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Sample records for a1 heterogeneous nuclear

  1. The A1 and A1B proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticles modulate 5' splice site selection in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X; Bani, M R; Lu, S J; Rowan, S; Ben-David, Y; Chabot, B

    1994-01-01

    Recent in vitro results suggest that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticle (hnRNP) A1 protein modulates alternative splicing by favoring distal 5' splice site (5'SS) selection and exon skipping. We used a mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cell line (CB3C7) deficient in the expression of hnRNP A1 to test whether variations in hnRNP A1 and AlB protein levels affected alternative splicing in vivo. In contrast to A1-expressing MEL cell lines, CB3C7 cells preferentially selected the proximal 13S and 12S 5'SS on the adenovirus E1A pre-mRNA. Transiently expressing the A1 or A1B cDNA in CB3C7 cells shifted 5'SS selection toward the more distal 9S donor site. A1 protein synthesis was required for this effect since the expression of a mutated A1 cDNA did not affect 5'SS selection. These results demonstrate that in vivo variations in hnRNP A1 protein levels can influence 5'SS selection. Images PMID:8041722

  2. Muscle developmental defects in heterogeneous nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Chia; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Lee, Chien-Chin; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is crucial for regulating alternative splicing. Its integrated function within an organism has not, however, been identified. We generated hnRNP A1 knockout mice to study the role of hnRNP A1 in vivo. The knockout mice, hnRNP A1−/−, showed embryonic lethality because of muscle developmental defects. The blood pressure and heart rate of the heterozygous mice were higher than those of the wild-type mice, indicating heart function defects. We performed mouse exon arrays to study the muscle development mechanism. The processes regulated by hnRNP A1 included cell adhesion and muscle contraction. The expression levels of muscle development-related genes in hnRNP A1+/− mice were significantly different from those in wild-type mice, as detected using qRT-PCR. We further confirmed the alternative splicing patterns of muscle development-related genes including mef2c, lrrfip1, usp28 and abcc9. Alternative mRNA isoforms of these genes were increased in hnRNP A1+/− mice compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, we revealed that the functionally similar hnRNP A2/B1 did not compensate for the expression of hnRNP A1 in organisms. In summary, our study demonstrated that hnRNP A1 plays a critical and irreplaceable role in embryonic muscle development by regulating the expression and alternative splicing of muscle-related genes. PMID:28077597

  3. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 regulates rhythmic synthesis of mouse Nfil3 protein via IRES-mediated translation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Seo, Ji-Young; Ryu, Hye Guk; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2017-02-21

    Nuclear factor, interleukin 3, regulated (Nfil3, also known as E4 Promoter-Binding Protein 4 (E4BP4)) protein is a transcription factor that binds to DNA and generally represses target gene expression. In the circadian clock system, Nfil3 binds to a D-box element residing in the promoter of clock genes and contributes to their robust oscillation. Here, we show that the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of Nfil3 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and that IRES-mediated translation occurs in a phase-dependent manner. We demonstrate that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) binds to a specific region of Nfil3 mRNA and regulates IRES-mediated translation. Knockdown of hnRNP A1 almost completely abolishes protein oscillation without affecting mRNA oscillation. Moreover, we observe that intracellular calcium levels, which are closely related to bone formation, depend on Nfil3 levels in osteoblast cell lines. We suggest that the 5'-UTR mediated cap-independent translation of Nfil3 mRNA contributes to the rhythmic expression of Nfil3 by interacting with the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1. These data provide new evidence that the posttranscriptional regulation of clock gene expression is important during bone metabolism.

  4. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 regulates rhythmic synthesis of mouse Nfil3 protein via IRES-mediated translation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Rim; Seo, Ji-Young; Ryu, Hye Guk; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear factor, interleukin 3, regulated (Nfil3, also known as E4 Promoter-Binding Protein 4 (E4BP4)) protein is a transcription factor that binds to DNA and generally represses target gene expression. In the circadian clock system, Nfil3 binds to a D-box element residing in the promoter of clock genes and contributes to their robust oscillation. Here, we show that the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of Nfil3 mRNA contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and that IRES-mediated translation occurs in a phase-dependent manner. We demonstrate that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) binds to a specific region of Nfil3 mRNA and regulates IRES-mediated translation. Knockdown of hnRNP A1 almost completely abolishes protein oscillation without affecting mRNA oscillation. Moreover, we observe that intracellular calcium levels, which are closely related to bone formation, depend on Nfil3 levels in osteoblast cell lines. We suggest that the 5′-UTR mediated cap-independent translation of Nfil3 mRNA contributes to the rhythmic expression of Nfil3 by interacting with the RNA binding protein hnRNP A1. These data provide new evidence that the posttranscriptional regulation of clock gene expression is important during bone metabolism. PMID:28220845

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Induces the Cytoplasmic Retention of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 by Disrupting Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Monette, Anne; Ajamian, Lara; López-Lastra, Marcelo; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-opts host proteins and cellular machineries to its advantage at every step of the replication cycle. Here we show that HIV-1 enhances heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 expression and promotes the relocalization of hnRNP A1 to the cytoplasm. The latter was dependent on the nuclear export of the unspliced viral genomic RNA (vRNA) and to alterations in the abundance and localization of the FG-repeat nuclear pore glycoprotein p62. hnRNP A1 and vRNA remain colocalized in the cytoplasm supporting a post-nuclear function during the late stages of HIV-1 replication. Consistently, we show that hnRNP A1 acts as an internal ribosomal entry site trans-acting factor up-regulating internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation initiation of the HIV-1 vRNA. The up-regulation and cytoplasmic retention of hnRNP A1 by HIV-1 would ensure abundant expression of viral structural proteins in cells infected with HIV-1. PMID:19737937

  6. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 in health and neurodegenerative disease: from structural insights to post-transcriptional regulatory roles.

    PubMed

    Bekenstein, Uriya; Soreq, Hermona

    2013-09-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are a family of conserved nuclear proteins that associate with nascent RNA polymerase II transcripts to yield hnRNP particles, playing key roles in mRNA metabolism, DNA-related functions and microRNA biogenesis. HnRNPs accompany transcripts from stages of transcriptional regulation through splicing and post-transcriptional regulation, and are believed to affect the majority of expressed genes in mammals. Most hnRNP mRNA transcripts undergo alternative splicing and post-translational modifications, to yield a remarkable diversity of proteins with numerous functional elements that work in concert in their multiple functions. Therefore, mis-regulation of hnRNPs leads to different maladies. Here, we focus on the role of one of the best-known members of this protein family, hnRNP A1 in RNA metabolism, and address recent works that note its multileveled involvement in several neurodegenerative disorders. Initially discovered as a DNA binding protein, hnRNP A1 includes two RNA recognition motifs, and post-translational modifications of these and other regions in this multifunctional protein alter both its nuclear pore shuttling properties and its RNA interactions and affect transcription, mRNA splicing and microRNA biogenesis. HnRNP A1 plays several key roles in neuronal functioning and its depletion, either due to debilitated cholinergic neurotransmission or under autoimmune reactions causes drastic changes in RNA metabolism. Consequently, hnRNP A1 decline contributes to the severity of symptoms in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) and HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). At the translational level, these properties of hnRNP A1 led to massive research efforts aimed at developing RNA

  7. Modulation of exon skipping and inclusion by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 and pre-mRNA splicing factor SF2/ASF.

    PubMed Central

    Mayeda, A; Helfman, D M; Krainer, A R

    1993-01-01

    The essential splicing factor SF2/ASF and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) modulate alternative splicing in vitro of pre-mRNAs that contain 5' splice sites of comparable strengths competing for a common 3' splice site. Using natural and model pre-mRNAs, we have examined whether the ratio of SF2/ASF to hnRNP A1 also regulates other modes of alternative splicing in vitro. We found that an excess of SF2/ASF effectively prevents inappropriate exon skipping and also influences the selection of mutually exclusive tissue-specific exons in natural beta-tropomyosin pre-mRNA. In contrast, an excess of hnRNP A1 does not cause inappropriate exon skipping in natural constitutively or alternatively spliced pre-mRNAs. Although hnRNP A1 can promote alternative exon skipping, this effect is not universal and is dependent, e.g., on the size of the internal alternative exon and on the strength of the polypyrimidine tract in the preceding intron. With appropriate alternative exons, an excess of SF2/ASF promotes exon inclusion, whereas an excess of hnRNP A1 causes exon skipping. We propose that in some cases the ratio of SF2/ASF to hnRNP A1 may play a role in regulating alternative splicing by exon inclusion or skipping through the antagonistic effects of these proteins on alternative splice site selection. Images PMID:8474457

  8. The human telomerase RNA component, hTR, activates the DNA-dependent protein kinase to phosphorylate heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1.

    PubMed

    Ting, Nicholas S Y; Pohorelic, Brant; Yu, Yaping; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Beattie, Tara L

    2009-10-01

    Telomere integrity in human cells is maintained by the dynamic interplay between telomerase, telomere associated proteins, and DNA repair proteins. These interactions are vital to suppress DNA damage responses and unfavorable changes in chromosome dynamics. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is critical for this process. Cells deficient for functional DNA-PKcs show increased rates of telomere loss, accompanied by chromosomal fusions and translocations. Treatment of cells with specific DNA-PK kinase inhibitors leads to similar phenotypes. These observations indicate that the kinase activity of DNA-PK is required for its function at telomeres possibly through phosphorylation of essential proteins needed for telomere length maintenance. Here we show that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a direct substrate for DNA-PK in vitro. Phosphorylation of hnRNP A1 is stimulated not only by the presence of DNA but also by the telomerase RNA component, hTR. Furthermore, we show that hnRNP A1 is phosphorylated in vivo in a DNA-PK-dependent manner and that this phosphorylation is greatly reduced in cell lines which lack hTR. These data are the first to report that hTR stimulates the kinase activity of DNA-PK toward a known telomere-associated protein, and may provide further insights into the function of DNA-PK at telomeres.

  9. Solution Structure of the HIV-1 Intron Splicing Silencer and Its Interactions with the UP1 Domain of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1*

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Niyati; Morgan, Christopher E.; Rife, Brittany D.; Salemi, Marco; Tolbert, Blanton S.

    2016-01-01

    Splicing patterns in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are maintained through cis regulatory elements that recruit antagonistic host RNA-binding proteins. The activity of the 3′ acceptor site A7 is tightly regulated through a complex network of an intronic splicing silencer (ISS), a bipartite exonic splicing silencer (ESS3a/b), and an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE3). Because HIV-1 splicing depends on protein-RNA interactions, it is important to know the tertiary structures surrounding the splice sites. Herein, we present the NMR solution structure of the phylogenetically conserved ISS stem loop. ISS adopts a stable structure consisting of conserved UG wobble pairs, a folded 2X2 (GU/UA) internal loop, a UU bulge, and a flexible AGUGA apical loop. Calorimetric and biochemical titrations indicate that the UP1 domain of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 binds the ISS apical loop site-specifically and with nanomolar affinity. Collectively, this work provides additional insights into how HIV-1 uses a conserved RNA structure to commandeer a host RNA-binding protein. PMID:26607354

  10. Solution Structure of the HIV-1 Intron Splicing Silencer and Its Interactions with the UP1 Domain of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1.

    PubMed

    Jain, Niyati; Morgan, Christopher E; Rife, Brittany D; Salemi, Marco; Tolbert, Blanton S

    2016-01-29

    Splicing patterns in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are maintained through cis regulatory elements that recruit antagonistic host RNA-binding proteins. The activity of the 3' acceptor site A7 is tightly regulated through a complex network of an intronic splicing silencer (ISS), a bipartite exonic splicing silencer (ESS3a/b), and an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE3). Because HIV-1 splicing depends on protein-RNA interactions, it is important to know the tertiary structures surrounding the splice sites. Herein, we present the NMR solution structure of the phylogenetically conserved ISS stem loop. ISS adopts a stable structure consisting of conserved UG wobble pairs, a folded 2X2 (GU/UA) internal loop, a UU bulge, and a flexible AGUGA apical loop. Calorimetric and biochemical titrations indicate that the UP1 domain of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 binds the ISS apical loop site-specifically and with nanomolar affinity. Collectively, this work provides additional insights into how HIV-1 uses a conserved RNA structure to commandeer a host RNA-binding protein.

  11. Chemical proteomics identifies heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 as the molecular target of quercetin in its anti-cancer effects in PC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chia-Chen; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chen, Chih-Ta; Liu, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Fong-Chi; Hsu, Kai-Chao; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2014-08-08

    Quercetin, a flavonoid abundantly present in plants, is widely used as a phytotherapy in prostatitis and prostate cancer. Although quercetin has been reported to have a number of therapeutic effects, the cellular target(s) responsible for its anti-cancer action has not yet been clearly elucidated. Here, employing affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1) as a direct target of quercetin. A specific interaction between quercetin and hnRNPA1 was validated by immunoblotting and in vitro binding experiments. We found that quercetin bound the C-terminal region of hnRNPA1, impairing the ability of hnRNPA1 to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and ultimately resulting in its cytoplasmic retention. In addition, hnRNPA1 was recruited to stress granules after treatment of cells with quercetin for up to 48 h, and the levels of cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis), an internal ribosome entry site translation-dependent protein, were reduced by hnRNPA1 regulation. This is the first report that anti-cancer effects of quercetin are mediated, in part, by impairing functions of hnRNPA1, insights that were obtained using a chemical proteomics strategy.

  12. p38 MAP kinase-dependent regulation of the expression level and subcellular distribution of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 and its involvement in cellular senescence in normal human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Naoko; Rios, Ileana; Moran, Heriberto; Sayers, Brendan; Hubbard, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a RNA binding protein that plays important role in the biogenesis of mRNA, such as alternative splicing and mRNA stability. We have previously demonstrated that hnRNP A1 has diminished protein levels and shows cytoplasmic accumulation in senescent human diploid fibroblasts. Recent reports showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK), a member of the MAP kinase family is necessary and sufficient for the cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 by stress stimuli such as osmotic shock. p38 MAP kinase has been shown to be involved in cell proliferation and the induction of senescence in response to extracellular stimuli. However, the relationship between hnRNP A1 and p38 MAPK and the roles of hnRNP A1 in cellular senescence have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that hnRNP A1 forms a complex with phospho-p38 MAPK in vivo. Inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580 elevated hnRNP A1 protein levels and prohibited the cytoplasmic accumulation of the protein, but not hnRNP A2, in senescent cells. The phosphorylation level of hnRNP A1 was elevated in senescent cells. Reduction of hnRNP A1 and A2 levels by siRNA transfection induced a senescence-like morphology and elevated the level of F-actin, a marker of senescence. These results suggest that the expression levels and subcellular distribution of hnRNP A1 are regulated in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner, probably via its phosphorylation. Our results also suggest that hnRNP A2 in addition to hnRNP A1 may play a role in establishing the senescence phenotype. PMID:19430204

  13. HIGH TEMPERATURE, HIGH POWER HETEROGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; Wykoff, W.R.; Busey, H.M.

    1960-06-14

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor is designed comprising a stationary housing and a rotatable annular core being supported for rotation about a vertical axis in the housing, the core containing a plurality of radial fuel- element supporting channels, the cylindrical empty space along the axis of the core providing a central plenum for the disposal of spent fuel elements, the core cross section outer periphery being vertically gradated in radius one end from the other to provide a coolant duct between the core and the housing, and means for inserting fresh fuel elements in the supporting channels under pressure and while the reactor is in operation.

  14. Mechanistic Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (CEACAM1) Splice Isoforms by the Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonuclear Proteins hnRNP L, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP M*

    PubMed Central

    Dery, Kenneth J.; Gaur, Shikha; Gencheva, Marieta; Yen, Yun; Shively, John E.; Gaur, Rajesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1) is expressed in a variety of cell types and is implicated in carcinogenesis. Alternative splicing of CEACAM1 pre-mRNA generates two cytoplasmic domain splice variants characterized by the inclusion (L-isoform) or exclusion (S-isoform) of exon 7. Here we show that the alternative splicing of CEACAM1 pre-mRNA is regulated by novel cis elements residing in exon 7. We report the presence of three exon regulatory elements that lead to the inclusion or exclusion of exon 7 CEACAM1 mRNA in ZR75 breast cancer cells. Heterologous splicing reporter assays demonstrated that the maintenance of authentic alternative splicing mechanisms were independent of the CEACAM1 intron sequence context. We show that forced expression of these exon regulatory elements could alter CEACAM1 splicing in HEK-293 cells. Using RNA affinity chromatography, three members of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family (hnRNP L, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP M) were identified. RNA immunoprecipitation of hnRNP L and hnRNP A1 revealed a binding motif located central and 3′ to exon 7, respectively. Depletion of hnRNP A1 or L by RNAi in HEK-293 cells promoted exon 7 inclusion, whereas overexpression led to exclusion of the variable exon. By contrast, overexpression of hnRNP M showed exon 7 inclusion and production of CEACAM1-L mRNA. Finally, stress-induced cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in MDA-MB-468 cells dynamically alters the CEACAM1-S:CEACAM1:L ratio in favor of the l-isoform. Thus, we have elucidated the molecular factors that control the mechanism of splice-site recognition in the alternative splicing regulation of CEACAM1. PMID:21398516

  15. Serine/Arginine-Rich Splicing Factor 3 and Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 Regulate Alternative RNA Splicing and Gene Expression of Human Papillomavirus 18 through Two Functionally Distinguishable cis Elements

    PubMed Central

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Tang, Shuang; Doorbar, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) is the second most common oncogenic HPV type associated with cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancers. Like other oncogenic HPVs, HPV18 encodes two major (one early and one late) polycistronic pre-mRNAs that are regulated by alternative RNA splicing to produce a repertoire of viral transcripts for the expression of individual viral genes. However, RNA cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors contributing to HPV18 alternative RNA splicing remain unknown. In this study, an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) in the nucleotide (nt) 3520 to 3550 region in the HPV18 genome was identified and characterized for promotion of HPV18 929^3434 splicing and E1^E4 production through interaction with SRSF3, a host oncogenic splicing factor differentially expressed in epithelial cells and keratinocytes. Introduction of point mutations in the SRSF3-binding site or knockdown of SRSF3 expression in cells reduces 929^3434 splicing and E1^E4 production but activates other, minor 929^3465 and 929^3506 splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 expression also enhances the expression of E2 and L1 mRNAs. An exonic splicing silencer (ESS) in the HPV18 nt 612 to 639 region was identified as being inhibitory to the 233^416 splicing of HPV18 E6E7 pre-mRNAs via binding to hnRNP A1, a well-characterized, abundantly and ubiquitously expressed RNA-binding protein. Introduction of point mutations into the hnRNP A1-binding site or knockdown of hnRNP A1 expression promoted 233^416 splicing and reduced E6 expression. These data provide the first evidence that the alternative RNA splicing of HPV18 pre-mRNAs is subject to regulation by viral RNA cis elements and host trans-acting splicing factors. IMPORTANCE Expression of HPV18 genes is regulated by alternative RNA splicing of viral polycistronic pre-mRNAs to produce a repertoire of viral early and late transcripts. RNA cis elements and trans-acting factors contributing to HPV18 alternative RNA splicing have been

  16. Saw palmetto extract induces nuclear heterogeneity in mice.

    PubMed

    Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Francis, Bettina M; Rayburn, A Lane

    2009-01-01

    Saw palmetto (SW), a phytotherapeutic compound used in the treatment of prostate disease, was examined for potential nuclear effects. SW extract was incorporated into a complete casein-based semisynthetic rodent chow at 0%, 0.1% and 1% SW. SW was fed to mice for 6 weeks, after which the mice received a single i/p injection of either the known genotoxic agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in saline or just saline. Forty-eight hours after injection, blood and bone marrow were collected for flow cytometric analysis. A significant effect of MMS was observed in both male and female mice with respect to: an increase in nuclear heterogeneity in bone marrow cells as measured by the coefficient of variation of the G1 peak in a flow histogram (6.32 versus 4.8 in male mice, 7.0 versus 4.9 in female mice) and an increase in the number of micronucleated blood cells (3.4% versus 0.56% male mice, 3.1% versus 0.6 in female mice) indicating a positive genotoxic response. SW also appears to increase the heterogeneity of bone marrow nuclei in a dose dependent manner (0-5.1%, 0.1-5.5% and 1-5.7% in male mice, 0-5.7%, 0.1-6.0% and 1-6.2% in female mice) without a concomitant increase in blood cell micronuclei. These results indicate that SW is not genotoxic with respect to physical DNA damage and that the changes observed in the bone marrow are due to chromatin conformation modifications in the nuclei of in vivo treated mouse cells.

  17. A nuclear localization domain in the hnRNP A1 protein

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear RNP (hnRNP) A1 protein is one of the major pre-mRNA/mRNA binding proteins in eukaryotic cells and one of the most abundant proteins in the nucleus. It is localized to the nucleoplasm and it also shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The amino acid sequence of A1 contains two RNP motif RNA-binding domains (RBDs) at the amino terminus and a glycine-rich domain at the carboxyl terminus. This configuration, designated 2x RBD-Gly, is representative of perhaps the largest family of hnRNP proteins. Unlike most nuclear proteins characterized so far, A1 (and most 2x RBD-Gly proteins) does not contain a recognizable nuclear localization signal (NLS). We have found that a segment of ca. 40 amino acids near the carboxyl end of the protein (designated M9) is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization; attaching this segment to the bacterial protein beta- galactosidase or to pyruvate kinase completely localized these otherwise cytoplasmic proteins to the nucleus. The RBDs and another RNA binding motif found in the glycine-rich domain, the RGG box, are not required for A1 nuclear localization. M9 is a novel type of nuclear localization domain as it does not contain sequences similar to classical basic-type NLS. Interestingly, sequences similar to M9 are found in other nuclear RNA-binding proteins including hnRNP A2. PMID:7730395

  18. Heterogeneous Nuclear Reactor Models for Optimal Xenon Control.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Ishtiaq Ahmad

    Nuclear reactors are generally modeled as homogeneous mixtures of fuel, control, and other materials while in reality they are heterogeneous-homogeneous configurations comprised of fuel and control rods along with other materials. Similarly, for space-time studies of a nuclear reactor, homogeneous, usually one-group diffusion theory, models are used, and the system equations are solved by either nodal or modal expansion approximations. Study of xenon-induced problems has also been carried out using similar models and with the help of dynamic programming or classical calculus of variations or the minimum principle. In this study a thermal nuclear reactor is modeled as a two-dimensional lattice of fuel and control rods placed in an infinite-moderator in plane geometry. The two-group diffusion theory approximation is used for neutron transport. Space -time neutron balance equations are written for two groups and reduced to one space-time algebraic equation by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. This equation is written at all fuel and control rod locations. Iodine -xenon and promethium-samarium dynamic equations are also written at fuel rod locations only. These equations are then linearized about an equilibrium point which is determined from the steady-state form of the original nonlinear system equations. After studying poisonless criticality, with and without control, and the stability of the open-loop system and after checking its controllability, a performance criterion is defined for the xenon-induced spatial flux oscillation problem in the form of a functional to be minimized. Linear -quadratic optimal control theory is then applied to solve the problem. To perform a variety of different additional useful studies, this formulation has potential for various extensions and variations; for example, different geometry of the problem, with possible extension to three dimensions, heterogeneous -homogeneous formulation to include, for example, homogeneously

  19. Heterokaryotic nuclear conditions and a heterogeneous nuclear population are observed by flow cytometry in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Catal, Mursel; King, Louis; Tumbalam, Pavani; Wiriyajitsomboon, Prissana; Kirk, William W; Adams, Gerard C

    2010-08-01

    A simple and reliable method for preparation of whole nuclei of a common oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, is described for laser flow cytometry. The ease of preparation, the absence of detectable debris and aggregates, and the precision in determinations of DNA content per nucleus improve interpretation and understanding of the genetics of the organism. Phytophthora infestans is the pathogen that causes potato and tomato late blight. The genetic flexibility of P. infestans and other oomycete pathogens has complicated understanding of the mechanisms of variation contributing to shifts in race structure and virulence profiles on important agricultural crops. Significant phenotypic and genotypic changes are being reported in the apparent absence of sexual recombination in the field. Laser flow cytometry with propidium iodide is useful in investigating the nuclear condition of the somatic colony of field strains of P. infestans. The majority of the studied strains contain a single population of nuclei in nonreplicated diplophase. However, mean DNA content per nucleus varies considerably among isolates confirming the heterogeneity of the nuclear population in regard to C-value, for field isolates. Nuclear DNA content varies from 1.75x to 0.75x that of nuclei in a standard strain from central Mexico. Some strains contain two to three populations of nuclei with differing DNA contents in the mycelium and are heterokaryons. Such a range in DNA content suggests DNA-aneuploidy, but direct confirmation of aneuploidy will require microscopy of chromosomes. Heterokaryosis and populations of nuclei of differing DNA content necessarily confound standardized assays used worldwide in crop breeding programs for determination of race profiles and virulence phenotypes of this important pathogen.

  20. Quantitative tumor heterogeneity assessment on a nuclear population basis.

    PubMed

    Wessel Lindberg, Anne-Sofie; Conradsen, Knut; Larsen, Rasmus; Friis Lippert, Michael; Røge, Rasmus; Vyberg, Mogens

    2017-01-31

    Immunohistochemistry Ki-67 stain is widely used for visualizing cell proliferation. The common method for scoring the proliferation is to manually select and score a hot spot. This method is time-consuming and will often not give reproducible results due to subjective selection of the hotspots and subjective scoring. An automatic hotspot detection and proliferative index scoring would be time-saving, make the determination of the Ki-67 score easier and minimize the uncertainty of the score by introducing a more objective and standardized score. Tissue Micro Array cores stained for Ki-67 and their neighbor slide stained for Pan Cytokeratin were aligned and Ki-67 positive and negative nuclei were identified inside tumor regions. A heatmap was calculated based on these and illustrates the distribution of the heterogenous response of Ki-67 positive nuclei in the tumor tissue. An automatic hot spot detection was developed and the Ki-67 score was calculated. All scores were compared with scores provided by a pathologist using linear regression models. No significant difference was found between the Ki-67 scores guided by the developed heatmap and the scores provided by a pathologist. For comparison, scores were also calculated at a random place outside the hot spot and these scores were found to be significantly different from the pathologist scores. A heatmap visualizing the heterogeneity in tumor tissue expressed by Ki-67 was developed and used for an automatic identification of hot spots in which a Ki-67 score was calculated. The Ki-67 scores did not differ significantly from scores provided by a pathologist. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  1. Nuclear estrogen receptor molecular heterogeneity in the mouse uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, T.S.; Korach, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Holomeric estrogen receptor (ER) prepared from ovariectomized mouse uteri displays heterogeneous electrophoretic mobility when analyzed by NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. ER derived from nuclei (ER/sub n/) appears as a closely spaced doublet having apparent molecular masses of 66.4 and 65 kDa, while ER from the cytosolic compartment (ER/sub c/) has a single band of 65 kDa. Both partially purified ER/sub c/ and the 8S form of unactivated ER/sub c/ show only the 65-kDa band. The appearance of the ER/sub n/ doublet is hormonally inducible, and the relative proportions of the two doublet bands are influenced by the type of hormone treatment, with weakly estrogenic compounds yielding the lower band as predominant while potent estrogens increase the proportion of the upper band. Steroid binding of the ER/sub n/ doublet was determined by (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine affinity labeling of both the 66.4- and the 65-kDa peptides; binding to the 65-kDa peptide was predominant. The ER/sub n/ doublet displays a time dependency after estrogen administration with maximal amounts occurring in a bimodal fashion at 1 and 8 hr.

  2. Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in the amphibian germinal vesicle: loops, spheres, and snurposomes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of snRNPs in the germinal vesicle (GV) of frogs and salamanders by immunofluorescent staining and in situ nucleic acid hybridization. The major snRNAs involved in pre-mRNA splicing (U1, U2, U4, U5, and U6) occur together in nearly all loops of the lampbrush chromosomes, and in hundreds to thousands of small granules (1-4 microns diameter) suspended in the nucleoplasm. The loops and granules also contain several antigens that are regularly associated with snRNAs or spliceosomes (the Sm antigen, U1- and U2- specific antigens, and the splicing factor SC35). A second type of granule, often distinguishable by morphology, contains only U1 snRNA and associated antigens. We propose the term "snurposome" to describe the granules that contain snRNPs ("snurps"). Those that contain only U1 snRNA are A snurposomes, whereas those that contain all the splicing snRNAs are B snurposomes. GVs contain a third type of snRNP granule, which we call the C snurposome. C snurposomes range in size from less than 1 micron to giant structures greater than 20 microns in diameter. Usually, although not invariably, they have B snurposomes on their surface. They may also contain from one to hundreds of inclusions. Because of their remarkably spherical shape, C snurposomes with their associated B snurposomes have long been referred to as spheres or sphere organelles. Most spheres are free in the nucleoplasm, but a few are attached to chromosomes at specific chromosome loci, the sphere organizers (SOs). The relationship of sphere organelles to other snRNP- containing structures in the GV is obscure. We show by immunofluorescent staining that the lampbrush loops and B snurposomes also react with antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Transcription units on the loops are uniformly stained by anti-hnRNP and anti-snRNP antibodies, suggesting that nascent transcripts are associated with hnRNPs and snRNPs along their entire length, perhaps

  3. Heat transfer analysis of fuel assemblies in a heterogeneous gas core nuclear rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Appelbaum, Jacob; Diaz, Nils; Maya, Isaac

    1991-01-01

    Heat transfer problems of a heterogeneous gaseous core nuclear rocket were studied. The reactor core consists of 1.5-m long hexagonal fuel assemblies filled with pressurized uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) gas. The fuel gas temperature ranges from 3500 to 7000 K at a nominal operating condition of 40 atm. Each fuel assembly has seven coolant tubes, through which hydrogen propellant flows. The propellant temperature is not constrained by the fuel temperature but by the maximum temperature of the graphite coolant tube. For a core achieving a fission power density of 1000 MW/cu m, the propellant core exit temperature can be as high as 3200 K. The physical size of a 1250 MW gaseous core nuclear rocket is comparable with that of a NERVA-type solid core nuclear rocket. The engine can deliver a specific impulse of 1020 seconds and a thrust of 330 kN.

  4. Recognition of subsets of the mammalian A/B-type core heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptides by novel autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Dangli, A; Plomaritoglou, A; Boutou, E; Vassiliadou, N; Moutsopoulos, H M; Guialis, A

    1996-01-01

    The structurally related A/B-type core heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) polypeptides of 34-39 kDa (A1, A2, B1 and B2) belong to a family of RNA-binding proteins that are major components of 40 S hnRNP complexes. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mapping analysis we compared each member of the A/B-type core proteins in the human and rat liver cells. This comparison revealed the unique presence in rat cells of major protein species, referred to as mBx polypeptides, that appeared as three charge isoforms at a position corresponding to the minor HeLa B1b protein spot. In addition, clear differences in the ratios of the A1 polypeptide to the A1b isoform were observed. The detection, in sera of patients with rheumatic autoimmune diseases, of two novel autoantibody specificities, one recognizing solely B2 protein and the second both the B2 and mBx polypeptides, helped to identify mBx proteins as new A/B-type hnRNP components, immunologically related to B2 protein. A common immunoreactive V8 protease peptide of approx. 17 kDa has been identified in B2 and mBx hnRNP polypeptides. mBx protein species are identified in cells of murine origin, and have a ubiquitous tissue distribution and developmental appearance. PMID:9003360

  5. N-methylation of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rieker, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Several of the core proteins on the 40S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (hnRNP) from HeLa cells contain N/sup G/,N/sup G/-dimethyl-L-arginine (uDMA). 3-deazaadenosine (c/sup 3/Ado), an inhibitor of and substrate for s-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, has been used to study the methylation patterns of the individual polypeptides. Trimethyllysine and uDMA formation in total cellular protein were inhibited in the presence of the drug while other methylated basic amino acids were unaffected. This inhibition was reversed within 60 min after removal of the drug from the medium. Monolayer HeLa cultures were incubated with (methyl-/sup 3/H)-L-methoinine for 12 hours in the presence of 50 uM c/sup 3/Ado. Purified particles were obtained by centrifugation of nuclear extracts on sucrose density gradients. The core proteins were isolated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, acid hydrolyzed and analyzed for radioactivity incorporated into methionine and methylated basic amino acids. The ratio of radioactivity incorporated into uDMA relative to that into methionine for the two major particle proteins with molecular weights of 31,000 (A/sub 1/) and 43,000 (A/sub 2/) was about 2.0 and 0.2 in control cultures. In the presence of c/sup 3/Ado, these ratios were depressed 60 to 80%. Results of pulse-chase experiments suggested that A/sub 1/ and A/sub 2/ are metabolically stable proteins (t/sub 0.5/ > 75 hr), whether or not the proteins were undermethylated. Monomethyl-L-arginine may be a precursor in the formation of u-DMA.

  6. Phosphorylation of rat liver heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2 and C can be modulated by calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Bosser, R; Faura, M; Serratosa, J; Renau-Piqueras, J; Pruschy, M; Bachs, O

    1995-01-01

    It was previously reported that the phosphorylation of three proteins of 36, 40 to 42, and 50 kDa by casein kinase 2 is inhibited by calmodulin in nuclear extracts from rat liver cells (R. Bosser, R. Aligué, D. Guerini, N. Agell, E. Carafoli, and O. Bachs, J. Biol. Chem. 268:15477-15483, 1993). By immunoblotting, peptide mapping, and endogenous phosphorylation experiments, the 36- and 40- to 42-kDa proteins have been identified as the A2 and C proteins, respectively, of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. To better understand the mechanism by which calmodulin inhibits the phosphorylation of these proteins, they were purified by using single-stranded DNA chromatography, and the effect of calmodulin on their phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 was analyzed. Results revealed that whereas calmodulin inhibited the phosphorylation of purified A2 and C proteins in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, it did not affect the casein kinase 2 phosphorylation of a different protein substrate, i.e., beta-casein. These results indicate that the effect of calmodulin was not on casein kinase 2 activity but on specific protein substrates. The finding that the A2 and C proteins can bind to a calmodulin-Sepharose column in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner suggests that this association could prevent the phosphorylation of the proteins by casein kinase 2. Immunoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that such interactions could also occur in vivo, since calmodulin and A2 and C proteins colocalize on the ribonucleoprotein particles in rat liver cell nuclei. PMID:7823935

  7. Insulin Inhibits Nrf2 Gene Expression via Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein F/K in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anindya; Abdo, Shaaban; Zhao, Shuiling; Wu, Chin-Han; Shi, Yixuan; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Chenier, Isabelle; Alquier, Thierry; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2017-01-23

    Oxidative stress induces endogenous antioxidants via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), potentially preventing tissue injury. We investigated whether insulin affects renal Nrf2 expression in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and studied its underlying mechanism. Insulin normalized hyperglycemia, hypertension, oxidative stress and renal injury, inhibited renal Nrf2 and angiotensinogen (Agt) gene expression and up-regulated heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP F) and hnRNP K expression in Akita mice with T1D. In immortalized rat renal proximal tubular cells, insulin suppressed Nrf2 and Agt but stimulated hnRNP F and hnRNP K gene transcription in high glucose via p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling. Transfection with small interfering RNAs of p44/42 MAPK, hnRNP F or hnRNP K blocked insulin inhibition of Nrf2 gene transcription. Insulin curbed Nrf2 promoter activity via a specific DNA-responsive element that binds hnRNP F/K, and hnRNP F/K overexpression curtailed Nrf2 promoter activity. In hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic mice, renal Nrf2 and Agt expression was down-regulated, whereas hnRNP F/K expression was up-regulated. Thus, the beneficial actions of insulin in diabetic nephropathy appear to be mediated, in part, by suppressing renal Nrf2 and Agt gene transcription and preventing Nrf2 stimulation of Agt expression via hnRNP F/K. These findings identify hnRNP F/K and Nrf2 as potential therapeutic targets in diabetes.

  8. An association between RBMX, a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, and ARTS-1 regulates extracellular TNFR1 release

    SciTech Connect

    Adamik, Barbara; Islam, Aminul; Rouhani, Farshid N.; Hawari, Feras I.; Zhang Jing; Levine, Stewart J.

    2008-07-04

    The type I, 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR1) is released to the extracellular space by two mechanisms, the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains. Both pathways appear to be regulated by an interaction between TNFR1 and ARTS-1 (aminopeptidase regulator of TNFR1 shedding). Here, we sought to identify ARTS-1-interacting proteins that modulate TNFR1 release. Co-immunoprecipitation identified an association between ARTS-1 and RBMX (RNA-binding motif gene, X chromosome), a 43-kDa heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein. RNA interference attenuated RBMX expression, which reduced both the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the IL-1{beta}-mediated inducible proteolytic cleavage of soluble TNFR1 ectodomains. Reciprocally, over-expression of RBMX increased TNFR1 exosome-like vesicle release and the IL-1{beta}-mediated inducible shedding of TNFR1 ectodomains. This identifies RBMX as an ARTS-1-associated protein that regulates both the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles and the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains.

  9. Role and molecular mechanism of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in tumor development and progression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a member of the hnRNP family, which exists in the nucleus and the cytoplasm simultaneously. It is a multifunctional protein that can participate in a variety of regulatory progressions of gene expression and signal transduction, such as chromatin remodeling, transcription, RNA alternative splicing and translation. hnRNP K not only directly binds to the kinases, but also recruits the associated factors regarding transcription, splicing and translation to control gene expression, and therefore, it serves as a docking platform for integrating transduction pathways to nucleic acid-directed processes. Numerous studies also show that abnormal expression of hnRNP K is closely associated with the tumor formation. This protein is overexpressed in numerous types of cancer and its aberrant cytoplasmic localization is also associated with a worse prognosis for patients. These results consistently indicate that hnRNP K has a key role in cancer progression. To understand the hnRNP K pathophysiological process in tumor disease, the previous research results regarding the association between hnRNP K and tumors were reviewed.

  10. DNA Damage-induced Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K SUMOylation Regulates p53 Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Risso, Guillermo; Muñoz, Manuel Javier; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that is a key player in the p53-triggered DNA damage response, acting as a cofactor for p53 in response to DNA damage. hnRNP K is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 and, upon DNA damage, is de-ubiquitylated. In sharp contrast with the role and consequences of the other post-translational modifications, nothing is known about the role of SUMO conjugation to hnRNP K in p53 transcriptional co-activation. In the present work, we show that hnRNP K is modified by SUMO in lysine 422 within its KH3 domain, and sumoylation is regulated by the E3 ligase Pc2/CBX4. Most interestingly, DNA damage stimulates hnRNP K sumoylation through Pc2 E3 activity, and this modification is required for p53 transcriptional activation. Abrogation of hnRNP K sumoylation leads to an aberrant regulation of the p53 target gene p21. Our findings link the DNA damage-induced Pc2 activation to the p53 transcriptional co-activation through hnRNP K sumoylation. PMID:22825850

  11. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K is a Novel Regulator of Androgen Receptor Translation

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Nishit K; Kim, Jayoung; Cinar, Bekir; Ramachandran, Aruna; Hager, Martin H; Di Vizio, Dolores; Adam, Rosalyn M; Rubin, Mark A; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Freeman, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression in prostate cancer (PCa) is still poorly understood. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in PCa cells was previously shown to lower AR expression by a rapamycin-sensitive, post-transcriptional mechanism involving the AR mRNA 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR). In a search for an intermediate within the EGFR/PI3-kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway that regulates AR at this site, we identified the nucleic acid binding protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K), by mass spectrometric analysis of Akt immune complexes from lipid raft-enriched subcellular fractions. We show here that hnRNP-K is a novel inhibitor of AR mRNA translation that regulates androgen-responsive gene expression and PCa cell proliferation. A functional hnRNP-K binding site involved in down-regulating AR protein levels was identified in the AR mRNA 5′-UTR. Further analysis revealed that hnRNP-K is also able to inhibit AR translation in the absence of the 5′-UTR, consistent with the presence of additional predicted hnRNP-K binding sites within the AR open reading frame and in the 3′-UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of a human PCa tissue microarray revealed an inverse correlation between hnRNP-K expression and AR protein levels in organ-confined PCa tumors and a substantial decline in cytoplasmic hnRNP-K in metastases, despite an overall increase in hnRNP-K levels in metastatic tumors. These data suggest that translational inhibition of AR by hnRNP-K may occur in organ-confined tumors but possibly at a reduced level in metastases. HnRNP-K is the first protein identified that directly interacts with and regulates the AR translational apparatus. PMID:19258514

  12. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M associates with mTORC2 and regulates muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Sun, Yun-Ya; Liang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Yenshou

    2017-01-20

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a range of crucial roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, metabolism, and morphology. However, mTOR forms two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2), via association with a series of different components; this allows the complexes to execute their wide range of functions. This study explores further the composition of the mTORC2 complex. Utilizing Rictor knock-out cells, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, a novel Rictor associated protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M), was identified. The association between hnRNP M and Rictor was verified using recombinant and endogenous protein and the binding site was found to be within aa 1~532 of hnRNP M. The presence of hnRNP M significantly affects phosphorylation of SGK1 S422, but not of Akt S473, PKCα S657 and PKCζ T560. Furthermore, hnRNP M also plays a critical role in muscle differentiation because knock-down of either hnRNP M or Rictor in C2C12 myoblasts reduced differentiation. This decrease is able to be rescued by overexpression SGK S422D in hnRNP M knockdown C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together, we have identified a novel Rictor/mTOR binding molecule, hnRNP M, that allows mTORC2 signaling to phosphorylate SGK1 thus regulating muscle differentiation.

  13. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M associates with mTORC2 and regulates muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Sun, Yun-Ya; Liang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Yenshou

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a range of crucial roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, metabolism, and morphology. However, mTOR forms two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2), via association with a series of different components; this allows the complexes to execute their wide range of functions. This study explores further the composition of the mTORC2 complex. Utilizing Rictor knock-out cells, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, a novel Rictor associated protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M), was identified. The association between hnRNP M and Rictor was verified using recombinant and endogenous protein and the binding site was found to be within aa 1~532 of hnRNP M. The presence of hnRNP M significantly affects phosphorylation of SGK1 S422, but not of Akt S473, PKCα S657 and PKCζ T560. Furthermore, hnRNP M also plays a critical role in muscle differentiation because knock-down of either hnRNP M or Rictor in C2C12 myoblasts reduced differentiation. This decrease is able to be rescued by overexpression SGK S422D in hnRNP M knockdown C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together, we have identified a novel Rictor/mTOR binding molecule, hnRNP M, that allows mTORC2 signaling to phosphorylate SGK1 thus regulating muscle differentiation. PMID:28106162

  14. Protein and gene expression characteristics of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Lin; Liu, Fei; Liu, Fang; Zhao, Xiao-Hang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression characteristics of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRNPH1) mRNA and protein in cell lines and tissues of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS Western blotting was used to assess the expression of HNRNPH1 protein in seven ESCC cell lines and 30 paired fresh tissue specimens. The subcellular localization of HNRNPH1 was determined by immunofluorescence in ESCC cells. The RNA sequencing data from 87 patients with ESCC were obtained from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA), and the expression and clinical characteristics analysis of different transcript variants of HNRNPH1 were evaluated in this dataset. In addition, immunohistochemistry was carried out to detect the expression of HNRNPH1 protein in 125 patients. RESULTS The expression of HNRNPH1 protein varied across different ESCC cell lines. It was exclusively restricted to the nucleus of the ESCC cells. There are two transcript variants of the HNRNPH1 gene. Variant 1 was constitutively expressed, and its expression did not change during tumorigenesis. In contrast, levels of variant 2 were low in non-tumorous tissues and were dramatically increased in ESCC (P = 0.0026). The high levels of variant 2 were associated with poorer differentiated tumors (P = 0.0287). Furthermore, in paired fresh tissue specimens, HNRNPH1 protein was overexpressed in 73.3% (22/30) of neoplastic tissues. HNRNPH1 was significantly upregulated in ESCC, with strong staining in 43.2% (54/125) of tumor tissues and 22.4% (28/125) of matched non-cancerous tissues (P = 0.0005). Positive HNRNPH1 expression was significantly associated with poor tumor differentiation degree (P = 0.0337). CONCLUSION The different alternative transcript variants of HNRNPH1 exhibited different expression changes during tumorigenesis. Its mRNA and protein were overexpressed in ESCC and associated with poorer differentiation of tumor cells. These findings highlight the potential of HNRNPH1 in the therapy and diagnosis

  15. Purification and partial sequencing of the nuclear autoantigen RA33 shows that it is indistinguishable from the A2 protein of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, G; Hartmuth, K; Skriner, K; Maurer-Fogy, I; Sinski, A; Thalmann, E; Hassfeld, W; Barta, A; Smolen, J S

    1992-01-01

    RA33 is a nuclear autoantigen with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kD. Autoantibodies against RA33 are found in about 30% of sera from RA patients, but only occasionally in sera from patients with other connective tissue diseases. To characterize RA33, the antigen was purified from HeLa cell nuclear extracts to more than 90% homogeneity by affinity chromatography on heparin-Sepharose and by chromatofocusing. Sequence analysis of five tryptic peptides revealed that their sequences matched corresponding sequences of the A2 protein of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complex. Furthermore, RA33 was shown to be present in the 40S hnRNP complex and to behave indistinguishably from A2 in binding to single stranded DNA. In summary, these data strongly indicate that RA33 and A2 are the same protein, and thus identify on a molecular level a new autoantigen. Images PMID:1522214

  16. In Silico Adoption of an Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1

    PubMed Central

    Lanig, Harald; Reisen, Felix; Whitley, David; Schneider, Gisbert; Banting, Lee; Clark, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    A 4.1μs molecular dynamics simulation of the NR4A1 (hNur77) apo-protein has been undertaken and a previously undetected druggable pocket has become apparent that is located remotely from the ‘traditional’ nuclear receptor ligand-binding site. A NR4A1/bis-indole ligand complex at this novel site has been found to be stable over 1 μs of simulation and to result in an interesting conformational transmission to a remote loop that has the capacity to communicate with a NBRE within a RXR-α/NR4A1 heterodimer. Several features of the simulations undertaken indicate how NR4A1 can be affected by alternate-site modulators. PMID:26270486

  17. Relaxation Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging Investigation of Heterogeneous Aging in a Hydroxy-Terminated Polybutadiene-Based Elastomer

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.; Cherry, Brian R.; Minard, Kevin R.; Celina, Mat C.

    2005-12-27

    Relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (R-NMRI) was employed to investigate the effects of thermo-oxidative aging in a hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) based elastomer. A series of three-dimensional (3D) Hahn-echo weighted single point images (SPI) of the elastomer were utilized to generate a 3D parameter map of the aged material. NMR spin-spin relaxation times (T2) were measured for each voxel producing a 3D NMR parameter (T2) map of the aged polymer. These T2 maps reveal a dramatic reduction of local polymer mobility near the aging surface with the degree of T2 heterogeneity varying as a function of aging. Using correlations between NMR T2 and material modulus, the impact of this heterogeneous thermo-oxidative aging on the material properties is discussed.

