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Sample records for a1 protease activity

  1. Activities of Vacuolar Cysteine Proteases in Plant Senescence.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Dana E; Costa, Lorenza; Guiamét, Juan José

    2018-01-01

    Plant senescence is accompanied by a marked increase in proteolytic activities, and cysteine proteases (Cys-protease) represent the prevailing class among the responsible proteases. Cys-proteases predominantly locate to lytic compartments, i.e., to the central vacuole (CV) and to senescence-associated vacuoles (SAVs), the latter being specific to the photosynthetic cells of senescing leaves. Cellular fractionation of vacuolar compartments may facilitate Cys-proteases purification and their concentration for further analysis. Active Cys-proteases may be analyzed by different, albeit complementary approaches: (1) in vivo examination of proteolytic activity by fluorescence microscopy using specific substrates which become fluorescent upon cleavage by Cys-proteases, (2) protease labeling with specific probes that react irreversibly with the active enzymes, and (3) zymography, whereby protease activities are detected in polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with a substrate for proteases. Here we describe the three methods mentioned above for detection of active Cys-proteases and a cellular fractionation technique to isolate SAVs.

  2. Profiling protease activities with dynamic proteomics workflows

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, Diana; Hardt, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Proteases play prominent roles in many physiological processes and the pathogenesis of various diseases, which makes them interesting drug targets. To fully understand the functional role of proteases in these processes, it is necessary to characterize the target specificity of the enzymes, identify endogenous substrates and cleavage products as well as protease activators and inhibitors. The complexity of these proteolytic networks presents a considerable analytic challenge. To comprehensively characterize these systems, quantitative methods that capture the spatial and temporal distributions of the network members are needed. Recently, activity-based workflows have come to the forefront to tackle the dynamic aspects of proteolytic processing networks in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. In this review, we will discuss how mass spectrometry-based approaches can be used to gain new insights into protease biology by determining substrate specificities, profiling the activity-states of proteases, monitoring proteolysis in vivo, measuring reaction kinetics and defining in vitro and in vivo proteolytic events. In addition, examples of future aspects of protease research that go beyond mass spectrometry-based applications are given. PMID:22246865

  3. Protease inhibitors from plants with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Seong-Cheol; Hwang, Indeok; Cheong, Hyeonsook; Nah, Jae-Woon; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Park, Yoonkyung

    2009-06-23

    Antimicrobial proteins (peptides) are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides). Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides) that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins). Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides) with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C(18) reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  4. Modulation of the Bacillus anthracis Secretome by the Immune Inhibitor A1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Swick, Michelle C.; Engler, David A.; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    The Bacillus anthracis secretome includes protective antigen, lethal factor, and edema factor, which are the components of anthrax toxin, and other proteins with known or potential roles in anthrax disease. Immune inhibitor A1 (InhA1) is a secreted metalloprotease that is unique to pathogenic members of the Bacillus genus and has been associated with cleavage of host proteins during infection. Here, we report the effect of InhA1 on the B. anthracis secretome. Differential in-gel electrophoresis of proteins present in culture supernatants from a parent strain and an isogenic inhA1-null mutant revealed multiple differences. Of the 1,340 protein spots observed, approximately one-third were less abundant and one-third were more abundant in the inhA1 secretome than in the parent strain secretome. Proteases were strongly represented among those proteins exhibiting a 9-fold or greater change. InhA1 purified from a B. anthracis culture supernatant directly cleaved each of the anthrax toxin proteins as well as an additional secreted protease, Npr599. The conserved zinc binding motif HEXXH of InhA1 (HEYGH) was critical for its proteolytic activity. Our data reveal that InhA1 directly and indirectly modulates the form and/or abundance of over half of all the secreted proteins of B. anthracis. The proteolytic activity of InhA1 on established secreted virulence factors, additional proteases, and other secreted proteins suggests that this major protease plays an important role in virulence not only by cleaving mammalian substrates but also by modulating the B. anthracis secretome itself. PMID:24214942

  5. Modulation of the Bacillus anthracis secretome by the immune inhibitor A1 protease.

    PubMed

    Pflughoeft, Kathryn J; Swick, Michelle C; Engler, David A; Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Koehler, Theresa M

    2014-01-01

    The Bacillus anthracis secretome includes protective antigen, lethal factor, and edema factor, which are the components of anthrax toxin, and other proteins with known or potential roles in anthrax disease. Immune inhibitor A1 (InhA1) is a secreted metalloprotease that is unique to pathogenic members of the Bacillus genus and has been associated with cleavage of host proteins during infection. Here, we report the effect of InhA1 on the B. anthracis secretome. Differential in-gel electrophoresis of proteins present in culture supernatants from a parent strain and an isogenic inhA1-null mutant revealed multiple differences. Of the 1,340 protein spots observed, approximately one-third were less abundant and one-third were more abundant in the inhA1 secretome than in the parent strain secretome. Proteases were strongly represented among those proteins exhibiting a 9-fold or greater change. InhA1 purified from a B. anthracis culture supernatant directly cleaved each of the anthrax toxin proteins as well as an additional secreted protease, Npr599. The conserved zinc binding motif HEXXH of InhA1 (HEYGH) was critical for its proteolytic activity. Our data reveal that InhA1 directly and indirectly modulates the form and/or abundance of over half of all the secreted proteins of B. anthracis. The proteolytic activity of InhA1 on established secreted virulence factors, additional proteases, and other secreted proteins suggests that this major protease plays an important role in virulence not only by cleaving mammalian substrates but also by modulating the B. anthracis secretome itself.

  6. Protease and Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD. PMID:20879045

  7. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.

    1982-08-15

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with /sup 14/C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease Imore » activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition.« less

  8. The S8 serine, C1A cysteine and A1 aspartic protease families in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Beers, Eric P; Jones, Alan M; Dickerman, Allan W

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome has over 550 protease sequences representing all five catalytic types: serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, metallo and threonine (MEROPS peptidase database, http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), which probably reflect a wide variety of as yet unidentified functions performed by plant proteases. Recent indications that the 26S proteasome, a T1 family-threonine protease, is a regulator of light and hormone responsive signal transduction highlight the potential of proteases to participate in many aspects of plant growth and development. Recent discoveries that proteases are required for stomatal distribution, embryo development and disease resistance point to wider roles for four additional multigene families that include some of the most frequently studied (yet poorly understood) plant proteases: the subtilisin-like, serine proteases (family S8), the papain-like, cysteine proteases (family C1A), the pepsin-like, aspartic proteases (family A1) and the plant matrixin, metalloproteases (family M10A). In this report, 54 subtilisin-like, 30 papain-like and 59 pepsin-like proteases from Arabidopsis, are compared with S8, C1A and A1 proteases known from other plant species at the functional, phylogenetic and gene structure levels. Examples of structural conservation between S8, C1A and A1 genes from rice, barley, tomato and soybean and those from Arabidopsis are noted, indicating that some common, essential plant protease roles were established before the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Numerous examples of tandem duplications of protease genes and evidence for a variety of restricted expression patterns suggest that a high degree of specialization exists among proteases within each family. We propose that comprehensive analysis of the functions of these genes in Arabidopsis will firmly establish serine, cysteine and aspartic proteases as regulators and effectors of a wide range of plant processes.

  9. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  10. Acanthamoeba Protease Activity Promotes Allergic Airway Inflammation via Protease-Activated Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES) proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25) in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease. PMID:24658532

  11. Identification and monitoring of protease activity in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, J A; Monkovic, D D; Dekleva, M L

    2000-01-20

    An assay for the detection of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) protease activity, using partially purified yeast-derived recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (rHBsAg) as substrate, was developed to monitor proteolysis of rHBsAg that may occur through fermentation and isolation. The method consists of incubating small amounts of yeast lysate (protease source) with the substrate at 35 degrees C for about 16 h. Substrate proteolysis is assessed by subjecting the incubation mixtures to SDS-PAGE followed by silver-staining. The type of protease responsible for particular cleavages can be identified by treating the yeast lysates with specific protease inhibitors prior to incubation with substrate. The treatment of lysates with PMSF indicated that while many lysates possessed only serine protease activity (Protease B), some possessed proteolytic activity that could not be quenched with high levels of PMSF or other serine protease inhibitors. The use of the aspartyl protease inhibitor Pepstatin A in conjunction with PMSF virtually eliminated all proteolytic activity in these lysates, indicating that an aspartyl protease (Protease A) is expressed under some fermentation conditions. The relative amount of each protease in a lysate can be determined semiquantitatively by scanning the SDS gels densitometrically and plotting the ratio of degradates to intact antigen in the presence and absence of protease inhibitors. This method was used successfully to monitor the time-dependent expression of these proteases throughout production-scale fermentations. The impact of fermentation and purification changes on those proteases specifically responsible for the rHBsAg degradation can be easily evaluated. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Joint Laboratory between Dong-A University and Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang; Choo, Young Moo

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olyticmore » enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.« less

  13. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanocrescent SERS probe

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.

    2015-09-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  14. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  15. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sao, Kentaro; Murata, Masaharu, E-mail: m-murata@dem.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujisaki, Yuri

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressedmore » by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.« less

  16. Serine protease HtrA1 modulates chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Jeremy; Aletti, Giovanni; Baldi, Alfonso; Catalano, Vincenzo; Muretto, Pietro; Keeney, Gary L.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Staub, Julie; Ehrmann, Michael; Cliby, William A.; Lee, Yean Kit; Bible, Keith C.; Hartmann, Lynn C.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Shridhar, Viji

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy presents a serious challenge in the successful treatment of various cancers and is mainly responsible for mortality associated with disseminated cancers. Here we show that expression of HtrA1, which is frequently downregulated in ovarian cancer, influences tumor response to chemotherapy by modulating chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity. Downregulation of HtrA1 attenuated cisplatin- and paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity, while forced expression of HtrA1 enhanced cisplatin- and paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity. HtrA1 expression was upregulated by both cisplatin and paclitaxel treatment. This upregulation resulted in limited autoproteolysis and activation of HtrA1. Active HtrA1 induces cell death in a serine protease–dependent manner. The potential role of HtrA1 as a predictive factor of clinical response to chemotherapy was assessed in both ovarian and gastric cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based regimens. Patients with ovarian or gastric tumors expressing higher levels of HtrA1 showed a higher response rate compared with those with lower levels of HtrA1 expression. These findings uncover what we believe to be a novel pathway by which serine protease HtrA1 mediates paclitaxel- and cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and suggest that loss of HtrA1 in ovarian and gastric cancers may contribute to in vivo chemoresistance. PMID:16767218

  17. Focal Cerebral Ischemia Induces Active Proteases That Degrade Microvascular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Shunichi; Fini, Catherine A.; Mabuchi, Takuma; Koziol, James A.; Eggleston, Leonard L.; del Zoppo, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Focal cerebral ischemia causes microvessel matrix degradation and generates proteases known to degrade this matrix. However, proof that the proteases generated do indeed degrade vascular matrix is lacking. Here we demonstrate that active proteases derived from ischemic tissue after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and transferred to normal tissue can degrade vascular matrix. Methods In an ex vivo bioassay, the effects of supernatants from ischemic and normal basal ganglia of nonhuman primates, proteases, and control buffer on the immunoreactivity of vascular matrix constituents in normal brain tissue sections were quantified. Protease families were identified with specific inhibitors. Results Plasmin, active matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and active MMP-9 significantly reduced microvessel-associated collagen, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). The vascular HSPG perlecan was more sensitive than collagen or laminin in the bioassay and in the ischemic core 2 hours after MCAO. Two-hour and 7-day ischemic tissue samples significantly degraded matrix perlecan and collagen. Inhibitor studies confirmed that while active MMPs were generated, active cysteine proteases significantly degraded microvessel perlecan. The cysteine proteases cathepsins B and L were generated in the microvasculature and adjacent neurons or glial cells 2 hours after MCAO and decreased perlecan in the bioassay. Conclusions This is the first direct evidence that active proteases are generated in ischemic cerebral tissues that are acutely responsible for vascular matrix degradation. Degradation of vascular perlecan, the most sensitive matrix component thus far identified, may be due to cathepsins B and L, generated very rapidly after MCAO. PMID:15001799

  18. Fluoride Does Not Inhibit Enamel Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tye, C.E.; Antone, J.V.; Bartlett, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorosed enamel can be porous, mottled, discolored, hypomineralized, and protein-rich if the enamel matrix is not completely removed. Proteolytic processing by matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) and kallikrein-4 (KLK4) is critical for enamel formation, and homozygous mutation of either protease results in hypomineralized, protein-rich enamel. Herein, we demonstrate that the lysosomal proteinase cathepsin K is expressed in the enamel organ in a developmentally defined manner that suggests a role for cathepsin K in degrading re-absorbed enamel matrix proteins. We therefore asked if fluoride directly inhibits the activity of MMP20, KLK4, dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) (an in vitro activator of KLK4), or cathepsin K. Enzyme kinetics were studied with quenched fluorescent peptides with purified enzyme in the presence of 0–10 mM NaF, and data were fit to Michaelis-Menten curves. Increasing concentrations of known inhibitors showed decreases in enzyme activity. However, concentrations of up to 10 mM NaF had no effect on KLK4, MMP20, DPPI, or cathepsin K activity. Our results show that fluoride does not directly inhibit enamel proteolytic activity. PMID:21118795

  19. Major Cys protease activities are not essential for senescence in individually darkened Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Pružinská, Adriana; Shindo, Takayuki; Niessen, Sherry; Kaschani, Farnusch; Tóth, Réka; Millar, A Harvey; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2017-01-06

    Papain-like Cys Proteases (PLCPs) and Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VPEs) are amongst the most highly expressed proteases during leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Using activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), a method that enables detection of active enzymes within a complex sample using chemical probes, the activities of PLCPs and VPEs were investigated in individually darkened leaves of Arabidopsis, and their role in senescence was tested in null mutants. ABPP and mass spectrometry revealed an increased activity of several PLCPs, particularly RD21A and AALP. By contrast, despite increased VPE transcript levels, active VPE decreased in individually darkened leaves. Eight protease knock-out lines and two protease over expressing lines were subjected to senescence phenotype analysis to determine the importance of individual protease activities to senescence. Unexpectedly, despite the absence of dominating PLCP activities in these plants, the rubisco and chlorophyll decline in individually darkened leaves and the onset of whole plant senescence were unaltered. However, a significant delay in progression of whole plant senescence was observed in aalp-1 and rd21A-1/aalp-1 mutants, visible in the reduced number of senescent leaves. Major Cys protease activities are not essential for dark-induced and developmental senescence and only a knock out line lacking AALP shows a slight but significant delay in plant senescence.

  20. Characterization of the protease activity of detergents: laboratory practicals for studying the protease profile and activity of various commercial detergents.

    PubMed

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-07-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body fluids, and food soils. This article describes two easy and cheap laboratory exercises to study the presence, profile, and basic enzymology of detergent proteases. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the detergent protease activity of various commercial detergents using the N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide method and the bovine serum albumin degradation capacity. Students are also required to elucidate the enzymatic subtype of detergent proteases by studying the inhibitory potential of several types of protease inhibitors revealed by the same experimental methodology. Additionally, the results of the exercises can be used to provide additional insights on elementary enzymology by studying the influence of several important parameters on protease activity such as temperature (in this article) and the influence of pH and effects of surfactants and oxidizers (proposed). Students also develop laboratory skills, problem-solving capacities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are mainly designed for an advanced undergraduate project in the biochemistry and biotechnology sciences. Globally, these laboratory practicals show students the biotechnological applications of proteases in the detergent industry and also reinforce important enzymology concepts. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Temporal dependence of cysteine protease activation following excitotoxic hippocampal injury.

    PubMed

    Berry, J N; Sharrett-Field, L J; Butler, T R; Prendergast, M A

    2012-10-11

    Excitotoxic insults can lead to intracellular signaling cascades that contribute to cell death, in part by activation of proteases, phospholipases, and endonucleases. Cysteine proteases, such as calpains, are calcium (Ca(2+))-activated enzymes which degrade cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule-associated proteins, tubulin, and spectrin, among others. The current study used the organotypic hippocampal slice culture model to examine whether pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine protease activity inhibits N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA-) induced excitotoxic (20 μM NMDA) cell death and changes in synaptophysin immunoreactivity. Significant NMDA-induced cytotoxicity (as measured by propidium iodide [PI] uptake) was found in the CA1 region of the hippocampus at all timepoints examined (24, 72, 120 h), an effect significantly attenuated by co-exposure to the selective NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but not MDL-28170, a potent cysteine protease inhibitor. Results indicated sparing of NMDA-induced loss of the synaptic vesicular protein synaptophysin in all regions of the hippocampus by MDL-28170, though only at early timepoints after injury. These results suggest Ca(2+)-dependent recruitment of cysteine proteases within 24h of excitotoxic insult, but activation of alternative cellular degrading mechanisms after 24h. Further, these data suggest that synaptophysin may be a substrate for calpains and related proteases. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Temporal dependence of cysteine protease activation following excitotoxic hippocampal injury

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jennifer N.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda; Butler, Tracy R.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Excitotoxic insults can lead to intracellular signaling cascades that contribute to cell death, in part by activation of proteases, phospholipases, and endonucleases. Cysteine proteases, such as calpains, are calcium-activated enzymes which degrade cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule-associated proteins, tubulin, and spectrin, among others. The current study used the organotypic hippocampal slice culture model to examine whether pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine protease activity inhibits N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA-) induced excitotoxic (20 μM NMDA) cell death and changes in synaptophysin immunoreactivity. Significant NMDA-induced cytotoxicity (as measured by propidium iodide [PI] uptake) was found in the CA1 region of the hippocampus at all timepoints examined (24, 72, 120 hours), an effect significantly attenuated by co-exposure to the selective NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but not MDL-28170, a potent cysteine protease inhibitor. Results indicated sparing of NMDA-induced loss of the synaptic vesicular protein synaptophysin in all regions of the hippocampus by MDL-28170, though only at early timepoints after injury. These results suggest calcium-dependent recruitment of cysteine proteases within 24 hours of excitotoxic insult, but activation of alternative cellular degrading mechanisms after 24 hours. Further, these data suggest that synaptophysin may be a substrate for calpains and related proteases. PMID:22842515

  3. Cleavage of a Recombinant Human Immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 Hybrid Antibody by Certain Bacterial IgA1 Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Bernard W.; Dunlop, James I.; Batten, Margaret R.; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M.

    2000-01-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcα receptors and trigger respiratory bursts in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. sanguis, Neisseria meningitidis types 1 and 2, N. gonorrhoeae types 1 and 2, and Haemophilus influenzae type 2. Thus, for these enzymes the recognition site for IgA1 cleavage is contained within half of the IgA1 hinge region; additional distal elements, if required, are provided by either an IgA1 or an IgA2 framework. In contrast, the IgA2/A1 hybrid appeared to be resistant to cleavage with S. oralis and some H. influenzae type 1 IgA1 proteases, suggesting these enzymes require additional determinants for efficient substrate recognition. PMID:10639405

  4. Serine proteases and protease-activated receptor 2-dependent allodynia: a novel cancer pain pathway.

    PubMed

    Lam, D K; Schmidt, B L

    2010-05-01

    Mediators involved in the generation of pain in patients with cancer are poorly understood. Using a combined molecular, pharmacologic, behavioral, and genetic approach, we have identified a novel mechanism of cancer-dependent allodynia induced by protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). Here we show that human head and neck carcinoma cells have increased levels of proteolytic activity compared to normal human cell controls. Supernatant from human carcinoma cells, but not controls, caused marked and prolonged mechanical allodynia in mice, when administered into the hindpaw. This nociceptive effect was abolished by serine protease inhibition, diminished by mast cell depletion and absent in PAR2-deficient mice. In addition, non-contact co-culture of trigeminal ganglion neurons with human head and neck carcinoma cells increased the proportion of neurons that exhibited PAR2-immunoreactivity. Our results point to a direct role for serine proteases and their receptor in the pathogenesis of cancer pain. This previously unrecognized cancer pain pathway has important therapeutic implications wherein serine protease inhibitors and PAR2 antagonists may be useful for the treatment of cancer pain. Copyright 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show themore » overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.« less

  6. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  7. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. colimore » α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.« less

  8. Probing the Activity of Eukaryotic Rhomboid Proteases In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Cordier, B; Lemberg, M K

    2017-01-01

    Proteolysis within the membrane is a recent concept in biology. Rhomboid intramembrane serine proteases are conserved in evolution and serve as key switches in diverse cellular pathways ranging from signaling to protein degradation. Since deregulation of intramembrane proteolysis can lead to severe diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, dissecting their enzymatic function and specificity becomes crucial. As membrane proteins, their solubilization, and purification are technically challenging. As a start point for a comprehensive in vitro characterization of eukaryotic rhomboid proteases, we depict in this chapter a robust workflow to find the best conditions to obtain pure and active enzymes from a bacterial expression system. To monitor the integrity of their active site and visualize substrate cleavage, various established activity assays including activity-based labeling and gel-based cleavage assays are described. These methods are illustrated by use of the Escherichia coli rhomboid protease GlpG and human RHBDL2 as an example. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Protease activity in cockroach and basidiomycete allergen extracts.

    PubMed

    Wongtim, S; Lehrer, S B; Salvaggio, J E; Horner, W E

    1993-01-01

    Inherent proteolytic activity was estimated in cockroach and basidiomycete extracts by quantifying acid soluble peptides that were released by incubating extracts with 1% bovine serum albumin as measured by Lowry (Sigma). Reference proteases released 740 (Proteinase K, 0.1 U), 248 (Trypsin, 1.0 U), and 533 micrograms/ml (Pronase, 0.5 U) of soluble peptides. American whole body cockroach extract (0.1 mg dry weight) released 330 micrograms/ml of soluble peptides, representing 13 trypsin equivalent units (TEU)/mg. Extracts from spores of the mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus released 230 micrograms/ml (0.9 TEU/mg) and Pleurotus cap extract released 112 micrograms/ml (0.5 TEU/mg). Mycelium of Pleurotus and the mushroom Psilocybe cubensis and spores of Psilocybe and the puffball Calvatia cyathiformis showed negligible amounts of proteolytic activity. The protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride reduced the proteolytic activity of American whole body cockroach extract by 80% (@1 mM) and the inhibitor ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid inhibited the proteolytic activity of Pleurotus spores by 95% (@1 mM). Loss of allergen activity as determined by RAST inhibition and immunoprinting correlated with protease activity. Thus, in the preparation and handling of allergen extracts, one should employ conditions that minimize proteolysis.

  10. Protease-activated receptors in kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Palygin, Oleg; Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are members of a well-known family of transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Four PARs have been identified to date, of which PAR1 and PAR2 are the most abundant receptors, and have been shown to be expressed in the kidney vascular and tubular cells. PAR signaling is mediated by an N-terminus tethered ligand that can be unmasked by serine protease cleavage. The receptors are activated by endogenous serine proteases, such as thrombin (acts on PARs 1, 3, and 4) and trypsin (PAR2). PARs can be involved in glomerular, microvascular, and inflammatory regulation of renal function in both normal and pathological conditions. As an example, it was shown that human glomerular epithelial and mesangial cells express PARs, and these receptors are involved in the pathogenesis of crescentic glomerulonephritis, glomerular fibrin deposition, and macrophage infiltration. Activation of these receptors in the kidney also modulates renal hemodynamics and glomerular filtration rate. Clinical studies further demonstrated that the concentration of urinary thrombin is associated with glomerulonephritis and type 2 diabetic nephropathy; thus, molecular and functional mechanisms of PARs activation can be directly involved in renal disease progression. We briefly discuss here the recent literature related to activation of PAR signaling in glomeruli and the kidney in general and provide some examples of PAR1 signaling in glomeruli podocytes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Pathogen-secreted proteases activate a novel plant immune pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Li, Jian-Feng; Niu, Yajie; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Woody, Owen Z; Xiong, Yan; Djonović, Slavica; Millet, Yves; Bush, Jenifer; McConkey, Brendan J; Sheen, Jen; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2015-05-14

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signalling networks in plants and animals. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive. Here we report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signalling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana involving the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of an MAPK cascade. In this pathway, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the Gβ subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G-protein signalling to downstream activation of an MAPK cascade. The protease-G-protein-RACK1-MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signalling pathways such as that elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to an MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the new protease-mediated immune signalling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems.

  12. Pathogen-Secreted Proteases Activate a Novel Plant Immune Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Li, Jian-Feng; Niu, Yajie; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Woody, Owen Z.; Xiong, Yan; Djonović, Slavica; Millet, Yves; Bush, Jenifer; McConkey, Brendan J.; Sheen, Jen; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signaling networks in plants and animals1,2. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive1. We report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signaling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana involving the Gα, Gβ and Gγ subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of a MAPK cascade. In this pathway, Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the Gβ subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G protein signaling to downstream activation of a MAPK cascade. The protease-G protein-RACK1-MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signaling pathways such as the one elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to a MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the novel protease-mediated immune signaling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel types of immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems. PMID:25731164

  13. Immunoglobulins in Nasal Secretions of Healthy Humans: Structural Integrity of Secretory Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) and Occurrence of Neutralizing Antibodies to IgA1 Proteases of Nasal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeby, Line; Rasmussen, Trine Tang; Reinholdt, Jesper; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    Certain bacteria, including overt pathogens as well as commensals, produce immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases. By cleaving IgA1, including secretory IgA1, in the hinge region, these enzymes may interfere with the barrier functions of mucosal IgA antibodies, as indicated by experiments in vitro. Previous studies have suggested that cleavage of IgA1 in nasal secretions may be associated with the development and perpetuation of atopic disease. To clarify the potential effect of IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal cavity, we have analyzed immunoglobulin isotypes in nasal secretions of 11 healthy humans, with a focus on IgA, and at the same time have characterized and quantified IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal flora of the subjects. Samples in the form of nasal wash were collected by using a washing liquid that contained lithium as an internal reference. Dilution factors and, subsequently, concentrations in undiluted secretions could thereby be calculated. IgA, mainly in the secretory form, was found by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to be the dominant isotype in all subjects, and the vast majority of IgA (median, 91%) was of the A1 subclass, corroborating results of previous analyses at the level of immunoglobulin-producing cells. Levels of serum-type immunoglobulins were low, except for four subjects in whom levels of IgG corresponded to 20 to 66% of total IgA. Cumulative levels of IgA, IgG, and IgM in undiluted secretions ranged from 260 to 2,494 (median, 777) μg ml−1. IgA1 protease-producing bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Streptococcus mitis biovar 1) were isolated from the nasal cavities of seven subjects at 2.1 × 103 to 7.2 × 106 CFU per ml of undiluted secretion, corresponding to 0.2 to 99.6% of the flora. Nevertheless, α-chain fragments characteristic of IgA1 protease activity were not detected in secretions from any subject by immunoblotting. Neutralizing antibodies to IgA1 proteases of autologous

  14. Evolution of the protease-activated receptor family in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    JIN, MIN; YANG, HAI-WEI; TAO, AI-LIN; WEI, JI-FU

    2016-01-01

    Belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPcr) family, the protease-activated receptors (Pars) consist of 4 members, PAR1-4. PARs mediate the activation of cells via thrombin, serine and other proteases. Such protease-triggered signaling events are thought to be critical for hemostasis, thrombosis and other normal pathological processes. In the present study, we examined the evolution of PARs by analyzing phylogenetic trees, chromosome location, selective pressure and functional divergence based on the 169 functional gene alignment sequences from 57 vertebrate gene sequences. We found that the 4 PARs originated from 4 invertebrate ancestors by phylogenetic trees analysis. The selective pressure results revealed that only PAR1 appeared by positive selection during its evolution, while the other PAR members did not. In addition, we noticed that although these PARs evolved separately, the results of functional divergence indicated that their evolutional rates were similar and their functions did not significantly diverge. The findings of our study provide valuable insight into the evolutionary history of the vertebrate PAR family. PMID:26820116

  15. Peptide-modified optical filters for detecting protease activity.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Kristopher A; Böcking, Till; Gaus, Katharina; Gal, Michael; Gooding, J Justin

    2007-11-01

    The organic derivatization of silicon-based nanoporous photonic crystals is presented as a method to immobilize peptides for the detection of protease enzymes in solution. A narrow-line-width rugate filter, a one-dimensional photonic crystal, is fabricated that exhibits a high-reflectivity optical resonance that is sensitive to small changes in the refractive index at the pore walls. To immobilize peptide in the pore of the photonic crystal, the hydrogen-terminated silicon surface was first modified with the alkene 10-succinimidyl undecenoate via hydrosilylation. The monolayer with the succinimide ester moiety at the distal end served the dual function of protecting the underlying silicon from oxidation as well as providing a surface suitable for subsequent derivatization with amines. The surface was further modified with 1-aminohexa(ethylene glycol) (EG(6)) to resist nonspecific adsorption of proteins common in complex biological samples. The distal hydroxyl of the EG(6) is activated using the solid-phase coupling reagent disuccinimidyl carbonate for selective immobilization of peptides as protease recognition elements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals high activation and coupling efficiency at each stage of the functionalization. Exposure of the peptide-modified crystals to the protease subtilisin in solution causes a change in the refractive index, resulting in a shift of the resonance to shorter wavelengths, indicating cleavage of organic material within the pores. The lowest detected concentration of enzyme was 37 nM (7.4 pmol in 200 microL).

  16. Moringa oleifera Lam.: Protease activity against blood coagulation cascade.

    PubMed

    Satish, A; Sairam, Sudha; Ahmed, Faiyaz; Urooj, Asna

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the protease activity of aqueous extracts of Moringa oleifera (Moringaceae) leaf (MOL) and root (MOR). Protease activity was assayed using casein, human plasma clot and human fibrinogen as substrates. Caseinolytic activity of MOL was significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) than that of MOR. Similar observations were found in case of human plasma clot hydrolyzing activity, wherein MOL caused significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) plasma clot hydrolysis than MOR. Zymographic techniques were used to detect proteolytic enzymes following electrophoretic separation in gels. Further, both the extracts exhibited significant procoagulant activity as reflected by a significant decrease (P ≤ 0.05) in recalcification time, accompanied by fibrinogenolytic and fibrinolytic activities; clotting time was decreased from 180 ± 10 sec to 119 ± 8 sec and 143 ± 10 sec by MOL and MOR, respectively, at a concentration of 2.5 mg/mL. Fibrinogenolytic (human fibrinogen) and fibrinolytic activity (human plasma clot) was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), plate method and colorimetric method. Zymographic profile indicated that both the extracts exerted their procoagulant activity by selectively hydrolyzing Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen to form fibrin clot, thereby exhibiting fibrinogenolytic activity. However, prolonged incubation resulted in degradation of the formed fibrin clot, suggesting fibrinolytic like activity. These findings support the traditional usage of M. oleifera extracts for wound healing.

  17. Protease activity in the larval stage of the parasitoid wasp, Eulophus pennicornis (Nees) (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae); effects of protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Down, R E; Ford, L; Mosson, H J; Fitches, E; Gatehouse, J A; Gatehouse, A M

    1999-08-01

    Hymenopteran, parasitoid wasps have good potential for use in integrated pest management (IPM); for example, the gregarious ectoparasitoid, Eulophus pennicornis, has been suggested as a biological control agent for larvae of the tomato moth (Lacanobia oleracea L.). However, the processes by which such parasitic larvae are able to utilize the nutritional resource provided by the host have been little studied. Protease activity was present in E. pennicornis larvae, and characterization of the enzymes responsible for proteolysis was performed using a range of synthetic substrates and specific inhibitors. Serine protease enzymes was both trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities were present. A range of plant-derived serine protease inhibitors was tested for activity against these enzymes. Certain inhibitors, notably soybean Kunitz inhibitor (SKTI), inhibited enzyme activity by > 80% at < 10(-5) M. When SKTI was fed to L. oleracea larvae in an artificial diet, the inhibitor was subsequently detected within the larval haemolymph, showing that protease inhibitors in the host diet can be delivered to a parasitoid via the host haemolymph. If transgenic plants expressing foreign protease inhibitors for protection against insect pests are to form a component of IPM systems, possible adverse effects, whether direct or indirect, of transgene expression on parasitoids like E. pennicornis should be considered.

  18. The serine protease HtrA1 specifically interacts and degrades the tuberous sclerosis complex 2 protein.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Mara; Severino, Anna; Manente, Lucrezia; Tuduce, Ioana L; Toldo, Stefano; Caraglia, Michele; Crispi, Stefania; Ehrmann, Michael; He, Xiaoping; Maguire, Jacie; De Falco, Maria; De Luca, Antonio; Shridhar, Viji; Baldi, Alfonso

    2010-09-01

    Hamartin and tuberin are products of the tumor suppressor genes TSC1 and TSC2, respectively. Mutations affecting either gene result in the tuberous sclerosis syndrome, a neurologic genetic disorder characterized by the formation of multiple benign tumors or hamartomas. In this study, we report the identification of TSC2, but not TSC1, as a substrate of HtrA1, a member of the human HtrA family proteins of serine proteases. We show the direct interaction and colocalization in the cytoplasm of HtrA1 and TSC2 and that HtrA1 cleaves TSC2 both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that alterations in HtrA1 expression cause modifications in phosphorylation status of two downstream targets of TSC2: 4E-BP1 and S6K. Our data suggest that, under particular physiologic or pathologic conditions, HtrA1 degrades TSC2 and activates the downstream targets. Considering that HtrA1 levels are significantly increased during embryogenesis, we speculate that one of the targets of HtrA1 activity during fetal development is the TSC2-TSC1 pathway. © 2010 AACR.

  19. Cloning, expression and activity analysis of a novel fibrinolytic serine protease from Arenicola cristata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunling; Ju, Jiyu

    2015-06-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (< 40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form of A. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed in E. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result suggested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clot in vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene in A. cristata.

  20. Protease activated receptor 2 controls myelin development, resiliency and repair.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyesook; Radulovic, Maja; Walters, Grant; Paulsen, Alex R; Drucker, Kristen; Starski, Phillip; Wu, Jianmin; Fairlie, David P; Scarisbrick, Isobel A

    2017-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes are essential regulators of axonal energy homeostasis and electrical conduction and emerging target cells for restoration of neurological function. Here we investigate the role of protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2), a unique protease activated G protein-coupled receptor, in myelin development and repair using the spinal cord as a model. Results demonstrate that genetic deletion of PAR2 accelerates myelin production, including higher proteolipid protein (PLP) levels in the spinal cord at birth and higher levels of myelin basic protein and thickened myelin sheaths in adulthood. Enhancements in spinal cord myelin with PAR2 loss-of-function were accompanied by increased numbers of Olig2- and CC1-positive oligodendrocytes, as well as in levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and extracellular signal related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. Parallel promyelinating effects were observed after blocking PAR2 expression in purified oligodendrocyte cultures, whereas inhibiting adenylate cyclase reversed these effects. Conversely, PAR2 activation reduced PLP expression and this effect was prevented by brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a promyelinating growth factor that signals through cAMP. PAR2 knockout mice also showed improved myelin resiliency after traumatic spinal cord injury and an accelerated pattern of myelin regeneration after focal demyelination. These findings suggest that PAR2 is an important controller of myelin production and regeneration, both in the developing and adult spinal cord. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. MOFzyme: Intrinsic protease-like activity of Cu-MOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Chen, Daomei; Wang, Jiaqiang; Yan, Zhiying; Jiang, Liang; Deliang Duan; He, Jiao; Luo, Zhongrui; Zhang, Jinping; Yuan, Fagui

    2014-10-01

    The construction of efficient enzyme mimetics for the hydrolysis of peptide bonds in proteins is challenging due to the high stability of peptide bonds and the importance of proteases in biology and industry. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of infinite crystalline lattices with metal clusters and organic linkers may provide opportunities for protease mimic which has remained unknown. Herein, we report that Cu2(C9H3O6)4/3 MOF (which is well known as HKUST-1 and denoted as Cu-MOF here), possesses an intrinsic enzyme mimicking activity similar to that found in natural trypsin to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and casein. The Michaelis constant (Km) of Cu-MOF is about 26,000-fold smaller than that of free trypsin indicating a much higher affinity of BSA for Cu-MOF surface. Cu-MOF also exhibited significantly higher catalytic efficiency than homogeneous artificial metalloprotease Cu(II) complexes and could be reused for ten times without losing in its activity. Moreover, Cu-MOF was successfully used to simulate trypsinization in cell culture since it dissociated cells in culture even without EDTA.

  2. Intramolecular Modulation of Serine Protease Inhibitor Activity in a Marine Cyanobacterium with Antifeedant Properties

    PubMed Central

    Matthew, Susan; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Becerro, Mikel A.; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Paul, Valerie J.; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Extracts of the Floridian marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya cf. confervoides were found to deter feeding by reef fish and sea urchins (Diadema antillarum). This antifeedant activity may be a reflection of the secondary metabolite content, known to be comprised of many serine protease inhibitors. Further chemical and NMR spectroscopic investigation led us to isolate and structurally characterize a new serine protease inhibitor 1 that is formally derived from an intramolecular condensation of largamide D (2). The cyclization resulted in diminished activity, but to different extents against two serine proteases tested. This finding suggests that cyanobacteria can endogenously modulate the activity of their protease inhibitors. PMID:20631871

  3. NMR Analysis of a Novel Enzymatically Active Unlinked Dengue NS2B-NS3 Protease Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Mee; Gayen, Shovanlal; Kang, CongBao; Joy, Joma; Huang, Qiwei; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Ang, Melgious Jin Yan; Lim, Huichang Annie; Hung, Alvin W.; Li, Rong; Noble, Christian G.; Lee, Le Tian; Yip, Andy; Wang, Qing-Yin; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Hill, Jeffrey; Shi, Pei-Yong; Keller, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    The dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen responsible for an estimated 100 million human infections annually. The viral genome encodes a two-component trypsin-like protease that contains the cofactor region from the nonstructural protein NS2B and the protease domain from NS3 (NS3pro). The NS2B-NS3pro complex plays a crucial role in viral maturation and has been identified as a potential drug target. Using a DENV protease construct containing NS2B covalently linked to NS3pro via a Gly4-Ser-Gly4 linker (“linked protease”), previous x-ray crystal structures show that the C-terminal fragment of NS2B is remote from NS3pro and exists in an open state in the absence of an inhibitor; however, in the presence of an inhibitor, NS2B complexes with NS3pro to form a closed state. This linked enzyme produced NMR spectra with severe signal overlap and line broadening. To obtain a protease construct with a resolved NMR spectrum, we expressed and purified an unlinked protease complex containing a 50-residue segment of the NS2B cofactor region and NS3pro without the glycine linker using a coexpression system. This unlinked protease complex was catalytically active at neutral pH in the absence of glycerol and produced dispersed cross-peaks in a 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum correlation spectrum that enabled us to conduct backbone assignments using conventional techniques. In addition, titration with an active-site peptide aldehyde inhibitor and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement studies demonstrated that the unlinked DENV protease exists predominantly in a closed conformation in solution. This protease complex can serve as a useful tool for drug discovery against DENV. PMID:23511634

  4. Molecular Characterization of Protease Activity in Serratia sp. Strain SCBI and Its Importance in Cytotoxicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lauren M.

    2014-01-01

    A newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate (SCBI), is both a mutualist of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 and a pathogen of lepidopteran insects. Serratia sp. strain SCBI displays high proteolytic activity, and because secreted proteases are known virulence factors for many pathogens, the purpose of this study was to identify genes essential for extracellular protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and to determine what role proteases play in insect pathogenesis and cytotoxicity. A bank of 2,100 transposon mutants was generated, and six SCBI mutants with defective proteolytic activity were identified. These mutants were also defective in cytotoxicity. The mutants were found defective in genes encoding the following proteins: alkaline metalloprotease secretion protein AprE, a BglB family transcriptional antiterminator, an inosine/xanthosine triphosphatase, GidA, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, and a PIN domain protein. Gene expression analysis on these six mutants showed significant downregulation in mRNA levels of several different types of predicted protease genes. In addition, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis provided insight into how inactivation of AprE, GidA, and a PIN domain protein influences motility and virulence, as well as protease activity. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to further characterize expression of predicted protease genes in wild-type Serratia sp. SCBI, the highest mRNA levels for the alkaline metalloprotease genes (termed prtA1 to prtA4) occurred following the death of an insect host, while two serine protease and two metalloprotease genes had their highest mRNA levels during active infection. Overall, these results indicate that proteolytic activity is essential for cytotoxicity in Serratia sp. SCBI and that its regulation appears to be highly complex. PMID:25182493

  5. Comparative analysis on the distribution of protease activities among fruits and vegetable resources.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Qiao-Juan; Jiang, Zheng-Qiang

    2016-12-15

    In this study, a comparative analysis on the distribution of protease activities among 90 plant resources, including fruits and vegetables, has been performed. Protease activities of plant extracts were assayed at different pH values (pH 3.0, pH 7.5 and pH 10.5) using casein as a substrate. Ten fruits and thirteen vegetables show protease activities above 10U/g. Pineapple, fig and papaya, which are used for commercial protease production, exhibited high protease activities. Additionally, high protease activities were detected in kiwifruit (28.8U/g), broccoli (16.9U/g), ginger (16.6U/g), leek (32.7U/g) and red pepper (15.8U/g) at different pH values. SDS-PAGE and zymograms confirmed that various types of proteases existed in the five plant extracts and might be explored. Furthermore, five plant extracts were treated by different protease inhibitors. These results show that there are still many plant resources unexplored, which may be promising candidates for plant-derived protease production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Monitoring single protease activities on triple-helical collagen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzar, Raj; Froberg, James; Srivastava, D. K.; Choi, Yongki

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a particular family of proteases, play a pivotal role in degrading the extracellular matrix (ECM). It has been known for more than 40 years that MMPs are closely involved in multiple human cancers during cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. However, the mechanisms of MMP activity are far from being understood. Here, we monitored enzymatic processing of MMPs with two complementary approaches, atomic force microscopy and nanocircuits measurements. AFM measurements demonstrated that incubation of collagen monomers with MMPs resulted in a single position cleavage, producing 3/4 and 1/4 collagen fragments. From electronic monitoring of single MMP nanocircuit measurements, we were able to capture a single cleavage event with a rate of 0.012 Hz, which were in good agreement with fluorescence assay measurements. This work was supported financially by the NIGMS/NIH (P30GM103332-02) and ND NASA EPSCoR RID Grant.

  7. Network Analyses Reveal Pervasive Functional Regulation Between Proteases in the Human Protease Web

    PubMed Central

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Cox, Jennifer H.; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Starr, Amanda E.; Lange, Philipp F.; Pavlidis, Paul; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing is an irreversible posttranslational modification affecting a large portion of the proteome. Protease-cleaved mediators frequently exhibit altered activity, and biological pathways are often regulated by proteolytic processing. Many of these mechanisms have not been appreciated as being protease-dependent, and the potential in unraveling a complex new dimension of biological control is increasingly recognized. Proteases are currently believed to act individually or in isolated cascades. However, conclusive but scattered biochemical evidence indicates broader regulation of proteases by protease and inhibitor interactions. Therefore, to systematically study such interactions, we assembled curated protease cleavage and inhibition data into a global, computational representation, termed the protease web. This revealed that proteases pervasively influence the activity of other proteases directly or by cleaving intermediate proteases or protease inhibitors. The protease web spans four classes of proteases and inhibitors and so links both recently and classically described protease groups and cascades, which can no longer be viewed as operating in isolation in vivo. We demonstrated that this observation, termed reachability, is robust to alterations in the data and will only increase in the future as additional data are added. We further show how subnetworks of the web are operational in 23 different tissues reflecting different phenotypes. We applied our network to develop novel insights into biologically relevant protease interactions using cell-specific proteases of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte as a system. Predictions from the protease web on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8) and neutrophil elastase being linked by an inactivating cleavage of serpinA1 by MMP8 were validated and explain perplexing Mmp8 −/− versus wild-type polymorphonuclear chemokine cleavages in vivo. Our findings supply systematically derived and

  8. [Identification of Target Extracellular Proteases--Activators of Proteins of Haemostasis System Produced by Micromycetes Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus terreus].

    PubMed

    Zvonareva, E S; Osmolovskiy, A A; Kreyer, V G; Baranova, N A; Kotova, I B; Egorov, N S

    2015-01-01

    Effects of extracellular proteases of Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus terreus on plasma hemostasis proteins, consist of initiating the activation of prothrombin complex proteins, was detected. Was discovered, that A. ochraceus proteases have a direct influence on protein C and coagulation factor X, and A. terreus proteases causes their activation indirectly through kallikrein system stimulation. The ability of extracellular proteases of micromycetes activate prekallikrein in human blood plasma on the example of A. terreus was first demonstrated.

  9. Cerebral small vessel disease-related protease HtrA1 processes latent TGF-β binding protein 1 and facilitates TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Beaufort, Nathalie; Scharrer, Eva; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Lux, Vanda; Ehrmann, Michael; Huber, Robert; Houlden, Henry; Werring, David; Haffner, Christof; Dichgans, Martin

    2014-11-18

    High temperature requirement protein A1 (HtrA1) is a primarily secreted serine protease involved in a variety of cellular processes including transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling. Loss of its activity causes cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CARASIL), an inherited form of cerebral small vessel disease leading to early-onset stroke and premature dementia. Dysregulated TGF-β signaling is considered to promote CARASIL pathogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here we present evidence from mouse brain tissue and embryonic fibroblasts as well as patient skin fibroblasts for a facilitating role of HtrA1 in TGF-β pathway activation. We identify latent TGF-β binding protein 1 (LTBP-1), an extracellular matrix protein and key regulator of TGF-β bioavailability, as a novel HtrA1 target. Cleavage occurs at physiological protease concentrations, is prevented under HtrA1-deficient conditions as well as by CARASIL mutations and disrupts both LTBP-1 binding to fibronectin and its incorporation into the extracellular matrix. Hence, our data suggest an attenuation of TGF-β signaling caused by a lack of HtrA1-mediated LTBP-1 processing as mechanism underlying CARASIL pathogenesis.

  10. Extraction of lipase and protease and characterization of activated sludge from pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Karn, Santosh Kr; Kumar, Pradeep; Pan, Xiangliang

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes released by the microorganisms in activated sludge are responsible for the organic matter degradation there; however, the optimal extraction procedure of this valuable resource has not been well established until now. In this study protease and lipase were extracted from activated sludge using ultrasound disintegration combined with a nonionic detergent (Triton X-100) and cation-exchange resin (CER) in combination for the extraction of protease and lipase. It was observed that the concentration of 0.1% and 1% Triton X-100 has a strong influence for the extraction of lipase and protease respectively. Closer study of the enzyme extraction process is essential for different enzymes from activated sludge process.

  11. Uncoupling of Protease trans-Cleavage and Helicase Activities in Pestivirus NS3

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fengwei; Lu, Guoliang; Li, Ling

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nonstructural protein NS3 from the Flaviviridae family is a multifunctional protein that contains an N-terminal protease and a C-terminal helicase, playing essential roles in viral polyprotein processing and genome replication. Here we report a full-length crystal structure of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) NS3 in complex with its NS4A protease cofactor segment (PCS) at a 2.35-Å resolution. The structure reveals a previously unidentified ∼2,200-Å2 intramolecular protease-helicase interface comprising three clusters of interactions, representing a “closed” global conformation related to the NS3-NS4A cis-cleavage event. Although this conformation is incompatible with protease trans-cleavage, it appears to be functionally important and beneficial to the helicase activity, as the mutations designed to perturb this conformation impaired both the helicase activities in vitro and virus production in vivo. Our work reveals important features of protease-helicase coordination in pestivirus NS3 and provides a key basis for how different conformational states may explicitly contribute to certain functions of this natural protease-helicase fusion protein. IMPORTANCE Many RNA viruses encode helicases to aid their RNA genome replication and transcription by unwinding structured RNA. Being naturally fused to a protease participating in viral polyprotein processing, the NS3 helicases encoded by the Flaviviridae family viruses are unique. Therefore, how these two enzyme modules coordinate in a single polypeptide is of particular interest. Here we report a previously unidentified conformation of pestivirus NS3 in complex with its NS4A protease cofactor segment (PCS). This conformational state is related to the protease cis-cleavage event and is optimal for the function of helicase. This work provides an important basis to understand how different enzymatic activities of NS3 may be achieved by the coordination between the protease and helicase through

  12. Uncoupling of Protease trans-Cleavage and Helicase Activities in Pestivirus NS3.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fengwei; Lu, Guoliang; Li, Ling; Gong, Peng; Pan, Zishu

    2017-11-01

    The nonstructural protein NS3 from the Flaviviridae family is a multifunctional protein that contains an N-terminal protease and a C-terminal helicase, playing essential roles in viral polyprotein processing and genome replication. Here we report a full-length crystal structure of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) NS3 in complex with its NS4A protease cofactor segment (PCS) at a 2.35-Å resolution. The structure reveals a previously unidentified ∼2,200-Å 2 intramolecular protease-helicase interface comprising three clusters of interactions, representing a "closed" global conformation related to the NS3-NS4A cis -cleavage event. Although this conformation is incompatible with protease trans -cleavage, it appears to be functionally important and beneficial to the helicase activity, as the mutations designed to perturb this conformation impaired both the helicase activities in vitro and virus production in vivo Our work reveals important features of protease-helicase coordination in pestivirus NS3 and provides a key basis for how different conformational states may explicitly contribute to certain functions of this natural protease-helicase fusion protein. IMPORTANCE Many RNA viruses encode helicases to aid their RNA genome replication and transcription by unwinding structured RNA. Being naturally fused to a protease participating in viral polyprotein processing, the NS3 helicases encoded by the Flaviviridae family viruses are unique. Therefore, how these two enzyme modules coordinate in a single polypeptide is of particular interest. Here we report a previously unidentified conformation of pestivirus NS3 in complex with its NS4A protease cofactor segment (PCS). This conformational state is related to the protease cis -cleavage event and is optimal for the function of helicase. This work provides an important basis to understand how different enzymatic activities of NS3 may be achieved by the coordination between the protease and helicase through different

  13. Determination of the protease cleavage site repertoire—The RNase H but not the RT domain is essential for foamy viral protease activity

    SciTech Connect

    Spannaus, Ralf; Bodem, Jochen, E-mail: Jochen.Bodem@vim.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2014-04-15

    In contrast to orthoretroviruses, the foamy virus protease is only active as a protease-reverse transcriptase fusion protein and requires viral RNA for activation. Maturation of foamy viral proteins seems to be restricted to a single cleavage site in Gag and Pol. We provide evidence that unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity, which is unique among retroviruses. Analyses of the cleavage site sequences of the Gag and Pol cleavage sites revealed a high similarity compared to those of Lentiviruses. We show that positions P2' and P2 are invariant and that Gag and Pol cleavage sites are processed with similar efficiencies.more » The RNase H domain is essential for protease activity, but can functionally be substituted by RNase H domains of other retroviruses. Thus, the RNase H domain might be involved in the stabilization of the protease dimer, while the RT domain is essential for RNA dependent protease activation. - Highlights: • Unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity of foamy viruses. • Positions P2 and P2' are invariant in the foamy viral cleavage sites. • The RNaseH domain is essential for protease activity. • The RNaseH domains of other retroviruses support foamy viral protease activity.« less

  14. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Heires, Art J.; Nordgren, Tara M.; Souder, Chelsea P.; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A.; Toews, Myron L.; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease. PMID

  15. The cutting edge: membrane-anchored serine protease activities in the pericellular microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Antalis, Toni M; Buzza, Marguerite S; Hodge, Kathryn M; Hooper, John D; Netzel-Arnett, Sarah

    2010-06-15

    The serine proteases of the trypsin-like (S1) family play critical roles in many key biological processes including digestion, blood coagulation, and immunity. Members of this family contain N- or C-terminal domains that serve to tether the serine protease catalytic domain directly to the plasma membrane. These membrane-anchored serine proteases are proving to be key components of the cell machinery for activation of precursor molecules in the pericellular microenvironment, playing vital functions in the maintenance of homoeostasis. Substrates activated by membrane-anchored serine proteases include peptide hormones, growth and differentiation factors, receptors, enzymes, adhesion molecules and viral coat proteins. In addition, new insights into our understanding of the physiological functions of these proteases and their involvement in human pathology have come from animal models and patient studies. The present review discusses emerging evidence for the diversity of this fascinating group of membrane serine proteases as potent modifiers of the pericellular microenvironment through proteolytic processing of diverse substrates. We also discuss the functional consequences of the activities of these proteases on mammalian physiology and disease.

  16. Parallel screening and activity profiling with HIV protease inhibitor pharmacophore models.

    PubMed

    Steindl, Theodora M; Schuster, Daniela; Laggner, Christian; Chuang, Karen; Hoffmann, Rémy D; Langer, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Parallel Screening has been introduced as an in silico method to predict the potential biological activities of compounds by screening them with a multitude of pharmacophore models. This study presents an early application example employing a Pipeline Pilot-based screening platform for automatic large-scale virtual activity profiling. An extensive set of HIV protease inhibitor pharmacophore models was used to screen a selection of active and inactive compounds. Furthermore, we aimed to address the usually critically eyed point, whether it is possible in a parallel screening system to differentiate between similar molecules/molecules acting on closely related proteins, and therefore we incorporated a collection of other protease inhibitors including aspartic protease inhibitors. The results of the screening experiments show a clear trend toward most extensive retrieval of known active ligands, followed by the general protease inhibitors and lowest recovery of inactive compounds.

  17. Proteolytic activity of human cytomegalovirus UL80 protease cleavage site mutants.

    PubMed

    Jones, T R; Sun, L; Bebernitz, G A; Muzithras, V P; Kim, H J; Johnston, S H; Baum, E Z

    1994-06-01

    The human cytomegalovirus UL80 open reading frame encodes protease and assembly protein from its N- and C-terminal regions, respectively. We reported previously that a 30-kDa protease is derived by autoproteolytic processing of a polyprotein which is the translation product of the entire UL80 open reading frame (E. Z. Baum, G. A. Bebernitz, J. D. Hulmes, V. P. Muzithras, T. R. Jones, and Y. Gluzman, J. Virol. 67:497-506, 1993). Three autoproteolytic cleavage sites within the UL80 polyprotein were characterized; site 143 is within the protease domain and inactivates the protease. In this article, we report (i) expression analyses of UL80 in infected cells, including the processing kinetics of the UL80 polyprotein; (ii) the existence of an additional cleavage site (site 209) within the protease domain of the UL80 polyprotein; and (iii) the effect of mutagenesis at each of the cleavage sites upon proteolytic activity and steady-state levels of the UL80 processing products. During the course of infection, UL80 polyprotein processing begins at cleavage site 643 and follows at sites 256 and 143. Cleavage at site 643 and/or 256 within the polyprotein is not a prerequisite for efficient protease activity, since all three proteases (85-, 80-, and 30-kDa proteins) were equally active in cleaving the assembly protein precursor to its mature form. Inhibition of cleavage at site 143 resulted in a three- to sixfold increase in the steady-state level of the 30-kDa protease, supporting the hypothesis that cleavage at this site may represent a mechanism by which cytomegalovirus regulates the level of active protease.

  18. Conserved structure and adjacent location of the thrombin receptor and protease-activated receptor 2 genes define a protease-activated receptor gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Kahn, M; Ishii, K; Kuo, W L; Piper, M; Connolly, A; Shi, Y P; Wu, R; Lin, C C; Coughlin, S R

    1996-05-01

    Thrombin is a serine protease that elicits a variety of cellular responses. Molecular cloning of a thrombin receptor revealed a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by a novel proteolytic mechanism. Recently, a second protease-activated receptor was discovered and dubbed PAR2. PAR2 is highly related to the thrombin receptor by sequence and, like the thrombin receptor, is activated by cleavage of its amino terminal exodomain. Also like the thrombin receptor, PAR2 can be activated by the hexapeptide corresponding to its tethered ligand sequence independent of receptor cleavage. Thus, functionally, the thrombin receptor and PAR2 constitute a fledgling receptor family that shares a novel proteolytic activation mechanism. To further explore the relatedness of the two known protease-activated receptors and to examine the possibility that a protease-activated gene cluster might exist, we have compared the structure and chromosomal locations of the thrombin receptor and PAR2 genes. The genomic structures of the two protease-activated receptor genes were determined by analysis of lambda phage, P1 bacteriophage, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic clones. Chromosomal location was determined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes, and the relative distance separating the two genes was evaluated both by means of two-color FISH and analysis of YACs and BACs containing both genes. Analysis of genomic clones revealed that the two protease-activated receptor genes share a two-exon genomic structure in which the first exon encodes 5'-untranslated sequence and signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the mature receptor protein and 3'-untranslated sequence. The two receptor genes also share a common locus with the two human genes located at 5q13 and the two mouse genes at 13D2, a syntenic region of the mouse genome. These techniques also suggest that the physical distance separating these two genes is less than 100 kb. The

  19. Purification of a 24-kD protease from apoptotic tumor cells that activates DNA fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We report the purification of a protease from tumor cells undergoing apoptosis that is involved in activating DNA fragmentation. Initial studies revealed that two inhibitors of serine proteases, N-1- tosylamide-2-phenylethylchloromethyl ketone and carbobenzoxy-Ala-Ala- borophe (DK120), suppressed tumor necrosis factor or ultraviolet (UV) light-induced DNA fragmentation in the U937 histiocytic lymphoma as well as UV light-induced DNA fragmentation in the BT-20 breast carcinoma, HL-60 myelocytic leukemia, and 3T3 fibroblasts. The protease was purified by affinity chromatography with DK120 as ligand and showed high activity on a synthetic substrate preferred by elastase-like enzymes (Ala-Ala-Pro-Val p-nitroanilide), but was inactive on the trypsin substrate, N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine thiobenzyl ester, or the chymotrypsin substrate, Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide. The activity of the DK120-binding protease purified from U937 cells undergoing apoptosis was increased approximately 10-fold over that recovered from normal cells. Further purification to homogeneity by heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed a single band of 24 kD on a silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. In addition to protease activity, the purified enzyme induced DNA fragmentation into multiples of 180 basepairs in isolated U937 nuclei. These findings suggest the 24- kD protease is a novel enzyme that activates DNA fragmentation in U937 cells undergoing apoptosis. PMID:7964487

  20. Design, synthesis, and activity of nanocellulosic protease sensors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we contrast the molecular assembly, and biochemical utility of nanocellulosic materials prepared from cotton and wood as protease sensors. The cotton-based nanocellulosic substrates were prepared in a variety of ways to produce nanocrystals, films and aerogels, which were derivatized with eithe...

  1. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  2. Increased expression and immunogenicity of HIV-1 protease following inactivation of the enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Hallengärd, David; Haller, B Kristian; Petersson, Sarah; Boberg, Andreas; Maltais, Anna-Karin; Isaguliants, Maria; Wahren, Britta; Bråve, Andreas

    2011-01-17

    HIV-1 protease is an important target for anti-HIV therapy but has not received much attention as a vaccine antigen. To investigate the immunogenic properties of HIV-1 protease, we designed DNA plasmids encoding variants of the protease gene. Mutations resulting in enzymatic inactivation (D25N) and resistance to standard antiretroviral drugs (V82F/I84V) were introduced in order to examine the impact of the enzymatic activity on immunogenicity and the possibility to induce immune responses against drug resistant protease, respectively. The enzymatic inactivation of protease resulted in significantly increased in vitro expression as well as in vivo immunogenicity. The inactivated protease was highly immunogenic in both BALB/c and HLA-A0201 transgenic C57Bl/6 mice, and the immunogenicity was retained when the gene was delivered as a part of a multigene HIV-1 DNA vaccine. The drug resistance mutations hampered both the cellular and humoral immune responses, as the mutations also affect both CD4 and CD8 T cell epitopes. Taken together, our data demonstrates the possibility to drastically increase the immunogenicity of HIV-1 protease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

    PubMed

    Iketani, Aya; Nakamura, Mayumi; Suzuki, Yuya; Awai, Koichiro; Shioi, Yuzo

    2013-03-01

    A serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from basidiocarps of the edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes was characterized. The protease was purified to near homogeneity by three steps of chromatography using acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (Ac-YVAD-MCA) as a substrate. The enzyme was termed FvSerP (F. velutipes serine protease). This enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the caspase-specific inhibitor, Ac-YVAD-CHO, as well as moderately inhibited by serine protease inhibitors. Based on the N-terminal sequence, the cDNA of FvSerP was identified. The deduced protease sequence was a peptide composed of 325 amino acids with a molecular mass of 34.5 kDa. The amino acid sequence of FvSerP showed similarity to neither caspases nor to the plant subtilisin-like serine protease with caspase-like activity called saspase. FvSerP shared identity to the functionally unknown genes from class of Agaricomycetes, with similarity to the peptidase S41 domain of a serine protease. It was thus concluded that this enzyme is likely a novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities belonging to the peptidase S41 family and distributed in the class Agaricomycetes. This enzyme possibly functions in autolysis, a type of programmed cell death that occurs in the later stages of development of basidiocarps with reference to their enzymatic functions. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of the Protease Activity of Detergents: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Protease Profile and Activity of Various Commercial Detergents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body…

  5. Trypsin causes platelet activation independently of known protease-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingying; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2014-01-01

    To identify a physiological agonist of PAR3, we used PAR4 null murine platelets, which were known to express only PAR3. In this study, we tested several proteases and found that trypsin, but not heat-inactivated trypsin, activated PAR4 null murine platelets. Even at high concentrations, trypsin caused shape change without increasing intracellular calcium levels in PAR4 null murine platelets. Consistent with this result, the Gq inhibitor YM-254890 had no effect on trypsin-induced shape change. However, trypsin-induced platelet shape change was abolished by either p160ROCK inhibitor, Y27632 or H1152. Furthermore, trypsin caused phosphorylation of myosin light chain (Thr18), but not Akt or Erk. Surprisingly, trypsin caused a similar shape change in PAR4-desensitized PAR3 null murine platelets as in PAR4 null murine platelets, indicating that trypsin did not activate PAR3 to cause shape change. More interestingly, the Src family kinase (SFK) inhibitor PP2 abolished trypsin-induced, but not AYPGKF-induced, shape change. Hence, trypsin activated a novel signaling pathway through RhoA/p160ROCK and was regulated by SFKs. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a novel protease signaling pathway in platelets that is independent of PARs. This protease-induced novel signaling pathway regulates platelet shape change through SFKs and p160ROCK. PMID:24030758

  6. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  7. The m-AAA Protease Associated with Neurodegeneration Limits MCU Activity in Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    König, Tim; Tröder, Simon E; Bakka, Kavya; Korwitz, Anne; Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Lampe, Philipp A; Patron, Maria; Mühlmeister, Mareike; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Brandt, Ulrich; Decker, Thorsten; Lauria, Ines; Paggio, Angela; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rugarli, Elena I; De Stefani, Diego; Langer, Thomas

    2016-10-06

    Mutations in subunits of mitochondrial m-AAA proteases in the inner membrane cause neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA28) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP7). m-AAA proteases preserve mitochondrial proteostasis, mitochondrial morphology, and efficient OXPHOS activity, but the cause for neuronal loss in disease is unknown. We have determined the neuronal interactome of m-AAA proteases in mice and identified a complex with C2ORF47 (termed MAIP1), which counteracts cell death by regulating the assembly of the mitochondrial Ca 2+ uniporter MCU. While MAIP1 assists biogenesis of the MCU subunit EMRE, the m-AAA protease degrades non-assembled EMRE and ensures efficient assembly of gatekeeper subunits with MCU. Loss of the m-AAA protease results in accumulation of constitutively active MCU-EMRE channels lacking gatekeeper subunits in neuronal mitochondria and facilitates mitochondrial Ca 2+ overload, mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, and neuronal death. Together, our results explain neuronal loss in m-AAA protease deficiency by deregulated mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  9. Production, characterization, gene cloning, and nematocidal activity of the extracellular protease from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia N4.

