characterization of SMM-189 as a potent and selective CB2 inverse agonist, which acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of CP 55,940. The ability of SMM-189 to regulate microglial activation, in terms of chemokine expression and cell morphology, has been determined. Finally, we have determined that SMM-189 possesses acceptable biopharmaceutical properties indicating that the triaryl class of CB2 inverse agonists are viable compounds for continued preclinical development for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic brain injury.

  19. Pharmacologic Treatment with GABAB Receptor Agonist of Methamphetamine-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive drug, and addiction to METH has increased to epidemic proportions worldwide. Chronic use of METH causes psychiatric symptoms, such as hallucinations and delusions, and long-term cognitive deficits, which are indistinguishable from paranoid schizophrenia. The GABA receptor system is known to play a significant role in modulating the dopaminergic neuronal system, which is related to behavioral changes induced by drug abuse. However, few studies have investigated the effects of GABA receptor agonists on cognitive deficits induced by METH. In the present review, we show that baclofen, a GABA receptor agonist, is effective in treating METH-induced impairment of object recognition memory and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex, a measure of sensorimotor gating in mice. Acute and repeated treatment with METH induced a significant impairment of PPI. Furthermore, repeated but not acute treatment of METH resulted in a long-lasting deficit of object recognition memory. Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, dose-dependently ameliorated the METH-induced PPI deficits and object recognition memory impairment in mice. On the other hand, THIP, a GABAA receptor agonist, had no effect on METH-induced cognitive deficits. These results suggest that GABAB receptors may constitute a putative new target in treating cognitive deficits in chronic METH users. PMID:21886573

  20. Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Agonist Overuse: Urologists’ Response to Reimbursement and Characteristics Associated with Persistent Overuse

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Carpenter, William R.; Jackson, George L.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Liu, Huan; Weinberger, Morris

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Medicare reimbursement cuts have been associated with declining Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonist overuse in localized prostate cancer. Medical school affiliation and foreign training have been associated with persistent overuse. However, physician-level prescribing changes and the practice type of persistent overusers have not been examined. We sought to describe physician-level changes in GnRH agonist overuse and test the association of time in practice and solo practice type with GnRH agonist overuse. METHODS We matched American Medical Association physician data for 2,138 urologists to SEER–Medicare data for 12,943 men diagnosed with early stage and lower grade adenocarcinoma of the prostate between 2000 and 2007. We conducted a population-based, retrospective study using multi-level modeling to control for patient and provider characteristics. RESULTS Three distinct patterns of GnRH agonist overuse were observed. Urologists’ time in practice was not associated with GnRH agonist overuse (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.75–1.05).However, solo practice type (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.34–2.02), medical school affiliation (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.55–0.77), and patient race were. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.37–2.27), Hispanics (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.12–1.79) and men of “other” race (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.04–1.99) had greater odds of receiving unnecessary GnRH agonists. CONCLUSIONS GnRH agonist overuse remains high among some urologists who may be professionally isolated and difficult to reach. These urologists treat more vulnerable populations, which may contribute to health disparities in prostate cancer treatment quality. Nonetheless, these findings provide guidance to develop interventions to address overuse in prostate cancer. PMID:25849354

  1. Extrinsic factors regulate partial agonist efficacy of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Farroni, Jeffrey S; McCool, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    Background Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in many adult forebrain regions consist of alpha2 + beta heteromeric channels. This subunit composition is distinct from the alpha1 + beta channels found throughout the adult spinal cord. Unfortunately, the pharmacology of forebrain alpha2beta receptors are poorly defined compared to 'neonatal' alpha2 homomeric channels or 'spinal' alpha1beta heteromers. In addition, the pharmacologic properties of native alpha2beta glycine receptors have been generally distinct from receptors produced by heterologous expression. To identify subtype-specific pharmacologic tools for the forebrain alpha2beta receptors, it is important to identify a heterologous expression system that closely resembles these native glycine-gated chloride channels. Results While exploring pharmacological properties of alpha2beta glycine receptors compared to alpha2-homomers, we found that distinct heterologous expression systems appeared to differentially influence partial agonist pharmacology. The β-amino acid taurine possessed 30–50% efficacy for alpha2-containing receptor isoforms when expressed in HEK 293 cells. However, taurine efficacy was dramatically reduced in L-cell fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained for β-alanine. The efficacy of these partial agonists was also strongly reduced by the beta subunit. There were no significant differences in apparent strychnine affinity values calculated from concentration-response data between expression systems or subunit combinations. Nor did relative levels of expression correlate with partial agonist efficacy when compared within or between several different expression systems. Finally, disruption of the tubulin cytoskeleton reduced the efficacy of partial agonists in a subunit-dependent, but system-independent, fashion. Conclusions Our results suggest that different heterologous expression systems can dramatically influence the agonist pharmacology of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. In

  2. Stimulants as specific inducers of dopamine-independent σ agonist self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L; Tanda, Gianluigi; Kopajtic, Theresa A; Katz, Jonathan L

    2013-10-01

    A previous study showed that cocaine self-administration induced dopamine-independent reinforcing effects of σ agonists mediated by their selective actions at σ1 receptors (σ1Rs), which are intracellularly mobile chaperone proteins implicated in abuse-related effects of stimulants. The present study assessed whether the induction was specific to self-administration of cocaine. Rats were trained to self-administer the dopamine releaser, d-methamphetamine (0.01-0.32 mg/kg per injection), the μ-opioid receptor agonist, heroin (0.001-0.032 mg/kg per injection), and the noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor/channel antagonist ketamine (0.032-1.0 mg/kg per injection). As with cocaine, self-administration of d-methamphetamine induced reinforcing effects of the selective σ1R agonists PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride] and (+)-pentazocine (0.032-1.0 mg/kg per injection, each). In contrast, neither self-administration of heroin nor ketamine induced PRE-084 or (+)-pentazocine (0.032-10 mg/kg per injection, each) self-administration. Although the σ1R agonists did not maintain responding in subjects with histories of heroin or ketamine self-administration, substitution for those drugs was obtained with appropriate agonists (e.g., remifentanil, 0.1-3.2 µg/kg per injection, for heroin and (5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine ((+)-MK 801; dizocilpine), 0.32-10.0 µg/kg per injection, for ketamine). The σR antagonist N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine dihydrobromide (BD 1008; 1.0-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently blocked PRE-084 self-administration but was inactive against d-methamphetamine, heroin, and ketamine. In contrast, PRE-084 self-administration was affected neither by the dopamine receptor antagonist (+)-butaclamol (10-100 μg/kg) nor by the opioid antagonist (-)-naltrexone (1.0-10 mg/kg), whereas these antagonists were active against d

  3. Stimulants as Specific Inducers of Dopamine-Independent σ Agonist Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L.; Tanda, Gianluigi; Kopajtic, Theresa A.

    2013-01-01

    A previous study showed that cocaine self-administration induced dopamine-independent reinforcing effects of σ agonists mediated by their selective actions at σ1 receptors (σ1Rs), which are intracellularly mobile chaperone proteins implicated in abuse-related effects of stimulants. The present study assessed whether the induction was specific to self-administration of cocaine. Rats were trained to self-administer the dopamine releaser, d-methamphetamine (0.01–0.32 mg/kg per injection), the μ-opioid receptor agonist, heroin (0.001–0.032 mg/kg per injection), and the noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor/channel antagonist ketamine (0.032–1.0 mg/kg per injection). As with cocaine, self-administration of d-methamphetamine induced reinforcing effects of the selective σ1R agonists PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride] and (+)-pentazocine (0.032–1.0 mg/kg per injection, each). In contrast, neither self-administration of heroin nor ketamine induced PRE-084 or (+)-pentazocine (0.032–10 mg/kg per injection, each) self-administration. Although the σ1R agonists did not maintain responding in subjects with histories of heroin or ketamine self-administration, substitution for those drugs was obtained with appropriate agonists (e.g., remifentanil, 0.1–3.2 µg/kg per injection, for heroin and (5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine ((+)-MK 801; dizocilpine), 0.32–10.0 µg/kg per injection, for ketamine). The σR antagonist N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine dihydrobromide (BD 1008; 1.0–10 mg/kg) dose-dependently blocked PRE-084 self-administration but was inactive against d-methamphetamine, heroin, and ketamine. In contrast, PRE-084 self-administration was affected neither by the dopamine receptor antagonist (+)-butaclamol (10–100 μg/kg) nor by the opioid antagonist (−)-naltrexone (1.0–10 mg/kg), whereas these antagonists were active

  4. The convulsive and electroencephalographic changes produced by nonpeptidic delta-opioid agonists in rats: comparison with pentylenetetrazol.

    PubMed

    Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Baladi, Michelle G; Folk, John E; Rice, Kenner C; Woods, James H

    2006-06-01

    delta-Opioid agonists produce convulsions and antidepressant-like effects in rats. It has been suggested that the antidepressant-like effects are produced through a convulsant mechanism of action either through overt convulsions or nonconvulsive seizures. This study evaluated the convulsive and seizurogenic effects of nonpeptidic delta-opioid agonists at doses that previously were reported to produce antidepressant-like effects. In addition, delta-opioid agonist-induced electroencephalographic (EEG) and behavioral changes were compared with those produced by the chemical convulsant pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). For these studies, EEG changes were recorded using a telemetry system before and after injections of the delta-opioid agonists [(+)-4-[(alphaR)-alpha-[(2S,5R)-2,5-dimethyl-4-(2-propenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-(3-methoxyphenyl)methyl]-N,N-diethylbenz (SNC80) and [(+)-4-[alpha(R)-alpha-[(2S,5R)-2,5-dimethyl-4-(2-propenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-(3-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide [(+)-BW373U86]. Acute administration of nonpeptidic delta-opioid agonists produced bilateral ictal and paroxysmal spike and/or sharp wave discharges. delta-Opioid agonists produced brief changes in EEG recordings, and tolerance rapidly developed to these effects; however, PTZ produced longer-lasting EEG changes that were exacerbated after repeated administration. Studies with antiepileptic drugs demonstrated that compounds used to treat absence epilepsy blocked the convulsive effects of nonpeptidic delta-opioid agonists. Overall, these data suggest that delta-opioid agonist-induced EEG changes are not required for the antidepressant-like effects of these compounds and that neural circuitry involved in absence epilepsy may be related to delta-opioid agonist-induced convulsions. In terms of therapeutic development, these data suggest that it may be possible to develop delta-opioid agonists devoid of convulsive properties.

  5. Comparative gene expression profiles induced by PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Universite de Rennes 1, 35065 Rennes Cedex; Biologie Servier, 45520 Gidy

    2011-07-01

    Species-differential toxic effects have been described with PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists between rodent and human liver. PPAR{alpha} agonists (fibrates) are potent hypocholesterolemic agents in humans while they induce peroxisome proliferation and tumors in rodent liver. By contrast, PPAR{gamma} agonists (glitazones) and even dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists (glitazars) have caused idiosyncratic hepatic and nonhepatic toxicities in human without evidence of any damage in rodent during preclinical studies. The mechanisms involved in such differences remain largely unknown. Several studies have identified the major target genes of PPAR{alpha} agonists in rodent liver while no comprehensive analysis has been performed on gene expression changes inducedmore » by PPAR{gamma} and dual PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists. Here, we investigated transcriptomes of rat hepatocytes after 24 h treatment with two PPAR{gamma} (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) and two PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} (muraglitazar and tesaglitazar) agonists. Although, hierarchical clustering revealed a gene expression profile characteristic of each PPAR agonist class, only a limited number of genes was specifically deregulated by glitazars. Functional analyses showed that many genes known as PPAR{alpha} targets were also modulated by both PPAR{gamma} and PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} agonists and quantitative differences in gene expression profiles were observed between these two classes. Moreover, most major genes modulated in rat hepatocytes were also found to be deregulated in rat liver after tesaglitazar treatment. Taken altogether, these results support the conclusion that differential toxic effects of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} agonists in rodent liver do not result from transcriptional deregulation of major PPAR target genes but rather from qualitative and/or quantitative differential responses of a small subset of genes.« less

  6. The relationship between reinforcing effects and in vitro effects of D1 agonists in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Weed, M R; Paul, I A; Dwoskin, L P; Moore, S E; Woolverton, W L

    1997-10-01

    The reinforcing effects of many psychomotor stimulants have been related to increased dopaminergic neurotransmission and stimulation of central nervous system (CNS) dopamine (DA) receptors. Consistent with this notion, some drugs that directly stimulate DA receptors have been found to function as positive reinforcers. The present experiments were designed to examine why some, but not all, D1 receptor agonists can function as reinforcers in rhesus monkeys by comparing behavioral and CNS in vitro measures of potency and efficacy. Seven rhesus monkeys were allowed to self-administer cocaine under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule until stable responding was established. Various doses of D1 agonists, previously reported to function as positive reinforcers, were then made available for self-administration. Stimulation of cAMP production in rhesus and rat striatal tissue was studied for these compounds and for D1 agonists previously reported not to function as positive reinforcers in monkeys (SKF 38393, SKF 77434 and S(-)-6-BrAPB). Blockade of DA uptake in rat striata was also examined for all compounds. SKF 81297, SKF 82958 and R(+)-6-BrAPB maintained responding under the PR schedule and did not differ significantly in efficacy as positive reinforcers; SKF 81297 was less potent than the other two agonists. SKF 81297, SKF 82958 and R(+)-6-BrAPB stimulated higher levels of cAMP production in rhesus striata than did SKF 38393, SKF 77434 and S(-)-6-BrAPB. In contrast, all compounds blocked DA uptake. Thus, reinforcing efficacy among D1 agonists increases with efficacy in stimulating D1 receptors.