  18. Patterns of cyto-nuclear linkage disequilibrium in Silene latifolia: genomic heterogeneity and temporal stability

    PubMed Central

    Fields, P D; McCauley, D E; McAssey, E V; Taylor, D R

    2014-01-01

    Non-random association of alleles in the nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, or cyto-nuclear linkage disequilibrium (LD), is both an important component of a number of evolutionary processes and a statistical indicator of others. The evolutionary significance of cyto-nuclear LD will depend on both its magnitude and how stable those associations are through time. Here, we use a longitudinal population genetic data set to explore the magnitude and temporal dynamics of cyto-nuclear disequilibria through time. We genotyped 135 and 170 individuals from 16 and 17 patches of the plant species Silene latifolia in Southwestern VA, sampled in 1993 and 2008, respectively. Individuals were genotyped at 14 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the mitochondrial gene, atp1. Normalized LD (D′) between nuclear and cytoplasmic loci varied considerably depending on which nuclear locus was considered (ranging from 0.005–0.632). Four of the 14 cyto-nuclear associations showed a statistically significant shift over approximately seven generations. However, the overall magnitude of this disequilibrium was largely stable over time. The observed origin and stability of cyto-nuclear LD is most likely caused by the slow admixture between anciently diverged lineages within the species' newly invaded range, and the local spatial structure and metapopulation dynamics that are known to structure genetic variation in this system. PMID:24002238

  19. Dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR in heterogeneous catalysis research

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frédéric A.; Slowing, Igor I.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Pruski, Marek

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a revolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is taking place, attributable to the rapid development of high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique yielding sensitivity improvements of 2–3 orders of magnitude. This higher sensitivity in SSNMR has already impacted materials research, and the implications of new methods on catalytic sciences are expected to be profound.

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization solid-state NMR in heterogeneous catalysis research

    DOE PAGES

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Perras, Frédéric A.; Slowing, Igor I.; ...

    2015-10-20

    In this study, a revolution in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is taking place, attributable to the rapid development of high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), a technique yielding sensitivity improvements of 2–3 orders of magnitude. This higher sensitivity in SSNMR has already impacted materials research, and the implications of new methods on catalytic sciences are expected to be profound.

  1. [Nuclear heterogeneity and proliferative capacity of human adipose derived MSC-like cells].

    PubMed

    Lavrov, A V; Smirnichina, S A

    2010-01-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are MSC-like cells which could be easily used for regenerative medicine. Here, the morphology and proliferative capacity of human ADSCs is discribed. ADSCs were analyzed after one month of cultivation at a density of 10 cells/cm2. 21 colonies were counted. Few atypical cells (huge nuclei and cytoplasm) were found in 9 out of 17 colonies analyzed. ANOVA demonstrated that colonies also differed (P = 0.0025) in nuclei dimensions and scatter in the dimensions in each colony. Nuclei dimensions and cell density logarithms correlated in reverse proportion (-0.7; P = 0.002). Thus, ADSCs were heterogeneous and represented two types of cells: small highly proliferative and large low proliferative cells. Cell heterogeneity observed in some colonies might be due to cells registered at different cell cycle phases. Stable and typical morphology, colony-formation capability and high proliferative capacity of cells indicate visceral adipose tissue as a rich source of ADSCs.

  2. Heterogeneity in mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential is independent of the nuclear division cycle in multinucleate fungal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, John P; Occhipinti, Patricia; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2012-03-01

    In the multinucleate filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii, nuclei divide asynchronously in a common cytoplasm. We hypothesize that the division cycle machinery has a limited zone of influence in the cytoplasm to promote nuclear autonomy. Mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells undergo cell cycle-specific changes in morphology and membrane potential and therefore can serve as a reporter of the cell cycle state of the cytoplasm. To evaluate if the cell cycle state of nuclei in A. gossypii can influence the adjacent cytoplasm, we tested whether local mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in A. gossypii are associated with the division state of a nearby nucleus. We found that mitochondria exhibit substantial heterogeneity in both morphology and membrane potential within a single multinucleated cell. Notably, differences in mitochondrial morphology or potential are not associated with a specific nuclear division state. Heterokaryon mutants with a mixture of nuclei with deletions of and wild type for the mitochondrial fusion/fission genes DNM1 and FZO1 exhibit altered mitochondrial morphology and severe growth and sporulation defects. This dominant effect suggests that the gene products may be required locally near their expression site rather than diffusing widely in the cell. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial dynamics are essential in these large syncytial cells, yet morphology and membrane potential are independent of nuclear cycle state.

  3. HETEROGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR EMPLOYING SMALL UNCLAD BODIES OF FISSIONABLE MATERIAL AS FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Katz, J.J.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear reactor in which fuel pellets are continuously dissolved in a moderator liquid is described. The fuel pellets are fed into the top of elongated baskets which are submerged in moderator liquid, and a portion of the moderator liquid is continuously withdrawn and processed to recove r reaction products.

  4. Physical and Functional Interaction between Heterochromatin Protein 1α and the RNA-binding Protein Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein U*

    PubMed Central

    Ameyar-Zazoua, Maya; Souidi, Mouloud; Fritsch, Lauriane; Robin, Philippe; Thomas, Audrey; Hamiche, Ali; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Harel-Bellan, Annick

    2009-01-01

    By combining biochemical purification and mass spectrometry, we identified proteins associated with human heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α) both in the nucleoplasm and in chromatin. Some of these are RNA-binding proteins, and among them is the protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U)/SAF-A, which is linked to chromatin organization and transcriptional regulation. Here, we demonstrate that hnRNP U is a bona fide HP1α-interacting molecule. More importantly, hnRNP U depletion reduces HP1α-dependent gene silencing and disturbs HP1α subcellular localization. Thus, our data demonstrate that hnRNP U is involved in HP1α function, shedding new light on the mode of action of HP1α and on the function of hnRNP U. PMID:19617346

  5. 26 CFR 1.468A-1T - Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules...-1T Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules (temporary). (a) Introduction. Section 468A provides an elective method for taking into account nuclear decommissioning costs for Federal income...

  6. 26 CFR 1.468A-1 - Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules. 1...-1 Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules. (a) Introduction. Section 468A provides an elective method for taking into account nuclear decommissioning costs for Federal income tax purposes. In...

  7. 26 CFR 1.468A-1 - Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules. 1...-1 Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules. (a) Introduction. Section 468A provides an elective method for taking into account nuclear decommissioning costs for Federal income tax purposes. In...

  8. 26 CFR 1.468A-1 - Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules. 1...-1 Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules. (a) Introduction. Section 468A provides an elective method for taking into account nuclear decommissioning costs for Federal income tax purposes. In...

  9. 26 CFR 1.468A-1 - Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules. 1...-1 Nuclear decommissioning costs; general rules. (a) Introduction. Section 468A provides an elective method for taking into account nuclear decommissioning costs for Federal income tax purposes. In...

  10. Comparison of Different Upscaling Methods for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Complex Heterogeneous Materials System: Application on Nuclear Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-06-16

    To develop a strategy in thermal conductivity prediction of a complex heterogeneous materials system, loaded nuclear waste forms, the computational efficiency and accuracy of different upscaling methods have been evaluated. The effective thermal conductivity, obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components, is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling method, were developed and implemented. Microstructure based finite element method (FEM) prediction results were used to as benchmark to determine the accuracy of the different upscaling methods. Micrographs from waste forms with varying waste loadings were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity in FEM and homogenization methods. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (e.g., Taylor model and Sachs model) are stronger than the self-consistent model, statistical upscaling method, and finite element method. However, when balancing computational efficiency and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a useful method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste forms.

  11. An investigation into heterogeneity in a single vein-type uranium ore deposit: Implications for nuclear forensics.

    PubMed

    Keatley, A C; Scott, T B; Davis, S; Jones, C P; Turner, P

    2015-12-01

    Minor element composition and rare earth element (REE) concentrations in nuclear materials are important as they are used within the field of nuclear forensics as an indicator of sample origin. However recent studies into uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) have shown significant elemental and isotopic heterogeneity from a single mine site such that some sites have shown higher variation within the mine site than that seen between multiple sites. The elemental composition of both uranium and gangue minerals within ore samples taken along a single mineral vein in South West England have been measured and reported here. The analysis of the samples was undertaken to determine the extent of the localised variation in key elements. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to analyse the gangue mineralogy and measure major element composition. Minor element composition and rare earth element (REE) concentrations were measured by Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA). The results confirm that a number of key elements, REE concentrations and patterns used for origin location do show significant variation within mine. Furthermore significant variation is also visible on a meter scale. In addition three separate uranium phases were identified within the vein which indicates multiple uranium mineralisation events. In light of these localised elemental variations it is recommended that representative sampling for an area is undertaken prior to establishing the REE pattern that may be used to identify the originating mine for an unknown ore sample and prior to investigating impact of ore processing on any arising REE patterns.

  12. Content of N-6 methyl adenylic acid in heterogeneous nuclear and messenger RNA of HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, U; Fernandez-Muñoz, R; Darnell, J E

    1977-01-01

    With the aid of a suitable thin layer chromatographic procedure, the N-6 methyl adenylic acid (m6A), content of a variety of 32P labeled RNA species from HeLa cells has been measured. Poly(A)-containing (poly(A)+) cytoplasmic RNA has on the average one m6Ap per 800 to 900 nucleotides. This value is independent of the length of the molecules. The proportion of m6Ap in poly(A)+ cytoplasmic RNA does not change between 4 and 18 hours of labeling with 32P, suggesting that the majority of the messenger RNA molecules may have a similar level of internal methylation regardless of their half-life. The non-polyadenylated, non-ribosomal cytoplasmic RNA fraction sedimenting from 10S TO 28S is less methylated with approximately one m6A per 2,700 nucleotides. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA molecules (DMSO treated) which sediment from 28S to 45S have approximately one m6Ap per 3,000 nucleotides. The hnRNA molecules sedimenting from 10S to 28S have one m6Ap per 1,800 nucleotides. Poly(A)+ nuclear RNA is enriched in m6A, containing 1 residue of m6A per 700 to 800 nucleotides, a value close to that obtained for the polyadenylated cytoplasmic RNA. Images PMID:866178

  13. Concerted effects of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 to control vitamin D-directed gene transcription and RNA splicing in human bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Park, Juw Won; Chun, Rene F.; Lisse, Thomas S.; Garcia, Alejandro J.; Zavala, Kathryn; Sea, Jessica L.; Lu, Zhi-xiang; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S.; Xing, Yi; Hewison, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally recognized as an RNA splicing regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC1/C2) can also bind to double-stranded DNA and function in trans as a vitamin D response element (VDRE)-binding protein. As such, hnRNPC1/C2 may couple transcription induced by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) with subsequent RNA splicing. In MG63 osteoblastic cells, increased expression of the 1,25(OH)2D target gene CYP24A1 involved immunoprecipitation of hnRNPC1/C2 with CYP24A1 chromatin and RNA. Knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 suppressed expression of CYP24A1, but also increased expression of an exon 10-skipped CYP24A1 splice variant; in a minigene model the latter was attenuated by a functional VDRE in the CYP24A1 promoter. In genome-wide analyses, knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 resulted in 3500 differentially expressed genes and 2232 differentially spliced genes, with significant commonality between groups. 1,25(OH)2D induced 324 differentially expressed genes, with 187 also observed following hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown, and a further 168 unique to hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown. However, 1,25(OH)2D induced only 10 differentially spliced genes, with no overlap with differentially expressed genes. These data indicate that hnRNPC1/C2 binds to both DNA and RNA and influences both gene expression and RNA splicing, but these actions do not appear to be linked through 1,25(OH)2D-mediated induction of transcription. PMID:27672039

  14. Reconstruction of the isotope activity content of heterogeneous nuclear waste drums.

    PubMed

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Radioactive waste must be characterized in order to verify its conformance with national regulations for intermediate storage or its disposal. Segmented gamma scanning (SGS) is a most widely applied non-destructive analytical technique for the characterization of radioactive waste drums. The isotope specific activity content is generally calculated assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution for each measured drum segment. However, real radioactive waste drums exhibit non-uniform isotope and density distributions most affecting the reliability and accuracy of activities reconstruction in SGS. The presence of internal shielding structures in the waste drum contributes generally to a strong underestimation of the activity and this in particular for radioactive sources emitting low energy gamma-rays independently of their spatial distribution. In this work we present an improved method to quantify the activity of spatially concentrated gamma-emitting isotopes (point sources or hot spots) in heterogeneous waste drums with internal shielding structures. The isotope activity is reconstructed by numerical simulations and fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution recorded during the drum rotation in SGS using an analytical expression derived from a geometric model. First results of the improved method and enhancements of this method are shown and are compared to each other as well as to the conventional method which assumes a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution. It is shown that the new model improves the accuracy and the reliability of the activity reconstruction in SGS and that the presented algorithm is suitable with respect to the framework requirement of industrial application.

  15. Heterogeneous nuclear expression of the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in normal and neoplastic human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Gambacorta, M.; Flenghi, L.; Fagioli, M.; Pileri, S.; Leoncini, L.; Bigerna, B.; Pacini, R.; Tanci, L. N.; Pasqualucci, L.; Ascani, S.; Mencarelli, A.; Liso, A.; Pelicci, P. G.; Falini, B.

    1996-01-01

    The RING-finger promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is the product of the PML gene that fuses with the retinoic acid receptor-alpha gene in the t(15; 17) translocation of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Wild-type PML localizes in the nucleus with a typical speckled pattern that is a consequence of the concentration of the protein within discrete subnuclear domains known as nuclear bodies. Delocalization of PML from nuclear bodies has been documented in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and suggested to contribute to leukemogenesis. In an attempt to get new insights into the function of the wild-type PML protein and to investigate whether it displays an altered expression pattern in neoplasms other than acute promyelocytic leukemia, we stained a large number of normal and neoplastic human tissues with a new murine monoclonal antibody (PG-M3) directed against the amino-terminal region of PML. As the PG-M3 epitope is partially resistant to fixatives, only cells that overexpress PML are detected by the antibody in microwave-heated paraffin sections. Among normal tissues, PML was characteristically up-regulated in activated epithelioid histiocytes and fibroblasts in a variety of pathological conditions, columnar epithelium in small active thyroid follicles, well differentiated foamy cells in the center of sebaceous glands, and hypersecretory endometria (Arias-Stella). Interferons, the PML of which is a primary target gene, and estrogens are likely to represent some of the cytokines and/or hormones that may be involved in the up-regulation of PML under these circumstances. In keeping with this concept, we found that PML is frequently overexpressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin's disease, a tumor of cytokine-producing cells. Among solid tumors, overexpression of PML was frequently found in carcinomas of larynx and thyroid (papillary), epithelial thymomas, and Kaposi's sarcoma, whereas carcinomas of the lung, thyroid (follicular), breast, and colon were

  16. Considerations for a US Nuclear Force Structure below a 1,000-Warhead Limit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    discussion between the two counties on tactical nuclear weapons.13 By 26 January 2011 both the Russian State Duma and Federation Council ratified the...country brings to the table. The challenge is to coordinate the step-by-step disarmament of the nine current members of the nuclear weapons club while

  17. Ocean dynamic processes causing spatially heterogeneous distribution of sedimentary caesium-137 massively released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, H.; Morino, Y.; Furuichi, N.; Ohara, T.

    2015-12-01

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radiocaesium 137Cs that were released into the environment by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011 are widely known to have extensively migrated to Pacific Ocean sediment off of eastern Japan. Several recent reports have stated that the sedimentary 137Cs is now stable with a remarkably heterogeneous distribution. The present study elucidates ocean dynamic processes causing this heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution in and around the shelf off Fukushima and adjacent prefectures. We performed a numerical simulation of oceanic 137Cs behaviour for about 10 months after the accident, using a comprehensive dynamic model involving advection-diffusion transport in seawater, adsorption and desorption to and from particulate matter, sedimentation and suspension on and from the bottom, and vertical diffusion transport in the sediment. A notable simulated result was that the sedimentary 137Cs significantly accumulated in a swath just offshore of the shelf break (along the 50-100 m isobath) as in recent observations, although the seabed in the entire simulation domain was assumed to have ideal properties such as identical bulk density, uniform porosity, and aggregation of particles with a single grain diameter. This result indicated that the heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution was not necessarily a result of the spatial distribution of 137Cs sediment adsorptivity. The present simulation suggests that the shape of the swath is mainly associated with spatiotemporal variation between bottom shear stress in the shallow shelf (< 50 m depths) and that offshore of the shelf break. In a large part of the shallow shelf, the simulation indicated that strong bottom friction suspending particulate matter from the seabed frequently occurred via a periodic spring tide about every 2 weeks and via occasional strong wind. The sedimentary 137Cs thereby could hardly stay on the surface of the seabed with the result that

  18. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    SciTech Connect

    Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  19. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and G inhibits the transcription of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sheng; Korzan, Wayne J.; Chen, Chun-Chun; Fernald, Russell D.

    2008-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) causes the release of gonadotropins from the pituitary to control reproduction. Here we report that two heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP-A/B and hnRNP-G) bind to the GnRH-I upstream promoter region in a cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni. We identified these binding proteins using a newly developed homology based method of mass spectrometric peptide mapping. We show that both hnRNP-A/B and hnRNP-G co-localize with GnRH1 in the pre-optic area of the hypothalamus in the brain. We also demonstrated that these ribonucleoproteins exhibit similar binding capacity in vivo, using immortalized mouse GT1-7 cells where overexpression of either hnRNP-A/B or hnRNP-G significantly down-regulate GnRH1 mRNA levels in GT1-7 cells, suggesting that both act as repressors in GnRH1 transcriptional regulation. PMID:17920292

  20. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein L is required for the survival and functional integrity of murine hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreau, Marie-Claude; Grapton, Damien; Helness, Anne; Vadnais, Charles; Fraszczak, Jennifer; Shooshtarizadeh, Peiman; Wilhelm, Brian; Robert, François; Heyd, Florian; Möröy, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation and survival of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has to be strictly coordinated to ensure the timely production of all blood cells. Here we report that the splice factor and RNA binding protein hnRNP L (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L) is required for hematopoiesis, since its genetic ablation in mice reduces almost all blood cell lineages and causes premature death of the animals. In agreement with this, we observed that hnRNP L deficient HSCs lack both the ability to self-renew and foster hematopoietic differentiation in transplanted hosts. They also display mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated levels of γH2AX, are Annexin V positive and incorporate propidium iodide indicating that they undergo cell death. Lin-c-Kit+ fetal liver cells from hnRNP L deficient mice show high p53 protein levels and up-regulation of p53 target genes. In addition, cells lacking hnRNP L up-regulated the expression of the death receptors TrailR2 and CD95/Fas and show Caspase-3, Caspase-8 and Parp cleavage. Treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk, but not the deletion of p53, restored cell survival in hnRNP L deficient cells. Our data suggest that hnRNP L is critical for the survival and functional integrity of HSCs by restricting the activation of caspase-dependent death receptor pathways. PMID:27271479

  1. Nuclear receptors HNF4α and LRH-1 cooperate in regulating Cyp7a1 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kir, Serkan; Zhang, Yuan; Gerard, Robert D; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2012-11-30

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a postprandial enterokine induced by the nuclear bile acid receptor, FXR, in ileum. FGF19 inhibits bile acid synthesis in liver through transcriptional repression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) via a mechanism involving the nuclear receptor SHP. Here, in a series of loss-of-function studies, we show that the nuclear receptors HNF4α and LRH-1 have dual roles in regulating Cyp7a1 in vivo. First, they cooperate in maintaining basal Cyp7a1 expression. Second, they enable SHP binding to the Cyp7a1 promoter and facilitate FGF19-mediated repression of bile acid synthesis. HNF4α and LRH-1 promote active transcription histone marks on the Cyp7a1 promoter that are reversed by FGF19 in a SHP-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that both HNF4α and LRH-1 are important regulators of Cyp7a1 transcription in vivo.

  2. Isolation and characterization of the heterogeneous nuclear RNA-ribonucleoprotein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Y.D.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure of cells to UV light of sufficient intensity brings about crosslinking of RNA to proteins which are in direct contact with it in vivo. The major (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins which become crosslinked to poly(A)/sup +/hnRNA in HeLa cells are of 120K, 68K, 53K, 43K, 41K, 38K, and 36K (K = kilodaltons). By immunizing mice with UV crosslinked complexes two monoclonal antibodies (2B12 and 4F4) against the C proteins (41K and 43K) and one (3G6) against the 120K protein of the hnRNP complex were obtained. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrates that the C proteins and 120K are segregated to the nucleus and are not associated with nucleoli or chromatin. The two C proteins are highly related to each other antigenically. Monoclonal antibody 4F4 identifies the C proteins of the hnRNP complex in widely divergent species from human to lizard. The C proteins are phosphorylated and are in contact with hnRNA in vivo. The hnRNP complex was isolated from vertebrate cell nuclei by immunoprecipitation with these monoclonal antibodies. This complex contains proteins and hnRNA of up to approx.10 kb. The major steady state labeled (/sup 35/S)methionine labeled proteins of the isolated complex from HeLa cells are of 34K, 36K, 36K (A1 and A2), 37K, 38K (B1 and B2), 41K, 43K (C1 and C2) and doublets at 68K and at 120K. These proteins are organized into a 30S particle. Large hnRNP complexes are composed of multiples of 30S particles which are connected by highly nuclease sensitive stretches of hnRNA. It it concluded that the hnRNP structure is an integral component of the mRNA formation pathway in the eukaryotic cell.

  3. Genetic heterogeneity in cystinuria: the SLC3A1 gene is linked to type I but not to type III cystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Calonge, M J; Volpini, V; Bisceglia, L; Rousaud, F; de Sanctis, L; Beccia, E; Zelante, L; Testar, X; Zorzano, A; Estivill, X

    1995-01-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive amino-aciduria where three urinary phenotypes have been described (I, II, and III). An amino acid transporter gene, SLC3A1 (formerly rBAT), was found to be responsible for this disorder. To assess whether mutations in SLC3A1 are involved in different cystinuria phenotypes, linkage with this gene and its nearest marker (D2S119) was analyzed in 22 families with type I and/or type III cystinuria. Linkage with heterogeneity was proved (alpha = 0.45; P < 0.008). Type I/I families showed homogeneous linkage to SLC3A1 (Zmax > 3.0 at theta = 0.00; alpha = 1), whereas types I/III and III/III were not linked. Our data suggest that type I cystinuria is due to mutations in the SLC3A1 gene, whereas another locus is responsible for type III. This result establishes genetic heterogeneity for cystinuria, classically considered as a multiallelic monogenic disease. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7568194

  4. Primary structures of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2, B1, and C2 proteins: a diversity of RNA binding proteins is generated by small peptide inserts.

    PubMed Central

    Burd, C G; Swanson, M S; Görlach, M; Dreyfuss, G

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated cDNAs for the major heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2, B1, and C2 proteins and determined their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences. The A2 and B1 cDNAs are identical except for a 36-nucleotide in-frame insert in B1. Similarly, the sequence of the C2 protein cDNA is related to that of C1 in that C2 contains an extra 39 in-frame nucleotides. Therefore, the B1 amino acid sequence is identical to A2 except for the insertion of 12 amino acids near its amino terminus, and C1 and C2 are also identical to each other except for an extra 13 amino acids near the middle of C2. All three proteins are members of a large family of RNA binding proteins that contain the consensus sequence-type RNA binding domain (CS-RBD). The A2 and B1 proteins have a modular structure similar to that of the hnRNP protein A1: they contain two CS-RBDs and a glycine-rich auxiliary domain at the carboxyl terminus. The CS-RBDs of A2 and B1 have approximately 80% amino acid identity with those of A1, whereas the glycine-rich auxiliary domain is considerably more divergent with less than 30% of the amino acids being identical. These findings indicate that the addition of small peptides, probably by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, generates some of the diversity apparent among hnRNP proteins. Images PMID:2557628

  5. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng-Hou; Wu, Ying-Li; Zhao, Meng; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  6. A novel SDS-stable dimer of a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein at presynaptic terminals of squid neurons.

    PubMed

    Lico, D T P; Lopes, G S; Brusco, J; Rosa, J C; Gould, R M; De Giorgis, J A; Larson, R E

    2015-08-06

    The presence of mRNAs in synaptic terminals and their regulated translation are important factors in neuronal communication and plasticity. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complexes are involved in the translocation, stability, and subcellular localization of mRNA and the regulation of its translation. Defects in these processes and mutations in components of the hnRNP complexes have been related to the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies and neurodegenerative diseases. Despite much data on mRNA localization and evidence for protein synthesis, as well as the presence of translation machinery, in axons and presynaptic terminals, the identity of RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA transport and function in presynaptic regions is lacking. We previously characterized a strongly basic RNA-binding protein (p65), member of the hnRNPA/B subfamily, in squid presynaptic terminals. Intriguingly, in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), p65 migrated as a 65-kDa protein, whereas members of the hnRNPA/B family typically have molecular masses ranging from 35 to 42kDa. In this report we present further biochemical and molecular characterization that shows endogenous p65 to be an SDS-stable dimer composed of ∼37-kDa hnRNPA/B-like subunits. We cloned and expressed a recombinant protein corresponding to squid hnRNPA/B-like protein and showed its propensity to aggregate and form SDS-stable dimers in vitro. Our data suggest that this unique hnRNPA/B-like protein co-localizes with synaptic vesicle protein 2 and RNA-binding protein ELAV and thus may serve as a link between local mRNA processing and presynaptic function and regulation.

  7. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui; Kurimoto, Akiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2015-03-27

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  8. Direct Recruitment of ERK Cascade Components to Inducible Genes Is Regulated by Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K*

    PubMed Central

    Mikula, Michal; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2011-01-01

    Components of the ERK cascade are recruited to genes, but it remains unknown how they are regulated at these sites. The RNA-binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K interacts with kinases and is found along genes including the mitogen-inducible early response gene EGR-1. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitations to study co-recruitment of hnRNP K and ERK cascade activity along the EGR-1 gene. These measurements revealed that the spatiotemporal binding patterns of ERK cascade transducers (GRB2, SOS, B-Raf, MEK, and ERK) at the EGR-1 locus resemble both hnRNP K and RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Inhibition of EGR-1 transcription with either serum-responsive factor knockdown or 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole altered recruitment of all of the above ERK cascade components along this locus that mirrored the changes in Pol II and hnRNP K profiles. siRNA knockdown of hnRNP K decreased the levels of active MEK and ERK at the EGR-1, changes associated with decreased levels of elongating pre-mRNA and less efficient splicing. The hnRNP K dependence and pattern of ERK cascade activation at the c-MYC locus were different from at EGR-1. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitations revealed that hnRNP K was associated with the EGR-1 but not c-MYC mRNAs. These data suggest a model where Pol II transcription-driven recruitment of hnRNP K along the EGR-1 locus compartmentalizes activation of the ERK cascade at these genes, events that regulate synthesis of mature mRNA. PMID:21233203

  9. The autism-related gene SNRPN regulates cortical and spine development via controlling nuclear receptor Nr4a1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiping; Zhao, Pingping; Xu, Qiong; Shan, Shifang; Hu, Chunchun; Qiu, Zilong; Xu, Xiu

    2016-01-01

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (SNRPN) gene, encoding the RNA-associated SmN protein, duplications or deletions of which are strongly associated with neurodevelopmental disabilities. SNRPN-coding protein is highly expressed in the brain. However, the role of SNRPN protein in neural development remains largely unknown. Here we showed that the expression of SNRPN increased markedly during postnatal brain development. Overexpression or knockdown of SNRPN in cortical neurons impaired neurite outgrowth, neuron migration, and the distribution of dendritic spines. We found that SNRPN regulated the expression level of Nr4a1, a critical nuclear receptor during neural development, in cultured primary cortical neurons. The abnormal spine development caused by SNRPN overexpression could be fully rescued by Nr4a1 co-expression. Importantly, we found that either knockdown of Nr4a1 or 3, 3′- Diindolylmethane (DIM), an Nr4a1 antagonist, were able to rescue the effects of SNRPN knockdown on neurite outgrowth of embryonic cortical neurons, providing the potential therapeutic methods for SNRPN deletion disorders. We thus concluded that maintaining the proper level of SNRPN is critical in cortical neurodevelopment. Finally, Nr4a1 may serve as a potential drug target for SNRPN-related neurodevelopmental disabilities, including Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). PMID:27430727

  10. A Novel Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein-Like Protein Interacts with NS1 of the Minute Virus of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Colin E.; Boden, Richard A.; Astell, Caroline R.

    1999-01-01

    NS1, the major nonstructural parvovirus protein of the minute virus of mice, is a multifunctional protein responsible for several aspects of viral replication. NS1 transactivates the P38 promoter (used to express the structural proteins), as well as its own strong promoter, P4. To study the mechanism of activation and to map regions of NS1 responsible for transactivation, NS1 and various deletions of NS1 were cloned in frame with the GAL4DB and cotransfected into COS-7 and LA9 cells with a synthetic GAL4-responsive reporter plasmid. These studies showed NS1 can directly activate transcription through its 129 carboxyl-terminal amino acid residues. Any deletion from this region of the C terminus, even as few as 8 amino acids, completely abolishes transactivation. A yeast two-hybrid system used to identify protein-protein interactions demonstrated that NS1 is able to dimerize when expressed in yeast cells. However, only an almost complete NS11–638 bait was able to interact with the full-length NS1. A two-hybrid screen identified a HeLa cell cDNA clone (NS1-associated protein 1 [NSAP1]) that interacts with NS11–276 and NS11–638. An additional sequence was predicted from human EST (expressed sequence tag) data, and the cDNA was estimated to be at least 2,221 bp long, potentially encoding a 562-amino-acid protein product. A polyclonal antibody raised to a synthetic peptide within NSAP1 recognizes an ∼65-kDa cellular protein. This NSAP1 cDNA has not previously been characterized, but the predicted protein sequence is 80% identical to the recently identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) R (W. Hassfeld et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 26:439–445, 1998). NSAP1 contains four ribonucleoprotein domains, as well as a highly repetitive C-terminal region. A closely related mouse cDNA (deduced from murine EST data) encodes a protein with only a single amino acid residue change from the human protein. NSAP1 is predicted to be a 65-kDa polynucleotide binding

  11. Noble metal-catalyzed homogeneous and heterogeneous processes in treating simulated nuclear waste media with formic acid

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-09-01

    Simulants for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed containing the major non-radioactive components Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Nd, Ni, Si, Zr, Na, CO{sub 3}{sup 2}-, NO{sub 3}-, and NO{sub 2}- were used to study reactions of formic acid at 90{degrees}C catalyzed by the noble metals Ru, Rh, and/or Pd found in significant quantities in uranium fission products. Such reactions were monitored using gas chromatography to analyze the CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O in the gas phase and a microammonia electrode to analyze the NH{sub 4}+/NH{sub 3} in the liquid phase as a function of time. The following reactions have been studied in these systems since they are undesirable side reactions in nuclear waste processing: (1) Decomposition of formic acid to CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2} is undesirable because of the potential fire and explosion hazard of H{sub 2}. Rhodium, which was introduced as soluble RhCl{sub 3}-3H{sub 2}O, was found to be the most active catalyst for H{sub 2} generation from formic acid above {approximately} 80{degrees}C in the presence of nitrite ion. The H{sub 2} production rate has an approximate pseudo first-order dependence on the Rh concentration, (2) Generation of NH{sub 3} from the formic acid reduction of nitrate and/or nitrite is undesirable because of a possible explosion hazard from NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} accumulation in a waste processing plant off-gas system. The Rh-catalyzed reduction of nitrogen-oxygen compounds to ammonia by formic acid was found to exhibit the following features: (a) Nitrate rather than nitrite is the principal source of NH{sub 3}. (b) Ammonia production occurs at the expense of hydrogen production. (c) Supported rhodium metal catalysts are more active than rhodium in any other form, suggesting that ammonia production involves heterogeneous rather than homogeneous catalysis.

  12. Heterogeneous behavior of lipids according to HbA1c levels undermines the plausibility of metabolic syndrome in type 1 diabetes: data from a nationwide multicenter survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) may cluster in type 1 diabetes, analogously to the metabolic syndrome described in type 2 diabetes. The threshold of HbA1c above which lipid variables start changing behavior is unclear. This study aims to 1) assess the behavior of dyslipidemia according to HbA1c values; 2) detect a threshold of HbA1c beyond which lipids start to change and 3) compare the clustering of lipids and other non-lipid CVRF among strata of HbA1c individuals with type 1 diabetes. Methods Effects of HbA1c quintiles (1st: ≤7.4%; 2nd: 7.5-8.5%; 3rd: 8.6-9.6%; 4th: 9.7-11.3%; and 5th: >11.5%) and covariates (gender, BMI, blood pressure, insulin daily dose, lipids, statin use, diabetes duration) on dyslipidemia were studied in 1275 individuals from the Brazilian multi-centre type 1 diabetes study and 171 normal controls. Results Body size and blood pressure were not correlated to lipids and glycemic control. OR (99% CI) for high-LDL were 2.07 (1.21-3.54) and 2.51 (1.46-4.31), in the 4th and 5th HbA1c quintiles, respectively. Hypertriglyceridemia increased in the 5th quintile of HbA1c, OR 2.76 (1.20-6.37). OR of low-HDL-cholesterol were 0.48 (0.24-0.98) and 0.41 (0.19-0.85) in the 3rd and 4th HbA1c quintiles, respectively. HDL-cholesterol correlated positively (0.437) with HbA1c in the 3rd quintile. HDL-cholesterol and insulin dose correlated inversely in all levels of glycemic control. Conclusions Correlation of serum lipids with HbA1c is heterogeneous across the spectrum of glycemic control in type 1 diabetes individuals. LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides worsened alongside HbA1c with distinct thresholds. Association of lower HDL-cholesterol with higher daily insulin dose is consistent and it points out to a role of exogenous hyperinsulinemia in the pathophysiology of the CVRF clustering. These data suggest diverse pathophysiological processes depending on HbA1c, refuting a unified explanation for cardiovascular risk in type 1 diabetes. PMID

  13. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    SciTech Connect

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina; Petrini, Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for l > 1 spins in dynamically heterogeneous systems with chemical exchange among environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Bryant, R G

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for nuclei with spin l > 1 are considered in cases in which the observed nucleus may sample a rotationally immobilized and an isotropic environment that are coupled by a chemical exchange process. Spectra are simulated for the central (1/2, -1/2) transition for a 3/2 nucleus as a function of the concentrations of the two environments and as a function of the exchange rate between them. It is shown that a crucial feature determining the shape of the observable spectra is the spatial extent or the local order in the immobilized phase. In the case for which all rotationally immobilized sites sampled by the exchanging nucleus are identically oriented but where there is a distribution of these microdomain orientations with respect to the magnetic field direction, a powder pattern for the central transition is observed that carries whatever dynamic information may be derived from it. In the fast exchange limit, the width of the powder pattern scales inversely with the concentration of the isotropic environment as usual. In the intermediate exchange regimes, a complex line shape results that may mask the anisotropic character of the spectrum. In the slow exchange limit, superposition of the spectral contributions results; however, if the isotropic environment concentration is significantly larger than the anisotropic environment concentration, the anisotropic contribution is very difficult to detect because of the dynamic range problem and the possibly large difference in the effective line widths. In the case for which the exchanging nucleus samples a considerable distribution of rotationally immobilized site orientations, the anisotropic character of the spectrum is lost and a super-Lorentzian line shape results. These effects are demonstrated experimentally by 35Cl nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained on a lamellar liquid crystal that is modified with the addition of a thiolmercurate to provide a site of large quadrupole

  15. Molecular definition of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein R (hnRNP R) using autoimmune antibody: immunological relationship with hnRNP P.

    PubMed

    Hassfeld, W; Chan, E K; Mathison, D A; Portman, D; Dreyfuss, G; Steiner, G; Tan, E M

    1998-01-15

    Serum from a patient showing symptoms related to autoimmunity was found to contain autoantibodies to the nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and to several novel nuclear antigens with estimated molecular weights of 40, 43, 72, 74 and 82 kDa. Using this serum for screening a human cDNA expression library a 2.5 kb cDNA clone was isolated which encoded the complete sequence of a protein of 633 amino acids. Sequence analysis revealed a modular structure of the protein: an acidic N-terminal region of approximately 150 amino acids was followed by three adjacent consensus sequence RNA binding domains located in the central part of the protein. In the C-terminal portion a nuclear localization signal and an octapeptide (PPPRMPPP) with similarity to a major B cell epitope of the snRNP core protein B were identified. This was followed by a glycine- and arginine-rich section of approximately 120 amino acids forming another type of RNA binding motif, a RGG box. Interestingly, three copies of a tyrosine-rich decapeptide were found interspersed in the RGG box region. The major in vitro translation product of the cDNA co-migrated in SDS-PAGE with the 82 kDa polypeptide that was recognized by autoantibodies. The structural motifs as well as the immunofluorescence pattern generated by anti-82 kDa antibodies suggested that the antigen was one of the proteins of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) complex. Subsequently the 82 kDa antigen was identified as hnRNP R protein by its presence in immunoprecipitated hnRNP complexes and co-migration of the recombinant protein with this hitherto uncharacterized hnRNP constituent in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The concomitant autoimmune response to a hnRNP component of the pre-mRNA processing machinery and to NuMA, a protein engaged in mitotic events and reported to be associated with mRNA splicing complexes in interphase, may indicate physical and functional association of these antigens. Support for this notion

  16. HRP-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of mammalian heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins Q and R, is an alternative splicing factor that binds to UCUAUC splicing regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Jennifer L; Barberan-Soler, Sergio; Zahler, Alan M

    2009-10-16

    Alternative splicing is regulated by cis sequences in the pre-mRNA that serve as binding sites for trans-acting alternative splicing factors. In a previous study, we used bioinformatics and molecular biology to identify and confirm that the intronic hexamer sequence UCUAUC is a nematode alternative splicing regulatory element. In this study, we used RNA affinity chromatography to identify trans factors that bind to this sequence. HRP-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins Q and R, binds to UCUAUC in the context of unc-52 intronic regulatory sequences as well as to RNAs containing tandem repeats of this sequence. The three Us in the hexamer are the most important determinants of this binding specificity. We demonstrate, using RNA interference, that HRP-2 regulates the alternative splicing of two genes, unc-52 and lin-10, both of which have cassette exons flanked by an intronic UCUAUC motif. We propose that HRP-2 is a protein responsible for regulating alternative splicing through binding interactions with the UCUAUC sequence.

  17. Ocean dynamic processes causing spatially heterogeneous distribution of sedimentary caesium-137 massively released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, H.; Morino, Y.; Furuichi, N.; Ohara, T.

    2015-08-01

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radiocaesium 137Cs that was released into the environment by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 2011 are widely known to have extensively migrated to Pacific oceanic sediment off of east Japan. Several recent reports have stated that the sedimentary 137Cs is now stable with a remarkably heterogeneous distribution. The present study elucidates ocean dynamic processes causing this heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution in and around the shelf off Fukushima and adjacent prefectures. We performed a numerical simulation of oceanic 137Cs behaviour for about 10 months after the accident, using a comprehensive dynamic model involving advection-diffusion transport in seawater, adsorption and desorption to and from particulate matter, sedimentation and suspension on and from the bottom, and vertical diffusion transport in the sediment. A notable simulated result was that the sedimentary 137Cs significantly accumulated in a swath just offshore of the shelf break (along the 50-100 m isobath) as in recent observations, although the seabed in the entire simulation domain was assumed to have ideal properties such as identical bulk density, uniform porosity, and aggregation of particles with a single grain diameter. This result indicated that the heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution was not necessarily a result of the spatial distribution of 137Cs sediment adsorptivity. The present simulation suggests that the shape of the swath is mainly associated with spatiotemporal variation between bottom shear stress in the shallow shelf (< 50 m depths) and that offshore of the shelf break. In a large part of the shallow shelf, the simulation indicated that strong bottom friction suspending particulate matter from the seabed frequently occurred via a periodic spring tide about every 2 weeks and via occasional strong wind. The sedimentary 137Cs thereby could hardly stay on the surface of the seabed with the result that

  18. Radiosensitization and downregulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) upon inhibition of mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) in malignant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Stefan; Lamkowski, Andreas; Priller, Markus; Port, Matthias; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Background Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is an important cofactor in the p53-mediated DNA damage response pathway upon ionizing radiation (IR) and exerts anti-apoptotic effects also independent of p53 pathway activation. Furthermore, hnRNP K is overexpressed in various neoplasms including malignant melanoma (MM). Here, we investigate the role of hnRNP K in the radioresistance of MM cells. Methods and results Our results show cytoplasmic expression of hnRNP K in human MM surgical specimens, but not in benign nevi, and a quick dose- and time-dependent upregulation in response to IR accompanied by cytoplasmic redistribution of the protein in the IPC-298 cellular tumor model carrying an activating NRAS mutation (p.Q61L). SiRNA-based knockdown of hnRNP K induced a delayed decline in γH2AX/53BP1-positive DNA repair foci upon IR. Pharmacological interference with MAPK signaling abrogated ERK phosphorylation, diminished cellular hnRNP K levels, impaired γH2AX/53BP1-foci repair and proliferative capability and increased apoptosis comparable to the observed hnRNP K knockdown phenotype in IPC-298 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that pharmacological interference with MAPK signaling increases vulnerability of NRAS-mutant malignant melanoma cells to ionizing radiation along with downregulation of endogenous hnRNP K and point towards a possible use for combined MEK inhibition and localized radiation therapy of MM in the NRAS-mutant setting where BRAF inhibitors offer no clinical benefit. PMID:26136337

  19. Production of Viral mRNA in Adenovirus-Transformed Cells by the Post-Transcriptional Processing of Heterogeneous Nuclear RNA Containing Viral and Cell Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wall, R.; Weber, J.; Gage, Z.; Darnell, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Adenovirus 2-transformed cells contain virus-specific sequences which are covalently linked to cell-specific RNA sequences in heterogeneous nuclear RNA (HnRNA) molecules larger than 45S. Virus sequences are identified by hybridization to viral DNA, and the cell sequences are detected by hybridization to cellular DNA under conditions where hybridization only occurs to reiterated sites in cell DNA. Such large composite viral-cell HnRNA molecules presumably arise through the uninterrupted transcription of host sequences and integrated viral DNA. Adenovirus-specific polysomal RNA from these cells sediments as three discrete species at 16, 20, and 26S. These specific classes of viral mRNA do not contain rapidly hybridizing host-specific RNA sequences. Both virus-specific HnRNA and mRNA contain polyadenylic acid sequences since they bind to polyU columns at levels characteristics of other polyA-terminated HnRNA and mRNA. Thus, the discrete species of virus-specific mRNA in adenovirus 2 transformed cells appear to be derived from high-molecular-weight virus-specific HnRNA through a series of post-transcriptional modifications involving polyA addition. Subsequently the HnRNA is cleaved so that the cell-specific RNA sequences that originate from the reiterated sites in cell DNA do not accompany the adenovirus mRNA to the cytoplasm. These events for the adenovirus-specific mRNA appear, therefore, to be similar to the stages in the biogenesis of the majority of mRNA in eukaryotic cells. PMID:4736534

  20. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-IL; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y.L.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ -binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism. PMID:26348907

  1. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-Il; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y L; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ-binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism.

  2. Nuclear transcription factor Oct-1 binds to the 5'-upstream region of CYP1A1 and negatively regulates its expression.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R; Weaver, J A; Sterling, K M; Bresnick, E

    1996-02-01

    The cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases, which represent an extended superfamily, catalyze the biotransformation of many endogenous and exogenous substances. One of these hemoproteins, cytochrome P4501A1, is most closely associated with the bioactivation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzo[a]pyrene, which may play a role in environmental carcinogenesis. A negative regulatory element (NRE) has been localized in the 5'-upstream region of the cytochrome P4501A1 gene (CYP1A1) at -843 to -746 base pairs from the site of transcription. The purpose of this research was to define any interactions of trans-acting proteins with this cis element. Rat liver nuclei were used as the source of trans-acting proteins and a biotinylated NRE-bearing fragment (-782 to -843 bp) from a plasmid which contained the CYP1A1 was prepared by the polymerase chain reaction technique. Gel mobility shift assays were used to demonstrate interactions between this NRE fragment and nuclear proteins. The specific binding to an octamer-containing motif in the 5'-upstream region of CYP1A1 was demonstrated; this was used as a step in the partial purification from rat liver of the transcription factor, Oct-1. Conventional chromatographic procedures and DNA recognition site affinity chromatography were also used. HepG2 human hepatoma cells were transfected with both pMCoLUC+ which contains the luciferase gene as a reporter gene driven by the CYP1A1 promoter (including the NRE), and an Oct-1 expression vector. Luciferase activity/mg protein in the doubly-transfected cells was significantly lower than in cells containing only pMCoLUC+. A nuclear transcription factor Oct-1 interacts with a portion of the NRE of the rat CYP1A1, suppressing the expression of this gene. These findings may help to explain the low level of basal expression of CYP1A1 in mammalian systems.

  3. Nuclear sequestration of COL1A1 mRNA transcript associated with type I osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)

    SciTech Connect

    Primorac, D.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified an OI type I patient with a splice donor mutation that resulted in intron 26 retention instead of exon skipping and sequestration of normal levels of the mutant transcript in the nuclear compartment. Intron retention was consistent with the exon definition hypothesis for splice site selection since the size of the exon-intron-exon unit was less than 300 bp. Furthermore, the retained intron contained in-frame stop codons which is thought to cause the mutant RNA to remain within the nucleus rather than appearing in the cytoplasm. To test these hypotheses, genomic fragments containing the normal sequence or the donor mutation were cloned into a collagen minigene and expressed in stably tansfected NIH 3T3 cells. None of the modifications to the normal intron altered the level of RNA that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as expected. However none of the modifications to the mutant intron allowed accumulation of normal levels of mRNA in the cytoplasm. Moreover, in contrast to our findings in the patient`s cells only low levels of mutant transcript were found in the nucleus; a fraction of the transcript did appear in the cytoplasm which had spliced the mutant donor site correctly. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated equal levels of transcription from each transgene. Expression of another donor mutation known to cause in-frame exon skipping in OI type IV was accurately reproduced in the minigene in transfected 3T3 cells. Our experience suggests that either mechanism can lead to formation of a null allele possibly related to the type of splicing events surrounding the potential stop codons. Understanding the rules governing inactivation of a collagen RNA transcript may be important in designing a strategy to inactivate a dominate negative mutation associated with the more severe forms of OI.