    PubMed

    Jankiewicz, Urszula; Larkowska, Ewa; Swiontek Brzezinska, Maria

    2016-06-01

    A rhizosphere strain of the bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia N4 secretes the serine protease PN4, whose molecular mass is approximately 42 kDa. The optimal temperature for the enzyme activity of the 11-fold purified protein was 50°C and the optimal pH was 10.5. The activity of the enzyme was strongly inhibited by specific serine protease inhibitors, which allowed for its classification as an alkaline serine protease family. Ca(2+) ions stimulated the activity of the protease PN4, while Mg(2+) ions stabilized its activity, and Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) ions strongly inhibited its activity. The enzyme has broad substrate specificity. For example, it is able to hydrolyse casein, keratin, albumin, haemoglobin, and gelatin, as well as the insoluble modified substrates azure keratin and azocoll. The gene that encodes the 1740 bp precursor form of the enzyme (accession number: LC031815) was cloned. We then deduced that its amino acid sequence includes the region of the conserved domain of the S8 family of peptidases as well as the catalytic triad Asp/His/Ser. The bacterial culture fluid as well as the purified protease PN4 demonstrated biocidal activity with regard to the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and Panagrellus spp. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid Detection of Thrombin and Other Protease Activity Directly in Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Johnson Chung Sing

    Thrombin is a serine protease that plays a key role in the clotting cascade to promote hemostasis following injury to the endothelium. From a clinical diagnostic perspective, in-vivo thrombin activity is linked to various blood clotting disorders, as well as cardiovascular disease (DVT, arteriosclerosis, etc). Thus, the ability to rapidly measure protease activity directly in whole blood will provide important new diagnostics, and clinical researchers with a powerful tool to further elucidate the relationship between circulating protease levels and disease. The ultimate goal is to design novel point of care (POC) diagnostic devices that are capable of monitoring protease activities directly in whole blood and biological sample. A charge-changing substrate specific to the thrombin enzyme was engineered and its functionality was confirmed by a series of experiments. This led to the preliminary design, construction, and testing of two device platforms deemed fully functional for the electrophoretic separation and focusing of charged peptide fragments. The concept of using the existing charge-changing substrate platform for bacterial protease detection was also investigated. Certain strains of E coli are associated with severe symptoms such as abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and vomiting. The OmpT protease is expressed on the outer membrane of E coli and plays a role in the cleavage of antimicrobial peptides, the degradation of recombinant heterologous proteins, and the activation of plasminogen in the host. Thus, a synthetic peptide substrate specific to the OmpT protease was designed and modeled for the purpose of detecting E coli in biological sample.

  11. Pathomimetic cancer avatars for live-cell imaging of protease activity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Kyungmin; Heyza, Joshua; Cavallo-Medved, Dora; Sloane, Bonnie F

    2016-03-01

    Proteases are essential for normal physiology as well as multiple diseases, e.g., playing a causative role in cancer progression, including in tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Identification of dynamic alterations in protease activity may allow us to detect early stage cancers and to assess the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies. Despite the clinical importance of proteases in cancer progression, their functional roles individually and within the context of complex protease networks have not yet been well defined. These gaps in our understanding might be addressed with: 1) accurate and sensitive tools and methods to directly identify changes in protease activities in live cells, and 2) pathomimetic avatars for cancer that recapitulate in vitro the tumor in the context of its cellular and non-cellular microenvironment. Such avatars should be designed to facilitate mechanistic studies that can be translated to animal models and ultimately the clinic. Here, we will describe basic principles and recent applications of live-cell imaging for identification of active proteases. The avatars optimized by our laboratory are three-dimensional (3D) human breast cancer models in a matrix of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM). They are designated mammary architecture and microenvironment engineering (MAME) models as they have been designed to mimic the structural and functional interactions among cell types in the normal and cancerous human breast. We have demonstrated the usefulness of these pathomimetic avatars for following dynamic and temporal changes in cell:cell interactions and quantifying changes in protease activity associated with these interactions in real-time (4D). We also briefly describe adaptation of the avatars to custom-designed and fabricated tissue architecture and microenvironment engineering (TAME) chambers that enhance our ability to analyze concomitant changes in the malignant phenotype and the associated tumor microenvironment. Copyright

  12. Pathomimetic cancer avatars for live-cell imaging of protease activity

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Kyungmin; Heyza, Joshua; Cavallo-Medved, Dora; Sloane, Bonnie F.

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are essential for normal physiology as well as multiple diseases, e.g., playing a causative role in cancer progression, including in tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Identification of dynamic alterations in protease activity may allow us to detect early stage cancers and to assess the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies. Despite the clinical importance of proteases in cancer progression, their functional roles individually and within the context of complex protease networks have not yet been well defined. These gaps in our understanding might be addressed with: 1) accurate and sensitive tools and methods to directly identify changes in protease activities in live cells, and 2) pathomimetic avatars for cancer that recapitulate in vitro the tumor in the context of its cellular and non-cellular microenvironment. Such avatars should be designed to facilitate mechanistic studies that can be translated to animal models and ultimately the clinic. Here, we will describe basic principles and recent applications of live-cell imaging for identification of active proteases. The avatars optimized by our laboratory are three-dimensional (3D) human breast cancer models in a matrix of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM). They are designated mammary architecture and microenvironment engineering (MAME) models as they have been designed to mimic the structural and functional interactions among cell types in the normal and cancerous human breast. We have demonstrated the usefulness of these pathomimetic avatars for following dynamic and temporal changes in cell:cell interactions and quantifying changes in protease activity associated with these interactions in real-time (4D). We also briefly describe adaptation of the avatars to custom-designed and fabricated tissue architecture and microenvironment engineering (TAME) chambers that enhance our ability to analyze concomitant changes in the malignant phenotype and the associated tumor microenvironment. PMID

  13. Activity of protease-activated receptors in the human submucous plexus.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kerstin; Michel, Klaus; Krueger, Dagmar; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Ceyhan, Güralp Onur; Zeller, Florian; Kreis, Martin E; Schemann, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are expressed in the enteric nervous system. Excessive release of proteases has been reported in functional and inflammatory bowel diseases. Studies in several animal models indicate the involvement of neural PARs. We studied the actions of different PAR-activating peptides (AP) in the human submucous plexus and performed comparative studies in guinea pig submucous neurons. We used voltage- and calcium-sensitive dye recordings to study the effects of PAR1-AP, PAR2-AP, PAR4-AP, the PAR1 activator thrombin, and the PAR2 activator tryptase on neurons and glia in human and guinea pig submucous plexus. Human preparations were derived from surgical resections. Levels of mucosal secretion evoked by PAR-APs were measured in Ussing chambers. PAR1-AP and thrombin evoked a prominent spike discharge and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca](i)) transients in most human submucous neurons and glia. PAR2-AP, tryptase, and PAR4-AP caused significantly weaker responses in a minor population. In contrast, PAR2-AP evoked much stronger responses in enteric neurons and glia of guinea pigs than did PAR1-AP or PAR4-AP. PAR1-AP, but not PAR2-AP or PAR4-AP, evoked a nerve-mediated secretion in human epithelium. The PAR1 antagonist SCH79797 inhibited the PAR1-AP, and thrombin evoked responses on neurons, glia, and epithelial secretion. In the submucous layer of human intestine, but not guinea pig intestine, PAR2-AP evoked [Ca](i) signals in CD68(+) macrophages. In the human submucous plexus, PAR1, rather than PAR2 or PAR4, activates nerves and glia. These findings indicate that PAR1 should be the focus of future studies on neural PAR-mediated actions in the human intestine; PAR1 might be developed as a therapeutic target for gastrointestinal disorders associated with increased levels of proteases. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Activation of Influenza A Viruses by Host Proteases from Swine Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Peitsch, Catharina; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are important natural hosts of influenza A viruses, and due to their susceptibility to swine, avian, and human viruses, they may serve as intermediate hosts supporting adaptation and genetic reassortment. Cleavage of the influenza virus surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. Most influenza viruses, including human and swine viruses, are activated at a monobasic HA cleavage site, and we previously identified TMPRSS2 and HAT to be relevant proteases present in human airways. We investigated the proteolytic activation of influenza viruses in primary porcine tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells (PTEC and PBEC, respectively). Human H1N1 and H3N2 viruses replicated efficiently in PTECs and PBECs, and viruses containing cleaved HA were released from infected cells. Moreover, the cells supported the proteolytic activation of HA at the stage of entry. We found that swine proteases homologous to TMPRSS2 and HAT, designated swTMPRSS2 and swAT, respectively, were expressed in several parts of the porcine respiratory tract. Both proteases cloned from primary PBECs were shown to activate HA with a monobasic cleavage site upon coexpression and support multicycle replication of influenza viruses. swAT was predominantly localized at the plasma membrane, where it was present as an active protease that mediated activation of incoming virus. In contrast, swTMPRSS2 accumulated in the trans-Golgi network, suggesting that it cleaves HA in this compartment. In conclusion, our data show that HA activation in porcine airways may occur by similar proteases and at similar stages of the viral life cycle as in human airways. PMID:24155384

  15. Alternaria-derived serine protease activity drives IL-33-mediated asthma exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Snelgrove, Robert J; Gregory, Lisa G; Peiró, Teresa; Akthar, Samia; Campbell, Gaynor A; Walker, Simone A; Lloyd, Clare M

    2014-09-01

    The fungal allergen Alternaria alternata is implicated in severe asthma and rapid onset life-threatening exacerbations of disease. However, the mechanisms that underlie this severe pathogenicity remain unclear. We sought to investigate the mechanism whereby Alternaria was capable of initiating severe, rapid onset allergic inflammation. IL-33 levels were quantified in wild-type and ST2(-/-) mice that lacked the IL-33 receptor given inhaled house dust mite, cat dander, or Alternaria, and the effect of inhibiting allergen-specific protease activities on IL-33 levels was assessed. An exacerbation model of allergic airway disease was established whereby mice were sensitized with house dust mite before subsequently being challenged with Alternaria (with or without serine protease activity), and inflammation, remodeling, and lung function assessed 24 hours later. Alternaria, but not other common aeroallergens, possessed intrinsic serine protease activity that elicited the rapid release of IL-33 into the airways of mice through a mechanism that was dependent upon the activation of protease activated receptor-2 and adenosine triphosphate signaling. The unique capacity of Alternaria to drive this early IL-33 release resulted in a greater pulmonary inflammation by 24 hours after challenge relative to the common aeroallergen house dust mite. Furthermore, this Alternaria serine protease-IL-33 axis triggered a rapid, augmented inflammation, mucus release, and loss of lung function in our exacerbation model. Alternaria-specific serine protease activity causes rapid IL-33 release, which underlies the development of a robust TH2 inflammation and exacerbation of allergic airway disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA G-Wire Formation Using an Artificial Peptide is Controlled by Protease Activity.

    PubMed

    Usui, Kenji; Okada, Arisa; Sakashita, Shungo; Shimooka, Masayuki; Tsuruoka, Takaaki; Nakano, Shu-Ichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Mashima, Tsukasa; Katahira, Masato; Hamada, Yoshio

    2017-11-16

    The development of a switching system for guanine nanowire (G-wire) formation by external signals is important for nanobiotechnological applications. Here, we demonstrate a DNA nanostructural switch (G-wire <--> particles) using a designed peptide and a protease. The peptide consists of a PNA sequence for inducing DNA to form DNA-PNA hybrid G-quadruplex structures, and a protease substrate sequence acting as a switching module that is dependent on the activity of a particular protease. Micro-scale analyses via TEM and AFM showed that G-rich DNA alone forms G-wires in the presence of Ca 2+ , and that the peptide disrupted this formation, resulting in the formation of particles. The addition of the protease and digestion of the peptide regenerated the G-wires. Macro-scale analyses by DLS, zeta potential, CD, and gel filtration were in agreement with the microscopic observations. These results imply that the secondary structure change (DNA G-quadruplex <--> DNA/PNA hybrid structure) induces a change in the well-formed nanostructure (G-wire <--> particles). Our findings demonstrate a control system for forming DNA G-wire structures dependent on protease activity using designed peptides. Such systems hold promise for regulating the formation of nanowire for various applications, including electronic circuits for use in nanobiotechnologies.

  17. Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin(HA)/protease: An extracellular metalloprotease with multiple pathogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Jorge A; Silva, Anisia J

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae of serogroup O1 and O139, the etiological agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, expresses the extracellular Zn-dependent metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease also reported as vibriolysin. This enzyme is also produced by non-O1/O139 (non-cholera) strains that cause mild, sporadic illness (i.e. gastroenteritis, wound or ear infections). Orthologs of HA/protease are present in other members of the Vibrionaceae family pathogenic to humans and fish. HA/protease belongs to the M4 neutral peptidase family and displays significant amino acid sequence homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (LasB) and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus thermolysin. It exhibits a broad range of potentially pathogenic activities in cell culture and animal models. These activities range from the covalent modification of other toxins, the degradation of the protective mucus barrier and disruption of intestinal tight junctions. Here we review (i) the structure and regulation of HA/protease expression, (ii) its interaction with other toxins and the intestinal mucosa and (iii) discuss the possible role(s) of HA/protease in the pathogenesis of cholera. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin(HA)/protease: an extracellular metalloprotease with multiple pathogenic activities

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Jorge A.; Silva, Anisia J.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae of serogroup O1 and O139, the etiological agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, expresses the extracellular Zn-dependent metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease also reported as vibriolysin. This enzyme is also produced by non-O1/O139 (non-cholera) strains that cause mild, sporadic illness (i.e. gastroenteritis, wound or ear infections). Orthologs of HA/protease are present in other members of the Vibrionaceae family pathogenic to humans and fish. HA/protease belongs to the M4 neutral peptidase family and displays significant amino acid sequence homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (LasB) and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus thermolysin. It exhibits a broad range of potentially pathogenic activities in cell culture and animal models. These activities range from the covalent modification of other toxins, the degradation of the protective mucus barrier and disruption of intestinal tight junctions. Here we review (i) the structure and regulation of HA/protease expression, (ii) its interaction with other toxins and the intestinal mucosa and (iii) discuss the possible role(s) of HA/protease in the pathogenesis of cholera. PMID:26952544

  19. Exploring the activity of tobacco etch virus protease in detergent solutions.

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Anna-Karin; van den Berg, Susanne; Hebert, Hans; Berglund, Helena; Eshaghi, Said

    2008-11-01

    Tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease is generally used to remove affinity tags from target proteins. It has been reported that some detergents inhibit the activity of this protease, and therefore should be avoided when removing affinity tags from membrane proteins. The aim of this study was to explore and evaluate this further. Hence, affinity tag removal with TEV protease was tested from three membrane proteins (a Pgp synthase and two CorA homologs) in the presence of 16 different detergents commonly used in membrane protein purification and crystallization. We observed that in the presence of the same detergent (Triton X-100), TEV protease could remove the affinity tag completely from one protein (CorA) but not from another protein (Pgp synthase). There was also a large variation in yield of cleaved membrane protein in different detergents, which probably depends on features of the protein-detergent complex. These observations show that, contrary to an earlier report, detergents do not inhibit the enzymatic activity of the TEV protease.

  20. Anti-trypanosomal activity of non-peptidic nitrile-based cysteine protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Burtoloso, Antonio C. B.; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Furber, Mark; Gomes, Juliana C.; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W.; Leitão, Andrei; Quilles, José Carlos; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.

    2017-01-01

    The cysteine protease cruzipain is considered to be a validated target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Chagas disease. Anti-trypanosomal activity against the CL Brener strain of T. cruzi was observed in the 0.1 μM to 1 μM range for three nitrile-based cysteine protease inhibitors based on two scaffolds known to be associated with cathepsin K inhibition. The two compounds showing the greatest potency against the trypanosome were characterized by EC50 values (0.12 μM and 0.25 μM) that were an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding Ki values measured against cruzain, a recombinant form of cruzipain, in an enzyme inhibition assay. This implies that the anti-trypanosomal activity of these two compounds may not be explained only by the inhibition of the cruzain enzyme, thereby triggering a putative polypharmacological profile towards cysteine proteases. PMID:28222138

  1. Molecular cloning, over expression, and activity studies of a peptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitor: designed synthetic gene to functional recombinant peptide.

    PubMed

    Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Umasankar, Perunthottathu K; Patole, Milind S; Rao, Mala

    2010-01-01

    The aspartic protease inhibitor (ATBI) purified from a Bacillus sp. is a potent inhibitor of several proteases including recombinant HIV-1 protease, pepsin, and fungal aspartic protease. In this study, we report the cloning, and over expression of a synthetic gene coding for ATBI in Escherichia coli and establish a purification protocol. The ATBI molecule consists of eleven amino acids and is peptidic in nature. We used the peptide sequence data of ATBI to synthesize complementary oligonucleotides, which were annealed and subsequently cloned in-frame with the gene for glutathione-S-transferase (GST). The expression of the resulting fusion protein was induced in E. coli BL21-A1 cells using arabinose. The recombinant peptide was purified using a reduced glutathione column, and cleaved with Factor Xa to remove the GST tag. The resultant product was further purified to homogeneity using RP-HPLC. Mass spectroscopy analysis revealed that the purified peptide had a molecular weight of 1186Da which matches the theoretical molecular weight of the amino acids present in the synthetic gene. The recombinant peptide was found to be active in vitro against HIV-1 protease, pepsin, and fungal aspartic protease. The protocol described in this study may be used to clone pharmaceutically important peptide molecules.

  2. Silver-Stained Fibrin Zymography: Separation of Proteases and Activity Detection Using a Single Substrate-Containing Gel.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Su; Kang, Dae-Ook; Choi, Nack-Shick

    2017-01-01

    Silver-stained fibrin zymography for separation of protease bands and activity detection using a single substrate gel was designed. The method takes advantage of the nano-scale sensitivity of both zymography and silver staining. After sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in a gel containing fibrin (protease substrate), the gel was incubated in enzyme reaction buffer and the zymogram gel was silver-stained. Bands with protease activity were stained with silver in clear areas where the protein substrate had been degraded. The molecular sizes of proteases were accurately determined.

  3. Silver-stained fibrin zymography: separation of proteases and activity detection using a single substrate-containing gel.

    PubMed

    Chung, Dong-Min; Kim, Ki Eun; Ahn, Keug-Hyun; Park, Chan-Sun; Kim, Dong-Ho; Koh, Hong Bum; Chun, Hyo Kon; Yoon, Byung-Dae; Kim, Hong Jib; Kim, Min-Soo; Choi, Nack-Shick

    2011-08-01

    A new zymogram method, silver-stained fibrin zymography, for separation of protease bands and activity detection using a single substrate gel, was developed. The method takes advantage of the nanoscale sensitivity of both zymography and silver staining. After SDS-PAGE in a gel containing fibrin, the gel was incubated in enzyme reaction buffer and the zymogram was silver-stained. Bands with protease activity were stained with silver in clear areas where the protein substrate had been degraded. The molecular sizes of proteases were accurately determined. Furthermore, proteases of high molecular weight were clearly and sharply resolved.

  4. Genome Wide Mapping of Peptidases in Rhodnius prolixus: Identification of Protease Gene Duplications, Horizontally Transferred Proteases and Analysis of Peptidase A1 Structures, with Considerations on Their Role in the Evolution of Hematophagy in Triatominae

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Bianca S.; Gomes, Bruno; da Costa, Samara G.; Moraes, Caroline da Silva; Mesquita, Rafael D.; Dillon, Viv M.; Garcia, Eloi de Souza; Azambuja, Patricia; Dillon, Roderick J.; Genta, Fernando A.

    2017-01-01

    Triatominae is a subfamily of the order Hemiptera whose species are able to feed in the vertebrate blood (i.e., hematophagy). This feeding behavior presents a great physiological challenge to insects, especially in Hemipteran species with a digestion performed by lysosomal-like cathepsins instead of the more common trypsin-like enzymes. With the aim of having a deeper understanding of protease involvement in the evolutionary adaptation for hematophagy in Hemipterans, we screened peptidases in the Rhodnius prolixus genome and characterized them using common blast (NCBI) and conserved domain analyses (HMMER/blast manager software, FAT, plus PFAM database). We compared the results with available sequences from other hemipteran species and with 18 arthropod genomes present in the MEROPS database. Rhodnius prolixus contains at least 433 protease coding genes, belonging to 71 protease families. Seven peptidase families in R. prolixus presented higher gene numbers when compared to other arthropod genomes. Further analysis indicated that a gene expansion of the protease family A1 (Eukaryotic aspartyl protease, PF00026) might have played a major role in the adaptation to hematophagy since most of these peptidase genes seem to be recently acquired, are expressed in the gut and present putative secretory pathway signal peptides. Besides that, most R. prolixus A1 peptidases showed high frequencies of basic residues at the protein surface, a typical structural signature of Cathepsin D-like proteins. Other peptidase families expanded in R. prolixus (i.e., C2 and M17) also presented significant differences between hematophagous (higher number of peptidases) and non-hematophagous species. This study also provides evidence for gene acquisition from microorganisms in some peptidase families in R. prolixus: (1) family M74 (murein endopeptidase), (2) family S29 (Hepatitis C virus NS3 protease), and (3) family S24 (repressor LexA). This study revealed new targets for studying the

  5. Post-secretional activation of Protease IV by quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jungmin; Li, Xi-Hui; Kim, Soo-Kyong; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2017-06-30

    Protease IV (PIV), a key virulence factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a secreted lysyl-endopeptidase whose expression is induced by quorum sensing (QS). We found that PIV expressed in QS mutant has severe reduction of activity in culture supernatant (CS), even though it is overexpressed to high level. PIV purified from the QS mutant (M-PIV) had much lower activity than the PIV purified from wild type (P-PIV). We found that the propeptide cleaved from prepro-PIV was co-purified with M-PIV, but never with P-PIV. Since the activity of M-PIV was restored by adding the CS of QS-positive and PIV-deficient strain, we hypothesized that the propeptide binds to and inhibits PIV, and is degraded to activate PIV by a QS-dependent factor. In fact, the CS of the QS-positive and PIV-deficient strain was able to degrade the propeptide. Since the responsible factor should be a QS-dependently expressed extracellular protease, we tested QS-dependent proteases of P. aeruginosa and found that LasB (elastase) can degrade the propeptide and activate M-PIV. We purified the propeptide of PIV and confirmed that the propeptide can bind to and inhibit PIV. We suggest that PIV is post-secretionally activated through the extracellular degradation of the propeptide by LasB, a QS-dependent protease.

  6. Comparative analysis of procoagulant and fibrinogenolytic activity of crude protease fractions of turmeric species.

    PubMed

    Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Nafeesa, Zohara; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-08-22

    Turmeric rhizome is a traditional herbal medicine, which has been widely used as a remedy to stop bleeding on fresh cuts and for wound healing by the rural and tribal population of India. To validate scientific and therapeutic application of turmeric rhizomes to stop bleeding on fresh cuts and its role in wound healing process. The water extracts of thoroughly scrubbed and washed turmeric rhizomes viz., Curcuma aromatica Salisb., Curcuma longa L., Curcuma caesia Roxb., Curcuma amada Roxb. and Curcuma zedoria (Christm.) Roscoe. were subjected to salting out and dialysis. The dialyzed crude enzyme fractions (CEFs) were assessed for proteolytic activity using casein as substrate and were also confirmed by caseinolytic zymography. Its coagulant activity and fibrinogenolytic activity were assessed using human citrated plasma and fibrinogen, respectively. The type of protease(s) in CEFs was confirmed by inhibition studies using specific protease inhibitors. The CEFs of C. aromatica, C. longa and C. caesia showed 1.89, 1.21 and 1.07 folds higher proteolytic activity, respectively, compared to papain. In contrast to these, C. amada and C. zedoria exhibited moderate proteolytic activity. CEFs showed low proteolytic activities compared to trypsin. The proteolytic activities of CEFs were confirmed by caseinolytic zymography. The CEFs of C. aromatica, C. longa and C. caesia showed complete hydrolysis of Aα, Bβ and γ subunits of human fibrinogen, while C. amada and C. zedoria showed partial hydrolysis. The CEFs viz., C. aromatica, C. longa, C. caesia, C. amada and C. zedoria exhibited strong procoagulant activity by reducing the human plasma clotting time from 172s (Control) to 66s, 84s 88s, 78s and 90s, respectively. The proteolytic activity of C. aromatica, C. longa, C. caesia and C. amada was inhibited (>82%) by PMSF, suggesting the possible presence of a serine protease(s). However, C. zedoria showed significant inhibition (60%) against IAA and moderate inhibition (30

  7. Activity of calcium activated protease in skeletal muscles and its changes in atrophy and stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Nagainis, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The reduction of protein content in skeletal muscle undergoing disuse-induced atrophy is correlated with accelerated rates of protein degradation and reduced rates of protein synthesis (Goldspink, 1977). It is not known in what manner myofibers are partially disassembled during disuse atrophy to fibers of smaller diameter; nor is it known which proteases are responsible for this morphological change in contractile protein mass. Dayton and colleagues (1975) have suggested that the Ca(2+)-activated protease (CaP) may initiate myofibril degradation. The discovery of a form of CaP that is activatable by nano-molar concentrations of Ca(2+) indicates that CaP activity may be regulated by physiological concentrations of Ca(2+) (Mellgren, 1980). The enhancement of proteolysis by the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, reported by Etlinger (1979), is consistent with a significant role for CaP in protein degradation. It was of interest, therefore, to measure the levels of CaP activity and the CaP inhibitor in extracts obtained from skeletal muscles of rat and chicken limbs undergoing disuse atrophy or stretch hypertrophy, respectively.

  8. Activity and expression of Candida glabrata vacuolar proteases in autophagy-like conditions.

    PubMed

    Cortez-Sánchez, J Luis; Cortés-Acosta, Elías; Cueto-Hernández, V Mónica; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Ibarra, J Antonio

    2018-03-01

    Candida glabrata is an emerging opportunistic pathogen that has intrinsic resistance to azoles. During infection or while living as a commensal, it encounters nutritional stresses such as deficiency of carbon or nitrogen sources. Herein, we investigate the expression and activity of PrA, Ape1, Ape3 and CpY vacuolar proteases during these stressful nutrimental conditions. Our findings demonstrate a differential activity profile depending on the addition or lack of carbon, nitrogen or both. Of the four proteases tested, PrA and Ape3 showed a higher activity in the absence of nitrogen. Steady-state RNA levels for all the proteases were also differentially expressed although not always correlated with its activity, suggesting multiple levels of regulation. Microscopy observations of C. glabrata cells subjected to the different conditions showed an increase in the vacuolar volume. Moreover, the presence of ATG8-PE and an increased expression of ATG8 were observed in the yeast under the tested conditions suggesting that C. glabrata is in autophagy stage. Taken together, our results showed that PrA, Ape1, Ape3 and CpY have varying activities and expression depending on whether nitrogen or carbon is added to the media, and that these vacuolar proteases might have a role in the autophagy process.

  9. Protease-activated receptor 2, a receptor involved in melanosome transfer, is upregulated in human skin by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Scott, G; Deng, A; Rodriguez-Burford, C; Seiberg, M; Han, R; Babiarz, L; Grizzle, W; Bell, W; Pentland, A

    2001-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the protease-activated receptor 2 is involved in skin pigmentation through increased phagocytosis of melanosomes by keratinocytes. Ultraviolet irradiation is a potent stimulus for melanosome transfer. We show that protease-activated receptor 2 expression in human skin is upregulated by ultraviolet irradiation. Subjects with skin type I, II, or III were exposed to two or three minimal erythema doses of irradiation from a solar simulator. Biopsies were taken from nonexposed and irradiated skin 24 and 96 h after irradiation and protease-activated receptor 2 expression was detected using immunohistochemical staining. In nonirradiated skin, protease-activated receptor 2 expression was confined to keratinocytes in the lower one-third of the epidermis. After ultraviolet irradiation protease-activated receptor 2 expression was observed in keratinocytes in the upper two-thirds of the epidermis or the entire epidermis at both time points studied. Subjects with skin type I showed delayed upregulation of protease-activated receptor 2 expression, however, compared with subjects with skin types II and III. Irradiated cultured human keratinocytes showed upregulation in protease-activated receptor 2 expression as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. Cell culture supernatants from irradiated keratinocytes also exhibited a dose-dependent increase in protease-activated receptor-2 cleavage activity. These results suggest an important role for protease-activated receptor-2 in pigmentation in vivo. Differences in protease-activated receptor 2 regulation in type I skin compared with skin types II and III suggest a potential mechanism for differences in tanning in subjects with different skin types.

  10. Nepenthesin Protease Activity Indicates Digestive Fluid Dynamics in Carnivorous Nepenthes Plants

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E.; Bikker, Floris J.; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory. PMID:25750992

  11. Nepenthesin protease activity indicates digestive fluid dynamics in carnivorous nepenthes plants.

    PubMed

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E; Bikker, Floris J; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory.

  12. Isolation of Mucorales from processed maize (Zea mays L.) and screening for protease activity

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo Santiago, André Luiz Cabral Monteiro; de Souza Motta, Cristina Maria

    2008-01-01

    Mucorales were isolated from maize flour, corn meal and cooked cornflakes using surface and depth plate methods. Rhizopus oryzae, Circinella muscae, Mucor subtilissimus, Mucor hiemalis f. hiemalis, Syncephalastrum racemosum, Rhizopus microsporus var. chinensis and Absidia cylindrospora showed protease activity. PMID:24031292

  13. Mucosal sensitization to German cockroach involves protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Page, Kristen; Ledford, John R; Zhou, Ping; Dienger, Krista; Wills-Karp, Marsha

    2010-05-24

    Allergic asthma is on the rise in developed countries. A common characteristic of allergens is that they contain intrinsic protease activity, and many have been shown to activate protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 in vitro. The role for PAR-2 in mediating allergic airway inflammation has not been assessed using a real world allergen. Mice (wild type or PAR-2-deficient) were sensitized to German cockroach (GC) feces (frass) or protease-depleted GC frass by either mucosal exposure or intraperitoneal injection and measurements of airway inflammation (IL-5, IL-13, IL-17A, and IFNgamma levels in the lung, serum IgE levels, cellular infiltration, mucin production) and airway hyperresponsiveness were performed. Following systemic sensitization, GC frass increased airway hyperresponsiveness, Th2 cytokine release, serum IgE levels, cellular infiltration and mucin production in wild type mice. Interestingly, PAR-2-deficient mice had similar responses as wild type mice. Since these data were in direct contrast to our finding that mucosal sensitization with GC frass proteases regulated airway hyperresponsiveness and mucin production in BALB/c mice (Page et. al. 2007 Resp Res 8:91), we backcrossed the PAR-2-deficient mice into the BALB/c strain. Sensitization to GC frass could now occur via the more physiologically relevant method of intratracheal inhalation. PAR-2-deficient mice had significantly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, Th2 and Th17 cytokine release, serum IgE levels, and cellular infiltration compared to wild type mice when sensitization to GC frass occurred through the mucosa. To confirm the importance of mucosal exposure, mice were systemically sensitized to GC frass or protease-depleted GC frass via intraperitoneal injection. We found that removal of proteases from GC frass had no effect on airway inflammation when administered systemically. We showed for the first time that allergen-derived proteases in GC frass elicit allergic airway inflammation via PAR-2

  14. Alternaria-derived serine protease activity drives IL-33–mediated asthma exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Snelgrove, Robert J.; Gregory, Lisa G.; Peiró, Teresa; Akthar, Samia; Campbell, Gaynor A.; Walker, Simone A.; Lloyd, Clare M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The fungal allergen Alternaria alternata is implicated in severe asthma and rapid onset life-threatening exacerbations of disease. However, the mechanisms that underlie this severe pathogenicity remain unclear. Objective We sought to investigate the mechanism whereby Alternaria was capable of initiating severe, rapid onset allergic inflammation. Methods IL-33 levels were quantified in wild-type and ST2−/− mice that lacked the IL-33 receptor given inhaled house dust mite, cat dander, or Alternaria, and the effect of inhibiting allergen-specific protease activities on IL-33 levels was assessed. An exacerbation model of allergic airway disease was established whereby mice were sensitized with house dust mite before subsequently being challenged with Alternaria (with or without serine protease activity), and inflammation, remodeling, and lung function assessed 24 hours later. Results Alternaria, but not other common aeroallergens, possessed intrinsic serine protease activity that elicited the rapid release of IL-33 into the airways of mice through a mechanism that was dependent upon the activation of protease activated receptor-2 and adenosine triphosphate signaling. The unique capacity of Alternaria to drive this early IL-33 release resulted in a greater pulmonary inflammation by 24 hours after challenge relative to the common aeroallergen house dust mite. Furthermore, this Alternaria serine protease–IL-33 axis triggered a rapid, augmented inflammation, mucus release, and loss of lung function in our exacerbation model. Conclusion Alternaria-specific serine protease activity causes rapid IL-33 release, which underlies the development of a robust TH2 inflammation and exacerbation of allergic airway disease. PMID:24636086

  15. Benzylamide antagonists of protease activated receptor 2 with anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Yau, Mei-Kwan; Liu, Ligong; Lim, Junxian; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Cotterell, Adam J; Suen, Jacky Y; Vesey, David A; Reid, Robert C; Fairlie, David P

    2016-02-01

    Activation of protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) has been implicated in inflammatory and metabolic disorders and its inhibition may yield novel therapeutics. Here, we report a series of PAR2 antagonists based on C-terminal capping of 5-isoxazolyl-L-cyclohexylalanine-L-isoleucine, with benzylamine analogues being effective new PAR2 antagonists. 5-Isoxazolyl-L-cyclohexylalanine-L-isoleucine-2-methoxybenzylamine (10) inhibited PAR2-, but not PAR1-, induced release of Ca(2+) (IC50 0.5 μM) in human colon cells, IL-6 and TNFα secretion (IC50 1-5 μM) from human kidney cells, and was anti-inflammatory in acute rat paw inflammation (ED50 5 mg/kg sc). These findings show that new benzylamide antagonists of PAR2 have anti-inflammatory activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intracellular Antiviral Activity of Low-Dose Ritonavir in Boosted Protease Inhibitor Regimens

    PubMed Central

    De Nicolò, Amedeo; Simiele, Marco; Calcagno, Andrea; Mohamed Abdi, Adnan; Bonora, Stefano; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Protease inhibitors are largely used for the treatment of HIV infection in combination with other antiretroviral drugs. Their improved pharmacokinetic profiles can be achieved through the concomitant administration of low doses of ritonavir (RTV), a protease inhibitor currently used as a booster, increasing the exposure of companion drugs. Since ritonavir-boosted regimens are associated with long-term adverse events, cobicistat, a CYP3A4 inhibitor without antiviral activity, has been developed. Recently, high intracellular concentrations of ritonavir in lymphocytes and monocytes were reported even when ritonavir was administered at low doses, so we aimed to compare its theoretical antiviral activity with those of the associated protease inhibitors. Intracellular concentrations of ritonavir and different protease inhibitors were determined through the same method. Inhibitory constants were obtained from the literature. The study enrolled 103 patients receiving different boosted protease inhibitors, darunavir-ritonavir 600 and 100 mg twice daily and 800 and 100 mg once daily (n = 22 and 4, respectively), atazanavir-ritonavir 300 and 100 mg once daily (n = 40), lopinavir-ritonavir 400 and 100 mg twice daily (n = 21), or tipranavir-ritonavir 500 and 200 mg twice daily (n = 16). According to the observed concentrations, we calculated the ratios between the intracellular concentrations of ritonavir and those of the companion protease inhibitor and between the theoretical viral protease reaction speeds with each drug, with and without ritonavir. The median ratios were 4.04 and 0.63 for darunavir-ritonavir twice daily, 2.49 and 0.74 for darunavir-ritonavir once daily, 0.42 and 0.74 for atazanavir-ritonavir, 0.57 and 0.95 for lopinavir-ritonavir, and 0.19 and 0.84 for tipranavir-ritonavir, respectively. Therefore, the antiviral effect of ritonavir was less than that of the concomitant protease inhibitors but, importantly, mostly with darunavir. Thus, further in vitro and in

  17. Activity, Specificity, and Probe Design for the Smallpox Virus Protease K7L*

    PubMed Central

    Aleshin, Alexander E.; Drag, Marcin; Gombosuren, Naran; Wei, Ge; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Satterthwait, Arnold C.; Strongin, Alex Y.; Liddington, Robert C.; Salvesen, Guy S.

    2012-01-01

    The K7L gene product of the smallpox virus is a protease implicated in the maturation of viral proteins. K7L belongs to protease Clan CE, which includes distantly related cysteine proteases from eukaryotes, pathogenic bacteria, and viruses. Here, we describe its recombinant high level expression, biochemical mechanism, substrate preference, and regulation. Earlier studies inferred that the orthologous I7L vaccinia protease cleaves at an AG-X motif in six viral proteins. Our data for K7L suggest that the AG-X motif is necessary but not sufficient for optimal cleavage activity. Thus, K7L requires peptides extended into the P7 and P8 positions for efficient substrate cleavage. Catalytic activity of K7L is substantially enhanced by homodimerization, by the substrate protein P25K as well as by glycerol. RNA and DNA also enhance cleavage of the P25K protein but not of synthetic peptides, suggesting that nucleic acids augment the interaction of K7L with its protein substrate. Library-based peptide preference analyses enabled us to design an activity-based probe that covalently and selectively labels K7L in lysates of transfected and infected cells. Our study thus provides proof-of-concept for the design of inhibitors and probes that may contribute both to a better understanding of the role of K7L in the virus life cycle and the design of novel anti-virals. PMID:23012361

  18. Activity, specificity, and probe design for the smallpox virus protease K7L.

    PubMed

    Aleshin, Alexander E; Drag, Marcin; Gombosuren, Naran; Wei, Ge; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Satterthwait, Arnold C; Strongin, Alex Y; Liddington, Robert C; Salvesen, Guy S

    2012-11-16

    The K7L gene product of the smallpox virus is a protease implicated in the maturation of viral proteins. K7L belongs to protease Clan CE, which includes distantly related cysteine proteases from eukaryotes, pathogenic bacteria, and viruses. Here, we describe its recombinant high level expression, biochemical mechanism, substrate preference, and regulation. Earlier studies inferred that the orthologous I7L vaccinia protease cleaves at an AG-X motif in six viral proteins. Our data for K7L suggest that the AG-X motif is necessary but not sufficient for optimal cleavage activity. Thus, K7L requires peptides extended into the P7 and P8 positions for efficient substrate cleavage. Catalytic activity of K7L is substantially enhanced by homodimerization, by the substrate protein P25K as well as by glycerol. RNA and DNA also enhance cleavage of the P25K protein but not of synthetic peptides, suggesting that nucleic acids augment the interaction of K7L with its protein substrate. Library-based peptide preference analyses enabled us to design an activity-based probe that covalently and selectively labels K7L in lysates of transfected and infected cells. Our study thus provides proof-of-concept for the design of inhibitors and probes that may contribute both to a better understanding of the role of K7L in the virus life cycle and the design of novel anti-virals.

  19. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparisonmore » of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.« less

  20. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  1. Protease and lipase activities of fungal and bacterial strains derived from an artisanal raw ewe's milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Ozturkoglu-Budak, Sebnem; Wiebenga, Ad; Bron, Peter A; de Vries, Ronald P

    2016-11-21

    We previously identified the microbiota present during cheese ripening and observed high protease and lipase activity in Divle Cave cheese. To determine the contribution of individual isolates to enzyme activities, we investigated a range of species representing this microbiota for their proteolytic and lipolytic ability. In total, 17 fungal, 5 yeast and 18 bacterial strains, previously isolated from Divle Cave cheese, were assessed. Qualitative protease and lipase activities were performed on skim-milk agar and spirit-blue lipase agar, respectively, and resulted in a selection of strains for quantitative assays. For the quantitative assays, the strains were grown on minimal medium containing irradiated Divle Cave cheese, obtained from the first day of ripening. Out of 16 selected filamentous fungi, Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium cavernicola and Penicillium olsonii showed the highest protease activity, while Mucor racemosus was the best lipase producer. Yarrowia lipolytica was the best performing yeast with respect to protease and lipase activity. From the 18 bacterial strains, 14 and 11 strains, respectively showed protease and lipase activity in agar plates. Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus stratosphericus, Brevibacterium antiquum, Psychrobacter glacincola and Pseudomonas proteolytica displayed the highest protease and lipase activity. The proteases of yeast and filamentous fungi were identified as mainly aspartic protease by specific inhibition with Pepstatin A, whereas inhibition by PMSF (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) indicated that most bacterial enzymes belong to serine type protease. Our results demonstrate that aspartic proteases, which usually have high milk clotting activity, are predominantly derived from fungal strains, and therefore fungal enzymes appear to be more suitable for use in the cheese industry. Microbial enzymes studied in this research might be alternatives for rennin (chymosin) from animal source because of their low cost and stable

  2. Role of enteric nerves in immune-mediated changes in protease activated receptor 2 effects on gut function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) are expressed on structural cells and immune cells. Control of the initiation, duration, and magnitude of the PAR effects are linked to the level of receptor expression, the availability of proteases, and the intracellular signal transduction machinery. We inve...

  3. Characterization and gene cloning of a novel serine protease with nematicidal activity from Trichoderma pseudokoningii SMF2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei-Lei; Liu, Li-Jun; Shi, Mei; Song, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Chang-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2009-10-01

    Trichoderma pseudokoningii SMF2 is a biocontrol fungus with inhibitory ability against phytopathogenic fungi. Here, a crude extract of strain SMF2 in a solid ferment exhibited strong nematicidal activity against Meloidogyne incognita, and a novel serine protease SprT with nematicidal activity was purified from the crude extract. Protease SprT has a molecular mass of 31 kDa, a pH optimum of 8.5, and a temperature optimum of 60-65 degrees C. It had good thermostability, and was stable in an alkaline environment. SprT could degrade bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, and gelatin, and its activity was enhanced by many metal ions. The cuticles of nematodes treated by protease SprT obviously crimpled. Purified protease SprT could kill juveniles of M. incognita and inhibit egg hatch, suggesting that it is involved in the nematicidal process of T. pseudokoningii SMF2. The full-length cDNA gene-encoding protease SprT was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Sequence analysis showed that SprT is a monodomain subtilase containing 284 amino acid residues. It had higher identities and a closer relation to the nematicidal serine proteases (59-69%) from nematode parasitic fungi than to the serine proteases (<50%) from Trichoderma. Protease SprT represents the first well-characterized subtilase with nematicidal activity from Trichoderma.

  4. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  5. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications.

  6. Biological wound matrices with native dermis-like collagen efficiently modulate protease activity.

    PubMed

    Tati, Ramesh; Nordin, Sara; Abdillahi, Suado M; Mörgelin, Matthias

    2018-04-02

    When the delicate balance between catabolic and anabolic processes is disturbed for any reason, the healing process can stall, resulting in chronic wounds. In chronic wound pathophysiology, proteolytic imbalance is implicated due to elevated protease levels mediating tissue damage. Hence, it is important to design appropriate wound treatments able to control and modulate protease activity directly at the host/biomaterial interface. Here, we investigate collagen-based wound dressings with the focus on their potential to adsorb and inactivate tissue proteases. We examined the effect of six collagen-based dressings on their ability to adsorb and inactivate different granulocyte proteases, plasmin, human neutrophil elastase (HLE), and matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-1, -2, -8, and -9, by an integrated approach including immunoelectron microscopy. We observed a reduction of the proteolytic activities of plasmin, HLE, and MMP-1, -2, -8, and -9, both on the biomaterial surface and in human chronic wound fluid. The most pronounced effect was observed in collagen-based dressings, with the highest content of native collagen networks resembling dermis structures. Our data suggest that this treatment strategy might be beneficial for the chronic wound environment, with the potential to promote improved wound healing.

  7. Soybean P34 Probable Thiol Protease Probably Has Proteolytic Activity on Oleosins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Luping; Kong, Xiangzhen; Zhang, Caimeng; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2017-07-19

    P34 probable thiol protease (P34) and Gly m Bd 30K (30K) show high relationship with the protease of 24 kDa oleosin of soybean oil bodies. In this study, 9 day germinated soybean was used to separate bioprocessed P34 (P32) from bioprocessed 30K (28K). Interestingly, P32 existed as dimer, whereas 28K existed as monomer; a P32-rich sample had proteolytic activity and high cleavage site specificity (Lys-Thr of 24 kDa oleosin), whereas a 28K-rich sample showed low proteolytic activity; the P32-rich sample contained one thiol protease. After mixing with purified oil bodies, all P32 dimers were dissociated and bound to 24 kDa oleosins to form P32-24 kDa oleosin complexes. By incubation, 24 kDa oleosin was preferentially hydrolyzed, and two hydrolyzed products (HPs; 17 and 7 kDa) were confirmed. After most of 24 kDa oleosin was hydrolyzed, some P32 existed as dimer, and the other as P32-17 kDa HP. It was suggested that P32 was the protease.

  8. Salmon trypsin stimulates the expression of interleukin-8 via protease-activated receptor-2

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Anett K.; Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Biology, University of Tromso, Tromso; Seternes, Ole-Morten

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we focus on salmon trypsin as an activator of inflammatory responses in airway cells in vitro. The rationale behind the investigation is that salmon industry workers are exposed to aerosols containing enzymes, which are generated during industrial processing of the fish. Knowing that serine proteases such as trypsin are highly active mediators with diverse biological activities, the stimulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) and interleukin (IL)-8 and the role of protease-activated receptors (PAR) in inflammatory signal mediation were investigated. Protease-activated receptors are considered important under pathological situations in the human airways, and a thorough understanding of PAR-inducedmore » cellular events and their consequences in airway inflammation is necessary. Human airway epithelial cells (A549) were exposed to trypsin isolated from fish (Salmo salar), and we observed that purified salmon trypsin could generate secretion of IL-8 in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PAR-2 activation by salmon trypsin is coupled to an induction of NF-{kappa}B-mediated transcription using a PAR-2 transfected HeLa cell model. Finally, we show that the release of IL-8 from A549 following stimulation with purified salmon trypsin is mediated through activation of PAR-2 using specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The results presented suggest that salmon trypsin, via activation of PAR-2, might influence inflammation processes in the airways if inhaled in sufficient amounts.« less

  9. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors.

  10. Expression and characterization of alkaline protease from the metagenomic library of tannery activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Devi, Selvaraju Gayathri; Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Sanitha, Mary; Iyappan, Sellamuthu; Curtis, Wayne R; Ramya, Mohandass

    2016-12-01

    Metagenomics has the potential to facilitate the discovery of novel enzymes; however, to date, only a few alkaline proteases have been characterized from environmentally-sourced DNA. We report the identification and characterization of an alkaline serine protease designated as Prt1A from the metagenomic library of tannery activated sludge. Sequence analysis revealed that Prt1A is closely related to S8A family subtilisins with a catalytic triad of Asp 143 , His 173, and Ser 326 . The putative protease gene (prt-1A) was subcloned in pET 28a (+) vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS cells. This 38.8 KDa recombinant protease was purified to homogeneity by nickel affinity chromatography and exhibited optimal enzyme activity at elevated pH (11.0) and temperature (55°C). The enzyme activity was enhanced by the addition of 5 mM Ca 2+ ions, and was stable in the presence of anionic detergent, oxidizing agent and various organic solvents. The enzyme displayed high affinity and catalytic efficiency for casein under standard assay conditions (V max  = 279 U/mg/min, K m  = 1.70 mg/mL) and was also compatible with commercial detergents. These results suggest that Prt1A protease could act as an efficient enzyme in various industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reactive Carbonyl Species Activate Caspase-3-Like Protease to Initiate Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Md Sanaullah; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered programmed cell death (PCD) is a typical plant response to biotic and abiotic stressors. We have recently shown that lipid peroxide-derived reactive carbonyl species (RCS), downstream products of ROS, mediate oxidative signal to initiate PCD. Here we investigated the mechanism by which RCS initiate PCD. Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cultured cells were treated with acrolein, one of the most potent RCS. Acrolein at 0.2 mM caused PCD in 5 h (i.e. lethal), but at 0.1 mM it did not (sublethal). Specifically, these two doses caused critically different effects on the cells. Both lethal and sublethal doses of acrolein exhausted the cellular glutathione pool in 30 min, while the lethal dose only caused a significant ascorbate decrease and ROS increase in 1-2 h. Prior to such redox changes, we found that acrolein caused significant increases in the activities of caspase-1-like protease (C1LP) and caspase-3-like protease (C3LP), the proteases which trigger PCD. The lethal dose of acrolein increased the C3LP activity 2-fold more than did the sublethal dose. In contrast, C1LP activity increments caused by the two doses were not different. Acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal, another RCS, activated both proteases in a cell-free extract from untreated cells. H 2 O 2 at 1 mM added to the cells increased C1LP and C3LP activities and caused PCD, and the RCS scavenger carnosine suppressed their activation and PCD. However, H 2 O 2 did not activate the proteases in a cell-free extract. Thus the activation of caspase-like proteases, particularly C3LP, by RCS is an initial biochemical event in oxidative signal-stimulated PCD in plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Non-active site changes elicit broad-based cross-resistance of the HIV-1 protease to inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olsen, D B; Stahlhut, M W; Rutkowski, C A; Schock, H B; vanOlden, A L; Kuo, L C

    1999-08-20

    Three high level, cross-resistant variants of the HIV-1 protease have been analyzed for their ability to bind four protease inhibitors approved by the Food and Drug Administration (saquinavir, ritonavir, indinavir, and nelfinavir) as AIDS therapeutics. The loss in binding energy (DeltaDeltaG(b)) going from the wild-type enzyme to mutant enzymes ranges from 2.5 to 4.4 kcal/mol, 40-65% of which is attributed to amino acid substitutions away from the active site of the protease and not in direct contact with the inhibitor. The data suggest that non-active site changes are collectively a major contributor toward engendering resistance against the protease inhibitor and cannot be ignored when considering cross-resistance issues of drugs against the HIV-1 protease.

  13. Selection of suitable detergents for obtaining an active dengue protease in its natural form from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liew, Lynette Sin Yee; Lee, Michelle Yueqi; Wong, Ying Lei; Cheng, Jinting; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-05-01

    Dengue protease is a two-component enzyme and is an important drug target against dengue virus. The protease activity and protein stability of dengue nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) require a co-factor region from a four-span membrane protein NS2B. A natural form of dengue protease containing full-length NS2B and NS3 protease domain NS2BFL-NS3pro will be useful for dengue drug discovery. In current study, detergents that can be used for protease purification were tested. Using a water soluble protease construct, 39 detergents were selected for both NS2B and NS2BFL-NS3pro purification. The results showed that 18 detergents were able to sustain the activity of the natural dengue protease and 11 detergents could be used for NS2B purification. The results obtained in this study will be useful for biochemical and biophysical studies on dengue protease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential Expression of Extracellular Lipase and Protease Activities of Mycelial and Yeast Forms in Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Juntachai, Weerapong; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    Malassezia furfur is a dimorphic yeast that is part of the human skin microflora. This fungus is a pathogen of a certain skin diseases, such as pityriasis versicolor, and in rare cases causes systemic infection in neonates. However, the role of dimorphism in the pathogenicity remains unclear. A modified induction medium (IM) was successfully able to induce mycelial growth of M. furfur under both solid and liquid condition. Filamentous elements with branching hyphae were observed when cultured in the IM. Furthermore, addition of bovine fetus serum into the liquid IM did not promote hyphal formation; on the contrary, it retrograded hyphae to the yeast form. Plate-washing assay showed that M. furfur hyphae did not possess the ability of invasive growth. Secretory proteins from both yeast and hyphal forms were isolated, and lipase and protease activities were analyzed. Intriguingly, the hyphal form showed higher activities than those of the yeast form, particularly the protease activity.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor from leaves of Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.

    PubMed

    Satheesh, L Shilpa; Murugan, K

    2011-05-01

    Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor isolated from Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt. has been reported. A 14.3 kDa protease inhibitor (PI) was isolated and purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation (20-85% saturation), sephadex G-75, DEAE sepharose column and trypsin-sepharose affinity chromatography from the leaves of C. grandis. The purity was checked by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. PI exhibited marked growth inhibitory effects on colon cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. PI was thermostable and showed antimicrobial activity without hemolytic activity. PI strongly inhibited pathogenic microbial strains, including Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Eschershia coli, Bacillus subtilis and pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, Mucor indicus, Penicillium notatum, Aspergillus flavus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Examination by bright field microscopy showed inhibition of mycelial growth and sporulation. Morphologically, PI treated fungus showed a significant shrinkage of hyphal tips. Reduced PI completely lost its activity indicating that disulfide bridge is essential for its protease inhibitory and antifungal activity. Results reported in this study suggested that PI may be an excellent candidate for development of novel oral or other anti-infective agents.

  16. Activation and inactivation of human factor X by proteases derived from Ficus carica.

    PubMed

    Richter, Günter; Schwarz, Hans Peter; Dorner, Friedrich; Turecek, Peter L

    2002-12-01

    We investigated the effect of proteases derived from Ficus carica (common fig) on human blood coagulation. The milky sap (latex) of several Ficus (F.) species contain ficin, which is a mixture of proteases. Ficin derived from Ficus carica shortened the activated partial thromboplastin time and the prothrombin time of normal plasmas and plasmas deficient in coagulation factors, except plasma deficient in factor X (FX) and generated activated FX (FXa) in defibrinated plasma. Chromatographic separation of ficin from Ficus carica yielded six proteolytic fractions with a different specificity towards FX. We isolated two factor X activators with molecular masses of 23.2 and 23.5 kDa, and studied their action on purified human FX. Factor X was converted to activated FXbeta by consecutive proteolytic cleavage in the heavy chain between Leu178 and Asp179, Arg187 and Gly188, and Arg194and Ile195 (FX numbering system) with concomitant release of a carboxy-terminal peptide. The cleavage pattern of FXa degradation products in the light chain was influenced by Ca2+ and Mn2+. These data suggest the haemostatic potency of Ficus proteases is based on activation of human coagulation factor X.

  17. Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Melittin and Its Protease-Activated Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallouk, Andrew Philip

    Melittin is a cytolytic peptide derived from honeybee venom which inserts into lipid membranes and oligomerizes to form membrane pores. While this peptide is an attractive candidate for treatment of cancers and infectious processes, its nonspecific cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity have limited its therapeutic applications. The goal of this dissertation was to enhance the specificity of melittin therapy through the use of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles to minimize nonspecific cytotoxicity and the development of melittin prodrugs which only exhibit cytolytic activity following activation by site-specific proteases. Although previous studies have characterized the biological effects of melittin-loaded nanoparticles following intravenous administration, we first investigated their use as topical agents for prevention of HIV infection. We found that incorporation of native melittin onto perfluorocarbon nanoparticles maintained antiviral activity while substantially reducing contact toxicity to sperm and vaginal epithelium. These results demonstrated the potential utility of melittin-loaded nanoparticles as a topical vaginal virucide. To further enhance melittin specificity, we developed melittin derivatives which could be activated by matrix metalloproteinase-9, a protease which is overexpressed in many tumors and which plays a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. We then characterized the interactions of these peptides with perfluorocarbon nanoparticles and demonstrated the safety and efficacy of intravenous prodrug-loaded nanoparticle therapy in a mouse model of melanoma. The versatility of this platform could facilitate development of personalized cancer therapies directed towards a patient's individual protease expression profile.

  18. Tobacco etch virus protease retains its activity in various buffers and in the presence of diverse additives.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changsheng; Liang, Jiongqiu; Shi, Rui; Gao, Xuna; Zhang, Ruijuan; Hong, Fulin; Yuan, Qihang; Wang, Shengbin

    2012-03-01

    Tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease is widely used to remove tags from recombinant fusion proteins because of its stringent sequence specificity. It is generally accepted that the high concentrations of salts or other special agents in most protein affinity chromatography buffers can affect enzyme activity, including that of TEV protease. Consequently, tedious desalination or the substitution of standard TEV reaction buffer for elution buffer are often needed to ensure TEV protease activity when removing fusion tags after purifying target proteins using affinity chromatography. To address this issue, we used SOE PCR technology to synthesize a TEV protease gene with a codon pattern adapted to the codon usage bias of Escherichia coli, recovered the purified recombinant TEV protease, and examined its activity in various elution buffers commonly used in affinity chromatography as well as the effects of selected additives on its activity. Our results showed that the rTEV protease maintained high activity in all affinity chromatography elution buffers tested and tolerated high concentrations of additives commonly used in protein purification procedures, such as ethylene glycol, EGTA, Triton X-100, Tween-20, NP-40, CHAPS, urea, SDS, guanidine hydrochloride and β-mercaptoethanol. These results will facilitate the use of rTEV protease in removing tags from fusion proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced permeation, leaf retention, and plant protease inhibitor activity with bicontinuous microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Dhaware, Deepika G; Khandelwal, Neha; Giri, Ashok P; Panchagnula, Venkateswarlu

    2012-10-01

    Bicontinuous microemulsions (BCMEs) have excellent solubulizing properties along with low interfacial tension and aqueous content that can be controlled. In this work, water soluble plant protease inhibitor (PI), well characterized for its activity against insect pests, was incorporated into a BCME system and explored for permeation on hydrophobic leaf surfaces and protease inhibition activity. The bicontinuous nature of the microemulsion containing water:2-propanol:1-butanol (55:35:10 w/w) was characterized using conductivity and self-diffusion coefficient measurements. The PI was soluble in the water-rich bicontinuous domains, stable in the microemulsions, and protease inhibition activity was retained for a prolonged duration. The microemulsions ensured greater wettability and a wider spread of the PI on hydrophobic leaf surfaces as revealed by contact angle measurements. Significantly, trypsin inhibition activity assays of the PI recovered from the leaves after delivery from the microemulsion indicated a significant increase in the PI retention on the leaf. This BCME enabled greater leaf permeation and retention of the PI can be attributed to a temporary disruption of the waxy leaf surface followed by self-repair without causing any long term damage to the plant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Single-site substitutions improve cold activity and increase thermostability of the dehairing alkaline protease (DHAP).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Yan; Wu, Li-Ying; Liu, Gang; Feng, Hong

    2016-12-01

    To engineer dehairing alkaline protease (DHAP) variants to improve cold activity and increase thermostability so these variants are suitable for the leather processing industry. Based on previous studies with bacterial alkaline proteases, double-site mutations (W106K/V149I and W106K/M124L) were introduced into the DHAP from Bacillus pumilus. Compared with the wild-type DHAP hydrolytic activity, the double-site variant W106K/V149I showed an increase in specific hydrolytic activity at 15 °C by 2.3-fold toward casein in terms of hydrolytic rate and 2.7-fold toward the synthetic peptide AAPF-pN by means of k cat /K m value. The thermostability of the variant (W106K/V149I) was improved with the half-life at 60 and 70 °C increased by 2.7- and 5.0-fold, respectively, when compared with the thermostability of the wild-type DHAP. Conclusively, an increase in the cold activity and thermostability of a bacterial alkaline protease was achieved by protein engineering.

  1. Synergistic Caseinolytic Activity and Differential Fibrinogenolytic Action of Multiple Proteases of Maclura spinosa (Roxb. ex Willd.) latex

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, B. K.; Achar, Raghu Ram; Sharanappa, P.; Priya, B. S.; Swamy, S. Nanjunda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kollamalayaali tribes of South India use latex of Maclura spinosa for milk curdling. This action is implicated to proteases which exhibit strong pharmacological potential in retardation of blood flow and acceleration of wound healing. Objective: To validate the presence of a proteolytic enzyme(s) in Maclura spinosa latex (MSL), and to investigate their probable role in hemostasis. Materials and Methods: Processed latex was examined for proteolytic and hemostatic activity using casein and human fibrinogen as substrates, respectively. Caseinoltyic activity was compared with two standard proteases viz., trypsin I and trypsin II. Effect of various standard protease inhibitors viz., iodoacetic acid (IAA), phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on both caseinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activities were examined. Electrophoretogram of fibrinogenolytic assays were subjected to densitometric analysis. Results: Proteolytic action of MSL was found to be highly efficient over trypsin I and trypsin II in dose-dependent caseinolytic activity (P < 0.05; specific activity of 1,080 units/mg protein). The Aα and Bβ bands of human fibrinogen were readily cleaved by MSL (for 1 μg crude protein and 30 min of incubation time). Furthermore, MSL cleaved γ subunit in dose- and time-dependent manner. Quantitative correlation of these results was obtained by densitometric analysis. The caseinolytic activity of MSL was inhibited by IAA, PMSF. While, only PMSF inhibited fibrinogenolytic activity. Conclusions: MSL contains proteolytic enzymes belonging to two distinct superfamilies viz., serine protease and cysteine proteases. The fibrinogenolytic activity of MSL is restricted to serine proteases only. The study extrapolates the use of M. spinosa latex from milk curdling to hemostasis. SUMMARY Proteolytic enzymes present in latex of Maclura spinosa can be assigned to two different protease superfamilies viz

  2. The Effect of Clade-Specific Sequence Polymorphisms on HIV-1 Protease Activity and Inhibitor Resistance Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Kolli, Madhavi; King, Nancy M.

    2010-09-08

    The majority of HIV-1 infections around the world result from non-B clade HIV-1 strains. The CRF01{_}AE (AE) strain is seen principally in Southeast Asia. AE protease differs by {approx}10% in amino acid sequence from clade B protease and carries several naturally occurring polymorphisms that are associated with drug resistance in clade B. AE protease has been observed to develop resistance through a nonactive-site N88S mutation in response to nelfinavir (NFV) therapy, whereas clade B protease develops both the active-site mutation D30N and the nonactive-site mutation N88D. Structural and biochemical studies were carried out with wild-type and NFV-resistant clade B andmore » AE protease variants. The relationship between clade-specific sequence variations and pathways to inhibitor resistance was also assessed. AE protease has a lower catalytic turnover rate than clade B protease, and it also has weaker affinity for both NFV and darunavir (DRV). This weaker affinity may lead to the nonactive-site N88S variant in AE, which exhibits significantly decreased affinity for both NFV and DRV. The D30N/N88D mutations in clade B resulted in a significant loss of affinity for NFV and, to a lesser extent, for DRV. A comparison of crystal structures of AE protease shows significant structural rearrangement in the flap hinge region compared with those of clade B protease and suggests insights into the alternative pathways to NFV resistance. In combination, our studies show that sequence polymorphisms within clades can alter protease activity and inhibitor binding and are capable of altering the pathway to inhibitor resistance.« less

  3. Fibroblast Activation Protein-Alpha, a Serine protease that Facilitates Metastasis by Modification of Diverse Microenvironments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    insulin by prolonging the half life of glucagon like peptide- 1 ( GLP - Tumor growth is promoted by catalytically-inactive FAP 5 1 ) and glucose... 1 -0589 TITLE: Fibroblast activation protein-alpha, a serine protease that facilitates metastasis by modification of diverse...for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data

  4. Biocontrol activity of an alkaline serine protease from Aureobasidium pullulans expressed in Pichia pastoris against four postharvest pathogens on apple.