  7. A cannabinoid 2 receptor agonist attenuates bone cancer-induced pain and bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Alysia; Wright, Courtney; Vardanyan, Anna; King, Tamara; Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Nelson, Mark; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Mantyh, Patrick W; Vanderah, Todd W.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Cannabinoid CB2 agonists have been shown to alleviate behavioral signs of inflammatory and neuropathic pain in animal models. AM1241, a CB2 agonist, does not demonstrate central nervous system side-effects seen with CB1 agonists such as hypothermia and catalepsy. Metastatic bone cancer causes severe pain in patients and is treated with analgesics such as opiates. Recent reports suggest that sustained opiates can produce paradoxical hyperalgesic actions and enhance bone destruction in a murine model of bone cancer. In contrast, CB2 selective agonists have been shown to reduce bone loss associated with a model of osteoporosis. Here we tested whether a CB2 agonist administered over a 7 day period inhibits bone cancer-induced pain as well as attenuates cancer-induced bone degradation. Main Methods A murine bone cancer model was used in which osteolytic sarcoma cells were injected into the intramedullary space of the distal end of the femur. Behavioral and radiographic image analysis was performed at days 7, 10 and 14 after injection of tumor cells into the femur. Key Findings Osteolytic sarcoma within the femur produced spontaneous and touch evoked behavioral signs of pain within the tumor-bearing limb. The systemic administration of AM1241 acutely or for 7 days significantly attenuated spontaneous and evoked pain in the inoculated limb. Sustained AM1241 significantly reduced bone loss and decreased the incidence of cancer-induced bone fractures. Significance These findings suggest a novel therapy for cancer-induced bone pain, bone loss and bone fracture while lacking many unwanted side effects seen with current treatments for bone cancer pain. PMID:20176037

  8. Antinociceptive effects of imidazoline I2 receptor agonists in the formalin test in rats

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, David A; Qiu, Yanyan; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2015-01-01

    The imidazoline I2 receptor is an emerging drug target for analgesics. This study extended previous studies by examining the antinociceptive effects of three I2 receptor agonists (2-BFI, BU224 and CR4056) in the formalin test. The receptor mechanisms and anatomical mediation of I2 receptor agonist-induced antinociception were also examined. Formalin-induced flinching responses (2%, 50µl) were quantified after treatment with I2 receptor agonists alone or in combination with the I2 receptor antagonist idazoxan. Anatomical mediation was studied by locally administering 2-BFI into the plantar surface or into the right lateral ventricle via cannulae (i.c.v). The locomotor activity was also examined after central (i.c.v.) administration of 2-BFI. 2-BFI (1–10 mg/kg, i.p.) and BU224 (1–10 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the spontaneous flinching response observed during 10 min (phase 1) and 20–60 min (phase 2) following formalin treatment, while CR4056 (1–32 mg/kg, i.p.) only decreased phase 2 flinching response. The I2 receptor antagonist idazoxan attenuated the antinociceptive effects of 2-BFI and BU224 during phase 1, but not phase 2. Peripheral administration of 2-BFI (1–10 mg/kg, i.pl) to the hindpaw of rats had no antinociceptive effects. In contrast, centrally delivered 2-BFI (10–100 µg, i.c.v.) dose-dependently attenuated phase 1 and phase 2 flinching at doses that did not reduce the locomotor activity. Together, these data revealed the differential antinociceptive effects of I2 receptor agonists and the differential antagonism profiles by idazoxan, suggesting the involvement of different I2 receptor subtypes in reducing different phases of formalin-induced pain-like behaviors. In addition, the results also suggest the central mediation of I2 receptor agonist-induced antinociceptive actions. PMID:26599907

  9. Effects of topical sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 receptor agonist on corneal allograft in mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liang; Liu, Yong; Wang, Liqiang; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Yifei

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the antirejection effects of topical selective sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 receptor (S1P1) agonist and cyclosporine A (CsA) on the acceptance of a transplanted, allogeneic cornea graft in a murine animal model. Fifty-six BALB/c mice were randomly divided into 4 groups. All the mice received corneal grafts from 28 C57BL/6 donors. Experimental recipients were treated with 0.25%, 0.5% S1P1 agonist suspension eye drops or 1% CsA eye drops 4 times a day after the corneal graft was performed. Controls received no treatment. The corneal grafts were imaged and evaluated with clinical scoring. The excised corneal sections 14 days after transplantation were stained using hematoxylin-eosin for histopathological evaluation. CD86+ and MHC-II+ dendritic cells in corneal samples were identified by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of mRNA in the cornea was evaluated using real-time quantitative PCR for interleukin-2, interferon-gamma, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. Corneal graft survival was prolonged by treatment with 0.5% S1P1 agonist and 1% CsA (P < 0.01, respectively) when compared with that in the control in clinical scoring. In addition, topical application of 0.5% S1P1 increased the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 mRNA expression of the corneal grafts. There were significant differences observed with 0.5% S1P1 and agonist 1% CsA (P < 0.01, respectively) when compared with the values of the control group in histology scoring. Topical 0.5% S1P1 agonist is as effective as 1% CsA, and both can effectively prolong the survival of corneal allografts in mice.

  10. Local administration of a hedgehog agonist accelerates fracture healing in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwagi, Miki; Division of Clinical Biotechnology, The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033; Hojo, Hironori

    Bone fracture healing is processed through multiple biological stages including the transition from cartilaginous callus to bony callus formation. Because of its specific, temporal and indispensable functions demonstrated by mouse genetic studies, Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is one of the most potent signaling pathways involved in these processes, but the effect of Hh-signaling activation by small compounds on the repair process had not yet been addressed. Here we examined therapeutic effects of local and one shot-administration of the Hh agonist known as smoothened agonist (SAG) on bone fracture healing in a mouse model. A quantitative analysis with three-dimensional micro-computed tomography showedmore » that SAG administration increased the size of both the cartilaginous callus and bony callus at 14 days after the surgery. A histological analysis showed that SAG administration increased the number of cells expressing a proliferation marker and a chondrocyte marker in cartilaginous callus as well as the cells expressing an osteoblast marker in bony callus. These results indicate that the SAG administration resulted in an enhancement of callus formation during bone fracture healing, which is at least in part mediated by an increase in chondrocyte proliferation in cartilaginous callus and the promotion of bone formation in bony callus. Therapeutic strategies with a SAG-mediated protocol may thus be useful for the treatment of bone fractures. - Highlights: • Local administration of a Hh agonist accelerates callus formation. • The Hh agonist administration promotes chondrocyte proliferation in the soft callus. • The Hh agonist administration increases osteoblast formation in the hard callus.« less

  11. Simulations of Biased Agonists in the β2 Adrenergic Receptor with Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The biased agonism of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), where in addition to a traditional G protein-signaling pathway a GPCR promotes intracellular signals though β-arrestin, is a novel paradigm in pharmacology. Biochemical and biophysical studies have suggested that a GPCR forms a distinct ensemble of conformations signaling through the G protein and β-arrestin. Here we report on the dynamics of the β2 adrenergic receptor bound to the β-arrestin and G protein-biased agonists and the empty receptor to further characterize the receptor conformational changes caused by biased agonists. We use conventional and accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations to explore the conformational transitions of the GPCR from the active state to the inactive state. We found that aMD simulations enable monitoring of the transition within the nanosecond time scale while capturing the known microscopic characteristics of the inactive states, such as the ionic lock, the inward position of F6.44, and water clusters. Distinct conformational states are shown to be stabilized by each biased agonist. In particular, in simulations of the receptor with the β-arrestin-biased agonist N-cyclopentylbutanepherine, we observe a different pattern of motions in helix 7 when compared to simulations with the G protein-biased agonist salbutamol that involves perturbations of the network of interactions within the NPxxY motif. Understanding the network of interactions induced by biased ligands and the subsequent receptor conformational shifts will lead to development of more efficient drugs. PMID:23879802

  12. Peroxidative Metabolism of β2-Agonists Salbutamol and Fenoterol and Their Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Reszka, Krzysztof J.; McGraw, Dennis W.; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2009-01-01

    Phenolic β2-adrenoreceptor agonists salbutamol, fenoterol and terbutaline relax smooth muscle cells that relieve acute airway bronchospasm associated with asthma. Why their use sometimes fails to relieve bronchospasm, and why the drugs appear to be less effective in patients with severe asthma exacerbations, remains unclear. We show that in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, both myeloperoxidase, secreted by activated neutrophils present in inflamed airways, and lactoperoxidase, which is naturally present in the respiratory system, catalyze oxidation of these β2-agonists. Azide, cyanide, thiocyanate, ascorbate, glutathione, and methimazole inhibited this process, while methionine was without effect. Inhibition by ascorbate and glutathione was associated with their oxidation to corresponding radical species by the agonists’-derived phenoxyl radicals. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we detected free radical metabolites from β2-agonists by spin trapping with 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). Formation of these radicals was inhibited by pharmacologically-relevant concentrations of methimazole and dapsone. In alkaline buffers radicals from fenoterol and its structural analog, metaproteronol, were detected by direct EPR. Analysis of these spectra suggests that oxidation of fenoterol and metaproterenol, but not terbutaline, causes their transformation through intramolecular cyclization by addition of their amino nitrogen to the aromatic ring. Together, these results indicate that phenolic β2-agonists function as substrates for airway peroxidases and that the resulting products differ in their structural and functional properties from their parent compounds. They also suggest that these transformations can be modulated by pharmacological approaches using appropriate peroxidase inhibitors or alternative substrates. These processes may affect therapeutic efficacy and also play a role in adverse reactions of the β2-agonists. PMID:19462961

  13. β2-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists Inhibit the Proliferation of 1321N1 Astrocytoma CellsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Toll, L.; Jimenez, L.; Waleh, N.; Jozwiak, K.; Woo, A.Y.-H.; Xiao, R.-P.; Bernier, M.

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytomas and glioblastomas have been particularly difficult to treat and refractory to chemotherapy. However, significant evidence has been presented that demonstrates a decrease in astrocytoma cell proliferation subsequent to an increase in cAMP levels. The 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line, as well as other astrocytomas and glioblastomas, expresses β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) that are coupled to Gs activation and consequent cAMP production. Experiments were conducted to determine whether the β2-AR agonist (R,R′)-fenoterol and other β2-AR agonists could attenuate mitogenesis and, if so, by what mechanism. Receptor binding studies were conducted to characterize β2-AR found in 1321N1 and U118 cell membranes. In addition, cells were incubated with (R,R′)-fenoterol and analogs to determine their ability to stimulate intracellular cAMP accumulation and inhibit [3H]thymidine incorporation into the cells. 1321N1 cells contain significant levels of β2-AR as determined by receptor binding. (R,R′)-fenoterol and other β2-AR agonists, as well as forskolin, stimulated cAMP accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. Accumulation of cAMP induced a decrease in [3H]thymidine incorporation. There was a correlation between concentration required to stimulate cAMP accumulation and inhibit [3H]thymidine incorporation. U118 cells have a reduced number of β2-ARs and a concomitant reduction in the ability of β2-AR agonists to inhibit cell proliferation. These studies demonstrate the efficacy of β2-AR agonists for inhibition of growth of the astrocytoma cell lines. Because a significant portion of brain tumors contain β2-ARs to a greater extent than whole brain, (R,R′)-fenoterol, or some analog, may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors after biopsy to determine β2-AR expression. PMID:21071556

  14. NOP Receptor Mediates Anti-analgesia Induced by Agonist-Antagonist Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Gear, Robert W.; Bogen, Oliver; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ~90 minutes after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69,593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  15. Facilitatory effects of selective agonists for tachykinin receptors on cholinergic neurotransmission: evidence for species differences.

    PubMed Central

    Belvisi, M. G.; Patacchini, R.; Barnes, P. J.; Maggi, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    1. Exogenous tachykinins modulate cholinergic neurotransmission in rabbit and guinea-pig airways. We have investigated the effect of selective tachykinin receptor agonists and antagonists on cholinergic neurotransmission evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) of bronchial rings in rabbit, guinea-pig and human airways in vitro to assess which type of tachykinin receptor is mediating this facilitatory effect. 2. Bronchial rings were set up for isometric tension recording. Contractile responses to EFS (60 V, 0.4 ms, 2 Hz for 10 s every min) and exogenous acetylcholine (ACh) were obtained and the effects of selective tachykinin agonists and antagonists were investigated. 3. In rabbit bronchi the endogenous tachykinins, substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) (10 nM) potentiated cholinergic responses to EFS (by 287.6 +/- 121%, P < 0.01 and 181.4 +/- 56.5%, P < 0.001 respectively). 4. The NK1 receptor selective agonist, [Sar9]SP sulphone (10 nM) evoked a maximal facilitatory action on cholinergic responses of 334.9 +/- 63% (P < 0.01) (pD2 = 8.5 +/- 0.06) an effect which was blocked by the selective NK1-receptor antagonist, CP 96,345 (100 nM) (P < 0.05) but not by the NK2 receptor antagonist, MEN 10,376 (100 nM). The NK2 receptor selective agonist, [beta Ala8]NKA(4-10) (10 nM), produced a maximum enhancement of 278 +/- 83.5% (P < 0.01) (pD2 = 8.7 +/- 0.1) an effect which was blocked by MEN 10,376 (100 nM) (P < 0.05) and not by CP 96,345. [MePhe7]NKB, an NK3 receptor selective agonist was without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7516799

  16. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N.; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E.; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouseTM platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  17. PPAR-γ Agonists As Antineoplastic Agents in Cancers with Dysregulated IGF Axis

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Veronica; Nicolosi, Maria Luisa; Giuliano, Stefania; Bellomo, Maria; Belfiore, Antonino; Malaguarnera, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are associated to increased cancer incidence and mortality. Moreover, cancer development and progression as well as cancer resistance to traditional anticancer therapies are often linked to a deregulation/overactivation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis, which involves the autocrine/paracrine production of IGFs (IGF-I and IGF-II) and overexpression of their cognate receptors [IGF-I receptor, IGF-insulin receptor (IR), and IR]. Recently, new drugs targeting various IGF axis components have been developed. However, these drugs have several limitations including the occurrence of insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia, which, in turn, may affect cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are needed. In this regard, the pleiotropic effects of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ agonists may have promising applications in cancer prevention and therapy. Indeed, activation of PPAR-γ by thiazolidinediones (TZDs) or other agonists may inhibit cell growth and proliferation by lowering circulating insulin and affecting key pathways of the Insulin/IGF axis, such as PI3K/mTOR, MAPK, and GSK3-β/Wnt/β-catenin cascades, which regulate cancer cell survival, cell reprogramming, and differentiation. In light of these evidences, TZDs and other PPAR-γ agonists may be exploited as potential preventive and therapeutic agents in tumors addicted to the activation of IGF axis or occurring in hyperinsulinemic patients. Unfortunately, clinical trials using PPAR-γ agonists as antineoplastic agents have reached conflicting results, possibly because they have not selected tumors with overactivated insulin/IGF-I axis or occurring in hyperinsulinemic patients. In conclusion, the use of PPAR-γ agonists in combined therapies of IGF-driven malignancies looks promising but requires future developments. PMID:28275367

  18. Heterologous Expression in Remodeled C. elegans: A Platform for Monoaminergic Agonist Identification and Anthelmintic Screening.

