Science.gov

Sample records for a1 protease produced

  1. Similar proportions of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease-producing streptococci in initial dental plaque of selectively IgA-deficient and normal individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, J; Friman, V; Kilian, M

    1993-01-01

    By comparing the initial colonization of cleaned teeth in immunoglobulin A (IgA)-deficient, IgM-compensating individuals with that in normal individuals, no significant difference in the proportion of IgA1 protease-producing streptococci was found. Thus, as one of several bacterial means of immune evasion, the ability to cleave secretory IgA1 does not appear essential to the successful adherence of oral streptococci. PMID:8359924

  2. Genetic and biochemical analysis of gonococcal IgA1 protease: cloning in Escherichia coli and construction of mutants of gonococci that fail to produce the activity.

    PubMed Central

    Koomey, J M; Gill, R E; Falkow, S

    1982-01-01

    The biological significance of bacterial extracellular proteases that specifically cleave human IgA1 is unknown. We have prepared a gene bank of gonococcal chromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli K-12 using a cosmid cloning system. Among these clones, we have identified and characterized an E. coli strain that elaborates an extracellular endopeptidase that is indistinguishable from gonococcal IgA1 protease in its substrate specificity and action on human IgA1. Analysis of recombinant plasmids and examination of plasmid-specific peptides in minicells have shown that the IgA1 protease activity in E. coli is associated with expression of a Mr 140,000 peptide. We have isolated IgA1 protease-deficient mutants of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by reintroduction of physically defined deletions of the cloned gene into the gonococcal chromosome by transformation. Images PMID:6818556

  3. Screening and characterization of protease producing actinomycetes from marine saltern.

    PubMed

    Suthindhiran, Krish; Jayasri, Mangalam Achuthananda; Dipali, Dipa; Prasar, Apurva

    2014-10-01

    In the course of systematic screening program for bioactive actinomycetes, an alkaline protease producing halophilic strain Actinopolyspora sp. VITSDK2 was isolated from marine saltern, Southern India. The strain was identified as Actinopolyspora based on its phenotypic and phylogenetic characters. The protease was partially purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and subsequently by DEAE cellulose column chromatography. The enzyme was further purified using HPLC and the molecular weight was found to be 22 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The purified protease exhibited pH stability in a wide range of 4-12 with optimum at 10.0. The enzyme was found to be stable between 25 and 80 °C and displayed a maximum activity at 60 °C. The enzyme activity was increased marginally in presence of Mn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) and decreased in presence of Cu(2+) . PMSF and DFP completely inhibited the activity suggesting it belongs to serine protease. Further, the proteolytic activity was abolished in presence of N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone suggesting this might be chymotrypsin-like serine protease. The protease was 96% active when kept for 10 days at room temperature. The results indicate that the enzyme belong to chymotrypsin-like serine protease exhibiting both pH and thermostability, which can be used for various applications in industries. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. IgA1 proteases of Haemophilus influenzae: cloning and characterization in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Bricker, J; Mulks, M H; Plaut, A G; Moxon, E R; Wright, A

    1983-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is one of several bacterial pathogens known to release IgA1 proteases into the extracellular environment. Each H. influenzae isolate produces one of at least three distinct types of these enzymes that differ in the specific peptide bond they cleave in the hinge region of human IgA1. We have isolated the gene specifying type 1 IgA1 protease from a total genomic library of H. influenzae, subcloned it into plasmid vectors, and introduced these vectors into Escherichia coli K-12. The enzyme synthesized by E. coli was active and had the same specificity as that of the H. influenzae donor. Unlike that of the donor, E. coli protease activity accumulated in the periplasm rather than being transported extracellularly. The position of the protease gene in H. influenzae DNA and its direction of transcription was approximated by deletion mapping. Tn5 insertions, and examination of the polypeptides synthesized by minicells. A 1-kilobase probe excised from the IgA1 protease gene hybridized with DNA restriction fragments of all H. influenzae serogroups but not with DNA of a nonpathogenic H. parainfluenzae species known to be IgA1 protease negative. Images PMID:6341996

  5. Nematicidal Bacteria Associated to Pinewood Nematode Produce Extracellular Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Romeu; Verissimo, Paula; Santos, Susana S.; Fonseca, Luís; Abrantes, Isabel M. O.; Morais, Paula V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria associated with the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, a pathogen of trees and the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD) may play a role in the disease. In order to evaluate their role (positive or negative to the tree), strains isolated from the track of nematodes from infected Pinus pinaster trees were screened, in vitro, for their nematicidal potential. The bacterial products, from strains more active in killing nematodes, were screened in order to identify and characterize the nematicidal agent. Forty-seven strains were tested and, of these, 21 strains showed capacity to produce extracellular products with nematicidal activity. All Burkholderia strains were non-toxic. In contrast, all Serratia strains except one exhibited high toxicity. Nematodes incubated with Serratia strains showed, by SEM observation, deposits of bacteria on the nematode cuticle. The most nematicidal strain, Serratia sp. A88copa13, produced proteases in the supernatant. The use of selective inhibitors revealed that a serine protease with 70 kDa was majorly responsible for the toxicity of the supernatant. This extracellular serine protease is different phylogenetically, in size and biochemically from previously described proteases. Nematicidal assays revealed differences in nematicidal activity of the proteases to different species of Bursaphelenchus, suggesting its usefulness in a primary screen of the nematodes. This study offers the basis for further investigation of PWD and brings new insights on the role bacteria play in the defense of pine trees against B. xylophilus. Understanding all the factors involved is important in order to develop strategies to control B. xylophilus dispersion. PMID:24244546

  6. Diversity of both the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and bacterial extracellular proteases in the coastal sediments of King George Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Wang, Guang-Long; Li, Dan; Zhao, Dian-Li; Qin, Qi-Long; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Protease-producing bacteria play a vital role in degrading sedimentary organic nitrogen. However, the diversity of these bacteria and their extracellular proteases in most regions remain unknown. In this paper, the diversity of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and of bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of Maxwell Bay, King George Island, Antarctica was investigated. The cultivable protease-producing bacteria reached 10(5) cells/g in all 8 sediment samples. The cultivated protease-producing bacteria were mainly affiliated with the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria, and the predominant genera were Bacillus (22.9%), Flavobacterium (21.0%) and Lacinutrix (16.2%). Among these strains, Pseudoalteromonas and Flavobacteria showed relatively high protease production. Inhibitor analysis showed that nearly all the extracellular proteases from the bacteria were serine proteases or metalloproteases. These results begin to address the diversity of protease-producing bacteria and bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of the Antarctic Sea.

  7. Proteases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A J

    2001-05-01

    The processes of growth and remodeling of cells and tissues in multicellular organisms require the breakdown of old protein molecules, in concert with the synthesis of new ones. For example, many newly-synthesized molecules require proteolytic processing to convert them to biologically active forms. Proteolysis can terminate the activity of a protein--e.g., capsases mediate apoptosis, which is a vital step in the life cycle of the cell. Proteolysis contributes to defense systems too, as the recognition of peptide fragments of foreign proteins triggers the immune response. Proteases are the class of enzymes involved in these important reactions. This unit discusses the general categories of proteases, and sets the stage for addition of overview units on cysteine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases, as well as protocol units featuring techniques for analyzing mammalian and yeast proteasomes and protease inhibitors, among other topics.

  8. Purification and characterization of an immunoglobulin A1 protease from Bacteroides melaninogenicus.

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, S B; Kilian, M

    1984-01-01

    Attention has recently been focused on bacterial proteases with the capacity to cleave immunoglobulin A (IgA proteases) as possible pathogenic factors in bacterial meningitis, gonorrhoea, and destructive periodontal disease. Here, we describe a method for the rapid purification of a specific IgA1 protease from Bacteroides melaninogenicus. The IgA1 protease was purified 6,172-fold with a yield of 9% by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-ion exchange chromatography, and separation on a preparative TSK-G 3000SWG high-pressure gel permeation chromatography column. The enzyme was specific for human IgA1 and cleaved a prolyl-seryl peptide bond in the hinge region of the alpha 1 chain between residues 223 and 224. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 62,000, the isoelectric point was 5.0, and the Km was 3.4 X 10(-6). The enzyme was active over a broad pH range and had maximal activity at pH 5.0. B. melaninogenicus IgA1 protease was classified as a thiol protease on the basis of its inhibition by traditional protease inhibitors and the fact that it was active only under reducing conditions. Images PMID:6147309

  9. Diversity of both the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and their extracellular proteases in the sediments of the South China sea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhao, Hui-Lin; Dang, Hong-Yue; Luan, Xi-Wu; Zhang, Xi-Ying; He, Hai-Lun; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2009-10-01

    Protease-producing bacteria are known to play an important role in degrading sedimentary particular organic nitrogen, and yet, their diversity and extracellular proteases remain largely unknown. In this paper, the diversity of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and their extracellular proteases in the sediments of the South China Sea was investigated. The richness of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria reached 10(6) cells/g in all sediment samples. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the predominant cultivated protease-producing bacteria are Gammaproteobacteria affiliated with the genera Pseudoalteromonas, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Idiomarina, Halomonas, Vibrio, Shewanella, Pseudomonas, and Rheinheimera, with Alteromonas (34.6%) and Pseudoalteromonas (28.2%) as the predominant groups. Inhibitor analysis showed that nearly all the extracellular proteases from the bacteria are serine proteases or metalloproteases. Moreover, these proteases have different hydrolytic ability to different proteins, reflecting they may belong to different kinds of serine proteases or metalloproteases. To our knowledge, this study represents the first report of the diversity of bacterial proteases in deep-sea sediments.

  10. Diversity of Cultivable Protease-Producing Bacteria in Laizhou Bay Sediments, Bohai Sea, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wu, Chaoya; Zhou, Mingyang; Wang, En Tao; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Liu, Wei; Ning, Jicai; Xie, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    Protease-producing bacteria are widespread in ocean sediments and play important roles in degrading sedimentary nitrogenous organic materials. However, the diversity of the bacteria and the proteases involved in such processes remain largely unknown especially for communities in enclosed sea bays. Here, we investigated the diversity of the extracellular protease-producing bacteria and their protease types in Laizhou Bay. A total of 121 bacterial isolates were obtained from sediment samples in 7 sites and their protease types were characterized. The abundance of cultivable protease-producing bacteria was about 104 CFU g−1 of sediment. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences suggest that the isolates belonged to 17 genera from 4 phyla including Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and mainly dominated by the genera Pseudoalteromonas (40.5%), Bacillus (36.3%), and Photobacterium (5.8%). The diversity and community structure varied among different sampling sites but no significant correlation was observed with soil sediment's characteristics. Enzyme activity and inhibition tests further revealed that all isolates secreted proteases that were inhibited by serine and/or metalloprotease inhibitors, and a smaller proportion was inhibited by inhibitors of cysteine and/or aspartic proteases. Furthermore, all isolates effectively degraded casein and/or gelatin with only a few that could hydrolyze elastin, suggesting that the bacteria were producing different kinds of serine proteases or metalloproteases. This study provided novel insights on the community structure of cultivable protease-producing bacteria near the Yellow River estuary of an enclosed sea bay. PMID:28360893

  11. Proteolysis of bacterial membrane proteins by Neisseria gonorrhoeae type 2 immunoglobulin A1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Shoberg, R J; Mulks, M H

    1991-01-01

    The immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases of Neisseria gonorrhoeae have been defined as having human IgA1 as their single permissive substrate. However, in recent years there have been reports of other proteins which are susceptible to the proteolytic activity of these enzymes. To examine the possibility that gonococcal membrane proteins are potential substrates for these enzymes, isolated outer and cytoplasmic membranes of N. gonorrhoeae were treated in vitro with exogenous pure IgA1 protease. Analysis of silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of outer membranes indicated that there were two outer membrane proteins of 78 and 68 kDa which were cleaved by IgA1 protease in vitro in GCM 740 (a wild-type strain) and in two isogenic IgA1 protease-negative variants. Similar results were observed with a second gonococcal strain, F62, and its isogenic IgA1 protease-negative derivative. When GCM 740 cytoplasmic membranes were treated with protease, three minor proteins of 24.5, 23.5, and 21.5 kDa were cleaved. In addition, when outer membranes of Escherichia coli DH1 were treated with IgA1 protease, several proteins were hydrolyzed. While the identities of all of these proteolyzed proteins are unknown, the data presented indicate that there are several proteins found in the isolated membranes of gram-negative bacteria which are permissive in vitro substrates for gonococcal IgA1 protease. Images PMID:1713195

  12. Extracellular trypsin-like proteases produced by Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Maki; Isomura, Shigeki; Yokoyama, Eiji; Ujita, Minoru; Hara, Akira

    2005-12-01

    A trypsin-like protease, P-1-1, was purified from the culture supernatant of the fungus Cordyceps militaris by (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation, chromatography on DEAE Bio-Gel Agarose, TSKgel CM-5PW, and gel-filtration with HiLoad 26/60 Superdex 75 pg, and its properties were examined. Purified P-1-1 showed a single band by SDS-PAGE and was estimated to have a molecular mass of 23,405 by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The optimum pH of the enzyme was between 8.5 and 12.0. It was inhibited strongly by leupeptin and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), and definitely did by N(alpha)-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone hydrochloride (TLCK), phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and chymostatin. The carbonyl group sides of Arg and Lys were confirmed as the sites of cleavage by the enzyme toward cecropin B. These results indicate that P-1-1 is a trypsin-type serine protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of P-1-1 showed a high homology with those of trypsins or chymotrypsin derived from Diptera insects.

  13. Diversity of protease-producing marine bacteria from sub-antarctic environments.

    PubMed

    Cristóbal, Héctor Antonio; López, Maria Alejandra; Kothe, Erika; Abate, Carlos Mauricio

    2011-12-01

    From seawater and the intestines of benthonic organisms collected from the Beagle Channel, Argentina, 230 marine bacteria were isolated. Cultivable bacteria were characterized and classified as psychrotolerant, whereas few isolates were psychrophiles. These isolates were capable of producing proteases at 4 and 15 °C under neutral (pH 7.0), alkaline (pH 10.0) and acidic (pH 4.5) conditions on different media, revealing 62, 33 and 22% producers at cold and 84, 47 and 33% producers at low temperatures, respectively. More protease-producing strains (67%) were detected when isolated from benthic invertebrates as compared to seawater (33%), with protease production under neutral conditions resulting in milk protein hydrolysis halos between 27 and 30 ± 2 mm in diameter. Using sterile 0.22 μm membrane filters, 29 isolates exhibiting extracellular protease activity were detected. These were grouped into six operational taxonomic units by restriction analysis and identified based on 16S rDNA as γ-proteobacteria of the genera Pseudoalteromonas, Pseudomonas, Shewanella, Alteromonas, Aeromonas, and Serratia. Plasmids were found to be harbored by eight strains, mainly within the isolates from benthonic organisms.

  14. Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel alkaline protease produced by Penicillium nalgiovense.

    PubMed

    Papagianni, M; Sergelidis, D

    2014-04-01

    Penicillium nalgiovense PNA9 produces an extracellular protease during fermentation with characteristics of growth-associated product. Enzyme purification involved ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, and ultrafiltration, resulting in 12.1-fold increase of specific activity (19.5 U/mg). The protein was isolated through a series of BN-PAGE and native PAGE runs. ESI-MS analysis confirmed the molecular mass of 45.2 kDa. N-Terminal sequencing (MGFLKLLKGSLATLAVVNAGKLLTANDGDE) revealed 93 % similarity to a Penicillium chrysogenum protease, identified as major allergen. The protease exhibits simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics and K m (1.152 mg/ml), V max (0.827 mg/ml/min), and k cat (3.2 × 10(2)) (1/s) values against azocasein show that it possesses high substrate affinity and catalytic efficiency. The protease is active within 10-45 °C, pH 4.0-10.0, and 0-3 M NaCl, while maximum activity was observed at 35 °C, pH 8.0, and 0.25 M NaCl. It is active against the muscle proteins actin and myosin and inactive against myoglobin. It is highly stable in the presence of non-ionic surfactants, hydrogen peroxide, BTNB, and EDTA. Activity was inhibited by SDS, Mn(2+) and Zn(2+), and by the serine protease inhibitor PMSF, indicating the serine protease nature of the enzyme. These properties make the novel protease a suitable candidate enzyme in meat ripening and other biotechnological applications.

  15. Immunoglobulins in Nasal Secretions of Healthy Humans: Structural Integrity of Secretory Immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) and Occurrence of Neutralizing Antibodies to IgA1 Proteases of Nasal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kirkeby, Line; Rasmussen, Trine Tang; Reinholdt, Jesper; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    Certain bacteria, including overt pathogens as well as commensals, produce immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases. By cleaving IgA1, including secretory IgA1, in the hinge region, these enzymes may interfere with the barrier functions of mucosal IgA antibodies, as indicated by experiments in vitro. Previous studies have suggested that cleavage of IgA1 in nasal secretions may be associated with the development and perpetuation of atopic disease. To clarify the potential effect of IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal cavity, we have analyzed immunoglobulin isotypes in nasal secretions of 11 healthy humans, with a focus on IgA, and at the same time have characterized and quantified IgA1 protease-producing bacteria in the nasal flora of the subjects. Samples in the form of nasal wash were collected by using a washing liquid that contained lithium as an internal reference. Dilution factors and, subsequently, concentrations in undiluted secretions could thereby be calculated. IgA, mainly in the secretory form, was found by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to be the dominant isotype in all subjects, and the vast majority of IgA (median, 91%) was of the A1 subclass, corroborating results of previous analyses at the level of immunoglobulin-producing cells. Levels of serum-type immunoglobulins were low, except for four subjects in whom levels of IgG corresponded to 20 to 66% of total IgA. Cumulative levels of IgA, IgG, and IgM in undiluted secretions ranged from 260 to 2,494 (median, 777) μg ml−1. IgA1 protease-producing bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Streptococcus mitis biovar 1) were isolated from the nasal cavities of seven subjects at 2.1 × 103 to 7.2 × 106 CFU per ml of undiluted secretion, corresponding to 0.2 to 99.6% of the flora. Nevertheless, α-chain fragments characteristic of IgA1 protease activity were not detected in secretions from any subject by immunoblotting. Neutralizing antibodies to IgA1 proteases of autologous

  16. Protoporphyrins Enhance Oligomerization and Enzymatic Activity of HtrA1 Serine Protease

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hakryul; Patterson, Victoria; Stoessel, Sean; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Hoh, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    High temperature requirement protein A1 (HtrA1), a secreted serine protease of the HtrA family, is associated with a multitude of human diseases. However, the exact functions of HtrA1 in these diseases remain poorly understood. We seek to unravel the mechanisms of HtrA1 by elucidating its interactions with chemical or biological modulators. To this end, we screened a small molecule library of 500 bioactive compounds to identify those that alter the formation of extracellular HtrA1 complexes in the cell culture medium. An initial characterization of two novel hits from this screen showed that protoporphyrin IX (PPP-IX), a precursor in the heme biosynthetic pathway, and its metalloporphyrin (MPP) derivatives fostered the oligomerization of HtrA1 by binding to the protease domain. As a result of the interaction with MPPs, the proteolytic activity of HtrA1 against Fibulin-5, a specific HtrA1 substrate in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), was increased. This physical interaction could be abolished by the missense mutations of HtrA1 found in patients with cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CARASIL). Furthermore, knockdown of HtrA1 attenuated apoptosis induced by PPP-IX. These results suggest that PPP-IX, or its derivatives, and HtrA1 may function as co-factors whereby porphyrins enhance oligomerization and the protease activity of HtrA1, while active HtrA1 elevates the pro-apoptotic actions of porphyrin derivatives. Further analysis of this interplay may shed insights into the pathogenesis of diseases such as AMD, CARASIL and protoporphyria, as well as effective therapeutic development. PMID:25506911

  17. Proresolving Actions of Synthetic and Natural Protease Inhibitors Are Mediated by Annexin A1.

    PubMed

    Vago, Juliana P; Tavares, Luciana P; Sugimoto, Michelle A; Lima, Graziele Letícia N; Galvão, Izabela; de Caux, Thais R; Lima, Kátia M; Ribeiro, Ana Luíza C; Carneiro, Fernanda S; Nunes, Fernanda Freire C; Pinho, Vanessa; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2016-02-15

    Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is a glucocorticoid-regulated protein endowed with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties. Intact AnxA1 is a 37-kDa protein that may be cleaved in vivo at the N-terminal region by neutrophil proteases including elastase and proteinase-3, generating the 33-kDa isoform that is largely inactive. In this study, we investigated the dynamics of AnxA1 expression and the effects of synthetic (sivelestat [SIV]; Eglin) and natural (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor [SLPI]; Elafin) protease inhibitors on the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation. During the settings of LPS inflammation AnxA1 cleavage associated closely with the peak of neutrophil and elastase expression and activity. SLPI expression increased during resolving phase of the pleurisy. Therapeutic treatment of LPS-challenge mice with recombinant human SLPI or Elafin accelerated resolution, an effect associated with increased numbers of apoptotic neutrophils in the pleural exudates, inhibition of elastase, and modulation of the survival-controlling proteins NF-κB and Mcl-1. Similar effects were observed with SIV, which dose-dependently inhibited neutrophil elastase and shortened resolution intervals. Mechanistically, SIV-induced resolution was caspase-dependent, associated to increased levels of intact AnxA1 and decreased expression of NF-κB and Mcl-1. The proresolving effect of antiproteases was also observed in a model of monosodium urate crystals-induced inflammation. SIV skewed macrophages toward resolving phenotypes and enhanced efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. A neutralizing antiserum against AnxA1 and a nonselective antagonist of AnxA1 receptor abolished the accelerated resolution promoted by SIV. Collectively, these results show that elastase inhibition not only inhibits inflammation but actually promotes resolution, and this response is mediated by protection of endogenous intact AnxA1 with ensuing augmentation of neutrophil apoptosis.

  18. Purification and Properties of an Extracellular Protease Produced by the Entomopathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana

    PubMed Central

    Bidochka, Michael J.; Khachatourians, George G.

    1987-01-01

    Beauveria bassiana GK2016 grown in a medium with gelatin as the sole carbon and nitrogen source produced an extracellular protease. The protease production was highest when the fungus was grown on a semiliquid medium and was purified about 18-fold, with a recovery of 21%. The protease molecular weight was estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to be about 35,000. It had an optimum activity at pH 8.5 and 37°C and was rapidly inactivated at 50°C. Its enzymatic activity was that of an endopeptidase which hydrolyzed elastin, casein, and gelatin but was much less active on bovine serum albumin and collagen. No trypsinlike activity was detected on N-α-benzoyl-dl-arginine-p-nitroanilide. It was, however, inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, indicating that a serine residue is present in the active site. The protease was unaffected by metal-chelating agents, sulfhydryl reagents, trypsin inhibitor, and chymotrypsin inhibitor. Images PMID:16347395

  19. The fibrinolytic activity of a novel protease derived from a tempeh producing fungus, Fusarium sp. BLB.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Fujii, Tadashi; Morimiya, Tatsuo; Johdo, Osamu; Nakamura, Takumi

    2007-09-01

    Tempeh is a traditional Indonesian soybean-fermented food produced by filamentous fungi, Rhizopus sp. and Fusarium sp. We isolated and sequenced the genomic gene and a cDNA clone encoding a novel protease (FP) from Fusarium sp. BLB. The genomic gene was 856 bp in length and contained two introns. An isolated cDNA clone encoded a protein of 250 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequence of FP showed highest homology, of 76%, with that of trypsin from Fusarium oxysporum. The hydrolysis activity of FP toward synthetic peptide was higher than that of any other protease tested, including Nattokinases. Furthermore, the thrombolytic activity of FP was about 2.1-fold higher than that of Nattokinase when the concentration of plasminogen was 24 units/ml. These results suggest that FP is superior to Nattokinases in dissolving fibrin when absorbed into the blood.

  20. Purification and Characterization of a Protease Produced by a Planomicrobium sp. L-2 from Gut of Octopus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Sun, Shujing; Piao, Meizi; Yang, Ji Young

    2013-01-01

    Protease widely exists in the digestive tract of animals and humans, playing a very important role in protein digestion and absorption. In this study, a high protease-producing strain Planomicrobium sp. L-2 was isolated and identified from the digestive tract of Octopus variabilis. The strain was identified by physiological and biochemical experiments and 16S rDNA sequences analysis. A protease was obtained from the strain Planomicrobium sp. L-2 through ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis and enrichment, DEAE-Sephadex A50 anion-exchange chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 gel chromatography. The molecular weight and properties of the protease were characterized, including optimum temperature and pH, thermal stability, protease inhibitions and metal ions. According to our results, the protease from Planomicrobium sp. L-2 strain designated as F1-1 was obtained by three-step separation and purification from crude enzyme. The molecular weight of the protease was 61.4 kDa and its optimum temperature was 40°C. The protease F1-1 showed a broad pH profile for casein hydrolysis between 5.0~11.0. No residual activity was observed after incubation for 40 min at 60°C and 60 min at 50°C. F1-1 protease was inhibited by Mn2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ ions, as well as PMSF, indicating that the protease F1-1 was a serine protease. Additionally, research basis provided by this study could be considered for industrial application of octopus intestinal proteases. PMID:24551830

  1. Acid proteases from species of Mucormii. partial characterization of the acid protease produced by a strain of Mucor miehei isolated in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Rickert, W S; McBride-Warren, P A

    1975-03-01

    The acid protease produced by a strain of Mucor miehei isolated in Cuba was purified by column electrofocusing and partially characterized as to amino-acid composition, molecular weight, helical content, total carbohydrate content, and approximate isoelectric point; A detailed comparison of these results was reported previously for Mucor miehei protease (Ottesen, M. & Rickert, W;S. (1970) C.R. Trav. Labmcarlsberg 37, 301) suggested that the two enzymes are similar but not identicalmthis conclusion was reinforced by an analysis of circular-dichroism spectra.

  2. Protease with collagenolytic activity produced by Bacillus sp. DPUA 1728 from Amazonian soil

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Lorena A.; Cruz, Raimundo F.; dos Santos, Januário G.; Silva, Wilson C.

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative analyses were carried out on solid medium with insoluble collagen 0.25% (w/v) to detect proteases with collagenolytic activity produced by Bacillus sp. In cultures incubated for 24 h, a 23 full factorial design with four repetitions at the center point was developed to analyze the effects and interactions between initial pH, temperature and the concentration of gelatin. Based on the results of the first 23 full factorial design, a successive 23 full factorial design was performed. The most favorable production conditions were found to be 1.5% (w/v) gelatin, pH 9.0 and 37 °C with enzymatic activity of 86.27 U/mL. The enzyme showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH 9.0, and it was stable over wide pH (7.2-10.0) and temperature (45 °C-60 °C) ranges. These results indicate that Bacillus sp DPUA 1728 is a potential source for producing collagenolytic protease with possible biotechnological applications, such as in the food, cosmetics and leather industries. PMID:26691484

  3. ADAM-9 is an insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 protease produced and secreted by human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Subburaman; Thompson, Garrett R; Amaar, Yousef G; Hathaway, Gary; Tschesche, Harald; Baylink, David J

    2002-12-24

    IGF binding protein-5 (BP-5) is an important bone formation regulator. Therefore, elucidation of the identity of IGF binding protein-5 (BP-5) protease produced by osteoblasts is important for our understanding of the molecular pathways that control the action of BP-5. In this regard, BP-5 protease purified by various chromatographic steps from a conditioned medium of U2 human osteosarcoma cells migrated as a single major band, which comigrated with the protease activity in native PAGE and yielded multiple bands in SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. N-Terminal sequencing of these bands revealed that three of the bands yielded amino acid sequences that were identical to that of alpha2 macroglobulin (alpha2M). Although alpha2M was produced by human osteoblasts (OBs), it was not found to be a BP-5 protease. Because alpha2M had been shown to complex with ADAM proteases and because ADAM-12 was found to cleave BP-3 and BP-5, we evaluated if one of the members of ADAM family was the BP-5 protease. On the basis of the findings that (1) purified preparations of BP-5 protease from U2 cell CM contained ADAM-9, (2) ADAM-9 is produced and secreted in high abundance by various human OB cell types, (3) purified ADAM-9 cleaved BP-5 effectively while it did not cleave other IGFBPs or did so with less potency, and (4) purified ADAM-9 bound to alpha2M, we conclude that ADAM-9 is a BP-5 protease produced by human OBs.

  4. Characteristics of extracellular proteases produced by Bacillus laterosporus and Flavobacterium sp. isolated from gelatinfactory effluents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Rao, C L; Ball, B K; Hasija, S K

    1996-11-01

    Forty bacterial isolates from the effluents of a gelatin factory (Jabalpur, India) were screened for protease activity and the two most potent producers were identified as Bacillus laterosporus and a Flavobacterium sp. The enzymes of both isolates were optimal at pH 8 and 60°C, with maximum activity after 90 min. The enzyme activity of B. laterosporus was suppressed by Fe(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) ions but was enhanced by Ba(2+) and Ca(2+). That of Flavobacterium sp. was suppressed by Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) ions but enhanced by Ba(2+), Ca(2+) and Fe(2+). The enzyme activity of the former was strongly inhibited by KCN, whereas that of the latter was only slightly inhibited by 8-hydroxyquinoline.

  5. Plasminogen-independent fibrinolysis by proteases produced by transformed chick embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L B; Buchanan, J M

    1975-01-01

    The fibrinolytic activity of proteases secreted by chick embryo fibroblasts infected with Rous sarcoma virus was studied by use of a procedure in which a fibrin clot was formed with highly purified fibrinogen and thrombin above the cell layer. This procedure results in the formation of fibrin that is apparently a more suitable substrate for studies on fibrinolysis than is fibrin prepared by other methods. Since neither plasminogen nor serum were included in the assay system in the present studies, the fibrinolytic activity observed cannot be ascribed to the conversion of the plasminogen in serum to plasmin by a plasminogen activator produced by transformed cells. Our procedure, therefore, measures proteolytic activities other than those reported by previous investigators. Maintenance of some of the transformed phenotypes of Rous sarcoma virus transformed chick embryo fibroblasts such as morpholigical change and increased rate of glucose uptake apparently does not depend on the presence of plasminogen in the culture medium. Images PMID:165484

  6. A Bacillus subtilis fusion protein system to produce soybean Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vogtentanz, Gudrun; Collier, Katherine D; Bodo, Michael; Chang, Judy H; Day, Anthony G; Estell, David A; Falcon, Brandy C; Ganshaw, Grant; Jarnagin, Alisha S; Kellis, James T; Kolkman, Marc A B; Lai, Cindy S; Meneses, Renato; Miller, Jeffrey V; de Nobel, Hans; Power, Scott; Weyler, Walter; Wong, David L; Schmidt, Brian F

    2007-09-01

    A fusion protein based expression system was developed in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis to produce the soybean Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (sBBI). The N-terminus of the mature sBBI was fused to the C-terminus of the 1st cellulose binding domain linker (CBD linker) of the BCE103 cellulase (from an alkalophilic Bacillus sp.). The strong aprE promoter was used to drive the transcription of the fusion gene and the AprE signal sequence was fused to the mature BCE103 cellulase for efficient secretion of the fusion protein into the culture medium. It was necessary to use a B. subtilis strain deficient in nine protease genes in order to reduce the proteolytic degradation of the fusion protein during growth. The fusion protein was produced in shake flasks at concentrations >1g/L. After growth, the sBBI was activated by treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol to allow the disulfide bonds to form correctly. An economical and scalable purification process was developed to purify sBBI based on acid precipitation of the fusion protein followed by acid/heat cleavage of the fusion protein at labile Asp-Pro bonds in the CBD linker. If necessary, non-native amino acids at the N- and C-termini were trimmed off using glutamyl endopeptidase I. After purification, an average of 72 mg of active sBBI were obtained from 1L of culture broth representing an overall yield of 21% based on the amount of sBBI activated before purification.

  7. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production.

  8. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production. PMID:26716833

  9. Serine protease HtrA1 accumulates in corneal transforming growth factor beta induced protein (TGFBIp) amyloid deposits

    PubMed Central

    Karring, Henrik; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Runager, Kasper; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Klintworth, Gordon K.; Højrup, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Specific mutations in the transforming growth factor beta induced (TGFBI) gene are associated with lattice corneal dystrophy (LCD) type 1 and its variants. In this study, we performed an in-depth proteomic analysis of human corneal amyloid deposits associated with the heterozygous A546D mutation in TGFBI. Methods Corneal amyloid deposits and the surrounding corneal stroma were procured by laser capture microdissection from a patient with an A546D mutation in TGFBI. Proteins in the captured corneal samples and healthy corneal stroma were identified with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and quantified by calculating exponentially modified Protein Abundance Index values. Mass spectrometry data were further compared for identifying enriched regions of transforming growth factor beta induced protein (TGFBIp/keratoepithelin/βig-h3) and detecting proteolytic cleavage sites in TGFBIp. Results A C-terminal fragment of TGFBIp containing residues Y571-R588 derived from the fourth fasciclin 1 domain (FAS1–4), serum amyloid P-component, apolipoprotein A-IV, clusterin, and serine protease HtrA1 were significantly enriched in the amyloid deposits compared to the healthy cornea. The proteolytic cleavage sites in TGFBIp from the diseased cornea are in accordance with the activity of serine protease HtrA1. We also identified small amounts of the serine protease kallikrein-14 in the amyloid deposits. Conclusions Corneal amyloid caused by the A546D mutation in TGFBI involves several proteins associated with other varieties of amyloidosis. The proteomic data suggest that the sequence 571-YHIGDEILVSGGIGALVR-588 contains the amyloid core of the FAS1–4 domain of TGFBIp and point at serine protease HtrA1 as the most likely candidate responsible for the proteolytic processing of amyloidogenic and aggregated TGFBIp, which explains the accumulation of HtrA1 in the amyloid deposits. With relevance to identifying serine proteases, we also found glia-derived nexin

  10. Helical apolipoproteins stabilize ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 by protecting it from thiol protease-mediated degradation.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Reijiro; Yokoyama, Shinji

    2002-06-21

    ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1 was increased by apolipoprotein A-I without an increase of its message in THP-1 cells. The pulse label study demonstrated that apoA-I retarded degradation of ABCA1. Similar changes were demonstrated by apoA-II, but the effect of high density lipoprotein was almost negligible on the basis of equivalent protein concentration. Thiol protease inhibitors (leupeptin and N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-norleucinal (ALLN)) increased ABCA1 and slowed its decay in the cells, whereas none of the proteosome-specific inhibitor lactacystin, other protease inhibitors, or the lysosomal inhibitor NH(4)Cl showed such effects. The effects of apoA-I and ALLN were additive for the increase of ABCA1, and the apoA-I-mediated cellular lipid release was enhanced by ALLN. The data suggest that ABCA1 is rapidly degraded by a thiol protease(s) in the cells unless helical apolipoproteins in their lipid-free form stabilize ABCA1 by protecting it from protease-mediated degradation.

  11. [Physiological and cell biological characterization of the protease producer Thermoactinomyces vulgaris during prolonged culture in a stirred fermenter].

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, S; Körner, D; Strohbach, G; Klingenberg, P; Jacob, H E; Gumpert, J; Ruttloff, H

    1982-01-01

    The physiological behaviour of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris - producing a thermostable serine-protease - was analyzed during fermentation. During 38 h the consumption of nutrients and oxygen as well as the rates of macromolecular and protease synthesis were measured. The morphological and ultrastructural changes of the mycelia were also studied. The mycelia grew exponentially for about 5 hours. After a short lag and a second slower growth phase, growth continued about linearly until the end, as was indicated by a constant rate of incorporation of labelled thymidine. However, at the same time a changing portion of hyphae - up to 45% - underwent lysis. According to the changing ratio of growing and lysing material, regarding the physiological activity of the culture the fermentation process could be divided into 4 periods. The formation of the protease started at the transition to the slow growth phase and continued linearly. The ability to produce the protease was attributed to a mycelium being formed after the shift down caused by limitation of supply of utilizable nitrogen compounds. The end of protease production 10 h later was correlated to a drastic decrease of the respiratory activity of the mycelia, probably caused by exhaustion of easily utilizable carbohydrates.

  12. Active-site gating regulates substrate selectivity in a chymotrypsin-like serine protease the structure of haemophilus influenzae immunoglobulin A1 protease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Troy A; Qiu, Jiazhou; Plaut, Andrew G; Holyoak, Todd

    2009-06-12

    We report here the first structure of a member of the immunoglobulin A protease (IgAP) family at 1.75-A resolution. This protease is a founding member of the type V (autotransporter) secretion system and is considered a virulence determinant among the bacteria expressing the enzyme. The structure of the enzyme fits that of a classic autotransporter in which several unique domains necessary for protein function are appended to a central, 100-A-long beta-helical domain. The N-terminal domain of the IgAP is found to possess a chymotrypsin-like fold. However, this catalytic domain contains a unique loop D that extends over the active site acting as a lid, gating substrate access. The data presented provide a structural basis for the known ability of IgAPs to cleave only the proline/serine/threonine-rich hinge peptide unique to IgA1 (isotype 1) in the context of the intact fold of the immunoglobulin. Based upon the structural data, as well as molecular modeling, a model suggesting that the unique extended loop D in this IgAP sterically occludes the active-site binding cleft in the absence of immunoglobulin binding is presented. Only in the context of binding of the IgA1-Fc domain in a valley formed between the N-terminal protease domain and another domain appended to the beta-helix spine (domain 2) is the lid stabilized in an open conformation. The stabilization of this open conformation through Fc association subsequently allows access of the hinge peptide to the active site, resulting in recognition and cleavage of the substrate.

  13. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus pumilus BA06, a producer of alkaline serine protease with leather-dehairing function.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuan-Wu; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Yi-Zheng; Feng, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Bacillus pumilus BA06 was isolated from the proteinaceous soil and produced an extracellular alkaline protease with leather-dehairing function. The genome of BA06 was sequenced. The comparative genome analysis indicated that strain BA06 is different in genome from the other B. pumilus strains, with limited insertions, deletions, and rearrangements.

  14. Improving the performance of industrial ethanol-producing yeast by expressing the aspartyl protease on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong-peng; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Zhong-yang; Wang, Zheng-Xiang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2010-12-01

    The yeasts used in fuel ethanol manufacture are unable to metabolize soluble proteins. The PEP4 gene, encoding a vacuolar aspartyl protease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was either secretively or cell-surface anchored expressed in industrial ethanol-producing S. cerevisiae. The obtained recombinant strains APA (expressing the protease secretively) and APB (expressing the protease on the cell wall) were studied under ethanol fermentation conditions in feed barley cultures. The effects of expression of the protease on product formation, growth and cell protein content were measured. The biomass yield of the wild-type was clearly lower than that of the recombinant strains (0.578 ± 0.12 g biomass/g glucose for APA and 0.582 ± 0.08 g biomass/g glucose for APB). In addition, nearly 98-99% of the theoretical maximum level of ethanol yield was achieved (relative to the amount of substrate consumed) for the recombinant strains, while limiting the nitrogen source resulted in dissatisfactory fermentation for the wild-type and more than 30 g/l residual sugar was detected at the end of fermentation. In addition, higher growth rate, viability and lower yields of byproducts such as glycerol and pyruvic acid for recombinant strains were observed. Expressing acid protease can be expected to lead to a significant increase in ethanol productivity.

  15. Cuticle-degrading proteases produced by the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana in the presence of coffee berry borer cuticle.

    PubMed

    Dias, B A; Neves, P M O J; Furlaneto-Maia, L; Furlaneto, M C

    2008-04-01

    A Brazilian isolate of Beauveria bassiana (CG425) that shows high virulence against the coffee berry borer (CBB) was examined for the production of subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) cuticle-degrading proteases. Fungal growth was either in nitrate-medium or in CBB cuticle-containing medium under both buffered and unbuffered conditions. In unbuffered medium supplemented with cuticle, the pH of cultures dropped and Pr1 and Pr2 activities were detected in high amounts only at a pH of 5.5 or higher. In buffered cultures, Pr1 and Pr2 activities were higher in medium supplemented with cuticle compared to activities with nitrate-medium. The Pr1 and Pr2 activities detected were mostly in the culture supernatant. These data suggest that Pr1 and Pr2 proteases produced by strain CG425 are induced by components of CBB cuticle, and that the culture pH influences the expression of these proteases, indicating the occurrence of an efficient mechanism of protein secretion in this fungus. The results obtained in this study extend the knowledge about protease production in B. bassiana CG425, opening new avenues for studying the role of secreted proteases in virulence against the coffee berry borer during the infection process.

  16. Cuticle-degrading proteases produced by the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana in the presence of coffee berry borer cuticle

    PubMed Central

    Dias, B.A.; Neves, P.M.O.J.; Furlaneto-Maia, L.; Furlaneto, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    A Brazilian isolate of Beauveria bassiana (CG425) that shows high virulence against the coffee berry borer (CBB) was examined for the production of subtilisin-like (Pr1) and trypsin-like (Pr2) cuticle-degrading proteases. Fungal growth was either in nitrate-medium or in CBB cuticle-containing medium under both buffered and unbuffered conditions. In unbuffered medium supplemented with cuticle, the pH of cultures dropped and Pr1 and Pr2 activities were detected in high amounts only at a pH of 5.5 or higher. In buffered cultures, Pr1 and Pr2 activities were higher in medium supplemented with cuticle compared to activities with nitrate-medium. The Pr1 and Pr2 activities detected were mostly in the culture supernatant. These data suggest that Pr1 and Pr2 proteases produced by strain CG425 are induced by components of CBB cuticle, and that the culture pH influences the expression of these proteases, indicating the occurrence of an efficient mechanism of protein secretion in this fungus. The results obtained in this study extend the knowledge about protease production in B. bassiana CG425, opening new avenues for studying the role of secreted proteases in virulence against the coffee berry borer during the infection process. PMID:24031220

  17. Purification, characterization, and properties of an alkaline protease produced by Serratia marcescens S3-R1 inhabiting Korean ginseng rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Nam, Myoung Soo; Whang, Kyung Sook; Choi, Seong Hyun; Bae, Hyoung Churl; Kim, Yoo Kyeong; Park, Young W

    2013-12-01

    An alkaline protease produced by the Serratia marcescens S3-R1 which inhabits in the Korean ginseng rhizosphere was investigated. The purposes of this study were to characterize and purify the bacterial enzyme by four different purification steps: precipitation of enzyme fraction by ammonium sulfate, loading the enzyme pellets on a DEAE-Sepharose anion-exchange chromatograph, separation of the fraction containing enzyme activity by fast protein liquid Mono Q chromatography and identification of the single-band fraction by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and then quantification of the single-band fraction by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The molecular weight of the purified protease was estimated as 50 308 Da by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protease was identified as Ala-Val-Thr-Ile-Glu-Asp-Ala-Val-Asp-Asp, and the enzyme belongs to the metalloprotease family. The optimal activities of the protease occurred at pH 7-9 and a temperature 40 °C. The ranges of pH and thermal stability of the enzyme were at 7-10 and 30-40 °C, respectively. The alkaline protease was successfully purified and characterized from the bacterium Serratia marcescens S3-R1, which has potential for industrial application, including milk protein hydrolysates. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Cloning, expression and characterisation of an HtrA-like serine protease produced in vivo by Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Guimarães, Michelle Lopes; Marengo, Eliana Blini; Tempone, Antonio Jorge; Amaral, Julio Jablonski; Klitzke, Clécio F; Silveira, Erika K Xavier da; Portaro, Fernanda Calheta Vieira; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2009-12-01

    Members of the high temperature requirement A (HtrA) family of chaperone proteases have been shown to play a role in bacterial pathogenesis. In a recent report, we demonstrated that the gene ML0176, which codes for a predicted HtrA-like protease, a gene conserved in other species of mycobacteria, is transcribed by Mycobacterium leprae in human leprosy lesions. In the present study, the recombinant ML0176 protein was produced and its enzymatic properties investigated. M. lepraerecombinant ML0176 was able to hydrolyse a variety of synthetic and natural peptides. Similar to other HtrA proteins, this enzyme displayed maximum proteolytic activity at temperatures above 40 degrees C and was completely inactivated by aprotinin, a protease inhibitor with high selectivity for serine proteases. Finally, analysis of M. leprae ML0176 specificity suggested a broader cleavage preference than that of previously described HtrAs homologues. In summary, we have identified an HtrA-like protease in M. lepraethat may constitute a potential new target for the development of novel prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategies against mycobacterial infections.

  19. Identification of a human immunodominant B-cell epitope within the immunoglobulin A1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    De Paolis, Francesca; Beghetto, Elisa; Spadoni, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca; Felici, Franco; Oggioni, Marco R; Gargano, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Background The IgA1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a proteolytic enzyme that specifically cleaves the hinge regions of human IgA1, which dominates most mucosal surfaces and is the major IgA isotype in serum. This protease is expressed in all of the known pneumococcal strains and plays a major role in pathogen's resistance to the host immune response. The present work was focused at identifying the immunodominant regions of pneumococcal IgA1 protease recognized by the human antibody response. Results An antigenic sequence corresponding to amino acids 420–457 (epiA) of the iga gene product was identified by screening a pneumococcal phage display library with patients' sera. The epiA peptide is conserved in all pneumococci and in two out of three S. mitis strains, while it is not present in other oral streptococci so far sequenced. This epitope was specifically recognized by antibodies present in sera from 90% of healthy adults, thus representing an important target of the humoral response to S. pneumoniae and S. mitis infection. Moreover, sera from 68% of children less than 4 years old reacted with the epiA peptide, indicating that the human immune response against streptococcal antigens occurs during childhood. Conclusion The broad and specific recognition of the epiA polypeptide by human sera demonstrate that the pneumococcal IgA1 protease contains an immunodominant B-cell epitope. The use of phage display libraries to identify microbe or disease-specific antigens recognized by human sera is a valuable approach to epitope discovery. PMID:18088426

  20. Characterization of a protease produced by a Trichoderma harzianum isolate which controls cocoa plant witches' broom disease

    PubMed Central

    De Marco, Janice L; Felix, Carlos Roberto

    2002-01-01

    Background Several Trichoderma strains have been reported to be effective in controlling plant diseases, and the action of fungal hydrolytic enzymes has been considered as the main mechanism involved in the antagonistic process. However, although Trichoderma strains were found to impair development of Crinipellis perniciosa, the causal agent of cocoa plant witches' broom disease, no fungal strain is available for effective control of this disease. We have then undertaken a program of construction of hydrolytic enzyme-overproducing Trichoderma strains aiming improvement of the fungal antagonistic capacity. The protease of an indian Trichoderma isolate showing antagonistic activity against C. perniciosa was purified to homogeneity and characterized for its kinetic properties and action on the phytopathogen cell wall. Results A protease produced by the Trichoderma harzianum isolate 1051 was purified to homogeneity by precipitation with ammonium sulfate followed by hydrophobic chromatography. The molecular mass of this protease as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was about 18.8 kDa. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence shares no homology with any other protease. The purified enzyme substantially affected the cell wall of the phytopathogen C. perniciosa. Western-blotting analysis showed that the enzyme was present in the culture supernatant 24 h after the Trichoderma started to grow in casein-containing liquid medium. Conclusions The capacity of the Trichoderma harzianum protease to hydrolyze the cell wall of C. perniciosa indicates that this enzyme may be actually involved in the antagonistic process between the two fungi. This fact strongly suggest that hydrolytic enzyme over-producing transgenic fungi may show superior biocontrol capacity. PMID:11835696

  1. Optimization and characterization of alkaline protease and carboxymethyl-cellulase produced by Bacillus pumillus grown on Ficus nitida wastes.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Eman Zakaria

    2013-01-01

    The potentiality of 23 bacterial isolates to produce alkaline protease and carboxymethyl-cellulase (CMCase) on Ficus nitida wastes was investigated. Bacillus pumillus ATCC7061 was selected as the most potent bacterial strain for the production of both enzymes. It was found that the optimum production of protease and CMCase were recorded at 30 °C, 5% Ficus nitida leaves and incubation period of 72 h. The best nitrogen sources for protease and CMCase production were yeast extract and casein, respectively. Also maximum protease and CMCase production were reported at pH 9 and pH 10, respectively. The enzymes possessed a good stability over a pH range of 8-10, expressed their maximum activities at pH10 and temperature range of 30-50 °C, expressed their maximum activities at 50 °C. Ions of Hg(2+), Fe2+ and Ag(+) showed a stimulatory effect on protease activity and ions of Fe(2+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+) and Ag(+) caused enhancement of CMCase activity. The enzymes were stable not only towards the nonionic surfactants like Triton X-100 and Tween 80 but also the strong anionic surfactant, SDS. Moreover, the enzymes were not significantly inhibited by EDTA or cystein. Concerning biotechnological applications, the enzymes retained (51-97%) of their initial activities upon incubation in the presence of commercials detergents for 1 h. The potential use of the produced enzymes in the degradation of human hair and cotton fabric samples were also assessed.

  2. Optimization and characterization of alkaline protease and carboxymethyl-cellulase produced by Bacillus pumillus grown on Ficus nitida wastes

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Eman Zakaria

    2013-01-01

    The potentiality of 23 bacterial isolates to produce alkaline protease and carboxymethyl-cellulase (CMCase) on Ficus nitida wastes was investigated. Bacillus pumillus ATCC7061 was selected as the most potent bacterial strain for the production of both enzymes. It was found that the optimum production of protease and CMCase were recorded at 30 °C, 5% Ficus nitida leaves and incubation period of 72 h. The best nitrogen sources for protease and CMCase production were yeast extract and casein, respectively. Also maximum protease and CMCase production were reported at pH 9 and pH 10, respectively. The enzymes possessed a good stability over a pH range of 8–10, expressed their maximum activities at pH10 and temperature range of 30–50 °C, expressed their maximum activities at 50 °C. Ions of Hg2+, Fe2+ and Ag+ showed a stimulatory effect on protease activity and ions of Fe2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cu2+ and Ag+ caused enhancement of CMCase activity. The enzymes were stable not only towards the nonionic surfactants like Triton X-100 and Tween 80 but also the strong anionic surfactant, SDS. Moreover, the enzymes were not significantly inhibited by EDTA or cystein. Concerning biotechnological applications, the enzymes retained (51–97%) of their initial activities upon incubation in the presence of commercials detergents for 1 h. The potential use of the produced enzymes in the degradation of human hair and cotton fabric samples were also assessed. PMID:24294252

  3. Metschnikowia persici sp. nov., A Novel Protease-Producing Yeast Species from China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Tao-Tao; Lu, Cai-Ge; Liu, Ya; Zhang, Dian-Peng; Liu, Wei-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    Three yeast strains, named as FHL-A, FHL-B, and FHL-C, were isolated from peach fruit surfaces collected from different regions in the North of China highly produced protease and were presented as single separate group in the genus Metschnikowia by sequence comparisons of 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 domain and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. BLASTn alignments on NCBI showed that the similarity of 26S rRNA gene sequences of the three strains to all sequences of other yeasts accessed into the GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ and other database was very low (≦93%). The phylogenetic tree based on the D1/D2 region of 26S rRNA gene sequences revealed that three strains are most closely related to Metschnikowia koreensis KCTC 7828T (AF257272.1) (sequence similarity: 93.0%) and Metschnikowia reukaufii CBS9709(T) (AJ716113.1) (sequence similarity: 93.0%). However, the strains are distinguished from M. koreensis by its non-assimilation of galactose, ribitol, and D-xylose, and by its growth at 37 °C or in vitamin-free medium, and are notably different from M. reukaufii by its non-assimilation of galactose, D-xylose, D-arabinose, and D-ribose, and by its growth at 35 °C or in vitamin-free medium. The strain FHL-B formed asci in V8 juice sporulation medium for 3 weeks. Therefore, the name Metschnikowia persici is proposed for the novel species, with FHL-B (= CBS12815(T) = CFCC 3578T) as the type strain.