    PubMed

    Banani, Houda; Spadaro, Davide; Zhang, Dianpeng; Matic, Slavica; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2014-07-16

    The yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans PL5 is a microbial antagonist against postharvest pathogens of fruits. The strain is able to produce hydrolases, including glucanases, chitinases and proteases. The alkaline serine protease gene ALP5 from A. pullulans was cloned, inserted into the vector pPIC9 to construct pPIC9/ALP5, and then expressed in Pichia pastoris strain KM71. ALP5 had a molecular mass of 42.9kDa after 5days growth with 1% methanol induction at 28°C. The recombinant protease expressed in P. pastoris showed its highest activity under alkaline conditions (at pH10) and a temperature of 50°C. The antifungal activity of the recombinant protease was investigated against Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea, Monilinia fructicola and Alternaria alternata in vitro and on apple. The recombinant protease reduced significantly the spore germination and the germ tube length of the tested pathogens in PDB medium. The highest level of protease efficacy was observed against M. fructicola and B. cinerea, whereas a lower efficacy was observed against P. expansum and A. alternata indicating a possible effect of the pathogen cell wall composition on the proteolytic activity of the recombinant protease. The presence of protease was able to cause the swelling of the hyphae of B. cinerea, under an optical microscope. The recombinant protease expressed in P. pastoris was more active against the pathogens in vitro than the same enzyme expressed in E. coli in previous studies. The efficacy of ALP5 was also evaluated against the pathogens in vivo on cv Golden Delicious apples. The protease was more efficient in controlling M. fructicola, B. cinerea and P. expansum than A. alternata. However, the extent of the activity was dependent on the enzyme concentration and the length of fruit storage. This study demonstrated the capacity of the alkaline serine protease to keep its enzymatic activity for some days in the unfavorable environment of the fruit wounds. The alkaline

  5. The Zinc-Dependent Protease Activity of the Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Lebeda, Frank J.; Cer, Regina Z.; Mudunuri, Uma; Stephens, Robert; Singh, Bal Ram; Adler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT, serotypes A-G) are some of the most toxic proteins known and are the causative agents of botulism. Following exposure, the neurotoxin binds and enters peripheral cholinergic nerve endings and specifically and selectively cleaves one or more SNARE proteins to produce flaccid paralysis. This review centers on the kinetics of the Zn-dependent proteolytic activities of these neurotoxins, and briefly describes inhibitors, activators and factors underlying persistence of toxin action. Some of the structural, enzymatic and inhibitor data that are discussed here are available at the botulinum neurotoxin resource, BotDB (http://botdb.abcc.ncifcrf.gov). PMID:22069621

  6. Discovery of novel cyclic peptide inhibitors of dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease with antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Youhei; Matsui, Kouhei; Nobori, Haruaki; Maeda, Haruka; Sato, Akihiko; Kurosu, Takeshi; Orba, Yasuko; Sawa, Hirofumi; Hattori, Kazunari; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2017-08-01

    NS2B-NS3 protease is an essential enzyme for the replication of dengue virus (DENV), which continues to be a serious threat to worldwide public health. We designed and synthesized a series of cyclic peptides mimicking the substrates of this enzyme, and assayed their activity against the DENV-2 NS2B-NS3 protease. The introduction of aromatic residues at the appropriate positions and conformational restriction generated the most promising cyclic peptide with an IC 50 of 0.95μM against NS2B-NS3 protease. Cyclic peptides with proper positioning of additional arginines and aromatic residues exhibited antiviral activity against DENV. Furthermore, replacing the C-terminal amide bond of the polybasic amino acid sequence with an amino methylene moiety stabilized the cyclic peptides against hydrolysis by NS2B-NS3 protease, while maintaining their enzyme inhibitory activity and antiviral activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Activation of the Arabidopsis membrane-bound transcription factor bZIP28 is mediated by site-2 protease, but not site-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yuji; Ashida, Makoto; Hasegawa, Chisa; Tabara, Kazuki; Mishiba, Kei-Ichiro; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2017-08-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a homeostatic cellular response conserved in eukaryotic cells to alleviate the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Arabidopsis bZIP28 is a membrane-bound transcription factor activated by proteolytic cleavage in response to ER stress, thereby releasing its cytosolic portion containing the bZIP domain from the membrane to translocate into the nucleus where it induces the transcription of genes encoding ER-resident molecular chaperones and folding enzymes. It has been widely recognized that the proteolytic activation of bZIP28 is mediated by the sequential cleavage of site-1 protease (S1P) and site-2 protease (S2P). In the present study we provide evidence that bZIP28 protein is cleaved by S2P, but not by S1P. We demonstrated that wild-type and s1p mutant plants produce the active, nuclear form of bZIP28 in response to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin. In contrast, tunicamycin-treated s2p mutants do not accumulate the active, nuclear form of bZIP28. Consistent with these observations, s2p mutants, but not s1p mutants, exhibited a defective transcriptional response of ER stress-responsive genes and significantly higher sensitivity to tunicamycin. Interestingly, s2p mutants accumulate two membrane-bound bZIP28 fragments with a shorter ER lumen-facing C-terminal domain. Importantly, the predicted cleavage sites are located far from the canonical S1P recognition motif previously described. We propose that ER stress-induced proteolytic activation of bZIP28 is mediated by the sequential actions of as-yet-unidentified protease(s) and S2P, and does not require S1P. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Protease-activated receptors and their biological role - focused on skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Florian; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-12-01

    For several years, protease-activated receptors (PARs) are targets of science regarding to various diseases and platelet aggregation. In the past, a number of publications related to PARs have been published, which refer to a variety of aspects. An important point of view is the inflammation of the skin, which has not been reported in detail yet. This review will provide an overview of the current knowledge on PARs, and in particular, on the involvement of PARs in terms of skin inflammation. Wound healing is an important step after skin injury and is connected with involvement of PARs and inflammation. An important point in skin inflammation is the coagulation-dependent skin inflammation. PARs are a special kind of receptors, being activated by proteolytic cleavage or chemical agonists. They may play an important role in various physiological processes. It is shown that the proteases are involved in many diseases for example Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The fact, that proteases regulate the coagulation, and are involved in interleukin and cytokine release leads to the conclusion that they are involved in inflammation processes. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Cysteine proteases from the Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited thrombin and plasmin like activities.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, H V; Riyaz, M; Venkatesh Kumar, R; Dharmappa, K K; Tarannum, Shaista; Siddesha, J M; Rajesh, R; Vishwanath, B S

    2009-10-01

    In the present study we evaluated the presence of cysteine protease from the latex of four plants Asclepias curassavica L., Calotropis gigantea R.Br., Pergularia extensa R.Br. and Cynanchum puciflorum R.Br. belongs to the family Asclepiadaceae. Cysteine proteases from these plants latex exhibited both thrombin and plasmin like activities. Latex enzyme fraction in a concentration dependent manner induced the formation of clot in citrated blood plasma. Direct incubation of fibrinogen with latex enzyme fraction resulted in the formation of fibrin clot similar to thrombin enzyme. However prolonged incubation resulted in degradation of the formed fibrin clot suggesting plasmin like activity. Latex enzyme fraction preferentially hydrolyzed Aalpha and Bbeta chains of fibrinogen to form fibrin clot. Latex enzyme fraction also hydrolyzed the subunits of fully cross linked fibrin efficiently, the order of hydrolysis was alpha-polymer > alpha-chains > beta-chain and gamma-gamma dimer. Cysteine proteases from all the four Asclepiadaceae plants latex exhibited similar action on fibrinogen and fibrin. This study scientifically validate the use of plant latex in stop bleeding and wound healing by traditional healers all over the world.

  10. Cytotoxicity and effect on protease activity of copolymer extracts containing catechin.

    PubMed

    Zarella, Bruno Lara; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Kato, Melissa Thiemi; Hannas, Angelica Reis; Salo, Tuula; Tjäderhane, Leo; Prakki, Anuradha

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate cytotoxicity and effect on protease activity of epigallocatechin-gallate extracted from experimental restorative dental copolymers in comparison to the control compound chlorhexidine. Copolymer disks were prepared from bis-GMA/TEGDMA (70/30 mol%) containing no compound (control) or 1% w/w of either epigallocatechin-gallate or chlorhexidine. MDPC-23 odontoblast-like cells were seeded with the copolymer extracts leached out into deionized water. Cell metabolic activity was quantified by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay at 24, 48, 72 h. Inhibition of protease activity by resin extracts was measured by a collagenolytic/genatinolytic enzyme activity assay and gelatin zymography. Data for MTT and protease inhibition were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey or Bonferroni post hoc tests (α=0.05). The MTT revealed that at 72 h, extracts from control (16.7%) and chlorhexidine (22.3%) copolymers induced significant reduction in cell metabolism (p<0.05). All copolymer extracts caused enzymatic inhibition in a dose dependent manner (p<0.01). Even when highly diluted, epigallocatechin-gallate extract had a significant antiproteolytic activity (p<0.05). Zymograms showed that all extracts reduced activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 (pro- and active forms), with MMP-9 exhibiting the highest percentage inhibition revealed by densitometry. Epigallocatechin-gallate and chlorhexidine extracts did not exert cytotoxicity on evaluated cells when compared to control extracts. Both compounds retained antiproteolytic activity after extraction from a dental copolymer. Once extracted from a dental copolymer, epigallocatechin-gallate is not cytotoxic and retains antiproteolytic activity. These results may allow incorporation of epigallocatechin-gallate as a natural-safe alternative to chlorhexidine in functionalized restorative materials. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC) by the Alkaline Protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, Michael B.; Zhang, Liang; Heidrich, Elisa M.; Myerburg, Michael M.; Thibodeau, Patrick H.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that significantly contributes to the mortality of patients with cystic fibrosis. Chronic infection by Pseudomonas induces sustained immune and inflammatory responses and damage to the airway. The ability of Pseudomonas to resist host defenses is aided, in part, by secreted proteases, which act as virulence factors in multiple modes of infection. Recent studies suggest that misregulation of protease activity in the cystic fibrosis lung may alter fluid secretion and pathogen clearance by proteolytic activation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). To evaluate the possibility that proteolytic activation of ENaC may contribute to the virulence of Pseudomonas, primary human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to P. aeruginosa and ENaC function was assessed by short circuit current measurements. Apical treatment with a strain known to express high levels of alkaline protease (AP) resulted in an increase in basal ENaC current and a loss of trypsin-inducible ENaC current, consistent with sustained activation of ENaC. To further characterize this AP-induced ENaC activation, AP was purified, and its folding, activity, and ability to activate ENaC were assessed. AP folding was efficient under pH and calcium conditions thought to exist in the airway surface liquid of normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs. Short circuit measurements of ENaC in polarized monolayers indicated that AP activated ENaC in immortalized cell lines as well as post-transplant, primary human bronchial epithelial cells from both CF and non-CF patients. This activation was mapped to the γ-subunit of ENaC. Based on these data, patho-mechanisms associated with AP in the CF lung are proposed wherein secretion of AP leads to decreased airway surface liquid volume and a corresponding decrease in mucocilliary clearance of pulmonary pathogens. PMID:22859302

  12. Protease-activated receptor-2 activation exaggerates TRPV1-mediated cough in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Raffaele; Andre, Eunice; Amadesi, Silvia; Dinh, Thai Q; Fischer, Axel; Bunnett, Nigel W; Harrison, Selena; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Trevisani, Marcello

    2006-08-01

    A lowered threshold to the cough response frequently accompanies chronic airway inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanism(s) that from chronic inflammation results in a lowered cough threshold is poorly understood. Irritant agents, including capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and citric acid, elicit cough in humans and in experimental animals through the activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) activation plays a role in inflammation and sensitizes TRPV1 in cultured sensory neurons by a PKC-dependent pathway. Here, we have investigated whether PAR2 activation exaggerates TRPV1-dependent cough in guinea pigs and whether protein kinases are involved in the PAR2-induced cough modulation. Aerosolized PAR2 agonists (PAR2-activating peptide and trypsin) did not produce any cough per se. However, they potentiated citric acid- and resiniferatoxin-induced cough, an effect that was completely prevented by the TRPV1 receptor antagonist capsazepine. In contrast, cough induced by hypertonic saline, a stimulus that provokes cough in a TRPV1-independent manner, was not modified by aerosolized PAR2 agonists. The PKC inhibitor GF-109203X, the PKA inhibitor H-89, and the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin did not affect cough induced by TRPV1 agonists, but abated the exaggeration of this response produced by PAR2 agonists. In conclusion, PAR2 stimulation exaggerates TRPV1-dependent cough by activation of diverse mechanism(s), including PKC, PKA, and prostanoid release. PAR2 activation, by sensitizing TRPV1 in primary sensory neurons, may play a role in the exaggerated cough observed in certain airways inflammatory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  13. β-Amyloid induces nuclear protease-mediated lamin fragmentation independent of caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Vijay Sankar; Islam, Md Imamul; Haque, Md Aminul; Shin, Song Yub; Park, Il-Seon

    2016-06-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ), a hallmark peptide of Alzheimer's disease, induces both caspase-dependent apoptosis and non-apoptotic cell death. In this study, we examined caspase-independent non-apoptotic cell death preceding caspase activation in Aβ42-treated cells. We first determined the optimal treatment conditions for inducing cell death without caspase activation and selected a double-treatment method involving the incubation of cells with Aβ42 for 4 and 6 h (4+6 h sample). We observed that levels of lamin A (LA) and lamin B (LB) were reduced in the 4+6 h samples. This reduction was decreased by treatment with suc-AAPF-CMK, an inhibitor of nuclear scaffold (NS) protease, but not by treatment with z-VAD-FMK, a pan-caspase inhibitor. In addition, suc-AAPF-CMK decreased the changes in nuclear morphology observed in cells in the 4+6 h samples, which were different from nuclear fragmentation observed in STS-treated cells. Furthermore, suc-AAPF-CMK inhibited cell death in the 4+6 h samples. LA and LB fragmentation occurred in the isolated nuclei and was also inhibited by suc-AAPF-CMK. Together, these data indicated that the fragmentation of LA and LB in the Aβ42-treated cells was induced by an NS protease, whose identity is not clearly determined yet. A correlation between Aβ42 toxicity and the lamin fragmentation by NS protease suggests that inhibition of the protease could be an effective method for controlling the pathological process of AD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. 7-hydroxycalamenene Effects on Secreted Aspartic Proteases Activity and Biofilm Formation of Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Mariana M. B.; Almeida, Catia A.; Chaves, Francisco C. M.; Rodrigues, Igor A.; Bizzo, Humberto R.; Alviano, Celuta S.; Alviano, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The 7-hydroxycalamenenene-rich essential oil (EO) obtained from the leaves of Croton cajucara (red morphotype) have been described as active against bacteria, protozoa, and fungi species. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of 7-hydroxycalamenenene against Candida albicans and nonalbicans species. Materials and Methods: C. cajucara EO was obtained by hydrodistillation and its major compound, 7-hydroxycalamenene, was purified using preparative column chromatography. The anti-candidal activity was investigated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and secreted aspartic proteases (SAP) and biofilm inhibition assays. Results: 7-hydroxycalamenene (98% purity) displayed anti-candidal activity against all Candida species tested. Higher activity was observed against Candida dubliniensis, Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans, showing MIC values ranging from 39.06 μg/ml to 78.12 μg/ml. The purified 7-hydroxycalamenene was able to inhibit 58% of C. albicans ATCC 36801 SAP activity at MIC concentration (pH 7.0). However, 7-hydroxycalamenene demonstrated poor inhibitory activity on C. albicans ATCC 10231 biofilm formation even at the highest concentration tested (2500 μg/ml). Conclusion: The bioactive potential of 7-hydroxycalamenene against planktonic Candida spp. further supports its use for the development of antimicrobials with anti-candidal activity. SUMMARY Croton cajucara Benth. essential oil provides high amounts of 7-hydroxycalamenene7-Hydroxycalameneneisolated from C. cajucarais active against Candida spp7-Hydroxycalameneneinhibits C. albicans aspartic protease activity7-Hydroxycalamenene was not active against C. albicans biofilm formation. Figure PMID:27019560

  15. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis induces cytokine secretion in epithelial cells in a protease-activated receptor-dependent (PAR) manner.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Priscila; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Dos Santos, Saara Maria Batista; de Barros, Bianca Carla Silva Campitelli; Maza, Paloma Korehisa; Puccia, Rosana; Suzuki, Erika

    2017-04-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is one of the etiological agents of the human systemic mycosis paracoccidioidomycosis. Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are expressed in many cell types and comprise a family of G protein-coupled receptors (PAR-1, PAR-2, and PAR-4), which may be activated by proteases secreted by several pathogens. In the present study, we showed that the pathogenic fungus P. brasiliensis secretes components that promote interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion by the lung epithelial cell line A549. Cytokine secretion was reduced by antagonistic peptides for PAR-1 and PAR-2, but not for PAR-4. P. brasiliensis proteases were isolated from fungal culture supernatants in a p-aminomethylbenzamidine-Sepharose column. The obtained fractions were tested for enzymatic activity against fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides derived from sequences that spanned the activation sites of human PARs. The eluted fraction, termed PbP, contained protease activities that were able to hydrolyze the FRET peptides. PbP also induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in A549 epithelial cells, which was reduced upon heat inactivation of PbP, incubation with antagonistic peptides for PAR-1 and PAR-2, and the protease inhibitors aprotinin, leupeptin, and E-64. Together, these results show for the first time that P. brasiliensis yeasts secrete proteases that activate PARs in lung epithelial cells, leading to cytokine secretion.

  16. NS2 proteases from hepatitis C virus and related hepaciviruses share composite active sites and previously unrecognized intrinsic proteolytic activities

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Matthieu; Blumen, Brigitte; Fogeron, Marie-Laure

    2018-01-01

    Over the recent years, several homologues with varying degrees of genetic relatedness to hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been identified in a wide range of mammalian species. HCV infectious life cycle relies on a first critical proteolytic event of its single polyprotein, which is carried out by nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) and allows replicase assembly and genome replication. In this study, we characterized and evaluated the conservation of the proteolytic mode of action and regulatory mechanisms of NS2 across HCV and animal hepaciviruses. We first demonstrated that NS2 from equine, bat, rodent, New and Old World primate hepaciviruses also are cysteine proteases. Using tagged viral protein precursors and catalytic triad mutants, NS2 of equine NPHV and simian GBV-B, which are the most closely and distantly related viruses to HCV, respectively, were shown to function, like HCV NS2 as dimeric proteases with two composite active sites. Consistent with the reported essential role for NS3 N-terminal domain (NS3N) as HCV NS2 protease cofactor via NS3N key hydrophobic surface patch, we showed by gain/loss of function mutagenesis studies that some heterologous hepacivirus NS3N may act as cofactors for HCV NS2 provided that HCV-like hydrophobic residues are conserved. Unprecedently, however, we also observed efficient intrinsic proteolytic activity of NS2 protease in the absence of NS3 moiety in the context of C-terminal tag fusions via flexible linkers both in transiently transfected cells for all hepaciviruses studied and in the context of HCV dicistronic full-length genomes. These findings suggest that NS3N acts as a regulatory rather than essential cofactor for hepacivirus NS2 protease. Overall, unique features of NS2 including enzymatic function as dimers with two composite active sites and additional NS3-independent proteolytic activity are conserved across hepaciviruses regardless of their genetic distances, highlighting their functional significance in hepacivirus

  17. Occurrence and evolution of the paralogous zinc metalloproteases IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species.

    PubMed

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    The distribution, genome location, and evolution of the four paralogous zinc metalloproteases, IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD, in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species were studied by in silico analysis of whole genomes and by activity screening of 154 representatives of 20 species. ZmpB was ubiquitous in the Mitis and Salivarius groups of the genus Streptococcus and in the genera Gemella and Granulicatella, with the exception of a fragmented gene in Streptococcus thermophilus, the only species with a nonhuman habitat. IgA1 protease activity was observed in all members of S. pneumoniae, S. pseudopneumoniae, S. oralis, S. sanguinis, and Gemella haemolysans, was variably present in S. mitis and S. infantis, and absent in S. gordonii, S. parasanguinis, S. cristatus, S. oligofermentans, S. australis, S. peroris, and S. suis. Phylogenetic analysis of 297 zmp sequences and representative housekeeping genes provided evidence for an unprecedented selection for genetic diversification of the iga, zmpB, and zmpD genes in S. pneumoniae and evidence of very frequent intraspecies transfer of entire genes and combination of genes. Presumably due to their adaptation to a commensal lifestyle, largely unaffected by adaptive mucosal immune factors, the corresponding genes in commensal streptococci have remained conserved. The widespread distribution and significant sequence diversity indicate an ancient origin of the zinc metalloproteases predating the emergence of the humanoid species. zmpB, which appears to be the ancestral gene, subsequently duplicated and successfully diversified into distinct functions, is likely to serve an important but yet unknown housekeeping function associated with the human host. The paralogous zinc metalloproteases IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD have been identified as crucial for virulence of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. This study maps the presence of the corresponding genes and enzyme activities in S

  18. Activation of protease activated receptor 2 by exogenous agonist exacerbates early radiation injury in rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Hollenberg, Morley D; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR(2) is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR(2) activation. Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR(2) agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH(2)) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 days after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. The PAR(2) agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR(2) agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR(2) agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR(2) did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. The results of the present study support a role for PAR(2) activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR(2) antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Activation of Protease Activated Receptor 2 by Exogenous Agonist Exacerbates Early Radiation Injury in Rat Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR{sub 2}) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR{sub 2} is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR{sub 2} activation. Methods and Materials: Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR{sub 2} agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH{sub 2}) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 daysmore » after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The PAR{sub 2} agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR{sub 2} agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR{sub 2} agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR{sub 2} did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. Conclusion: The results of the present study support a role for PAR{sub 2} activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR{sub 2} antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios.« less

  20. Crystal Structures of a Multidrug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Reveal an Expanded Active-Site Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Logsdon, Bradley C.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip

    2010-03-08

    The goal of this study was to use X-ray crystallography to investigate the structural basis of resistance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors. We overexpressed, purified, and crystallized a multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease enzyme derived from a patient failing on several protease inhibitor-containing regimens. This HIV-1 variant contained codon mutations at positions 10, 36, 46, 54, 63, 71, 82, 84, and 90 that confer drug resistance to protease inhibitors. The 1.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of this MDR patient isolate reveals an expanded active-site cavity. The active-site expansion includes position 82 and 84 mutations due to the alterations inmore » the amino acid side chains from longer to shorter (e.g., V82A and I84V). The MDR isolate 769 protease 'flaps' stay open wider, and the difference in the flap tip distances in the MDR 769 variant is 12 {angstrom}. The MDR 769 protease crystal complexes with lopinavir and DMP450 reveal completely different binding modes. The network of interactions between the ligands and the MDR 769 protease is completely different from that seen with the wild-type protease-ligand complexes. The water molecule-forming hydrogen bonds bridging between the two flaps and either the substrate or the peptide-based inhibitor are lacking in the MDR 769 clinical isolate. The S1, S1', S3, and S3' pockets show expansion and conformational change. Surface plasmon resonance measurements with the MDR 769 protease indicate higher k{sub off} rates, resulting in a change of binding affinity. Surface plasmon resonance measurements provide k{sub on} and k{sub off} data (K{sub d} = k{sub off}/k{sub on}) to measure binding of the multidrug-resistant protease to various ligands. This MDR 769 protease represents a new antiviral target, presenting the possibility of designing novel inhibitors with activity against the open and expanded protease forms.« less

  1. Role of protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) in ocular infections and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Trivendra; Alizadeh, Hassan

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) belong to a unique family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are cleaved at an activation site within the N-terminal exodomain by a variety of proteinases, essentially of the serine (Ser) proteinase family. After cleavage, the new N-terminal sequence functions as a tethered ligand, which binds intramolecularly to activate the receptor and initiate signaling. Cell signals induced through the activation of PARs appear to play a significant role in innate and adoptive immune responses of the cornea, which is constantly exposed to proteinases under physiological or pathophysiological conditions. Activation of PARs interferes with all aspects of the corneal physiology such as barrier function, transports, innate and adoptive immune responses, and functions of corneal nerves. It is not known whether the proteinase released from the microorganism can activate PARs and triggers the inflammatory responses. The role of PAR2 expressed by the corneal epithelial cells and activation by serine protease released from microorganism is discussed here. Recent evidences suggest that activation of PAR2, by the serine proteinases, play an important role in innate and inflammatory responses of the corneal infection.

  2. Lectin, hemolysin and protease inhibitors in seed fractions with ovicidal activity against Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Salles, Hévila Oliveira; Braga, Ana Carolina Linhares; Nascimento, Maria Thayana dos Santos Canuto do; Sousa, Ana Márjory Paiva; Lima, Adriano Rodrigues; Vieira, Luiz da Silva; Cavalcante, Antônio Cézar Rocha; Egito, Antonio Silvio do; Andrade, Lúcia Betânia da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive molecules of plant species are promising alternatives for the chemical control of gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. Extracts of native and exotic seed species from Brazil's semi-arid region were tested in vitro in an egg hatch assay and the bioactivity of their proteins was investigated. Each seed species was subjected to three extractions with three types of solvents. All the seeds showed ovicidal activity, which varied according to the solvents. Higher ovicidal activity was found in the molecule fractions of low molecular weight (<12 kDa) for Albizia lebbeck, Ipomoea asarifolia, Jatropha curcas, Libidibia ferrea, Moringa oleifera and Ricinus communis (P<0.05, Bonferroni test). The two fractions of Crotalaria spectabilis showed the same ovicidal activity (P>0.05, Bonferroni test). Hemagglutinating activity was detected in the fractions of C. spectabilis and M. oleifera fractions, hemolysin activity in the A. lebbeck and M. oleifera fractions, serine protease inhibitory activity in the A. lebbeck, I. asarifolia, J. curcas, M. oleifera and R. communis fractions, cysteine protease inhibitor activity in the M. oleifera fraction, and no protein activity in the L. ferrea fraction. The results of this work reveal new plant species with a potential for use in controlling nematode parasites in goats, thus opening a new field of research involving plant protein molecules with ovicidal properties.

  3. Enzymatically active lysosomal proteases are associated with amyloid deposits in Alzheimer brain.

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, A M; Nixon, R A

    1990-01-01

    The formation of beta-amyloid in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease requires the proteolytic cleavage of a membrane-associated precursor protein. The proteases that may be involved in this process have not yet been identified. Cathepsins are normally intracellular proteolytic enzymes associated with lysosomes; however, when sections from Alzheimer brains were stained by antisera to cathepsin D and cathepsin B, high levels of immunoreactivity were also detected in senile plaques. Extracellular sites of cathepsin immunoreactivity were not seen in control brains from age-matched individuals without neurologic disease or from patients with Huntington disease or Parkinson disease. In situ enzyme histochemistry of cathepsin D and cathepsin B on sections of neocortex using synthetic peptides and protein substrates showed that senile plaques contained the highest levels of enzymatically active cathepsin. At the ultrastructural level, cathepsin immunoreactivity in senile plaques was localized principally to lysosomal dense bodies and lipofuscin granules, which were extracellular. Similar structures were abundant in degenerating neurons of Alzheimer neocortex, and cathepsin-laden neuronal perikarya in various stages of disintegration could be seen within some senile plaques. The high levels of enzymatically competent lysosomal proteases abnormally localized in senile plaques represent evidence for candidate enzymes that may mediate the proteolytic formation of amyloid. We propose that amyloid precursor protein within senile plaques is processed by lysosomal proteases principally derived from degenerating neurons. Escape of cathepsins from the stringently regulated intracellular milieu provides a basis for an abnormal sequence of proteolytic cleavages of accumulating amyloid precursor protein. Images PMID:1692625

  4. Antiviral activities of peptide-based covalent inhibitors of the Enterovirus 71 3C protease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yong Wah; Ang, Melgious Jin Yan; Lau, Qiu Ying; Poulsen, Anders; Ng, Fui Mee; Then, Siew Wen; Peng, Jianhe; Hill, Jeffrey; Hong, Wan Jin; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is a highly contagious disease caused by a range of human enteroviruses. Outbreaks occur regularly, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, putting a burden on public healthcare systems. Currently, there is no antiviral for treating this infectious disease and the only vaccines are limited to circulation in China, presenting an unmet medical need that needs to be filled urgently. The human enterovirus 3 C protease has been deemed a plausible drug target due to its essential roles in viral replication. In this study, we designed and synthesized 10 analogues of the Rhinovirus 3 C protease inhibitor, Rupintrivir, and tested their 3 C protease inhibitory activities followed by a cellular assay using human enterovirus 71 (EV71)-infected human RD cells. Our results revealed that a peptide-based compound containing a trifluoromethyl moiety to be the most potent analogue, with an EC50 of 65 nM, suggesting its potential as a lead for antiviral drug discovery. PMID:27645381

  5. Rapid method for measuring protease activity in milk using radiolabeled casein

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, G.L.

    1987-09-01

    A rapid means to detect the presence of protease activity in raw milk could be useful in predicting keeping ability of products made from that milk. A 30-min assay has been developed and compared with three other methods of detecting protease. Casein, (methyl-/sup 14/C)-methylated-alpha was purchased from a radioisotope supplier. Concentrations of substrate from 2 to 20 nCi gave counts per minute, which increased linearly when counted with the Charm analyzer. There was not a significant difference in counting times of 10, 20, or 30 min. A mixture of sodium acetate and acetic acid precipitated nonhydrolyzed substrate with an efficiencymore » of 97%. Comparison of the (/sup 14/C) casein assay, a casein fluorescein isothiocyanate assay, trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid procedure, and the Hull procedure using protease from psychrotrophic bacteria revealed that the (/sup 14/C) casein and casein fluorescein isothiocyanate methods were roughly equivalent and that the radiometric procedure was 10 times more sensitive than the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid assay. The radiometric procedure was approximately 10(4) times more sensitive than the Hull procedure. The (/sup 14/C) casein and casein fluorescein isothiocyanate methods were similar in time required, about 30 min, while the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid assay and Hull method required about 1 h plus reagent preparation time. The (/sup 14/C) casein procedure was most expensive per test; the other three were cheaper and similar to each other in cost.« less

  6. Partial characterization of cold active amylases and proteases of Streptomyces sp. from Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Cotârleţ, Mihaela; Negoiţă, Teodor Gh.; Bahrim, Gabriela E.; Stougaard, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate novel enzyme-producing bacteria from vegetation samples from East Antarctica and also to characterize them genetically and biochemically in order to establish their phylogeny. The ability to grow at low temperature and to produce amylases and proteases cold-active was also tested. The results of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the 4 Alga rRNA was 100% identical to the sequences of Streptomyces sp. rRNA from Norway and from the Solomon Islands. The Streptomyces grew well in submerged system at 20°C, cells multiplication up to stationary phase being drastically increased after 120 h of submerged cultivation. The beta-amylase production reached a maximum peak after seven days, while alpha-amylase and proteases were performing biosynthesis after nine days of submerged cultivation at 20°C. Newly Streptomyces were able to produce amylase and proteases in a cold environment. The ability to adapt to low temperature of these enzymes could make them valuable ingredients for detergents, the food industry and bioremediation processes which require low temperatures. PMID:24031702

  7. Antiviral activities of peptide-based covalent inhibitors of the Enterovirus 71 3C protease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yong Wah; Ang, Melgious Jin Yan; Lau, Qiu Ying; Poulsen, Anders; Ng, Fui Mee; Then, Siew Wen; Peng, Jianhe; Hill, Jeffrey; Hong, Wan Jin; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-09-20

    Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is a highly contagious disease caused by a range of human enteroviruses. Outbreaks occur regularly, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, putting a burden on public healthcare systems. Currently, there is no antiviral for treating this infectious disease and the only vaccines are limited to circulation in China, presenting an unmet medical need that needs to be filled urgently. The human enterovirus 3 C protease has been deemed a plausible drug target due to its essential roles in viral replication. In this study, we designed and synthesized 10 analogues of the Rhinovirus 3 C protease inhibitor, Rupintrivir, and tested their 3 C protease inhibitory activities followed by a cellular assay using human enterovirus 71 (EV71)-infected human RD cells. Our results revealed that a peptide-based compound containing a trifluoromethyl moiety to be the most potent analogue, with an EC50 of 65 nM, suggesting its potential as a lead for antiviral drug discovery.

  8. Blockade of protease-activated receptor-4 (PAR4) provides robust antithrombotic activity with low bleeding.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pancras C; Seiffert, Dietmar; Bird, J Eileen; Watson, Carol A; Bostwick, Jeffrey S; Giancarli, Mary; Allegretto, Nick; Hua, Ji; Harden, David; Guay, Jocelyne; Callejo, Mario; Miller, Michael M; Lawrence, R Michael; Banville, Jacques; Guy, Julia; Maxwell, Brad D; Priestley, E Scott; Marinier, Anne; Wexler, Ruth R; Bouvier, Michel; Gordon, David A; Schumacher, William A; Yang, Jing

    2017-01-04

    Antiplatelet agents are proven efficacious treatments for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, the existing drugs are compromised by unwanted and sometimes life-threatening bleeding that limits drug usage or dosage. There is a substantial unmet medical need for an antiplatelet drug with strong efficacy and low bleeding risk. Thrombin is a potent platelet agonist that directly induces platelet activation via the G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled protease-activated receptors PAR1 and PAR4. A PAR1 antagonist is approved for clinical use, but its use is limited by a substantial bleeding risk. Conversely, the potential of PAR4 as an antiplatelet target has not been well characterized. Using anti-PAR4 antibodies, we demonstrated a low bleeding risk and an effective antithrombotic profile with PAR4 inhibition in guinea pigs. Subsequently, high-throughput screening and an extensive medicinal chemistry effort resulted in the discovery of BMS-986120, an orally active, selective, and reversible PAR4 antagonist. In a cynomolgus monkey arterial thrombosis model, BMS-986120 demonstrated potent and highly efficacious antithrombotic activity. BMS-986120 also exhibited a low bleeding liability and a markedly wider therapeutic window compared to the standard antiplatelet agent clopidogrel tested in the same nonhuman primate model. These preclinical findings define the biological role of PAR4 in mediating platelet aggregation. In addition, they indicate that targeting PAR4 is an attractive antiplatelet strategy with the potential to treat patients at a high risk of atherothrombosis with superior safety compared with the current standard of care. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Protease-activated ratiometric fluorescent probe for pH mapping of malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi; Zhou, Jin; Gao, Zhenyu; Sun, Xiaoyu; Liu, Chunyan; Shangguan, Dihua; Yang, Wensheng; Gao, Mingyuan

    2015-03-24

    A protease-activated ratiometric fluorescent probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye and biocompatible Fe3O4 nanocrystals was constructed. A peptide substrate of MMP-9 served as a linker between the particle quencher and the chromophore that was covalently attached to the antitumor antibody. The optical response of the probe to activated MMP-9 and gastric cell line SGC7901 tumor cells was investigated, followed by in vivo tumor imaging. Based on the ratiometric pH response to the tumor microenvironment, the resulting probe was successfully used to image the pH of subcutaneous tumor xenografts.

  10. Proteolysis of an active site peptide of lactate dehydrogenase by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    PubMed

    Tomaszek, T A; Moore, M L; Strickler, J E; Sanchez, R L; Dixon, J S; Metcalf, B W; Hassell, A; Dreyer, G B; Brooks, I; Debouck, C

    1992-10-27

    The muscle and heart lactate dehydrogenase (LDHs) of rabbit and pig are specifically cleaved at a single position by HIV-1 protease, resulting in the conversion of 36-kDa subunits of the oligomeric enzymes into 21- and 15-kDa protein bands as analyzed by SDS-PAGE. While the proteolysis was observed at neutral pH, it became more pronounced at pH 6.0 and 5.0. The time courses of the cleavage of the 36-kDa subunits were commensurate with the time-dependent loss of both quaternary structure and enzymatic activity. These results demonstrated that deoligomerization of rabbit muscle LDH at acidic pH rendered its subunits more susceptible to proteolysis, suggesting that a partially denatured form of the enzyme was the actual substrate. Proteolytic cleavage of the rabbit muscle enzyme occurred at a decapeptide sequence, His-Gly-Trp-Ile-Leu*Gly-Glu-His-Gly-Asp (scissile bond denoted throughout by an asterisk), which constitutes a "strand-loop" element in the muscle and heart LDH structures and contains the active site histidyl residue His-193. The kinetic parameters Km, Vmax/KmEt, and Vmax/Et for rabbit muscle LDH and the synthetic decapeptide Ac-His-Gly-Trp-Ile-Leu*Gly-Glu-His-Gly-Asp-NH2 were nearly identical, suggesting that the decapeptide within the protein substrate is conformationally mobile, as would be expected for the peptide substrate in solution. Insertion of part of this decapeptide sequence into bacterial galactokinase likewise rendered this protein susceptible to proteolysis by HIV-1 protease, and site-directed mutagenesis of this peptide in galactokinase revealed that the Glu residue at the P2' was important to binding to HIV-1 protease. Crystallographic analysis of HIV-1 protease complexed with a tight-binding peptide analogue inhibitor derived from this decapeptide sequence revealed that the "strand-loop" structure of the protein substrate must adopt a beta-sheet structure upon binding to the protease. The Glu residue in the P2' position of the inhibitor

  11. Cathepsin K in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis: LAM Cell-Fibroblast Interactions Enhance Protease Activity by Extracellular Acidification.

    PubMed

    Dongre, Arundhati; Clements, Debbie; Fisher, Andrew J; Johnson, Simon R

    2017-08-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare disease in which LAM cells and fibroblasts form lung nodules and it is hypothesized that LAM nodule-derived proteases cause cyst formation and tissue damage. On protease gene expression profiling in whole lung tissue, cathepsin K gene expression was 40-fold overexpressed in LAM compared with control lung tissue (P ≤ 0.0001). Immunohistochemistry confirmed cathepsin K protein was expressed in LAM but not control lungs. Cathepsin K gene expression and protein and protease activity were detected in LAM-associated fibroblasts but not the LAM cell line 621-101. In lung nodules, cathepsin K immunoreactivity predominantly co-localized with LAM-associated fibroblasts. In vitro, fibroblast extracellular cathepsin K activity was minimal at pH 7.5 but significantly enhanced at pH 7 and 6. 621-101 cells reduced extracellular pH with acidification dependent on 621-101 mechanistic target of rapamycin activity and net hydrogen ion exporters, particularly sodium bicarbonate co-transporters and carbonic anhydrases, which were also expressed in LAM lung tissue. In LAM cell-fibroblast co-cultures, acidification paralleled cathepsin K activity, and both were reduced by sodium bicarbonate co-transporter (P ≤ 0.0001) and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (P = 0.0021). Our findings suggest that cathepsin K activity is dependent on LAM cell-fibroblast interactions, and inhibitors of extracellular acidification may be potential therapies for LAM. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of highly potent protease-activated receptor 2 agonists via synthetic lipid tethering

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Andrea N.; Hoffman, Justin; Tillu, Dipti V.; Sherwood, Cara L.; Zhang, Zhenyu; Patek, Renata; Asiedu, Marina N. K.; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J.; Boitano, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) associated with a variety of pathologies. However, the therapeutic potential of PAR2 is limited by a lack of potent and specific ligands. Following proteolytic cleavage, PAR2 is activated through a tethered ligand. Hence, we reasoned that lipidation of peptidomimetic ligands could promote membrane targeting and thus significantly improve potency and constructed a series of synthetic tethered ligands (STLs). STLs contained a peptidomimetic PAR2 agonist (2-aminothiazol-4-yl-LIGRL-NH2) bound to a palmitoyl group (Pam) via polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers. In a high-throughput physiological assay, these STL agonists displayed EC50 values as low as 1.47 nM, representing a ∼200 fold improvement over the untethered parent ligand. Similarly, these STL agonists were potent activators of signaling pathways associated with PAR2: EC50 for Ca2+ response as low as 3.95 nM; EC50 for MAPK response as low as 9.49 nM. Moreover, STLs demonstrated significant improvement in potency in vivo, evoking mechanical allodynia with an EC50 of 14.4 pmol. STLs failed to elicit responses in PAR2−/− cells at agonist concentrations of >300-fold their EC50 values. Our results demonstrate that the STL approach is a powerful tool for increasing ligand potency at PAR2 and represent opportunities for drug development at other protease activated receptors and across GPCRs.—Flynn, A. N., Hoffman, J., Tillu, D. V., Sherwood, C. L., Zhang, Z., Patek, R., Asiedu, M. N. K., Vagner, J., Price, T. J., Boitano, S. Development of highly potent protease-activated receptor 2 agonists via synthetic lipid tethering. PMID:23292071

  13. Serum protease activity in chronic kidney disease patients: The GANI_MED renal cohort.

    PubMed

    Wolke, Carmen; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Endlich, Nicole; Rettig, Rainer; Stracke, Sylvia; Fiene, Beate; Aymanns, Simone; Felix, Stephan B; Hannemann, Anke; Lendeckel, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Serum or plasma proteases have been associated with various diseases including cancer, inflammation, or reno-cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate whether the enzymatic activities of serum proteases are associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our study population comprised 268 participants of the "Greifswald Approach to Individualized Medicine" (GANI_MED) cohort. Enzymatic activity of aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B, alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase, insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, leucine aminopeptidase 3, prolyl-endopeptidase (PEP), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), angiotensin I-converting enzyme, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) proteases was measured in serum. Linear regression of the respective protease was performed on kidney function adjusted for age and sex. Kidney function was modeled either by the continuous Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD)-based eGFR or dichotomized by eGFR < 15 mL/min/1.73 m 2 or <45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively. Results with a false discovery rate below 0.05 were deemed statistically significant. Among the 10 proteases investigated, only the activities of ACE2 and DPP4 were correlated with eGFR. Patients with lowest eGFR exhibited highest DPP4 and ACE2 activities. DPP4 and PEP were correlated with age, but all other serum protease activities showed no associations with age or sex. Our data indicate that ACE2 and DPP4 enzymatic activity are associated with the eGFR in patients with CKD. This finding distinguishes ACE2 and DPP4 from other serum peptidases analyzed and clearly indicates that further analyses are warranted to identify the precise role of these serum ectopeptidases in the pathogenesis of CKD and to fully elucidate underlying molecular mechanisms. Impact statement • Renal and cardiac diseases are very common and often occur concomitantly

  14. Enzyme specificity and effects of gyroxin, a serine protease from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, on protease-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Camila M; Kondo, Marcia Y; Nering, Marcela B; Gouvêa, Iuri E; Okamoto, Débora; Andrade, Douglas; da Silva, José Alberto A; Prieto da Silva, Alvaro R B; Yamane, Tetsuo; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Lapa, Antônio J; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa R

    2014-03-01

    Gyroxin is a serine protease displaying a thrombin-like activity found in the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Typically, intravenous injection of purified gyroxin induces a barrel rotation syndrome in mice. The serine protease thrombin activates platelets aggregation by cleaving and releasing a tethered N-terminus peptide from the G-protein-coupled receptors, known as protease-activated receptors (PARs). Gyroxin also presents pro-coagulant activity suggested to be dependent of PARs activation. In the present work, the effects of these serine proteases, namely gyroxin and thrombin, on PARs were comparatively studied by characterizing the hydrolytic specificity and kinetics using PARs-mimetic FRET peptides. We show for the first time that the short (sh) and long (lg) peptides mimetizing the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 activation sites are all hydrolyzed by gyroxin exclusively after the Arg residues. Thrombin also hydrolyzes PAR-1 and -4 after the Arg residue, but hydrolyzes sh and lg PAR-3 after the Lys residue. The kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin using sh and lg PAR-4 mimetic peptides were at least 2150 and 400 times smaller than those determined for thrombin, respectively. For the sh and lg PAR-2 mimetic peptides the kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin were at least 6500 and 2919 times smaller than those determined for trypsin, respectively. The kcat/KM values for gyroxin using the PAR-1 and -3 mimetic peptides could not be determined due to the extreme low hydrolysis velocity. Moreover, the functional studies of the effects of gyroxin on PARs were conducted in living cells using cultured astrocytes, which express all PARs. Despite the ability to cleavage the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 peptides, gyroxin was unable to activate the PARs expressed in astrocytes as determined by evaluating the cytosolic calcium mobilization. On the other hand, we also showed that gyroxin is able to interfere with the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin or

  15. Chitinase activates protease-activated receptor-2 in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong Hee; Hong, Jung Yeon; Park, Boryung; Lee, Syng-Ill; Seo, Jeong Taeg; Kim, Kyu-Earn; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Shin, Dong Min

    2008-11-01

    Mammalian chitinase released by airway epithelia is thought to be an important mediator of disease manifestation in an experimental model of asthma. However, the intracellular signaling mechanisms engaged by exogenous chitinase in human airway epithelial cells are unknown. Here, we investigated the direct effects of exogenous chitinase from Streptomyces griseus on Ca(2+) signaling in human airway epithelial cells. Spectrofluorometry was used to measure intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in fura-2-AM-loaded cells. S. griseus chitinase induced dose-dependent [Ca(2+)](i) increases in normal human bronchial epithelial cells and promoted [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in H292 cells. Chitinase-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations were independent of extracellular Ca(2+), suggesting that the observed [Ca(2+)](i) increases were due to Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Accordingly, after depleting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) with the ER Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, chitinase-mediated [Ca(2+)](i) increases were abolished. Treatment with the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 or the 1, 4, 5-trisinositolphosphate (IP(3)) receptor inhibitor 2-APB attenuated chitinase-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increases. Desensitization of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) by repetitive agonist stimulation or siRNA-mediated PAR-2 knock-down revealed that chitinase-mediated [Ca(2+)](i) increases were exclusively mediated by PAR-2 activation. Finally, chitinase was found to cleave a model peptide representing the cleavage site of PAR-2 and enhanced IL-8 production. These results indicate that exogenous chitinase is a potent proteolytic activator of PAR-2 that can directly induce PLC/IP(3)-dependent Ca(2+) signaling in human airway epithelial cells.

  16. Factor VII-activating protease deficiency promotes neointima formation by enhancing leukocyte accumulation.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J-M; Reichel, C A; Schmidt-Woell, T; Dutzmann, J; Zuchtriegel, G; Krombach, F; Herold, J; Bauersachs, J; Sedding, D G; Kanse, S M

    2016-10-01

    Essentials Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is a plasma protease involved in vascular processes. Neointima formation was investigated after vascular injury in FSAP -/- mice. The neointimal lesion size and the accumulation of macrophages were increased in FSAP -/- mice. This was due to an increased activity of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2). Background Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is a multifunctional circulating plasma serine protease involved in thrombosis and vascular remodeling processes. The Marburg I single-nucleotide polymorphism (MI-SNP) in the FSAP-coding gene is characterized by low proteolytic activity, and is associated with increased rates of stroke and carotid stenosis in humans. Objectives To determine whether neointima formation after vascular injury is increased in FSAP -/- mice. Methods and Results The neointimal lesion size and the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were significantly enhanced in FSAP -/- mice as compared with C57BL/6 control mice after wire-induced injury of the femoral artery. Accumulation of leukocytes and macrophages was increased within the lesions of FSAP -/- mice at day 3 and day 14. Quantitative zymography demonstrated enhanced activity of gelatinases/matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 within the neointimal lesions of FSAP -/- mice, and immunohistochemistry showed particular costaining of MMP-9 with accumulating leukocytes. Using intravital microscopy, we observed that FSAP deficiency promoted the intravascular adherence and the subsequent transmigration of leukocytes in vivo in response to chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). CCL2 expression was increased in FSAP -/- monocytes but not in the vessel wall. There was no difference in the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). Conclusions FSAP deficiency causes an increase in CCL2 expression and CCL2-mediated infiltration of leukocytes into the injured vessel, thereby promoting SMC proliferation and migration by the

  17. Cleavage and Activation of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein by Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Müller, Marcel A.; Lavender, Hayley; Gnirss, Kerstin; Nehlmeier, Inga; Niemeyer, Daniela; He, Yuxian; Simmons, Graham; Drosten, Christian; Soilleux, Elizabeth J.; Jahn, Olaf; Steffen, Imke; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a constant threat to human health. The viral spike protein (SARS-S) mediates host cell entry and is a potential target for antiviral intervention. Activation of SARS-S by host cell proteases is essential for SARS-CoV infectivity but remains incompletely understood. Here, we analyzed the role of the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT) and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2), in SARS-S activation. We found that HAT activates SARS-S in the context of surrogate systems and authentic SARS-CoV infection and is coexpressed with the viral receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in bronchial epithelial cells and pneumocytes. HAT cleaved SARS-S at R667, as determined by mutagenesis and mass spectrometry, and activated SARS-S for cell-cell fusion in cis and trans, while the related pulmonary protease TMPRSS2 cleaved SARS-S at multiple sites and activated SARS-S only in trans. However, TMPRSS2 but not HAT expression rendered SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion independent of cathepsin activity, indicating that HAT and TMPRSS2 activate SARS-S differentially. Collectively, our results show that HAT cleaves and activates SARS-S and might support viral spread in patients. PMID:21994442

  18. Identification of Plasma Proteases Inhibited by Manduca sexta Serpin-4 and Serpin-5 and Their Association with Components of the Prophenol Oxidase Activation Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Youren; Jiang, Haobo; Kanost, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    One innate immune response pathway of insects is a serine protease cascade that activates prophenol oxi-dase (pro-PO) in plasma. However, details of this pathway are not well understood, including the number and order of proteases involved. Protease inhibitors from the serpin superfamily appear to regulate the proteases in the pathway. Manduca sexta serpin-4 and serpin-5 suppress pro-PO activation in plasma, apparently by inhibiting proteases upstream of the direct activator of pro-PO. To identify plasma proteases inhibited by these serpins, we used immunoaffinity chromatography with serpin antibodies to isolate serpin-protease complexes that formed after activation of the cascade by exposure of plasma to bacteria or lipopolysaccharide. Covalent complexes of serpin-4 with hemolymph proteases HP-1 and HP-6 appeared in plasma activated by Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria, whereas serpin-4 complexes with HP-21 and two unidentified proteases were unique to plasma treated with Gram-positive bacteria. HP-1 and HP-6 were also identified as target proteases of serpin-5, forming covalent complexes after bacterial activation of the cascade. These results suggest that HP-1 and HP-6 may be components of the pro-PO activation pathway, which are activated in response to infection and regulated by serpin-4 and serpin-5. HP-21 and two unidentified proteases may participate in a Gram-positive bacteria-specific branch of the pathway. Several plasma proteins that co-purified with serpin-protease complexes, most notably immulectins and serine protease homologs, are known to be components of the pro-PO activation pathway. Our results suggest that after activation by exposure to bacteria, components of the pro-PO pathway associate to form a large noncovalent complex, which localizes the melanization reaction to the surface of invading microorganisms. PMID:15695806

  19. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Zachary S; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R; Echegoyen, Luis; Llano, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4(+) T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Detection of protease activity by fluorescent protein FRET sensors: from computer simulation to live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryashchenko, Alexander S.; Khrenova, Maria G.; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2018-04-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors are widely used for the detection of protease activity in vitro and in vivo. Usually they consist of a FRET pair connected with a polypeptide linker containing a specific cleavage site for the relevant protease. Use of the fluorescent proteins as components of the FRET pair allows genetic encoding of such sensors and solves the problem of their delivery into live cells and animals. There are several ways to improve the properties of such sensors, mainly to increase FRET efficiency and therefore the dynamic range. One of the ways to achieve this is to use a non-fluorescent chromoprotein as an acceptor. Molecular dynamic simulations may assist in the construction of linker structures connecting donor and acceptor molecules. Estimation of the orientation factor κ 2 can be obtained by methods based on quantum theory and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approaches. The linker can be structured by hydrophobic interactions, bringing it into a closed conformation that shortens the distance between donor and acceptor and, consequently, increases FRET efficiency. We analyzed the effects of different linker structures on the detection of caspase-3 activity using a non-fluorescent acceptor. Also we have constructed the Tb3+- TagRFP sensor in which a complex of the terbium ion and terbium-binding peptide is used as a donor. This allowed us to use the unique property of lanthanide ions—fluorescence lifetime up to milliseconds—to perform measurements with time delay and exclude the nanosecond-order fluorescence. Using our systems as a starting point, by changing the recognition site in the linker it is possible to perform imaging of different protease activity in vitro or in vivo.

  1. A Camelid-derived Antibody Fragment Targeting the Active Site of a Serine Protease Balances between Inhibitor and Substrate Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Oldenburg, Emil; Yung, Kristen Wing Yu; Ghassabeh, Gholamreza H.; Muyldermans, Serge; Declerck, Paul J.; Huang, Mingdong; Andreasen, Peter A.; Ngo, Jacky Chi Ki

    2016-01-01

    A peptide segment that binds the active site of a serine protease in a substrate-like manner may behave like an inhibitor or a substrate. However, there is sparse information on which factors determine the behavior a particular peptide segment will exhibit. Here, we describe the first x-ray crystal structure of a nanobody in complex with a serine protease. The nanobody displays a new type of interaction between an antibody and a serine protease as it inserts its complementary determining region-H3 loop into the active site of the protease in a substrate-like manner. The unique binding mechanism causes the nanobody to behave as a strong inhibitor as well as a poor substrate. Intriguingly, its substrate behavior is incomplete, as 30–40% of the nanobody remained intact and inhibitory after prolonged incubation with the protease. Biochemical analysis reveals that an intra-loop interaction network within the complementary determining region-H3 of the nanobody balances its inhibitor versus substrate behavior. Collectively, our results unveil molecular factors, which may be a general mechanism to determine the substrate versus inhibitor behavior of other protease inhibitors. PMID:27226628

  2. Cytotoxic and Inflammatory Responses Induced by Outer Membrane Vesicle-Associated Biologically Active Proteases from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Ayan; Tapader, Rima; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Ghosh, Amit; Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta; Saha, Dhira Rani; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2016-01-01

    Proteases in Vibrio cholerae have been shown to play a role in its pathogenesis. V. cholerae secretes Zn-dependent hemagglutinin protease (HAP) and calcium-dependent trypsin-like serine protease (VesC) by using the type II secretion system (TIISS). Our present studies demonstrated that these proteases are also secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) and transported to human intestinal epithelial cells in an active form. OMV-associated HAP induces dose-dependent apoptosis in Int407 cells and an enterotoxic response in the mouse ileal loop (MIL) assay, whereas OMV-associated VesC showed a hemorrhagic fluid response in the MIL assay, necrosis in Int407 cells, and an increased interleukin-8 (IL-8) response in T84 cells, which were significantly reduced in OMVs from VesC mutant strain. Our results also showed that serine protease VesC plays a role in intestinal colonization of V. cholerae strains in adult mice. In conclusion, our study shows that V. cholerae OMVs secrete biologically active proteases which may play a role in cytotoxic and inflammatory responses. PMID:26930702

  3. The protease-activated receptor 2 regulates pigmentation via keratinocyte-melanocyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Seiberg, M; Paine, C; Sharlow, E; Andrade-Gordon, P; Costanzo, M; Eisinger, M; Shapiro, S S

    2000-01-10

    Close association exists between melanocytes, the pigment melanin-producing cells in the body, and their neighboring keratinocytes. Keratinocytes are the pigment recipients and skin pigmentation is the result of this interaction. While the chemical basis of melanin production (melanogenesis) is well documented, the molecular mechanism of melanosome transfer needs to be elucidated. We are now providing first evidence that the protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) expressed on keratinocytes, but not on melanocytes, is involved in melanosome transfer and therefore may regulate pigmentation. Activation of PAR-2 with trypsin or with the peptide agonist SLIGRL induced pigmentation in both two- and three-dimensional cocultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes, but not in cocultures that were spatially separated, indicating the need for intimate cell-cell contact. Topical application of SLIGRL on human skin transplanted on SCID mice resulted in a visible skin darkening. Histological examination revealed increased deposits of melanin in the keratinocytes. Inhibition of PAR-2 activation by RWJ-50353, a serine protease inhibitor, resulted in depigmentation and changes in expression of melanogenic-specific genes. Keratinocyte-melanocyte contact was essential for this depigmenting effect. Topical application of this inhibitor induced lightening of the dark skin Yucatan swine, which was confirmed by histochemical analysis. The results presented here suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of pigmentation, mediated by the activation or inhibition of the keratinocyte receptor PAR-2. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  4. Engineered tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease active in the secretory pathway of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cesaratto, Francesca; López-Requena, Alejandro; Burrone, Oscar R; Petris, Gianluca

    2015-10-20

    Tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) is a unique endopeptidase with stringent substrate specificity. TEVp has been widely used as a purified protein for in vitro applications, but also as a biological tool directly expressing it in living cells. To adapt the protease to diverse applications, several TEVp mutants with different stability and enzymatic properties have been reported. Herein we describe the development of a novel engineered TEVp mutant designed to be active in the secretory pathway. While wild type TEVp targeted to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells is synthetized as an N-glycosylated and catalytically inactive enzyme, a TEVp mutant with selected mutations at two verified N-glycosylation sites and at an exposed cysteine was highly efficient. This mutant was very active in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of living cells and can be used as a biotechnological tool to cleave proteins within the secretory pathway. As an immediate practical application we report the expression of a complete functional monoclonal antibody expressed from a single polypeptide, which was cleaved by our TEVp mutant into the two antibody chains and secreted as an assembled and functional molecule. In addition, we show active TEVp mutants lacking auto-cleavage activity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Transfer of egg white proteins and activation of proteases during the development of Anas platyrhynchos domestica embryo.

    PubMed

    Shbailat, Seba Jamal; Abuassaf, Razan Ataallah

    2018-03-01

    The route of egg white transfer into the yolk and the mechanisms underlying the digestion of egg proteins are unexplored in the fertilized egg of the duck, Anas platyrhynchos domestica. Here, we investigated the route(s) of egg white transfer and we determined the type of activated proteases during duck embryo development. Initially, we tested the electrophoretic patterns of egg proteins throughout development. Then, we used lysozyme as a reference protein to follow egg white transfer and we measured its activity. After that, we determined the type of activated proteases by employing different types of protease inhibitors. Several presumptive egg white protein bands appeared in different egg compartments. Also, lysozyme activity was detected chronologically on day 15 in the extraembryonic fluid, on day 17 in the amniotic and intestinal fluids and on day 19 in the yolk. Furthermore, acidic aspartic proteases seemed to be activated at hatch in the intestine and late in development in the yolk. Our results suggest that the main route of egg white transfer into the yolk is through the amniotic cavity and intestinal lumen. Also, the transferred egg white and endogenous yolk proteins are probably digested by the activated acidic proteases in the intestine and yolk.

  6. Synthesis and Biological Characterization of Protease-Activated Prodrugs of Doxazolidine

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Benjamin L.; Rudnicki, Daniel L.; Kirby, Thomas Price; Colvin, Sean M.; Burkhart, David J.; Koch, Tad H.

    2012-01-01

    Doxazolidine (doxaz) is a new anthracycline anticancer agent. While structurally similar to doxorubicin (dox), doxaz acts via a distinct mechanism to selectively enhance anticancer activity over cardiotoxicity, the most significant clinical impediment to successful anthracycline treatment. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a prodrug platform designed for doxaz release mediated by secreted proteolytic activity, a common association with invasiveness and poor prognosis in cancer patients. GaFK-Doxaz is hydrolysable by the proteases plasmin and cathepsin B, both strongly linked with cancer progression, as well as trypsin. We demonstrate that activation of GaFK-Doxaz releases highly potent doxaz which powerfully inhibits the growth of a wide variety of cancer cells (average IC50: 8 nM). GaFK-Doxaz is stable in human plasma and is poorly membrane permeable, thereby limiting activation to locally-secreted proteolytic activity and reducing the likelihood of severe side effects. PMID:22742660

  7. Cysteine protease activity of feline Tritrichomonas foetus promotes adhesion-dependent cytotoxicity to intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, M K; Stauffer, S H; Brand, M D; Gookin, J L

    2014-07-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Cathepsin S Cleavage of Protease-Activated Receptor-2 on Endothelial Cells Promotes Microvascular Diabetes Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kumar VR, Santhosh; Darisipudi, Murthy N.; Steiger, Stefanie; Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Tato, Maia; Kukarni, Onkar P.; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Thomasova, Dana; Popper, Bastian; Demleitner, Jana; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Reichel, Christoph; Cohen, Clemens D.; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Liapis, Helen; Moll, Solange; Reid, Emma; Stitt, Alan W.; Schott, Brigitte; Gruner, Sabine; Haap, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Martin; Hartmann, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a central pathomechanism in diabetes-associated complications. We hypothesized a pathogenic role in this dysfunction of cathepsin S (Cat-S), a cysteine protease that degrades elastic fibers and activates the protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) on endothelial cells. We found that injection of mice with recombinant Cat-S induced albuminuria and glomerular endothelial cell injury in a PAR2-dependent manner. In vivo microscopy confirmed a role for intrinsic Cat-S/PAR2 in ischemia–induced microvascular permeability. In vitro transcriptome analysis and experiments using siRNA or specific Cat-S and PAR2 antagonists revealed that Cat-S specifically impaired the integrity and barrier function of glomerular endothelial cells selectively through PAR2. In human and mouse type 2 diabetic nephropathy, only CD68+ intrarenal monocytes expressed Cat-S mRNA, whereas Cat-S protein was present along endothelial cells and inside proximal tubular epithelial cells also. In contrast, the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C was expressed only in tubules. Delayed treatment of type 2 diabetic db/db mice with Cat-S or PAR2 inhibitors attenuated albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis (indicators of diabetic nephropathy) and attenuated albumin leakage into the retina and other structural markers of diabetic retinopathy. These data identify Cat-S as a monocyte/macrophage–derived circulating PAR2 agonist and mediator of endothelial dysfunction–related microvascular diabetes complications. Thus, Cat-S or PAR2 inhibition might be a novel strategy to prevent microvascular disease in diabetes and other diseases. PMID:26567242

  9. A Novel Serine Protease Secreted by Medicinal Maggots Enhances Plasminogen Activator-Induced Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Mariena J. A.; Andersen, Anders S.; Nazir, Sheresma; van Tilburg, Nico H.; Oestergaard, Peter R.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Hensbergen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As haemostatic processes play an important role in wound healing, this study focused on the effects of maggot secretions on coagulation and fibrinolysis. The results showed that maggot secretions enhance plasminogen activator-induced formation of plasmin and fibrinolysis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. By contrast, coagulation was not affected by secretions. Biochemical studies indicated that a novel serine protease within secretions, designated Sericase, cleaved plasminogen to several fragments. Recombinant Sericase degraded plasminogen leading amongst others to the formation of the mini-plasminogen like fragment Val454-plasminogen. In addition, the presence of a non-proteolytic cofactor in secretions was discovered, which plays a role in the enhancement of plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis by Sericase. We conclude from our in vitro studies that the novel serine protease Sericase, with the aid of a non-proteolytic cofactor, enhances plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis. PMID:24647546

  10. High throughput protease profiling comprehensively defines active site specificity for thrombin and ADAMTS13.

    PubMed

    Kretz, Colin A; Tomberg, Kärt; Van Esbroeck, Alexander; Yee, Andrew; Ginsburg, David

    2018-02-12

    We have combined random 6 amino acid substrate phage display with high throughput sequencing to comprehensively define the active site specificity of the serine protease thrombin and the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. The substrate motif for thrombin was determined by >6,700 cleaved peptides, and was highly concordant with previous studies. In contrast, ADAMTS13 cleaved only 96 peptides (out of >10 7 sequences), with no apparent consensus motif. However, when the hexapeptide library was substituted into the P3-P3' interval of VWF73, an exosite-engaging substrate of ADAMTS13, 1670 unique peptides were cleaved. ADAMTS13 exhibited a general preference for aliphatic amino acids throughout the P3-P3' interval, except at P2 where Arg was tolerated. The cleaved peptides assembled into a motif dominated by P3 Leu, and bulky aliphatic residues at P1 and P1'. Overall, the P3-P2' amino acid sequence of von Willebrand Factor appears optimally evolved for ADAMTS13 recognition. These data confirm the critical role of exosite engagement for substrates to gain access to the active site of ADAMTS13, and define the substrate recognition motif for ADAMTS13. Combining substrate phage display with high throughput sequencing is a powerful approach for comprehensively defining the active site specificity of proteases.