    PubMed

    Law, Wenjing; Wuescher, Leah M; Ortega, Amanda; Hapiak, Vera M; Komuniecki, Patricia R; Komuniecki, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Monoamines, such as 5-HT and tyramine (TA), paralyze both free-living and parasitic nematodes when applied exogenously and serotonergic agonists have been used to clear Haemonchus contortus infections in vivo. Since nematode cell lines are not available and animal screening options are limited, we have developed a screening platform to identify monoamine receptor agonists. Key receptors were expressed heterologously in chimeric, genetically-engineered Caenorhabditis elegans, at sites likely to yield robust phenotypes upon agonist stimulation. This approach potentially preserves the unique pharmacologies of the receptors, while including nematode-specific accessory proteins and the nematode cuticle. Importantly, the sensitivity of monoamine-dependent paralysis could be increased dramatically by hypotonic incubation or the use of bus mutants with increased cuticular permeabilities. We have demonstrated that the monoamine-dependent inhibition of key interneurons, cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscle inhibited locomotion and caused paralysis. Specifically, 5-HT paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT receptor null animals expressing either nematode, insect or human orthologues of a key Gαo-coupled 5-HT1-like receptor in the cholinergic motor neurons. Importantly, 8-OH-DPAT and PAPP, 5-HT receptor agonists, differentially paralyzed the transgenic animals, with 8-OH-DPAT paralyzing mutant animals expressing the human receptor at concentrations well below those affecting its C. elegans or insect orthologues. Similarly, 5-HT and TA paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT or TA receptor null animals, respectively, expressing either C. elegans or H. contortus 5-HT or TA-gated Cl- channels in either C. elegans cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscles. Together, these data suggest that this heterologous, ectopic expression screening approach will be useful for the identification of agonists for key monoamine receptors from parasites and could have broad application for the identification

  19. Heterologous Expression in Remodeled C. elegans: A Platform for Monoaminergic Agonist Identification and Anthelmintic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Law, Wenjing; Wuescher, Leah M.; Ortega, Amanda; Hapiak, Vera M.; Komuniecki, Patricia R.; Komuniecki, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Monoamines, such as 5-HT and tyramine (TA), paralyze both free-living and parasitic nematodes when applied exogenously and serotonergic agonists have been used to clear Haemonchus contortus infections in vivo. Since nematode cell lines are not available and animal screening options are limited, we have developed a screening platform to identify monoamine receptor agonists. Key receptors were expressed heterologously in chimeric, genetically-engineered Caenorhabditis elegans, at sites likely to yield robust phenotypes upon agonist stimulation. This approach potentially preserves the unique pharmacologies of the receptors, while including nematode-specific accessory proteins and the nematode cuticle. Importantly, the sensitivity of monoamine-dependent paralysis could be increased dramatically by hypotonic incubation or the use of bus mutants with increased cuticular permeabilities. We have demonstrated that the monoamine-dependent inhibition of key interneurons, cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscle inhibited locomotion and caused paralysis. Specifically, 5-HT paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT receptor null animals expressing either nematode, insect or human orthologues of a key Gαo-coupled 5-HT1-like receptor in the cholinergic motor neurons. Importantly, 8-OH-DPAT and PAPP, 5-HT receptor agonists, differentially paralyzed the transgenic animals, with 8-OH-DPAT paralyzing mutant animals expressing the human receptor at concentrations well below those affecting its C. elegans or insect orthologues. Similarly, 5-HT and TA paralyzed C. elegans 5-HT or TA receptor null animals, respectively, expressing either C. elegans or H. contortus 5-HT or TA-gated Cl- channels in either C. elegans cholinergic motor neurons or body wall muscles. Together, these data suggest that this heterologous, ectopic expression screening approach will be useful for the identification of agonists for key monoamine receptors from parasites and could have broad application for the identification

  20. Allosteric activation of the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor by selective, nonpeptide agonists.

    PubMed

    Yanofsky, Stephen D; Shen, Emily S; Holden, Frank; Whitehorn, Erik; Aguilar, Barbara; Tate, Emily; Holmes, Christopher P; Scheuerman, Randall; MacLean, Derek; Wu, May M; Frail, Donald E; López, Francisco J; Winneker, Richard; Arey, Brian J; Barrett, Ronald W

    2006-05-12

    The pituitary glycoprotein hormones, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), act through their cognate receptors to initiate a series of coordinated physiological events that results in germ cell maturation. Given the importance of FSH in regulating folliculogenesis and fertility, the development of FSH mimetics has been sought to treat infertility. Currently, purified and recombinant human FSH are the only FSH receptor (FSH-R) agonists available for infertility treatment. By screening unbiased combinatorial chemistry libraries, using a cAMP-responsive luciferase reporter assay, we discovered thiazolidinone agonists (EC50's = 20 microm) of the human FSH-R. Subsequent analog library screening and parallel synthesis optimization resulted in the identification of a potent agonist (EC50 = 2 nm) with full efficacy compared with FSH that was FSH-R-selective and -dependent. The compound mediated progesterone production in Y1 cells transfected with the human FSH-R (EC50 = 980 nm) and estradiol production from primary rat ovarian granulosa cells (EC50 = 10.5 nm). This and related compounds did not compete with FSH for binding to the FSH-R. Use of human FSH/thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor chimeras suggested a novel mechanism for receptor activation through a binding site independent of the natural hormone binding site. This study is the first report of a high affinity small molecule agonist that activates a glycoprotein hormone receptor through an allosteric mechanism. The small molecule FSH receptor agonists described here could lead to an oral alternative to the current parenteral FSH treatments used clinically to induce ovarian stimulation for both in vivo and in vitro fertilization therapy.

  1. PPARγ agonists regulate the expression of stemness and differentiation genes in brain tumour stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Pestereva, E; Kanakasabai, S; Bright, J J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brain tumour stem cells (BTSCs) are a small population of cancer cells that exhibit self-renewal, multi-drug resistance, and recurrence properties. We have shown earlier that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists inhibit the expansion of BTSCs in T98G and U87MG glioma. In this study, we analysed the influence of PPARγ agonists on the expression of stemness and differentiation genes in BTSCs. Methods: The BTSCs were isolated from T98G and DB29 glioma cells, and cultured in neurobasal medium with epidermal growth factor+basic fibroblast growth factor. Proliferation was measured by WST-1 (4-[3-(4-iodophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-2 H-5-tetrazolio]-1,3-benzene disulphonate) and 3H thymidine uptake assays, and gene expression was analysed by quantitative reverse--transcription PCR and Taqman array. The expression of CD133, SRY box 2, and nanog homeobox (Nanog) was also evaluated by western blotting, immunostaining, and flow cytometry. Results: We found that PPARγ agonists, ciglitazone and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-ProstaglandinJ2, inhibited cell viability and proliferation of T98G- and DB29-BTSCs. The PPARγ agonists reduced the expansion of CD133+ BTSCs and altered the expression of stemness and differentiation genes. They also inhibited Sox2 while enhancing Nanog expression in BTSCs. Conclusion: These findings highlight that PPARγ agonists inhibit BTSC proliferation in association with altered expression of Sox2, Nanog, and other stemness genes. Therefore, targeting stemness genes in BTSCs could be a novel strategy in the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:22531638

  2. Selective melanocortin MC4 receptor agonists reverse haemorrhagic shock and prevent multiple organ damage

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, D; Mioni, C; Bazzani, C; Zaffe, D; Botticelli, A R; Capolongo, S; Sabba, A; Galantucci, M; Iannone, A; Grieco, P; Novellino, E; Colombo, G; Tomasi, A; Catania, A; Guarini, S

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: In circulatory shock, melanocortins have life-saving effects likely to be mediated by MC4 receptors. To gain direct insight into the role of melanocortin MC4 receptors in haemorrhagic shock, we investigated the effects of two novel selective MC4 receptor agonists. Experimental approach: Severe haemorrhagic shock was produced in rats under general anaesthesia. Rats were then treated with either the non-selective agonist [Nle4, D-Phe7]α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (NDP-α-MSH) or with the selective MC4 agonists RO27-3225 and PG-931. Cardiovascular and respiratory functions were continuously monitored for 2 h; survival rate was recorded up to 24 h. Free radicals in blood were measured using electron spin resonance spectrometry; tissue damage was evaluated histologically 25 min or 24 h after treatment. Key results: All shocked rats treated with saline died within 30-35 min. Treatment with NDP-α-MSH, RO27-3225 and PG-931 produced a dose-dependent (13-108 nmol kg-1 i.v.) restoration of cardiovascular and respiratory functions, and improved survival. The three melanocortin agonists also markedly reduced circulating free radicals relative to saline-treated shocked rats. All these effects were prevented by i.p. pretreatment with the selective MC4 receptor antagonist HS024. Moreover, treatment with RO27-3225 prevented morphological and immunocytochemical changes in heart, lung, liver, and kidney, at both early (25 min) and late (24 h) intervals. Conclusions and Implications: Stimulation of MC4 receptors reversed haemorrhagic shock, reduced multiple organ damage and improved survival. Our findings suggest that selective MC4 receptor agonists could have a protective role against multiple organ failure following circulatory shock. PMID:17245369

  3. Oxytocin and Vasopressin Agonists and Antagonists as Research Tools and Potential Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Manning, M; Misicka, A; Olma, A; Bankowski, K; Stoev, S; Chini, B; Durroux, T; Mouillac, B; Corbani, M; Guillon, G

    2012-01-01

    We recently reviewed the status of peptide and nonpeptide agonists and antagonists for the V1a, V1b and V2 receptors for arginine vasopressin (AVP) and the oxytocin receptor for oxytocin (OT). In the present review, we update the status of peptides and nonpeptides as: (i) research tools and (ii) therapeutic agents. We also present our recent findings on the design of fluorescent ligands for V1b receptor localisation and for OT receptor dimerisation. We note the exciting discoveries regarding two novel naturally occurring analogues of OT. Recent reports of a selective VP V1a agonist and a selective OT agonist point to the continued therapeutic potential of peptides in this field. To date, only two nonpeptides, the V2/V1a antagonist, conivaptan and the V2 antagonist tolvaptan have received Food and Drug Administration approval for clinical use. The development of nonpeptide AVP V1a, V1b and V2 antagonists and OT agonists and antagonists has recently been abandoned by Merck, Sanofi and Pfizer. A promising OT antagonist, Retosiban, developed at Glaxo SmithKline is currently in a Phase II clinical trial for the prevention of premature labour. A number of the nonpeptide ligands that were not successful in clinical trials are proving to be valuable as research tools. Peptide agonists and antagonists continue to be very widely used as research tools in this field. In this regard, we present receptor data on some of the most widely used peptide and nonpeptide ligands, as a guide for their use, especially with regard to receptor selectivity and species differences. PMID:22375852

  4. Antineoplastic Effects of PPARγ Agonists, with a Special Focus on Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated nuclear hormone receptor that functions as transcription factor and plays an important role in lipid metabolism and insulin sensitization. Recent studies have shown that PPARγ is overexpressed in many tumor types, including cancers of breast, lung, pancreas, colon, glioblastoma, prostate and thyroid differentiated/anaplastic cancers. These data suggest a role of PPARγ in tumor development and/or progression. PPARγ is emerging as a growth-limiting and differentiation-promoting factor, and it exerts a tumor suppressor role. Moreover, naturally-occurring and synthetic PPARγ agonists promote growth inhibition and apoptosis. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic agonists of PPARγ that were developed to treat type II diabetes. These compounds also display anticancer effects which appear mainly to be independent of their PPARγ agonist activity. Various preclinical and clinical studies strongly suggest a role for TZDs both alone and in combination with existing chemotherapeutic agents, for the treatment of cancer. Differentiation therapy involves the use of agents with the ability to induce differentiation in cells that have lost this ability, i.e. cancer cells, targeting pathways capable of re-activating blocked terminal differentiation programs. PPARγ agonists have been shown to induce differentiation in solid tumors such as thyroid differentiated/ anaplastic cancers and sarcomas. However, emerging data suggest that chronic use of TZDs is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The exploration of newer PPARγ agonists can help in unveiling the underlying mechanisms of these drugs, providing new molecules that are able to treat cancer, without increasing the cardiovascular risk of neoplastic patients.

  5. Investigation of the interaction between the atypical agonist c[YpwFG] and MOR.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, Luca; Squassabia, Federico; De Marco, Rossella; Artali, Roberto; Cardillo, Giuliana; Tolomelli, Alessandra; Spampinato, Santi; Bedini, Andrea

    2008-05-01

    Endogenous and exogenous opiates are currently considered the drugs of choice for treating different kinds of pain. However, their prolonged use produces several adverse symptoms, and in addition, many forms of pain are resistant to any kind of therapy. Therefore, the discovery of compounds active towards mu-opioid receptors (MORs) by alternative pharmacological mechanisms could be of value for developing novel classes of analgesics. There is evidence that some unusual molecules can bind opioid receptors, albeit lacking some of the typical opioid pharmacophoric features. In particular, the recent discovery of a few compounds that showed agonist behavior even in the absence of the primary pharmacophore, namely a protonable amine, led to a rediscussion of the importance of ionic interactions in stabilizing the ligand-receptor complex and in activating signal transduction. Very recently, we synthesized a library of cyclic analogs of the endogenous, MOR-selective agonist endomorphin-1 (YPWF-NH(2)), containing a Gly5 bridge between Tyr1 and Phe4. The cyclopeptide c[YpwFG] showed good affinity and agonist behavior. This atypical MOR agonist does not have the protonable Tyr amine. In order to gain more information about plausible mechanisms of interaction between c[YpwFG] and the opioid receptor, we synthesized a selected set of derivatives containing different bridges between Tyr1 and Phe4, and tested their affinities towards mu-opioid receptors. We performed conformational analysis of the cyclopeptides by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics, and investigated plausible, unprecedented modes of interaction with the MOR by molecular docking. The successive quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics investigation of the complexes obtained by the molecular docking procedure furnished a more detailed description of the binding mode and the electronic properties of the ligands. The comparison with the binding mode of the potent agonist JOM-6 seems to indicate that the cyclic