  4. Trichosporon inkin biofilms produce extracellular proteases and exhibit resistance to antifungals.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Cordeiro, Rossana; Serpa, Rosana; Flávia Uchoa Alexandre, Camila; de Farias Marques, Francisca Jakelyne; Vladia Silva de Melo, Charlline; da Silva Franco, Jônatas; José de Jesus Evangelista, Antonio; Pires de Camargo, Zoilo; Samia Nogueira Brilhante, Raimunda; Fabio Gadelha Rocha, Marcos; Luciano Bezerra Moreira, José; de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes Bandeira, Tereza; Júlio Costa Sidrim, José

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine experimental conditions for in vitro biofilm formation of clinical isolates of Trichosporon inkin, an important opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised patients. Biofilms were formed in microtitre plates in three different media (RPMI, Sabouraud and CLED), with inocula of 104, 105 or 106 cells ml- 1, at pH 5.5 and 7.0, and at 35 and 28 °C, under static and shaking conditions for 72 h. Growth kinetics of biofilms were evaluated at 6, 24, 48 and 72 h. Biofilm milieu analysis were assessed by counting viable cells and quantification of nucleic acids released into biofilm supernatants. Biofilms were also analysed for proteolytic activity and antifungal resistance against amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole. Finally, ultrastructural characterization of biofilms formed in microtitre plates and catheter disks was performed by scanning electron microscopy. Greater biofilm formation was observed with a starter inoculum of 106 cells ml- 1, at pH 7.0 at 35 °C and 80 r.p.m., in both RPMI and Sabouraud media. Growth kinetics showed an increase in both viable cells and biomass with increasing incubation time, with maximum production at 48 h. Biofilms were able to disperse viable cells and nucleic acids into the supernatant throughout the developmental cycle. T. inkin biofilms produced more protease than planktonic cells and showed high tolerance to amphotericin B, caspofungin and azole derivatives. Mature biofilms were formed by different morphotypes, such as blastoconidia, arthroconidia and hyphae, in a strain-specific manner. The present article details the multicellular lifestyle of T. inkin and provides perspectives for further research.

  5. Studies on alkaline serine protease produced by Bacillus clausii GMBE 22.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Dilek; Bal, Hulya; Denizci, Aziz Akin; Ozturk, Nurcin Celik; Ozturk, Hasan Umit; Dilgimen, Aydan Salman; Ozturk, Dilek Coskuner; Erarslan, Altan

    2009-01-01

    An alkali tolerant Bacillus strain having extracellular serine alkaline protease activity was newly isolated from compost and identified as Bacillus clausii GMBE 22. An alkaline protease (AP22) was 4.66-fold purified in 51.5% yield from Bacillus clausii GMBE 22 by ethanol precipitation and DEAE-cellulose anion exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was identified as serine protease by LC-ESI-MS analysis. Its complete inhibition by phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride (PMSF) also justified that it is a serine alkaline protease. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 25.4 kDa. Optimal temperature and pH values are 60 degrees C and 12.0, respectively. The enzyme showed highest specificity to N-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA. The K(m) and k(cat) values for hydrolysis of this substrate are 0.347 mM and 1141 min(-1) respectively. The enzyme was affected by surface active agents to varying extents. The enzyme is stable for 2 h at 30 degrees C and pH 10.5. AP22 is also stable for 5 days over the pH range 9.0-11.0 at room temperature. AP22 has good pH stability compared with the alkaline proteases belonging to other strains of Bacillus clausii reported in the literature.

  6. Purification and characterization of a protease produced by Bacillus megaterium RRM2: application in detergent and dehairing industries.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, Renganathan; Jayappriyan, Kothilmozhian Ranishree; Rengasamy, Ramasamy

    2011-12-01

    An alkaline serine protease produced by Bacillus megaterium RRM2 isolated from the red alga, Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty) Doty ex Silva was studied for the first time and the same analyzed for the production of protease in the present study. Identification of the bacterium was done on the basis of both biochemical analysis and by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The extracellular protease obtained from B. megaterium RRM2 was purified by a three-step process involving ammonium sulphate precipitation, gel filtration (Sephadex G100) and Q-Sepharose column chromatography. The purity was found to be 30.6-fold with a specific activity of 3591.5 U/mg protein with a molecular weight of 27 kDa. The metal ions Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+) and Na(+) marginally enhanced the activity of the purified enzyme while Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), CO(2+) and Zn(2+), had reduced the activity. The enzyme was found to be active in the pH range of 9.0-10.0 and remained active up to 60 °C. Phenyl Methyl Sulfonyl Fluoride (PMSF) inhibited the enzyme activity, thus, confirming that this enzyme is an alkaline serine protease. Likewise, DTT also inhibited the enzyme thus confirming the disulfide nature of the enzyme. The enzyme exhibited a high degree of tolerance to Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS). The partially purified protease when used as an additive in the commercial detergents was found to be a suitable source for washing clothes especially those stained with blood. Further, it showed good dehairing activity within a short duration in goat skin without affecting its collagen component.

  7. Relationship between free radicals produced by entamoeba histolytica and its proteases complex activity.

    PubMed

    Crisóstomo-Vázquez, M P; Cervantes-Cervantes, M P; Jiménez-Cardoso, E; Muñoz-Sánchez, J L

    2002-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a parasite which causes health problems and there has been many approaches to know what is the factor causing its pathogenicity. In the present work, we assayed if the production of free radicals by the amoeba, has a relationship with the proteases activity. When we test the DMSO action (free radicals quenching activity) the specific activity of the proteases complex of the parasite were affected also. At 33.3% (V/V) concentration of DMSO it was present a maximal decrease of the initial activity (about 46% decrease), for to a higher concentrations existing a trend to recuperate the original activity, suggesting that the free radicals are an important factor for the hydrolysis grade of the protein substrate. All the differences except those between 46.7 and 66.6%, were significantly different compared with the control without any addition. The effects of Probucol and Probucol plus DMSO, compared to those caused by Metronidazol (MZ). We can observe that the quenchers caused a decrease on proteases activity similar to that of MZ (which is an antiparasite drug) and it was of c.a. 58% of activity decrease. These data suggest that the action of both, free radicals and proteases complex of Entamoeba histolytica, can account for the pathogenicity of the parasite.

  8. The trimeric serine protease HtrA1 forms a cage-like inhibition complex with an anti-HtrA1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Ciferri, Claudio; Lipari, Michael T; Liang, Wei-Ching; Estevez, Alberto; Hang, Julie; Stawicki, Scott; Wu, Yan; Moran, Paul; Elliott, Mike; Eigenbrot, Charles; Katschke, Kenneth J; van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    High temperature requirement A1 (HtrA1) is a trypsin-fold serine protease implicated in the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Our interest in an antibody therapy to neutralize HtrA1 faces the complication that the target adopts a trimeric arrangement, with three active sites in close proximity. In the present study, we describe antibody 94, obtained from a human antibody phage display library, which forms a distinct macromolecular complex with HtrA1 and inhibits the enzymatic activity of recombinant and native HtrA1 forms. Using biochemical methods and negative-staining EM we were able to elucidate the molecular composition of the IgG94 and Fab94 complexes and the associated inhibition mechanism. The 246-kDa complex between the HtrA1 catalytic domain trimer (HtrA1_Cat) and Fab94 had a propeller-like organization with one Fab bound peripherally to each protomer. Low-resolution EM structures and epitope mapping indicated that the antibody binds to the surface-exposed loops B and C of the catalytic domain, suggesting an allosteric inhibition mechanism. The HtrA1_Cat-IgG94 complex (636 kDa) is a cage-like structure with three centrally located IgG94 molecules co-ordinating two HtrA1_Cat trimers and the six active sites pointing into the cavity of the cage. In both complexes, all antigen-recognition regions (paratopes) are found to bind one HtrA1 protomer and all protomers are bound by a paratope, consistent with the complete inhibition of enzyme activity. Therefore, in addition to its potential therapeutic usefulness, antibody 94 establishes a new paradigm of multimeric serine protease inhibition.

  9. Diversity of cold-active protease-producing bacteria from arctic terrestrial and marine environments revealed by enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hye; Cho, Kyeung Hee; Lee, Yung Mi; Yim, Joung Han; Lee, Hong Kum; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2010-08-01

    A new approach for enrichment culture was applied to obtain cold-active protease-producing bacteria for marine and terrestrial samples from Svalbard, Norway. The method was developed for the enrichment of bacteria by long-term incubation at low temperatures in semi-solid agar medium containing meat pieces as the main source of carbon and energy. ZoBell and 0.1x nutrient broth were added for marine and terrestrial microorganisms, respectively, to supply basal elements for growth. One to three types of colonies were observed from each enrichment culture, indicating that specific bacterial species were enriched during the experimental conditions. Among 89 bacterial isolates, protease activity was observed from 48 isolates in the screening media containing skim milk. Good growth was observed at 4 degrees C and 10 degrees C while none of the isolates could grow at 37 degrees C. At low temperatures, enzyme activity was equal to or higher than activity at higher temperatures. Bacterial isolates were included in the genera Pseudoalteromonas (33 isolates), Arthrobacter (24 isolates), Pseudomonas (16 isolates), Psychrobacter (6 isolates), Sphingobacterium (6 isolates), Flavobacterium (2 isolates), Sporosarcina (1 isolate), and Stenotrophomonas (1 isolate). Protease activity was observed from Pseudoalteromonas (33 isolates), Pseudomonas (10 isolates), Arthrobacter (4 isolates), and Flavobacterium (1 isolate).

  10. Molecular characterization and growth optimization of halo-tolerant protease producing Bacillus Subtilis Strain BLK-1.5 isolated from salt mines of Karak, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nawab; Ullah, Nimat; Qasim, Muhammad; Rahman, Hazir; Khan, Shahid Niaz; Sadiq, Abdul; Adnan, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Microbial proteolytic enzyme is one of the most important industrial enzymes that hydrolyze proteins. The applications of proteases under harsh industrial conditions like alkalinity, salinity, and temperature make them inactive and unstable. This suggests need for search for novel microbial sources for protease production having diverse properties. For this purpose, 54 bacterial strains were isolated from different salt mines of Karak, Pakistan and were investigated for their proteolytic activity on skim milk agar plates. The strain which showed maximum protease activity was characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Furthermore, growth and protease production was optimized for the characterized bacteria under different physical factors, i.e., pH, temperature and salinity. The isolate BLK-1.5 exhibited strong protease production and was identified as Bacillus subtilis based on biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Maximum production of protease was recorded at pH 10, 37 °C and 7 % (w/v) NaCl. Molecular weight of proteases was estimated 38 kDa and its optimum activity was observed at pH 10, 50 °C and 2 % (w/v) NaCl. In conclusion, the protease produced by halo-tolerant Bacillus subtilis strain BLK-1.5 has diverse characteristics and could be useful in various industrial applications.

  11. IgA1 Protease Treatment Reverses Mesangial Deposits and Hematuria in a Model of IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Sebastian M; Abbad, Lilia; Boedec, Erwan; Papista, Christina; Le Stang, Marie-Bénédicte; Moal, Christelle; Maillard, Julien; Jamin, Agnès; Bex-Coudrat, Julie; Wang, Yong; Li, Aiqun; Martini, Paolo G V; Monteiro, Renato C; Berthelot, Laureline

    2016-09-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), characterized by mesangial IgA1 deposits, is a leading cause of renal failure worldwide. IgAN pathogenesis involves circulating hypogalactosylated IgA1 complexed with soluble IgA Fc receptor I (sCD89) and/or anti-hypogalactosylated-IgA1 autoantibodies, but no specific treatment is available for IgAN. The absence of IgA1 and CD89 homologs in the mouse has precluded in vivo proof-of-concept studies of specific therapies targeting IgA1. However, the α1KI‑CD89Tg mouse model of IgAN, which expresses human IgA1 and human CD89, allows in vivo testing of recombinant IgA1 protease (IgA1‑P), a bacterial protein that selectively cleaves human IgA1. Mice injected with IgA1‑P (1-10 mg/kg) had Fc fragments of IgA1 in both serum and urine, associated with a decrease in IgA1-sCD89 complexes. Levels of mesangial IgA1 deposits and the binding partners of these deposits (sCD89, transferrin receptor, and transglutaminase 2) decreased markedly 1 week after treatment, as did the levels of C3 deposition, CD11b(+) infiltrating cells, and fibronectin. Antiprotease antibodies did not significantly alter IgA1‑P activity. Moreover, hematuria consistently decreased after treatment. In conclusion, IgA1‑P strongly diminishes human IgA1 mesangial deposits and reduces inflammation, fibrosis, and hematuria in a mouse IgAN model, and therefore may be a plausible treatment for patients with IgAN. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. [Identification of psychrotrophs SYP-A2-3 producing cold-adapted protease from the No. 1 Glacier of China and study on its fermentation conditions].

    PubMed

    Shi, Jin-song; Wu, Qi-fan; Xu, Zheng-hong; Tao, Wen-yi

    2005-04-01

    The psychrotrophs SYP-A2-3 producing the cold-adapted protease has been isolated from the bacterial samples collected from the No. 1 Glacier of China and identified as Bacillus cereus according to its morphological and physiochemical characteristics and 16s rDNA gene sequence analysis. It could grow between 0 degree C and 38 degrees C while its optimal growth temperature was 25 degrees C and the optimal temperature for its protease production was 15 degrees C. The cold-adapted protease was identified as neutral metallo-protease, the molecular weight was 34.2 kD shown by SDS-PAGE, the optimal pH and temperature for activity was 7.0-8.5 and 42 degrees C, respectively. Various fermentation conditions of its protease production were also investigated. The results showed that casein was the best nitrogen source while glucose and starch were suitable carbon source for its protease production. The initial pH of fermentation broth ranged from 6.5 to 7.0 was optimal. Under optimized conditions, the protease activity produced by SYP-A2-3 could reach 3800 U/mL and 4800 U/mL conducted in shaking flask and 5 L stirred jar experiment, respectively.

  13. Extracellular Proteome Profiling of Bacillus pumilus SCU11 Producing Alkaline Protease for Dehairing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Shiqiang; Song, Ting; He, Tingting; Shao, Huanhuan; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-11-28

    Bacillus pumilus is one of the most characterized microorganisms that are used for high-level production of select industrial enzymes. A novel B. pumilus SCU11 strain possessing high alkaline protease activity was obtained in our previous work. The culture supernatant of this strain showed efficient dehairing capability with minimal collagen damage, indicating promising potential applications in the leather industry. In this study, the strain's extracellular proteome was identified by LC-MS/MS-based shotgun proteomic analysis, and their related secretory pathways were characterized by BLAST searches. A total of 513 proteins, including 100 actual secreted and 413 intracellular proteins, were detected in the extracellular proteome. The functions of these secreted proteins were elucidated and four complete secretory systems (Sec, Tat, Com, and ABC transporter) were proposed for B. pumilus. These data provide B. pumilus a comprehensive extracellular proteome profile, which is a valuable theoretical and applicative basis for future genetic modifications and development of industrial enzymes.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of unusually thermostable CutA1 protein from human brain and its protease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Sawano, Masahide; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Takehira, Michiyo; Kunishima, Naoki; Katoh, Etsuko; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-03-01

    Unusually stable proteins are a disadvantage for the metabolic turnover of proteins in cells. The CutA1 proteins from Pyrococcus horikoshii and from Oryza sativa (OsCutA1) have unusually high denaturation temperatures (Td) of nearly 150 and 100 °C, respectively, at pH 7.0. It seemed that the CutA1 protein from the human brain (HsCutA1) also has a remarkably high stability. Therefore, the thermodynamic stabilities of HsCutA1 and its protease susceptibility were examined. The Td was remarkably high, being over 95 °C at pH 7.0. The unfolding Gibbs energy (ΔG(0)H2O) was 174 kJ/mol at 37 °C from the denaturant denaturation. The thermodynamic analysis showed that the unfolding enthalpy and entropy values of HsCutA1 were considerably lower than those of OsCutA1 with a similar stability to HsCutA1, which should be related to flexibility of the unstructured properties in both N- and C-terminals of HsCutA1. HsCutA1 was almost completely digested after 1-day incubation at 37 °C by subtilisin, although OsCutA1 was hardly digested at the same conditions. These results indicate that easily available fragmentation of HsCutA1 with remarkably high thermodynamic stability at the body temperature should be important for its protein catabolism in the human cells.

  15. [Identification of Target Extracellular Proteases--Activators of Proteins of Haemostasis System Produced by Micromycetes Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus terreus].

    PubMed

    Zvonareva, E S; Osmolovskiy, A A; Kreyer, V G; Baranova, N A; Kotova, I B; Egorov, N S

    2015-01-01

    Effects of extracellular proteases of Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus terreus on plasma hemostasis proteins, consist of initiating the activation of prothrombin complex proteins, was detected. Was discovered, that A. ochraceus proteases have a direct influence on protein C and coagulation factor X, and A. terreus proteases causes their activation indirectly through kallikrein system stimulation. The ability of extracellular proteases of micromycetes activate prekallikrein in human blood plasma on the example of A. terreus was first demonstrated.

  16. Nutritional value and proteases of Lentinus citrinus produced by solid state fermentation of lignocellulosic waste from tropical region.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ana Rita Gaia; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; de Souza Kirsch, Larissa; Campelo, Maria da Conceição Loureiro; de Aguiar Oliveira, Ila Maria

    2016-09-01

    This paper examined the growth and yield performance of Lentinus citrinus on cupuaçu exocarp (Theobroma grandiflorum) mixed with litter (CE + LI) or rice bran (Oryza sativa) (CE + RB) in the ratio of 2:1 (800 g:200 g) to investigate the nutritional composition and proteolytic potential of the fruiting body produced. Significance values of yield were determined on substrate combinations. In CE + LI the biological efficiency of the mushrooms was 93.5% and the content of fat (4.5%), fiber (11.0%), protein (27.0%) and amino acids were higher when compared with CE + RB. Among the amino acids, the amount of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, arginine and leucine was high. The biological efficiency on CE + RB reduced to 84.2% and based on the nutritional value, carbohydrates (53.59%), energy (324.33 kcal) and minerals such as zinc, iron, copper, potassium and phosphorus were higher in this substrate combination. Protease activity from fruiting body was significant in CE + LI (463.55 U/mL). This protease showed an optimal activity at 50 °C in neutral and alkaline pH with maximum stability at 30 °C at alkaline pH. This is the first report of L. citrinus fruiting body nutritional composition with potential for human food and application in industrial processes.

  17. Preparation and use of media for protease-producing bacterial strains based on by-products from Cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) and wastewaters from marine-products processing factories.

    PubMed

    Souissi, Nabil; Ellouz-Triki, Yosra; Bougatef, Ali; Blibech, Monia; Nasri, Moncef

    2008-01-01

    Cuttlefish powder (CFP) from Sepia officinalis by-products was prepared and tested as a fermentation substrate for microbial growth and protease production by several species of bacteria: Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus BG1, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. All microorganisms studied grew well and produced protease activity when cultivated in medium containing only CFP indicating that the strains can obtain their carbon and nitrogen source requirements directly from whole by-product proteins. Moreover, it was found that the addition to the cuttlefish medium of diluted fishery wastewaters (FWW), generated by marine-products processing factories, enhanced the production of protease. Maximum activity was obtained when cells were grown in cuttlefish media containing 5-times or 10-times diluted FWW. Five-times diluted FWW enhanced protease production by B. cereus BG1 and B. subtilis by 467% and 75% more than control media, respectively. The enhancement could have been due to the high organic content or high salts in FWW. As a result, cuttlefish by-products powder enriched with diluted FWW was found to be a suitable growth media for protease-producing strains. This new process, which converts underutilized wastes (liquid and solid) into more marketable and acceptable forms, coupled with protease production, can be an alternative way to the biological treatment of solid and liquid wastes generated by the cuttlefish processing industry.

  18. Tepidimonas taiwanensis sp. nov., a novel alkaline-protease-producing bacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tien-Lai; Chou, Yi-Ju; Chen, Wen-Ming; Arun, Bhagwath; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2006-02-01

    The bacterial strain designated I1-1(T) was isolated from a hot spring located in the Pingtung area, southern Taiwan. Cells of this organism were Gram reaction negative rods, motile by a single polar flagellum. Optimum conditions for growth were 55 degrees C and pH 7. Strain I1-1(T) grew well in lower nutrient media such as 5-10% Luria-Bertani broth, and its extracellular products expressed alkaline protease activity. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that strain I1-1(T) is a member of beta-Proteobacteria. On the basis of a phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequences, DNA-DNA similarity data, whole-cell protein analysis, physiological and biochemical characteristics, as well as fatty acid compositions, the organism belonged to the genus Tepidimonas and represented a novel species within this genus. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain I1-1(T) were 16:0 (about 41%), 18:1 omega7c (about 13%), and summed feature 3 [16:1 omega7c or 15:0 iso 2OH or both (about 26%)]. Its DNA base ratio was 68.1 mol%. We propose to classify strain I1-1(T) (=BCRC 17406(T)=LMG 22826(T)) as Tepidimonas taiwanensis sp. nov.

  19. Potential antioxidant peptides produced from whey hydrolysis with an immobilized aspartic protease from Salpichroa origanifolia fruits.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Gabriela Fernanda; Kise, Francisco; Rosso, Adriana Mabel; Parisi, Mónica Graciela

    2017-12-15

    An aspartic protease from Salpichroa origanifolia fruits was successfully immobilized onto an activated support of glutaraldehyde agarose. The immobilized enzyme presented higher thermal stability than the free enzyme from 40°C to 50°C and high reusability, retaining 54% of the initial activity after ten cycles of the process. Whey protein concentrates (WPC) were hydrolyzed with both free and immobilized enzyme, reaching a similar degree of hydrolysis of approximately 6-8% after 20h. In addition, the immobilized derivate hydrolyzed α-lactalbumin protein with a higher affinity than β-lactoglobulin. The hydrolysate was ultra-filtrated, and the fractions were evaluated for antioxidant activities with the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity method. The fraction containing peptides with a molecular mass below 3kDa demonstrated a strong radical quenching effect (IC50: 0.48mg/ml). These results suggest that hydrolyzed WPC could be considered as a promising source of natural food antioxidants for the development of functional food. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Internalization and trafficking of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in human respiratory epithelial cells and roles of IgA1 proteases for optimal invasion and persistence.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Cara F; Håkansson, Anders P; Murphy, Timothy F

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is a leading cause of opportunistic infections of the respiratory tract in children and adults. Although considered an extracellular pathogen, NTHI has been observed repeatedly within and between cells of the human respiratory tract, and these observations have been correlated to symptomatic infection. These findings are intriguing in light of the knowledge that NTHI persists in the respiratory tract despite antibiotic therapy and the development of bactericidal antibodies. We hypothesized that intracellular NTHI avoids, escapes, or neutralizes the endolysosomal pathway and persists within human respiratory epithelial cells and that human IgA1 proteases are required for optimal internalization and persistence of NTHI. Virtually all strains encode a human IgA1 protease gene, igaA, and we previously characterized a novel human IgA1 protease gene, igaB, that is associated with disease-causing strains and is homologous to the IgA1 protease that is unique to pathogenic Neisseria spp. Here, we show that NTHI invades human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro in a lipid raft-independent manner, is subsequently trafficked via the endolysosomal pathway, and is killed in lysosomes after variable durations of persistence. IgaA is required for optimal invasion. IgaB appears to play little or no role in adherence or invasion but is required for optimal intracellular persistence of NTHI. IgaB cleaves lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) at pHs characteristic of the plasma membrane, early endosome, late endosome, and lysosome. However, neither IgA1 protease inhibits acidification of intracellular vesicles containing NTHI. NTHI IgA1 proteases play important but different roles in NTHI invasion and trafficking in respiratory epithelial cells.

  1. Internalization and Trafficking of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells and Roles of IgA1 Proteases for Optimal Invasion and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Clementi, Cara F.; Håkansson, Anders P.

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is a leading cause of opportunistic infections of the respiratory tract in children and adults. Although considered an extracellular pathogen, NTHI has been observed repeatedly within and between cells of the human respiratory tract, and these observations have been correlated to symptomatic infection. These findings are intriguing in light of the knowledge that NTHI persists in the respiratory tract despite antibiotic therapy and the development of bactericidal antibodies. We hypothesized that intracellular NTHI avoids, escapes, or neutralizes the endolysosomal pathway and persists within human respiratory epithelial cells and that human IgA1 proteases are required for optimal internalization and persistence of NTHI. Virtually all strains encode a human IgA1 protease gene, igaA, and we previously characterized a novel human IgA1 protease gene, igaB, that is associated with disease-causing strains and is homologous to the IgA1 protease that is unique to pathogenic Neisseria spp. Here, we show that NTHI invades human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro in a lipid raft-independent manner, is subsequently trafficked via the endolysosomal pathway, and is killed in lysosomes after variable durations of persistence. IgaA is required for optimal invasion. IgaB appears to play little or no role in adherence or invasion but is required for optimal intracellular persistence of NTHI. IgaB cleaves lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) at pHs characteristic of the plasma membrane, early endosome, late endosome, and lysosome. However, neither IgA1 protease inhibits acidification of intracellular vesicles containing NTHI. NTHI IgA1 proteases play important but different roles in NTHI invasion and trafficking in respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:24218477

  2. Enzymes produced by halotolerant spore-forming gram-positive bacterial strains isolated from a resting habitat (Restinga de Jurubatiba) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: focus on proteases.

    PubMed

    D Santos, Anderson Fragoso; Pacheco, Clarissa Almeida; Valle, Roberta D Santos; Seldin, Lucy; D Santos, André Luis Souza

    2014-12-01

    The screening for hydrolases-producing, halotolerant, and spore-forming gram-positive bacteria from the root, rhizosphere, and non-rhizosphere soil of Blutaparon portulacoides, a plant found in the Restinga de Jurubatiba located at the northern region of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, resulted in the isolation of 22 strains. These strains were identified as Halobacillus blutaparonensis (n = 2), Oceanobacillus picturae (n = 5), and Oceanobacillus iheyensis (n = 15), and all showed the ability to produce different extracellular enzymes. A total of 20 isolates (90.9 %) showed activity for protease, 5 (22.7 %) for phytase, 3 (13.6 %) for cellulase, and 2 (9.1 %) for amylase. Some bacterial strains were capable of producing three (13.6 %) or two (9.1 %) distinct hydrolytic enzymes. However, no bacterial strain with ability to produce esterase and DNase was observed. The isolate designated M9, belonging to the species H. blutaparonensis, was the best producer of protease and also yielded amylase and phytase. This strain was chosen for further studies regarding its protease activity. The M9 strain produced similar amounts of protease when grown either without or with different NaCl concentrations (from 0.5 to 10 %). A simple inspection of the cell-free culture supernatant by gelatin-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed the presence of three major alkaline proteases of 40, 50, and 70 kDa, which were fully inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) (two classical serine protease inhibitors). The secreted proteases were detected in a wide range of temperature (from 4 to 45 °C) and their hydrolytic activities were stimulated by NaCl (up to 10 %). The serine proteases produced by the M9 strain cleaved gelatin, casein, albumin, and hemoglobin, however, in different extensions. Collectively, these results suggest the potential use of the M9 strain in biotechnological

  3. Correlation Between Expression of High Temperature Requirement Serine Protease A1 (HtrA1) in Nucleus Pulposus and T2 Value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Yue, Jiawei; Jiang, Lu; Huang, Yonghui; Sun, Jifu; Wu, Yan

    2017-04-22

    BACKGROUND Degrading enzymes play an important role in the process of disc degeneration. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between the expression of high temperature requirement serine protease A1 (HtrA1) in the nucleus pulposus and the T2 value of the nucleus pulposus region in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIAL AND METHODS Thirty-six patients who had undergone surgical excision of the nucleus pulposus were examined by MRI before surgery. Pfirrmann grading of the target intervertebral disc was performed according to the sagittal T2-weighted imaging, and the T2 value of the target nucleus pulposus was measured according to the median sagittal T2 mapping. The correlation between the Pfirrmann grade and the T2 value was analyzed. The expression of HtrA1 in the nucleus pulposus was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blot. The correlation between the expression of HtrA1 and the T2 value was analyzed. RESULTS The T2 value of the nucleus pulposus region was 33.11-167.91 ms, with an average of 86.64±38.73 ms. According to Spearman correlation analysis, there was a rank correlation between T2 value and Pfirrmann grade (P<0.0001), and the correlation coefficient (rs)=-0.93617. There was a linear correlation between the mRNA level of HtrA1 and T2 value in nucleus pulposus tissues (a=3.88, b=-0.019, F=112.63, P<0.0001), normalized regression coefficient=-0.88. There was a linear correlation between the expression level of HtrA1 protein and the T2 value in the nucleus pulposus tissues (a=3.30, b=-0.016, F=93.15, P<0.0001) and normalized regression coefficient=-0.86. CONCLUSIONS The expression of HtrA1 was strongly related to the T2 value, suggesting that HtrA1 plays an important role in the pathological process of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  4. Comparison of extracellular DNase- and protease-producing spoilage bacteria isolated from Delaware pond-sourced and retail channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    PubMed

    Hickey, Michael E; Accumanno, Gina M; McIntosh, Dennis M; Blank, Grant S; Lee, Jung-Lim

    2015-03-30

    Spoilage of fishery products begins immediately following filleting due to microbial growth that degrades fish tissue quality prior to consumption. Extensive research has been conducted to identify such bacterial populations. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in fish spoilage is necessary as a novel remedy for microbial spoilage inhibition has yet to be established for fish tissue. The present study identified, for the first time, bacterial populations that produce extracellular DNase and protease from Delaware and local retail distributed channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fillets. A clear trend was identified between bacteria derived from catfish filleted under aseptic conditions where Pseudomonas was the dominant genus. Bacteria isolated from retail catfish contained high quantities of DNase-producing isolates, in contrast to aseptic-filleted catfish tissue which had none. Both types of catfish sample maintained high populations of protease-producing bacterial colonies throughout the duration of the study. Most bacteria isolated from catfish intestines exhibited DNase production with no protease production. Specific spoilage organism populations were significantly higher on retail-derived catfish in comparison to lab-filleted Delaware cultured catfish tissue. It is suggested that DNase production and protease production contribute to the spoilage of fish tissue as a result of mishandling and septic filleting being the major cause of rapid catfish tissue spoilage. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Fed-batch optimization of alpha-amylase and protease-producing Bacillus subtilis using Markov chain methods.

    PubMed

    Skolpap, Wanwisa; Scharer, J M; Douglas, P L; Moo-Young, M

    2004-06-20

    A stoichiometry-based model for the fed-batch culture of the recombinant bacterium Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051a, producing extracellular alpha-amylase as a desirable product and proteases as undesirable products, was developed and verified. The model was then used for optimizing the feeding schedule in fed-batch culture. To handle higher-order model equations (14 state variables), an optimization methodology for the dual-enzyme system is proposed by integrating Pontryagin's optimum principle with fermentation measurements. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) procedures were appropriate for model parameter and decision variable estimation by using a priori parameter distributions reflecting the experimental results. Using a simplified Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, the specific productivity of alpha-amylase was maximized and the optimum path was confirmed by experimentation. The optimization process predicted a further 14% improvement of alpha-amylase productivity that could not be realized because of the onset of sporulation. Among the decision variables, the switching time from batch to fed-batch operation (t(s)) was the most sensitive decision variable.

  6. An oxidant- and solvent-stable protease produced by Bacillus cereus SV1: application in the deproteinization of shrimp wastes and as a laundry detergent additive.

    PubMed

    Manni, Laila; Jellouli, Kemel; Ghorbel-Bellaaj, Olfa; Agrebi, Rym; Haddar, Anissa; Sellami-Kamoun, Alya; Nasri, Moncef

    2010-04-01

    The current increase in amount of shrimp wastes produced by the shrimp industry has led to the need in finding new methods for shrimp wastes disposal. In this study, an extracellular organic solvent- and oxidant-stable metalloprotease was produced by Bacillus cereus SV1. Maximum protease activity (5,900 U/mL) was obtained when the strain was grown in medium containing 40 g/L shrimp wastes powder as a sole carbon source. The optimum pH, optimum temperature, pH stability, and thermal stability of the crude enzyme preparation were pH 8.0, 60 degrees C, pH 6-9.5, and <55 degrees C, respectively. The crude protease was extremely stable toward several organic solvents. No loss of activity was observed even after 60 days of incubation at 30 degrees C in the presence of 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide and ethyl ether; the enzyme retained more than 70% of its original activity in the presence of ethanol and N,N-dimethylformamide. The protease showed high stability toward anionic (SDS) and non-ionic (Tween 80, Tween 20, and Triton X-100) surfactants. Interestingly, the activity of the enzyme was significantly enhanced by oxidizing agents. In addition, the enzyme showed excellent compatibility with some commercial liquid detergents. The protease of B. cereus SV1, produced under the optimal culture conditions, was tested for shrimp waste deproteinization in the preparation of chitin. The protein removal with a ratio E/S of 20 was about 88%. The novelties of the SV1 protease include its high stability to organic solvents and surfactants. These unique properties make it an ideal choice for application in detergent formulations and enzymatic peptide synthesis. In addition, the enzyme may find potential applications in the deproteinization of shrimp wastes to produce chitin.

  7. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN. PMID:27485391

  8. Bacterial IgA protease-mediated degradation of agIgA1 and agIgA1 immune complexes as a potential therapy for IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Xueying; Shen, Hongchun; Mao, Nan; Wang, Honglian; Cui, Luke; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Junming

    2016-08-03

    Mesangial deposition of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 (agIgA1) and its immune complexes is a key pathogenic mechanism of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, treatment of IgAN remains ineffective. We report here that bacteria-derived IgA proteases are capable of degrading these pathogenic agIgA1 and derived immune complexes in vitro and in vivo. By screening 14 different bacterial strains (6 species), we found that 4 bacterial IgA proteases from H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis exhibited high cleaving activities on serum agIgA1 and artificial galactose-depleted IgA1 in vitro and the deposited agIgA1-containing immune complexes in the mesangium of renal biopsy from IgAN patients and in a passive mouse model of IgAN in vitro. In the modified mouse model of passive IgAN with abundant in situ mesangial deposition of the agIgA-IgG immune complexes, a single intravenous delivery of IgA protease from H. influenzae was able to effectively degrade the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the glomerulus, demonstrating a therapeutic potential for IgAN. In conclusion, the bacteria-derived IgA proteases are biologically active enzymes capable of cleaving the circulating agIgA and the deposited agIgA-IgG immune complexes within the kidney of IgAN. Thus, the use of such IgA proteases may represent a novel therapy for IgAN.

  9. Influence of nitrogen source and pH value on undesired poly(γ-glutamic acid) formation of a protease producing Bacillus licheniformis strain.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Lena; Kauffmann, Kira; Wengeler, Timo; Mitsunaga, Hitoshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Büchs, Jochen

    2015-09-01

    Bacillus spp. are used for the production of industrial enzymes but are also known to be capable of producing biopolymers such as poly(γ-glutamic acid). Biopolymers increase the viscosity of the fermentation broth, thereby impairing mixing, gas/liquid mass and heat transfer in any bioreactor system. Undesired biopolymer formation has a significant impact on the fermentation and downstream processing performance. This study shows how undesirable poly(γ-glutamic acid) formation of an industrial protease producing Bacillus licheniformis strain was prevented by switching the nitrogen source from ammonium to nitrate. The viscosity was reduced from 32 to 2.5 mPa s. A constant or changing pH value did not influence the poly(γ-glutamic acid) production. Protease production was not affected: protease activities of 38 and 46 U mL(-1) were obtained for ammonium and nitrate, respectively. With the presented results, protease production with industrial Bacillus strains is now possible without the negative impact on fermentation and downstream processing by undesired poly(γ-glutamic acid) formation.

  10. Engineering of a Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain with High Neutral Protease Producing Capacity and Optimization of Its Fermentation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Yang, Lian; Ping, Yanhai; Bai, Yingguo; Luo, Huiying; Huang, Huoqing; Yao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The neutral protease has high potential for industrial applications, and attempts to improve enzyme expression level have important application values. In the present study, a neutral protease-encoding gene, Banpr, was cloned from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain K11, and a genetic manipulation method specific for this difficult-to-transform strain was developed for the high-level expression of neutral protease. The recombinant plasmid pUB110-Banpr was constructed in Bacillus subtilis strain WB600 and then transformed into strain K11 under optimized conditions. A positive transformant 110N-6 with the highest protease secreting capacity on skim milk plates and great genetic stability for more than 100 generations was selected for further study. Optimization of the fermentation conditions increased the enzyme activity of strain 110N-6 to 8995 ± 250 U/ml in flask culture and 28084 ± 1282 U/ml in 15-l fermentor, which are significantly higher than that of the native strain K11 and industrial strain B. subtilis AS.1398, respectively. The high expression level and extreme genetic stability make B. amyloliquefaciens strain 110N-6 more favorable for mass production of neutral protease for industrial uses. PMID:26752595

  11. Application of the wheat-germ cell-free translation system to produce high temperature requirement A3 (HtrA3) proteases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harmeet; Makino, Shin-ichi; Endo, Yaeta; Li, Ying; Stephens, Andrew N; Nie, Guiying

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian high temperature requirement A3 (HtrA3) is a serine protease of the HtrA family. It is an important factor for placental development and a tumor suppressor. The biochemical properties of HtrA3 are uncharacterized. One critical step in biochemical characterization is overexpressing and purifying the full-length recombinant protein. However, utility of cell-based expression systems is limited for a protease because of autocleavage. The wheat-germ cell-free translation system is highly efficient at producing "difficult" eukaryotic multidomain proteins and is easily modifiable for protein synthesis at different temperatures. In this study, we evaluated the potential of the wheat-germ cell-free translation system for producing human HtrA3. HtrA3 underwent autocleavage when synthesized at 17 °C. When the synthesis temperature was lowered to 4 °C, full-length HtrA3 was successfully produced and proteolytically active. Catalytic site serine substitution with alanine (S305A) stabilized HtrA3 while abolishing its protease activity. This mutant was readily synthesized and stable at 17 °C. When used with glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assay, S305A HtrA3 was a valuable bait in searching for endogenous HtrA3 binding proteins. Thus, we demonstrated the unique utility of the wheat-germ cell-free translation system for producing and characterizing human HtrA3. These strategies will be likely applicable to a wide range of proteases.

  12. Improvement in the growth performance of white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, by a protease-producing probiotic, Bacillus subtilis E20, from natto.

    PubMed

    Liu, C-H; Chiu, C-S; Ho, P-L; Wang, S-W

    2009-09-01

    To isolate and identify a benefic bacterium, Bacillus subtilis E20, from natto (fermented soybeans), and incorporate it into shrimp feed to promote shrimp growth performance. A protease-producing bacterium, E20, isolated from natto was identified as B. subtilis by an API 50 CHB kit and the 16S rDNA sequence. B. subtilis E20 was able to grow at a broad range of temperatures (10-50 degrees C), pH values (5-10), and NaCl levels (0-9%). The best culture conditions for B. subtilis E20 to produce the protease were 40 degrees C, a pH of 6-8 and 0% NaCl. No shrimp died after being injected with B. subtilis E20 [up to 10(9) colony-forming units (CFU) per shrimp]. Bacillus subtilis E20 was incorporated in diets at the levels of 0 (control), 10(6), 10(7), and 10(8) CFU kg(-1) for shrimp grow-out culture, and results showed that after feeding on B. subtilis E20-containing diets (10(8) CFU kg(-1) of diet), shrimp had excellent growth performance and production compared to the control because protease activities in the digestive tract were improved by B. subtilis E20. Bacillus subtilis E20 isolated from natto is a great protease producer and is able to improve shrimp growth performance through increasing the digestibility of food. Results suggest that B. subtilis E20 is a potential candidate for use as a probiotic to improve shrimp growth performance, and consequently reduce feed costs.

  13. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolate from Markisa fruit (Passiflora sp.) as a producer of protease enzyme and probiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Habibi

    2017-03-01

    16S rRNA gene analysis of bacteria lactic acid (LAB) isolate from Markisa Kuning Fruit (Passiflora edulis var. flavicarpa) as a producer of protease enzyme and probiotics has been done. The aim of the study is to determine the protease enzyme activity and 16S rRNA gene amplification using PCR. The calculation procedure was done to M4 isolate bacteria lactic acid (LAB) Isolate which has been resistant to acids with pH 2.0 in the manner of screening protease enzyme activity test result 6.5 to clear zone is 13 mm againts colony diametre is 2 mm. The results of study enzyme activity used spectrophotometer UV-Vis obtainable the regression equation Y=0.02983+0.001312X, with levels of protein M4 isolate is 0.6594 mg/mL and enzyme activity of obtainable is 0.8626 unit/ml while the spesific enzyme activity produced is 1.308 unit/mg. Then, 16S rRNA gene amplificatiom and DNA sequencing has been done. The results of study showed that the bacteria species contained from M4 bacteria lactic acid (LAB) isolate is Weisella cibiria strain II-I-59. Weisella cibiria strain II-I-59 is one of bacteria could be utilized in the digestive tract.

  14. Intragenomic diversity of the V1 regions of 16S rRNA genes in high-alkaline protease-producing Bacillus clausii spp.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Yasushi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Shimamura, Shigeru; Nishi, Shinro; Nogi, Yuichi; Uchimura, Kohsuke; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hitomi, Jun; Ozaki, Katsuya; Kawai, Shuji; Ito, Susumu; Horikoshi, Koki

    2007-07-01

    Alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain KSM-K16, which produces high-alkaline M-protease, was characterized phenotypically, biochemically and genetically. This strain was identified as Bacillus clausii based on the results of taxonomic studies, including sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization. Seven rRNA operons in the genome were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes revealed two distinct types of variable region V1. Moreover, some cloned 16S rRNA genes in some of the reference strains of B. clausii had a V1 region of yet another type. The B. clausii strains could clearly be divided into at least two subgroups based on the frequencies of the types of cloned V1 sequence. Bacillus sp. strain KSM-K16 was found to be in a different phylogenetic position from other high-alkaline protease-producing strains of B. clausii.

  15. Comparison of HCV NS3 protease and NS5B polymerase inhibitor activity in 1a, 1b and 2a replicons and 2a infectious virus.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Matthew S; Yang, Huiling; Shih, I-hung; Feng, Joy Y; Mabery, Eric M; Robinson, Margaret F; Zhong, Weidong; Delaney, William E

    2009-08-01

    The hepatitis C virus infection system represents an important new tool for drug discovery. In this study, we compared the in vitro antiviral efficacy of several NS3 and NS5B inhibitors in genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a replicons and in the 2a infectious virus system. The nucleoside inhibitor 2'-C-methyl adenosine showed similar efficacy in each system tested. Three non-nucleoside inhibitors had small differences in potency between genotype 1a and 1b. In contrast, there was a dramatic loss of potency for these non-nucleoside inhibitors in the genotype 2a replicon, 2a infectious virus, and 2a NS5B biochemical assays. The protease inhibitor BILN-2061 had similar efficacy against 1a and 1b replicons but was 61-109-fold less potent against the 2a replicon and virus, respectively. VX-950, a covalent protease inhibitor, had similar efficacy (<3-fold changes in EC(50)) regardless of genotype or subtype. Importantly, we observed a significant correlation (p<0.0001) in antiviral potency between the 2a replicon and 2a infectious virus for all classes of compounds tested.

  16. An extracellular serine protease produced by Vibrio vulnificus NCIMB 2137, a metalloprotease-gene negative strain isolated from a diseased eel.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi; Wang, Jiyou; Katoh, Keizo; Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Mizuno, Tamaki; Maehara, Yoko

    2012-04-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a ubiquitous estuarine microorganism but causes fatal systemic infections in immunocompromised humans, cultured eels or shrimps. An extracellular metalloprotease VVP/VvpE has been reported to be a potential virulence factor of the bacterium; however, a few strains isolated from a diseased eel or shrimp were recently found to produce a serine protease termed VvsA, but not VVP/VvpE. In the present study, we found that these strains had lost the 80 kb genomic region including the gene encoding VVP/VvpE. We also purified VvsA from the culture supernatant through ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration and ion-exchange column chromatography, and the enzyme was demonstrated to be a chymotrypsin-like protease, as well as those from some vibrios. The gene vvsA was shown to constitute an operon with a downstream gene vvsB, and several Vibrio species were found to have orthologues of vvsAB. These findings indicate that the genes vvp/vvpE and vvsAB might be mobile genetic elements.

  17. Screening of protease producing fungi for microbial digestion of seed proteins and synthesis of amino acids-metalnutrient chelates.

    PubMed

    Deore, G B; Limaye, A S; Dushing, Y A; Dhobale, S B; Kale, S; Laware, S L

    2013-01-15

    The problem of metalnutrient deficiency is becoming more serious with the introduction of modern agricultural practices. As a result, metalnutrient deficiency is recognized as one of the critical yield limiting factors. Metalnutrients are generally offered in their sulphate or oxide forms. However, it is reported that organically bound minerals generally have a higher bioavailability than inorganic minerals. Chelation makes otherwise unavailable metalnutrients plant available. Amino acids are well known among various chelating agents. In present investigation the fungus Paecilomyces variotii PR-4 was isolated from soil and was used for production of protease and determination of its activity. Proteins from germinating seeds of chick pea, mung bean, soybean and cowpea were hydrolyzed for the production of amino acids. Amino acids were recovered, estimated and utilized for chelation of metalnutrients viz., Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mg, B and Mo. The resultant chelates were employed to detect with Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectrophotometer (FTIR) analysis. The peaks of most intensive bands in the IR spectra of ligands recorded were present in the intervals of the wave numbers 3500-3300 and 1720-1700 cm(-1). Chelation of metalnutrients led to the broadening of peak and changes of the peak position of hydroxyl groups, which indicated the binding of the carboxylic groups and primary amine groups of amino acids to the metalnutrients. The resultant amino acids-metalnutrient chelates can be utilized as organic fertilizer.

  18. Evidence of bovine immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) protease activity in partially purified culture supernate of Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C W; Shewen, P E

    1996-01-01

    In the bovine respiratory tract, IgG1 is a major secretory immunoglobulin (Ig), and both IgG1 and IgG2 are believed to be important in defense against pneumonic pasteurellosis (shipping fever) in calves. Here we provide evidence for hydrolysis of IgG1 in the presence of partially purified culture supernate (ppCS) from the respiratory pathogen Pasteurella haemolytica A1. Bovine IgG1 was hydrolysed sequentially into three distinct bands (approximately 39, 12, and 7 kDa respectively). Furthermore, partial hydrolysis of bovine IgG2 was observed, but neither bovine IgA nor IgM were affected by incubation with ppCS. These findings suggest that the production of an IgG1-specific protease by P. haemolytica A1 may be a virulence mechanism contributing to the pathogenesis of bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:8785718

  19. Microbial proteases: detection, production, and genetic improvement.

    PubMed

    Kasana, Ramesh Chand; Salwan, Richa; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Microbial proteases are one of the important groups of industrially and commercially produced enzymes contributing approximately 2/3 of all enzyme sales. Though proteases are produced by many microorganisms, emphasis is on the microorganisms producing proteases with desired characters. As demand for novel proteases is increasing day by day the initial screening methods and assays for protease detection are of utmost importance. This review focuses attention on present status of knowledge on the various methods and protocols available for protease screening, detection, and quantification starting from plate assays to spectrophotometric, fluorometric, and nanoparticles based assays. The review will help in making strategies for exploitation of protease resources and improvement of enzymes to obtain more robust proteases.

  20. Plant cysteine proteases that evoke itch activate protease-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V.B.; Lerner, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bromelain, ficin and papain are cysteine proteases from plants that produce itch upon injection into skin. Their mechanism of action has not been considered previously. Objectives To determine the mechanism by which these proteases function. Methods The ability of these proteases to activate protease-activated receptors was determined by ratiometric calcium imaging. Results We show here that bromelain, ficin and papain activate protease-activated receptors 2 and 4. Conclusions Bromelain, ficin and papain function as signalling molecules and activate protease-activated receptors. Activation of these receptors is the likely mechanism by which these proteases evoke itch. PMID:20491769

  1. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  2. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  3. Changes in expression of human serine protease HtrA1, HtrA2 and HtrA3 genes in benign and malignant thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Zurawa-Janicka, Dorota; Kobiela, Jarosław; Galczynska, Natalia; Stefaniak, Tomasz; Lipinska, Barbara; Lachinski, Andrzej; Skorko-Glonek, Joanna; Narkiewicz, Joanna; Proczko-Markuszewska, Monika; Sledzinski, Zbigniew

    2012-11-01

    Human HtrA proteins are serine proteases involved in essential physiological processes. HtrA1 and HtrA3 function as tumor suppressors and inhibitors of the TGF-β signaling pathway. HtrA2 regulates mitochondrial homeostasis and plays a pivotal role in the induction of apoptosis. The aim of the study was to determine whether the HtrA proteins are involved in thyroid carcinogenesis. We used the immunoblotting technique to estimate protein levels of HtrA1, HtrA2, long and short variants of HtrA3 (HtrA3-L and HtrA3-S) and TGF-β1 in tissues of benign and malignant thyroid lesions, and control groups. We found that the levels of HtrA2 and HtrA3-S were higher in thyroid malignant tumors compared to normal tissues and benign tumors. The HtrA3-L level was increased in malignant tumor tissues compared to benign tumor tissues and control tissues from patients with benign lesions, and elevated in normal tissues from patients with thyroid carcinoma compared to normal tissues from patients with benign lesions. We also compared levels of HtrA proteins in follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and found that these types of carcinoma differed in the expression of HtrA3-S and HtrA1. These results indicate the implication of HtrA proteins in thyroid carcinogenesis suggest that HtrA3 variants may play different roles in cancer development, and that the increased HtrA3-L levels in thyroid tissue could be correlated with the development of malignant lesions. The TGF-β1 levels in tumor tissues were not significantly altered compared to control tissues.

  4. Brain pyroglutamate amyloid-β is produced by cathepsin B and is reduced by the cysteine protease inhibitor E64d, representing a potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Hook, Gregory; Yu, Jin; Toneff, Thomas; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Pyroglutamate amyloid-β peptides (pGlu-Aβ) are particularly pernicious forms of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) present in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. pGlu-Aβ peptides are N-terminally truncated forms of full-length Aβ peptides (flAβ(1-40/42)) in which the N-terminal glutamate is cyclized to pyroglutamate to generate pGlu-Aβ(3-40/42). β-secretase cleavage of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) produces flAβ(1-40/42), but it is not yet known whether the β-secretase BACE1 or the alternative β-secretase cathepsin B (CatB) participate in the production of pGlu-Aβ. Therefore, this study examined the effects of gene knockout of these proteases on brain pGlu-Aβ levels in transgenic AβPPLon mice, which express AβPP isoform 695 and have the wild-type (wt) β-secretase activity found in most AD patients. Knockout or overexpression of the CatB gene reduced or increased, respectively, pGlu-Aβ(3-40/42), flAβ(1-40/42), and pGlu-Aβ plaque load, but knockout of the BACE1 gene had no effect on those parameters in the transgenic mice. Treatment of AβPPLon mice with E64d, a cysteine protease inhibitor of CatB, also reduced brain pGlu-Aβ(3-42), flAβ(1-40/42), and pGlu-Aβ plaque load. Treatment of neuronal-like chromaffin cells with CA074Me, an inhibitor of CatB, resulted in reduced levels of pGlu-Aβ(3-40) released from the activity-dependent, regulated secretory pathway. Moreover, CatB knockout and E64d treatment has been previously shown to improve memory deficits in the AβPPLon mice. These data illustrate the role of CatB in producing pGlu-Aβ and flAβ that participate as key factors in the development of AD. The advantages of CatB inhibitors, especially E64d and its derivatives, as alternatives to BACE1 inhibitors in treating AD patients are discussed.

  5. Amino acid starvation induced by protease inhibition produces differential alterations in redox status and the thiol proteome in organogenesis-stage rat embryos and visceral yolk sacs.