  11. Systematic functional analysis and application of a cold-active serine protease from a novel Chryseobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Mageswari, Anbazhagan; Subramanian, Parthiban; Chandrasekaran, Suganthi; Karthikeyan, Sivashanmugam; Gothandam, Kodiveri Muthukaliannan

    2017-02-15

    Psychrotolerant bacteria isolated from natural and artificially cold environments were screened for synthesis of cold-active protease. The strain IMDY showing the highest protease production at 5°C was selected and phylogenetic analysis revealed that IMDY as novel bacterium with Chryseobacterium soli(T) as its nearest neighbor. Classical optimization enhanced the protease production from 18U/mg to 26U/mg and the enzyme was found to be active at low temperature, activity enhanced by CaCl2, inhibited by PMSF, stable against NaCl, and its activity retained in the presence of surfactants, organic solvents and detergents. On testing, the meat tenderization, myofibril fragmentation, pH, and TBA values were favorable in IMDY-protease treated meat compared to control. SDS profiling and SEM analysis also showed tenderization in meat samples. Hence, this study proposes to consider the cold-active protease from Chryseobacterium sp. IMDY as a pertinent candidate to develop potential applications in food processing industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Screening for thermotolerant ligninolytic fungi with laccase, lipase, and protease activity isolated in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cruz Ramírez, M G; Rivera-Ríos, J M; Téllez-Jurado, A; Maqueda Gálvez, A P; Mercado-Flores, Y; Arana-Cuenca, A

    2012-03-01

    The State of Hidalgo (Mexico) has a large area of forests known as the Huasteca Hidalguense, with a large variety of microorganisms inhabiting it. They represent an important resource from the ecological and technological point of view because they can be used in a broad variety of industrial processes. Due to the climatic conditions of this region, fungi inhabiting it must be thermophile or, at least, thermotolerant, as temperatures can be higher than 45°C in the summer, declining to 20°C in the winter. Use of ligninolytic fungi relies on their capacity to produce enzymes of industrial interest, a topic that has been under continuous research by academic and industrial investigators. Among the most important enzymes are proteases that are widely used due to their biotechnological applications with a high economic impact. Other enzymes, laccases, peroxidases, and lipases are of interest for the industries of the state of Hidalgo, especially in the textile industry, specifically in effluent processing. Fungi (n=156) were collected in the Huasteca Hidalguense, of which 100 were isolated in potato-dextrose-agar covered plates and maintained in tilted tubes. Afterwards, enzymatic activity (laccase, protease and lipase) was determined in the plates. The purpose was to select those fungi with the highest potential for biotechnological applications. Fungi generally grew at either 30°C or 37°C, and for some isolates enzymatic activities were detected at this higher temperature. Results are presented as the relation between enzymatic activity and growth rate: 60 fungi presented laccase activity, 49 had lipase activity, and none had protease activity. In most cases, enzymatic activity was higher than the growth rate, indicating that the isolated fungi have a great biotechnological potential. Statistical analysis revealed that isolates 31 (Trametes) and 8.1 (unidentified) have a larger potential to be studied as laccase-producing fungi. On the other hand, isolates 144

  13. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  14. Enhancement of Alkaline Protease Activity and Stability via Covalent Immobilization onto Hollow Core-Mesoporous Shell Silica Nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Abdelnasser Salah Shebl; Al-Salamah, Ali A.; El-Toni, Ahmed M.; Almaary, Khalid S.; El-Tayeb, Mohamed A.; Elbadawi, Yahya B.; Antranikian, Garabed

    2016-01-01

    The stability and reusability of soluble enzymes are of major concerns, which limit their industrial applications. Herein, alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto hollow core-mesoporous shell silica (HCMSS) nanospheres. Subsequently, the properties of immobilized proteases were evaluated. Non-, ethane- and amino-functionalized HCMSS nanospheres were synthesized and characterized. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto the synthesized nano-supports by physical and covalent immobilization approaches. However, protease immobilization by covalent attachment onto the activated HCMSS–NH2 nanospheres showed highest immobilization yield (75.6%) and loading capacity (88.1 μg protein/mg carrier) and was applied in the further studies. In comparison to free enzyme, the covalently immobilized protease exhibited a slight shift in the optimal pH from 10.5 to 11.0, respectively. The optimum temperature for catalytic activity of both free and immobilized enzyme was seen at 60 °C. However, while the free enzyme was completely inactivated when treated at 60 °C for 1 h the immobilized enzyme still retained 63.6% of its initial activity. The immobilized protease showed higher Vmax, kcat and kcat/Km, than soluble enzyme by 1.6-, 1.6- and 2.4-fold, respectively. In addition, the immobilized protease affinity to the substrate increased by about 1.5-fold. Furthermore, the enzyme stability in various organic solvents was significantly enhanced upon immobilization. Interestingly, the immobilized enzyme exhibited much higher stability in several commercial detergents including OMO, Tide, Ariel, Bonux and Xra by up to 5.2-fold. Finally, the immobilized protease maintained significant catalytic efficiency for twelve consecutive reaction cycles. These results suggest the effectiveness of the developed nanobiocatalyst as a candidate for detergent formulation and peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media. PMID:26840303

  15. Enhancement of Alkaline Protease Activity and Stability via Covalent Immobilization onto Hollow Core-Mesoporous Shell Silica Nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdelnasser Salah Shebl; Al-Salamah, Ali A; El-Toni, Ahmed M; Almaary, Khalid S; El-Tayeb, Mohamed A; Elbadawi, Yahya B; Antranikian, Garabed

    2016-01-29

    The stability and reusability of soluble enzymes are of major concerns, which limit their industrial applications. Herein, alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto hollow core-mesoporous shell silica (HCMSS) nanospheres. Subsequently, the properties of immobilized proteases were evaluated. Non-, ethane- and amino-functionalized HCMSS nanospheres were synthesized and characterized. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto the synthesized nano-supports by physical and covalent immobilization approaches. However, protease immobilization by covalent attachment onto the activated HCMSS-NH₂ nanospheres showed highest immobilization yield (75.6%) and loading capacity (88.1 μg protein/mg carrier) and was applied in the further studies. In comparison to free enzyme, the covalently immobilized protease exhibited a slight shift in the optimal pH from 10.5 to 11.0, respectively. The optimum temperature for catalytic activity of both free and immobilized enzyme was seen at 60 °C. However, while the free enzyme was completely inactivated when treated at 60 °C for 1 h the immobilized enzyme still retained 63.6% of its initial activity. The immobilized protease showed higher V(max), k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), than soluble enzyme by 1.6-, 1.6- and 2.4-fold, respectively. In addition, the immobilized protease affinity to the substrate increased by about 1.5-fold. Furthermore, the enzyme stability in various organic solvents was significantly enhanced upon immobilization. Interestingly, the immobilized enzyme exhibited much higher stability in several commercial detergents including OMO, Tide, Ariel, Bonux and Xra by up to 5.2-fold. Finally, the immobilized protease maintained significant catalytic efficiency for twelve consecutive reaction cycles. These results suggest the effectiveness of the developed nanobiocatalyst as a candidate for detergent formulation and peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media.

  16. Cloned Bacillus subtilis alkaline protease (aprA) gene showing high level of keratinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, T I

    1998-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis alkaline protease(aprA) gene was previously cloned on a pUBHO-derivative plasmid. High levels of expression and gene stability were demonstrated when B. subtilis cells were grown on the laboratory medium 2XSG. B. subtilis cells harboring the multicopy aprA gene were grown on basal medium, supplemented with 1 % chicken feather as a source of energy, carbon, and nitrogen. Proteolytic and keratinolytic activities were monitored throughout the cultivation time. A high level of keratinolytic activity was obtained, and this indicates that alkaline protease is acting as a keratinase. Furthermore, considerable amounts of soluble proteins and free amino acids were obtained as a result of the enzymatic hydrolysis of feather. Biodegradation of feather waste using these cells represents an alternative way to improve the nutritional value of feather, since feather waste is currently utilized on a limited basis as a dietary protein supplement for animal feedstuffs. Moreover, the release of free amino acids from feather and the secreted keratinase enzyme would promote industries based on feather waste.

  17. Benzophenone derivatives as cysteine protease inhibitors and biological activity against Leishmania(L.) amazonensis amastigotes.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Letícia; Alves, Karina Ferreira; Maciel-Rezende, Claudia Mara; Jesus, Larissa de Oliveira Passos; Pires, Francieli Ribeiro; Junior, Claudio Viegas; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Júdice, Wagner Alves de Souza; dos Santos, Marcelo Henrique; Marques, Marcos José

    2015-10-01

    The leishmanicidal potential of benzophenones has been described, some of them highlighting their potential as cysteine protease inhibitors. Therefore, this work described leishmanicidal activity of nine benzophenone derivatives (1a-c;2a-c;3a-c) against intramacrophage amastigote forms of Leishmania(L.)amazonensis (IC50) and the cytotoxic effect on murine peritoneal macrophages (CC50). The derivative 1c exhibited a selectivity index SI (CC50/IC50) of 6.7, besides cytotoxicity lower than Amphotericin B (p< 0.05). Moreover it showed inhibitory activity against papain (42.8±0.3, p<0.05), and when tested on trypanosomatids cysteine proteases 1c also proved to be a potent inhibitor of rCPB2.8, rCPB3.0 and cruzain, showing non-competitive inhibition mechanism by enzymatic assays in vitro.So, benzophenone 1c is interesting drug candidate prototype, with a multi-target directed mode of action, inhibiting rCPB2.8, rCPB3.0 and cruzain. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  19. C-terminal residues of mature Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 protease are critical for dimerization and catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kádas, János; Boross, Péter; Weber, Irene T.; Bagossi, Péter; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, József

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with a number of human diseases. Its protease is essential for the virus replication, and similar to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease, it is a potential target for chemotherapy. The primary sequence of HTLV-1 protease is substantially longer compared to that of HIV-1 protease, and the role of the ten C-terminal residues is controversial. We have expressed C-terminally truncated forms of the HTLV-1 protease with and without N-terminal histidine tags. Removal of five C-terminal residues caused four- to fourtyfold decrease of the specificity constants, while the removal of an additional five C-terminal residues rendered the protease completely inactive. The addition of the N-terminal histidine tag dramatically decreased the activity of the HTLV-1 protease forms. Pull-down experiments carried out with histidine-tagged forms, gelfiltration experiments and dimerization assays provided the first unequivocal experimental data for the role of the C-terminal residues in dimerization of the enzyme. There is a hydrophobic tunnel on the surface of HTLV-1 protease close to the terminal ends that is absent in HIV-1 protease. This hydrophobic tunnel can accommodate the C-terminal extra residues of HTLV-1 protease, which was predicted to stabilize the dimer of the full-length enzyme and provides an alternative target site for protease inhibition. PMID:18636969

  20. Protease-activated receptor-2 induces proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine gene expression in canine keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shingo; Maeda, Sadatoshi; Ohno, Koichi; Kaji, Noriyuki; Hori, Masatoshi; Fujino, Yasuhito; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2013-05-15

    Although the molecular basis of the allergenicity remains to be fully elucidated, the ability of allergens to elicit allergic responses is at least partly attributed to their proteolytic activity. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by site-specific proteolysis by serine proteases and is known to mediate inflammatory processes in various tissues. In this study, we investigated the effects of trypsin, a major serine protease, and a human PAR-2 agonist peptide (SLIGKV-NH2) on proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine gene expression in the canine keratinocyte cell line CPEK. The expression of PAR-2 mRNA and protein in CPEK cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The localization of PAR-2 in CPEK was examined by immunofluorescence. The mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The free intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was measured using the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye. CPEK cells constitutively expressed PAR-2 mRNA and protein. Stimulation of CPEK cells with trypsin induced significant upregulation of the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, P<0.05), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, P<0.01), thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17, P<0.01), and interleukin 8 (IL-8/CXCL8, P<0.01). Similarly, the PAR-2 agonist peptide increased the mRNA expression levels of TNF-α (P<0.05), GM-CSF (P<0.05), TARC/CCL17 (P<0.05), and IL-8/CXCL8 (P<0.05) in CPEK cells. Both trypsin and the PAR-2 agonist peptide increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and PAR-2 internalization. These results suggest that PAR-2 activation can augment inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in canine keratinocytes, and it may initiate allergic inflammation through the proteolytic activity of allergens in canine atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Anti-fibrinolytic and anti-microbial activities of a serine protease inhibitor from honeybee (Apis cerana) venom.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Choi, Yong Soo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia, Jingming; Jin, Byung Rae

    2017-10-01

    Bee venom contains a variety of peptide constituents, including low-molecular-weight protease inhibitors. While the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6 containing a trypsin inhibitor-like cysteine-rich domain was identified from honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom, no anti-fibrinolytic or anti-microbial roles for this inhibitor have been elucidated. In this study, we identified an Asiatic honeybee (A. cerana) venom serine protease inhibitor (AcVSPI) that was shown to act as a microbial serine protease inhibitor and plasmin inhibitor. AcVSPI was found to consist of a trypsin inhibitor-like domain that displays ten cysteine residues. Interestingly, the AcVSPI peptide sequence exhibited high similarity to the putative low-molecular-weight serine protease inhibitor Api m 6, which suggests that AcVSPI is an allergen Api m 6-like peptide. Recombinant AcVSPI was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, and it demonstrated inhibitory activity against trypsin, but not chymotrypsin. Additionally, AcVSPI has inhibitory effects against plasmin and microbial serine proteases; however, it does not have any detectable inhibitory effects on thrombin or elastase. Consistent with these inhibitory effects, AcVSPI inhibited the plasmin-mediated degradation of fibrin to fibrin degradation products. AcVSPI also bound to bacterial and fungal surfaces and exhibited anti-microbial activity against fungi as well as gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. These findings demonstrate the anti-fibrinolytic and anti-microbial roles of AcVSPI as a serine protease inhibitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-HIV-1 activity, protease inhibition and safety profile of extracts prepared from Rhus parviflora

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, extracts prepared from the leaves of Rhus parviflora Roxb. (Anacardiaceae) were evaluated for their anti-HIV activity, which have been traditionally used for the treatment of neurological disorders such as anxiety, insomnia and epilepsy. Methods Aqueous and 50% ethanolic extracts prepared from leaves of the plant were tested for their cytotoxicity and anti-HIV property using reporter gene based assays as well as human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Further these extracts were evaluated for their ability to inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease activity. Safety profile of the extracts was determined on viability of Lactobacillus sp., secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by vaginal keratinocytes and transepithelial resistance. Results Both aqueous (IC50 = 15 μg/ml) and 50% ethanolic (IC50 = 26 μg/ml) extracts prepared from leaves of R. parviflora showed anti-HIV activity in TZM-bl cells wherein the virus was treated with the extracts prior to infection. Further, both the extracts also inhibited virus load in HIV infected CEM-GFP cells and human PBLs. The anti-HIV activity is mediated through inhibition of HIV-1 protease activity. Both the extracts did not disturb the integrity of monolayer formed by intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The extracts when tested up to 100 μg/ml did not significantly reduce the viability of L. plantarum, L. fermentum, L. rhamnosus and L. casei. The extracts (100 μg/ml) did not reveal any cytotoxic effect on vaginal keratinocytes (Vk2/E6E7). Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by Vk2/E6E7 cells treated with both the plant extracts were within the non-inflammatory range. Conclusions The studies reported herein showed in vitro anti-HIV activity and preliminary safety profile of the extracts prepared from the leaves of R. parviflora. PMID:24059266

  3. Skeletal muscle protease activities in the early growth and development of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Lysenko, Liudmila A; Kantserova, Nadezda P; Kaivarainen, Elena I; Krupnova, Marina Yu; Nemova, Nina N

    2017-09-01

    Growth-related dynamics of intracellular protease activities in four year classes of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. 1758) parr and smolts inhabiting salmon rivers of northwestern Russia (the White Sea basin) were studied. Cathepsin B, cathepsin D, proteasome, and calpain activities in the skeletal muscles of salmon were assessed to investigate their relative contribution to the total protein degradation as well as to young fish growth process. It was confirmed that calpain activity dominates in salmon muscles while proteasome plays a minor role, in contrast to terrestrial vertebrates. Calpain and proteasome activities were maximal at the early post-larval stage (in parrs 0+) and declined with age (parrs 1+ through 2+) dropping to the lowest level in salmon smolts. Annual growth increments and proteolytic activities of calpains and proteasome in the muscles of salmon juveniles changed with age in an orchestrated manner, while lysosomal cathepsin activities increased with age. Comparing protease activities and growth increments in salmon parr and smolts we suggested that the partial suppression of the protein degradation could be a mechanism stimulating efficient growth in smoltifying salmon. Growth and smoltification-related dynamics of protease activities was quite similar in salmon populations from studied spawning rivers, such as Varzuga and Indera; however, some habitat-related differences were observed. Growth increments and protease activities varied in salmon parr 0+ (but not on later ages) inhabiting either main rivers or small tributaries apparently due to habitat difference on the resources for fish growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Horseshoe crab coagulation factor B. A unique serine protease zymogen activated by cleavage of an Ile-Ile bond.

    PubMed

    Muta, T; Oda, T; Iwanaga, S

    1993-10-05

    Horseshoe crab factor B is an intracellular serine protease zymogen involved in the bacterial endotoxin-responsive hemolymph coagulation cascade. cDNAs for factor B were isolated utilizing a polymerase chain reaction product using two primers derived from the partial amino acid sequence. The cloned cDNA of 1928 base pairs encoded 400 amino acid residues of factor B precursor. The first 23 amino acid residues constitute a presumed prepropeptide that may be processed by both a signal peptidase and a processing protease, similar to mammalian vitamin K-dependent protease precursors. The mature protein consists of 377 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 40,570 Da. The overall structure is highly homologous to that of limulus proclotting enzyme (35.9% identity), the substrate for active factor B in the cascade. Like the proclotting enzyme, mature factor B is composed of an amino-terminal "clip"-like domain and a carboxyl-terminal serine protease domain homologous to that of human plasma prekallikrein (36.5%). Internal sequences encode a unique activation peptide. Surprisingly, the cleavage sites of the zymogen factor B for activation by limulus active factor C were found to be an Arg-Ser and an Ile-Ile bond, the latter of which has not been found in any other protease zymogens. These cleavages result in the release of the activation peptide, which consists of 21 residues with a carboxyl-terminal isoleucine. These results indicate that the intracellular clotting system of the limulus hemocyte, like mammalian plasma clotting cascade, proceeds with the sequential activation of three serine protease zymogens: factor C, factor B, and proclotting enzyme.

  5. Reduction of protease activity in milk by continuous flow high-intensity pulsed electric field treatments.

    PubMed

    Bendicho, S; Barbosa-Cánovas, G V; Martín, O

    2003-03-01

    High-intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF) is a non-thermal food processing technology that is currently being investigated to inactivate microorganisms and certain enzymes, involving a limited increase of food temperature. Promising results have been obtained on the inactivation of microbial enzymes in milk when suspended in simulated milk ultrafiltrate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous HIPEF equipment on inactivating a protease from Bacillus subtilis inoculated in milk. Samples were subjected to HIPEF treatments of up to 866 micros of squared wave pulses at field strengths from 19.7 to 35.5 kV/cm, using a treatment chamber that consisted of eight colinear chambers connected in series. Moreover, the effects of different parameters such as pulse width (4 and 7 micros), pulse repetition rates (67, 89, and 111 Hz), and milk composition (skim and whole milk) were tested. Protease activity decreased with increased treatment time or field strength and pulse repetition rate. Regarding pulse width, no differences were observed between 4 and 7 micros pulses when total treatment time was considered. On the other hand, it was observed that milk composition affected the results since higher inactivation levels were reached in skim than in whole milk. The maximum inactivation (81%) was attained in skim milk after an 866-micros treatment at 35.5 kV/cm and 111 Hz.

  6. Insecticidal activity of two proteases against Spodoptera frugiperda larvae infected with recombinant baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Baculovirus comprise the largest group of insect viruses most studied worldwide, mainly because they efficiently kill agricutural insect pests. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses containing the ScathL gene from Sarcophaga peregrina (vSynScathL), and the Keratinase gene from the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus (vSynKerat), were constructed. and their insecticidal properties analysed against Spodoptera frugiperda larvae. Results Bioassays of third-instar and neonate S. frugiperda larvae with vSynScathL and vSynKerat showed a decrease in the time needed to kill the infected insects when compared to the wild type virus. We have also shown that both recombinants were able to increase phenoloxidase activity in the hemolymph of S. frugiperda larvae. The expression of proteases in infected larvae resulted in destruction of internal tissues late in infection, which could be the reason for the increased viral speed of kill. Conclusions Baculoviruses and their recombinant forms constitute viable alternatives to chemical insecticides. Recombinant baculoviruses containing protease genes can be added to the list of engineered baculoviruses with great potential to be used in integrated pest management programs. PMID:20587066

  7. Host Plants Indirectly Influence Plant Virus Transmission by Altering Gut Cysteine Protease Activity of Aphid Vectors*

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Patricia V.; Ghanim, Murad; Rebelo, Ana Rita; Santos, Rogerio S.; Orsburn, Benjamin C.; Gray, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, is a vector of the Potato leafroll virus (PLRV, Luteoviridae), transmitted exclusively by aphids in a circulative manner. PLRV transmission efficiency was significantly reduced when a clonal lineage of M. persicae was reared on turnip as compared with the weed physalis, and this was a transient effect caused by a host-switch response. A trend of higher PLRV titer in physalis-reared aphids as compared with turnip-reared aphids was observed at 24 h and 72 h after virus acquisition. The major difference in the proteomes of these aphids was the up-regulation of predicted lysosomal enzymes, in particular the cysteine protease cathepsin B (cathB), in aphids reared on turnip. The aphid midgut is the site of PLRV acquisition, and cathB and PLRV localization were starkly different in midguts of the aphids reared on the two host plants. In viruliferous aphids that were reared on turnip, there was near complete colocalization of cathB and PLRV at the cell membranes, which was not observed in physalis-reared aphids. Chemical inhibition of cathB restored the ability of aphids reared on turnip to transmit PLRV in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the increased activity of cathB and other cysteine proteases at the cell membrane indirectly decreased virus transmission by aphids. Understanding how the host plant influences virus transmission by aphids is critical for growers to manage the spread of virus among field crops. PMID:27932519

  8. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    SciTech Connect

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 thatmore » forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.« less

  9. Evidence for inactivation of cysteine proteases by reactive carbonyls via glycation of active site thiols

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jingmin; Dunlop, Rachael A.; Rodgers, Kenneth J.; Davies, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia, triose phosphate decomposition and oxidation reactions generate reactive aldehydes in vivo. These compounds react non-enzymatically with protein side chains and N-terminal amino groups to give adducts and cross-links, and hence modified proteins. Previous studies have shown that free or protein-bound carbonyls inactivate glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase with concomitant loss of thiol groups [Morgan, Dean and Davies (2002) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 403, 259–269]. It was therefore hypothesized that modification of lysosomal cysteine proteases (and the structurally related enzyme papain) by free and protein-bound carbonyls may modulate the activity of these components of the cellular proteolytic machinery responsible for the removal of modified proteins and thereby contribute to a decreased removal of modified proteins from cells. It is shown that MGX (methylglyoxal), GO (glyoxal) and glycolaldehyde, but not hydroxyacetone and glucose, inhibit catB (cathepsin B), catL (cathepsin L) and catS (cathepsin S) activity in macrophage cell lysates, in a concentration-dependent manner. Protein-bound carbonyls produced similar inhibition with both cell lysates and intact macrophage cells. Inhibition was also observed with papain, with this paralleled by loss of the active site cysteine residue and formation of the adduct species S-carboxymethylcysteine, from GO, in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of autolysis of papain by MGX, along with cross-link formation, was detected by SDS/PAGE. Treatment of papain and catS with the dialdehyde o-phthalaldehyde resulted in enzyme inactivation and an intra-molecular active site cysteine–lysine cross-link. These results demonstrate that reactive aldehydes inhibit cysteine proteases by modification of the active site cysteine residue. This process may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in tissues of people with diabetes and age-related pathologies, including atherosclerosis, cataract and

  10. Structural basis for the ATP-independent proteolytic activity of LonB proteases and reclassification of their AAA+ modules.

    PubMed

    An, Young Jun; Na, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Myung-Il; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2015-10-01

    Lon proteases degrade defective or denature proteins as well as some folded proteins for the control of cellular protein quality. There are two types of Lon proteases, LonA and LonB. Each consists of two functional components: a protease component and an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+ module). Here, we report the 2.03 -resolution crystal structure of the isolated AAA+ module (iAAA+ module) of LonB from Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 (TonLonB). The iAAA+ module, having no bound nucleotide, adopts a conformation virtually identical to the ADP-bound conformation of AAA+ modules in the hexameric structure of TonLonB; this provides insights into the ATP-independent proteolytic activity observed in a LonB protease. Structural comparison of AAA+ modules between LonA and LonB revealed that the AAA+ modules of Lon proteases are separated into two distinct clades depending on their structural features. The AAA+ module of LonB belongs to the -H2 & Ins1 insert clade (HINS clade)- defined for the first time in this study, while the AAA+ module of LonA is a member of the HCLR clade.

  11. Functional assembly of intrinsic coagulation proteases on monocytes and platelets. Comparison between cofactor activities induced by thrombin and factor Xa

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Generation of coagulation factor Xa by the intrinsic pathway protease complex is essential for normal activation of the coagulation cascade in vivo. Monocytes and platelets provide membrane sites for assembly of components of this protease complex, factors IXa and VIII. Under biologically relevant conditions, expression of functional activity by this complex is associated with activation of factor VIII to VIIIa. In the present studies, autocatalytic regulatory pathways operating on monocyte and platelet membranes were investigated by comparing the cofactor function of thrombin-activated factor VIII to that of factor Xa-activated factor VIII. Reciprocal functional titrations with purified human factor VIII and factor IXa were performed at fixed concentrations of human monocytes, CaCl2, factor X, and either factor IXa or factor VIII. Factor VIII was preactivated with either thrombin or factor Xa, and reactions were initiated by addition of factor X. Rates of factor X activation were measured using chromogenic substrate specific for factor Xa. The K1/2 values, i.e., concentration of factor VIIIa at which rates were half maximal, were 0.96 nM with thrombin- activated factor VIII and 1.1 nM with factor Xa-activated factor VIII. These values are close to factor VIII concentration in plasma. The Vsat, i.e., rates at saturating concentrations of factor VIII, were 33.3 and 13.6 nM factor Xa/min, respectively. The K1/2 and Vsat values obtained in titrations with factor IXa were not significantly different from those obtained with factor VIII. In titrations with factor X, the values of Michaelis-Menten coefficients (Km) were 31.7 nM with thrombin- activated factor VIII, and 14.2 nM with factor Xa-activated factor VIII. Maximal rates were 23.4 and 4.9 nM factor Xa/min, respectively. The apparent catalytic efficiency was similar with either form of factor VIIIa. Kinetic profiles obtained with platelets as a source of membrane were comparable to those obtained with monocytes

  12. Jojoba seed meal proteins associated with proteolytic and protease inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Madan K; Peri, Irena; Smirnoff, Patricia; Birk, Yehudith; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi

    2002-09-25

    The jojoba, Simmondsia chinensis, is a characteristic desert plant native to the Sonoran desert. The jojoba meal after oil extraction is rich in protein. The major jojoba proteins were albumins (79%) and globulins (21%), which have similar amino acid compositions and also showed a labile thrombin-inhibitory activity. SDS-PAGE showed two major proteins at 50 kDa and 25 kDa both in the albumins and in the globulins. The 25 kDa protein has trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitory activities. In vitro digestibility of the globulins and albumins resembled that of casein and soybean protein concentrates and was increased after heat treatment. The increased digestibility achieved by boiling may be attributed to inactivation of the protease inhibitors and denaturation of proteins.

  13. Retaining in-gel zymographic activity of cysteine proteases via a cysteine-supplemented running buffer.

    PubMed

    Vootukuri Reddy, Sreekanth; Philpott, Mike P; Trigiante, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Zymography is a powerful technique to separate and identify different enzymatic activities on a standard acrylamide gel. For oxidation prone enzymes such as cysteine proteases however, the oxidizing species generated by electrolysis of the gel running buffer may result in partial or complete inactivation, thus compromising the final readout. This can be only partially remedied by subsequent treatment of the gel with reducing agents. We demonstrate the generation of reactive oxidizing species during electrophoresis and discovered that supplementation of the gel running buffer with a minimum of 5 mM cysteine prevents enzyme inactivation and allows retention of proteolytic activity as measured by zymography on model substrate N α-benzoyl-l-arginine p-nitroanilide, without at the same time altering the mobilities of the gel proteins. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Metal-Mediated Modulation of Streptococcal Cysteine Protease Activity and Its Biological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chella Krishnan, Karthickeyan; Mukundan, Santhosh; Landero Figueroa, Julio A.; Caruso, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcal cysteine protease (SpeB), the major secreted protease produced by group A streptococcus (GAS), cleaves both host and bacterial proteins and contributes importantly to the pathogenesis of invasive GAS infections. Modulation of SpeB expression and/or its activity during invasive GAS infections has been shown to affect bacterial virulence and infection severity. Expression of SpeB is regulated by the GAS CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system, and we demonstrated that bacteria with mutations in the CovR-CovS two-component regulatory system are selected for during localized GAS infections and that these bacteria lack SpeB expression and exhibit a hypervirulent phenotype. Additionally, in a separate study, we showed that expression of SpeB can also be modulated by human transferrin- and/or lactoferrin-mediated iron chelation. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to investigate the possible roles of iron and other metals in modulating SpeB expression and/or activity in a manner that would potentiate bacterial virulence. Here, we report that the divalent metals zinc and copper inhibit SpeB activity at the posttranslational level. Utilizing online metal-binding site prediction servers, we identified two putative metal-binding sites in SpeB, one of which involves the catalytic-dyad residues 47Cys and 195His. Based on our findings, we propose that zinc and/or copper availability in the bacterial microenvironment can modulate the proteolytic activity of SpeB in a manner that preserves the integrity of several other virulence factors essential for bacterial survival and dissemination within the host and thereby may exacerbate the severity of invasive GAS infections. PMID:24799625

  15. Protease-activated receptor 1-dependent neuronal damage involves NMDA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Hamill, Cecily E; Mannaioni, Guido; Lyuboslavsky, Polina; Sastre, Aristide A; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2009-05-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a G-protein coupled receptor that is expressed throughout the central nervous system. PAR1 activation by brain-derived as well as blood-derived proteases has been shown to have variable and complex effects in a variety of animal models of neuronal injury and inflammation. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of PAR1 on lesion volume in wild-type or PAR1-/- C57Bl/6 mice subjected to transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery or injected with NMDA in the striatum. We found that removal of PAR1 reduced infarct volume following transient focal ischemia to 57% of control. Removal of PAR1 or application of a PAR1 antagonist also reduced the neuronal injury associated with intrastriatal injection of NMDA to 60% of control. To explore whether NMDA receptor potentiation by PAR1 activation contributes to the harmful effects of PAR1, we investigated the effect of NMDA receptor antagonists on the neuroprotective phenotype of PAR1-/- mice. We found that MK801 reduced penumbral but not core neuronal injury in mice subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion or intrastriatal NMDA injection. Lesion volumes in both models were not significantly different between PAR1-/- mice treated with and without MK801. Use of the NMDA receptor antagonist and dissociative anesthetic ketamine also renders NMDA-induced lesion volumes identical in PAR1-/- mice and wild-type mice. These data suggest that the ability of PAR1 activation to potentiate NMDA receptor function may underlie its harmful actions during injury.

  16. Studies on screening, isolation and purification of a fibrinolytic protease from an isolate (VK12) of Ganoderma lucidum and evaluation of its antithrombotic activity.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, Sekar; Palani, Perumal; Nishanthi, Ramasami; Kaviyarasan, Venkatesan

    2011-01-01

    Antithrombotic activity of a protease purified from a medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum, has been evaluated platelet aggregation in vitro and pulmonary thrombosis in vivo. The purified protease exhibited concentration dependent inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation induced by ADP (adenosine diphosphate), with an IC(50) value of 2.4 mg/mL. The purified protease protected mice against thrombotic death or paralysis induced by collagen and epinephrine in a dose dependent manner when administered orally. It produced a significant inhibition of thrombotic death or paralysis at 60 µg/kg body weight, while aspirin produced a significant inhibition of thrombosis at 10-20 mg/kg body weight. The purified protease also has showed fibrinolytic activity and alters coagulation parameters such as activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and thrombin time (TT) in rat platelet. These results suggested that the antithrombotic activity of Ganoderma lucidum protease might be due to antiplatelet activity rather than anticoagulation activity.

  17. A novel alkaline protease with antiproliferative activity from fresh fruiting bodies of the toxic wild mushroom Amanita farinosa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Zhao, Yongchang; Chai, Hongmei; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-01-01

    A novel protease with a molecular mass of 15 kDa was purified from fresh fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Amanita farinosa. The purification protocol entailed anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, cation exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. The protease was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose but adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and SP-Sepharose. It demonstrated a single 15-kDa band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) and a 15-kDa peak in gel filtration. The optimal pH and optimal temperature of the protease were pH 8.0 and 65 °C, respectively. Proliferation of human hepatoma HepG2 cells was inhibited by the protease with an IC(50) of 25 µM. The protease did not have antifungal or ribonuclease activity.

  18. Extracellular Protease of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, a Biocontrol Factor with Activity against the Root-Knot Nematode Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imran Ali; Haas, Dieter; Heeb, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    In Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, mutation of the GacA-controlled aprA gene (encoding the major extracellular protease) or the gacA regulatory gene resulted in reduced biocontrol activity against the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita during tomato and soybean infection. Culture supernatants of strain CHA0 inhibited egg hatching and induced mortality of M. incognita juveniles more strongly than did supernatants of aprA and gacA mutants, suggesting that AprA protease contributes to biocontrol. PMID:16151170

  19. Protease-Activated Receptor-1 Contributes to Cardiac Remodeling and Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pawlinski, Rafal; Tencati, Michael; Hampton, Craig R.; Shishido, Tetsuro; Bullard, Tara A.; Casey, Liam M.; Andrade-Gordon, Patricia; Kotzsch, Matthias; Spring, Denise; Luther, Thomas; Abe, Jun-ichi; Pohlman, Timothy H.; Verrier, Edward D.; Blaxall, Burns C.; Mackman, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    Background Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) is the high-affinity receptor for the coagulation protease thrombin. It is expressed by a variety of cell types in the heart, including cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts. We have shown that tissue factor (TF) and thrombin contribute to infarct size after cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Moreover, in vitro studies have shown that PAR-1 signaling induces hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes and proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of PAR-1 in infarction, cardiac remodeling, and hypertrophy after I/R injury. In addition, we analyzed the effect of overexpression of PAR-1 on cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results We found that PAR-1 deficiency reduced dilation of the left ventricle and reduced impairment of left ventricular function 2 weeks after I/R injury. Activation of ERK1/2 was increased in injured PAR-1−/− mice compared with wild-type mice; however, PAR-1 deficiency did not affect infarct size. Cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of PAR-1 in mice induced eccentric hypertrophy (increased left ventricular dimension and normal left ventricular wall thickness) and dilated cardiomyopathy. Deletion of the TF gene in cardiomyocytes reduced the eccentric hypertrophy in mice overexpressing PAR-1. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that PAR-1 contributes to cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Moreover, overexpression of PAR-1 on cardiomyocytes induced eccentric hypertrophy. Inhibition of PAR-1 after myocardial infarction may represent a novel therapy to reduce hypertrophy and heart failure in humans. PMID:17967980

  20. Live-Cell Imaging of Protease Activity: Assays to Screen Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Chalasani, Anita; Ji, Kyungmin; Sameni, Mansoureh; Mazumder, Samia H; Xu, Yong; Moin, Kamiar; Sloane, Bonnie F

    2017-01-01

    Methodologies to image and quantify the activity of proteolytic enzymes have been developed in an effort to identify protease-related druggable pathways that are involved in malignant progression of cancer. Our laboratory has pioneered techniques for functional live-cell imaging of protease activity in pathomimetic avatars for breast cancer. We analyze proteolysis in the context of proliferation and formation of structures by tumor cells in 3-D cultures over time (4D). In order to recapitulate the cellular composition and architecture of tumors in the pathomimetic avatars, we include other tumor-associated cells (e.g., fibroblasts, myoepithelial cells, microvascular endothelial cells). We also model noncellular aspects of the tumor microenvironment such as acidic pericellular pH. Use of pathomimetic avatars in concert with various types of imaging probes has allowed us to image, quantify, and follow the dynamics of proteolysis in the tumor microenvironment and to test interventions that impact directly or indirectly on proteolytic pathways. To facilitate use of the pathomimetic avatars for screening of therapeutic modalities, we have designed and fabricated custom 3D culture chambers with multiple wells that are either individual or connected by a channel to allow cells to migrate between wells. Optical glass microscope slides underneath an acrylic plate allow the cultures to be imaged with an inverted microscope. Fluid ports in the acrylic plate are at a level above the 3D cultures to allow introduction of culture media and test agents such as drugs into the wells and the harvesting of media conditioned by the cultures for immunochemical and biochemical analyses. We are using the pathomimetic avatars to identify druggable pathways, screen drug and natural product libraries and accelerate entry of validated drugs or natural products into clinical trials.

  1. Preparation, Characterization and Activity of a Peptide-Cellulosic Aerogel Protease Sensor from Cotton.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Fontenot, Krystal R; Prevost, Nicolette T; Pircher, Nicole; Liebner, Falk; Condon, Brian D

    2016-10-26

    Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA) provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties, like interconnected high porosity and specific surface area, suitable for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization and activity of peptide-nanocellulose aerogels (PepNA) made from unprocessed cotton and designed with protease detection activity. Low-density cellulosic aerogels were prepared from greige cotton by employing calcium thiocyanate octahydrate/lithium chloride as a direct cellulose dissolving medium. Subsequent casting, coagulation, solvent exchange and supercritical carbon dioxide drying afforded homogeneous cellulose II aerogels of fibrous morphology. The cotton-based aerogel had a porosity of 99% largely dominated by mesopores (2-50 nm) and an internal surface of 163 m²·g -1 . A fluorescent tripeptide-substrate (succinyl-alanine-proline-alanine-4-amino-7-methyl-coumarin) was tethered to NA by (1) esterification of cellulose C6 surface hydroxyl groups with glycidyl-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC), (2) deprotection and (3) coupling of the immobilized glycine with the tripeptide. Characterization of the NA and PepNA included techniques, such as elemental analysis, mass spectral analysis, attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging, nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and bioactivity studies. The degree of substitution of the peptide analog attached to the anhydroglucose units of PepNA was 0.015. The findings from mass spectral analysis and attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging indicated that the peptide substrate was immobilized on to the surface of the NA. Nitrogen adsorption revealed a high specific surface area and a highly porous system, which supports the open porous structure observed from scanning electron microscopy images. Bioactivity studies of PepNA revealed a detection sensitivity of 0.13 units/milliliter for human neutrophil elastase, a diagnostic biomarker for inflammatory diseases. The

  2. Preparation, Characterization and Activity of a Peptide-Cellulosic Aerogel Protease Sensor from Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. Vincent; Fontenot, Krystal R.; Prevost, Nicolette T.; Pircher, Nicole; Liebner, Falk; Condon, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA) provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties, like interconnected high porosity and specific surface area, suitable for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization and activity of peptide-nanocellulose aerogels (PepNA) made from unprocessed cotton and designed with protease detection activity. Low-density cellulosic aerogels were prepared from greige cotton by employing calcium thiocyanate octahydrate/lithium chloride as a direct cellulose dissolving medium. Subsequent casting, coagulation, solvent exchange and supercritical carbon dioxide drying afforded homogeneous cellulose II aerogels of fibrous morphology. The cotton-based aerogel had a porosity of 99% largely dominated by mesopores (2–50 nm) and an internal surface of 163 m2·g−1. A fluorescent tripeptide-substrate (succinyl-alanine-proline-alanine-4-amino-7-methyl-coumarin) was tethered to NA by (1) esterification of cellulose C6 surface hydroxyl groups with glycidyl-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC), (2) deprotection and (3) coupling of the immobilized glycine with the tripeptide. Characterization of the NA and PepNA included techniques, such as elemental analysis, mass spectral analysis, attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging, nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and bioactivity studies. The degree of substitution of the peptide analog attached to the anhydroglucose units of PepNA was 0.015. The findings from mass spectral analysis and attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging indicated that the peptide substrate was immobilized on to the surface of the NA. Nitrogen adsorption revealed a high specific surface area and a highly porous system, which supports the open porous structure observed from scanning electron microscopy images. Bioactivity studies of PepNA revealed a detection sensitivity of 0.13 units/milliliter for human neutrophil elastase, a diagnostic biomarker for inflammatory diseases. The

  3. Defective thrombus formation in mice lacking endogenous factor VII activating protease (FSAP).

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Saravanan; Thielmann, Ina; Morowski, Martina; Pragst, Ingo; Sandset, Per Morten; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Etscheid, Michael; Kanse, Sandip M

    2015-04-01

    Factor VII (FVII) activating protease (FSAP) is a circulating protease with a putative function in blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. Genetic epidemiological studies have implied a role for FSAP in carotid stenosis, stroke and thrombosis. To date, no in vivo evidence is available to support these claims. We have, for the first time, used FSAP-/- mice to define its role in thrombosis and haemostasis in vivo and to characterise the molecular mechanisms involved. FeCl3-induced arterial thrombosis in carotid and mesenteric artery revealed that the occlusion time was significantly increased in FSAP-/- mice (p< 0.01) and that some FSAP-/- mice did not occlude at all. FSAP-/- mice were protected from lethal pulmonary thromboembolism induced by collagen/ epinephrine infusion (p< 0.01). Although no spontaneous bleeding was evident, in the tail bleeding assay a re-bleeding pattern was observed in FSAP-/- mice. To explain these observations at a mechanistic level we then determined how haemostasis factors and putative FSAP substrates were altered in FSAP-/- mice. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) levels were higher in FSAP-/- mice compared to WT mice whereas FVIIa levels were unchanged. Other coagulation factors as well as markers of platelet activation and function revealed no significant differences between WT and FSAP-/- mice. This phenotype of FSAP-/- mice could be reversed by application of exogenous FSAP. In conclusion, a lack of endogenous FSAP impaired the formation of stable, occlusive thrombi in mice. The underlying in vivo effect of FSAP is more likely to be related to the modulation of TFPI rather than FVIIa.

  4. Studies on activity, distribution, and zymogram of protease, α-amylase, and lipase in the paddlefish Polyodon spathula.

    PubMed

    Ji, H; Sun, H T; Xiong, D M

    2012-06-01

    A series of biochemical determination and electrophoretic observations have been conducted to analyze the activities and characteristics of protease, α-amylase, and lipase of paddlefish Polyodon spathula. The results obtained have been compared with those of bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis) and hybrid sturgeon (Huso dauricus ♀ × Acipenser schrenki Brandt ♂), in order to increase available knowledge of the physiological characteristics of this sturgeon species and to gain information with regard to its nutrition. Further, a comparative study of enzymatic activity, distribution, and characterization between commercial feed-reared paddlefish (CG) and natural live food-reared (NG) paddlefish was conducted. Results showed that higher proteolytic activity was observed in the pH range 2.5-3.0 and at a pH of 7.0 for paddlefish. Levels of acid protease activity of paddlefish were similar to that of hybrid sturgeon, and significantly higher than that of bighead carp. The inhibition assay of paddlefish showed that the rate of inhibition of tosyl-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone was approximately 2.6-fold that of tosyl-lysine chloromethyl ketone. There was no significant difference observed for acid protease activity between PG and CG groups, whereas the activity of alkaline protease, α-amylase, and lipase in the PG group were significantly lower than those in the CG group. The substrate sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis further showed that there were certain types of enzymes, especially α-amylase, with similar molecular mass in the paddlefish and hybrid sturgeon. It can be inferred that acid digestion was main mechanism for protein hydrolysis in paddlefish, as reported for other fishes with a stomach. This indicates that the paddlefish requires higher alkaline protease, α-amylase, and lipase activity to digest natural live food.

  5. Antioxidant Activities of Hydrolysates of Arca Subcrenata Prepared with Three Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liyan; Li, Tingfei; Yu, Rongmin; Yan, Chunyan; Ren, Shengfang; Zhao, Yu

    2008-01-01

    In order to get products with antioxidant activity from Arca subcrenata Lischke, the optimal hydrolase and hydrolysis conditions were investigated in the paper. Three proteases (neutrase, alcalase and papain) were applied to hydrolyze the homogenate of A. subcrenata. An orthogonal design was used to optimize hydrolysis conditions, and the pH-stat methods was used to determine the degree of hydrolysis. Viewed from the angle of reducing power, such as scavenging activities against α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and hydrogen peroxide, the antioxidant activities of the alcalase hydrolysate (AH) were superior to neutrase hydrolysate (NH) and papain hydrolysate (PH), and its EC50 values in DPPH radical and hydrogen peroxide scavenging effect were 6.23 mg/ml and 19.09 mg/ml, respectively. Moreover, compared with products hydrolyzed by neutrase and papain, the molecular mass of AH was lower and its content of amino acid of peptides was higher. Therefore, alcalase was selected as the optimal enzyme to produce active ingredients since its hydrolysate exhibited the best antioxidant activity among them and possessed large amount of potential active peptides. PMID:19172198

  6. Dual function of a bee venom serine protease: prophenoloxidase-activating factor in arthropods and fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme in mammals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Young Moo; Lee, Kwang Sik; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Kim, Bo Yeon; Sohn, Mi Ri; Roh, Jong Yul; Je, Yeon Ho; Kim, Nam Jung; Kim, Iksoo; Woo, Soo Dong; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2010-05-03

    Bee venom contains a variety of peptides and enzymes, including serine proteases. While the presence of serine proteases in bee venom has been demonstrated, the role of these proteins in bee venom has not been elucidated. Furthermore, there is currently no information available regarding the melanization response or the fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bee venom serine protease, and the molecular mechanism of its action remains unknown. Here we show that bee venom serine protease (Bi-VSP) is a multifunctional enzyme. In insects, Bi-VSP acts as an arthropod prophenoloxidase (proPO)-activating factor (PPAF), thereby triggering the phenoloxidase (PO) cascade. Bi-VSP injected through the stinger induces a lethal melanization response in target insects by modulating the innate immune response. In mammals, Bi-VSP acts similarly to snake venom serine protease, which exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Bi-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products, defining roles for Bi-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings provide a novel view of the mechanism of bee venom in which the bee venom serine protease kills target insects via a melanization strategy and exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity.

  7. Basis Tetrapeptides as Potent Intracellular Inhibitors of type A Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, M.; Swaminathan, S.; Oyler, G.

    2011-01-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent of all toxins that cause flaccid muscle paralysis leading to death. They are also potential biothreat agents. A systematic investigation of various short peptide inhibitors of the BoNT protease domain with a 17-residue peptide substrate led to arginine-arginine-glycine-cysteine having a basic tetrapeptide structure as the most potent inhibitor. When assayed in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), the inhibitory effect was drastically reduced. Replacing the terminal cysteine with one hydrophobic residue eliminated the DTT effect but with two hydrophobic residues made the pentapeptide a poor inhibitor. Replacing the first arginine with cysteine or addingmore » an additional cysteine at the N terminus did not improve inhibition. When assessed using mouse brain lysates, the tetrapeptides also inhibited BoNT/A cleavage of the endogenous SNAP-25. The peptides penetrated the neuronal cell lines, N2A and BE(2)-M17, without adversely affecting metabolic functions as measured by ATP production and P-38 phosphorylation. Biological activity of the peptides persisted within cultured chick motor neurons and rat and mouse cerebellar neurons for more than 40 h and inhibited BoNT/A protease action inside the neurons in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Our results define a tetrapeptide as the smallest peptide inhibitor in the backdrop of a large substrate protein of 200+ amino acids having multiple interaction regions with its cognate enzyme. The inhibitors should also be valuable candidates for drug development.« less

  8. Host Plants Indirectly Influence Plant Virus Transmission by Altering Gut Cysteine Protease Activity of Aphid Vectors.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Patricia V; Ghanim, Murad; Alexander, Mariko; Rebelo, Ana Rita; Santos, Rogerio S; Orsburn, Benjamin C; Gray, Stewart; Cilia, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae , is a vector of the Potato leafroll virus (PLRV, Luteoviridae), transmitted exclusively by aphids in a circulative manner. PLRV transmission efficiency was significantly reduced when a clonal lineage of M. persicae was reared on turnip as compared with the weed physalis, and this was a transient effect caused by a host-switch response. A trend of higher PLRV titer in physalis-reared aphids as compared with turnip-reared aphids was observed at 24 h and 72 h after virus acquisition. The major difference in the proteomes of these aphids was the up-regulation of predicted lysosomal enzymes, in particular the cysteine protease cathepsin B (cathB), in aphids reared on turnip. The aphid midgut is the site of PLRV acquisition, and cathB and PLRV localization were starkly different in midguts of the aphids reared on the two host plants. In viruliferous aphids that were reared on turnip, there was near complete colocalization of cathB and PLRV at the cell membranes, which was not observed in physalis-reared aphids. Chemical inhibition of cathB restored the ability of aphids reared on turnip to transmit PLRV in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the increased activity of cathB and other cysteine proteases at the cell membrane indirectly decreased virus transmission by aphids. Understanding how the host plant influences virus transmission by aphids is critical for growers to manage the spread of virus among field crops. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. A Functional Interplay between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Residues 77 and 93 Involved in Differential Regulation of Precursor Autoprocessing and Mature Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Counts, Christopher J.; Ho, P. Shing; Donlin, Maureen J.; Tavis, John E.; Chen, Chaoping

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is a viral enzyme vital to the production of infectious virions. It is initially synthesized as part of the Gag-Pol polyprotein precursor in the infected cell. The free mature PR is liberated as a result of precursor autoprocessing upon virion release. We previously described a model system to examine autoprocessing in transfected mammalian cells. Here, we report that a covariance analysis of miniprecursor (p6*-PR) sequences derived from drug naïve patients identified a series of amino acid pairs that vary together across independent viral isolates. These covariance pairs were used to build the first topology map of the miniprecursor that suggests high levels of interaction between the p6* peptide and the mature PR. Additionally, several PR-PR covariance pairs are located far from each other (>12 Å Cα to Cα) relative to their positions in the mature PR structure. Biochemical characterization of one such covariance pair (77–93) revealed that each residue shows distinct preference for one of three alkyl amino acids (V, I, and L) and that a polar or charged amino acid at either of these two positions abolishes precursor autoprocessing. The most commonly observed 77V is preferred by the most commonly observed 93I, but the 77I variant is preferred by other 93 variances (L, V, or M) in supporting precursor autoprocessing. Furthermore, the 77I93V covariant enhanced precursor autoprocessing and Gag polyprotein processing but decreased the mature PR activity. Therefore, both covariance and biochemical analyses support a functional association between residues 77 and 93, which are spatially distant from each other in the mature PR structure. Our data also suggests that these covariance pairs differentially regulate precursor autoprocessing and the mature protease activity. PMID:25893662

  10. Increases in activity of proteasome and papain-like cysteine protease in Arabidopsis autophagy mutants: back-up compensatory effect or cell-death promoting effect?

    PubMed

    Havé, Marien; Balliau, Thierry; Cottyn-Boitte, Betty; Dérond, Emeline; Cueff, Gwendal; Soulay, Fabienne; Lornac, Aurélia; Reichman, Pavel; Dissmeyer, Nico; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Gallois, Patrick; Rajjou, Loïc; Zivy, Michel; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2018-03-14

    Autophagy is essential for protein degradation, nutrient recycling, and nitrogen remobilization. Autophagy is induced during leaf ageing and in response to nitrogen starvation, and is known to play a fundamental role in nutrient recycling for remobilization and seed filling. Accordingly, ageing leaves of Arabidopsis autophagy mutants (atg) have been shown to over-accumulate proteins and peptides, possibly because of a reduced protein degradation capacity. Surprisingly, atg leaves also displayed higher protease activities. The work reported here aimed at identifying the nature of the proteases and protease activities that accumulated differentially (higher or lower) in the atg mutants. Protease identification was performed using shotgun LC-MS/MS proteome analyses and activity-based protein profiling (ABPP). The results showed that the chloroplast FTSH (FILAMENTATION TEMPERATURE SENSITIVE H) and DEG (DEGRADATION OF PERIPLASMIC PROTEINS) proteases and several extracellular serine proteases [subtilases (SBTs) and serine carboxypeptidase-like (SCPL) proteases] were less abundant in atg5 mutants. By contrast, proteasome-related proteins and cytosolic or vacuole cysteine proteases were more abundant in atg5 mutants. Rubisco degradation assays and ABPP showed that the activities of proteasome and papain-like cysteine protease were increased in atg5 mutants. Whether these proteases play a back-up role in nutrient recycling and remobilization in atg mutants or act to promote cell death is discussed in relation to their accumulation patterns in the atg5 mutant compared with the salicylic acid-depleted atg5/sid2 double-mutant, and in low nitrate compared with high nitrate conditions. Several of the proteins identified are indeed known as senescence- and stress-related proteases or as spontaneous cell-death triggering factors.

  11. Bacillus subtilis Intramembrane Protease RasP Activity in Escherichia coli and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Parrell, Daniel; Zhang, Yang; Olenic, Sandra; Kroos, Lee

    2017-10-01

    RasP is a predicted intramembrane metalloprotease of Bacillus subtilis that has been proposed to cleave the stress response anti-sigma factors RsiW and RsiV, the cell division protein FtsL, and remnant signal peptides within their transmembrane segments. To provide evidence for direct effects of RasP on putative substrates, we developed a heterologous coexpression system. Since expression of catalytically inactive RasP E21A inhibited expression of other membrane proteins in Escherichia coli , we added extra transmembrane segments to RasP E21A, which allowed accumulation of most other membrane proteins. A corresponding active version of RasP appeared to promiscuously cleave coexpressed membrane proteins, except those with a large periplasmic domain. However, stable cleavage products were not observed, even in clpP mutant E. coli Fusions of transmembrane segment-containing parts of FtsL and RsiW to E. coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) also resulted in proteins that appeared to be RasP substrates upon coexpression in E. coli , including FtsL with a full-length C-terminal domain (suggesting that prior cleavage by a site 1 protease is unnecessary) and RsiW designed to mimic the PrsW site 1 cleavage product (suggesting that further trimming by extracytoplasmic protease is unnecessary). Purified RasP cleaved His 6 -MBP-RsiW(73-118) in vitro within the RsiW transmembrane segment based on mass spectrometry analysis, demonstrating that RasP is an intramembrane protease. Surprisingly, purified RasP failed to cleave His 6 -MBP-FtsL(23-117). We propose that the lack of α-helix-breaking residues in the FtsL transmembrane segment creates a requirement for the membrane environment and/or an additional protein(s) in order for RasP to cleave FtsL. IMPORTANCE Intramembrane proteases govern important signaling pathways in nearly all organisms. In bacteria, they function in stress responses, cell division, pathogenesis, and other processes. Their membrane-associated substrates are

  12. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  13. Protease activities triggered byRalstonia solanacearuminfection in susceptible and tolerant tomato lines.

    PubMed

    Planas-Marquès, Marc; Bernardo-Faura, Martí; Paulus, Judith Katharina; Kaschani, Farnusch; Kaiser, Markus; Valls, Marc; van der Hoorn, Renier; Coll, Nuria Sanchez

    2018-03-09

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a powerful proteomic technique to display protein activities in a proteome. It is based on the use of small molecular probes that react with the active site of proteins in an activity-dependent manner. We used ABPP to dissect the protein activity changes that occur in the intercellular spaces of tolerant (Hawaii 7996) and susceptible (Marmande) tomato plants in response to R. solanacearum, the causing agent of bacterial wilt, one of the most destructive bacterial diseases in plants. The intercellular space -or apoplast- is the first battlefield where the plant faces R. solanacearum. Here, we explore the possibility that the limited R. solanacearum colonization reported in the apoplast of tolerant tomato is partly determined by its active proteome. Our work reveals specific activation of papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs) and serine hydrolases (SHs) in the leaf apoplast of the tolerant tomato Hawaii 7996 upon R. solanacearum infection. In particular, the P69 family members P69C and P69F, and an unannotated lipase (Solyc02g077110.2.1), were found to be post-translationally activated. In addition, protein network analysis showed that deeper changes in network topology take place in the susceptible tomato variety, suggesting that the tolerant cultivar might be more prepared to face R. solanacearum in its basal state. Altogether this work identifies significant changes in the activity of 4 PLCPs and 27 SHs in the tomato leaf apoplast in response to R. solanacearum, most of which are yet to be characterized. Our findings denote the importance of novel proteomic approaches such as ABPP to provide new insights on old and elusive questions regarding the molecular basis of resistance to R. solanacearum. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine micelles sustain the activity of Dengue non-structural (NS) protein 3 protease domain fused with the full-length NS2B.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiwei; Li, Qingxin; Joy, Joma; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Ruiz-Carrillo, David; Hill, Jeffrey; Lescar, Julien; Kang, Congbao

    2013-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the flavivirus genus, affects 50-100 million people in tropical and sub-tropical regions. The DENV protease domain is located at the N-terminus of the NS3 protease and requires for its enzymatic activity a hydrophilic segment of the NS2B that acts as a cofactor. The protease is an important antiviral drug target because it plays a crucial role in virus replication by cleaving the genome-coded polypeptide into mature functional proteins. Currently, there are no drugs to inhibit DENV protease activity. Most structural and functional studies have been conducted using protein constructs containing the NS3 protease domain connected to a soluble segment of the NS2B membrane protein via a nine-residue linker. For in vitro structural and functional studies, it would be useful to produce a natural form of the DENV protease containing the NS3 protease domain and the full-length NS2B protein. Herein, we describe the expression and purification of a natural form of DENV protease (NS2BFL-NS3pro) containing the full-length NS2B protein and the protease domain of NS3 (NS3pro). The protease was expressed and purified in detergent micelles necessary for its folding. Our results show that this purified protein was active in detergent micelles such as lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine (LMPC). These findings should facilitate further structural and functional studies of the protease and will facilitate drug discovery targeting DENV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Requirement of a large K+-uptake capacity and of extracytoplasmic protease activity for protamine resistance of Escherichia coli

    PubMed

    Stumpe; Bakker

    1997-03-07

    The effect of protamine on growing cells of Escherichia coli K-12 strains containing different K+-uptake systems was investigated. Immediately after the addition of the toxic peptide, growth ceased and all strains lost most of their K+. In addition, these cells released a significant amount of their ATP into the medium, and the cytoplasmic volume of these cells decreased by 70%. Whereas cells without rapid K+-uptake systems did not recover, cells containing either the Trk systems or the overproduced Kup system slowly reversed the effects of protamine, and growth resumed after the cells had reached their original volume. Experiments with a set of strains carrying mutations in the K+-uptake gene trkA showed a reasonably satisfactory correlation between inhibition of net K+ uptake and the lag time for resumption of growth after addition of protamine. Cells carrying mutations in three extracytoplasmic proteases were hypersusceptible to protamine, suggesting that the toxic peptide is degraded by these proteases. Data on the effect of a second addition of protamine suggest that protamine degradation activity is inducible. These data are interpreted to mean that reaccumulation of K+ by protamine-treated cells triggers recovery of the cells, thereby allowing induction of extracytoplasmic proteases. These, in turn, degrade protamine, leading to complete recovery of the cells and resumption of growth. Cells that cannot take up K+ rapidly remain metabolically compromised to such an extent that extracytoplasmic protease activity is not induced, leading to a prolonged susceptibility of the cells to the toxic peptide.

  16. Requirement of a large K+-uptake capacity and of extracytoplasmic protease activity for protamine resistance of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stumpe, S; Bakker, E P

    1997-01-01

    The effect of protamine on growing cells of Escherichia coli K-12 strains containing different K+-uptake systems was investigated. Immediately after the addition of the toxic peptide, growth ceased and all strains lost most of their K+. In addition, these cells released a significant amount of their ATP into the medium, and the cytoplasmic volume of these cells decreased by 70%. Whereas cells without rapid K+-uptake systems did not recover, cells containing either the Trk systems or the overproduced Kup system slowly reversed the effects of protamine, and growth resumed after the cells had reached their original volume. Experiments with a set of strains carrying mutations in the K+-uptake gene trkA showed a reasonably satisfactory correlation between inhibition of net K+ uptake and the lag time for resumption of growth after addition of protamine. Cells carrying mutations in three extracytoplasmic proteases were hypersusceptible to protamine, suggesting that the toxic peptide is degraded by these proteases. Data on the effect of a second addition of protamine suggest that protamine degradation activity is inducible. These data are interpreted to mean that reaccumulation of K+ by protamine-treated cells triggers recovery of the cells, thereby allowing induction of extracytoplasmic proteases. These, in turn, degrade protamine, leading to complete recovery of the cells and resumption of growth. Cells that cannot take up K+ rapidly remain metabolically compromised to such an extent that extracytoplasmic protease activity is not induced, leading to a prolonged susceptibility of the cells to the toxic peptide.

  17. Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) promotes the proteolysis and inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI)

    PubMed Central

    Kanse, Sandip M.; Declerck, Paul J.; Ruf, Wolfram; Broze, George; Etscheid, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) activates FVII as well as pro-urokinase and inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB, thus regulating haemostasis- and remodeling-associated processes in the vasculature. A genetic variant of FSAP (Marburg I polymorphism) results in low enzymatic activity and is associated with an enhanced risk for carotid stenosis and stroke. We postulate that there are additional substrates for FSAP that will help to explain its role in vascular biology and have searched for such a substrate. Results and Methods Using screening procedures to determine the influence of FSAP on various haemostasis-related processes on endothelial cells we discovered that FSAP inhibited tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a major anti-coagulant secreted by these cells. Proteolytic degradation of TFPI by FSAP could also be demonstrated by Western blotting and the exact cleavage sites were determined by N-terminal sequencing. The Marburg I variant of FSAP had a diminished ability to inhibit TFPI. A monoclonal antibody to FSAP, that specifically inhibited FSAP binding to TFPI, reversed the inhibitory effect of FSAP on TFPI. Conclusions The identification of TFPI as a sensitive substrate for FSAP increases our understanding of its role in regulating haemostasis and proliferative remodeling events in the vasculature. PMID:22116096

  18. Changes in ultrastructure, protease and caspase-like activities during flower senescence in Lilium longiflorum.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Riccardo; Lombardi, Lara; Rogers, Hilary J; Picciarelli, Piero; Lorenzi, Roberto; Ceccarelli, Nello

    2011-05-01

    The last phase of flower development is senescence during which nutrients are recycled to developing tissues. The ultimate fate of petal cells is cell death. In this study we used the ethylene-insensitive Lilium longiflorum as a model system to characterize Lily flower senescence from the physiological, biochemical and ultrastructural point of view. Lily flower senescence is highly predictable: it starts three days after flower opening, before visible signs of wilting, and ends with the complete wilting of the corolla within 10 days. The earliest events in L. longiflorum senescence include a fall in fresh and dry weight, fragmentation of nuclear DNA and cellular disruption. Mesophyll cell degradation is associated with vacuole permeabilization and rupture. Protein degradation starts later, coincident with the first visible signs of tepal senescence. A fall in total protein is accompanied by a rise in total proteases, and also by a rise of three classes of caspase-like activity with activities against YVAD, DEVD and VEID. The timing of the appearance of these caspase-like activities argues against their involvement in the regulation of the early stages of senescence, but their possible role in the regulation of the final stages of senescence and cell death is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stimulation of endothelial cells by protease activity in commercial preparations of xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Ager, A; Wenham, D J; Gordon, J L

    1984-07-01

    The oxygen radical generating system of xanthine oxidase plus xanthine, which has been used as a model for the oxidative burst of activated granulocytes, is known to damage endothelium in vivo and in vitro. We previously observed effects (inhibited by catalase, and thus associated with the formation of H2O2) on several parameters of endothelial function, using a non-commercial preparation of xanthine oxidase. Our present study demonstrates that xanthine oxidase from two different commercial sources has additional effects on endothelial morphology and ion flux that are substrate-independent (i.e. produced in the absence of added xanthine) and are attributable to the presence of pancreatin (a crude enzyme mixture used in the commercial preparation of xanthine oxidase from milk). These effects are related to the tryptic activity of pancreatin and extend previous observations on the effects of neutral proteases on endothelial cells. Our results emphasise the practical point that studies on the effects of commercial xanthine oxidase preparations on endothelial cells must take account of their trypsin-like activity as well as their capacity to generate oxygen products.

  20. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 (PAR4): A Promising Target for Antiplatelet Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rwibasira Rudinga, Gamariel; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Kong, Yi

    2018-02-14

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are currently among the leading causes of death worldwide. Platelet aggregation is a key cellular component of arterial thrombi and major cause of CVDs. Protease-activated receptors (PARs), including PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, fall within a subfamily of seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Human platelets express PAR1 and PAR4, which contribute to the signaling transduction processes. In association with CVDs, PAR4 not only contributes to platelet activation but also is a modulator of cellular responses that serve as hallmarks of inflammation. Although several antiplatelet drugs are available on the market, they have many side effects that limit their use. Emerging evidence shows that PAR4 targeting is a safer strategy for preventing thrombosis and consequently may improve the overall cardiac safety profile. Our present review summarizes the PAR4 structural characteristics, activation mechanism, role in the pathophysiology of diseases and understanding the association of PAR4 targeting for improved cardiac protection. Conclusively, this review highlights the importance of PAR4 antagonists and its potential utility in different CVDs.

  1. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) in cervical cancer proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Pedro Ernesto; Ramirez-Dueñas, Maria Guadalupe; Albarran-Somoza, Benibelks; García-Iglesias, Trinidad; del Toro-Arreola, Alicia; Franco-Topete, Ramón; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is cleaved and activated by trypsin and tryptase. There is evidence that PAR-2 contributes to tumor progression in stomach, colon, pancreas, prostate and breast cancer patients. However, the role of PAR-2 in cervical cancer is still unknown. The aim of this work was to study the PAR-2 expression in cervical cancer tissues and the effect of PAR-2 activation on cervical cancer proliferation. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze PAR-2 expression in fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue from 16 patients with invasive cervical cancer. HPV types were identified by PCR. PAR-2 expression in UISO-SQC-1, HeLa, SiHa, CasKi and C-33 A cervical cancer cell lines was evaluated by flow cytometry. Trypsin was detected by Western blot. Tumor proliferation in response to trypsin or agonist peptide was evaluated by the MTT method. A strong correlation between trypsin and PAR-2 expression in five cervical cancer cell lines, in association with proliferative growth in the presence of trypsin or agonist peptide, was found. All tumors from cervical cancer patients expressed PAR-2 (immunoreactive score was higher in poorly differentiated tumors). Results suggest that trypsin and PAR-2 are involved in cervical cancer cell proliferation.