  6. Effect of vibration frequency on agonist and antagonist arm muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Jiménez, Sergio; Benítez, Adolfo; García González, Miguel A; Moras Feliu, Gerard; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of vibration frequency (f out) on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the biceps brachii (BB) and triceps brachii (TB) muscles when acting as agonist and antagonist during static exercises with different loads. Fourteen healthy men were asked to hold a vibratory bar as steadily as possible for 10 s during lying row (pulling) and bench press (pushing) exercise at f out of 0 (non-vibration condition), 18, 31 and 42 Hz with loads of 20, 50, and 80 % of the maximum sustainable load (MSL). The root mean square of the EMG activity (EMGRMS) of the BB and TB muscles was expressed as a function of the maximal EMGRMS for respective muscles to characterize agonist activation and antagonist coactivation. We found that (1) agonist activation was greater during vibration (42 Hz) compared to non-vibration exercise for the TB but not for the BB muscle (p < 0.05); (2) antagonist activation was greater during vibration compared to non-vibration exercise for both BB (p < 0.01) and TB (p < 0.05) muscles; (3) the vibration-induced increase in antagonist coactivation was proportional to vibration f out in the range 18-42 Hz and (4) the vibration-induced increase in TB agonist activation and antagonist coactivation occurred at all loading conditions in the range 20-80 % MSL. The use of high vibration frequencies within the range of 18-42 Hz can maximize TB agonist activation and antagonist activation of both BB and TB muscles during upper limb vibration exercise.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of the novel oral prostacyclin receptor agonist selexipag in subjects with hepatic or renal impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Hans G.; Krause, Andreas; Ulč, Ivan; Halabi, Atef; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of hepatic or renal dysfunction on the pharmacokinetics (PK), tolerability and safety of selexipag, an orally active prostacyclin receptor agonist. Methods Two prospective, open‐label studies evaluated the PK of selexipag and its active metabolite ACT‐333679 in healthy subjects and in subjects with mild, moderate and severe hepatic impairment or severe renal function impairment (SRFI). A single dose of 200 μg or 400 μg was administered. The PK parameters were derived from plasma concentration–time profiles. Results Exposure increased with the severity of hepatic impairment. Geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals of the area under the concentration–time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) for selexipag and ACT‐333679 increased 2.1‐fold (1.7–2.6) and 1.2‐fold (0.9–1.6) in subjects with mild hepatic impairment, and 4.5‐fold (3.4–5.8) and 2.2‐fold (1.7–2.8) in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment when compared with healthy subjects. The two subjects with severe hepatic impairment showed similar dose‐normalized exposure to that of subjects with moderate hepatic impairment. A 1.7‐fold increase in the AUC0–∞ of selexipag and ACT‐333679 was observed with SRFI compared with healthy subjects. Although exposure to selexipag and/or ACT‐333679 was higher in subjects with mild or moderate hepatic impairment or SRFI vs. healthy subjects, no safety concerns were raised in these groups. Conclusions Based on these observations, the PK data suggest that the clinically used starting dose needs no adjustments in patients with mild or moderate hepatic impairment or SRFI. However, doses should be up‐titrated with caution in these patients. The small number of subjects limits the interpretation of selexipag PK in subjects with severe hepatic impairment. PMID:27062188

  8. Effects of bezafibrate, PPAR pan-agonist, and GW501516, PPARdelta agonist, on development of steatohepatitis in mice fed a methionine- and choline-deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Tatsuya; Inada, Yoichi; Nakano, Shigeru; Tamura, Toru; Takahashi, Tetsuaki; Maruyama, Kazuyasu; Yamazaki, Yoshinobu; Kuroda, Junji; Shibata, Nobuo

    2006-04-24

    We evaluated the effects of bezafibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pan-agonist, and GW501516, a PPARdelta agonist, on mice fed a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet, a model of non-alcholic steatohepatitis (NASH), to investigate (a) the efficacy of bezafibrate against non-alcholic steatohepatitis and (b) the relation between non-alcholic steatohepatitis and the functional role of PPARdelta. Bezafibrate (50 or 100 mg/kg/day) and GW501516 (10 mg/kg/day) were administered by gavage once a day for 5 weeks. Hepatic lipid contents, plasma triglyceride, high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations were evaluated, as were histopathological changes in the liver and hepatic mRNA expression levels. Bezafibrate and GW501516 inhibited the MCD-diet-induced elevations of hepatic triglyceride and thiobarbituric acid-reactants contents and the histopathological increases in fatty droplets within hepatocytes, liver inflammation and number of activated hepatic stellate cells. In this model, bezafibrate and GW501516 increased the levels of hepatic mRNAs associated with fatty acid beta-oxidation [acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO), carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), liver-fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) and peroxisomal ketothiolase], and reduced the levels of those associated with inflammatory cytokines or chemokine [transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1beta, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB1]. In addition, bezafibrate characteristically reduced the elevation in the level of plasma ALT, but enhanced that in plasma adiponectin and increased the mRNA expression levels of its receptors (adiponectin receptors 1 and 2). These results suggest that (a) bezafibrate (especially) and GW501516 might improve hepatic steatosis via an improvement in fatty acid beta-oxidation and a direct prevention of inflammation, (b

  9. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate CAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of CAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of CAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of CAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of CAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  10. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Cureri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of cAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of cAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  11. Evaluation of Mucociliary Clearance by Three Dimension Micro-CT-SPECT in Guinea Pig: Role of Bitter Taste Agonists.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Jose Luis; Ortiz, Amparo; Milara, Javier; Armengot, Miguel; Sanz, Celia; Compañ, Desamparados; Morcillo, Esteban; Cortijo, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Different image techniques have been used to analyze mucociliary clearance (MCC) in humans, but current small animal MCC analysis using in vivo imaging has not been well defined. Bitter taste receptor (T2R) agonists increase ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and cause bronchodilation but their effects in vivo are not well understood. This work analyzes in vivo nasal and bronchial MCC in guinea pig animals using three dimension (3D) micro-CT-SPECT images and evaluates the effect of T2R agonists. Intranasal macroaggreggates of albumin-Technetium 99 metastable (MAA-Tc99m) and lung nebulized Tc99m albumin nanocolloids were used to analyze the effect of T2R agonists on nasal and bronchial MCC respectively, using 3D micro-CT-SPECT in guinea pig. MAA-Tc99m showed a nasal mucociliary transport rate of 0.36 mm/min that was increased in presence of T2R agonist to 0.66 mm/min. Tc99m albumin nanocolloids were homogeneously distributed in the lung of guinea pig and cleared with time-dependence through the bronchi and trachea of guinea pig. T2R agonist increased bronchial MCC of Tc99m albumin nanocolloids. T2R agonists increased CBF in human nasal ciliated cells in vitro and induced bronchodilation in human bronchi ex vivo. In summary, T2R agonists increase MCC in vivo as assessed by 3D micro-CT-SPECT analysis.

  12. Identification of Buctopamine and Mebuctopamine, a β2 Receptor Agonist and Its Metabolite, in Swine Hair and Feed Additives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Heng; Yang, Chia-Ying; Cheng, Chih Wen; Lin, Yi-Ying; Kuo, Su Lien; Hsin, Ling-Wei

    2017-05-17

    4-[2-(t-Butylamino)-1-hydroxyethyl]phenol (buctopamine, 4), a new β 2 receptor agonist (β 2 -agonist), was found to be an adulterant in feed additives for swine in Taiwan, where using β 2 -agonists in food-production animals is prohibited. Buctopamine and its metabolite, 4-[2-(t-butylamino)-1-hydroxyethyl]-2-methoxyphenol (mebuctopamine, 2), were detected in swine hair specimens. Authentic compounds 2 and 4 were synthesized with 98.6% and 97.7% purity, respectively, as reference standards for analysis, and both compounds were more hydrophilic than ractopamine and clenbuterol. In a preliminary pharmacological evaluation, compounds 2 and 4 exhibited moderate human β 2 receptor binding affinity and did not show significant affinities for the human α 1 , α 2 , β 1 , and β 3 receptors. After addition of compounds 2-4 into the β 2 -agonist library, a multiresidue analysis of 26 β 2 -agonists by using triple quadrupole LC/MS/MS for routine screening conducted by regulatory authorities was established, in which the common limits of quantification for the 26 β 2 -agonists in swine feed and hair are 10 and 25 ng/g, respectively. In addition, the illegal use of buctopamine (4) has been effectively prevented. The results of this study are also useful for controlling the illegal use of new β 2 -agonists in food-production animals.

  13. The outcome of hypophysectomy for prolactinomas in the era of dopamine agonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Soule, S G; Farhi, J; Conway, G S; Jacobs, H S; Powell, M

    1996-06-01

    Dopamine agonists are the primary therapeutic modality for the majority of patients with prolactinomas, with pituitary surgery reserved for those patients intolerant of or resistant to these agents. Most published surgical series, however, contain patients treated by surgery as the primary therapeutic modality. Previous exposure to dopamine agonists or the selection of patients with prolactinomas resistant to conventional therapy may potentially compromise the surgical success rate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pituitary surgery for prolactinomas in a tertiary referral centre where the majority of patients were operated on after treatment with dopamine agonists. A retrospective review of the outcome of pituitary surgery for prolactinomas performed at a tertiary neurosurgical centre by a single neurosurgeon. Twenty-three patients underwent excision of a macro and 11 excision of a micro-prolactinoma. Pituitary tumour diameter was determined by CT or MRI imaging. Pre and post-operative measurements were made of serum PRL concentration (off dopamine agonist therapy), free T4, free T3, LH and testosterone (males). Post-operative restoration of a menstrual cycle was taken to indicate resolution of hypogonadism in female patients. The majority (73.9%) of the patients with macro and all with micro-prolactinomas had received dopamine agonists preoperatively. Of the 23 patients with macroprolactinomas, in whom the median preoperative PRL concentration was 13255 mU/l, 17 (73.9%) had radiological evidence of suprasellar extension and 5 (21.7%) cavernous sinus invasion. Only 4 (17.4%) of the patients with macroprolactinomas had a normal serum PRL post-operatively, although there was an improvement in visual fields in 66% of those with preoperative defects. The median preoperative PRL concentration was 4309 mU/l in the patients with microprolactinomas, significantly lower than in the macroprolactinoma group (P = 0.02). Despite a

  14. PPAR agonists reduce steatosis in oleic acid-overloaded HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Université de Rennes 1, Faculté des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, 35043 Rennes Cedex; Biologie Servier, Gidy

    2014-04-01

    Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common form of chronic liver disease there is no pharmacological agent approved for its treatment. Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are closely associated with hepatic lipid metabolism, they seem to play important roles in NAFLD. However, the effects of PPAR agonists on steatosis that is a common pathology associated with NAFLD, remain largely controversial. In this study, the effects of various PPAR agonists, i.e. fenofibrate, bezafibrate, troglitazone, rosiglitazone, muraglitazar and tesaglitazar on oleic acid-induced steatotic HepaRG cells were investigated after a single 24-hour or 2-week repeat treatment. Lipid vesicles stainedmore » by Oil-Red O and triglycerides accumulation caused by oleic acid overload, were decreased, by up to 50%, while fatty acid oxidation was induced after 2-week co-treatment with PPAR agonists. The greatest effects on reduction of steatosis were obtained with the dual PPARα/γ agonist muraglitazar. Such improvement of steatosis was associated with up-regulation of genes related to fatty acid oxidation activity and down-regulation of many genes involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, modulation of expression of some nuclear receptor genes, such as FXR, LXRα and CAR, which are potent actors in the control of lipogenesis, was observed and might explain repression of de novo lipogenesis. Conclusion: Altogether, our in vitro data on steatotic HepaRG cells treated with PPAR agonists correlated well with clinical investigations, bringing a proof of concept that drug-induced reversal of steatosis in human can be evaluated in in vitro before conducting long-term and costly in vivo studies in animals and patients. - Highlights: • There is no pharmacological agent approved for the treatment of NAFLD. • This study demonstrates that PPAR agonists can reduce fatty acid-induced steatosis. • Some nuclear receptors appear to be potent actors in the

  15. Novel selective agonists and antagonists confirm neurokinin NK1 receptors in guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J. M.; Morton, I. K.

    1991-01-01

    1. This study investigated the recognition characteristics of neurokinin receptors mediating potentiation of the contractile response to field stimulation in the guinea-pig vas deferens. 2. A predominant NK1 receptor population is strongly suggested by the relative activities of the common naturally-occurring tachykinin agonists, which fall within less than one order of magnitude. This conclusion is supported by the relative activities of the synthetic NK1 selective agonists substance P methyl ester, [Glp6,L-Pro9]-SP(6-11) and delta-aminovaleryl-[L-Pro9,N-MeLeu10]- SP(7-11) (GR73632) which were 0.78, 9.3 and 120 as active as substance P, respectively. Furthermore, the NK2 selective agonist [Lys3, Gly8,-R-gamma-lactam-Leu9]-NKA(3-10) (GR64349) was active only at the highest concentrations tested (greater than 10 microM), and the NK3 selective agonist, succ-[Asp6,N-MePhe8]-SP(6-11) (senktide) was essentially inactive (10 nM-32 microM). 3. [D-Arg1,D-Pro2,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]-SP(1-11) antagonized responses to neurokinin A, neurokinin B, physalaemin, eledoisin, [Glp6,D-Pro9]-SP(6-11), GR73632 and GR64349 (apparent pKB s 5.6-6.2), but was less potent in antagonizing responses to substance P, substance P methyl ester and [Glp6,L-Pro9]-SP(6-11) (apparent pKB s less than or equal to 5.0-5.0). 4. In contrast, the recently developed NK1-selective receptor antagonist [D-Pro9[Spiro-gamma-lactam]Leu10,Trp11]-SP(1-11) (GR71251) did not produce agonist-dependent pKB estimates. Schild plot analysis indicated a competitive interaction with a single receptor population where the antagonist had an estimated overall pKB of 7.58 +/- 0.13 for the four agonists of differing subtype selectivity tested (GR73632, GR64349, substance P methyl ester and neurokinin B).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1707714

  16. Vasoconstriction induced by G1, a G-protein-coupled oestrogen receptor1 (GPER-1) agonist, in the isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Akif Hakan; Buyukafsar, Kansu

    2013-02-28

    Vascular effects of the G protein-coupled oestrogen receptor1 (GPER-1) agonist, G1 (10(-7)-5×10(-6) M), the main oestrogenic hormone, 17β-estradiol (10(-9)-10(-4) M), the NR3A1 agonist, PPT (10(-8)-10(-5) M), the NR3A2 agonist DPN (10(-8)-10(-5) M), and the classical oestrogen receptor blocker but also a GPER agonist, ICI-182780 (10(-8)-3×10(-6) M), were investigated on the perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney. To seek cellular mechanisms involved in GPER-1-induced signalling we tested several compounds including the inhibitors of Rho-kinase (ROCK) (Y-27632), tyrosine kinase (genistein), p38MAPK (SB203580), p44/42MAPK (PD98059), protein kinase C (PKC) (GF109203X), Jun-kinase (JNK) (SP600125), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) (LY294002), Ca(2+) channels (nifedipine), GPER-1 (G15) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase (AG-1478). Moreover, the effect of saponin (50mg/ml) that was used for endothelium removal was explored on G1-elicited vascular action. G1, 17β-estradiol and ICI-182780 but not PPT and DPN induced vasoconstrictions in basal renal perfusion pressure. In contrast, G1 promoted vasodilatation when the perfusion pressure was elevated in advance by phenylephrine. G1-elicited vasoconstriction was not modified by endothelial removal; however, it was markedly inhibited by GPER-1 antagonist, G15. The vasoconstrictor response to G1 was also significantly attenuated by Y-27632, PD98059, SB203580, GF109203X, genistein, AG-1478, and nifedipine, but not LY294002 and SP600125. Western blotting indicated the expression of GPER-1 in renal artery, medulla and cortex of rat kidney. In conclusion, GPER-1 could substantially modulate vascular responses through a variety of signalling pathways including ROCK, PKC, p38 MAPK, p42/44 MAPK, tyrosine kinase, EGF receptor kinase and VOCC but not JNK or PI3K in isolated perfused rat kidney. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. On the role of subtype selective adenosine receptor agonists during proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human primary bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Costa, M Adelina; Barbosa, A; Neto, E; Sá-e-Sousa, A; Freitas, R; Neves, J M; Magalhães-Cardoso, T; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2011-05-01