    PubMed

    Harris, Craig; Jilek, Joseph L; Sant, Karilyn E; Pohl, Jan; Reed, Matthew; Hansen, Jason M

    2015-12-01

    The process of embryonic nutrition in rodent conceptuses during organogenesis has been shown to involve a dominant histiotrophic mechanism where essential developmental substrates and micronutrients are supplied as whole maternal proteins or cargoes associated with proteins. The histiotrophic nutrition pathways (HNP) responsible for uptake and initial processing of proteins across maternal-conceptal interfaces involve uptake via receptor mediated endocytosis and protein degradation via lysosomal proteolysis. Chemical inhibition of either process can lead to growth deficits and malformation in the embryo (EMB), but selective inhibition of either HNP component will elicit a different subset of developmental perturbations. In vitro, whole embryo culture exposure of GD10 or GD11 rat conceptuses to the natural protease inhibitor, leupeptin, leads to significant reductions in all measured embryonic growth parameters as well as a myriad of other effects. Leupeptin doses of 10 μM or 20 μM over a 26-h period (GD10-GD11) and 50 μM over a 3 h pulse period produced significant decreases in the clearance of FITC-albumin from culture media. The near complete loss of acid soluble fluorescence and increased total visceral yolk sac (VYS) protein content confirmed the selective inhibition of proteolysis. Inhibition of lysosomal proteolysis thus deprives the developing EMB of essential nutrient amino acids producing conditions akin to amino acid starvation, but may also cause direct effects on pathways critical for normal growth and differentiation. Following leupeptin exposure for 26 or 6 h, total glutathione (GSH) concentrations dropped significantly in the VYS, but only slightly in yolk sac (YSF) and amniotic (AF) fluids. Cys concentrations increased in VYS and EMB, but dropped in YSF and AF fluids. Redox potentials (Eh) for the glutathione disulfide (GSSG)/glutathione (GSH) redox couple trended significantly toward the positive, confirming the net oxidation of conceptual

  6. Amino Acid Starvation Induced by Protease Inhibition Produces Differential Alterations in Redox Status and the Thiol Proteome in Organogenesis-Stage Rat Embryos and Visceral Yolk Sacs

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Craig; Jilek, Joseph L.; Sant, Karilyn E.; Pohl, Jan; Reed, Matthew; Hansen, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    The process of embryonic nutrition in rodent conceptuses during organogenesis has been shown to involve a dominant histiotrophic mechanism where essential developmental substrates and micronutrients are supplied as whole maternal proteins or cargoes associated with proteins. The histiotrophic nutrition pathways (HNP) responsible for uptake and initial processing of proteins across maternal-conceptal interfaces involve uptake via receptor mediated endocytosis and protein degradation via lysosomal proteolysis. Chemical inhibition of either process can lead to growth deficits and malformation in the embryo (EMB), but selective inhibition of either HNP component will elicit a different subset of developmental perturbations. In vitro, whole embryo culture (WEC) exposure of GD10 or GD11 rat conceptuses to the natural protease inhibitor, leupeptin, leads to significant reductions in all measured embryonic growth parameters as well as a myriad of other effects. Leupeptin doses of 10 μM or 20 μM over a 26 hr period (GD10-GD11) and 50 μM over a 3 hr pulse period produced significant decreases in the clearance of FITC-albumin from culture media. The near complete loss of acid soluble fluorescence and increased total visceral yolk sac (VYS) protein content confirmed the selective inhibition of proteolysis. Inhibition of lysosomal proteolysis thus deprives the developing EMB of essential nutrient amino acids producing conditions akin to amino acid starvation, but may also cause direct effects on pathways critical for normal growth and differentiation. Following leupeptin exposure for 26 or 6 hr, total glutathione (GSH) concentrations dropped significantly in the VYS, but only slightly in yolk sac (YSF) and amniotic (AF) fluids. Cys concentrations increased in VYS and EMB, but dropped in YSF and AF fluids. Redox potentials (Eh) for the GSSG/GSH redox couple trended significantly toward the positive, confirming the net oxidation of conceptual tissues following leupeptin

  7. Protease inhibitor studies enrolling.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The protease enzyme is essential for HIV to make copies of itself. So far, research has failed to find a protease inhibitor that works against HIV. It is believed that, regardless of what type of protease inhibitor someone takes, it will need to be supplemented with other anti-HIV drugs. Three protease inhibitors have thus far been found to be safe, although long-term effects are unknown. These drugs are saquinavir, ABT-538, and L-735,524 produced by Hoffman-LaRoche, Abbott, and Merck respectively. Clinical trials of saquinavir are promising but it has not been shown to be the knock-out drug needed. ABT-538 has high bioavailability, but studies are showing it can cause liver and eye damage. L-735,524 studies are showing that resistance develops quite quickly. Future studies at higher doses are expected. To obtain information on protease studies currently looking for participants, contact The Network. Information on other approved, alternative, and experimental drugs is also available.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas sp. Strain BMS12, a Plant Growth-Promoting and Protease-Producing Bacterium, Isolated from the Rhizosphere Sediment of Phragmites karka of Chilika Lake, India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Samir R; Panda, Ananta Narayan; Ray, Lopamudra; Sahu, Neha; Mishra, Gayatri; Jadhao, Sudhir; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Adhya, Tapan Kumar; Rastogi, Gurdeep; Pattnaik, Ajit Kumar; Raina, Vishakha

    2016-06-30

    We report the 4.51 Mb draft genome of Pseudomonas sp. strain BMS12, a Gram-negative bacterium in the class of Gammaproteobacteria, isolated from the rhizospheric sediment of Phragmites karka, an invasive weed in Chilika Lake, Odisha, India. The Pseudomonas sp. strain BMS12 is capable of producing proteases and is also an efficient plant growth promoter that can be useful for various phytoremedial and industrial applications.

  9. Network Analyses Reveal Pervasive Functional Regulation Between Proteases in the Human Protease Web

    PubMed Central

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Cox, Jennifer H.; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Starr, Amanda E.; Lange, Philipp F.; Pavlidis, Paul; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing is an irreversible posttranslational modification affecting a large portion of the proteome. Protease-cleaved mediators frequently exhibit altered activity, and biological pathways are often regulated by proteolytic processing. Many of these mechanisms have not been appreciated as being protease-dependent, and the potential in unraveling a complex new dimension of biological control is increasingly recognized. Proteases are currently believed to act individually or in isolated cascades. However, conclusive but scattered biochemical evidence indicates broader regulation of proteases by protease and inhibitor interactions. Therefore, to systematically study such interactions, we assembled curated protease cleavage and inhibition data into a global, computational representation, termed the protease web. This revealed that proteases pervasively influence the activity of other proteases directly or by cleaving intermediate proteases or protease inhibitors. The protease web spans four classes of proteases and inhibitors and so links both recently and classically described protease groups and cascades, which can no longer be viewed as operating in isolation in vivo. We demonstrated that this observation, termed reachability, is robust to alterations in the data and will only increase in the future as additional data are added. We further show how subnetworks of the web are operational in 23 different tissues reflecting different phenotypes. We applied our network to develop novel insights into biologically relevant protease interactions using cell-specific proteases of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte as a system. Predictions from the protease web on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8) and neutrophil elastase being linked by an inactivating cleavage of serpinA1 by MMP8 were validated and explain perplexing Mmp8 −/− versus wild-type polymorphonuclear chemokine cleavages in vivo. Our findings supply systematically derived and

  10. Genome Sequence of the Multiple-Protease-Producing Strain Geobacillus thermoleovorans N7, a Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Sucharita; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Sen, Urmimala; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoleovorans strain N7 (MCC 3175), isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India, which contains genes that encode several industrially and medically important thermostable enzymes like neutral protease, xylose isomerase, rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase, nitrate and nitrite reductase, l-asparaginase, glutaminase, and RNase P. PMID:27789644

  11. Genome Sequence of the Multiple-Protease-Producing Strain Geobacillus thermoleovorans N7, a Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sucharita; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Sen, Urmimala; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti

    2016-10-27

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoleovorans strain N7 (MCC 3175), isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, West Bengal, India, which contains genes that encode several industrially and medically important thermostable enzymes like neutral protease, xylose isomerase, rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase, nitrate and nitrite reductase, l-asparaginase, glutaminase, and RNase P.

  12. Antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) protein hydrolysates produced by the proteases AFP, HT, Pro-G, actinidin and zingibain.

    PubMed

    Teh, Sue-Siang; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Carne, Alan; Birch, John

    2016-07-15

    Hemp protein isolates (HPIs) were hydrolysed by proteases (AFP, HT, ProG, actinidin and zingibain). The enzymatic hydrolysis of HPIs was evaluated through the degree of hydrolysis and SDS-PAGE profiles. The bioactive properties of the resultant hydrolysates (HPHs) were accessed through ORAC, DPPḢ scavenging and ACE-inhibitory activities. The physical properties of the resultant HPHs were evaluated for their particle sizes, zeta potential and surface hydrophobicity. HT had the highest rate of caseinolytic activity at the lowest concentration (0.1 mg mL(-1)) compared to other proteases that required concentration of 100 mg mL(-1) to achieve their maximum rate of caseinolytic activity. This led to the highest degree of hydrolysis of HPIs by HT in the SDS-PAGE profiles. Among all proteases and substrates, HT resulted in the highest bioactivities (ORAC, DPPḢ scavenging and ACE-inhibitory activities) generated from alkali extracted HPI in the shortest time (2 h) compared to the other protease preparations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prorenin processing enzyme (PPE) produced by Baculovirus-infected Sf-9 insect cells: PPE is the cysteine protease encoded in the acMNPV gene.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Takeshi; Awa, Hirono; Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Nirasawa, Satoru; Takahashi, Saori

    2010-01-01

    In infection cultures of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) insect cells with a recombinant baculovirus, vhpR, carrying human preprorenin cDNA in the polyhedrin locus of Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV), the expressed inactive recombinant human (rh)-prorenin is reported to be proteolytically processed to yield active rh-renin in the very late phase of culture (Takahashi et al., Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 71, 2610-2613 (2007)). To identify the enzyme that catalyzes the processing of rh-prorenin, referred to as prorenin processing enzyme (PPE), we purified potential PPE from virus-infected Sf-9 culture supernatant by the use of an internally quenched fluorescent (IQF) substrate for PPE. The 32-kDa protein band agreed well with PPE activity on the final Mono Q FPLC. By N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, the protein was revealed to be a cysteine protease encoded by the AcMNPV gene. Enzyme activity was inhibited by cysteine protease inhibitors but not by other protease inhibitors. When the purified rh-prorenin was incubated with the 32-kDa protein, renin activity appeared concomitant with the disappearance of rh-prorenin. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the activated product was identical to that of the rh-renin that had accumulated in the infection cultures. These results indicate that the 32-kDa cysteine protease derived from the AcMNPV gene is the enzyme PPE of virus-infected Sf-9 cells.

  14. Occurrence and evolution of the paralogous zinc metalloproteases IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species.

    PubMed

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    The distribution, genome location, and evolution of the four paralogous zinc metalloproteases, IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD, in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species were studied by in silico analysis of whole genomes and by activity screening of 154 representatives of 20 species. ZmpB was ubiquitous in the Mitis and Salivarius groups of the genus Streptococcus and in the genera Gemella and Granulicatella, with the exception of a fragmented gene in Streptococcus thermophilus, the only species with a nonhuman habitat. IgA1 protease activity was observed in all members of S. pneumoniae, S. pseudopneumoniae, S. oralis, S. sanguinis, and Gemella haemolysans, was variably present in S. mitis and S. infantis, and absent in S. gordonii, S. parasanguinis, S. cristatus, S. oligofermentans, S. australis, S. peroris, and S. suis. Phylogenetic analysis of 297 zmp sequences and representative housekeeping genes provided evidence for an unprecedented selection for genetic diversification of the iga, zmpB, and zmpD genes in S. pneumoniae and evidence of very frequent intraspecies transfer of entire genes and combination of genes. Presumably due to their adaptation to a commensal lifestyle, largely unaffected by adaptive mucosal immune factors, the corresponding genes in commensal streptococci have remained conserved. The widespread distribution and significant sequence diversity indicate an ancient origin of the zinc metalloproteases predating the emergence of the humanoid species. zmpB, which appears to be the ancestral gene, subsequently duplicated and successfully diversified into distinct functions, is likely to serve an important but yet unknown housekeeping function associated with the human host. The paralogous zinc metalloproteases IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD have been identified as crucial for virulence of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. This study maps the presence of the corresponding genes and enzyme activities in S

  15. Isolation and characterization of plantaricin ASM1: a new bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus plantarum A-1.

    PubMed

    Hata, Tomomi; Tanaka, Rie; Ohmomo, Sadahiro

    2010-01-31

    Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria showing stability even in neutral and weak alkaline pH were screened, and a new bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus plantarum A-1, plantaricin ASM1 (PASM1) was purified and characterized. This bacteriocin which is heat-stable but digested by trypsin inhibits the growth of lactic acid bacterial species, such as Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, and Enterococcus. PASM1 showed stability in a wide pH range compared to nisin A. The bacteriocin was purified using cation exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The activity of the purified bacteriocin was obtained as one fraction. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of the fraction showed a mass of 5045.7Da. Combining the data obtained from amino acid and DNA sequencing, the primary sequence of PASM1 was determined. The sequence of the corresponding gene revealed that the peptide is ribosomally synthesized as a 64 amino acid precursor containing a 21 amino acid N-terminal extension of the double-glycine type. The mature peptide consists of 43 amino acids, which could contain two intramolecular disulfide bonds in the structure. Three putative open reading frames were located upstream of the PLNA1 gene. These genes may encode the thioredoxin family proteins and a response regulator both of which have been suggested to regulate expression of the PASM1 gene and the processing of its leader peptide. PASM1 has no reported homologue bacteriocins. Stability in a wide pH range and heat indicates its potential for application in food preservation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  17. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  18. Identification and characterization of CMP-NeuAc:GalNAc-IgA1 α2,6-sialyltransferase in IgA1-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    Raska, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Brown, Rhubell; Kulhavy, Rose; Andrasi, Judit; Hall, Stacy; Vu, Huong L.; Carlsson, Frederic; Lindahl, Gunnar; Tomana, Milan; Julian, Bruce A.; Wyatt, Robert J.; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Summary Glycosylation defects occur in several human diseases. In IgA nephropathy, IgA1 contains O-glycans that are galactose-deficient and consist mostly of core 1 α2,6 sialylated N-acetylgalactosamine, a configuration suspected to prevent β1,3 galactosylation. We confirmed the same aberrancy in IgA1 secreted by the human DAKIKI B cell line. Biochemical assays indicated CMP-NeuAc:GalNAc-IgA1 α2,6-sialyltransferase activity in this cell line. However, a candidate enzyme, ST6-GalNAcI, was not transcribed in DAKIKI cells, B cells isolated from blood, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-immortalized IgA1-producing cells from the blood of IgAN patients and healthy controls. Instead, ST6-GalNAcII transcription was detected at a high level. Expression of the ST6-GalNAcII gene and activity of the CMP-NeuAc:GalNAc-IgA1 α2,6-sialyltransferase were higher in IgA1-producing cell lines from IgAN patients than in such cells from healthy controls. These data are the first evidence that human cells that lack ST6-GalNAcI can sialylate core 1 GalNAc-Ser/Thr. PMID:17418236

  19. Structure and mechanism of rhomboid protease.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ya; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Xue, Yi

    2013-05-31

    Rhomboid protease was first discovered in Drosophila. Mutation of the fly gene interfered with growth factor signaling and produced a characteristic phenotype of a pointed head skeleton. The name rhomboid has since been widely used to describe a large family of related membrane proteins that have diverse biological functions but share a common catalytic core domain composed of six membrane-spanning segments. Most rhomboid proteases cleave membrane protein substrates near the N terminus of their transmembrane domains. How these proteases function within the confines of the membrane is not completely understood. Recent progress in crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli rhomboid protease GlpG in complex with inhibitors has provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism of the protease and its conformational change. Improved biochemical assays have also identified a substrate sequence motif that is specifically recognized by many rhomboid proteases.

  20. Secretion of proteases from Pasteurella multocida isolates.

    PubMed

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; de la Garza, M

    1999-01-01

    The capability of Pasteurella multocida to secrete proteases to the culture medium and their characterization were studied in five animal isolates (bovine, chicken, sheep, and two from pig). All the isolates produced proteases in a wide range of molecular mass. It is suggested that they are neutral metalloproteases, since they were optimally active between pH 6 and 7, inhibited by chelating agents but not by other protease inhibitors, and reactivated by calcium. Proteases from isolates were able to degrade IgG. Several proteins from supernatants of cultures precipitated with 70% (NH4)2SO4 of all the P. multocida isolates were recognized by a polyclonal antiserum raised against a purified protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Protease production might play an important role during tissue colonization and in P. multocida diseases.

  1. Structure and Mechanism of Rhomboid Protease*

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ya; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Xue, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Rhomboid protease was first discovered in Drosophila. Mutation of the fly gene interfered with growth factor signaling and produced a characteristic phenotype of a pointed head skeleton. The name rhomboid has since been widely used to describe a large family of related membrane proteins that have diverse biological functions but share a common catalytic core domain composed of six membrane-spanning segments. Most rhomboid proteases cleave membrane protein substrates near the N terminus of their transmembrane domains. How these proteases function within the confines of the membrane is not completely understood. Recent progress in crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli rhomboid protease GlpG in complex with inhibitors has provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism of the protease and its conformational change. Improved biochemical assays have also identified a substrate sequence motif that is specifically recognized by many rhomboid proteases. PMID:23585569

  2. Widely distributed mutations in the COL2A1 gene produce achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Körkkö, J; Cohn, D H; Ala-Kokko, L; Krakow, D; Prockop, D J

    2000-05-15

    The COL2A1 gene was assayed for mutations in genomic DNA from 12 patients with achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis. The exons and flanking sequences of the 54 exons in the COL2A1 gene were amplified by a series of specific primers using PCR. The PCR products were scanned for mutations by conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis, and PCR products that generated heteroduplex bands were then sequenced. Mutations in the COL2A1 gene were found in all 12 patients. Ten of the mutations were single base substitutions that converted a codon for an obligate glycine to a codon for an amino acid with a bulkier side chain. One of the mutations was a change in a consensus RNA splice site. Another was an 18-base pair deletion of coding sequences. The results confirmed previous indications that conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis is highly sensitive for detection of mutations in large and complex genes. They also demonstrate that most, if not all, patients with achondrogenesis type II/hypochondrogenesis have mutations in the COL2A1 gene.

  3. Inactivation of the Antifungal and Immunomodulatory Properties of Human Cathelicidin LL-37 by Aspartic Proteases Produced by the Pathogenic Yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Bochenska, Oliwia; Zawrotniak, Marcin; Wolak, Natalia; Trebacz, Grzegorz; Gogol, Mariusz; Ostrowska, Dominika; Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Kozik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Constant cross talk between Candida albicans yeast cells and their human host determines the outcome of fungal colonization and, eventually, the progress of infectious disease (candidiasis). An effective weapon used by C. albicans to cope with the host defense system is the release of 10 distinct secreted aspartic proteases (SAPs). Here, we validate a hypothesis that neutrophils and epithelial cells use the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 to inactivate C. albicans at sites of candidal infection and that C. albicans uses SAPs to effectively degrade LL-37. LL-37 is cleaved into multiple products by SAP1 to -4, SAP8, and SAP9, and this proteolytic processing is correlated with the gradual decrease in the antifungal activity of LL-37. Moreover, a major intermediate of LL-37 cleavage—the LL-25 peptide—is antifungal but devoid of the immunomodulatory properties of LL-37. In contrast to LL-37, LL-25 did not affect the generation of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils upon treatment with phorbol esters. Stimulating neutrophils with LL-25 (rather than LL-37) significantly decreased calcium flux and interleukin-8 production, resulting in lower chemotactic activity of the peptide against neutrophils, which may decrease the recruitment of neutrophils to infection foci. LL-25 also lost the function of LL-37 as an inhibitor of neutrophil apoptosis, thereby reducing the life span of these defense cells. This study indicates that C. albicans can effectively use aspartic proteases to destroy the antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties of LL-37, thus enabling the pathogen to survive and propagate. PMID:25847962

  4. IgA1-secreting cell lines from patients with IgA nephropathy produce aberrantly glycosylated IgA1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Moldoveanu, Zina; Hall, Stacy; Brown, Rhubell; Vu, Huong L.; Novak, Lea; Julian, Bruce A.; Tomana, Milan; Wyatt, Robert J.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Mestecky, Jiri; Novak, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of IgA1 plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy. This abnormality is manifested by a deficiency of galactose in the hinge-region O-linked glycans of IgA1. Biosynthesis of these glycans occurs in a stepwise fashion beginning with the addition of N-acetylgalactosamine by the enzyme N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 and continuing with the addition of either galactose by β1,3-galactosyltransferase or a terminal sialic acid by a N-acetylgalactosamine–specific α2,6-sialyltransferase. To identify the molecular basis for the aberrant IgA glycosylation, we established EBV-immortalized IgA1-producing cells from peripheral blood cells of patients with IgA nephropathy. The secreted IgA1 was mostly polymeric and had galactose-deficient O-linked glycans, characterized by a terminal or sialylated N-acetylgalactosamine. As controls, we showed that EBV-immortalized cells from patients with lupus nephritis and healthy individuals did not produce IgA with the defective galactosylation pattern. Analysis of the biosynthetic pathways in cloned EBV-immortalized cells from patients with IgA nephropathy indicated a decrease in β1,3-galactosyltransferase activity and an increase in N-acetylgalactosamine–specific α2,6-sialyltransferase activity. Also, expression of β1,3-galactosyltransferase was significantly lower, and that of N-acetylgalactosamine–specific α2,6-sialyltransferase was significantly higher than the expression of these genes in the control cells. Thus, our data suggest that premature sialylation likely contributes to the aberrant IgA1 glycosylation in IgA nephropathy and may represent a new therapeutic target. PMID:18172551

  5. The dimer interfaces of protease and extra-protease domains influence the activation of protease and the specificity of GagPol cleavage.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Steven C; Gulnik, Sergei; Everitt, Lori; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2003-01-01

    Activation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease is an essential step in viral replication. As is the case for all retroviral proteases, enzyme activation requires the formation of protease homodimers. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which retroviral proteases become active within their precursors. Using an in vitro expression system, we have examined the determinants of activation efficiency and the order of cleavage site processing for the protease of HIV-1 within the full-length GagPol precursor. Following activation, initial cleavage occurs between the viral p2 and nucleocapsid proteins. This is followed by cleavage of a novel site located in the transframe domain. Mutational analysis of the dimer interface of the protease produced differential effects on activation and specificity. A subset of mutations produced enhanced cleavage at the amino terminus of the protease, suggesting that, in the wild-type precursor, cleavages that liberate the protease are a relatively late event. Replacement of the proline residue at position 1 of the protease dimer interface resulted in altered cleavage of distal sites and suggests that this residue functions as a cis-directed specificity determinant. In summary, our studies indicate that interactions within the protease dimer interface help determine the order of precursor cleavage and contribute to the formation of extended-protease intermediates. Assembly domains within GagPol outside the protease domain also influence enzyme activation.

  6. Klebsiella spp as a 1, 3-propanediol producer: the metabolic engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Celińska, E

    2012-09-01

    Klebsiella spp are one of the best natural producers of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD). However, their usage in the biotechnological production of the diol is limited, since the species belong to the second hazard group. Nevertheless, multiple advantageous traits of Klebsiella spp justify the international effort devoted to develop a biotechnological process of 1,3-PD production with these microorganisms. Apart from the process engineering approach aiming at improvement of 1,3-PD production by Klebsiella spp, plethora of metabolic engineering approaches have been reported. Different strategies have been undertaken to genetically improve Klebsiella strains and provide them with the ability to synthesize 1,3-PD more efficiently. These include over-expression of both homologous and heterologous genes of the 1,3-PD synthesis pathway, protein and cofactor engineering, deletion of the genes involved in by-products formation. This review provides an overview of the initial and most recent reports on the metabolic engineering of Klebsiella spp with the aim of improvement of 1,3-PD biosynthesis.

  7. Comparative Study on Biochemical Properties and Antioxidative Activity of Cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) Protein Hydrolysates Produced by Alcalase and Bacillus licheniformis NH1 Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Balti, Rafik; Bougatef, Ali; El Hadj Ali, Nedra; Ktari, Naourez; Jellouli, Kemel; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima; Dhulster, Pascal; Nasri, Moncef

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidative activities and biochemical properties of protein hydrolysates prepared from cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) using Alcalase 2.4 L and Bacillus licheniformis NH1 proteases with different degrees of hydrolysis (DH) were determined. For the biochemical properties, hydrolysis by both enzymes increased protein solubility to above 75% over a wide pH range. The antioxidant activities of cuttlefish protein hydrolysates (CPHs) increase with increasing DH. In addition, all CPHs exhibited antioxidative activity in a concentration-dependent manner. NH1-CPHs generally showed greater antioxidative activity than Alcalase protein hydrolysates (P < 0.05) as indicated by the higher 1,1-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and ferrous chelating activity. Both Alcalase and NH1 protein hydrolysates were able to retard lipid peroxidation and β-carotene-linoleic acid oxidation. Alcalase-CPH (DH = 12.5%) and NH1-CPH (DH = 15%) contained 75.36% and 80.11% protein, respectively, with histidine and arginine as the major amino acids, followed by glutamic acid/glutamine, serine, lysine, and leucine. In addition, CPHs have a high percentage of essential amino acids made up 48.85% and 50.04%. Cuttlefish muscle protein hydrolysates had a high nutritional value and could be used as supplement to poorly balanced dietary proteins. PMID:22312455

  8. Occurrence and Evolution of the Paralogous Zinc Metalloproteases IgA1 Protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Related Commensal Species

    PubMed Central

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The distribution, genome location, and evolution of the four paralogous zinc metalloproteases, IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD, in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species were studied by in silico analysis of whole genomes and by activity screening of 154 representatives of 20 species. ZmpB was ubiquitous in the Mitis and Salivarius groups of the genus Streptococcus and in the genera Gemella and Granulicatella, with the exception of a fragmented gene in Streptococcus thermophilus, the only species with a nonhuman habitat. IgA1 protease activity was observed in all members of S. pneumoniae, S. pseudopneumoniae, S. oralis, S. sanguinis, and Gemella haemolysans, was variably present in S. mitis and S. infantis, and absent in S. gordonii, S. parasanguinis, S. cristatus, S. oligofermentans, S. australis, S. peroris, and S. suis. Phylogenetic analysis of 297 zmp sequences and representative housekeeping genes provided evidence for an unprecedented selection for genetic diversification of the iga, zmpB, and zmpD genes in S. pneumoniae and evidence of very frequent intraspecies transfer of entire genes and combination of genes. Presumably due to their adaptation to a commensal lifestyle, largely unaffected by adaptive mucosal immune factors, the corresponding genes in commensal streptococci have remained conserved. The widespread distribution and significant sequence diversity indicate an ancient origin of the zinc metalloproteases predating the emergence of the humanoid species. zmpB, which appears to be the ancestral gene, subsequently duplicated and successfully diversified into distinct functions, is likely to serve an important but yet unknown housekeeping function associated with the human host. PMID:23033471

  9. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  10. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  11. Purple-leaved Ficus lyrata plants produced by overexpressing a grapevine VvMybA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jietang; Li, Zhijian T; Chen, Juan; Henny, Richard J; Gray, Dennis J; Chen, Jianjun

    2013-11-01

    This study established an efficient method of regenerating plants of Ficus lyrata and producing purple-leaved F. lyrata plants through genetic transformation using a VvMybA1 gene of grapevine. Ficus lyrata, a species with unique violin- or guitar-shaped leaves, was regenerated from leaf-derived calli cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium supplemented with 4.5 μM N-phenyl-N'-1, 2, 3-thiadiazol-5-yl urea (TDZ) and 0.5 μM α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). Leaf discs were inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 105 harboring a binary vector DEAT that contains the VvMybA1 gene and neomycin phosphotransferase (npt II) gene and subsequently cultured on the established regeneration medium supplemented with 100 mg l(-1) kanamycin. Results showed that 87.5 % of the leaf discs produced kanamycin-resistant callus, and 68.8 % of them produced adventitious shoots. Transgenic plants with three leaf colors including green, green-purple, and purple were produced. Regular and quantitative real-time PCR analyses confirmed the integration of transgenes into the host genome. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the VvMybA1 gene was responsible for the purple-colored phenotype. Purple-leaved plants with strong color stability grew vigorously in a greenhouse. This study illustrated the feasibility of using a genetically engineered VvMybA1 gene for drastic modification of leaf color of an important woody ornamental plant.

  12. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  13. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Tchetina, Elena V; Markova, Galina A; Poole, A Robin; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John; Makarov, Sergey A; Kuzin, Aleksandr N

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1-50 μM). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10-50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  14. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Markova, Galina A.; Poole, A. Robin; Zukor, David J.; Antoniou, John; Makarov, Sergey A.; Kuzin, Aleksandr N.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1–50 μM). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10–50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients. PMID:28042296

  15. Proteases as therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Charles S.; Page, Michael J.; Madison, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are an expanding class of drugs that hold great promise. The U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has approved 12 protease therapies, and a number of next generation or completely new proteases are in clinical development. Although they are a well-recognized class of targets for inhibitors, proteases themselves have not typically been considered as a drug class despite their application in the clinic over the last several decades; initially as plasma fractions and later as purified products. Although the predominant use of proteases has been in treating cardiovascular disease, they are also emerging as useful agents in the treatment of sepsis, digestive disorders, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, retinal disorders, psoriasis and other diseases. In the present review, we outline the history of proteases as therapeutics, provide an overview of their current clinical application, and describe several approaches to improve and expand their clinical application. Undoubtedly, our ability to harness proteolysis for disease treatment will increase with our understanding of protease biology and the molecular mechanisms responsible. New technologies for rationally engineering proteases, as well as improved delivery options, will expand greatly the potential applications of these enzymes. The recognition that proteases are, in fact, an established class of safe and efficacious drugs will stimulate investigation of additional therapeutic applications for these enzymes. Proteases therefore have a bright future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:21406063

  16. Transient Glyco-Engineering to Produce Recombinant IgA1 with Defined N- and O-Glycans in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dicker, Martina; Tschofen, Marc; Maresch, Daniel; König, Julia; Juarez, Paloma; Orzaez, Diego; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases, such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG), less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumor activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered ΔXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that ΔXT/FT N. benthamiana plants can be engineered toward the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans. PMID:26858738

  17. Transient Glyco-Engineering to Produce Recombinant IgA1 with Defined N- and O-Glycans in Plants.

    PubMed

    Dicker, Martina; Tschofen, Marc; Maresch, Daniel; König, Julia; Juarez, Paloma; Orzaez, Diego; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases, such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG), less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumor activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered ΔXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that ΔXT/FT N. benthamiana plants can be engineered toward the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans.

  18. Serine proteases inhibiting cyanopeptides.

    PubMed

    Radau, G

    2000-08-01

    There are many compounds inhibiting serine proteases which play an important role in the human organism. This article reviews publications on the low-molecular weight, serine protease inhibitory cyanopeptides and reports on new developments in establishing structure-activity relationships.

  19. 7-Dehydrocholesterol metabolites produced by sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) modulate liver X receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Endo-Umeda, Kaori; Yasuda, Kaori; Sugita, Kazuyuki; Honda, Akira; Ohta, Miho; Ishikawa, Minoru; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Sakaki, Toshiyuki; Makishima, Makoto

    2014-03-01

    7-Dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) is a common precursor of vitamin D3 and cholesterol. Although various oxysterols, oxygenated cholesterol derivatives, have been implicated in cellular signaling pathways, 7-DHC metabolism and potential functions of its metabolites remain poorly understood. We examined 7-DHC metabolism by various P450 enzymes and detected three metabolites produced by sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) using high-performance liquid chromatography. Two were further identified as 25-hydroxy-7-DHC and 26/27-hydroxy-7-DHC. These 7-DHC metabolites were detected in serum of a patient with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Luciferase reporter assays showed that 25-hydroxy-7-DHC activates liver X receptor (LXR) α, LXRβ and vitamin D receptor and that 26/27-hydroxy-7-DHC induces activation of LXRα and LXRβ, although the activities of both compounds on LXRs were weak. In a mammalian two-hybrid assay, 25-hydroxy-7-DHC and 26/27-hydroxy-7-DHC induced interaction between LXRα and a coactivator fragment less efficiently than a natural LXR agonist, 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol. These 7-DHC metabolites did not oppose agonist-induced LXR activation and interacted directly to LXRα in a manner distinct from a potent agonist. These findings indicate that the 7-DHC metabolites are partial LXR activators. Interestingly, 25-hydroxy-7-DHC and 26/27-hydroxy-7-DHC suppressed mRNA expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, an LXR target gene, in HepG2 cells and HaCaT cells, while they weakly increased mRNA levels of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, another LXR target, in HaCaT cells. Thus, 7-DHC is catabolized by CYP27A1 to metabolites that act as selective LXR modulators.

  20. A preliminary neutron diffraction analysis of Achromobacter protease I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yuki; Masaki, Takeharu; Yamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2010-11-01

    Achromobacter protease I (API, E.C. 3.4.21.50) is one of the serine proteases produced by Achromobacter lyticus M497-1. API is distinct from the other tripsin type protease in its lysine specificity. The neutron structure analysis of catalytic triad with Trp169 and His210 was presented. His57 was double protonated and formed hydrogen bonds to Ser194Oγ and Asp113Oδ1, Oδ2.

  1. Bacterial proteases and virulence.

    PubMed

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated with the proteases either encoded within the same polypeptide or on separate subunits. In contrast, substrate recognition by extracellular proteases is less selective and therefore these enzymes are generally expressed as zymogens to prevent premature proteolytic activity that would be detrimental to the cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host.

  2. Acid protease production in fungal root endophytes.

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Michael S; Fraser, Erica; Kernaghan, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Fungal endophytes are ubiquitous in healthy root tissue, but little is known about their ecosystem functions, including their ability to utilize organic nutrient sources such as proteins. Root-associated fungi may secrete proteases to access the carbon and mineral nutrients within proteins in the soil or in the cells of their plant host. We compared the protein utilization patterns of multiple isolates of the root endophytes Phialocephala fortinii s.l., Meliniomyces variabilis and Umbelopsis isabellina with those of two ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, Hebeloma incarnatulum and Laccaria bicolor, and the wood-decay fungus Irpex lacteus at pH values of 2-9 on liquid BSA media. We also assessed protease activity using a fluorescently labeled casein assay and gelatin zymography and characterized proteases using specific protease inhibitors. I. lacteus and U. isabellina utilized protein efficiently, while the ECM fungi exhibited poor protein utilization. ECM fungi secreted metallo-proteases and had pH optima above 4, while other fungi produced aspartic proteases with lower pH optima. The ascomycetous root endophytes M. variabilis and P. fortinii exhibited intermediate levels of protein utilization and M. variabilis exhibited a very low pH optimum. Comparing proteolytic profiles between fungal root endophytes and fungi with well defined ecological roles provides insight into the ecology of these cryptic root associates.

  3. Dual origin of gut proteases in Formosan subterranean termites (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Sethi, Amit; Xue, Qing-Gang; La Peyre, Jerome F; Delatte, Jennifer; Husseneder, Claudia

    2011-07-01

    Cellulose digestion in lower termites, mediated by carbohydrases originating from both termite and endosymbionts, is well characterized. In contrast, limited information exists on gut proteases of lower termites, their origins and roles in termite nutrition. The objective of this study was to characterize gut proteases of the Formosan subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae). The protease activity of extracts from gut tissues (fore-, mid- and hindgut) and protozoa isolated from hindguts of termite workers was quantified using hide powder azure as a substrate and further characterized by zymography with gelatin SDS-PAGE. Midgut extracts showed the highest protease activity followed by the protozoa extracts. High level of protease activity was also detected in protozoa culture supernatants after 24 h incubation. Incubation of gut and protozoa extracts with class-specific protease inhibitors revealed that most of the proteases were serine proteases. All proteolytic bands identified after gelatin SDS-PAGE were also inhibited by serine protease inhibitors. Finally, incubation with chromogenic substrates indicated that extracts from fore- and hindgut tissues possessed proteases with almost exclusively trypsin-like activity while both midgut and protozoa extracts possessed proteases with trypsin-like and subtilisin/chymotrypsin-like activities. However, protozoa proteases were distinct from midgut proteases (with different molecular mass). Our results suggest that the Formosan subterranean termite not only produces endogenous proteases in its gut tissues, but also possesses proteases originating from its protozoan symbionts.

  4. A functional proteomics screen of proteases in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    McKerrow, J. H.; Bhargava, V.; Hansell, E.; Huling, S.; Kuwahara, T.; Matley, M.; Coussens, L.; Warren, R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteases facilitate several steps in cancer progression. To identify proteases most suitable for drug targeting, actual enzyme activity and not messenger RNA levels or immunoassay of protein is the ideal assay readout. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An automated microtiter plate assay format was modified to allow detection of all four major classes of proteases in tissue samples. Fifteen sets of colorectal carcinoma biopsies representing primary tumor, adjacent normal colon, and liver metastases were screened for protease activity. RESULTS: The major proteases detected were matrix metalloproteases (MMP9, MMP2, and MMP1), cathepsin B, cathepsin D, and the mast cell serine proteases, tryptase and chymase. Matrix metalloproteases were expressed at higher levels in the primary tumor than in adjacent normal tissue. The mast cell proteases, in contrast, were at very high levels in adjacent normal tissue, and not detectable in the metastases. Cathepsin B activity was significantly higher in the primary tumor, and highest in the metastases. The major proteases detected by activity assays were then localized in biopsy sections by immunohistochemistry. Mast cell proteases were abundant in adjacent normal tissue, because of infiltration of the lamina propria by mast cells. Matrix metalloproteases were localized to the tumor cells themselves; whereas, cathepsin B was predominantly expressed by macrophages at the leading edge of invading tumors. Although only low levels of urinary plasminogen activator were detected by direct enzyme assay, immunohistochemistry showed abundant protein within the tumor. CONCLUSIONS: This analysis, surveying all major classes of proteases by assays of activity rather than immunolocalization or in situ hybridization alone, serves to identify proteases whose activity is not completely balanced by endogenous inhibitors and which may be essential for tumor progression. These proteases are logical targets for initial efforts to produce low

  5. Related IgA1 and IgG producing cells in blood and diseased mucosa in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Thoree, V C; Golby, S J C; Boursier, L; Hackett, M; Dunn-Walters, D K; Sanderson, J D; Spencer, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease in which the colonic mucosa is infiltrated with plasma cells producing IgG autoantibodies. It is not known whether this represents a local mucosal response which has switched to IgG or a peripheral response which may have been initiated by peripheral antigen which homed to the colonic mucosa. The clonal distribution of IgG secreting cells and isotype switched variants in UC is not known. Aims: To investigate the clonal distribution of mucosal IgG in UC and to search for related IgG and IgA secreting cells in normal and diseased mucosa and blood in UC. To investigate characteristics which may discriminate between the mucosal and peripheral repertoire in the normal mucosa and in UC. Patients: Blood and normal and diseased mucosa from two patients with UC were studied. Methods: Immunoglobulin gene analysis and clone specific polymerase chain reaction were used to study the clonal distribution and characteristics of IgG and related IgA in the mucosa and blood of patients with UC. Results: The IgG response in the mucosa of UC patients included widespread clones of cells that were present in both the diseased mucosa and blood but that were scarce in normal mucosa. Clonally related IgA class switch variants, all IgA1, were detected but also only in the diseased mucosa and blood. This suggests that these clones home preferentially to the diseased mucosa. We showed that JH1 usage was characteristic of the peripheral repertoire, and that examples of JH1 usage were observed in mucosal IgG in UC. Conclusions: Overall, these data are consistent with a model of UC in which a peripheral response is expressed and expanded in the colonic mucosa. PMID:12077090

  6. Protease increases fermentation rate and ethanol yield in dry-grind ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Johnston, David B; McAloon, Andrew J

    2014-02-01

    The effects of acid protease and urea addition during the fermentation step were evaluated. The fermentations were also tested with and without the addition of urea to determine if protease altered the nitrogen requirements of the yeast. Results show that the addition of the protease had a statistically significant effect on the fermentation rate and yield. Fermentation rates and yields were improved with the addition of the protease over the corresponding controls without protease. Protease addition either with or with added urea resulted in a higher final ethanol yield than without the protease addition. Urea addition levels >1200 ppm of supplemental nitrogen inhibited ethanol production. The economic effects of the protease addition were evaluated by using process engineering and economic models developed at the Eastern Regional Research Center. The decrease in overall processing costs from protease addition was as high as $0.01/L (4 ¢/gal) of denatured ethanol produced.

  7. Feces Derived Allergens of Tyrophagus putrescentiae Reared on Dried Dog Food and Evidence of the Strong Nutritional Interaction between the Mite and Bacillus cereus Producing Protease Bacillolysins and Exo-chitinases

    PubMed Central

    Erban, Tomas; Rybanska, Dagmar; Harant, Karel; Hortova, Bronislava; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging source of allergens in stored products and homes. Feces proteases are the major allergens of astigmatid mites (Acari: Acaridida). In addition, the mites are carriers of microorganisms and microbial adjuvant compounds that stimulate innate signaling pathways. We sought to analyze the mite feces proteome, proteolytic activities, and mite-bacterial interaction in dry dog food (DDF). Proteomic methods comprising enzymatic and zymographic analysis of proteases and 2D-E-MS/MS were performed. The highest protease activity was assigned to trypsin-like proteases; lower activity was assigned to chymotrypsin-like proteases, and the cysteine protease cathepsin B-like had very low activity. The 2D-E-MS/MS proteomic analysis identified mite trypsin allergen Tyr p3, fatty acid-binding protein Tyr p13 and putative mite allergens ferritin (Grp 30) and (poly)ubiquitins. Tyr p3 was detected at different positions of the 2D-E. It indicates presence of zymogen at basic pI, and mature-enzyme form and enzyme fragment at acidic pI. Bacillolysins (neutral and alkaline proteases) of Bacillus cereus symbiont can contribute to the protease activity of the mite extract. The bacterial exo-chitinases likely contribute to degradation of mite exuviae, mite bodies or food boluses consisting of chitin, including the peritrophic membrane. Thus, the chitinases disrupt the feces and facilitate release of the allergens. B. cereus was isolated and identified based on amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA and motB genes. B. cereus was added into high-fat, high-protein (DDF) and low-fat, low-protein (flour) diets to 1 and 5% (w/w), and the diets palatability was evaluated in 21-day population growth test. The supplementation of diet with B. cereus significantly suppressed population growth and the suppressive effect was higher in the high-fat, high-protein diet than in the low-fat, low-protein food. Thus, B. cereus has to coexist with the mite in

  8. Feces Derived Allergens of Tyrophagus putrescentiae Reared on Dried Dog Food and Evidence of the Strong Nutritional Interaction between the Mite and Bacillus cereus Producing Protease Bacillolysins and Exo-chitinases.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Rybanska, Dagmar; Harant, Karel; Hortova, Bronislava; Hubert, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank, 1781) is an emerging source of allergens in stored products and homes. Feces proteases are the major allergens of astigmatid mites (Acari: Acaridida). In addition, the mites are carriers of microorganisms and microbial adjuvant compounds that stimulate innate signaling pathways. We sought to analyze the mite feces proteome, proteolytic activities, and mite-bacterial interaction in dry dog food (DDF). Proteomic methods comprising enzymatic and zymographic analysis of proteases and 2D-E-MS/MS were performed. The highest protease activity was assigned to trypsin-like proteases; lower activity was assigned to chymotrypsin-like proteases, and the cysteine protease cathepsin B-like had very low activity. The 2D-E-MS/MS proteomic analysis identified mite trypsin allergen Tyr p3, fatty acid-binding protein Tyr p13 and putative mite allergens ferritin (Grp 30) and (poly)ubiquitins. Tyr p3 was detected at different positions of the 2D-E. It indicates presence of zymogen at basic pI, and mature-enzyme form and enzyme fragment at acidic pI. Bacillolysins (neutral and alkaline proteases) of Bacillus cereus symbiont can contribute to the protease activity of the mite extract. The bacterial exo-chitinases likely contribute to degradation of mite exuviae, mite bodies or food boluses consisting of chitin, including the peritrophic membrane. Thus, the chitinases disrupt the feces and facilitate release of the allergens. B. cereus was isolated and identified based on amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA and motB genes. B. cereus was added into high-fat, high-protein (DDF) and low-fat, low-protein (flour) diets to 1 and 5% (w/w), and the diets palatability was evaluated in 21-day population growth test. The supplementation of diet with B. cereus significantly suppressed population growth and the suppressive effect was higher in the high-fat, high-protein diet than in the low-fat, low-protein food. Thus, B. cereus has to coexist with the mite in

  9. Detergent alkaline proteases: enzymatic properties, genes, and crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Katsuhisa; Ozaki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Tohru; Ito, Susumu

    2007-06-01

    Subtilisin-like serine proteases from bacilli have been used in various industrial fields worldwide, particularly in the production of laundry and automatic dishwashing detergents. They belong to family A of the subtilase superfamily, which is composed of three clans, namely, true subtilisins, high-alkaline proteases, and intracellular proteases. We succeeded in the large-scale production of a high-alkaline protease (M-protease) from alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii KSM-K16, and the enzyme has been introduced into compact heavy-duty laundry detergents. We have also succeeded in the industrial-scale production of a new alkaline protease, KP-43, which was originally resistant to chemical oxidants and to surfactants, produced by alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain KSM-KP43 and have incorporated it into laundry detergents. KP-43 and related proteases form a new clan, oxidatively stable proteases, in subtilase family A. In this review, we describe the enzymatic properties, gene sequences, and crystal structures of M-protease, KP-43, and related enzymes.

  10. [Chloroplast Deg proteases].

    PubMed

    Grabsztunowicz, Magda; Luciński, Robert; Baranek, Małgorzata; Sikora, Bogna; Jackowski, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    For some chloroplast proteases ATP binding and hydrolysis is not necessary for their catalytic activity, most probably because even strongly unfolded substrates may penetrate their catalytic chamber. Deg1, 2, 5 and 8 are the best known of Arabidopsis thaliana ATP- independent chloroplast proteases, encoded by orthologues of genes coding for DegP, DegQ and DegS proteases of Escherichia coli. Current awareness in the area of structure and functions of chloroplast Degs is much more limited vs the one about their bacterial counterparts. Deg5 and Deg8 form a catalytic heterododecamer which is loosely attached to luminal side of thylakoid membrane. The complex catalyses--supported by Deg1 and one of FtsH proteases--the degradation of PsbA damaged due to plant exposition to elevated irradiance and thus these protease are of key importance for the plants' sensitivity to photoinhibition. Deg2 role in the disposal of damaged PsbA has not been elucidated. Recombinant Deg1 may degrade PsbO and plastocyanin in vitro but it is not clear whether this reaction is performed in vivo as well.

  11. Qualitative Differences in the N-Acetyl-D-galactosaminyltransferases Produced by Human A1 and A2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schachter, H.; Michaels, M. A.; Tilley, Christine A.; Crookston, Marie C.; Crookston, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    This study describes the kinetic properties of N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyltransferase in serum from subjects with blood groups A1 and A2. When the A1 and A2 enzymes were compared, with lacto-N-fucopentaose I and 2′-fucosyllactose as acceptors, the enzymes differed in their cation requirements, pH optima, and Km values. The two acceptors competed for the same transferase. Mixing experiments showed that the lower activity of the A2 enzyme could not be attributed to a modifier or inhibitor in serum. It was concluded that the A1 and A2 enzymes differ qualitatively. PMID:4509655

  12. Neutrophil serine proteases in antibacterial defense.

    PubMed

    Stapels, Daphne A C; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2015-02-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) are critical for the effective functioning of neutrophils and greatly contribute to immune protection against bacterial infections. Thanks to their broad substrate specificity, these chymotrypsin-like proteases trigger multiple reactions that are detrimental to bacterial survival such as direct bacterial killing, generation of antimicrobial peptides, inactivation of bacterial virulence factors and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. Recently, the importance of NSPs in antibacterial defenses has been further underscored by discoveries of unique bacterial evasion strategies to combat these proteases. Bacteria can indirectly disarm NSPs by protecting bacterial substrates against NSP cleavage, but also produce inhibitory molecules that potently block NSPs. Here we review recent insights in the functional contribution of NSPs in host protection against bacterial infections and the elegant strategies that bacteria use to counteract these responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  14. The site-2 protease.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Robert B

    2013-12-01

    The site-2 protease (S2P) is an unusually-hydrophobic integral membrane protease. It cleaves its substrates, which are membrane-bound transcription factors, within membrane-spanning helices. Although structural information for S2P from animals is lacking, the available data suggest that cleavage may occur at or within the lipid bilayer. In mammalian cells, S2P is essential owing to its activation of the sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs); in the absence of exogenous lipid, cells lacking S2P cannot survive. S2P is also important in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, activating several different membrane-bound transcription factors. Human patients harboring reduction-of-function mutations in S2P exhibit an array of pathologies ranging from skin defects to neurological abnormalities. Surprisingly, Drosophila melanogaster lacking S2P are viable and fertile. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Klebsiella oxytoca M5a1 to produce optically pure D-lactate in mineral salts medium.

    PubMed

    Sangproo, Maytawadee; Polyiam, Pattharasedthi; Jantama, Sirima Suvarnakuta; Kanchanatawee, Sunthorn; Jantama, Kaemwich

    2012-09-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca strains were constructed to produce optical pure d-lactate by pH-controlled batch fermentation in mineral salts medium. The alcohol dehydrogenase gene, adhE, and the phospho-transacetylase/acetate kinase A genes, pta-ackA, were deleted from the wild type. KMS002 (ΔadhE) and KMS004 (ΔadhE Δpta-ackA) exhibited d-lactate production as a primary pathway for the regeneration of NAD(+). Both strains produced 11-13 g/L of d-lactate in medium containing 2% (w/v) glucose with yields of 0.64-0.71 g/g glucose used. In sugarcane molasses, KMS002 and KMS004 produced 22-24 g/L of d-lactate with yields of 0.80-0.87 g/g total sugars utilized. Both strains also utilized maltodextrin derived from cassava starch and produced d-lactate at a concentration of 33-34 g/L with yields of 0.91-0.92 g/g maltodextrin utilized. These d-lactate yields are higher than those reported for engineered E. coli strains.

  16. A Genomic Analysis of Rat Proteases and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Proteases perform important roles in multiple biological and pathological processes. The availability of the rat genome sequence has facilitated the analysis of the complete protease repertoire or degradome of this model organism. The rat degradome consists of at least 626 proteases and homologs, which are distributed into 24 aspartic, 160 cysteine, 192 metallo, 221 serine, and 29 threonine proteases. This distribution is similar to that of the mouse degradome but is more complex than that of the human degradome composed of 561 proteases and homologs. This increased complexity of rat proteases mainly derives from the expansion of several families, including placental cathepsins, testases, kallikreins, and hematopoietic serine proteases, involved in reproductive or immunological functions. These protease families have also evolved differently in rat and mouse and may contribute to explain some functional differences between these closely related species. Likewise, genomic analysis of rat protease inhibitors has shown some differences with mouse protease inhibitors and the expansion of families of cysteine and serine protease inhibitors in rodents with respect to human. These comparative analyses may provide new views on the functional diversity of proteases and inhibitors and contribute to the development of innovative strategies for treating proteolysis diseases. PMID:15060002

  17. A Bacillus anthracis strain deleted for six proteases serves as an effective host for production of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Pomerantseva, Olga M; Moayeri, Mahtab; Fattah, Rasem; Tallant, Cynthia; Leppla, Stephen H

    2011-11-01

    Bacillus anthracis produces a number of extracellular proteases that impact the integrity and yield of other proteins in the B. anthracis secretome. In this study we show that anthrolysin O (ALO) and the three anthrax toxin proteins, protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF), produced from the B. anthracis Ames 35 strain (pXO1⁺, pXO2⁻), are completely degraded at the onset of stationary phase due to the action of proteases. An improved Cre-loxP gene knockout system was used to sequentially delete the genes encoding six proteases (InhA1, InhA2, camelysin, TasA, NprB, and MmpZ). The role of each protease in degradation of the B. anthracis toxin components and ALO was demonstrated. Levels of the anthrax toxin components and ALO in the supernatant of the sporulation defective, pXO1⁺ A35HMS mutant strain deleted for the six proteases were significantly increased and remained stable over 24 h. A pXO1-free variant of this six-protease mutant strain, designated BH460, provides an improved host strain for the preparation of recombinant proteins. As an example, BH460 was used to produce recombinant EF, which previously has been difficult to obtain from B. anthracis. The EF protein produced from BH460 had the highest in vivo potency of any EF previously purified from B. anthracis or Escherichia coli hosts. BH460 is recommended as an effective host strain for recombinant protein production, typically yielding greater than 10mg pure protein per liter of culture.