  2. Large Lateral Movement of Transmembrane Helix S5 Is Not Required for Substrate Access to the Active Site of Rhomboid Intramembrane Protease*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yi; Ha, Ya

    2013-01-01

    Rhomboids represent an evolutionarily ancient protease family. Unlike most other proteases, they are polytopic membrane proteins and specialize in cleaving transmembrane protein substrates. The polar active site of rhomboid protease is embedded in the membrane and normally closed. For the bacterial rhomboid GlpG, it has been proposed that one of the transmembrane helices (S5) of the protease can rotate to open a lateral gate, enabling substrate to enter the protease from inside the membrane. Here, we studied the conformational change in GlpG by solving the cocrystal structure of the protease with a mechanism-based inhibitor. We also examined the lateral gating model by cross-linking S5 to a neighboring helix (S2). The crystal structure shows that inhibitor binding displaces a capping loop (L5) from the active site but causes only minor shifts in the transmembrane helices. Cross-linking S5 and S2, which not only restricts the lateral movement of S5 but also prevents substrate from passing between the two helices, does not hinder the ability of the protease to cleave a membrane protein substrate in detergent solution and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Taken together, these data suggest that a large lateral movement of the S5 helix is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid protease. PMID:23609444

  3. Large lateral movement of transmembrane helix S5 is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid intramembrane protease.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi; Ha, Ya

    2013-06-07

    Rhomboids represent an evolutionarily ancient protease family. Unlike most other proteases, they are polytopic membrane proteins and specialize in cleaving transmembrane protein substrates. The polar active site of rhomboid protease is embedded in the membrane and normally closed. For the bacterial rhomboid GlpG, it has been proposed that one of the transmembrane helices (S5) of the protease can rotate to open a lateral gate, enabling substrate to enter the protease from inside the membrane. Here, we studied the conformational change in GlpG by solving the cocrystal structure of the protease with a mechanism-based inhibitor. We also examined the lateral gating model by cross-linking S5 to a neighboring helix (S2). The crystal structure shows that inhibitor binding displaces a capping loop (L5) from the active site but causes only minor shifts in the transmembrane helices. Cross-linking S5 and S2, which not only restricts the lateral movement of S5 but also prevents substrate from passing between the two helices, does not hinder the ability of the protease to cleave a membrane protein substrate in detergent solution and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Taken together, these data suggest that a large lateral movement of the S5 helix is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid protease.

  4. A study on trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. protease inhibitory activity in Cassia tora (L.) syn Senna tora (L.) Roxb. seed extract.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vinayak R; Kumar, Shailendra; Garg, Satyendra K

    2011-07-12

    Proteases play an important role in virulence of many human, plant and insect pathogens. The proteinaceous protease inhibitors of plant origin have been reported widely from many plant species. The inhibitors may potentially be used for multiple therapeutic applications in viral, bacterial, fungal diseases and physiological disorders. In traditional Indian medicine system, Cassia tora (Senna tora) is reportedly effective in treatment of skin and gastrointestinal disorders. The present study explores the protease inhibitory activity of the above plant seeds against trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases. The crushed seeds of Cassia tora were washed thoroughly with acetone and hexane for depigmentation and defatting. The proteins were fractionated by ammonium sulphate (0-30, 30-60, 60-90%) followed by dialysis and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The inhibitory potential of crude seed extract and most active dialyzed fraction against trypsin and proteases was established by spot test using unprocessed x-ray film and casein digestion methods, respectively. Electrophoretic analysis of most active fraction (30-60%) and SEC elutes were carried employing Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Gelatin SDS-PAGE. Inhibition of fungal spore germination was studied in the presence of dialyzed active inhibitor fraction. Standard deviation (SD) and ANOVA were employed as statistical tools. The crude seeds' extract displayed strong antitryptic, bacterial and fungal protease inhibitory activity on x-ray film. The seed protein fraction 30-60% was found most active for trypsin inhibition in caseinolytic assay (P < 0.001). The inhibition of caseinolytic activity of the proteases increased with increasing ratio of seed extract. The residual activity of trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases remained only 4, 7 and 3.1%, respectively when proteases were incubated with 3 mg ml-1 seed protein extract for 60 min. The

  5. A study on trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. protease inhibitory activity in Cassia tora (L.) syn Senna tora (L.) Roxb. seed extract

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Proteases play an important role in virulence of many human, plant and insect pathogens. The proteinaceous protease inhibitors of plant origin have been reported widely from many plant species. The inhibitors may potentially be used for multiple therapeutic applications in viral, bacterial, fungal diseases and physiological disorders. In traditional Indian medicine system, Cassia tora (Senna tora) is reportedly effective in treatment of skin and gastrointestinal disorders. The present study explores the protease inhibitory activity of the above plant seeds against trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases. Methods The crushed seeds of Cassia tora were washed thoroughly with acetone and hexane for depigmentation and defatting. The proteins were fractionated by ammonium sulphate (0-30, 30-60, 60-90%) followed by dialysis and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The inhibitory potential of crude seed extract and most active dialyzed fraction against trypsin and proteases was established by spot test using unprocessed x-ray film and casein digestion methods, respectively. Electrophoretic analysis of most active fraction (30-60%) and SEC elutes were carried employing Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Gelatin SDS-PAGE. Inhibition of fungal spore germination was studied in the presence of dialyzed active inhibitor fraction. Standard deviation (SD) and ANOVA were employed as statistical tools. Results The crude seeds' extract displayed strong antitryptic, bacterial and fungal protease inhibitory activity on x-ray film. The seed protein fraction 30-60% was found most active for trypsin inhibition in caseinolytic assay (P < 0.001). The inhibition of caseinolytic activity of the proteases increased with increasing ratio of seed extract. The residual activity of trypsin, Aspergillus flavus and Bacillus sp. proteases remained only 4, 7 and 3.1%, respectively when proteases were incubated with 3 mg ml-1 seed protein

  6. Lon protease affects the RdxA nitroreductase activity and metronidazole susceptibility in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tu, I-Fan; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Yang, Feng-Ling; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2014-10-01

    The lon gene of Helicobacter pylori strains is constitutively expressed during growth. However, virtually nothing is understood concerning the role of Lon in H. pylori. This study examined the function and physiological role of Lon in H. pylori (HpLon) using a trapping approach to identify putative Lon binding partners in the bacterium. Protease-deficient Lon was expressed and served as the bait in trapping approach to capture the interacting partners in H. pylori. The antibiotic susceptibility of wild-type and lon derivative mutants was determined by the E test trips and the disc diffusion assay. The effect of HpLon on RdxA activity was detected the change in NADPH oxidation and metronidazole reduction by spectrophotometer. Lon in Helicobacter pylori (HpLon) interacting partners are mostly associated with metronidazole activation. lon mutant presents more susceptible to metronidazole than that of the wild type, and this phenotype is recovered by complementation of the wild-type Lon. We found that the ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities (AAA(+) ) module of HpLon causes a decrease in both NADPH oxidase and Mtz reductase activity in RdxA, a major Mtz-activating enzyme in H. pylori. Metronidazole resistance of H. pylori causes the serious medical problem worldwide. In this study, HpLon is involved in metronidazole susceptibility among H. pylori strains. We provide the evidence that HpLon alters RdxA activity in vitro. The decrease in metronidazole activation caused by HpLon is possibly prior to accumulate mutation in rdxA gene before the metronidazole-resistant strains to be occurred. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Antioxidant and Anticancer Activities of Walnut (Juglans regia L.) Protein Hydrolysates Using Different Proteases.

    PubMed

    Jahanbani, Raheleh; Ghaffari, S Mahmood; Salami, Maryam; Vahdati, Kourosh; Sepehri, Houri; Sarvestani, Nazanin Namazi; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-12-01

    Walnut (Juglans regia L.) contains approximately 20-25 % protein with abundant essential amino acids. The enzymatic hydrolysate of Persian walnut (Chandler) seed proteins was prepared by incubation with three different proteases, including pancreatic chymotrypsin and trypsin, and a microbial enzyme proteinase K. The hydrolysates were found to possess excellent antioxidant capacities. The peptide fractions scavenged the 2, 2'-anizo-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) free radicals and inhibited the activity of reactive oxygen species. Walnut protein hydrolysates were also tested, for the first time, against the viability of human breast (MDA-MB231) and colon (HT-29) cancer cell lines. MTT, [3-(4, 5dimethylthiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide], assay was used to assess in vitro cancer cell viability upon treatment with the peptide fractions. The peptide fractions showed cell growth inhibition of 63 ± 1.73 % for breast cancer and 51 ± 1.45 % for colon cancer cells. Thus, a direct correlation between antioxidant and anticancer activities of walnut peptide fractions exists and supports their potential therapeutic benefit.

  8. Regulation of serine protease activity by aluminum: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Clauberg, M; Joshi, J G

    1993-01-01

    The brain of Alzheimer disease patients contains plaques that are diagnostic for the disease. The plaques also contain beta-amyloid peptide, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and the element aluminum. We present indirect evidence that can relate all three components of plaques to each other in such a way as to suggest their involvement in the etiology of the disease. The beta-amyloid peptide is derived by proteolytic processing from beta-amyloid precursor proteins and some of these proteins contain a domain that is highly homologous to bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor also inhibits alpha-chymotrypsin and we show that aluminum affects both the activity and the inhibition of this enzyme. At pH 6.5, in the presence of aluminum, the enzyme activity is doubled, and the inhibitor is only 1% as effective as in the absence of the metal ion. The inhibition by BX-9, a protease inhibitor prepared from protein components of amyloid plaques, is also reduced by aluminum; so too is that by alpha 1-antichymotrypsin but to a lesser degree. In the Alzheimer brain, we propose that aluminum may accelerate proteolytic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein by suppression of the inhibitor domain. Thus, the beta-amyloid peptide may accumulate and initiate plaque formation. PMID:7679214

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease blocks complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways.

    PubMed

    Laarman, Alexander J; Bardoel, Bart W; Ruyken, Maartje; Fernie, Job; Milder, Fin J; van Strijp, Jos A G; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2012-01-01

    The complement system rapidly detects and kills Gram-negative bacteria and supports bacterial killing by phagocytes. However, bacterial pathogens exploit several strategies to evade detection by the complement system. The alkaline protease (AprA) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been associated with bacterial virulence and is known to interfere with complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes, but its exact role in bacterial complement escape is unknown. In this study, we analyzed how AprA interferes with complement activation and whether it could block complement-dependent neutrophil functions. We found that AprA potently blocked phagocytosis and killing of Pseudomonas by human neutrophils. Furthermore, AprA inhibited opsonization of bacteria with C3b and the formation of the chemotactic agent C5a. AprA specifically blocked C3b deposition via the classical and lectin pathways, whereas the alternative pathway was not affected. Serum degradation assays revealed that AprA degrades both human C1s and C2. However, repletion assays demonstrated that the mechanism of action for complement inhibition is cleavage of C2. In summary, we showed that P. aeruginosa AprA interferes with classical and lectin pathway-mediated complement activation via cleavage of C2.

  10. Purification of Bacteroides amylophilus Protease

    PubMed Central

    Lesk, E. M.; Blackburn, T. H.

    1971-01-01

    A protease was released by Bacteroides amylophilus cells in late stationary phase, approximately 12 hr after maximum cell density was reached. The protease was concentrated by adsorption on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sephadex and was purified 532-fold by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, by G-200-Sephadex gel filtration, and by isoelectric focusing. The purified protease was active between pH 4.5 and 12.0 with optima at pH 6.0 and 11.5. Evidence against there being a single protease was given by the differential inhibition of esterase and protease activities by some inhibitors. There was some evidence that only a single protease was present as the ratio of protease activity at various pH values did not alter significantly during purification or when the purified protease was partially heat-inactivated or treated with two specific trypsin-type protease inhibitors: N-α-tosyl-l-lysylchloromethyl ketone or phenylmethane-sulfonyl fluoride. Two forms of the same protease were found by acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration confirmed the presence of protease in 30,000 and 60,000 molecular-weight forms. Treatment with 1 mm ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or with 4 m urea failed to convert the 60,000-molecular-weight to the 30,000-molecular-weight species. PMID:4995648

  11. Chitin accelerates activation of a novel haloarchaeal serine protease that deproteinizes chitin-containing biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaoxin; Wang, Mengxin; Du, Xin; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Li; Li, Moran; Wang, Jian; Tang, Bing; Tang, Xiao-Feng

    2014-09-01

    The haloarchaeon Natrinema sp. strain J7-2 has the ability to degrade chitin, and its genome harbors a chitin metabolism-related gene cluster that contains a halolysin gene, sptC. The sptC gene encodes a precursor composed of a signal peptide, an N-terminal propeptide consisting of a core domain (N*) and a linker peptide, a subtilisin-like catalytic domain, a polycystic kidney disease domain (PkdD), and a chitin-binding domain (ChBD). Here we report that the autocatalytic maturation of SptC is initiated by cis-processing of N* to yield an autoprocessed complex (N*-I(WT)), followed by trans-processing/degradation of the linker peptide, the ChBD, and N*. The resulting mature form (M(WT)) containing the catalytic domain and the PkdD showed optimum azocaseinolytic activity at 3 to 3.5 M NaCl, demonstrating salt-dependent stability. Deletion analysis revealed that the PkdD did not confer extra stability on the enzyme but did contribute to enzymatic activity. The ChBD exhibited salt-dependent chitin-binding capacity and mediated the binding of N*-I(WT) to chitin. ChBD-mediated chitin binding enhances SptC maturation by promoting activation of the autoprocessed complex. Our results also demonstrate that SptC is capable of removing proteins from shrimp shell powder (SSP) at high salt concentrations. Interestingly, N*-I(WT) released soluble peptides from SSP faster than did M(WT). Most likely, ChBD-mediated binding of the autoprocessed complex to chitin in SSP not only accelerates enzyme activation but also facilitates the deproteinization process by increasing the local protease concentration around the substrate. By virtue of these properties, SptC is highly attractive for use in preparation of chitin from chitin-containing biomass. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Chitin Accelerates Activation of a Novel Haloarchaeal Serine Protease That Deproteinizes Chitin-Containing Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaoxin; Wang, Mengxin; Du, Xin; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Li; Li, Moran; Wang, Jian; Tang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    The haloarchaeon Natrinema sp. strain J7-2 has the ability to degrade chitin, and its genome harbors a chitin metabolism-related gene cluster that contains a halolysin gene, sptC. The sptC gene encodes a precursor composed of a signal peptide, an N-terminal propeptide consisting of a core domain (N*) and a linker peptide, a subtilisin-like catalytic domain, a polycystic kidney disease domain (PkdD), and a chitin-binding domain (ChBD). Here we report that the autocatalytic maturation of SptC is initiated by cis-processing of N* to yield an autoprocessed complex (N*-IWT), followed by trans-processing/degradation of the linker peptide, the ChBD, and N*. The resulting mature form (MWT) containing the catalytic domain and the PkdD showed optimum azocaseinolytic activity at 3 to 3.5 M NaCl, demonstrating salt-dependent stability. Deletion analysis revealed that the PkdD did not confer extra stability on the enzyme but did contribute to enzymatic activity. The ChBD exhibited salt-dependent chitin-binding capacity and mediated the binding of N*-IWT to chitin. ChBD-mediated chitin binding enhances SptC maturation by promoting activation of the autoprocessed complex. Our results also demonstrate that SptC is capable of removing proteins from shrimp shell powder (SSP) at high salt concentrations. Interestingly, N*-IWT released soluble peptides from SSP faster than did MWT. Most likely, ChBD-mediated binding of the autoprocessed complex to chitin in SSP not only accelerates enzyme activation but also facilitates the deproteinization process by increasing the local protease concentration around the substrate. By virtue of these properties, SptC is highly attractive for use in preparation of chitin from chitin-containing biomass. PMID:25002433

  13. DNA and factor VII–activating protease protect against the cytotoxicity of histones

    PubMed Central

    Marsman, Gerben; von Richthofen, Helen; Bulder, Ingrid; Lupu, Florea; Hazelzet, Jan; Luken, Brenda M.

    2017-01-01

    Circulating histones have been implicated as major mediators of inflammatory disease because of their strong cytotoxic effects. Histones form the protein core of nucleosomes; however, it is unclear whether histones and nucleosomes are equally cytotoxic. Several plasma proteins that neutralize histones are present in plasma. Importantly, factor VII–activating protease (FSAP) is activated upon contact with histones and subsequently proteolyzes histones. We aimed to determine the effect of FSAP on the cytotoxicity of both histones and nucleosomes. Indeed, FSAP protected against histone-induced cytotoxicity of cultured cells in vitro. Upon incubation of serum with histones, endogenous FSAP was activated and degraded histones, which also prevented cytotoxicity. Notably, histones as part of nucleosome complexes were not cytotoxic, whereas DNA digestion restored cytotoxicity. Histones in nucleosomes were inefficiently cleaved by FSAP, which resulted in limited cleavage of histone H3 and removal of the N-terminal tail. The specific isolation of either circulating nucleosomes or free histones from sera of Escherichia coli challenged baboons or patients with meningococcal sepsis revealed that histone H3 was present in the form of nucleosomes, whereas free histone H3 was not detected. All samples showed signs of FSAP activation. Markedly, we observed that all histone H3 in nucleosomes from the patients with sepsis, and most histone H3 from the baboons, was N-terminally truncated, giving rise to a similarly sized protein fragment as through cleavage by FSAP. Taken together, our results suggest that DNA and FSAP jointly limit histone cytotoxicity and that free histone H3 does not circulate in appreciable concentrations in sepsis. PMID:29296900

  14. Contractile properties of slow and fast skeletal muscles from protease activated receptor-1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Sitparan, Paran K; Pagel, Charles N; Pinniger, Gavin J; Yoo, H J; Mackie, Eleanor J; Bakker, Anthony J

    2014-12-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) may play a role in skeletal muscle development. We compared the contractile properties of slow-twitch soleus muscles and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from PAR-1 null and littermate control mice. Contractile function was measured using a force transducer system. Fiber type proportions were determined using immunohistochemistry. Soleus muscles from PAR-1 null mice exhibited longer contraction times, a leftward shift in the force-stimulation frequency relationship, and decreased fatiguability compared with controls. PAR-1 null soleus muscles also had increased type 1 and decreased type IIb/x fiber numbers compared with controls. In PAR-1 null EDL muscles, no differences were found, except for a slower rate of fatigue compared with controls. The absence of PAR-1 results in a slower skeletal muscle contractile phenotype, likely due to an increase in type I and a decrease in type IIb/x fiber numbers. Muscle Nerve 50: 991-998, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Chlamydial Protease-Like Activity Factor Mediated Protection Against C. trachomatis In Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Shradha; Gupta, Rishein; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Koundinya Lanka, Gopala Krishna; Chambers, James P.; Guentzel, M. Neal; Zhong, Guangming; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2016-01-01

    We have comprehensively demonstrated using the mouse model that intranasal immunization with recombinant chlamydial protease-like activity factor (rCPAF) leads to a significant reduction in bacterial burden, genital tract pathology and preserves fertility following intravaginal genital chlamydial challenge. In the present report, we evaluated the protective efficacy of rCPAF immunization in guinea pigs, a second animal model for genital chlamydial infection. Using a vaccination strategy similar to the mouse model, we intranasally immunized female guinea pigs with rCPAF plus CpG deoxynucleotides (CpG; as an adjuvant), and challenged intravaginally with C. trachomatis serovar D (CT-D). Immunization with rCPAF/CpG significantly reduced vaginal CT-D shedding and induced resolution of infection by day 24, compared to day 33 in CpG alone treated and challenged animals. Immunization induced robust anti-rCPAF serum IgG 2 weeks following the last immunization, and was sustained at a high level 4 weeks post challenge. Upregulation of antigen specific IFN-γ gene expression was observed in rCPAF/CpG vaccinated splenocytes. Importantly, a significant reduction in inflammation in the genital tissue in rCPAF/CpG-immunized guinea pigs compared to CpG-immunized animals was observed. Taken together, this study provides evidence of the protective efficacy of rCPAF as a vaccine candidate in a second animal model of genital chlamydial infection. PMID:27990018

  16. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  17. Engineering of Substrate Selectivity for Tissue Factor·Factor VIIa Complex Signaling through Protease-activated Receptor 2*

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Katrine S.; Østergaard, Henrik; Olsen, Ole H.; Bjelke, Jais R.; Ruf, Wolfram; Petersen, Lars C.

    2010-01-01

    The complex of factor VIIa (FVIIa) with tissue factor (TF) triggers coagulation by recognizing its macromolecular substrate factors IX (FIX) and X (FX) predominantly through extended exosite interactions. In addition, TF mediates unique cell-signaling properties in cancer, angiogenesis, and inflammation that involve proteolytic cleavage of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). PAR2 is cleaved by FVIIa in the binary TF·FVIIa complex and by FXa in the ternary TF·FVIIa·FXa complex, but physiological roles of these signaling complexes are incompletely understood. In a screen of FVIIa protease domain mutants, three variants (Q40A, Q143N, and T151S) activated macromolecular coagulation substrates and supported signaling of the ternary TF·FVIIa-Xa complex normally but were severely impaired in binary TF·FVIIa·PAR2 signaling. The residues identified were located in the model-predicted S2′ pocket of FVIIa, and complementary PAR2 P2′ Leu-38 replacements demonstrated that the P2′ side chain was indeed crucial for PAR2 cleavage by TF·FVIIa. In addition, PAR2 was activated more efficiently by FVIIa T99Y, consistent with further contributions from the S2 subsite. The P2 residue preference of FVIIa and FXa predicted additional PAR2 mutants that were efficiently activated by TF·FVIIa but resistant to cleavage by the alternative PAR2 activator FXa. Thus, contrary to the paradigm of exosite-assisted cleavage of PAR1 by thrombin, the cofactor-associated protease FVIIa recognizes PAR2 predominantly by catalytic cleft interactions. Furthermore, the delineated molecular details of this substrate interaction enabled protein engineering of protease-selective PAR2 receptors that will aid further studies to dissect the roles of TF signaling complexes in vivo. PMID:20388709

  18. A novel cell-based assay to measure activity of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Campos-Gomez, Javier; Ahmad, Fahim; Rodriguez, Efrain

    2016-09-15

    The encephalitic alphaviruses encode nsP2 protease (nsP2pro), which because of its vital role in virus replication, represents an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. To facilitate the discovery of nsP2 inhibitors we have developed a novel assay for quantitative measurement of nsP2pro activity in a cell-based format. The assay is based on a substrate fusion protein consisting of eGFP and Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) linked together by a small peptide containing a VEEV nsp2pro cleavage sequence. The expression of the substrate protein in cells along with recombinant nsP2pro results in cleavage of the substrate protein resulting in extracellular release of free Gluc.more » The Gluc activity in supernatants corresponds to intracellular nsP2pro-mediated substrate cleavage; thus, providing a simple and convenient way to quantify nsP2pro activity. Here, we demonstrate potential utility of the assay in identification of nsP2pro inhibitors, as well as in investigations related to molecular characterization of nsP2pro. - Highlights: • A novel cell-based assay to measure VEEV nsP2 protease activity was developed. • Assay utility was demonstrated for antiviral screening. • .The assay also proved to be useful in basic mechanistic studies of nsP2 protease.« less

  19. Tranexamic acid and the gut barrier: Protection by inhibition of trypsin uptake and activation of downstream intestinal proteases.

    PubMed

    Diebel, Mark E; Diebel, Lawrence N; Liberati, David M

    2017-03-01

    Intraluminal pancreatic trypsin and other digestive enzymes injure the gut barrier following trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS). Intestinal proteases (sheddases) exert important effects on normal gut function but may cause barrier disruption due to exaggerated production following T/HS. We hypothesized that the protective mechanism of TXA on the gut barrier following T/HS includes inhibition of these "downstream" proteases. This was studied in vitro. Trypsin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9) and ADAM-17 activity were measured in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) exposed to HR + trypsin. TXA was added to IEC subsets. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) were exposed to IEC supernatants and syndecan release and ICAM-1 expression determined. Trypsin activity and the activity of the "downstream" sheddases ADAM-17, MMP was increased in IEC lysates following exposure to HR + trypsin. Syndecan and ICAM-1 were increased in HMVEC exposed to IEC supernatants. TXA administration 'early' abrogated these effects. TXA administration early after shock protects the gut barrier by inhibiting trypsin uptake and activity and the subsequent downstream protease cascade. To be effective, TXA should be administered early in all "at risk" patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Diversity of proteolytic microbes isolated from Antarctic freshwater lakes and characteristics of their cold-active proteases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Mihoko; Kawamata, Akinori; Kosugi, Makiko; Imura, Satoshi; Kurosawa, Norio

    2017-09-01

    Despite being an extreme environment, the water temperature of freshwater lakes in Antarctica reaches 10 °C in summer, accelerating biological activity. In these environments, proteolytic microbial decomposers may play a large role in protein hydrolysis. We isolated 71 microbial strains showing proteolytic activity at 4 °C from three Antarctic freshwater lakes. They were classified as bacteria (63 isolates) and eukaryotes (8 isolates). The bacterial isolates were classified into the genera Flavobacterium (28 isolates), Pseudomonas (14 isolates), Arthrobacter (10 isolates), Psychrobacter (7 isolates), Cryobacterium (2 isolates), Hymenobacter (1 isolate), and Polaromonas (1 isolate). Five isolates of Flavobacterium and one of Hymenobacter seemed to belong to novel species. All eukaryotic isolates belonged to Glaciozyma antarctica, a psychrophilic yeast species originally isolated from the Weddell Sea near the Joinville Island, Antarctica. A half of representative strains were psychrophilic and did not grow at temperatures above 25 °C. The protease secreted by Pseudomonas prosekii strain ANS4-1 showed the highest activity among all proteases from representative isolates. The results of inhibitor tests indicated that nearly all the isolates secreted metalloproteases. Proteases from four representative isolates retained more than 30% maximal activity at 0 °C. These results expand our knowledge about microbial protein degradation in Antarctic freshwater lakes.

  1. Occurrence and Evolution of the Paralogous Zinc Metalloproteases IgA1 Protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Related Commensal Species

    PubMed Central

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The distribution, genome location, and evolution of the four paralogous zinc metalloproteases, IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD, in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species were studied by in silico analysis of whole genomes and by activity screening of 154 representatives of 20 species. ZmpB was ubiquitous in the Mitis and Salivarius groups of the genus Streptococcus and in the genera Gemella and Granulicatella, with the exception of a fragmented gene in Streptococcus thermophilus, the only species with a nonhuman habitat. IgA1 protease activity was observed in all members of S. pneumoniae, S. pseudopneumoniae, S. oralis, S. sanguinis, and Gemella haemolysans, was variably present in S. mitis and S. infantis, and absent in S. gordonii, S. parasanguinis, S. cristatus, S. oligofermentans, S. australis, S. peroris, and S. suis. Phylogenetic analysis of 297 zmp sequences and representative housekeeping genes provided evidence for an unprecedented selection for genetic diversification of the iga, zmpB, and zmpD genes in S. pneumoniae and evidence of very frequent intraspecies transfer of entire genes and combination of genes. Presumably due to their adaptation to a commensal lifestyle, largely unaffected by adaptive mucosal immune factors, the corresponding genes in commensal streptococci have remained conserved. The widespread distribution and significant sequence diversity indicate an ancient origin of the zinc metalloproteases predating the emergence of the humanoid species. zmpB, which appears to be the ancestral gene, subsequently duplicated and successfully diversified into distinct functions, is likely to serve an important but yet unknown housekeeping function associated with the human host. PMID:23033471

  2. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Chintala, Madhu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539more » (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.« less

  3. Anticoagulant and antithrombotic properties of intracellular protease-activated receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wielders, S J H; Bennaghmouch, A; Reutelingsperger, C P M; Bevers, E M; Lindhout, T

    2007-03-01

    Blockade of the thrombin receptors protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR4 with pepducins, cell-penetrating lipopeptides based on the third intracellular loop of PAR1 and PAR4, effectively inhibits platelet aggregation. We have previously shown that PAR1 pepducin also exerts an anticoagulant activity by partial inhibition of the thrombin plus collagen-induced externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) at the platelet plasma membrane. In the present study we examined the effects of PAR1 and PAR4 pepducins on tissue factor (TF)-initiated thrombin generation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and the interaction between PAR4 pepducin-loaded mouse platelets and a growing thrombus to confirm the relevance of the in vitro data. Localization of pepducins at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane was confirmed with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. Both the PAR1 pepducin, P1pal12, and the PAR4 pepducin, P4pal10, inhibited TF-initiated thrombin generation in PRP. Concentrations of P1pal12 and P4pal10, which blocked the thrombin-induced influx of extracellular calcium ions and inhibited platelet aggregation, reduced the rate of thrombin generation during the propagation phase by 38% and 36%, respectively. Whether this anticoagulant effect is relevant in inhibiting in vivo arterial thrombin growth is uncertain because P4pal10 prevented the incorporation of platelets in a growing thrombus. Our findings suggest that in spite of their potential anticoagulant activities the in vivo antithrombotic effect of intracellular PAR pepducins is mainly based on inhibiting platelet-platelet interactions.

  4. Ion transport regulated by protease-activated receptor 2 in human airway Calu-3 epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shinji; Ito, Yasushi; Kondo, Masashi; Ohashi, Takamasa; Ito, Satoru; Nakayama, Shinsuke; Shimokata, Kaoru; Kume, Hiroaki

    2005-01-01

    We examined the mechanisms underlying anion secretion mediated by protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) and its role in the regulation of ion transport, using polarized human airway Calu-3 cells. PAR2 stimulation by trypsin and a PAR2-activating peptide (PAR2AP), especially from the basolateral aspect, caused transient Cl− secretion due to cytosolic Ca2+ mobilization. Antagonists of PI-PLC (U73122, ET-18-OCH3) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (xestospongin C (Xest C)) were without effect on the PAR2AP-mediated Cl− secretion, whereas it was attenuated by D609 (a PC-PLC inhibitor) and phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA, a PKC activator). Even 30 min after removal of PAR2AP after a 10-min-exposure, cells were still poorly responsive to PAR2 stimulation, but the reduced responsiveness was upregulated by a PKC inhibitor, GF109203X (GFX). Pretreatment with PAR2AP did not affect responses to anion secretagogues, such as isoproterenol, forskolin, thapsigargin, 1-ethyl-2-benzimdazolinone, and adenosine, but ATP-induced responses were significantly reduced. Nystatin permeabilization studies revealed that the presence of PAR2AP prevented ATP-induced increments in basolateral membrane K+ conductance without affecting apical membrane Cl− conductance. ATP-elicited Ca2+ mobilization, which was sensitive to D609 and PMA, was inhibited by the pretreatment with PAR2AP, and this inhibition was blunted by the presence of GFX. Collectively, stimulation of PAR2 generates a brief response of Cl− secretion through PC-PLC-mediated pathway, followed by not only auto-desensitization of PAR2 itself but also cross-desensitization of a PC-PLC-coupled purinoceptor. The two types of desensitization seem likely to have PKC-mediated downregulation of PC-PLC in common. PMID:16025139

  5. Nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors in cancer: mechanisms involved in anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Koltai, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    To review the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors (PIs) based on evidences reported in the published literature. We extensively reviewed the literature concerning nelfinavir (NFV) as an off target anti-cancer drug and other PIs. A classification of PIs based on anti-cancer mode of action was proposed. Controversies regarding nelfinavir mode of action were also addressed. The two main mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity are endoplasmic reticulum stress-unfolded protein response pathway and Akt inhibition. However there are many other effects, partially dependent and independent of those mentioned, that may be useful in cancer treatment, including MMP-9 and MMP-2 inhibition, down-regulation of CDK-2, VEGF, bFGF, NF-kB, STAT-3, HIF-1 alfa, IGF, EGFR, survivin, BCRP, androgen receptor, proteasome, fatty acid synthase (FAS), decrease in cellular ATP concentration and upregulation of TRAIL receptor DR5, Bax, increased radiosensitivity, and autophagy. The end result of all these effects is slower growth, decreased angiogenesis, decreased invasion and increased apoptosis, which means reduced proliferation and increased cancer cells death. PIs may be classified according to their anticancer activity at clinically achievable doses, in AKT inhibitors, ER stressors and Akt inhibitors/ER stressors. Beyond the phase I trials that have been recently completed, adequately powered and well-designed clinical trials are needed in the various cancer type settings, and specific trials where NFV is tested in association with other known anti-cancer pharmaceuticals should be sought, in order to find an appropriate place for NFV in cancer treatment. The analysis of controversies on the molecular mechanisms of NFV hints to the possibility that NFV works in a different way in tumor cells and in hepatocytes and adipocytes.

  6. Inhibitory activity of cyclohexenyl chalcone derivatives and flavonoids of fingerroot, Boesenbergia rotunda (L.), towards dengue-2 virus NS3 protease.

    PubMed

    Kiat, Tan Siew; Pippen, Richard; Yusof, Rohana; Ibrahim, Halijah; Khalid, Norzulaani; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd

    2006-06-15

    Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) cyclohexenyl chalcone derivatives, 4-hydroxypanduratin A and panduratin A, showed good competitive inhibitory activities towards dengue 2 virus NS3 protease with the Ki values of 21 and 25 microM, respectively, whilst those of pinostrobin and cardamonin were observed to be non-competitive. NMR and GCMS spectroscopic data formed the basis of assignment of structures of the six compounds isolated.

  7. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs.

    PubMed

    Keane, Fiona M; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Seelk, Stefanie; Gall, Margaret G; Chowdhury, Sumaiya; Poplawski, Sarah E; Lai, Jack H; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Farrell, Penny; Vieira de Ribeiro, Ana Julia; Osborne, Brenna; Yu, Denise M T; Seth, Devanshi; Rahman, Khairunnessa; Haber, Paul; Topaloglu, A Kemal; Wang, Chuanmin; Thomson, Sally; Hennessy, Annemarie; Prins, John; Twigg, Stephen M; McLennan, Susan V; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Bachovchin, William W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis.

  8. Structural Insights into the Protease-like Antigen Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 and Its Noncanonical Active-Site Serine

    SciTech Connect

    Hodder, Anthony N.; Malby, Robyn L.; Clarke, Oliver B.

    2009-08-28

    The sera genes of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium encode a family of unique proteins that are maximally expressed at the time of egress of parasites from infected red blood cells. These multi-domain proteins are unique, containing a central papain-like cysteine-protease fragment enclosed between the disulfide-linked N- and C-terminal domains. However, the central fragment of several members of this family, including serine repeat antigen 5 (SERA5), contains a serine (S596) in place of the active-site cysteine. Here we report the crystal structure of the central protease-like domain of Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, revealing a number of anomalies in addition to the putativemore » nucleophilic serine: (1) the structure of the putative active site is not conducive to binding substrate in the canonical cysteine-protease manner; (2) the side chain of D594 restricts access of substrate to the putative active site; and (3) the S{sub 2} specificity pocket is occupied by the side chain of Y735, reducing this site to a small depression on the protein surface. Attempts to determine the structure in complex with known inhibitors were not successful. Thus, despite having revealed its structure, the function of the catalytic domain of SERA5 remains an enigma.« less

  9. Propapoptotic effects of NF-kappaB in LNCaP prostate cancer cells lead to serine protease activation.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K; Gelmann, E P

    2002-09-01

    LNCaP prostate cancer cells are resistant to induction of apoptosis by gamma-irradiation and partially sensitive to TNF-alpha or FAS antibody, irradiation sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by FAS antibody or TNF-alpha. LNCaP cell clones stably expressing IkappaBalpha super repressor were resistant to apoptosis induced by death ligands in the presence or absence of irradiation. IkappaBalpha super repressor expression also increased clonogenic survival after exposure to TNF-alpha+irradiation, but had no effect on survival after irradiation alone. IkappaBalpha super repressor expression blocked the increase of whole cell and cell surface FAS expression induced by TNF-alpha, but did not effect induction of FAS expression and cell surface FAS expression that resulted from irradiation. In cells expressing IkappaBalpha super repressor there was diminished activation of caspases-8 and -7 and diminished production of proscaspases-8 and -7, usually required for death induction in LNCaP cells. Peptide inhibitors of caspase activation complemented the IkappaBalpha super repressor inhibition of apoptosis, but peptide inhibitors of serine proteases had no effect on LNCaP cells expressing IkappaBalpha super repressor. Moreover, cleavage of a serine protease substrate was induced by treatment of LNCaP cells with TNF-alpha and irradiation. The data suggest that in LNCaP cells NF-kappaB mediates a proapoptotic pathway that leads to activation of proapoptotic serine proteases.

  10. Macelignan inhibits melanosome transfer mediated by protease-activated receptor-2 in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Kang, Young-Gyu; Kim, Jaekyung; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Skin pigmentation is the result of melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is a key mediator of melanosome transfer, which occurs as the melanocyte extends its dendrite toward surrounding keratinocytes that take up melanosomes by phagocytosis. We investigated the effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans HOUTT. (nutmeg) on melanosome transfer and the regulation of PAR-2 in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). HaCaT cells stimulated by the PAR-2-activating peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH₂ (SLIGRL) were treated with macelignan; PAR-2 expression was then determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. We evaluated the effects of macelignan on calcium mobilization and keratinocyte phagocytosis. In addition, B16F10 melanoma cells and keratinocytes were co-cultured to assess the effects of macelignan on prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) secretion and subsequent dendrite formation. Macelignan decreased HaCaT PAR-2 mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, macelignan markedly reduced intracellular calcium mobilization and significantly downregulated keratinocyte phagocytosis, as shown by decreased ingestion of Escherichia coli bioparticles and fluorescent microspheres. In co-culture experiments, macelignan reduced keratinocyte PGE₂ secretion, thereby preventing dendrite formation in B16F10 melanoma cells compared with SLIGRL-treated controls. Macelignan inhibits melanosome transfer by downregulating PAR-2, thereby reducing keratinocyte phagocytosis and PGE₂ secretion, which in turn inhibits dendrite formation in B16F10 melanoma cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that macelignan could be used as a natural depigmenting agent to ameliorate hyperpigmentation.

  11. Active Subtilisin-Like Protease from a Hyperthermophilic Archaeon in a Form with a Putative Prosequence

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Yuji; Koga, Yuichi; Inoue, Yohei; Haruki, Mitsuru; Takagi, Masahiro; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Morikawa, Masaaki; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2001-01-01

    The gene encoding subtilisin-like protease T. kodakaraensis subtilisin was cloned from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. T. kodakaraensis subtilisin is a member of the subtilisin family and composed of 422 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 43,783. It consists of a putative presequence, prosequence, and catalytic domain. Like bacterial subtilisins, T. kodakaraensis subtilisin was overproduced in Escherichia coli in a form with a putative prosequence in inclusion bodies, solubilized in the presence of 8 M urea, and refolded and converted to an active molecule. However, unlike bacterial subtilisins, in which the prosequence was removed from the catalytic domain by autoprocessing upon refolding, T. kodakaraensis subtilisin was refolded in a form with a putative prosequence. This refolded protein of recombinant T. kodakaraensis subtilisin which is composed of 398 amino acid residues (Gly−82 to Gly316), was purified to give a single band on a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel and characterized for biochemical and enzymatic properties. The good agreement of the molecular weights estimated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (44,000) and gel filtration (40,000) suggests that T. kodakaraensis subtilisin exists in a monomeric form. T. kodakaraensis subtilisin hydrolyzed the synthetic substrate N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide only in the presence of the Ca2+ ion with an optimal pH and temperature of pH 9.5 and 80°C. Like bacterial subtilisins, it showed a broad substrate specificity, with a preference for aromatic or large nonpolar P1 substrate residues. However, it was much more stable than bacterial subtilisins against heat inactivation and lost activity with half-lives of >60 min at 80°C, 20 min at 90°C, and 7 min at 100°C. PMID:11375149

  12. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Graham; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Steffen, Imke; Chaipan, Chawaree; Agudelo, Juliet; Lu, Kai; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Hofmann, Heike; Bates, Paul; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S-activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a protease essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation. PMID:21435673

  13. Quantification of Pelvic Organ Prolapse in Mice: Vaginal Protease Activity Precedes Increased MOPQ Scores in Fibulin 5 Knockout Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Wieslander, Cecilia K.; Rahn, David D.; McIntire, Donald D.; Acevedo, Jesús F.; Drewes, Peter G.; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Word, R. Ann

    2008-01-01

    Two mouse models of pelvic organ prolapse have been generated recently, both of which have null mutations in genes involved in elastic fiber synthesis and assembly (fibulin 5 and lysyl oxidase-like 1). Interestingly, although these mice exhibit elastinopathies early in life, pelvic organ prolapse does not develop until later in life. In this investigation we developed and validated a tool to quantify the severity of pelvic organ prolapse in mice, and we used this tool prospectively to study the role of fibulin 5, aging, and vaginal proteases in the development of pelvic organ prolapse. The results indicate that >90% of Fbln5−/− mice develop prolapse by 6 mo of age, even in the absence of vaginal delivery, and that increased vaginal protease activity precedes the development of prolapse. PMID:18987327

  14. HCV NS3 protease enhances liver fibrosis via binding to and activating TGF-β type I receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Kotaro; Hara, Mitsuko; Terada, Takaho; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Takaya, Daisuke; Yaguchi, So-Ichi; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Tokio; Miyazawa, Keiji; Aizaki, Hideki; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji; Imoto, Masaya; Kojima, Soichi

    2013-11-01

    Viruses sometimes mimic host proteins and hijack the host cell machinery. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes liver fibrosis, a process largely mediated by the overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and collagen, although the precise underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we report that HCV non-structural protein 3 (NS3) protease affects the antigenicity and bioactivity of TGF-β2 in (CAGA)9-Luc CCL64 cells and in human hepatic cell lines via binding to TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α facilitates this mechanism by increasing the colocalization of TβRI with NS3 protease on the surface of HCV-infected cells. An anti-NS3 antibody against computationally predicted binding sites for TβRI blocked the TGF-β mimetic activities of NS3 in vitro and attenuated liver fibrosis in HCV-infected chimeric mice. These data suggest that HCV NS3 protease mimics TGF-β2 and functions, at least in part, via directly binding to and activating TβRI, thereby enhancing liver fibrosis.

  15. Protease-activated receptor 1 and 2 contribute to angiotensin II-induced activation of adventitial fibroblasts from rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    He, Rui-Qing; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Bao-Li

    2016-04-29

    Adventitial fibroblasts (AFs) can be activated by angiotensin II (Ang II) and exert pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory effects in vascular remodeling. Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and 2 play a significant role in fibrogenic and inflammatory diseases. The present study hypothesized that PAR1 and PAR2 are involved in Ang II-induced AF activation and contribute to adventitial remodeling. We found that direct activation of PAR1 and PAR2 with PAR1-AP and PAR2-AP led to AF activation, including proliferation and differentiation of AFs, extracellular matrix synthesis, as well as production of pro-fibrotic cytokine TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and MCP-1. Furthermore, PAR1 and PAR2 mediatedmore » Ang II-induced AF activation, since both PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists inhibited Ang II-induced proliferation, migration, differentiation, extracellular matrix synthesis and production of pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory cytokines in AFs. Finally, mechanistic study showed that Ang II, via Ang II type I receptor (AT1R), upregulated both PAR1 and PAR2 expression, and transactivated PAR1 and PAR2, as denoted by internalization of both proteins. In conclusion, our results suggest that PAR1 and PAR2 play a critical role in Ang II-induced AF activation, and this may contribute to adventitia-related pathological changes. - Highlights: • Direct activation of PAR1 and PAR2 led to adventitial fibroblast (AF) activation. • PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists attenuated Ang II-induced AF activation. • Ang II induced the upregulation and transactivation of PAR1/PAR2 in AFs.« less

  16. Detection of protease activities using specific aminoacyl or peptidyl p-nitroanilides after sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and its applications.

    PubMed

    Hou, W C; Chen, H J; Chen, T E; Lin, Y H

    1999-03-01

    A general method for detecting protease activities on acrylamide or agarose gels after sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) using specific aminoacyl p-nitroanilide (NA) or peptidyl NA as substrate is described. This method is extended from the spectrophotometric assay of p-nitroaniline, which is a chromogenic product liberated by protease action on aminoacyl NA or peptidyl NA. The acrylamide gel containing protein bands was dipped directly into a solution which contained specific synthetic aminoacyl NA or peptidyl NA as a substrate or had been overlaid with an agarose gel containing the same substrate. The p-nitroaniline released on the acrylamide or agarose gel by the specific protease was diazotized with sodium nitrite and then coupled to N-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine to produce distinct activity band(s). The substrates used for protease activity staining on gels were identical to those used for spectrophotometric assays. Some applications are described.

  17. Activation of ClpP protease by ADEP antibiotics: insights from hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sowole, Modupeola A; Alexopoulos, John A; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Ortega, Joaquin; Konermann, Lars

    2013-11-15

    The bacterial protease ClpP consists of 14 subunits that assemble into two stacked heptameric rings. The central degradation chamber can be accessed via axial pores. In free ClpP, these pores are obstructed by the N-terminal regions of the seven subunits at either end of the barrel. Acyldepsipeptides (ADEPs) are antibacterial compounds that bind in hydrophobic clefts surrounding the pore region, causing the pores to open up. The ensuing uncontrolled degradation of intracellular proteins is responsible for the antibiotic activity of ADEPs. Recently published X-ray structures yielded conflicting models regarding the conformation adopted by the N-terminal regions in the open state. Here, we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry to obtain complementary insights into the ClpP behavior with and without ADEP1. Ligand binding causes rigidification of the equatorial belt, accompanied by destabilization in the vicinity of the binding clefts. The N-terminal regions undergo rapid deuteration with only minor changes after ADEP1 binding, revealing a lack of stable H-bonding. Our data point to a mechanism where the pore opening mechanism is mediated primarily by changes in the packing of N-terminal nonpolar side chains. We propose that a "hydrophobic plug" causes pore blockage in ligand-free ClpP. ADEP1 binding provides new hydrophobic anchor points that nonpolar N-terminal residues can interact with. In this way, ADEP1 triggers the transition to an open conformation, where nonpolar moieties are clustered around the rim of the pore. This proposed mechanism helps reconcile the conflicting models that had been put forward earlier. © 2013.

  18. Phosphorylation of the type II transmembrane serine protease, TMPRSS13, in hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 and -2-mediated cell-surface localization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew S; Varela, Fausto A; Hyland, Thomas E; Schoenbeck, Andrew J; White, Jordan M; Tanabe, Lauren M; Todi, Sokol V; List, Karin

    2017-09-08

    TMPRSS13 is a member of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family. Although various TTSPs have been characterized in detail biochemically and functionally, the basic properties of TMPRSS13 remain unclear. Here, we investigate the activation, inhibition, post-translational modification, and localization of TMPRSS13. We show that TMPRSS13 is a glycosylated, active protease and that its own proteolytic activity mediates zymogen cleavage. Full-length, active TMPRSS13 exhibits impaired cell-surface expression in the absence of the cognate Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 or HAI-2. Concomitant presence of TMPRSS13 with either HAI-1 or -2 mediates phosphorylation of residues in the intracellular domain of the protease, and it coincides with efficient transport of the protease to the cell surface and its subsequent shedding. Cell-surface labeling experiments indicate that the dominant form of TMPRSS13 on the cell surface is phosphorylated, whereas intracellular TMPRSS13 is predominantly non-phosphorylated. These data provide novel insight into the cellular properties of TMPRSS13 and highlight phosphorylation of TMPRSS13 as a novel post-translational modification of this TTSP family member and potentially other members of this family of proteases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Central domain of IL-33 is cleaved by mast cell proteases for potent activation of group-2 innate lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Lefrançais, Emma; Duval, Anais; Mirey, Emilie; Roga, Stéphane; Espinosa, Eric; Cayrol, Corinne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is an alarmin cytokine from the IL-1 family. IL-33 activates many immune cell types expressing the interleukin 1 receptor-like 1 (IL1RL1) receptor ST2, including group-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s, natural helper cells, nuocytes), the major producers of IL-5 and IL-13 during type-2 innate immune responses and allergic airway inflammation. IL-33 is likely to play a critical role in asthma because the IL33 and ST2/IL1RL1 genes have been reproducibly identified as major susceptibility loci in large-scale genome-wide association studies. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating IL-33 activity is thus urgently needed. Here, we investigated the role of mast cells, critical effector cells in allergic disorders, known to interact with ILC2s in vivo. We found that serine proteases secreted by activated mast cells (chymase and tryptase) generate mature forms of IL-33 with potent activity on ILC2s. The major forms produced by mast cell proteases, IL-3395–270, IL-33107–270, and IL-33109–270, were 30-fold more potent than full-length human IL-331–270 for activation of ILC2s ex vivo. They induced a strong expansion of ILC2s and eosinophils in vivo, associated with elevated concentrations of IL-5 and IL-13. Murine IL-33 is also cleaved by mast cell tryptase, and a tryptase inhibitor reduced IL-33–dependent allergic airway inflammation in vivo. Our study identifies the central cleavage/activation domain of IL-33 (amino acids 66–111) as an important functional domain of the protein and suggests that interference with IL-33 cleavage and activation by mast cell and other inflammatory proteases could be useful to reduce IL-33–mediated responses in allergic asthma and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25313073

  20. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Aravind T; Lakshmi, Sowmya P; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R; Reddy, Raju C

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs' electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease.

  1. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aravind T.; Lakshmi, Sowmya P.; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R.; Reddy, Raju C.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs’ electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease. PMID:27119365

  2. Microplate fluorescence protease assays test the inhibition of select North American snake venoms' activities with an anti-proteinase library.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph A

    2015-09-01

    Snake envenomation is a relatively neglected significant world health problem, designated an orphan disease by the WHO. While often effective, antivenins are insufficient. Could another approach greatly aid inhibition of the venom toxins? New fluorescent substrates for measuring protease activity in microplate assays suitable for high throughput screening were tested and found reproducible with snake venom. Representative North American venoms showed relatively strong proteinase and collagenase, but weaker elastase activities. Caseinolytic activity is inhibited by the nonspecific proteinase inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline and by EDTA, as is collagenase activity, consistent with the action of metalloproteinases. Both general protease and collagenase assays CV average 3%, and Km measured were above normal working conditions. Using a library of anti -proteinase compounds with multiple venoms revealed high inhibitor activity by three agents with known multiple metalloproteinase inhibitor activity (Actinonin, GM6001, and NNGH), which incidentally supports the concept that much of the degradative activity of certain venoms is due to metalloproteinases with collagenase activity. These results together support the use of microplate proteinase assays, particularly this collagenase assay, in future drug repurposing studies leading to the development of new treatments for those envenomations that have a major proteolytic component in their pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Purification and Characterization of Serine Proteases That Exhibit Caspase-Like Activity and Are Associated with Programmed Cell Death in Avena sativa

    PubMed Central

    Coffeen, Warren C.; Wolpert, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Victoria blight of Avena sativa (oat) is caused by the fungus Cochliobolus victoriae, which is pathogenic because of the production of the toxin victorin. The victorin-induced response in sensitive A. sativa has been characterized as a form of programmed cell death (PCD) and displays morphological and biochemical features similar to apoptosis, including chromatin condensation, DNA laddering, cell shrinkage, altered mitochondrial function, and ordered, substrate-specific proteolytic events. Victorin-induced proteolysis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is shown to be prevented by caspase-specific and general protease inhibitors. Evidence is presented for a signaling cascade leading to Rubisco proteolysis that involves multiple proteases. Furthermore, two proteases that are apparently involved in the Rubisco proteolytic cascade were purified and characterized. These proteases exhibit caspase specificity and display amino acid sequences homologous to plant subtilisin-like Ser proteases. The proteases are constitutively present in an active form and are relocalized to the extracellular fluid after induction of PCD by either victorin or heat shock. The role of the enzymes as processive proteases involved in a signal cascade during the PCD response is discussed. PMID:15020745

  4. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3Cmore » protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.« less

  5. Cysteine protease inhibitors reduce brain beta-amyloid and beta-secretase activity in vivo and are potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hook, Gregory; Hook, Vivian Y H; Kindy, Mark

    2007-09-01

    Beta-secretase inhibitors that lower brain beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta) are likely to be effective for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Irreversible epoxysuccinyl cysteine protease inhibitors are known to reduce brain Abeta and beta-secretase activity in the guinea pig model of human Abeta production. In this study, acetyl-L-leucyl-L-valyl-L-lysinal (Ac-LVK-CHO) is also shown to significantly reduce brain Abeta and beta-secretase activity and brain Abeta in the same model. Ac-LVK-CHO is structurally distinct from the epoxysuccinyl inhibitors and is a reversible cysteine protease inhibitor. The results suggest that cysteine protease inhibitors generally, and reversible cysteine protease inhibitors specifically, have potential for development as AD therapeutics.

  6. Comparative study on the proteases from fish pyloric caeca and the use for production of gelatin hydrolysate with antioxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Khantaphant, Sutheera; Benjakul, Soottawat

    2008-12-01

    Proteases from pyloric caeca extract of three fish species including brownstripe red snapper (Lutjanus vitta), bigeye snapper (Priacanthus tayenus) and threadfin bream (Nemipterus marginatus) were comparatively studied. The extracts from bigeye snapper and threadfin bream exhibited the highest hydrolytic activities toward casein, alpha-N-benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide and alpha-N-rho-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester at pH 8.0 and 60 degrees C and pH 8.5 and 55 degrees C, respectively. The extract of brownstripe red snapper showed the optimal pH and temperature of 8.0 and 60 degrees C with all substrates used except the optimal temperature was 65 degrees C when casein was used. All proteases were strongly inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) and N-rho-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethylketone (TLCK) and partially inhibited by N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethylketone for all substrates tested, suggesting that trypsin-like proteases were the major enzymes. Substrate-gel activity staining of 40-60% ammonium sulfate (AS) fraction revealed that major activity bands were observed with molecular mass of 24, 22 and 20 kDa for brownstripe red snapper, bigeye snapper and threadfin bream, respectively. Those activity bands were partially inhibited by SBTI and TLCK. AS fraction was further used to produce gelatin hydrolysate from the skin of brownstripe red snapper with different degrees of hydrolysis (DH). Hydrolysate with DH of 15% exhibited the highest DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities and ferric reducing antioxidant power (p<0.05). Therefore, the extract from pyloric caeca could be used to produce the gelatin hydrolysates possessing antioxidative activities.

  7. The SARS coronavirus papain like protease can inhibit IRF3 at a post activation step that requires deubiquitination activity.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Krystal; Schäfer, Alexandra; Pham, Alissa; Frieman, Matthew

    2014-12-07

    The outcome of a viral infection is regulated by complex interactions of viral and host factors. SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) engages and regulates several innate immune response pathways during infection. We have previously shown that the SARS-CoV Papain-like Protease (PLpro) inhibits type I interferon (IFN) by inhibiting IRF3 phosphorylation thereby blocking downstream Interferon induction. This finding prompted us to identify other potential mechanisms of inhibition of PLpro on IFN induction. We have used plasmids expressing PLpro and IRF3 including an IRF3 mutant that is constitutively active, called IRF3(5D). In these experiments we utilize transfections, chromatin immunoprecipitation, Electro-mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) and protein localization to identify where IRF3 and IRF3(5D) are inhibited by PLpro. Here we show that PLpro also inhibits IRF3 activation at a step after phosphorylation and that this inhibition is dependent on the de-ubiquitination (DUB) activity of PLpro. We found that PLpro is able to block the type I IFN induction of a constitutively active IRF3, but does not inhibit IRF3 dimerization, nuclear localization or DNA binding. However, inhibition of PLpro's DUB activity by mutagenesis blocked the IRF3 inhibition activity of PLpro, suggesting a role for IRF3 ubiquitination in induction of a type I IFN innate immune response. These results demonstrate an additional mechanism that PLpro is able to inhibit IRF3 signaling. These data suggest novel innate immune antagonism activities of PLpro that may contribute to SARS-CoV pathogenesis.

  8. Midgut Protease Activity During Larval Development of Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) Fed With Natural and Artificial Diet

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Ciprian, José Pedro; Aceituno-Medina, Marysol; Guillen, Karina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we examined the activity of two serine proteases (chymotrypsin and trypsin) and two metalloproteases (carboxypeptidases A and B) during larval development in Anastrepha obliqua fed natural (mango fruit) and artificial (formulation used in mass-rearing) diets. Proteolytic activity of chymotrypsin, trypsin, carboxypeptidase A, and carboxypeptidase B was detected in the midgut of different instars of A. obliqua and was strongly affected by the pH and diet type. The protein content of the natural and artificial diets was similar. Enzymatic activity was higher in the midgut of the larvae fed the natural diet than in larvae fed the artificial diet. The activity of the endopeptidases (chymotrypsin and trypsin) was lower than those of the exopeptidases (carboxypeptidases A and B). The pH of the midgut varied from acidic to neutral. The results indicate that in the midgut of the larvae reared on both types of diet, the level of carboxypeptidase activity was approximately 100-fold greater than the level of chymotrypsin activity and 10,000-fold greater than the level of trypsin. In conclusion, carboxypeptidase A and B are the main proteases involved in the digestion of proteins in the larvae of A. obliqua. The natural diet showed a high bioaccessibility. A clear tendency to express high activities of chymotrypsin and trypsin was observed by the third instar. Our research contributes to the planning and development of novel bioaccessibility assays to understand the nutrition processing of A. obliqua larvae under mass-rearing conditions for sterile insect technique.

  9. The Circulating Protease Persephone Is an Immune Sensor for Microbial Proteolytic Activities Upstream of the Drosophila Toll Pathway.

    PubMed

    Issa, Najwa; Guillaumot, Nina; Lauret, Emilie; Matt, Nicolas; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Veillard, Florian

    2018-02-15

    Microbial or endogenous molecular patterns as well as pathogen functional features can activate innate immune systems. Whereas detection of infection by pattern recognition receptors has been investigated in details, sensing of virulence factors activities remains less characterized. In Drosophila, genetic evidences indicate that the serine protease Persephone belongs to a danger pathway activated by abnormal proteolytic activities to induce Toll signaling. However, neither the activation mechanism of this pathway nor its specificity has been determined. Here, we identify a unique region in the pro-domain of Persephone that functions as bait for exogenous proteases independently of their origin, type, or specificity. Cleavage in this bait region constitutes the first step of a sequential activation and licenses the subsequent maturation of Persephone to the endogenous cysteine cathepsin 26-29-p. Our results establish Persephone itself as an immune receptor able to sense a broad range of microbes through virulence factor activities rather than molecular patterns. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. In situ immobilization of acid protease on mesoporous activated carbon packed column for the production of protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Ganesh Kumar, A; Perinbam, K; Kamatchi, P; Nagesh, N; Sekaran, G

    2010-02-01

    The mesoporous activated carbon (MAC) was used as a support material for in situ immobilization of acid protease (AP). The optimum temperature for the activities of both free and immobilized AP was found to be 50 degrees C. The catalytic efficiency of AP-MAC system has significantly been maintained for more than ten consecutive reaction cycles. The functional groups and surface morphology of the AP, MAC and AP-MAC were observed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The production of protein hydrolysates was carried out from bovine serum albumin (BSA) using AP-MAC packed column and its properties were studied.

  11. Cathepsin B and D, and Ca2+-dependent neutral protease activities in the retina of taurine-depleted rats.

    PubMed

    Tsung, P K; Lombardini, J B

    1985-09-01

    Rats were treated with guanidinoethanesulfonic acid (GES), a taurine transport inhibitor, which reduces the tissue content of taurine. The quantity of taurine in the rat retinas after GES treatment was reduced by 46% after the first week, 60% after the second week, and 67% after the third week. Activities of cathepsin B and D were not significantly altered when calculated on the basis of either protein or DNA content in the taurine-depleted retinas. However, cytosolic Ca2+-dependent neutral protease activity in retinas from GES-treated rats increased by 55% after the third week.

  12. A fibrinolytic protease AfeE from Streptomyces sp. CC5, with potent thrombolytic activity in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhibin; Liu, Pingping; Cheng, Guangyan; Zhang, Biying; Dong, Weiliang; Su, Xingli; Huang, Yan; Cui, Zhongli; Kong, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Fibrinolytic proteases have potential applications in cardiovascular disease therapy. A novel fibrinolytic protease, AfeE, with strong thrombolytic activity was purified from Streptomyces sp. CC5. AfeE displayed maximum activity at 40°C in the pH range of 7.0-12.0. It was strongly inhibited by serine protease inhibitor phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride, soybean trypsin inhibitor, tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone. The activity of the enzyme was partially inhibited by Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Zn(2+). AfeE exhibited higher substrate specificity for fibrin than fibrinogen, which has rarely been reported in fibrinolytic enzymes. AfeE also showed high thrombolytic activity in a carrageenan-induced mouse tail thrombosis model. AfeE prolonged prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and thrombin time in rat blood. A bleeding time assay revealed that AfeE did not prolong bleeding time in mice at a dose of 1mg/kg. No acute cytotoxicity was observed for AfeE at 320μg/well in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The afeE gene was cloned from the genome of Streptomyces sp. CC5. Full-length AFE-CC5E contained 434 amino acids and was processed into a mature form consisting 284 amino acids by posttranslational modification, as revealed by high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis. These results indicate that AfeE is a prospective candidate for antithrombotic drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation of plasminogen activator inhibitor implicates protease InhA in the acute-phase response to Bacillus anthracis infection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung-Chul; Jorgensen, Shelley C; Popova, Taissia G; Tonry, Jessica H; Bailey, Charles L; Popov, Serguei G

    2009-06-01

    Anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. The infection is associated with inflammation and sepsis, but little is known about the acute-phase response during disease and the nature of the bacterial factors causing it. In this study, we examined the levels of the acute-phase proteins (APPs) in comparative experiments using mice challenged with spores and a purified B. anthracis protease InhA as a possible factor mediating the response. A strong increase in the plasma levels of APPs such as haptoglobin and serum amyloid A was observed during infection. Protein and mRNA levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 in the liver were also increased concurrently with bacterial dissemination at 72 h post-infection. Similar effects were observed at 6 h post injection with InhA. Induction of hepatic transforming growth factor-beta1, a PAI-1 inducer, was also found in the liver of InhA-injected mice. PAI-1 elevation by InhA resulted in an increased level of urokinase-type plasminogen activator complex with PAI-1 and a decreased level of D-dimers indicating inhibition of blood fibrinolysis. These results reveal an acute liver response to anthrax infection and provide a plausible pathophysiological link between the host inflammatory response and the pro-thrombotic haemostatic imbalance in the course of disease through PAI-1 induction in the liver.

  14. A Clinical Wide-Field Fluorescence Endoscopic Device for Molecular Imaging Demonstrating Cathepsin Protease Activity in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sensarn, Steven; Zavaleta, Cristina L.; Segal, Ehud; Rogalla, Stephan; Lee, Wansik; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Bogyo, Matthew; Contag, Christopher H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Early and effective detection of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract will require novel molecular probes and advances in instrumentation that can reveal functional changes in dysplastic and malignant tissues. Here, we describe adaptation of a wide-field clinical fiberscope to perform wide-field fluorescence imaging while preserving its white-light capability for the purpose of providing wide-field fluorescence imaging capability to point-of-care microscopes. Procedures We developed and used a fluorescent fiberscope to detect signals from a quenched probe, BMV109, that becomes fluorescent when cleaved by, and covalently bound to, active cathepsin proteases. Cathepsins are expressed in inflammation- and tumor-associated macrophages as well as directly from tumor cells and are a promising target for cancer imaging. The fiberscope has a 1-mm outer diameter enabling validation via endoscopic exams in mice, and therefore we evaluated topically applied BMV109 for the ability to detect colon polyps in an azoxymethane-induced colon tumor model in mice. Results This wide-field endoscopic imaging device revealed consistent and clear fluorescence signals from BMV109 that specifically localized to the polypoid regions as opposed to the normal adjacent colon tissue (p < 0.004) in the murine colon carcinoma model. Conclusions The sensitivity of detection of BMV109 with the fluorescence fiberscope suggested utility of these tools for early detection at hard-to-reach sites. The fiberscope was designed to be used in conjunction with miniature, endoscope-compatible fluorescence microscopes for dual wide-field and microscopic cancer detection. PMID:27154508

  15. Beta-arrestin inhibits CAMKKbeta-dependent AMPK activation downstream of protease-activated-receptor-2

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteinase-activated-receptor-2 (PAR2) is a seven transmembrane receptor that can activate two separate signaling arms: one through Gαq and Ca2+ mobilization, and a second through recruitment of β-arrestin scaffolds. In some cases downstream targets of the Gαq/Ca2+ signaling arm are directly inhibited by β-arrestins, while in other cases the two pathways are synergistic; thus β-arrestins act as molecular switches capable of modifying the signal generated by the receptor. Results Here we demonstrate that PAR2 can activate adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of cellular energy balance, through Ca2+-dependent Kinase Kinase β (CAMKKβ), while inhibiting AMPK through interaction with β-arrestins. The ultimate outcome of PAR2 activation depended on the cell type studied; in cultured fibroblasts with low endogenous β-arrestins, PAR2 activated AMPK; however, in primary fat and liver, PAR2 only activated AMPK in β-arrestin-2-/- mice. β-arrestin-2 could be co-immunoprecipitated with AMPK and CAMKKβ under baseline conditions from both cultured fibroblasts and primary fat, and its association with both proteins was increased by PAR2 activation. Addition of recombinant β-arrestin-2 to in vitro kinase assays directly inhibited phosphorylation of AMPK by CAMKKβ on Thr172. Conclusions Studies have shown that decreased AMPK activity is associated with obesity and Type II Diabetes, while AMPK activity is increased with metabolically favorable conditions and cholesterol lowering drugs. These results suggest a role for β-arrestin in the inhibition of AMPK signaling, raising the possibility that β-arrestin-dependent PAR2 signaling may act as a molecular switch turning a positive signal to AMPK into an inhibitory one. PMID:20858278

  16. The N-terminal Arg Residue Is Essential for Autocatalytic Activation of a Lipopolysaccharide-responsive Protease Zymogen*

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Shiga, Takafumi; Shibata, Toshio; Sako, Miyuki; Maenaka, Katsumi; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Factor C, a serine protease zymogen involved in innate immune responses in horseshoe crabs, is known to be autocatalytically activated on the surface of bacterial lipopolysaccharides, but the molecular mechanism of this activation remains unknown. In this study, we show that wild-type factor C expressed in HEK293S cells exhibits a lipopolysaccharide-induced activity equivalent to that of native factor C. Analysis of the N-terminal addition, deletion, or substitution mutants shows that the N-terminal Arg residue and the distance between the N terminus and the tripartite of lipopolysaccharide-binding site are essential factors for autocatalytic activation, and that the positive charge of the N terminus may interact with an acidic amino acid(s) of the molecule to convert the zymogen into an active form. Chemical cross-linking experiments indicate that the N terminus is required to form a complex of the factor C molecules in a sufficiently close vicinity to be chemically cross-linked on the surface of lipopolysaccharides. We propose a molecular mechanism of the autocatalytic activation of the protease zymogen on lipopolysaccharides functioning as a platform to induce specific protein-protein interaction between the factor C molecules. PMID:25077965

  17. The N-terminal Arg residue is essential for autocatalytic activation of a lipopolysaccharide-responsive protease zymogen.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Shiga, Takafumi; Shibata, Toshio; Sako, Miyuki; Maenaka, Katsumi; Koshiba, Takumi; Mizumura, Hikaru; Oda, Toshio; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2014-09-12

    Factor C, a serine protease zymogen involved in innate immune responses in horseshoe crabs, is known to be autocatalytically activated on the surface of bacterial lipopolysaccharides, but the molecular mechanism of this activation remains unknown. In this study, we show that wild-type factor C expressed in HEK293S cells exhibits a lipopolysaccharide-induced activity equivalent to that of native factor C. Analysis of the N-terminal addition, deletion, or substitution mutants shows that the N-terminal Arg residue and the distance between the N terminus and the tripartite of lipopolysaccharide-binding site are essential factors for autocatalytic activation, and that the positive charge of the N terminus may interact with an acidic amino acid(s) of the molecule to convert the zymogen into an active form. Chemical cross-linking experiments indicate that the N terminus is required to form a complex of the factor C molecules in a sufficiently close vicinity to be chemically cross-linked on the surface of lipopolysaccharides. We propose a molecular mechanism of the autocatalytic activation of the protease zymogen on lipopolysaccharides functioning as a platform to induce specific protein-protein interaction between the factor C molecules. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Protease-Activated Receptor 2: Are Common Functions in Glial and Immune Cells Linked to Inflammation-Related CNS Disorders?