    Purines are important modulators of bone cell biology. ATP is metabolized into adenosine by human primary osteoblast cells (HPOC); due to very low activity of adenosine deaminase, the nucleoside is the end product of the ecto-nucleotidase cascade. We, therefore, investigated the expression and function of adenosine receptor subtypes (A(1) , A(2A) , A(2B) , and A(3) ) during proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of HPOC. Adenosine A(1) (CPA), A(2A) (CGS21680C), A(2B) (NECA), and A(3) (2-Cl-IB-MECA) receptor agonists concentration-dependently increased HPOC proliferation. Agonist-induced HPOC proliferation was prevented by their selective antagonists, DPCPX, SCH442416, PSB603, and MRS1191. CPA and NECA facilitated osteogenic differentiation measured by increases in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. This contrasts with the effect of CGS21680C which delayed HPOC differentiation; 2-Cl-IB-MECA was devoid of effect. Blockade of the A(2B) receptor with PSB603 prevented osteogenic differentiation by NECA. In the presence of the A(1) antagonist, DPCPX, CPA reduced ALP activity at 21 and 28 days in culture. At the same time points, blockade of A(2A) receptors with SCH442416 transformed the inhibitory effect of CGS21680C into facilitation. Inhibition of adenosine uptake with dipyridamole caused a net increase in osteogenic differentiation. The presence of all subtypes of adenosine receptors on HPOC was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Data show that adenosine is an important regulator of osteogenic cell differentiation through the activation of subtype-specific receptors. The most abundant A(2B) receptor seems to have a consistent role in cell differentiation, which may be balanced through the relative strengths of A(1) or A(2A) receptors determining whether osteoblasts are driven into proliferation or differentiation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Exercise as an adjunct treatment for opiate agonist treatment: review of the current research and implementation strategies.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Jeremiah; Wadeson, Heather K; VanHeest, Jaci L

    2012-01-01

    Opiate dependence is a significant public health concern linked to poor quality of life, comorbid psychiatric disorders, and high costs to society. Current opiate agonist treatments are an effective but limited intervention. Adjunctive interventions could improve and augment opiate agonist treatment outcomes, including drug abstinence, quality of life, and physical health. This article reviews exercise as an adjunctive intervention for opiate agonist treatment, especially in regards to improving mood and overall quality of life, while reducing other substance use. Poor adherence and dropout frequently prevent many individuals from garnering the many physical and mental health benefits of exercise. Strategies for implementing an exercise intervention, including safety considerations, are discussed.

  19. Structure-based design of Trifarotene (CD5789), a potent and selective RARγ agonist for the treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Thoreau, Etienne; Arlabosse, Jean-Marie; Bouix-Peter, Claire; Chambon, Sandrine; Chantalat, Laurent; Daver, Sébastien; Dumais, Laurence; Duvert, Gwenaëlle; Feret, Angélique; Ouvry, Gilles; Pascau, Jonathan; Raffin, Catherine; Rodeville, Nicolas; Soulet, Catherine; Tabet, Samuel; Talano, Sandrine; Portal, Thibaud

    2018-06-01

    Retinoids have a dominant role in topical acne therapy and to date, only RARβ and RARγ dual agonists have reached the market. Given the tissue distribution of RAR isoforms, it was hypothesized that developing RARγ -selective agonists could yield a new generation of topical acne treatments that would increase safety margins while maintaining the robust efficacy of previous drugs. Structural knowledge derived from the X-ray structure of known γ-selective CD437, suggested the design of a novel triaryl series of agonists which was optimized and ultimately led to the discovery of Trifarotene/CD5789. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cervical cancer cells suppress effector functions of cytotoxic T cells through the adenosinergic pathway.

    PubMed

    Mora-García, M L; Ávila-Ibarra, L R; García-Rocha, R; Weiss-Steider, B; Hernández-Montes, J; Don-López, C A; Gutiérrez-Serrano, V; Titla-Vilchis, I J; Fuentes-Castañeda, M C; Monroy-Mora, A; Jave-Suárez, L F; Chacón-Salinas, R; Vallejo-Castillo, L; Pérez-Tapia, S M; Monroy-García, A

    2017-10-01

    The expression of CD73 in tumor cells plays a significant role in the production of adenosine (Ado) that suppresses antitumor effector cells. In this study we analyzed the capability of HPV-positive (HPV+) cervical cancer (CeCa) cell lines CaSki, SiHa, HeLa, and RoVa; and HPV-negative (HPV-) cell lines C33A and ViBo to produce Ado and inhibit effector functions of CD8+ T cells. HPV+ CeCa cells expressed significantly higher levels of CD73 in the membrane (p<0.01) than HPV- CeCa cells and this expression was associated with the production of larger amounts of Ado (>400μM) compared to HPV-CeCa cells (<200μM) in the presence of AMP, as well asa stronger inhibition of (>50%) proliferation, activation, and cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells via interaction with A2A adenosine receptor. We also provide evidence that silenced E6/E7 expression in CeCa cells, strongly reduced its CD73 expression level and its capability to generate Ado. This results suggest that HPV infection, which is associated with more than 99% of CeCa cases, may present an increased constitutive expression of CD73 in cervical neoplasia to contribute to the suppression of the immune response mediated by the production of large amounts of Ado. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ABCA1 agonist peptides for the treatment of disease

    DOE PAGES

    Bielicki, John K.

    2016-02-01

    Purpose of review The review summarizes information pertaining to the preclinical development of new apolipoprotein (apo) E mimetic peptides that stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux. Recent findings Small α-helical peptides based on the C-terminal domain of apoE have been developed for therapeutic applications. These peptides stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux via the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) with high potency, like native apolipoproteins on a molar basis. This potent activity has been related to the unique ability of these peptides to maintain α-helix structure upon dilution. Recent structure-activity studies improving the safety features of these mimetic peptides have greatly improved their potentialmore » for clinical use. Structural features of the class A α-helix motif that induce muscle toxicity and hypertriglyceridemia have been identified. These may have implications for the design of other HDL mimetic peptides. Summary ABCA1 is an integral membrane protein that plays a central role in biology. Its principal function is to mediate the efflux of cholesterol and phospholipid from cells to extracellular apo, preventing a build-up of excess cholesterol in membranes. This process generates HDL particles that perform a variety of functions to protect against disease. A number of these functions can be viewed as directly or indirectly supporting ABCA1 activity, thus constituting a positive feedback system to optimize cellular lipid efflux responses and disease prevention. Consequently, therapeutic approaches that mimic the activities of apos may prove highly effective to combat disease. One such approach involves the use of peptides. The broad biological relevance of ABCA1 suggests these apo mimetic peptides may be useful for the treatment of a number of diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease.« less

  2. ABCA1 agonist peptides for the treatment of disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bielicki, John K.

    Purpose of review The review summarizes information pertaining to the preclinical development of new apolipoprotein (apo) E mimetic peptides that stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux. Recent findings Small α-helical peptides based on the C-terminal domain of apoE have been developed for therapeutic applications. These peptides stimulate cellular cholesterol efflux via the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) with high potency, like native apolipoproteins on a molar basis. This potent activity has been related to the unique ability of these peptides to maintain α-helix structure upon dilution. Recent structure-activity studies improving the safety features of these mimetic peptides have greatly improved their potentialmore » for clinical use. Structural features of the class A α-helix motif that induce muscle toxicity and hypertriglyceridemia have been identified. These may have implications for the design of other HDL mimetic peptides. Summary ABCA1 is an integral membrane protein that plays a central role in biology. Its principal function is to mediate the efflux of cholesterol and phospholipid from cells to extracellular apo, preventing a build-up of excess cholesterol in membranes. This process generates HDL particles that perform a variety of functions to protect against disease. A number of these functions can be viewed as directly or indirectly supporting ABCA1 activity, thus constituting a positive feedback system to optimize cellular lipid efflux responses and disease prevention. Consequently, therapeutic approaches that mimic the activities of apos may prove highly effective to combat disease. One such approach involves the use of peptides. The broad biological relevance of ABCA1 suggests these apo mimetic peptides may be useful for the treatment of a number of diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease.« less

  3. Characterization of "mini-nucleotides" as P2X receptor agonists in rat cardiomyocyte cultures. An integrated synthetic, biochemical, and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Fischer, B; Yefidoff, R; Major, D T; Rutman-Halili, I; Shneyvays, V; Zinman, T; Jacobson, K A; Shainberg, A

    1999-07-15

    The design and synthesis of "mini-nucleotides", based on a xanthine-alkyl phosphate scaffold, are described. The physiological effects of the new compounds were evaluated in rat cardiac cell culture regarding Ca(2+) elevation and contractility. The results indicate biochemical and physiological profiles similar to those of ATP, although at higher concentrations. The biological target molecules of these "mini-nucleotides" were identified by using selective P2-R and A(1)-R antagonists and P2-R subtype selective agonists. On the basis of these results and of experiments in Ca(2+) free medium, in which [Ca(2+)](i) elevation was not observed, we concluded that interaction of the analogues is likely with P2X receptor subtypes, which causes Ca(2+) influx. Theoretical calculations analyzing electronic effects within the series of xanthine-alkyl phosphates were performed on reduced models at quantum mechanical levels. Calculated dipole moment vectors, electrostatic potential maps, and volume parameters suggest an explanation for the activity or inactivity of the synthesized derivatives and predict a putative binding site environment for the active agonists. Xanthine-alkyl phosphate analogues proved to be selective agents for activation of P2X-R subtypes, whereas ATP activated all P2-R subtypes in cardiac cells. Therefore, these analogues may serve as prototypes of selective drugs aiming at cardiac disorders mediated through P2X receptors.

  4. Prospects for Creation of Cardioprotective and Antiarrhythmic Drugs Based on Opioid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Leonid N; Oeltgen, Peter R.; Naryzhnaya, Natalia V.; Pei, Jian‐Ming; Brown, Stephen A.; Lishmanov, Yury B.; Downey, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has now been demonstrated that the μ, δ1, δ2, and κ1 opioid receptor (OR) agonists represent the most promising group of opioids for the creation of drugs enhancing cardiac tolerance to the detrimental effects of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Opioids are able to prevent necrosis and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes during I/R and improve cardiac contractility in the reperfusion period. The OR agonists exert an infarct‐reducing effect with prophylactic administration and prevent reperfusion‐induced cardiomyocyte death when ischemic injury of heart has already occurred; that is, opioids can mimic preconditioning and postconditioning phenomena. Furthermore, opioids are also effective in preventing ischemia‐induced arrhythmias. PMID:27197922

  5. Use of muscarinic agonists in the treatment of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fox, R I; Konttinen, Y; Fisher, A

    2001-12-01

    Two muscarinic agonists (pilocarpine and cevimeline) have recently been approved for the treatment of symptoms of xerostomia in Sjögren's syndrome (SS). These agents stimulate the M1 and M3 receptors present on salivary glands, leading to increased secretory function. The use of these agents emphasizes the importance of neuroendocrine mechanisms in SS, which is considered an autoimmune disorder. We review recent studies on the release of cytokines and metalloproteinases in SS-affected glands and their influence on the release of and response to neurotransmitters. Also, we review the structure and function of muscarinic receptors as they may relate to SS and the potential use of novel muscarinic agonists in SS. (c)2001 Elsevier Science.

  6. Sarizotan, a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor agonist and dopamine receptor ligand. 1. Neurochemical profile.

    PubMed

    Bartoszyk, G D; Van Amsterdam, C; Greiner, H E; Rautenberg, W; Russ, H; Seyfried, C A

    2004-02-01

    Sarizotan exhibited high affinities only to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors and dopamine DA D4>D3>D2 receptors with the profile of a 5-HT1A agonist and DA antagonist demonstrated by the inhibition of cAMP-stimulation and guinea pig ileum contraction, decreased accumulation of the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan and increased levels of 5-HT metabolites, increased accumulation of DA precursor dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and the reduced levels of DA metabolites in intact rats. However, sarizotan at higher doses decreased DA precursor accumulation in reserpinized rats and induced contralateral rotational behavior in unilaterally substantia nigra lesioned rats, indicating some intrinsic dopaminergic activity; at D2 receptors sarizotan may act as a partial agonist, depending on the dopaminergic impulse flow. Sarizotan represents a new approach for the treatment of extrapyramidal motor complications such as l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

  7. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Selective Agonist Enhances Collateral Growth and Protects against Subsequent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Li, Fuying; Yui, Daishi; Miki, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Collateral growth after acute occlusion of an intracranial artery is triggered by increasing shear stress in preexisting collateral pathways. Recently, sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1PR1) on endothelial cells was reported to be essential in sensing fluid shear stress. Here, we evaluated the expression of S1PR1 in the hypoperfused mouse brain and investigated the effect of a selective S1PR1 agonist on leptomeningeal collateral growth and subsequent ischemic damage after focal ischemia. Methods In C57Bl/6 mice (n = 133) subjected to unilateral common carotid occlusion (CCAO) and sham surgery. The first series examined the time course of collateral growth, cell proliferation, and S1PR1 expression in the leptomeningeal arteries after CCAO. The second series examined the relationship between pharmacological regulation of S1PR1 and collateral growth of leptomeningeal anastomoses. Animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: LtCCAO and daily intraperitoneal (ip) injection for 7 days of an S1PR1 selective agonist (SEW2871, 5 mg/kg/day); sham surgery and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 after surgery; LtCCAO and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 and an S1PR1 inverse agonist (VPC23019, 0.5 mg/kg); LtCCAO and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days after surgery; and sham surgery and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days. Leptomeningeal anastomoses were visualized 14 days after LtCCAO by latex perfusion method, and a set of animals underwent subsequent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) 7days after the treatment termination. Neurological functions 1hour, 1, 4, and 7days and infarction volume 7days after pMCAO were evaluated. Results In parallel with the increase in S1PR1 mRNA levels, S1PR1 expression colocalized with endothelial cell markers in the leptomeningeal arteries, increased markedly on the side of the CCAO, and peaked 7 days after CCAO. Mitotic cell numbers in the leptomeningeal arteries

  8. Transcriptomic and phenotypic profiling in developing zebrafish exposed to thyroid hormone receptor agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, Derik E.; Noyes, Pamela D.; Waters, Katrina M.