  18. Assessing the yield, microstructure, and texture properties of miniature Chihuahua-type cheese manufactured with a phospholipase A1 and exopolysaccharide-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Trancoso-Reyes, N; Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; Sepulveda, D R; Hernández-Ochoa, L R

    2014-02-01

    Chihuahua cheese or Mennonite cheese is one of the most popular and consumed cheeses in Mexico and by the Hispanic community in the United States. According to local producers the yield of Chihuahua cheese ranges from 9 to 9.5 kg of cheese from 100 kg of milk. Cheese yield is a crucial determinant of profitability in cheese-manufacturing plants; therefore, different methods have been developed to increase it. In this work, a miniature Chihuahua-type cheese model was used to assess the effect of a phospholipase A1 (PL-A1) and exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bacteria (separately and in combination) on the yield, microstructure, and texture of cheese. Four different cheeses were manufactured: cheese made with PL-A1, cheese made with EPS-producing bacteria, cheese with both PL-A1 and EPS-producing bacteria, and a cheese control without PL-A1 or EPS-producing bacteria. The compositional analysis of cheese was carried out using methods of AOAC International (Washington, DC). The actual yield and moisture-adjusted yield were calculated for all cheese treatments. Texture profile analyses of cheeses were performed using a texture analyzer. Micrographs were obtained by electron scanning microscopy. Fifty panelists carried out sensorial analysis using ranking tests. Incorporation of EPS-producing bacteria in the manufacture of cheese increased the moisture content and water activity. In contrast, the addition of PL-A1 did not increase fat retention or cheese yield. The use of EPS alone improved the cheese yield by increasing water and fat retention, but also caused a negative effect on the texture and flavor of Chihuahua cheese. The use of EPS-producing bacteria in combination with PL-A1 improved the cheese yield and increased the moisture and fat content. The cheeses with the best flavor and texture were those manufactured with PL-A1 and the cheeses manufactured with the combination of PL-A1 and EPS-producing culture.

  19. Proteases in bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ingmer, Hanne; Brøndsted, Lone

    2009-11-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for protein quality control under adverse conditions experienced in the host, as well as for the timely degradation of central virulence regulators. We have focused on the contribution of the conserved Lon, Clp, HtrA and FtsH proteases to pathogenesis and have highlighted common biological processes for which their activities are important for virulence.

  20. German cockroach frass proteases cleave pro-matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Valerie S; Page, Kristen

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, secreted as pro-MMP-9, is cleaved by serine proteases at the N-terminus to generate active MMP-9. Pro-MMP-9 has been found in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with asthma. Because many inhaled aeroallergens contain active proteases, the authors sought to determine whether German cockroach (GC) fecal remnants (frass) and house dust mite (HDM) were able to cleave pro-MMP-9. Treatment of recombinant human (rh) pro-MMP-9 with GC frass resulted in a dose- and time-dependent cleavage. This was abrogated by pretreating frass with an inhibitor of serine, but not cysteine protease activity. GC frass also induced cleavage of pro-MMP-9 from primary human neutrophils dependent on the active serine proteases in GC frass. HDM was less potent at cleaving pro-MMP-9. Alpha1-antitrypsin (A1AT), a naturally occurring protease inhibitor, attenuated GC frass-induced cleavage of pro-MMP-9. A1AT partially inactivated the serine protease activity in GC frass, while GC frass cleaved A1AT in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These data suggest that GC frass-derived serine proteases could regulate the activity of MMP-9 and that A1AT may play an important role in modulating GC frass activity in vivo. These data suggest a mechanism by which inhalation of GC frass could regulate airway remodeling through the activation of pro-MMP-9.

  1. Rapid qualitative protease microassay (RPM).

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Ma, P W K; Luthe, D S

    2005-09-30

    A rapid qualitative protease microassay (RPM) was developed as an alternative to conventional assays of cysteine protease activity in HPLC fractions. Using this technique protease activity in samples could be visually determined within 5 min. The method was sensitive to 3.3x10(-7) U/mL of papain and detected cysteine protease activity in dilute HPLC fractions with activity of 5.4x10(-5) U/mL. Because the method monitors the decolorization of Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained substrate, it can be modified to detect other classes of proteases.

  2. IgA nephropathy and tonsils--an approach from the structure of IgA1 produced by tonsillar lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Horie, Akeyo; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Iwase, Hitoo; Sugiyama, Satoshi

    2004-12-01

    Human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), which is the predominant subtype to be deposited in glomeruli in IgA nephropathy (IgAN), has a unique mucine-like structure in its hinge region. Namely, it contains O-glycans and proline-rich peptides We previously observed underglycosylation of the hinge region in serum and deposited IgA1 in IgAN. On the other hand, clinical development and exacerbation of IgAN are frequently preceded by episodes of upper respiratory tract infection, and palatine tonsils represent the predominant immunocompetent tissue of the upper respiratory tract. Therefore, we hypothesized that tonsils were one of the origins of glomerular IgA1 in IgAN, and investigated the O-glycan structure of IgA1 produced by tonsillar lymphocytes (tonsillar IgA1). A significant increase in asialo-agalacto type O-glycans was found in the tonsillar IgA1 hinge in IgAN. These results suggest that the tonsils produce underglycosylated IgA1 molecules, which enter the bloodstream and are then deposited in the glomeruli.

  3. Mitigation of EMI/RFI produced by a 1.2 kW uninterruptible power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikros, Efthimios

    1993-09-01

    Recently installed equipment in naval receiving sites, such as Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS), digital telephone switching systems, and personal computers, inject noise into receiver systems via power conductors, cable shields, and grounds, thus reducing the probability of intercept of a signal of interest in the 2-100 NMHz range. In this thesis a survey of EMI/RFI sources at receiving sites is performed. The effectiveness of a Barrier-Filter-Ground architecture in containing/eliminating EMI/RFI from a 1.2 kW UPS is tested. The spectral and temporal properties of the EMI/RFI from the UPS are recorded. Estimates for the EMI/RFI power are obtained from 60Hz to 100kHz, and a possible solution is proposed for obtaining noise power estimates for higher frequencies.

  4. From proteases to proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, Hans

    2001-01-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950–2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments). PMID:11274481

  5. From proteases to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Neurath, H

    2001-04-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950-2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments).

  6. Proteases in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Peter N; Ahmad, Syed S

    2002-01-01

    The serine proteases, cofactors and cell-receptor molecules that comprise the haemostatic mechanism are highly conserved modular proteins that have evolved to participate in biochemical reactions in blood coagulation, anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Blood coagulation is initiated by exposure of tissue factor, which forms a complex with factor VIIa and factor X, which results in the generation of small quantities of thrombin and is rapidly shutdown by the tissue factor pathway inhibitor. The generation of these small quantities of thrombin then activates factor XI, resulting in a sequence of events that lead to the activation of factor IX, factor X and prothrombin. Sufficient thrombin is generated to effect normal haemostasis by converting fibrinogen into fibrin. The anticoagulant pathways that regulate blood coagulation include the protein C anticoagulant mechanism, the serine protease inhibitors in plasma, and the Kunitz-like inhibitors, tissue factor pathway inhibitor and protease nexin 2. Finally, the fibrinolytic mechanism that comprises the activation of plasminogen into plasmin prevents excessive fibrin accumulation by promoting local dissolution of thrombi and promoting wound healing by reestablishment of blood flow.

  7. Multifunctional Mitochondrial AAA Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Steven E.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria perform numerous functions necessary for the survival of eukaryotic cells. These activities are coordinated by a diverse complement of proteins encoded in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that must be properly organized and maintained. Misregulation of mitochondrial proteostasis impairs organellar function and can result in the development of severe human diseases. ATP-driven AAA+ proteins play crucial roles in preserving mitochondrial activity by removing and remodeling protein molecules in accordance with the needs of the cell. Two mitochondrial AAA proteases, i-AAA and m-AAA, are anchored to either face of the mitochondrial inner membrane, where they engage and process an array of substrates to impact protein biogenesis, quality control, and the regulation of key metabolic pathways. The functionality of these proteases is extended through multiple substrate-dependent modes of action, including complete degradation, partial processing, or dislocation from the membrane without proteolysis. This review discusses recent advances made toward elucidating the mechanisms of substrate recognition, handling, and degradation that allow these versatile proteases to control diverse activities in this multifunctional organelle. PMID:28589125

  8. Optimum production and characterization of an acid protease from marine yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii W6b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Peng, Ying; Wang, Xianghong; Chi, Zhenming

    2010-12-01

    The marine yeast strain W6b isolated from sediment of the South China Sea was found to produce a cell-bound acid protease. The crude acid protease produced by this marine yeast showed the highest activity at pH 3.5 and 40 °C. The optimal pH and temperature for the crude acid protease were in agreement with those for acid protease produced by the terrestrial yeasts. The optimal medium of the acid protease production was seawater containing 1.0% glucose, 1.5% casein, and 0.5% yeast extract, and the optimal cultivation conditions of the acid protease production were pH 4.0, a temperature of 25 °C and a shaking speed of 140 rmin-1. Under the optimal conditions, 72.5 UmL-1 of acid protease activity could be obtained in cell suspension within 48 h of fermentation at shake flask level. The acid protease production was induced by high-molecular-weight nitrogen sources and repressed by low-molecular-weight nitrogen sources. Skimmed-milk-clotting test showed that the crude acid protease from the cell suspension of the yeast W6b had high skimmed milk coagulability. The acid protease produced by M. reukaufii W6b may have highly potential applications in cheese, food and fermentation industries.

  9. Effects of cultural conditions on protease production by Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, T; Day, D F

    1983-01-01

    Production of extracellular proteolytic activity by Aeromonas hydrophila was influenced by temperature, pH, and aeration. Conditions which produced maximal growth also resulted in maximal protease production. Enzyme production appeared to be modulated by an inducer catabolite repression system whereby NH4+ and glucose repressed enzyme production and complex nitrogen and nonglucose, carbon energy sources promoted it. Under nutritional stress, protease production was high, despite poor growth. PMID:6342534

  10. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    terminus in the enzyme’s substrate or product binding. Keywords: botulinum neurotoxin, tyrosine phosphorylation, zinc endoporotease, protease, clostridium ...associated membrane protein. These 150 kDa exotoxins are produced by strains of Clostridium botulinum as sevendistinct serotypes,designatedBoNT/A-G.After...A) anti-phosphotyrosine antibody Western blot (B). (A) Relative abundance of the m/z species representing phosphorylated LcB was plotted as a% of

  11. Protease signalling: the cutting edge

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Boris; Turk, Dus̆an; Turk, Vito

    2012-01-01

    Protease research has undergone a major expansion in the last decade, largely due to the extremely rapid development of new technologies, such as quantitative proteomics and in-vivo imaging, as well as an extensive use of in-vivo models. These have led to identification of physiological substrates and resulted in a paradigm shift from the concept of proteases as protein-degrading enzymes to proteases as key signalling molecules. However, we are still at the beginning of an understanding of protease signalling pathways. We have only identified a minor subset of true physiological substrates for a limited number of proteases, and their physiological regulation is still not well understood. Similarly, links with other signalling systems are not well established. Herein, we will highlight current challenges in protease research. PMID:22367392

  12. Protease signalling: the cutting edge.

    PubMed

    Turk, Boris; Turk, Dušan; Turk, Vito

    2012-04-04

    Protease research has undergone a major expansion in the last decade, largely due to the extremely rapid development of new technologies, such as quantitative proteomics and in-vivo imaging, as well as an extensive use of in-vivo models. These have led to identification of physiological substrates and resulted in a paradigm shift from the concept of proteases as protein-degrading enzymes to proteases as key signalling molecules. However, we are still at the beginning of an understanding of protease signalling pathways. We have only identified a minor subset of true physiological substrates for a limited number of proteases, and their physiological regulation is still not well understood. Similarly, links with other signalling systems are not well established. Herein, we will highlight current challenges in protease research.

  13. Serine protease inhibitors suppress pancreatic endogenous proteases and modulate bacterial neutral proteases.

    PubMed

    Nduaguibe, Chikodili C; Bentsi-Barnes, Kwamina; Mullen, Yoko; Kandeel, Fouad; Al-Abdullah, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Pefabloc, Trasylol and Urinary Trypsin Inhibitor (UTI) have been reported to be effective serine protease inhibitors that impair pancreatic endogenous proteases resulting in improved islet yield. Here we evaluated the effect of these inhibitors on endogenous proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase), bacterial neutral proteases (thermolysin and neutral protease) and islet isolation digestion samples. Protease activity was measured using a fluorimetric assay and islet function was assessed by dynamic perifusion. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase were significantly inhibited by Pefabloc and UTI. Trasylol showed strong inhibitory effects on trypsin and chymotrypsin but also decreased thermolysin activity. UTI was found to inhibit the activity of endogenous proteases and increase the activity of bacterial neutral proteases. Human islets exposed to Pefabloc had reduced insulin response, unlike Trasylol or UTI, which had no detrimental effect on insulin secretion. Although Trasylol was an effective inhibitor of endogenous proteases, FDA regulatory issues preclude its use in clinical application and thus in the isolation process. UTI has the greatest potential because it impairs endogenous pancreatic proteases and enhances digestion enzymes.

  14. A survey of IgA protease production among clinical isolates of Proteeae.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Albrechtsen, M; Kerr, M A

    1988-01-01

    A collection of 100 strains of Proteeae, in which all species within the tribe were represented, was examined for IgA protease production. The strains were isolated from various clinical specimens from sick and healthy persons in several countries. IgA protease-producing strains were not found amongst species of Providencia and Morganella but were common in Proteus spp. All the strains of P. mirabilis and P. penneri and many of the strains of P. vulgaris examined produced an EDTA-sensitive protease that cleaved the IgA heavy chain outside the hinge region. The proteus enzyme was different in this respect from the EDTA-sensitive, hinge-cutting proteases of other bacteria. The ability to produce IgA protease was unrelated to the O antigenicity, biotype or bacteriocin type of the strain. IgA protease production may be an important virulence mechanism for Proteus strains.

  15. Recent developments in production and biotechnological applications of cold-active microbial proteases.

    PubMed

    Kuddus, Mohammed; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2012-11-01

    Microbial proteases that occupy a pivotal position with respect to their commercial applications are most important hydrolytic enzymes and have been studied extensively since the advent of enzymology. Cold-adapted microorganisms are potential source of cold-active proteases and they have been isolated from the cold regions. Although there are many microbial sources available for producing proteases, only few are recognized as commercial producer. Cold-active proteases along with their producing microbes are of commercial value and find multiple applications in various industrial and biotechnological sectors such as additives in detergents, additives in food industries, environmental bioremediations, biotransformation and molecular biology applications. Therefore, cold-active proteases are the enzymes of choice for many biotechnologists, microbiologists, biochemists, environmentalists and biochemical engineers. In the present review, we discuss some novel sources along with recent developments in production and biotechnological applications of cold-active microbial proteases.

  16. Inhibition of protease production of various bacteria by ammonium salts: its effect on toxin production and virulence.

    PubMed

    Liu, P V; Hsieh, H C

    1969-08-01

    Production of protease by many bacteria was found to be inhibited by ammonium salts, and the enzyme production was more sensitive to the salts than was growth of the organisms. Inhibition of protease production by some pathogenic bacteria may result in the recognition of an exotoxin which otherwise would have been digested by the protease. In the case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, qualitatively different toxicities could be demonstrated in the culture fluids, depending on the presence or absence of protease in such a fluid. The toxicity of the culture in the presence of a high titer of protease may be due primarily to the protease, whereas the toxicity exhibited in the absence of protease could be due to proteinacious exotoxin. Producers of high titers of protease tended to be less virulent in vivo than producers of low titers of the enzyme, which exert their toxicities by a separate exotoxin.

  17. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  18. Isolation and purification of enniatins A, A(1), B, B(1), produced by Fusarium tricinctum in solid culture, and cytotoxicity effects on Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Meca, G; Ruiz, M J; Soriano, J M; Ritieni, A; Moretti, A; Font, G; Mañes, J

    2010-09-01

    Enniatins (ENs) are antibiotic compounds of hexadepsipeptidic structure produced by several strains of Fusarium spp. The ENs A, A(1), B, B(1) were purified from extracts of Fusarium tricinctum grown on a solid medium of corn, by a low pressure liquid chromatography (LPLC) on reverse phase of Amberlite XAD-7 followed by semipreparative LC. The purity and the structure of the isolated compounds were confirmed by LC-MS/MS. The technique of the purification of the fungal extract enabled complete separation of the ENs A, A(1), B, B(1) with a mean purity of 97% for all the compounds. The cytoxicity of the ENs was tested in the cell lines of human origin (epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells, Caco-2) by MTT assays. Only EN A(1) and B(1) evoked toxicity at the tested concentrations. The inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) for EN A(1) on Caco-2 cells was 12.3 microM, whereas the IC(50) produced by the EN B(1) was 19.5 microM. This study indicates that ENs, fungal metabolites that are commonly found in corn and in general in product composed by corn, may have a toxic potential for human health. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Proteases of Wood Rot Fungi with Emphasis on the Genus Pleurotus

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, Fabíola Dorneles; Ferreira, Roselene Oliveira; de Araujo, Caroline Aparecida Vaz; Peralta, Rosane Marina; de Souza, Cristina Giatti Marques

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are present in all living organisms and they play an important role in physiological conditions. Cell growth and death, blood clotting, and immune defense are all examples of the importance of proteases in maintaining homeostasis. There is growing interest in proteases due to their use for industrial purposes. The search for proteases with specific characteristics is designed to reduce production costs and to find suitable properties for certain industrial sectors, as well as good producing organisms. Ninety percent of commercialized proteases are obtained from microbial sources and proteases from macromycetes have recently gained prominence in the search for new enzymes with specific characteristics. The production of proteases from saprophytic basidiomycetes has led to the identification of various classes of proteases. The genus Pleurotus has been extensively studied because of its ligninolytic enzymes. The characteristics of this genus are easy cultivation techniques, high yield, low nutrient requirements, and excellent adaptation. There are few studies in the literature about proteases of Pleurotus spp. This review gathers together information about proteases, especially those derived from basidiomycetes, and aims at stimulating further research about fungal proteases because of their physiological importance and their application in various industries such as biotechnology and medicine. PMID:26180792

  20. Purification and biochemical characterization of an alkaline protease from marine bacteria Pseudoalteromonas sp. 129-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shimei; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Dechao; Li, Chaoxu; Sun, Chaomin

    2015-12-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by marine bacteria strain Pseudoalteromonas sp. 129-1 was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, anion exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. The purity of the protease was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and molecular mass was estimated to be 35 kDa. The protease maintained considerable activity and stability at a wide temperature range of 10-60 °C and pH range of 6-11, and optimum activity was detected at temperature of 50 °C and pH of 8. Metallo-protease inhibitor, EDTA, had no inhibitory effect on protease activity even at concentration up to 15 mM, whereas 15 mM PMSF, a common serine protease inhibitor, greatly inactivated the protease. The high stability of the protease in the presence of surfactants (SDS, Tween 80, and Triton X-100), oxidizing agent H(2)O(2), and commercial detergents was observed. Moreover, the protease was tolerant to most of the tested organic solvents, and saline tolerant up to 30%. Interestingly, biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was greatly reduced by 0.01 mg ml(-1) of the protease, and nearly completely abolished with the concentration of 1 mg ml(-1). Collectively, the protease showed valuable feathers as an additive in laundry detergent and non-toxic anti-biofilm agent.

  1. A Culture-Based Method for Determining the Production of Secreted Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, David; Bermudes, David

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a culture-based method for determining the production of secreted protease inhibitors. The assay utilizes standard proteolysis detection plates to support microbial growth followed by infiltrating the plate with a protease and subsequently detecting the remaining protein by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation, or by bromocreosol green (BCG) or Ponseau S (PS) staining. The presence of a protease inhibitor can be observed in the form of a protected zone of protein around the protease inhibitor-producing strain. Using the protease inhibitors α-2-macroglobulin, aprotinin, leupeptin, and bestatin and the primary and secondary forms of Photorhabdus luminescens in combination with the protease trypsin, we were able to demonstrate that the assay is specific for the cognate inhibitor of the protease and for bacteria secreting protease inhibitors. In addition, when casein-containing plates were used, the size of the diffusion zone was inversely correlated with the molecular weight of the inhibitor allowing a relative estimation of the protease inhibitor molecular weight. This assay is useful for detecting the presence of microbial secreted protease inhibitors and may reveal their production by microorganisms that were not previously recognized to produce them. PMID:24632514

  2. Anti-TMV activity of malformin A1, a cyclic penta-peptide produced by an endophytic fungus Aspergillus tubingensis FJBJ11.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qing-Wei; Gao, Fang-Luan; Wang, Fu-Rong; Chen, Qi-Jian

    2015-03-12

    Plant-associated microorganisms are known to produce a variety of metabolites with novel structures and interesting biological activities. An endophytic fungus FJBJ11, isolated from the plant tissue of Brucea javanica (L.) Merr. (Simaroubaceae), was proven to be significantly effective in producing metabolites with anti-Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activities. The isolate was identified as Aspergillus tubingensis FJBJ11 based on morphological characteristics and ITS sequence. Bioassay-guided isolation led to the identification of a cycli penta-peptide, malformin A1, along with two cyclic dipeptides, cyclo (Gly-L-Pro) and cyclo (Ala-Leu). Malformin A1 showed potent inhibitory effect against the infection and replication of TMV with IC50 values of 19.7 and 45.4 μg·mL⁻¹, as tested using local lesion assay and leaf-disc method, respectively. The results indicated the potential use of malformin A1 as a leading compound or a promising candidate of new viricide.

  3. A New Class of Serine and Cysteine Protease Inhibitor with Chemotherapeutic Potential

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    also be used to produce a serine protease inhibitor. Similar to the cysteine inhibitors, a dipeptide side chain is attached to the ring which is...which relieves the 7 strain (Figure 3). Serine and cysteine proteases use a mechanism to cleave peptide bonds which involves addition of a catalytic...serine and cysteine proteases share a similar mechanism for hydrolyzing amide bonds , we expect that 4-heterocyclohexanones should be good inhibitors

  4. Zebra chip disease decreases tuber (Solanum tuberosum L.) protein content by attenuating protease inhibitor levels and increasing protease activities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G N Mohan; Knowles, Lisa O; Knowles, N Richard

    2015-11-01

    Zebra chip disease of potato decreases protease inhibitor levels resulting in enhanced serine-type protease activity, decreased protein content and altered protein profiles of fully mature tubers. Zebra-chip (ZC), caused by Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), is a relatively new disease of potato that negatively affects growth, yield, propagation potential, and fresh and process qualities of tubers. Diseased plants produce tubers with characteristic brown discoloration of vascular tissue accompanied by elevated levels of free amino acids and reducing sugars. Here we demonstrate that ZC disease induces selective protein catabolism in tubers through modulating protease inhibitor levels. Soluble protein content of tubers from CLso-infected plants was 33% lower than from non-infected plants and electrophoretic analyses revealed substantial reductions in major tuber proteins. Patatin (~40 kDa) and ser-, asp- (22 kDa) and cys-type (85 kDa) protease inhibitors were either absent or greatly reduced in ZC-afflicted tubers. In contrast to healthy (non-infected) tubers, the proteolytic activity in CLso infected tubers was high and the ability of extracts from infected tubers to inhibit trypsin (ser-type) and papain (cys-type) proteases greatly attenuated. Moreover, extracts from CLso-infected tubers rapidly catabolized proteins purified from healthy tubers (40 kDa patatin, 22 kDa protease inhibitors, 85 kDa potato multicystatin) when subjected to proteolysis individually. In contrast, crude extracts from non-infected tubers effectively inhibited the proteolytic activity from ZC-afflicted tubers. These results suggest that the altered protein profile of ZC afflicted tubers is largely due to loss of ser- and cys-type protease inhibitors. Further analysis revealed a novel PMSF-sensitive (ser) protease (ca. 80-120 kDa) in CLso infected tubers. PMSF abolished the proteolytic activities responsible for degrading patatin, the 22 kDa protease inhibitor(s) and potato

  5. Proteases from psychrotrophs: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kasana, Ramesh Chand

    2010-05-01

    Proteases are hydrolytic enzymes which catalyze the total hydrolysis of proteins in to amino acids. Although proteolytic enzymes can be obtained from animals and plants but microorganisms are the preferred source for industrial applications in view of scientific and economical advantage. Among various groups of microbes, psychrotrophs are ideal candidates for enzymes production keeping in mind that enzymes active at low temperature and stable under alkaline condition, in presence of oxidants and detergents are in large demand as laundry additive. The proteases from psychrotrophs also find application in environmental bioremediation, food and molecular biology. During the previous two decades, proteases from psychrotrophs have received increased attention because of their wide range of applications, but the full potential of psychrotrophic proteases has not been exploited. This review focuses attention on the present status of knowledge on the production, optimization, molecular characteristics, applications, substrate specificity, and crystal structure of psychrotrophic proteases. The review will help in making strategies for exploitation of psychrotrophic protease resources and improvement of enzymes to obtain more robust proteases of industrial and biotechnological significance.

  6. Proteases in gastrointestinal neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Herszényi, L; Plebani, M; Carraro, P; De Paoli, M; Roveroni, G; Cardin, R; Foschia, F; Tulassay, Z; Naccarato, R; Farinati, F

    2000-02-15

    Cysteine and serine proteases are involved in cancer invasion and metastasis. In the past few years we investigated the tissue levels of these proteases in gastric cancer (GC), gastric precancerous changes (CAG), colorectal cancer (CRC) and the plasma and serum levels of proteases in several gastrointestinal tumours, using ELISA methods. Significantly higher antigen levels were found not only in GC tissue but also in CAG with respect to the levels found normal tissue; with respect to CAG, patients with dysplasia had higher levels than patients without dysplasia. The same findings were obtained in CRC. In general protease levels correlated with the major histomorphological parameters, such as grading and histotype in GC as well as in CRC. Tissue protease levels had a strong prognostic impact in GC, in which UPA was singled out by multivariate analysis as the major prognostic factor, and CRC. The plasma levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (UPA) and the serum levels of cathepsin B were significantly increased in patients with gastrointestinal tumours. In conclusions, cysteine and serine proteases may have a part not only in GC and CRC invasion and metastasis, but also in the progression of gastric precancerous changes into cancer. They are strong prognostic factors in GC and CRC. These proteases may also have a role as tumour markers in the early diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract tumours.

  7. Regulation of pH attenuates toxicity of a byproduct produced by an ethanologenic strain of Sphingomonas sp. A1 during ethanol fermentation from alginate

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Mari; Yoshida, Shiori; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Marine macroalgae is a promising carbon source that contains alginate and mannitol as major carbohydrates. A bioengineered ethanologenic strain of the bacterium Sphingomonas sp. A1 can produce ethanol from alginate, but not mannitol, whereas the yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus NBRC 0259–3 can produce ethanol from mannitol, but not alginate. Thus, one practical approach for converting both alginate and mannitol into ethanol would involve two-step fermentation, in which the ethanologenic bacterium initially converts alginate into ethanol, and then the yeast produces ethanol from mannitol. In this study, we found that, during fermentation from alginate, the ethanologenic bacterium lost viability and secreted toxic byproducts into the medium. These toxic byproducts inhibited bacterial growth and killed bacterial cells and also inhibited growth of S. paradoxus NBRC 0259–3. We discovered that adjusting the pH of the culture supernatant or the culture medium containing the toxic byproducts to 6.0 attenuated the toxicity toward both bacteria and yeast, and also extended the period of viability of the bacterium. Although continuous adjustment of pH to 6.0 failed to improve the ethanol productivity of this ethanologenic bacterium, this pH adjustment worked very well in the two-step fermentation due to the attenuation of toxicity toward S. paradoxus NBRC 0259–3. These findings provide information critical for establishment of a practical system for ethanol production from brown macroalgae. PMID:24445222

  8. Extracellular proteases from eight psychrotolerant Antarctic strains.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Susana C; Coria, Silvia H; MacCormack, Walter P

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular proteases from 8 Antarctic psychrotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strains were purified and characterised. All of them are neutral metalloproteases, have an apparent molecular mass of 45kDa, optimal activity at 40 degrees C and pH 7-9, retaining significant activity at pH 5-11. With the exception of P96-18, which is less stable, all retain more than 50% activity after 3 h of incubation at pH 5-9 and show low thermal stability (their half-life times range from 20 to 60 min at 40 degrees C and less than 5 min at 50 degrees C). These proteases can be used in commercial processes carried out at neutral pH and moderate temperatures, and are of special interest for their application in mixtures of enzymes where final thermal selective inactivation is needed. Results also highlight the relevance of Antarctic biotopes for the isolation of protease-producing enzymes active at low temperatures.

  9. Purification and Properties of Mucor pusillus Acid Protease1

    PubMed Central

    Somkuti, G. A.; Babel, F. J.

    1968-01-01

    The protease produced by Mucor pusillus was recovered from a wheat bran medium by treatment with ammonium sulfate, ethyl alcohol, gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography. The yield of the enzyme was 55%. The overall increase in the specific activity of the protease was 34-fold. The purified protease was most active at pH 3.8 and 5.6 against hemoglobin and casein, respectively. Optimal hydrolysis of casein was observed at 55 C. The enzyme was stable from pH 3.0 to 6.0. Enzyme inactivated by metal ions was reactivated by ethylenediaminetetraacetate and o-phenanthroline. Reducing agents and thiol poisons had no effect on the protease, suggesting that free sulfhydryl groups were not required for enzyme activity. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate did not inhibit the protease, indicating the probable absence of serine in the active center. The Michaelis-Menten constant for casein was 0.357%. Electrophoretic analysis of active protein recovered by ion-exchange chromatography showed that the protease preparation was homogeneous. Images PMID:5646628

  10. Cathepsin proteases in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are important for the growth and survival of apicomplexan parasites that infect humans. The apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii expresses five members of the C1 family of cysteine proteases, including one cathepsin L-like (TgCPL), one cathepsin B-like (TgCPB), and three cathepsin C-like (TgCPC1, 2 and 3) proteases. Recent genetic, biochemical and structural studies reveal that cathepsins function in microneme and rhoptry protein maturation, host cell invasion, replication, and nutrient acquisition.. Here, we review the key features and roles of T. gondii cathepsins and discuss the therapeutic potential for specific inhibitor development. PMID:21660658

  11. Efficacy of protease inhibitor from marine Streptomyces sp. VITBVK2 against Leishmania donovani - An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, Veena; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2017-03-01

    In the present study the leishmanicidal effect of potential protease inhibitor producing marine actinobacterial isolate has been investigated against Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis. Among 89 marine actinobacteria isolated from a salt pan in Kanyakumari, only one isolate (BVK2) showed 97% of protease inhibition activity against trypsin. Moderate to high protease inhibitor activity was shown by isolate BVK2 on proteinase (30%) and chymotrypsin (85%). In optimization study for protease inhibitor production glucose as carbon source and casein as nitrogen source showed the best activity. In the in-vitro Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) assay, 100 μg/ml of BVK2 extract was active against amastigotes in infected J774A.1 macrophages and showed 87% of parasitic inhibition. The isolate BVK2 showed significant anti-parasitic activity with an IC50 of 27.1 μg/ml after double doses were administered. The potential isolate was identified by molecular 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Streptomyces sp. VITBVK2. The results obtained suggest that the marine actinobacterial extract which have novel metabolites can be considered as a potential source for the development of drugs.

  12. Scouring Potential of Mesophile Acidic Proteases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for Grey Cotton Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, D.

    2013-04-01

    Mesophile, acidic proteases were produced using the microbial source, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with wider thermal tolerances. Process conditions of scouring treatment were optimized using Taguchi method for optimum temperature, time, pH and concentration of protease. Treatment with the protease lower weight loss values compared to the alkali scouring, however, significant improvement in the absorbency compared to the grey samples was observed. Large amounts of pectin left out in the samples resulted in higher extractable impurities, substantiated by the FTIR results. Relatively, lower reduction in the tear strengths was observed in both warp and weft directions after protease treatment of the cotton fabrics.

  13. Exogenous proteases for meat tenderization.

    PubMed

    Bekhit, Alaa A; Hopkins, David L; Geesink, Geert; Bekhit, Adnan A; Franks, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The use of exogenous proteases to improve meat tenderness has attracted much interest recently, with a view to consistent production of tender meat and added value to lower grade meat cuts. This review discusses the sources, characteristics, and use of exogenous proteases in meat tenderization to highlight the specificity of the proteases toward meat proteins and their impact on meat quality. Plant enzymes (such as papain, bromelain, and ficin) have been extensively investigated as meat tenderizers. New plant proteases (actinidin and zingibain) and microbial enzyme preparations have been of recent interest due to controlled meat tenderization and other advantages. Successful use of these enzymes in fresh meat requires their enzymatic kinetics and characteristics to be determined, together with an understanding of the impact of the surrounding environmental conditions of the meat (pH, temperature) on enzyme function. This enables the optimal conditions for tenderizing fresh meat to be established, and the elimination or reduction of any negative impacts on other quality attributes.

  14. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  15. SjAPI, the first functionally characterized Ascaris-type protease inhibitor from animal venoms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongyun; Wang, Bin; Hu, Jun; Yang, Weishan; Cao, Zhijian; Zhuo, Renxi; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang

    2013-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors act as modulators of serine proteases, playing important roles in protecting animal toxin peptides from degradation. However, all known serine protease inhibitors discovered thus far from animal venom belong to the Kunitz-type subfamily, and whether there are other novel types of protease inhibitors in animal venom remains unclear. Here, by screening scorpion venom gland cDNA libraries, we identified the first Ascaris-type animal toxin family, which contains four members: Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (SjAPI), Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor 2 (SjAPI-2), Chaerilus tricostatus Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (CtAPI), and Buthus martensii Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (BmAPI). The detailed characterization of Ascaris-type peptide SjAPI from the venom gland of scorpion Scorpiops jendeki was carried out. The mature peptide of SjAPI contains 64 residues and possesses a classical Ascaris-type cysteine framework reticulated by five disulfide bridges, different from all known protease inhibitors from venomous animals. Enzyme and inhibitor reaction kinetics experiments showed that recombinant SjAPI was a dual function peptide with α-chymotrypsin- and elastase-inhibiting properties. Recombinant SjAPI inhibited α-chymotrypsin with a Ki of 97.1 nM and elastase with a Ki of 3.7 μM, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses and chimera experiments indicated that SjAPI contained the unique short side chain functional residues "AAV" and might be a useful template to produce new serine protease inhibitors. To our knowledge, SjAPI is the first functionally characterized animal toxin peptide with an Ascaris-type fold. The structural and functional diversity of animal toxins with protease-inhibiting properties suggested that bioactive peptides from animal venom glands might be a new source of protease inhibitors, which will accelerate the development of diagnostic and therapeutic agents for human diseases that target

  16. An antibiotic, heavy metal resistant and halotolerant Bacillus cereus SIU1 and its thermoalkaline protease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many workers have reported halotolerant bacteria from saline conditions capable of protease production. However, antibiotic resistance and heavy metal tolerance pattern of such organisms is not documented very well. Similarly, only a few researchers have reported the pattern of pH change of fermentation medium during the course of protease production. In this study, we have isolated a halotolerant Bacillus cereus SIU1 strain from a non-saline environment and studied its antibiotic and heavy metal resistance pattern. The isolate produces a thermoalkaline protease and changes the medium pH during the course of fermentation. Thermostability of protease was also studied for 30 min. Results Seventy bacterial strains isolated from the soils of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India were screened for protease production. All of them exhibited protease activity. However, 40% bacterial isolates were found good protease producers as observed by caseinolytic zones on milk agar plates. Among them, culture S-4 was adjudged as the best protease producer, and was identified as Bacillus cereus by morphological, biochemical and 16 S rDNA sequence analyses. The isolate was resistant to heavy metals (As2+, Pb2+, Cs1+) and antibiotics (penicillin, lincomycin, cloxacillin, pefloxacin). Its growth behavior and protease production was studied at 45°C and pH 9.0. The protease units of 88 ml-1 were noted in unoptimized modified glucose yeast extract (GYE) medium during early stationary phase at 20 h incubation period. The enzyme was stable in the temperature range of 35°-55°C. Conclusions An antibiotic and heavy metal resistant, halotolerant Bacillus cereus isolate is capable of producing thermoalkaline protease, which is active and stable at pH 9.0 and 35°-55°C. This isolate may be useful in several industrial applications owing to its halotolerance and antibiotic and heavy metal resistance characteristics. PMID:20646325

  17. An antibiotic, heavy metal resistant and halotolerant Bacillus cereus SIU1 and its thermoalkaline protease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay K; Tripathi, Vinayak R; Jain, Rakesh K; Vikram, Surendra; Garg, Satyendra K

    2010-07-21

    Many workers have reported halotolerant bacteria from saline conditions capable of protease production. However, antibiotic resistance and heavy metal tolerance pattern of such organisms is not documented very well. Similarly, only a few researchers have reported the pattern of pH change of fermentation medium during the course of protease production. In this study, we have isolated a halotolerant Bacillus cereus SIU1 strain from a non-saline environment and studied its antibiotic and heavy metal resistance pattern. The isolate produces a thermoalkaline protease and changes the medium pH during the course of fermentation. Thermostability of protease was also studied for 30 min. Seventy bacterial strains isolated from the soils of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India were screened for protease production. All of them exhibited protease activity. However, 40% bacterial isolates were found good protease producers as observed by caseinolytic zones on milk agar plates. Among them, culture S-4 was adjudged as the best protease producer, and was identified as Bacillus cereus by morphological, biochemical and 16 S rDNA sequence analyses. The isolate was resistant to heavy metals (As2+, Pb2+, Cs1+) and antibiotics (penicillin, lincomycin, cloxacillin, pefloxacin). Its growth behavior and protease production was studied at 45 degrees C and pH 9.0. The protease units of 88 ml-1 were noted in unoptimized modified glucose yeast extract (GYE) medium during early stationary phase at 20 h incubation period. The enzyme was stable in the temperature range of 35 degrees-55 degrees C. An antibiotic and heavy metal resistant, halotolerant Bacillus cereus isolate is capable of producing thermoalkaline protease, which is active and stable at pH 9.0 and 35 degrees-55 degrees C. This isolate may be useful in several industrial applications owing to its halotolerance and antibiotic and heavy metal resistance characteristics.

  18. Application of Protease Technology in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews background on proteases and their functions, their physiological significance in skin, and the potential implications of incorporating specific proteases and protease blends into dermatological products, including skin care formulations. The history of protease blend formulations used in wound model studies and for other disorders is reviewed. In vitro data with use of a specific 3-protease blend with evaluation of the impact on various skin proteins and peptides is also discussed in this article. PMID:23882305

  19. Kinetics of alkaline protease production by Streptomyces griseoflavus PTCC1130

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Vesal; Saffari, Zahra; Farhanghi, Ali; Atyabi, Seyed Mohammad; Norouzian, Dariush

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Proteases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the degradation of proteins resulting in the production of their amino acid constituents. They are the most important group of industrial enzymes which account for about 60% of total enzymes in the market and produced mainly by microorganisms. The attempts were made to study the kinetic parameters of protease produced by Streptomyces griseoflavus PTCC1130. Materials and Methods: Streptomyces griseoflavus PTCC1130 was grown on casein agar. Different media such as BM1, BM2, BM3 and BM4 were prepared. Data obtained from growth and protease production were subjected to kinetics evaluation. Casein was used as substrate for protease activity and the released soluble peptide bearing aromatic amino acid were quantified by Folin Cioclateaue reagent. Protein content of the enzyme and the sugar utilized by the organism were estimated by Bradford and Miller’s methods respectively. Results: Basal Medium named as BM1, BM2, BM3 and BM4(50 mL in 250 mL Erlen Meyer flasks) were screened out to evaluate protease production by Streptomyces griseoflavus PTCC1130. They were inoculated with known amount of seed culture and kept on rotary shaker. To obtain the specific growth rate, wet weight of biomass was plotted against the time. The clarified supernatant was used for the analysis of protease by measuring the soluble peptide containing aromatic amino acid residues employing Folin Cioclateaue reagent. Our results showed that maximum level of enzyme production (14035 U/L) was occurred at late exponential phase using Basal Medium supplemented with zinc sulfate (0.5g/L), casein (10g/L) at pH 6.5. Conclusions: A kinetic study of protease production by Streptomyces griseoflavus PTCC1130 provided highly quantitative information regarding the behavior of a system, which is essential to study the fermentation process. Exploitation of such kinetics analysis would be useful in commercialization of microbial enzyme

  20. Structures and absolute stereochemistry of dinapinones A1 and A2, inhibitors of triacylglycerol synthesis, produced by penicillium pinophilum FKI-3864.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Ryuji; Ohte, Satoshi; Kawamoto, Kyosuke; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Mio; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    During our screening program for microbial inhibitors of triacylglycerol synthesis in mammalian cells, four structurally related new compounds, dinapinones A1 (1) and A2 (2) and monapinones A (3) and B (4), were isolated from the culture broth of Penicillium pinophilum FKI-3864. Compounds 3 and 4 were produced by the fungus only when fermented in seawater-supplemented medium. The structures of 1 to 4 were elucidated by spectroscopic studies including various NMR experiments. Compounds 1 and 2 were atropisomers consisting of two monomers with the same planar structure of dihydronaphthopyranone as 3. The absolute stereochemistry of 3 was elucidated by NOE experiment and circular dichroism spectra. Furthermore, the stereochemistry of 1 and 2 was elucidated by in vitro conversion from the structure-defined 3 to its dimers 1 and 2.

  1. Protease production by Burkholderia pseudomallei and virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Y P; Thibault, F M; Paucod, J C; Vidal, D R

    2000-02-05

    The aim of this study was to assess protease production and virulence of various Burkholderia pseudomallei strains. Protease activity was evaluated in filtrates from cultures grown for 50 h in TSB Dialysate by azocasein hydrolysis, and expressed as absorbancy at 405 nm. Virulence was assessed in 8 weeks old SWISS mice, by intraperitoneal injection of 6-6 x 10(5) CFU, and the LD50 was calculated after 30 days by the method of Reed and Muench. The lethal activity was studied for five strains of B. pseudomallei and the type strains of Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia mallei, and Burkholderia cepacia. The three type strains appeared to be low protease producers (A405 = 0.11, 0.09 and 0.00, respectively) and avirulent. The two more virulent B. pseudomallei strains exhibited significantly different LD50, 3.5 x 10(2) (IPP 6068 VIR) versus 2.1 x 10(5) CFU/mouse (40/97), and protease activities (A405 = 0.046 and 0.79, respectively). Moreover, the avirulent parent of IPP 6068 (AG), was a better protease producer than the 6068 VIR strain, A405 = 0.26 versus 0.046. These results suggest that there is no correlation between virulence and level of exoproteolytic activity, when B. pseudomallei is injected to mice via the intraperitoneal route.

  2. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Sweatt, J David

    2011-08-17

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes-coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example-have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  3. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Almonte, Antoine G.; Sweatt, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes—coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example—have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:21782155

  4. The salt-sensitive structure and zinc inhibition of Borrelia burgdorferi protease BbHtrA.

    PubMed

    Russell, Theresa M; Tang, Xiaoling; Goldstein, Jason M; Bagarozzi, Dennis; Johnson, Barbara J B

    2016-02-01

    HtrA serine proteases are highly conserved and essential ATP-independent proteases with chaperone activity. Bacteria express a variable number of HtrA homologues that contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of bacterial pathogens. Lyme disease spirochetes possess a single HtrA protease homologue, Borrelia burgdorferi HtrA (BbHtrA). Previous studies established that, like the human orthologue HtrA1, BbHtrA is proteolytically active against numerous extracellular proteins in vitro. In this study, we utilized size exclusion chromatography and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) to demonstrate BbHtrA oligomeric structures that were substrate independent and salt sensitive. Examination of the influence of transition metals on the activity of BbHtrA revealed that this protease is inhibited by Zn(2+) > Cu(2+) > Mn(2+). Extending this analysis to two other HtrA proteases, E. coli DegP and HtrA1, revealed that all three HtrA proteases were reversibly inhibited by ZnCl2 at all micro molar concentrations examined. Commercial inhibitors for HtrA proteases are not available and physiologic HtrA inhibitors are unknown. Our observation of conserved zinc inhibition of HtrA proteases will facilitate structural and functional studies of additional members of this important class of proteases. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Characterization, cloning, and heterologous expression of a subtilisin-like serine protease gene VlPr1 from Verticillium lecanii.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Liu, Jin-Liang; Xie, Li-Qin; Wang, Xue-Liang; Zhang, Shi-Hong; Pan, Hong-Yu

    2012-12-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Verticillium lecanii is a well-known biocontrol agent. V. lecanii produces subtilisin-like serine protease (Pr1), which is important in the biological control activity of some insect pests by degrading insect cuticles. In this study, a subtilisin-like serine protease gene VlPr1 was cloned from the fungus and the VlPr1 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. The VlPr1 gene contains an open reading frame (ORF) interrupted by three short introns, and encodes a protein of 379 amino acids. Protein sequence analysis revealed high homology with subtilisin serine proteases. The molecular mass of the protease was 38 kDa, and the serine protease exhibited its maximal activity at 40°C and pH 9.0. Protease activity was also affected by Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) concentration. The protease showed inhibitory activity against several plant pathogens, especially towards Fusarium moniliforme.

  6. Approaches for the generation of active papain-like cysteine proteases from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chunfang; Zhang, Junyan; Lin, Deqiu; Tao, Ailin

    2015-05-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases are widely expressed, fulfill specific functions in extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation and processing events, and may represent viable drug targets for major diseases. In depth and rigorous studies of the potential for these proteins to be targets for drug development require sufficient amounts of protease protein that can be used for both experimental and therapeutic purposes. Escherichia coli was widely used to express papain-like cysteine proteases, but most of those proteases are produced in insoluble inclusion bodies that need solubilizing, refolding, purifying and activating. Refolding is the most critical step in the process of generating active cysteine proteases and the current approaches to refolding include dialysis, dilution and chromatography. Purification is mainly achieved by various column chromatography. Finally, the attained refolded proteases are examined regarding their protease structures and activities.

  7. Design, synthesis, and activity of nanocellulosic protease sensors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we contrast the molecular assembly, and biochemical utility of nanocellulosic materials prepared from cotton and wood as protease sensors. The cotton-based nanocellulosic substrates were prepared in a variety of ways to produce nanocrystals, films and aerogels, which were derivatized with eithe...

  8. Potent Inhibition of Feline Coronaviruses with Peptidyl Compounds Targeting Coronavirus 3C-like Protease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunjeong; Mandadapu, Sivakoteswara Rao; Groutas, William C.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2012-01-01

    Feline coronavirus infection is common among domestic and exotic felid species and usually associated with mild or asymptomatic enteritis; however, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease of cats that is caused by systemic infection with a feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), a variant of feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). Currently, there is no specific treatment approved for FIP despite the importance of FIP as the leading infectious cause of death in young cats. During the replication process, coronavirus produces viral polyproteins that are processed into mature proteins by viral proteases, the main protease (3C-like [3CL] protease) and the papain-like protease. Since the cleavages of viral polyproteins are an essential step for virus replication, blockage of viral protease is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Previously, we reported the generation of broad-spectrum peptidyl inhibitors against viruses that possess a 3C or 3CL protease. In this study, we further evaluated the antiviral effects of the peptidyl inhibitors against feline coronaviruses, and investigated the interaction between our protease inhibitor and a cathepsin B inhibitor, an entry blocker, against feline coronaviruses in cell culture. Herein we report that our compounds behave as reversible, competitive inhibitors of 3CL protease, potently inhibited the replication of feline coronaviruses (EC50 in a nanomolar range) and, furthermore, the combination of cathepsin B and 3CL protease inhibitors led to a strong synergistic interaction against feline coronaviruses in cell culture systems. PMID:23219425

  9. Cloning and Expression of Soluble Recombinant HIV-1 CRF35 Protease-HP Thioredoxin Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Azarnezhad, Asaad; Sharifi, Zohreh; Seyedabadi, Rahmatollah; Hosseini, Arshad; Johari, Behrooz; Sobhani Fard, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Background: As a drug target and an antigenic agent, HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is at the center of attention for designing anti-AIDS inhibitors and diagnostic tests. In previous studies, the production of the recombinant protease has been faced with several difficulties; therefore, the aims of this study were the easy production, purification of the soluble form of protease in E. coli and investigation of its immunoreactivity. Methods: Protease coding region was isolated from the serum of an infected individual, amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into PTZ57R using TA-cloning. Protease coding frame was isolated by PCR and cloned in pET102/D. TOPO expression vector and cloned protease was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21. Produced recombinant protein was purified by affinity Ni-NTA column and protein concentration was checked by BCA protein assay kit. Subsequently, immunoreactivity of recombinant protease (rPR) was assayed by Western blotting and ELISA. Results: Cloning of the HIV protease by TOPO cloning system in pET102/D.TOPO was confirmed with PCR and sequencing. The concentration range of purified recombinant protein was 85 to 100 μg/ml. Immunogenicity of rPR was confirmed by Western blotting and ELISA. Conclusion: Soluble production of recombinant HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 rPR) was performed successfully. This recombinant protein disclosed 86% specificity and 90% sensitivity in immunoassay tests. PMID:27920885

  10. Characterization of bacterial proteases with a panel of fluorescent peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Wildeboer, Dirk; Jeganathan, Fiona; Price, Robert G; Abuknesha, Ramadan A

    2009-01-15

    Bacteria produce a range of proteolytic enzymes. In an attempt to detect and identify bacteria on the basis of their protease activity, a panel of protease substrates was investigated. Peptides conjugated to the fluorophore 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (AMC) are well-established substrates for measuring protease activity. Although peptide-AMC substrates are generally not specific for a single protease, a unique pattern can be achieved for both highly specific enzymes and those with a broader substrate range by comparing different peptide substrates. The panel of 7 peptide-AMC substrates chosen exhibited a unique pattern for nine microbial proteases. The selected peptides were used to determine protease activity in cultured strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. A signal pattern obtained with peptides with arginine, lysine, and tyrosine in the P1 position characterized the bacterial protease activities in these samples. The kinetic parameters for the three best substrates for the P. aeruginosa sample were calculated. Further information about substrate specificity was gained by the selective use of protease inhibitors. The results presented show that peptide-AMC substrates provide a simple and sensitive tool to characterize protease activity in microbiological samples and that they have the potential to identify and distinguish different bacterial species.

  11. Potent inhibition of feline coronaviruses with peptidyl compounds targeting coronavirus 3C-like protease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunjeong; Mandadapu, Sivakoteswara Rao; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2013-02-01

    Feline coronavirus infection is common among domestic and exotic felid species and usually associated with mild or asymptomatic enteritis; however, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease of cats that is caused by systemic infection with a feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), a variant of feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). Currently, there is no specific treatment approved for FIP despite the importance of FIP as the leading infectious cause of death in young cats. During the replication process, coronavirus produces viral polyproteins that are processed into mature proteins by viral proteases, the main protease (3C-like [3CL] protease) and the papain-like protease. Since the cleavages of viral polyproteins are an essential step for virus replication, blockage of viral protease is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Previously, we reported the generation of broad-spectrum peptidyl inhibitors against viruses that possess a 3C or 3CL protease. In this study, we further evaluated the antiviral effects of the peptidyl inhibitors against feline coronaviruses, and investigated the interaction between our protease inhibitor and a cathepsin B inhibitor, an entry blocker, against a feline coronavirus in cell culture. Herein we report that our compounds behave as reversible, competitive inhibitors of 3CL protease, potently inhibited the replication of feline coronaviruses (EC(50) in a nanomolar range) and, furthermore, combination of cathepsin B and 3CL protease inhibitors led to a strong synergistic interaction against feline coronaviruses in a cell culture system.

  12. The encephalomyocarditis virus 3C protease is a substrate for the ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic system.

    PubMed

    Lawson, T G; Gronros, D L; Werner, J A; Wey, A C; DiGeorge, A M; Lockhart, J L; Wilson, J W; Wintrode, P L

    1994-11-11

    The encephalomyocarditis virus 3C protease has been shown to be rapidly degraded in infected cells and in vitro in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. The in vitro degradation, at least, is accomplished by a virus-independent, ATP-dependent proteolytic system. Here we identify this proteolytic system as the ubiquitin-mediated system. Incubation of the 3C protease in rabbit reticulocyte or cultured mouse cell lysate preparations, alone or in the presence of added ubiquitin or methylated ubiquitin, resulted in the generation of new higher molecular weight species. These new products were shown to be 3C protease-ubiquitin conjugates by their ability to bind antibodies against both the 3C protease and ubiquitin. Supplemental ubiquitin also stimulated the degradation of the 3C protease in these preparations. Large 3C protease-polyubiquitin conjugates were observed to accumulate in reticulocyte lysate in the presence of adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), an inhibitor of the 26 S multicatalytic protease. This, combined with the fact that the proteolytic activity could be removed from the lysate by sedimentation, implicates the multicatalytic protease in the degradation of the 3C protease-ubiquitin conjugates. It was also found that the slow rate of degradation of a model polyprotein, which resembles the stable viral 3CD diprotein produced in vivo, is likely due to the fact that the polyprotein is a poor substrate for the ubiquitin-conjugating system.