  4. The C-protein tetramer binds 230 to 240 nucleotides of pre-mRNA and nucleates the assembly of 40S heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, M; Rech, J E; Northington, S J; Flicker, P F; Mayeda, A; Krainer, A R; LeStourgeon, W M

    1994-01-01

    A series of in vitro protein-RNA binding studies using purified native (C1)3C2 and (A2)3B1 tetramers, total soluble heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP), and pre-mRNA molecules differing in length and sequence have revealed that a single C-protein tetramer has an RNA site size of 230 to 240 nucleotides (nt). Two tetramers bind twice this RNA length, and three tetramers fold monoparticle lengths of RNA (700 nt) into a unique 19S triangular complex. In the absence of this unique structure, the basic A- and B-group proteins bind RNA to form several different artifactual structures which are not present in preparations of native hnRNP and which do not function in hnRNP assembly. Three (A2)3B1 tetramers bind the 19S complex to form a 35S assembly intermediate. Following UV irradiation to immobilize the C proteins on the packaged RNA, the 19S triangular complex is recovered as a remnant structure from both native and reconstituted hnRNP particles. C protein-RNA complexes composed of three, six, or nine tetramers (one, two, or three triangular complexes) nucleate the stoichiometric assembly of monomer, dimer, and trimer hnRNP particles. The binding of C-protein tetramers to RNAs longer than 230 nt is through a self-cooperative combinatorial mode. RNA packaged in the 19S complex and in 40S hnRNP particles is efficiently spliced in vitro. These findings demonstrate that formation of the triangular C protein-RNA complex is an obligate first event in the in vitro and probably the in vivo assembly the 40S hnRNP core particle, and they provide insight into the mechanism through which the core proteins package 700-nt increments of RNA. These findings also demonstrate that unless excluded by other factors, the C proteins are likely to be located along the length of nascent transcripts. Images PMID:8264621

  5. Heterogeneity of mast cells and expression of Annexin A1 protein in a second degree burn model with silver sulfadiazine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Helena Ribeiro; de Azevedo, Lucas Ribeiro; Possebon, Lucas; Costa, Sara de Souza; Iyomasa-Pilon, Melina Mizusaki; Oliani, Sonia Maria; Girol, Ana Paula

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) participate in all stages of skin healing and one of their mediators is the Annexin A1 protein (AnxA1), linked to inflammation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis processes, but not studied in thermal burns yet. Therefore, our objectives were to evaluate the behavior of MCs and AnxA1 in a second degree burn model, treated or not with silver sulfadiazine 1% (SDP 1%) and associated to macrophages quantification and cytokines dosages. MCs counts showed few cells in the early stages of repair but increased MCs in the final phases in the untreated group. The normal skin presented numerous tryptase-positive MCs that were reduced after burning in all analyzed periods. Differently, few chymase-positive MCs were observed in the early stages of healing, however, increased chymase-positive MCs were found at the final phase in the untreated group. MCs also showed high immunoreactivity for AnxA1 on day 3 in both groups. In the tissue there was a strong protein expression in the early stages of healing, but in the final phases only in the SDP treated animals. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1 levels and macrophages quantification were increased in inflammation and reepithelialization phases. Reduced IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 levels and numerous macrophages occurred in the treated animals during tissue repair. Our results indicate modulation in the profile of MCs and AnxA1expression during healing by the treatment with SDP 1%, pointing them as targets for therapeutic interventions on skin burns. PMID:28278234

  6. Transcriptomic Analysis Shows Decreased Cortical Expression of NR4A1, NR4A2 and RXRB in Schizophrenia and Provides Evidence for Nuclear Receptor Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Susan M.; Wilkins, Marc R.; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are differentially expressed in the cortex of people with schizophrenia, implicating factors that control transcription more generally. Hormone nuclear receptors dimerize to coordinate context-dependent changes in gene expression. We hypothesized that members of two families of nuclear receptors (NR4As), and retinoid receptors (RARs and RXRs), are altered in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of people with schizophrenia. We used next generation sequencing and then qPCR analysis to test for changes in mRNA levels for transcripts encoding nuclear receptors: orphan nuclear receptors (3 in the NR4A, 3 in the RAR, 3 in the RXR families and KLF4) in total RNA extracted from the DLPFC from people with schizophrenia compared to controls (n = 74). We also correlated mRNA levels with demographic factors and with estimates of antipsychotic drug exposure (schizophrenia group only). We tested for correlations between levels of transcription factor family members and levels of genes putatively regulated by these transcription factors. We found significantly down regulated expression of NR4A1 (Nurr 77) and KLF4 mRNAs in people with schizophrenia compared to controls, by both NGS and qPCR (p = or <0.01). We also detected decreases in NR4A2 (Nurr1) and RXRB mRNAs by using qPCR in the larger cohort (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). We detected decreased expression of RARG and NR4A2 mRNAs in females with schizophrenia (p<0.05). The mRNA levels of NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3 were all negative correlated with lifetime estimates of antipsychotic exposure. These novel findings, which may be influenced by antipsychotic drug exposure, implicate the orphan and retinoid nuclear receptors in the cortical pathology found in schizophrenia. Genes down stream of these receptors can be dysregulated as well, but the direction of change is not immediately predictable based on the putative transcription factor changes. PMID:27992436

  7. Nkx6.1 regulates islet β-cell proliferation via Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Tessem, Jeffery S; Moss, Larry G; Chao, Lily C; Arlotto, Michelle; Lu, Danhong; Jensen, Mette V; Stephens, Samuel B; Tontonoz, Peter; Hohmeier, Hans E; Newgard, Christopher B

    2014-04-08

    Loss of functional β-cell mass is a hallmark of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and methods for restoring these cells are needed. We have previously reported that overexpression of the homeodomain transcription factor NK6 homeobox 1 (Nkx6.1) in rat pancreatic islets induces β-cell proliferation and enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but the pathway by which Nkx6.1 activates β-cell expansion has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that Nkx6.1 induces expression of the nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, members 1 and 3 (Nr4a1 and Nr4a3) orphan nuclear receptors, and that these factors are both necessary and sufficient for Nkx6.1-mediated β-cell proliferation. Consistent with this finding, global knockout of Nr4a1 results in a decrease in β-cell area in neonatal and young mice. Overexpression of Nkx6.1 and the Nr4a receptors results in increased expression of key cell cycle inducers E2F transcription factor 1 and cyclin E1. Furthermore, Nkx6.1 and Nr4a receptors induce components of the anaphase-promoting complex, including ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C, resulting in degradation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. These studies identify a unique bipartite pathway for activation of β-cell proliferation, suggesting several unique targets for expansion of functional β-cell mass.

  8. Serum under-O-glycosylated IgA1 level is not correlated with glomerular IgA deposition based upon heterogeneity in the composition of immune complexes in IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Serum under-O-glycosylated IgA1 levels are not correlated with glomerular IgA deposition based upon heterogeneity in the composition of glomerular immune complexes in IgAN patients. PMID:24928472

  9. Annexin A1 nuclear translocation induces retinal ganglion cell apoptosis after ischemia-reperfusion injury through the p65/IL-1β pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yin; Li, Xing; Gong, Jieling; Li, Lu; Chen, Liwen; Zheng, Lu; Chen, Zhiqi; Shi, Jing; Zhang, Hong

    2017-04-04

    The degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has been identified as a major problem in glaucoma. Previous studies have indicated an association between annexin A1 (ANXA1) and neuronal cell apoptosis, and RGCs apoptosis in acute ischemia-reperfusion was attributed to an increased production of IL-1β. We found that the expression and nuclear translocation of ANXA1 were upregulated in models of acute ischemia-reperfusion in RGCs in vivo. ANXA1 was found to have a promoting effect on the expression of IL-1β in primary cultured RGCs, which could be inhibited by treatment with ANXA1 shRNA or the p65 inhibitor BAY 11-7082. ANXA1 interacted with p65, and recruited it into the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that ANXA1 accumulated at the IL-1β gene promoter. The reduction of p65 nuclear translocation using a membrane-permeable ANXA1 peptide containing a Ser5Ala mutation led to a decrease in the expression of IL-1β, and acute ischemia-reperfusion induced RGCs apoptosis in vivo. These results indicate that in RGCs, ANXA1 increases IL-1β expression by recruiting p65 to the nucleus, which induces cell apoptosis. The obtained results may help the development of a novel treatment strategy against RGCs apoptosis in acute ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  10. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  11. Heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schlögl, Robert

    2015-03-09

    A heterogeneous catalyst is a functional material that continually creates active sites with its reactants under reaction conditions. These sites change the rates of chemical reactions of the reactants localized on them without changing the thermodynamic equilibrium between the materials.

  12. c-Cbl mediates the degradation of tumorigenic nuclear β-catenin contributing to the heterogeneity in Wnt activity in colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shashar, Moshe; Siwak, Jamaica; Tapan, Umit; Lee, Shin Yin; Meyer, Rosana D.; Parrack, Paige; Tan, Josenia; Khatami, Fatemeh; Francis, Jean; Zhao, Qing; Hartshorn, Kevan; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.; Rahimi, Nader; Chitalia, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Despite the loss of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) in a majority of colorectal cancers (CRC), not all CRCs bear hallmarks of Wnt activation, such as nuclear β-catenin. This underscores the presence of other Wnt regulators that are important to define, given the pathogenic and prognostic roles of nuclear β-catenin in human CRC. Herein, we investigated the effect of Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl) on nuclear β-catenin, which is an oncoprotein upregulated in CRC due to loss-of-function APC or gain-of-function CTNNB1 mutations. Despite mechanistic rationale and recent discoveries of c-Cbl's mutations in solid tumors, little is known about its functional importance in CRC. Our study in a cohort of human CRC patients demonstrated an inverse correlation between nuclear β-catenin and c-Cbl. Further investigation showed that the loss of c-Cbl activity significantly enhanced nuclear β-catenin and CRC tumor growth in cell culture and a mouse xenograft model. c-Cbl interacted with and downregulated β-catenin in a manner that was independent of CTNNB1 or APC mutation status. This study demonstrates a previously unrecognized function of c-Cbl as a negative regulator of CRC. PMID:27661103

  13. The Influence of Standardized Valeriana officinalis Extract on the CYP3A1 Gene Expression by Nuclear Receptors in In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Mrozikiewicz, Przemyslaw M.; Karasiewicz, Monika; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L.; Ozarowski, Marcin; Grzeskowiak, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Valeriana officinalis is one of the most popular medicinal plants commonly used as a sedative and sleep aid. It is suggested that its pharmacologically active compounds derived from the root may modulate the CYP3A4 gene expression by activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and lead to pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of valerian on the expression level of CYP3A1 (homologue to human CYP3A4) as well as nuclear receptors PXR, CAR, RXR, GR, and HNF-4α. Male Wistar rats were given standardized valerian extract (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 3 and 10 days. The expression in liver tissue was analyzed by using real-time PCR. Our result showed a decrease of CYP3A1 expression level by 35% (P = 0.248) and 37% (P < 0.001), respectively. Moreover, Valeriana exhibited statistically significant reduction in RXR (approximately 28%) only after 3-day treatment. We also demonstrated a decrease in the amount HNF-4α by 22% (P = 0.005) and 32% (P = 0.012), respectively. In case of CAR, the increase of expression level by 46% (P = 0.023) was noted. These findings suggest that Valeriana officinalis extract can decrease the CYP3A4 expression and therefore may lead to interactions with synthetic drugs metabolized by this enzyme. PMID:25302309

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  15. Age-Related Nuclear Translocation of P2X6 Subunit Modifies Splicing Activity Interacting with Splicing Factor 3A1

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Hernández, Juan Ignacio; Sebastián-Serrano, Álvaro; Gómez-Villafuertes, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    P2X receptors are ligand-gated ion channels sensitive to extracellular nucleotides formed by the assembling of three equal or different P2X subunits. In this work we report, for the first time, the accumulation of the P2X6 subunit inside the nucleus of hippocampal neurons in an age-dependent way. This location is favored by its anchorage to endoplasmic reticulum through its N-terminal domain. The extracellular domain of P2X6 subunit is the key to reach the nucleus, where it presents a speckled distribution pattern and is retained by interaction with the nuclear envelope protein spectrin α2. The in vivo results showed that, once inside the nucleus, P2X6 subunit interacts with the splicing factor 3A1, which ultimately results in a reduction of the mRNA splicing activity. Our data provide new insights into post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA splicing, describing a novel mechanism that could explain why this process is sensitive to changes that occur with age. PMID:25874565

  16. The proximal region of the 3'-untranslated region of cyclooxygenase-2 is recognized by a multimeric protein complex containing HuR, TIA-1, TIAR, and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U.

    PubMed

    Cok, Steven J; Acton, Stephen J; Morrison, Aubrey R

    2003-09-19

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an early response gene induced in renal mesangial cells by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of COX-2 mRNA plays an important role in IL-1beta induction by regulating message stability and translational efficiency. The first 60 nucleotides of the 3'-UTR of COX-2 are highly conserved and contain multiple copies of the regulatory sequence AUUUA. Introduction of the 60-nucleotide sequence into the 3'-UTR of a heterologous reporter gene resulted in a 70% decrease in reporter gene expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that mesangial cell nuclear fractions contain a multimeric protein complex that bound this region of COX-2 mRNA in a sequence-specific manner. We identified four members of the protein-RNA complex as HuR, TIA-1, TIAR, and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U). Treatment of mesangial cells with IL-1beta caused an increase in cytosolic HuR, which was accompanied by an increase in COX-2 mRNA that co-immunoprecipitated with cytosolic HuR. Therefore, we propose that HuR binds to the proximal region of the 3'-UTR of COX-2 following stimulation by IL-1beta and increases the expression of COX-2 mRNA by facilitating its transport out of the nucleus.

  17. Reconstructing species phylogeny of the carabid beetles Ohomopterus using multiple nuclear DNA sequences: heterogeneous information content and the performance of simultaneous analyses.

    PubMed

    Sota, Teiji; Vogler, Alfried P

    2003-01-01

    We attempted a phylogenetic reconstruction for the carabid subgenus Ohomopterus (genus Carabus), a notable case of radiation with mitochondrial introgression across species. Sequence data from five nuclear single copy loci were used, including wingless (Wg), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PepCK), cytochrome c (Cytc), elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha), and an anonymous single copy locus (Carab1). Sequences of Cytc, EF-1alpha, and Carab1 included intron or intron-like parts with length variation. The analysis of individual loci resulted in low resolution of the phylogenetic relationships, and the monophyly of several morphologically recognized species for which multiple specimens were analyzed was not revealed. Several specimens were heterozygous, with non-monophyletic alleles observed in three of the five loci at which alleles in heterozygotes were separated. In a simultaneous analysis of the five loci with ambiguously aligned parts eliminated and heterozygotic sites treated as missing, the resulting tree was well resolved, but the branch support was generally weak because of conflicting phylogenetic signals from different loci. We also attempted to incorporate allelic sequence data plus the ambiguously aligned parts in the analysis, by using all possible combinations of alleles from different loci in heterozygotic individuals, but the resultant tree was not supported more strongly. Nonetheless, these simultaneous analyses provided support for the monophyly of several species and species groups, and revealed the basic evolutionary trend of OHOMOPTERUS: initial widespread groups with simpler genitalia and the origination of exaggerated genitalia in a derived clade. This study exemplifies problems inherent in the phylogenetic reconstruction of closely related organisms where low levels of variation limit the information content from each locus, while heterozygosity, different phylogenetic history of multiple loci, and alignment ambiguity further hamper

  18. Purification, cloning, and expression of a murine phosphoprotein that binds the kappa B motif in vitro identifies it as the homolog of the human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein. Description of a novel DNA-dependent phosphorylation process.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, J; Van Seuningen, I; Seger, R; Rauch, C T; Sleath, P R; McMullen, B A; Bomsztyk, K

    1994-07-01

    The kappa B enhancer element regulates expression of many genes involved in immune responses and other processes. kappa B motif binds a number of proteins, some but not all, are related to the NF-kappa B family of transcription factors. We have previously identified a 65-kDa phosphoprotein that is specifically recognized by the kappa B motif (Ostrowski, J., Sims, J. E., Sibley, C. H., Valentine, M. A., Dower, S. K., Meier, K. E., and Bomsztyk, K. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 12722-12733). This protein is closely associated with a serine/threonine kinase that is responsive to treatment of cells with interleukin-1 and other agents. We report here purification, cloning, and expression of this kappa B motif-binding phosphoprotein. The primary structure deduced from the isolated murine cDNA, identifies the protein as the homolog of the human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein. Antipeptide antibodies and expression of the cloned cDNA in Escherichia coli, demonstrated that the K protein is the authentic phosphoprotein that binds the kappa B motif in vitro. We also demonstrate that the in vitro phosphorylation of the natural and the recombinant K proteins by the associated kinase is stimulated by the kappa B motif.

  19. Interaction of ApoA-IV with NR4A1 and NR1D1 Represses G6Pase and PEPCK Transcription: Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Downregulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in Mice and a Human Hepatocyte Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Fei; Ji, Yong; DavidsoN, W. Sean; Li, Zongfang; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the nuclear receptor, NR1D1, is a cofactor in ApoA-IV-mediated downregulation of gluconeogenesis. Nuclear receptor, NR4A1, is involved in the transcriptional regulation of various genes involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. We investigated whether NR4A1 influences the effect of ApoA-IV on hepatic glucose metabolism. Our in situ proximity ligation assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that ApoA-IV colocalized with NR4A1 in human liver (HepG2) and kidney (HEK-293) cell lines. The chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase reporter assays indicated that the ApoA-IV and NR4A1 colocalized at the RORα response element of the human G6Pase promoter, reducing its transcriptional activity. Our RNA interference experiments showed that knocking down the expression of NR4A1 in primary mouse hepatocytes treated with ApoA-IV increased the expression of NR1D1, G6Pase, and PEPCK, and that knocking down NR1D1 expression increased the level of NR4A1. We also found that ApoA-IV induced the expression of endogenous NR4A1 in both cultured primary mouse hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and decreased glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Our findings showed that ApoA-IV colocalizes with NR4A1, which suppresses G6Pase and PEPCK gene expression at the transcriptional level, reducing hepatic glucose output and lowering blood glucose. The ApoA-IV-induced increase in NR4A1 expression in hepatocytes mediates further repression of gluconeogenesis. Our findings suggest that NR1D1 and NR4A1 serve similar or complementary functions in the ApoA-IV-mediated regulation of gluconeogenesis. PMID:26556724

  20. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with fractionation and unidentified nuclear effects (FUN CAIs): II. Heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the early Solar System inferred from in situ high-precision magnesium-isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changkun; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Huss, Gary R.; Davis, Andrew M.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with isotopic mass fractionation effects and unidentified nuclear isotopic anomalies (FUN CAIs) have been studied for more than 40 years, but their origins remain enigmatic. Here we report in situ high precision measurements of aluminum-magnesium isotope systematics of FUN CAIs by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Individual minerals were analyzed in six FUN CAIs from the oxidized CV3 carbonaceous chondrites Axtell (compact Type A CAI Axtell 2271) and Allende (Type B CAIs C1 and EK1-4-1, and forsterite-bearing Type B CAIs BG82DH8, CG-14, and TE). Most of these CAIs show evidence for excess 26Mg due to the decay of 26Al. The inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratios [(26Al/27Al)0] and the initial magnesium isotopic compositions (δ26Mg0) calculated using an exponential law with an exponent β of 0.5128 are (3.1 ± 1.6) × 10-6 and 0.60 ± 0.10‰ (Axtell 2271), (3.7 ± 1.5) × 10-6 and -0.20 ± 0.05‰ (BG82DH8), (2.2 ± 1.1) × 10-6 and -0.18 ± 0.05‰ (C1), (2.3 ± 2.4) × 10-5 and -2.23 ± 0.37‰ (EK1-4-1), (1.5 ± 1.1) × 10-5 and -0.42 ± 0.08‰ (CG-14), and (5.3 ± 0.9) × 10-5 and -0.05 ± 0.08‰ (TE) with 2σ uncertainties. We infer that FUN CAIs recorded heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the CAI-forming region(s). Comparison of 26Al-26Mg systematics, stable isotope (oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and titanium) and trace element studies of FUN and non-FUN igneous CAIs indicates that there is a continuum among these CAI types. Based on these observations and evaporation experiments on CAI-like melts, we propose a generic scenario for the origin of igneous (FUN and non-FUN) CAIs: (i) condensation of isotopically normal solids in an 16O-rich gas of approximately solar composition; (ii) formation of CAI precursors by aggregation of these solids together with variable abundances of isotopically anomalous grains-possible carriers of unidentified nuclear (UN) effects; and (iii) melt evaporation of these precursors

  1. The orphan nuclear receptor Nr4a1 couples sympathetic and inflammatory cues in CNS-recruited macrophages to limit neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Iftach; Hanna, Richard N.; Shaked, Helena; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Nowyhed, Heba N.; Tweet, George; Tacke, Robert; Basat, Alp Bugra; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Togher, Susan; Miller, Jacqueline; Blatchley, Amy; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Darvas, Martin; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Thomas, Graham; Lai-Wing-Sun, Sonia; Rezk, Ayman; Bar-Or, Amit; Glass, Christopher K.; Bandukwala, Hozefa; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms linking the sympathetic stress response and inflammation remain enigmatic. Here we demonstrate that the transcription factor Nr4a1 regulates production of norepinephrine (NE) in macrophages, thereby limiting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Lack of Nr4a1 in myeloid cells led to enhanced NE production, accelerated leukocyte infiltration to the central nervous system (CNS) and disease exacerbation in vivo. In contrast, myeloid-specific deletion of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, protected against EAE. Further, we found that Nr4a1 repressed autocrine NE production in macrophages by recruiting the corepressor CoREST to the Th promoter. Our data reveal a new role for macrophages in neuroinflammation and identify Nr4a1 as a key regulator of macrophage catecholamine production. PMID:26523867

  2. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

    PubMed

    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins.

  3. Mutation in type II procollagen (COL2A1) that substitutes aspartate for glycine alpha 1-67 and that causes cataracts and retinal detachment: evidence for molecular heterogeneity in the Wagner syndrome and the Stickler syndrome (arthro-ophthalmopathy)

    PubMed Central

    Körkkö, J; Ritvaniemi, P; Haataja, L; Kääriäinen, H; Kivirikko, K I; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1993-01-01

    A search for mutations in the gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1) was carried out in affected members of a family with early-onset cataracts, lattice degeneration of the retina, and retinal detachment. They had no symptoms suggestive of involvement of nonocular tissues, as is typically found in the Stickler syndrome. The COL2A1 gene was amplified with PCR, and the products were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The results suggested a mutation in one allele for exon 10. Sequencing of the fragment demonstrated a single-base mutation that converted the codon for glycine at position alpha 1-67 to aspartate. The mutation was found in three affected members of the family available for study but not in unaffected members or 100 unrelated individuals. Comparison with previously reported mutations suggested that mutations introducing premature termination codons in the COL2A1 gene are a frequent cause of the Stickler syndrome, but mutations in the COL2A1 gene that replace glycine codons with codons for bulkier amino acid can produce a broad spectrum of disorders that range from lethal chondrodysplasias to a syndrome involving only ocular tissues, similar to the syndrome in the family originally described by Wagner in 1938. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8317498

  4. Etiologic heterogeneity in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, S B; Reich, T; Cloninger, C R

    1987-01-01

    Etiologic heterogeneity in alcohol abuse was evaluated in 195 extended pedigrees, comprising 288 nuclear families of 140 male and 55 female Caucasian American hospitalized alcoholics. Previous adoption studies in Sweden demonstrated differential heritability of two patterns of alcohol abuse in men: type-2 alcoholism exhibited early onset of abuse associated with criminal behavior, while type-1 abuse began at a later age, uncomplicated by antisocial traits. Alcohol abuse in female Swedish adoptees was relatively homogeneous and similar to the late-onset, type-1 abuse. The notion of etiologic heterogeneity, as suggested by the Stockholm Adoption Studies, was examined in the American pedigrees by contrasting the models of familial transmission of susceptibility to alcoholism obtained via segregation analyses of families of male versus female probands. Families of male probands demonstrated significant familial resemblance, accounted for by a multifactorial-polygenic background in addition to a major (gene) effect. In contrast, familial resemblance in the pedigrees of female probands was attributed solely to a multifactorial-polygenic effect. We considered whether some families of male alcoholics were similar to families of female probands, who expressed type-1 abuse predominantly. Pedigrees of male probands were separated in two groups: (1) "female-like" families had a better likelihood for the model obtained for families of female probands than the one for families of all male probands, (2) "male-like" families had a better likelihood for the model of familial transmission describing families of all male probands. A statistically significant difference in the pattern of familial transmission was observed between the "male-like" and "female-like" groups. Discriminant function analysis of alcohol-related symptoms showed that the familial subtypes differed in clinical features as well. Alcohol abuse by male relatives in "male-like" families was characterized by the

  5. Relative Expression of Vitamin D Hydroxylases, CYP27B1 and CYP24A1, and of Cyclooxygenase-2 and Heterogeneity of Human Colorectal Cancer in Relation to Age, Gender, Tumor Location, and Malignancy: Results from Factor and Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brozek, Wolfgang; Manhardt, Teresa; Kállay, Enikö; Peterlik, Meinrad; Cross, Heide S.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies on the significance of vitamin D insufficiency and chronic inflammation in colorectal cancer development clearly indicated that maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the large intestinal epithelium requires balanced interaction of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and prostaglandin cellular signaling networks. The present study addresses the question how colorectal cancer pathogenesis depends on alterations of activities of vitamin D hydroxylases, i.e., CYP27B1-encoded 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase and CYP24A1-encoded 25-hydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase, and inflammation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Data from 105 cancer patients on CYP27B1, VDR, CYP24A1, and COX-2 mRNA expression in relation to tumor grade, anatomical location, gender and age were fit into a multivariate model of exploratory factor analysis. Nearly identical results were obtained by the principal factor and the maximum likelihood method, and these were confirmed by hierarchical cluster analysis: Within the eight mutually dependent variables studied four independent constellations were found that identify different features of colorectal cancer pathogenesis: (i) Escape of COX-2 activity from restraints by the CYP27B1/VDR system can initiate cancer growth anywhere in the colorectum regardless of age and gender; (ii) variations in COX-2 expression are mainly responsible for differences in cancer incidence in relation to tumor location; (iii) advancing age has a strong gender-specific influence on cancer incidence; (iv) progression from well differentiated to undifferentiated cancer is solely associated with a rise in CYP24A1 expression. PMID:24213465

  6. Functional interaction of hepatic nuclear factor-4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha in CYP7A1 regulation is inhibited by a key lipogenic activator, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c.

    PubMed

    Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Fang, Sungsoon; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2007-11-01

    Insulin inhibits transcription of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), a key gene in bile acid synthesis, and the hepatic nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) site in the promoter was identified as a negative insulin response sequence. Using a fasting/feeding protocol in mice and insulin treatment in HepG2 cells, we explored the inhibition mechanisms. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), an insulin-induced lipogenic factor, inversely correlated with Cyp7a1 expression in mouse liver. Interaction of HNF-4 with its coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha), was observed in livers of fasted mice and was reduced after feeding. Conversely, HNF-4 interaction with SREBP-1c was increased after feeding. In vitro studies suggested that SREBP-1c competed with PGC-1alpha for direct interaction with the AF2 domain of HNF-4. Reporter assays showed that SREBP-1c, but not of a SREBP-1c mutant lacking the HNF-4 interacting domain, inhibited HNF-4/PGC-1alpha transactivation of Cyp7a1. SREBP-1c also inhibited PGC-1alpha-coactivation of estrogen receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, pregnane X receptor, and farnesoid X receptor, implying inhibition of HNF-4 by SREBP-1c could extend to other nuclear receptors. In chromatin immunoprecipitation studies, HNF-4 binding to the promoter was not altered, but PGC-1alpha was dissociated, SREBP-1c and histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2) were recruited, and acetylation of histone H3 was decreased upon feeding. Adenovirus-mediated expression of a SREBP-1c dominant-negative mutant, which blocks the interaction of SREBP-1c and HNF-4, partially but significantly reversed the inhibition of Cyp7a1 after feeding. Our data show that SREBP-1c functions as a non-DNA-binding inhibitor and mediates, in part, suppression of Cyp7a1 by blocking functional interaction of HNF-4 and PGC-1alpha. This mechanism may be relevant to known repression of many other HNF-4 target genes upon

  7. Heterogeneity of nuclear estrogen-binding sites in the rat uterus: a simple method for the quantitation of type I and type II sites by (3H)estradiol exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Markaverich, B.M.; Williams, M.; Upchurch, S.; Clark, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Estrogen administration to mature-ovariectomized rats causes the activation or stimulation of secondary nuclear estrogen-binding sites (type II) in the uterus which can interfere with estrogen receptor (type I) measurement. Earlier reports from our laboratory have shown that quantitation of type I sites in the presence of the type II site is very difficult and can only be achieved by graphic analysis of saturation curves which employ a wide range (0.4-40 NM) of (/sup 3/H)estradiol concentrations in nuclear exchange assay. The studies presented in this manuscript describe simple methods which can be used to separately quantitate both nuclear estrogen-binding sites using a single concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol. Since the nuclear type II site does not bind (/sup 3/H)estradiol in the presence of reducing agent, type I sites can be easily quantitated by incubating nuclei (37 C for 30 min) in Tris-EDTA buffer containing 0.1-1.00 mM dithiothreitol using a single saturating concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol. Conversely, a single concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol (40-80 nM) can be used to quantitate the nuclear type II site by incubating nuclei in Tris-EDTA buffer under conditions (4 C for 60 min) which do not measure occupied nuclear estrogen receptor. Therefore, by using the appropriate buffer system, type I and type II sites can be easily separated in mixed binding systems. In addition, we also demonstrate that Nafoxidine does not bind to the nuclear type II site. Therefore, it can be used as a competitive inhibitor of (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding to type I sites and permit the measurement of type II sites without interference from type I sites. These techniques should be applicable to autoradiographic or fluorescence studies which cannot discriminate between steroid binding to these two classes of nuclear estrogen-binding sites.

  8. Ligand-dependent regulation of the activity of the orphan nuclear receptor, small heterodimer partner (SHP), in the repression of bile acid biosynthetic CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 genes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Ji; Choi, Sung-E; Seok, Sun Mi; Yang, Linda; Zuercher, William J; Xu, Yong; Willson, Timothy M; Xu, H Eric; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2011-07-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP) plays important roles in diverse biological processes by directly interacting with transcription factors and inhibiting their activities. SHP has been designated an orphan nuclear receptor, but whether its activity can be modulated by ligands has been a long-standing question. Recently, retinoid-related molecules, including 4-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-3-chlorocinnamic acid (3Cl-AHPC), were shown to bind to SHP and enhance apoptosis. We have examined whether 3Cl-AHPC acts as an agonist and increases SHP activity in the repression of bile acid biosynthetic CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 genes and delineated the underlying mechanisms. Contrary to this expectation, micromolar concentrations of 3Cl-AHPC increased CYP7A1 expression but indirectly via p38 kinase signaling. Nanomolar concentrations, however, repressed CYP7A1 expression and decreased bile acid levels in HepG2 cells, and little repression was observed when SHP was down-regulated by small hairpin RNA. Mechanistic studies revealed that 3Cl-AHPC bound to SHP, increased the interaction of SHP with liver receptor homologue (LRH)-1, a hepatic activator for CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 genes, and with repressive cofactors, Brahma, mammalian Sin3a, and histone deacetylase-1, and, subsequently, increased the occupancy of SHP and these cofactors at the promoters. Mutation of Leu-100, predicted to contact 3Cl-AHPC within the SHP ligand binding pocket by molecular modeling, severely impaired the increased interaction with LRH-1, and repression of LRH-1 activity mediated by 3Cl-AHPC. 3Cl-AHPC repressed SHP metabolic target genes in a gene-specific manner in human primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These data suggest that SHP may act as a ligand-regulated receptor in metabolic pathways. Modulation of SHP activity by synthetic ligands may be a useful therapeutic strategy.

  9. Phenotypically heterogeneous populations in spatially heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Pintu; Klumpp, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    The spatial expansion of a population in a nonuniform environment may benefit from phenotypic heterogeneity with interconverting subpopulations using different survival strategies. We analyze the crossing of an antibiotic-containing environment by a bacterial population consisting of rapidly growing normal cells and slow-growing, but antibiotic-tolerant persister cells. The dynamics of crossing is characterized by mean first arrival times and is found to be surprisingly complex. It displays three distinct regimes with different scaling behavior that can be understood based on an analytical approximation. Our results suggest that a phenotypically heterogeneous population has a fitness advantage in nonuniform environments and can spread more rapidly than a homogeneous population.

  10. Patterns of Emphysema Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Valipour, Arschang; Shah, Pallav L.; Gesierich, Wolfgang; Eberhardt, Ralf; Snell, Greg; Strange, Charlie; Barry, Robert; Gupta, Avina; Henne, Erik; Bandyopadhyay, Sourish; Raffy, Philippe; Yin, Youbing; Tschirren, Juerg; Herth, Felix J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although lobar patterns of emphysema heterogeneity are indicative of optimal target sites for lung volume reduction (LVR) strategies, the presence of segmental, or sublobar, heterogeneity is often underappreciated. Objective The aim of this study was to understand lobar and segmental patterns of emphysema heterogeneity, which may more precisely indicate optimal target sites for LVR procedures. Methods Patterns of emphysema heterogeneity were evaluated in a representative cohort of 150 severe (GOLD stage III/IV) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients from the COPDGene study. High-resolution computerized tomography analysis software was used to measure tissue destruction throughout the lungs to compute heterogeneity (≥ 15% difference in tissue destruction) between (inter-) and within (intra-) lobes for each patient. Emphysema tissue destruction was characterized segmentally to define patterns of heterogeneity. Results Segmental tissue destruction revealed interlobar heterogeneity in the left lung (57%) and right lung (52%). Intralobar heterogeneity was observed in at least one lobe of all patients. No patient presented true homogeneity at a segmental level. There was true homogeneity across both lungs in 3% of the cohort when defining heterogeneity as ≥ 30% difference in tissue destruction. Conclusion Many LVR technologies for treatment of emphysema have focused on interlobar heterogeneity and target an entire lobe per procedure. Our observations suggest that a high proportion of patients with emphysema are affected by interlobar as well as intralobar heterogeneity. These findings prompt the need for a segmental approach to LVR in the majority of patients to treat only the most diseased segments and preserve healthier ones. PMID:26430783

  11. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  12. Double trouble for grasshopper molecular systematics: intra-individual heterogeneity of both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequences in Hesperotettix viridis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hesperotettix viridis grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae:Melanoplinae) exhibit intra-individual variation in both mitochondrial 12S-valine-16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA sequences. These findings violate core assumptions underlying DNA sequence data obtained via pol...

  13. Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schryer, David R.

    In the past few years it has become increasingly clear that heterogeneous, or multiphase, processes play an important role in the atmosphere. Unfortunately the literature on the subject, although now fairly extensive, is still rather dispersed. Furthermore, much of the expertise regarding heterogeneous processes lies in fields not directly related to atmospheric science. Therefore, it seemed desirable to bring together for an exchange of ideas, information, and methodologies the various atmospheric scientists who are actively studying heterogeneous processes as well as other researchers studying similar processes in the context of other fields.

  14. Towards heterogeneous distributed debugging

    SciTech Connect

    Damodaran-Kamal, S.K.

    1995-04-01

    Several years of research and development in parallel debugger design have given up several techniques, though implemented in a wide range of tools for an equally wide range of systems. This paper is an evaluation of these myriad techniques as applied to the design of a heterogeneous distributed debugger. The evaluation is based on what features users perceive as useful, as well as the ease of implementation of the features using the available technology. A preliminary architecture for such a heterogeneous tool is proposed. Our effort in this paper is significantly different from the other efforts at creating portable and heterogeneous distributed debuggers in that we concentrate on support for all the important issues in parallel debugging, instead of simply concentrating on portability and heterogeneity.

  15. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  16. NERVA Reactor Based on NRX A1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This artist's concept from 1963 shows a proposed NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) incorporating the NRX-A1, the first NERVA-type cold flow reactor. The NERVA engine, based on Kiwi nuclear reactor technology, was intended to power a RIFT (Reactor-In-Flight-Test) nuclear stage, for which Marshall Space Flight Center had development responsibility.

  17. Heterogeneous basic catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Hideshi

    1995-05-01

    Heterogeneous acid catalysis attracted much attention primarily because heterogeneous acidic catalysts act as catalysts in petroleum refinery and are known as a main catalyst in the cracking process which is the largest process among the industrial chemical processes. In contrast to these extensive studies of heterogeneous acidic catalysts, fewer efforts have been given to the study of heterogeneous basic catalysts. The types of heterogeneous basic catalysts are listed in Table 1. Except for non-oxide catalysts, the basic sites are believed to be surface O atoms. The studies of heterogeneous catalysis have been continuous and progressed steadily. They have never been reviewed in the chemical Reviews before. It is more useful and informative to describe the studies of heterogeneous basic catalysis performed for a long period. In the present article, therefore, the cited papers are not restricted to those published recently, but include those published for the last 25 years. The paper first describes the generation of basic sites before describing methods used in the characterization of basic surfaces. These are indicator methods, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of CO{sub 2}, UV absorption and luminescence spectroscopies, TPD of H{sub 2}, XPS, IR of CO{sub 2}, IR of pyrrole, and oxygen exchange between CO{sub 2} and the surface. The paper then discusses studies on the catalysis by heterogeneous basic catalysts. Some of these reactions are dehydration, dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, amination, alkylation, ring transformation, and reactions of organosilanes. Catalysts discussed are single component metal oxides, zeolites, non-oxide types, and superbasic catalysts. 141 refs.

  18. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  19. Characterization of Paper Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Considine, John M.

    Paper and paperboard are the most widely-used green materials in the world because they are renewable, recyclable, reusable, and compostable. Continued and expanded use of these materials and their potential use in new products requires a comprehensive understanding of the variability of their mechanical properties. This work develops new methods to characterize the mechanical properties of heterogeneous materials through a combination of techniques in experimental mechanics, materials science and numerical analysis. Current methods to analyze heterogeneous materials focus on crystalline materials or polymer-crystalline composites, where material boundaries are usually distinct. This work creates a methodology to analyze small, continuously-varying stiffness gradients in 100% polymer systems and is especially relevant to paper materials where factors influencing heterogeneity include local mass, fiber orientation, individual pulp fiber properties, local density, and drying restraint. A unique approach was used to understand the effect of heterogeneity on paper tensile strength. Additional variation was intentionally introduced, in the form of different size holes, and their effect on strength was measured. By modifying two strength criteria, an estimate of strength in the absence of heterogeneity was determined. In order to characterize stiffness heterogeneity, a novel load fixture was developed to excite full-field normal and shear strains for anisotropic stiffness determination. Surface strains were measured with digital image correlation and were analyzed with the VFM (Virtual Fields Method). This approach led to VFM-identified stiffnesses that were similar to values determined by conventional tests. The load fixture and VFM analyses were used to measure local stiffness and local stiffness variation on heterogeneous anisotropic materials. The approach was validated on simulated heterogeneous materials and was applied experimentally to three different paperboards

  20. Spatial heterogeneity in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Morrissy, A Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M G; Remke, Marc; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Shih, David J H; Holgado, Borja L; Farooq, Hamza; Donovan, Laura K; Garzia, Livia; Agnihotri, Sameer; Kiehna, Erin N; Mercier, Eloi; Mayoh, Chelsea; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Nikbakht, Hamid; Gayden, Tenzin; Torchia, Jonathon; Picard, Daniel; Merino, Diana M; Vladoiu, Maria; Luu, Betty; Wu, Xiaochong; Daniels, Craig; Horswell, Stuart; Thompson, Yuan Yao; Hovestadt, Volker; Northcott, Paul A; Jones, David T W; Peacock, John; Wang, Xin; Mack, Stephen C; Reimand, Jüri; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam M; Thiessen, Nina; Li, Yisu; Schein, Jacqueline E; Lee, Darlene; Carlsen, Rebecca; Mayo, Michael; Tse, Kane; Tam, Angela; Dhalla, Noreen; Ally, Adrian; Chuah, Eric; Cheng, Young; Plettner, Patrick; Li, Haiyan I; Corbett, Richard D; Wong, Tina; Long, William; Loukides, James; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Tabori, Uri; Rood, Brian R; Myseros, John S; Packer, Roger J; Korshunov, Andrey; Lichter, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan M; Schüller, Ulrich; Dirks, Peter; Huang, Annie; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Bader, Gary D; Swanton, Charles; Ma, Yusanne; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Majewski, Jacek; Jones, Steven J M; Das, Sunit; Malkin, David; Jabado, Nada; Marra, Marco A; Taylor, Michael D

    2017-04-10

    Spatial heterogeneity of transcriptional and genetic markers between physically isolated biopsies of a single tumor poses major barriers to the identification of biomarkers and the development of targeted therapies that will be effective against the entire tumor. We analyzed the spatial heterogeneity of multiregional biopsies from 35 patients, using a combination of transcriptomic and genomic profiles. Medulloblastomas (MBs), but not high-grade gliomas (HGGs), demonstrated spatially homogeneous transcriptomes, which allowed for accurate subgrouping of tumors from a single biopsy. Conversely, somatic mutations that affect genes suitable for targeted therapeutics demonstrated high levels of spatial heterogeneity in MB, malignant glioma, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Actionable targets found in a single MB biopsy were seldom clonal across the entire tumor, which brings the efficacy of monotherapies against a single target into question. Clinical trials of targeted therapies for MB should first ensure the spatially ubiquitous nature of the target mutation.

  1. Cancer heterogeneity and imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B

    2016-10-04

    There is interest in identifying and quantifying tumor heterogeneity at the genomic, tissue pathology and clinical imaging scales, as this may help better understand tumor biology and may yield useful biomarkers for guiding therapy-based decision making. This review focuses on the role and value of using x-ray, CT, MRI and PET based imaging methods that identify, measure and map tumor heterogeneity. In particular we highlight the potential value of these techniques and the key challenges required to validate and qualify these biomarkers for clinical use.

  2. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  3. Heterogeneous Uncertainty Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-08

    probabilistic ( HTP ) agents, the concept of probabilistic version of XML and RDF, and probabilistic methods to reason about collections of moving objects. S...heterogeneous temporal probabilistic ( HTP ) agents, the concept of probabilistic version of XML and RDF, and probabilistic methods to reason about...temporal probabilistic ( HTP ) agent. HTP agents can build temporal probabilistic reasoning capabilities on top of multiple databases and software

  4. Heterogeneous waste processing

    DOEpatents

    Vanderberg, Laura A.; Sauer, Nancy N.; Brainard, James R.; Foreman, Trudi M.; Hanners, John L.

    2000-01-01

    A combination of treatment methods are provided for treatment of heterogeneous waste including: (1) treatment for any organic compounds present; (2) removal of metals from the waste; and, (3) bulk volume reduction, with at least two of the three treatment methods employed and all three treatment methods emplyed where suitable.

  5. Scales of mantle heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. C.; Akber-Knutson, S.; Konter, J.; Kellogg, J.; Hart, S.; Kellogg, L. H.; Romanowicz, B.

    2004-12-01

    A long-standing question in mantle dynamics concerns the scale of heterogeneity in the mantle. Mantle convection tends to both destroy (through stirring) and create (through melt extraction and subduction) heterogeneity in bulk and trace element composition. Over time, these competing processes create variations in geochemical composition along mid-oceanic ridges and among oceanic islands, spanning a range of scales from extremely long wavelength (for example, the DUPAL anomaly) to very small scale (for example, variations amongst melt inclusions). While geochemical data and seismic observations can be used to constrain the length scales of mantle heterogeneity, dynamical mixing calculations can illustrate the processes and timescales involved in stirring and mixing. At the Summer 2004 CIDER workshop on Relating Geochemical and Seismological Heterogeneity in the Earth's Mantle, an interdisciplinary group evaluated scales of heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle using a combined analysis of geochemical data, seismological data and results of numerical models of mixing. We mined the PetDB database for isotopic data from glass and whole rock analyses for the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR), projecting them along the ridge length. We examined Sr isotope variability along the East Pacific rise by looking at the difference in Sr ratio between adjacent samples as a function of distance between the samples. The East Pacific Rise exhibits an overall bowl shape of normal MORB characteristics, with higher values in the higher latitudes (there is, however, an unfortunate gap in sampling, roughly 2000 km long). These background characteristics are punctuated with spikes in values at various locations, some, but not all of which are associated with off-axis volcanism. A Lomb-Scargle periodogram for unevenly spaced data was utilized to construct a power spectrum of the scale lengths of heterogeneity along both ridges. Using the same isotopic systems (Sr, Nd

  6. Inferring biological dynamics in heterogeneous cellular environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressé, Steve

    In complex environments, it often appears that biomolecules such as proteins do not diffuse normally. That is, their mean square displacement does not scale linearly with time. This anomalous diffusion happens for multiple reasons: proteins can bind to structures and other proteins; fluorophores used to label proteins may flicker or blink making it appear that the labeled protein is diffusing anomalously; and proteins can diffuse in differently crowded environments. Here we describe methods for learning about such processes from imaging data collected inside the heterogeneous environment of the living cell. Refs.: ''Inferring Diffusional Dynamics from FCS in Heterogeneous Nuclear Environments'' Konstantinos Tsekouras, Amanda Siegel, Richard N. Day, Steve Pressé*, Biophys. J. , 109, 7 (2015). ''A data-driven alternative to the fractional Fokker-Planck equation'' Steve Pressé*, J. Stat. Phys.: Th. and Expmt. , P07009 (2015).

  7. Concepts in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    OxIdlaing Species In Heterogeneous Catalytic Oxidation. In the history of the study of heterogeneioum oxidation catalysis, reaction mechanisms have’ been...for sonti timie but recent workŔ’ onl the lplatitnum-rtothe~idina alloy systemn semi- s quite promising 10) lvad ito at bettr understanding. 1t wait...chemical nature of the catalyst, its previous history , and on the courac of the catalytic reaction itself. The energy spectrum of the active surface

  8. Heterogeneities in granular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, A.; Barker, G. C.; Luck, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The absence of Brownian motion in granular media is a source of much complexity, including the prevalence of heterogeneity, whether static or dynamic, within a given system. Such strong heterogeneities can exist as a function of depth in a box of grains; this is the system we study here. First, we present results from three-dimensional, cooperative and stochastic Monte Carlo shaking simulations of spheres on heterogeneous density fluctuations. Next, we juxtapose these with results obtained from a theoretical model of a column of grains under gravity; frustration via competing local fields is included in our model, whereas the effect of gravity is to slow down the dynamics of successively deeper layers. The combined conclusions suggest that the dynamics of a real granular column can be divided into different phases—ballistic, logarithmic, activated, and glassy—as a function of depth. The nature of the ground states and their retrieval (under zero-temperature dynamics) is analyzed; the glassy phase shows clear evidence of its intrinsic (“crystalline”) states, which lie below a band of approximately degenerate ground states. In the other three phases, by contrast, the system jams into a state chosen randomly from this upper band of metastable states. PMID:18541918

  9. Unravelling mononuclear phagocyte heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Frédéric; Gordon, Siamon; Hume, David A.; Mowat, Allan M.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2011-01-01

    When Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn first described dendritic cells (DCs) in 1973 it took many years to convince the immunology community that these cells were truly distinct from macrophages. Almost four decades later, the DC is regarded as the key initiator of adaptive immune responses; however, distinguishing DCs from macrophages still leads to confusion and debate in the field. Here, Nature Reviews Immunology asks five experts to discuss the issue of heterogeneity in the mononuclear phagocyte system and to give their opinion on the importance of defining these cells for future research. PMID:20467425

  10. {sup 48}Ca HETEROGENEITY IN DIFFERENTIATED METEORITES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsin-Wei; Lee, Typhoon; Lee, Der-Chuen; Shen, Jason Jiun-San; Chen, Jiang-Chang

    2011-12-10

    Isotopic heterogeneities of {sup 48}Ca have been found in numerous bulk meteorites that are correlated with {sup 50}Ti and {sup 54}Cr anomalies among differentiated planetary bodies, and the results suggest that a rare subset of neutron-rich Type Ia supernova (nSN Ia) was responsible for contributing these neutron-rich iron-group isotopes into the solar system (SS). The heterogeneity of these isotopes found in differentiated meteorites indicates that the isotopic compositions of the bulk SS are not uniform, and there are significant amounts of nSNe Ia dust incompletely mixed with the rest of SS materials during planetary formation. Combined with the data of now-extinct short-lived nuclide {sup 60}Fe, which can be produced more efficiently from an nSN Ia than a Type II supernova ejecta, the observed planetary-scale isotopic heterogeneity probably reflects a late input of stellar dust grains with neutron-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium nuclides into the early SS.