    There is a need to develop novel, high-throughput screening and prioritization methods to identify chemicals with adverse estrogen, androgen, and thyroid activity to protect human health and the environment and is of interest to the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. The current aim is to explore the utility of zebrafish as a testing paradigm to classify endocrine activity using phenotypically anchored transcriptome profiling. Transcriptome analysis was conducted on embryos exposed to 25 estrogen-, androgen-, or thyroid-active chemicals at a concentration that elicited adverse malformations or mortality at 120 hours post-fertilization in 80% of the animals exposed. Analysis of the top 1000more » significant differentially expressed transcripts across all treatments identified a unique transcriptional and phenotypic profile for thyroid hormone receptor agonists, which can be used as a biomarker screen for potential thyroid hormone agonists.« less

  9. Anti-arrhythmic activities of opioid agonists and antagonists and their stereoisomers.

    PubMed Central

    Sarne, Y.; Flitstein, A.; Oppenheimer, E.

    1991-01-01

    1. A series of opioid agonists, antagonists and their (+)-stereoisomers were tested for antiarrhythmic activity in the rat coronary artery occlusion model. 2. Naloxone (0.01-2 mg kg-1) significantly reduced the incidence and severity of cardiac arrhythmias, in accordance with previous published studies. 3. The non-opioid stereoisomer, (+)-naloxone, was equipotent with naloxone against occlusion-induced arrhythmia. 4. Similar non-stereospecific antiarrhythmic effects were induced by another opioid antagonist, Win 44,441-3 and its stereoisomer Win 44,441-2. 5. The opioid agonists, morphine and levorphanol, protected against occlusion-induced arrhythmia as did the opioid antagonists, and the (+)-stereoisomer, dextrorphan, was equipotent to levorphanol. 6. It is concluded that the antiarrhythmic effects of opioid drugs are not mediated by opioid receptors. A direct effect on ionic currents in cardiac muscle is suggested as the mechanism of opioid antiarrhythmic activity. PMID:1364840

  10. A Novel Non-Peptidic Agonist of the Ghrelin Receptor with Orexigenic Activity In vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Cavada, Elena; Pardo, Leticia M.; Kandil, Dalia; Torres-Fuentes, Cristina; Clarke, Sarah L.; Shaban, Hamdy; McGlacken, Gerard P.; Schellekens, Harriet

    2016-11-01

    Loss of appetite in the medically ill and ageing populations is a major health problem and a significant symptom in cachexia syndromes, which is the loss of muscle and fat mass. Ghrelin is a gut-derived hormone which can stimulate appetite. Herein we describe a novel, simple, non-peptidic, 2-pyridone which acts as a selective agonist for the ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a). The small 2-pyridone demonstrated clear agonistic activity in both transfected human cells and mouse hypothalamic cells with endogenous GHS-R1a receptor expression. In vivo tests with the hit compound showed significant increased food intake following peripheral administration, which highlights the potent orexigenic effect of this novel GHS-R1a receptor ligand.

  11. The tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22 discriminates weak self peptides from strong agonist TCR signals.

    PubMed

    Salmond, Robert J; Brownlie, Rebecca J; Morrison, Vicky L; Zamoyska, Rose

    2014-09-01

    T cells must be tolerant of self antigens to avoid autoimmunity but responsive to foreign antigens to provide protection against infection. We found that in both naive T cells and effector T cells, the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22 limited signaling via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) by weak agonists and self antigens while not impeding responses to strong agonist antigens. T cells lacking PTPN22 showed enhanced formation of conjugates with antigen-presenting cells pulsed with weak peptides, which led to activation of the T cells and their production of inflammatory cytokines. This effect was exacerbated under conditions of lymphopenia, with the formation of potent memory T cells in the absence of PTPN22. Our data address how loss-of-function PTPN22 alleles can lead to the population expansion of effector and/or memory T cells and a predisposition to human autoimmunity.

  12. Future Treatment of Constipation-associated Disorders: Role of Relamorelin and Other Ghrelin Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Mosińska, Paula; Zatorski, Hubert; Storr, Martin; Fichna, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    There is an unmet need for effective pharmacological therapies for constipation, a symptom that significantly deteriorates patients’ quality of life and impacts health care. Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor and has been shown to exert prokinetic effects on gastrointestinal (GI) motility via the vagus and pelvic nerves. The pharmacological potential of ghrelin is hampered by its short half-life. Ghrelin receptor (GRLN-R) agonists with enhanced pharmacokinetics were thus developed. Centrally penetrant GRLN-R agonists stimulate defecation and improve impaired lower GI transit in animals and humans. This review summarizes the current knowledge on relamorelin, a potent ghrelin mimetic, and other GRLN-R analogs which are in preclinical or clinical stages of development for the management of disorders with underlying GI hypomotility, like constipation. PMID:28238253

  13. Investigation of pyrazolo-sulfonamides as putative small molecule oxytocin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Katte, Timothy A; Reekie, Tristan A; Werry, Eryn L; Jorgensen, William T; Boyd, Rochelle; Wong, Erick C N; Gulliver, Damien W; Connor, Mark; Kassiou, Michael

    2017-08-18

    The neuropeptide oxytocin has been implicated in multiple central nervous system functions in mammalian species. Increased levels have been reported to improve trust, alleviate symptoms related to autism and social phobias, and reduce social anxiety. Hoffman-La Roche published a patent claiming to have found potent small molecule oxytocin receptor agonists, smaller than the first non-peptide oxytocin agonist reported, WAY 267,464. We selected two of the more potent compounds from the patent and, in addition, created WAY 267,464 hybrid structures and determined their oxytocin and vasopressin receptor activity. Human embryonic kidney and Chinese hamster ovary cells were used for the expression of oxytocin or vasopressin 1a receptors and activity assessed via IP1 accumulation assays and calcium FLIPR assays. The results concluded that the reported compounds in the patent and the hybrid structures have no activity at the oxytocin or vasopressin 1a receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Italy’s Electronic Health Record System for Opioid Agonist Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Serpelloni, Giovanni; Gomma, Maurizio; Genetti, Bruno; Zermiani, Monica; Rimondo, Claudia; Mollica, Roberto; Gryczynski, Jan; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Schwartz, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health record systems (EHRs) play an increasingly important role in opioid agonist treatment. In Italy, an EHR called the Multi Functional Platform (MFP) is in use in 150 opioid-agonist treatment facilities in 8 of Italy’s 23 regions. This report describes MFP and presents 2010 data from 65 sites that treated 8,145 patients, of whom 72.3% were treated with methadone and 27.7% with buprenorphine. Patients treated with buprenorphine compared to methadone were more likely to be male (p < 0.01) and younger (p < 0.001). Methadone compared to buprenorphine patients had a higher percentage of opioid-positive urine tests (p < 0.001) and longer mean length of stay (p = 0.004). MFP has been implemented widely in Italy and has been able to track patient outcomes across treatment facilities. In the future, this EHR system can be used for performance improvement initiatives. PMID:23518287

  15. Microenvironmental agonists generate de novo phenotypic resistance to combined ibrutinib plus venetoclax in CLL and MCL

    PubMed Central

    Portell, Craig A.; Gordon, Vicki L.; Capaldo, Brian J.; Bekiranov, Stefan; Axelrod, Mark J.; Brett, L. Kyle; Wulfkuhle, Julia D.; Gallagher, Rosa I.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Bender, Timothy P.; Williams, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    De novo resistance and rapid recurrence often characterize responses of B-cell malignancies to ibrutinib (IBR), indicating a need to develop drug combinations that block compensatory survival signaling and give deeper, more durable responses. To identify such combinations, we previously performed a combinatorial drug screen and identified the Bcl-2 inhibitor venetoclax (VEN) as a promising partner for combination with IBR in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). We have opened a multi-institutional clinical trial to test this combination. However, analysis of primary samples from patients with MCL as well as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) revealed unexpected heterogeneous de novo resistance even to the IBR+VEN combination. In the current study, we demonstrate that resistance to the combination can be generated by microenvironmental agonists: interleukin-10 (IL-10), CD40L and, most potently, cytosine guanine dinucleotide–oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODNs), which is a surrogate for unmethylated DNA and a specific agonist for Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) signaling. Incubation with these agonists caused robust activation of NF-κB signaling, especially alternative NF-κB, which led to enhanced expression of the antiapoptotic proteins Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, and survivin, thus decreasing dependence on Bcl-2. Inhibitors of NF-κB signaling blocked overexpression of these antiapoptotic proteins and overcame resistance. Inhibitors of Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, or survivin also overcame this resistance, and showed synergistic benefit with the IBR+VEN combination. We conclude that microenvironmental factors, particularly the TLR9 agonist, can generate de novo resistance to the IBR+VEN combination in CLL and MCL cells. This signaling pathway presents targets for overcoming drug resistance induced by extrinsic microenvironmental factors in diverse B-cell malignancies. PMID:29034364

  16. Activation of Protease Activated Receptor 2 by Exogenous Agonist Exacerbates Early Radiation Injury in Rat Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR{sub 2}) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR{sub 2} is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR{sub 2} activation. Methods and Materials: Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR{sub 2} agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH{sub 2}) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 daysmore » after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The PAR{sub 2} agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR{sub 2} agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR{sub 2} agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR{sub 2} did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. Conclusion: The results of the present study support a role for PAR{sub 2} activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR{sub 2} antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios.« less

  17. Characterization of 12 GnRH peptide agonists – a kinetic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nederpelt, Indira; Georgi, Victoria; Schiele, Felix; Nowak‐Reppel, Katrin; Fernández‐Montalván, Amaury E.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Drug‐target residence time is an important, yet often overlooked, parameter in drug discovery. Multiple studies have proposed an increased residence time to be beneficial for improved drug efficacy and/or longer duration of action. Currently, there are many drugs on the market targeting the gonadotropin‐releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor for the treatment of hormone‐dependent diseases. Surprisingly, the kinetic receptor‐binding parameters of these analogues have not yet been reported. Therefore, this project focused on determining the receptor‐binding kinetics of 12 GnRH peptide agonists, including many marketed drugs. Experimental Approach A novel radioligand‐binding competition association assay was developed and optimized for the human GnRH receptor with the use of a radiolabelled peptide agonist, [125I]‐triptorelin. In addition to radioligand‐binding studies, a homogeneous time‐resolved FRET Tag‐lite™ method was developed as an alternative assay for the same purpose. Key Results Two novel competition association assays were successfully developed and applied to determine the kinetic receptor‐binding characteristics of 12 high‐affinity GnRH peptide agonists. Results obtained from both methods were highly correlated. Interestingly, the binding kinetics of the peptide agonists were more divergent than their affinities with residence times ranging from 5.6 min (goserelin) to 125 min (deslorelin). Conclusions and Implications Our research provides new insights by incorporating kinetic, next to equilibrium, binding parameters in current research and development that can potentially improve future drug discovery targeting the GnRH receptor. PMID:26398856

  18. Characterization of 12 GnRH peptide agonists - a kinetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Nederpelt, Indira; Georgi, Victoria; Schiele, Felix; Nowak-Reppel, Katrin; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury E; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2016-01-01

    Drug-target residence time is an important, yet often overlooked, parameter in drug discovery. Multiple studies have proposed an increased residence time to be beneficial for improved drug efficacy and/or longer duration of action. Currently, there are many drugs on the market targeting the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor for the treatment of hormone-dependent diseases. Surprisingly, the kinetic receptor-binding parameters of these analogues have not yet been reported. Therefore, this project focused on determining the receptor-binding kinetics of 12 GnRH peptide agonists, including many marketed drugs. A novel radioligand-binding competition association assay was developed and optimized for the human GnRH receptor with the use of a radiolabelled peptide agonist, [(125) I]-triptorelin. In addition to radioligand-binding studies, a homogeneous time-resolved FRET Tag-lite™ method was developed as an alternative assay for the same purpose. Two novel competition association assays were successfully developed and applied to determine the kinetic receptor-binding characteristics of 12 high-affinity GnRH peptide agonists. Results obtained from both methods were highly correlated. Interestingly, the binding kinetics of the peptide agonists were more divergent than their affinities with residence times ranging from 5.6 min (goserelin) to 125 min (deslorelin). Our research provides new insights by incorporating kinetic, next to equilibrium, binding parameters in current research and development that can potentially improve future drug discovery targeting the GnRH receptor. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    PubMed Central

    Ettrup, Anders; da Cunha-Bang, Sophie; McMahon, Brenda; Lehel, Szabolcs; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Skibsted, Anine W; Jørgensen, Louise M; Hansen, Martin; Baandrup, Anders O; Bache, Søren; Svarer, Claus; Kristensen, Jesper L; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2014-01-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [11C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT2A receptors with [11C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input measurements provided the most optimal quantification of cerebral [11C]Cimbi-36 binding. Reference tissue modeling was feasible as it induced a negative but predictable bias in [11C]Cimbi-36 PET outcome measures. In five subjects, pretreatment with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ketanserin before a second PET scan significantly decreased [11C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [11C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT2A receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. Thus, we here describe [11C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT2A receptors in the human brain. PMID:24780897

  20. An Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor Agonist Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Megan D; Chan, Trevor; Swigart, Philip M; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Dash, Rajesh; Simpson, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors mediate adaptive effects in the heart and cardiac myocytes, and a myocyte survival pathway involving the alpha-1A receptor subtype and ERK activation exists in vitro. However, data in vivo are limited. Here we tested A61603 (N-[5-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-2-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl]methanesulfonamide), a selective imidazoline agonist for the alpha-1A. A61603 was the most potent alpha-1-agonist in activating ERK in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. A61603 activated ERK in adult mouse ventricular myocytes and protected the cells from death caused by the anthracycline doxorubicin. A low dose of A61603 (10 ng/kg/d) activated ERK in the mouse heart in vivo, but did not change blood pressure. In male mice, concurrent subcutaneous A61603 infusion at 10 ng/kg/d for 7 days after a single intraperitoneal dose of doxorubicin (25 mg/kg) increased survival, improved cardiac function, heart rate, and cardiac output by echocardiography, and reduced cardiac cell necrosis and apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis. All protective effects were lost in alpha-1A-knockout mice. In female mice, doxorubicin at doses higher than in males (35-40 mg/kg) caused less cardiac toxicity than in males. We conclude that the alpha-1A-selective agonist A61603, via the alpha-1A adrenergic receptor, prevents doxorubicin cardiomyopathy in male mice, supporting the theory that alpha-1A adrenergic receptor agonists have potential as novel heart failure therapies.