  13. Purification and characterisation of a salt-stable protease from the halophilic archaeon Halogranum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ruichang; Shi, Tong; Liu, Xiangdong; Zhao, Mengqin; Cui, Henglin; Yuan, Li

    2017-03-01

    Because proteases play an important role in the fermentation of fish sauce, the purification and characterisation of an extracellular protease from the halophilic archaeon Halogranum rubrum was investigated. The molecular mass of the protease was estimated to be approximately 47 kDa based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electropheresis (SDS-PAGE) and native-PAGE analysis. The optimum conditions for catalytic activity were pH 8.0 and 50°C. The protease showed alkaline stability (pH 7.0-10.0). The protease also exhibited novel catalytic ability over a broad range of salinity (NaCl 0-3 mol L(-1) ). Calcium ion enhanced the proteolytic activity of the enzyme. The Km and Vmax values of the purified protease for casein were calculated to be 4.89 mg mL(-1) and 1111.11 U mL(-1) , respectively. The protease was strongly inhibited by ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). Meanwhile, the protease was stable in the presence of Triton X-100, isopropanol, ethanol or dithio-bis-nitrobenzoic (DTNB), but was inhibited by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or methanol. MALDI -TOF/TOF MS analysis revealed that the protease shared some functional traits with protease produced by Halogranum salarium. Furthermore, it exhibited high hydrolytic activity on silver carp myosin protein. The protease is an alkaline and salt-tolerant enzyme that hydrolyses silver carp myosin with high efficiency. These excellent characteristics make this protease an attractive candidate for industrial use in low-salt fish sauce fermentation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Serine proteases in rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Davies, B J; Pickard, B S; Steel, M; Morris, R G; Lathe, R

    1998-09-04

    Brain serine proteases are implicated in developmental processes, synaptic plasticity, and in disorders including Alzheimer's disease. The spectrum of the major enzymes expressed in brain has not been established previously. We now present a systematic study of the serine proteases expressed in adult rat and mouse hippocampus. Using a combination of techniques including polymerase chain reaction amplification and Northern blotting we show that tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) is the major species represented. Unexpectedly, the next most abundant species were RNK-Met-1, a lymphocyte protease not reported previously in brain, and two new family members, BSP1 (brain serine protease 1) and BSP2. We report full-length sequences of the two new proteases; homologies indicate that these are of tryptic specificity. Although BSP2 is expressed in several brain regions, BSP1 expression is strikingly restricted to hippocampus. Other enzymes represented, but at lower levels, included elastase IV, proteinase 3, complement C2, chymotrypsin B, chymotrypsin-like protein, and Hageman factor. Although thrombin and urokinase-type plasminogen activator were not detected in the primary screen, low level expression was confirmed using specific polymerase chain reaction primers. In contrast, and despite robust expression of t-PA, the usual t-PA substrate plasminogen was not expressed at detectable levels.

  15. Mast Cell Proteases and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongyan; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions but are also now recognized for their important contributions to a number of disparate inflammatory conditions through the release of inflammatory mediators, serglycin and other proteoglycans, and proteases. Because these tissue resident inflammatory cells express proteases in such great abundance and their enzymatic activity results in cleavage of a multitude of proteins and peptides, which in turn modify tissue function, their substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and mode of action have become the subjects of great interest. Although mast cell protease-dependent proteolysis is critical to host defense against invading pathogens, regulation of these hydrolytic enzymes is essential to limiting self-induced damage as well. Indeed, dysregulated release of mast cell proteases is now recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory conditions including asthma, abdominal aortic aneurysm formation, vessel damage in atherosclerosis and hypertension, arthritis, and ischemia/reperfusion injury. Understanding how mast cell proteases contribute to inflammation will thus help unravel molecular mechanisms that underlie such immunologic disorders and will help identify new therapeutic targets for drug development. PMID:22125569

  16. Simultaneous production of biopesticide and alkaline proteases by Bacillus thuringiensis using sewage sludge as a raw material.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, R D; Sikati Foko, V; Barnabe, S; Vidyarthi, A S; Valéro, J R; Surampalli, R Y

    2002-01-01

    The simultaneous production of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) based biopesticide and proteases was studied using synthetic medium and wastewater sludge as a raw material. The studies were conducted in shake flask and computer controlled 15-L capacity fermentors. Measuring viable cell and spore counts, entomotoxicity and protease activity monitored the progress of the biopesticide production process. A higher viable cell count and spore count was observed in synthetic Soya medium, however, higher entomotoxicity and protease activity were observed in wastewater sludge medium. Thus, the wastewater sludge is a better raw material than commercial Soya medium for the biopesticides and enzyme production. The maximum entomotoxicity and protease activity observed in the fermentor was 9,332 IU/microL and 4.58 IU/mL, respectively. The proteases produced by Bt were also characterised. Two types of proteases were detected; neutral proteases with pH optimum 7.0 and alkaline proteases with pH optimum 10-11. Further, two types of alkaline proteases were detected; one having a pH and temperature optimum at 10 and 50 degrees C while the other at 11 and 70 degrees C. The protease thermal stability was found to increase in the presence of CaCl2, indicating the proteases were metalloproteases.

  17. Biochemical analysis and investigation on the prospective applications of alkaline protease from a Bacillus cereus strain.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mahjabeen; Rehman, Atiqa; Yasmin, Riffat; Munir, Bushra

    2012-06-01

    Proteases have prospective financial and environment-friendly applications; hence attention is focused currently on the finding of new protease producing microorganism so as to meet the requirements of industry. A thermophilic bacterial strain producing extracellular protease activity was isolated from soil and identified as Bacillus cereus by analysis of 16S rRNA. Protease production by the microorganism was improved by studying the impact of the type of nitrogen and carbon source, fermentation period, growth temperature and initial pH of the culture medium in cultivation optimization experiments. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity in two step procedure involving Sephadex G-75 and Q-Sepharose chromatography. The molecular weight of purified enzyme was found to be 58 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Protease exhibited a pH and temperature optima of 7.5 and 60°, respectively. The enzyme was active in the pH range of 6.0-9.0 and stable up to 70°C. Histological analysis of protease treated goat and cow skin pelts showed complete removal of non leather forming structures such as hair shaft, hair follicles and glandular structures. The protease showed the stain removing property from blood stained cotton cloth and found to be compatible with six commercially available detergents. The protease could release peptides from natural proteins after digestion of coagulated egg albumin and blood clot.

  18. Barrier dysfunction caused by environmental proteases in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Takai, Toshiro; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2011-03-01

    Skin barrier dysfunction has emerged as a critical driving force in the initiation and exacerbation of atopic dermatitis and the "atopic march" in allergic diseases. The genetically determined barrier deficiency and barrier disruption by environmental and endogenous proteases in skin and epithelium are considered to increase the risk of sensitization to allergens and contribute to the exacerbation of allergic diseases. Sources of allergens such as mites, cockroaches, fungi, and pollen, produce or contain proteases, which are frequently themselves allergens. Staphylococcus aureus, which heavily colonizes the lesions of atopic dermatitis patients and is known to trigger a worsening of the disease, also produces extracellular proteases. Environmental proteases can cause barrier breakdown in the skin, not only in the epithelium, and stimulate various types of cells through IgE-independent mechanisms. Endogenous protease inhibitors control the functions of environmental and endogenous proteases. In this review, we focus on the barrier dysfunction caused by environmental proteases and roles of endogenous protease inhibitors in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Additionally, we examine the subsequent innate response to Th2-skewed adaptive immune reactions.

  19. Cytomegalovirus protease targeted prodrug development.

    PubMed

    Sabit, Hairat; Dahan, Arik; Sun, Jing; Provoda, Chester J; Lee, Kyung-Dall; Hilfinger, John H; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a prevalent virus that infects up to 90% of the population. The goal of this research is to determine if small molecular prodrug substrates can be developed for a specific HCMV encoded protease and thus achieve site-specific activation. HCMV encodes a 256 amino acid serine protease that is responsible for capsid assembly, an essential process for herpes virus production. The esterase activity of the more stable HCMV A143T/A144T protease mutant was evaluated with model p-nitrophenol (ONp) esters, Boc-Xaa-ONp (Ala, Leu, Ile, Val, Gln, Phe at the Xaa position). We demonstrate that the A143T/A144T mutant has esterase activity toward specific small ester compounds, e.g., Boc-L-Ala-ONp. Mono amino acid and dipeptide prodrugs of ganciclovir (GCV) were also synthesized and evaluated for hydrolysis by the A143T/A144T protease mutant in solution. Hydrolysis of these prodrugs was also evaluated in Caco-2 cell homogenates, human liver microsomes (HLMs), and rat and human plasma. For the selectivity potential of the prodrugs, the hydrolysis ratio was evaluated as a percentage of prodrug hydrolyzed by the HCMV protease over the percentages of prodrug hydrolyses by Caco-2 cell homogenates, HLMs, and human/rat plasma. A dipeptide prodrug of ganciclovir, Ac-l-Gln-l-Ala-GCV, emerged as a potential selective prodrug candidate. The results of this research demonstrate that targeting prodrugs for activation by a specific protease encoded by the infectious HCMV pathogen may be achievable.

  20. Synthesis of macrocyclic trypanosomal cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen Ting; Lira, Ricardo; Hansell, Elizabeth; McKerrow, James H; Roush, William R

    2008-11-15

    The importance of cysteine proteases in parasites, compounded with the lack of redundancy compared to their mammalian hosts makes proteases attractive targets for the development of new therapeutic agents. The binding mode of K11002 to cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi was used in the design of conformationally constrained inhibitors. Vinyl sulfone-containing macrocycles were synthesized via olefin ring-closing metathesis and evaluated against cruzain and the closely related cysteine protease, rhodesain.

  1. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  2. Proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, B; Burgess, D H; Schlegel, J; Pörn, M I; Vanags, D; Orrenius, S

    1997-01-01

    Involvement of a unique family of cysteine proteases in the multistep apoptotic process has been documented. Cloning of several mammalian genes identifies some components of this cellular response. However, it is currently unclear which protease plays a role as a signal and/or effector of apoptosis. We summarize contributions to the data concerning proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

  3. Protease production by Staphylococcus epidermidis and its effect on Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Vandecandelaere, Ilse; Depuydt, Pieter; Nelis, Hans J; Coenye, Tom

    2014-04-01

    Due to the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to several antibiotics, treatment of S. aureus infections is often difficult. As an alternative to conventional antibiotics, the field of bacterial interference is investigated. Staphylococcus epidermidis produces a serine protease (Esp) which inhibits S. aureus biofilm formation and which degrades S. aureus biofilms. In this study, we investigated the protease production of 114 S. epidermidis isolates, obtained from biofilms on endotracheal tubes (ET). Most of the S. epidermidis isolates secreted a mixture of serine, cysteine and metalloproteases. We found a link between high protease production by S. epidermidis and the absence of S. aureus in ET biofilms obtained from the same patient. Treating S. aureus biofilms with the supernatant (SN) of the most active protease producing S. epidermidis isolates resulted in a significant biomass decrease compared to untreated controls, while the number of metabolically active cells was not affected. The effect on the biofilm biomass was mainly due to serine proteases. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms treated with the SN of protease producing S. epidermidis were thinner with almost no extracellular matrix. An increased survival of Caenorhabditis elegans, infected with S. aureus Mu50, was observed when the SN of protease positive S. epidermidis was added. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization and isolation of an extracellular serine protease from the tomato pathogen Colletotrichum coccodes, and it's role in pathogenicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redman, R.S.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Extracellular enzymes play an important role in the pathogenicity and virulence of phytopathogenic fungi. Several isolates of Colletotrichum coccodes, causal agent of anthracnose on tomato, were screened to determine the relationship between protease activity and virulence. A direct relationship was observed between extracellular protease activity and the induction of disease symptoms of fruit and mortality in plants. Isolate Cc155 exhibited the highest protease activity after five days of growth in protease induction medium and produced an extracellular serine protease (sp78) that was 78 kDa, auto-degradative, glucose repressible, and non-glycosylated. To determine the role of sp78 in pathogenicity, a uv-induced extracellular protease deficient mutant (np155) was generated from the wildtype isolate Cc155. Np155 maintained growth rates comparable to Cc155 and produced wildtype levels of extracellular cellulase but did not produce extracellular protease. Unlike Cc155, np155 caused no disease symptoms on tomato fruit and 0% mortality on tomato seedlings. These results suggest that extracellular protease activity is required for pathogenicity and virulence of C. coccodes, and that the elimination of protease activity transforms a virulent pathogen to a non-pathogenic endophyte.

  5. Characterization and isolation of an extracellular serine protease from the tomato pathogen Colletotrichum coccodes, and it's role in pathogenicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redman, Regina S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2002-01-01

    Extracellular enzymes play an important role in the pathogenicity and virulence of phytopathogenic fungi. Several isolates of Colletotrichum coccodes causal agent of anthracnose on tomato, were screened to determine the relationship between protease activity and virulence. A direct relationship was observed between extracellular protease activity and the induction of disease symptoms of fruit and mortality in plants. Isolate Cc155 exhibited the highest protease activity after five days of growth in protease induction medium and produced an extracellular serine protease (sp78) that was 78 kDa, auto-degradative, glucose repressible, and non-glycosylated. To determine the role of sp78 in pathogenicity, a UV-induced extracellular protease deficient mutant (np155) was generated from the wildtype isolate Cc155. Np155 maintained growth rates comparable to Cc155 and produced wildtype levels of extracellular cellulase but did not produce extracellular protease. Unlike Cc155, np155 caused no disease symptoms on tomato fruit and 0% mortality on tomato seedlings. These results suggest that extracellular protease activity is required for pathogenicity and virulence of C. coccodes and that the elimination of protease activity transforms a virulent pathogen to a non-pathogenic endophyte.

  6. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and Their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-15

    PROTEASES; PROTEASE INHIBITORS; STORED-PRODUCT INISECTS; TRIBOLIUM CASIANEUH; MIDGUT PROTEASES; TENEBRIO MOLITOR MIDGUT-PROTEASES; LOCUST CAECAL...separation and identification of numerous midgut proteases in Tenebrio and Tribolium . The PAGE-gelatin matrix revealed the inhibitory effect of BBI...the proteinaceous trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor from soybeans) on several Tribolium proteases - an effect which was not detectable in inhibition

  7. Evidence for possible involvement of an elastolytic serine protease in aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kolattukudy, P E; Lee, J D; Rogers, L M; Zimmerman, P; Ceselski, S; Fox, B; Stein, B; Copelan, E A

    1993-01-01

    A number of isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus obtained from the hospital environment produced extracellular elastolytic activity. This activity was found to be catalyzed by a single 33-kDa protein which was purified and characterized to be a serine protease. A. fumigatus, when grown on the insoluble structural material obtained from murine and bovine lung, produced the same extracellular 33-kDa elastolytic protease, indicating that this enzyme is likely to be produced when the organism infects the lung. Polymerase chain reaction with an oligonucleotide primer based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the elastolytic enzyme yielded a cDNA which was cloned and sequenced. The active serine motif showed more similarity to subtilisin than to mammalian elastase. The amino acid sequence showed 80% identity to the alkaline protease from Aspergillus oryzae. Screening of hospital isolates of Aspergillus flavus showed great variation in the production of elastolytic activity and a much lower level of activity than that produced by A. fumigatus. The elastolytic protease from A. flavus was shown to be a serine protease susceptible to modification and inactivation by active serine and histidine-directed reagents. This protease cross-reacted with the antibodies prepared against the elastolytic protease from A. fumigatus. Immunogold localization of the elastolytic enzyme showed that A. fumigatus germinating and penetrating into the lungs of neutropenic mice secreted the elastolytic protease. An elastase-deficient mutant generated from a highly virulent isolate of A. fumigatus caused drastically reduced mortality when nasally introduced into the lung of neutropenic mice. All of the evidence suggests that extracellular elastolytic protease is a significant virulence factor in invasive aspergillosis. Images PMID:8500876

  8. Proteases of an early colonizer can hinder Streptococcus mutans colonization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, B-Y; Deutch, A; Hong, J; Kuramitsu, H K

    2011-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary cariogen that produces several virulence factors that are modulated by a competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) signaling system. In this study, we sought to determine if proteases produced by early dental plaque colonizers such as Streptococcus gordonii interfere with the subsequent colonization of S. mutans BM71 on the existing streptococcal biofilms. We demonstrated that S. mutans BM71 colonized much less efficiently in vitro on streptococcal biofilms than on Actinomyces naeslundii biofilms. Several oral streptococci, relative to A. naeslundii, produced proteases that inactivated the S. mutans CSP. We further demonstrated that cell protein extracts from S. gordonii, but not from A. naeslundii, interfered with S. mutans BM71 colonization. In addition, S. mutans BM71 colonized more efficiently on the sgc protease knockout mutant of S. gordonii than on the parent biofilms. In conclusion, proteases of early colonizers can interfere with subsequent colonization by S. mutans in vitro.

  9. Mast cells limit extracellular levels of IL-13 via a serglycin proteoglycan-serine protease axis.

    PubMed

    Waern, Ida; Karlsson, Iulia; Thorpe, Michael; Schlenner, Susan M; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Åbrink, Magnus; Hellman, Lars; Pejler, Gunnar; Wernersson, Sara

    2012-12-01

    Mast cell (MC) granules contain large amounts of proteases of the chymase, tryptase and carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) type that are stored in complex with serglycin,a proteoglycan with heparin side chains. Hence, serglycinprotease complexes are released upon MC degranulation and may influence local inflammation. Here we explored the possibility that a serglycin-protease axis may regulate levels of IL-13, a cytokine involved in allergic asthma. Indeed, we found that wild-type MCs efficiently degraded exogenous or endogenously produced IL-13 upon degranulation,whereas serglycin −/− MCs completely lacked this ability.Moreover, MC-mediated IL-13 degradation was blocked both by a serine protease inhibitor and by a heparin antagonist,which suggests that IL-13 degradation is catalyzed by serglycin-dependent serine proteases and that optimal IL-13 degradation is dependent on both the serglycin and the protease component of the serglycin-protease complex.Moreover, IL-13 degradation was abrogated in MC-CPA −/−MC cultures, but was normal in cultures of MCs with an inactivating mutation of MC-CPA, which suggests that the IL-13-degrading serine proteases rely on MC-CPA protein.Together, our data implicate a serglycin-serine protease axis in the regulation of extracellular levels of IL-13. Reduction of IL-13 levels through this mechanism possibly can provide a protective function in the context of allergic inflammation.

  10. Amelioration of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis by synthetic protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jennette, J C; Tidwell, R R; Geratz, J D; Bing, D H; Falk, R J

    1987-06-01

    Proteases are involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases by participating in the activation of mediator systems and by producing proteolytic tissue injury. Homeostatic control of inflammation is accomplished in part by physiologic protease inhibitors. The authors investigated the effectiveness of a number of synthetic protease inhibitors in ameliorating the glomerular injury induced by immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in mice. Two amidine-type protease inhibitors, bis (5-amidino-2-benzimidazolyl)methane and 1,2-bis (5-amidino-2-benzimidazolyl)ethane, had the greatest effects. They caused a marked reduction in glomerular necrosis (P less than 0.001) but did not affect the amount or site of immune complex localization or leukocyte influx. The inhibition constants of the protease inhibitors against nine purified physiologic proteases were determined. These results were discussed in relation to the effectiveness of the protease inhibitors in reducing glomerular injury. This investigation indicates that the administration of synthetic protease inhibitors can have a beneficial effect on immune-mediated inflammatory injury.

  11. Full quantum mechanical study of binding of HIV-1 protease drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da W.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    Fully quantum mechanical studies of detailed binding interactions between HIV-1 protease and six FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drugs (saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, and lopinavir) are carried out using a recently developed MFCC (molecular fractionation with conjugate caps) method. The MFCC calculation produces a quantum mechanical interaction spectrum for any protease drug binding complex. Detailed quantitative analysis on binding of lopinavir to specific residues of the protease is given from the current study. The present calculation shows that the dominant binding of lopinavir to the protease is through the formation of a strong hydrogen bond between the central hydroxyl group of the drug to the aspartate oxygen of Asp25 in one of the two chains of the protease (A chain). This is closely followed by hydrogen binding of the drug to Asp29 in the B chain and somewhat weak hydrogen bonding to Asp30, Gly27, Gly48, and Ile50 in both chains. By partitioning all six drugs into four building blocks besides the central component containing the hydroxyl group, MFCC calculation finds that block III has essentially no binding interaction with the protease and the major binding interactions of these drugs are from blocks II and IV, in addition to the dominant central hydroxyl group. This detailed quantitative information on drug binding to the protease is very useful in rational design of new and improved inhibitors of HIV-1 protease and its mutants.

  12. Function and Regulation of SUMO Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Christopher M.; Wilson, Nicole R.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Covalent attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to proteins is highly dynamic, and both SUMO-protein conjugation and cleavage can be regulated. Protein desumoylation is performed by SUMO proteases, which control cellular mechanisms ranging from transcription and cell division to ribosome biogenesis. Recent advances include the discovery of two novel classes of SUMO proteases, insights regarding SUMO protease specificity, and revelations of previously unappreciated SUMO protease functions in several key cellular pathways. These developments, together with new connections between SUMO proteases and the recently discovered SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs), make this an exciting period for the study of these enzymes. PMID:23175280

  13. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from a contact lens-induced acute red eye (CLARE) is protease-deficient.

    PubMed

    Estrellas, P S; Alionte, L G; Hobden, J A

    2000-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases are thought to be important virulence factors in the pathogenesis of corneal disease. This study examined protease production from two strains of P. aeruginosa responsible for two very distinct clinical diseases: strain Paer1, isolated from a Contact Lens-induced Acute Red Eye (CLARE), and strain KEI 1025, isolated from a corneal ulcer. Strains were compared to a laboratory strain (ATCC 19660) known to produce severe keratitis in experimentally infected mice for protease production and for ocular virulence. Protease production was examined with colorimetric assays, gelatin zymography and western blots. Elastase A activity was quantitated with a staphylolytic assay. Ocular virulence was examined using a mouse scratch model of keratitis. In contrast to strains KEI 1025 or ATCC 19660, Paer1 was unable to produce enzymatically active elastase A, elastase, and protease IV. All three strains produced active alkaline protease. Strains KEI 1025 and ATCC 19660 produced a fulminant keratitis in mice whereas Paer1 produced a mild transient infection. Restoration of elastase activity in Paer1 via genetic complementation did not result in a virulent phenotype. Co-infection of mouse eyes with strains Paer1 and ATCC 19660 resulted in the eventual loss of Paer1 from corneal tissue. These studies suggest that P. aeruginosa elastase A and/or protease IV, but not alkaline protease or elastase, contribute to the ocular virulence of this organism.

  14. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  15. Bacterial proteases in IBD and IBS.

    PubMed

    Steck, Natalie; Mueller, Kerstin; Schemann, Michael; Haller, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    Proteases play a decisive role in health and disease. They fulfil diverse functions and have been associated with the pathology of gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The current knowledge focuses on host-derived proteases including matrix metalloproteinases, various serine proteases and cathepsins. The possible contribution of bacterial proteases has been largely ignored in the pathogenesis of IBD and IBS, although there is increasing evidence, especially demonstrated for proteases from pathogenic bacteria. The underlying mechanisms extend to proteases from commensal bacteria which may be relevant for disease susceptibility. The intestinal microbiota and its proteolytic capacity exhibit the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD and IBS. This review highlights the relevance of host- and bacteria-derived proteases and their signalling mechanisms.

  16. Inactivation of chemotactic activity of C5a by the serratial 56-kilodalton protease.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, T; Kojima, Y; Akaike, T; Ijiri, S; Molla, A; Maeda, H

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the 56-kilodalton protease (56K protease) from Serratia marcescens on complement-derived chemotactic activity were examined. Fresh human serum was incubated with zymosan to produce C5a. This activated serum was then incubated with various concentrations of 56K protease, and the chemotactic activity of mouse peritoneal exudate polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and macrophages was evaluated. A significant dose-dependent decrease of chemotactic activity was observed after protease treatment. Furthermore, treatment of human recombinant C5a with 56K protease at a dose of 1.0 microgram/ml resulted in a complete loss of chemotactic activity. When the living bacteria of the virulent strain, which produced about 10 times more protease than did the less virulent strain, were injected intraperitoneally into mice, the magnitude of infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into the peritoneal cavity was much lower than that caused by the less virulent strain. Because complement-dependent chemotactic activity is an initial response to bacterial infection, these results suggest indirect pathogenic functions of serratial proteases that suppress chemotactic activity. PMID:1691142

  17. Statistical optimization of alkaline protease production from Penicillium citrinum YL-1 under solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun-Zhu; Wu, Duan-Kai; Zhao, Si-Yang; Lin, Wei-Min; Gao, Xiang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Proteases from halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms were found in traditional Chinese fish sauce. In this study, 30 fungi were isolated from fermented fish sauce in five growth media based on their morphology. However, only one strain, YL-1, which was identified as Penicillium citrinum by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis, can produce alkaline protease. This study is the first to report that a protease-producing fungus strain was isolated and identified in traditional Chinese fish sauce. Furthermore, the culture conditions of alkaline protease production by P. citrinum YL-1 in solid-state fermentation were optimized by response surface methodology. First, three variables including peptone, initial pH, and moisture content were selected by Plackett-Burman design as the significant variables for alkaline protease production. The Box-Behnken design was then adopted to further investigate the interaction effects between the three variables on alkaline protease production and determine the optimal values of the variables. The maximal production (94.30 U/mL) of alkaline protease by P. citrinum YL-1 took place under the optimal conditions of peptone, initial pH, and moisture content (v/w) of 35.5 g/L, 7.73, and 136%, respectively.

  18. Protease activation of the entomocidal protoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, R E; Bibilos, M M; Bulla, L A

    1985-01-01

    Two isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki were examined which produced different levels of intracellular proteases. Although the crystals from both strains had comparable toxicity, one of the strains, LB1, had a strong polypeptide band at 68,000 molecular weight in the protein from the crystal; in the other, HD251, no such band was evident. When the intracellular proteases in both strains were measured, strain HD251 produced less than 10% of the proteolytic activity found in LB1. These proteases were primarily neutral metalloproteases, although low levels of other proteases were detected. In LB1, the synthesis of protease increased as the cells began to sporulate; however, in HD251, protease activity appeared much later in the sporulation cycle. The protease activity in strain LB1 was very high when the cells were making crystal toxin, whereas in HD251 reduced proteolytic activity was present during crystal toxin synthesis. The insecticidal toxin (molecular weight, 68,000) from both strains could be prepared by cleaving the protoxin (molecular weight, 135,000) with trypsin, followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The procedure described gave quantitative recovery of toxic activity, and approximately half of the total protein was recovered. Calculations show that these results correspond to stoichiometric conversion of protoxin to insecticidal toxin. The toxicities of whole crystals, soluble crystal protein, and purified toxin from both strains were comparable. Images PMID:3909962

  19. Protease activation of the entomocidal protoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki.

    PubMed

    Andrews, R E; Bibilos, M M; Bulla, L A

    1985-10-01

    Two isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki were examined which produced different levels of intracellular proteases. Although the crystals from both strains had comparable toxicity, one of the strains, LB1, had a strong polypeptide band at 68,000 molecular weight in the protein from the crystal; in the other, HD251, no such band was evident. When the intracellular proteases in both strains were measured, strain HD251 produced less than 10% of the proteolytic activity found in LB1. These proteases were primarily neutral metalloproteases, although low levels of other proteases were detected. In LB1, the synthesis of protease increased as the cells began to sporulate; however, in HD251, protease activity appeared much later in the sporulation cycle. The protease activity in strain LB1 was very high when the cells were making crystal toxin, whereas in HD251 reduced proteolytic activity was present during crystal toxin synthesis. The insecticidal toxin (molecular weight, 68,000) from both strains could be prepared by cleaving the protoxin (molecular weight, 135,000) with trypsin, followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The procedure described gave quantitative recovery of toxic activity, and approximately half of the total protein was recovered. Calculations show that these results correspond to stoichiometric conversion of protoxin to insecticidal toxin. The toxicities of whole crystals, soluble crystal protein, and purified toxin from both strains were comparable.

  20. Phage-protease-peptide: a novel trifecta enabling multiplex detection of viable bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, S D; Tilton, L; Serrano, M A C; Wang, M; Vachet, R W; Nugen, S R

    2015-10-01

    Bacteriophages represent rapid, readily targeted, and easily produced molecular probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Molecular biology techniques have allowed researchers to make significant advances in the bioengineering of bacteriophage to further improve speed and sensitivity of detection. Despite their host specificity, bacteriophages have not been meaningfully leveraged in multiplex detection of bacterial pathogens. We propose a proof-of-principal phage-based scheme to enable multiplex detection. Our scheme involves bioengineering bacteriophage to carry a gene for a specific protease, which is expressed during infection of the target cell. Upon lysis, the protease is released to cleave a reporter peptide, and the signal detected. Here we demonstrate the successful (i) modification of T7 bacteriophage to carry tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease; (ii) expression of TEV protease by Escherichia coli following infection by our modified T7, an average of 2000 units of protease per phage are produced during infection; and (iii) proof-of-principle detection of E. coli in 3 h after a primary enrichment via TEV protease activity using a fluorescent peptide and using a designed target peptide for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. This proof-of-principle can be translated to other phage-protease-peptide combinations to enable multiplex bacterial detection and readily adopted on multiple platforms, like MALDI-TOF MS or fluorescent readers, commonly found in labs.

  1. Collagen type IV alpha 1 (COL4A1) and collagen type XIII alpha 1 (COL13A1) produced in cancer cells promote tumor budding at the invasion front in human urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Makito; Hori, Shunta; Morizawa, Yosuke; Tatsumi, Yoshihiro; Toritsuka, Michihiro; Ohnishi, Sayuri; Shimada, Keiji; Furuya, Hideki; Khadka, Vedbar S; Deng, Youping; Ohnishi, Kenta; Iida, Kota; Gotoh, Daisuke; Nakai, Yasushi; Inoue, Takeshi; Anai, Satoshi; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Aoki, Katsuya; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Konishi, Noboru; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2017-05-30

    Current knowledge of the molecular mechanism driving tumor budding is limited. Here, we focused on elucidating the detailed mechanism underlying tumor budding in urothelial cancer of the bladder. Invasive urothelial cancer was pathologically classified into three groups as follows: nodular, trabecular, and infiltrative (tumor budding). Pathohistological analysis of the orthotopic tumor model revealed that human urothelial cancer cell lines MGH-U3, UM-UC-14, and UM-UC-3 displayed typical nodular, trabecular, and infiltrative patterns, respectively. Based on the results of comprehensive gene expression analysis using microarray (25 K Human Oligo chip), we identified two collagens, COL4A1 and COL13A1, which may contribute to the formation of the infiltrative pattern. Visualization of protein interaction networks revealed that proteins associated with connective tissue disorders, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, growth hormone, and estrogen were pivotal factors in tumor cells. To evaluate the invasion pattern of tumor cells in vitro, 3-D collective cell invasion assay using Matrigel was performed. Invadopodial formation was evaluated using Gelatin Invadopodia Assay. Knockdown of collagens with siRNA led to dramatic changes in invasion patterns and a decrease in invasion capability through decreased invadopodia. The in vivo orthotopic experimental model of bladder tumors showed that intravesical treatment with siRNA targeting COL4A1 and COL13A1 inhibited the formation of the infiltrative pattern. COL4A1 and COL13A1 production by cancer cells plays a pivotal role in tumor invasion through the induction of tumor budding. Blocking of these collagens may be an attractive therapeutic approach for treatment of human urothelial cancer of the bladder.

  2. Nelfinavir: fourth protease inhibitor approved.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to nelfinavir in both adult and pediatric formulations. Agouron, the manufacturer, used innovative computerized drug design techniques to discover, design, and refine the nelfinavir molecule. Nelfinavir is marketed under the trade name Viracept, and costs $5,000 per year. Early clinical trials find it to be as powerful as the other protease inhibitors, but with a different resistance profile. The drug has relatively few drug indications; however, several compounds have been contraindicated.

  3. Serine Protease Activity of Calnuc

    PubMed Central

    Kanuru, Madhavi; Raman, Rajeev; Aradhyam, Gopala Krishna

    2013-01-01

    The functions of calnuc, a novel Ca2+-binding protein with multiple structural domains and diverse interacting partners, are yet unknown. We demonstrate unknown facets of calnuc, which is a serine protease in which Ser-378 of GXSXG motif, Asp-328 of DTG motif, and His-339 form the “catalytic triad,” locating the enzyme active site in the C-terminal region. Analogous to the active site of Zn2+ carboxypeptidases, calnuc has two high affinity (Kd ∼ 20 nm), well conserved Zn2+-binding sites near its N terminus, although it is inactive as a peptidase. Zn2+ binding allosterically and negatively regulates the serine protease activity of calnuc, inhibition being caused by an “open to close” change in its conformation not seen upon Ca2+ binding. Most strikingly, interaction with G protein α subunit completely inhibits the enzymatic activity of calnuc. We thus illustrate that G proteins and Zn2+ act as two “keys” that control enzymatic activity of calnuc, arresting it in “locked” state. Calnuc, therefore, exists dynamically in two different forms, (i) as a Ca2+-binding protein in Zn2+-bound form and (ii) as a protease in Zn2+-free form, commissioning it to perform multiple functions. PMID:23195954

  4. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET) has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. PMID:20234801

  5. Purification and characterization of cloned alkaline protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Irfana; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; Afzal, Mohammed; Ur-Rehman, Asad; Aftab, Saima; Zafar, Asma; Ud-Din, Zia; Khuharo, Ateeque Rahman; Iqbal, Jawad; Ul-Haq, Ikram

    2015-02-01

    Thermostable alkaline serine protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus B-1172 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-22b(+), as an expression vector. The growth conditions were optimized for maximal production of the protease using variable fermentation parameters, i.e., pH, temperature, and addition of an inducer. Protease, thus produced, was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography with 13.7-fold purification, with specific activity of 97.5 U mg(-1) , and a recovery of 23.6%. Molecular weight of the purified protease, 39 kDa, was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was stable at 90 °C at pH 9. The enzyme activity was steady in the presence of EDTA indicating that the protease was not a metalloprotease. No significant change in the activity of protease after addition of various metal ions further strengthened this fact. However, an addition of 1% Triton X-100 or SDS surfactants constrained the enzyme specific activity to 34 and 19%, respectively. Among organic solvents, an addition of 1-butanol (20%) augmented the enzyme activity by 29% of the original activity. With casein as a substrate, the enzyme activity under optimized conditions was found to be 73.8 U mg(-1) . The effect of protease expression on the host cells growth was also studied and found to negatively affect E. coli cells to certain extent. Catalytic domains of serine proteases from eight important thermostable organisms were analyzed through WebLogo and found to be conserved in all serine protease sequences suggesting that protease of G. stearothermophilus could be beneficially used as a biocontrol agent and in many industries including detergent industry.

  6. Identification of SlpB, a Cytotoxic Protease from Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nicholas A.; Hunt, Kristin M.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Zhang, Liang; Thibodeau, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens causes ocular infections in healthy individuals. Secreted protease activity was characterized from 44 ocular clinical isolates, and a higher frequency of protease-positive strains was observed among keratitis isolates than among conjunctivitis isolates. A positive correlation between protease activity and cytotoxicity to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro was determined. Deletion of prtS in clinical keratitis isolate K904 reduced, but did not eliminate, cytotoxicity and secreted protease production. This indicated that PrtS is necessary for full cytotoxicity to ocular cells and implied the existence of another secreted protease(s) and cytotoxic factors. Bioinformatic analysis of the S. marcescens Db11 genome revealed three additional open reading frames predicted to code for serralysin-like proteases noted here as slpB, slpC, and slpD. Induced expression of prtS and slpB, but not slpC and slpD, in strain PIC3611 rendered the strain cytotoxic to a lung carcinoma cell line; however, only prtS induction was sufficient for cytotoxicity to a corneal cell line. Strain K904 with deletion of both prtS and slpB genes was defective in secreted protease activity and cytotoxicity to human cell lines. PAGE analysis suggests that SlpB is produced at lower levels than PrtS. Purified SlpB demonstrated calcium-dependent and AprI-inhibited protease activity and cytotoxicity to airway and ocular cell lines in vitro. Lastly, genetic analysis indicated that the type I secretion system gene, lipD, is required for SlpB secretion. These genetic data introduce SlpB as a new cytotoxic protease from S. marcescens. PMID:25939509

  7. Occurrence of the Plasmid-Mediated Fluoroquinolone Resistance qepA1 Gene in Two Clonal Clinical Isolates of CTX-M-15-Producing Escherichia coli from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Yanat, Betitera; Dali Yahia, Radia; Yazi, Leila; Machuca, Jesús; Díaz-De-Alba, Paula; Touati, Abdelaziz; Pascual, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel

    2017-06-01

    QepA is a plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant of low prevalence described worldwide, mainly in Enterobacteriaceae. This study describes, for the first time in Algeria, two clonally related, QepA-producing Escherichia coli clinical isolates positive for CTX-M-15. The clonal spread of these multidrug-resistant isolates is a major public health concern.

  8. Potent inhibitors of HCV-NS3 protease derived from boronic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatraman, Srikanth; Wu, Wanli; Prongay, Andrew; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor; Njoroge, F. George

    2009-07-23

    Chronic hepatitis C infection is the leading causes for cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma, leading to liver failure and liver transplantation. The etiological agent, HCV virus produces a single positive strand of RNA that is processed with the help of serine protease NS3 to produce mature virus. Inhibition of NS3 protease can be potentially used to develop effective drugs for HCV infections. Numerous efforts are now underway to develop potent inhibitors of HCV protease that contain ketoamides as serine traps. Herein we report the synthesis of a series of potent inhibitors that contain a boronic acid as a serine trap. The activity of these compounds were optimized to 200 pM. X-ray structure of compound 17 bound to NS3 protease is also discussed.

  9. Improving production of extracellular proteases by random mutagenesis and biochemical characterization of a serine protease in Bacillus subtilis S1-4.

    PubMed

    Wang, X C; Zhao, H Y; Liu, G; Cheng, X J; Feng, H

    2016-06-17

    The feather is a valuable by-product with a huge annual yield produced by the poultry industry. Degradation of feathers by microorganisms is a prerequisite to utilize this insoluble protein resource. To improve the degrading efficiency of feathers, mutagenesis of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis S1-4 was performed. By combining ultraviolet irradiation and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine treatment for mutagenesis, a high protease-producing mutant (UMU4) of B. subtilis S1-4 was selected, which exhibited 2.5-fold higher extracellular caseinolytic activity than did the wild-type strain. UMU4 degraded chicken feathers more efficiently, particularly for the release of soluble proteins from the feathers, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, an extracellular protease with a molecular weight of 45 kDa, as determined by SDS-PAGE, was purified from UMU4. Biochemical characterization indicated that the caseinolytic activity of the protease was largely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, suggesting that the purified enzyme is a serine protease. This protease was highly active over a wide range of pHs (6.0 to 12.0) and temperatures (50° to 75°C) with an optimal pH and temperature of 8.0 and 65°C, respectively. The purified enzyme exhibited good thermostability with a 72.2 min half-life of thermal denaturation at 60°C. In addition, this protease was not sensitive to heavy metal ions, surfactants, or oxidative reagents. In conclusion, strain improvement for protease production can serve as an alternative strategy to promote feather degradation. The UMU4 mutant of B. subtilis and its serine protease could be potentially used in various industries.

  10. Comparison of HbA1c analysers: Agilent 1100 HPLC using kits produced by Gordion Diagnostic (Turkey) with Premier Hb9210 using kits produced by Trinity Biotech (USA) in different patient groups.

    PubMed

    Arzuhal, A E; Erden, G; Ucar, F; Yavuz Taslipinar, M; Ozcan, N; Guneyk, A; Bulut, E; Ginis, Z; Ozdemir, S

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of Agilent 1100 HPLC analyser using HbA1c kits manufactured by Gordion Diagnostic (Turkey) with that of Premier Hb9210 using the original kits for the measurement of HbA1c in different patient groups. Subjects were divided into four groups: Group 1 included 140 diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with normal urea and haemoglobin levels; Group 2 included 84 diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with high urea levels; Group 3 included 44 diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with iron deficiency anaemia; and Group 4 included 52 diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with high haemoglobin levels. EP Evaluator Release 8 program was used to evaluate the resultant data. According to the comparison results of the two methods in all groups, there was an excellent correlation between the two methods (R>0.98). Moderate-low correlation was found between increased urea concentration and the difference of the two methods (R= -0.374, p = 0.0005). The difference between the methods was found to be increased with increased urea concentrations. This difference, although statistically significant, was within the permitted limits. The observed correlation between the difference of the two methods and the low and high haemoglobin concentrations was statistically non-significant (R = 0.149, p = 0.3343; R = 0.263, p = 0.0594). We found that Agilent 1100 HbA1c analyser and Gordions' HbA1c kit comply with the clinical requirements and are suitable for HbA1c analysis at high levels of urea and Hb and low levels of Hb in diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  11. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents.

    PubMed

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Pitzler, Christian; Körfer, Georgette; Jakob, Felix; Ronny Martinez; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-12-25

    Proteases are essential ingredients in modern laundry detergents. Over the past 30 years, subtilisin proteases employed in the laundry detergent industry have been engineered by directed evolution and rational design to tailor their properties towards industrial demands. This comprehensive review discusses recent success stories in subtilisin protease engineering. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents comprise simultaneous improvement of thermal resistance and activity at low temperatures, a rational strategy to modulate pH profiles, and a general hypothesis for how to increase promiscuous activity towards the production of peroxycarboxylic acids as mild bleaching agents. The three protease engineering campaigns presented provide in-depth analysis of protease properties and have identified principles that can be applied to improve or generate enzyme variants for industrial applications beyond laundry detergents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biofluid proteases profiling in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Fábio; Ferreira, Rita; Amado, Francisco; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of protease relevance in biologic systems beyond catabolism of proteins and peptides to amino acids has stimulated interest as to their role in the pathogenesis of several disorders including diabetes mellitus (DM). Evaluation of proteases and the assessment of their activity in biofluids are fundamental to elucidate these proteolytic systems in DM and its related complications. In contrast to traditional immunoassay or substrate based approaches that targeted specific proteases and their inhibitors, the field of degradomics has provided a comprehensive approach to study these enzymes. Although the degradome contains over 500 proteases, very few have been associated with DM and its micro- and macrovascular complications. In this paper, we review these proteases and their respective inhibitors with emphasis on DM. It is likely that future research will expand these initial studies and look to develop high throughput automated technologies to identify and characterize biofluid proteases of diagnostic and prognostic value in other pathologies.

  13. Insights into the Ropy Phenotype of the Exopolysaccharide-Producing Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis A1dOxR

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Sánchez, Borja; Moine, Deborah; Berger, Bernard; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    The proteome of the ropy strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis A1dOxR, compared to that of its nonropy isogenic strain, showed an overproduction of a protein involved in rhamnose biosynthesis. Results were confirmed by gene expression analysis, and this fact agreed with the high rhamnose content of the ropy exopolysaccharide. PMID:23584772

  14. Enabling Low Cost Biopharmaceuticals: A Systematic Approach to Delete Proteases from a Well-Known Protein Production Host Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Landowski, Christopher P.; Huuskonen, Anne; Wahl, Ramon; Westerholm-Parvinen, Ann; Kanerva, Anne; Hänninen, Anna-Liisa; Salovuori, Noora; Penttilä, Merja; Natunen, Jari; Ostermeier, Christian; Helk, Bernhard; Saarinen, Juhani; Saloheimo, Markku

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei has tremendous capability to secrete proteins. Therefore, it would be an excellent host for producing high levels of therapeutic proteins at low cost. Developing a filamentous fungus to produce sensitive therapeutic proteins requires that protease secretion is drastically reduced. We have identified 13 major secreted proteases that are related to degradation of therapeutic antibodies, interferon alpha 2b, and insulin like growth factor. The major proteases observed were aspartic, glutamic, subtilisin-like, and trypsin-like proteases. The seven most problematic proteases were sequentially removed from a strain to develop it for producing therapeutic proteins. After this the protease activity in the supernatant was dramatically reduced down to 4% of the original level based upon a casein substrate. When antibody was incubated in the six protease deletion strain supernatant, the heavy chain remained fully intact and no degradation products were observed. Interferon alpha 2b and insulin like growth factor were less stable in the same supernatant, but full length proteins remained when incubated overnight, in contrast to the original strain. As additional benefits, the multiple protease deletions have led to faster strain growth and higher levels of total protein in the culture supernatant. PMID:26309247

  15. Enabling Low Cost Biopharmaceuticals: A Systematic Approach to Delete Proteases from a Well-Known Protein Production Host Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Landowski, Christopher P; Huuskonen, Anne; Wahl, Ramon; Westerholm-Parvinen, Ann; Kanerva, Anne; Hänninen, Anna-Liisa; Salovuori, Noora; Penttilä, Merja; Natunen, Jari; Ostermeier, Christian; Helk, Bernhard; Saarinen, Juhani; Saloheimo, Markku

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei has tremendous capability to secrete proteins. Therefore, it would be an excellent host for producing high levels of therapeutic proteins at low cost. Developing a filamentous fungus to produce sensitive therapeutic proteins requires that protease secretion is drastically reduced. We have identified 13 major secreted proteases that are related to degradation of therapeutic antibodies, interferon alpha 2b, and insulin like growth factor. The major proteases observed were aspartic, glutamic, subtilisin-like, and trypsin-like proteases. The seven most problematic proteases were sequentially removed from a strain to develop it for producing therapeutic proteins. After this the protease activity in the supernatant was dramatically reduced down to 4% of the original level based upon a casein substrate. When antibody was incubated in the six protease deletion strain supernatant, the heavy chain remained fully intact and no degradation products were observed. Interferon alpha 2b and insulin like growth factor were less stable in the same supernatant, but full length proteins remained when incubated overnight, in contrast to the original strain. As additional benefits, the multiple protease deletions have led to faster strain growth and higher levels of total protein in the culture supernatant.

  16. [Isolation and properties of cysteine protease from Serratia proteamaculans 94].

    PubMed

    Mozhina, N V; Burmistrova, O A; Pupov, D V; Rudenskaia, G N; Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Demidiuk, I V; Kostrov, S V

    2008-01-01

    A new cysteine protease (SpCP) with a molecular mass of about 50 kDa and optimal functioning at pH 8.0 was isolated from the culture medium of a Serratia proteamaculans 94 psychrotolerant strain using affinity and gel permeation chromatography. The enzyme N terminal amino acid sequence (SPVEEAEGDGIVLDV-) exhibits a reliable similarity to N terminal sequences of gingipains R, cysteine proteases from Polphyromonas gingivalis. Unlike gingipains R, SpCP displays a double substrate specificity and cleaves bonds formed by carboxylic groups of Arg, hydrophobic amino acid residues (Val, Leu, Ala, Tyr, and Phe), Pro, and Gly. SpCP can also hydrolyze native collagen. The enzyme catalysis is effective in a wide range of temperatures. Kinetic studies of Z-Ala-Phe-Arg-pNA hydrolysis catalyzed by the protease at 4 and 37 degrees C showed that a decrease in temperature by more than 30 degrees C causes a 1.3-fold increase in the kcat/Km ratio. Thus, SpCP is an enzyme adapted to low positive temperatures. A protease displaying such properties was found in microorganisms of the Serratia genus for the first time and may serve as a virulent factor for these bacteria.

  17. Bacterial proteases: targets for diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaman, W E; Hays, J P; Endtz, H P; Bikker, F J

    2014-07-01

    Proteases are essential for the proliferation and growth of bacteria, and are also known to contribute to bacterial virulence. This makes them interesting candidates as diagnostic and therapeutic targets for infectious diseases. In this review, the authors discuss the most recent developments and potential applications for bacterial proteases in the diagnosis and treatment of bacterial infections. Current and future bacterial protease targets are described and their limitations outlined.

  18. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  19. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  20. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  1. Cloning of the gene encoding streptococcal immunoglobulin A protease and its expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, J V; Plaut, A G; Fishman, Y; Wright, A

    1988-01-01

    We have identified and cloned a 6-kilobase-pair segment of chromosomal DNA from Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556 that encodes immunoglobulin A (IgA) protease activity when cloned into Escherichia coli. The enzyme specified by the iga gene in plasmid pJG1 accumulates in the periplasm of E. coli MM294 cells and has a substrate specificity for human IgA1 identical to that of native S. sanguis protease. Hybridization experiments with probes from within the encoding DNA showed no detectable homology at the nucleotide sequence level with chromosomal DNA of gram-negative bacteria that excrete IgA protease. Moreover, the S. sanguis iga gene probes showed no detectable hybridization with chromosomal DNA of S. pneumoniae, although the IgA proteases of these two streptococcal species cleaved the identical peptide bond in the human IgA1 heavy-chain hinge region. Images PMID:3294181

  2. Optimization of protease extraction from horse mango (Mangifera foetida Lour) kernels by a response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Norazmi; Liew, Siew Ling; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar; Said, Mamot

    2012-01-01

    Protease is one of the most important industrial enzymes with a multitude of applications in both food and non-food sectors. Although most commercial proteases are microbial proteases, the potential of non-conventional protease sources, especially plants, should not be overlooked. In this study, horse mango (Mangifera foetida Lour) fruit, known to produce latex with a blistering effect upon contact with human skin, was chosen as a source of protease, and the effect of the extraction process on its protease activity evaluated. The crude enzyme was extracted from the kernels and extraction was optimized by a response surface methodology (RSM) using a central composite rotatable design (CCRD). The variables studied were pH (x(1)), CaCl(2) (x(2)), Triton X-100 (x(3)), and 1,4-dithryeitol (x(4)). The results obtained indicate that the quadratic model is significant for all the variables tested. Based on the RSM model generated, optimal extraction conditions were obtained at pH 6.0, 8.16 mM CaCl(2), 5.0% Triton X-100, and 10.0 mM DTT, and the estimated response was 95.5% (w/w). Verification test results showed that the difference between the calculated and the experimental protease activity value was only 2%. Based on the t-value, the effects of the variables arranged in ascending order of strength were CaCl(2) < pH < DTT < Triton X-100.

  3. Purification and characterization of manganese-dependent alkaline serine protease from Bacillus pumilus TMS55.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Kalibulla Syed; Muniyandi, Jeyaraj; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2011-01-01

    The purification and characterization of a Mn2+-dependent alkaline serine protease produced by Bacillus pumilus TMS55 were investigated. The enzyme was purified in three steps: concentrating the crude enzyme using ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel filtration and cation-exchange chromatography. The purified protease had a molecular mass of approximately 35 kDa, was highly active over a broad pH range of 7.0 to 12.0, and remained stable over a pH range of 7.5 to 11.5. The optimum temperature for the enzyme activity was found to be 60 degreesC. PMSF and AEBSF (1 mM) significantly inhibited the protease activity, indicating that the protease is a serine protease. Mn2+ ions enhanced the activity and stability of the enzyme. In addition, the purified protease remained stable with oxidants (H2O2, 2%) and organic solvents (25%), such as benzene, hexane, and toluene. Therefore, these characteristics of the protease and its dehairing ability indicate its potential for a wide range of commercial applications.