  11. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  12. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  13. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  14. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  15. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  16. Disordered hyperuniform heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-10-01

    Disordered hyperuniform many-body systems are distinguishable states of matter that lie between a crystal and liquid: they are like perfect crystals in the way they suppress large-scale density fluctuations and yet are like liquids or glasses in that they are statistically isotropic with no Bragg peaks. These systems play a vital role in a number of fundamental and applied problems: glass formation, jamming, rigidity, photonic and electronic band structure, localization of waves and excitations, self-organization, fluid dynamics, quantum systems, and pure mathematics. Much of what we know theoretically about disordered hyperuniform states of matter involves many-particle systems. In this paper, we derive new rigorous criteria that disordered hyperuniform two-phase heterogeneous materials must obey and explore their consequences. Two-phase heterogeneous media are ubiquitous; examples include composites and porous media, biological media, foams, polymer blends, granular media, cellular solids, and colloids. We begin by obtaining some results that apply to hyperuniform two-phase media in which one phase is a sphere packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space {{{R}}d} . Among other results, we rigorously establish the requirements for packings of spheres of different sizes to be ‘multihyperuniform’. We then consider hyperuniformity for general two-phase media in {{{R}}d} . Here we apply realizability conditions for an autocovariance function and its associated spectral density of a two-phase medium, and then incorporate hyperuniformity as a constraint in order to derive new conditions. We show that some functional forms can immediately be eliminated from consideration and identify other forms that are allowable. Specific examples and counterexamples are described. Contact is made with well-known microstructural models (e.g. overlapping spheres and checkerboards) as well as irregular phase-separation and Turing-type patterns. We also ascertain a family of

  17. Disordered hyperuniform heterogeneous materials.

    PubMed

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-10-19

    Disordered hyperuniform many-body systems are distinguishable states of matter that lie between a crystal and liquid: they are like perfect crystals in the way they suppress large-scale density fluctuations and yet are like liquids or glasses in that they are statistically isotropic with no Bragg peaks. These systems play a vital role in a number of fundamental and applied problems: glass formation, jamming, rigidity, photonic and electronic band structure, localization of waves and excitations, self-organization, fluid dynamics, quantum systems, and pure mathematics. Much of what we know theoretically about disordered hyperuniform states of matter involves many-particle systems. In this paper, we derive new rigorous criteria that disordered hyperuniform two-phase heterogeneous materials must obey and explore their consequences. Two-phase heterogeneous media are ubiquitous; examples include composites and porous media, biological media, foams, polymer blends, granular media, cellular solids, and colloids. We begin by obtaining some results that apply to hyperuniform two-phase media in which one phase is a sphere packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space [Formula: see text]. Among other results, we rigorously establish the requirements for packings of spheres of different sizes to be 'multihyperuniform'. We then consider hyperuniformity for general two-phase media in [Formula: see text]. Here we apply realizability conditions for an autocovariance function and its associated spectral density of a two-phase medium, and then incorporate hyperuniformity as a constraint in order to derive new conditions. We show that some functional forms can immediately be eliminated from consideration and identify other forms that are allowable. Specific examples and counterexamples are described. Contact is made with well-known microstructural models (e.g. overlapping spheres and checkerboards) as well as irregular phase-separation and Turing-type patterns. We also ascertain a family

  18. Heterogeneity and timing of translocation and membrane-mediated assembly of different annexins

    SciTech Connect

    Skrahina, Tatsiana; Piljic, Alen; Schultz, Carsten

    2008-03-10

    Many cell types, including neurons and epithelial cells, express a variety of annexins. Although the overall function has only been partially unravelled, a dominant feature is the formation of two-dimensional assemblies under the plasma membrane in a calcium-dependent manner. Here we show that fluorescently tagged annexins A1, A2, A4, A5, and A6 translocate and assemble at the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope, except annexin A2, which only attaches to the plasma membrane. All annexins have different response times to elevated calcium levels as was shown by the translocation of co-expressed proteins. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed the static nature of all annexin assemblies. Analysis of the assemblies by Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) using acceptor bleaching demonstrated mostly annexin-specific self-assembly. Heterogeneous assembly formation was shown between annexins A5 and A1, and A5 and A2. The formation of homo- and heterogeneous annexin assemblies may play an important role when high increases in calcium occur, such as after disruption of the plasma membrane.

  19. Heterogeneity in Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, M J; Delleman, J W

    1977-01-01

    Heterogeneity of Waardenburg syndrome is demonstrated in a review of 1,285 patients from the literature and 34 previously unreported patients in five families in the Netherlands. The syndrome seems to consist of two genetically distinct entities that can be differentiated clinically: type I, Waardenburg syndrome with dystopia canthorum; and type II, Waardenburg syndrome without dystopia canthorum. Both types have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The incidence of bilateral deafness in the two types of the syndrome was found in one-fourth with type I and about half of the patients with type II. This difference has important consequences for genetic counseling. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:331943

  20. Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

  1. Nuclear heterogeneity in conidial populations of Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a major producer of aflatoxin and an opportunistic pathogen for a wide range of hosts. Understanding genotypic and phenotypic variations within strains of A. flavus is important for controlling disease and reducing aflatoxin contamination. A. flavus is multinucleate and predomi...

  2. Data manipulation in heterogeneous databases

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Segev, A.

    1991-10-01

    Many important information systems applications require access to data stored in multiple heterogeneous databases. This paper examines a problem in inter-database data manipulation within a heterogeneous environment, where conventional techniques are no longer useful. To solve the problem, a broader definition for join operator is proposed. Also, a method to probabilistically estimate the accuracy of the join is discussed.

  3. Interference Management in Heterogeneous Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    INTERFERENCE MANAGEMENT IN HETEROGENEOUS NETWORKS UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND JUNE 2013 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) AUG 2011 – FEB 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTERFERENCE MANAGEMENT IN HETEROGENEOUS NETWORKS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...However, such deployments require efficient frequency allocation schemes for managing interference from the pico- and macro base stations that are

  4. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  5. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  6. Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  7. Molecular Heterogeneity in Aldosterone-Producing Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Nanba, Kazutaka; Chen, Andrew X.; Omata, Kei; Vinco, Michelle; Giordano, Thomas J.; Else, Tobias; Hammer, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: The use of next-generation sequencing has resulted in the identification of recurrent somatic mutations underlying primary aldosteronism (PA). However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the relationship between tumor aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) expression and somatic mutation status. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate tumor CYP11B2 expression and somatic aldosterone-driver gene mutation heterogeneity. Methods: Fifty-one adrenals from 51 PA patients were studied. Immunohistochemistry for CYP11B2 was performed. Aldosterone-producing adenomas with intratumor CYP11B2 heterogeneity were analyzed for mutation status using targeted next-generation sequencing. DNA was isolated from CYP11B2-positive, CYP11B2-negative, and adjacent normal areas from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Results: Of 51 adrenals, seven (14 %) showed distinct heterogeneity in CYP11B2 by immunohistochemistry, including six adenomas with intratumor heterogeneity and one multinodular hyperplastic adrenal with both CYP11B2-positive and -negative nodules. Of the six adrenocortical adenomas with CYP11B2 heterogeneity, three had aldosterone-regulating mutations (CACNA1D p.F747C, KCNJ5 p.L168R, ATP1A1 p.L104R) only in CYP11B2-positive regions, and one had two different mutations localized to two histologically distinct CYP11B2-positive regions (ATP2B3 p.L424_V425del, KCNJ5 p.G151R). Lastly, one adrenal with multiple CYP11B2-expressing nodules showed different mutations in each (CACNA1D p.F747V and ATP1A1 p.L104R), and no mutations were identified in CYP11B2-negative nodule or adjacent normal adrenal. Conclusions: Adrenal tumors in patients with PA can demonstrate clear heterogeneity in CYP11B2 expression and somatic mutations in driver genes for aldosterone production. These findings suggest that aldosterone-producing adenoma tumorigenesis can occur within preexisting nodules through the acquisition of somatic mutations that drive aldosterone

  8. Theory of heterogeneous viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmacher, Walter; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Mazzone, Valerio

    2016-03-01

    We review a new theory of viscoelasticity of a glass-forming viscous liquid near and below the glass transition. In our model, we assume that each point in the material has a specific viscosity, which varies randomly in space according to a fluctuating activation free energy. We include a Maxwellian elastic term, and assume that the corresponding shear modulus fluctuates as well with the same distribution as that of the activation barriers. The model is solved in coherent potential approximation, for which a derivation is given. The theory predicts an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence of the viscosity in the vanishing frequency limit, independent of the distribution of the activation barriers. The theory implies that this activation energy is generally different from that of a diffusing particle with the same barrier height distribution. If the distribution of activation barriers is assumed to have the Gaussian form, the finite-frequency version of the theory describes well the typical low-temperature alpha relaxation peak of glasses. Beta relaxation can be included by adding another Gaussian with centre at much lower energies than that is responsible for the alpha relaxation. At high frequencies, our theory reduces to the description of an elastic medium with spatially fluctuating elastic moduli (heterogeneous elasticity theory), which explains the occurrence of the boson peak-related vibrational anomalies of glasses.

  9. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  10. Heterogeneous recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, Vitaly I.

    1991-02-01

    The paper summarizes the results of investigations performed to obtain deep 3-D holograms with 102 i0 mkm physical thickness allowing the postexposure amplification and the a posteriori changing of the grating parameters. This aim has been achieved by developing heterogeneous systems on the basis of porous glass with light-sensitive compositions introduced into it. 1. INTRODUCTION. LIGHT-SENSITIVE MEDIA FOR 3-D HOLOGRAMS RECORDING. The 3-D holograms have many useful properties: very high diffraction efficiency angular and spectral selectivity but low level of noise. It shoud be noted that in this case deep 3-D holograms are dealt with whose physical thickness is as high as 102 -i mkm. Such hologram recording is usually done using homogeneous light-sensitive media for example dyed acid-halide and electrooptical crystals photochrome glass photostructurized polimer compositions and so on. The nature of photophisical and photochemical processes responsible for the light sensitivity of these materials exclude the possibility of post-exposure treatment. This does not allow to enhance the recorded holograms and considerably hampers their fixing or makes it practically impossible. The object of our work is to create the media which are quite suitable for two-stage processes of the deep hologram formation with post-exposure processing. Such material must satisfy the following requirements: a)they must have high permeability for the developing substances in order to make the development duration suitable for practical applications b)they must be shrinkproof to prevent deformation of the

  11. Reference Point Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N.; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income. PMID:27672374

  12. Reference Point Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income.

  13. Nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

  14. Nuclear privatization

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffs, E.

    1995-11-01

    The United Kingdom government announced in May 1995 plans to privatize the country`s two nuclear generating companies, Nuclear Electric and Scottish Nuclear. Under the plan, the two companies will become operating divisions of a unified holding company, to be called British Electric, with headquarters in Scotland. Britain`s nuclear plants were left out of the initial privatization in 1989 because the government believed the financial community would be unwilling to accept the open-ended liability of decommissioning the original nine stations based on the Magnox gas-cooled reactor. Six years later, the government has found a way around this by retaining these power stations in state ownership, leaving the new nuclear company with the eight Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) stations and the recently completed Sizewell B PWR stations. The operating Magnox stations are to be transferred to BNFL, which operates two Magnox stations of their own at Calder Hall and Chapelcross.

  15. Nuclear stress test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  16. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    HbA1C test; Glycated hemoglobin test; Glycohemoglobin test; Hemoglobin A1C; Diabetes - A1C; Diabetic - A1C ... gov/pubmed/26696680 . Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb, glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, HbA1a, HbA1b, HbA1c - blood. ...

  17. EIYMNVPV Motif is Essential for A1CF Nucleus Localization and A1CF (-8aa) Promotes Proliferation of MDA-MB-231 Cells via Up-Regulation of IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Hao, Jin; Yuan, Yue; Peng, Rui; Wang, Honglian; Ni, Dongsheng; Gu, Yuping; Huang, Liyuan; Mao, Zhaomin; Lyu, Zhongshi; Du, Yao; Liu, Zhicheng; Li, Yiman; Ju, Pan; Long, Yaoshui; Liu, Jianing; Zhou, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Apobec-1 complementation factor (A1CF) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonuceloprotein (hnRNP) and mediates apolipoprotein-B mRNA editing. A1CF can promote the regeneration of the liver by post-transcriptionally stabilizing Interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA. It also contains two transcriptional variants-A1CF64 and A1CF65, distinguished by the appearance of a 24-nucleotide motif which contributes to the corresponding eight-amino acid motif of EIYMNVPV. For the first time, we demonstrated that the EIYMNVPV motif was essential for A1CF nucleus localization, A1CF deficient of the EIYMNVPV motif, A1CF (-8aa) showed cytoplasm distribution. More importantly, we found that A1CF (-8aa), but not its full-length counterpart, can promote proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells accompanied with increased level of IL-6 mRNA. Furthermore, silencing of IL-6 attenuated A1CF (-8aa)-induced proliferation in MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, notably, these findings suggest that A1CF (-8aa) promoted proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro viewing IL-6 as a target. Thus, the EIYMNVPV motif could be developed as a potential target for basal-like breast cancer therapy. PMID:27231908

  18. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  19. The effect of O-GlcNAcylation on hnRNP A1 translocation and interaction with transportin1.

    PubMed

    Roth, Shira; Khalaila, Isam

    2017-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a major pre-mRNA binding protein involved in transcription and translation. Although predominantly nuclear, hnRNP A1 shuttles rapidly between the nucleus and the cytosol, delivering its anchored pre-mRNA for further processing. Translocation is important for hnRNP A1 to accomplish its transcriptional and translational roles. Transportin1 (Trn1), a translocation protein, facilitates the translocation of hnRNP A1 back to the nucleus. Moreover, phosphorylation of serine residues at hnRNP A1 C-terminal domain affects its translocation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation is not the only modification that hnRNP A1 undergoes, but also O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) could occur. Several putative novel O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation sites in hnRNP A1 were mapped. Whereas enhanced O-GlcNAcylation increased hnRNP A1 interaction with Trn1, enhanced phosphorylation reduced the interaction between the proteins. In addition, elevated O-GlcNAcylation resulted in hnRNP A1 seclusion in the nucleus, whereas elevated phosphorylation resulted in its accumulation in the cytosol. These findings suggest that a new player, i.e., O-GlcNAcylation, regulates hnRNP A1 translocation and interaction with Trn1, possibly affecting its function. There is a need for further study, to elucidate the role of O-GlcNAcylation in the regulation of the specific activities of hnRNP A1 in transcription and translation.

  20. Heterogonous Nanofluids for Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alammar, Khalid

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear reactions can be associated with high heat energy release. Extracting such energy efficiently requires the use of high-rate heat exchangers. Conventional heat transfer fluids, such as water and oils are limited in their thermal conductivity, and hence nanofluids have been introduced lately to overcome such limitation. By suspending metal nanoparticles with high thermal conductivity in conventional heat transfer fluids, thermal conductivity of the resulting homogeneous nanofluid is increased. Heterogeneous nanofluids offer yet more potential for heat transfer enhancement. By stratifying nanoparticles within the boundary layer, thermal conductivity is increased where temperature gradients are highest, thereby increasing overall heat transfer of a flowing fluid. In order to test the merit of this novel technique, a numerical study of a laminar pipe flow of a heterogeneous nanofluid was conducted. Effect of Iron-Oxide distribution on flow and heat transfer characteristics was investigated. With Iron-Oxide volume concentration of 0.009 in water, up to 50% local heat transfer enhancement was predicted for the heterogeneous compared to homogeneous nanofluids. Increasing the Reynolds number is shown to increase enhancement while having negligible effect on pressure drop. Using permanent magnets attached externally to the pipe, an experimental investigation conducted at MIT nuclear reactor laboratory for similar flow characteristics of a heterogeneous nanofluid have shown upto 160% enhancement in heat transfer. Such results show that heterogeneous nanofluids are promising for augmenting heat transfer rates in nuclear power heat exchanger systems.

  1. Nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Halley-Stott, Richard P; Pasque, Vincent; Gurdon, J B

    2013-06-01

    There is currently particular interest in the field of nuclear reprogramming, a process by which the identity of specialised cells may be changed, typically to an embryonic-like state. Reprogramming procedures provide insight into many mechanisms of fundamental cell biology and have several promising applications, most notably in healthcare through the development of human disease models and patient-specific tissue-replacement therapies. Here, we introduce the field of nuclear reprogramming and briefly discuss six of the procedures by which reprogramming may be experimentally performed: nuclear transfer to eggs or oocytes, cell fusion, extract treatment, direct reprogramming to pluripotency and transdifferentiation.

  2. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  3. Heterogeneity in motor driven transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabei, Ali

    2015-03-01

    I will discuss quantitative analysis of particle tracking data for motor driven vesicles inside an insulin secreting cell. We use this method to study the dynamical and structural heterogeneity inside the cell. I will discuss our effort to explain the origin of observed heterogeneity in intracellular transport. Finally, I will explain how analyzing directional correlations in transport trajectories reveals self-similarity in the diffusion media.

  4. (Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

  5. Nuclear battlefields

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, W.M.; Fieldhouse, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides complete data on the nuclear operations and research facilities in the U.S.A., the U.S.S.R., France, China and the U.K. It describes detailed estimates on the U.S.S.R.'s nuclear stockpile for over 500 locations. It shows how non-nuclear countries cooperate with the world-wide war machine. And it maps the U.S. nuclear facilities from Little America, WY, and Charleston, SC, to the battleships patroling the world's oceans and subs stalking under the sea. The data were gathered from unclassified sources through the Freedom of Information Act, from data supplied to military installations, and from weapons source books. It provides guidance for policymakers, government and corporate officials.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  7. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home » Science Education » Science Topics » Nuclear Medicine SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for ... administered by inhalation, by oral ingestion, or by direct injection into an organ. The mode of tracer ...

  8. Nuclear accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Mobley, J.A.

    1982-05-01

    A nuclear accident with radioactive contamination can happen anywhere in the world. Because expert nuclear emergency teams may take several hours to arrive at the scene, local authorities must have a plan of action for the hours immediately following an accident. The site should be left untouched except to remove casualties. Treatment of victims includes decontamination and meticulous wound debridement. Acute radiation syndrome may be an overwhelming sequela.

  9. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  10. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  11. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  12. Modeling Cellular Noise Underlying Heterogeneous Cell Responses in the Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Kazunari; Shindo, Yuki; Takahashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity, which plays an essential role in biological phenomena, such as drug resistance and migration, is considered to arise from intrinsic (i.e., reaction kinetics) and extrinsic (i.e., protein variability) noise in the cell. However, the mechanistic effects of these types of noise to determine the heterogeneity of signal responses have not been elucidated. Here, we report that the output of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling activity is modulated by cellular noise, particularly by extrinsic noise of particular signaling components in the pathway. We developed a mathematical model of the EGF signaling pathway incorporating regulation between extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear pore complex (NPC), which is necessary for switch-like activation of the nuclear ERK response. As the threshold of switch-like behavior is more sensitive to perturbations than the graded response, the effect of biological noise is potentially critical for cell fate decision. Our simulation analysis indicated that extrinsic noise, but not intrinsic noise, contributes to cell-to-cell heterogeneity of nuclear ERK. In addition, we accurately estimated variations in abundance of the signal proteins between individual cells by direct comparison of experimental data with simulation results using Apparent Measurement Error (AME). AME was constant regardless of whether the protein levels varied in a correlated manner, while covariation among proteins influenced cell-to-cell heterogeneity of nuclear ERK, suppressing the variation. Simulations using the estimated protein abundances showed that each protein species has different effects on cell-to-cell variation in the nuclear ERK response. In particular, variability of EGF receptor, Ras, Raf, and MEK strongly influenced cellular heterogeneity, while others did not. Overall, our results indicated that cellular heterogeneity in response to EGF is strongly driven by extrinsic noise, and that such heterogeneity

  13. Plasma filtering techniques for nuclear waste remediation

    DOE PAGES

    Gueroult, Renaud; Hobbs, David T.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2015-04-24

    Nuclear waste cleanup is challenged by the handling of feed stocks that are both unknown and complex. Plasma filtering, operating on dissociated elements, offers advantages over chemical methods in processing such wastes. The costs incurred by plasma mass filtering for nuclear waste pretreatment, before ultimate disposal, are similar to those for chemical pretreatment. However, significant savings might be achieved in minimizing the waste mass. As a result, this advantage may be realized over a large range of chemical waste compositions, thereby addressing the heterogeneity of legacy nuclear waste.

  14. Plasma filtering techniques for nuclear waste remediation.

    PubMed

    Gueroult, Renaud; Hobbs, David T; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2015-10-30

    Nuclear waste cleanup is challenged by the handling of feed stocks that are both unknown and complex. Plasma filtering, operating on dissociated elements, offers advantages over chemical methods in processing such wastes. The costs incurred by plasma mass filtering for nuclear waste pretreatment, before ultimate disposal, are similar to those for chemical pretreatment. However, significant savings might be achieved in minimizing the waste mass. This advantage may be realized over a large range of chemical waste compositions, thereby addressing the heterogeneity of legacy nuclear waste.

  15. Nuclear telemedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, R. T.; Szasz, I. J.

    1990-06-01

    Diagnostic nuclear medicine patient images have been transniitted for 8 years from a regional conununity hospital to a university teaching hospital 700 kiloinetres away employing slow scan TV and telephone. Transruission and interpretation were done at the end of each working day or as circumstances required in cases of emergencies. Referring physicians received the nuclear medicine procedure report at the end of the completion day or within few minutes of completion in case of emergency procedures. To date more than 25 patient studies have been transmitted for interpretation. Blinded reinterpretation of the original hard copy data of 350 patient studies resulted in 100 agreement with the interpretation of transmitted data. This technique provides high quality diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine services in remote hospitals where the services of an on-site nuclear physician is not available. 2. HISTORY Eight years ago when the nuclear medicine physician at Trail Regional Hospital left the Trail area and an other could not be recruited we examined the feasibility of image transmission by phone for interpretation since closing the department would have imposed unacceptable physical and financial hardship and medical constraints on the patient population the nearest nuclear medicine facility was at some 8 hours drive away. In hospital patients would have to be treated either based purely on physical findings or flown to Vancouver at considerable cost to the health care system (estimated cost $1500.

  16. Dealing with spatial heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsily, Gh.; Delay, F.; Gonçalvès, J.; Renard, Ph.; Teles, V.; Violette, S.

    2005-03-01

    Heterogeneity can be dealt with by defining homogeneous equivalent properties, known as averaging, or by trying to describe the spatial variability of the rock properties from geologic observations and local measurements. The techniques available for these descriptions are mostly continuous Geostatistical models, or discontinuous facies models such as the Boolean, Indicator or Gaussian-Threshold models and the Markov chain model. These facies models are better suited to treating issues of rock strata connectivity, e.g. buried high permeability channels or low permeability barriers, which greatly affect flow and, above all, transport in aquifers. Genetic models provide new ways to incorporate more geology into the facies description, an approach that has been well developed in the oil industry, but not enough in hydrogeology. The conclusion is that future work should be focused on improving the facies models, comparing them, and designing new in situ testing procedures (including geophysics) that would help identify the facies geometry and properties. A world-wide catalog of aquifer facies geometry and properties, which could combine site genesis and description with methods used to assess the system, would be of great value for practical applications. On peut aborder le problème de l'hétérogénéité en s'efforçant de définir une perméabilité équivalente homogène, par prise de moyenne, ou au contraire en décrivant la variation dans l'espace des propriétés des roches à partir des observations géologiques et des mesures locales. Les techniques disponibles pour une telle description sont soit continues, comme l'approche Géostatistique, soit discontinues, comme les modèles de faciès, Booléens, ou bien par Indicatrices ou Gaussiennes Seuillées, ou enfin Markoviens. Ces modèles de faciès sont mieux capables de prendre en compte la connectivité des strates géologiques, telles que les chenaux enfouis à forte perméabilité, ou au contraire les faci

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  18. Heterogeneity of vertebrate brain tubulins.

    PubMed Central

    Field, D J; Collins, R A; Lee, J C

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the extent of brain tubulin heterogeneity in six vertebrate species commonly used in tubulin research (rat, calf, pig, chicken, human, and lamb) using isoelectric focusing, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and peptide mapping procedures that provide higher resolution than previously available. The extent of heterogeneity is extremely similar in all of these organisms, as judged by number, range of isoelectric points, and distribution of the isotubulins. A minimum of 6 alpha and 12 beta tubulins was resolved from all sources. Even the pattern of spots on two-dimensional peptide maps is remarkably similar. These similarities suggest that the populations of tubulin in all of these brains should have similar overall physical properties. It is particularly interesting that chicken, which has only four or five beta-tubulin genes, contains approximately 12 beta tubulins. Thus, post-translational modification must generate at least some of the tubulin heterogeneity. Mammalian species, which contain 15-20 tubulin DNA sequences, do not show any more tubulin protein heterogeneity than does chicken. This suggests that expression of only a small number of the mammalian genes may be required to generate the observed tubulin heterogeneity. Images PMID:6588378

  19. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  20. A dosimetric model for the heterogeneous delivery of radioactive nanoparticles In vivo: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Satterlee, Andrew B; Attayek, Peter; Midkiff, Bentley; Huang, Leaf

    2017-03-17

    ᅟ: Accurate and quantitative dosimetry for internal radiation therapy can be especially challenging, given the heterogeneity of patient anatomy, tumor anatomy, and source deposition. Internal radiotherapy sources such as nanoparticles and monoclonal antibodies require high resolution imaging to accurately model the heterogeneous distribution of these sources in the tumor. The resolution of nuclear imaging modalities is not high enough to measure the heterogeneity of intratumoral nanoparticle deposition or intratumoral regions, and mathematical models do not represent the actual heterogeneous dose or dose response. To help answer questions at the interface of tumor dosimetry and tumor biology, we have modeled the actual 3-dimensional dose distribution of heterogeneously delivered radioactive nanoparticles in a tumor after systemic injection.

  1. Nuclear risk

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, M.

    1989-01-01

    The title of our session, Nuclear Risk Versus Other Power Options, is provocative. It is also a title with different meanings to different people. To the utility chief executive officer, nuclear power is a high-risk financial undertaking because of political and economic barriers to cost recovery. To the utility dispatcher, it is a high-risk future power source since plant completion and start-up dates can be delayed for very long times due to uncertain legal and political issues. To the environmentalist, concerned about global effects such as greenhouse and acid rain, nuclear power is a relatively low risk energy source. To the financial people, nuclear power is a cash cow turned sour because of uncertainties as to what new plants will cost and whether they will even be allowed to operate. The statistics on risk are known and the results of probability risk assessment calculations of risks are known. The challenge is not to make nuclear power safer, it is already one of the safest, if not the safest, source of power currently available. The challenge is to find a way to communicate this to the public.

  2. Nuclear Systems Kilopower Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Don; Gibson, Marc; Mason, Lee; Houts, Michael; McClure, Patrick; Robinson, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Systems Kilopower Project was initiated by NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program in fiscal year 2015 to demonstrate subsystem-level technology readiness of small space fission power in a relevant environment (Technology Readiness Level 5) for space science and human exploration power needs. The Nuclear Systems Kilopower Project consists of two elements. The primary element is the Kilopower Prototype Test, also called the Kilopower Reactor Using Stirling Technology(KRUSTY) Test. This element consists of the development and testing of a fission ground technology demonstrator of a 1 kWe fission power system. A 1 kWe system matches requirements for some robotic precursor exploration systems and future potential deep space science missions, and also allows a nuclear ground technology demonstration in existing nuclear test facilities at low cost. The second element, the Mars Kilopower Scalability Study, consists of the analysis and design of a scaled-up version of the 1 kWe reference concept to 10 kWe for Mars surface power projected requirements, and validation of the applicability of the KRUSTY experiment to key technology challenges for a 10 kWe system. If successful, these two elements will lead to initiation of planning for a technology demonstration of a 10 kWe fission power capability for Mars surface outpost power.

  3. Simulator for heterogeneous dataflow architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    1993-01-01

    A new simulator is developed to simulate the execution of an algorithm graph in accordance with the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) rules. ATAMM is a Petri Net model which describes the periodic execution of large-grained, data-independent dataflow graphs and which provides predictable steady state time-optimized performance. This simulator extends the ATAMM simulation capability from a heterogenous set of resources, or functional units, to a more general heterogenous architecture. Simulation test cases show that the simulator accurately executes the ATAMM rules for both a heterogenous architecture and a homogenous architecture, which is the special case for only one processor type. The simulator forms one tool in an ATAMM Integrated Environment which contains other tools for graph entry, graph modification for performance optimization, and playback of simulations for analysis.

  4. Simulator for heterogeneous dataflow architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    1993-09-01

    A new simulator is developed to simulate the execution of an algorithm graph in accordance with the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) rules. ATAMM is a Petri Net model which describes the periodic execution of large-grained, data-independent dataflow graphs and which provides predictable steady state time-optimized performance. This simulator extends the ATAMM simulation capability from a heterogenous set of resources, or functional units, to a more general heterogenous architecture. Simulation test cases show that the simulator accurately executes the ATAMM rules for both a heterogenous architecture and a homogenous architecture, which is the special case for only one processor type. The simulator forms one tool in an ATAMM Integrated Environment which contains other tools for graph entry, graph modification for performance optimization, and playback of simulations for analysis.

  5. Static heterogeneities in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of water seems to be closely related to static heterogeneities. These static heterogeneities are related to the local structure of water molecules, and when properly characterized, may offer an economical explanation of thermodynamic data. The key feature of liquid water is not so much that the existence of hydrogen bonds, first pointed out by Linus Pauling, but rather the local geometry of the liquid molecules is not spherical or oblong but tetrahedral. In the consideration of static heterogeneities, this local geometry is critical. Recent experiments suggested more than one phase of amorphous solid water, while simulations suggest that one of these phases is metastable with respect to another, so that in fact there are only two stable phases.

  6. Nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This paper discusses how, as part of the Department of Energy's implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, DOE is required to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and, if it determines that the site is suitable, recommend to the President its selection for a nuclear waste repository. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in considering development of the plan, issued five objections, one of which is DOE's failure to recognize the range of alternative conceptual models of the Yucca Mountain site that can be supported by the limited existing technical data. At the end of the quarter DOE directed its project offices in Washington and Texas to begin orderly phase-out of all site-specific repository activities. Costs for this phase-out are $53 million for the Deaf Smith site and $85 million for the Hanford site.

  7. Advanced reactor physics methods for heterogeneous reactor cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Steven A.

    To maintain the economic viability of nuclear power the industry has begun to emphasize maximizing the efficiency and output of existing nuclear power plants by using longer fuel cycles, stretch power uprates, shorter outage lengths, mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel and more aggressive operating strategies. In order to accommodate these changes, while still satisfying the peaking factor and power envelope requirements necessary to maintain safe operation, more complexity in commercial core designs have been implemented, such as an increase in the number of sub-batches and an increase in the use of both discrete and integral burnable poisons. A consequence of the increased complexity of core designs, as well as the use of MOX fuel, is an increase in the neutronic heterogeneity of the core. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the current methods that are used for reactor analysis. New methods must be developed to address these deficiencies while still maintaining the computational efficiency of existing reactor analysis methods. In this thesis, advanced core design methodologies are developed to be able to adequately analyze the highly heterogeneous core designs which are currently in use in commercial power reactors. These methodological improvements are being pursued with the goal of not sacrificing the computational efficiency which core designers require. More specifically, the PSU nodal code NEM is being updated to include an SP3 solution option, an advanced transverse leakage option, and a semi-analytical NEM solution option.

  8. Nuclear Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossión, Rubén

    2010-09-01

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction). Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  9. Dynamic fracture of heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G.; Liu, C.; Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.; Bennett, J.G.; Haberman, K.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to investigate the fundamental aspects of the process of dynamic fracture propagation in heterogeneous materials. The work focused on three important, but poorly understood, aspects of dynamic fracture for materials with a heterogeneous microstructure. These were: the appropriateness of using a single-parameter asymptotic analysis to describe dynamic crack-tip deformation fields, the temperature rises at the tip and on the flanks of a running crack, and the constitutive modeling of damage initiation and accumulation.

  10. Nuclear pursuits

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This table lists quantities of warheads (in stockpile, peak number per year, total number built, number of known test explosions), weapon development milestones (developers of the atomic bomb and hydrogen bomb, date of first operational ICBM, first nuclear-powered naval SSN in service, first MIRVed missile deployed), and testing milestones (first fission test, type of boosted fission weapon, multistage thermonuclear test, number of months from fission bomb to multistage thermonuclear bomb, etc.), and nuclear infrastructure (assembly plants, plutonium production reactors, uranium enrichment plants, etc.). Countries included in the tally are the United States, Soviet Union, Britain, France, and China.

  11. Nuclear orbiting

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, D.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear orbiting following collisions between sd and p shell nuclei is discussed. The dependence of this process on the real and imaginary parts of the nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed, as well as the evolution of the dinucleus toward a fully equilibrated fused system. 26 refs., 15 figs.

  12. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  13. Nuclear Terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2001-01-01

    As pointed out by several speakers, the level of violence and destruction in terrorist attacks has increased significantly during the past decade. Fortunately, few have involved weapons of mass destruction, and none have achieved mass casualties. The Aum Shinrikyo release of lethal nerve agent, sarin, in the Tokyo subway on March 20, 1995 clearly broke new ground by crossing the threshold in attempting mass casualties with chemical weapons. However, of all weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons still represent the most frightening threat to humankind. Nuclear weapons possess an enormous destructive force. The immediacy and scale of destruction are unmatched. In addition to destruction, terrorism also aims to create fear among the public and governments. Here also, nuclear weapons are unmatched. The public's fear of nuclear weapons or, for that matter, of all radioactivity is intense. To some extent, this fear arises from a sense of unlimited vulnerability. That is, radioactivity is seen as unbounded in three dimensions - distance, it is viewed as having unlimited reach; quantity, it is viewed as having deadly consequences in the smallest doses (the public is often told - incorrectly, of course - that one atom of plutonium will kill); and time, if it does not kill you immediately, then it will cause cancer decades hence.

  14. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-09-01

    A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

  16. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  17. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    The technical principles and practices of the civil nuclear industry are described with particular reference to fission and its products, natural and artificial radioactivity elements principally concerned and their relationships, main types of reactor, safety issues, the fuel cycle, waste management, issues related to weapon proliferation, environmental considerations and possible future developments.

  18. Molecular ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review and status report to those in theoretical chemistry of the rapidly developing surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. The art of catalysis is developing into science. This profound change provides one with opportunities not only to understand the molecular ingredients of important catalytic systems but also to develop new and improved catalyst. The participation of theorists to find answers to important questions is sorely needed for the sound development of the field. It is the authors hope that some of the outstanding problems of heterogeneous catalysis that are identified in this paper will be investigated. For this purpose the paper is divided into several sections. The brief Introduction to the methodology and recent results of the surface science of heterogeneous catalysis is followed by a review of the concepts of heterogeneous catalysis. Then, the experimental results that identified the three molecular ingredients of catalysis, structure, carbonaceous deposit and the oxidation state of surface atoms are described. Each section is closed with a summary and a list of problems that require theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Finally attempts to build new catalyst systems and the theoretical and experimental problems that appeared in the course of this research are described.

  19. Teaching about Heterogeneous Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals vary in their responses to incentives and opportunities. For example, additional education will affect one person differently than another. In recent years, econometricians have given increased attention to such heterogeneous responses and to the consequences of such responses for interpreting regression estimates, especially…

  20. Floodplain heterogeneity and meander migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of horizontal heterogeneity of floodplain soils on rates and patterns of meander migration is analyzed with a Ikeda et al. (1981)-type model for hydrodynamics and bed morphodynamics, coupled with a physically-based bank erosion model according to the approach developed by Motta et al. (20...

  1. Heterogeneous porous media in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababou, Rachid

    In natural geologic formations, flow and transport-related processes are perturbed by multidimensional and anisotropic material heterogeneities of diverse sizes, shapes, and origins (bedding, layering, inclusions, fractures, grains, for example). Heterogeneity tends to disperse and mix transported quantities and may initiate new transfer mechanisms not seen in ideally homogeneous porous media. Effective properties such as conductivity and dispersivity may not be simple averages of locally measured quantities.The special session, “Effective Constitutive Laws for Heterogeneous Porous Media,” convened at AGU's 1992 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, addressed these issue. Over forty-five contributions, both oral and poster, covering a broad range of physical phenomena were presented. The common theme was the macroscale characterization and modeling of flow and flow-related processes in geologic media that are heterogeneous at various scales (from grain size or fracture aperture, up to regional scales). The processes analyzed in the session included coupled hydro-mechanical processes; Darcy-type flow in the saturated, unsaturated, or two-phase regimes; tracer transport, dilution, and dispersion. These processes were studied for either continuous (porous) or discontinuous (fractured) media.

  2. Social Capital and Community Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffe, Hilde

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that more pronounced community heterogeneity is associated with lower levels of social capital. These studies, however, concentrate on specific aspects in which people differ (such as income inequality or ethnic diversity). In the present paper, we introduce the number of parties in the local party system as a more…

  3. Surface science of heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    White, J M

    1982-10-29

    Some of the present and future directions for surface science as a growing and naturally interdisciplinary subject are reviewed. Particular attention is given to surface reaction chemistry as it is related to heterogenous catalysis, a subject area where there are abundant opportunities for detailed measurements of structure and dynamics at the molecular level.

  4. Flammability of Heterogeneously Combusting Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    Most engineering materials, including some metals, most notably aluminum, burn in homogeneous combustion. 'Homogeneous' refers to both the fuel and the oxidizer being in the same phase, which is usually gaseous. The fuel and oxidizer are well mixed in the combustion reaction zone, and heat is released according to some relation like q(sub c) = delta H(sub c)c[((rho/rho(sub 0))]exp a)(exp -E(sub c)/RT), Eq. (1) where the pressure exponent a is usually close to unity. As long as there is enough heat released, combustion is sustained. It is useful to conceive of a threshold pressure beyond which there is sufficient heat to keep the temperature high enough to sustain combustion, and beneath which the heat is so low that temperature drains away and the combustion is extinguished. Some materials burn in heterogeneous combustion, in which the fuel and oxidizer are in different phases. These include iron and nickel based alloys, which burn in the liquid phase with gaseous oxygen. Heterogeneous combustion takes place on the surface of the material (fuel). Products of combustion may appear as a solid slag (oxide) which progressively covers the fuel. Propagation of the combustion melts and exposes fresh fuel. Heterogeneous combustion heat release also follows the general form of Eq.(1), except that the pressure exponent a tends to be much less than 1. Therefore, the increase in heat release with increasing pressure is not as dramatic as it is in homogeneous combustion. Although the concept of a threshold pressure still holds in heterogeneous combustion, the threshold is more difficult to identify experimentally, and pressure itself becomes less important relative to the heat transfer paths extant in any specific application. However, the constants C, a, and E(sub c) may still be identified by suitable data reduction from heterogeneous combustion experiments, and may be applied in a heat transfer model to judge the flammability of a material in any particular actual

  5. Hydrological heterogeneity in agricultural riparian buffer strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Larocque, Marie; Perron, Rachel; Wiseman, Natalie; Labrecque, Michel

    2017-03-01

    Riparian buffer strips (RBS) may protect surface water and groundwater in agricultural settings, although their effectiveness, observed in field-scale studies, may not extend to a watershed scale. Hydrologically-controlled leaching plots have often shown RBS to be effective at buffering nutrients and pesticides, but uncontrolled field studies have sometimes suggested limited effectiveness. The limited RBS effectiveness may be explained by the spatiotemporal hydrological heterogeneity near non-irrigated fields. This hypothesis was tested in conventional corn and soy fields in the St. Lawrence Lowlands of southern Quebec (Canada), where spring melt brings heavy and rapid runoff, while summer months are hot and dry. One field with a mineral soil (Saint-Roch-de-l'Achigan) and another with an organic-rich soil (Boisbriand) were equipped with passive runoff collectors, suction cup lysimeters, and piezometers placed before and after a 3 m-wide RBS, and monitored from 2011 to 2014. Soil topography of the RBS was mapped to a 1 cm vertical precision and a 50 cm sampling grid. On average, surface runoff intersects the RBS perpendicularly, but is subject to substantial local heterogeneity. Groundwater saturates the root zones, but flows little at the time of snowmelt. Groundwater flow is not consistently perpendicular to the RBS, and may reverse, flowing from stream to field under low water flow regimes with stream-aquifer connectivity, thus affecting RBS effectiveness calculations. Groundwater flow direction can be influenced by stratigraphy, local soil hydraulic properties, and historical modification of the agricultural stream beds. Understanding the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of surface and groundwater flows is essential to correctly assess the effectiveness of RBS in intercepting agro-chemical pollution. The implicit assumption that water flows across vegetated RBS, from the field to the stream, should always be verified.

  6. Nuclear Weapons Targeting, AP-550, CROM A1, Reference Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    when the cal cu i1 t oJr i s r iii in inq g i CPWI memory. The RS ~T key il so ta-kes tire(’ CICula1ttor ou[t o ryilo p ro,; ramr and leaves the pointer...11OBmax = 2308 yl/ 3 exp(-AJVN/15) for P-targets HOBmax = the minimum of: 900Y1/3 epQ -targets 2308Y2 / 3 exp(-AJVN/15) 28 where AJVN = adjusted... RS MuI1 Yield (KT) HOB (ft) CEP (ft) Offset, PEH (ft) (ft) (if) of Safety PH(f SOURCE OF DATA: Defense Intelligence Agency, Physical Vulnerability

  7. Surface heterogeneity of small asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Sho

    A rubble pile model of asteroid origin would predict averaged rather homogeneous surface of an asteroid. Previous spacecraft observations (mostly S-type asteroids) did not show large color/albedo variation on the surface. Vesta would be exceptional since HST observation suggested that its surface should be heterogeneous due to the impact excavation of the interior. As for a young asteroid (832) Karin (age being 5Ma), Sasaki et al. (2004) detected variation of infrared spectra which could be explained by the difference of the space weathering degree. They discussed the possibility of the survival of the old surface. However, the variation was not confirmed by later observation (Chapman et al., 2007; Vernazza et al., 2007). Recent observation of a small (550m) asteroid Itokawa by Hayabusa spacecraft revealed that Itokawa is heterogeneous in color and albedo although the overall rocky structure is considered as a rubble pile (Saito et al., 2006). The color difference can be explained by the difference of weathering degree (Ishiguro et al., 2008). The heterogeneity could be explained by mass movement caused by rapid rotation from YORP effect (Scheeres et al., 2007) or seismic shaking (Sasaki, 2006). Probably small silicate asteroids without significant regolith could have heterogeneous in color and albedo. On large asteroids (˜ a few 10km), regolith reaccumulation should have covered the underlying heterogeneity. References: Chapman, C. R. et al (2007) Icarus, 191, 323-329 Ishiguro, M. et al. (2008) MAPS, in press. Saito, J. et al. (2006) Science, 312, 1341-1344 Sasaki, S. (2006) in Spacecraft Reconnaissance of Asteroid and Comet Interiors Sasaki, T. et al (2004) Astrophys. J. 615, L161-L164 Scheeres, D. J. (2007) Icarus 188, 425-429 Vernazza, P. et al. (2007) Icarus 191, 330-336.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  9. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  10. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  12. Nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Radioactive waste is mounting at U.S. nuclear power plants at a rate of more than 2,000 metric tons a year. Pursuant to statute and anticipating that a geologic repository would be available in 1998, the Department of Energy (DOE) entered into disposal contracts with nuclear utilities. Now, however, DOE does not expect the repository to be ready before 2010. For this reason, DOE does not want to develop a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) by 1998. This book is concerned about how best to store the waste until a repository is available, congressional requesters asked GAO to review the alternatives of continued storage at utilities' reactor sites or transferring waste to an MRS facility, GAO assessed the likelihood of an MRSA facility operating by 1998, legal implications if DOE is not able to take delivery of wastes in 1998, propriety of using the Nuclear Waste Fund-from which DOE's waste program costs are paid-to pay utilities for on-site storage capacity added after 1998, ability of utilities to store their waste on-site until a repository is operating, and relative costs and safety of the two storage alternatives.

  13. Biodiesel production using heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Surbhi; Arora, Ajay K; Badoni, Rajendra P; Tuli, Deepak K

    2011-02-01

    The production and use of biodiesel has seen a quantum jump in the recent past due to benefits associated with its ability to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG). There are large number of commercial plants producing biodiesel by transesterification of vegetable oils and fats based on base catalyzed (caustic) homogeneous transesterification of oils. However, homogeneous process needs steps of glycerol separation, washings, very stringent and extremely low limits of Na, K, glycerides and moisture limits in biodiesel. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The present report is review of the progress made in development of heterogeneous catalysts suitable for biodiesel production. This review shall help in selection of suitable catalysts and the optimum conditions for biodiesel production.

  14. NASA GSFC Perspective on Heterogeneous Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Wesley A.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of NASA GSFC, our onboard processing applications, the applicability heterogeneous processing to these applications, and necessary developments to enable heterogeneous processing to be infused into our missions.

  15. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  16. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  17. Temperature chaos and quenched heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucca, Paolo; Parisi, Giorgio; Rizzo, Tommaso

    2014-03-01

    We present a treatable generalization of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model which introduces correlations in the elements of the coupling matrix through multiplicative disorder on the single variables and investigate the consequences on the phase diagram. We define a generalized qEA parameter and test the structural stability of the SK results in this correlated case evaluating the de Almeida-Thouless line of the model. As a main result we demonstrate the increase of temperature chaos effects due to heterogeneities.

  18. On comparing heterogeneity across biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Robert J; Rajaram, Satwik; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2015-06-01

    Microscopy reveals complex patterns of cellular heterogeneity that can be biologically informative. However, a limitation of microscopy is that only a small number of biomarkers can typically be monitored simultaneously. Thus, a natural question is whether additional biomarkers provide a deeper characterization of the distribution of cellular states in a population. How much information about a cell's phenotypic state in one biomarker is gained by knowing its state in another biomarker? Here, we describe a framework for comparing phenotypic states across biomarkers. Our approach overcomes the current limitation of microscopy by not requiring costaining biomarkers on the same cells; instead, we require staining of biomarkers (possibly separately) on a common collection of phenotypically diverse cell lines. We evaluate our approach on two image datasets: 33 oncogenically diverse lung cancer cell lines stained with 7 biomarkers, and 49 less diverse subclones of one lung cancer cell line stained with 12 biomarkers. We first validate our method by comparing it to the "gold standard" of costaining. We then apply our approach to all pairs of biomarkers and use it to identify biomarkers that yield similar patterns of heterogeneity. The results presented in this work suggest that many biomarkers provide redundant information about heterogeneity. Thus, our approach provides a practical guide for selecting independently informative biomarkers and, more generally, will yield insights into both the connectivity of biological networks and the complexity of the state space of biological systems.