  1. SB265610 is an allosteric, inverse agonist at the human CXCR2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, ME; Bond, ME; Manini, J; Brown, Z; Charlton, SJ

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: In several previous studies, the C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonist 1-(2-bromo-phenyl)-3-(7-cyano-3H-benzotriazol-4-yl)-urea (SB265610) has been described as binding competitively with the endogenous agonist. This is in contrast to many other chemokine receptor antagonists, where the mechanism of antagonism has been described as allosteric. Experimental approach: To determine whether it displays a unique mechanism among the chemokine receptor antagonists, the mode of action of SB265610 was investigated at the CXCR2 receptor using radioligand and [35S]-GTPγS binding approaches in addition to chemotaxis of human neutrophils. Key results: In equilibrium saturation binding studies, SB265610 depressed the maximal binding of [125I]-interleukin-8 ([125I]-IL-8) without affecting the Kd. In contrast, IL-8 was unable to prevent binding of [3H]-SB265610. Kinetic binding experiments demonstrated that this was not an artefact of irreversible or slowly reversible binding. In functional experiments, SB265610 caused a rightward shift of the concentration-response curves to IL-8 and growth-related oncogene α, but also a reduction in maximal response elicited by each agonist. Fitting these data to an operational allosteric ternary complex model suggested that, once bound, SB265610 completely blocks receptor activation. SB265610 also inhibited basal [35S]-GTPγS binding in this preparation. Conclusions and implications: Taken together, these data suggest that SB265610 behaves as an allosteric inverse agonist at the CXCR2 receptor, binding at a region distinct from the agonist binding site to prevent receptor activation, possibly by interfering with G protein coupling. PMID:19422399

  2. Identification of Novel Synthetic Toll-like Receptor 2 Agonists by High Throughput Screening*

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yue; Omueti-Ayoade, Katherine; Mutha, Sarita K.; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Tapping, Richard I.

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a central role in host defense by inducing inflammatory and adaptive immune responses following infection. Drugs that target TLRs are of considerable interest as potential inflammatory regulators, vaccine adjuvants, and novel immunotherapeutics. TLR2, in cooperation with either TLR1 or TLR6, mediates responses to a wide variety of microbial products as well as products of host tissue damage. In an effort to understand the structural basis of TLR2 recognition and uncover novel TLR2 agonists, a synthetic chemical library of 24,000 compounds was screened using an IL-8-driven luciferase reporter in cells expressing these human receptors. The screening yielded several novel TLR2-dependent activators that utilize TLR1, TLR6, or both as co-receptors. These novel small molecule compounds are aromatic in nature and structurally unrelated to any known TLR2 agonists. The three most potent compounds do not exhibit synergistic activity, nor do they act as pseudoantagonists toward natural TLR2 activators. Interestingly, two of the compounds exhibit species specificity and are inactive toward murine peritoneal macrophages. Mutational analysis reveals that although the central extracellular region of TLR1 is required for stimulation, there are subtle differences in the mechanism of stimulation mediated by the synthetic compounds in comparison with natural lipoprotein agonists. The three most potent compounds activate cells in the nanomolar range and stimulate cytokine production from human peripheral blood monocytes. Our results confirm the utility of high throughput screens to uncover novel synthetic TLR2 agonists that may be of therapeutic benefit. PMID:20504771

  3. Activation of Adhesion G Protein-coupled Receptors: AGONIST SPECIFICITY OF STACHEL SEQUENCE-DERIVED PEPTIDES.

    PubMed

    Demberg, Lilian M; Winkler, Jana; Wilde, Caroline; Simon, Kay-Uwe; Schön, Julia; Rothemund, Sven; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone; Liebscher, Ines

    2017-03-17

    Members of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) family carry an agonistic sequence within their large ectodomains. Peptides derived from this region, called the Stachel sequence, can activate the respective receptor. As the conserved core region of the Stachel sequence is highly similar between aGPCRs, the agonist specificity of Stachel sequence-derived peptides was tested between family members using cell culture-based second messenger assays. Stachel peptides derived from aGPCRs of subfamily VI (GPR110/ADGRF1, GPR116/ADGRF5) and subfamily VIII (GPR64/ADGRG2, GPR126/ADGRG6) are able to activate more than one member of the respective subfamily supporting their evolutionary relationship and defining them as pharmacological receptor subtypes. Extended functional analyses of the Stachel sequences and derived peptides revealed agonist promiscuity, not only within, but also between aGPCR subfamilies. For example, the Stachel -derived peptide of GPR110 (subfamily VI) can activate GPR64 and GPR126 (both subfamily VIII). Our results indicate that key residues in the Stachel sequence are very similar between aGPCRs allowing for agonist promiscuity of several Stachel -derived peptides. Therefore, aGPCRs appear to be pharmacologically more closely related than previously thought. Our findings have direct implications for many aGPCR studies, as potential functional overlap has to be considered for in vitro and in vivo studies. However, it also offers the possibility of a broader use of more potent peptides when the original Stachel sequence is less effective. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Microenvironmental agonists generate de novo phenotypic resistance to combined ibrutinib plus venetoclax in CLL and MCL.

    PubMed

    Jayappa, Kallesh D; Portell, Craig A; Gordon, Vicki L; Capaldo, Brian J; Bekiranov, Stefan; Axelrod, Mark J; Brett, L Kyle; Wulfkuhle, Julia D; Gallagher, Rosa I; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Bender, Timothy P; Williams, Michael E; Weber, Michael J

    2017-06-13

    De novo resistance and rapid recurrence often characterize responses of B-cell malignancies to ibrutinib (IBR), indicating a need to develop drug combinations that block compensatory survival signaling and give deeper, more durable responses. To identify such combinations, we previously performed a combinatorial drug screen and identified the Bcl-2 inhibitor venetoclax (VEN) as a promising partner for combination with IBR in Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL). We have opened a multi-institutional clinical trial to test this combination. However, analysis of primary samples from patients with MCL as well as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) revealed unexpected heterogeneous de novo resistance even to the IBR+VEN combination. In the current study, we demonstrate that resistance to the combination can be generated by microenvironmental agonists: IL-10, CD40L and, most potently, CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), which is a surrogate for unmethylated DNA and a specific agonist for TLR9 signaling. Incubation with these agonists caused robust activation of NF-κB signaling, especially alternative NF-κB, which led to enhanced expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, and survivin, thus decreasing dependence on Bcl-2. Inhibitors of NF-κB signaling blocked overexpression of these anti-apoptotic proteins and overcame resistance. Inhibitors of Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, or survivin also overcame this resistance, and showed synergistic benefit with the IBR+VEN combination. We conclude that microenvironmental factors, particularly the TLR9 agonist, can generate de novo resistance to the IBR+VEN combination in CLL and MCL cells. This signaling pathway presents targets for overcoming drug resistance induced by extrinsic microenvironmental factors in diverse B-cell malignancies.

  5. Working memory span capacity improved by a D2 but not D1 receptor family agonist.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Isadore S; Sharp, Richard F; Geyer, Mark A; Meves, Jessica M; Young, Jared W

    2011-06-01

    Patients with schizophrenia exhibit poor working memory (WM). Although several subcomponents of WM can be measured, evidence suggests the primary subcomponent affected in schizophrenia is span capacity (WMC). Indeed, the NIMH-funded MATRICS initiative recommended assaying the WMC when assessing the efficacy of a putative therapeutic for FDA approval. Although dopamine D1 receptor agonists improve delay-dependent memory in animals, evidence for improvements in WMC due to dopamine D1 receptor activation is limited. In contrast, the dopamine D2-family agonist bromocriptine improves WMC in humans. The radial arm maze (RAM) can be used to assess WMC, although complications due to ceiling effects or strategy confounds have limited its use. We describe a 12-arm RAM protocol designed to assess whether the dopamine D1-family agonist SKF 38393 (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) or bromocriptine (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) could improve WMC in C57BL/6N mice (n=12) in cross-over designs. WMC increased and strategy usage decreased with training. The dopamine D1 agonist SKF 38393 had no effect on WMC or long-term memory. Bromocriptine decreased WMC errors, without affecting long-term memory, consistent with human studies. These data confirm that WMC can be measured in mice and reveal drug effects that are consistent with reported effects in humans. Future research is warranted to identify the subtype of the D2-family of receptors responsible for the observed improvement in WMC. Finally, this RAM procedure may prove useful in developing animal models of deficient WMC to further assess putative treatments for the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Discovery of potent and selective small-molecule PAR-2 agonists.

    PubMed

    Seitzberg, Jimmi Gerner; Knapp, Anne Eeg; Lund, Birgitte Winther; Mandrup Bertozzi, Sine; Currier, Erika A; Ma, Jian-Nong; Sherbukhin, Vladimir; Burstein, Ethan S; Olsson, Roger

    2008-09-25

    Proteinase activated receptor-2 plays a crucial role in a wide variety of conditions with a strong inflammatory component. We present the discovery and characterization of two structurally different, potent, selective, and metabolically stable small-molecule PAR-2 agonists. These ligands may be useful as pharmacological tools for elucidating the complex physiological role of the PAR-2 receptors as well as for the development of PAR-2 antagonists.

  7. Airway Peroxidases Catalyze Nitration of the β2-Agonist Salbutamol and Decrease Its Pharmacological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sallans, Larry; Macha, Stephen; Brown, Kari; McGraw, Dennis W.; Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2011-01-01

    β2-Agonists are the most effective bronchodilators for the rapid relief of asthma symptoms, but for unclear reasons, their effectiveness may be decreased during severe exacerbations. Because peroxidase activity and nitrogen oxides are increased in the asthmatic airway, we examined whether salbutamol, a clinically important β2-agonist, is subject to potentially inactivating nitration. When salbutamol was exposed to myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase or lactoperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrite (NO2−), both absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry indicated formation of a new metabolite with features expected for the nitrated drug. The new metabolites showed an absorption maximum at 410 nm and pKa of 6.6 of the phenolic hydroxyl group. In addition to nitrosalbutamol (m/z 285.14), a salbutamol-derived nitrophenol, formed by elimination of the formaldehyde group, was detected (m/z 255.13) by mass spectrometry. It is noteworthy that the latter metabolite was detected in exhaled breath condensates of asthma patients receiving salbutamol but not in unexposed control subjects, indicating the potential for β2-agonist nitration to occur in the inflamed airway in vivo. Salbutamol nitration was inhibited in vitro by ascorbate, thiocyanate, and the pharmacological agents methimazole and dapsone. The efficacy of inhibition depended on the nitrating system, with the lactoperoxidase/H2O2/NO2− being the most affected. Functionally, nitrated salbutamol showed decreased affinity for β2-adrenergic receptors and impaired cAMP synthesis in airway smooth muscle cells compared with the native drug. These results suggest that under inflammatory conditions associated with asthma, phenolic β2-agonists may be subject to peroxidase-catalyzed nitration that could potentially diminish their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20974700

  8. Differences in acute anorectic effects of long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonists in rats.

    PubMed

    Sisley, Stephanie; Smith, Kathleen; Sandoval, Darleen A; Seeley, Randy J

    2014-08-01

    Long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have both glucose- and weight-lowering effects. The brain is poised to mediate both of these actions since GLP-1Rs are present in key areas known to control weight and glucose. Although some research has been performed on the effects of exendin-4 in the brain, little data exists on the central effects of liraglutide, a long-acting GLP-1R agonist with much closer structural homology to native GLP-1. In lean, Long-Evans rats, we found that direct intra-third cerebroventricular (i3vt) administration of 0.26 nmol liraglutide caused a 50% reduction in food intake. However, exendin-4 produced the same reduction in food intake with 10-fold greater potency (0.02 nmol). These data are supported by similar c-Fos immunoreactivity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei by exendin-4 as compared to liraglutide despite differing doses. The anorectic effects of both drugs were blocked with i3vt pre-treatment of a GLP-1R competitive antagonist, exendin(9-39), indicating that both drugs required the GLP-1R for their effects. Exendin-4, and not liraglutide, caused hyperglycemia when given i3vt prior to an oral glucose tolerance test, although liraglutide did not lower glucose. Thus, these data show that GLP-1R agonists have differing anorectic potencies in the CNS, which may account for some of their clinical differences. Additionally, we show here that the glucose lowering properties of acute administration of GLP-1R agonists are not accounted for by their central effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nicotinic agonist-induced improvement of vigilance in mice in the 5-choice continuous performance test

    PubMed Central

    YOUNG, Jared W; MEVES, Jessica M; GEYER, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Impaired attentional processing is prevalent in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders and may negatively impact other cognitive and functional domains. Nicotine – a nonspecific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist – improves vigilance in healthy subjects and schizophrenia patients as measured by continuous performance tests (CPTs), but the nAChR mediating this effect remains unclear. Here we examine the effects of: a) nicotine; b) the selective α7 nAChR agonist PNU 282987; and c) the selective α4β2 nAChR agonist ABT-418 alone and in combination with scopolamine-induced disruption of mouse 5-choice (5C-)CPT performance. This task requires the inhibition of responses to non-target stimuli as well as active responses to target stimuli, consistent with human CPTs. C57BL/6N mice were trained to perform the 5C-CPT. Drug effects were examined in extended session and variable stimulus-duration challenges of performance. Acute drug effects on scopolamine-induced disruption in performance were also investigated. Nicotine and ABT-418 subtly but significantly improved performance of normal mice and attenuated scopolamine-induced disruptions in the 5C-CPT. PNU 282–987 had no effects on performance. The similarity of nicotine and ABT-418 effects provides support for an α4β2 nAChR mechanism of action for nicotine-induced improvement in attention/vigilance. Moreover, the data provide pharmacological predictive validation for the 5C-CPT because nicotine improved and scopolamine disrupted normal performance of the task, consistent with healthy humans in the CPT. Future studies using more selective agonists may result in more robust improvements in performance. PMID:23201359

  10. Agonist anti-GITR antibody significantly enhances the therapeutic efficacy of Listeria monocytogenes-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shrimali, Rajeev; Ahmad, Shamim; Berrong, Zuzana; Okoev, Grigori; Matevosyan, Adelaida; Razavi, Ghazaleh Shoja E; Petit, Robert; Gupta, Seema; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2017-08-15