    PubMed

    Bushell, Trevor J; Cunningham, Margaret R; McIntosh, Kathryn A; Moudio, Serge; Plevin, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) whose activation requires the cleavage of the N-terminus by a serine protease. However, recent evidence reveals that alternative routes of activation also occur, that PARs signal via multiple pathways and that pathway activation is activator- dependent. Given our increased understanding of PAR function both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions, one aspect that has remained constant is the link between PAR2 and inflammation. PAR2 is expressed in immune cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system and has been shown to play a role in several peripheral inflammatory conditions. PAR2 is similarly expressed on astrocytes and microglia within the CNS and its activation is either protective or detrimental to CNS function depending on the conditions or disease state investigated. With a clear similarity between the function of PAR2 on both immune cells and CNS glial cells, here we have reviewed their roles in both these systems. We suggest that the recent development of novel PAR2 modulators, including those that show biased signalling, will further increase our understanding of PAR2 function and the development of potential therapeutics for CNS disorders in which inflammation is proposed to play a role.

  19. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  20. TMPRSS12 Is an Activating Protease for Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Bingling; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Yongzhen; Guan, Xiaolu; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) into host cells initially requires the fusion of viral and cell membranes, which is exclusively mediated by fusion (F) protein. Proteolysis of aMPV F protein by endogenous proteases of host cells allows F protein to induce membrane fusion; however, these proteases have not been identified. Here, we provide the first evidence that the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS12 facilitates the cleavage of subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F protein. We found that overexpression of TMPRSS12 enhanced aMPV/B F protein cleavage, F protein fusogenicity, and viral replication. Subsequently, knockdown of TMPRSS12 with specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) reduced aMPV/B F protein cleavage, F protein fusogenicity, and viral replication. We also found a cleavage motif in the aMPV/B F protein (amino acids 100 and 101) that was recognized by TMPRSS12. The histidine, aspartic acid, and serine residue (HDS) triad of TMPRSS12 was shown to be essential for the proteolysis of aMPV/B F protein via mutation analysis. Notably, we observed TMPRSS12 mRNA expression in target organs of aMPV/B in chickens. Overall, our results indicate that TMPRSS12 is crucial for aMPV/B F protein proteolysis and aMPV/B infectivity and that TMPRSS12 may serve as a target for novel therapeutics and prophylactics for aMPV. IMPORTANCE Proteolysis of the aMPV F protein is a prerequisite for F protein-mediated membrane fusion of virus and cell and for aMPV infection; however, the proteases used in vitro and vivo are not clear. A combination of analyses, including overexpression, knockdown, and mutation methods, demonstrated that the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS12 facilitated cleavage of subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F protein. Importantly, we located the motif in the aMPV/B F protein recognized by TMPRSS12 and the catalytic triad in TMPRSS12 that facilitated proteolysis of the aMPV/B F protein. This is the first report on TMPRSS12 as a protease for proteolysis of viral

  1. TMPRSS12 Is an Activating Protease for Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bingling; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Yongzhen; Guan, Xiaolu; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-12-15

    The entry of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) into host cells initially requires the fusion of viral and cell membranes, which is exclusively mediated by fusion (F) protein. Proteolysis of aMPV F protein by endogenous proteases of host cells allows F protein to induce membrane fusion; however, these proteases have not been identified. Here, we provide the first evidence that the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS12 facilitates the cleavage of subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F protein. We found that overexpression of TMPRSS12 enhanced aMPV/B F protein cleavage, F protein fusogenicity, and viral replication. Subsequently, knockdown of TMPRSS12 with specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) reduced aMPV/B F protein cleavage, F protein fusogenicity, and viral replication. We also found a cleavage motif in the aMPV/B F protein (amino acids 100 and 101) that was recognized by TMPRSS12. The histidine, aspartic acid, and serine residue (HDS) triad of TMPRSS12 was shown to be essential for the proteolysis of aMPV/B F protein via mutation analysis. Notably, we observed TMPRSS12 mRNA expression in target organs of aMPV/B in chickens. Overall, our results indicate that TMPRSS12 is crucial for aMPV/B F protein proteolysis and aMPV/B infectivity and that TMPRSS12 may serve as a target for novel therapeutics and prophylactics for aMPV. Proteolysis of the aMPV F protein is a prerequisite for F protein-mediated membrane fusion of virus and cell and for aMPV infection; however, the proteases used in vitro and vivo are not clear. A combination of analyses, including overexpression, knockdown, and mutation methods, demonstrated that the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS12 facilitated cleavage of subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F protein. Importantly, we located the motif in the aMPV/B F protein recognized by TMPRSS12 and the catalytic triad in TMPRSS12 that facilitated proteolysis of the aMPV/B F protein. This is the first report on TMPRSS12 as a protease for proteolysis of viral envelope

  2. Characterization of detergent compatible protease of a halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9: differential role of metal ions in stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, S K

    2013-10-01

    A moderately halophilic protease producer, Bacillus sp. strain isolated from sea water is described. The protease is purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulphate precipitation and CM cellulose chromatography. The serine protease has a molecular mass of 29 kDa. Enzymatic characterization of protease revealed K(m) 2.22 mg mL(-1), Vmax 1111.11 U mL(-1), pH optimum 9.0, t1/2 190 min at 60°C and salt optima 1% (w/v) NaCl. The protease is remarkably stable in hydrophilic and hydrophobic solvents at high concentrations. The purified preparation is unstable at room temperature. Ca(2+) ions are required for preventing this loss of activity. Interestingly, the activity and stability are modulated differentially. Whereas, divalent cation Ca(2+) are involved in maintaining stability in solution at room temperature by preventing unfolding, monovalent Na(+) and K(+) ions participate in regulating the activity and assist in refolding of the enzyme. Application of the protease is shown in efficient removal of blood stain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterisation of faecal protease activity in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea: origin and effect of gut transit.

    PubMed

    Tooth, David; Garsed, Klara; Singh, Gulzar; Marciani, Luca; Lam, Ching; Fordham, Imogen; Fields, Annie; Banwait, Rawinder; Lingaya, Melanie; Layfield, Robert; Hastings, Maggie; Whorwell, Peter; Spiller, Robin

    2014-05-01

    Faecal serine proteases (FSPs) may play a role in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D), but their origin is unclear. We aimed to structurally characterise them and define the impact of colonic cleansing and transit time. Faecal samples were obtained from 30 healthy volunteers (HV) and 79 patients with IBS-D participating in a trial of ondansetron versus placebo. Colonic transit was measured using radio-opaque markers. Samples were also obtained from 24 HV before and after colonic cleansing with the osmotic laxative MoviPrep. FSPs were purified from faecal extracts using benzamidine-Sepharose affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE profiled components were identified using trypsinolysis and tandem mass spectrometry. Functional protease activity in faecal extracts was measured using a colorimetric assay based on the proteolysis of azo-casein. Protein analysis identified the most abundant FSPs as being of human origin and probably derived from pancreatic juice. Functional assays showed increased faecal protease (FP) and amylase in patients with IBS-D compared with HV. Those with higher amylase had significantly higher FP and greater anxiety. FP activity correlated negatively with whole gut transit in patients with IBS-D (Spearman r=-0.32, p=0.005) and HV (r=-0.55, p=0.014). Colon cleansing caused a significant rise in FP activity in HV from a baseline of median (IQR) 253 (140-426) to 1031 (435-2296), levels similar to those seen in patients with IBS-D. FSP activity correlated positively with days/week with urgency. The most abundant FSPs are of human origin. Rapid transit through the colon and/or decreased (possibly bacterial) proteolytic degradation increases their faecal concentration and could contribute to visceral hypersensitivity in patients with IBS-D. NCT00745004.

  4. Protease activated receptor 4 limits bacterial growth and lung pathology during late stage Streptococcus pneumoniae induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, S F; Van't Veer, C; van den Boogaard, F E; Nieuwland, R; Hoogendijk, A J; de Boer, O J; Roelofs, J J T H; van der Poll, T

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen of pneumonia and sepsis. Pneumonia and sepsis are associated with enhanced activation of coagulation, resulting in the production of several host-derived proteases at the primary site of infection and in the circulation. Serine proteases cleave protease activated receptors (PARs), which form a molecular link between coagulation and inflammation. PAR4 is one of four subtypes of PARs and is widely expressed by multiple cell types in the respiratory tract implicated in pulmonary inflammation, by immune cells and by platelets. In mice, mouse (m)PAR4 is the only thrombin receptor expressed by platelets. We here sought to determine the contribution of mPAR4 to the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae in mPAR4-deficient (par4-/-) and wild-type mice. Mice were sacrificed after 6, 24 or 48 hours (h). Blood, lungs, liver and spleen were collected for analyses. Ex vivo stimulation assays were performed with S. pneumoniae and mPAR4 activating peptides. At 48 h after infection, higher bacterial loads were found in the lungs and blood of par4-/- mice (p < 0.05), accompanied by higher histopathology scores and increased cytokine levels (p < 0.05) in the lungs. Ex vivo, co-stimulation with mPAR4 activating peptide enhanced the whole blood cytokine response to S. pneumoniae. Thrombin inhibition resulted in decreased cytokine release after S. pneumoniae stimulation in human whole blood. Our findings suggest that mPAR4 contributes to antibacterial defence during murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

  5. Subcellular localization and activation of ADAM proteases in the context of FasL shedding in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ebsen, Henriette; Lettau, Marcus; Kabelitz, Dieter; Janssen, Ottmar

    2015-06-01

    The "A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinases" (ADAMs) form a subgroup of the metzincin endopeptidases. Proteolytically active members of this protein family act as sheddases and govern key processes in development and inflammation by regulating cell surface expression and release of cytokines, growth factors, adhesion molecules and their receptors. In T lymphocytes, ADAM10 sheds the death factor Fas Ligand (FasL) and thereby regulates T cell activation, death and effector function. Although FasL shedding by ADAM10 was confirmed in several studies, its regulation is still poorly defined. We recently reported that ADAM10 is highly abundant on T cells whereas its close relative ADAM17 is expressed at low levels and transiently appears at the cell surface upon stimulation. Since FasL is also stored intracellularly and brought to the plasma membrane upon stimulation, we addressed where the death factor gets exposed to ADAM proteases. We report for the first time that both ADAM10 and ADAM17 are associated with FasL-containing secretory lysosomes. Moreover, we demonstrate that TCR/CD3/CD28-stimulation induces a partial positioning of both proteases and FasL to lipid rafts and only the activation-induced raft-positioning results in FasL processing. TCR/CD3/CD28-induced FasL proteolysis is markedly affected by reducing both ADAM10 and ADAM17 protein levels, indicating that in human T cells also ADAM17 is implicated in FasL processing. Since FasL shedding is affected by cholesterol depletion and by inhibition of Src kinases or palmitoylation, we conclude that it requires mobilization and co-positioning of ADAM proteases in lipid raft-like platforms associated with an activation of raft-associated Src-family kinases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterisation of faecal protease activity in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea: origin and effect of gut transit

    PubMed Central

    Tooth, David; Garsed, Klara; Singh, Gulzar; Marciani, Luca; Lam, Ching; Fordham, Imogen; Fields, Annie; Banwait, Rawinder; Lingaya, Melanie; Layfield, Robert; Hastings, Maggie; Whorwell, Peter; Spiller, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Faecal serine proteases (FSPs) may play a role in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D), but their origin is unclear. We aimed to structurally characterise them and define the impact of colonic cleansing and transit time. Design Faecal samples were obtained from 30 healthy volunteers (HV) and 79 patients with IBS-D participating in a trial of ondansetron versus placebo. Colonic transit was measured using radio-opaque markers. Samples were also obtained from 24 HV before and after colonic cleansing with the osmotic laxative MoviPrep. FSPs were purified from faecal extracts using benzamidine-Sepharose affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE profiled components were identified using trypsinolysis and tandem mass spectrometry. Functional protease activity in faecal extracts was measured using a colorimetric assay based on the proteolysis of azo-casein. Results Protein analysis identified the most abundant FSPs as being of human origin and probably derived from pancreatic juice. Functional assays showed increased faecal protease (FP) and amylase in patients with IBS-D compared with HV. Those with higher amylase had significantly higher FP and greater anxiety. FP activity correlated negatively with whole gut transit in patients with IBS-D (Spearman r=−0.32, p=0.005) and HV (r=−0.55, p=0.014). Colon cleansing caused a significant rise in FP activity in HV from a baseline of median (IQR) 253 (140–426) to 1031 (435–2296), levels similar to those seen in patients with IBS-D. FSP activity correlated positively with days/week with urgency. Conclusions The most abundant FSPs are of human origin. Rapid transit through the colon and/or decreased (possibly bacterial) proteolytic degradation increases their faecal concentration and could contribute to visceral hypersensitivity in patients with IBS-D. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00745004. PMID:23911555

  7. Purification and physicochemical characterization of a serine protease with fibrinolytic activity from latex of a medicinal herb Euphorbia hirta.

    PubMed

    Patel, Girijesh Kumar; Kawale, Ashish Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2012-03-01

    A 34 kDa serine protease, designated as hirtin, with fibrinolytic activity was purified to homogeneity from the latex of Euphorbia hirta by the combination of ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The N-terminal sequence of hirtin was found to be YAVYIGLILETAA/NNE. Hirtin exhibited esterase and amidase activities along with azocaseinolytic, gelatinolytic, fibrinogenolytic and fibrinolytic activities. It preferentially hydrolyzed Aα and α-chains, followed by Bβ and β, and γ and γ-γ chains of fibrinogen and fibrin clot respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme activity was found to be pH 7.2 and 50 °C respectively. Enzymatic activity of hirtin was significantly inhibited by PMSF and AEBSF. It showed higher specificity for synthetic substrate p-tos-GPRNA for thrombin. The CD spectra of hirtin showed a high content of β-sheets as compared to α-helix. The results indicate that hirtin is a thrombin-like serine protease and may have potential industrial and therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulation of Neutral Protease Productivity in Bacillus subtilis: Transformation of High Protease Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Yuko; Yamane, Kunio; Maruo, Bunji

    1974-01-01

    A transformable strain of Bacillus subtilis 6160, a derivative of B. subtilis 168, produces three kinds of casein hydrolytic enzymes (alkaline protease, neutral protease, and esterase) in a culture medium. B. natto IAM 1212 produces 15 to 20 times as much total proteolytic activity as does B. subtilis. Extracellular proteases produced by the two strains were separated into each enzyme fraction by diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex A-50 column chromatography. The difference in the total protease activities of extracellular proteases between the two strains was due to the amount of neutral protease. The ratios of neutral protease activity to alkaline protease activity (N/A) were 1.1 in B. subtilis 6160 and 13.0 in B. natto IAM 1212. Enzymological and immunological properties of alkaline protease and neutral protease obtained from the two strains were quite similar or identical, respectively. Specific activities measured by an immunological analysis of the two neutral proteases against casein were also equal. A genetic character of high protease productivity in B. natto IAM 1212 was transferred to B. subtilis 6160 by the deoxyribonucleic acid-mediated transformation. Among 73 transformants that acquired high protease productivity, 69 produced a higher amount of neutral protease and the ratios of N/A were changed to 15 to 60. Three other strains were transformed in the productivity of neutral protease and α-amylase simultaneously, and one showed considerable change in the production of alkaline protease and neutral protease. The specific activities (casein hydrolytic activities/enzyme molecules) of neutral proteases from the representative four transformants were equal to those of the two parental strains. These results suggested the presence of a specific gene(s) that participated in the productivity of neutral protease in B. subtilis. Images PMID:4209970

  9. Increased Expression of Cathelicidin by Direct Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor 2: Possible Implications on the Pathogenesis of Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Yoon Jee; Lim, Beom Jin; Sohn, Hyo Jung; Shin, Dongyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent findings of increased cathelicidin protein and its proteolytic fragments in rosacea suggest a pathogenic role for cathelicidin in this disease. The relationship between cathelicidin and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is therefore of interest, as PAR-2, expressed principally in keratinocytes, regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between expression of PAR-2 and cathelicidin in rosacea and to test the effect of direct PAR-2 activation on cathelicidin expression in keratinocytes. Materials and Methods Samples from 40 patients with clinicopathologic diagnosis of rosacea and facial skin tissue samples from 20 patients with no specific findings or milium without inflammation were retrieved. Intensities of immunohistochemical staining for PAR-2 and cathelicidin were compared between normal and rosacea-affected skin tissues. Additionally, correlations between PAR-2 and cathelicidin staining intensities within rosacea patients were analyzed. In cultured keratinocytes, changes in PAR-2, cathelicidin, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein were analyzed after treatment with PAR-2 activating peptide (AP). Results Cathelicidin expression was significantly higher in rosacea skin tissues than in normal tissues (p<0.001), while PAR-2 expression was not significantly higher in rosacea tissues than in normal skin tissues. A positive correlation between PAR-2 and cathelicidin within rosacea samples was observed (R=0.330, p=0.037). After treatment of PAR-2 AP, both mRNA and protein levels for PAR-2, cathelicidin, and VEGF significantly increased in cultured keratinocytes, compared with PAR-2 control peptide treatment. Conclusion PAR-2 may participate in the pathogenesis of rosacea through activation of cathelicidin LL-37, a mediator of innate immune responses in the skin. PMID:25323904

  10. Increased expression of cathelicidin by direct activation of protease-activated receptor 2: possible implications on the pathogenesis of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Yoon Jee; Lim, Beom Jin; Sohn, Hyo Jung; Shin, Dongyun; Oh, Sang Ho

    2014-11-01

    Recent findings of increased cathelicidin protein and its proteolytic fragments in rosacea suggest a pathogenic role for cathelicidin in this disease. The relationship between cathelicidin and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is therefore of interest, as PAR-2, expressed principally in keratinocytes, regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between expression of PAR-2 and cathelicidin in rosacea and to test the effect of direct PAR-2 activation on cathelicidin expression in keratinocytes. Samples from 40 patients with clinicopathologic diagnosis of rosacea and facial skin tissue samples from 20 patients with no specific findings or milium without inflammation were retrieved. Intensities of immunohistochemical staining for PAR-2 and cathelicidin were compared between normal and rosacea-affected skin tissues. Additionally, correlations between PAR-2 and cathelicidin staining intensities within rosacea patients were analyzed. In cultured keratinocytes, changes in PAR-2, cathelicidin, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein were analyzed after treatment with PAR-2 activating peptide (AP). Cathelicidin expression was significantly higher in rosacea skin tissues than in normal tissues (p<0.001), while PAR-2 expression was not significantly higher in rosacea tissues than in normal skin tissues. A positive correlation between PAR-2 and cathelicidin within rosacea samples was observed (R=0.330, p=0.037). After treatment of PAR-2 AP, both mRNA and protein levels for PAR-2, cathelicidin, and VEGF significantly increased in cultured keratinocytes, compared with PAR-2 control peptide treatment. PAR-2 may participate in the pathogenesis of rosacea through activation of cathelicidin LL-37, a mediator of innate immune responses in the skin.

  11. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  12. Conformational Lability in Serine Protease Active Sites: Structures of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator (HGFA) Alone and with the Inhibitory Domain from HGFA Inhibitor-1B

    SciTech Connect

    Shia, Steven; Stamos, Jennifer; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2010-07-20

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) is a serine protease that converts hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) into its active form. When activated HGF binds its cognate receptor Met, cellular signals lead to cell growth, differentiation, and migration, activities which promote tissue regeneration in liver, kidney and skin. Intervention in the conversion of HGF to its active form has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit where HGF/Met activity is associated with tumorigenesis. To help identify ways to moderate HGF/Met effects, we have determined the molecular structure of the protease domain of HGFA. The structure we determined, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, with nomore » pseudo-substrate or inhibitor bound is characterized by an unconventional conformation of key residues in the enzyme active site. In order to find whether this apparently non-enzymatically competent arrangement would persist in the presence of a strongly-interacting inhibitor, we also have determined, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, the X-ray structure of HGFA complexed with the first Kunitz domain (KD1) from the physiological inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 1B (HAI-1B). In this complex we observe a rearranged substrate binding cleft that closely mirrors the cleft of other serine proteases, suggesting an extreme conformational dynamism. We also characterize the inhibition of 16 serine proteases by KD1, finding that the previously reported enzyme specificity of the intact extracellular region of HAI-1B resides in KD1 alone. We find that HGFA, matriptase, hepsin, plasma kallikrein and trypsin are potently inhibited, and use the complex structure to rationalize the structural basis of these results.« less

  13. Transcriptional activation by heat and cold of a thiol protease gene in tomato. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, M.A.; Fischer, R.L.

    1990-08-01

    We previously determined that low temperature induces the accumulation in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit of a cloned mRNA, designated C14, encoding a polypeptide related to thiol proteases. We now demonstrate that C14 mRNA accumulation is a response common to both high (40{degree}C) and low (4{degree}C) temperature stresses. Exposure of tomato fruit to 40{degree}C results in the accumulation of C14 mRNA, by 8 hours. This response is more rapid than that to 4{degree}C, but slower than the induction of many heat shock messages by 40{degree}C, and therefore unique. We have also studied the mechanism by which heat and cold exposure activatemore » C14 gene expression. Both high and low temperature regulate protease gene expression through transcriptional induction of a single C14 gene. A hypothesis for the function of C14 thiol protease gene expression in response to heat and cold is discussed.« less

  14. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Graham, E-mail: gsimmons@bloodsystems.or; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona

    2011-05-10

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a proteasemore » essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation.« less

  15. NaCl concentration in the medium modulates the secretion of active EmpA protease in Vibrio anguillarum at post-transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Crisafi, F; Denaro, R; Yakimov, M; Felice, M R; Giuliano, L; Genovese, L

    2015-12-01

    This study focused on the influence of different amounts of NaCl in the medium in Vibrio anguillarum EmpA protease production at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Vibrio anguillarum 975/I was cultivated in cM9 medium with varying concentrations of NaCl: 0·5, 1·5, 3·0%. EmpA protease was monitored in the supernatants by the skim milk test, azocasein assay and Western blot analysis. The empA gene expression was measured by real-time PCR. A mutant strain 975/I defective for the empA gene confirmed the specificity of the response for EmpA protease. Active protease production was induced by 0·5 and 1·5% NaCl-amended media; however, the strain cultivated in 3·0% NaCl was unable to secrete EmpA protease. The quantitative expression of the empA gene was very similar in all tested conditions. The NaCl concentration in the medium modulates the secretion of active EmpA protease in V. anguillarum at a post-transcriptional level. EmpA protease is one of the most important virulence factors in V. anguillarum. We demonstrated the influence of osmotic changes in the regulation of EmpA protease in the V. anguillarum 975/I strain. This finding has an important impact on the evaluation of factors determining the onset of disease in fish. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Conditional Inducible Triple-Transgenic Mouse Model for Rapid Real-Time Detection of HCV NS3/4A Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Haiwei; Qiao, Qinghua; Han, Peijun; Xu, Zhikai; Yin, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) frequently establishes persistent infections that can develop into severe liver disease. The HCV NS3/4A serine protease is not only essential for viral replication but also cleaves multiple cellular targets that block downstream interferon activation. Therefore, NS3/4A is an ideal target for the development of anti-HCV drugs and inhibitors. In the current study, we generated a novel NS3/4A/Lap/LC-1 triple-transgenic mouse model that can be used to evaluate and screen NS3/4A protease inhibitors. The NS3/4A protease could be conditionally inducibly expressed in the livers of the triple-transgenic mice using a dual Tet-On and Cre/loxP system. In this system, doxycycline (Dox) induction resulted in the secretion of Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) into the blood, and this secretion was dependent on NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage at the 4B5A junction. Accordingly, NS3/4A protease activity could be quickly assessed in real time simply by monitoring Gluc activity in plasma. The results from such monitoring showed a 70-fold increase in Gluc activity levels in plasma samples collected from the triple-transgenic mice after Dox induction. Additionally, this enhanced plasma Gluc activity was well correlated with the induction of NS3/4A protease expression in the liver. Following oral administration of the commercial NS3/4A-specific inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, plasma Gluc activity was reduced by 50% and 65%, respectively. Overall, our novel transgenic mouse model offers a rapid real-time method to evaluate and screen potential NS3/4A protease inhibitors. PMID:26943641

  17. The Inflammasome Drives GSDMD-Independent Secondary Pyroptosis and IL-1 Release in the Absence of Caspase-1 Protease Activity.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Katharina S; Groß, Christina J; Dreier, Roland F; Saller, Benedikt S; Mishra, Ritu; Gorka, Oliver; Heilig, Rosalie; Meunier, Etienne; Dick, Mathias S; Ćiković, Tamara; Sodenkamp, Jan; Médard, Guillaume; Naumann, Ronald; Ruland, Jürgen; Kuster, Bernhard; Broz, Petr; Groß, Olaf

    2017-12-26

    Inflammasomes activate the protease caspase-1, which cleaves interleukin-1β and interleukin-18 to generate the mature cytokines and controls their secretion and a form of inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis. By generating mice expressing enzymatically inactive caspase-1 C284A , we provide genetic evidence that caspase-1 protease activity is required for canonical IL-1 secretion, pyroptosis, and inflammasome-mediated immunity. In caspase-1-deficient cells, caspase-8 can be activated at the inflammasome. Using mice either lacking the pyroptosis effector gasdermin D (GSDMD) or expressing caspase-1 C284A , we found that GSDMD-dependent pyroptosis prevented caspase-8 activation at the inflammasome. In the absence of GSDMD-dependent pyroptosis, the inflammasome engaged a delayed, alternative form of lytic cell death that was accompanied by the release of large amounts of mature IL-1 and contributed to host protection. Features of this cell death modality distinguished it from apoptosis, suggesting it may represent a distinct form of pro-inflammatory regulated necrosis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Protease-activated receptor 2 activation is sufficient to induce the transition to a chronic pain state.

    PubMed

    Tillu, Dipti V; Hassler, Shayne N; Burgos-Vega, Carolina C; Quinn, Tammie L; Sorge, Robert E; Dussor, Gregory; Boitano, Scott; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J

    2015-05-01

    Protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR2) is known to play an important role in inflammatory, visceral, and cancer-evoked pain based on studies using PAR2 knockout (PAR2(-/-)) mice. We have tested the hypothesis that specific activation of PAR2 is sufficient to induce a chronic pain state through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling to protein synthesis machinery. We have further tested whether the maintenance of this chronic pain state involves a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB)/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) signaling axis. We observed that intraplantar injection of the novel highly specific PAR2 agonist, 2-aminothiazol-4-yl-LIGRL-NH2 (2-at), evokes a long-lasting acute mechanical hypersensitivity (median effective dose ∼12 pmoles), facial grimacing, and causes robust hyperalgesic priming as revealed by a subsequent mechanical hypersensitivity and facial grimacing to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) injection. The promechanical hypersensitivity effect of 2-at is completely absent in PAR2(-/-) mice as is hyperalgesic priming. Intraplantar injection of the upstream ERK inhibitor, U0126, and the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F complex inhibitor, 4EGI-1, prevented the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic priming after 2-at injection. Systemic injection of the trkB antagonist ANA-12 similarly inhibited PAR2-mediated mechanical hypersensitivity, grimacing, and hyperalgesic priming. Inhibition of aPKC (intrathecal delivery of ZIP) or trkB (systemic administration of ANA-12) after the resolution of 2-at-induced mechanical hypersensitivity reversed the maintenance of hyperalgesic priming. Hence, PAR2 activation is sufficient to induce neuronal plasticity leading to a chronic pain state, the maintenance of which is dependent on a BDNF/trkB/aPKC signaling axis.

  19. Assessing Activity and Inhibition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Papain-Like and 3C-Like Proteases Using Luciferase-Based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kilianski, Andy; Mielech, Anna M.; Deng, Xufang

    2013-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is associated with an outbreak of more than 90 cases of severe pneumonia with high mortality (greater than 50%). To date, there are no antiviral drugs or specific therapies to treat MERS-CoV. To rapidly identify potential inhibitors of MERS-CoV replication, we expressed the papain-like protease (PLpro) and the 3-chymotrypsin-like protease (3CLpro) from MERS-CoV and developed luciferase-based biosensors to monitor protease activity in cells. We show that the expressed MERS-CoV PLpro recognizes and processes the canonical CoV-PLpro cleavage site RLKGG in the biosensor. However, existing CoV PLpro inhibitors were unable to block MERS-CoV PLpro activity, likely due to the divergence of the amino acid sequence in the drug binding site. To investigate MERS-CoV 3CLpro activity, we expressed the protease in context with flanking nonstructural protein 4 (nsp4) and the amino-terminal portion of nsp6 and detected processing of the luciferase-based biosensors containing the canonical 3CLpro cleavage site VRLQS. Importantly, we found that a small-molecule inhibitor that blocks replication of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV and murine CoV also inhibits the activity of MERS-CoV 3CLpro. Overall, the protease expression and biosensor assays developed here allow for rapid evaluation of viral protease activity and the identification of protease inhibitors. These biosensor assays can now be used to screen for MERS-CoV-specific or broad-spectrum coronavirus PLpro and 3CLpro inhibitors. PMID:23986593

  20. Cathelicidin, kallikrein 5, and serine protease activity is inhibited during treatment of rosacea with azelaic acid 15% gel

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Alvin B.; Hata, Tissa; Miller, Jeremiah; Audish, David; Kotol, Paul; Two, Aimee; Shafiq, Faiza; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Harper, Julie C.; Del Rosso, James Q.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Excess cathelicidin and kallikrein 5 (KLK5) have been hypothesized to play a role in the pathophysiology of rosacea. Objective We sought to evaluate the effects of azelaic acid (AzA) on these elements of the innate immune system. Methods Gene expression and protease activity were measured in laboratory models and patients with rosacea during a 16-week multicenter, prospective, open-label study of 15% AzA gel. Results AzA directly inhibited KLK5 in cultured keratinocytes and gene expression of KLK5, Toll-like receptor-2, and cathelicidin in mouse skin. Patients with rosacea showed reduction in cathelicidin and KLK5 messenger RNA after treatment with AzA gel. Subjects without rosacea had lower serine protease activity (SPA) than patients with rosacea. Distinct subsets of patients with rosacea who had high and low baseline SPA were identified, and patients with high baseline exhibited a statistically significant reduction of SPA with 15% AzA gel treatment. Limitations Study size was insufficient to predict clinical efficacy based on the innate immune response to AzA. Conclusions These results show that cathelicidin and KLK5 decrease in association with AZA exposure. Our observations suggest a new mechanism of action for AzA and that SPA may be a useful biomarker for disease activity. PMID:23871720

  1. Inhibition of dengue virus replication by novel inhibitors of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and protease activities.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Sveva; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Coluccia, Antonio; La Regina, Giuseppe; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Famiglini, Valeria; Masci, Domiziana; Hiscott, John; Lee, Jin-Ching; Silvestri, Romano

    2017-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the leading mosquito-transmitted viral infection in the world. With more than 390 million new infections annually, and up to 1 million clinical cases with severe disease manifestations, there continues to be a need to develop new antiviral agents against dengue infection. In addition, there is no approved anti-DENV agents for treating DENV-infected patients. In the present study, we identified new compounds with anti-DENV replication activity by targeting viral replication enzymes - NS5, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and NS3 protease, using cell-based reporter assay. Subsequently, we performed an enzyme-based assay to clarify the action of these compounds against DENV RdRp or NS3 protease activity. Moreover, these compounds exhibited anti-DENV activity in vivo in the ICR-suckling DENV-infected mouse model. Combination drug treatment exhibited a synergistic inhibition of DENV replication. These results describe novel prototypical small anti-DENV molecules for further development through compound modification and provide potential antivirals for treating DENV infection and DENV-related diseases.

  2. HIV-1 protease with leucine zipper fused at N-terminus exhibits enhanced linker amino acid-dependent activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fu-Hsien; Wang, Chin-Tien

    2018-04-14

    HIV-1 protease (PR) activation is triggered by Gag-Pol dimerization. Premature PR activation results in reduced virion yields due to enhanced Gag cleavage. A p6* transframe peptide located directly upstream of protease is believed to play a modulating role in PR activation. Previous reports indicate that the C-terminal p6* tetra-peptide prevents premature PR activation triggered by a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization motif inserted in the deleted p6* region. To clarify the involvement of C-terminal p6* residues in mitigating enhanced LZ-incurred Gag processing, we engineered constructs containing C-terminal p6* residue substitutions with and without a mutation blocking the p6*/PR cleavage site, and created other Gag or p6* domain-removing constructs. The capabilities of these constructs to mediate virus maturation were assessed by Western blotting and single-cycle infection assays. p6*-PR cleavage blocking did not significantly reduce the LZ enhancement effect on Gag cleavage when only four amino acid residues were present between the p6* and PR. This suggests that the potent LZ dimerization motif may enhance PR activation by facilitating PR dimer formation, and that PR precursors may trigger sufficient enzymatic activity without breaking off from the PR N-terminus. Enhanced LZ-induced activation of PR embedded in Gag-Pol was found to be independent of the Gag assembly domain. In contrast, the LZ enhancement effect was markedly reduced when six amino acids were present at the p6*-PR junction, in part due to impaired PR maturation by substitution mutations. We also observed that a proline substitution at the P3 position eliminated the ability of p6*-deleted Gag-Pol to mediate virus maturation, thus emphasizing the importance of C-terminal p6* residues to modulating PR activation. The ability of HIV-1 C-terminal p6* amino acid residues to modulate PR activation contributes, at least in part, to their ability to counteract enhanced Gag cleavage induced by a leucine

  3. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  4. DPC 681 and DPC 684: Potent, Selective Inhibitors of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Active against Clinically Relevant Mutant Variants

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, Robert F.; Trainor, George; Getman, Daniel; Harris, Greg; Garber, Sena; Cordova, Beverly; Bacheler, Lee; Jeffrey, Susan; Logue, Kelly; Cawood, Pamela; Klabe, Ronald; Diamond, Sharon; Davies, Marc; Saye, Joanne; Jona, Janan; Erickson-Viitanen, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) are important components of many highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens. However, development of phenotypic and/or genotypic resistance can occur, including cross-resistance to other PIs. Development of resistance takes place because trough levels of free drug are inadequate to suppress preexisting resistant mutant variants and/or to inhibit de novo-generated resistant mutant variants. There is thus a need for new PIs, which are more potent against mutant variants of HIV and show higher levels of free drug at the trough. We have optimized a series of substituted sulfonamides and evaluated the inhibitors against laboratory strains and clinical isolates of HIV type 1 (HIV-1), including viruses with mutations in the protease gene. In addition, serum protein binding was determined to estimate total drug requirements for 90% suppression of virus replication (plasma IC90). Two compounds resulting from our studies, designated DPC 681 and DPC 684, are potent and selective inhibitors of HIV protease with IC90s for wild-type HIV-1 of 4 to 40 nM. DPC 681 and DPC 684 showed no loss in potency toward recombinant mutant HIVs with the D30N mutation and a fivefold or smaller loss in potency toward mutant variants with three to five amino acid substitutions. A panel of chimeric viruses constructed from clinical samples from patients who failed PI-containing regimens and containing 5 to 11 mutations, including positions 10, 32, 46, 47, 50, 54, 63, 71, 82, 84, and 90 had mean IC50 values of <20 nM for DPC 681 and DPC 681, respectively. In contrast, marketed PIs had mean IC50 values ranging from 200 nM (amprenavir) to >900 nM (nelfinavir). PMID:11600351

  5. Effect of aluminum on protein oxidation, non-protein thiols and protease activity in seedlings of rice cultivars differing in aluminum tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bhoomika, Kumari; Pyngrope, Samantha; Dubey, Rama S

    2014-04-15

    The effect of toxic concentrations of aluminum (Al) was investigated on contents of protein-thiols, non-protein and total thiols, protein carbonylation and protease activity in the seedlings of Al-sensitive (Al-S) Indica rice cv. HUR-105 and Al-tolerant (Al-T) cv. Vandana grown in sand cultures. Al treatment of 178 μM and 421 μM for 3-12 days caused a significant decline in the level of protein thiols, rise in non-protein thiols (NPTs) as well as protein carbonyl content and an insignificant alteration in the level of total thiols in cv. HUR-105 seedlings. However, in the seedlings of Al-T cv. Vandana, no significant alteration could be observed on any of these parameters with Al treatment. Al treatment inhibited protease activity in roots, whereas the opposite trend was seen in shoots. New isozymes of protease appeared in shoots of cv. Vandana with increased level of Al treatment. Our results show a link between protein thiols and NPTs and suggest the role of NPTs in the repair and protection of protein thiols. Inhibitory effect of Al on protease activity in roots could be a major reason for Al rhizotoxic effects. Al tolerance in rice appears to be associated with lesser content of protein thiols in roots, smaller amount of carbonylated proteins in roots as well as shoots and higher protease activity in shoots. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular cloning of canine protease-activated receptor-2 and its expression in normal dog tissues and atopic skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shingo; Maeda, Sadatoshi; Shibata, Sanae; Chimura, Naoki; Fukata, Tsuneo

    2009-05-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) belongs to a new G protein-coupled receptor subfamily and is activated by serine proteases. PAR-2 has been demonstrated to play an important role in inflammation and immune response in allergic diseases. In this study, we cloned canine PAR-2 cDNA from the canine kidney by RT-PCR. The canine PAR-2 clone contained a full-length open reading frame encoding 397 amino acids that had 84% and 80% homology with human and mouse homologues, respectively. Canine PAR-2 mRNA was detected in the heart, lung, liver, pancreas, stomach, small intestine, colon, kidney, adrenal gland, spleen, thyroid gland, thymus, skeletal muscle, lymph node, fat and skin of three healthy dogs. The expression pattern of PAR-2 mRNA in canine tissues was similar to that in humans. The expression level of PAR-2 mRNA in skin was not different between the atopic dermatitis (AD) and healthy dogs, suggesting that the level of PAR-2 mRNA transcription may not be associated with development of canine AD. The canine PAR-2 cDNA clone obtained in this study will be useful for further investigation of the immunopathogenesis of canine allergic diseases.

  7. Antiplatelet and antithrombotic activity of a fibrin(ogen)olytic protease from Bacillus cereus strain FF01.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sourav; Dutta, Sumita; Das, Tanusree; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2015-08-01

    Fibrin(ogen)olytic enzymes offer great promise for the treatment of thrombosis associated disorders. The present study describes the characterization of an extracellular fibrin(ogen)olytic serine protease (named Bacethrombase) purified from the Bacillus cereus strain FF01. The molecular mass of the Bacethrombase was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectroscopy analyses at 39.5 kDa and 38,450.51 Da, respectively. The peptide mass fingerprinting and analyses of the composition of the amino acids revealed the similarity of the Bacethrombase to the bacterial serine proteases. The secondary structure of the Bacethrombase was composed of 14% helix, 6.6% beta-sheet, and 79.4% random coil. Bacethrombase was found to contain 48% sialic acid and it preferentially degraded the Aα-chain of fibrinogen, as well as fibrin. The anticoagulant potency of the Bacethrombase was comparable with that of warfarin and heparin, and was corroborated by its fibrinogenolytic activity rather than the inhibition of thrombin, prothrombin or FXa. Bacethrombase demonstrated antiplatelet activity, and dose-dependently inhibited the ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Bacethrombase (10 mg/kg) did not show toxicity after i.v. administration in Wistar rats; however, it revealed an in vivo anticoagulant effect and significantly inhibited the carrageenan-induced in vivo thrombus formation in rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship between temperature optima and secreted protease activities of three Pythium species and pathogenicity toward plant and animal hosts.

    PubMed

    Davis, Diana J; Lanter, Kelli; Makselan, Stephanie; Bonati, Christopher; Asbrock, Paige; Ravishankar, J P; Money, Nicholas P

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro physiological characteristics of three species of Pythium (oomycetes) that utilize different food sources were compared with their ecological activities: P. insidiosum is a pathogen of mammals (including humans), P. graminicola infects the roots of graminaceous hosts, and P. grandisporangium is an enigmatic water mold isolated from mangrove leaves and marine algae. P. insidiosum and P. graminicola showed peak growth rates at 37 degrees C before complete inhibition of growth at 40 degrees C; P. grandisporangium grew fastest at 22 degrees C. Differences between the invasive pressures exerted by the hyphae of these microorganisms were not considered significant in relation to the substrates colonized by these water molds. All three species showed substantial secreted protease activity, producing three or more serine proteases with weights ranging from 24-38 kDa. Fastest growth rates were supported when collagen was supplied as the sole carbon source, and none of the species were able to grow on purified plant cell wall polysaccharides. The growth and nutritional characteristics of P. graminicola and P. grandisporangium bear little obvious relationship to the ecological niches that they inhabit. This highlights the caution necessary in extrapolating from laboratory analyses to the natural environment, and points to the potential importance of ecological opportunity in determining the host range and food source of certain microorganisms.

  9. Structural plasticity of T4 transcription co-activator gp33 revealed by a protease-resistant unfolded state.

    PubMed

    Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan; Maurya, Svetlana Rajkumar; Burdak, Bhawna; Surti, Parini; Patel, Manoj S; Jain, Vikas

    2017-10-07

    Gene 33 protein (gp33) is a transcriptional coactivator for late genes of the T4 bacteriophage. gp33 possesses a 5-helix bundle core, with unstructured N- and C-terminal regions that account for >50% of the protein sequence. It plays a unique role of interacting with host RNA polymerase, couples transcription with DNA replication, and plays the dual function as repressor and co-activator in phage transcription. Here, we identify protein structural plasticity as the molecular basis of the dual nature in gp33. We find that gp33 has the peculiar property of remaining protease insensitive in its urea-unfolded state. Using NMR studies with spectroscopic measurements, we propose that intra-protein interactions are replaced by protein-urea interactions in gp33. This process not only unfolds gp33 but also renders it protease-resistant. Our studies shed new light on the unique structural malleability of gp33 that might be important in its transition from a repressor to a late transcription co-activator. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploration of peptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K protease by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Eighteen tripeptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K were discovered by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation. The 18 tripeptides fit the active site better than the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, and a better inhibitor of cathepsin K could be designed considering these tripeptides. Among the 18 tripeptides, Phe-Arg-Asp and Tyr-Arg-Asp fit the active site the best and their structural similarity should be considered in the design process. Interesting factors emerged from the structure of the decision tree, and its structural information will guide exploration of potential inhibitor molecules for proteases.

  11. A Drosophila Protease Cascade Member, Seminal Metalloprotease-1, Is Activated Stepwise by Male Factors and Requires Female Factors for Full Activity

    PubMed Central

    LaFlamme, Brooke A.; Avila, Frank W.; Michalski, Kevin; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2014-01-01

    Females and males of sexually reproducing animals must cooperate at the molecular and cellular level for fertilization to succeed, even though some aspects of reproductive molecular biology appear to involve antagonistic interactions. We previously reported the existence of a proteolytic cascade in Drosophila melanogaster seminal fluid that is initiated in the male and ends in the female. This proteolytic cascade, which processes at least two seminal fluid proteins (Sfps), is a useful model for understanding the regulation of Sfp activities, including proteolysis cascades in mammals. Here, we investigated the activation mechanism of the downstream protease in the cascade, the astacin-family metalloprotease Seminal metalloprotease-1 (Semp1, CG11864), focusing on the relative contribution of the male and female to its activation. We identified a naturally occurring semp1 null mutation within the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel. By expressing mutant forms of Semp1 in males homozygous for the null mutation, we discovered that cleavage is required for the complete activation of Semp1, and we defined at least two sites that are essential for this activational cleavage. These amino acid residues suggest a two-step mechanism for Semp1 activation, involving the action of at least two male-derived proteases. Although the cascade’s substrates potentially influence both fertility and sperm competition within the mated female, the role of female factors in the activation or activity of Semp1 is unknown. We show here that Semp1 can undergo its activational cleavage in male ejaculates, without female contributions, but that cleavage of Semp1’s substrates does not proceed to completion in ejaculates, indicating an essential role for female factors in Semp1’s full activity. In addition, we find that expression of Semp1 in virgin females demonstrates that females can activate this protease on their own, resulting in activity that is complete but substantially delayed. PMID

  12. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of α-keto amides as enterovirus 71 3C protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Debin; Ma, Yuying; Zhang, Rui; Nie, Quandeng; Cui, Zhengjie; Wang, Yaxin; Shang, Luqing; Yin, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    α-Keto amide derivatives as enterovirus 71 (EV71) 3C protease (3C(pro)) inhibitors have been synthesized and assayed for their biochemical and antiviral activities. structure-activity relationship (SAR) study indicated that small moieties were primarily tolerated at P1' and the introduction of para-fluoro benzyl at P2 notably improved the potency of inhibitor. Inhibitors 8v, 8w and 8x exhibited satisfactory activity (IC50=1.32±0.26μM, 1.88±0.35μM and 1.52±0.31μM, respectively) and favorable CC50 values (CC50>100μM). α-Keto amide may represent a good choice as a warhead for EV71 3C(pro) inhibitor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Purification and characterization of a serine protease and chitinases from Paecilomyces lilacinus and detection of chitinase activity on 2D gels.

    PubMed

    Khan, Alamgir; Williams, Keith; Molloy, Mark P; Nevalainen, Helena

    2003-12-01

    The filamentous fungus Paecilomyces lilacinus is currently developed as a biocontrol agent against plant parasitic nematodes. Nematode eggs and cuticles are the infection sites for biocontrol agents that penetrate by the production of lytic enzymes. P. lilacinus was cultured in liquid media and proteases and chitinases were induced by the introduction of egg yolk and chitin, respectively. A serine protease was purified from a culture medium using Sepharose-bacitracin affinity column. The protease occurred in three forms, two of which were C-terminally truncated. Chitinase activity was also observed in the culture supernatant, and after separation by isoelectric focusing six proteins were detected that showed activity. Chitinase activity was further confirmed on non-denaturing one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) gels using a sandwich assay with glycol chitin as a substrate. Two of the proteins had similarities with endochitinases as shown by their N-terminal amino acid sequences.

  14. Alternaria Fungus Induces the Production of GM-CSF, Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-8 and Calcium Signaling in Human Airway Epithelium through Protease-Activated Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Wada, Kota; White, Thomas; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Recent studies suggest that host immune responses to environmental fungi may play an important role in the development of allergic diseases, such as human asthma. Epithelium is considered an active participant in allergic inflammation. We previously reported that aspartate protease from Alternaria induces the activation and degranulation of human eosinophils that are mediated through protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). However, our current knowledge on the innate immune responses of epithelium to environmental fungi is very limited. We investigated the responses of epithelium to fungi and the mechanisms of these responses. Methods Human airway epithelial cell line BEAS-2B and Calu-3 (both from American Type Culture Collection) were incubated with PAR-2 peptides and extracts of various fungi. The cellular responses, including GM-CSF, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, eotaxin, eotaxin-2 and RANTES production as well as increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), were examined. To characterize the proteases involved in these responses, protease inhibitors such as pepstatin A and alkalo-thermophilic Bacillus inhibitor (ATBI), HIV protease inhibitors and 4-amidinophenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride were used. To investigate the role of PAR-2, PAR-2-agonistic and PAR-2-antagonistic peptides were used. Results PAR-2-activating peptide, but not the control peptide, induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production; these cellular responses were accompanied by a quick and marked increase in [Ca2+]i. Among 7 common environmental fungi, only Alternaria induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production and increased [Ca2+]i response. Both cytokine production and increased [Ca2+]i were significantly inhibited by PAR-2 antagonist peptide and by aspartate protease inhibitors (pepstatin A, ritonavir, nelfinavir and ATBI), but not by the PAR-2 control peptide or by other protease inhibitors. Conclusions Aspartate proteases from Alternaria induce cytokine production and

  15. An effective and simple procedure to isolate abundant quantities of biologically active chemopreventive Lunasin Protease Inhibitor Concentrate (LPIC) from soybean.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Wang, Thomas T Y

    2015-06-15

    Lunasin is a 5-kDa soybean bioactive peptide with demonstrated anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, purification methods have been developed to obtain gram quantities of lunasin. However, these methods are cumbersome, time consuming and cost-prohibitive. To overcome these constrains we have developed a novel method which involves extraction of soybean flour with 30% ethanol followed by preferential precipitation of lunasin and protease inhibitors by calcium. The calcium precipitated protein fraction, which we termed as Lunasin Protease Inhibitor Concentrate (LPIC), contains three abundant proteins with molecular weights of 21, 14 and 5 kDa. This simple procedure yields 3.2g of LPIC from 100g of soybean flour and the entire isolation procedure can be completed in less than 2h. Treatment of THP-1 human monocyte cell lines with LPIC resulted in suppression of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cytokine expression, demonstrating that the LPIC isolated by our simple procedure is biologically active. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. P1-Substituted Symmetry-Based Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors with Potent Antiviral Activity against Drug-Resistant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    DeGoey, David A.; Grampovnik, David J.; Chen, Hui-Ju

    2013-03-07

    Because there is currently no cure for HIV infection, patients must remain on long-term drug therapy, leading to concerns over potential drug side effects and the emergence of drug resistance. For this reason, new and safe antiretroviral agents with improved potency against drug-resistant strains of HIV are needed. A series of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) with potent activity against both wild-type (WT) virus and drug-resistant strains of HIV was designed and synthesized. The incorporation of substituents with hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups at the P1 position of our symmetry-based inhibitor series resulted in significant potency improvements against the resistantmore » mutants. By this approach, several compounds, such as 13, 24, and 29, were identified that demonstrated similar or improved potencies compared to 1 against highly mutated strains of HIV derived from patients who previously failed HIV PI therapy. Overall, compound 13 demonstrated the best balance of potency against drug resistant strains of HIV and oral bioavailability in pharmacokinetic studies. X-ray analysis of an HIV PI with an improved resistance profile bound to WT HIV protease is also reported.« less

  17. Structure-guided mutagenesis of active site residues in the dengue virus two-component protease NS2B-NS3

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The dengue virus two-component protease NS2B/NS3 mediates processing of the viral polyprotein precursor and is therefore an important determinant of virus replication. The enzyme is now intensively studied with a view to the structure-based development of antiviral inhibitors. Although 3-dimensional structures have now been elucidated for a number of flaviviral proteases, enzyme-substrate interactions are characterized only to a limited extend. The high selectivity of the dengue virus protease for the polyprotein precursor offers the distinct advantage of designing inhibitors with exquisite specificity for the viral enzyme. To identify important determinants of substrate binding and catalysis in the active site of the dengue virus NS3 protease, nine residues, L115, D129, G133, T134, Y150, G151, N152, S163 and I165, located within the S1 and S2 pockets of the enzyme were targeted by alanine substitution mutagenesis and effects on enzyme activity were fluorometrically assayed. Methods Alanine substitutions were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at residues L115, D129, G133, T134, Y150, G151, N152, S163 and I165 and recombinant proteins were purified from overexpressing E. coli. Effects of these substitutions on enzymatic activity of the NS3 protease were assayed by fluorescence release from the synthetic model substrate GRR-amc and kinetic parameters Km, kcat and kcat/Km were determined. Results Kinetic data for mutant derivatives in the active site of the dengue virus NS3 protease were essentially in agreement with a functional role of the selected residues for substrate binding and/or catalysis. Only the L115A mutant displayed activity comparable to the wild-type enzyme, whereas mutation of residues Y150 and G151 to alanine completely abrogated enzyme activity. A G133A mutant had an approximately 10-fold reduced catalytic efficiency thus suggesting a critical role for this residue seemingly as part of the oxyanion binding hole. Conclusions Kinetic

  18. Mutation in the Pro-Peptide Region of a Cysteine Protease Leads to Altered Activity and Specificity—A Structural and Biochemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sruti; Choudhury, Debi; Roy, Sumana; Dattagupta, Jiban Kanti; Biswas, Sampa

    2016-01-01

    Papain-like proteases contain an N-terminal pro-peptide in their zymogen form that is important for correct folding and spatio-temporal regulation of the proteolytic activity of these proteases. Catalytic removal of the pro-peptide is required for the protease to become active. In this study, we have generated three different mutants of papain (I86F, I86L and I86A) by replacing the residue I86 in its pro-peptide region, which blocks the specificity determining S2-subsite of the catalytic cleft of the protease in its zymogen form with a view to investigate the effect of mutation on the catalytic activity of the protease. Steady-state enzyme kinetic analyses of the corresponding mutant proteases with specific peptide substrates show significant alteration of substrate specificity—I86F and I86L have 2.7 and 29.1 times higher kcat/Km values compared to the wild-type against substrates having Phe and Leu at P2 position, respectively, while I86A shows lower catalytic activity against majority of the substrates tested. Far-UV CD scan and molecular mass analyses of the mature form of the mutant proteases reveal similar CD spectra and intact masses to that of the wild-type. Crystal structures of zymogens of I86F and I86L mutants suggest that subtle reorganization of active site residues, including water, upon binding of the pro-peptide may allow the enzyme to achieve discriminatory substrate selectivity and catalytic efficiency. However, accurate and reliable predictions on alteration of substrate specificity require atomic resolution structure of the catalytic domain after zymogen activation, which remains a challenging task. In this study we demonstrate that through single amino acid substitution in pro-peptide, it is possible to modify the substrate specificity of papain and hence the pro-peptide of a protease can also be a useful target for altering its catalytic activity/specificity. PMID:27352302

  19. Identification of Transmembrane Protease Serine 2 and Forkhead Box A1 As the Potential Bisphenol A Responsive Genes in the Neonatal Male Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Moriya, Shogo; Soga, Tomoko; Parhar, Ishwar

    2018-01-01

    Perinatal exposure of Bisphenol A (BPA) to rodents modifies their behavior in later life. To understand how BPA modifies their neurodevelopmental process, we first searched for BPA responsive genes from androgen and estrogen receptor signaling target genes by polymerase chain reaction array in the neonatal male rat brain. We used a transgenic strain of Wistar rats carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein tagged to gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) promoter to investigate the possible interaction of BPA responsive genes and GnIH neurons. We found upregulation of transmembrane protease serine 2 ( Tmprss2 ), an androgen receptor signaling target gene, and downregulation of Forkhead box A1 ( Foxa1 ), an ER signaling target gene, in the medial amygdala of male rats that were subcutaneously administered with BPA from day 1 to 3. Tmprss2-immunoreactive (ir) cells were distributed in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus in 3 days old but not in 1-month-old male rats. Density of Tmprss2-ir cells in the medial amygdala was increased by daily administration of BPA from day 1 to 3. Tmprss2 immunoreactivity was observed in 26.5% of GnIH neurons clustered from the ventral region of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus to the dorsal region of the arcuate nucleus of 3-day-old male rat hypothalamus. However, Tmprss2 mRNA expression significantly decreased in the amygdala and hypothalamus of 1-month-old male rats. Foxa1 mRNA expression was higher in the hypothalamus than the amygdala in 3 days old male rats. Intense Foxa1-ir cells were only found in the peduncular part of lateral hypothalamus of 3-day-old male rats. Density of Foxa1-ir cells in the hypothalamus was decreased by daily administration of BPA from day 1 to 3. Foxa1 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus also significantly decreased at 1 month. These results suggest that BPA disturbs the neurodevelopmental process and behavior of rats later in their life by modifying

  20. Identification of Transmembrane Protease Serine 2 and Forkhead Box A1 As the Potential Bisphenol A Responsive Genes in the Neonatal Male Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Moriya, Shogo; Soga, Tomoko; Parhar, Ishwar

    2018-01-01

    Perinatal exposure of Bisphenol A (BPA) to rodents modifies their behavior in later life. To understand how BPA modifies their neurodevelopmental process, we first searched for BPA responsive genes from androgen and estrogen receptor signaling target genes by polymerase chain reaction array in the neonatal male rat brain. We used a transgenic strain of Wistar rats carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein tagged to gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) promoter to investigate the possible interaction of BPA responsive genes and GnIH neurons. We found upregulation of transmembrane protease serine 2 (Tmprss2), an androgen receptor signaling target gene, and downregulation of Forkhead box A1 (Foxa1), an ER signaling target gene, in the medial amygdala of male rats that were subcutaneously administered with BPA from day 1 to 3. Tmprss2-immunoreactive (ir) cells were distributed in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus in 3 days old but not in 1-month-old male rats. Density of Tmprss2-ir cells in the medial amygdala was increased by daily administration of BPA from day 1 to 3. Tmprss2 immunoreactivity was observed in 26.5% of GnIH neurons clustered from the ventral region of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus to the dorsal region of the arcuate nucleus of 3-day-old male rat hypothalamus. However, Tmprss2 mRNA expression significantly decreased in the amygdala and hypothalamus of 1-month-old male rats. Foxa1 mRNA expression was higher in the hypothalamus than the amygdala in 3 days old male rats. Intense Foxa1-ir cells were only found in the peduncular part of lateral hypothalamus of 3-day-old male rats. Density of Foxa1-ir cells in the hypothalamus was decreased by daily administration of BPA from day 1 to 3. Foxa1 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus also significantly decreased at 1 month. These results suggest that BPA disturbs the neurodevelopmental process and behavior of rats later in their life by modifying Tmprss

  1. Protease-Activated Receptor (PAR) 1 and PAR4 Differentially Regulate Factor V Expression from Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Duvernay, Matthew; Young, Summer; Gailani, David; Schoenecker, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    With the recent interest of protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and PAR4 as possible targets for the treatment of thrombotic disorders, we compared the efficacy of protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR4 in the generation of procoagulant phenotypes on platelet membranes. PAR4-activating peptide (AP)–stimulated platelets promoted thrombin generation in plasma up to 5 minutes earlier than PAR1-AP–stimulated platelets. PAR4-AP–mediated factor V (FV) association with the platelet surface was 1.6-fold greater than for PAR1-AP. Moreover, PAR4 stimulation resulted in a 3-fold greater release of microparticles, compared with PAR1 stimulation. More robust FV secretion and microparticle generation with PAR4-AP was attributable to stronger and more sustained phosphorylation of myosin light chain at serine 19 and threonine 18. Inhibition of Rho-kinase reduced PAR4-AP–mediated FV secretion and microparticle generation to PAR1-AP–mediated levels. Thrombin generation assays measuring prothrombinase complex activity demonstrated 1.5-fold higher peak thrombin levels on PAR4-AP–stimulated platelets, compared with PAR1-AP–stimulated platelets. Rho-kinase inhibition reduced PAR4-AP–mediated peak thrombin generation by 25% but had no significant effect on PAR1-AP–mediated thrombin generation. In conclusion, stimulation of PAR4 on platelets leads to faster and more robust thrombin generation, compared with PAR1 stimulation. The greater procoagulant potential is related to more efficient FV release from intracellular stores and microparticle production driven by stronger and more sustained myosin light chain phosphorylation. These data have implications about the role of PAR4 during hemostasis and are clinically relevant in light of recent efforts to develop PAR antagonists to treat thrombotic disorders. PMID:23307185

  2. Effect of poloxamer 407 administration on the serum lipids profile, anxiety level and protease activity in the heart and liver of mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Thomas P.; Dubrovina, Nina I.; Kisarova, Yana A.; Zhanaeva, Svetlana Ya.; Cherkanova, Marina S.; Filjushina, Elena E.; Alexeenko, Tatyana V.; Machova, Eva; Zhukova, Natalya A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic administration of the poloxamer 407 (P-407), a block copolymer, to elevate serum lipids in mice is a well-established mouse model of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that the activity of several types of proteases in heart and liver tissue is changed in the early stages of atherosclerosis development. Additionally, we evaluated whether increased serum lipids would induce anxiety in mice, as determined by using a ‘plus-maze’ test. The mice were administered P-407 by intraperitoneal injection twice a week for one month. P-407 administration to mice resulted in a marked increase in total serum cholesterol, atherogenic non-HDL-cholesterol, and especially in total triglycerides, and it also increased anxiety. Morphological changes observed in P-407-treated mice included contractile type changes in cardiomyocytes and foamy macrophages in liver. A significant increase of cysteine proteases cathepsin B and cathepsin L (at 24 h) and aspartate protease cathepsin D (at both 24 h and 5 days) was determined in heart tissue following P-407 administration. However, no changes were noted in heart matrix metalloproteinase activity. The activity of cysteine and aspartate proteases was significantly increased in liver at both 24 hours and 5 days after P-407 administration. In conclusion, administration of P-407 to mice for one month resulted in increased anxiety, and more importantly, there was an increase in the activity of heart and liver proteases secondary to sustained dyslipidemia. It is suggested that heart and liver cysteine and aspartate proteases may represent potential therapeutic targets in the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:24170975

  3. Protease activation and the signal transduction pathway regulating motility in sperm from the water strider Aquarius remigis.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Thaler, Catherine D; Haimo, Leah T; Cardullo, Richard A

    2012-04-01

    Many motile processes are regulated such that movement occurs only upon activation of a signaling cascade. Sperm from a variety of species are initially quiescent and must be activated prior to beating. The signaling events leading to the activation and regulation of sperm motility are not well characterized. Mature seminal vesicle sperm from the water strider Aquarius remigis are immotile in vitro, but vigorous motility is activated by trypsin. Trypsin-activated motility was blocked by pretreatment of the sperm with BAPTA-AM to chelate intracellular Ca(2+) and was partially rescued by subsequent addition of A23187 and Ca(2+). Thapsigargin stimulated motility in the absence of trypsin, suggesting that intracellular Ca(2+) stores are available. In addition, motility could be fully activated by the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A, suggesting that the immotile state is maintained by an endogenous phosphatase and that kinase activity is required for motility. The MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 significantly reduced trypsin activated motility, and MPM-2, an antibody which recognizes proline-directed phosphorylation by kinases such as MAPK, recognized components of the water strider sperm flagellum. Antibodies specific for the mouse protease activated receptor PAR2 recognized an antigen on the sperm flagellum. These results suggest that trypsin stimulates a Ca(2+) and MAPK mediated signaling pathway and potentially implicate a PAR2-like protein in regulating motility. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Obtusilactone A and (-)-sesamin induce apoptosis in human lung cancer cells by inhibiting mitochondrial Lon protease and activating DNA damage checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Jung; Hsu, Shu-Wei; Fang, Wei-Cheng; Hsu, Tai-Feng; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen

    2010-12-01

    Several compounds from Cinnamomum kotoense show anticancer activities. However, the detailed mechanisms of most compounds from C. kotoense remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of obtusilactone A (OA) and (-)-sesamin in lung cancer. Our results show that human Lon is upregulated in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, and downregulation of Lon triggers caspase-3 mediated apoptosis. Through enzyme-based screening, we identified two small-molecule compounds, obtusilactone A (OA) and (-)-sesamin from C. kotoense, as potent Lon protease inhibitors. Obtusilactone A and (-)-sesamin interact with Ser855 and Lys898 residues in the active site of the Lon protease according to molecular docking analysis. Thus, we suggest that cancer cytotoxicity of the compounds is partly due to the inhibitory effects on Lon protease. In addition, the compounds are able to cause DNA double-strand breaks and activate checkpoints. Treatment with OA and (-)-sesamin induced p53-independent DNA damage responses in NSCLC cells, including G(1) /S checkpoint activation and apoptosis, as evidenced by phosphorylation of checkpoint proteins (H2AX, Nbs1, and Chk2), caspase-3 cleavage, and sub-G(1) accumulation. In conclusion, OA and (-)-sesamin act as both inhibitors of human mitochondrial Lon protease and DNA damage agents to activate the DNA damage checkpoints as well induce apoptosis in NSCLC cells. These dual functions open a bright avenue to develop more selective chemotherapy agents to overcome chemoresistance and sensitize cancer cells to other chemotherapeutics. © 2010 Japanese Cancer Association.