  19. Soft Dielectrics: Heterogeneity and Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudykh, Stephan; Debotton, Gal; Bhattacharya, Kaushik

    2012-02-01

    Dielectric Elastomers are capable of large deformations in response to electrical stimuli. Heterogeneous soft dielectrics with proper microstructures demonstrate much stronger electromechanical coupling than their homogeneous constituents. In turn, the heterogeneity is an origin for instability developments leading to drastic change in the composite microstructure. In this talk, the electromechanical instabilities are considered. Stability of anisotropic soft dielectrics is analyzed. Ways to achieve giant deformations and manipulating extreme material properties are discussed. 1. S. Rudykh and G. deBotton, ``Instabilities of Hyperelastic Fiber Composites: Micromechanical Versus Numerical Analyses.'' Journal of Elasticity, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/2010.1007/s10659-011-9313-x 2. S. Rudykh, K. Bhattacharya and G. deBotton, ``Snap-through actuation of thick-wall electroactive balloons.'' International Journal of Non-Linear Mechanics, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnonlinmec.2011.05.006 3. S. Rudykh and G. deBotton, ``Stability of Anisotropic Electroactive Polymers with Application to Layered Media.'' Zeitschrift f"ur angewandte Mathematik und Physik, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00033-011-0136-1 4. S. Rudykh, A. Lewinstein, G. Uner and G. deBotton, ``Giant Enhancement of the Electromechanical Coupling in Soft Heterogeneous Dielectrics.'' 2011 http://arxiv.org/abs/1105.4217v1

  20. Measuring heterogeneous remanence in paleomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Geneviciene, Ieva

    2007-06-01

    Remanence directions of from the same block-sample may be inconsistent or unrepresentative due to orientation and location heterogeneity of their remanence-bearing minerals (RBM). Magnetization-heterogeneity is usually undetectable at the specimen-level but we replicated its effects by measuring 8 small specimens with stable magnetizations (8 or 5.2 cm3). These were assembled into a single large multi-specimen inside 125 cm3 containers that were measured in a Molspin ``BigSpin'' magnetometer. Large-specimen remanence directions deflect towards the direction of any strongly magnetized sub-specimen. Differences between the large-specimen remanence and that for the group of individually measured sub-specimens worsened when one sub-specimen was mis-oriented. These discrepancies were cancelled or reduced using larger numbers of specimen orientations in the magnetometer. Conventional schemes with 4 or 6 different measurement-orientations may fail to suppress heterogeneity-effects whereas our 12-orientation protocol may succeed. For most specimens, acceptable remanence-homogeneity is present where similar remanence-directions are recorded from 4, 6, and 12 different spin-orientations.

  1. Analyzing and modeling heterogeneous behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiting; Wu, Xiaoqing; He, Dongyue; Zhu, Qiang; Ni, Jixiang

    2016-05-01

    Recently, it was pointed out that the non-Poisson statistics with heavy tail existed in many scenarios of human behaviors. But most of these studies claimed that power-law characterized diverse aspects of human mobility patterns. In this paper, we suggest that human behavior may not be driven by identical mechanisms and can be modeled as a Semi-Markov Modulated Process. To verify our suggestion and model, we analyzed a total of 1,619,934 records of library visitations (including undergraduate and graduate students). It is found that the distribution of visitation intervals is well fitted with three sections of lines instead of the traditional power law distribution in log-log scale. The results confirm that some human behaviors cannot be simply expressed as power law or any other simple functions. At the same time, we divided the data into groups and extracted period bursty events. Through careful analysis in different groups, we drew a conclusion that aggregate behavior might be composed of heterogeneous behaviors, and even the behaviors of the same type tended to be different in different period. The aggregate behavior is supposed to be formed by "heterogeneous groups". We performed a series of experiments. Simulation results showed that we just needed to set up two states Semi-Markov Modulated Process to construct proper representation of heterogeneous behavior.

  2. Nuclear overlap functions

    SciTech Connect

    Eskola, K.J.; Vogt, R.; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    A three parameter Wood-Saxon shape is used to describe the nuclear density distribution, which R{sub A} is the nuclear radius, {approx} is the surface thickness, and {omega} allows for central irregularities. The electron scattering data is used where available for R{sub A}, z, and {omega}. When data is unavailable, the parameters {omega} = O, z = 0.54 fm and R{sub A} = 1.19 A{sup 1/3} - 1.61 A{sup -1/3} fm are used. The central density {rho}{sub 0} is found from the normalization {infinity} d{sup 3}r{rho}{sub A}(r) = A.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-08-19

    A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

  4. Genetic heterogeneity in multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Deere, M.; Blanton, S.H.; Scott, C.I.

    1994-09-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is generally an autosomal dominant hereditary chondrodystrophy characterized by abnormal epiphyseal centers of the long bones. There are at least two clinical and radiographical MED phenotypes, Fairbank and Ribbing forms, with the former having been better characterized. While less frequent, there are also reports of an autosomal recessive type which does not differ radiographically from the autosomal dominant type. Recently, a family with MED has been shown to map to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 19. We have tested linkage to six short tandem repeat markers from chromosome 19 in three multigenerational families with Fairbank MED and another MED family in which there were three of seven affected siblings with unaffected parents. The three families with autosomal dominant MED were linked to D19S215 with a maximum lod score of 3.82 at {theta} = 0.0. Linkage to chromosome 19 was excluded in the fourth family under autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant models with either reduced penetrance or germline mosaicism. Lod scores were -{infinity} and -2.37 at {theta} = 0.0 for D19S215, respectively. Linkage to candidate genes, Col9A1, Col9A2, and Col11A1 was tested and excluded for both models in this family. Col11A1 was excluded under a recessive model. We have confirmed linkage of MED, Fairbank, to chromosome 19 and demonstrated that MED is genetically heterogeneous.

  5. The Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Explains problems enforcing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) of 1968. Provides factual charts and details concerning the production of nuclear energy and arms, the processing and disposal of waste products, and outlines the nuclear fuel cycle. Discusses safeguards, the risk of nuclear terrorism, and ways to deal with these problems. (NL)

  6. The Nuclear Power/Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Sam; Totten, Martha Wescoat

    1985-01-01

    Once they have nuclear power, most countries will divert nuclear materials from commercial to military programs. In excerpts from the book "Facing the Danger" (by Totten, S. and M. W., Crossing Press, 1984), five anti-nuclear activists explain how and why they have been addressing the nuclear connection. (RM)

  7. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  9. Nuclear security

    SciTech Connect

    Dingell, J.D.

    1991-02-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, located in Livermore, California, generates and controls large numbers of classified documents associated with the research and testing of nuclear weapons. Concern has been raised about the potential for espionage at the laboratory and the national security implications of classified documents being stolen. This paper determines the extent of missing classified documents at the laboratory and assesses the adequacy of accountability over classified documents in the laboratory's custody. Audit coverage was limited to the approximately 600,000 secret documents in the laboratory's custody. The adequacy of DOE's oversight of the laboratory's secret document control program was also assessed.

  10. Nuclear dualism.

    PubMed

    Karrer, Kathleen M

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear dualism is a characteristic feature of the ciliated protozoa. Tetrahymena have two different nuclei in each cell. The larger, polyploid, somatic macronucleus (MAC) is the site of transcriptional activity in the vegetatively growing cell. The smaller, diploid micronucleus (MIC) is transcriptionally inactive in vegetative cells, but is transcriptionally active in mating cells and responsible for the genetic continuity during sexual reproduction. Although the MICs and MACs develop from mitotic products of a common progenitor and reside in a common cytoplasm, they are different from one another in almost every respect.

  11. Applications of nuclear physics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A C

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  12. Applications of nuclear physics

    DOE PAGES

    Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine

    2017-01-10

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applicationsmore » of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Lastly, each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.« less

  13. Applications of nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  14. Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous LWR MOX fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicu, D.; Barker, M.

    2013-11-01

    view of the location where the thermograms are recorded: the temperature transients on the rear face of the samples are measured with a pyrometer and the system is provided with a lens assembly which enables a 1 mm diameter spot of the sample surface to be focused onto the signal collecting fibre. The thermograms are therefore averaged over a 1 mm diameter surface, which is much larger than the size of the heterogeneities (Pu rich agglomerates with a size of less than 200 μm).The impact of sample thickness on the measured thermal diffusivity was experimentally investigated for the MIMAS MOX with 7.0 wt.% Pu. For this purpose, discs of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mm thickness were cut and the thermal diffusivity was measured. The same investigation was done for standard UO2, in order to verify the accuracy of the inverse technique used for the identification of the thermal diffusivity from the thermograms. The inverse technique [39] explicitly takes into account the sample thickness in the calculation of the heat losses. The results for UO2 (Fig. 6) show that the measured thermal diffusivity does not depend on sample thickness, and is in good agreement with the recommendation of Fink [16]. The results for the heterogeneous MOX (Fig. 7) also show no dependence on sample thickness.

  15. A1C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... eAG on their DiabetesPro web site . The NGSP web site also provides a calculator to convert hemoglobin A1c in SI units mmol/mol into percentage. ^ Back to top Is there anything else I should know? The A1c test will not reflect temporary, acute blood glucose increases ...

  16. A1C

    MedlinePlus

    A1C is a blood test for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. It measures your average blood glucose, or blood sugar, level over the past 3 ... A1C alone or in combination with other diabetes tests to make a diagnosis. They also use the ...

  17. Stress relaxation in heterogeneous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, T. A.

    1992-05-01

    When heterogeneous polymers such as diblock copolymers form a microdomain phase, an imposed strain gives rise to stress from two sources, and several mechanisms of stress relaxation. The release of stress by disentanglement is strongly influenced by the effective confinement of the junction points to the domain boundaries and by the stretching of the chains. Using accepted notions of entangled chain kinetics, it is argued that the relaxation time for sliding stress is exponential in the chainlength to the 7/9 power. A method for calculating the frequency-dependent dynamic modulus is sketched. Despite the slow relaxation implied by these mechanisms, it appears possible to create domains of high energy.

  18. A Heterogeneous Medium Analytical Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1999-09-27

    A benchmark, called benchmark BLUE, has been developed for one-group neutral particle (neutron or photon) transport in a one-dimensional sub-critical heterogeneous plane parallel medium with surface illumination. General anisotropic scattering is accommodated through the Green's Function Method (GFM). Numerical Fourier transform inversion is used to generate the required Green's functions which are kernels to coupled integral equations that give the exiting angular fluxes. The interior scalar flux is then obtained through quadrature. A compound iterative procedure for quadrature order and slab surface source convergence provides highly accurate benchmark qualities (4- to 5- places of accuracy) results.

  19. Interregional equilibrium with heterogeneous labor.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Perrot, A; Thisse J-f

    1996-02-01

    "The impact of labor migration on interregional equilibrium is studied when workers are heterogeneous in productivity and regional mobility. The skilled respond to market disequilibrium by moving into the most attractive region. The unskilled are immobile in the short-run and move with the skilled in the long-run. Both regions have a neoclassical production function affected by an externality depending on the number of skilled. Workers move according to the utility differential when regional amenities vary with population or according to the wage differential. The equilibrium pattern depends on the unskilled's mobility and on migration incentives. Typically, regional imbalance characterizes the equilibrium which is often suboptimal."

  20. Heterogeneous photocatalysts in organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatskaya, M.; König, B.

    2014-03-01

    The review deals with the application of inorganic semiconductors in organic synthesis. Although the majority of reported reactions still aim at the photocatalytic decomposition of organic compounds, the number of examples in synthetic applications is growing. The principal mechanisms of heterogeneous semiconductor photocatalysis are considered and examples illustrating the use of inorganic semiconductors in organic synthesis are given. The discussion is arranged according to the required excitation wavelength (UV or visible light) and to the new bond that is formed (carbon-carbon or carbon-heteroatom bond). The bibliography includes 47 references.

  1. MRI of Heterogeneous Hydrogenation Reactions Using Parahydrogen Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, Scott Russell

    2008-01-01

    The power of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is its ability to image the internal structure of optically opaque samples and provide detailed maps of a variety of important parameters, such as density, diffusion, velocity and temperature. However, one of the fundamental limitations of this technique is its inherent low sensitivity. For example, the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) is particularly problematic for imaging gases in porous materials due to the low density of the gas and the large volume occluded by the porous material. This is unfortunate, as many industrially relevant chemical reactions take place at gas-surface interfaces in porous media, such as packed catalyst beds. Because of this severe SNR problem, many techniques have been developed to directly increase the signal strength. These techniques work by manipulating the nuclear spin populations to produce polarized} (i.e., non-equilibrium) states with resulting signal strengths that are orders of magnitude larger than those available at thermal equilibrium. This dissertation is concerned with an extension of a polarization technique based on the properties of parahydrogen. Specifically, I report on the novel use of heterogeneous catalysis to produce parahydrogen induced polarization and applications of this new technique to gas phase MRI and the characterization of micro-reactors. First, I provide an overview of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and how parahydrogen is used to improve the SNR of the NMR signal. I then present experimental results demonstrating that it is possible to use heterogeneous catalysis to produce parahydrogen-induced polarization. These results are extended to imaging void spaces using a parahydrogen polarized gas. In the second half of this dissertation, I demonstrate the use of parahydrogen-polarized gas-phase MRI for characterizing catalytic microreactors. Specifically, I show how the improved SNR allows one to map parameters important for characterizing the heat and mass

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  5. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  6. Simulating Heterogeneous Tumor Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Mishra, Bud

    2016-01-01

    Certain tumor phenomena, like metabolic heterogeneity and local stable regions of chronic hypoxia, signify a tumor’s resistance to therapy. Although recent research has shed light on the intracellular mechanisms of cancer metabolic reprogramming, little is known about how tumors become metabolically heterogeneous or chronically hypoxic, namely the initial conditions and spatiotemporal dynamics that drive these cell population conditions. To study these aspects, we developed a minimal, spatially-resolved simulation framework for modeling tissue-scale mixed populations of cells based on diffusible particles the cells consume and release, the concentrations of which determine their behavior in arbitrarily complex ways, and on stochastic reproduction. We simulate cell populations that self-sort to facilitate metabolic symbiosis, that grow according to tumor-stroma signaling patterns, and that give rise to stable local regions of chronic hypoxia near blood vessels. We raise two novel questions in the context of these results: (1) How will two metabolically symbiotic cell subpopulations self-sort in the presence of glucose, oxygen, and lactate gradients? We observe a robust pattern of alternating striations. (2) What is the proper time scale to observe stable local regions of chronic hypoxia? We observe the stability is a function of the balance of three factors related to O2—diffusion rate, local vessel release rate, and viable and hypoxic tumor cell consumption rate. We anticipate our simulation framework will help researchers design better experiments and generate novel hypotheses to better understand dynamic, emergent whole-tumor behavior. PMID:28030620

  7. Shock Initiation of Heterogeneous Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2004-05-10

    The fundamental picture that shock initiation in heterogeneous explosives is caused by the linking of hot spots formed at inhomogeneities was put forward by several researchers in the 1950's and 1960's, and more recently. Our work uses the computer hardware and software developed in the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the U.S. Department of Energy to explicitly include heterogeneities at the scale of the explosive grains and to calculate the consequences of realistic although approximate models of explosive behavior. Our simulations are performed with ALE-3D, a three-dimensional, elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler finite-difference program, which includes chemical kinetics and heat transfer, and which is under development at this laboratory. We developed the parameter values for a reactive-flow model to describe the non-ideal detonation behavior of an HMX-based explosive from the results of grain-scale simulations. In doing so, we reduced the number of free parameters that are inferred from comparison with experiment to a single one - the characteristic defect dimension. We also performed simulations of the run to detonation in small volumes of explosive. These simulations illustrate the development of the reaction zone and the acceleration of the shock front as the flame fronts start from hot spots, grow, and interact behind the shock front. In this way, our grain-scale simulations can also connect to continuum experiments directly.

  8. Heterogeneous Transmutation Sodium Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Bays

    2007-09-01

    The threshold-fission (fertile) nature of Am-241 is used to destroy this minor actinide by capitalizing upon neutron capture instead of fission within a sodium fast reactor. This neutron-capture and its subsequent decay chain leads to the breeding of even neutron number plutonium isotopes. A slightly moderated target design is proposed for breeding plutonium in an axial blanket located above the active “fast reactor” driver fuel region. A parametric study on the core height and fuel pin diameter-to-pitch ratio is used to explore the reactor and fuel cycle aspects of this design. This study resulted in both non-flattened and flattened core geometries. Both of these designs demonstrated a high capacity for removing americium from the fuel cycle. A reactivity coefficient analysis revealed that this heterogeneous design will have comparable safety aspects to a homogeneous reactor of comparable size. A mass balance analysis revealed that the heterogeneous design may reduce the number of fast reactors needed to close the current once-through light water reactor fuel cycle.

  9. Heterogeneous Integration of Compound Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutanabbir, Oussama; Gösele, Ulrich

    2010-08-01

    The ability to tailor compound semiconductors and to integrate them onto foreign substrates can lead to superior or novel functionalities with a potential impact on various areas in electronics, optoelectronics, spintronics, biosensing, and photovoltaics. This review provides a brief description of different approaches to achieve this heterogeneous integration, with an emphasis on the ion-cut process, also known commercially as the Smart-Cut™ process. This process combines semiconductor wafer bonding and undercutting using defect engineering by light ion implantation. Bulk-quality heterostructures frequently unattainable by direct epitaxial growth can be produced, provided that a list of technical criteria is fulfilled, thus offering an additional degree of freedom in the design and fabrication of heterogeneous and flexible devices. Ion cutting is a generic process that can be employed to split and transfer fine monocrystalline layers from various crystals. Materials and engineering issues as well as our current understanding of the underlying physics involved in its application to cleaving thin layers from freestanding GaN, InP, and GaAs wafers are presented.

  10. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. For continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the, clinical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects. of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration.

  11. Rules of RNA specificity of hnRNP A1 revealed by global and quantitative analysis of its affinity distribution.

    PubMed

    Jain, Niyati; Lin, Hsuan-Chun; Morgan, Christopher E; Harris, Michael E; Tolbert, Blanton S

    2017-02-28

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a multipurpose RNA-binding protein (RBP) involved in normal and pathological RNA metabolism. Transcriptome-wide mapping and in vitro evolution identify consensus hnRNP A1 binding motifs; however, such data do not reveal how surrounding RNA sequence and structural context modulate affinity. We determined the affinity of hnRNP A1 for all possible sequence variants (n = 16,384) of the HIV exon splicing silencer 3 (ESS3) 7-nt apical loop. Analysis of the affinity distribution identifies the optimal motif 5'-YAG-3' and shows how its copy number, position in the loop, and loop structure modulate affinity. For a subset of ESS3 variants, we show that specificity is determined by association rate constants and that variants lacking the minimal sequence motif bind competitively with consensus RNA. Thus, the results reveal general rules of specificity of hnRNP A1 and provide a quantitative framework for understanding how it discriminates between alternative competing RNA ligands in vivo.

  12. Rules of RNA specificity of hnRNP A1 revealed by global and quantitative analysis of its affinity distribution

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Niyati; Lin, Hsuan-Chun; Morgan, Christopher E.; Harris, Michael E.; Tolbert, Blanton S.

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a multipurpose RNA-binding protein (RBP) involved in normal and pathological RNA metabolism. Transcriptome-wide mapping and in vitro evolution identify consensus hnRNP A1 binding motifs; however, such data do not reveal how surrounding RNA sequence and structural context modulate affinity. We determined the affinity of hnRNP A1 for all possible sequence variants (n = 16,384) of the HIV exon splicing silencer 3 (ESS3) 7-nt apical loop. Analysis of the affinity distribution identifies the optimal motif 5′-YAG-3′ and shows how its copy number, position in the loop, and loop structure modulate affinity. For a subset of ESS3 variants, we show that specificity is determined by association rate constants and that variants lacking the minimal sequence motif bind competitively with consensus RNA. Thus, the results reveal general rules of specificity of hnRNP A1 and provide a quantitative framework for understanding how it discriminates between alternative competing RNA ligands in vivo. PMID:28193894

  13. ARCHER, a New Monte Carlo Software Tool for Emerging Heterogeneous Computing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. George; Liu, Tianyu; Su, Lin; Du, Xining; Riblett, Matthew; Ji, Wei; Gu, Deyang; Carothers, Christopher D.; Shephard, Mark S.; Brown, Forrest B.; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob

    2014-06-01

    The Monte Carlo radiation transport community faces a number of challenges associated with peta- and exa-scale computing systems that rely increasingly on heterogeneous architectures involving hardware accelerators such as GPUs. Existing Monte Carlo codes and methods must be strategically upgraded to meet emerging hardware and software needs. In this paper, we describe the development of a software, called ARCHER (Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous EnviRonments), which is designed as a versatile testbed for future Monte Carlo codes. Preliminary results from five projects in nuclear engineering and medical physics are presented.

  14. Nuclear war: Opposing viewpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Szumski, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents opposing viewpoints on nuclear war. Topics discussed include: how nuclear would begin; would humanity survive; would civil defense work; will an arms agreement work; and can space weapons reduce the risk of nuclear war.

  15. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  16. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  17. Lipid-sensors, enigmatic-orphan and orphan nuclear receptors as therapeutic targets in breast-cancer.

    PubMed

    Garattini, Enrico; Bolis, Marco; Gianni', Maurizio; Paroni, Gabriela; Fratelli, Maddalena; Terao, Mineko

    2016-07-05

    Breast-cancer is heterogeneous and consists of various groups with different biological characteristics. Innovative pharmacological approaches accounting for this heterogeneity are needed. The forty eight human Nuclear-Hormone-Receptors are ligand-dependent transcription-factors and are classified into Endocrine-Receptors, Adopted-Orphan-Receptors (Lipid-sensors and Enigmatic-Orphans) and Orphan-receptors. Nuclear-Receptors represent ideal targets for the design/synthesis of pharmacological ligands. We provide an overview of the literature available on the expression and potential role played by Lipid-sensors, Enigmatic-Orphans and Orphan-Receptors in breast-cancer. The data are complemented by an analysis of the expression levels of each selected Nuclear-Receptor in the PAM50 breast-cancer groups, following re-elaboration of the data publicly available. The major aim is to support the idea that some of the Nuclear-Receptors represent largely unexploited therapeutic-targets in breast-cancer treatment/chemo-prevention. On the basis of our analysis, we conclude that the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C3, NR1H2 and NR1H3 are likely to be onco-suppressors in breast-cancer. The Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F1 NR2A1 and NR3B3 as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR0B1, NR0B2, NR1D1, NR2F1, NR2F2 and NR4A3 exert a similar action. These Nuclear-Receptors represent candidates for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing their expression or activating them in tumor cells. The group of Nuclear-Receptors endowed with potential oncogenic properties consists of the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C2 and NR1I2, the Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F3, NR3B1 and NR5A2, as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR2E1, NR2E3 and NR6A1. These oncogenic Nuclear-Receptors should be targeted with selective antagonists, reverse-agonists or agents/strategies capable of reducing their expression in breast-cancer cells.

  18. Lipid-sensors, enigmatic-orphan and orphan nuclear receptors as therapeutic targets in breast-cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garattini, Enrico; Bolis, Marco; Gianni', Maurizio; Paroni, Gabriela; Fratelli, Maddalena; Terao, Mineko

    2016-01-01

    Breast-cancer is heterogeneous and consists of various groups with different biological characteristics. Innovative pharmacological approaches accounting for this heterogeneity are needed. The forty eight human Nuclear-Hormone-Receptors are ligand-dependent transcription-factors and are classified into Endocrine-Receptors, Adopted-Orphan-Receptors (Lipid-sensors and Enigmatic-Orphans) and Orphan-receptors. Nuclear-Receptors represent ideal targets for the design/synthesis of pharmacological ligands. We provide an overview of the literature available on the expression and potential role played by Lipid-sensors, Enigmatic-Orphans and Orphan-Receptors in breast-cancer. The data are complemented by an analysis of the expression levels of each selected Nuclear-Receptor in the PAM50 breast-cancer groups, following re-elaboration of the data publicly available. The major aim is to support the idea that some of the Nuclear-Receptors represent largely unexploited therapeutic-targets in breast-cancer treatment/chemo-prevention. On the basis of our analysis, we conclude that the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C3, NR1H2 and NR1H3 are likely to be onco-suppressors in breast-cancer. The Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F1 NR2A1 and NR3B3 as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR0B1, NR0B2, NR1D1, NR2F1, NR2F2 and NR4A3 exert a similar action. These Nuclear-Receptors represent candidates for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at increasing their expression or activating them in tumor cells. The group of Nuclear-Receptors endowed with potential oncogenic properties consists of the Lipid-Sensors, NR1C2 and NR1I2, the Enigmatic-Orphans, NR1F3, NR3B1 and NR5A2, as well as the Orphan-Receptors, NR2E1, NR2E3 and NR6A1. These oncogenic Nuclear-Receptors should be targeted with selective antagonists, reverse-agonists or agents/strategies capable of reducing their expression in breast-cancer cells. PMID:26894976

  19. HETEROGENEOUS REBURNING BY MIXED FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Yin Chen; Benson B. Gathitu

    2005-01-14

    Recent studies of heterogeneous reburning, i.e., reburning involving a coal-derived char, have elucidated its variables, kinetics and mechanisms that are valuable to the development of a highly efficient reburning process. Young lignite chars contain catalysts that not only reduce NO, but they also reduce HCN that is an important intermediate that recycles to NO in the burnout zone. Gaseous CO scavenges the surface oxides that are formed during NO reduction, regenerating the active sites on the char surface. Based on this mechanistic information, cost-effective mixed fuels containing these multiple features has been designed and tested in a simulated reburning apparatus. Remarkably high reduction of NO and HCN has been observed and it is anticipated that mixed fuel will remove 85% of NO in a three-stage reburning process.

  20. Surface science and heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1980-05-01

    The catalytic reactions studied include hydrocarbon conversion over platinum, the transition metal-catalyzed hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and the photocatalyzed dissociation of water over oxide surfaces. The method of combined surface science and catalytic studies is similar to those used in synthetic organic chemistry. The single-crystal models for the working catalyst are compared with real catalysts by comparing the rates of cyclopropane ring opening on platinum and the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on rhodium single crystal surface with those on practical commercial catalyst systems. Excellent agreement was obtained for these reactions. This document reviews what was learned about heterogeneous catalysis from these surface science approaches over the past 15 years and present models of the active catalyst surface.

  1. The heterogeneity of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Meinhold-Heerlein, I; Hauptmann, S

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian cancer carries the worst prognosis of all gynecological malignancies. This is mainly due to its resistance against commonly used cytostatic drugs as well as the lack of a screening method for its detection at an early stage. Both basic and translational research have shown over the past decades that ovarian cancer as a medical term includes several types of tumors with different phenotypes, molecular biology, etiology, tumor progression, and even different prognosis. In this issue of Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, J. Dietel presents a review article about novel findings of the etiopathogenesis of ovarian cancer and the role that fallopian tubes may play. He also outlines the implied clinical consequences. Here, we give a brief overview of the heterogeneity of ovarian cancer to introduce the topic.

  2. Genetic heterogeneity of hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, H.; Isselbacher, K.J. ); Yakicier, C.; Marcais, C.; Ozturk, M. ); Kew, M. ); Volkmann, M. ); Zentgraf, H. )

    1994-01-18

    The authors studied 80 hepatocellular carcinomas from three continents for p53 gene (TP53) mutations and hepatitis B virus (HBV) sequences. p53 mutations were frequent in tumors from Mozambique but not in tumors from South Africa, China, and Germany. Independent of geographic origin, most tumors were positive for HBV sequences. X gene coding sequences of HBV were detected in 78% of tumors, whereas viral sequences in the surface antigen- and core antigen-encoding regions were present in less than 35% of tumors. These observations indicate that hepatocellular carcinomas are genetically heterogeneous. Mozambican-types of hepatocellular carcinomas are characterized by a high incidence of p53 mutations related to aflatoxins. In other tumors, the rarity of p53 mutations combined with the frequent presence of viral X gene coding sequences suggests a possible interference of HBV with the wild-type p53 function.

  3. Data Integration for Heterogenous Datasets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract More and more, the needs of data analysts are requiring the use of data outside the control of their own organizations. The increasing amount of data available on the Web, the new technologies for linking data across datasets, and the increasing need to integrate structured and unstructured data are all driving this trend. In this article, we provide a technical overview of the emerging “broad data” area, in which the variety of heterogeneous data being used, rather than the scale of the data being analyzed, is the limiting factor in data analysis efforts. The article explores some of the emerging themes in data discovery, data integration, linked data, and the combination of structured and unstructured data. PMID:25553272

  4. Heterogeneous Reburning By Mixed Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson Hall

    2009-03-31

    Recent studies of heterogeneous reburning, i.e., reburning involving a coal-derived char, have elucidated its variables, kinetics and mechanisms that are valuable to the development of a highly efficient reburning process. Young lignite chars contain catalysts that not only reduce NO, but they also reduce HCN that is an important intermediate that recycles to NO in the burnout zone. Gaseous CO scavenges the surface oxides that are formed during NO reduction, regenerating the active sites on the char surface. Based on this mechanistic information, cost-effective mixed fuels containing these multiple features has been designed and tested in a simulated reburning apparatus. Remarkably high reduction of NO and HCN has been observed and it is anticipated that mixed fuel will remove 85% of NO in a three-stage reburning process.

  5. Nuclear South Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    inseparable from the history of nuclear developments in both India and Pakistan. The timing of India’s tests was determined by the pronuclear stance of the...Rawalpindi, 2001), 17-18. 53 3Robert Boardman, The Politics of Fading Dreams: Britain and the Nuclear Export Business, Nuclear Exports and World Politics (New...disasters of nuclear arms race. 61 BIBLIOGRAPHY Books Boardman, Robert. The Politics of Fading Dreams: Britain and the Nuclear Export Business, Nuclear

  6. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian D.

    2012-06-18

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  7. (90377) Sedna: Heterogeneous Surface Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Ore, Cristina M.; Barucci, M.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; de Bergh, C.; Merlin, F.; Dumas, C.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2010-10-01

    The peculiar TNO (90377) Sedna is one of the most remote solar system objects accessible to investigations (current heliocentric distance 88AU). This dwarf planet is one of the reddest objects following the taxonomic group RR. To better constrain its surface composition and to investigate the possible heterogeneity of the surface of Sedna, several observations have been carried out at ESO-VLT with the powerful spectrometer SINFONI, which observes the H and K bands simultaneously. Even if Sedna, given its faintness, was at the limit of observations, the new analyzed spectra (obtained in 2005, 2007, and 2008) show a different behavior, particularly in the K band. Spectral modeling using the Shkuratov radiative transfer method has been performed using the various sets of data, including visible and Spitzer data, for a large wavelength range 0.4-4.5 microns, and the albedo value (0.21) estimated by Stansberry et al. (2008). We find that the surface of Sedna is not completely homogeneous. The visible and near-IR spectra can be modeled with organic materials (triton and titan tholin), serpentine, and H2O ice in fairly significant amounts, and CH4, N2 and C2H6 in varying trace amounts. One of the spectra, showing a different signature in the K-band, observed as part of the October 2005 group of data, is best modeled with CH3OH in place of CH4, with reduced amounts of serpentine and with the addition of olivine. The compositional surface heterogeneity can give clues to the origin and past history of this peculiar distant object.

  8. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  9. Nuclear Proliferation: A Global Nuclear Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    thinking about nuclear weapons as a “ Wild Card ” in this case. Finally, just as North Korea is using nuclear weapons as a “bargaining chip,” we...definite disadvantage for non-nuclear nations not to have a nuclear” Wild Card ”. So some misguided Japanese politicians are attracted to the “ Wild Card ” advantage

  10. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  11. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  12. Nuclear fuel in a reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Burns, Peter C; Ewing, Rodney C; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2012-03-09

    Nuclear accidents that lead to melting of a reactor core create heterogeneous materials containing hundreds of radionuclides, many with short half-lives. The long-lived fission products and transuranium elements within damaged fuel remain a concern for millennia. Currently, accurate fundamental models for the prediction of release rates of radionuclides from fuel, especially in contact with water, after an accident remain limited. Relatively little is known about fuel corrosion and radionuclide release under the extreme chemical, radiation, and thermal conditions during and subsequent to a nuclear accident. We review the current understanding of nuclear fuel interactions with the environment, including studies over the relatively narrow range of geochemical, hydrological, and radiation environments relevant to geological repository performance, and discuss priorities for research needed to develop future predictive models.

  13. A Study on the Basic Criteria for Selecting Heterogeneity Parameters of F18-FDG PET Images

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Attila; Pall Jonsson, Hermann; Dahlbom, Magnus; Daver, Freddie; D. DiFranco, Matthew; Opposits, Gabor; K. Krizsan, Aron; Garai, Ildiko; Czernin, Johannes; Varga, Jozsef; Tron, Lajos; Balkay, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Textural analysis might give new insights into the quantitative characterization of metabolically active tumors. More than thirty textural parameters have been investigated in former F18-FDG studies already. The purpose of the paper is to declare basic requirements as a selection strategy to identify the most appropriate heterogeneity parameters to measure textural features. Our predefined requirements were: a reliable heterogeneity parameter has to be volume independent, reproducible, and suitable for expressing quantitatively the degree of heterogeneity. Based on this criteria, we compared various suggested measures of homogeneity. A homogeneous cylindrical phantom was measured on three different PET/CT scanners using the commonly used protocol. In addition, a custom-made inhomogeneous tumor insert placed into the NEMA image quality phantom was imaged with a set of acquisition times and several different reconstruction protocols. PET data of 65 patients with proven lung lesions were retrospectively analyzed as well. Four heterogeneity parameters out of 27 were found as the most attractive ones to characterize the textural properties of metabolically active tumors in FDG PET images. These four parameters included Entropy, Contrast, Correlation, and Coefficient of Variation. These parameters were independent of delineated tumor volume (bigger than 25–30 ml), provided reproducible values (relative standard deviation< 10%), and showed high sensitivity to changes in heterogeneity. Phantom measurements are a viable way to test the reliability of heterogeneity parameters that would be of interest to nuclear imaging clinicians. PMID:27736888

  14. A Study on the Basic Criteria for Selecting Heterogeneity Parameters of F18-FDG PET Images.

    PubMed

    Forgacs, Attila; Pall Jonsson, Hermann; Dahlbom, Magnus; Daver, Freddie; D DiFranco, Matthew; Opposits, Gabor; K Krizsan, Aron; Garai, Ildiko; Czernin, Johannes; Varga, Jozsef; Tron, Lajos; Balkay, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Textural analysis might give new insights into the quantitative characterization of metabolically active tumors. More than thirty textural parameters have been investigated in former F18-FDG studies already. The purpose of the paper is to declare basic requirements as a selection strategy to identify the most appropriate heterogeneity parameters to measure textural features. Our predefined requirements were: a reliable heterogeneity parameter has to be volume independent, reproducible, and suitable for expressing quantitatively the degree of heterogeneity. Based on this criteria, we compared various suggested measures of homogeneity. A homogeneous cylindrical phantom was measured on three different PET/CT scanners using the commonly used protocol. In addition, a custom-made inhomogeneous tumor insert placed into the NEMA image quality phantom was imaged with a set of acquisition times and several different reconstruction protocols. PET data of 65 patients with proven lung lesions were retrospectively analyzed as well. Four heterogeneity parameters out of 27 were found as the most attractive ones to characterize the textural properties of metabolically active tumors in FDG PET images. These four parameters included Entropy, Contrast, Correlation, and Coefficient of Variation. These parameters were independent of delineated tumor volume (bigger than 25-30 ml), provided reproducible values (relative standard deviation< 10%), and showed high sensitivity to changes in heterogeneity. Phantom measurements are a viable way to test the reliability of heterogeneity parameters that would be of interest to nuclear imaging clinicians.

  15. Nuclear Power in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun

    2012-02-01

    In response to the Fukushima accident, China is strengthening its nuclear safety at reactors in operation, under construction and in preparation, including efforts to improve nuclear safety regulations and guidelines based on lessons learned from the accident. Although China is one of the major contributors in the global nuclear expansion, China's nuclear power industry is relatively young. Its nuclear safety regulators are less experienced compared to those in other major nuclear power countries. To realize China's resolute commitment to rapid growth of safe nuclear energy, detailed analyses of its nuclear safety regulatory system are required. This talk explains China's nuclear energy program and policy at first. It also explores China's governmental activities and future nuclear development after Fukushima accidents. At last, an overview of China's nuclear safety regulations and practices are provided. Issues and challenges are also identified for police makers, regulators, and industry professionals.

  16. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  17. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  18. Chemical and seismological constraints on mantle heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Helffrich, George

    2002-11-15

    Recent seismological studies that use scattered waves to detect heterogeneities in the mantle reveal the presence of a small, distributed elastic heterogeneity in the lower mantle which does not appear to be thermal in nature. The characteristic size of these heterogeneities appears to be ca. 8 km, suggesting that they represent subducted recycled oceanic crust. With this stimulus, old ideas that the mantle is heterogeneous in structure, rather than stratified, are reinterpreted and a simple, end-member model for the heterogeneity structure is proposed. The volumetrically largest components in the model are recycled oceanic crust, which contains the heat-producing elements, and mantle depleted of these and other incompatible trace elements. About 10% of the mantle's mass is made up of recycled oceanic crust, which is associated with the observed small-scale seismic heterogeneity. The way this heterogeneity is distributed is in convectively stretched and thinned bodies ranging downwards in size from 8 km. With the present techniques to detect small bodies through scattering, only ca. 55% of the mantle's small-scale heterogeneities are detectable seismically.

  19. Functional Heterogeneity and Senior Management Team Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Pascale; Somech, Anit

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There has been an increasing trend toward the creation of senior management teams (SMTs) which are characterized by a high degree of functional heterogeneity. Although such teams may create better linkages to information, along with the benefits of functional heterogeneity comes the potential for conflicts that stem from the value…

  20. The composition of heterogeneous control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Benjamin; Astrom, Karl

    1991-01-01

    The fuzzy control literature and industrial practice provide certain nonlinear methods for combining heterogeneous control laws, but these methods have been very difficult to analyze theoretically. An alternate formulation and extension of this approach is presented that has several practical and theoretical benefits. An example of heterogeneous control is given and two alternate analysis methods are presented.

  1. Understanding the Executive Functioning Heterogeneity in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffard, Stephane; Bayard, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by heterogeneous brain abnormalities involving cerebral regions implied in the executive functioning. The dysexecutive syndrome is one of the most prominent and functionally cognitive features of schizophrenia. Nevertheless, it is not clear to what extend executive deficits are heterogeneous in schizophrenia…

  2. Improvement of Nuclear Heating Evaluation Inside the Core of the OSIRIS Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péron, Arthur; Malouch, Fadhel; Diop, Cheikh M.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a nuclear heating from neutron and photon rays calculation scheme mainly based on the Monte-Carlo neutral particle transport code TRIPOLI-4® which takes into account the axial distributions of fuel element compositions. This calculation scheme is applied to the OSIRIS reactor in order to evaluate the effect of using realistic axially heterogeneous compositions instead of uniform ones. After a description of nuclear heating evaluation, the calculation scheme is described. Numerical simulations and related results are detailed and analysed to determine the impact of axially heterogeneous compositions on fluxes, power and nuclear heating.

  3. Mapping small-scale mantle heterogeneities using seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentham, H. L.; Rost, S.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years array seismology has been used extensively to detect and locate the small scale (~10 km) structure of the Earth. In the mantle, small scale structure likely represents chemical heterogeneity and is essential in our understanding of mechanical mixing processes within mantle convection. As subducted crust is chemically distinct from the background mantle, imaging the remains of the crust provides a tracer for convectional flow. Evidence for heterogeneities has been found in the lower mantle in previous seismology studies but the arrivals associated with such heterogeneities are difficult to detect in the seismic data as they are typically low amplitude and are often masked by a multitude of larger amplitude arrivals. In this study we find global and regional seismic heterogeneities in the mantle by processing teleseismic earthquake data through array seismology methods. We find global patterns of heterogeneity using a stacking approach. To locate regional heterogeneities, we target the "quiet" window prior to the PP arrival for earthquakes with epicentral distances of 90-110°. Within this time window, we enhance the weak coherent energy that arrives off great circle path by calculating the observed directivity (slowness and backazimuth) and using a semblance weighted beampower measure. We use the directivity and travel times of suitable precursors to back-trace the energy to the origin of P-to-P reflections, using a 1D raytracer. Most of the P-to-P reflections that we observe have reflection origins in the upper/mid mantle. Beneath the western Pacific subduction zones, such reflections show a good correlation with subduction zone contours that are derived from subduction zone seismicity, and correlate well with tomography gradients of 0.01-0.5% per degree, interpreted as the edge of the slab. Deep mantle reflections (>600 km) are also observed to depths of ~1900 km. The locations of these heterogeneities are combined with previous seismological

  4. Heterogeneity assessment of functional T cell avidity

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Kalliopi; Baumgaertner, Petra; Gannon, Philippe O.; Speiser, Michel F.; Allard, Mathilde; Hebeisen, Michael; Rufer, Nathalie; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    The potency of cellular immune responses strongly depends on T cell avidity to antigen. Yet, functional avidity measurements are rarely performed in patients, mainly due to the technical challenges of characterizing heterogeneous T cells. The mean functional T cell avidity can be determined by the IFN-γ Elispot assay, with titrated amounts of peptide. Using this assay, we developed a method revealing the heterogeneity of functional avidity, represented by the steepness/hillslope of the peptide titration curve, documented by proof of principle experiments and mathematical modeling. Our data show that not only natural polyclonal CD8 T cell populations from cancer patients, but also monoclonal T cells differ strongly in their heterogeneity of functional avidity. Interestingly, clones and polyclonal cells displayed comparable ranges of heterogeneity. We conclude that besides the mean functional avidity, it is feasible and useful to determine its heterogeneity (hillslope) for characterizing T cell responses in basic research and patient investigation. PMID:28287160

  5. The New Nuclear Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the issue of nuclear proliferation, noting that the countries with nuclear capability now include Israel, South Africa, India, and Pakistan. Describes the role and problems of the United States in halting nuclearization. Supplies charts, maps, and information concerning the state of nuclear capability in each country. (NL)

  6. Nuclear air cushion vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant is identified. Using mission studies and cost estimates, some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles are described. The technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies are summarized.

  7. Nuclear energy and security

    SciTech Connect

    BLEJWAS,THOMAS E.; SANDERS,THOMAS L.; EAGAN,ROBERT J.; BAKER,ARNOLD B.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity.

  8. Terrorists and Nuclear Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, David

    1975-01-01

    This essay explores the ways terrorist groups may gain possession of nuclear materials; the way in which they may use nuclear weapons and other nuclear technologies to their benefit; and various courses of action designed to minimize the possibilities of terrorists utilizing nuclear technology to their benefit and society's detriment. (BT)

  9. Frontiers of Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    Current developments in nuclear structure at the `limits` are discussed. The studies of nuclear behavior at extreme conditions provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk frontiers of nuclear structure are briefly reviewed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  10. Nuclear medicine annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are reviewed in this work: nuclear physicians role in planning for and handling radiation accidents; the role of nuclear medicine in evaluating the hypertensive patient; studies of the heart with radionuclides; role of radionuclide imaging in the patient undergoing chemotherapy; hematologic nuclear medicine; the role of nuclear medicine in sports related injuries; radionuclide evaluation of hepatic function with emphasis on cholestatis.

  11. Operating a heterogeneous telescope network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Alasdair; Bischoff, Karsten; Burgdorf, Martin; Cavanagh, Brad; Christian, Damien; Clay, Neil; Dickens, Rob; Economou, Frossie; Fadavi, Mehri; Frazer, Stephen; Granzer, Thomas; Grosvenor, Sandy; Hessman, Frederic V.; Jenness, Tim; Koratkar, Anuradha; Lehner, Matthew; Mottram, Chris; Naylor, Tim; Saunders, Eric S.; Solomos, Nikolaos; Steele, Iain A.; Tuparev, Georg; Vestrand, W. Thomas; White, Robert R.; Yost, Sarah

    2006-06-01

    In the last few years the ubiquitous availability of high bandwidth networks has changed the way both robotic and non-robotic telescopes operate, with single isolated telescopes being integrated into expanding "smart" telescope networks that can span continents and respond to transient events in seconds. The Heterogeneous Telescope Networks (HTN)* Consortium represents a number of major research groups in the field of robotic telescopes, and together we are proposing a standards based approach to providing interoperability between the existing proprietary telescope networks. We further propose standards for interoperability, and integration with, the emerging Virtual Observatory. We present the results of the first interoperability meeting held last year and discuss the protocol and transport standards agreed at the meeting, which deals with the complex issue of how to optimally schedule observations on geographically distributed resources. We discuss a free market approach to this scheduling problem, which must initially be based on ad-hoc agreements between the participants in the network, but which may eventually expand into a electronic market for the exchange of telescope time.

  12. Distributional Scaling in Heterogeneous Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsinelli, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    An investigation is undertaken into the fractal scaling properties of the piezometric head in a heterogeneous unconfined aquifer. The governing equations for the unconfined flow are derived from conservation of mass and the Darcy law. The Dupuit approximation will be used to model the dynamics. The spatially varying nature of the tendency to conduct flow (e.g. the hydraulic conductivity) is represented as a stochastic process. Experimental studies in the literature have indicated that the conductivity belongs to a class of non-stationary stochastic fields, called H-ss fields. The uncertainty in the soil parameters is imparted onto the flow variables; in groundwater investigations the potentiometric head will be a random function. The structure of the head field will be analyzed with an emphasis on the scaling properties. The scaling scheme for the modeling equations and the simulation procedure for the saturated hydraulic conductivity process will be explained, then the method will be validated through numerical experimentation using the USGS Modflow-2005 software. The results of the numerical simulations demonstrate that the head will exhibit multi-fractal scaling if the hydraulic conductivity exhibits multi-fractal scaling and the differential equations for the groundwater equation satisfy a particular set of scale invariance conditions.

  13. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size.

  14. Genetic heterogeneity in juvenile NCL

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Y.M.; Andermann, E.; Mitchison, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are a group of related lysosomal storage diseases classified according to the age of onset, clinical syndrome, and pathology. The clinical syndromes include myoclonus, visual failure, progressive dementia, ataxia and generalized tonic clonic seizures in varying combinations depending on the age of onset and pathology. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive in most cases, except for several families with the adult form (Kufs` disease) which have autosomal dominant inheritance. Linkage for the infantile (Halatia-Santavuori) form (CLN1), characterized ultrastructurally by lysosomal granular osmiophilic deposits (GROD), has been demonstrated with markers on chromosome lp, while the gene for the typical juvenile (Spielmeyer-Vogt) form (CLN3), characterized by fingerprint-profile inclusions, has been linked to chromosome 16p. The gene locations of the late infantile (Jansky-Bielschowsky) and adult (Kufs` disease) forms are unknown, although it has recently been shown that the late infantile form does not link to chromosome 16p. We describe three siblings, including a pair of monozygotic twins, with juvenile onset NCL with GROD in whom linkage to the CLN3 region of chromsome 16p has been excluded. This would suggest that there is genetic heterogeneity not only among the different clinical syndromes, but also among identical clinical syndromes with different ultrastructural characteristics. Preliminary studies of linkage to chromosome 1p employing the microsatellite marker HY-TM1 have been uninformative. Further studies with other chromosome 1 markers are underway.