  4. Cross-resistance analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants individually selected for resistance to five different protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, M; Myers, R E; Maschera, B; Parry, N R; Oliver, N M; Blair, E D

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor-resistant variants, isolated on passage of HIV-1HXB2 in MT-4 cells with five different protease inhibitors, have been examined for cross-resistance to five inhibitors. The protease inhibitors studied were Ro 31-8959, A-77003, XM323, L-735,524, and VX-478. Resistant variants with two to four mutations within their protease sequence and 9- to 40-fold-decreased susceptibility were selected for all five inhibitors within six to eight passes in cell culture. Passage of a zidovudine-resistant mutant in Ro 31-8959 generated a dual reverse transcriptase- and protease-resistant virus. Variants were cloned directly into a modified pHXB2-D infectious clone for cross-resistance analysis. Although the resistant variants selected possessed different combinations of protease mutations for each inhibitor, many showed cross-resistance to the other inhibitors, and one showed cross-resistance to all five inhibitors. Interestingly, some mutants showed increased susceptibility to some inhibitors. Further HIV passage studies in the combined presence of two protease inhibitors demonstrated that in vitro it was possible to delay significantly selection of mutations producing resistance to one or both inhibitors. These studies indicate that there may be some rationale for combining different protease inhibitors as well as protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV combination therapy. PMID:7486905

  5. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

  6. Intramembrane protease RasP boosts protein production in Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Neef, Jolanda; Bongiorni, Cristina; Goosens, Vivianne J; Schmidt, Brian; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2017-04-04

    The microbial cell factory Bacillus subtilis is a popular industrial platform for high-level production of secreted technical enzymes. Nonetheless, the effective secretion of particular heterologous enzymes remains challenging. Over the past decades various studies have tackled this problem, and major improvements were achieved by optimizing signal peptides or removing proteases involved in product degradation. On the other hand, serious bottlenecks in the protein export process per se remained enigmatic, especially for protein secretion at commercially significant levels by cells grown to high density. The aim of our present study was to assess the relevance of the intramembrane protease RasP for high-level protein production in B. subtilis. Deletion of the rasP gene resulted in reduced precursor processing and extracellular levels of the overproduced α-amylases AmyE from B. subtilis and AmyL from Bacillus licheniformis. Further, secretion of the overproduced serine protease BPN' from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens was severely impaired in the absence of RasP. Importantly, overexpression of rasP resulted in threefold increased production of a serine protease from Bacillus clausii, and 2.5- to 10-fold increased production of an AmyAc α-amylase from Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus, depending on the culture conditions. Of note, growth defects due to overproduction of the two latter enzymes were suppressed by rasP-overexpression. Here we show that an intramembrane protease, RasP, sets a limit to high-level production of two secreted heterologous enzymes that are difficult to produce in the B. subtilis cell factory. This finding was unexpected and suggests that proteolytic membrane sanitation is key to effective enzyme production in Bacillus.

  7. Mast Cell Proteases as Protective and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, George H.

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are the most abundant class of proteins produced by mast cells. Many of these are stored in membrane-enclosed intracellular granules until liberated by degranulating stimuli, which include cross-linking of high affinity IgE receptor FcεRI by IgE bound to multivalent allergen. Understanding and separating the functions of the proteases is important because expression differs among mast cells in different tissue locations. Differences between laboratory animals and humans in protease expression also influence the degree of confidence with which results obtained in animal models of mast cell function can be extrapolated to humans. The inflammatory potential of mast cell proteases was the first aspect of their biology to be explored and has received the most attention, in part because some of them—notably tryptases and chymases—are biomarkers of local and systemic mast cell degranulation and anaphylaxis. Although some of the proteases indeed augment allergic inflammation and are potential targets for inhibition to treat asthma and related allergic disorders, they are protective and even anti-inflammatory in some settings. For example, mast cell tryptases may protect from serious bacterial lung infections and may limit the “rubor” component of inflammation caused by vasodilating neuropeptides in the skin. Chymases help to maintain intestinal barrier function and to expel parasitic worms, and may support blood pressure during anaphylaxis by generating angiotensin II. In other life-or-death examples, carboxypeptidase A3 and other mast cell peptidases limit systemic toxicity of endogenous peptides like endothelin and neurotensin during septic peritonitis, and inactivate venom-associated peptides. On the other hand, mast cell peptidase-mediated destruction of protective cytokines, like IL-6, can enhance mortality from sepsis. Peptidases released from mast cells also influence non-mast cell proteases, such as by activating matrix metalloproteinase cascades

  8. Clitocypin, a fungal cysteine protease inhibitor, exerts its insecticidal effect on Colorado potato beetle larvae by inhibiting their digestive cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Šmid, Ida; Rotter, Ana; Gruden, Kristina; Brzin, Jože; Buh Gašparič, Meti; Kos, Janko; Žel, Jana; Sabotič, Jerica

    2015-07-01

    Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, CPB) is a major potato pest that adapts readily to insecticides. Several types of protease inhibitors have previously been investigated as potential control agents, but with limited success. Recently, cysteine protease inhibitors from parasol mushroom, the macrocypins, were reported to inhibit growth of CPB larvae. To further investigate the insecticidal potential and mode of action of cysteine protease inhibitors of fungal origin, clitocypin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from clouded agaric (Clitocybe nebularis), was evaluated for its lethal effects on CPB larvae. Clitocypin isolated from fruiting bodies and recombinant clitocypin produced in Escherichia coli slowed growth and reduced survival of CPB larvae in a concentration dependent manner. Clitocypin was also expressed by transgenic potato, but only at low levels. Nevertheless, it reduced larval weight gain and delayed development. We have additionally shown that younger larvae are more susceptible to the action of clitocypin. The inhibition of digestive cysteine proteases, intestains, by clitocypin was shown to be the underlying mode of action. Protease inhibitors from mushrooms are confirmed as promising candidates for biopesticides.

  9. Chemiluminescent probe for the in vitro detection of protease activity.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jean-Alexandre; Jean, Ludovic; Romieu, Anthony; Massonneau, Marc; Noack-Fraissignes, Pauline; Renard, Pierre-Yves

    2007-11-08

    A strategy involving the use of a self-immolative linker has been investigated for the chemiluminescent sensing of proteases. The reactive linker enabled the release of a 1,2-dioxetane light precursor. As a proof of principle, caspase-3, a key peptidase involved in apoptosis has been targeted. An in vitro assay has been carried out and proved the decomposition of the linker and the selectivity for caspase-3.

  10. Expression of IgA Proteases by Haemophilus influenzae in the Respiratory Tract of Adults With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Kirkham, Charmaine; Jones, Megan M.; Sethi, Sanjay; Kong, Yong; Pettigrew, Melinda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Immunoglobulin (Ig)A proteases of Haemophilus influenzae are highly specific endopeptidases that cleave the hinge region of human IgA1 and also mediate invasion and trafficking in human respiratory epithelial cells, facilitating persistence of H. influenzae. Little is known about the expression of IgA proteases in clinical settings of H. influenzae infection. Methods. We identified and characterized IgA protease genes in H. influenzae and studied their expression and proteolytic specificity, in vitro and in vivo in 169 independent strains of H. influenzae collected longitudinally over 10 years from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Results. The H. influenzae pangenome has 2 alleles of IgA protease genes; all strains have igaA, and 40% of strains have igaB. Each allele has 2 variants with differing proteolytic specificities for human IgA1. A total of 88% of 169 strains express IgA protease activity. Expression of the 4 forms of IgA protease varies among strains. Based on the presence of IgA1 fragments in sputum samples, each of the different forms of IgA protease is selectively expressed in the human airways during infection. Conclusions. Four variants of IgA proteases are variably expressed by H. influenzae during infection of the human airways. PMID:25995193

  11. Expression of IgA Proteases by Haemophilus influenzae in the Respiratory Tract of Adults With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F; Kirkham, Charmaine; Jones, Megan M; Sethi, Sanjay; Kong, Yong; Pettigrew, Melinda M

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)A proteases of Haemophilus influenzae are highly specific endopeptidases that cleave the hinge region of human IgA1 and also mediate invasion and trafficking in human respiratory epithelial cells, facilitating persistence of H. influenzae. Little is known about the expression of IgA proteases in clinical settings of H. influenzae infection. We identified and characterized IgA protease genes in H. influenzae and studied their expression and proteolytic specificity, in vitro and in vivo in 169 independent strains of H. influenzae collected longitudinally over 10 years from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The H. influenzae pangenome has 2 alleles of IgA protease genes; all strains have igaA, and 40% of strains have igaB. Each allele has 2 variants with differing proteolytic specificities for human IgA1. A total of 88% of 169 strains express IgA protease activity. Expression of the 4 forms of IgA protease varies among strains. Based on the presence of IgA1 fragments in sputum samples, each of the different forms of IgA protease is selectively expressed in the human airways during infection. Four variants of IgA proteases are variably expressed by H. influenzae during infection of the human airways. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Contribution of Aspartic Proteases in Candida Virulence. Protease Inhibitors against Candida Infections.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Małgorzata, Bondaryk; Zbigniew, Ochal

    2016-08-09

    Candida species are the major opportunistic human pathogens accounting for 70-90% of all invasive fungal infections. Candida spp, especially C. albicans, are able to produce and secrete hydrolytic enzymes, particularly aspartic proteases (Saps). These enzymes production is an evolutionary adaptation of pathogens to utilize nutrients and survive in host. Sap1-10 are believed to contribute to the adhesion and invasion of host tissues through the degradation of cell surface structures. Aspartic proteases control several steps in innate immune evasion and they degrade proteins related to immunological defense (antibodies, complement and cytokines), allowing the fungus to escape from the first line of host defense. The existing ways to identify potential drug targets rely on specific subset like virulence genes, transcriptional and stress response factors. Candida virulence factors like Sap isoenzymes can be pivotal targets for drug development. The identification of mechanism of a non-canonical inflammasome exerted by Saps could open novel therapeutic strategies to dampen hyperinflammatory response in candidiasis.

  13. Process for producing ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Lantero, O.J.; Fish, J.J.

    1993-07-27

    A process is described for producing ethanol from raw materials containing a high dry solid mash level having fermentable sugars or constituents which can be converted into sugars, comprising the steps of: (a) liquefaction of the raw materials in the presence of an alpha amylase to obtain liquefied mash; (b) saccharification of the liquefied mash in the presence of a glucoamylase to obtain hydrolysed starch and sugars; (c) fermentation of the hydrolysed starch and sugars by yeast to obtain ethanol; and (d) recovering the obtained ethanol, wherein an acid fungal protease is introduced to the liquefied mash during the saccharification and/or to the hydrolysed starch and sugars during the fermentation, thereby increasing the rate of production of ethanol as compared to a substantially similar process conducted without the introduction of the protease.

  14. Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine micelles sustain the activity of Dengue non-structural (NS) protein 3 protease domain fused with the full-length NS2B.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiwei; Li, Qingxin; Joy, Joma; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Ruiz-Carrillo, David; Hill, Jeffrey; Lescar, Julien; Kang, Congbao

    2013-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the flavivirus genus, affects 50-100 million people in tropical and sub-tropical regions. The DENV protease domain is located at the N-terminus of the NS3 protease and requires for its enzymatic activity a hydrophilic segment of the NS2B that acts as a cofactor. The protease is an important antiviral drug target because it plays a crucial role in virus replication by cleaving the genome-coded polypeptide into mature functional proteins. Currently, there are no drugs to inhibit DENV protease activity. Most structural and functional studies have been conducted using protein constructs containing the NS3 protease domain connected to a soluble segment of the NS2B membrane protein via a nine-residue linker. For in vitro structural and functional studies, it would be useful to produce a natural form of the DENV protease containing the NS3 protease domain and the full-length NS2B protein. Herein, we describe the expression and purification of a natural form of DENV protease (NS2BFL-NS3pro) containing the full-length NS2B protein and the protease domain of NS3 (NS3pro). The protease was expressed and purified in detergent micelles necessary for its folding. Our results show that this purified protein was active in detergent micelles such as lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylcholine (LMPC). These findings should facilitate further structural and functional studies of the protease and will facilitate drug discovery targeting DENV.

  15. Production of thermostable protease enzyme in wastewater sludge using thermophilic bacterial strains isolated from sludge.

    PubMed

    Chenel, J P; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2008-01-01

    The volume of sludge produced annually is very high and poses serious disposal problems. The traditional methods of sludge disposal produce secondary pollutants. Therefore, the alternate or suitable solution is reuse of sludge in an ecofriendly approach. Biotechnology is an interesting tool to add value to the processes involved in wastewater and wastewater sludge disposal/reuse. In this context, a study was carried out on thermophilic bacterial strains that produce thermostable proteases. The bacterial strains were first isolated from municipal wastewater sludge. In contrast to the conventional strains used in industries, like Bacillus sp., the new strains were Gram-Negative type. In semi-synthetic medium, a maximal protease activity of 5.25 IU/ml (International Unit per ml) was obtained at a pH of 8.2 and at a temperature of 60 degrees C, which is higher than the stability temperature of 37 degrees C for a similar protease obtained from the conventional producer Bacillus licheniformis. Moreover, growth and protease activity of the strains were tested in wastewater sludge. It is expected that the complexity of sludge could stimulate/enhance the protease production and their characteristics. In conclusion, reuse of wastewater sludge will help to reduce their quantity as well as the value-added products produced will replace chemical products used in industries.

  16. Purification, primary structures and evolution of coagulant proteases from Deinagkistrodon actus venom.

    PubMed

    Nikandrov, Nikolai N; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Tani, Ayako; Chijiwa, Takahito; Shibata, Hiroki; Chang, Chang-Chun; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki; Ito, Tatsumi; Ohno, Motonori

    2005-12-15

    Deinagkistrodon (formerly Agkistrodon) actus (Taiwan) snake venom was found to contain at least seven closely related coagulant proteases. One of them, named actibin, was purified to homogeneity by means of four chromatographic steps. Actibin acted on fibrinogen to form fibrin clots with extremely high specific activity of 1,630 NIH units/mg and preferentially released fibrinopeptide A. Actibin was an acidic glycoprotein (pI 3.4) with molecular weight of 41,000, which was reduced to 28,800 after deglycosylation with N-glycanase. The k(cat)/K(m) values of actibin for hydrolysis of tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester and benzoyl-l-arginine p-nitroanilide were one-third to a half those for thrombin, reflecting a high potency of actibin in fibrinogen clotting. The amidase activities of actibin and its family proteases were inhibited by 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin, a serine protease inhibitor, indicating that actibin and its family proteases are serine proteases. Four cDNAs, named DaP1 and DaP7-DaP9, encoding D. actus coagulant proteases were cloned. All cDNAs contain an open reading frame of 780 bp coding for 260 amino acid residues, including a signal peptide of 24 amino acid residues. Their amino acid sequences predicted are highly homologous to one another with one to five amino acid substitutions. When four D. actus protease cDNAs were compared with the cDNAs coding for Trimeresurus flavoviridis and T. gramineus venom serine proteases, accelerated evolution was clearly observed. Similarity of the nucleotide sequences of four D. actus protease cDNAs with no synonymous and one to five nonsynonymous substitutions seems not to be in direct conformity with accelerated evolution. This possibly suggests that they have evolved to a similar direction to enhance their clotting activity rather than to produce other physiological activities.

  17. Bacterial proteases from the intracellular vacuole niche; protease conservation and adaptation for pathogenic advantage.

    PubMed

    Huston, Wilhelmina M

    2010-06-01

    Proteases with important roles for bacterial pathogens that specifically reside within intracellular vacuoles are frequently homologous to those that have important virulence functions for other bacteria. Research has identified that some of these conserved proteases have evolved specialized functions for intracellular vacuole-residing bacteria. Unique proteases with pathogenic functions have also been described from Chlamydia, Mycobacteria, and Legionella. These findings suggest that there are further novel functions for proteases from these bacteria that remain to be described. This review summarizes the recent findings of novel protease functions from the intracellular human pathogenic bacteria that reside exclusively in vacuoles.

  18. Proteases of Stored Product Insects and their Inhibition by Specific Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans and Wheat Grain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-31

    CHYMOTRYPSINS; BOWMAN-BIRK TRYPSIN-CHYMOTRYPSIN INHIBITOR (SOYBEANS); CHICKPEAS TRYPSIN-CHYMOTRYPSIN INHIBITOR; SOYBEAN PROTEASE INHIBITORS 20. ABSTRACT...could be fully inhibited at a 1:1 molar ratio by the naturally-occuring proteinaceous trypsin inhibitors BBI from soybeans and CI from chickpeas ...substrates. These activities were fully inhibited by the proteinaceous trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors BBI from soybeans and CI from chickpeas when assayed

  19. Evaluation on Potential Contributions of Protease Activated Receptors Related Mediators in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zeng, Xiaoning; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) have been recognized as a distinctive four-member family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be cleaved by certain serine proteases. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the role of PARs in allergic inflammation, the fundamental pathologic changes of allergy, but the potential roles of PARs in allergy remain obscure. Since many of these proteases are produced and actively involved in the pathologic process of inflammation including exudation of plasma components, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tissue damage and repair, PARs appear to make important contribution to allergy. The aim of the present review is to summarize the expression of PARs in inflammatory and structural cells, the influence of agonists or antagonists of PARs on cell behavior, and the involvement of PARs in allergic disorders, which will help us to better understand the roles of serine proteases and PARs in allergy. PMID:24876677

  20. Excretory bladder: the source of cysteine proteases in Paragonimus westermani metacercariae

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun-Jong; Kang, Shin-Yong; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Seung-Yull

    2002-01-01

    The cysteine proteases of Paragonimus westermani metacercariae are involved in metacercarial excystment, host immune modulation, and possibly in tissue penetration. In order to clarify the origin of the enzymes, 28 and 27 kDa cysteine proteases in metacercarial excretory-secretory products were purified through the FPLC system using Mono Q column chromatography. The polyclonal antibodies to the enzymes were produced in BALB/c mice. Immunolocalization studies revealed that both cysteine proteases were distributed at the linings of excretory bladder and excretory concretions of the metacercariae. It was suggested that the excretory epithelium of P. westermani undertake the secretory function of metacercarial cysteine proteases, in addition to its role as a route for eliminating waste products. PMID:12073734

  1. Purification and characterization of aspartic protease derived from Sf9 insect cells.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Takeshi; Ono, Hiroki; Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Nirasawa, Satoru; Takahashi, Saori

    2010-01-01

    An aspartic protease that is significantly produced by baculovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells was purified to homogeneity from a growth medium. To monitor aspartic protease activity, an internally quenched fluoresce (IQF) substrate specific to cathepsin D was used. The purified aspartic protease showed a single protein band on SDS-PAGE with an apparent molecular mass of 40 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme had a high homology to a Bombyx mori aspartic protease. The enzyme showed greatest affinity for the IQF substrate at pH 3.0 with a K(m) of 0.85 µM. The k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) values were 13 s(-1) and 15 s(-1) µM(-1) respectively. Pepstatin A proved to be a potent competitive inhibitor with inhibitor constant, K(i), of 25 pM.

  2. Physicochemical Fractionation of Extracellular Cornea-Damaging Proteases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kreger, Arnold S.; Griffin, Olwen K.

    1974-01-01

    Fractionation of the culture supernatant fluids of a cornea-virulent strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by ammonium sulfate precipitation, diafiltration, isoelectric focusing, ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration, and sucrose density gradient centrifugation failed to separate the rabbit cornea-damaging activity and the in vitro protease activity of the preparations. Three proteases having similar molecular weights (approximately 20,000) and isoelectric points of approximately 4.6, 5.8, and 8.8 were obtained free of detectable amounts of other known extracellular pseudomonal enzymes. Heating a mixture of the three proteases for 15 min at 80 C resulted in complete loss of protease and cornea-damaging activities. The sterile culture filtrate of a nonproteolytic but lethal toxin-producing strain of P. aeruginosa did not contain cornea-damaging activity. Cultivation of the proteolytic strain in broth containing 4.7% ammonium sulfate yielded a culture supernatant fluid free of protease and cornea-damaging activities. The results obtained support the conclusion that a cornea-virulent strain of P. aeruginosa can produce, in vitro, at least three different extracellular proteases capable of eliciting rapid and extensive damage to rabbit corneas. Images PMID:4363232

  3. Streptomyces flavogriseus HS1: isolation and characterization of extracellular proteases and their compatibility with laundry detergents.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Sofiane; Kammoun, Maher; Soltana, Hala; Nasri, Moncef; Hmidet, Noomen

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the isolation of a new protease producing Streptomyces strain HS1 and the biochemical characterization of the secreted proteases. By sequencing of its noted 16S rDNA, HS1 strain was found to have a 100% identity with Streptomyces flavogriseus. The highest protease production was found using FermII media. In these conditions maximum protease production (99 U/mL) was obtained after 96 h incubation at 30°C and 150 rpm. HS1 strain produced at least five proteases as revealed by zymogram technique. The enzyme preparation exhibited activity over a broad range of pH (5-11) and temperature (25-70°C). Optimum activity was observed at a pH of 7.0 and a temperature of 50°C. Proteolytic activity was significantly unaffected by Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). EDTA and PMSF highly decreased the original activity. The crude extracellular proteases showed high stability when used as a detergent additive. These properties offer an interesting potential for enzymatic hydrolysis at the industrial level.

  4. An efficient procedure for the expression and purification of HIV-1 protease from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hong-Loan Thi; Nguyen, Thuy Thi; Vu, Quy Thi; Le, Hang Thi; Pham, Yen; Trinh, Phuong Le; Bui, Thuan Phuong; Phan, Tuan-Nghia

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have focused on HIV-1 protease for developing drugs for treating AIDS. Recombinant HIV-1 protease is used to screen new drugs from synthetic compounds or natural substances. However, large-scale expression and purification of this enzyme is difficult mainly because of its low expression and solubility. In this study, we constructed 9 recombinant plasmids containing a sequence encoding HIV-1 protease along with different fusion tags and examined the expression of the enzyme from these plasmids. Of the 9 plasmids, pET32a(+) plasmid containing the HIV-1 protease-encoding sequence along with sequences encoding an autocleavage site GTVSFNF at the N-terminus and TEV plus 6× His tag at the C-terminus showed the highest expression of the enzyme and was selected for further analysis. The recombinant protein was isolated from inclusion bodies by using 2 tandem Q- and Ni-Sepharose columns. SDS-PAGE of the obtained HIV-1 protease produced a single band of approximately 13 kDa. The enzyme was recovered efficiently (4 mg protein/L of cell culture) and had high specific activity of 1190 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) at an optimal pH of 4.7 and optimal temperature of 37 °C. This procedure for expressing and purifying HIV-1 protease is now being scaled up to produce the enzyme on a large scale for its application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Streptomyces flavogriseus HS1: Isolation and Characterization of Extracellular Proteases and Their Compatibility with Laundry Detergents

    PubMed Central

    Kammoun, Maher; Soltana, Hala; Nasri, Moncef; Hmidet, Noomen

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the isolation of a new protease producing Streptomyces strain HS1 and the biochemical characterization of the secreted proteases. By sequencing of its noted 16S rDNA, HS1 strain was found to have a 100% identity with Streptomyces flavogriseus. The highest protease production was found using FermII media. In these conditions maximum protease production (99 U/mL) was obtained after 96 h incubation at 30°C and 150 rpm. HS1 strain produced at least five proteases as revealed by zymogram technique. The enzyme preparation exhibited activity over a broad range of pH (5–11) and temperature (25–70°C). Optimum activity was observed at a pH of 7.0 and a temperature of 50°C. Proteolytic activity was significantly unaffected by Ca2+ and Mg2+. EDTA and PMSF highly decreased the original activity. The crude extracellular proteases showed high stability when used as a detergent additive. These properties offer an interesting potential for enzymatic hydrolysis at the industrial level. PMID:24804214

  6. Tissue Dissociation Enzyme Neutral Protease Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Breite, A.G.; Dwulet, F.E.; McCarthy, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Neutral proteases, essential components of purified tissue dissociation enzymes required for successful human islet isolation, show variable activities and effects of substrate on their activities. Initially we used a spectrophotometric endpoint assay with azocasein substrate to measure neutral protease activity. After critical review of the results, we observed these data to be inconsistent and not correlating expected differences in specific activities between thermolysin and Bacillus polymyxa proteases. This observation led to the development of a fluorescent microplate assay using fluorescein isothyocyanate–conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) as the substrate. This simpler, more flexible method offered a homogeneous, kinetic enzyme assay allowing determination of steady state reaction rates of sample replicates at various dilutions. The assay had a linear range of 4- to 8-fold and interassay coefficients of variation for B polymyxa protease and thermolysin of <9% and <15%, respectively, which were lower than those using the spectrophotometric endpoint assay, namely, 54% and 36%, respectively. This format allowed for incorporation of enzyme inhibitors, as illustrated by addition of sulfhydryl protease inhibitors, which, consistent with earlier reports, strongly indicated that the main contaminant in purified collagenase preparations was clostripain. Determination of the specific activities for several purified neutral proteases showed that the B polymyxa and Clostridium histolyticum proteases had approximately 40% and 15% specific activities, respectively, of those obtained with purified thermolysin, indicating the different characteristics of neutral protease enzymes for cell isolation procedures. PMID:20692405

  7. Activity of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin in experimental pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae deficient in porins, expressing active efflux and producing QnrA1.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, J M; Pichardo, C; García, I; Pachón-Ibañez, M E; Docobo-Pérez, F; Pascual, A; Pachón, J; Martínez-Martínez, L

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the activities of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin in a murine model of pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae C2 (with altered GyrA, deficient in porins and expressing active efflux of quinolones) and the transconjugant C2pMG252 derived from it and expressing the qnrA1 determinant. MICs and MBCs of the two quinolones were determined according to CLSI guidelines. Time-kill curves (at 1x and 4x MIC) were also performed to assess bactericidal activity. An experimental model of pneumonia in mice was evaluated. Groups of 15 mice were infected with either strain and treated with ciprofloxacin (80 mg/kg/day) or levofloxacin (100 mg/kg/day). Control non-treated animals were also evaluated. In the case of strain C2, log(10) CFU/g of lung in non-treated animals was 9.16 +/- 2.16. This value was reduced to 3.53 +/- 1.04 (p <0.001) and 3.38 +/- 0.46 (p <0.001) in animals treated with ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin, respectively. Percentages of surviving mice were 26.7% (control group) and 100% (both ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin; p <0.001 vs. controls). Bacterial counts (log(10) CFU/g) in lungs of animals infected with strain C2pMG252 were 9.65 +/- 2.49 in non-treated animals and 7.74 +/- 2.67 and 7.57 +/- 3.84 for those treated with ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin, respectively (p >0.05 vs. control group). Of non-treated animals infected with strain C2pMG252, 14.3% survived. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin improved the survival in these mice (53.3% for both antimicrobials, p 0.03). In conclusion, the expression of qnrA1 in K. pneumoniae with additional mechanisms of resistance causes decreased efficacy of fluoroquinolones in a pneumonia model in mice.

  8. IS195, an Insertion Sequence-Like Element Associated with Protease Genes in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Janina P.; Macrina, Francis L.

    1998-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is recognized as an important etiologic agent in adult and early-onset periodontal disease. Proteases produced by this organism contribute to its virulence in mice. Protease-encoding genes have been shown to contain multiple copies of repeated nucleotide sequences. These conserved sequences have also been found in hemagglutinin genes. In the process of studying the genetic loci containing the conserved repeated sequences, we have characterized a prtP gene homolog from P. gingivalis W83 encoding a cysteine protease with Lys-X specificity. However, this prtP gene was interrupted by an insertion sequence-like element which we designated IS195. Furthermore, IS195 and another element, IS1126, were present downstream of prtP gene homologs (kgp) found in P. gingivalis H66 and 381. IS195, a 1,068-bp insertion sequence-like element, contained 11-bp inverted repeats at its termini and was bordered by 9-bp direct repeats presumed to be a transposition-mediated target site duplication. Its central region contained one large open reading frame encoding a predicted 300-amino-acid protein which appeared to be a transposase. We isolated two naturally occurring variants of P. gingivalis W83, one carrying IS195 within the coding region of the prtP gene and another containing an intact prtP gene. Biochemical characterization revealed a lack of trypsin-like Lys-X specific proteolytic activity in the P. gingivalis W83 variant carrying the disrupted prtP gene. Studies using a mouse model revealed a reduction of virulence resulting from insertion of IS195 into the coding region of the prtP gene. An allelic-exchange mutant defective in the prtP gene also was constructed and tested in vivo. It displayed intermediate virulence compared to that of the wild-type and prtP::IS195 mutant strains. We conclude that the Lys-X cysteine protease contributes to virulence in soft tissue infections. PMID:9632563

  9. Identification and characterization of a -1 reading frameshift in the heavy chain constant region of an IgG1 recombinant monoclonal antibody produced in CHO cells

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Zhirui; Wu, Qindong; Wang, Tongtong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Frameshifts lead to complete alteration of the intended amino acid sequences, and therefore may affect the biological activities of protein therapeutics and pose potential immunogenicity risks. We report here the identification and characterization of a novel -1 frameshift variant in a recombinant IgG1 therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells during the cell line selection studies. The variant was initially observed as an atypical post-monomer fragment peak in size exclusion chromatography. Characterization of the fragment peak using intact and reduced liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses determined that the fragment consisted of a normal light chain disulfide-linked to an aberrant 26 kDa fragment that could not be assigned to any HC fragment even after considering common modifications. Further analysis using LC-MS/MS peptide mapping revealed that the aberrant fragment contained the expected HC amino acid sequence (1-232) followed by a 20-mer novel sequence corresponding to expression of heavy chain DNA sequence in the -1 reading frame. Examination of the DNA sequence around the frameshift initiation site revealed that a mononucleotide repeat GGGGGG located in the IgG1 HC constant region was most likely the structural root cause of the frameshift. Rapid identification of the frameshift allowed us to avoid use of a problematic cell line containing the frameshift as the production cell line. The frameshift reported here may be observed in other mAb products and the hypothesis-driven analytical approaches employed here may be valuable for rapid identification and characterization of frameshift variants in other recombinant proteins. PMID:26652198

  10. Quantum study of HIV-1 protease-bridge water interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Li L.; Tong, Yan; Mei, Ye; Zhang, Qing G.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2007-10-01

    We present a fully quantum mechanical calculation for binding interaction between HIV-1 protease (PR) and the water molecule W301 which bridges the flaps of the protease with the inhibitors of PR. The quantum calculation is made possible by applying a recently developed molecular fractionation with conjugate caps (MFCC) method which divides a protein molecule into capped amino acid-based fragments and their conjugate caps. These individual fragments are properly treated to preserve the chemical property of bonds that are cut. Ab initio methods at HF, B3LYP, and MP2 levels with a fixed basis set 6-31+G* have been employed in the present calculation. The MFCC calculation produces a quantum mechanical interaction "map" representing interactions between individual residues of PR and W301. This enables a detailed quantitative analysis on binding of W301 to specific residues of PR at quantum mechanical level.

  11. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  12. Non-erythroid alpha-spectrin breakdown by calpain and interleukin 1 beta-converting-enzyme-like protease(s) in apoptotic cells: contributory roles of both protease families in neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Nath, R; Raser, K J; Stafford, D; Hajimohammadreza, I; Posner, A; Allen, H; Talanian, R V; Yuen, P; Gilbertsen, R B; Wang, K K

    1996-01-01

    The cytoskeletal protein non-erythroid alpha-spectrin is well documented as an endogenous calpain substrate, especially under pathophysiological conditions. In cell necrosis (e.g. maitotoxin-treated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells), alpha-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) of 150 kDa and 145 kDa were produced by cellular calpains. In contrast, in neuronal cells undergoing apoptosis (cerebellar granule neurons subjected to low potassium and SH-SY5Y cells treated with staurosporine), an additional SBDP of 120 kDa was also observed. The formation of the 120 kDa SBDP was insensitive to calpain inhibitors but was completely blocked by an interleukin 1 beta-converting-enzyme (ICE)-like protease inhibitor, Z-Asp-CH2OC(O)-2,6-dichlorobenzene. Autolytic activation of both calpain and the ICE homologue CPP32 was also observed in apoptotic cells. alpha-Spectrin can also be cleaved in vitro by purified calpains to produce the SBDP doublet of 150/145 kDa and by ICE and ICE homologues [ICH-1, ICH-2 and CPP32(beta)] to produce a 150 kDa SBDP. In addition, CPP32 and ICE also produced a 120 kDa SBDP. Furthermore inhibition of either ICE-like protease(s) or calpain protects both granule neurons and SH-SY5Y cells against apoptosis. Our results suggest that both protease families participate in the expression of neuronal apoptosis. PMID:8920967

  13. Comparison of protease activities in different Bacillus licheniformis strains using wastewater sludge and synthetic soy medium as raw material.

    PubMed

    Bezawada, J; Yan, S; Tyagia, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2010-01-01

    The production of extracellular protease by different Bacillus licheniformis strains (ATCC 21415, ATCC 21417 and ATCC 21424) was tested in wastewater sludge as a raw material as well as in synthetic soy medium to compare the capacity of protease production by different strains and to compare the capacity of the medium to provide nutrients for enzyme synthesis. All of the strains showed similar activities in both media. The protease activity was very high in the fermentor in both of the media compared with the shake flask. Results from microbial selection indicated that ATCC 21424 had high potential for protease production using sludge as a growth medium. The observation from this study suggested that wastewater sludge could be used as a raw material (nutrient source) to produce protease for industrial applications.

  14. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might

  15. Mutagenic activation and detoxification of benzo[a]pyrene in vitro by hepatic cytochrome P450 1A1 and phase II enzymes in three meat-producing animals.

    PubMed

    Darwish, W; Ikenaka, Y; Eldaly, E; Ishizuka, M

    2010-01-01

    The mutagenic activation activity of hepatic microsomes from three meat-producing animals (cattle, deer and horses) was compared with those of rats as a reference species. In the Ames Salmonella typhimurium TA98 assay, the liver microsomes of all examined animals mutagenically activated benzo[a]pyrene, an ideal promutagens, in terms of production of histidine-independent revertant colonies. The microsomes of horses had the highest ability to produce revertant colonies of the examined animals under both low and high substrate concentrations. Inhibition of this mutagenic activity using alpha-naphthoflavone, anti-rat CYP1A1, CYP3A2 and CYP2E1 antibodies suggests that this activity was mainly because of CYP1A1 in these animals as well as in rats. The addition of co-factors for two phase II enzymes, microsomal UDP glucoronosyl transferase and cytosolic glutathione-S-transferase, reduced the production of the revertant colonies in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, horses had the highest reduction rate among the examined animals, suggesting that phase II enzymes play a great role in producing a state of balance between the bioactivation and detoxification of xenobiotics in these meat-producing animals. This report is the first to investigate the mutagenic activation activity of the hepatic microsomes and the role of phase II enzymes against this activity in meat-producing animals.

  16. Protease and protease-activated receptor-2 signaling in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Lee, Seung Hun

    2010-11-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/ PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD.

  17. Protease and Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD. PMID:20879045

  18. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  19. The effect of environmental conditions on expression of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron C10 protease genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are members of the normal human intestinal microbiota. However, both organisms are capable of causing opportunistic infections, during which the environmental conditions to which the bacteria are exposed change dramatically. To further explore their potential for contributing to infection, we have characterized the expression in B. thetaiotaomicron of four homologues of the gene encoding the C10 cysteine protease SpeB, a potent extracellular virulence factor produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Results We identified a paralogous set of genes (btp genes) in the B. thetaiotaomicron genome, that were related to C10 protease genes we recently identified in B. fragilis. Similar to C10 proteases found in B. fragilis, three of the B. thetaiotaomicron homologues were transcriptionally coupled to genes encoding small proteins that are similar in structural architecture to Staphostatins, protease inhibitors associated with Staphopains in Staphylococcus aureus. The expression of genes for these C10 proteases in both B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron was found to be regulated by environmental stimuli, in particular by exposure to oxygen, which may be important for their contribution to the development of opportunistic infections. Conclusions Genes encoding C10 proteases are increasingly identified in operons which also contain genes encoding proteins homologous to protease inhibitors. The Bacteroides C10 protease gene expression levels are responsive to different environmental stimuli suggesting they may have distinct roles in the bacterial-host interaction. PMID:22943521

  20. The effect of environmental conditions on expression of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron C10 protease genes.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Roibeard F; Murphy, Elizabeth C; Kagawa, Todd F; O'Toole, Paul W; Cooney, Jakki C

    2012-09-03

    Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are members of the normal human intestinal microbiota. However, both organisms are capable of causing opportunistic infections, during which the environmental conditions to which the bacteria are exposed change dramatically. To further explore their potential for contributing to infection, we have characterized the expression in B. thetaiotaomicron of four homologues of the gene encoding the C10 cysteine protease SpeB, a potent extracellular virulence factor produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. We identified a paralogous set of genes (btp genes) in the B. thetaiotaomicron genome, that were related to C10 protease genes we recently identified in B. fragilis. Similar to C10 proteases found in B. fragilis, three of the B. thetaiotaomicron homologues were transcriptionally coupled to genes encoding small proteins that are similar in structural architecture to Staphostatins, protease inhibitors associated with Staphopains in Staphylococcus aureus. The expression of genes for these C10 proteases in both B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron was found to be regulated by environmental stimuli, in particular by exposure to oxygen, which may be important for their contribution to the development of opportunistic infections. Genes encoding C10 proteases are increasingly identified in operons which also contain genes encoding proteins homologous to protease inhibitors. The Bacteroides C10 protease gene expression levels are responsive to different environmental stimuli suggesting they may have distinct roles in the bacterial-host interaction.

  1. Statistical optimization of medium components for extracellular protease production by an extreme haloarchaeon, Halobacterium sp. SP1(1).

    PubMed

    Akolkar, A; Bharambe, N; Trivedi, S; Desai, A

    2009-01-01

    Optimization of medium components for extracellular protease production by Halobacterium sp. SP1(1) using statistical approach. The significant factors influencing the protease production as screened by Plackett-Burman method were identified as soybean flour and FeCl(3). Response surface methodology such as central composite design was applied for further optimization studies. The concentrations of medium components for higher protease production as optimized using this approach were (g l(-1)): NaCl, 250; KCl, 2; MgSO(4), 10; tri-Na-citrate, 1.5; soybean flour, 10 and FeCl(3), 0.16. This statistical optimization approach led to production of 69.44 +/- 0.811 U ml(-1) of protease. Soybean flour and FeCl(3) were identified as important factors controlling the production of extracellular protease by Halobacterium sp. SP1(1). The statistical approach was found to be very effective in optimizing the medium components in manageable number of experimental runs with overall 3.9-fold increase in extracellular protease production. The present study is the first report on statistical optimization of medium components for production of haloarchaeal protease. The study also explored the possibility of using extracellular protease produced by Halobacterium sp. SP1(1) for various applications like antifouling coatings and fish sauce preparation using cheaper raw material.

  2. Knots can impair protein degradation by ATP-dependent proteases.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Álvaro; Rodriguez-Aliaga, Piere; Molina, José Alejandro; Martin, Andreas; Bustamante, Carlos; Baez, Mauricio

    2017-09-12

    ATP-dependent proteases translocate proteins through a narrow pore for their controlled destruction. However, how a protein substrate containing a knotted topology affects this process remains unknown. Here, we characterized the effects of the trefoil-knotted protein MJ0366 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii on the operation of the ClpXP protease from Escherichia coli ClpXP completely degrades MJ0366 when pulling from the C-terminal ssrA-tag. However, when a GFP moiety is appended to the N terminus of MJ0366, ClpXP releases intact GFP with a 47-residue tail. The extended length of this tail suggests that ClpXP tightens the trefoil knot against GFP, which prevents GFP unfolding. Interestingly, if the linker between the knot core of MJ0366 and GFP is longer than 36 residues, ClpXP tightens and translocates the knot before it reaches GFP, enabling the complete unfolding and degradation of the substrate. These observations suggest that a knot-induced stall during degradation of multidomain proteins by AAA proteases may constitute a novel mechanism to produce partially degraded products with potentially new functions.

  3. Enhanced production and organic solvent stability of a protease from Brevibacillus laterosporus strain PAP04.

    PubMed

    Anbu, P

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial strain (PAP04) isolated from cattle farm soil was shown to produce an extracellular, solvent-stable protease. Sequence analysis using 16S rRNA showed that this strain was highly homologous (99%) to Brevibacillus laterosporus. Growth conditions that optimize protease production in this strain were determined as maltose (carbon source), skim milk (nitrogen source), pH 7.0, 40°C temperature, and 48 h incubation. Overall, conditions were optimized to yield a 5.91-fold higher production of protease compared to standard conditions. Furthermore, the stability of the enzyme in organic solvents was assessed by incubation for 2 weeks in solutions containing 50% concentration of various organic solvents. The enzyme retained activity in all tested solvents except ethanol; however, the protease activity was stimulated in benzene (74%) followed by acetone (63%) and chloroform (54.8%). In addition, the plate assay and zymography results also confirmed the stability of the PAP04 protease in various organic solvents. The organic solvent stability of this protease at high (50%) concentrations of solvents makes it an alternative catalyst for peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media.

  4. Purification and characterization of a prothrombin-activating protease from Nephila clavata.

    PubMed

    Joo, Han-Seung; Park, Gun-Chun; Cho, Woo Ri; Tak, Eunsik; Paik, Seung R; Chang, Chung-Soon

    2002-03-01

    We report upon the purification and characterization of a novel prothrombin-activating enzyme from the body fluid (total homogenates of isolated digestive tract without eggs, spinnerets and silk glands) of the spider, Nephila clavata by a combination of acetone fractionation, ion exchange, and Soybean trypsin inhibitor-Sepharose chromatography. Analysis of the purified enzyme with SDS-PAGE and gel filtration revealed a single polypeptide chain with an apparent molecular weight of 24kDa. The proteolytic activity of the enzyme was stable up to 50 degrees C, however, it became unstable over 55 degrees C. The enzyme had an optimum pH of 8, and Ca(2+) was not required for the enzyme activity. According to inhibition profiles obtained with several serine protease inhibitors such as PMSF and benzamidine, the purified protease is a member of the serine proteases. Bz-Ile-Glu(gamma-OR)- Gly-Arg-pNA and Z-Arg-Gly-Arg-pNA which are known as substrates for factor Xa, were hydrolyzed favorably by the enzyme. And the Nephila protease could produce thrombin from prothrombin at nM range, and form the turbid ring using fibrinogen-agarose plate. The results obtained confirmed that the purified protease is a potent prothrombin-activating activity belonging to the family of serine protease.

  5. Proteases from Entamoeba spp. and Pathogenic Free-Living Amoebae as Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Reyes-López, Magda; Ortiz-Estrada, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    The standard reference for pathogenic and nonpathogenic amoebae is the human parasite Entamoeba histolytica; a direct correlation between virulence and protease expression has been demonstrated for this amoeba. Traditionally, proteases are considered virulence factors, including those that produce cytopathic effects in the host or that have been implicated in manipulating the immune response. Here, we expand the scope to other amoebae, including less-pathogenic Entamoeba species and highly pathogenic free-living amoebae. In this paper, proteases that affect mucin, extracellular matrix, immune system components, and diverse tissues and cells are included, based on studies in amoebic cultures and animal models. We also include proteases used by amoebae to degrade iron-containing proteins because iron scavenger capacity is currently considered a virulence factor for pathogens. In addition, proteases that have a role in adhesion and encystation, which are essential for establishing and transmitting infection, are discussed. The study of proteases and their specific inhibitors is relevant to the search for new therapeutic targets and to increase the power of drugs used to treat the diseases caused by these complex microorganisms. PMID:23476670

  6. Proteases from Entamoeba spp. and Pathogenic Free-Living Amoebae as Virulence Factors.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Reyes-López, Magda; Ortiz-Estrada, Guillermo; de la Garza, Mireya

    2013-01-01

    The standard reference for pathogenic and nonpathogenic amoebae is the human parasite Entamoeba histolytica; a direct correlation between virulence and protease expression has been demonstrated for this amoeba. Traditionally, proteases are considered virulence factors, including those that produce cytopathic effects in the host or that have been implicated in manipulating the immune response. Here, we expand the scope to other amoebae, including less-pathogenic Entamoeba species and highly pathogenic free-living amoebae. In this paper, proteases that affect mucin, extracellular matrix, immune system components, and diverse tissues and cells are included, based on studies in amoebic cultures and animal models. We also include proteases used by amoebae to degrade iron-containing proteins because iron scavenger capacity is currently considered a virulence factor for pathogens. In addition, proteases that have a role in adhesion and encystation, which are essential for establishing and transmitting infection, are discussed. The study of proteases and their specific inhibitors is relevant to the search for new therapeutic targets and to increase the power of drugs used to treat the diseases caused by these complex microorganisms.

  7. Functional proteomics-aided selection of protease inhibitors for herbivore insect control

    PubMed Central

    Rasoolizadeh, Asieh; Munger, Aurélie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Sainsbury, Frank; Cloutier, Conrad; Michaud, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Studies have reported the potential of protease inhibitors to engineer insect resistance in transgenic plants but the general usefulness of this approach in crop protection still remains to be established. Insects have evolved strategies to cope with dietary protease inhibitors, such as the use of proteases recalcitrant to inhibition, that often make the selection of effective inhibitors very challenging. Here, we used a functional proteomics approach for the ‘capture’ of Cys protease targets in crude protein extracts as a tool to identify promising cystatins for plant improvement. Two cystatins found to differ in their efficiency to capture Cys proteases of the coleopteran pest Leptinotarsa decemlineata also differed in their usefulness to produce transgenic potato lines resistant to this insect. Plants expressing the most potent cystatin at high level had a strong repressing effect on larval growth and leaf intake, while plants expressing the weakest cystatin showed no effect on both two parameters compared to untransformed parental line used for genetic transformation. Our data underline the relevance of considering the whole range of possible protease targets when selecting an inhibitor for plant pest control. They also confirm the feasibility of developing cystatin-expressing transgenics resistant to a major pest of potato. PMID:27958307

  8. Purification and characterization of a novel extracellular alkaline protease from Cellulomonas bogoriensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Yang, Liyuan; Lv, Xue; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Chen, Shan

    2016-05-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by the alkali-tolerant Cellulomonas bogoriensis was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. The purity of the protease was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was confirmed to be 18.3 kDa. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 11. The stability of the protease was maintained at a wide temperature range of 4-60 °C and pH range of 3-12. Irreversible inhibition of the enzyme activity by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone demonstrated that the purified enzyme is a chymotrypsin of the serine protease family. The Km and Vmax of the protease activity on casein were 19.2 mg/mL and 25000 μg/min/mg, respectively. The broad substrate specificity and remarkable stability in the presence of organic solvents, salt, and commercial detergents, as well as its excellent stain removal and dehairing capability, make the purified alkaline protease a promising candidate for industrial applications.

  9. A Novel Method for High-Level Production of TEV Protease by Superfolder GFP Tag

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xudong; Wu, Di; Lu, Zhisheng; Chen, Wentao; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Yu

    2009-01-01

    Because of its stringent sequence specificity, tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease is widely used to remove fusion tags from recombinant proteins. Due to the poor solubility of TEV protease, many strategies have been employed to increase the expression level of this enzyme. In our work, we introduced a novel method to produce TEV protease by using visible superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) as the fusion tag. The soluble production and catalytic activity of six variants of sfGFP-TEV was examined, and then the best variant was selected for large-scale production. After purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Q anion exchange chromatography, the best variant of sfGFP-TEV fusion protease was obtained with purity of over 98% and yield of over 320 mg per liter culture. The sfGFP-TEV had a similar catalytic activity to that of the original TEV protease. Our research showed a novel method of large-scale production of visible and functional TEV protease for structural genomics research and other applications. PMID:20182554

  10. Purification and characterization of a milk-clotting aspartic protease from Withania coagulans fruit.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Mahmoud; Aghamaali, Mahmoud Reza; Sajedi, Reza H; Asghari, S Mohsen; Jorjani, Eisa

    2017-05-01

    Withania coagulans fruit has traditionally been used as milk coagulant. The present study reports the purification and characterization of an aspartic protease from W. coagulans fruit. The enzyme was purified via fractional ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the presence of a monomeric protein with molecular weight of 31kDa. Proteolytic activity (PA) of the protease was evaluated using casein, and the milk-clotting activity (MCA) was analyzed by skim milk. The Km and Vmax values of the enzyme for casein were obtained to be 1.29mg/ml and 0.035μmol Tyr/min, respectively. Optimal temperature and pH were 65°C and 5.5, respectively. After incubation of enzyme at 65°C for 1h, 73% of PA was remained which demonstrated high thermal stability of the enzyme. Mass spectrometry analysis of the purified protease and enzyme assays in the presence of protease inhibitors indicated that aspartic protease was the only responsible enzyme in milk coagulation. Furthermore, by investigating the effect of salts on enzyme activity, it was observed that both NaCl and CaCl2 reduced enzyme activity. These characteristics of the protease suggest that the enzyme may be suitable for producing low salt content cheeses.

  11. Enhanced production and organic solvent stability of a protease fromBrevibacillus laterosporus strain PAP04

    PubMed Central

    Anbu, P.

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial strain (PAP04) isolated from cattle farm soil was shown to produce an extracellular, solvent-stable protease. Sequence analysis using 16S rRNA showed that this strain was highly homologous (99%) to Brevibacillus laterosporus. Growth conditions that optimize protease production in this strain were determined as maltose (carbon source), skim milk (nitrogen source), pH 7.0, 40°C temperature, and 48 h incubation. Overall, conditions were optimized to yield a 5.91-fold higher production of protease compared to standard conditions. Furthermore, the stability of the enzyme in organic solvents was assessed by incubation for 2 weeks in solutions containing 50% concentration of various organic solvents. The enzyme retained activity in all tested solvents except ethanol; however, the protease activity was stimulated in benzene (74%) followed by acetone (63%) and chloroform (54.8%). In addition, the plate assay and zymography results also confirmed the stability of the PAP04 protease in various organic solvents. The organic solvent stability of this protease at high (50%) concentrations of solvents makes it an alternative catalyst for peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media. PMID:27007657

  12. Production, purification and characterization of an aspartic protease from Aspergillus foetidus.

    PubMed

    Souza, Paula Monteiro; Werneck, Gabriela; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Siqueira, Felix; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Perego, Patrizia; Converti, Attilio; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira; Junior, Adalberto Pessoa

    2017-03-28

    An acidic thermostable protease was extracellularly produced either in shake flask or in stirred tank bioreactor by an Aspergillus foetidus strain isolated from the Brazilian savanna soil using different nitrogen sources. Its maximum activity (63.7 U mL(-1)) was obtained in a medium containing 2% (w/v) peptone. A cultivation carried out in a 5.0 L stirred-tank bioreactor provided a maximum protease activity 9% lower than that observed in Erlenmeyer flasks, which was obtained after a significantly shorter (by 16-29%) time. Protease purification by a combination of gel-filtration chromatography resulted in a 16.9-fold increase in specific activity (248.1 U g(-1)). The estimated molecular weight of the purified enzyme was 50.6 kDa, and the optimal pH and temperature were 5.0 and 55 °C, respectively. The enzyme was completely inhibited by pepstatin A, and its activity enhanced by some metals. According to the inhibition profiles, it was confirmed that the purified acid protease belongs to the aspartic protease type. These results are quite promising for future development of large-scale production of such protease, which can be useful in biotechnological applications requiring high enzyme activity and stability under acidic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cysteine Proteases from Bloodfeeding Arthropod Ectoparasites

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Daniel; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Calvo, Eric; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been discovered in various bloodfeeding ectoparasites. Here, we assemble the available information about the function of these peptidases and reveal their role in hematophagy and parasite development. While most of the data shed light on key proteolytic events that play a role in arthropod physiology, we also report on the association of cysteine proteases with arthropod vectorial capacity. With emphasis on ticks, specifically Ixodes ricinus, we finally propose a model about the contribution of cysteine peptidases to blood digestion, and how their concerted action with other tick midgut proteases leads to the absorbance of nutrients by the midgut epithelial cells. PMID:21660665

  14. HIV-1 Protease: Structure, Dynamics and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Ishima, R.; Torchia, D.A.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV-1 protease is synthesized as part of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein. It is responsible for its own release from the precursor and the processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into the mature structural and functional proteins required for virus maturation. Because of its indispensable role, the mature HIV-1 protease dimer has proven to be a successful target for the development of antiviral agents. In the last 5 years, a major emphasis in protease research has been to improve inhibitor design and treatment regimens.

  15. An overview on fermentation, downstream processing and properties of microbial alkaline proteases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Beg, Q K; Khan, S; Chauhan, B

    2002-12-01

    Microbial alkaline proteases dominate the worldwide enzyme market, accounting for a two-thirds share of the detergent industry. Although protease production is an inherent property of all organisms, only those microbes that produce a substantial amount of extracellular protease have been exploited commercially. Of these, strains of Bacillus sp. dominate the industrial sector. To develop an efficient enzyme-based process for the industry, prior knowledge of various fermentation parameters, purification strategies and properties of the biocatalyst is of utmost importance. Besides these, the method of measurement of proteolytic potential, the selection of the substrate and the assay protocol depends upon the ultimate industrial application. A large array of assay protocols are available in the literature; however, with the predominance of molecular approaches for the generation of better biocatalysts, the search for newer substrates and assay protocols that can be conducted at micro/nano-scale are becoming important. Fermentation of proteases is regulated by varying the C/N ratio and can be scaled-up using fed-batch, continuous or chemostat approaches by prolonging the stationary phase of the culture. The conventional purification strategy employed, involving e.g., concentration, chromatographic steps, or aqueous two-phase systems, depends on the properties of the protease in question. Alkaline proteases useful for detergent applications are mostly active in the pH range 8-12 and at temperatures between 50 and 70 degrees C, with a few exceptions of extreme pH optima up to pH 13 and activity at temperatures up to 80-90 degrees C. Alkaline proteases mostly have their isoelectric points near to their pH optimum in the range of 8-11. Several industrially important proteases have been subjected to crystallization to extensively study their molecular homology and three-dimensional structures.