  5. Functional regulation of PVBV Nuclear Inclusion protein-a protease activity upon interaction with Viral Protein genome-linked and phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, C.; Jimsheena, V.K.; Banerjee, S.

    2012-01-20

    Regulation of NIa-Pro is crucial for polyprotein processing and hence, for successful infection of potyviruses. We have examined two novel mechanisms that could regulate NIa-Pro activity. Firstly, the influence of VPg domain on the proteolytic activity of NIa-Pro was investigated. It was shown that the turnover number of the protease increases when these two domains interact (cis: two-fold; trans: seven-fold) with each other. Secondly, the protease activity of NIa-Pro could also be modulated by phosphorylation at Ser129. A mutation of this residue either to aspartate (phosphorylation-mimic) or alanine (phosphorylation-deficient) drastically reduces the protease activity. Based on these observations and molecularmore » modeling studies, we propose that interaction with VPg as well as phosphorylation of Ser129 could relay a signal through Trp143 present at the protein surface to the active site pocket by subtle conformational changes, thus modulating protease activity of NIa-Pro.« less

  6. Progesterone promotes focal adhesion formation and migration in breast cancer cells through induction of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge; Aranda, Evelyn; Henriquez, Soledad; Quezada, Marisol; Espinoza, Estefanía; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Oliva, Bárbara; Lange, Soledad; Villalon, Manuel; Jones, Marius; Brosens, Jan J; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Knutson, Todd P; Lange, Carol A; Leyton, Lisette; Owen, Gareth I

    2012-08-01

    Progesterone and progestins have been demonstrated to enhance breast cancer cell migration, although the mechanisms are still not fully understood. The protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of membrane receptors that are activated by serine proteases in the blood coagulation cascade. PAR1 (F2R) has been reported to be involved in cancer cell migration and overexpressed in breast cancer. We herein demonstrate that PAR1 mRNA and protein are upregulated by progesterone treatment of the breast cancer cell lines ZR-75 and T47D. This regulation is dependent on the progesterone receptor (PR) but does not require PR phosphorylation at serine 294 or the PR proline-rich region mPRO. The increase in PAR1 mRNA was transient, being present at 3  h and returning to basal levels at 18  h. The addition of a PAR1-activating peptide (aPAR1) to cells treated with progesterone resulted in an increase in focal adhesion (FA) formation as measured by the cellular levels of phosphorylated FA kinase. The combined but not individual treatment of progesterone and aPAR1 also markedly increased stress fiber formation and the migratory capacity of breast cancer cells. In agreement with in vitro findings, data mining from the Oncomine platform revealed that PAR1 expression was significantly upregulated in PR-positive breast tumors. Our observation that PAR1 expression and signal transduction are modulated by progesterone provides new insight into how the progestin component in hormone therapies increases the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

  7. Regulation of the Pacemaker Activity of Colonic Interstitial Cells of Cajal by Protease-Activated Receptors: Involvement of Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide Channels.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Man Woo; Choi, Seok; Zuo, Dong Chuan; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Jun; Cho, Ju Yeon; So, Insuk; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2016-01-01

    The exact mechanism of protease-activated receptors (PARs) on pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) has not been reported. We investigated the effects on pacemaker activity by the activation of PARs and its signal mechanisms in colonic ICCs. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique, RT-PCR and Ca2+ imaging were used in cultured ICCs from mouse colon. PAR-1 and PAR-2 were expressed in Ano-1 positive ICCs. TFLLR-NH2 (a PAR-1 agonist) and trypsin (a PAR-2 agonist) depolarized the membrane and increased the pacemaker potential frequency. U-73122 (a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor) and thapsigargin (a Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor) suppressed the TFLLR-NH2- and trypsin-induced effects on pacemaker potential. TFLLR-NH2 and trypsin also increased intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) intensity with increasing of Ca2+ oscillations. Genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor), SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor), CsCl, ZD7288, clonidine (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN) channel blockers), SQ-22536 and dideoxyadenosine (adenylate cyclase inhibitors) suppressed the increased pacemaker potential frequency without effects on depolarization of the membrane induced by TFLLR-NH2 and trypsin. These results suggest that activation of PAR-1 and PAR-2 modulates the pacemaker activity of colonic ICCs through the PLC-dependent [Ca2+]i release pathway. The increased pacemaker potential frequency by PAR-1 and PAR-2 was also dependent on tyrosine kinase, JNK, and HCN activation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Neutrophil Elastase Activates Protease-activated Receptor-2 (PAR2) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) to Cause Inflammation and Pain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peishen; Lieu, TinaMarie; Barlow, Nicholas; Sostegni, Silvia; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N; Vanner, Stephen J; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2015-05-29

    Proteases that cleave protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) at Arg(36)↓Ser(37) reveal a tethered ligand that binds to the cleaved receptor. PAR(2) activates transient receptor potential (TRP) channels of nociceptive neurons to induce neurogenic inflammation and pain. Although proteases that cleave PAR(2) at non-canonical sites can trigger distinct signaling cascades, the functional importance of the PAR(2)-biased agonism is uncertain. We investigated whether neutrophil elastase, a biased agonist of PAR(2), causes inflammation and pain by activating PAR2 and TRP vanilloid 4 (TRPV4). Elastase cleaved human PAR(2) at Ala(66)↓Ser(67) and Ser(67)↓Val(68). Elastase stimulated PAR(2)-dependent cAMP accumulation and ERK1/2 activation, but not Ca(2+) mobilization, in KNRK cells. Elastase induced PAR(2) coupling to Gαs but not Gαq in HEK293 cells. Although elastase did not promote recruitment of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK(2)) or β-arrestin to PAR(2), consistent with its inability to promote receptor endocytosis, elastase did stimulate GRK6 recruitment. Elastase caused PAR(2)-dependent sensitization of TRPV4 currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes by adenylyl cyclase- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent mechanisms. Elastase stimulated PAR(2)-dependent cAMP formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and a PAR(2)- and TRPV4-mediated influx of extracellular Ca(2+) in mouse nociceptors. Adenylyl cyclase and PKA-mediated elastase-induced activation of TRPV4 and hyperexcitability of nociceptors. Intraplantar injection of elastase to mice caused edema and mechanical hyperalgesia by PAR(2)- and TRPV4-mediated mechanisms. Thus, the elastase-biased agonism of PAR(2) causes Gαs-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase and PKA, which activates TRPV4 and sensitizes nociceptors to cause inflammation and pain. Our results identify a novel mechanism of elastase-induced activation of TRPV4 and expand the role of PAR(2) as a mediator of protease-driven inflammation and pain.

  9. Genetic Encoding of Photocaged Tyrosines with Improved Light-Activation Properties for the Optical Control of Protease Function.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ji; Torres-Kolbus, Jessica; Liu, Jihe; Deiters, Alexander

    2017-07-18

    We genetically encoded three new caged tyrosine analogues with improved photochemical properties by using an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA CUA pair in bacterial and mammalian cells. We applied the new tyrosine analogues to the photoregulation of firefly luciferase by caging its key tyrosine residue, Tyr340, and observed excellent off-to-on light switching. This reporter was then used to evaluate the activation rates of the different light-removable protecting groups in live cells. We identified the nitropiperonyl caging group as an excellent compromise between incorporation efficiency and photoactivation properties. To demonstrate applicability of the new caged tyrosines, an important proteolytic enzyme, tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease, was engineered for optical control. The ability to incorporate differently caged tyrosine analogues into proteins in live cells further expands the unnatural amino acid and optogenetic toolbox. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The Second-Generation Maturation Inhibitor GSK3532795 Maintains Potent Activity Toward HIV Protease Inhibitor-Resistant Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Ray, Neelanjana; Li, Tianbo; Lin, Zeyu; Protack, Tricia; van Ham, Petronella Maria; Hwang, Carey; Krystal, Mark; Nijhuis, Monique; Lataillade, Max; Dicker, Ira

    2017-05-01

    Protease inhibitor (PI)-resistant HIV-1 isolates with primary substitutions in protease (PR) and secondary substitutions in Gag could potentially exhibit cross-resistance to maturation inhibitors. We evaluated the second-generation maturation inhibitor, GSK3532795, for activity toward clinical isolates with genotypic and phenotypic characteristics associated with PI resistance (longitudinal). Longitudinal clinical isolates from 15 PI-treated patients and 7 highly PI-resistant (nonlongitudinal) viruses containing major and minor PI resistance-associated mutations were evaluated for GSK3532795 sensitivity. Phenotypic sensitivity was determined using the PhenoSense Gag/PR assay (Monogram Biosciences) or in-house single- and multiple-cycle assays. Changes from baseline [CFB; ratio of post- to pre-treatment FC-IC50 (fold-change in IC50 versus wild-type virus)] <3 were considered to be within the no-effect level. All nonlongitudinal viruses tested were sensitive to GSK3532795 (FC-IC50 range 0.16-0.68). Among longitudinal isolates, all post-PI treatment samples had major PI resistance-associated mutations in PR and 17/21 had PI resistance-associated changes in Gag. Nineteen of the 21 post-PI treatment samples had GSK3532795 CFB <3. Median (range) CFB was 0.83 (0.05-27.4) [Monogram (11 patients)] and 1.5 (1.0-2.2) [single-cycle (4 patients)]. The 2 post-PI treatment samples showing GSK3532795 CFB >3 (Monogram) were retested using single- and multiple-cycle assays. Neither sample had meaningful sensitivity changes in the multiple-cycle assay. Gag changes were not associated with an increased GSK3532795 CFB. GSK3532795 maintained antiviral activity against PI-resistant isolates with emergent PR and/or Gag mutations. This finding supports continued development of GSK3532795 in treatment-experienced patients with or without previous PI therapy.

  11. Changes in protease activity and Cry3Aa toxin binding in the Colorado potato beetle: implications for insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins

    Treesearch

    Olga Loseva; Mohamed Ibrahim; Mehmet Candas; C. Noah Koller; Leah S. Bauer; Lee A. Jr. Bulla

    2002-01-01

    Widespread commercial use of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins to control pest insects has increased the likelihood for development of insect resistance to this entomopathogen. In this study, we investigated protease activity profiles and toxin-binding capacities in the midgut of a strain of Colorado potato beetle (CPB) that has developed resistance...

  12. Antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) protein hydrolysates produced by the proteases AFP, HT, Pro-G, actinidin and zingibain.

    PubMed

    Teh, Sue-Siang; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Carne, Alan; Birch, John

    2016-07-15

    Hemp protein isolates (HPIs) were hydrolysed by proteases (AFP, HT, ProG, actinidin and zingibain). The enzymatic hydrolysis of HPIs was evaluated through the degree of hydrolysis and SDS-PAGE profiles. The bioactive properties of the resultant hydrolysates (HPHs) were accessed through ORAC, DPPḢ scavenging and ACE-inhibitory activities. The physical properties of the resultant HPHs were evaluated for their particle sizes, zeta potential and surface hydrophobicity. HT had the highest rate of caseinolytic activity at the lowest concentration (0.1 mg mL(-1)) compared to other proteases that required concentration of 100 mg mL(-1) to achieve their maximum rate of caseinolytic activity. This led to the highest degree of hydrolysis of HPIs by HT in the SDS-PAGE profiles. Among all proteases and substrates, HT resulted in the highest bioactivities (ORAC, DPPḢ scavenging and ACE-inhibitory activities) generated from alkali extracted HPI in the shortest time (2 h) compared to the other protease preparations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING OF PROTEASE INHIBITORS AND EFAVIRENZ IN HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS WITH ACTIVE SUBSTANCE RELATED DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing; Zingman, Barry S.; Luque, Amneris; Fischl, Margaret A.; Gripshover, Barbara; Venuto, Charles; DiFrancesco, Robin; Forrest, Alan; Morse, Gene D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Achieving targeted antiretroviral (ART) plasma concentrations during long-term treatment in HIV-infected patients with substance related disorders (SRD) may be challenging due to a number of factors including medication adherence, co-infection with hepatitis B or C virus, medication intolerance and drug interactions. One approach to investigate these factors is to conduct therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) to measure ART exposure during treatment. The objective of this study was to utilize TDM to compare efavirenz and protease inhibitor pharmacokinetics in patients with and without SRDs. Methods This was a multi-center, cross-sectional open-label study in patients with HIV-1 infection receiving ART, with active (n=129) or without (n=146) SRD according to National Institute on Drug Abuse criteria. 275 subjects who were receiving either protease inhibitor- or efavirenz-based ART regimens for more than 6 months were enrolled at four HIV treatment centers with an equal distribution of SRD and non-SRD at each site. Patients were instructed during enrollment visits with regard to the importance of adherence prior to and after study visits. Demographics and routine clinical laboratory tests were recorded. Results Among the 275 patients, 47% had SRD with at least one substance. There were no significant differences between SRD and non-SRD groups for race, gender, age, or CD4 count at entry. A significantly higher proportion of patients with SRD had an entry HIV RNA plasma concentration > 75 copies/ml compared to patients without SRD (40% vs. 28%, p=0.044). Logistic regression modeling revealed an association between HIV RNA plasma concentration and African-American race (p=0.017). A significantly higher proportion of SRDs also had an efavirenz or protease inhibitor trough concentration below the desired range (23% vs. 9%, p=0.048). Significantly lower trough concentrations were noted in patients with SRDs receiving atazanavir (0.290 vs. 0.976 µg/mL) or lopinavir

  14. Therapeutic drug monitoring of protease inhibitors and efavirenz in HIV-infected individuals with active substance-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing; Zingman, Barry S; Luque, Amneris E; Fischl, Margaret A; Gripshover, Barbara M; Venuto, Charles S; DiFrancesco, Robin; Forrest, Alan; Morse, Gene D

    2011-06-01

    Achieving targeted antiretroviral (ARV) plasma concentrations during long-term treatment in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with substance-related disorders (SRDs) may be challenging due to a number of factors, including medication adherence, coinfection with hepatitis B or C virus, medication intolerance, and drug interactions. One approach to investigate these factors is to conduct therapeutic drug monitoring to measure ARV exposure during treatment. The objective of this study was to utilize therapeutic drug monitoring to compare efavirenz (EFV) and protease inhibitor pharmacokinetics in patients with and without SRDs. This was a multicenter, cross-sectional open-label study in patients with HIV-1 infection receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), with active (n=129) or without (n=146) SRD according to National Institute on Drug Abuse criteria. Two hundred seventy-five subjects who were receiving either protease inhibitor-based or EFV-based ART regimens for >6 months were enrolled at 4 HIV treatment centers with an equal distribution of SRD and non-SRD at each site. The patients were instructed during enrollment visits with regard to the importance of adherence before and after study visits. Demographics and routine clinical laboratory tests were recorded. Among the 275 patients, 47% had SRD with at least 1 substance. There were no significant differences between SRD and non-SRD groups for race, gender, age, or CD4 count at entry. A significantly higher proportion of patients with SRD had an entry HIV RNA plasma concentration>75 copies per milliliter compared with patients without SRD (40% vs 28%, P=0.044). Logistic regression modeling revealed an association between HIV RNA plasma concentration and African American race (P=0.017). A significantly higher proportion of SRDs also had an EFV or protease inhibitor trough concentration below the desired range (23% vs 9%, P=0.048). Significantly lower trough concentrations were noted in patients

  15. Antioxidant activity of protein hydrolysates from whole anchovy sprat (Clupeonella engrauliformis) prepared using endogenous enzymes and commercial proteases.

    PubMed

    Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Rasco, Barbara; Shiroodi, Setareh Ghorban; Modanlow, Maryam; Gholami, Sanaz; Nemati, Mahrokh

    2013-05-01

    The antioxidant activity and chemical properties of fish protein hydrolysates (FPHs) prepared from anchovy sprat (Clupeonella engrauliformis) using endogenous enzymes (autolysis) and commercial proteases were investigated. The highest degree of hydrolysis (DH) was observed with Alcalase and papain and the highest protein recovery (PR) with Alcalase and bromelain. FPH yield was highest with Alcalase (82.3%) and lowest with autolysis (63.64%). Increased DH resulted in increased FPH yield (R(2) = 0.77). The highest oil recovery was observed with bromelain (6.41%) and the lowest with autolysis (3.58%). Antioxidant activity determined by DPPH, reducing power and ferrous chelation assays was highest in bromelain, Promod and papain FPHs respectively. The highest ABTS activity was observed in Alcalase FPH, followed by Promod and Protamex™ FPHs. The lowest antioxidant activity was observed in autolysed and Flavourzyme FPHs (P > 0.05). Heavy metals (arsenic, lead and mercury) were recorded at levels below the regulatory limits established by the FDA. Anchovy sprat hydrolysates showed high antioxidant activities and amino acid contents and low heavy metal concentrations, indicating that they have high potential for use in human and animal diets. The high antioxidant activities are related to the high levels of hydrophobic amino acids found in this study. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Effects of protease and non-starch polysaccharide enzyme on performance, digestive function, activity and gene expression of endogenous enzyme of broilers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lin; Wang, Mingfa; Zhang, Xiaotu; Wang, Zhixiang

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred one-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were fed corn-soybean basal diets containing non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) enzyme and different levels of acid protease from 1 to 42 days of age to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes on growth performance, digestive function, activity of endogenous digestive enzymes in the pancreas and mRNA expression of pancreatic digestive enzymes. For days 1-42, compared to the control chickens, average daily feed intake (ADFI) and average daily gain (ADG) were significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme in combination with protease supplementation at 40 or 80 mg/kg (p<0.05). Feed-to-gain ratio (FGR) was significantly improved by supplementation with NSP enzymes or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease compared to the control diet (p<0.05). Apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP) was significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease (p<0.05). Cholecystokinin (CCK) level in serum was reduced by 31.39% with NSP enzyme combined with protease supplementation at 160 mg/kg (p<0.05), but the CCK level in serum was increased by 26.51% with NSP enzyme supplementation alone. After 21 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 74.13%, 70.66% and 42.59% (p<0.05), respectively. After 42 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 32.45% and 27.41%, respectively (p<0.05). However, supplementation with NSP enzyme and 80 or 160 mg/kg protease decreased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 10.75% and 25.88%, respectively (p<0.05). The activities of pancreatic lipase and amylase were significantly higher in treated animals than they were in the control group (p<0.05). Supplementation with NSP enzyme, NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased

  17. A Conserved Hydrogen-Bonding Network of P2 bis-Tetrahydrofuran-Containing HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors (PIs) with a Protease Active-Site Amino Acid Backbone Aids in Their Activity against PI-Resistant HIV

    PubMed Central

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Garimella, Harisha; Aoki, Manabu; Aoki-Ogata, Hiromi; Desai, Darshan V.; Chang, Simon B.; Davis, David A.; Fyvie, W. Sean; Kaufman, Joshua D.; Smith, David W.; Das, Debananda; Wingfield, Paul T.; Maeda, Kenji; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, GRL008, a novel nonpeptidic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor (PI), and darunavir (DRV), both of which contain a P2-bis-tetrahydrofuranyl urethane (bis-THF) moiety, were found to exert potent antiviral activity (50% effective concentrations [EC50s], 0.029 and 0.002 μM, respectively) against a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of HIV-1 (HIVA02) compared to ritonavir (RTV; EC50, >1.0 μM) and tipranavir (TPV; EC50, 0.364 μM). Additionally, GRL008 showed potent antiviral activity against an HIV-1 variant selected in the presence of DRV over 20 passages (HIVDRVRP20), with a 2.6-fold increase in its EC50 (0.097 μM) compared to its corresponding EC50 (0.038 μM) against wild-type HIV-1NL4-3 (HIVWT). Based on X-ray crystallographic analysis, both GRL008 and DRV showed strong hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) with the backbone-amide nitrogen/carbonyl oxygen atoms of conserved active-site amino acids G27, D29, D30, and D30′ of HIVA02 protease (PRA02) and wild-type PR in their corresponding crystal structures, while TPV lacked H-bonds with G27 and D30′ due to an absence of polar groups. The P2′ thiazolyl moiety of RTV showed two conformations in the crystal structure of the PRA02-RTV complex, one of which showed loss of contacts in the S2′ binding pocket of PRA02, supporting RTV's compromised antiviral activity (EC50, >1 μM). Thus, the conserved H-bonding network of P2-bis-THF-containing GRL008 with the backbone of G27, D29, D30, and D30′ most likely contributes to its persistently greater antiviral activity against HIVWT, HIVA02, and HIVDRVRP20. PMID:24752271

  18. Nafamostat mesilate, a broad spectrum protease inhibitor, modulates platelet, neutrophil and contact activation in simulated extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, S; Gikakis, N; Hack, C E; Niewiarowski, S; Edmunds, L H; Koneti Rao, A; Sun, L; Cooper, S L; Colman, R W

    1996-01-01

    Activation of humoral and cellular participants in inflammation enhances the risk of postoperative bleeding and multiple organ damage in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We now compare the effects of heparin alone in combination with nafamostat mesilate (NM), a protease inhibitor with specificity of trypsin-like enzymes, in an extracorporeal circuit which simulates CPB. NM significantly inhibits the release of platelet beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG) at 60 and 120 min. Platelet counts do not differ. ADP-induced aggregation decreases in circuits with NM, which is due to a direct effect of NM on platelet function. NM prevents any significant release of neutrophil elastase; at 120 min, plasma elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complex is 0.16 micrograms/ml in the NM group and 1.24 micrograms/ml in the control group. NM completely inhibits formation of complexes of C1 inhibitor with kallikrein and FXIIa. NM does not alter markers of complement activation (C1-C1-inhibitor complex and C5b-9), or indicators of thrombin formation (F1.2). However, at 120 min, thrombin activity as measured by release of fibrinopeptide A is significantly decreased. The data indicate that complement activation during CPB correlates poorly with neutrophil activation and that either kallikrein or FXIIa or both may be more important agonists. The ability of NM to inhibit two important contact system proteins and platelet and neutrophil release raises the possibility of suppressing the inflammatory response during clinical CPB.

  19. Protein Kinase D and Gβγ Subunits Mediate Agonist-evoked Translocation of Protease-activated Receptor-2 from the Golgi Apparatus to the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dane D; Zhao, Peishen; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N; Lieu, TinaMarie; Gerges, Marina; Yeatman, Holly R; Canals, Meritxell; Vanner, Stephen J; Poole, Daniel P; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2016-05-20

    Agonist-evoked endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors has been extensively studied. The mechanisms by which agonists stimulate mobilization and plasma membrane translocation of G protein-coupled receptors from intracellular stores are unexplored. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) traffics to lysosomes, and sustained protease signaling requires mobilization and plasma membrane trafficking of PAR2 from Golgi stores. We evaluated the contribution of protein kinase D (PKD) and Gβγ to this process. In HEK293 and KNRK cells, the PAR2 agonists trypsin and 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 activated PKD in the Golgi apparatus, where PKD regulates protein trafficking. PAR2 activation induced translocation of Gβγ, a PKD activator, to the Golgi apparatus, determined by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer between Gγ-Venus and giantin-Rluc8. Inhibitors of PKD (CRT0066101) and Gβγ (gallein) prevented PAR2-stimulated activation of PKD. CRT0066101, PKD1 siRNA, and gallein all inhibited recovery of PAR2-evoked Ca(2+) signaling. PAR2 with a photoconvertible Kaede tag was expressed in KNRK cells to examine receptor translocation from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. Irradiation of the Golgi region (405 nm) induced green-red photo-conversion of PAR2-Kaede. Trypsin depleted PAR2-Kaede from the Golgi apparatus and repleted PAR2-Kaede at the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 inhibited PAR2-Kaede translocation to the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 also inhibited sustained protease signaling to colonocytes and nociceptive neurons that naturally express PAR2 and mediate protease-evoked inflammation and nociception. Our results reveal a major role for PKD and Gβγ in agonist-evoked mobilization of intracellular PAR2 stores that is required for sustained signaling by extracellular proteases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Cloning, characterization, expression and antifungal activity of an alkaline serine protease of Aureobasidium pullulans PL5 involved in the biological control of postharvest pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianpeng; Spadaro, Davide; Valente, Silvia; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2012-02-15

    An alkaline protease gene was amplified from genomic DNA and cDNA of the antagonistic yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans PL5, a biocontrol agent effective against Monilinia laxa on stone fruit and Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum on pome fruits. An open reading frame of 1248 bp encoding a 415-amino acid (aa) protein with a calculated molecular weight (M(r)) of 42.9 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 4.5 was characterized. The cDNAALP5 gene had an 18-amino acid signal peptide, one N-gylcosylation, one histidine active site, and one serine active site. The ALP5 gene with a M(r) of 1351 bp contained two introns. One intron was of 54 bp, while the other was of 50 bp. Protein BLAST and phylogenetic tree analysis of the deduced amino sequences from the cDNAALP5 gene showed that the encoded protein had 100% homology to a protease enzyme (ALP2) of a sea strain of A. pullulans, suggesting that the protein ALP5 was an alkaline serine protease. Expression of ALP5 in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), followed by identification with Western-blotting, purification with Ni-NTA and analysis of enzymatic activity, yielded an homogeneous recombinant ALP5 which hydrolysed the substrate casein and inhibited the mycelial growth of the pathogens. At its optimal pH of 10.0 and reaction temperature of 50°C, the recombinant protease exhibited the highest activity towards the substrate casein, though the highest stability was at lower temperatures and pH between 7.0 and 9.0. This study provided the direct evidence that extracellular proteases secreted by the antagonist A. pullulans PL5 played a role in the biocontrol activities against some postharvest pathogens of apple and peach. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Recognition of Lys48-Linked Di-ubiquitin and Deubiquitinating Activities of the SARS Coronavirus Papain-like Protease.

    PubMed

    Békés, Miklós; van der Heden van Noort, Gerbrand J; Ekkebus, Reggy; Ovaa, Huib; Huang, Tony T; Lima, Christopher D

    2016-05-19

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) recognize and cleave linkage-specific polyubiquitin (polyUb) chains, but mechanisms underlying specificity remain elusive in many cases. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus papain-like protease (PLpro) is a DUB that cleaves ISG15, a two-domain Ub-like protein, and Lys48-linked polyUb chains, releasing diUb(Lys48) products. To elucidate this specificity, we report the 2.85 Å crystal structure of SARS PLpro bound to a diUb(Lys48) activity-based probe. SARS PLpro binds diUb(Lys48) in an extended conformation via two contact sites, S1 and S2, which are proximal and distal to the active site, respectively. We show that specificity for polyUb(Lys48) chains is predicated on contacts in the S2 site and enhanced by an S1-S1' preference for a Lys48 linkage across the active site. In contrast, ISG15 specificity is dominated by contacts in the S1 site. Determinants revealed for polyUb(Lys48) specificity should prove useful in understanding PLpro deubiquitinating activities in coronavirus infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel characteristics of glutamate-induced cell death in primary septohippocampal cultures: relationship to calpain and caspase-3 protease activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Newcomb, J K; Pike, B R; Wang, K K; d'Avella, D; Hayes, R L

    2000-03-01

    Studies examined the phenotypic characteristics of glutamate-induced cell death and their relationship to calpain and caspase-3 activation. Cell viability was assessed by fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide staining and lactate dehydrogenase release. Calpain and caspase-3 activity was inferred from signature proteolytic fragmentation of alpha-spectrin. Characterization of cell death phenotypes was assessed by Hoechst 33258 and DNA fragmentation assays. Exposure of septohippocampal cultures to 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mmol/L glutamate induced a dose-dependent cell death with an LD50 of 2.0 mmol/L glutamate after 24 hours of incubation. Glutamate treatment induced cell death in neurons and astroglia and produced morphological alterations that differed from necrotic or apoptotic changes observed after maitotoxin or staurosporine exposure, respectively. After glutamate treatment, cell nuclei were enlarged and eccentrically shaped, and aggregated chromatin appeared in a diffusely speckled pattern. Furthermore, no dose of glutamate produced evidence of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Incubation with varying doses of glutamate produced calpain and caspase-3 activation. Calpain inhibitor II (N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-methionyl) provided protection only with a narrow dose range, whereas carbobenzoxy-Asp-CH2-OC(O)-2,6-dichlorobenzene (Z-D-DCB; pan-caspase inhibitor) and MK-801 (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist) were potently effective across a wider dose range. Cycloheximide did not reduce cell death or protease activation.

  3. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Inhibit Calpain Activity and Membrane Localization of Calpain 2 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Kristopher; Leloup, Ludovic; Freeman, Lisa C.; Wells, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used frequently worldwide for the alleviation of pain despite their capacity to cause adverse gastrointestinal (GI) side effects. GI toxicity, once thought to be the result of non-specific inhibition of cyclooxegenase (COX) enzymes, is now hypothesized to have multiple other causes that are COX independent. In particular, NSAIDs inhibit intestinal epithelial restitution, the process by which barrier function in intestinal mucosa is restored at sites of epithelial wounds within hours through cell spreading and migration. Accordingly, recent evidence indicates that the expression of calpain proteases, which play a key role in cell migration, is decreased by NSAIDs that inhibit cell migration in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Here, we examine the effect of NSAIDs on calpain activity and membrane expression in IEC-6 cells. Indomethacin, NS-398, and SC-560 inhibited calpain activity and decreased expression of calpain 2 in total membrane fractions and in plasma membranes involved in cell attachment to the substrate. Additionally, we demonstrated that inhibition of calpain activity by NSAIDs or ALLM, a calpain inhibitor, limits cell migration and in vitro wound healing of IEC-6 cells. Our results indicate that NSAIDs may inhibit cell migration by decreasing calpain activity and membrane-associated expression of calpain 2. Our results provide valuable insight into the mechanisms behind NSAID-induced GI toxicity and provide a potential pathway through which these negative side effects can be avoided in future members of the NSAID class. PMID:20854926

  4. Activation of mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases leads to generation of a fibrin clot

    PubMed Central

    Gulla, Krishana C; Gupta, Kshitij; Krarup, Anders; Gal, Peter; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Sim, Robert B; O’Connor, C David; Hajela, Krishnan

    2010-01-01

    The lectin pathway of complement is activated upon binding of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) or ficolins (FCNs) to their targets. Upon recognition of targets, the MBL-and FCN-associated serine proteases (MASPs) are activated, allowing them to generate the C3 convertase C4b2a. Recent findings indicate that the MASPs also activate components of the coagulation system. We have previously shown that MASP-1 has thrombin-like activity whereby it cleaves and activates fibrinogen and factor XIII. MASP-2 has factor Xa-like activity and activates prothrombin through cleavage to form thrombin. We now report that purified L-FCN-MASPs complexes, bound from serum to N-acetylcysteine-Sepharose, or MBL-MASPs complexes, bound to mannan-agarose, generate clots when incubated with calcified plasma or purified fibrinogen and factor XIII. Plasmin digestion of the clot and analysis using anti-D-dimer antibodies revealed that the clot was made up of fibrin and was similar to that generated by thrombin in normal human plasma. Fibrinopeptides A and B (FPA and FPB, respectively) were released after fibrinogen cleavage by L-FCN-MASPs complexes captured on N-acetylcysteine-Sepharose. Studies of inhibition of fibrinopeptide release indicated that the dominant pathway for clotting catalysed by the MASPs is via MASP-2 and prothrombin activation, as hirudin, a thrombin inhibitor that does not inhibit MASP-1 and MASP-2, substantially inhibits fibrinopeptide release. In the light of their potent chemoattractant effects on neutrophil and fibroblast recruitment, the MASP-mediated release of FPA and FPB may play a role in early immune activation. Additionally, MASP-catalysed deposition and polymerization of fibrin on the surface of micro-organisms may be protective by limiting the dissemination of infection. PMID:20002787

  5. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is upregulated by Acanthamoeba plasminogen activator (aPA) and induces proinflammatory cytokine in human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Trivendra; Abdi, Mahshid; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2014-05-29

    Acanthamoeba plasminogen activator (aPA) is a serine protease elaborated by Acanthamoeba trophozoites that facilitates the invasion of trophozoites to the host and contributes to the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). The aim of this study was to explore if aPA stimulates proinflammatory cytokine in human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells via the protease-activated receptors (PARs) pathway. Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites were grown in peptone-yeast extract glucose for 7 days, and the supernatants were collected and centrifuged. The aPA was purified using the fast protein liquid chromatography system, and aPA activity was determined by zymography assays. Human corneal epithelial cells were incubated with or without aPA (100 μg/mL), PAR1 agonists (thrombin, 10 μM; TRAP-6, 10 μM), and PAR2 agonists (SLIGRL-NH2, 100 μM; AC 55541, 10 μM) for 24 and 48 hours. Inhibition of PAR1 and PAR2 involved preincubating the HCE cells for 1 hour with the antagonist of PAR1 (SCH 79797, 60 μM) and PAR2 (FSLLRY-NH2, 100 μM) with or without aPA. Human corneal epithelial cells also were preincubated with PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists and then incubated with or without PAR1 agonists (thrombin and TRAP-6) and PAR2 agonists (SLIGRL-NH2 and AC 55541). Expression of PAR1 and PAR2 was examined by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry. Interleukin-8 expression was quantified by qRT-PCR and ELISA. Human corneal epithelial cells constitutively expressed PAR1 and PAR2 mRNA. Acanthamoeba plasminogen activator and PAR2 agonists significantly upregulated PAR2 mRNA expression (1- and 2-fold, respectively) (P < 0.05). Protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist significantly inhibited aPA, and PAR2 agonists induced PAR2 mRNA expression in HCE cells (P < 0.05). Protease-activated receptor 1 agonists, but not aPA, significantly upregulated PAR1 mRNA expression, which was significantly inhibited by PAR1 antagonist in HCE cells. Acanthamoeba plasminogen

  6. Enhanced effector function of CD8(+) T cells from healthy controls and HIV-infected patients occurs through thrombin activation of protease-activated receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Amanda; Smith, Mindy; Karpova, Tatiana; Hasley, Rebecca B; Belkina, Natalya; Shaw, Stephen; Balenga, Nariman; Druey, Kirk M; Nickel, Erin; Packard, Beverly; Imamichi, Hiromi; Hu, Zonghui; Follmann, Dean; McNally, James; Higgins, Jeanette; Sneller, Michael; Lane, H Clifford; Catalfamo, Marta

    2013-02-15

    Disruption of vascular integrity by trauma and other tissue insults leads to inflammation and activation of the coagulation cascade. The serine protease thrombin links these 2 processes. The proinflammatory function of thrombin is mediated by activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). We found that peripheral blood effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes expressed PAR-1 and that expression was increased in CD8(+) T cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thrombin enhanced cytokine secretion in CD8(+) T cells from healthy controls and HIV-infected patients. In addition, thrombin induced chemokinesis, but not chemotaxis, of CD8(+) T cells, which led to structural changes, including cell polarization and formation of a structure rich in F-actin and phosphorylated ezrin-radexin-moesin proteins. These findings suggest that thrombin mediates cross-talk between the coagulation system and the adaptive immune system at sites of vascular injury through increased T-cell motility and production of proinflammatory cytokines.

  7. Enhanced Effector Function of CD8+ T Cells From Healthy Controls and HIV-Infected Patients Occurs Through Thrombin Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Amanda; Smith, Mindy; Karpova, Tatiana; Hasley, Rebecca B.; Belkina, Natalya; Shaw, Stephen; Balenga, Nariman; Druey, Kirk M.; Nickel, Erin; Packard, Beverly; Imamichi, Hiromi; Hu, Zonghui; Follmann, Dean; McNally, James; Higgins, Jeanette; Sneller, Michael; Lane, H. Clifford; Catalfamo, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of vascular integrity by trauma and other tissue insults leads to inflammation and activation of the coagulation cascade. The serine protease thrombin links these 2 processes. The proinflammatory function of thrombin is mediated by activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). We found that peripheral blood effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes expressed PAR-1 and that expression was increased in CD8+ T cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients. Thrombin enhanced cytokine secretion in CD8+ T cells from healthy controls and HIV-infected patients. In addition, thrombin induced chemokinesis, but not chemotaxis, of CD8+ T cells, which led to structural changes, including cell polarization and formation of a structure rich in F-actin and phosphorylated ezrin-radexin-moesin proteins. These findings suggest that thrombin mediates cross-talk between the coagulation system and the adaptive immune system at sites of vascular injury through increased T-cell motility and production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:23204166

  8. D-BMAP18 antimicrobial peptide is active in vitro, resists to pulmonary proteases but loses its activity in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardirossian, Mario; Pompilio, Arianna; Degasperi, Margherita; Runti, Giulia; Pacor, Sabrina; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Scocchi, Marco

    2017-06-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistant-pathogens is driving the search for new antimicrobial compounds. Pulmonary infections experienced by cystic fibrosis patients are a dramatic example of this health-care emergency. Antimicrobial peptides could answer the need for new antibiotics but translating them from basic research to the clinic is a challenge. We have previously evaluated the potential of the small membranolytic peptide BMAP-18 to treat CF-related infections, discovering that while this molecule had a good activity in vitro it was not active in vivo because of its rapid degradation by pulmonary proteases. In this study, we synthesized and tested the proteases-resistant all-D enantiomer. In spite of a good antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolates and of a tolerable cytotoxicity in vitro, D-BMAP18 was ineffective to treat P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection in mice, in comparison to tobramycin. We observed that different factors other than peptide degradation hampered its efficacy for pulmonary application. These results indicate that D-BMAP18 needs further optimization before being suitable for clinical application and this approach may represent a guide for optimization of other anti-infective peptides eligible for the treatment of pulmonary infections.

  9. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-Contaminated Cell Lines Activate Primary Innate Immune Cells via a Protease-Sensitive Factor.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Jarosch, Alexander; Schmickl, Martina; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Hotz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma are a frequent and occult contaminant of cell cultures, whereby these prokaryotic organisms can modify many aspects of cell physiology, rendering experiments that are conducted with such contaminated cells problematic. Chronic Mycoplasma contamination in human monocytic cells lines has been associated with suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) function. In contrast, we show here that components derived from a Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell line can activate innate immunity in non-infected primary immune cells. Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 by dendritic cells in response to Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell components was critically dependent on the adapter protein MyD88 but only partially on TLR2. Unlike canonical TLR2 signaling that is triggered in response to the detection of Mycoplasma infection, innate immune activation by components of Mycoplasma-infected cells was inhibited by chloroquine treatment and sensitive to protease treatment. We further show that in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, soluble factors from Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cells induce the production of large amounts of IFN-α. We conclude that Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell lines release protein factors that can potently activate co-cultured innate immune cells via a previously unrecognized mechanism, thus limiting the validity of such co-culture experiments.

  10. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-Contaminated Cell Lines Activate Primary Innate Immune Cells via a Protease-Sensitive Factor

    PubMed Central

    Heidegger, Simon; Jarosch, Alexander; Schmickl, Martina; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Hotz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma are a frequent and occult contaminant of cell cultures, whereby these prokaryotic organisms can modify many aspects of cell physiology, rendering experiments that are conducted with such contaminated cells problematic. Chronic Mycoplasma contamination in human monocytic cells lines has been associated with suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) function. In contrast, we show here that components derived from a Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell line can activate innate immunity in non-infected primary immune cells. Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 by dendritic cells in response to Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell components was critically dependent on the adapter protein MyD88 but only partially on TLR2. Unlike canonical TLR2 signaling that is triggered in response to the detection of Mycoplasma infection, innate immune activation by components of Mycoplasma-infected cells was inhibited by chloroquine treatment and sensitive to protease treatment. We further show that in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, soluble factors from Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cells induce the production of large amounts of IFN-α. We conclude that Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell lines release protein factors that can potently activate co-cultured innate immune cells via a previously unrecognized mechanism, thus limiting the validity of such co-culture experiments. PMID:26565413

  11. Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Papain-Like Protease 1 Antagonizes Production of Interferon-βthrough Its Deubiquitinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoliang; Tian, Jin; Kang, Hongtao; Guo, Dongchun; Liu, Jiasen; Liu, Dafei; Jiang, Qian; Li, Zhijie; Qu, Juanjuan; Qu, Liandong

    2017-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs), such as human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63), severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV), murine hepatitis virus (MHV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), encode papain-like (PL) proteases that inhibit Sendai virus- (SeV-) induced interferon (IFN- β ) production. Recently, the crystal structure of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) PL1 has been solved, which was similar to that of SARS-CoV PL2 pro , which may antagonize host innate immunity. However, very little is known about whether TGEV PL1 can antagonize host innate immune response. Here, we presented evidence that TGEV PL1 encoded by the replicase gene could suppress the IFN- β expression and inhibit the nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). The ability to antagonize IFN- β production was dependent on the intact catalytic activity of PL1. Furthermore, TGEV PL1 exerted deubiquitinase (DUB) activity which strongly inhibited the retinoic acid-induced gene I- (RIG-1-) and stimulator of interferon gene- (STING-) dependent IFN expression. Our data collectively suggest that TGEV PL1 can inhibit the IFN- β expression and interfere with RIG-1- and STING-mediated signaling through a viral DUB activity. Our study has yielded strong evidence for the TGEV PL1 mechanisms that counteract the host innate immunity.

  12. Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Papain-Like Protease 1 Antagonizes Production of Interferon-β through Its Deubiquitinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jin; Kang, Hongtao; Guo, Dongchun; Liu, Jiasen; Liu, Dafei; Jiang, Qian; Li, Zhijie; Qu, Juanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs), such as human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63), severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV), murine hepatitis virus (MHV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), encode papain-like (PL) proteases that inhibit Sendai virus- (SeV-) induced interferon (IFN-β) production. Recently, the crystal structure of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) PL1 has been solved, which was similar to that of SARS-CoV PL2pro, which may antagonize host innate immunity. However, very little is known about whether TGEV PL1 can antagonize host innate immune response. Here, we presented evidence that TGEV PL1 encoded by the replicase gene could suppress the IFN-β expression and inhibit the nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). The ability to antagonize IFN-β production was dependent on the intact catalytic activity of PL1. Furthermore, TGEV PL1 exerted deubiquitinase (DUB) activity which strongly inhibited the retinoic acid-induced gene I- (RIG-1-) and stimulator of interferon gene- (STING-) dependent IFN expression. Our data collectively suggest that TGEV PL1 can inhibit the IFN-β expression and interfere with RIG-1- and STING-mediated signaling through a viral DUB activity. Our study has yielded strong evidence for the TGEV PL1 mechanisms that counteract the host innate immunity. PMID:29201911

  13. Multifunctional Mitochondrial AAA Proteases.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Steven E

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria perform numerous functions necessary for the survival of eukaryotic cells. These activities are coordinated by a diverse complement of proteins encoded in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that must be properly organized and maintained. Misregulation of mitochondrial proteostasis impairs organellar function and can result in the development of severe human diseases. ATP-driven AAA+ proteins play crucial roles in preserving mitochondrial activity by removing and remodeling protein molecules in accordance with the needs of the cell. Two mitochondrial AAA proteases, i-AAA and m-AAA, are anchored to either face of the mitochondrial inner membrane, where they engage and process an array of substrates to impact protein biogenesis, quality control, and the regulation of key metabolic pathways. The functionality of these proteases is extended through multiple substrate-dependent modes of action, including complete degradation, partial processing, or dislocation from the membrane without proteolysis. This review discusses recent advances made toward elucidating the mechanisms of substrate recognition, handling, and degradation that allow these versatile proteases to control diverse activities in this multifunctional organelle.

  14. Multifunctional Mitochondrial AAA Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Steven E.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria perform numerous functions necessary for the survival of eukaryotic cells. These activities are coordinated by a diverse complement of proteins encoded in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that must be properly organized and maintained. Misregulation of mitochondrial proteostasis impairs organellar function and can result in the development of severe human diseases. ATP-driven AAA+ proteins play crucial roles in preserving mitochondrial activity by removing and remodeling protein molecules in accordance with the needs of the cell. Two mitochondrial AAA proteases, i-AAA and m-AAA, are anchored to either face of the mitochondrial inner membrane, where they engage and process an array of substrates to impact protein biogenesis, quality control, and the regulation of key metabolic pathways. The functionality of these proteases is extended through multiple substrate-dependent modes of action, including complete degradation, partial processing, or dislocation from the membrane without proteolysis. This review discusses recent advances made toward elucidating the mechanisms of substrate recognition, handling, and degradation that allow these versatile proteases to control diverse activities in this multifunctional organelle. PMID:28589125

  15. Co-evolution of insect proteases and plant protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, Maarten A; Beekwilder, Jules

    2011-08-01

    Plants are at the basis of the food chain, but there is no such thing as a "free lunch" for herbivores. To promote reproductive success, plants evolved multi-layered defensive tactics to avoid or discourage herbivory. To the detriment of plants, herbivores, in turn, evolved intricate strategies to find, eat, and successfully digest essential plant parts to raise their own offspring. In this battle the digestive tract is the arena determining final victory or defeat as measured by growth or starvation of the herbivore. Earlier, specific molecular opponents were identified as proteases and inhibitors: digestive proteases of herbivores evolved structural motifs to occlude plant protease inhibitors, or alternatively, the insects evolved proteases capable of specifically degrading the host plant inhibitors. In response plant inhibitors evolved hyper-variable and novel protein folds to remain active against potential herbivores. At the level of protease regulation in herbivorous insects, it was shown that inhibition-insensitive digestive proteases are up-regulated when sensitive proteases are inhibited. The way this regulation operates in mammals is known as negative feedback by gut-luminal factors, so-called 'monitor peptides' that are sensitive to the concentration of active enzymes. We propose that regulation of gut enzymes by endogenous luminal factors has been an open invitation to plants to "hijack" this regulation by evolving receptor antagonists, although yet these plant factors have not been identified. In future research the question of the co-evolution of insect proteases and plant inhibitors should, therefore, be better approached from a systems level keeping in mind that evolution is fundamentally opportunistic and that the plant's fitness is primarily improved by lowering the availability of essential amino acids to an herbivore by any available mechanism.

  16. Different residues in the SARS-CoV spike protein determine cleavage and activation by the host cell protease TMPRSS2

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Lennart Michel; Hartleib, Anika; Nehlmeier, Inga; Gierer, Stefanie; Hoffmann, Markus; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike; Winkler, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) mediates viral entry into target cells. Cleavage and activation of SARS S by a host cell protease is essential for infectious viral entry and the responsible enzymes are potential targets for antiviral intervention. The type II transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS2 cleaves and activates SARS S in cell culture and potentially also in the infected host. Here, we investigated which determinants in SARS S control cleavage and activation by TMPRSS2. We found that SARS S residue R667, a previously identified trypsin cleavage site, is also required for S protein cleavage by TMPRSS2. The cleavage fragments produced by trypsin and TMPRSS2 differed in their decoration with N-glycans, suggesting that these proteases cleave different SARS S glycoforms. Although R667 was required for SARS S cleavage by TMPRSS2, this residue was dispensable for TMPRSS2-mediated S protein activation. Conversely, residue R797, previously reported to be required for SARS S activation by trypsin, was dispensable for S protein cleavage but required for S protein activation by TMPRSS2. Collectively, these results show that different residues in SARS S control cleavage and activation by TMPRSS2, suggesting that these processes are more complex than initially appreciated. PMID:28636671

  17. Different residues in the SARS-CoV spike protein determine cleavage and activation by the host cell protease TMPRSS2.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Lennart Michel; Spiegel, Martin; Plegge, Teresa; Hartleib, Anika; Nehlmeier, Inga; Gierer, Stefanie; Hoffmann, Markus; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike; Winkler, Michael; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) mediates viral entry into target cells. Cleavage and activation of SARS S by a host cell protease is essential for infectious viral entry and the responsible enzymes are potential targets for antiviral intervention. The type II transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS2 cleaves and activates SARS S in cell culture and potentially also in the infected host. Here, we investigated which determinants in SARS S control cleavage and activation by TMPRSS2. We found that SARS S residue R667, a previously identified trypsin cleavage site, is also required for S protein cleavage by TMPRSS2. The cleavage fragments produced by trypsin and TMPRSS2 differed in their decoration with N-glycans, suggesting that these proteases cleave different SARS S glycoforms. Although R667 was required for SARS S cleavage by TMPRSS2, this residue was dispensable for TMPRSS2-mediated S protein activation. Conversely, residue R797, previously reported to be required for SARS S activation by trypsin, was dispensable for S protein cleavage but required for S protein activation by TMPRSS2. Collectively, these results show that different residues in SARS S control cleavage and activation by TMPRSS2, suggesting that these processes are more complex than initially appreciated.

  18. A Low Dose of Fermented Soy Germ Alleviates Gut Barrier Injury, Hyperalgesia and Faecal Protease Activity in a Rat Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Lara; Bézirard, Valérie; Salvador-Cartier, Christel; Bacquié, Valérie; Lencina, Corinne; Lévêque, Mathilde; Braniste, Viorica; Ménard, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines like macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), IL-1β and TNF-α predominate in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and TNBS colitis. Increased levels of serine proteases activating protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) are found in the lumen and colonic tissue of IBD patients. PAR-2 activity and pro-inflammatory cytokines impair epithelial barrier, facilitating the uptake of luminal aggressors that perpetuate inflammation and visceral pain. Soy extracts contain phytoestrogens (isoflavones) and serine protease inhibitors namely Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBI). Since estrogens exhibit anti-inflammatory and epithelial barrier enhancing properties, and that a BBI concentrate improves ulcerative colitis, we aimed to evaluate if a fermented soy germ extract (FSG) with standardized isoflavone profile and stable BBI content exert cumulative or synergistic protection based on protease inhibition and estrogen receptor (ER)-ligand activity in colitic rats. Female rats received orally for 15 d either vehicle or FSG with or without an ER antagonist ICI 182.780 before TNBS intracolonic instillation. Macroscopic and microscopic damages, myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine levels, intestinal paracellular permeability, visceral sensitivity, faecal proteolytic activity and PAR-2 expression were assessed 24 h, 3 d and 5 d post-TNBS. FSG treatment improved the severity of colitis, by decreasing the TNBS-induced rise in gut permeability, visceral sensitivity, faecal proteolytic activity and PAR-2 expression at all post-TNBS points. All FSG effects were reversed by the ICI 182.780 except the decrease in faecal proteolytic activity and PAR-2 expression. In conclusion, the anti-inflammatory properties of FSG treatment result from two distinct but synergic pathways i.e an ER-ligand and a PAR-2 mediated pathway, providing rationale for potential use as adjuvant therapy in IBD. PMID:23166707

  19. A low dose of fermented soy germ alleviates gut barrier injury, hyperalgesia and faecal protease activity in a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Lara; Bézirard, Valérie; Salvador-Cartier, Christel; Bacquié, Valérie; Lencina, Corinne; Lévêque, Mathilde; Braniste, Viorica; Ménard, Sandrine; Théodorou, Vassilia; Houdeau, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines like macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), IL-1β and TNF-α predominate in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and TNBS colitis. Increased levels of serine proteases activating protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) are found in the lumen and colonic tissue of IBD patients. PAR-2 activity and pro-inflammatory cytokines impair epithelial barrier, facilitating the uptake of luminal aggressors that perpetuate inflammation and visceral pain. Soy extracts contain phytoestrogens (isoflavones) and serine protease inhibitors namely Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBI). Since estrogens exhibit anti-inflammatory and epithelial barrier enhancing properties, and that a BBI concentrate improves ulcerative colitis, we aimed to evaluate if a fermented soy germ extract (FSG) with standardized isoflavone profile and stable BBI content exert cumulative or synergistic protection based on protease inhibition and estrogen receptor (ER)-ligand activity in colitic rats. Female rats received orally for 15 d either vehicle or FSG with or without an ER antagonist ICI 182.780 before TNBS intracolonic instillation. Macroscopic and microscopic damages, myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine levels, intestinal paracellular permeability, visceral sensitivity, faecal proteolytic activity and PAR-2 expression were assessed 24 h, 3 d and 5 d post-TNBS. FSG treatment improved the severity of colitis, by decreasing the TNBS-induced rise in gut permeability, visceral sensitivity, faecal proteolytic activity and PAR-2 expression at all post-TNBS points. All FSG effects were reversed by the ICI 182.780 except the decrease in faecal proteolytic activity and PAR-2 expression. In conclusion, the anti-inflammatory properties of FSG treatment result from two distinct but synergic pathways i.e an ER-ligand and a PAR-2 mediated pathway, providing rationale for potential use as adjuvant therapy in IBD.

  20. Molecular dynamics and docking simulation of a natural variant of Activated Protein C with impaired protease activity: implications for integrin-mediated antiseptic function.

    PubMed

    D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Orro, Alessandro; Morra, Giulia; Moscatelli, Marco; Trombetti, Gabriele; Milanesi, Luciano; Rovida, Ermanna

    2015-01-01

    Activated Protein C (APC) is a multifunctional serine protease, primarily known for its anticoagulant function in the coagulation system. Several studies have already elucidated its role in counteracting apoptosis and inflammation in cells, while significant effort is still ongoing for defining its involvement in sepsis. Earlier literature has shown that the antiseptic function of APC is mediated by its binding to leukocyte integrins, which is due to the presence of the integrin binding motif Arg-Gly-Asp at the N-terminus of the APC catalytic chain. Many natural mutants have been identified in patients with Protein C deficiency diagnosis including a variant of specificity pocket (Gly216Asp). In this work, we present a molecular model of the complex of APC with αVβ3 integrin obtained by protein-protein docking approach. A computational analysis of this variant is hereby presented, based on molecular dynamics and docking simulations, aiming at investigating the effects of the Gly216Asp mutation on the protein conformation and inferring its functional implications. Our study shows that such mutation is likely to impair the protease activity while preserving the overall protein fold. Moreover, superposition of the integrin binding motifs in wild-type and mutant forms suggests that the interaction with integrin can still occur and thus the mutant is likely to retain its antiseptic function related to the neutrophyl integrin binding. Therapeutic applications could result in this APC mutant which retains antiseptic function without anticoagulant side effects.

  1. Involvement of nuclear factor of activated T cells in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production in canine keratinocytes stimulated with a cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Sekido, Machiko; Iio, Aki; Chimura, Naoki; Shibata, Sanae; Kamishina, Harumi; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Maeda, Sadatoshi

    2013-06-01

    A previous study demonstrated that the cysteine protease of Dermatophagoides farinae induced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in a canine epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cell line (CPEK); however, the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Given that the transcription of GM-CSF mRNA in human lymphocytes is mainly regulated by the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), it is hypothesized that NFAT also contributes to GM-CSF production in canine keratinocytes stimulated with a cysteine protease. Nuclear translocation of NFAT was evaluated in CPEK cells in the absence or presence of the cysteine protease papain. We also investigated whether blockade of NFAT could inhibit GM-CSF production. Papain-induced nuclear translocation of NFAT, producing GM-CSF, was partly inhibited by ciclosporin. The results suggest that GM-CSF production mediated by the cysteine protease is regulated not only by NFAT but also by unknown signalling pathways in canine keratinocytes. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  2. Cupincin: A Novel Cupin Domain Containing Protease from Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Bran Comprising of Procoagulant and Fibrinogenolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, Roopesh; Tiku, Purnima Kaul

    2018-04-01

    The current study was carried out to evaluate the pharmacological properties of cupincin- A novel cupin domain containing metalloprotease with limited proteolysis from rice bran on blood coagulation and hydrolysis of human fibrinogen. Cupincin preferentially hydrolyzed the Aα chain of fibrinogen and then the Bβ-chain, but not the γ-chain. Cupincin reduced the re-calcification time of citrated human plasma dose dependently. Analysis of citrated whole blood in the presence of cupincin by rotem showed a decrease in coagulation time and clot formation time. Sonoclot analysis indicated that cupincin cleaved fibrinogen of whole citrated blood. SDS-PAGE and sonoclot analysis (LI-30) indicated that cupincin lacked plasmin-like activity. Global hemostasis tests like rotem and sonoclot analysis determined cupincin as a procoagulant enzyme. Cupincin did not show any effect on prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time tests suggesting its action on the common pathway of coagulation. The involvement of proteases from rice ( Oryza sativa L.) in haemostasis has never been exploited before. This study could provide the basis for the development of new procoagulant agents from a nontoxic source like rice.

  3. Camalexin-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells involves alterations of expression and activity of lysosomal protease cathepsin D.

    PubMed

    Smith, Basil; Randle, Diandra; Mezencev, Roman; Thomas, LeeShawn; Hinton, Cimona; Odero-Marah, Valerie

    2014-04-02

    Camalexin, the phytoalexin produced in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, possesses antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects. We have demonstrated that the cytostatic/cytotoxic effects of camalexin on several prostate cancer (PCa) cells are due to oxidative stress. Lysosomes are vulnerable organelles to Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-induced injuries, with the potential to initiate and or facilitate apoptosis subsequent to release of proteases such as cathepsin D (CD) into the cytosol. We therefore hypothesized that camalexin reduces cell viability in PCa cells via alterations in expression and activity of CD. Cell viability was evaluated by MTS cell proliferation assay in LNCaP and ARCaP Epithelial (E) cells, and their respective aggressive sublines C4-2 and ARCaP Mesenchymal (M) cells, whereby the more aggressive PCa cells (C4-2 and ARCaPM) displayed greater sensitivity to camalexin treatments than the lesser aggressive cells (LNCaP and ARCaPE). Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CD relocalization from the lysosome to the cytosol subsequent to camalexin treatments, which was associated with increased protein expression of mature CD; p53, a transcriptional activator of CD; BAX, a downstream effector of CD, and cleaved PARP, a hallmark for apoptosis. Therefore, camalexin reduces cell viability via CD and may present as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer cells.

  4. Camalexin-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells Involves Alterations of Expression and Activity of Lysosomal Protease Cathepsin D

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Basil; Randle, Diandra; Mezencev, Roman; Thomas, LeeShawn; Hinton, Cimona; Marah, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Camalexin, the phytoalexin produced in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, possesses antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects. We have demonstrated that the cytostatic/cytotoxic effects of camalexin on several prostate cancer (PCa) cells are due to oxidative stress. Lysosomes are vulnerable organelles to Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-induced injuries, with the potential to initiate and or facilitate apoptosis subsequent to release of proteases such as cathepsin D (CD) into the cytosol. We therefore hypothesized that camalexin reduces cell viability in PCa cells via alterations in expression and activity of CD. Cell viability was evaluated by MTS cell proliferation assay in LNCaP and ARCaP Epithelial (E) cells, and their respective aggressive sublines C4-2 and ARCaP Mesenchymal (M) cells, whereby the more aggressive PCa cells (C4-2 and ARCaPM) displayed greater sensitivity to camalexin treatments than the lesser aggressive cells (LNCaP and ARCaPE). Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CD relocalization from the lysosome to the cytosol subsequent to camalexin treatments, which was associated with increased protein expression of mature CD; p53, a transcriptional activator of CD; BAX, a downstream effector of CD, and cleaved PARP, a hallmark for apoptosis. Therefore, camalexin reduces cell viability via CD and may present as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer cells. PMID:24699144

  5. Characterization of naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenes as novel inhibitors of deubiquitinating protease USP7 with anticancer activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jing, Bo; Liu, Meng; Yang, Li; Cai, Hai-Yan; Chen, Jie-Bo; Li, Ze-Xi; Kou, Xi; Wu, Yun-Zhao; Qin, Dong-Jun; Zhou, Li; Jin, Jin; Lei, Hu; Xu, Han-Zhang; Wang, Wei-Wei; Wu, Ying-Li

    2018-03-01

    Deubiquitinating protease USP7 is a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatment, and interest in developing USP7 inhibitors has greatly increased. In the present study, we reported a series of natural pentacyclic triterpenes with USP7 inhibitory activity in vitro. Among them, both the ursane triterpenes and oleanane triterpenes were more active than the lupine triterpenes, whereas ursolic acid was the most potent with IC 50 of 7.0±1.5 μmol/L. Molecular docking studies showed that ursolic acid might occupy the ubiquitin binding pocket of USP7, with the 17-carboxyl group and 3-hydroxyl group playing a vital role in the USP7-ursolic acid interaction. Using the cellular thermal shift assay, we demonstrated that ursolic acid interacted with USP7 in RPMI8226 human myeloma cells. Ursolic acid dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of the myeloma cells with IC 50 of 6.56 μmol/L, accompanied by reductions in USP7 substrates such as MDM2, UHRF1 and DNMT1. Overexpression of USP7 partially, but significantly attenuated ursolic acid-induced cell death as well as downregulation of MDM2, UHRF1 and DNMT1. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that pentacyclic triterpenes represent a novel scaffold for developing USP7 inhibitors and that USP7 inhibition contributes to the anti-cancer effect of ursolic acid.

  6. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Petersen, Ole H; Gerasimenko, Oleg V

    2016-08-05

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca(2+) signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca(2+) signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5-10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release followed by Ca(2+) entry and also substantially reduced Ca(2+) extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca(2+) signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca(2+) signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) entry by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca(2+) entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Secreted Aspartic Protease Cleavage of Candida albicans Msb2 Activates Cek1 MAPK Signaling Affecting Biofilm Formation and Oropharyngeal Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Sonia; Tati, Swetha; Conti, Heather R.; Hube, Bernhard; Cullen, Paul J.; Edgerton, Mira

    2012-01-01

    Perception of external stimuli and generation of an appropriate response are crucial for host colonization by pathogens. In pathogenic fungi, mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways regulate dimorphism, biofilm/mat formation, and virulence. Signaling mucins, characterized by a heavily glycosylated extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain, and a small cytoplasmic domain, are known to regulate various signaling pathways. In Candida albicans, the mucin Msb2 regulates the Cek1 MAPK pathway. We show here that Msb2 is localized to the yeast cell wall and is further enriched on hyphal surfaces. A msb2Δ/Δ strain formed normal hyphae but had biofilm defects. Cek1 (but not Mkc1) phosphorylation was absent in the msb2Δ/Δ mutant. The extracellular domain of Msb2 was shed in cells exposed to elevated temperature and carbon source limitation, concomitant with germination and Cek1 phosphorylation. Msb2 shedding occurred differentially in cells grown planktonically or on solid surfaces in the presence of cell wall and osmotic stressors. We further show that Msb2 shedding and Cek1 phosphorylation were inhibited by addition of Pepstatin A (PA), a selective inhibitor of aspartic proteases (Saps). Analysis of combinations of Sap protease mutants identified a sap8Δ/Δ mutant with reduced MAPK signaling along with defects in biofilm formation, thereby suggesting that Sap8 potentially serves as a major regulator of Msb2 processing. We further show that loss of either Msb2 (msb2Δ/Δ) or Sap8 (sap8Δ/Δ) resulted in higher C. albicans surface β-glucan exposure and msb2Δ/Δ showed attenuated virulence in a murine model of oral candidiasis. Thus, Sap-mediated proteolytic cleavage of Msb2 is required for activation of the Cek1 MAPK pathway in response to environmental cues including those that induce germination. Inhibition of Msb2 processing at the level of Saps may provide a means of attenuating MAPK signaling and reducing C. albicans virulence. PMID:23139737

  8. Using molecular imaging to assess the delivery and infection of protease activated virus in animal model of myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Banghe; Guenther, Caitlin; Kwon, Sunkuk; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Suh, Junghae

    2017-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the greatest cause of death in the US and gene therapy has the potential to be an effective therapy. In this study, we demonstrated MMP-9 based protease-activatable virus (PAV) for selective infection of myocardial infarct (MI) that is associated with active MMP-9 expression. To test the specificity of PAV, we used expression of a far-red fluorescence protein (iRFP) delivered by the PAV together with a dual PET/NIRF imaging agent specific for active MMP-9 activity at the site of MI in a murine model. Calibrated fluorescence imaging employed a highly-sensitive intensified camera, laser diode excitation sources, and filtration schemes based upon the spectra of iRFP and the NIRF agent. One to two days after ligation of the left anterior descending artery, the PAV or WT AAV9 virus encoding for iRFP (5x1010 genomic particles) and radiolabeled MMP-9 imaging agent (3 nmol) were injected intravenously (i.v.). PET imaging showed MMP activity was associated with adverse tissue remodeling at the site of the MI. One week after, animals were again injected i.v. with the MMP-9 agent (3 nmol) and 18-24 h later, the animals were euthanized and the hearts were harvested, sliced, and imaged for congruent iRFP transgene expression and NIRF signals associated with MMP-9 tissue activity. The fluorescent margins of iRFP and NIRF contrasted tissues were quantified in terms Standard International units of mW/cm2/sr. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of PAV and WT targeting to sites of MI was determined from these calibrated fluorescence measurements. The PAV demonstrated significantly higher delivery performance than that of the WT AAV9 virus.