    We previously demonstrated that in addition to generating an antigen-specific immune response, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm)-based immunotherapy significantly reduces the ratio of regulatory T cells (Tregs)/CD4 + and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the tumor microenvironment. Since Lm-based immunotherapy is able to inhibit the immune suppressive environment, we hypothesized that combining this treatment with agonist antibody to a co-stimulatory receptor that would further boost the effector arm of immunity will result in significant improvement of anti-tumor efficacy of treatment. Here we tested the immune and therapeutic efficacy of Listeria-based immunotherapy combination with agonist antibody to glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR) in TC-1 mouse tumor model. We evaluated the potency of combination on tumor growth and survival of treated animals and profiled tumor microenvironment for effector and suppressor cell populations. We demonstrate that combination of Listeria-based immunotherapy with agonist antibody to GITR synergizes to improve immune and therapeutic efficacy of treatment in a mouse tumor model. We show that this combinational treatment leads to significant inhibition of tumor-growth, prolongs survival and leads to complete regression of established tumors in 60% of treated animals. We determined that this therapeutic benefit of combinational treatment is due to a significant increase in tumor infiltrating effector CD4 + and CD8 + T cells along with a decrease of inhibitory cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study that exploits Lm-based immunotherapy combined with agonist anti-GITR antibody as a potent treatment strategy that simultaneously targets both the effector and suppressor arms of the immune system, leading to significantly improved anti-tumor efficacy. We believe that our findings depicted in this manuscript provide a promising and translatable strategy that can enhance the overall

  11. Conformationally constrained farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists: heteroaryl replacements of the naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Bass, Jonathan Y; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Mills, Wendy Y; Navas, Frank; Parks, Derek J; Smalley, Terrence L; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Wisely, G Bruce

    2011-02-15

    To improve on the drug properties of GSK8062 1b, a series of heteroaryl bicyclic naphthalene replacements were prepared. The quinoline 1c was an equipotent FXR agonist with improved drug developability parameters relative to 1b. In addition, analog 1c lowered body weight gain and serum glucose in a DIO mouse model of diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential activation of G-proteins by μ-opioid receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Saidak, Zuzana; Blake-Palmer, Katherine; Hay, Debbie L; Northup, John K; Glass, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the ability of the activated μ-opioid receptor (MOR) to differentiate between myristoylated Gαi1 and GαoA type Gα proteins, and the maximal activity of a range of synthetic and endogenous agonists to activate each Gα protein. Membranes from HEK293 cells stably expressing transfected MOR were chaotrope extracted to denature endogenous G-proteins and reconstituted with specific purified G-proteins. The Gα subunits were generated in bacteria and were demonstrated to be recognised equivalently to bovine brain purified Gα protein by CB1 cannabinoid receptors. The ability of agonists to catalyse the MOR-dependent GDP/[35S]GTPγS exchange was then compared for Gαi1 and GαoA. Activation of MOR by DAMGO produced a high-affinity saturable interaction for GαoA (Km=20±1 nM) but a low-affinity interaction with Gαi1 (Km=116±12 nM). DAMGO, met-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalin displayed maximal Gα activation among the agonists evaluated. Endomorphins 1 and 2, methadone and β-endorphin activated both Gα to more than 75% of the maximal response, whereas fentanyl partially activated both G-proteins. Buprenorphine and morphine demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the maximal activities between Gαi1 and GαoA. Interestingly, DAMGO, morphine, endomorphins 1 and 2, displayed significant differences in the potencies for the activation of the two Gα. Differences in maximal activity and potency, for Gαi1 versus GαoA, are both indicative of agonist selective activation of G-proteins in response to MOR activation. These findings may provide a starting point for the design of drugs that demonstrate greater selectivity between these two G-proteins and therefore produce a more limited range of effects. PMID:16415903

  13. Long-Acting β2-Agonists in Asthma: Enantioselective Safety Studies are Needed.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Glenn A; Raidal, Sharanne; Hostrup, Morten; Calzetta, Luigino; Wood-Baker, Richard; Farber, Mark O; Page, Clive P; Walters, E Haydn

    2018-05-01

    Long-acting β2-agonists (LABAs) such as formoterol and salmeterol are used for prolonged bronchodilatation in asthma, usually in combination with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). Unexplained paradoxical asthma exacerbations and deaths have been associated with LABAs, particularly when used without ICS. LABAs clearly demonstrate effective bronchodilatation and steroid-sparing activity, but long-term treatment can lead to tolerance of their bronchodilator effects. There are also concerns with regard to the effects of LABAs on bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), where long-term use is associated with increased BHR and loss of bronchoprotection. A complicating factor is that formoterol and salmeterol are both chiral compounds, usually administered as 50:50 racemic (rac-) mixtures of two enantiomers. The chiral nature of these compounds has been largely forgotten in the debate regarding LABA safety and effects on BHR, particularly that (S)-enantiomers of β2-agonists may be deleterious to asthma control. LABAs display enantioselective pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Biological plausibility of the deleterious effects of β2-agonists (S)-enantiomers is provided by in vitro and in vivo studies from the short-acting β2-agonist (SABA) salbutamol. Supportive clinical findings include the fact that patients in emergency departments who demonstrate a blunted response to salbutamol are more likely to benefit from (R)-salbutamol than rac-salbutamol, and resistance to salbutamol appears to be a contributory mechanism in rapid asthma deaths. More effort should therefore be applied to investigating potential enantiospecific effects of LABAs on safety, specifically bronchoprotection. Safety studies directly assessing the effects of LABA (S)-enantiomers on BHR are long overdue.

  14. Ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) agonists show potential as interventive agents during aging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roy G; Sun, Yuxiang; Jiang, Hong; Albarran-Zeckler, Rosie; Timchenko, Nikolai

    2007-11-01

    Administration of an orally active agonist (MK-0677) of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a) to elderly subjects restored the amplitude of endogenous episodic growth hormone (GH) release to that of young adults. Functional benefits include increased lean mass and bone density and modest improvements in strength. In old mice, a similar agonist partially restored function to the thymus and reduced tumor cell growth and metastasis. Treatment of old mice with the endogenous GHS-R1a agonist ghrelin restored a young liver phenotype. The mechanism involves inhibition of cyclin D3:cdk4/cdk6 activity and increased protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) activity in liver nuclei, which stabilizes the dephosphorylated form of the transcription factor C/EBPalpha preventing the age-dependent formation of the C/EBPalpha-Rb-E2F4-Brm nuclear complex. By inhibiting formation of this complex, repression of E2F target genes is de-repressed and C/EBPalpha regulated expression of Pepck, a regulator of gluconeogenesis, is normalized, thereby restoring a young liver phenotype. In the brain, aging is associated with decline in dopamine function. We investigated the potential neuromodulatory role of GHS-R1a on dopamine action. Neurons were identified in the hippocampus, cortex, substantia nigra, and ventral tegmental areas that coexpressed GHS-R1a and dopamine receptor subtype-1 (D1R). Cell culture studies showed that, in the presence of ghrelin and dopamine, GHS-R and D1R form heterodimers, which modified G-protein signal transduction resulting in amplification of dopamine signaling. We speculate that aging is associated with deficient endogenous ghrelin signaling that can be rescued by intervention with GHS-R1a agonists to improve quality of life and maintain independence.

  15. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT2C Receptor Agonists for Addictive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2015-07-15

    The neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) has long been associated with the control of a variety of motivated behaviors, including feeding. Much of the evidence linking 5-HT and feeding behavior was obtained from studies of the effects of the 5-HT releaser (dex)fenfluramine in laboratory animals and humans. Recently, the selective 5-HT2C receptor agonist lorcaserin received FDA approval for the treatment of obesity. This review examines evidence to support the use of selective 5-HT2C receptor agonists as treatments for conditions beyond obesity, including substance abuse (particularly nicotine, psychostimulant, and alcohol dependence), obsessive compulsive, and excessive gambling disorder. Following a brief survey of the early literature supporting a role for 5-HT in modulating food and drug reinforcement, we propose that intrinsic differences between SSRI and serotonin releasers may have underestimated the value of serotonin-based pharmacotherapeutics to treat clinical forms of addictive behavior beyond obesity. We then highlight the critical involvement of the 5-HT2C receptor in mediating the effect of (dex)fenfluramine on feeding and body weight gain and the evidence that 5-HT2C receptor agonists reduce measures of drug reward and impulsivity. A recent report of lorcaserin efficacy in a smoking cessation trial further strengthens the idea that 5-HT2C receptor agonists may have potential as a treatment for addiction. This review was prepared as a contribution to the proceedings of the 11th International Society for Serotonin Research Meeting held in Hermanus, South Africa, July 9-12, 2014.

  16. Anti-radiation damage effect of polyethylenimine as a toll-like receptor 5 targeted agonist

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Xing, Yaling; Qian, Yuanyu; Chen, Xiaojuan; Tu, Jian; Ren, Lening; Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhongbin

    2013-01-01

    A number of agents are now available for use in protecting against ionizing radiation. These radiation-protective agents, however, have many adverse effects. Efforts have been made to develop new radiation-protective agents for medical application. Here, we investigated whether a compound, polyethylenimine (PEI), which activates Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5)-mediated NF-kB signaling pathways, could have an anti-radiation effect on a mouse model. First, a cell-based screening model for an agonist of TLR5-mediated NF-kB pathway was established and then validated by activation of TLR5-mediated NF-kB luciferase reporter activity with a known TLR5 agonist, flagellin. We found that PEI induced dose-dependent activation of the TLR5-mediated NF-kB pathway, indicating that PEI is indeed a TLR5 agonist. Furthermore, the anti-radiation effect of polyethylenimine was assessed using a γ-ray total body irradiation (TBI) mouse model. Compared with the irradiation control, both survival time and survival rate were significantly improved in mice that received either a low dose of polyethylenimine (P= 0.019) or a high dose of polyethylenimine (P< 0.001). We also observed a positive correlation between animal body weight and survival time in mice that received a low dose of polyethylenimine, a high dose of polyethylenimine and amifostine, over a period of 30 days, r= 0.42 (P< 0.02), 0.72 (P< 0.0001) and 0.95 (P< 0.0001), respectively, while a negative correlation between animal body weight and survival time was observed in the irradiation control (r= –0.89; P< 0.0001). These results indicate that polyethylenimine is a new TLR5 agonist with potential application in offering protection for patients receiving radiotherapy or in radiation-related accidents. PMID:23104900

  17. Anti-radiation damage effect of polyethylenimine as a toll-like receptor 5 targeted agonist.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Xing, Yaling; Qian, Yuanyu; Chen, Xiaojuan; Tu, Jian; Ren, Lening; Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhongbin

    2013-03-01

    A number of agents are now available for use in protecting against ionizing radiation. These radiation-protective agents, however, have many adverse effects. Efforts have been made to develop new radiation-protective agents for medical application. Here, we investigated whether a compound, polyethylenimine (PEI), which activates Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5)-mediated NF-kB signaling pathways, could have an anti-radiation effect on a mouse model. First, a cell-based screening model for an agonist of TLR5-mediated NF-kB pathway was established and then validated by activation of TLR5-mediated NF-kB luciferase reporter activity with a known TLR5 agonist, flagellin. We found that PEI induced dose-dependent activation of the TLR5-mediated NF-kB pathway, indicating that PEI is indeed a TLR5 agonist. Furthermore, the anti-radiation effect of polyethylenimine was assessed using a γ-ray total body irradiation (TBI) mouse model. Compared with the irradiation control, both survival time and survival rate were significantly improved in mice that received either a low dose of polyethylenimine (P= 0.019) or a high dose of polyethylenimine (P< 0.001). We also observed a positive correlation between animal body weight and survival time in mice that received a low dose of polyethylenimine, a high dose of polyethylenimine and amifostine, over a period of 30 days, r= 0.42 (P< 0.02), 0.72 (P< 0.0001) and 0.95 (P< 0.0001), respectively, while a negative correlation between animal body weight and survival time was observed in the irradiation control (r= -0.89; P< 0.0001). These results indicate that polyethylenimine is a new TLR5 agonist with potential application in offering protection for patients receiving radiotherapy or in radiation-related accidents.

  18. Targeting alpha-7 nicotinic neurotransmission in schizophrenia: A novel agonist strategy

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Stephen I.; Schwartz, Barbara L.; Schooler, Nina R.; Brown, Clayton H.; Rosse, Richard B.; Rosse, Stephanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) agonists may be valuable treatments for negative symptoms and cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Unfortunately, chronic exposure to an agonist may reduce the receptor’s sensitivity. Therefore, we combined CDP-choline, a dietary source of the direct agonist choline, with galantamine, a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, to improve the efficiency of transducing the choline signal and, possibly, preserve the receptor in a sensitive state. We conducted a single-site, double-blind randomized clinical trial comparing galantamine/CDP-choline to placebos in schizophrenia patients with negative symptoms who were receiving second generation antipsychotics. Forty-three subjects received galantamine and CDP-choline or matching placebos for 16 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the 5-item Marder negative-symptoms factor of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Cognition and functioning were also assessed. Trial completion was high; 79%. There was no significant treatment effect on negative symptoms, other PANSS symptom factors, or the MATRICS Cognitive Consensus Battery. There were significant treatment effects in overall functioning and a test of free verbal recall. Three subjects discontinued treatment in the active treatment group for gastro-intestinal adverse events (AE). The most common AE for galantamine/CDP-choline was abdominal pain; for placebo it was headache and sweating. Although there was no significant treatment effect on negative symptoms, the direction of effect mirrored the effects on a cognitive measure and overall functioning. Further study of α7 nAChR agonist/PAMs are warranted in larger studies that will have greater power. PMID:23768813

  19. Muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists: current scenario in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Stuti; Kumar, Ashwini; Tripathi, Timir; Kumar, Awanish

    2018-04-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become the primary cause of dementia. It shows a progressive cognitive dysfunction with degenerating neurons. Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) propagate the cognitive ability and it consists of two primary members namely muscarinic (mAChRs) and nicotinic receptors (nAChRs). Where mAChRs is G-protein coupled receptor, (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels. The conventional therapeutic regimen for AD consists of three acetylcholinestearse inhibitors while a single NMDA receptor antagonist. Researchers around the globe are developing new and modifying the existing AChRs agonists to develop lead candidates with lower risk to benefit ratio where benefits clearly outweigh the adverse events. We have searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Google scholar, Science Direct and, Web of Science with keywords "Muscarinic/Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, agonists and, AD". The literature search included articles written in English. Scientific relevance for clinical studies, basic science studies is eligibility criteria for articles referred in this paper. M1 is the primary muscarinic subtype while α7 is the primary nAChR subtype that is responsible for cognition and memory and these two have been the major recent experimental targets for mAChR agonist strategy. The last cholinergic receptor agonist to enter phase 3 trial was EVP-6124 (Enceniclin) but was withdrawn due to severe gastrointestinal adverse effects. We aim to present an overview of the efforts and achievements in targeting Muscarinic and Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the current review for development of better AD therapeutics. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  20. Evaluation and Synthesis of Polar Aryl- and Heteroaryl Spiroazetidine-Piperidine Acetamides as Ghrelin Inverse Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several polar heteroaromatic acetic acids and their piperidine amides were synthesized and evaluated as ghrelin or type 1a growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a) inverse agonists. Efforts to improve pharmacokinetic and safety profile was achieved by modulating physicochemical properties and, more specifically, emphasizing increased polarity of our chemical series. ortho-Carboxamide containi