  15. Assessing Heterogeneity of Osteolytic Lesions in Multiple Myeloma by 1H HR-MAS NMR Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Tavel, Laurette; Fontana, Francesca; Garcia Manteiga, Josè Manuel; Mari, Silvia; Mariani, Elisabetta; Caneva, Enrico; Sitia, Roberto; Camnasio, Francesco; Marcatti, Magda; Cenci, Simone; Musco, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of plasma cells characterized by multifocal osteolytic bone lesions. Macroscopic and genetic heterogeneity has been documented within MM lesions. Understanding the bases of such heterogeneity may unveil relevant features of MM pathobiology. To this aim, we deployed unbiased 1H high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics to analyze multiple biopsy specimens of osteolytic lesions from one case of pathological fracture caused by MM. Multivariate analyses on normalized metabolite peak integrals allowed clusterization of samples in accordance with a posteriori histological findings. We investigated the relationship between morphological and NMR features by merging morphological data and metabolite profiling into a single correlation matrix. Data-merging addressed tissue heterogeneity, and greatly facilitated the mapping of lesions and nearby healthy tissues. Our proof-of-principle study reveals integrated metabolomics and histomorphology as a promising approach for the targeted study of osteolytic lesions. PMID:27809247

  16. The nuclear freeze controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, K.B.; Gray, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear arms control. Topics considered include the background and rationale behind the nuclear freeze proposal, nuclear deterrence, national defense, arms races, arms buildup, warfare, the moral aspects of nuclear deterrence, treaty verification, the federal budget, the economy, a historical perspective on Soviet policy toward the freeze, the other side of the Soviet peace offensive, and making sense of the nuclear freeze debate.

  17. The Computational Modeling of Alloys:From ab initio and thermodynamics to heterogeneous precipitation.

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A

    2007-10-09

    In this lecture we presented a methodology to obtain free energies from empirical potentials and applied it to the study of the phase diagram of FeCr. Subsequently, we used Metropolis Monte Carlo to analyze homogeneous and heterogeneous precipitation of the Cr rich solid solution {alpha}{prime}. These examples are part of our work in the area of steels for nuclear applications and can be found in several publications of our group cited as References.

  18. Heterogeneities in gelatin film formation using single-sided NMR.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Sushanta; Mattea, Carlos; Denner, Paul; Stapf, Siegfried

    2010-12-16

    Gelatin solutions were prepared in D(2)O. The drying process of cast solutions was followed with a single-sided nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scanner until complete solidification occurred. Spin-spin relaxation times (T(2)) were measured at different layers with microscopic resolution and were correlated with the drying process during film formation. Additionally, the evaporation of the gelatin solution was observed optically from the reduction of the sample thickness, revealing that at the macroscopic level, the rate of evaporation is not uniform throughout the experiment. A crossover in the spatial evolution of the drying process is observed from the NMR results. At the early stages, the gel appears to be drier in the upper layers near the evaporation front, while this tendency is inverted at the later stages, when drying is faster from the bottom. XRD (X-ray diffraction) data showed that a structural heterogeneity persists in the final film.

  19. Inverse problems in heterogeneous and fractured media using peridynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Daniel Z.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Parks, Michael L.

    2015-12-10

    The following work presents an adjoint-based methodology for solving inverse problems in heterogeneous and fractured media using state-based peridynamics. We show that the inner product involving the peridynamic operators is self-adjoint. The proposed method is illustrated for several numerical examples with constant and spatially varying material parameters as well as in the context of fractures. We also present a framework for obtaining material parameters by integrating digital image correlation (DIC) with inverse analysis. This framework is demonstrated by evaluating the bulk and shear moduli for a sample of nuclear graphite using digital photographs taken during the experiment. The resulting measured values correspond well with other results reported in the literature. Lastly, we show that this framework can be used to determine the load state given observed measurements of a crack opening. Furthermore, this type of analysis has many applications in characterizing subsurface stress-state conditions given fracture patterns in cores of geologic material.

  20. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  1. Evaluating the accuracy of a three-term pencil beam algorithm in heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J W; Knutson, N C; Fontenot, J D; Newhauser, W D; Hogstrom, K R

    2017-02-07

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of our in-house analytical dose calculation code against MCNPX data in heterogeneous phantoms. The analytical model utilizes a pencil beam model based on Fermi-Eyges theory to account for multiple Coulomb scattering and a least-squares fit to Monte Carlo data to account for nonelastic nuclear interactions as well as any remaining, uncharacterized scatter (the 'nuclear halo'). The model characterized dose accurately (up to 1% of maximum dose in broad fields (4  ×  4 cm(2) and 10  ×  10 cm(2)) and up to 0.01% in a narrow field (0.1  ×  0.1 cm(2)) fit to MCNPX data). The accuracy of the model was benchmarked in three types of stylized phantoms: (1) homogeneous, (2) laterally infinite slab heterogeneities, and (3) laterally finite slab heterogeneities. Results from homogeneous phantoms and laterally infinite slab heterogeneities showed high levels of accuracy (>98% of points within 2% or 0.1 cm distance-to-agreement (DTA)). However, because range straggling and secondary particle production were not included in our model, central-axis dose differences of 2-4% were observed in laterally infinite slab heterogeneities when compared to Monte Carlo dose. In the presence of laterally finite slab heterogeneities, the analytical model resulted in lower pass rates (>96% of points within 2% or 0.1 cm DTA), which was attributed to the use of the central-axis approximation.

  2. Evaluating the accuracy of a three-term pencil beam algorithm in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, J. W.; Knutson, N. C.; Fontenot, J. D.; Newhauser, W. D.; Hogstrom, K. R.

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of our in-house analytical dose calculation code against MCNPX data in heterogeneous phantoms. The analytical model utilizes a pencil beam model based on Fermi-Eyges theory to account for multiple Coulomb scattering and a least-squares fit to Monte Carlo data to account for nonelastic nuclear interactions as well as any remaining, uncharacterized scatter (the ‘nuclear halo’). The model characterized dose accurately (up to 1% of maximum dose in broad fields (4  ×  4 cm2 and 10  ×  10 cm2) and up to 0.01% in a narrow field (0.1  ×  0.1 cm2) fit to MCNPX data). The accuracy of the model was benchmarked in three types of stylized phantoms: (1) homogeneous, (2) laterally infinite slab heterogeneities, and (3) laterally finite slab heterogeneities. Results from homogeneous phantoms and laterally infinite slab heterogeneities showed high levels of accuracy (>98% of points within 2% or 0.1 cm distance-to-agreement (DTA)). However, because range straggling and secondary particle production were not included in our model, central-axis dose differences of 2-4% were observed in laterally infinite slab heterogeneities when compared to Monte Carlo dose. In the presence of laterally finite slab heterogeneities, the analytical model resulted in lower pass rates (>96% of points within 2% or 0.1 cm DTA), which was attributed to the use of the central-axis approximation.

  3. Molecular modeling of heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason, Jason Joseph

    A novel method for modeling heterogeneous catalysis was developed to further facilitate the understanding of catalytic reactor mechanisms. The method employs molecular dynamics simulations, statistical mechanical, and Unity Bond Index - Quadratic Exponential Potential (UBI-QEP) calculations to calculate the rate constants for reactions on metal surfaces. The primary difficulty of molecular dynamics simulations on metal surfaces has been the lack of reliable reactive potential energy surfaces. We have overcome this through the development of the Normalized Bond Index - Reactive Potential Function (NBI-RPF), which can accurately describe the reaction of adsorbates on metal surfaces. The first calculations of rate constants for a reaction on a metal surface using molecular dynamics simulations are presented. This method is applied to the determination of the mechanism for selective hydrogenation of acetylene in an ethylene rich flow. It was determined that the selectivity for acetylene hydrogenation is attributable to the higher reactivity of acetylene versus ethylene with respect to hydrogenation by molecular hydrogen. It was shown that hydrogen transfer from the carbonaceous layer to acetylene or ethylene is insignificant in the hydrogenation process. Molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics calculations were used to determine the diffusion rate constants for dimethylnaphthalene isomers is mordenite. 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 2,7-dimethylnaphthalene were found to have similar diffusion rate constants. Grand canonical Monte Carlo calculations were performed on the competitive adsorption of 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 2,7-dimethylnaphthalene in type X zeolites exchanged individually with barium, calcium, potassium, and rubidium ions, calcium exchanged MCM-22, and hydrogen form mordenite (MOR), X zeolite, Y zeolite, hypBEB, ZSM- 12, and MCM-22. These calculations showed that barium exchanged X zeolite was the most selective toward 2

  4. Isotopic heterogeneity in volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Ramos, F. C.; Tollstrup, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    The growing microsample database on volcanic rocks is showing that isotopic disequilibrium between and among phenocryst phases, their melt inclusions, and groundmass is the rule rather than the exception. This applies even in cases of little or no petrographic evidence for disequilibrium. Erupted magmas must therefore be regarded, to some extent, as mechanical mixtures of isotopically distinct components assembled from different sources. The preservation of isotopic disequilibrium requires that the assembly takes place before diffusion can eradicate evidence of disequilibrium. For a wide range of magmas (mafic, intermediate and felsic, silica under- and oversaturated) from different volcano types (flood basalts, monogenetic cones, stratocones, silicic calderas) this timescale ranges from thousands of years down to one year or less, with no consistent pattern of mixing-to-eruption time vs. volcano or magma type. Among many issues arising from these findings, we note that estimation of magmatic temperatures from application of equilibrium thermodynamics to phenocryst assemblages in volcanic rocks should be approached with extreme caution. The isotope ratio variations observed among the components of a single volcanic rock sample, in most cases, indicate interaction between magma and the local wall-rock. This is consistent with the view that the vast majority of magmas undergo modification during transport through and residence within the crust. Three physical origins of heterogeneity have been proposed: melting of wallrock, magmatic recharge, and mixing of components within a magma chamber initially segregated into melt-rich and crystal-rich portions. Time constraints on preservation of disequilibrium imply either a causal link with eruption, or that these processes occur through the lifetime of a chamber.

  5. Mechanical heterogeneities and lithospheric extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, Thibault; Petri, Benoit; Mohn, Geoffroy; Schenker, Filippo L.; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Detailed geological and geophysical studies of passive margins have highlighted the multi-stage and depth-dependent aspect of lithospheric thinning. Lithospheric thinning involves a variety of structures (normal faults, low angle detachments, extensional shear zones, extraction faults) and leads to a complex architecture of passive margins (with e.g. necking zone, mantle exhumation, continental allochthons). The processes controlling the generation and evolution of these structures as well as the impact of pre-rift inheritance are so far incompletely understood. In this study, we investigate the impact of pre-rift inheritance on the development of rifted margins using two-dimensional thermo-mechanical models of lithospheric thinning. To first order, we represent the pre-rift mechanical heterogeneities with lithological layering. The rheologies are kept simple (visco-plastic) and do not involve any strain softening mechanism. Our models show that mechanical layering causes multi-stage and depth-dependent extension. In the initial rifting phase, lithospheric extension is decoupled: as the crust undergoes thinning by brittle (frictional-plastic) faults, the lithospheric mantle accommodates extension by symmetric ductile necking. In a second rifting phase, deformation in the crust and lithospheric mantle is coupled and marks the beginning of an asymmetric extension stage. Low angle extensional shear zones develop across the lithosphere and exhume subcontinental mantle. Furthemore, crustal allochthons and adjacent basins develop coevally. We describe as well the thermal evolution predicted by the numerical models and discuss the first-order implications of our results in the context of the Alpine geological history.

  6. Interoperability of heterogeneous distributed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaschke, C.; Essendorfer, B.; Kerth, C.

    2016-05-01

    To achieve knowledge superiority in today's operations interoperability is the key. Budget restrictions as well as the complexity and multiplicity of threats combined with the fact that not single nations but whole areas are subject to attacks force nations to collaborate and share information as appropriate. Multiple data and information sources produce different kinds of data, real time and non-real time, in different formats that are disseminated to the respective command and control level for further distribution. The data is most of the time highly sensitive and restricted in terms of sharing. The question is how to make this data available to the right people at the right time with the right granularity. The Coalition Shared Data concept aims to provide a solution to these questions. It has been developed within several multinational projects and evolved over time. A continuous improvement process was established and resulted in the adaptation of the architecture as well as the technical solution and the processes it supports. Coming from the idea of making use of existing standards and basing the concept on sharing of data through standardized interfaces and formats and enabling metadata based query the concept merged with a more sophisticated service based approach. The paper addresses concepts for information sharing to facilitate interoperability between heterogeneous distributed systems. It introduces the methods that were used and the challenges that had to be overcome. Furthermore, the paper gives a perspective how the concept could be used in the future and what measures have to be taken to successfully bring it into operations.

  7. Frictional Heterogeneities Along Carbonate Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, C.; Carpenter, B. M.; Scuderi, M.; Tesei, T.

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of fault-slip behaviour in carbonates has an important societal impact as a) a significant number of earthquakes nucleate within or propagate through these rocks, and b) half of the known petroleum reserves occur within carbonate reservoirs, which likely contain faults that experience fluid pressure fluctuations. Field studies on carbonate-bearing faults that are exhumed analogues of currently active structures of the seismogenic crust, show that fault rock types are systematically controlled by the lithology of the faulted protolith: localization associated with cataclasis, thermal decomposition and plastic deformation commonly affect fault rocks in massive limestone, whereas distributed deformation, pressure-solution and frictional sliding along phyllosilicates are observed in marly rocks. In addition, hydraulic fractures, indicating cyclic fluid pressure build-ups during the fault activity, are widespread. Standard double direct friction experiments on fault rocks from massive limestones show high friction, velocity neutral/weakening behaviour and significant re-strengthening during hold periods, on the contrary, phyllosilicate-rich shear zones are characterized by low friction, significant velocity strengthening behavior and no healing. We are currently running friction experiments on large rock samples (20x20 cm) in order to reproduce and characterize the interaction of fault rock frictional heterogeneities observed in the field. In addition we have been performing experiments at near lithostatic fluid pressure in the double direct shear configuration within a pressure vessel to test the Rate and State friction stability under these conditions. Our combination of structural observations and mechanical data have been revealing the processes and structures that are at the base of the broad spectrum of fault slip behaviors recently documented by high-resolution geodetic and seismological data.

  8. Aquifer Heterogeneity and the Management of Coastal Groundwater Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliva, R. G.; Guo, W.; Missimer, T. M.; Clayton, E. A.

    2008-05-01

    A major challenge in the development and protection of groundwater resources in coastal areas is managing the interaction of fresh and saline waters. Production wellfields are vulnerable to saline-water intrusion. The performance of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) and aquifer recharge systems in coastal settings is dependent upon the degree of migration and mixing of injected freshwater and ambient saline water in many places. Optimization of the development of freshwater resources thus requires the ability to accurately simulate the migration of saline waters in response to aquifer pumpage and the movement and mixing of injected freshwater. Aquifer heterogeneity can profoundly impact groundwater flow rates and patterns in coastal aquifers, particularly in karstic aquifers. The rate of migration of native saline water and injected freshwater in transmissive flow zones may be orders of magnitude greater than that estimated assuming a homogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity. High degrees of aquifer heterogeneity can result in rapid saline-water intrusion and can compromise the performance of ASR systems. Aquifer heterogeneity must therefore be quantified and incorporated in groundwater flow and solute transport models. Flowmeter logging allows for quantification of meter-scale variations in hydraulic conductivity. Advanced borehole geophysics, such as nuclear magnetic resonance logging, provide a means for in-situ measurement of finer (cm) scale variations in aquifer hydraulic conductivity, which can be incorporated directly into 3-D data management and visualization software and, in turn, solute-transport models. These new technologies can greatly improve our understanding of aquifer systems and help in aquifer management in the coastal areas.

  9. Heterogeneous expression of apolipoprotein-E by human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tedla, Nicodemus; Glaros, Elias N; Brunk, Ulf T; Jessup, Wendy; Garner, Brett

    2004-01-01

    Apolipoprotein-E (apoE) is expressed at high levels by macrophages. In addition to its role in lipid transport, macrophage-derived apoE plays an important role in immunoregulation. Previous studies have identified macrophage subpopulations that differ substantially in their ability to synthesize specific cytokines and enzymes, however, potential heterogeneous macrophage apoE expression has not been studied. Here we examined apoE expression in human THP-1 macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry methods we reveal a striking heterogeneity in macrophage apoE expression in both cell types. In phorbol-ester-differentiated THP-1 macrophages, 5% of the cells over-expressed apoE at levels more than 50-fold higher than the rest of the population. ApoE over-expressing THP-1 macrophages contained condensed/fragmented nuclei and increased levels of activated caspase-3 indicating induction of apoptosis. In MDM, 3–5% of the cells also highly over-expressed apoE, up to 50-fold higher than the rest of the population; however, this was not associated with obvious nuclear alterations. The apoE over-expressing MDM were larger, more granular, and more autofluorescent than the majority of cells and they contained numerous vesicle-like structures that appeared to be coated by apoE. Flow cytometry experiments indicated that the apoE over-expressing subpopulation of MDM were positive for CD14, CD11b/Mac-1 and CD68. These observations suggest that specific macrophage subpopulations may be important for apoE-mediated immunoregulation and clearly indicate that subpopulation heterogeneity should be taken into account when investigating macrophage apoE expression. PMID:15500620

  10. The Green`s function method for critical heterogeneous slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Kornreich, D.E.

    1996-10-01

    Recently, the Green`s Function Method (GFM) has been employed to obtain benchmark-quality results for nuclear engineering and radiative transfer calculations. This was possible because of fast and accurate calculations of the Green`s function and the associated Fourier and Laplace transform inversions. Calculations have been provided in one-dimensional slab geometries for both homogeneous and heterogeneous media. A heterogeneous medium is analyzed as a series of homogeneous slabs, and Placzek`s lemma is used to extend each slab to infinity. This allows use of the infinite medium Green`s function (the anisotropic plane source in an infinite homogeneous medium) in the solution. To this point, a drawback of the GFM has been the limitation to media with c < 1, where c is the number of secondary particles produced in a collision. Clearly, no physical steady-state solution exists for an infinite medium that contains an infinite source and is described by c >1; however, mathematical solutions exist which result in oscillating Green`s functions. Such calculations are briefly discussing. The limitation to media with c < 1 has been relaxed so that the Green`s function may also be calculated for media with c {ge} 1. Thus, materials that contain fissionable isotopes may be modeled.

  11. Heterogeneous Chemistry Involving Methanol in Tropospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Yokelson, R. J.; Singh, H. B.; Hobbs, P. V.; Crawford, J. H.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this report we analyze airborne measurements to suggest that methanol in biomass burning smoke is lost heterogeneously in clouds. When a smoke plume intersected a cumulus cloud during the SAFARI 2000 field project, the observed methanol gas phase concentration rapidly declined. Current understanding of gas and aqueous phase chemistry cannot explain the loss of methanol documented by these measurements. Two plausible heterogeneous reactions are proposed to explain the observed simultaneous loss and production of methanol and formaldehyde, respectively. If the rapid heterogeneous processing of methanol, seen in a cloud impacted by smoke, occurs in more pristine clouds, it could affect the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere on a global scale.

  12. A heterogeneous graph-based recommendation simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Yeonchan, Ahn; Sungchan, Park; Lee, Matt Sangkeun; Sang-goo, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous graph-based recommendation frameworks have flexibility in that they can incorporate various recommendation algorithms and various kinds of information to produce better results. In this demonstration, we present a heterogeneous graph-based recommendation simulator which enables participants to experience the flexibility of a heterogeneous graph-based recommendation method. With our system, participants can simulate various recommendation semantics by expressing the semantics via meaningful paths like User Movie User Movie. The simulator then returns the recommendation results on the fly based on the user-customized semantics using a fast Monte Carlo algorithm.

  13. Molecular forensic science analysis of nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Dallas David

    Concerns over the proliferation and instances of nuclear material in the environment have increased interest in the expansion of nuclear forensics analysis and attribution programs. A new related field, molecular forensic science (MFS) has helped meet this expansion by applying common scientific analyses to nuclear forensics scenarios. In this work, MFS was applied to three scenarios related to nuclear forensics analysis. In the first, uranium dioxide was synthesized and aged at four sets of static environmental conditions and studied for changes in chemical speciation. The second highlighted the importance of bulk versus particle characterizations by analyzing a heterogeneous industrially prepared sample with similar techniques. In the third, mixed uranium/plutonium hot particles were collected from the McGuire Air Force Base BOMARC Site and analyzed for chemical speciation and elemental surface composition. This work has identified new signatures and has indicated unexpected chemical behavior under various conditions. These findings have lead to an expansion of basic actinide understanding, proof of MFS as a tool for nuclear forensic science, and new areas for expansion in these fields.

  14. Increasing selection response by Bayesian modeling of heterogeneous environmental variances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heterogeneity of environmental variance among genotypes reduces selection response because genotypes with higher variance are more likely to be selected than low-variance genotypes. Modeling heterogeneous variances to obtain weighted means corrected for heterogeneous variances is difficult in likel...

  15. Nuclear Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Meyer, Philip D.; Ward, Andy L.

    2005-01-12

    Nuclear wastes are by-products of nuclear weapons production and nuclear power generation, plus residuals of radioactive materials used by industry, medicine, agriculture, and academia. Their distinctive nature and potential hazard make nuclear wastes not only the most dangerous waste ever created by mankind, but also one of the most controversial and regulated with respect to disposal. Nuclear waste issues, related to uncertainties in geologic disposal and long-term protection, combined with potential misuse by terrorist groups, have created uneasiness and fear in the general public and remain stumbling blocks for further development of a nuclear industry in a world that may soon be facing a global energy crisis.

  16. Computational Mechanics for Heterogeneous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Baczewski, Andrew David; Stephen Bond; Erikson, William W.; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Noble, David R.; Pierce, Flint; Roberts, Christine; van Swol, Frank B.; Yarrington, Cole

    2013-11-01

    The subject of this work is the development of models for the numerical simulation of matter, momentum, and energy balance in heterogeneous materials. These are materials that consist of multiple phases or species or that are structured on some (perhaps many) scale(s). By computational mechanics we mean to refer generally to the standard type of modeling that is done at the level of macroscopic balance laws (mass, momentum, energy). We will refer to the flow or flux of these quantities in a generalized sense as transport. At issue here are the forms of the governing equations in these complex materials which are potentially strongly inhomogeneous below some correlation length scale and are yet homogeneous on larger length scales. The question then becomes one of how to model this behavior and what are the proper multi-scale equations to capture the transport mechanisms across scales. To address this we look to the area of generalized stochastic process that underlie the transport processes in homogeneous materials. The archetypal example being the relationship between a random walk or Brownian motion stochastic processes and the associated Fokker-Planck or diffusion equation. Here we are interested in how this classical setting changes when inhomogeneities or correlations in structure are introduced into the problem. Aspects of non-classical behavior need to be addressed, such as non-Fickian behavior of the mean-squared-displacement (MSD) and non-Gaussian behavior of the underlying probability distribution of jumps. We present an experimental technique and apparatus built to investigate some of these issues. We also discuss diffusive processes in inhomogeneous systems, and the role of the chemical potential in diffusion of hard spheres is considered. Also, the relevance to liquid metal solutions is considered. Finally we present an example of how inhomogeneities in material microstructure introduce fluctuations at the meso-scale for a thermal conduction problem

  17. The Involvement of Splicing Factor hnRNP A1 in UVB-Induced Alternative Splicing of hdm2.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianguo; Li, Li; Tong, Lingying; Tang, Liling; Wu, Shiyong

    2016-01-12

    Human homolog double minute 2 (hdm2), an oncoprotein, which binds to tumor suppressor p53 to facilitate its degradation, has been known to contribute to tumorigenesis. Its splicing variants are reported to be highly expressed in many cancers and can be induced by ultraviolet B light (UVB). However, the mechanisms of how UVB radiation induces hdm2 alternative splicing still remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the roles of two common splicing factors, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) A1 and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1), in regulating UVB-induced hdm2 splicing. Our study indicated that while the expression of both hnRNP A1 and SRSF1 are induced, only hnRNP A1 is involved in hdm2 alternative splicing upon UVB irradiation. Overexpression of hnRNP A1 resulted in decrease of full-length hdm2 (hdm2-FL) and increase of hdm2B, one of hdm2 alternate-splicing forms; while down-regulated hnRNP A1 expression led to the decrease of the hdm2-FL and hdm2B in HaCaT cells. Protein-mRNA binding assay confirmed that UVB irradiation could increase the binding of hnRNP A1 to hdm2 pre-mRNA. In conclusion, we elucidated that UVB induces alternative splicing of hdm2 via increasing the expression and the binding of hnRNP A1 to hdm2 full-length mRNA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Lipid rafts: heterogeneity on the high seas.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Linda J

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that are enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. They have been implicated in processes as diverse as signal transduction, endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Recent evidence suggests that this diversity of function is accompanied by a diversity in the composition of lipid rafts. The rafts in cells appear to be heterogeneous both in terms of their protein and their lipid content, and can be localized to different regions of the cell. This review summarizes the data supporting the concept of heterogeneity among lipid rafts and outlines the evidence for cross-talk between raft components. Based on differences in the ways in which proteins interact with rafts, the Induced-Fit Model of Raft Heterogeneity is proposed to explain the establishment and maintenance of heterogeneity within raft populations. PMID:14662007

  19. Eradication of infectious diseases in heterogeneous populations

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.; Lenhart, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    A model is presented of infectious disease in heterogeneous populations, which allows for variable intra- to intergroup contact ratios. The authors give necessary and sufficient conditions for disease eradication by means of vaccination. Smallpox is used as an illustrative example.

  20. Heterogeneous Clustering: Operational and User Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salm, Saita Wood

    1999-01-01

    Heterogeneous clustering can improve overall utilization of multiple hosts and can provide better turnaround to users by balancing workloads across hosts. Building a cluster requires both operational changes and revisions in user scripts.

  1. Exploring heterogeneous market hypothesis using realized volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Wen Cheong; Isa, Zaidi; Mohd Nor, Abu Hassan Shaari

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the heterogeneous market hypothesis using high frequency data. The cascaded heterogeneous trading activities with different time durations are modelled by the heterogeneous autoregressive framework. The empirical study indicated the presence of long memory behaviour and predictability elements in the financial time series which supported heterogeneous market hypothesis. Besides the common sum-of-square intraday realized volatility, we also advocated two power variation realized volatilities in forecast evaluation and risk measurement in order to overcome the possible abrupt jumps during the credit crisis. Finally, the empirical results are used in determining the market risk using the value-at-risk approach. The findings of this study have implications for informationally market efficiency analysis, portfolio strategies and risk managements.

  2. Heterogeneous treatment in the variational nodal method

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T.H.; Palmiotti, G.

    1995-06-01

    The variational nodal transport method is reduced to its diffusion form and generalized for the treatment of heterogeneous nodes while maintaining nodal balances. Adapting variational methods to heterogeneous nodes requires the ability to integrate over a node with discontinuous cross sections. In this work, integrals are evaluated using composite gaussian quadrature rules, which permit accurate integration while minimizing computing time. Allowing structure within a nodal solution scheme avoids some of the necessity of cross section homogenization, and more accurately defines the intra-nodal flux shape. Ideally, any desired heterogeneity can be constructed within the node; but in reality, the finite set of basis functions limits the practical resolution to which fine detail can be defined within the node. Preliminary comparison tests show that the heterogeneous variational nodal method provides satisfactory results even if some improvements are needed for very difficult, configurations.

  3. Heterogeneity and Risk Sharing in Village Economies.

    PubMed

    Chiappori, Pierre-André; Samphantharak, Krislert; Schulhofer-Wohl, Sam; Townsend, Robert M

    2014-03-01

    We show how to use panel data on household consumption to directly estimate households' risk preferences. Specifically, we measure heterogeneity in risk aversion among households in Thai villages using a full risk-sharing model, which we then test allowing for this heterogeneity. There is substantial, statistically significant heterogeneity in estimated risk preferences. Full insurance cannot be rejected. As the risk sharing, as-if-complete-markets theory might predict, estimated risk preferences are unrelated to wealth or other characteristics. The heterogeneity matters for policy: Although the average household would benefit from eliminating village-level risk, less-risk-averse households who are paid to absorb that risk would be worse off by several percent of household consumption.

  4. Heterogeneity and Risk Sharing in Village Economies*

    PubMed Central

    Chiappori, Pierre-André; Samphantharak, Krislert; Schulhofer-Wohl, Sam; Townsend, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    We show how to use panel data on household consumption to directly estimate households’ risk preferences. Specifically, we measure heterogeneity in risk aversion among households in Thai villages using a full risk-sharing model, which we then test allowing for this heterogeneity. There is substantial, statistically significant heterogeneity in estimated risk preferences. Full insurance cannot be rejected. As the risk sharing, as-if-complete-markets theory might predict, estimated risk preferences are unrelated to wealth or other characteristics. The heterogeneity matters for policy: Although the average household would benefit from eliminating village-level risk, less-risk-averse households who are paid to absorb that risk would be worse off by several percent of household consumption. PMID:24932226

  5. Heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of atmospheric trace contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollis, David F.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 1 May - 31 Oct. 1992 on heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of atmospheric trace contaminants is presented. Topics discussed include photoreactor monolith fundamental studies and monolith reactor operation: batch recirculation system.

  6. Intelligent Classification in Huge Heterogeneous Data Sets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    signals and through data dimension reduction, and to develop and tailor algorithms for the extraction of intelligence from several huge heterogeneous...dimension reduction and feature extraction . These techniques are employed when no training set is available, and therefore also no target output...algorithms for application to huge, heterogeneous data sets enabling the extraction of intelligence from information. The approach uses two-scale supervised

  7. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Skiba, James M.; Scherer, Carolynn P.

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  8. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power plant... corrective action shall be taken. For a nuclear power plant for which the licensee has submitted...

  9. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power plant... corrective action shall be taken. For a nuclear power plant for which the licensee has submitted...

  10. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power plant... corrective action shall be taken. For a nuclear power plant for which the licensee has submitted...

  11. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power plant... corrective action shall be taken. For a nuclear power plant for which the licensee has submitted...

  12. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Construction Permits § 50.65 Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power...

  13. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. (a)(1) As specified in paragraphs (b... shipment of irradiated reactor fuel or nuclear waste must contain the following information: (1) The name... nuclear waste shipment; (2) A description of the irradiated reactor fuel or nuclear waste contained in...

  14. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. (a)(1) As specified in paragraphs (b... shipment of irradiated reactor fuel or nuclear waste must contain the following information: (1) The name... nuclear waste shipment; (2) A description of the irradiated reactor fuel or nuclear waste contained in...

  15. Genomic and epigenomic heterogeneity of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, De-Chen; Mayakonda, Anand; Dinh, Huy Q; Huang, Pinbo; Lin, Lehang; Liu, Xiaoping; Ding, Ling-Wen; Wang, Jie; Berman, Benjamin; Song, Erwei; Yin, Dong; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2017-02-20

    Understanding the intratumoral heterogeneity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is instructive for developing personalized therapy and identifying molecular biomarkers. Here we applied whole-exome sequencing to 69 samples from 11 patients to resolve the genetic architecture of subclonal diversification. Spatial genomic diversity was found in all 11 HCC cases, with 29% of driver mutations being heterogeneous, including TERT, ARID1A, NOTCH2, and STAG2. Similar with other cancer types, TP53 mutations were always shared between all tumor regions i.e. located on the "trunk" of the evolutionary tree. In addition, we found that variants within several drug targets such as KIT, SYK and PIK3CA were mutated in a fully clonal manner, indicating their therapeutic potentials for HCC. Temporal dissection of mutational signatures suggested that mutagenic processes associated with exposure to aristolochic acid and aflatoxin might play a more important role in early, as opposed to late, stages of HCC development. Moreover, we observed extensive intratumoral epigenetic heterogeneity in HCC based on multiple independent analytical methods and showed that intratumoral methylation heterogeneity might play important roles in the biology of HCC cells. Our results also demonstrated prominent heterogeneity of intratumoral methylation even in a stable HCC genome. Together, these findings highlight widespread intratumoral heterogeneity at both the genomic and epigenomic levels in HCC and provide an important molecular foundation for better understanding the pathogenesis of this malignancy.

  16. Materials properties: heterogeneity and appropriate sampling modes.

    PubMed

    Esbensen, Kim H

    2015-01-01

    The target audience for this Special Section comprises parties related to the food and feed sectors, e.g., field samplers, academic and industrial scientists, laboratory personnel, companies, organizations, regulatory bodies, and agencies who are responsible for sampling, as well as project leaders, project managers, quality managers, supervisors, and directors. All these entities face heterogeneous materials, and the characteristics of heterogeneous materials needs to be competently understood by all of them. Before delivering analytical results for decision-making, one form or other of primary sampling is always necessary, which must counteract the effects of the sampling target heterogeneity. Up to five types of sampling error may arise as a specific sampling process interacts with a heterogeneous material; two sampling errors arise because of the heterogeneity of the sampling target, and three additional sampling errors are produced by the sampling process itself-if not properly understood, reduced, and/or eliminated, which is the role of Theory of Sampling. This paper discusses the phenomenon and concepts involved in understanding, describing, and managing the adverse effects of heterogeneity in sampling.

  17. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  18. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  19. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP)

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's history with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) technology goes back to the earliest days of the Agency. The Manned Lunar Rover Vehicle and the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications p...

  20. Nuclear disarmament verification

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1993-12-31

    Arms control treaties, unilateral actions, and cooperative activities -- reflecting the defusing of East-West tensions -- are causing nuclear weapons to be disarmed and dismantled worldwide. In order to provide for future reductions and to build confidence in the permanency of this disarmament, verification procedures and technologies would play an important role. This paper outlines arms-control objectives, treaty organization, and actions that could be undertaken. For the purposes of this Workshop on Verification, nuclear disarmament has been divided into five topical subareas: Converting nuclear-weapons production complexes, Eliminating and monitoring nuclear-weapons delivery systems, Disabling and destroying nuclear warheads, Demilitarizing or non-military utilization of special nuclear materials, and Inhibiting nuclear arms in non-nuclear-weapons states. This paper concludes with an overview of potential methods for verification.

  1. Nuclear fear revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2010-10-01

    In 1988 the science historian Spencer Weart published a groundbreaking book called Nuclear Fear: A History of Images, which examined visions of radiation damage and nuclear disaster in newspapers, television, film, literature, advertisements and popular culture.

  2. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report contains brief papers that discusses the following topics: Fundamental Symmetries in the Nucleus; Internucleon Interactions; Dynamics of Very Light Nuclei; Facets of the Nuclear Many-Body Problem; and Nuclear Instruments and Methods.

  3. Teaching "The Nuclear Predicament."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carman, Philip; Kneeshaw, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Contends that courses on nuclear war must help students examine the political, social, religious, philosophical, economic, and moral assumptions which characterized the dilemma of nuclear armament/disarmament. Describes the upper level undergraduate course taught by the authors. (JDH)

  4. Effective reaction parameters for mixing controlled reactions in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus; Kitanidis, Peter

    2008-02-01

    Sound understanding of mixing-controlled reactions in heterogeneous media is needed for the realistic modeling of contaminant transport in aquifers and is a precondition for the evaluation of natural attenuation processes, the design of nuclear waste disposal, and the engineered remediation of contaminated sites. In this work, we study the bimolecular dissolution-precipitation equilibrium reaction, adapted after De Simoni et al. (2005). Because of advective and dispersive transport of the reacting species, the system is globally in nonequilibrium because the effective reaction rate is limited by the finite rate of transport and thus is affected by the heterogeneity of the formation. We study the macroscopic formulation of such a reactive transport system in terms of mixing-controlled reaction parameters which integrate the impact of spatial heterogeneity. The apparent chemical saturation is found to be a function of the concentration variance and is generally greater than its local-scale equivalent. This explains why water samples taken from pumping wells are normally nonequilibrium with respect to minerals existing in the aquifer, even when local equilibrium is to be expected. The reaction rate is given by the product of a reaction factor, associated with the local equilibrium constant and concentration variance, and a mixing factor, which is the product of the microdispersion coefficient and the square gradient of the mean and perturbation concentration fields. The mixing factor dominates the description of the reaction rate in the upscaled macroscopic models. The reaction rate predicted by macroscopic models is controlled by two competing effects: The large heterogeneity-induced macrodispersion coefficient leads to an increase of reaction rate, while a more smoothed concentration gradient may lead to a decrease of the reaction rate. Macroscopic models may only give a good approximation at large time and away from the plume center of mass because of the balanced

  5. Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator Index (NERI): A benchmarking tool for assessing nuclear capacity in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Saum-Manning,L.

    2008-07-13

    Declining natural resources, rising oil prices, looming climate change and the introduction of nuclear energy partnerships, such as GNEP, have reinvigorated global interest in nuclear energy. The convergence of such issues has prompted countries to move ahead quickly to deal with the challenges that lie ahead. However, developing countries, in particular, often lack the domestic infrastructure and public support needed to implement a nuclear energy program in a safe, secure, and nonproliferation-conscious environment. How might countries become ready for nuclear energy? What is needed is a framework for assessing a country's readiness for nuclear energy. This paper suggests that a Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator (NERI) Index might serve as a meaningful basis for assessing a country's status in terms of progress toward nuclear energy utilization under appropriate conditions. The NERI Index is a benchmarking tool that measures a country's level of 'readiness' for nonproliferation-conscious nuclear energy development. NERI first identifies 8 key indicators that have been recognized by the International Atomic Energy Agency as key nonproliferation and security milestones to achieve prior to establishing a nuclear energy program. It then measures a country's progress in each of these areas on a 1-5 point scale. In doing so NERI illuminates gaps or underdeveloped areas in a country's nuclear infrastructure with a view to enable stakeholders to prioritize the allocation of resources toward programs and policies supporting international nonproliferation goals through responsible nuclear energy development. On a preliminary basis, the indicators selected include: (1) demonstrated need; (2) expressed political support; (3) participation in nonproliferation and nuclear security treaties, international terrorism conventions, and export and border control arrangements; (4) national nuclear-related legal and regulatory mechanisms; (5) nuclear infrastructure; (6) the

  6. Nuclear Energy Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-27

    small modular reactors and extend the lives and improve the operation of existing commercial nuclear power plants. 40 Interdisciplinary MIT Study, The Future of Nuclear Power, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003, p. 79. 41 Gronlund, Lisbeth, David Lochbaum, and Edwin Lyman, Nuclear Power in a Warming World, Union of Concerned Scientists, December 2007. 42 Travis Madsen, Tony Dutzik, and Bernadette Del Chiaro, et al., Generating Failure: How Building Nuclear Power Plants

  7. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    of efforts to improve the safety of nuclear reactors that were started together with the USSR. These efforts are focused in particular on...characteristics of these reactors are quite encouraging. With their improved safety and low radiation effect on environment they ensure the possi...Nuclear Power [KYODO] 3 Fukushima Nuclear Reactor Reports Leak [KYODO] 3 NORTH KOREA Nuclear Weapons Capability Discussed by ROK Paper

  8. Nuclear power browning out

    SciTech Connect

    Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

    1996-05-01

    When the sad history of nuclear power is written, April 26, 1986, will be recorded as the day the dream died. The explosion at the Chernobyl plant was a terrible human tragedy- and it delivered a stark verdict on the hope that nuclear power will one day replace fossil fuel-based energy systems. Nuclear advocates may soldier on, but a decade after Chernobyl it is clear that nuclear power is no longer a viable energy option for the twenty-first century.

  9. JPRS Report Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    release; Distribution Unlimited | -—fb 40 Nuclear Developments JPRS-TND-88-016 CONTENTS 2 SEPTEMBER 1988 CHINA Nuclear Power Chief Seeks...Foreign Cooperation [Yuan Zhou; CHINA DAILY (BUSINESS WEEKLY) 1 Aug 88] 1 Nuclear Fusion Study Reaches Advanced Level [Xiao Longlian; Beijing...Government ’Welcomes’ Group [Beijing XINHUA 12 Aug 88] 4 No Decision on Disposal of Daya Nuclear Waste [Andy Ho; Hong Kong SOUTH CHINA MORNING POST

  10. Nuclear air cushion vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper serves several functions. It identifies the 'state-of-the-art' of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant. Using mission studies and cost estimates, the report describes some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles. The paper also summarizes the technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies that have been performed at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  11. Revitalizing Nuclear Safety Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    This report covers the general issues involved in nuclear safety research and points out the areas needing detailed consideration. Topics included are: (1) "Principles of Nuclear Safety Research" (examining who should fund, who should conduct, and who should set the agenda for nuclear safety research); (2) "Elements of a Future…

  12. Nuclear energy technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  13. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    a new generation of nuclear Because of the significant improvements in radiation read- reactors with an increased degree of safety are developed...With USSR [Moscow PRA VDA 14 Aug] ...................... 14 Future Nuclear Reactor Plans Detailed fIslamnahad Radio...July Stoppages /Moscow International] ........................................... 19 Suspension of Nuclear Reactor Construction Urged ITASS

  14. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    extraction plant in collaboration with the Fer- Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). tilizers and Chemicals , Travancore (FACT) at Eloor near Cochin...Nuclear Reactor Shut Down After Malfunction [KYODO] ................................................................ 8 PHILIPPINES Proposal To Operate...Nuclear Reactor in Algeria [TELAM] .............................................................. 10 Nuclear Official Returns From Algeria [TELAM

  15. Teaching Nuclear History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holl, Jack M.; Convis, Sheila C.

    1991-01-01

    Presents results of a survey of the teaching about nuclear history at U.S. colleges and universities. Reports the existence of a well-established and extensive literature, a focus on nuclear weapons or warfare, and a concentration on nuclear citizenship, therapy, or eschatology for courses outside of history departments. Discusses individual…

  16. Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... necesita saber acerca de... Estudios de Imagen de Medicina Nuclear Un procedimiento de medicina nuclear se describe algunas veces como unos rayos- ... través del cuerpo del paciente. Los procedimientos de medicina nuclear utilizan pequeñas cantidades de mate- riales radiactivos, ...

  17. Nuclear fact book

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, O. F.; Platt, A. M.; Robinson, J. V.

    1983-05-01

    This reference provides significant highlights and summary facts in the following areas: general energy; nuclear energy; nuclear fuel cycle; uranium supply and enrichment; nuclear reactors; spent fuel and advanced repacking concepts; reprocessing; high-level waste; gaseous waste; transuranic waste; low-level waste; remedial action; transportation; disposal; radiation information; environment; legislation; socio-political aspects; conversion factors; and a glossary. (GHT)

  18. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  19. Basic Nuclear Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Basic concepts of nuclear structures, radiation, nuclear reactions, and health physics are presented in this text, prepared for naval officers. Applications to the area of nuclear power are described in connection with pressurized water reactors, experimental boiling water reactors, homogeneous reactor experiments, and experimental breeder…

  20. Test facility for nuclear planetology instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrukhin, A. A.; Golovin, D. V.; Dubasov, P. V.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Ponomarev, I. D.; Repkin, A. N.; Sanin, A. B.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Udovichenko, K. V.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2016-03-01

    An experimental facility for testing and calibrating nuclear planetology instruments has been constructed in partnership between the Space Research Institute (Moscow) and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. A model of Martian soil with a size of 3.82 × 3.21 m2 and an overall mass of about 30 t is assembled from silicate glass. Glass is chosen in order to imitate absolutely dry soil close in composition to the Martian one. The heterogeneous model allows one to imitate the average elemental composition of Martian soil in the best possible way by adding layers of the necessary materials to it. Near-surface water ice is simulated by polyethylene layers buried at different depths within the glass model. A portable neutron generator is used as the neutron source for testing active neutron and gamma spectrometers. The facility is radiation-hazardous and is thus equipped with interlock and radiation monitoring systems in accordance with the effective regulations.

  1. Stress-induced Nuclear Bodies Are Sites of Accumulation of Pre-mRNA Processing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Denegri, Marco; Chiodi, Ilaria; Corioni, Margherita; Cobianchi, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) HAP (hnRNP A1 interacting protein) is a multifunctional protein with roles in RNA metabolism, transcription, and nuclear structure. After stress treatments, HAP is recruited to a small number of nuclear bodies, usually adjacent to the nucleoli, which consist of clusters of perichromatin granules and are depots of transcripts synthesized before stress. In this article we show that HAP bodies are sites of accumulation for a subset of RNA processing factors and are related to Sam68 nuclear bodies (SNBs) detectable in unstressed cells. Indeed, HAP and Sam68 are both present in SNBs and in HAP bodies, that we rename “stress-induced SNBs.” The determinants required for the redistribution of HAP lie between residue 580 and 788. Different portions of this region direct the recruitment of the green fluorescent protein to stress-induced SNBs, suggesting an interaction of HAP with different components of the bodies. With the use of the 580–725 region as bait in a two-hybrid screening, we have selected SRp30c and 9G8, two members of the SR family of splicing factors. Splicing factors are differentially affected by heat shock: SRp30c and SF2/ASF are efficiently recruited to stress-induced SNBs, whereas the distribution of SC35 is not perturbed. We propose that the differential sequestration of splicing factors could affect processing of specific transcripts. Accordingly, the formation of stress-induced SNBs is accompanied by a change in the splicing pattern of the adenovirus E1A transcripts. PMID:11694584

  2. Colloid straining within saturated heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Porubcan, Alexis A; Xu, Shangping

    2011-02-01

    The transport of 0.46 μm, 2.94 μm, 5.1 μm and 6.06 μm latex particles in heterogeneous porous media prepared from the mixing of 0.78 mm, 0.46 mm and 0.23 mm quartz sands was investigated through column transport experiments. It was observed that the 0.46 μm particles traveled conservatively within the heterogeneous porous media, suggesting that under the experimental conditions employed in this research the strong repulsive interactions between the negatively charged latex particles and the clean quartz sands led to minimal colloid immobilization due to physicochemical filtration. The immobilization of the 2.94 μm, 5.1 μm and 6.06 μm latex particles was thus attributed to colloid straining. Experimental results showed that the straining of colloidal particles within heterogeneous sand mixtures increased when the fraction of finer sands increased. The mathematical model that was developed and tested based on results obtained using uniform sands (Xu et al., 2006) was found to be able to describe colloid straining within heterogeneous porous media. Examination of the relationship between the best-fit values of the clean-bed straining rate coefficients (k(0)) and the ratio of colloid diameter (d(p)) and sand grain size (d(g)) indicated that when number-average sizes were used to represent the size of the heterogeneous porous media, there existed a consistent relationship for both uniform sands and heterogeneous sand mixtures. Similarly, the use of the number-averaged sizes for the heterogeneous porous media produced a uniform relationship between the colloid straining capacity term (λ) and the ratio of d(p)/d(g) for all the sand treatments.