  16. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.; Mayer, M.

    1982-08-15

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with /sup 14/C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease I activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition.

  17. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of cockroach proteases in allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Page, Kristen

    2012-10-01

    Allergic asthma is on the rise in developed countries, and cockroach exposure is a major risk factor for the development of asthma. In recent years, a number of studies have investigated the importance of allergen-associated proteases in modulating allergic airway inflammation. Many of the studies have suggested the importance of allergen-associated proteases as having a direct role on airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells. In most cases, activation of the protease activated receptor (PAR)-2 has been implicated as a mechanism behind the potent allergenicity associated with cockroaches. In this review, we focus on recent evidence linking cockroach proteases to activation of a variety of cells important in allergic airway inflammation and the role of PAR-2 in this process. We will highlight recent data exploring the potential mechanisms involved in the biological effects of the allergen.

  19. Characterization of the in vitro activities of the P1 and helper component proteases of Soybean mosaic virus Strain G2 and Tobacco vein mottling virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potyviruses express their RNA genomes through the production of polyproteins that are processed in host cells by three virus-encoded proteases. Soybean plants produce large amounts of protease inhibitors during seed development and in response to wounding that could affect the activities of these pr...

  20. Regulatory Characteristics of Bacillus pumilus Protease Promoters.

    PubMed

    Toymentseva, Anna A; Mascher, Thorsten; Sharipova, Margarita R

    2017-05-01

    Expression of extracellular protease genes of Bacilli is subject to regulation by many positive and negative regulators. Here we analyzed 5' regulatory regions of genes encoding proteolytic proteases AprBp, GseBp, and MprBp from Bacillus pumilus strain 3-19. Gfp fusion constructs with upstream genomic regions of different lengths were created for all three genes to identify their natural promoters (regulatory regions). Our results suggest that the aprBp gene, encoding the major subtilisin-like protease, has the most extensive promoter region of approximately 445 bp, while the minor protease genes encoding glutamyl endopeptidase (gseBp) and metalloproteinase (mprBp) are preceded by promoters of 150 and 250 bp in length, respectively. Promoter analysis of P aprBp -gfpmu3 and P gseBp -gfpmu3 reporter fusion constructs in degU and spo0A mutants indicates a positive regulatory effect of DegU and Spo0A on protease expression, while the disruption of abrB, sinR, and scoC repressor genes did not significantly affect promoter activities of all protease genes. On the other hand, the expression of P aprBp -gfpmu3 and P gseBp -gfpmu3 reporters increased 1.6- and 3.0-fold, respectively, in sigD-deficient cells, indicating that the prevention of motility gene expression promotes protease expression. Our results indicate that all examined regulators regulated serine proteases production in B. subtilis.

  1. Protease Mediated Anti-Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    anticancer therapy and focal light illumination is expected to be an effective treatment with reduced phototoxicity given the quenched state of the...to months following photodynamic therapy (PDT). Herein, we report a novel design of protease-mediated photosensitization by which phototoxicity can...W81XWH-05-1-0515 TITLE: Protease Mediated Anti-Cancer Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ching-Hsuan Tung CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  2. Differential expression of conserved protease genes in crucifer-attacking pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Dow, J M; Fan, M J; Newman, M A; Daniels, M J

    1993-12-01

    Strains of Xanthomonas campestris pathovars armoraciae and raphani, which cause leaf spotting diseases in brassicas, produce a major extracellular protease in liquid culture which was partially purified. The protease (PRT 3) was a zinc-requiring metalloenzyme and was readily distinguishable from the two previously characterized proteases (PRT 1 and PRT 2) of X. campestris pv. campestris by the pattern of degradation of beta-casein and sensitivity to inhibitors. PRT 3 was produced at a low level in the vascular brassica pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris (five strains tested), in which PRT 1 and PRT 2 predominate. In contrast, expression of PRT 1, a serine protease, could not be detected in the six tested strains of the leaf spotting mesophyll pathogens. However, all these strains had DNA fragments which hybridized to a prtA probe and which probably carry a functional prtA (the structural gene for PRT 1). The structural gene for PRT 3 (prtC) was cloned by screening a genomic library of X. campestris pv. raphani in a protease-deficient X. campestris pv. campestris strain. Subcloning and Tn5 mutagenesis located the structural gene to 1.2 kb of DNA. DNA fragments which hybridized to the structural gene were found in all strains of the crucifer-attacking X. campestris pathovars tested as well as in a number of other pathovars. Experiments in which the pattern of protease production of the pathovars was manipulated by introduction of cloned genes into heterologous pathovars suggested that no determinative relationship exists between the pattern of protease gene expression and the (vascular or mesophyllic) mode of pathogenesis.

  3. Protease and lipase activities of fungal and bacterial strains derived from an artisanal raw ewe's milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Ozturkoglu-Budak, Sebnem; Wiebenga, Ad; Bron, Peter A; de Vries, Ronald P

    2016-11-21

    We previously identified the microbiota present during cheese ripening and observed high protease and lipase activity in Divle Cave cheese. To determine the contribution of individual isolates to enzyme activities, we investigated a range of species representing this microbiota for their proteolytic and lipolytic ability. In total, 17 fungal, 5 yeast and 18 bacterial strains, previously isolated from Divle Cave cheese, were assessed. Qualitative protease and lipase activities were performed on skim-milk agar and spirit-blue lipase agar, respectively, and resulted in a selection of strains for quantitative assays. For the quantitative assays, the strains were grown on minimal medium containing irradiated Divle Cave cheese, obtained from the first day of ripening. Out of 16 selected filamentous fungi, Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium cavernicola and Penicillium olsonii showed the highest protease activity, while Mucor racemosus was the best lipase producer. Yarrowia lipolytica was the best performing yeast with respect to protease and lipase activity. From the 18 bacterial strains, 14 and 11 strains, respectively showed protease and lipase activity in agar plates. Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus stratosphericus, Brevibacterium antiquum, Psychrobacter glacincola and Pseudomonas proteolytica displayed the highest protease and lipase activity. The proteases of yeast and filamentous fungi were identified as mainly aspartic protease by specific inhibition with Pepstatin A, whereas inhibition by PMSF (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) indicated that most bacterial enzymes belong to serine type protease. Our results demonstrate that aspartic proteases, which usually have high milk clotting activity, are predominantly derived from fungal strains, and therefore fungal enzymes appear to be more suitable for use in the cheese industry. Microbial enzymes studied in this research might be alternatives for rennin (chymosin) from animal source because of their low cost and stable

  4. How proteases regulate bone morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Nathalie; Behonick, Danielle; Stickens, Dominique; Werb, Zena

    2003-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade most components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), as well as many non-ECM molecules. MMPs participate in (1). degradation of ECM to allow cell migration; (2). alteration of the ECM microenvironment resulting in alteration in cellular behavior; (3). modulation of biologically active molecules by direct cleavage or release from ECM stores; (4). regulation of the activity of other proteases; and (5). cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. We have sought to understand the role of MMPs during development and tissue repair in transgenic mice. Endochondral bone formation presents a particularly interesting developmental challenge. During this process, an avascular tissue (cartilage) is converted into one of the most highly vascularized tissues (bone) in the vertebrate body. Ossification begins with invasion of the calcified hypertrophic cartilage by capillaries. Apoptosis of the terminal hypertrophic chondrocytes, degradation of the cartilage matrix, and deposition of bone matrix by osteoblasts accompanies neovascularization of the growth plate. Remodeling of ECM results in a cavity filled with vascular channels containing hematopoietic cells. Our results reveal that MMP9, MMP13, and vascular endothelial growth factor are key regulators for the remodeling of the skeletal tissues. They coordinate not only matrix degradation, but also the recruitment and differentiation of endothelial cells, osteoclasts, chondroclasts, and osteoprogenitors.

  5. PCSK9: an enigmatic protease.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Dayami

    2008-04-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) plays a critical role in cholesterol metabolism by controlling the levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that circulate in the bloodstream. Several gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations in the PCSK9 gene, that occur naturally, have been identified and linked to hypercholesterolemia and hypocholesterolemia, respectively. PCSK9 expression has been shown to be regulated by sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) and statins similar to other genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis. The most critical finding concerning PCSK9 is that this protease is able to influence the number of LDL receptor molecules expressed on the cell surface. Studies have demonstrated that PCSK9 acts mainly by enhancing degradation of LDL receptor protein in the liver. Inactivation of PCSK9 in mice reduces plasma cholesterol levels primarily by increasing hepatic expression of LDL receptor protein and thereby accelerating clearance of circulating LDL cholesterol. The objective of this review is to summarize the current information related to the regulation and function of PCSK9 and to identify gaps in our present knowledge.

  6. Lysosomal cysteine proteases: structure, function and inhibition of cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rebecca

    2005-12-01

    Lysosomal cysteine proteases, a subgroup of the cathepsin family, are critical for normal cellular functions such as general protein turnover, antigen processing and bone remodeling. In the past decade, the number of identified human cathepsins has more than doubled and their known role in several pathologies has expanded rapidly. Increased understanding of the structure and mechanism of this class of enzymes has brought on a new fervor in the design of small molecule inhibitors with the hope of producing specific, therapeutic drugs for diseases such as arthritis, allergy, multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

  7. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. |

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of a 48-kDa protease (AMP48) from Artocarpus heterophyllus latex.

    PubMed

    Siritapetawee, J; Thammasirirak, S; Samosornsuk, W

    2012-01-01

    Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) is a latex producing plant. Plant latex is produced from secretory cells and contains many intergradients. It also has been used in folk medicine. This study aimed to purify and characterize the biological activities of a protease from jackfruit latex. A protease was isolated and purified from crude latex of a jackfruit tree by acid precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The proteolytic activities of protein were tested using gelatin- and casein-zymography. The molecular weight and isoelectric point (pl) of protein were analysed by SDS/12.5% PAGE and 2D-PAGE, respectively. Antimicrobial activity of protein was analysed by broth microdilution method. In addition, the antibacterial activity of protein against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was observed and measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The purified protein contained protease activity by digesting gelatin- and casein-substrates. The protease was designated as antimicrobial protease-48 kDa or AMP48 due to its molecular mass on SDS-PAGE was approximately 48 kDa. The isoelectric point (pl) of AMP48 was approximately 4.2. In addition, AMP48 contained antimicrobial activities by it could inhibit the growths of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and clinical isolated Candida albicans at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 2.2 mg/ml and Minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) 8.8 mg/ml. AFM image also supported the antimicrobial activities of AMP48 by the treated bacterial morphology and size were altered from normal.

  9. A novel protease inhibitor in Bombyx mori is involved in defense against Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Li, Youshan; Zhao, Ping; Liu, Shiping; Dong, Zhaoming; Chen, Jianping; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-10-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi, such as Beauveria bassiana, penetrate the insect cuticle using a plethora of hydrolytic enzymes including cuticle-degrading proteases and chitinases, which are important virulence factors. The insect integument and hemolymph contains a relatively high concentration of protease inhibitors, which are closely involved with defense against pathogenic microorganisms. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying resistance against entomopathogenic fungi and to identify a new molecular target for improving fungal resistance in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, we cloned and expressed a novel silkworm TIL-type protease inhibitor BmSPI38, which was very stable over a wide range of temperatures and pH values. An activity assay suggested that BmSPI38 potently inactivated the insecticidal cuticle-degrading enzyme (CDEP-1) produced by B. bassiana and subtilisin A produced by Bacillus licheniformis. The melanization of silkworm induced by CDEP-1 protease could also be blocked by BmSPI38. These results provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms whereby insect protease inhibitors provide resistance against entomopathogenic fungi, suggesting the possibility of using fungal biopesticides in sericulture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  11. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel mesophilic alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. L010 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Huang, Fei; Xia, Mengyun; Jiang, Yan; Yang, Yi

    2013-11-04

    Bacteria producing proteases were isolated and selected from the environment and the alkaline proteases with superior performance for commercial exploitation were screened. The strain producing extracellular proteases was isolated by a casein plate and was identified by biochemical and morphological tests and by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. To acquire the open reading frame (ORF) of the protease, degenerate primers designing and genome walking method were used. The precursor and mature peptide of the protease were recombinant expressed in BL21 (DE3). After purification of the active protease, the characteristics and the catalytic ability were detected using synthetic peptide succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide as the substrates. Strain L010 isolated was named as Bacillus sp. L010 after identification. The ORF of the protease was 1149-bp long and encoded a protein of 382 amino acids comprised with a 30-residual signal peptide, a 77-residual propeptide, and a 275-residual mature protein, and the encoded protein was one of subtilisins-a member of serine proteases and designated as SprD. The precursor of SprD (pro-SprD) autoprocessed into active SprD mediated by the propeptide when pro-SprD was recombinant expressed in BL21 (DE3). The enzyme exhibited high catalytic efficiency (K(cat)/K(m)) towards synthesis substrates with optimal activity at 70 degrees C and pH 9 - 10. SprD was stable over a range of pH 7.0 to 10.0 and was thermal stable at 25 degrees C - 60 degrees C. The high stability of SprD towards alkaline conditions (pH 7 - 10) and under temperature 25 degrees C - 60 degrees C and the high catalytic efficiency suggested that the protease would find research value and potential applications.

  12. Regulation of COL1A1 expression in type I collagen producing tissues: identification of a 49 base pair region which is required for transgene expression in bone of transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedalov, A.; Salvatori, R.; Dodig, M.; Kronenberg, M. S.; Kapural, B.; Bogdanovic, Z.; Kream, B. E.; Woody, C. O.; Clark, S. H.; Mack, K.; hide

    1995-01-01

    Previous deletion studies using a series of COL1A1-CAT fusion genes have indicated that the 625 bp region of the COL1A1 upstream promoter between -2295 and -1670 bp is required for high levels of expression in bone, tendon, and skin of transgenic mice. To further define the important sequences within this region, a new series of deletion constructs extending to -1997, -1794, -1763, and -1719 bp has been analyzed in transgenic mice. Transgene activity, determined by measuring CAT activity in tissue extracts of 6- to 8-day-old transgenic mouse calvariae, remains high for all the new deletion constructs and drops to undetectable levels in calvariae containing the -1670 bp construct. These results indicate that the 49 bp region of the COL1A1 promoter between -1719 and -1670 bp is required for high COL1A1 expression in bone. Although deletion of the same region caused a substantial reduction of promoter activity in tail tendon, the construct extending to -1670 bp is still expressed in this tissue. However, further deletion of the promoter to -944 bp abolished activity in tendon. Gel mobility shift studies identified a protein in calvarial nuclear extracts that is not found in tendon nuclear extracts, which binds within this 49 bp region. Our study has delineated sequences in the COL1A1 promoter required for expression of the COL1A1 gene in high type I collagen-producing tissues, and suggests that different cis elements control expression of the COL1A1 gene in bone and tendon.

  13. Regulation of COL1A1 expression in type I collagen producing tissues: identification of a 49 base pair region which is required for transgene expression in bone of transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedalov, A.; Salvatori, R.; Dodig, M.; Kronenberg, M. S.; Kapural, B.; Bogdanovic, Z.; Kream, B. E.; Woody, C. O.; Clark, S. H.; Mack, K.; Rowe, D. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Previous deletion studies using a series of COL1A1-CAT fusion genes have indicated that the 625 bp region of the COL1A1 upstream promoter between -2295 and -1670 bp is required for high levels of expression in bone, tendon, and skin of transgenic mice. To further define the important sequences within this region, a new series of deletion constructs extending to -1997, -1794, -1763, and -1719 bp has been analyzed in transgenic mice. Transgene activity, determined by measuring CAT activity in tissue extracts of 6- to 8-day-old transgenic mouse calvariae, remains high for all the new deletion constructs and drops to undetectable levels in calvariae containing the -1670 bp construct. These results indicate that the 49 bp region of the COL1A1 promoter between -1719 and -1670 bp is required for high COL1A1 expression in bone. Although deletion of the same region caused a substantial reduction of promoter activity in tail tendon, the construct extending to -1670 bp is still expressed in this tissue. However, further deletion of the promoter to -944 bp abolished activity in tendon. Gel mobility shift studies identified a protein in calvarial nuclear extracts that is not found in tendon nuclear extracts, which binds within this 49 bp region. Our study has delineated sequences in the COL1A1 promoter required for expression of the COL1A1 gene in high type I collagen-producing tissues, and suggests that different cis elements control expression of the COL1A1 gene in bone and tendon.

  14. Evaluation of proteases and protease inhibitors in Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from laboratory and field populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proteases and proteases inhibitors were evaluated in a number of preparations of Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from glasshouse cultures (GH) and field (LR) populations. Using a FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide substrate pools that detect 4 endoprotease types (aspartic, cysteine, meta...

  15. Intervention for hyperlipidemia associated with protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Melroe, N H; Kopaczewski, J; Henry, K; Huebsch, J

    1999-01-01

    In the past 3 years, treatment for HIV infection has significantly improved the prognosis for HIV-infected persons. The administration of protease inhibitors for the treatment of HIV infection has had a significant role in the reduction of AIDS-related complications. Recent findings have indicated that protease inhibitors may significantly increase lipids to levels that pose a health risk that may be greater than the illness itself. This article reviews the initial findings of a study that investigated the impact of interventions for the treatment of protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia. The purpose of the study was to determine if initiation of interventions based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Guidelines would be effective in lowering protease inhibitor-related hyperlipidemia without disrupting the effectiveness of the HIV therapy. A total of 45 HIV-infected individuals who were taking a protease inhibitor and had abnormally elevated lipids were enrolled into this study. Mean serum cholesterol level prior to initiation of a protease inhibitor regimen was 170 mg/dl as compared to a mean cholesterol at time of enrollment of 289 mg/dl and triglycerides of 879 mg/dl. Interventions included diet and exercise and the prescription of gemfibrozil alone or in combination with atorvatstatin. During the course of the study, overall intervention significantly reduced serum cholesterol level to 201 mg/dl (p. 01) over a study period of ten months. Case studies of five medical events related to hyperlipidemia are included. Currently, 26 participants continue in the study. Sixteen participants discontinued protease inhibitor therapy during the course of the study and thus ended their participation.

  16. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of Its Binding Model toward Its Applications As Detergent Additive

    PubMed Central

    Baweja, Mehak; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Puneet K.; Nain, Lata; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-01-01

    A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10–70°C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50°C and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50 and 4°C with low supplementation (109 U/ml). Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash. PMID:27536284

  17. Purification and characterization of a thermo- and organic solvent-tolerant alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. JER02.

    PubMed

    Badoei-Dalfard, Arastoo; Karami, Zahra; Ravan, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus sp. JER02 is a bacterial strain that can be grown in a medium containing organic solvents and produce a protease enzyme. JER02 protease was purified with a yield of 31.9% of total protein and 328.83-fold purification. Km and Vmax of this protease were established as 0.826 µM and 7.18 µmol/min, respectively. JER02 protease stability was stimulated about 80% by cyclohexane. It exhibited optimum temperature activity at 70°C. Furthermore, this enzyme was active in a wide range of pH (4-12) and showed maximum activity at pH 9.0. The nonionic detergents Tween-20 and Triton X-100 improved the protease activity by 30 and 20%, respectively. In addition, this enzyme was shown to be very stable in the presence of strong anionic surfactants and oxidizing agents, since it retained 77%, 93%, and 98% of its initial activity, after 1 hr of incubation at room temperature with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium perborate (1%, v/v) and H2O2 (1%, v/v), respectively. Overall, the unique properties of the Bacillus sp. JER02 protease suggested that this thermo- and detergent-stable, solvent-tolerant protease has great potential for industrial applications.

  18. Isolation and characterization of two serine proteases from metagenomic libraries of the Gobi and Death Valley deserts.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Julie; Regeard, Christophe; DuBow, Michael S

    2011-08-01

    The screening of environmental DNA metagenome libraries for functional activities can provide an important source of new molecules and enzymes. In this study, we identified 17 potential protease-producing clones from two metagenomic libraries derived from samples of surface sand from the Gobi and Death Valley deserts. Two of the proteases, DV1 and M30, were purified and biochemically examined. These two proteases displayed a molecular mass of 41.5 kDa and 45.7 kDa, respectively, on SDS polyacrylamide gels. Alignments with known protease sequences showed less than 55% amino acid sequence identity. These two serine proteases appear to belong to the subtilisin (S8A) family and displayed several unique biochemical properties. Protease DV1 had an optimum pH of 8 and an optimal activity at 55°C, while protease M30 had an optimum pH >11 and optimal activity at 40°C. The properties of these enzymes make them potentially useful for biotechnological applications and again demonstrate that metagenomic approaches can be useful, especially when coupled with the study of novel environments such as deserts.

  19. Molecular Cloning and Optimization for High Level Expression of Cold-Adapted Serine Protease from Antarctic Yeast Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Mazian, Mu'adz; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd.

    2014-01-01

    Psychrophilic basidiomycete yeast, Glaciozyma antarctica strain PI12, was shown to be a protease-producer. Isolation of the PI12 protease gene from genomic and mRNA sequences allowed determination of 19 exons and 18 introns. Full-length cDNA of PI12 protease gene was amplified by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) strategy with an open reading frame (ORF) of 2892 bp, coded for 963 amino acids. PI12 protease showed low homology with the subtilisin-like protease from fungus Rhodosporidium toruloides (42% identity) and no homology to other psychrophilic proteases. The gene encoding mature PI12 protease was cloned into Pichia pastoris expression vector, pPIC9, and positioned under the induction of methanol-alcohol oxidase (AOX) promoter. The recombinant PI12 protease was efficiently secreted into the culture medium driven by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae α-factor signal sequence. The highest protease production (28.3 U/ml) was obtained from P. pastoris GS115 host (GpPro2) at 20°C after 72 hours of postinduction time with 0.5% (v/v) of methanol inducer. The expressed protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and activity staining with a molecular weight of 99 kDa. PMID:25093119

  20. Periodontal Treatment Downregulates Protease-Activated Receptor 2 in Human Gingival Crevicular Fluid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Euzebio Alves, Vanessa Tubero; Bueno da Silva, Henrique Aparecido; de França, Bruno Nunes; Eichler, Rosangela Santos; Saraiva, Luciana; de Carvalho, Maria Helena Catelli

    2013-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, including periodontitis; it can be activated by gingipain and produced by Porphyromonas gingivalis and by neutrophil protease 3 (P3). PAR2 activation plays a relevant role in inflammatory processes by inducing the release of important inflammatory mediators associated with periodontal breakdown. The effects of periodontal treatment on PAR2 expression and its association with levels of proinflammatory mediators and activating proteases were investigated in chronic periodontitis patients. Positive staining for PAR2 was observed in gingival crevicular fluid cells and was reflective of tissue destruction. Overexpression of PAR2 was positively associated with inflammatory clinical parameters and with the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha, matrix metalloprotease 2 (MMP-2), MMP-8, hepatocyte growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Elevated levels of gingipain and P3 and decreased levels of dentilisin and the protease inhibitors secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor and elafin were also associated with PAR2 overexpression. Healthy periodontal sites from individuals with chronic periodontitis showed diminished expression of PAR2 mRNA and the PAR2 protein (P < 0.05). Furthermore, periodontal treatment resulted in decreased PAR2 expression and correlated with decreased expression of inflammatory mediators and activating proteases. We concluded that periodontal treatment resulted in decreased levels of proteases and that proinflammatory mediators are associated with decreased PAR2 expression, suggesting that PAR2 expression is influenced by the presence of periodontal infection and is not a constitutive characteristic favoring periodontal inflammation. PMID:24042113

  1. N-Acetyl-d-Glucosamine-Mediated Regulation of Extracellular Protease in the Entomopathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana

    PubMed Central

    Bidochka, Michael J.; Khachatourians, George G.

    1988-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana GK2016 grown in a liquid medium incorporating gelatin as the sole carbon and nitrogen source produced an extracellular serine protease (molecular weight, 35,000; pI ca. 10). Without gelatin, B. bassiana could utilize N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc; 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucose) as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, and GlcNAc availability increased the storage carbohydrate content in mycelia. Synthesis of protease was repressed in gelatin medium containing GlcNAc at levels of >1.07 μmol mg of fungal dry weight−1. At levels below this, protease synthesis was initiated; subsequently, free amino nitrogen appeared in the medium and diauxic growth was observed. Slow feeding with GlcNAc (35.34 μg ml−1 h−1) did not repress protease synthesis nor did GlcNAc accumulate in the medium above 0.5 mg ml−1. Increasing the rate of release of GlcNAc (83.51 μg ml−1 h−1) resulted in the accumulation of GlcNAc in the medium to 2.0 mg ml−1, a 45% increase in growth and a decrease in protease synthesis by about 81%. Free amino acids generated from the hydrolysis of gelatin did not repress protease synthesis. These data are interpreted in terms of known interaction of B. bassiana with insect cuticular components. We suggest that the action of extracellular chitinases synthesized by B. bassiana on insect cuticle, and pursuant release of GlcNAc, may have important consequences on the regulation of other extracellular catabolic enzymes such as the protease. Images PMID:16347772

  2. Cysteine and Aspartyl Proteases Contribute to Protein Digestion in the Gut of Freshwater Planaria.

    PubMed

    Goupil, Louise S; Ivry, Sam L; Hsieh, Ivy; Suzuki, Brian M; Craik, Charles S; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; McKerrow, James H

    2016-08-01

    Proteases perform numerous vital functions in flatworms, many of which are likely to be conserved throughout the phylum Platyhelminthes. Within this phylum are several parasitic worms that are often poorly characterized due to their complex life-cycles and lack of responsiveness to genetic manipulation. The flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea, or planaria, is an ideal model organism to study the complex role of protein digestion due to its simple life cycle and amenability to techniques like RNA interference (RNAi). In this study, we were interested in deconvoluting the digestive protease system that exists in the planarian gut. To do this, we developed an alcohol-induced regurgitation technique to enrich for the gut enzymes in S. mediterranea. Using a panel of fluorescent substrates, we show that this treatment produces a sharp increase in proteolytic activity. These enzymes have broad yet diverse substrate specificity profiles. Proteomic analysis of the gut contents revealed the presence of cysteine and metallo-proteases. However, treatment with class-specific inhibitors showed that aspartyl and cysteine proteases are responsible for the majority of protein digestion. Specific RNAi knockdown of the cathepsin B-like cysteine protease (SmedCB) reduced protein degradation in vivo. Immunohistochemistry and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) confirmed that the full-length and active forms of SmedCB are found in secretory cells surrounding the planaria intestinal lumen. Finally, we show that the knockdown of SmedCB reduces the speed of tissue regeneration. Defining the roles of proteases in planaria can provide insight to functions of conserved proteases in parasitic flatworms, potentially uncovering drug targets in parasites.

  3. Cysteine and Aspartyl Proteases Contribute to Protein Digestion in the Gut of Freshwater Planaria

    PubMed Central

    Goupil, Louise S.; Ivry, Sam L.; Hsieh, Ivy; Suzuki, Brian M.; Craik, Charles S.; O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; McKerrow, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Proteases perform numerous vital functions in flatworms, many of which are likely to be conserved throughout the phylum Platyhelminthes. Within this phylum are several parasitic worms that are often poorly characterized due to their complex life-cycles and lack of responsiveness to genetic manipulation. The flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea, or planaria, is an ideal model organism to study the complex role of protein digestion due to its simple life cycle and amenability to techniques like RNA interference (RNAi). In this study, we were interested in deconvoluting the digestive protease system that exists in the planarian gut. To do this, we developed an alcohol-induced regurgitation technique to enrich for the gut enzymes in S. mediterranea. Using a panel of fluorescent substrates, we show that this treatment produces a sharp increase in proteolytic activity. These enzymes have broad yet diverse substrate specificity profiles. Proteomic analysis of the gut contents revealed the presence of cysteine and metallo-proteases. However, treatment with class-specific inhibitors showed that aspartyl and cysteine proteases are responsible for the majority of protein digestion. Specific RNAi knockdown of the cathepsin B-like cysteine protease (SmedCB) reduced protein degradation in vivo. Immunohistochemistry and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) confirmed that the full-length and active forms of SmedCB are found in secretory cells surrounding the planaria intestinal lumen. Finally, we show that the knockdown of SmedCB reduces the speed of tissue regeneration. Defining the roles of proteases in planaria can provide insight to functions of conserved proteases in parasitic flatworms, potentially uncovering drug targets in parasites. PMID:27501047

  4. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  5. Lysosomal protease expression in mature enamel.

    PubMed

    Tye, Coralee E; Lorenz, Rachel L; Bartlett, John D

    2009-01-01

    The enamel matrix proteins (amelogenin, enamelin and ameloblastin) are degraded by matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-4 during enamel development and mature enamel is virtually protein free. The precise mechanism of removal and degradation of the enamel protein cleavage products from the matrix, however, remains poorly understood. It has been proposed that receptor-mediated endocytosis allows for the cleaved proteins to be removed from the matrix during enamel formation and then transported to the lysosome for further degradation. This study aims to identify lysosomal proteases that are present in maturation-stage enamel organ. RNA from first molars of 11-day-old mice was collected and expression was initially assessed by RT-PCR and then quantified by qPCR. The pattern of expression of selected proteases was assessed by immunohistochemical staining of demineralized mouse incisors. With the exception of cathepsin G, all lysosomal proteases assessed were expressed in maturation-stage enamel organ. Identified proteases included cathepsins B, D, F, H, K, L, O, S and Z. Tripeptidyl peptidases I and II as well as dipeptidyl peptidases I, II, III and IV were also found to be expressed. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that the maturation-stage ameloblasts express cathepsins L and S and tripeptidyl peptidase II. Our results suggest that the ameloblasts are enriched by a large number of lysosomal proteases at maturation that are likely involved in the degradation of the organic matrix.

  6. Bacterial proteases, untapped antimicrobial drug targets.

    PubMed

    Culp, Elizabeth; Wright, Gerard D

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial proteases are an extensive collection of enzymes that have vital roles in cell viability, stress response and pathogenicity. Although their perturbation clearly offers the potential for antimicrobial drug development, both as traditional antibiotics and anti-virulence drugs, they are not yet the target of any clinically used therapeutics. Here we describe the potential for and recent progress in the development of compounds targeting bacterial proteases with a focus on AAA+ family proteolytic complexes and signal peptidases (SPs). Caseinolytic protease (ClpP) belongs to the AAA+ family of proteases, a group of multimeric barrel-shaped complexes whose activity is tightly regulated by associated AAA+ ATPases. The opportunity for chemical perturbation of these complexes is demonstrated by compounds targeting ClpP for inhibition, activation or perturbation of its associated ATPase. Meanwhile, SPs are also a proven antibiotic target. Responsible for the cleavage of targeting peptides during protein secretion, both type I and type II SPs have been successfully targeted by chemical inhibitors. As the threat of pan-antibiotic resistance continues to grow, these and other bacterial proteases offer an arsenal of novel antibiotic targets ripe for development.

  7. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  8. Development of a glutathione production process from proteinaceous biomass resources using protease-displaying Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kim, Songhee; Yoshida, Hideyo; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Kondo, Takashi; Okai, Naoko; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-02-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tri-peptide that is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. Glutathione is produced industrially by fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and supplementation of fermentation with several amino acids can increase intracellular GSH content. More recently, however, focus has been given to protein as a resource for biofuel and fine chemical production. We demonstrate that expression of a protease on the cell surface of S. cerevisiae enables the direct use of keratin and soy protein as a source of amino acids and that these substrates enhanced intracellular GSH content. Furthermore, fermentation using soy protein also enhanced cell concentration. GSH fermentation from keratin and to a greater extent from soy protein using protease-displaying yeast yielded greater GSH productivity compared to GSH fermentation with amino acid supplementation. This protease-displaying yeast is potentially applicable to a variety of processes for the bio-production of value-added chemicals from proteinaceous biomass resources.

  9. Serum proteases alter the antigenicity of peptides presented by class I major histocompatibility complex molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Colarusso, L J; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1992-01-01

    Any effect of serum on the antigenicity of peptides is potentially relevant to their use as immunogens in vivo. Here we demonstrate that serum contains distinct proteases that can increase or decrease the antigenicity of peptides. By using a functional assay, we show that a serum component other than beta 2-microglobulin enhances the presentation of ovalbumin peptides produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage. Three features of this serum activity implicate proteolysis: it is temperature dependent, it results in increased antigenicity in a low molecular weight peptide fraction, and it is inhibited by the protease inhibitor leupeptin. Conversely, presentation of the synthetic peptide OVA-(257-264) is inhibited by serum. This inhibition is unaffected by leupeptin but is blocked by bestatin, a protease inhibitor with distinct substrate specificities. Implications for peptide-based vaccine design and immunotherapy are discussed. PMID:1518868

  10. Possible identity of IL-8 converting enzyme in human fibroblasts as a cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kensaku; Sano, Emiko; Nakaki, Toshio; Naruto, Masanobu

    2003-04-01

    A converting activity was characterized in human diploid fibroblasts, which secrete 72IL-8 and 77IL-8 in treatment with IFN-beta and poly I: poly C. 77IL-8 was significantly converted to 72IL-8 by a partially purified fraction of the culture supernatant of human diploid fibroblasts. The converting activity, which was temperature-dependent and optimal at pH 6, was completely inhibited by cysteine protease inhibitors, antipain dihydrochloride and E-64, but not by other types of protease inhibitors. These data clearly show that human diploid fibroblasts are capable of processing IL-8 to produce a mature IL-8 and that the putative converting enzyme appears to be a cysteine protease.

  11. An enzymatic method for the determination of hemoglobinA(1C).

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Kozo; Shimoji, Kazuhiko; Kajiyama, Naoki

    2005-07-01

    Fructosyl peptide oxidase is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deglycation of N-(1-deoxyfructosyl)-Val-His, a model compound of hemoglobin (Hb)A(1C). To develop an enzymatic method for the measurement of HbA(1C), we screened for a proper protease using N-(1-deoxyfructosyl)-hexapeptide as a substrate. Several proteases, including Neutral protease from Bacillus polymyxa, were found to release N-(1-deoxyfructosyl)-Val-His efficiently, however no protease was found to release N-(1-deoxyfructosyl)-Val. Neutral protease also digested HbA(1C) to release N-(1-deoxyfructosyl)-Val-His, and then the fructosyl peptide was detected using fructosyl peptide oxidase. The linear relationship was observed between the concentration of HbA(1C) and the absorbancy of fructosyl peptide oxidase reaction, hence this new method is a practical means for measuring HbA(1C.).

  12. Integrated Innate Mechanisms Involved in Airway Allergic Inflammation to the Serine Protease Subtilisin

    PubMed Central

    Florsheim, Esther; Yu, Shuang; Bragatto, Ivan; Faustino, Lucas; Gomes, Eliane; Ramos, Rodrigo N.; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are recognized environmental allergens, but little is known about the mechanisms responsible for sensing enzyme activity and initiating the development of allergic inflammation. Because usage of the serine protease subtilisin in the detergent industry resulted in an outbreak of occupational asthma in workers, we sought to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation to subtilisin and to determine the immunological mechanisms involved in type 2 responses. By using a mouse model of allergic airway disease, we have defined here that subcutaneous or intranasal sensitization followed by airway challenge to subtilisin induces prototypic allergic lung inflammation, characterized by airway eosinophilia, type 2 cytokines release, mucus production, high levels of serum IgE, and airway reactivity. These allergic responses were dependent on subtilisin protease activity, protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, IL-33 receptor ST2, and MyD88 signaling. Also, subtilisin stimulated the expression of the pro-allergic cytokines IL-1α, IL-33, TSLP, and the growth factor amphiregulin in a human bronchial epithelial cell line. Notably, acute administration of subtilisin into the airways increased lung IL-5-producing type 2 innate lymphoid cells, which required PAR-2 expression. Finally, subtilisin activity acted as a Th2 adjuvant to an unrelated airborne antigen promoting allergic inflammation to inhaled OVA. Therefore, we established a murine model of occupational asthma to a serine protease and characterized the main molecular pathways involved in allergic sensitization to subtilisin that potentially contribute to initiate allergic airway disease. PMID:25876764

  13. Novel application of Mahua (Madhuca sp.) flowers for augmented protease production from Aeromonas sp. S1.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Amrik; Saini, Vandana; Gupta, Anshu

    2012-10-01

    The present study explored the utilization of Mahua (Madhuca sp.) flowers, a major non-timber forest product (NTFP) of India, as a low-cost, natural substrate for protease production under submerged fermentation. Bacterial strain Aeromonas sp. Si1, previously reported by us, was used as the protease producer. Using Mahua flower extract (MFE) as the medium additive, the protease production could successfully be enhanced by 5.6-fold (564.5 UmL-1) after 24 h of fermentation under optimized conditions compared with initial production of 99.9 UmL' in the absence of MFE. The cultural parameters for optimum production of protease were determined to be: incubation time-24 h; pH-7.0; MFE concentration-5% (v/v); inoculum size-0.3% (v/v) and agitation rate-200 rpm. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of cheaper and abundantly available Mahua flowers for induction of proteases, and thus offer a new approach for value addition to this biomass through industrial enzyme production.

  14. Protease specificity profiling by tandem mass spectrometry using proteome-derived peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Oliver; auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Overall, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    Protease specificity profiling using proteome-derived, database-searchable peptide libraries is a novel approach to define the active site specificity of proteolytic enzymes we call PICS (Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites). Proteome-derived peptide libraries are generated by trypsin, GluC, or chymotrypsin digestion of biologically relevant proteomes, such as cytosolic lysates, to generate three separate libraries that each differ from the others in their C-terminal amino acid residues according to the protease specificity. Primary amines of all peptides are then chemically protected so that after incubation with a test protease, the neo-N-termini of the prime-side cleavage products with exposed α-amines can be specifically biotinylated, enriched, and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding nonprime-side sequences are derived bioinformatically. Suited for all protease classes except carboxyproteases and those aminoproteases and dipeptidases requiring a free α-amine for cleavage, PICS simultaneously profiles the specificity of prime and nonprime positions and directly determines scissile peptide bonds of up to hundreds of cleavage site sequences in a single experiment. This wealth of sequence specificity information also allows for the investigation of subsite cooperativity. Herein we describe a simplified procedure to produce PICS peptide libraries, the methods to perform a PICS assay, and a new method of data analysis.

  15. Production, characterization and antioxidant potential of protease from Streptomyces sp. MAB18 using poultry wastes.

    PubMed

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Poultry waste is an abundant renewable source for the recovery of several value-added metabolites with potential industrial applications. This study describes the production of protease on poultry waste, with the subsequent use of the same poultry waste for the extraction of antioxidants. An extracellular protease-producing strain was isolated from Cuddalore coast, India, and identified as Streptomyces sp. MAB18. Its protease was purified 17.13-fold with 21.62% yield with a specific activity of 2398.36 U/mg and the molecular weight was estimated as 43 kDa. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 8-10 and temperature 50-60 ° C and it was most stable up to pH 12 and 6-12% of NaCl concentration. The enzyme activity was reduced when treated with Hg(2+), Pb(2+), and SDS and stimulated by Fe(2+), Mg(2+), Triton X-100, DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide), sodium sulphite, and β-mercaptoethanol. Furthermore, the antioxidant activities of protease were evaluated using in vitro antioxidant assays, such as DPPH radical-scavenging activity, O2 scavenging activity, NO scavenging activity, Fe(2+) chelating activity, and reducing power. The enzyme showed important antioxidant potential with an IC50 value of 78 ± 0.28 mg/mL. Results of the present study indicate that the poultry waste-derived protease may be useful as supplementary protein and antioxidant in the animal feed formulations.

  16. Biochemical characterization of a detergent-stable serine alkaline protease from Caldicoprobacter guelmensis.

    PubMed

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Laribi-Habchi, Hassiba; Elhoul, Mouna Ben; Hmida-Sayari, Aïda; Hacene, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Jaouadi, Bassem; Bejar, Samir

    2015-11-01

    Caldicoprobacter guelmensis isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma (Algeria) produced high amounts of extracellular thermostable serine alkaline protease (called SAPCG) (23,000U/mL). The latter was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, UNO Q-6 FPLC and Zorbex PSM 300 HPLC, and submitted to biochemical characterization assays. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer, with a molecular mass of 55,824.19Da. The 19 N-terminal residue sequence of SAPCG showed high homology with those of microbial proteases. The enzyme was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DFP), which suggested its belonging to the serine protease family. It showed optimum protease activity at pH 10 and 70°C with casein as a substrate. The thermoactivity and thermostability of SAPCG were enhanced in the presence of 2mM Ca(2+). Its half-life times at 80 and 90°C were 180 and 60min, respectively. Interestingly, the SAPCG protease exhibited significant compatibility with iSiS and Persil, and wash performance analysis revealed that it could remove blood-stains effectively. Overall, SAPCG displayed a number of attractive properties that make it a promising candidate for future applications as an additive in detergent formulations.

  17. Activation of Bacteroides fragilis toxin by a novel bacterial protease contributes to anaerobic sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian M.; Herrou, Julien; Hecht, Aaron L.; Teoh, Wei Ping; Turner, Jerrold R.; Crosson, Sean; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the leading cause of anaerobic bacteremia and sepsis 1. Enterotoxigenic strains producing B. fragilis toxin (BFT, fragilysin) contribute to colitis 2 and intestinal malignancy 3, yet are also isolated in bloodstream infection 4,5. It is not known whether these strains harbor unique genetic determinants that confer virulence in extra-intestinal disease. We demonstrate that BFT contributes to sepsis and identify a B. fragilis protease, fragipain (Fpn), which is required for endogenous activation of BFT through removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. Structural analysis of Fpn reveals a His-Cys catalytic dyad characteristic of C11 family cysteine proteases that are conserved in multiple pathogenic Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp. Fpn-deficient enterotoxigenic B. fragilis is attenuated in its ability to induce sepsis, however Fpn is dispensable in B. fragilis colitis wherein host proteases mediate BFT activation. Our findings define a role for B. fragilis enterotoxin and its activating protease in the pathogenesis of bloodstream infection, indicating a greater complexity of cellular targeting and action of BFT than previously appreciated. The expression of fpn by both toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains suggests this protease may contribute to anaerobic sepsis beyond its role in toxin activation, potentially serving as a target for disease modification. PMID:27089515

  18. Cysteine protease gene expression and proteolytic activity during senescence of Alstroemeria petals.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Carol; Leverentz, Michael K; Griffiths, Gareth; Thomas, Brian; Chanasut, Usawadee; Stead, Anthony D; Rogers, Hilary J

    2002-02-01

    The functional life of the flower is terminated by senescence and/or abscission. Multiple processes contribute to produce the visible signs of petal wilting and inrolling that typify senescence, but one of the most important is that of protein degradation and remobilization. This is mediated in many species through protein ubiquitination and the action of specific protease enzymes. This paper reports the changes in protein and protease activity during development and senescence of Alstroemeria flowers, a Liliaceous species that shows very little sensitivity to ethylene during senescence and which shows perianth abscission 8-10 d after flower opening. Partial cDNAs of ubiquitin (ALSUQ1) and a putative cysteine protease (ALSCYP1) were cloned from Alstroemeria using degenerate PCR primers and the expression pattern of these genes was determined semi-quantitatively by RT-PCR. While the levels of ALSUQ1 only fluctuated slightly during floral development and senescence, there was a dramatic increase in the expression of ALSCYP1 indicating that this gene may encode an important enzyme for the proteolytic process in this species. Three papain class cysteine protease enzymes showing different patterns of activity during flower development were identified on zymograms, one of which showed a similar expression pattern to the cysteine protease cDNA.

  19. Biophysical characterization of in vitro bound Streptomyces peucetius daunorubicin-serine protease complex.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Rashmi; Prasad, Ranjan

    2014-03-01

    A serine protease of Streptomyces peucetius is found in association with daunorubicin in the culture filtrate and co-purifies as a complex as reported earlier by us (Dubey et al., 2013). The same protease was purified without drug attachment from dpsA(-) mutant of S. peucetius, which does not produce daunorubicin. Drug-protein complex was made in vitro by mixing daunorubicin and the protease. Spectral analysis and circular dichroism (CD) analysis were employed to determine the interaction between daunorubicin and the protease. Our study showed that interaction of daunorubicin with the protease affects the spectral characteristics of the drug and changes the secondary structure of the protein. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis showed that the drug-protein interaction results in partial conversion of the drug to aglyconic form. The complex formation implies sequestration of the drug when it attains potentially lethal level in the extracellular milieu of S. peucetius culture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibitory properties of cysteine protease pro-peptides from barley confer resistance to spider mite feeding.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, M Estrella; Arnaiz, Ana; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Martinez, Manuel; Diaz, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    C1A plant cysteine proteases are synthesized as pre-pro-enzymes that need to be processed to become active by the pro-peptide claves off from its cognate enzyme. These pro-sequences play multifunctional roles including the capacity to specifically inhibit their own as well as other C1A protease activities from diverse origin. In this study, it is analysed the potential role of C1A pro-regions from barley as regulators of cysteine proteases in target phytophagous arthropods (coleopteran and acari). The in vitro inhibitory action of these pro-sequences, purified as recombinant proteins, is demonstrated. Moreover, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different fragments of HvPap-1 barley gene containing the pro-peptide sequence were generated and the acaricide function was confirmed by bioassays conducted with the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Feeding trials resulted in a significant reduction of leaf damage in the transgenic lines expressing the pro-peptide in comparison to non-transformed control and strongly correlated with an increase in mite mortality. Additionally, the analysis of the expression levels of a selection of potential mite targets (proteases and protease inhibitors) revealed a mite strategy to counteract the inhibitory activity produced by the C1A barley pro-prodomain. These findings demonstrate that pro-peptides can control mite pests and could be applied as defence proteins in biotechnological systems.

  1. Inhibitory Properties of Cysteine Protease Pro-Peptides from Barley Confer Resistance to Spider Mite Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Martinez, Manuel; Diaz, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    C1A plant cysteine proteases are synthesized as pre-pro-enzymes that need to be processed to become active by the pro-peptide claves off from its cognate enzyme. These pro-sequences play multifunctional roles including the capacity to specifically inhibit their own as well as other C1A protease activities from diverse origin. In this study, it is analysed the potential role of C1A pro-regions from barley as regulators of cysteine proteases in target phytophagous arthropods (coleopteran and acari). The in vitro inhibitory action of these pro-sequences, purified as recombinant proteins, is demonstrated. Moreover, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different fragments of HvPap-1 barley gene containing the pro-peptide sequence were generated and the acaricide function was confirmed by bioassays conducted with the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Feeding trials resulted in a significant reduction of leaf damage in the transgenic lines expressing the pro-peptide in comparison to non-transformed control and strongly correlated with an increase in mite mortality. Additionally, the analysis of the expression levels of a selection of potential mite targets (proteases and protease inhibitors) revealed a mite strategy to counteract the inhibitory activity produced by the C1A barley pro-prodomain. These findings demonstrate that pro-peptides can control mite pests and could be applied as defence proteins in biotechnological systems. PMID:26039069

  2. Modulation of an apparent mRNA pool for extracellular protease in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, R; Elliott, W H; May, B K

    1978-01-01

    Late-log-phase cells of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens have the unusual capacity to produce extracellular protease for over 60 min in the presence of rifampin or actinomycin D at levels which strongly inhibit incorporation of amino acids into cellular protein. If cells are incubated in the presence of high levels of amino acids for 75 min this capacity is exhausted, but it is retained if the incubation is carried out in low levels of amino acids. Transfer of exhausted cells from high to low concentrations of amino acids results in a progressive recovery of the capacity for rifampin-actinomycin-insensitive protease production. The results seem best explained on the basis of the accumulation of a reserve pool of mRNA for extracellular protease. Measurement of the apparent mRNA pool size over 12 h shows a cyclical rise and fall, and these changes correlate with a periodic variation of the rate of protease production. A working hypothesis is presented to account for these observations in terms of a novel control situation over protease mRNA transcription. PMID:711667

  3. Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin(HA)/protease: an extracellular metalloprotease with multiple pathogenic activities

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Jorge A.; Silva, Anisia J.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae of serogroup O1 and O139, the etiological agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, expresses the extracellular Zn-dependent metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease also reported as vibriolysin. This enzyme is also produced by non-O1/O139 (non-cholera) strains that cause mild, sporadic illness (i.e. gastroenteritis, wound or ear infections). Orthologs of HA/protease are present in other members of the Vibrionaceae family pathogenic to humans and fish. HA/protease belongs to the M4 neutral peptidase family and displays significant amino acid sequence homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (LasB) and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus thermolysin. It exhibits a broad range of potentially pathogenic activities in cell culture and animal models. These activities range from the covalent modification of other toxins, the degradation of the protective mucus barrier and disruption of intestinal tight junctions. Here we review (i) the structure and regulation of HA/protease expression, (ii) its interaction with other toxins and the intestinal mucosa and (iii) discuss the possible role(s) of HA/protease in the pathogenesis of cholera. PMID:26952544

  4. Cleavage entropy as quantitative measure of protease specificity.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G; Margreiter, Michael A; Spitzer, Gudrun M; Wallnoefer, Hannes G; Liedl, Klaus R

    2013-04-01

    A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases) and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity.

  5. Cleavage Entropy as Quantitative Measure of Protease Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E.; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G.; Margreiter, Michael A.; Spitzer, Gudrun M.; Wallnoefer, Hannes G.; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases) and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity. PMID:23637583

  6. Insect response to plant defensive protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-07

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are natural plant defense proteins that inhibit proteases of invading insect herbivores. However, their anti-insect efficacy is determined not only by their potency toward a vulnerable insect system but also by the response of the insect to such a challenge. Through the long history of coevolution with their host plants, insects have developed sophisticated mechanisms to circumvent antinutritional effects of dietary challenges. Their response takes the form of changes in gene expression and the protein repertoire in cells lining the alimentary tract, the first line of defense. Research in insect digestive proteases has revealed the crucial roles they play in insect adaptation to plant PIs and has brought about a new appreciation of how phytophagous insects employ this group of molecules in both protein digestion and counterdefense. This review provides researchers in related fields an up-to-date summary of recent advances.

  7. A cysteine protease of Dieffenbachia maculata.

    PubMed

    Chitre, A; Padmanabhan, S; Shastri, N V

    1998-12-01

    Plants of the genus Dieffenbachia, very popular as indoor ornamental plants, are known for their toxic as well as therapeutic properties. Their toxic manifestations have been partly attributed to their proteolytic activity. The work described in the present paper shows that stem leaves and petiole of Dieffenbachia maculata Schott, a commonly grown species, contain significant proteolytic activity, different parts showing different types of protease activities. Stem showed the highest enzyme activity and this protease was purified about 55 fold by solvent precipitation, gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme has a relative molecular mass of 61 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE and has an optimum pH of 8.0 and optimum temperature of 50 degrees C. Effects of various substrates, inhibitors and activators indicate that the enzyme is a cysteine protease with leucylpeptidase activity.