  9. Protease-activated Receptor-2 (PAR-2)-mediated Nf-κB Activation Suppresses Inflammation-associated Tumor Suppressor MicroRNAs in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeff J.; Miller, Daniel L.; Jiang, Rong; Liu, Yueying; Shi, Zonggao; Tarwater, Laura; Williams, Russell; Balsara, Rashna; Sauter, Edward R.; Stack, M. Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cause of death from cancer with an estimated 400,000 deaths worldwide and a low (50%) 5-year survival rate. The most common form of oral cancer is oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). OSCC is highly inflammatory and invasive, and the degree of inflammation correlates with tumor aggressiveness. The G protein-coupled receptor protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) plays a key role in inflammation. PAR-2 is activated via proteolytic cleavage by trypsin-like serine proteases, including kallikrein-5 (KLK5), or by treatment with activating peptides. PAR-2 activation induces G protein-α-mediated signaling, mobilizing intracellular calcium and Nf-κB signaling, leading to the increased expression of pro-inflammatory mRNAs. Little is known, however, about PAR-2 regulation of inflammation-related microRNAs. Here, we assess PAR-2 expression and function in OSCC cell lines and tissues. Stimulation of PAR-2 activates Nf-κB signaling, resulting in RelA nuclear translocation and enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory mRNAs. Concomitantly, suppression of the anti-inflammatory tumor suppressor microRNAs let-7d, miR-23b, and miR-200c was observed following PAR-2 stimulation. Analysis of orthotopic oral tumors generated by cells with reduced KLK5 expression showed smaller, less aggressive lesions with reduced inflammatory infiltrate relative to tumors generated by KLK5-expressing control cells. Together, these data support a model wherein KLK5-mediated PAR-2 activation regulates the expression of inflammation-associated mRNAs and microRNAs, thereby modulating progression of oral tumors. PMID:26839311

  10. The Proteolytic Activation of (H3N2) Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin Is Facilitated by Different Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Nora; Bergmann, Silke; Kösterke, Nadine; Lambertz, Ruth L. O.; Keppner, Anna; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Weiß, Siegfried; Hummler, Edith; Hatesuer, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cleavage of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) by host cell proteases is necessary for viral activation and infectivity. In humans and mice, members of the type II transmembrane protease family (TTSP), e.g., TMPRSS2, TMPRSS4, and TMPRSS11d (HAT), have been shown to cleave influenza virus HA for viral activation and infectivity in vitro. Recently, we reported that inactivation of a single HA-activating protease gene, Tmprss2, in knockout mice inhibits the spread of H1N1 influenza viruses. However, after infection of Tmprss2 knockout mice with an H3N2 influenza virus, only a slight increase in survival was observed, and mice still lost body weight. In this study, we investigated an additional trypsin-like protease, TMPRSS4. Both TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 are expressed in the same cell types of the mouse lung. Deletion of Tmprss4 alone in knockout mice does not protect them from body weight loss and death upon infection with H3N2 influenza virus. In contrast, Tmprss2−/− Tmprss4−/− double-knockout mice showed a remarkably reduced virus spread and lung pathology, in addition to reduced body weight loss and mortality. Thus, our results identified TMPRSS4 as a second host cell protease that, in addition to TMPRSS2, is able to activate the HA of H3N2 influenza virus in vivo. IMPORTANCE Influenza epidemics and recurring pandemics are responsible for significant global morbidity and mortality. Due to high variability of the virus genome, resistance to available antiviral drugs is frequently observed, and new targets for treatment of influenza are needed. Host cell factors essential for processing of the virus hemagglutinin represent very suitable drug targets because the virus is dependent on these host factors for replication. We reported previously that Tmprss2-deficient mice are protected against H1N1 virus infections, but only marginal protection against H3N2 virus infections was observed. Here we show that deletion of two host protease genes, Tmprss2 and

  11. EspP, an Extracellular Serine Protease from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Reduces Coagulation Factor Activities, Reduces Clot Strength, and Promotes Clot Lysis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Kevin H M; Khan, Shekeb; Rand, Margaret L; Mian, Hira S; Brnjac, Elena; Sandercock, Linda E; Akula, Indira; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pai, Emil F; Chesney, Alden E

    2016-01-01

    EspP (E. coli secreted serine protease, large plasmid encoded) is an extracellular serine protease produced by enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7, a causative agent of diarrhea-associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (D+HUS). The mechanism by which EHEC induces D+HUS has not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of EspP on clot formation and lysis in human blood. Human whole blood and plasma were incubated with EspP(WT )at various concentrations and sampled at various time points. Thrombin time (TT), prothrombin time (PT), and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), coagulation factor activities, and thrombelastgraphy (TEG) were measured. Human whole blood or plasma incubated with EspP(WT) was found to have prolonged PT, aPTT, and TT. Furthermore, human whole blood or plasma incubated with EspP(WT) had reduced activities of coagulation factors V, VII, VIII, and XII, as well as prothrombin. EspP did not alter the activities of coagulation factors IX, X, or XI. When analyzed by whole blood TEG, EspP decreased the maximum amplitude of the clot, and increased the clot lysis. Our results indicate that EspP alters hemostasis in vitro by decreasing the activities of coagulation factors V, VII, VIII, and XII, and of prothrombin, by reducing the clot strength and accelerating fibrinolysis, and provide further evidence of a functional role for this protease in the virulence of EHEC and the development of D+HUS.

  12. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents.

    PubMed

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Pitzler, Christian; Körfer, Georgette; Jakob, Felix; Ronny Martinez; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-12-25

    Proteases are essential ingredients in modern laundry detergents. Over the past 30 years, subtilisin proteases employed in the laundry detergent industry have been engineered by directed evolution and rational design to tailor their properties towards industrial demands. This comprehensive review discusses recent success stories in subtilisin protease engineering. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents comprise simultaneous improvement of thermal resistance and activity at low temperatures, a rational strategy to modulate pH profiles, and a general hypothesis for how to increase promiscuous activity towards the production of peroxycarboxylic acids as mild bleaching agents. The three protease engineering campaigns presented provide in-depth analysis of protease properties and have identified principles that can be applied to improve or generate enzyme variants for industrial applications beyond laundry detergents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening, biological evaluation and binding mode analysis of a novel protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Nam-Chul; Seo, Seoung-Hwan; Kim, Dohee; Shin, Ji-Sun; Ju, Jeongmin; Seong, Jihye; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Iiyoun; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Yun Kyung; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2016-08-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor, mediating inflammation and pain signaling in neurons, thus it is considered to be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. In this study, we performed a ligand-based virtual screening of 1.6 million compounds by employing a common-feature pharmacophore model and two-dimensional similarity search to identify a new PAR2 antagonist. The common-feature pharmacophore model was established based on the biological screening results of our in-house library. The initial virtual screening yielded a total number of 47 hits, and additional biological activity tests including PAR2 antagonism and anti-inflammatory effects resulted in a promising candidate, compound 43, which demonstrated an IC50 value of 8.22 µM against PAR2. In next step, a PAR2 homology model was constructed using the crystal structure of the PAR1 as a template to explore the binding mode of the identified ligands. A molecular docking method was optimized by comparing the binding modes of a known PAR2 agonist GB110 and antagonist GB83, and applied to predict the binding mode of our hit compound 43. In-depth docking analyses revealed that the hydrophobic interaction with Phe2435.39 is crucial for PAR2 ligands to exert antagonistic activity. MD simulation results supported the predicted docking poses that PAR2 antagonist blocked a conformational rearrangement of Na+ allosteric site in contrast to PAR2 agonist that showed Na+ relocation upon GPCR activation. In conclusion, we identified new a PAR2 antagonist together with its binding mode, which provides useful insights for the design and development of PAR2 ligands.

  14. A Novel Bioluminescent Protease Assay Using Engineered Firefly Luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Wigdal, Susan S; Anderson, Jessica L; Vidugiris, Gediminas J; Shultz, John; Wood, Keith V; Fan, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of disease processes. Understanding their biological functions underpins the efforts of drug discovery. We have developed a bioluminescent protease assay using a circularly permuted form of firefly luciferase, wherein the native enzyme termini were joined by a peptide containing a protease site of interest. Protease cleavage of these mutant luciferases greatly activates the enzyme, typically over 100 fold. The mutant luciferase substrates are easily generated by molecular cloning and cell-free translation reactions and thus the protease substrates do not need to be chemically synthesized or purchased. The assay has broad applicability using a variety of proteases and their cognate sites and can sensitively detect protease activity. In this report we further demonstrate its utility for the evaluation of protease recognition sequence specificity and subsequent establishment of an optimized assay for the identification and characterization of protease inhibitors using high throughput screening. PMID:20161840

  15. Expression of IgA Proteases by Haemophilus influenzae in the Respiratory Tract of Adults With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F; Kirkham, Charmaine; Jones, Megan M; Sethi, Sanjay; Kong, Yong; Pettigrew, Melinda M

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)A proteases of Haemophilus influenzae are highly specific endopeptidases that cleave the hinge region of human IgA1 and also mediate invasion and trafficking in human respiratory epithelial cells, facilitating persistence of H. influenzae. Little is known about the expression of IgA proteases in clinical settings of H. influenzae infection. We identified and characterized IgA protease genes in H. influenzae and studied their expression and proteolytic specificity, in vitro and in vivo in 169 independent strains of H. influenzae collected longitudinally over 10 years from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The H. influenzae pangenome has 2 alleles of IgA protease genes; all strains have igaA, and 40% of strains have igaB. Each allele has 2 variants with differing proteolytic specificities for human IgA1. A total of 88% of 169 strains express IgA protease activity. Expression of the 4 forms of IgA protease varies among strains. Based on the presence of IgA1 fragments in sputum samples, each of the different forms of IgA protease is selectively expressed in the human airways during infection. Four variants of IgA proteases are variably expressed by H. influenzae during infection of the human airways. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Promoter methylation of protease-activated receptor (PAR2) is associated with severe clinical phenotypes of ulcerative colitis (UC).

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Masakatsu; Yamashita, Hiromi; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Okubo, Masaaki; Maruyama, Naoko; Kamano, Toshiaki; Kamiya, Yoshio; Fujita, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Iwata, Masami; Takahama, Kazuya; Watanabe, Makoto; Nakano, Hiroshi; Hirata, Ichiro; Arisawa, Tomiyasu

    2009-06-01

    Tryptase acting at protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) contributes to the pathogenesis of Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). DNA methylation has been shown to be an important mechanism in gene silencing. We attempted to clarify the relationship between the promoter methylation of PAR2 and ulcerative colitis (UC). 84 UC patients enrolled in the study. UC patients were classified by disease behavior, severity and extent of disease. For rectal inflammatory mucosal specimens from all the patients, and normal terminal ileum from 23 patients, promoter methylation of PAR2 gene was quantified by digital densitographic analysis following to methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). The mean methylation levels of the PAR2 gene in all 84 subjects was 38.4 +/- 19.6%. Although mean methylation levels in rectal inflammatory mucosa, and paired normal terminal ileum did not vary, methylation levels of PAR2 gene was significantly higher in total colitis than rectal colitis (total colitis vs. rectal colitis; 42.9 +/- 19.6% vs. 34.5 +/- 18.9%, P = 0.046). The higher methylation levels were also associated with Steroid-dependent (P = 0.002) and refractory (P = 0.007) UC. Our data suggest that PAR2 methylation status in rectal mucosa correlates with more severe disease phenotypes of UC.

  17. Regulation of human protease-activated receptor 1 (hPar1) gene expression in breast cancer by estrogen.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Uziely, Beatrice; Jaber, Mohammad; Maoz, Miriam; Cohen, Irit; Hamburger, Tamar; Maly, Bella; Peretz, Tamar; Bar-Shavit, Rachel

    2012-05-01

    A pivotal role is attributed to the estrogen-receptor (ER) pathway in mediating the effect of estrogen in breast cancer progression. Yet the precise mechanisms of cancer development by estrogen remain poorly understood. Advancing tumor categorization a step forward, and identifying cellular gene fingerprints to accompany histopathological assessment may provide targets for therapy as well as vehicles for evaluating the response to treatment. We report here that in breast carcinoma, estrogen may induce tumor development by eliciting protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR(1)) gene expression. Induction of PAR(1) was shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, luciferase reporter gene driven by the hPar(1) promoter, and chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses. Functional estrogen regulation of hPar1 in breast cancer was demonstrated by an endothelial tube-forming network. Notably, tissue-microarray analyses from an established cohort of women diagnosed with invasive breast carcinoma exhibited a significantly shorter disease-free (P=0.006) and overall (P=0.02) survival of patients that were positive for ER and PAR(1), compared to ER-positive but PAR(1)-negative patients. We propose that estrogen transcriptionally regulates hPar(1), culminating in an aggressive gene imprint in breast cancer. While ER(+) patients are traditionally treated with hormone therapy, the presence of PAR(1) identifies a group of patients that requires additional treatment, such as anti-PAR(1) biological vehicles or chemotherapy.

  18. Vorapaxar: The Current Role and Future Directions of a Novel Protease-Activated Receptor Antagonist for Risk Reduction in Atherosclerotic Disease.

    PubMed

    Gryka, Rebecca J; Buckley, Leo F; Anderson, Sarah M

    2017-03-01

    Despite the current standard of care, patients with cardiovascular disease remain at a high risk for recurrent events. Inhibition of thrombin-mediated platelet activation through protease-activated receptor-1 antagonism may provide reductions in atherosclerotic disease beyond those achievable with the current standard of care. Our primary objective is to evaluate the clinical literature regarding the role of vorapaxar (Zontivity™) in the reduction of cardiovascular events in patients with a history of myocardial infarction and peripheral artery disease. In particular, we focus on the potential future directions for protease-activating receptor antagonists in the treatment of a broad range of atherosclerotic diseases. A literature search of PubMed and EBSCO was conducted to identify randomized clinical trials from August 2005 to June 2016 using the search terms: 'vorapaxar', 'SCH 530348', 'protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist', and 'Zontivity™'. Bibliographies were searched and additional resources were obtained. Vorapaxar is a first-in-class, protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist. The Thrombin Receptor Antagonist for Clinical Event Reduction (TRACER) trial did not demonstrate a significant reduction in a broad primary composite endpoint. However, the Thrombin-Receptor Antagonist in Secondary Prevention of Atherothrombotic Ischemic Events (TRA 2°P-TIMI 50) trial examined a more traditional composite endpoint and found a significant benefit with vorapaxar. Vorapaxar significantly increased bleeding compared with standard care. Ongoing trials will help define the role of vorapaxar in patients with peripheral arterial disease, patients with diabetes mellitus, and other important subgroups. The use of multivariate modeling may enable the identification of subgroups with maximal benefit and minimal harm from vorapaxar. Vorapaxar provides clinicians with a novel mechanism of action to further reduce the burden of ischemic heart disease. Identification of

  19. Extracts from Acacia catechu suppress HIV-1 replication by inhibiting the activities of the viral protease and Tat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acacia catechu (Mimosa family) stem bark extracts have been used traditionally as a dietary supplement as well as a folk medicine given its reported anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective, antioxidant, anti-microbial and anti-tumor activities. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-HIV-1 activity of the extracts from stem bark of A. catechu. Methods The aqueous and 50% ethanolic extracts of A. catechu stem bark were prepared and 50% ethanolic extract was further fractioned by successively partitioning with petroleum ether, chloroform and n-butanol. All the extracts and fractions were evaluated for cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 activity using different in vitro assays. The active n-butanol fraction was evaluated for its inhibition against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, integrase, protease, pro-viral genome integration and viral Tat protein mediated transactivation. The effect of n-butanol fraction on the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion in Vk2/E6E7 cells and transepithelial resistance in Caco-2 and HEC-1A cells was investigated. Results The aqueous and 50% ethanolic extracts of A. catechu showed IC50 values of 1.8 ± 0.18 μg/ml and 3.6 ± 0.31 μg/ml, respectively in cell-free virus based assay using TZM-bl cells and HIV-1NL4.3 (X-4 tropic). In the above assay, n-butanol fraction exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity with an IC50 of 1.7 ± 0.12 μg/ml. The n-butanol fraction showed a dose-dependent inhibition against HIV-1NL4.3 infection of the peripheral blood lymphocytes and against HIV-1BaL(R-5-tropic) as well as two different primary viral isolates of HIV-1 infection of TZM-bl cells. The n-butanol fraction demonstrates a potent inhibitory activity against the viral protease (IC50 = 12.9 μg/ml), but not reverse transcriptase or integrase. Further, in Alu-PCR no effect on viral integration was observed. The n-butanol fraction interfered with the Tat-mediated Long Terminal Repeat transactivation in

  20. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  1. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  2. Midgut protease activities in monophagous larvae of Apollo butterfly, Parnassius apollo ssp. frankenbergeri.

    PubMed

    Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Michalczyk, Katarzyna; Kedziorski, Andrzej

    2007-02-01

    We assayed the relative activities of midgut proteolytic enzymes in individuals of the fourth (L(4)) and fifth (L(5)) instar of Apollo larvae, inhabiting Pieniny Mts (southern Poland). The comparisons between midgut tissue with glicocalyx (MT) and liquid midgut contents with peritrophic membrane (MC) were made. Optimal media pHs of the assayed proteolytic enzymes in P. apollo midgut samples were similar to those of other lepidopteran species. Endopeptidases, as well as carboxypeptidases, digested effectively in alkaline environment, while aminopeptidases were active in a broad pH range. Trypsin is probably the main endoprotease (correlation with caseinolytic activity in MC of L(5) larvae: r=0.606; p=0.004); however, its activity was low as compared with that in other leaf-eating Lepidoptera. This suggests a minor role of trypsin and chymotrypsin in protein digestion in Apollo larvae, probably due to limited availability of the leaf proteins. Instead, due to very high carboxypeptidase A activity in midgut tissue, the larvae obtain exogenous amino acids either directly or from oligopeptides and glycoproteins. High and significant positive correlations between the enzyme activity and glucosidase as well as galactosidase activities strongly support this opinion.

  3. Use of Different Proteases to Obtain Flaxseed Protein Hydrolysates with Antioxidant Activity.

    PubMed

    Karamać, Magdalena; Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Kulczyk, Anna

    2016-06-29

    The antioxidant activity of flaxseed protein hydrolysates obtained using five different enzymes was evaluated. Proteins were isolated from flaxseed cake and were separately treated with papain, trypsin, pancreatin, Alcalase and Flavourzyme. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) was determined as the percentage of cleaved peptide bonds using a spectrophotometric method with o-phthaldialdehyde. The distribution of the molecular weights (MW) of the hydrolysis products was profiled using Tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Tricine-SDS-PAGE) and size exclusion-high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) separations. The antioxidant activities of the protein isolate and hydrolysates were probed for their radical scavenging activity using 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) radical cation (ABTS(•+)) and photochemiluminescence (PCL-ACL) assays, and for their ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and ability to bind Fe(2+). The hydrolysates were more effective as antioxidants than the protein isolate in all systems. The PCL-ACL values of the hydrolysates ranged from 7.2 to 35.7 μmol Trolox/g. Both the FRAP and ABTS(•+) scavenging activity differed among the hydrolysates to a lower extent, with the ranges of 0.20-0.24 mmol Fe(2+)/g and 0.17-0.22 mmol Trolox/g, respectively. The highest chelating activity (71.5%) was noted for the pancreatin hydrolysate. In general, the hydrolysates obtained using Alcalase and pancreatin had the highest antioxidant activity, even though their DH (15.4% and 29.3%, respectively) and the MW profiles of the peptides varied substantially. The O₂(•-) scavenging activity and the ability to chelate Fe(2+) of the Flavourzyme hydrolysate were lower than those of the Alcalase and pancreatin hydrolysates. Papain was the least effective in releasing the peptides with antioxidant activity. The study showed that the type of enzyme used for flaxseed protein hydrolysis determines the antioxidant activity

  4. Use of Different Proteases to Obtain Flaxseed Protein Hydrolysates with Antioxidant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Karamać, Magdalena; Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Kulczyk, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of flaxseed protein hydrolysates obtained using five different enzymes was evaluated. Proteins were isolated from flaxseed cake and were separately treated with papain, trypsin, pancreatin, Alcalase and Flavourzyme. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) was determined as the percentage of cleaved peptide bonds using a spectrophotometric method with o-phthaldialdehyde. The distribution of the molecular weights (MW) of the hydrolysis products was profiled using Tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Tricine-SDS-PAGE) and size exclusion-high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) separations. The antioxidant activities of the protein isolate and hydrolysates were probed for their radical scavenging activity using 2,2′-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) radical cation (ABTS•+) and photochemiluminescence (PCL-ACL) assays, and for their ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and ability to bind Fe2+. The hydrolysates were more effective as antioxidants than the protein isolate in all systems. The PCL-ACL values of the hydrolysates ranged from 7.2 to 35.7 μmol Trolox/g. Both the FRAP and ABTS•+ scavenging activity differed among the hydrolysates to a lower extent, with the ranges of 0.20–0.24 mmol Fe2+/g and 0.17–0.22 mmol Trolox/g, respectively. The highest chelating activity (71.5%) was noted for the pancreatin hydrolysate. In general, the hydrolysates obtained using Alcalase and pancreatin had the highest antioxidant activity, even though their DH (15.4% and 29.3%, respectively) and the MW profiles of the peptides varied substantially. The O2•− scavenging activity and the ability to chelate Fe2+ of the Flavourzyme hydrolysate were lower than those of the Alcalase and pancreatin hydrolysates. Papain was the least effective in releasing the peptides with antioxidant activity. The study showed that the type of enzyme used for flaxseed protein hydrolysis determines the antioxidant activity of

  5. Absolute proteomic quantification of the activity state of proteases and proteolytic cleavages using proteolytic signature peptides and isobaric tags.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Richard P; Chen, Wei; Overall, Christopher M

    2014-04-04

    Proteolytic processing alters the structure and function of a wide range of proteins in the proteome. We describe a method for the absolute quantification of proteolysis that is compatible with existing quantitative proteomic applications and could be applied on a protein-family wide scale. A tryptic peptide spanning a cleavage site differentiates this intact form of the protein from the corresponding semi-tryptic peptides of a protease cleaved protein. We term such proteomic signatures of specific proteolytic events "proteolytic signature peptides" (PSPs). By quantifying both the tryptic and semi-tryptic PSPs simultaneously with proteotypic peptides common to all forms of the protein both the relative and the absolute amounts of the intact and cleaved protein can be determined. Using synthetic PSP standards of cleavage sites in intact and cleaved proteins the absolute amounts of each form of the protein can be determined. The technique was demonstrated by the simultaneous identification and quantification of matrix metalloproteinase zymogens and their proteolytically activated forms in parallel with conventional absolute quantification of their TIMP inhibitors. For quantification we synthesized a pair of isobaric mass tags, we term CLIP-TRAQ, using C(13) labeled reagents that when fragmented during CID generate signature ions at 113.1 or 114.1 respectively. As an expandable platform this allows for the simultaneous identification of multiple proteins and their proteolytic state in complex proteomes on a family-wide scale in parallel with conventional proteomic analysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: CNPN 2013. Proteolysis is key to various biological processes and the activity and function of many proteins are dictated by their proteolytic state. The development of methods to quantify protein abundance in conjunction to determining their proteolytic state and hence activity is essential for the complete understanding of the processes for which

  6. Antidermatophytic and Protease-inhibiting Activities of Zerumbone: A Natural Sesquiterpene from the Rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Roscoe ex J.E; Smith

    PubMed Central

    Jyothilakshmi, Madhavankutty; Jyothis, Mathew; Narayanan, Gokulanathan Nair Hari; Latha, Mukalel Sankunni

    2017-01-01

    Context: Due to increase in the number of patients with impaired immunity, incidence of dermatophytoses has increased considerably. Antidermatophytic agents with anti-inflammatory and protease-inhibiting activities will help in restricting inflammatory response associated with dermatophytoses. Aims: The present study aims to evaluate antidermatophytic and protease-inhibiting activities of zerumbone. Cytotoxicity was tested using Chang liver cell line as a preliminary step in toxicity study. Methods and Materials: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of zerumbone purified from the rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet were determined against Epidermophyton floccosum var. nigricans, Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, and Trichophyton rubrum. MIC was determined according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) method M38-A2. Protease-inhibiting property was tested using trypsin as the enzyme. In vitro cytotoxic effect was studied using the MTT assay. Results: MIC of zerumbone was 8 mg/L against E. floccosum and M. canis and 16 mg/L for M. gypseum and T. rubrum. MFC of zerumbone was 64 mg/L against E. floccosum and M. canis and 128 mg/L for M. gypseum and T. rubrum. Zerumbone exhibited remarkable protease-inhibiting activity. In the MTT assay, IC50 values were 150 and 0.31 µg, respectively, for zerumbone and reference drug. Statistical Analysis Used: For protease inhibition, assay and cytotoxicity assay control and tests were done in triplicate and the results are expressed as mean ± SD, where n = 3. Conclusions: Zerumbone is a novel candidate for use in dermatophytoses therapy because of the combined antifungal, anti-inflammatory (unpublished results), and protease-inhibiting properties. Cytotoxicity of zerumbone was found to be very low compared with the reference drug. KEY MESSAGES Zerumbone possesses antidermatophytic, anti-inflammatory, and protease-inhibiting activities. Hence, it is a novel candidate for

  7. Lipopolysaccharide-sensitive serine-protease zymogen (factor C) of horseshoe crab hemocytes. Identification and alignment of proteolytic fragments produced during the activation show that it is a novel type of serine protease.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, F; Miyata, T; Nakamura, T; Morita, T; Kuma, K; Miyata, T; Iwanaga, S

    1987-09-15

    The horseshoe crab clotting factor, factor C, present in the hemocytes is a serine-protease zymogen activated with lipopolysaccharide. It is a two-chain glycoprotein (Mr = 123,000) composed of a heavy chain (Mr = 80,000) and a light chain (Mr = 43,000) [T. Nakamura et al. (1986) Eur. J. Biochem. 154, 511-521]. In our continued study of this zymogen, we have now also found a single-chain form of factor C (Mr = 123,000) in the hemocyte lysate. The heavy chain had the NH2-terminal sequence of Ser-Gly-Val-Asp-, consistent with that of the single-chain factor C, indicating that the heavy chain is derived from the NH2-terminal part of the molecule. The light chain had an NH2-terminal sequence of Ser-Ser-Gln-Pro-. Incubation of the two-chain zymogen with lipopolysaccharide resulted in the cleavage of a Phe-Ile bond between residues 72 and 73 of the light chain. Concomitant with this cleavage, the A (72 amino acid residues) and B chains derived from the light chain were formed. The complete amino acid sequence of the A chain was determined by automated Edman degradation. The A chain contained a typical segment which is similar in sequence to a family of repeats in human beta 2-glycoprotein I, complement factors B, protein H, C4b-binding protein, and coagulation factor XIII b subunit. The NH2-terminal sequence of the B chain was Ile-Trp-Asn-Gly-. This chain contained the serine-active site sequence-Asp-Ala-Cys-Ser-Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro-. These results indicate that horseshoe crab factor C exists in the hemocytes in a single-chain zymogen form and is converted to an active serine protease by hydrolysis of a specific Phe-Ile peptide bond.

  8. Contributions of protein kinases and β-arrestin to termination of protease-activated receptor 2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Seo, Jong Bae; Deng, Yi; Asbury, Charles L.; Hille, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    Activated Gq protein–coupled receptors (GqPCRs) can be desensitized by phosphorylation and β-arrestin binding. The kinetics and individual contributions of these two mechanisms to receptor desensitization have not been fully distinguished. Here, we describe the shut off of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). PAR2 activates Gq and phospholipase C (PLC) to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) into diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate (IP3). We used fluorescent protein–tagged optical probes to monitor several consequences of PAR2 signaling, including PIP2 depletion and β-arrestin translocation in real time. During continuous activation of PAR2, PIP2 was depleted transiently and then restored within a few minutes, indicating fast receptor activation followed by desensitization. Knockdown of β-arrestin 1 and 2 using siRNA diminished the desensitization, slowing PIP2 restoration significantly and even adding a delayed secondary phase of further PIP2 depletion. These effects of β-arrestin knockdown on PIP2 recovery were prevented when serine/threonine phosphatases that dephosphorylate GPCRs were inhibited. Thus, PAR2 may continuously regain its activity via dephosphorylation when there is insufficient β-arrestin to trap phosphorylated receptors. Similarly, blockers of protein kinase C (PKC) and G protein–coupled receptor kinase potentiated the PIP2 depletion. In contrast, an activator of PKC inhibited receptor activation, presumably by augmenting phosphorylation of PAR2. Our interpretations were strengthened by modeling. Simulations supported the conclusions that phosphorylation of PAR2 by protein kinases initiates receptor desensitization and that recruited β-arrestin traps the phosphorylated state of the receptor, protecting it from phosphatases. Speculative thinking suggested a sequestration of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5 kinase (PIP5K) to the plasma membrane by β-arrestin to explain why knockdown of β-arrestin led to

  9. HvPap-1 C1A protease actively participates in barley proteolysis mediated by abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Arroyo, Blanca; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Gandullo, Jacinto; Gonzalez-Melendi, Pablo; Santamaria, M Estrella; Dominguez-Figueroa, Jose D; Hensel, Goetz; Martinez, Manuel; Kumlehn, Jochen; Diaz, Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Protein breakdown and mobilization from old or stressed tissues to growing and sink organs are some of the metabolic features associated with abiotic/biotic stresses, essential for nutrient recycling. The massive degradation of proteins implies numerous proteolytic events in which cysteine-proteases are the most abundant key players. Analysing the role of barley C1A proteases in response to abiotic stresses is crucial due to their impact on plant growth and grain yield and quality. In this study, dark and nitrogen starvation treatments were selected to induce stress in barley. Results show that C1A proteases participate in the proteolytic processes triggered in leaves by both abiotic treatments, which strongly induce the expression of the HvPap-1 gene encoding a cathepsin F-like protease. Differences in biochemical parameters and C1A gene expression were found when comparing transgenic barley plants overexpressing or silencing the HvPap-1 gene and wild-type dark-treated leaves. These findings associated with morphological changes evidence a lifespan-delayed phenotype of HvPap-1 silenced lines. All these data elucidate on the role of this protease family in response to abiotic stresses and the potential of their biotechnological manipulation to control the timing of plant growth. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Inhibition of Both Protease and Helicase Activities of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 by an Ethyl Acetate Extract of Marine Sponge Amphimedon sp

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Yuusuke; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Tani, Hidenori; Ikeda, Masanori; Kato, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Naoya; Maekawa, Shinya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; de Voogd, Nicole J.; Nakakoshi, Masamichi; Tsubuki, Masayoshi; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Noda, Naohiro; Yamashita, Atsuya; Tanaka, Junichi; Moriishi, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    Combination therapy with ribavirin, interferon, and viral protease inhibitors could be expected to elicit a high level of sustained virologic response in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, several severe side effects of this combination therapy have been encountered in clinical trials. In order to develop more effective and safer anti-HCV compounds, we employed the replicon systems derived from several strains of HCV to screen 84 extracts from 54 organisms that were gathered from the sea surrounding Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. The ethyl acetate-soluble extract that was prepared from marine sponge Amphimedon sp. showed the highest inhibitory effect on viral replication, with EC50 values of 1.5 and 24.9 µg/ml in sub-genomic replicon cell lines derived from genotypes 1b and 2a, respectively. But the extract had no effect on interferon-inducing signaling or cytotoxicity. Treatment with the extract inhibited virus production by 30% relative to the control in the JFH1-Huh7 cell culture system. The in vitro enzymological assays revealed that treatment with the extract suppressed both helicase and protease activities of NS3 with IC50 values of 18.9 and 10.9 µg/ml, respectively. Treatment with the extract of Amphimedon sp. inhibited RNA-binding ability but not ATPase activity. These results suggest that the novel compound(s) included in Amphimedon sp. can target the protease and helicase activities of HCV NS3. PMID:23144928

  11. Influenza and SARS-Coronavirus Activating Proteases TMPRSS2 and HAT Are Expressed at Multiple Sites in Human Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Gierer, Stefanie; Danisch, Simon; Perin, Paula; Lucas, Jared M.; Nelson, Peter S.; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Soilleux, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine proteases TMPRSS2 and HAT activate influenza viruses and the SARS-coronavirus (TMPRSS2) in cell culture and may play an important role in viral spread and pathogenesis in the infected host. However, it is at present largely unclear to what extent these proteases are expressed in viral target cells in human tissues. Here, we show that both HAT and TMPRSS2 are coexpressed with 2,6-linked sialic acids, the major receptor determinant of human influenza viruses, throughout the human respiratory tract. Similarly, coexpression of ACE2, the SARS-coronavirus receptor, and TMPRSS2 was frequently found in the upper and lower aerodigestive tract, with the exception of the vocal folds, epiglottis and trachea. Finally, activation of influenza virus was conserved between human, avian and porcine TMPRSS2, suggesting that this protease might activate influenza virus in reservoir-, intermediate- and human hosts. In sum, our results show that TMPRSS2 and HAT are expressed by important influenza and SARS-coronavirus target cells and could thus support viral spread in the human host. PMID:22558251

  12. Biofluid proteases profiling in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Fábio; Ferreira, Rita; Amado, Francisco; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of protease relevance in biologic systems beyond catabolism of proteins and peptides to amino acids has stimulated interest as to their role in the pathogenesis of several disorders including diabetes mellitus (DM). Evaluation of proteases and the assessment of their activity in biofluids are fundamental to elucidate these proteolytic systems in DM and its related complications. In contrast to traditional immunoassay or substrate based approaches that targeted specific proteases and their inhibitors, the field of degradomics has provided a comprehensive approach to study these enzymes. Although the degradome contains over 500 proteases, very few have been associated with DM and its micro- and macrovascular complications. In this paper, we review these proteases and their respective inhibitors with emphasis on DM. It is likely that future research will expand these initial studies and look to develop high throughput automated technologies to identify and characterize biofluid proteases of diagnostic and prognostic value in other pathologies. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolation and characterization of an aspartic protease from Salpichroa origanifolia fruits.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Gabriela F; Obregon, W David; Munoz, Fernando; Guevara, M Gabriela; Fernandez, Graciela; Rosso, Adriana M; Parisi, Monica G

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the purification of an aspartic protease (salpichroin) from ripe fruits of Salpichroa origanifolia (Solanaceae) starting with precipitation using organic solvents and anionexchange chromatography with 32.1% recovery and 13.4-fold purification. SDS-PAGE and zymograms of this enzyme showed a single band corresponding to an apparent molecular mass of approximately 32 kDa. The biochemical and kinetic characterization of the pure enzyme showed an acidic behavior with an optimal pH value around 3.0-4.5 with hemoglobin and 5.5-6.0 with casein. Salpichroin activity was inhibited by pepstatin but not by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, E-64, EDTA or 1,10-phenanthroline, thus suggesting an aspartic protease behavior. Salpichroin hydrolyzed natural substrates, such as casein and hemoglobin, with high specific activity. Kinetic studies conducted with the synthetic peptide H-Pro- Thr-Glu-Phe-p-(NO2)-Phe-Arg-Leu-OH showed lower affinity (Km 494 µM) than other representative aspartic proteases. By investigating the cleavage of oxidized insulin β-chain to establish the hydrolytic specificity of salpichroin, we found six cleavage sites on the substrate of peptide bonds similar to those of chymosin. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS of the tryptic ingel digest of salpichroin showed that the isolated protease shared homologous sequences with other plant proteases of the A1 aspartic protease family. This is the first report concerning the isolation and biochemical characterization of an aspartic protease isolated from Salpichroa origanifolia fruits.

  14. Encephalomyocarditis Virus 3C Protease Relieves TRAF Family Member-associated NF-κB Activator (TANK) Inhibitory Effect on TRAF6-mediated NF-κB Signaling through Cleavage of TANK*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Liu, Qinfang; Zhang, Lijie; Zhang, Quan; Hu, Liang; Li, Changyao; Wang, Shengnan; Li, Jiangnan; Zhang, Yuanfeng; Yu, Huibin; Wang, Yan; Zhong, Zhaohua; Xiong, Tao; Xia, Xueshan; Wang, Xiaojun; Yu, Li; Deng, Guohua; Cai, Xuehui; Cui, Shangjin; Weng, Changjiang

    2015-01-01

    TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK) is a negative regulator of canonical NF-κB signaling in the Toll-like receptor- and B-cell receptor-mediated signaling pathways. However, functions of TANK in viral infection-mediated NF-κB activation remain unclear. Here, we reported that TANK was cleaved by encephalomyocarditis virus 3C at the 197 and 291 glutamine residues, which depends on its cysteine protease activity. In addition, encephalomyocarditis virus 3C impaired the ability of TANK to inhibit TRAF6-mediated NF-κB signaling. Interestingly, we found that several viral proteases encoded by the foot and mouth disease virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and equine arteritis virus also cleaved TANK. Our results suggest that TANK is a novel target of some viral proteases, indicating that some positive RNA viruses have evolved to utilize their major proteases to regulate NF-κB activation. PMID:26363073

  15. Hyaluronidase, phospholipase A2 and protease inhibitory activity of plants used in traditional treatment of snakebite-induced tissue necrosis in Mali, DR Congo and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Molander, Marianne; Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Søren; Staerk, Dan; Rønsted, Nina; Diallo, Drissa; Chifundera, Kusamba Zacharie; van Staden, Johannes; Jäger, Anna K

    2014-11-18

    Snakebite envenomation, every year, causes estimated 5-10,000 mortalities and results in more than 5-15,000 amputations in sub-Saharan Africa alone. Antiserum is not easily accessible in these regions or doctors are simply not available, thus more than 80% of all patients seek traditional practitioners as first-choice. Therefore it is important to investigate whether the plants used in traditional medicine systems contain compounds against the necrosis-inducing enzymes of snake venom. Extracts from traditionally used plants from DR Congo, Mali and South Africa were tested in hyaluronidase, phospholipase A2 and protease enzyme bioassays using Bitis arietans and Naja nigricollis as enzyme source. A total of 226 extracts from 94 different plant species from the three countries, Mali, Democratic Republic of Congo and South Africa were tested in phospholipase A2, proteases and hyaluronidase enzyme assays. Forty plant species showed more than 90% inhibition in one or more assay. Fabaceae, Anacardiaceae and Malvaceae were the families with the highest number of active species, and the active compounds were distributed in different plant parts depending on plant species. Polyphenols were removed in the search for specific enzyme inhibitors against hyaluronidase, phospholipase A2 or proteases from extracts with IC50 values below 100µg/ml. Water extracts of Pupalia lappacea, Combretum molle, Strychnos innocua and Grewia mollis and ethanol extract of Lannea acida and Bauhinia thonningii still showed IC50 values below 100µg/ml in either the hyaluronidase or protease bioassay after removal of polyphenols. As four of the active plants are widely distributed in the areas where the snake species Bitis arietans and Naja nigricollis occur a potential inhibitor of the necrotic enzymes is accessible for many people in sub-Saharan Africa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease Npro.

    PubMed

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer; Ruggli, Nicolas; Choi, Kyung H

    2014-03-01

    Pestivirus N(pro) is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N(pro) blocks the host׳s interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N(pro׳)s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N(pro)-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N(pro) proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N(pro׳)s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N(pro) does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparation, characterization, and activity of a peptide-cellulosic aerogel protease sensor from cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA) provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties of both high porosity and specific surface area for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization, and activity of a peptide-nanocellulose aerogel (PA) made from unprocessed cot...

  18. Wound healing and protease inhibition activity of Bacoside-A, isolated from Bacopa monnieri wettest.

    PubMed

    Sharath, R; Harish, B G; Krishna, V; Sathyanarayana, B N; Swamy, H M Kumara

    2010-08-01

    Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wettest. (Scrophulariaceae) is a well-known medicinal herb. In the Indian system of medicine it is known as Brahmi (Sanskrit) and Indian water hyssop. Methanolic extract of Bacopa monnieri and its isolated constituent Bacoside-A were screened for wound healing activity. Bacoside-A was screened for wound healing activity by excision, incision and dead space wound on Swiss albino rats. Significant wound healing activity was observed in both extract and the Bacoside-A treated groups. The SDS-PAGE caseinolytic zymogram analysis of inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) enzyme from the excision wound by Bacoside-A, an isolated constituent, was done with the concentrations 100 and 200 micromg/ml. In Bacoside-A treated groups, epithelialization of the excision wound was faster with a high rate (18.30 +/- 0.01 days) of wound contraction. The tensile strength of the incision wound was increased (538.47 +/- 0.14 g) in the Bacoside-A treated group. In the dead space wound model, the weight of the granuloma was also increased (89.15 +/- 0.08 g). The histological examination of the granuloma tissue of the Bacoside-A treated group showed increased cross-linking of collagen fibers and absence of monocytes. The wound healing activity of Bacoside-A was more effective in various wound models compared to the standard skin ointment Nitrofurazone.

  19. A Semi-Synthetic Ion Channel Platform for Detection of Phosphatase and Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Macrae, Michael X.; Blake, Steven; Jiang, Xiayun; Capone, Ricardo; Estes, Daniel J.; Mayer, Michael; Yang, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Sensitive methods to probe the activity of enzymes are important for clinical assays and for elucidating the role of these proteins in complex biochemical networks. This paper describes a semi-synthetic ion channel platform for detecting the activity of two different classes of enzymes with high sensitivity. In the first case, this method uses single ion channel conductance measurements to follow the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of a phosphate group attached to the C-terminus of gramicidin A (gA, an ion channel-forming peptide) in the presence of alkaline phosphatase (AP). Enzymatic hydrolysis of this phosphate group removes negative charges from the entrance of the gA pore, resulting in a product with measurably reduced single ion channel conductance compared to the original gA-phosphate substrate. This technique employs a standard, commercial bilayer setup and takes advantage of the catalytic turnover of enzymes and the amplification characteristics of ion flux through individual gA pores to detect picomolar concentrations of active AP in solution. Furthermore, this technique makes it possible to study the kinetics of an enzyme and provides an estimate for the observed rate constant (kcat) and the Michaelis constant (KM) by following the conversion of the gA-phosphate substrate to product over time in the presence of different concentrations of AP. In the second case, modification of gA with a substrate for proteolytic cleavage by anthrax lethal factor (LF) afforded a sensitive method for detection of LF activity, illustrating the utility of ion channel-based sensing for detection of a potential biowarfare agent. This ion channel-based platform represents a powerful, novel approach to monitor the activity of femtomoles to picomoles of two different classes of enzymes in solution. Furthermore, this platform has the potential for realizing miniaturized, cost-effective bioanalytical assays that complement currently established assays. PMID:19860382

  20. In vitro inhibition of protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4 demonstrates that these receptors are not involved in an Acanthamoeba castellanii keratitis isolate-mediated disruption of the human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Naeem, Komal; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis is a rare but serious human disease leading almost always to death. The pathophysiology of amoebic encephalitis is better understood, while events leading to the constitution of brain infection are largely unknown. Traversal of the blood-brain barrier is a key step in amoebae invasion of the central nervous system and facilitated by amoebic extracellular proteases. By using specific inhibitors of protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4, here we studied the role of these host receptors in Acanthamoeba castellanii-mediated damage to human brain microvasculature endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. The primary HBMEC were incubated with A. castellanii-conditioned medium in the presence or absence of FR-171113 (selective inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1), FSLLRY-NH2 (inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 2), and tcY-NH2 (inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 4). The HBMEC monolayer disruptions were assessed by microscopy using Eosin staining, while host cell cytotoxicity was determined by measuring the release of cytoplasmic lactate dehydrogenase. Zymographic assays were performed to determine the effects of inhibitors of protease-activated receptors on the extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. A. castellanii-conditioned medium produced severe HBMEC monolayer disruptions within 60 min. The selective inhibitors of protease-activated receptors tested did not affect HBMEC monolayer disruptions. On the contrary, pre-treatment of A. castellanii-conditioned medium with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor, or heating for 10 min at 95°C abolished HBMEC monolayer disruptions. Additionally, inhibitors of protease-activated receptors tested, failed to block A. castellanii-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity and did not affect extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. Protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4 do not appear to play a role in A. castellanii

  1. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Stable Proteases in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Sokolenko, A.; Altschmied, L.; Herrmann, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    Chloroplast subfractions were monitored for sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable proteases. Nine distinct activities in the molecular mass range from 14 to 66 kD have been detected. Five of the proteases associated with thylakoid membranes belong to the serine and cysteine types of proteases. These activities could be preserved and purified by a two-step electrophoresis procedure. PMID:12223846

  2. Programmed cell death of the nucellus during Sechium edule Sw. seed development is associated with activation of caspase-like proteases.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Lara; Casani, Simone; Ceccarelli, Nello; Galleschi, Luciano; Picciarelli, Piero; Lorenzi, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The nucellus is a maternal tissue that embeds and feeds the developing embryo and secondary endosperm. During seed development, the cells of the nucellus suffer a degenerative process soon after fertilization as the cellular endosperm expands and accumulates reserves. Nucellar cell degeneration has been considered to be a form of developmentally programmed cell death (PCD). It was investigated whether or not this degenerative process is characterized by apoptotic hallmarks. Evidence showed that cell death is mostly localized in the border region of the tissue adjacent to the expanding endosperm. Cell death is accompanied by profound changes in the morphology of the nuclei and by a huge degradation of nuclear DNA. Moreover, an increase of activity of different classes of proteinases is reported, and the induction of caspase-like proteases sensitive to specific inhibitors was detected. Nucellar caspase-like proteases are characterized by an acid pH optimum suggesting a possible localization in the vacuole.

  3. Expression of protease-activated-receptor 2 (PAR-2) in human esophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Inci, Kamuran; Edebo, Anders; Olbe, Lars; Casselbrant, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The role of duodenal reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) containing bile salts and pancreatic enzymes (with special attention to trypsin) is still under discussion. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family and PAR-2 is a unique member of this family because it is activated by trypsin. The aim of the present study was to examine the presence and the position of the PAR-2 receptor in human esophageal mucosa in different subgroups of GERD. Distal biopsies taken from healthy controls, patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), patients with specialized intestinal metaplasia (SIM) and adenocarcinoma were analyzed for the PAR-2 receptor with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Gene transcripts for the PAR-2 receptor were found in all groups, with increased levels in SIM patients compared to controls. However, this visual pattern was not seen for the protein expression of the PAR-2 receptor showing no apparent quantitative differences between the groups. Immunohistochemistry revealed distinct staining for the PAR-2 receptor in the luminal part of the esophageal epithelium. The localization of the PAR-2 receptor indicates that the receptor can be cleaved and activated by trypsin in duodenogastric esophageal refluxate. The data thus suggest that the trypsin-PAR-2 pathway may be involved in the pathogenesis of GERD.

  4. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Tchetina, Elena V; Markova, Galina A; Poole, A Robin; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John; Makarov, Sergey A; Kuzin, Aleksandr N

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1-50  μ M). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10-50  μ M DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10  μ M DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1 β , and TNF α and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1 α , and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  5. pH regulates pore formation of a protease activated Vip3Aa from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Kunthic, Thittaya; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Kawano, Ryuji; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Yao, Min; Boonserm, Panadda

    2017-11-01

    Vip3Aa insecticidal protein is produced from Bacillus thuringiensis and exerts a broad spectrum of toxicity against lepidopteran insect species. Although Vip3Aa has been effectively used as part of integrated pest management strategies, the mechanism of the toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of pH in a range from 5.0 to 10.0 on the pore-forming activity of the trypsin activated Vip3Aa (actVip3Aa) by in vitro pore-forming assays. Based on calcein release assay, actVip3Aa could permeabilize the artificial neutral liposomes under all the pH tested, except pH10.0. The maximum membrane permeability of actVip3Aa was detected at pH8.0 and the permeability decreased and abolished when exposing to acidic and alkaline conditions, respectively. The planar lipid bilayer experiment revealed that actVip3Aa formed ion channels at pH5.0-8.0 but no current signals were detected at pH10.0, consistent with the observation from calcein release assay. The toxin formed ion channels with a diameter of 1.4nm at pH8.0 and pore size was gradually decreased when reducing the pH. This study provided a view of the molecular mechanism of Vip3Aa by which the pore-forming activity is regulated by pH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. SCH 503034, a Mechanism-Based Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protease, Suppresses Polyprotein Maturation and Enhances the Antiviral Activity of Alpha Interferon in Replicon Cells

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, B. A.; Liu, R.; Lahser, F.; Agrawal, S.; Belanger, B.; Butkiewicz, N.; Chase, R.; Gheyas, F.; Hart, A.; Hesk, D.; Ingravallo, P.; Jiang, C.; Kong, R.; Lu, J.; Pichardo, J.; Prongay, A.; Skelton, A.; Tong, X.; Venkatraman, S.; Xia, E.; Girijavallabhan, V.; Njoroge, F. G.

    2006-01-01

    Cleavage of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyprotein by the viral NS3 protease releases functional viral proteins essential for viral replication. Recent studies by Foy and coworkers strongly suggest that NS3-mediated cleavage of host factors may abrogate cellular response to alpha interferon (IFN-α) (E. Foy, K. Li, R. Sumpter, Jr., Y.-M. Loo, C. L. Johnson, C. Wang, P. M. Fish, M. Yoneyama, T. Fujita, S. M. Lemon, and M. Gale, Jr., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102:2986-2991, 2005, and E. Foy, K. Li, C. Wang, R. Sumpter, Jr., M. Ikeda, S. M. Lemon, and M. Gale, Jr., Science 300:1145-1148, 2003). Blockage of NS3 protease activity therefore is expected to inhibit HCV replication by both direct suppression of viral protein production as well as by restoring host responsiveness to IFN. Using structure-assisted design, a ketoamide inhibitor, SCH 503034, was generated which demonstrated potent (overall inhibition constant, 14 nM) time-dependent inhibition of the NS3 protease in cell-free enzyme assays as well as robust in vitro activity in the HCV replicon system, as monitored by immunofluorescence and real-time PCR analysis. Continuous exposure of replicon-bearing cell lines to six times the 90% effective concentration of SCH 503034 for 15 days resulted in a greater than 4-log reduction in replicon RNA. The combination of SCH 503034 with IFN was more effective in suppressing replicon synthesis than either compound alone, supporting the suggestion of Foy and coworkers that combinations of IFN with protease inhibitors would lead to enhanced therapeutic efficacy. PMID:16495264

  7. SCH 503034, a mechanism-based inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS3 protease, suppresses polyprotein maturation and enhances the antiviral activity of alpha interferon in replicon cells.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, B A; Liu, R; Lahser, F; Agrawal, S; Belanger, B; Butkiewicz, N; Chase, R; Gheyas, F; Hart, A; Hesk, D; Ingravallo, P; Jiang, C; Kong, R; Lu, J; Pichardo, J; Prongay, A; Skelton, A; Tong, X; Venkatraman, S; Xia, E; Girijavallabhan, V; Njoroge, F G

    2006-03-01

    Cleavage of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyprotein by the viral NS3 protease releases functional viral proteins essential for viral replication. Recent studies by Foy and coworkers strongly suggest that NS3-mediated cleavage of host factors may abrogate cellular response to alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) (E. Foy, K. Li, R. Sumpter, Jr., Y.-M. Loo, C. L. Johnson, C. Wang, P. M. Fish, M. Yoneyama, T. Fujita, S. M. Lemon, and M. Gale, Jr., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102:2986-2991, 2005, and E. Foy, K. Li, C. Wang, R. Sumpter, Jr., M. Ikeda, S. M. Lemon, and M. Gale, Jr., Science 300:1145-1148, 2003). Blockage of NS3 protease activity therefore is expected to inhibit HCV replication by both direct suppression of viral protein production as well as by restoring host responsiveness to IFN. Using structure-assisted design, a ketoamide inhibitor, SCH 503034, was generated which demonstrated potent (overall inhibition constant, 14 nM) time-dependent inhibition of the NS3 protease in cell-free enzyme assays as well as robust in vitro activity in the HCV replicon system, as monitored by immunofluorescence and real-time PCR analysis. Continuous exposure of replicon-bearing cell lines to six times the 90% effective concentration of SCH 503034 for 15 days resulted in a greater than 4-log reduction in replicon RNA. The combination of SCH 503034 with IFN was more effective in suppressing replicon synthesis than either compound alone, supporting the suggestion of Foy and coworkers that combinations of IFN with protease inhibitors would lead to enhanced therapeutic efficacy.

  8. 'Pergularain e I'--a plant cysteine protease with thrombin-like activity from Pergularia extensa latex.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, Holenarasipura V; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Frey, Brigitte M; Frey, Felix J; Vishwanath, Bannikuppe S

    2010-03-01

    Pergularain e I, a cysteine protease with thrombin-like activity, was purified by ion exchange chromatography from the latex of Pergularia extensa. Its homogeneity was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), native PAGE and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The molecular mass of pergularain e I by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) was found to be 23.356 kDa and the N-terminal sequence is L-P-H-D-V-E. Pergularain e I is a glycoprotein containing approximately 20% of carbohydrate. Pergularain e I constituted 6.7% of the total protein with a specific activity of 9.5 units/mg/min with a 2.11-fold increased purity. Proteolytic activity of the pergularain e I was completely inhibited by iodoacetic acid (IAA). Pergularain e I exhibited procoagulant activity with citrated plasma and fibrinogen similar to thrombin. Pergularain e I increases the absorbance of fibrinogen solution in concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner. At 10 microg concentration, an absorbance of 0.48 was reached within 10 min of incubation time. Similar absorbance was observed when 0.2 NIH units of thrombin were used. Thrombin-like activity of pergularain e I is because of the selective hydrolysis of A alpha and B beta chains of fibrinogen and gamma-chain was observed to be insusceptible to hydrolysis. Molecular masses of the two peptide fragments released from fibrinogen due to the hydrolysis by pergularain e I at 5-min incubation time were found to be 1537.21 and 1553.29 and were in close agreement with the molecular masses of 16 amino acid sequence of fibrinopeptide A and 14 amino acid sequence of fibrinopeptide B, respectively. Prolonged fibrinogen-pergularain e I incubation releases additional peptides and their sequence comparison of molecular masses of the released peptides suggested that pergularain e I hydrolyzes specifically after arginine residues. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd

  9. Optimization of Parameters that Affect the Activity of the Alkaline Protease from Halotolerant Bacterium, Bacillus acquimaris VITP4, by the Application of Response Surface Methodology and Evaluation of the Storage Stability of the Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Chittoor, Jabeena Thaz; Balaji, Lavanya; Jayaraman, Gurunathan

    2016-03-01

    It was previously shown that the activity of a serine protease from a moderately halotolerant Bacillus aquimaris VITP4 strain is active in a wide range of pH and temperatures and could be modulated by the presence of the divalent metal ions. In the present study, a quantitative analysis was done in order to explore the parameters that are contributing to the protease activity. Changes in the secondary structure of the enzyme was determined by circular dichroism analysis. The conditions for the optimal activity was investigated by Response Surface Methodology. Stability of the enzyme was determined by thermal inactivation experiments. The initial one-factor-at-a-time experiments have indicated that the activity of the enzyme could be enhanced not only by the presence of low concentrations of NaCl but also by divalent metal ions, such as Ca 2+ , Mn 2+ and Cu 2+ . A clear dependence of the activity to the secondary structure of the enzyme could be established using circular dichroism spectroscopy. In the next level of optimization, four factors; viz. pH, temperature, concentration of Ca2+, and Mn 2+ were used to optimize the conditions required for the maximal activity of the enzyme by Response Surface Methodology, and the data could be explained using quadratic model. Under optimal condition of 43°C, pH 8.0, 8.2 mM Ca 2+ , and 4.3 mM Mn 2+ a 1.5 times enhancement in the enzyme activity could be achieved. The storage stability of the enzyme under these selected conditions has indicated a non-linear relation between the conditions for the enzymatic activity as well as stability. However, the condition for the maximal stability (267±18 min) has corresponded to that of the optimal conditions for the maximal activity. This study, for the first time, has explored the possibility of using statistical methods for identifying the optimal conditions for alkaline protease activity isolated from the halotolerant Bacillus aquimaris VITP4.

  10. Static magnetic field effects on proteases with fibrinolytic activity produced by Mucor subtilissimus.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Wendell; Nascimento, Thiago; Brandão-Costa, Romero; Fernandes, Thiago; Porto, Ana

    2017-02-01

    The influence of a static magnetic field (SMF) on crude enzyme extracts with proteolytic activity is described and discussed. Proteolytic enzymes, which hydrolyze peptide bonds, and fibrinolytic enzymes, which dissolve fibrin clots, have industrial relevance, and applicability dependent on improvements of productivity and activity. We investigated whether a moderate SMF affects proteolysis in different in vitro tests: general proteolysis of azocasein substrate, and static and dynamic fibrinolytic processes (to compare fibrin gel configuration under exposure). Crude enzyme extracts, obtained from solid state fermentation of Mucor subtilissimus UCP (Universidade Católica de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil) 1262, were used to carry out assays under slightly heterogeneous fields: a varied vertical SMF (for tests in Eppendorf tubes, from 0.100 to 0.170 T) and a varied horizontal SMF (for tests in Petri dishes, from 0.01 to 0.122 T), generated by two permanent magnets (NdFeB alloy). Results showed significant differences (P < 0.05) in static fibrinolysis assays after 24 h of exposure. The mean diameter of halos of fibrin degradation in the treated group increased by 21% compared to the control group; and the pixel number count of fibrin consumption (in a computational analysis of the area of each halo) enhanced by 30% with exposure. However, in dynamic fibrinolysis assays, no effects of SMF were observed. These results suggest a response of fibrin monomers to the SMF as a possible cause of the observed effects. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:109-120, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Preclinical characterization of the antiviral activity of SCH 900518 (narlaprevir), a novel mechanism-based inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS3 protease.

    PubMed

    Tong, X; Arasappan, A; Bennett, F; Chase, R; Feld, B; Guo, Z; Hart, A; Madison, V; Malcolm, B; Pichardo, J; Prongay, A; Ralston, R; Skelton, A; Xia, E; Zhang, R; Njoroge, F G

    2010-06-01

    Small-molecule hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitors such as boceprevir (SCH 503034) have been shown to have antiviral activity when they are used as monotherapy and in combination with pegylated alpha interferon and ribavirin in clinical trials. Improvements in inhibitor potency and pharmacokinetic properties offer opportunities to increase drug exposure and to further increase the sustained virological response. Exploration of the structure-activity relationships of ketoamide inhibitors related to boceprevir has led to the discovery of SCH 900518, a novel ketoamide protease inhibitor which forms a reversible covalent bond with the active-site serine. It has an overall inhibition constant (K*(i)) of 7 nM and a dissociation half-life of 1 to 2 h. SCH 900518 inhibited replicon RNA at a 90% effective concentration (EC(90)) of 40 nM. In biochemical assays, SCH 900518 was active against proteases of genotypes 1 to 3. A 2-week treatment with 5x EC(90) of the inhibitor reduced the replicon RNA level by 3 log units. Selection of replicon cells with SCH 900518 resulted in the outgrowth of several resistant mutants (with the T54A/S and A156S/T/V mutations). Cross-resistance studies demonstrated that the majority of mutations for resistance to boceprevir and telaprevir caused similar fold losses of activity against all three inhibitors; however, SCH 900518 retained more activity against these mutants due to its higher intrinsic potency. Combination treatment with alpha interferon enhanced the inhibition of replicon RNA and suppressed the emergence of resistant replicon colonies, supporting the use of SCH 900518-pegylated alpha interferon combination therapy in the clinic. In summary, the results of the preclinical characterization of the antiviral activity of SCH 900518 support its evaluation in clinical studies.

  12. In Vitro Selection and Characterization of Hepatitis C Virus Serine Protease Variants Resistant to an Active-Site Peptide Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Trozzi, Caterina; Bartholomew, Linda; Ceccacci, Alessandra; Biasiol, Gabriella; Pacini, Laura; Altamura, Sergio; Narjes, Frank; Muraglia, Ester; Paonessa, Giacomo; Koch, Uwe; De Francesco, Raffaele; Steinkuhler, Christian; Migliaccio, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) serine protease is necessary for viral replication and represents a valid target for developing new therapies for HCV infection. Potent and selective inhibitors of this enzyme have been identified and shown to inhibit HCV replication in tissue culture. The optimization of these inhibitors for clinical development would greatly benefit from in vitro systems for the identification and the study of resistant variants. We report the use HCV subgenomic replicons to isolate and characterize mutants resistant to a protease inhibitor. Taking advantage of the replicons' ability to transduce resistance to neomycin, we selected replicons with decreased sensitivity to the inhibitor by culturing the host cells in the presence of the inhibitor and neomycin. The selected replicons replicated to the same extent as those in parental cells. Sequence analysis followed by transfection of replicons containing isolated mutations revealed that resistance was mediated by amino acid substitutions in the protease. These results were confirmed by in vitro experiments with mutant enzymes and by modeling the inhibitor in the three-dimensional structure of the protease. PMID:12610142

  13. Extended substrate specificity and first potent irreversible inhibitor/activity-based probe design for Zika virus NS2B-NS3 protease.

    PubMed

    Rut, Wioletta; Zhang, Linlin; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Poreba, Marcin; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Drąg, Marcin

    2017-03-01

    Zika virus is spread by Aedes mosquitoes and is linked to acute neurological disorders, especially to microcephaly in newborn children and Guillan-Barré Syndrome. The NS2B-NS3 protease of this virus is responsible for polyprotein processing and therefore considered an attractive drug target. In this study, we have used the Hybrid Combinatorial Substrate Library (HyCoSuL) approach to determine the substrate specificity of ZIKV NS2B-NS3 protease in the P4-P1 positions using natural and a large spectrum of unnatural amino acids. Obtained data demonstrate a high level of specificity of the S3-S1 subsites, especially for basic amino acids. However, the S4 site exhibits a very broad preference toward natural and unnatural amino acids with selected D-amino acids being favored over L enantiomers. This information was used for the design of a very potent phosphonate inhibitor/activity-based probe of ZIKV NS2B-NS3 protease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Soluble expression of an amebic cysteine protease in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli SHuffle Express cells and purification of active enzyme.

    PubMed

    Jalomo-Khayrova, Ekaterina; Mares, Rosa E; Muñoz, Patricia L A; Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Rivero, Ignacio A; Ramos, Marco A

    2018-04-03

    Recombinant production of amebic cysteine proteases using Escherichia coli cells as the bacterial system has become a challenging effort, with protein insolubility being the most common issue. Since many of these enzymes need a native conformation stabilized by disulfide bonds, an elaborate process of oxidative folding is usually demanded to get a functional protein. The cytoplasm of E. coli SHuffle Express cells owns an enhanced ability to properly fold proteins with disulfide bonds. Because of this cellular feature, it was possible to assume that this strain represents a reliable expression system and worthwhile been considered as an efficient bacterial host for the recombinant production of amebic cysteine proteases. Using E. coli SHuffle Express cells as the bacterial system, we efficiently produce soluble recombinant EhCP1protein. Enzymatic and inhibition analyses revealed that it exhibits proper catalytic abilities, proceeds effectively over the substrate (following an apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetics), and displays a typical inhibition profile. We report the first feasibility study of the recombinant production of amebic cysteine proteases using E. coli SHuffle Express as the bacterial host. We present a simple protocol for the recombinant expression and purification of fully soluble and active EhCP1 enzyme. We confirm the suitability of recombinant EhCP1 as a therapeutic target. We propose an approachable bacterial system for the recombinant production of amebic proteins, particularly for those with a need for proper oxidative folding.

  15. Molecular crime and cellular punishment: active detoxification of misfolded and aggregated proteins in the cell by the chaperone and protease networks.