  3. History of Nuclear India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Ram

    2000-04-01

    India emerged as a free and democratic country in 1947, and entered into the nuclear age in 1948 by establishing the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), with Homi Bhabha as the chairman. Later on the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) was created under the Office of the Prime Minister Jawahar Lal Nehru. Initially the AEC and DAE received international cooperation, and by 1963 India had two research reactors and four nuclear power reactors. In spite of the humiliating defeat in the border war by China in 1962 and China's nuclear testing in 1964, India continued to adhere to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. On May 18, 1974 India performed a 15 kt Peaceful Nuclear Explosion (PNE). The western powers considered it nuclear weapons proliferation and cut off all financial and technical help, even for the production of nuclear power. However, India used existing infrastructure to build nuclear power reactors and exploded both fission and fusion devices on May 11 and 13, 1998. The international community viewed the later activity as a serious road block for the Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; both deemed essential to stop the spread of nuclear weapons. India considers these treaties favoring nuclear states and is prepared to sign if genuine nuclear disarmament is included as an integral part of these treaties.

  4. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  5. The nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.

    2016-11-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symmetry energy in different fields of research and of the accuracy of its determination from the phenomenology and from the microscopic many-body theory. In recent years, a great interest was devoted not only to the Nuclear Matter symmetry energy at saturation density but also to its whole density dependence, which is an essential ingredient for our understanding of many phenomena. We analyze the nuclear symmetry energy in different realms of nuclear physics and astrophysics. In particular we consider the nuclear symmetry energy in relation to nuclear structure, astrophysics of Neutron Stars and supernovae, and heavy ion collision experiments, trying to elucidate the connections of these different fields on the basis of the symmetry energy peculiarities. The interplay between experimental and observational data and theoretical developments is stressed. The expected future developments and improvements are schematically addressed, together with most demanded experimental and theoretical advances for the next few years.

  6. Thermodynamics of nuclear transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Hao; Mehta, Pankaj; Elbaum, Michael

    Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope is important for eukaryotes for gene expression and signaling. Experimental studies have revealed that nuclear transport is inherently a nonequilibrium process and actively consumes energy. In this work we present a thermodynamics theory of nuclear transport for a major class of nuclear transporters that are mediated by the small GTPase Ran. We identify the molecular elements responsible for powering nuclear transport, which we term the ``Ran battery'' and find that the efficiency of transport, measured by the cargo nuclear localization ratio, is limited by competition between cargo molecules and RanGTP to bind transport receptors, as well as the amount of NTF2 (i.e. RanGDP carrier) available to circulate the energy flow. This picture complements our current understanding of nuclear transport by providing a comprehensive thermodynamics framework to decipher the underlying biochemical machinery. Pm and CHW were supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling in Living Systems grant (to PM).

  7. Computational model of heterogeneous heating in melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellicker, Jason; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Kowalski, Gregory J.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin particles often present as an aggregate of smaller melanin pigment granules and have a heterogeneous surface morphology. When irradiated with light within the absorption spectrum of melanin, these heterogeneities produce measurable concentrations of the electric field that result in temperature gradients from thermal effects that are not seen with spherical or ellipsoidal modeling of melanin. Modeling melanin without taking into consideration the heterogeneous surface morphology yields results that underestimate the strongest signals or over{estimate their spatial extent. We present a new technique to image phase changes induced by heating using a computational model of melanin that exhibits these surface heterogeneities. From this analysis, we demonstrate the heterogeneous energy absorption and resulting heating that occurs at the surface of the melanin granule that is consistent with three{photon absorption. Using the three{photon dluorescence as a beacon, we propose a method for detecting the extents of the melanin granule using photothermal microscopy to measure the phase changes resulting from the heating of the melanin.

  8. Emergence of Persistent Infection due to Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vidit; Moitra, Promit; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2017-02-01

    We explore the emergence of persistent infection in a closed region where the disease progression of the individuals is given by the SIRS model, with an individual becoming infected on contact with another infected individual. We investigate the persistence of contagion qualitatively and quantitatively, under increasing heterogeneity in the partitioning of the population into different disease compartments, as well as increasing heterogeneity in the phases of the disease among individuals within a compartment. We observe that when the initial population is uniform, consisting of individuals at the same stage of disease progression, infection arising from a contagious seed does not persist. However when the initial population consists of randomly distributed refractory and susceptible individuals, a single source of infection can lead to sustained infection in the population, as heterogeneity facilitates the de-synchronization of the phases in the disease cycle of the individuals. We also show how the average size of the window of persistence of infection depends on the degree of heterogeneity in the initial composition of the population. In particular, we show that the infection eventually dies out when the entire initial population is susceptible, while even a few susceptibles among an heterogeneous refractory population gives rise to a large persistent infected set.

  9. Heterogeneity of liver cancer and personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Hongyang

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an extraordinarily heterogeneous malignant disease among the tumors that have so far been identified. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) arises most frequently in the setting of chronic liver inflammation and fibrosis, and takes a variety of course in individual patients to process to tumor. The risk factors such as HBV and/or HCV infections, aflatoxin infection, abuse alcohol intake, metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are closely related to the environmental and genetic susceptibilities to HCC. The consequent resulting genomic instability, molecular and signal transduction network disorders and microenvironmental discrepancies are characterized by the extraordinary heterogeneity of liver cancer. The histology-based definition of the morphological heterogeneity of liver cancer has been modified and refined to treat patients with targeted therapies, but this still cannot solve all the problems. Lack of consistent outcome for anticancer agents and conventional therapies in liver cancer treatment calls for assessing the benefits of new molecularly targeted drugs and combined therapy, under the heterogeneity condition of tumor. The present review article will provide the complex mechanism and phenotype of liver cancer heterogeneity, and help us to execute precision medicine in a really personalized manner.

  10. Emergence of Persistent Infection due to Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vidit; Moitra, Promit; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2017-01-01

    We explore the emergence of persistent infection in a closed region where the disease progression of the individuals is given by the SIRS model, with an individual becoming infected on contact with another infected individual. We investigate the persistence of contagion qualitatively and quantitatively, under increasing heterogeneity in the partitioning of the population into different disease compartments, as well as increasing heterogeneity in the phases of the disease among individuals within a compartment. We observe that when the initial population is uniform, consisting of individuals at the same stage of disease progression, infection arising from a contagious seed does not persist. However when the initial population consists of randomly distributed refractory and susceptible individuals, a single source of infection can lead to sustained infection in the population, as heterogeneity facilitates the de-synchronization of the phases in the disease cycle of the individuals. We also show how the average size of the window of persistence of infection depends on the degree of heterogeneity in the initial composition of the population. In particular, we show that the infection eventually dies out when the entire initial population is susceptible, while even a few susceptibles among an heterogeneous refractory population gives rise to a large persistent infected set. PMID:28145522

  11. Estimating flow heterogeneity in natural fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckenby, Robert J.; Sanderson, David J.; Lonergan, Lidia

    2005-10-01

    Examples of small to medium scale fault systems have been mapped in Jurassic sedimentary rocks in north Somerset, England. These examples include contractional and dilational strike-slip oversteps as well as normal faults. These maps form the basis of calculations performed to investigate heterogeneity in natural fracture systems with the aim of predicting fluid flow localisation in different fault styles. As there is no way to measure fracture aperture directly, we use vein thickness to represent an integrated flow path or 'palaeo-aperture' from which we derive a representation of the flow distribution. Three different methods are used to estimate flow heterogeneity based on: (1) fracture density (the ratio of fracture length to area), (2) fracture aperture (fracture porosity) and (3) hydraulic conductance (fracture permeability normalised to the pressure gradient and fluid properties). Our results show that fracture density and hydraulic conductance are poorly correlated and that fracture density does not fully represent the natural heterogeneity of fracture systems. Fracture aperture and hydraulic conductance indicate stronger degrees of flow localisation. Different types of structures also seem to display characteristic and predictable patterns of heterogeneity. Normal fault systems show the highest magnitude of localisation along the faults rather than in the relay ramps, while contractional and dilational strike-slip systems show very strong localisation in the faults and oversteps, respectively. In all cases the amount of damage in the oversteps can modify such patterns of heterogeneity.

  12. Phylogenetic Quantification of Intra-tumour Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland F.; Trinh, Anne; Sipos, Botond; Brenton, James D.; Goldman, Nick; Markowetz, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity is the result of ongoing evolutionary change within each cancer. The expansion of genetically distinct sub-clonal populations may explain the emergence of drug resistance, and if so, would have prognostic and predictive utility. However, methods for objectively quantifying tumour heterogeneity have been missing and are particularly difficult to establish in cancers where predominant copy number variation prevents accurate phylogenetic reconstruction owing to horizontal dependencies caused by long and cascading genomic rearrangements. To address these challenges, we present MEDICC, a method for phylogenetic reconstruction and heterogeneity quantification based on a Minimum Event Distance for Intra-tumour Copy-number Comparisons. Using a transducer-based pairwise comparison function, we determine optimal phasing of major and minor alleles, as well as evolutionary distances between samples, and are able to reconstruct ancestral genomes. Rigorous simulations and an extensive clinical study show the power of our method, which outperforms state-of-the-art competitors in reconstruction accuracy, and additionally allows unbiased numerical quantification of tumour heterogeneity. Accurate quantification and evolutionary inference are essential to understand the functional consequences of tumour heterogeneity. The MEDICC algorithms are independent of the experimental techniques used and are applicable to both next-generation sequencing and array CGH data. PMID:24743184

  13. 75 FR 30078 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC; Vermont Yankee Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). By letter dated May 20, 2010, the Director denied the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC; Vermont Yankee...

  14. Self-attracting walk on heterogeneous networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kanghun; Kyoung, Jaegu; Lee, D-S

    2016-05-01

    Understanding human mobility in cyberspace becomes increasingly important in this information era. While human mobility, memory-dependent and subdiffusive, is well understood in Euclidean space, it remains elusive in random heterogeneous networks like the World Wide Web. Here we study the diffusion characteristics of self-attracting walks, in which a walker is more likely to move to the locations visited previously than to unvisited ones, on scale-free networks. Under strong attraction, the number of distinct visited nodes grows linearly in time with larger coefficients in more heterogeneous networks. More interestingly, crossovers to sublinear growths occur in strongly heterogeneous networks. To understand these phenomena, we investigate the characteristic volumes and topology of the cluster of visited nodes and find that the reinforced attraction to hubs results in expediting exploration first but delaying later, as characterized by the scaling exponents that we derive. Our findings and analysis method can be useful for understanding various diffusion processes mediated by human.

  15. A physical mechanism of cancer heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cong; Wang, Jin

    2016-02-01

    We studied a core cancer gene regulatory network motif to uncover possible source of cancer heterogeneity from epigenetic sources. When the time scale of the protein regulation to the gene is faster compared to the protein synthesis and degradation (adiabatic regime), normal state, cancer state and an intermediate premalignant state emerge. Due to the epigenetics such as DNA methylation and histone remodification, the time scale of the protein regulation to the gene can be slower or comparable to the protein synthesis and degradation (non-adiabatic regime). In this case, many more states emerge as possible phenotype alternations. This gives the origin of the heterogeneity. The cancer heterogeneity is reflected from the emergence of more phenotypic states, larger protein concentration fluctuations, wider kinetic distributions and multiplicity of kinetic paths from normal to cancer state, higher energy cost per gene switching, and weaker stability.

  16. Self-attracting walk on heterogeneous networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kanghun; Kyoung, Jaegu; Lee, D.-S.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding human mobility in cyberspace becomes increasingly important in this information era. While human mobility, memory-dependent and subdiffusive, is well understood in Euclidean space, it remains elusive in random heterogeneous networks like the World Wide Web. Here we study the diffusion characteristics of self-attracting walks, in which a walker is more likely to move to the locations visited previously than to unvisited ones, on scale-free networks. Under strong attraction, the number of distinct visited nodes grows linearly in time with larger coefficients in more heterogeneous networks. More interestingly, crossovers to sublinear growths occur in strongly heterogeneous networks. To understand these phenomena, we investigate the characteristic volumes and topology of the cluster of visited nodes and find that the reinforced attraction to hubs results in expediting exploration first but delaying later, as characterized by the scaling exponents that we derive. Our findings and analysis method can be useful for understanding various diffusion processes mediated by human.

  17. Heterogeneity and thermal modeling of ground water.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Grant

    2007-01-01

    Heat transport in aquifers is becoming an increasingly important topic due to recent growth in the use of ground water in thermal applications. However, the effect of heterogeneity on heat transport in aquifers has yet to be examined in the same detail as it has been for solute transport, and it is unclear what effect this may have on our ability to create accurate models. This study examines this issue through stochastic modeling using the geostatistics for two aquifers with low and high degrees of heterogeneity. The results indicate that there is considerable uncertainty in the distribution of heat associated with injection of warm water into an aquifer. Heterogeneity in the permeability field was also found to slightly reduce the ability to recover this introduced heat at a later time. These simulations also reveal that hydrodynamic macrodispersion is an important consideration in some heat flow problems.

  18. Multiple roles of graphene in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaobin; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao

    2015-05-21

    Scientific interest in graphene as a catalyst and as a catalyst support in heterogeneous catalytic reactions has grown dramatically over the past several years. The present critical review summarizes the multiple roles of graphene in heterogeneous catalysis and highlights the influence of defects, heteroatom-containing functionalities, and graphene's two-dimensional structure on catalytic performance. We first discuss the role and advantages of graphene as a catalyst support, with emphasis on its interactions with the catalytic phases and the influence of mass transfer processes. We then clarify the origin of the intrinsic catalytic activity of graphene in heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Finally we suggest challenges and potential practical applications for graphene in industrial processes.

  19. Microswimmers in Complex Environments with Heterogeneous Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyon, Yunkyong; Fu, Henry

    2011-11-01

    We will discuss the swimming of microorganisms in complex and heterogeneous environments. Microswimmers in biological complex fluids, for instance, bacteria and sperm, are often greatly influenced by heterogeneous medium microstructure with length scales comparable to themselves. We characterize the interaction between the microswimmer and the medium microstructure using the model Golestanian three-sphere swimmer, treating the hydrodynamic interaction with the microstructure through the Oseen tensor. In this investigation, the microstructure of the heterogeneous environment is modeled by fixed spheres representing obstacles, or chains consisting of spheres connected with elastic springs. We find that the swimming speed of the swimmer depends on the force and deformation exerted on micro-structure. Furthermore, we find that while short freely suspended chains and short chains anchored at their ends interact with swimmer quite differently, long enough chains interact similarly, that is, a long mobile chain acts like a anchored chain. We discuss the implications for swimmer interactions with polymer solutions and compliant networks.

  20. Metabolic heterogeneity in human lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Christopher T.; Faubert, Brandon; Yuan, Qing; Lev-Cohain, Naama; Jin, Eunsook; Kim, Jiyeon; Jiang, Lei; Ko, Bookyung; Skelton, Rachael; Loudat, Laurin; Wodzak, Michelle; Klimko, Claire; McMillan, Elizabeth; Butt, Yasmeen; Ni, Min; Oliver, Dwight; Torrealba, Jose; Malloy, Craig R.; Kernstine, Kemp; Lenkinski, Robert E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in the genetic and environmental parameters that influence cell metabolism in culture. Here, we assessed the impact of these factors on human NSCLC metabolism in vivo using intra-operative 13C-glucose infusions in nine NSCLC patients to compare metabolism between tumors and benign lung. While enhanced glycolysis and glucose oxidation were common among these tumors, we observed evidence for oxidation of multiple nutrients in each of them, including lactate as a potential carbon source. Moreover, metabolically heterogeneous regions were identified within and between tumors, and surprisingly, our data suggested potential contributions of non-glucose nutrients in well-perfused tumor areas. Our findings not only demonstrate the heterogeneity in tumor metabolism in vivo but also highlight the strong influence of the microenvironment on this feature. PMID:26853473

  1. Heterogeneous Chemistry Related to Stratospheric Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    Emissions from stratospheric aircraft that may directly or indirectly affect ozone include NO(y), H2O, soot and sulfuric acid. To fully assess the impact of such emissions, it is necessary to have a full understanding of both the homogeneous and heterogeneous transformations that may occur in the stratosphere. Heterogeneous reactions on stratospheric particles play a key role in partitioning ozone-destroying species between their active and reservoir forms. In particular, heterogeneous reactions tend to activate odd chlorine while deactivating odd nitrogen. Accurate modeling of the net atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft requires a thorough understanding of the competing effects of this activation/deactivation. In addition, a full understanding of the potential aircraft impacts requires that the abundance, composition and formation mechanisms of the particles themselves be established. Over the last three years with support from the High Speed Research Program, we have performed laboratory experiments to determine the chemical composition, formation mechanism, and reactivity of stratospheric aerosols.

  2. Heterogeneous Distributed Computing for Computational Aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderam, Vaidy S.

    1998-01-01

    The research supported under this award focuses on heterogeneous distributed computing for high-performance applications, with particular emphasis on computational aerosciences. The overall goal of this project was to and investigate issues in, and develop solutions to, efficient execution of computational aeroscience codes in heterogeneous concurrent computing environments. In particular, we worked in the context of the PVM[1] system and, subsequent to detailed conversion efforts and performance benchmarking, devising novel techniques to increase the efficacy of heterogeneous networked environments for computational aerosciences. Our work has been based upon the NAS Parallel Benchmark suite, but has also recently expanded in scope to include the NAS I/O benchmarks as specified in the NHT-1 document. In this report we summarize our research accomplishments under the auspices of the grant.

  3. Information flow in heterogeneously interacting systems.

    PubMed

    Yamaguti, Yutaka; Tsuda, Ichiro; Takahashi, Yoichiro

    2014-02-01

    Motivated by studies on the dynamics of heterogeneously interacting systems in neocortical neural networks, we studied heterogeneously-coupled chaotic systems. We used information-theoretic measures to investigate directions of information flow in heterogeneously coupled Rössler systems, which we selected as a typical chaotic system. In bi-directionally coupled systems, spontaneous and irregular switchings of the phase difference between two chaotic oscillators were observed. The direction of information transmission spontaneously switched in an intermittent manner, depending on the phase difference between the two systems. When two further oscillatory inputs are added to the coupled systems, this system dynamically selects one of the two inputs by synchronizing, selection depending on the internal phase differences between the two systems. These results indicate that the effective direction of information transmission dynamically changes, induced by a switching of phase differences between the two systems.

  4. Deconstructing transcriptional heterogeneity in pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Roshan M; Cahan, Patrick; Shalek, Alex K; Satija, Rahul; DaleyKeyser, A Jay; Li, Hu; Zhang, Jin; Pardee, Keith; Gennert, David; Trombetta, John J; Ferrante, Thomas C; Regev, Aviv; Daley, George Q; Collins, James J

    2014-12-04

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are capable of dynamic interconversion between distinct substates; however, the regulatory circuits specifying these states and enabling transitions between them are not well understood. Here we set out to characterize transcriptional heterogeneity in mouse PSCs by single-cell expression profiling under different chemical and genetic perturbations. Signalling factors and developmental regulators show highly variable expression, with expression states for some variable genes heritable through multiple cell divisions. Expression variability and population heterogeneity can be influenced by perturbation of signalling pathways and chromatin regulators. Notably, either removal of mature microRNAs or pharmacological blockage of signalling pathways drives PSCs into a low-noise ground state characterized by a reconfigured pluripotency network, enhanced self-renewal and a distinct chromatin state, an effect mediated by opposing microRNA families acting on the Myc/Lin28/let-7 axis. These data provide insight into the nature of transcriptional heterogeneity in PSCs.

  5. Deconstructing transcriptional heterogeneity in pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Shalek, Alex K.; Satija, Rahul; DaleyKeyser, AJay; Li, Hu; Zhang, Jin; Pardee, Keith; Gennert, David; Trombetta, John J.; Ferrante, Thomas C.; Regev, Aviv; Daley, George Q.; Collins, James J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are capable of dynamic interconversion between distinct substates, but the regulatory circuits specifying these states and enabling transitions between them are not well understood. We set out to characterize transcriptional heterogeneity in PSCs by single-cell expression profiling under different chemical and genetic perturbations. Signaling factors and developmental regulators show highly variable expression, with expression states for some variable genes heritable through multiple cell divisions. Expression variability and population heterogeneity can be influenced by perturbation of signaling pathways and chromatin regulators. Strikingly, either removal of mature miRNAs or pharmacologic blockage of signaling pathways drives PSCs into a low-noise ground state characterized by a reconfigured pluripotency network, enhanced self-renewal, and a distinct chromatin state, an effect mediated by opposing miRNA families acting on the c-myc / Lin28 / let-7 axis. These data illuminate the nature of transcriptional heterogeneity in PSCs. PMID:25471879

  6. Characterizing hydrogeologic heterogeneity using lithologic data

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.; Hamm, LL.L.; Harris, M.K.; Thayer, P.A.; Haselow, J.S.; Smits, A.D.

    1997-06-13

    Large-scale (>1 m) variability in hydraulic conductivity is usually the main influence on field-scale groundwater flow patterns and dispersive transport. Incorporating realistic hydraulic conductivity heterogeneity into flow and transport models is paramount to accurate simulations, particularly for contaminant migration. Sediment lithologic descriptions and geophysical logs typically offer finer spatial resolution, and therefore more potential information about site-scale heterogeneity, than other site characterization data. In this study, a technique for generating a heterogeneous, three- dimensional hydraulic conductivity field from sediment lithologic descriptions is presented. The approach involves creating a three-dimensional, fine-scale representation of mud (silt and clay) percentage using a stratified interpolation algorithm. Mud percentage is then translated into horizontal and vertical conductivity using direct correlations derived from measured data and inverse groundwater flow modeling. Lastly, the fine-scale conductivity fields are averaged to create a coarser grid for use in groundwater flow and transport modeling.

  7. Heterogeneity in Karakoram glacier surges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, Duncan J.; Glasser, Neil F.; Cook, Simon J.; Luckman, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Many Karakoram glaciers periodically undergo surges during which large volumes of ice and debris are rapidly transported downglacier, usually at a rate of 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than during quiescence. Here we identify eight recent surges in the region and map their surface velocities using cross-correlation feature tracking on optical satellite imagery. In total, we present 44 surface velocity data sets, which show that Karakoram surges are generally short-lived, lasting between 3 and 5 years in most cases, and have rapid buildup and relaxation phases, often lasting less than a year. Peak velocities of up to 2 km a-1 are reached during summer months, and the surges tend to diminish during winter months. Otherwise, they do not follow a clearly identifiable pattern. In two of the surges, the peak velocity travels down-ice through time as a wave, which we interpret as a surge front. Three other surges are characterized by high velocities that occur simultaneously across the entire glacier surface, and acceleration and deceleration are close to monotonic. There is also no consistent seasonal control on surge initiation or termination. We suggest that the differing styles of surge can be partly accounted for by individual glacier configurations and that while some characteristics of Karakoram surges are akin to thermally controlled surges elsewhere (e.g., Svalbard), the dominant surge mechanism remains unclear. We thus propose that these surges represent a spectrum of flow instabilities and the processes controlling their evolution may vary on a glacier by glacier basis.

  8. Temperature dependent heterogeneous rotational correlation in lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadashvand, Neda; Othon, Christina M.

    2016-12-01

    Lipid structures exhibit complex and highly dynamic lateral structure; and changes in lipid density and fluidity are believed to play an essential role in membrane targeting and function. The dynamic structure of liquids on the molecular scale can exhibit complex transient density fluctuations. Here the lateral heterogeneity of lipid dynamics is explored in free standing lipid monolayers. As the temperature is lowered the probes exhibit increasingly broad and heterogeneous rotational correlation. This increase in heterogeneity appears to exhibit a critical onset, similar to those observed for glass forming fluids. We explore heterogeneous relaxation in in a single constituent lipid monolayer of 1, 2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine by measuring the rotational diffusion of a fluorescent probe (1-palmitoyl-2-[1]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is embedded in the lipid monolayer at low labeling density. Dynamic distributions are measured using wide-field time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The observed relaxation exhibits a narrow, liquid-like distribution at high temperatures (τ ˜ 2.4 ns), consistent with previous experimental measures (Dadashvand et al 2014 Struct. Dyn. 1 054701, Loura and Ramalho 2007 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1768 467-478). However, as the temperature is quenched, the distribution broadens, and we observe the appearance of a long relaxation population (τ ˜ 16.5 ns). This supports the heterogeneity observed for lipids at high packing densities, and demonstrates that the nanoscale diffusion and reorganization in lipid structures can be significantly complex, even in the simplest amorphous architectures. Dynamical heterogeneity of this form can have a significant impact on the organization, permeability and energetics of lipid membrane structures.

  9. Temperature dependent heterogeneous rotational correlation in lipids.

    PubMed

    Dadashvand, Neda; Othon, Christina M

    2016-11-15

    Lipid structures exhibit complex and highly dynamic lateral structure; and changes in lipid density and fluidity are believed to play an essential role in membrane targeting and function. The dynamic structure of liquids on the molecular scale can exhibit complex transient density fluctuations. Here the lateral heterogeneity of lipid dynamics is explored in free standing lipid monolayers. As the temperature is lowered the probes exhibit increasingly broad and heterogeneous rotational correlation. This increase in heterogeneity appears to exhibit a critical onset, similar to those observed for glass forming fluids. We explore heterogeneous relaxation in in a single constituent lipid monolayer of 1, 2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine  by measuring the rotational diffusion of a fluorescent probe (1-palmitoyl-2-[1]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is embedded in the lipid monolayer at low labeling density. Dynamic distributions are measured using wide-field time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The observed relaxation exhibits a narrow, liquid-like distribution at high temperatures (τ ∼ 2.4 ns), consistent with previous experimental measures (Dadashvand et al 2014 Struct. Dyn. 1 054701, Loura and Ramalho 2007 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1768 467-478). However, as the temperature is quenched, the distribution broadens, and we observe the appearance of a long relaxation population (τ ∼ 16.5 ns). This supports the heterogeneity observed for lipids at high packing densities, and demonstrates that the nanoscale diffusion and reorganization in lipid structures can be significantly complex, even in the simplest amorphous architectures. Dynamical heterogeneity of this form can have a significant impact on the organization, permeability and energetics of lipid membrane structures.

  10. Genetic heterogeneity among kindreds with Alport syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, S J; Atkin, C L; San Juan, A C

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-three kindreds were ascertained through patients at renal clinics at University of Utah Associated Hospitals. Urinalysis indicated glomerulonephritis in 231 of 997 examined kindred members; medical records documented kidney disease consistent with glomerulonephritis in 88 unexamined kindred members. Renal biopsies of 35 persons in a subset of 14 kindreds showed ultrastructural changes and absence of immune phenomena consistent with the diagnosis of Alport syndrome. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) had occurred in 72 (49%) of 148 known affected males and in 13 (8%) of 171 known affected females. No father-son affected pairs occurred in any of the kindreds; 84% of daughters of affected fathers were affected, and 49% of sons and 48% of daughters of affected mothers were affected. One of three phenotypes (juvenile Alport syndrome with deafness, adult Alport syndrome with deafness, or adult Alport syndrome without deafness or other defects) occurred in each of the 23 kindreds. We applied likelihood analysis to test for genetic heterogeneity underlying the phenotypic heterogeneity. In the first application (the admixture test), we tested for the occurrence of two forms of the disease without specifying which kindred had which form; we found insufficient evidence of admixture. In the second application (the predivided-sample test), we tested for genetic heterogeneity expressed as phenotypic heterogeneity. Kindreds were successively divided into two subgroups, with admission to the first subgroup dependent upon: (1) having greater than or equal to 2 males with ESRD, (2) occurrence of deafness in most nephrologically affected male family members, and (3) intrakindred mean age of ESRD in males later than age 31. Weak evidence of heterogeneity was found for category (1); stronger evidence of heterogeneity was found for category (3). Penetrance of microscopic hematuria in female heterozygotes was estimated as 82% overall, 85% for adult Alport syndrome, and 28% for

  11. Safety analysis report for the Hanford Critical Mass Laboratory: Supplement No. 2. Experiments with heterogeneous assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, B.F.; Davenport, L.C.

    1981-04-01

    Factors affecting the safety of criticality experiments using heterogeneous assemblies are described and assessed. It is concluded that there is no substantial change in safety from experiments already being routinely performed at the Critical Mass Laboratory (CML), and that laboratory and personnel safety are adequately provided by the combination of engineered and administrative safety limits enforced at the CML. This conclusion is based on the analysis of operational controls, potential hazards, and the consequences of accidents. Contingencies considered that could affect nuclear criticality include manual changes in fuel loadings, water flooding, fire, explosion, loss of services, earthquake, windstorm, and flood. Other potential hazards considered include radiation exposure to personnel, and potential releases within the Assembly Room and outside to the environment. It is concluded that the Maximum Credible Nuclear Burst of 3 x 10/sup 18/ fissions (which served as the design basis for the CML) is valid for heterogeneous assemblies as well as homogeneous assemblies. This is based upon examination of the results of reactor destructive tests and the results of the SL-1 reactor destructive accident. The production of blast effects which might jeopardize the CML critical assembly room (of thick reinforced concrete) is not considered credible due to the extreme circumstances required to produce blast effects in reactor destructive tests. Consequently, it is concluded that, for experiments with heterogeneous assemblies, the consequences of the Maximum Credible Burst are unchanged from those previously estimated for experiments with homogeneous systems.

  12. British nuclear policymaking

    SciTech Connect

    Bowie, C.J.; Platt, A.

    1984-01-01

    This study analyzes the domestic political, economic, and bureaucratic factors that affect the nuclear policymaking process in Great Britain. Its major conclusion is that, although there have been changes in that process in recent years (notably the current involvement of a segment of the British public in the debate about the deployment of intermediate-range nuclear forces), future British nuclear policymaking will remain much what it has been in the past. Three ideas are central to understanding British thinking on the subject: (1) Britain's long-standing resolve to have her own national nuclear force is largely traceable to her desire to maintain first-rank standing among the nations of the world in spite of loss of empire. (2) Financial considerations have always been important--so much so that they have usually dominated issues of nuclear policy. (3) The executive branch of government dominates the nuclear policymaking process but does not always present a united front. The United States heavily influences British nuclear policy through having supplied Britain since the late 1950s with nuclear data and components of nuclear weapon systems such as Polaris and Trident. The relationship works both ways since the U.S. depends on Britain as a base for deployment of both conventional and nuclear systems.

  13. Strip and microstrip line periodic heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerer, A. M.; Lerer, B. M.; Ryazanov, V. D.; Sledkov, V. A.

    1985-04-01

    A quasistatic method is described for analyzing periodic heterogeneities in single and coupled strip lines and microstrip lines. An ALGOL program on a BESM-6 computer calculated the running inductance and capacitance, wave impedances and delay coefficients for single and coupled strip lines and microstrip lines with periodic heterogeneities of arbitrary form. The analyzed quantities are investigated as a function of distance (from side shield to the strip), number of terms in the series and number of approximated functions. The method demonstrates good convergence and requires little machine time and results were verified experimentally.

  14. Atmospheric pressure microwave assisted heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chemat-Djenni, Zoubida; Hamada, Boudjema; Chemat, Farid

    2007-07-11

    The purpose of the study was to investigate microwave selective heating phenomena and their impact on heterogeneous chemical reactions. We also present a tool which will help microwave chemists to answer to such questions as "My reaction yields 90% after 7 days at reflux; is it possible to obtain the same yield after a few minutes under microwaves?" and to have an approximation of their reactions when conducted under microwaves with different heterogeneous procedures. This model predicting reaction kinetics and yields under microwave heating is based on the Arrhenius equation, in agreement with experimental data and procedures.

  15. Micro- and nanorobots swimming in heterogeneous liquids.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Bradley J; Peyer, Kathrin E

    2014-09-23

    Essentially all experimental investigations of swimming micro- and nanorobots have focused on swimming in homogeneous Newtonian liquids. In this issue of ACS Nano, Schamel et al. investigate the actuation of "nanopropellers" in a viscoelastic biological gel that illustrates the importance of the size of the nanostructure relative to the gel mesh size. In this Perspective, we shed further light on the swimming performance of larger microrobots swimming in heterogeneous liquids. One of the interesting results of our work is that earlier findings on the swimming performance of motile bacteria in heterogeneous liquids agree, in principle, with our results. We also discuss future research directions that should be pursued in this fascinating interdisciplinary field.

  16. Stabilizing metal nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Anmin; Lu, Rongwen; Veser, Götz

    2010-11-07

    Metal nanoparticles hold great promise for heterogeneous catalysis due to their high dispersion, large concentration of highly undercoordinated surface sites, and the presence of quantum confinement effects, which can drastically alter their reactivity. However, the poor thermal stability of nano-sized particles limits their use to low temperature conditions and constitutes one of the key hurdles towards industrial application. The present perspective paper briefly reviews the mechanisms underlying nanoparticle sintering, and then gives an overview of emerging approaches towards stabilizing metal nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis. We conclude by highlighting the current needs for further developments in the field.

  17. Heterogeneity and Scaling in Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory N. Boitnott; Gilles Y. Bussod; Paul N. Hagin; Stephen R. Brown

    2005-04-18

    The accurate characterization and remediation of contaminated subsurface environments requires the detailed knowledge of subsurface structures and flow paths. Enormous resources are invested in scoping and characterizing sites using core sampling, 3-D geophysical surveys, well tests, etc.... Unfortunately, much of the information acquired is lost to compromises and simplifications made in constructing numerical grids for the simulators used to predict flow and transport from the contaminated area to the accessible environment. In rocks and soils, the bulk geophysical and transport properties of the matrix and of fracture systems are determined by the juxtaposition of geometric features at many length scales. In the interest of computational efficiency, recognized heterogeneities are simplified, averaged out, or entirely ignored in spite of recent studies that recognize that: (1) Structural and lithologic heterogeneities exist on all scales in rocks. (2) Small heterogeneities influence, and can control the physical and chemical properties of rocks. In this work we propose a physically based approach for the description and treatment of heterogeneities, that highlights the use of laboratory equipment designed to measure the effect on physical properties of fine scale heterogeneities observed in rocks and soils. We then discuss the development of an integration methodology that uses these measurements to develop and upscale flow and transport models. Predictive simulations are 'calibrated' to the measured heterogeneity data, and subsequently upscaled in a way that is consistent with the transport physics and the efficient use of environmental geophysics. This methodology provides a more accurate interpretation and representation of the subsurface for both environmental engineering and remediation. We show through examples, (i) the important influence of even subtle heterogeneity in the interpreting of geophysical data, and (ii) how physically based upscaling can lead

  18. Method for Accessing Distributed Heterogeneous Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    A scenario of relational, hierarchial, and network data bases is presented and a distributed access view integrated data base system (DAVID) is described for uniformly accessing data bases which are heterogeneous and physically distributed. The DAVID system is based on data base logic so that the relational approach is generalized to the heterogeneous approach. The global data manager is explained as are global data manipulation languages which can operate on all the data bases and can query the data dictionary and the data directory.

  19. Retinal regionalization and heterogeneity of butterfly eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavenga, D.; Kinoshita, M.; Yang, E.-C.; Arikawa, K.

    2001-11-01

    The regional characteristics of the eyes of butterflies from different families have been surveyed using epi-illumination microscopy, utilizing the eyeshine visible due to the tapetum situated proximally to the rhabdom. All butterflies studied have a high spatial acuity in the frontal region. The facet diameter varies slightly across the eye, and the interommatidial angle and the eye parameter p are especially large dorsally. Whereas the ommatidial lattice is generally highly regular, the eyeshine colours distinctly depend on the species. Sometimes the eyeshine is locally uniform, but often it is heterogeneous. It is hypothesized that the regional characteristics as well as the local heterogeneity are adaptations that optimize spectral discrimination.

  20. Retinal regionalization and heterogeneity of butterfly eyes.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, D G; Kinoshita, M; Yang, E C; Arikawa, K

    2001-11-01

    The regional characteristics of the eyes of butterflies from different families have been surveyed using epi-illumination microscopy, utilizing the eyeshine visible due to the tapetum situated proximally to the rhabdom. All butterflies studied have a high spatial acuity in the frontal region. The facet diameter varies slightly across the eye, and the interommatidial angle and the eye parameter p are especially large dorsally. Whereas the ommatidial lattice is generally highly regular, the eyeshine colours distinctly depend on the species. Sometimes the eyeshine is locally uniform, but often it is heterogeneous. It is hypothesized that the regional characteristics as well as the local heterogeneity are adaptations that optimize spectral discrimination.

  1. Overcoming semantic heterogeneity in spatial data infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M.; Sprado, J.; Klien, E.; Schubert, C.; Christ, I.

    2009-04-01

    In current spatial data infrastructures (SDIs), it is still often difficult to effectively exchange or re-use geographic data sets. A main reason for this is semantic heterogeneity, which occurs at different levels: at the metadata, the schema and the data content level. It is the goal of the work presented in this paper to overcome the problems caused by semantic heterogeneity on all three levels. We present a method based on ontologies and logical reasoning, which enhances the discovery, retrieval, interpretation and integration of geographic data in SDIs. Its benefits and practical use are illustrated with examples from the domains of geology and hydrology.

  2. NucleaRDB: information system for nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Vroling, Bas; Thorne, David; McDermott, Philip; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Attwood, Teresa K; Pettifer, Steve; Vriend, Gert

    2012-01-01

    The NucleaRDB is a Molecular Class-Specific Information System that collects, combines, validates and disseminates large amounts of heterogeneous data on nuclear hormone receptors. It contains both experimental and computationally derived data. The data and knowledge present in the NucleaRDB can be accessed using a number of different interactive and programmatic methods and query systems. A nuclear hormone receptor-specific PDF reader interface is available that can integrate the contents of the NucleaRDB with full-text scientific articles. The NucleaRDB is freely available at http://www.receptors.org/nucleardb.

  3. Induction of cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1A2 by tanshinones in human HepG2 hepatoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Rong; Sun Jianguo; Ma Liping; Wu Xiaolan; Pan Guoyu; Hao Haiping; Zhou Fang; Jiye, A; Liu Changhui; Ai Hua; Shang Lili; Gao Haiyan; Peng Ying; Wan Ping; Wu Hui; Wang Guangji

    2011-04-01

    Diterpenoid tanshinones including tanshinone IIA (TIIA), cryptotanshinone (CTS), tanshinone I (TI) and dihydrotanshinone I (DHTI) are the major bioactive components from Danshen. The major aim of our present study was to investigate the induction potential of these four main components of tanshinones (TIIA, CTS, TI, and DHTI) on the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in HepG2 cells. Our results showed that all of these four tanshinones caused a significant time- and concentration-dependent increase in the amount of CYP1A1/2 expression in HepG2 cells. These induction effects were further characterized through transcriptional regulation: the induction of CYP1A1/2 mRNA level by tanshinones was completely blocked by the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D; the expression of CYP1A1/2 heterogeneous nuclear RNA was induced by tanshinone treatment; and CYP1A1 mRNA stability was not influenced by these tanshinones. Interestingly, tanshinones plus B[a]P produced additive/synergistic effect on CYP1A1/2 induction. In addition, the tanshinone-induced CYP1A1/2 expression was abolished by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonist resveratrol, suggesting an AhR dependent transcription mechanism. In the reporter gene assay, while TI and DHTI significantly induced AhR-dependent luciferase activity, TIIA and CTS failed to induce this activity. Collectively, the tanshinones could induce CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression through transcriptional activation mechanism and exert differential effects on activating AhR in HepG2 cells. Our findings suggest that rational administration of tanshinones should be considered with respect to their effect on AhR and CYP1A1/2 expression.

  4. Norovirus Genome Circularization and Efficient Replication Are Facilitated by Binding of PCBP2 and hnRNP A1

    PubMed Central

    López-Manríquez, Eduardo; Vashist, Surender; Ureña, Luis; Goodfellow, Ian; Chavez, Pedro; Mora-Heredia, José Eduardo; Cancio-Lonches, Clotilde; Garrido, Efraín

    2013-01-01

    Sequences and structures within the terminal genomic regions of plus-strand RNA viruses are targets for the binding of host proteins that modulate functions such as translation, RNA replication, and encapsidation. Using murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), we describe the presence of long-range RNA-RNA interactions that were stabilized by cellular proteins. The proteins potentially responsible for the stabilization were selected based on their ability to bind the MNV-1 genome and/or having been reported to be involved in the stabilization of RNA-RNA interactions. Cell extracts were preincubated with antibodies against the selected proteins and used for coprecipitation reactions. Extracts treated with antibodies to poly(C) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 significantly reduced the 5′-3′ interaction. Both PCBP2 and hnRNP A1 recombinant proteins stabilized the 5′-3′ interactions and formed ribonucleoprotein complexes with the 5′ and 3′ ends of the MNV-1 genomic RNA. Mutations within the 3′ complementary sequences (CS) that disrupt the 5′-3′-end interactions resulted in a significant reduction of the viral titer, suggesting that the integrity of the 3′-end sequence and/or the lack of complementarity with the 5′ end is important for efficient virus replication. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PCBP2 or hnRNP A1 resulted in a reduction in virus yield, confirming a role for the observed interactions in efficient viral replication. PCBP2 and hnRNP A1 induced the circularization of MNV-1 RNA, as revealed by electron microscopy. This study provides evidence that PCBP2 and hnRNP A1 bind to the 5′ and 3′ ends of the MNV-1 viral RNA and contribute to RNA circularization, playing a role in the virus life cycle. PMID:23946460

  5. Economics of nuclear power.

    PubMed

    Rossin, A D; Rieck, T A

    1978-08-18

    With 12 percent of U.S. electricity now being supplied by nuclear power, Commonwealth Edison has found nuclear plants to be good investments relative to other base load energy sources. The country's largest user of nuclear power, Commonwealth Edison, estimates that its commitment to nuclear saved its customers about 10 percent on their electric bills in 1977, compared to the cost with the next best alternative, coal. This advantage is seen as continuing, contrary to criticisms of the economics and reliability of nuclear power and claims that it has hidden subsidies. It is concluded that there is a need for both nuclear and coal and that government policy precluding or restricting either would be unwise.

  6. Nuclear Science References Database

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.

    2014-06-15

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

  7. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  8. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  9. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  10. Pakistans Nuclear Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-12

    2004 revelations about a procurement network run by former Pakistani nuclear official A. Q. Khan, Islamabad has taken a number of steps to improve ...strengthened export control laws, improved personnel security, and international nuclear security cooperation programs, have improved Pakistan’s...context where these broader tensions and conflicts are present. 1 Pakistani efforts to improve the security of its nuclear weapons have been ongoing

  11. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conference’s failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  12. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed.

  13. Nuclear Politics in Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    system. States with prestige are recognized by other actors as having a high 21 Nuclear Politics in Iran standing either generally or with regard to...Nuclear Politics in Iran Edited by Judith S. Yaphe MIDDLE EAST STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVES 1 Center for Strategic Research Institute for National...OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE MAY 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nuclear Politics in

  14. Nonstrategic Nuclear Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-03

    William Potter , and Nikolai Sokov, Reducing and Regulating Tactical (Nonstrategic) Nuclear Weapons in Europe, The James Martin Center For...See William C. Potter and Nikolai Sokov, “Nuclear Weapons that People Forget,” International Herald Tribune, May 31, 2000. 87 Sam Nunn, Igor...their security.97 94 Kent Harris , “NATO Allies Want U.S. Nuclear Weapons out of Europe

  15. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1978-01-01

    A lifting, rotating and sealing apparatus for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor core. This apparatus permits rotation of the plugs to provide under the plug refueling of a nuclear core. It also provides a means by which positive top core holddown can be utilized. Both of these operations are accomplished by means of the apparatus lifting the top core holddown structure off the nuclear core while stationary, and maintaining this structure in its elevated position during plug rotation. During both of these operations, the interface between the rotating member and its supporting member is sealingly maintained.

  16. Comprehensive Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M.; Allen, Todd R.; Stoller, Roger E; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke

    2012-01-01

    This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

  17. [Nuclear families in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Unalan, T

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the household or family types in Turkey in 1983, especially nuclear families. Nuclear families constitute 61.6% of all households in Turkey, and the majority of them are in the West and the Central regions. The highest % of nuclear families was found in the Mediterranean regions, and the lowest in the Black Sea region. Among all nuclear families, 87% of them consist of husband, wife and children, whereas 13% of them have only husband and wife. Nuclear families without children are common in urban areas and in the West while nuclear families with children are mostly found in rural areas and in the East and the Black Sea regions. Nuclear families with 3 or more children constitute 32% of all nuclear households in the West. On the other hand, the corresponding % is 73 for the Eastern region. As a result, it is concluded that nuclear families have significant regional and residential differentiations and households with the same formation in a developed and a less developed region should have different social, economic, and cultural characteristics.

  18. Technologists for Nuclear Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Huey D.

    1974-01-01

    Physicians need support personnel for work with radioisotopes in diagnosing dangerous diseases. The Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) Program at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida, is described. (MW)

  19. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  20. Programming Models for Heterogeneous Multicore Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-08

    Badia, F.D. Igual, J. Labarta, R. Mayo and E.S. Quintana- Orti . “An extension of the StarSs Programming Model for Platforms with Multiple GPUs...R. Mayo, J.M. Perez, J. Planas, E.S. Quintana- Orti . “A Proposal to Extend the OpenMP Tasking Model for Heterogeneous Architectures ” LNCS Vol. 5568

  1. Synthesis of RNA oligomers on heterogeneous templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of an RNA world in the chemical origin of life is appealing, as nucleic acids are capable of both information storage and acting as templates that catalyse the synthesis of complementary molecules. Template-directed synthesis has been demonstrated for homogeneous oligonucleotides that, like natural nucleic acids, have 3',5' linkages between the nucleotide monomers. But it seems likely that prebiotic routes to RNA-like molecules would have produced heterogeneous molecules with various kinds of phosphodiester linkages and both linear and cyclic nucleotide chains. Here we show that such heterogeneity need be no obstacle to the templating of complementary molecules. Specifically, we show that heterogeneous oligocytidylates, formed by the montmorillonite clay-catalysed condensation of actuated monomers, can serve as templates for the synthesis of oligoguanylates. Furthermore, we show that oligocytidylates that are exclusively 2',5'-linked can also direct synthesis of oligoguanylates. Such heterogeneous templating reactions could have increased the diversity of the pool of protonucleic acids from which life ultimately emerged.

  2. Colloid Straining within Saturated Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubcan, A.; Walczak, J.; Xu, S.

    2008-12-01

    A thorough understanding of colloid movement in the subsurface system is critical to the assessment of groundwater pollution by pathogenic bacteria and colloid-bound contaminants. It is increasingly recognized that straining, a process that occurs when the pore space is too small to allow for a particle's passage, represents an important process in colloid immobilization within groundwater systems. Previously published studies have focused on the kinetics of colloid straining within sand packs composed of uniform mineral grains. Natural aquifers, however, are usually characterized by physically heterogeneous sediments. In this study, we conducted column transport experiments with carboxylated latex particles and quartz sand to investigate the impact of sediment texture (i.e., the size distribution of mineral grains) on colloid straining kinetics. The quartz sands used in the experiment were thoroughly cleaned and the strong repulsive interactions between colloid particles and quartz sands resulted in minimal physicochemical deposition so the straining kinetics can be quantified unambiguously. Sand packs of different textures were prepared by mixing sands of various sizes (mesh sizes of 20-25, 35-40 and 60-70). Our results suggested that the ratio of colloid size and the median sand grain size was insufficient to predict colloid straining within heterogeneous sediments. Soil texture, which was related to the size distribution of the sand grains, must be considered. A relationship between colloid straining kinetics and the heterogeneity of porous media that can be useful for the prediction of colloid transport within heterogeneous sediments was presented.

  3. Towards inverse modeling of intratumor heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutovsky, Branislav; Horvath, Denis

    2015-08-01

    Development of resistance limits efficiency of present anticancer therapies and preventing it remains a big challenge in cancer research. It is accepted, at the intuitive level, that resistance emerges as a consequence of the heterogeneity of cancer cells at the molecular, genetic and cellular levels. Produced by many sources, tumor heterogeneity is extremely complex time dependent statistical characteristics which may be quantified by measures defined in many different ways, most of them coming from statistical mechanics. In this paper, we apply the Markovian framework to relate population heterogeneity to the statistics of the environment. As, from an evolutionary viewpoint, therapy corresponds to a purposeful modi- fication of the cells' fitness landscape, we assume that understanding general relationship between the spatiotemporal statistics of a tumor microenvironment and intratumor heterogeneity will allow to conceive the therapy as an inverse problem and to solve it by optimization techniques. To account for the inherent stochasticity of biological processes at cellular scale, the generalized distancebased concept was applied to express distances between probabilistically described cell states and environmental conditions, respectively.

  4. Heterogeneous catalysis: More than skimming the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Feng) Tao, Franklin; Tang, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The high temperatures and pressures used in heterogeneous catalysis make it difficult to observe catalysts using conventional techniques. Now, adsorbed product molecules on the surface of a single-crystal model catalyst have been observed during catalysis using a custom-built scanning tunnelling microscope that can work in situ.

  5. Reactor heterogeneity with saccharopolyspora erythraea airlift fermentations

    PubMed

    Pollard; Ison; Shamlou; Lilly

    1998-06-05

    Bioreactor heterogeneity has been studied in a multiconfigurable pilot-scale airlift reactor (0.25 m3) which created different degrees of heterogeneity. The impact of the two sparger configurations, i.e. in the draft tube or the annulus, in conjunction with a marine propeller fitted at the base of the downcomer, on the physiology of Saccharopolyspora erythraea was studied. Cellular growth, morphology, and productivity were compared between airlift and stirred tank reactors. Dissolved oxygen tension heterogeneity caused by differences in dissolved oxygen tension around the vessel did not affect growth, but the reduction of heterogeneity improved the specific erythromycin production rate and final specific production. Erythromycin production was shown to be proportional to the energy dissipation rate. The enhancement of bubble coalescence with increasing apparent viscosity led to the reduction of the sectional gas holdups and the improvement of liquid mixing. The extent of the changes with increasing apparent viscosity was dependent on the broth morphology, reactor configurations, and operating conditions. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Heterogeneous multidimensional scaling for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Ma, Xiaodi; Fu, Chenbo; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Guijun; Yu, Li

    2015-07-01

    Many real-world networks are essentially heterogeneous, where the nodes have different abilities to gain connections. Such networks are difficult to be embedded into low-dimensional Euclidean space if we ignore the heterogeneity and treat all the nodes equally. In this paper, based on a newly defined heterogeneous distance and a generalized network distance under the constraints of network and triangle inequalities, respectively, we propose a new heterogeneous multidimensional scaling method (HMDS) to embed different networks into proper Euclidean spaces. We find that HMDS behaves much better than the traditional multidimensional scaling method (MDS) in embedding different artificial and real-world networks into Euclidean spaces. Besides, we also propose a method to estimate the appropriate dimensions of Euclidean spaces for different networks, and find that the estimated dimensions are quite close to the real dimensions for those geometrical networks under study. These methods thus can help to better understand the evolution of real-world networks, and have practical importance in network visualization, community detection, link prediction and localization of wireless sensors.

  7. Scale Reliability Evaluation with Heterogeneous Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2015-01-01

    A latent variable modeling approach for scale reliability evaluation in heterogeneous populations is discussed. The method can be used for point and interval estimation of reliability of multicomponent measuring instruments in populations representing mixtures of an unknown number of latent classes or subpopulations. The procedure is helpful also…

  8. Heterogeneity: The key to failure forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Bell, Andrew F.; Main, Ian G.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Elastic waves are generated when brittle materials are subjected to increasing strain. Their number and energy increase non-linearly, ending in a system-sized catastrophic failure event. Accelerating rates of geophysical signals (e.g., seismicity and deformation) preceding large-scale dynamic failure can serve as proxies for damage accumulation in the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). Here we test the hypothesis that the style and mechanisms of deformation, and the accuracy of the FFM, are both tightly controlled by the degree of microstructural heterogeneity of the material under stress. We generate a suite of synthetic samples with variable heterogeneity, controlled by the gas volume fraction. We experimentally demonstrate that the accuracy of failure prediction increases drastically with the degree of material heterogeneity. These results have significant implications in a broad range of material-based disciplines for which failure forecasting is of central importance. In particular, the FFM has been used with only variable success to forecast failure scenarios both in the field (volcanic eruptions and landslides) and in the laboratory (rock and magma failure). Our results show that this variability may be explained, and the reliability and accuracy of forecast quantified significantly improved, by accounting for material heterogeneity as a first-order control on forecasting power. PMID:26307196

  9. Heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of atmospheric trace contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollis, David F.

    1993-01-01

    The progress report on heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of atmospheric trace contaminants covering the period from 1 May - 31 Oct. 1992 is presented. The two topics discussed are photoreactor monolith fundamental studies and monolith reactor operation: batch recirculation system. Concentration profiles are shown.

  10. Fragmentation of metal particles during heterogeneous explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, R. C.; Donahue, L.; Zhang, F.

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneous explosives contain a mixture of standard explosive material and reactive metal particles. The inclusion of metal particles alters the energy density and energy release timescales involved in the blast event. Available experimental evidence indicates that metal particles may be damaged or fragmented during heterogeneous blast, altering the distribution of particle sizes from their initial state. This paper discusses adaptation and application of fragmentation theory and physical models for particle damage during condensed matter detonation, aerodynamic breakup of molten particles, and particle impact fragmentation with nearby structures. The shock compression and impact fragmentation models are based on the energy methods for dynamic fragmentation by Grady and Kipp, while aerodynamic breakup is treated according to Weber number stability criteria for droplets. These particle fragmentation models are validated against fundamental test cases from the literature. The models are then applied to heterogeneous blast scenarios including free field and wall reflection in a semi-confined urban street. Comparison with experimental records of pressure shows good agreement despite challenges inherent in the complexity of heterogeneous blast measurement and multiphase simulation.

  11. Diffusion and Surface Reaction in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baiker, A.; Richarz, W.

    1978-01-01

    Ethylene hydrogenation on a platinum catalyst, electrolytically applied to a tube wall, is a good system for the study of the interactions between diffusion and surface reaction in heterogeneous catalysis. Theoretical background, apparatus, procedure, and student performance of this experiment are discussed. (BB)

  12. [Single-cell sequencing and tumour heterogeneity].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneity of tumours is now beginning to be documented precisely by single-cell new-generation sequencing. Recently published results on breast tumours show that each of the cells analysed displays a unique pattern of point mutations. This extensive genetic diversity is present before any treatment, and is likely to cause resistance to initially successful targeted therapies.

  13. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    surface explosion, gases continue to expand, although 62 DESCRIPTIONS OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS mote slowly than initially, and form a tion. RAINIER was a 1.7...SOL.IOIFII:D - POINT 2.104 The effects of the RAINIER MOLTEN ROCK event of Operation Plumbbob in 1957evet o OpraionPlu~bob n 157 Figure 2.1󈧇. The...weather bulkheads may render useless stabilizer bulkheads and the fuse!age interior equipment mounted on or near frame near the cockpit were buckled

  14. Forecasting the failure of heterogeneous magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, J.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Lavallée, Y.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Eruption prediction is a long-sought-after goal of volcanology. Yet applying existing techniques retrospectively (hindcasting), we fail to predict events more often than we success. As much of the seismicity associated with intermediate to silicic volcanic eruptions comes from the brittle response of the ascending magma itself, we clearly require a good understanding of the parameters that control the ability to forecast magma failure itself. Here, we present suites of controlled experiments at magmatic temperatures using a range of synthetic magmas to investigate the control of microstructures on the efficacy of forecast models for material failure. We find that the failure of magmas with very little microstructural heterogeneity - such as melts - is very challenging to predict; whereas, the failure of very heterogeneous magmas is always well-predicted. To shed further light on this issue, we provide a scaling law based on the relationship between the microstructural heterogeneity in a magma and the error in the prediction of its failure time. We propose this method be used to elucidate the variable success rate of predicting volcanic predictions. We discuss this scaling in the context of the birth, life and death of structural heterogeneity during magma ascent with specific emphasis on obsidian-forming eruptions such as Chaitèn, 2008. During such eruptions, the repetitive creation and destruction of fractures filled with granular magma, which are thought to be the in situ remnants of seismogenic fracturing itself, are expressions of the life-cycle of heterogeneity in an otherwise coherent, melt-rich magma. We conclude that the next generation of failure forecast tools available to monitoring teams should incorporate some acknowledgment of the magma microstructure and not be solely based on the geophysical signals prior to eruption.

  15. Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

    1992-10-01

    Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

  16. A new framework for parameterization of heterogeneous ocean convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilicak, M.; Adcroft, A.; Legg, S.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new framework for parameterization of ocean convection processes. The new framework is termed ''patchy convection'' since our aim is to represent the heterogeneity of mixing processes that take place within the horizontal scope of a grid cell. We focus on applying this new scheme to represent the effect of pre-conditioning for deep convection by subgrid scale eddy variability. The new scheme relies on mesoscale eddy kinetic energy field. We illustrate the patchy parameterization using a 1D idealized convection case. Next, the scheme is compared against observations. We employed the 1D case using the summer time ARGO floats from the Labrador Sea as initial conditions. We used ECMWF reanalysis atmospheric forcing and compared our results to the winter time ARGO floats. Finally we evaluate the scheme in two different global ocean-ice simulations with prescribed atmospheric forcing (CORE-I); (i) diagnosed eddy velocity field applied only in the Labrador Sea (ii) diagnosed global eddy velocity field. The global simulation results indicate that the patchy convection scheme improves the warm biases in the deep Atlantic Ocean and Southern Ocean. This proof-of-concept study is a first step in developing the patchy parameterization scheme, which will be extended in future to use a prognostic eddy field as well as to parameterize convection due to under-ice brine rejection. This study is funded through the CPT 2: Ocean Mixing Processes Associated with High Spatial Heterogeneity in Sea Ice and the Implications for Climate Models.

  17. Numerical Model Sensitivity to Heterogeneous Satellite Derived Vegetation Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael; Eastman, Joseph; Borak, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of a mesoscale weather prediction model to a 1 km satellite-based vegetation roughness initialization is investigated for a domain within the south central United States. Three different roughness databases are employed: i) a control or standard lookup table roughness that is a function only of land cover type, ii) a spatially heterogeneous roughness database, specific to the domain, that was previously derived using a physically based procedure and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery, and iii) a MODIS climatologic roughness database that like (i) is a function only of land cover type, but possesses domain specific mean values from (ii). The model used is the Weather Research and Forecast Model (WRF) coupled to the Community Land Model within the Land Information System (LIS). For each simulation, a statistical comparison is made between modeled results and ground observations within a domain including Oklahoma, Eastern Arkansas, and Northwest Louisiana during a 4-day period within IHOP 2002. Sensitivity analysis compares the impact the three roughness initializations on time-series temperature, precipitation probability of detection (POD), average wind speed, boundary layer height, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Overall, the results indicate that, for the current investigation, replacement of the standard look-up table values with the satellite-derived values statistically improves model performance for most observed variables. Such natural roughness heterogeneity enhances the surface wind speed, PBL height and TKE production up to 10 percent, with a lesser effect over grassland, and greater effect over mixed land cover domains.

  18. Nuclear Energy and the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    "Nuclear Energy and the Environment" is a pocket folder of removable leaflets concerned with two major topics: Nuclear energy and Nuclear Techniques. Under Nuclear Energy, leaflets concerning the topics of "Radiation--A Fact of Life,""The Impact of a Fact: 1963 Test Ban Treaty,""Energy Needs and Nuclear Power,""Power Reactor Safety,""Transport,"…

  19. Gordon Conference on Nuclear Research

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, S.M.

    1983-09-01

    Session topics were: quarks and nuclear physics; anomalons and anti-protons; the independent particle structure of nuclei; relativistic descriptions of nuclear structure and scattering; nuclear structure at high excitation; advances in nuclear astrophysics; properties of nuclear material; the earliest moments of the universe; and pions and spin excitations in nuclei.

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

  1. Vented nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Leonard N.; Kaznoff, Alexis I.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

  2. Under the Nuclear Umbrella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Leon F.

    1987-01-01

    Entertains the thesis that social work has a stake in the technological-humanistic debate and should greet the recent and spectacular technological failures with protest and alarm. Discusses relationship of nuclear issue and social work, effects of nuclear issue on children, and Chernobyl. Advocates pacifism, activism, and a coherent conception of…

  3. Vertical nuclear proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sidel, Victor W

    2007-01-01

    All the nuclear-weapon states are working to develop new nuclear-weapon systems and upgrade their existing ones. Although the US Congress has recently blocked further development of small nuclear weapons and earth-penetrating nuclear weapons, the United States is planning a range of new warheads under the Reliable Replacement Warhead programme, and renewing its nuclear weapons infrastructure. The United Kingdom is spending 1 billion pounds sterling on updating the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston, and about 20 billion pounds sterling on replacing its Vanguard submarines and maintaining its Trident warhead stockpile. The US has withdrawn from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and plans to install missile defence systems in Poland and the Czech Republic; Russia threatens to upgrade its nuclear countermeasures. The nuclear-weapon states should comply with their obligations under Article VI of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, as summarised in the 13-point plan agreed at the 2000 NPT Review Conference, and they should negotiate a Nuclear Weapons Convention.

  4. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Coc, Alain

    2014-05-09

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  5. Nuclear Taskforce Summation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    At the end of 1978, there were approximately 230 nuclear-fueled electric generating plants around the world; 72 of these were in the United States. Each plant requires an operations-and-maintenance workforce of 92 people, and attrition occurs at a rate of 8% per year. Requirements for a nuclear taskforce and job training, in view of current…

  6. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    7 Scientists Term Nuclear Reactor ’Satisfactory’ [XINHUA] ............................................................... 7 Neutron Velocity...PAULO 29 Oct] .................................... 14 Details of Secret Army Graphite Reactor Disclosed [FOLHA DE SAO PAULO 24 Oct] .............. 14...Corporation Plans To Expand Production [THE HINDU 2 Oct] .................................. 28 ISRAEL Request for Canadian Nuclear Reactor Confirmed

  7. Nuclear-Powered Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce, Gary

    1992-01-01

    Describes an exercise to develop interest and understanding about nuclear energy in which students make presentations regarding a proposal to build a hypothetical nuclear power plant. Students spend two weeks researching the topic; give testimony before a "Senate Energy Committee"; and vote on the proposal. Background information is…

  8. Talk About Nuclear Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremlett, Lewis

    1976-01-01

    Presents an overview of the relation of nuclear power to human health and the environment, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear power as an energy source urging technical educators to inculcate an awareness of the problems associated with the production of energy. Describes the fission reaction process, the hazards of…

  9. Nuclear Age Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The primary goal of the Oregon nuclear age education curriculum is to develop in students the knowledge and skills needed to meet the challenges of living in a nuclear age. This curriculum is developed around five general themes, each corresponding to a specific unit. The general goals for the units are: (Unit 1) to increase students' exposure to…

  10. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  11. Nuclear Shuttle Logistics Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This 1971 artist's concept shows the Nuclear Shuttle in both its lunar logistics configuraton and geosynchronous station configuration. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center Program Development persornel, the Nuclear Shuttle would deliver payloads to lunar orbits or other destinations then return to Earth orbit for refueling and additional missions.

  12. High energy nuclear structures

    SciTech Connect

    Boguta, J.; Kunz, J.

    1984-03-09

    In conventional nuclear physics the nucleus is described as a non-relativistic many-body system, which is governed by the Schroedinger equation. Nucleons interact in this framework via static two-body potentials, mesonic degrees of freedom are neglected. An alternative description of nuclear physics in terms of a relativistic field theory has been developed by Walecka. The model Lagrangian containing baryons, sigma-mesons and ..omega..-mesons was subsequently extended to include also ..pi..-mesons and rho-mesons. An essential feature of such a nuclear Lagrangian is its renormalizability. In addition to the description of known nuclear structure the field theoretical approach may reveal entirely new nuclear phenomena, based on the explicit treatment of mesonic degrees of freedom. The existence of such abnormal nuclear states was proposed by Lee and Wick employing the sigma-model Lagrangian. There the non-linearity of the meson field equations allows for soliton solutions in the presence of nucleons, in particular the sigma-field may exhibit a kink. Different types of soliton solutions occur in gauge theories with hidden symmetries. In the phenomenological Lagrangian the rho-meson is described by a non-abelian gauge field, that acquires its mass spontaneously due to the non-vanishing vacuum expectation value of a Higgs field. A general ansatz for soliton solutions of such a gauge theory was given by Dashen et al. A specific solution and its possible implications for nuclear physics like anomalous nuclear states were discussed by Boguta.

  13. Nuclear Weapons and Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, David I.

    1984-01-01

    The growing debate on nuclear weapons in recent years has begun to make inroads into school curricula. Elementary and secondary school teachers now face the important task of educating their students on issues relating to nuclear war without indoctrinating them to a particular point of view. (JBM)

  14. Nuclear effects at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    The development of a nuclear beam facility at HERA would allow the study of fundamental features of quark and gluon interactions in QCD. I briefly review the physics underlying nuclear shadowing and anti-shadowing as well as other diffractive and jet fragmentation processes that can be studies in high energy electron-nucleus collisions.

  15. TRAINING NUCLEAR TECHNICIANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOVNER, EDGAR A.

    PROBLEMS CONFRONTED BY PLANNERS OF NUCLEAR PROGRAMS AT THE TECHNICIAN LEVEL INCLUDE (1) LACK OF PRECEDENT IN CURRICULUM, COURSE OUTLINES, AND GRADUATE PLACEMENT, (2) DIFFICULTY IN DETERMINING COSTS OF LABORATORY CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND OPERATION, AND (3) REQUIREMENT OF ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION LICENSES IN NUCLEAR OCCUPATIONS. A 92-SEMESTER…

  16. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  17. Nuclear energy related research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-05-01

    The annual Research Program Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Center for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities, and industry also contribute to many projects.

  18. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  19. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  20. Nuclear transfer in rodents.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Linda J; Wilmut, Ian; Mullins, John J

    2004-01-01

    Cloning is the asexual reproduction of an individual, such that the offspring have an essentially identical nuclear genome. Nuclear transfer and cloning have been achieved in a number of species, namely sheep, cows, goats, rabbits, cats and mice, but have been largely unsuccessful, so far, in dogs, primates and rats. Clearly, contributory factors which affect the outcome of successful cloning experiments are not universally applicable to all species. One theme common to all cloning experiments, however, is the overall inefficiency of the process, typically 0-4%. A number of factors contribute to nuclear transfer inefficiency, and we will review mouse cloning experiments, which address these problems, highlighting the importance of donor nucleus choice (somatic or ES cell, fetal or adult, quiescent or actively dividing). Finally, we will summarize the emerging principles which appear to govern nuclear reprogramming and production of clones, and will consider the application of nuclear transfer to the rat.

  1. Nuclear physics: Macroscopic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    A systematic macroscopic, leptodermous approach to nuclear statics and dynamics is described, based formally on the assumptions {h_bar} {yields} 0 and b/R << 1, where b is the surface diffuseness and R the nuclear radius. The resulting static model of shell-corrected nuclear binding energies and deformabilities is accurate to better than 1 part in a thousand and yields a firm determination of the principal properties of the nuclear fluid. As regards dynamics, the above approach suggests that nuclear shape evolutions will often be dominated by dissipation, but quantitative comparisons with experimental data are more difficult than in the case of statics. In its simplest liquid drop version the model exhibits interesting formal connections to the classic astronomical problem of rotating gravitating masses.

  2. Nuclear Powerplant Safety: Source Terms. Nuclear Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    There has been increased public interest in the potential effects of nuclear powerplant accidents since the Soviet reactor accident at Chernobyl. People have begun to look for more information about the amount of radioactivity that might be released into the environment as a result of such an accident. When this issue is discussed by people…

  3. Nuclear war, nuclear proliferation, and their consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Sanruddin, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of a colloquium convened by the Groupe de Bellerive offers the contributions of Carl Sagan, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Kenneth Galbraith, Pierre Trudeau, Edward Kennedy, and other eminent scientists, politicians, and strategists on the subject of the proliferation of nuclear weaponry and its potential ramifications.

  4. Nuclear excitation and precompound nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Ray, S.; Ghosh, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The angular distribution of nucleons emitted in nucleon-induced precompound nuclear reactions are calculated taking into account the effect of excitation on the kinematics of nucleon-nucleon scattering inside the target-plus-projectile system. The results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations and those of reaction models based on a pure nucleon-nucleon collision picture.

  5. Modeling mechanical response of heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Siladitya

    Heterogeneous materials are ubiquitous in nature and as synthetic materials. These materials provide unique combination of desirable mechanical properties emerging from its heterogeneities at different length scales. Future structural and technological applications will require the development of advanced light weight materials with superior strength and toughness. Cost effective design of the advanced high performance synthetic materials by tailoring their microstructure is the challenge facing the materials design community. Prior knowledge of structure-property relationships for these materials is imperative for optimal design. Thus, understanding such relationships for heterogeneous materials is of primary interest. Furthermore, computational burden is becoming critical concern in several areas of heterogeneous materials design. Therefore, computationally efficient and accurate predictive tools are highly essential. In the present study, we mainly focus on mechanical behavior of soft cellular materials and tough biological material such as mussel byssus thread. Cellular materials exhibit microstructural heterogeneity by interconnected network of same material phase. However, mussel byssus thread comprises of two distinct material phases. A robust numerical framework is developed to investigate the micromechanisms behind the macroscopic response of both of these materials. Using this framework, effect of microstuctural parameters has been addressed on the stress state of cellular specimens during split Hopkinson pressure bar test. A voronoi tessellation based algorithm has been developed to simulate the cellular microstructure. Micromechanisms (microinertia, microbuckling and microbending) governing macroscopic behavior of cellular solids are investigated thoroughly with respect to various microstructural and loading parameters. To understand the origin of high toughness of mussel byssus thread, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) based optimization framework has been

  6. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide... evaluation model. This section does not apply to a nuclear power reactor facility for which...

  7. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide... evaluation model. This section does not apply to a nuclear power reactor facility for which...

  8. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide... evaluation model. This section does not apply to a nuclear power reactor facility for which...

  9. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide... evaluation model. This section does not apply to a nuclear power reactor facility for which...

  10. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide... evaluation model. This section does not apply to a nuclear power reactor facility for which...

  11. US nuclear weapons policy

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.

    1990-12-05

    We are closing chapter one'' of the nuclear age. Whatever happens to the Soviet Union and to Europe, some of the major determinants of nuclear policy will not be what they have been for the last forty-five years. Part of the task for US nuclear weapons policy is to adapt its nuclear forces and the oganizations managing them to the present, highly uncertain, but not urgently competitive situation between the US and the Soviet Union. Containment is no longer the appropriate watchword. Stabilization in the face of uncertainty, a more complicated and politically less readily communicable goal, may come closer. A second and more difficult part of the task is to deal with what may be the greatest potential source of danger to come out of the end of the cold war: the breakup of some of the cooperative institutions that managed the nuclear threat and were created by the cold war. These cooperative institutions, principally the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the Warsaw Pact, the US-Japan alliance, were not created specifically to manage the nuclear threat, but manage it they did. A third task for nuclear weapons policy is that of dealing with nuclear proliferation under modern conditions when the technologies needed to field effective nuclear weapons systems and their command and control apparatus are ever more widely available, and the leverage over some potential proliferators, which stemmed from superpower military support, is likely to be on the wane. This paper will make some suggestions regarding these tasks, bearing in mind that the unsettled nature of that part of the world most likely to become involved in nuclear weapons decisions today must make any suggestions tentative and the allowance for surprise more than usually important.

  12. The Power of Heterogeneity: Parameter Relationships from Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Röding, Magnus; Bradley, Siobhan J.; Williamson, Nathan H.; Dewi, Melissa R.; Nann, Thomas; Nydén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Complex scientific data is becoming the norm, many disciplines are growing immensely data-rich, and higher-dimensional measurements are performed to resolve complex relationships between parameters. Inherently multi-dimensional measurements can directly provide information on both the distributions of individual parameters and the relationships between them, such as in nuclear magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. However, when data originates from different measurements and comes in different forms, resolving parameter relationships is a matter of data analysis rather than experiment. We present a method for resolving relationships between parameters that are distributed individually and also correlated. In two case studies, we model the relationships between diameter and luminescence properties of quantum dots and the relationship between molecular weight and diffusion coefficient for polymers. Although it is expected that resolving complicated correlated relationships require inherently multi-dimensional measurements, our method constitutes a useful contribution to the modelling of quantitative relationships between correlated parameters and measurements. We emphasise the general applicability of the method in fields where heterogeneity and complex distributions of parameters are obstacles to scientific insight. PMID:27182701

  13. Para-hydrogen induced polarization in heterogeneous hydrogenationreactions

    SciTech Connect

    Koptyug, Igor V.; Kovtunov, Kirill; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar, M.Sabieh; Hilty, Christian; Han, Song-I; Pines, Alexander; Sagdeev, Renad Z.

    2007-01-31

    We demonstrate the creation and observation ofpara-hydrogen-induced polarization in heterogeneous hydrogenationreactions. Wilkinson's catalyst, RhCl(PPh3)3, supported on eithermodified silica gel or a polymer, is shown to hydrogenate styrene intoethylbenzene and to produce enhanced spin polarizations, observed throughNMR, when the reaction was performed with H2 gas enriched in the paraspinisomer. Furthermore, gaseous phase para-hydrogenation of propylene topropane with two catalysts, the Wilkinson's catalyst supported onmodified silica gel and Rh(cod)(sulfos) (cod = cycloocta-1,5-diene;sulfos) - O3S(C6H4)CH2C(CH2PPh2)3) supported on silica gel, demonstratesheterogeneous catalytic conversion resulting in large spin polarizations.These experiments serve as a direct verification of the mechanism ofheterogeneous hydrogenation reactions involving immobilized metalcomplexes and can be potentially developed into a practical tool forproducing catalyst-free fluids with highly polarized nuclear spins for abroad range of hyperpolarized NMR and MRI applications.

  14. Inverse problems in heterogeneous and fractured media using peridynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, Daniel Z.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Parks, Michael L.

    2015-12-10

    The following work presents an adjoint-based methodology for solving inverse problems in heterogeneous and fractured media using state-based peridynamics. We show that the inner product involving the peridynamic operators is self-adjoint. The proposed method is illustrated for several numerical examples with constant and spatially varying material parameters as well as in the context of fractures. We also present a framework for obtaining material parameters by integrating digital image correlation (DIC) with inverse analysis. This framework is demonstrated by evaluating the bulk and shear moduli for a sample of nuclear graphite using digital photographs taken during the experiment. The resulting measuredmore » values correspond well with other results reported in the literature. Lastly, we show that this framework can be used to determine the load state given observed measurements of a crack opening. Furthermore, this type of analysis has many applications in characterizing subsurface stress-state conditions given fracture patterns in cores of geologic material.« less

  15. The nuclear dynamo; Can a nuclear tornado annihilate nations

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, J.R. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of the hypothesis of a nuclear dynamo for a controlled nuclear fusion reactor. This dynamo hypothesis suggests properties for a nuclear tornado that could annihilate nations if accidentally triggered by a single high yield to weight nuclear weapon detonation. The formerly classified reports on ignition of the atmosphere, the properties of a nuclear dynamo, methods to achieve a nuclear dynamo in the laboratory, and the analogy of a nuclear dynamo to a nuclear tornado are discussed. An unclassified international study of this question is urged.

  16. Heterogeneity in Genetic Diversity among Non-Coding Loci Fails to Fit Neutral Coalescent Models of Population History

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Jeffrey L.; Roberts, Trina E.; Winker, Kevin; McCracken, Kevin G.

    2012-01-01

    Inferring aspects of the population histories of species using coalescent analyses of non-coding nuclear DNA has grown in popularity. These inferences, such as divergence, gene flow, and changes in population size, assume that genetic data reflect simple population histories and neutral evolutionary processes. However, violating model assumptions can result in a poor fit between empirical data and the models. We sampled 22 nuclear intron sequences from at least 19 different chromosomes (a genomic transect) to test for deviations from selective neutrality in the gadwall (Anas strepera), a Holarctic duck. Nucleotide diversity among these loci varied by nearly two orders of magnitude (from 0.0004 to 0.029), and this heterogeneity could not be explained by differences in substitution rates alone. Using two different coalescent methods to infer models of population history and then simulating neutral genetic diversity under these models, we found that the observed among-locus heterogeneity in nucleotide diversity was significantly higher than expected for these simple models. Defining more complex models of population history demonstrated that a pre-divergence bottleneck was also unlikely to explain this heterogeneity. However, both selection and interspecific hybridization could account for the heterogeneity observed among loci. Regardless of the cause of the deviation, our results illustrate that violating key assumptions of coalescent models can mislead inferences of population history. PMID:22384117

  17. 75 FR 39057 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC; Vermont Yankee Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC; Vermont Yankee Nuclear... CFR), Section 2.206, ``Requests for Action under this Subpart,'' the U.S. Nuclear...

  18. 77 FR 7184 - Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC; Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC; Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit No. 2; Exemption 1.0 Background Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. (Entergy or the licensee)...

  19. 75 FR 3497 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC, Entergy Nuclear Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC, Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 3, LLC,: Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit Nos. 2 and 3; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility Operating License...

  20. 76 FR 15001 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc,. Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC, Vermont Yankee Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc,. Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, LLC, Vermont Yankee Nuclear... Regulations (10 CFR) 2.206, ``Requests for Action under this Subpart,'' the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory...

  1. Heterogeneous Organo-Catalysis: Sustainable Pathways to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Glucose and fructose are among the most abundant plant-derived materials1 and have been converted into useful building units often used in the drug discovery and polymer architecture.2 Unfortunately, most of these conversions require mineral acids and complex heterogeneous catalysis systems which suffer from the diminished activity and recyclability issues.3 Herein, we report a highly reactive and inexpensive heterogeneous sulfonated graphitic carbon nitride (Sg-CN), endowed with strong acidity that readily transforms carbohydrates to furanics. The ready availability and benign nature of the material and its stability over the several reaction cycles renders this catalyst very useful in organic synthesis, polymer industry and in the preparation of drug precursors. Poster presentation at the 253rd American Chemical Society (ACS) National meeting in San Francisco, CA

  2. Heterogeneous Drying Stresses in Stratum Corneum

    PubMed Central

    German, G.K.; Engl, W.C.; Pashkovski, E.; Banerjee, S.; Xu, Y.; Mertz, A.F.; Hyland, C.; Dufresne, E.R.

    2012-01-01

    We study the drying of stratum corneum, the skin's outermost layer and an essential barrier to mechanical and chemical stresses from the environment. Even though stratum corneum exhibits structural features across multiple length-scales, contemporary understanding of the mechanical properties of stratum corneum is based on the assumption that its thickness and composition are homogeneous. We quantify spatially resolved in-plane traction stress and deformation at the interface between a macroscopic sample of porcine stratum corneum and an adherent deformable elastomer substrate. At length-scales greater than a millimeter, the skin behaves as a homogeneous elastic material. At this scale, a linear elastic model captures the spatial distribution of traction stresses and the dependence of drying behavior on the elastic modulus of the substrate. At smaller scales, the traction stresses are strikingly heterogeneous and dominated by the heterogeneous structure of the stratum corneum. PMID:22713557

  3. Heterogeneous chemistry of HBr and HF

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.R.; Ravishankara, A.R.

    1992-11-12

    The authors present information on heterogeneous chemistry of HF and HBr on glass and ice surfaces at a temperature of 200K. Their objective is to study whether heterogeneous reactions of these species could be important in the atmospheric chemistry occuring on NAT particles or cloud condensation nuclei, and be a contributor to ozone depletion. HF showed no significant uptake or reactions with ClONO{sub 2} or HOCl. HBr was found to adsorb on these surfaces, and did not exhibit saturation for even relative high concentrations. In addition it showed reactivity with ClONO{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O{sub 5} on ice surfaces.

  4. Heterogeneous physicochemistry of the polar ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Processes occurring in the polar winter stratosphere, which involve polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), are investigated using observations from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. In particular, data on the properties of PSCs and their physical chemistry, the microphysical processes and time constants for cloud processes, the heterogeneous chemical processes and their time constants, and nonlinearities in the long-term ozone trend associated with physical and chemical processes are examined. The chemical reactions leading to the depletion of the inert chlorine reservoir in a presence of type I PSCs are established, and it is shown that type II PSCs contribute to chemical processing that sustains the chemical imbalance of the polar stratosphere. It is shown that, using a simple model, the decadal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole may be understood through nonlinearities in the heterogeneous chemistry, with possible contributing effects of variations in stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations.

  5. The lunar seismic tomography and internal heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, N.; Zhu, P.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.

    2012-12-01

    A seismic tomography is presented to show the internal lateral heterogeneities of moon. The lunar seismic tomography is made from the moonquake arrival-time data acquired by the Apollo program during 1971 to 1977. The seismic records obtained from the four seismic station of Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package on the moon. The research target covers the surround of Apollo-12, 14, 15 and 16 landing sites. A preliminary image of three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structures of lunar interior have been calculated using hundreds of arrival-times of moonquake events from surface to deep mantle. These results show that some evidences of lateral heterogeneities in the lunar mantle and crust, which implies the existence of complex structure inside the moon.

  6. Dynamics of Adaptation in Spatially Heterogeneous Metapopulations

    PubMed Central

    Papaïx, Julien; David, Olivier; Lannou, Christian; Monod, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    The selection pressure experienced by organisms often varies across the species range. It is hence crucial to characterise the link between environmental spatial heterogeneity and the adaptive dynamics of species or populations. We address this issue by studying the phenotypic evolution of a spatial metapopulation using an adaptive dynamics approach. The singular strategy is found to be the mean of the optimal phenotypes in each habitat with larger weights for habitats present in large and well connected patches. The presence of spatial clusters of habitats in the metapopulation is found to facilitate specialisation and to increase both the level of adaptation and the evolutionary speed of the population when dispersal is limited. By showing that spatial structures are crucial in determining the specialisation level and the evolutionary speed of a population, our results give insight into the influence of spatial heterogeneity on the niche breadth of species. PMID:23424618

  7. Heterogeneous growth of single crystals on polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zumin; Jeurgens, Lars P. H.; Gu, Lin; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2017-03-01

    This work discloses a surprising, previously unknown heterogeneous growth mode. Namely, large-area, thin sheets of single-crystalline Ge were observed to grow laterally on top of a polycrystalline Al substrate, covering as many as tens of differently oriented Al grains at low temperatures. The observation of the Ge crystal-growth process by in situ heating transmission electron microscopy demonstrates an intriguing type of "faceted" growth: the growth of single-crystalline Ge thin sheets proceeding Al-grain by Al-grain on top of the polycrystalline Al substrate. The crystalline Ge growth front tends to align along the lines of intersection of the Al grain boundaries with the Al surface. Such an unusual heterogeneous growth mode has been shown to be a consequence of the strong anisotropy of the energy of the crystalline/crystalline (here: c-Ge/c-Al) interfaces.

  8. Simple model to study heterogeneous electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Junior, Edison; Lopes, Ana Carolina G.; Suffredini, Hugo B.; Homem-de-Mello, Paula

    2015-01-01

    New electrocatalyst materials have been proposed to increase the performance of fuel cells. Experimental studies show that Pt and Pb metallic and oxide materials are quite efficient in the oxidation of alcohols and small organic molecules such as formic acid in advanced fuel cells. This work proposes a model for studying morphologically heterogeneous catalysts through quantum chemistry methods such as density functional calculations. For testing the model, we have experimentally studied the adsorption of small organic molecules, namely formic acid and methanol, on Pt and Pb electrodes. All methodologies we have tested can be employed for this kind of study, but M06 functional results correlate best with previous simulations of homogeneous catalysts and with experimental data obtained for homogeneous and heterogeneous electrodes. Our model indicates that the presence of a Pt-Pb interface is responsible for higher adsorption energies of these molecules, most likely due to the orientation of the organic molecules that should facilitate the oxidation process.

  9. Multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous radiofrequency fields

    PubMed Central

    Cloos, Martijn A.; Knoll, Florian; Zhao, Tiejun; Block, Kai T.; Bruno, Mary; Wiggins, Graham C.; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an unrivalled medical diagnostic technique able to map tissue anatomy and physiology non-invasively. MRI measurements are meticulously engineered to control experimental conditions across the sample. However, residual radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneities are often unavoidable, leading to artefacts that degrade the diagnostic and scientific value of the images. Here we show that, paradoxically, these artefacts can be eliminated by deliberately interweaving freely varying heterogeneous RF fields into a magnetic resonance fingerprinting data-acquisition process. Observations made based on simulations are experimentally confirmed at 7 Tesla (T), and the clinical implications of this new paradigm are illustrated with in vivo measurements near an orthopaedic implant at 3T. These results show that it is possible to perform quantitative multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous RF fields, and to liberate MRI from the traditional struggle for control over the RF field uniformity. PMID:27526996

  10. Multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous radiofrequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloos, Martijn A.; Knoll, Florian; Zhao, Tiejun; Block, Kai T.; Bruno, Mary; Wiggins, Graham C.; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an unrivalled medical diagnostic technique able to map tissue anatomy and physiology non-invasively. MRI measurements are meticulously engineered to control experimental conditions across the sample. However, residual radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneities are often unavoidable, leading to artefacts that degrade the diagnostic and scientific value of the images. Here we show that, paradoxically, these artefacts can be eliminated by deliberately interweaving freely varying heterogeneous RF fields into a magnetic resonance fingerprinting data-acquisition process. Observations made based on simulations are experimentally confirmed at 7 Tesla (T), and the clinical implications of this new paradigm are illustrated with in vivo measurements near an orthopaedic implant at 3T. These results show that it is possible to perform quantitative multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous RF fields, and to liberate MRI from the traditional struggle for control over the RF field uniformity.

  11. Microgrids and Heterogeneous Power Quality and Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes two stylized alternative visions of how the power system might evolve to meet future requirements for the high quality electricity service that modern digital economies demand, a supergrids paradigm and a dispersed paradigm. Some of the economics of the dispersed vision are explored, and perspectives are presented on both the choice of homogeneous universal power quality upstream in the electricity supply chain and on the extremely heterogeneous requirements of end-use loads. It is argued that meeting the demanding requirements of sensitive loads by local provision of high quality power may be more cost effective than increasing the quality of universal homogeneous supply upstream in the legacy grid. Finally, the potential role of microgrids in delivering heterogeneous power quality is demonstrated by reference to two ongoing microgrid tests in the U.S. and Japan.

  12. Modeling vaccination in a heterogeneous metapopulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachiany, Menachem

    2016-09-01

    We present here a multicity SIS epidemic model with vaccination. The model describes the dynamics of heterogeneous metapopulations that contain imperfectly vaccinated individuals. The effect of vaccination on heterogeneous multicity models has not been previously studied. We show that under very generic conditions, the epidemic threshold does not depend on the diffusion coefficient of the vaccinated individuals, but it does depend on the diffusion coefficient of the infected population. We then show, using a novel methodology, that the reproduction number is determined by the homogeneous model parameters and by the maximal number of neighbors a city can have, when the diffusion coefficient of the infected population is low. Finally, we present numerical simulations to support the analytical results.

  13. Population dynamics on heterogeneous bacterial substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobius, Wolfram; Murray, Andrew W.; Nelson, David R.

    2012-02-01

    How species invade new territories and how these range expansions influence the population's genotypes are important questions in the field of population genetics. The majority of work addressing these questions focuses on homogeneous environments. Much less is known about the population dynamics and population genetics when the environmental conditions are heterogeneous in space. To better understand range expansions in two-dimensional heterogeneous environments, we employ a system of bacteria and bacteriophage, the viruses of bacteria. Thereby, the bacteria constitute the environment in which a population of bacteriophages expands. The spread of phage constitutes itself in lysis of bacteria and thus formation of clear regions on bacterial lawns, called plaques. We study the population dynamics and genetics of the expanding page for various patterns of environments.

  14. Heterogeneous propellant internal ballistics: criticism and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, R. L.

    2011-10-01

    Although heterogeneous propellant and its innately nondeterministic, chemically discrete morphology dominates applications, ballisticcharacterization deterministic time-mean burning rate and acoustic admittance measures' absence of explicit, nondeterministic information requires homogeneous propellant with a smooth, uniformly regressing burning surface: inadequate boundary conditions for heterogeneous propellant grained applications. The past age overcame this dichotomy with one-dimensional (1D) models and empirical knowledge from numerous, adequately supported motor developments and supplementary experiments. However, current cost and risk constraints inhibit this approach. Moreover, its fundamental science approach is more sensitive to incomplete boundary condition information (garbage-in still equals garbage-out) and more is expected. This work critiques this situation and sketches a path forward based on enhanced ballistic and motor characterizations in the workplace and approximate model and apparatus developments mentored by CSAR DNS capabilities (or equivalent).

  15. Heterogeneous concurrent computing with exportable services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderam, Vaidy

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneous concurrent computing, based on the traditional process-oriented model, is approaching its functionality and performance limits. An alternative paradigm, based on the concept of services, supporting data driven computation, and built on a lightweight process infrastructure, is proposed to enhance the functional capabilities and the operational efficiency of heterogeneous network-based concurrent computing. TPVM is an experimental prototype system supporting exportable services, thread-based computation, and remote memory operations that is built as an extension of and an enhancement to the PVM concurrent computing system. TPVM offers a significantly different computing paradigm for network-based computing, while maintaining a close resemblance to the conventional PVM model in the interest of compatibility and ease of transition Preliminary experiences have demonstrated that the TPVM framework presents a natural yet powerful concurrent programming interface, while being capable of delivering performance improvements of upto thirty percent.

  16. Multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous radiofrequency fields.

    PubMed

    Cloos, Martijn A; Knoll, Florian; Zhao, Tiejun; Block, Kai T; Bruno, Mary; Wiggins, Graham C; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an unrivalled medical diagnostic technique able to map tissue anatomy and physiology non-invasively. MRI measurements are meticulously engineered to control experimental conditions across the sample. However, residual radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneities are often unavoidable, leading to artefacts that degrade the diagnostic and scientific value of the images. Here we show that, paradoxically, these artefacts can be eliminated by deliberately interweaving freely varying heterogeneous RF fields into a magnetic resonance fingerprinting data-acquisition process. Observations made based on simulations are experimentally confirmed at 7 Tesla (T), and the clinical implications of this new paradigm are illustrated with in vivo measurements near an orthopaedic implant at 3T. These results show that it is possible to perform quantitative multiparametric imaging with heterogeneous RF fields, and to liberate MRI from the traditional struggle for control over the RF field uniformity.

  17. Trophic mismatch requires seasonal heterogeneity of warming.

    PubMed

    Straile, Dietmar; Kerimoglu, Onur; Peeters, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Climate warming has been shown to advance the phenology of species. Asynchronous changes in phenology between interacting species may disrupt feeding interactions (phenological mismatch), which could have tremendous consequences for ecosystem functioning. Long-term field observations have suggested asynchronous shifts in phenology with warming, whereas experimental studies have not been conclusive. Using proxy-based modeling of three trophic levels (algae, herbivores, and fish), we .show that asynchronous changes in phenology only occur if warming is seasonally heterogeneous, but not if warming is constant throughout the year. If warming is seasonally heterogeneous, the degree and even direction of asynchrony depends on the specific seasonality of the warming. Conclusions about phenological mismatches in food web interactions may therefore produce controversial results if the analyses do not distinguish between seasonally constant and seasonal specific warming. Furthermore, our results suggest that predicting asynchrony between interacting species requires reliable warming predictions that resolve sub-seasonal time scales.

  18. Sparse covariance estimation in heterogeneous samples*

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Abel; Lenkoski, Alex; Dobra, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Standard Gaussian graphical models implicitly assume that the conditional independence among variables is common to all observations in the sample. However, in practice, observations are usually collected from heterogeneous populations where such an assumption is not satisfied, leading in turn to nonlinear relationships among variables. To address such situations we explore mixtures of Gaussian graphical models; in particular, we consider both infinite mixtures and infinite hidden Markov models where the emission distributions correspond to Gaussian graphical models. Such models allow us to divide a heterogeneous population into homogenous groups, with each cluster having its own conditional independence structure. As an illustration, we study the trends in foreign exchange rate fluctuations in the pre-Euro era. PMID:26925189

  19. Integrating CLIPS applications into heterogeneous distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.

    1991-01-01

    SOCIAL is an advanced, object-oriented development tool for integrating intelligent and conventional applications across heterogeneous hardware and software platforms. SOCIAL defines a family of 'wrapper' objects called agents, which incorporate predefined capabilities for distributed communication and control. Developers embed applications within agents and establish interactions between distributed agents via non-intrusive message-based interfaces. This paper describes a predefined SOCIAL agent that is specialized for integrating C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS)-based applications. The agent's high-level Application Programming Interface supports bidirectional flow of data, knowledge, and commands to other agents, enabling CLIPS applications to initiate interactions autonomously, and respond to requests and results from heterogeneous remote systems. The design and operation of CLIPS agents are illustrated with two distributed applications that integrate CLIPS-based expert systems with other intelligent systems for isolating and mapping problems in the Space Shuttle Launch Processing System at the NASA Kennedy Space Center.

  20. Dedicated heterogeneous node scheduling including backfill scheduling

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Robert R.; Eckert, Philip D.; Hommes, Gregg

    2006-07-25

    A method and system for job backfill scheduling dedicated heterogeneous nodes in a multi-node computing environment. Heterogeneous nodes are grouped into homogeneous node sub-pools. For each sub-pool, a free node schedule (FNS) is created so that the number of to chart the free nodes over time. For each prioritized job, using the FNS of sub-pools having nodes useable by a particular job, to determine the earliest time range (ETR) capable of running the job. Once determined for a particular job, scheduling the job to run in that ETR. If the ETR determined for a lower priority job (LPJ) has a start time earlier than a higher priority job (HPJ), then the LPJ is scheduled in that ETR if it would not disturb the anticipated start times of any HPJ previously scheduled for a future time. Thus, efficient utilization and throughput of such computing environments may be increased by utilizing resources otherwise remaining idle.