  8. Serine Protease(s) Secreted by the Nematode Trichuris muris Degrade the Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, Sumaira Z.; McGuckin, Michael A.; Grencis, Richard K.; Thornton, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The polymeric mucin component of the intestinal mucus barrier changes during nematode infection to provide not only physical protection but also to directly affect pathogenic nematodes and aid expulsion. Despite this, the direct interaction of the nematodes with the mucins and the mucus barrier has not previously been addressed. We used the well-established Trichuris muris nematode model to investigate the effect on mucins of the complex mixture of immunogenic proteins secreted by the nematode called excretory/secretory products (ESPs). Different regimes of T. muris infection were used to simulate chronic (low dose) or acute (high dose) infection. Mucus/mucins isolated from mice and from the human intestinal cell line, LS174T, were treated with ESPs. We demonstrate that serine protease(s) secreted by the nematode have the ability to change the properties of the mucus barrier, making it more porous by degrading the mucin component of the mucus gel. Specifically, the serine protease(s) acted on the N-terminal polymerising domain of the major intestinal mucin Muc2, resulting in depolymerisation of Muc2 polymers. Importantly, the respiratory/gastric mucin Muc5ac, which is induced in the intestine and is critical for worm expulsion, was protected from the depolymerising effect exerted by ESPs. Furthermore, serine protease inhibitors (Serpins) which may protect the mucins, in particular Muc2, from depolymerisation, were highly expressed in mice resistant to chronic infection. Thus, we demonstrate that nematodes secrete serine protease(s) to degrade mucins within the mucus barrier, which may modify the niche of the parasite to prevent clearance from the host or facilitate efficient mating and egg laying from the posterior end of the parasite that is in intimate contact with the mucus barrier. However, during a TH2-mediated worm expulsion response, serpins, Muc5ac and increased levels of Muc2 protect the barrier from degradation by the nematode secreted protease(s). PMID

  9. Production of bioactive peptide hydrolysates from deer, sheep and pig plasma using plant and fungal protease preparations.

    PubMed

    Bah, Clara S F; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Carne, Alan; McConnell, Michelle A

    2015-06-01

    Plasma separated from deer, sheep and pig blood, obtained from abattoirs, was hydrolysed using protease preparations from plant (papain and bromelain) and fungal (FP400 and FPII) sources. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the peptide hydrolysates obtained after 1, 2, 4 and 24h of hydrolysis, were investigated. The release of trichloroacetic acid-soluble peptides over the hydrolysis period was monitored using the o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) assay, while the hydrolysis profiles were visualised using SDS-PAGE. The major plasma proteins in the animal plasmas were identified using MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. Hydrolysates of plasma generated with fungal proteases exhibited higher DPPH radical-scavenging, oxygen radical-scavenging capacity (ORAC) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) than those generated with plant proteases for all three animal plasmas. No antimicrobial activity was detected in the hydrolysates. The results indicated that proteolytic hydrolysis of animal blood plasmas, using fungal protease preparations in particular, produces hydrolysates with high antioxidant properties.

  10. Seminal and colostral protease inhibitors on leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Veselský, L; Cechová, D; Hruban, V; Klaudy, J

    1982-01-01

    For detection of protease inhibitors from cow colostrum (CTI) and bull seminal plasma (BUSI I and BUSI II) on the surface of leukocytes, immunological methods were used. An agglutination and an immunofluorescence test demonstrated components on the surface of bovine, porcine and ovine granulocytes and lymphocytes which were immunologically identical with the protease inhibitors isolated from cow colostrum and bull seminal plasma. When antisera against (CTI, BUSI and BUSI II were absorbed by bovine and porcine liver, kidney and spleen homogenate or by bovine and porcine granulocytes or lymphocytes, the immunological tests were negative.

  11. Saquinavir, the pioneer antiretroviral protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    la Porte, Charles J L

    2009-10-01

    The treatment of HIV infection underwent a major change in 1995 when saquinavir was the first protease inhibitor introduced into the market. This drug made the use of combination therapy in the treatment of HIV possible and increased the success rate of treatment. This article will review recent literature on saquinavir to define its current role in HIV treatment, among the newer antiretroviral drugs. Scientific literature and conference presentations were evaluated for relevant information pertaining to saquinavir. Although underused, saquinavir has good efficacy and tolerability when compared to other protease inhibitors. The film-coated tablet formulation improved pill burden. Saquinavir still has potential in the treatment of adults, children and pregnant women.

  12. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The design, development and clinical success of HIV protease inhibitors represent one of the most remarkable achievements of molecular medicine. This review describes all nine currently available FDA-approved protease inhibitors, discusses their pharmacokinetic properties, off-target activities, side-effects, and resistance profiles. The compounds in the various stages of clinical development are also introduced, as well as alternative approaches, aiming at other functional domains of HIV PR. The potential of these novel compounds to open new way to the rational drug design of human viruses is critically assessed. PMID:21994591

  13. Effects of culture conditions on ligninolytic enzymes and protease production by Phanerochaete chrysosporium in air.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoping; Wen, Xianghua; Bai, Yanan; Qian, Yi

    2008-01-01

    The production of ligninolytic enzymes and protease by Phanerochaete chrysosporium was investigated under different culture conditions. Different amounts of medium were employed in free and immobilized culture, together with two kinds of medium with different C/N ratios. Little lignin peroxidase (LiP) (< 2 U/L) was detected in free culture with nitrogen-limited medium (C/N ratio: 56/2.2, in mmol/L), while manganese peroxidase (MnP) maximum activity was 231 and 240 U/L in 50 and 100 ml medium culture, respectively. Immobilized culture with 50 ml nitrogen-limited medium gave the highest MnP and LiP production with the maximum values of 410 and 721 U/L separately on the day 5; however, flasks containing 100 ml nitrogen-limited medium only produced less MnP with a peak value of 290 U/L. Comparatively, carbon-limited medium (C/N ratio: 28/44, in mmol/L) was adopted in culture but produced little MnP and LiP. Medium type had the greatest impact on protease production. Large amount of protease was produced due to glucose limitation. Culture type and medium volume influence protease activity corporately by affecting oxygen supply. The results implied shallow immobilized culture was a possible way to gain high production of ligninolytic enzymes.

  14. Cysteine Protease Secreted by Paragonimus westermani Attenuates Effector Functions of Human Eosinophils Stimulated with Immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Myeong Heon; Kita, Hirohito; Park, Hae Young; Seoh, Ju Young

    2001-01-01

    An immunoglobulin G (IgG)-coated surface, such as that found on helminth parasites, is one of the most effective physiologic stimuli for eosinophil activation. The cysteine proteases secreted by tissue-invasive helminth larvae play an important role in evasion of the immune response by degrading the host immunoglobulins. In this study, we investigated whether cysteine proteases in the excretory-secretory product (ESP) produced by Paragonimus westermani newly excysted metacercariae (PwNEM), which cause pulmonary or extrapulmonary paragonimiasis in human beings, could modify effector functions of human eosinophils stimulated with IgG. We coated 96-well plates with human IgG in the absence or presence of the ESP produced by PwNEM. When eosinophils were incubated in the wells coated with IgG in the presence of the ESP, eosinophil degranulation and superoxide production were significantly reduced compared with results for cells incubated in wells coated with IgG alone. This inhibitory effect of the ESP on IgG-induced superoxide production was dose dependent and was significantly abolished by pretreatment of the ESP with heat. These findings suggest that the cysteine proteases secreted by PwNEM attenuate both activation and degranulation of eosinophils stimulated with IgG. Thus, the cysteine proteases produced by tissue-invasive helminth larvae play crucial roles in evasion of IgG-dependent eosinophil helminthotoxicity and in reduction of eosinophil-associated tissue inflammation during the migratory period. PMID:11179333

  15. Production of Thermostable Organic Solvent Tolerant Keratinolytic Protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4: IAA Production and Plant Growth Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Amit; Singh, Hukum; Anwar, Mohammad S.; Kumar, Shailendra; Ansari, Mohammad W.; Agrawal, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    There are several reports about the optimization of protease production, but only few have optimized the production of organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic proteases that show remarkable exploitation in the development of the non-polluting processes in biotechnological industries. The present study was carried with aim to optimize the production of a thermostable organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 utilizing chicken feathers. Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 isolated from the soil sample collected from a rice mill wasteyard site near Kashipur, Uttrakhand was identified on the basis of 16S rDNA analysis. The production of organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease enzyme by Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 was optimized by varying physical culture conditions such as pH (10.0), temperature (60°C), inoculum percentage (2%), feather concentration (2%) and agitation rate (2 g) for feather degradation. The result showed that Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 potentially produces extra-cellular thermostable organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease in the culture medium. Further, the feather hydrolysate from keratinase production media showed plant growth promoting activity by producing indole-3-acetic acid itself. The present findings suggest that keratinolytic protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 offers enormous industrial applications due to its organic solvent tolerant property in peptide synthesis, practical role in feather degradation and potential function in plant growth promoting activity, which might be a superior candidate to keep ecosystem healthy and functional. PMID:27555836

  16. Production of Thermostable Organic Solvent Tolerant Keratinolytic Protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4: IAA Production and Plant Growth Promotion.

    PubMed

    Verma, Amit; Singh, Hukum; Anwar, Mohammad S; Kumar, Shailendra; Ansari, Mohammad W; Agrawal, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    There are several reports about the optimization of protease production, but only few have optimized the production of organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic proteases that show remarkable exploitation in the development of the non-polluting processes in biotechnological industries. The present study was carried with aim to optimize the production of a thermostable organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 utilizing chicken feathers. Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 isolated from the soil sample collected from a rice mill wasteyard site near Kashipur, Uttrakhand was identified on the basis of 16S rDNA analysis. The production of organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease enzyme by Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 was optimized by varying physical culture conditions such as pH (10.0), temperature (60°C), inoculum percentage (2%), feather concentration (2%) and agitation rate (2 g) for feather degradation. The result showed that Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 potentially produces extra-cellular thermostable organic solvent tolerant keratinolytic protease in the culture medium. Further, the feather hydrolysate from keratinase production media showed plant growth promoting activity by producing indole-3-acetic acid itself. The present findings suggest that keratinolytic protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RM4 offers enormous industrial applications due to its organic solvent tolerant property in peptide synthesis, practical role in feather degradation and potential function in plant growth promoting activity, which might be a superior candidate to keep ecosystem healthy and functional.

  17. Serine proteases and metalloproteases associated with pathogenesis but not host specificity in the Entomophthoralean fungus Zoophthora radicans.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Baldwin, D; Kindrachuk, C; Hegedus, D D

    2006-06-01

    The protease activity of a Zoophthora radicans strain that was highly infective toward Pieris brassicae (cabbage butterfly) larvae was compared with that of isogenic strains that were adapted to Plutella xylostella (diamondback moth) larvae through serial passage. All strains produced three distinct serine proteases ranging in size from 25 to 37 kDa; however, the original strain from P. brassicae also produced large amounts of an approximately 46 kDa metalloprotease. Subsequently, a cDNA encoding a 43 kDa (mature enzyme) zinc-dependent metalloprotease, ZrMEP1, was isolated from the original fungal strain and most likely corresponds to the 46 kDa protease observed with in-gel assays. ZrMEP1 possessed characteristics of both the fungalysin and thermolysin metalloprotease families found in some pulmonary and dermal pathogens. This is the first report of this type of metalloprotease from an entomo pathogenic fungus. A cDNA encoding a trypsin-like serine protease, ZrSP1, was also identified and was most similar to a serine protease from the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae. In artificial media, ZrMEP1 and ZrSP1 were found to be differentially responsive to gelatin and catabolite repression in the fungal strains adapted to P. brassicae and P. xylostella, but their expression patterns within infected larvae were the same. It appears that while these proteases likely play a role in the infection process, they may not be major host specificity determinants.

  18. Screen of Non-annotated Small Secreted Proteins of Pseudomonas syringae Reveals a Virulence Factor That Inhibits Tomato Immune Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Takayuki; Kaschani, Farnusch; Kovács, Judit; Tian, Fang; Kourelis, Jiorgos; Hong, Tram Ngoc; Colby, Tom; Shabab, Mohammed; Chawla, Rohini; Kumari, Selva; Ilyas, Muhammad; Hörger, Anja C.; Alfano, James R.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoDC3000) is an extracellular model plant pathogen, yet its potential to produce secreted effectors that manipulate the apoplast has been under investigated. Here we identified 131 candidate small, secreted, non-annotated proteins from the PtoDC3000 genome, most of which are common to Pseudomonas species and potentially expressed during apoplastic colonization. We produced 43 of these proteins through a custom-made gateway-compatible expression system for extracellular bacterial proteins, and screened them for their ability to inhibit the secreted immune protease C14 of tomato using competitive activity-based protein profiling. This screen revealed C14-inhibiting protein-1 (Cip1), which contains motifs of the chagasin-like protease inhibitors. Cip1 mutants are less virulent on tomato, demonstrating the importance of this effector in apoplastic immunity. Cip1 also inhibits immune protease Pip1, which is known to suppress PtoDC3000 infection, but has a lower affinity for its close homolog Rcr3, explaining why this protein is not recognized in tomato plants carrying the Cf-2 resistance gene, which uses Rcr3 as a co-receptor to detect pathogen-derived protease inhibitors. Thus, this approach uncovered a protease inhibitor of P. syringae, indicating that also P. syringae secretes effectors that selectively target apoplastic host proteases of tomato, similar to tomato pathogenic fungi, oomycetes and nematodes. PMID:27603016

  19. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanocrescent SERS probe

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2015-09-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  20. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  1. Why the OPLS-AA force field cannot produce the β-hairpin structure of H1 peptide in solution when comparing with the GROMOS 43A1 force field?

    PubMed

    Cao, Zanxia; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jihua

    2011-12-01

    The optimal combination of force field and water model is an essential problem that is able to increase molecular dynamics simulation quality for different types of proteins and peptides. In this work, an attempt has been made to explore the problem by studying H1 peptide using four different models based on different force fields, water models and electrostatic schemes. The driving force for H1 peptide conformation transition and the reason why the OPLS-AA force field cannot produce the β-hairpin structure of H1 peptide in solution while the GROMOS 43A1 force field can do were investigated by temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD). The simulation using the GROMOS 43A1 force field preferred to adopt a β-hairpin structure, which was in good agreement with the several other simulations and the experimental evidences. However, the simulation using the OPLS-AA force field has a significant difference from the simulations with the GROMOS 43A1 force field simulation. The results show that the driving force in H1 peptide conformation transition is solvent exposure of its hydrophobic residues. However, the subtle balances between residue-residue interactions and residue-solvent interaction are disrupted by using the OPLS-AA force field, which induced the reduction in the number of residue-residue contact. Similar solvent exposure of the hydrophobic residues is observed for all the conformations sampled using the OPLS-AA force field. For H1 peptide which exhibits large solvent exposure of the hydrophobic residues, the GROMOS 43A1 force field with the SPC water model can provide more accurate results.

  2. Involvement of an Extracellular Protease in Algicidal Activity of the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain A28

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-og; Kato, Junichi; Takiguchi, Noboru; Kuroda, Akio; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Mitsutani, Atsushi; Ohtake, Hisao

    2000-01-01

    The marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain A28 was able to kill the diatom Skeletonema costatum strain NIES-324. The culture supernatant of strain A28 showed potent algicidal activity when it was applied to a paper disk placed on a lawn of S. costatum NIES-324. The condensed supernatant, which was prepared by subjecting the A28 culture supernatant to ultrafiltration with a 10,000-Mw-cutoff membrane, showed algicidal activity, suggesting that strain A28 produced extracellular substances capable of killing S. costatum cells. The condensed supernatant was then found to have protease and DNase activities. Two Pseudoalteromonas mutants lacking algicidal activity, designated NH1 and NH2, were selected after N-methyl-N′-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. The culture supernatants of NH1 and NH2 showed less than 15% of the protease activity detected with the parental strain, A28. The protease was purified to homogeneity from A28 culture supernatants by using ion-exchange chromatography followed by preparative gel electrophoresis. Paper-disk assays revealed that the purified protease had potent algicidal activity. The purified protease had a molecular mass for 50 kDa, and the N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined to be Ala-Thr-Pro-Asn-Asp-Pro. The optimum pH and temperature of the protease were found to be 8.8 and 30°C, respectively, by using succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide as a substrate. The protease activity was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, antipain, chymostatin, and leupeptin. No significant inhibition was detected with EDTA, EGTA, phenanthroline or tetraethylenepentamine. These results suggest that Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain A28 produced an extracellular serine protease which was responsible for the algicidal activity of this marine bacterium. PMID:11010878

  3. Tissue Factor, Protease Activated Receptors and Pathologic Heart Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Tissue factor is the primary initiator of coagulation cascade and plays an essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis. In addition, tissue factor and coagulation proteases contribute to the many cellular responses via activation of protease activated receptors. Heart is the organ demonstrating high levels of constitutive tissue factor expression. This review focuses on the role of tissue factor, coagulation proteases and protease activated receptors in heart hemostasis and the pathological heart remodeling associated with myocardial infarction, viral myocarditis and hypertension. PMID:25104210

  4. Biocontrol activity of an alkaline serine protease from Aureobasidium pullulans expressed in Pichia pastoris against four postharvest pathogens on apple.

    PubMed

    Banani, Houda; Spadaro, Davide; Zhang, Dianpeng; Matic, Slavica; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2014-07-16

    The yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans PL5 is a microbial antagonist against postharvest pathogens of fruits. The strain is able to produce hydrolases, including glucanases, chitinases and proteases. The alkaline serine protease gene ALP5 from A. pullulans was cloned, inserted into the vector pPIC9 to construct pPIC9/ALP5, and then expressed in Pichia pastoris strain KM71. ALP5 had a molecular mass of 42.9kDa after 5days growth with 1% methanol induction at 28°C. The recombinant protease expressed in P. pastoris showed its highest activity under alkaline conditions (at pH10) and a temperature of 50°C. The antifungal activity of the recombinant protease was investigated against Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea, Monilinia fructicola and Alternaria alternata in vitro and on apple. The recombinant protease reduced significantly the spore germination and the germ tube length of the tested pathogens in PDB medium. The highest level of protease efficacy was observed against M. fructicola and B. cinerea, whereas a lower efficacy was observed against P. expansum and A. alternata indicating a possible effect of the pathogen cell wall composition on the proteolytic activity of the recombinant protease. The presence of protease was able to cause the swelling of the hyphae of B. cinerea, under an optical microscope. The recombinant protease expressed in P. pastoris was more active against the pathogens in vitro than the same enzyme expressed in E. coli in previous studies. The efficacy of ALP5 was also evaluated against the pathogens in vivo on cv Golden Delicious apples. The protease was more efficient in controlling M. fructicola, B. cinerea and P. expansum than A. alternata. However, the extent of the activity was dependent on the enzyme concentration and the length of fruit storage. This study demonstrated the capacity of the alkaline serine protease to keep its enzymatic activity for some days in the unfavorable environment of the fruit wounds. The alkaline

  5. Discovery and characterization of a novel plant pathogen protease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chitinase modifying proteins are fungal proteases that attack specific plant defense chitinases. At least three unrelated types of proteases have evolved to have this function. They all truncate the targeted chitinases by cleaving near their amino termini, but each protease type targets a different ...

  6. A recombinant multi-antigen vaccine formulation containing Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigens MSA-2a1, MSA-2b and MSA-2c elicits invasion-inhibitory antibodies and IFN-γ producing cells.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Alba Marina; Françoso, Katia S; Ersching, Jonatan; Icimoto, Marcelo Y; Oliveira, Vitor; Rodriguez, Anabel E; Schnittger, Leonhard; Florin-Christensen, Monica; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Soares, Irene S

    2016-11-14

    Babesia bovis is a tick-transmitted protozoan hemoparasite and the causative agent of bovine babesiosis, a potential risk to more than 500 million cattle worldwide. The vaccines currently available are based on attenuated parasites, which are difficult to produce, and are only recommended for use in bovines under one year of age. When used in older animals, these vaccines may cause life-threatening clinical symptoms and eventually death. The development of a multi-subunit recombinant vaccine against B. bovis would be attractive from an economic standpoint and, most importantly, could be recommended for animals of any age. In the present study, recombinant ectodomains of MSA-2a1, MSA-2b and MSA-2c antigens were expressed in Pichia pastoris yeast as secreted soluble peptides. The antigens were purified to homogeneity, and biochemically and immunologically characterized. A vaccine formulation was obtained by emulsifying a mixture of the three peptides with the adjuvant Montanide ISA 720, which elicited high IgG antibody titers against each of the above antigens. IgG antibodies generated against each MSA-antigen recognized merozoites and significantly inhibited the invasion of bovine erythrocytes. Cellular immune responses were also detected, which were characterized by splenic and lymph node CD4(+) T cells producing IFN-γ and TNF-α upon stimulation with the antigens MSA-2a1 or MSA-2c. These data strongly suggest the high protective potential of the presented formulation, and we propose that it could be tested in vaccination trials of bovines challenged with B. bovis.

  7. Molecular markers of serine protease evolution

    PubMed Central

    Krem, Maxwell M.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2001-01-01

    The evolutionary history of serine proteases can be accounted for by highly conserved amino acids that form crucial structural and chemical elements of the catalytic apparatus. These residues display non- random dichotomies in either amino acid choice or serine codon usage and serve as discrete markers for tracking changes in the active site environment and supporting structures. These markers categorize serine proteases of the chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like and α/β-hydrolase fold clans according to phylogenetic lineages, and indicate the relative ages and order of appearance of those lineages. A common theme among these three unrelated clans of serine proteases is the development or maintenance of a catalytic tetrad, the fourth member of which is a Ser or Cys whose side chain helps stabilize other residues of the standard catalytic triad. A genetic mechanism for mutation of conserved markers, domain duplication followed by gene splitting, is suggested by analysis of evolutionary markers from newly sequenced genes with multiple protease domains. PMID:11406580

  8. Zika Virus Protease: An Antiviral Drug Target.

    PubMed

    Kang, CongBao; Keller, Thomas H; Luo, Dahai

    2017-10-01

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has caused global concern due to its link to severe damage to the brain development of foetuses and neuronal complications in adult patients. A worldwide research effort has been undertaken to identify effective and safe treatment and vaccination options. Among the proposed viral and host components, the viral NS2B-NS3 protease represents an attractive drug target due to its essential role in the virus life cycle. Here, we outline recent progress in studies on the Zika protease. Biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies on different protease constructs provide new insight into the structure and activity of the protease. The unlinked construct displays higher enzymatic activity and better mimics the native state of the enzyme and therefore is better suited for drug discovery. Furthermore, the structure of the free enzyme adopts a closed conformation and a preformed active site. The availability of a lead fragment hit and peptide inhibitors, as well as the attainability of soakable crystals, suggest that the unlinked construct is a promising tool for drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transient ECM protease activity promotes synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Magnowska, Marta; Gorkiewicz, Tomasz; Suska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent proteolysis at a synapse has been recognized as a pivotal factor in controlling dynamic changes in dendritic spine shape and function; however, excessive proteolytic activity is detrimental to the cells. The exact mechanism of control of these seemingly contradictory outcomes of protease activity remains unknown. Here, we reveal that dendritic spine maturation is strictly controlled by the proteolytic activity, and its inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor (Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 – TIMP-1). Excessive proteolytic activity impairs long-term potentiation of the synaptic efficacy (LTP), and this impairment could be rescued by inhibition of protease activity. Moreover LTP is altered persistently when the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit protease activity is abrogated, further demonstrating the role of such inhibition in the promotion of synaptic plasticity under well-defined conditions. We also show that dendritic spine maturation involves an intermediate formation of elongated spines, followed by their conversion into mushroom shape. The formation of mushroom-shaped spines is accompanied by increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio of glutamate receptors. Altogether, our results identify inhibition of protease activity as a critical regulatory mechanism for dendritic spines maturation. PMID:27282248

  10. Investigational protease inhibitors as antiretroviral therapies

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Narasimha M.; Patters, Benjamin J.; Rao, PSS; Cory, Theodore J.; Kumar, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) has tremendously improved the life expectancy of the HIV-infected population over the past three decades. Protease inhibitors have been one of the major classes of drugs in HAART regimens that are effective in treating HIV. However, the emergence of resistance and cross-resistance against protease inhibitors encourages researchers to develop new PIs with broad-spectrum activity, as well as novel means of enhancing the efficacy of existing PIs. Areas covered In this article we discuss recent advances in HIV protease inhibitor (PI) development, focusing on both investigational and experimental agents. We also include a section on pharmacokinetic booster drugs for improved bioavailability of protease inhibitors. Further, we discuss novel drug delivery systems using a variety of nanocarriers for the delivery of PIs across the blood-brain barrier to treat the HIV in the brain. Expert opinion We discuss our opinion on the promises and challenges on the development of novel investigational and experimental PIs that are less toxic and more effective in combating drug-resistance. Further, we discuss the future of novel nanocarriers that have been developed to deliver PIs to the brain cells. Although these are promising findings, many challenges need to be overcome prior to making them a viable option. PMID:27415449

  11. trans-Protease Activity and Structural Insights into the Active Form of the Alphavirus Capsid Protease

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Megha; Dhindwal, Sonali; Kumar, Pravindra; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alphavirus capsid protein (CP) is a serine protease that possesses cis-proteolytic activity essential for its release from the nascent structural polyprotein. The released CP further participates in viral genome encapsidation and nucleocapsid core formation, followed by its attachment to glycoproteins and virus budding. Thus, protease activity of the alphavirus capsid is a potential antialphaviral target to arrest capsid release, maturation, and structural polyprotein processing. However, the discovery of capsid protease inhibitors has been hampered due to the lack of a suitable screening assay and of the crystal structure in its active form. Here, we report the development of a trans-proteolytic activity assay for Aura virus capsid protease (AVCP) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for screening protease inhibitors. Kinetic parameters using fluorogenic peptide substrates were estimated, and the Km value was found to be 2.63 ± 0.62 μM while the kcat/Km value was 4.97 × 104 M−1 min−1. Also, the crystal structure of the trans-active form of AVCP has been determined to 1.81-Å resolution. Structural comparisons of the active form with the crystal structures of available substrate-bound mutant and inactive blocked forms of the capsid protease identify conformational changes in the active site, the oxyanion hole, and the substrate specificity pocket residues, which could be critical for rational drug design. IMPORTANCE The alphavirus capsid protease is an attractive antiviral therapeutic target. In this study, we have described the formerly unappreciated trans-proteolytic activity of the enzyme and for the first time have developed a FRET-based protease assay for screening capsid protease inhibitors. Our structural studies unveil the structural features of the trans-active protease, which has been previously proposed to exist in the natively unfolded form (M. Morillas, H. Eberl, F. H. Allain, R. Glockshuber, and E. Kuennemann, J

  12. An acidic amino acid-specific protease from germinating soybeans.

    PubMed

    Tan-Wilson, A L; Liu, X; Chen, R; Qi, X; Wilson, K A

    1996-05-01

    The degradation of the beta-conglycinin protein reserves in soybean seeds during germination and early growth begins with the proteolysis of its alpha and alpha' subunits by an enzyme called Protease C1. In the pathway, a number of proteolytic intermediates are produced and subsequently degraded. Determination of the N-terminal sequences of these intermediates provides insight regarding the requirements of the cleavage sites. The N-terminal sequence of three such proteolytic intermediates has been determined. The sequence has been located in the published sequences of the beta-conglycinin subunits. Comparing these cleavage sites, plus those of two others previously delineated, shows that the P1' and P4' positions always bear either a Glu or an Asp residue while the P1 position always bears either a Glu or a Gln residue. In addition, other sites from P3 to P7' are also rich in either Glu or Asp, and the whole region is predicted to be in a alpha-helix. Consistent with the observation, synthetic poly-L-Glu inhibits the Protease C1-catalysed degradation of the alpha and alpha' subunits of beta-conglycinin. Poly-L-Glu (av. M(r) = 1000) at 12.5 mM was more effective at inhibiting the reaction than poly-L-Glu (av. M(r) = 600) or poly-L-Glu (av. M(r) = 14,300) at the same concentration. Comparing large synthetic polypeptides at 12.5mM, inhibition by poly-L-Asp (av. M(r) = 15,000) is as effective as poly-L-Glu (av. M(r) = 14,300), while poly-L-Ser (av. M(r) = 15,000) had no effect at all. Poly-D-Glu (av. M(r) = 15,000) is a better inhibitor than poly-L-Glu of the same size. A serine protease of similar molecular weight as Protease C1 and also capable of catalysing the proteolysis of the alpha and alpha' subunits of beta-conglycinin to generate proteolytic intermediates of the same size has been found in mung bean.

  13. Kunitz-type protease inhibitors group B from Solanum palustre.

    PubMed

    Speransky, Anna S; Cimaglia, Fabio; Krinitsina, Anastasya A; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Fasano, Pasqua; Bogacheva, Anna M; Valueva, Tatiana A; Halterman, Dennis; Shevelev, Alexei B; Santino, Angelo

    2007-11-01

    Five Kunitz protease inhibitor group B genes were isolated from the genome of the diploid non-tuber-forming potato species Solanum palustre. Three of five new genes share 99% identity to the published KPI-B genes from various cultivated potato accessions, while others exhibit 96% identity. Spls-KPI-B2 and Spls-KPI-B4 proteins contain unique substitutions of the most conserved residues usually involved to trypsin and chymotrypsin-specific binding sites of Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI)-B, respectively. To test the inhibition of trypsin and chymotrypsin by Spls-KPI proteins, five of them were produced in E. coli purified using a Ni-sepharose resin and ion-exchange chromatography. All recombinant Spls-KPI-B inhibited trypsin; K(i) values ranged from 84.8 (Spls-KPI-B4), 345.5 (Spls-KPI-B1), and 1310.6 nM (Spls-KPI-B2) to 3883.5 (Spls-KPI-B5) and 8370 nM (Spls-KPI-B3). In addition, Spls-KPI-B1 and Spls-KPI-B4 inhibited chymotrypsin. These data suggest that regardless of substitutions of key active-center residues both Spls-KPI-B4 and Spls-KPI-B1 are functional trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors.

  14. Recent patents on microbial proteases for the dairy industry.

    PubMed

    Feijoo-Siota, Lucía; Blasco, Lucía; Rodríguez-Rama, José Luis; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Miguel, Trinidad de; Sánchez-Pérez, Angeles; Villa, Tomás G

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the general characteristics of exo and endopeptidases of microbial origin currently used in the milk industry. It also includes recent patents developed either to potentiate the enzymatic activity or to improve the resulting milk derivatives. The main application of these proteases is in the cheese-making industry. Although this industry preferentially uses animal rennets, and in particular genetically engineered chymosins, it also utilizes milk coagulants of microbial origin. Enzymes derived from Rhizomucor miehei, Rhizomucor pusillus and Cryphonectria parasitica are currently used to replace the conventional milk-clotting enzymes. In addition, the dairy industry uses microbial endo and exoproteases for relatively new applications, such as debittering and flavor generation in cheese, accelerated cheese ripening, manufacture of protein hydrolysates with improved functional properties, and production of enzyme-modified cheeses. Lactic acid bacteria play an essential role in these processes, hence these bacteria and the proteases they produce are currently being investigated by the dairy industry and are the subject of many of their patent applications.

  15. The Early Years of Retroviral Protease Crystal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Soon after its discovery, the attempts to develop anti-AIDS therapeutics focused on the retroviral protease (PR) — an enzyme used by lentiviruses to process the precursor polypeptide into mature viral proteins. An urgent need for the three-dimensional structure of PR to guide rational drug design prompted efforts to produce milligram quantities of this enzyme. However, only minute amounts of PR were present in the HIV-1 and HIV-2 viruses, and initial attempts to express this protein in bacteria were not successful. This review describes X-ray crystallographic studies of the retroviral proteases carried out at NCI-Frederick in the late 1980s and early 1990s and puts into perspective the crucial role that the total protein chemical synthesis played in unraveling the structure, mechanism of action, and inhibition of HIV-1 PR. Notably, the first fully correct structure of HIV-1 PR and the first cocrystal structure of its complex with an inhibitor (a substrate-derived, reduced isostere hexapeptide MVT-101) were determined using chemically synthesized protein. Most importantly, these sets of coordinates were made freely available to the research community and were used worldwide to solve X-ray structures of HIV-1 PR complexes with an array of inhibitors and set in motion a variety of theoretical studies. Publication of the structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 PR complexed with MVT-101 preceded only by six years the approval of the first PR inhibitor as an anti-AIDS drug. PMID:20593466

  16. Proteases and Protease Inhibitors of Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tataruch, Dorota; Gu, Dongfeng; Liu, Xinyu; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Holthofer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and, ultimately, is the main cause for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Beyond urinary albumin, no reliable biomarkers are available for accurate early diagnostics. Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) have recently emerged as an interesting source of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers. Here we used a protease and respective protease inhibitor array to profile urines of type 1 diabetes patients at different stages of kidney involvement. Urine samples were divided into groups based on the level of albuminuria and UEVs isolated by hydrostatic dialysis and screened for relative changes of 34 different proteases and 32 protease inhibitors, respectively. Interestingly, myeloblastin and its natural inhibitor elafin showed an increase in the normo- and microalbuminuric groups. Similarly, a characteristic pattern was observed in the array of protease inhibitors, with a marked increase of cystatin B, natural inhibitor of cathepsins L, H, and B as well as of neutrophil gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL) in the normoalbuminuric group. This study shows for the first time the distinctive alterations in comprehensive protease profiles of UEVs in diabetic nephropathy and uncovers intriguing mechanistic, prognostic, and diagnostic features of kidney damage in diabetes. PMID:25874235

  17. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sao, Kentaro; Murata, Masaharu; Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  18. Accessing the reproducibility and specificity of pepsin and other aspartic proteases.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joomi; Cao, Min-Jie; Yu, Ying Qing; Engen, John R

    2013-06-01

    The aspartic protease pepsin is less specific than other endoproteinases. Because aspartic proteases like pepsin are active at low pH, they are utilized in hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) experiments for digestion under hydrogen exchange quench conditions. We investigated the reproducibility, both qualitatively and quantitatively, of online and offline pepsin digestion to understand the compliment of reproducible pepsin fragments that can be expected during a typical pepsin digestion. The collection of reproducible peptides was identified from >30 replicate digestions of the same protein and it was found that the number of reproducible peptides produced during pepsin digestion becomes constant above 5-6 replicate digestions. We also investigated a new aspartic protease from the stomach of the rice field eel (Monopterus albus Zuiew) and compared digestion efficiency and specificity to porcine pepsin and aspergillopepsin. Unique cleavage specificity was found for rice field eel pepsin at arginine, asparagine, and glycine. Different peptides produced by the various proteases can enhance protein sequence coverage and improve the spatial resolution of HDX MS data. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mass spectrometry in structural biology.

  19. Accessing the Reproducibility and Specificity of Pepsin and other Aspartic Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Joomi; Cao, Min-Jie; Yu, Ying Qing; Engen, John R.

    2012-01-01

    The aspartic protease pepsin is less specific than other endoproteinases. Because aspartic proteases like pepsin are active at low pH, they are utilized in hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS) experiments for digestion under hydrogen exchange quench conditions. We investigated the reproducibility, both qualitatively and quantitatively, of online and offline pepsin digestion to understand the compliment of reproducible pepsin fragments that can be expected during a typical pepsin digestion. The collection of reproducible peptides was identified from >30 replicate digestions of the same protein and it was found that the number of reproducible peptides produced during pepsin digestion becomes constant above 5-6 replicate digestions. We also investigated a new aspartic protease from the stomach of the rice field eel (Monopterus albus Zuiew) and compared digestion efficiency and specificity to porcine pepsin and aspergillopepsin. Unique cleavage specificity was found for rice field eel pepsin at arginine, asparagine, and glycine. Different peptides produced by the various proteases can enhance protein sequence coverage and improve the spatial resolution of HDX MS data. PMID:23063535

  20. Optimization of protease production by the fungus Monacrosporium thaumasium and its action against Angiostrongylus vasorum larvae.

    PubMed

    Soares, Filippe Elias de Freitas; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; Araújo, Jackson Victor de; Lima, Walter dos Santos; Mozzer, Lanuze Rose; Queiroz, José Humberto de

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to optimize protease production from the nematophagous fungus Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34a) and evaluate its larvicidal activity and biological stability. An isolate of the nematophagous fungus Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34a) was used to produce the enzyme. The Plackett-Burman design was used in order to scan which components of the culture medium could have a significant influence on protease production by the fungus NF34a. An in vitro assay was also performed to evaluate the larvicidal activity of NF34a. It was observed that only one component of the culture medium (yeast extract), at the levels studied, had any significant effect (p < 0.05) on protease production. There was a reduction (p < 0.01) in the mean number of larvae recovered from the treated groups, compared with the control groups. The results confirm previous reports on the efficiency of nematophagous fungi for controlling nematode larvae that are potentially zoonotic. Thus, given the importance of biological control, we suggest that further studies should be conducted on the protease produced by the fungus Monacrosporium thaumasium.

  1. The AprV5 Subtilase Is Required for the Optimal Processing of All Three Extracellular Serine Proteases from Dichelobacter nodosus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaoyan; Kennan, Ruth M.; Steer, David L.; Smith, A. Ian; Whisstock, James C.; Rood, Julian I.

    2012-01-01

    Dichelobacter nodosus is the principal causative agent of ovine footrot and its extracellular proteases are major virulence factors. Virulent isolates of D. nodosus secrete three subtilisin-like serine proteases: AprV2, AprV5 and BprV. These enzymes are each synthesized as precursor molecules that include a signal (pre-) peptide, a pro-peptide and a C-terminal extension, which are processed to produce the mature active forms. The function of the C-terminal regions of these proteases and the mechanism of protease processing and secretion are unknown. AprV5 contributes to most of the protease activity secreted by D. nodosus. To understand the role of the C-terminal extension of AprV5, we constructed a series of C-terminal-deletion mutants in D. nodosus by allelic exchange. The proteases present in the resultant mutants and their complemented derivatives were examined by protease zymogram analysis, western blotting and mass spectrometry. The results showed that the C-terminal region of AprV5 is required for the normal expression of protease activity, deletion of this region led to a delay in the processing of these enzymes. D. nodosus is an unusual bacterium in that it produces three closely related extracellular serine proteases. We have now shown that one of these enzymes, AprV5, is responsible for its own maturation, and for the optimal cleavage of AprV2 and BprV, to their mature active forms. These studies have increased our understanding of how this important pathogen processes these virulence-associated extracellular proteases and secretes them into its external environment. PMID:23112874

  2. Surfactant- and oxidant-stable alkaline proteases from Bacillus invictae: Characterization and potential applications in chitin extraction and as a detergent additive.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Amal; Hamdi, Marwa; Abdelhedi, Ola; Jridi, Mourad; Nasri, Moncef; Bayoudh, Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    A newly alkaline proteases producing strain was isolated from sea water. The strain was identified as Bacillus invictae on the basis of biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The crude protease activity showed an optimal activity at approximately 60°C and in wide pH interval ranging from 9.0 to 11.0. At least six clear caseinolytic protease bands were observed in a zymogram. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine-protease inhibitor, was found to inhibit completely the protease activity. The crude alkaline proteases showed high stability toward solid and liquid detergents. Furthermore, wash performance analysis revealed that the crude enzyme could effectively remove blood stain when added to commercial detergent. In addition, the crude proteases were found to be effective in the deproteinization of shrimp shell waste. The percent of protein removal after 3h of hydrolysis at 50°C with an E/S ratio of 10U/mg of protein or after fermentation by the strain were about 76% and 82%, respectively. Thus, the results of the present study showed that the crude proteases of B. invectae could be effectively used in several industrial applications, as an eco-friendly agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The serine protease domain of MASP-3: enzymatic properties and crystal structure in complex with ecotin.

    PubMed

    Gaboriaud, Christine; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Martin, Lydie; Lacroix, Monique; Serre, Laurence; Teillet, Florence; Arlaud, Gérard J; Rossi, Véronique; Thielens, Nicole M

    2013-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins and collectin-11 are known to associate with three homologous modular proteases, the MBL-Associated Serine Proteases (MASPs). The crystal structures of the catalytic domains of MASP-1 and MASP-2 have been solved, but the structure of the corresponding domain of MASP-3 remains unknown. A link between mutations in the MASP1/3 gene and the rare autosomal recessive 3MC (Mingarelli, Malpuech, Michels and Carnevale,) syndrome, characterized by various developmental disorders, was discovered recently, revealing an unexpected important role of MASP-3 in early developmental processes. To gain a first insight into the enzymatic and structural properties of MASP-3, a recombinant form of its serine protease (SP) domain was produced and characterized. The amidolytic activity of this domain on fluorescent peptidyl-aminomethylcoumarin substrates was shown to be considerably lower than that of other members of the C1r/C1s/MASP family. The E. coli protease inhibitor ecotin bound to the SP domains of MASP-3 and MASP-2, whereas no significant interaction was detected with MASP-1, C1r and C1s. A tetrameric complex comprising an ecotin dimer and two MASP-3 SP domains was isolated and its crystal structure was solved and refined to 3.2 Å. Analysis of the ecotin/MASP-3 interfaces allows a better understanding of the differential reactivity of the C1r/C1s/MASP protease family members towards ecotin, and comparison of the MASP-3 SP domain structure with those of other trypsin-like proteases yields novel hypotheses accounting for its zymogen-like properties in vitro.

  4. The Serine Protease Domain of MASP-3: Enzymatic Properties and Crystal Structure in Complex with Ecotin

    PubMed Central

    Gaboriaud, Christine; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Martin, Lydie; Lacroix, Monique; Serre, Laurence; Teillet, Florence; Arlaud, Gérard J.; Rossi, Véronique; Thielens, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins and collectin-11 are known to associate with three homologous modular proteases, the MBL-Associated Serine Proteases (MASPs). The crystal structures of the catalytic domains of MASP-1 and MASP-2 have been solved, but the structure of the corresponding domain of MASP-3 remains unknown. A link between mutations in the MASP1/3 gene and the rare autosomal recessive 3MC (Mingarelli, Malpuech, Michels and Carnevale,) syndrome, characterized by various developmental disorders, was discovered recently, revealing an unexpected important role of MASP-3 in early developmental processes. To gain a first insight into the enzymatic and structural properties of MASP-3, a recombinant form of its serine protease (SP) domain was produced and characterized. The amidolytic activity of this domain on fluorescent peptidyl-aminomethylcoumarin substrates was shown to be considerably lower than that of other members of the C1r/C1s/MASP family. The E. coli protease inhibitor ecotin bound to the SP domains of MASP-3 and MASP-2, whereas no significant interaction was detected with MASP-1, C1r and C1s. A tetrameric complex comprising an ecotin dimer and two MASP-3 SP domains was isolated and its crystal structure was solved and refined to 3.2 Å. Analysis of the ecotin/MASP-3 interfaces allows a better understanding of the differential reactivity of the C1r/C1s/MASP protease family members towards ecotin, and comparison of the MASP-3 SP domain structure with those of other trypsin-like proteases yields novel hypotheses accounting for its zymogen-like properties in vitro. PMID:23861840

  5. Transcriptional and proteomic analysis of the Aspergillus fumigatus ΔprtT protease-deficient mutant.

    PubMed

    Hagag, Shelly; Kubitschek-Barreira, Paula; Neves, Gabriela W P; Amar, David; Nierman, William; Shalit, Itamar; Shamir, Ron; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila; Osherov, Nir

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common opportunistic mold pathogen of humans, infecting immunocompromised patients. The fungus invades the lungs and other organs, causing severe damage. Penetration of the pulmonary epithelium is a key step in the infectious process. A. fumigatus produces extracellular proteases to degrade the host structural barriers. The A. fumigatus transcription factor PrtT controls the expression of multiple secreted proteases. PrtT shows similarity to the fungal Gal4-type Zn(2)-Cys(6) DNA-binding domain of several transcription factors. In this work, we further investigate the function of this transcription factor by performing a transcriptional and a proteomic analysis of the ΔprtT mutant. Unexpectedly, microarray analysis revealed that in addition to the expected decrease in protease expression, expression of genes involved in iron uptake and ergosterol synthesis was dramatically decreased in the ΔprtT mutant. A second finding of interest is that deletion of prtT resulted in the upregulation of four secondary metabolite clusters, including genes for the biosynthesis of toxic pseurotin A. Proteomic analysis identified reduced levels of three secreted proteases (ALP1 protease, TppA, AFUA_2G01250) and increased levels of three secreted polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in the ΔprtT mutant possibly in response to its inability to derive sufficient nourishment from protein breakdown. This report highlights the complexity of gene regulation by PrtT, and suggests a potential novel link between the regulation of protease secretion and the control of iron uptake, ergosterol biosynthesis and secondary metabolite production in A. fumigatus.

  6. Thermoactive extracellular proteases of Geobacillus caldoproteolyticus, sp. nov., from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Ge; Stabnikova, Olena; Tay, Joo-Hwa; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Tay, Stephen Tiong-Lee

    2004-12-01

    A proteolytic thermophilic bacterial strain, designated as strain SF03, was isolated from sewage sludge in Singapore. Strain SF03 is a strictly aerobic, Gram stain-positive, catalase-positive, oxidase-positive, and endospore-forming rod. It grows at temperatures ranging from 35 to 65 degrees C, pH ranging from 6.0 to 9.0, and salinities ranging from 0 to 2.5%. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain SF03 was most similar to Saccharococcus thermophilus, Geobacillus caldoxylosilyticus, and G. thermoglucosidasius, with 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 97.6, 97.5 and 97.2%, respectively. Based on taxonomic and 16S rRNA analyses, strain SF03 was named G. caldoproteolyticus sp. nov. Production of extracellular protease from strain SF03 was observed on a basal peptone medium supplemented with different carbon and nitrogen sources. Protease production was repressed by glucose, lactose, and casamino acids but was enhanced by sucrose and NH4Cl. The cell growth and protease production were significantly improved when strain SF03 was cultivated on a 10% skim-milk culture medium, suggesting that the presence of protein induced the synthesis of protease. The protease produced by strain SF03 remained active over a pH range of 6.0-11.0 and a temperature range of 40-90 degrees C, with an optimal pH of 8.0-9.0 and an optimal temperature of 70-80 degrees C, respectively. The protease was stable over the temperature range of 40-70 degrees C and retained 57 and 38% of its activity at 80 and 90 degrees C, respectively, after 1 h.

  7. The action of neutrophil serine proteases on elastin and its precursor.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Andrea; Jung, Michael C; Jahreis, Günther; Rusciani, Anthony; Duca, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent; Weiss, Anthony S; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Schmelzer, Christian E H

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the degradation of the natural substrates tropoelastin and elastin by the neutrophil-derived serine proteases human leukocyte elastase (HLE), proteinase 3 (PR3) and cathepsin G (CG). Focus was placed on determining their cleavage site specificities using mass spectrometric techniques. Moreover, the release of bioactive peptides from elastin by the three proteases was studied. Tropoelastin was comprehensively degraded by all three proteases, whereas less cleavage occurred in mature cross-linked elastin. An analysis of the cleavage site specificities of the three proteases in tropoelastin and elastin revealed that HLE and PR3 similarly tolerate hydrophobic and/or aliphatic amino acids such as Ala, Gly and Val at P(1), which are also preferred by CG. In addition, CG prefers the bulky hydrophobic amino acid Leu and accepts the bulky aromatic amino acids Phe and Tyr. CG shows a strong preference for the charged amino acid Lys at P(1) in tropoelastin, whereas Lys was not identified at P(1) in CG digests of elastin due to extensive cross-linking at Lys residues in mature elastin. All three serine proteases showed a clear preference for Pro at P(2) and P(4)'. With respect to the liberation of potentially bioactive peptides from elastin, the study revealed that all three serine proteases have a similar ability to release bioactive sequences, with CG producing the highest number of these peptides. In bioactivity studies, potentially bioactive peptides that have not been investigated on their bioactivity to date, were tested. Three new bioactive GxxPG motifs were identified; GVYPG, GFGPG and GVLPG. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Chitin extraction from blue crab (Portunus segnis) and shrimp (Penaeus kerathurus) shells using digestive alkaline proteases from P. segnis viscera.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Marwa; Hammami, Amal; Hajji, Sawssen; Jridi, Mourad; Nasri, Moncef; Nasri, Rim

    2017-03-20

    Since chitin is closely associated with proteins, deproteinization is a crucial step in the process of extracting chitin. Thus, this research aimed to extract chitin from Portunus segnis and Penaeus kerathurus shells by means of crude digestive alkaline proteases from the viscera of P. segnis, regarding deproteinization step, as an alternative to chemical treatment. Casein zymography revealed that five caseinolytic proteases bands exist, suggesting the presence of at least five different major proteases. The optimum pH and temperature for protease activity were pH 8.0 and 60°C, respectively, using casein as a substrate. The crude enzymes extract was highly stable at low temperatures and over a wide range of pH from 6.0 to 12.0. The crude alkaline protease extract was found to be effective in the deproteinization of blue crab and shrimp shells, to produce chitin. The best efficiency in deproteinization (84.69±0.65% for blue crab shells and 91.06±1.40% for shrimp shells) was achieved with an E/S ratio of 5U/mg of proteins after 3h incubation at 50°C. These results suggest that enzymatic deproteinization of crab and shrimp wastes by fish endogenous alkaline proteases could be a potential alternative in the chitin production process.

  9. An aspartic protease of the scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei is involved in the digestion of host skin and blood macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Wajahat; Viberg, Linda T; Fischer, Katja; Walton, Shelley F; Holt, Deborah C

    2013-11-01

    Scabies is a disease of worldwide significance, causing considerable morbidity in both humans and other animals. The scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei burrows into the skin of its host, obtaining nutrition from host skin and blood. Aspartic proteases mediate a range of diverse and essential physiological functions such as tissue invasion and migration, digestion, moulting and reproduction in a number of parasitic organisms. We investigated whether aspartic proteases may play role in scabies mite digestive processes. We demonstrated the presence of aspartic protease activity in whole scabies mite extract. We then identified a scabies mite aspartic protease gene sequence and produced recombinant active enzyme. The recombinant scabies mite aspartic protease was capable of digesting human haemoglobin, serum albumin, fibrinogen and fibronectin, but not collagen III or laminin. This is consistent with the location of the scabies mites in the upper epidermis of human skin. The development of novel therapeutics for scabies is of increasing importance given the evidence of emerging resistance to current treatments. We have shown that a scabies mite aspartic protease plays a role in the digestion of host skin and serum molecules, raising the possibility that interference with the function of the enzyme may impact on mite survival.

  10. A novel detergent-stable solvent-tolerant serine thiol alkaline protease from Streptomyces koyangensis TN650.

    PubMed

    Ben Elhoul, Mouna; Zaraî Jaouadi, Nadia; Rekik, Hatem; Bejar, Wacim; Boulkour Touioui, Souraya; Hmidi, Maher; Badis, Abdelmalek; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2015-08-01

    An alkaline proteinase (STAP) was produced from strain TN650 isolated from a Tunisian off-shore oil field and assigned as Streptomyces koyangensis strain TN650 based on physiological and biochemical properties and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 45125.17-Da. The enzyme had an NH2-terminal sequence of TQSNPPSWGLDRIDQTTAFTKACSIKY, thus sharing high homology with those of Streptomyces proteases. The results showed that this protease was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DFP), and partially inhibited by 5,5-dithio-bis-(2-nitro benzoic acid) (DTNB), which strongly suggested its belonging to the serine thiol protease family. Using casein as a substrate, the optimum pH and temperature values for protease activity were pH 10 and 70 °C, respectively. The protease was stable at pH 7-10 and 30-60 °C for 24 h. STAP exhibited high catalytic efficiency, significant detergent stability, and elevated organic solvent resistance compared to the SG-XIV proteases from S. griseus and KERAB from Streptomyces sp. AB1. The stap gene encoding STAP was isolated, and its DNA sequence was determined. These properties make STAP a potential candidate for future application in detergent formulations and non-aqueous peptide biocatalysis.

  11. An Aspartic Protease of the Scabies Mite Sarcoptes scabiei Is Involved in the Digestion of Host Skin and Blood Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Wajahat; Viberg, Linda T.; Fischer, Katja; Walton, Shelley F.; Holt, Deborah C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Scabies is a disease of worldwide significance, causing considerable morbidity in both humans and other animals. The scabies mite Sarcoptes scabiei burrows into the skin of its host, obtaining nutrition from host skin and blood. Aspartic proteases mediate a range of diverse and essential physiological functions such as tissue invasion and migration, digestion, moulting and reproduction in a number of parasitic organisms. We investigated whether aspartic proteases may play role in scabies mite digestive processes. Methodology/Principle Findings We demonstrated the presence of aspartic protease activity in whole scabies mite extract. We then identified a scabies mite aspartic protease gene sequence and produced recombinant active enzyme. The recombinant scabies mite aspartic protease was capable of digesting human haemoglobin, serum albumin, fibrinogen and fibronectin, but not collagen III or laminin. This is consistent with the location of the scabies mites in the upper epidermis of human skin. Conclusions/Significance The development of novel therapeutics for scabies is of increasing importance given the evidence of emerging resistance to current treatments. We have shown that a scabies mite aspartic protease plays a role in the digestion of host skin and serum molecules, raising the possibility that interference with the function of the enzyme may impact on mite survival. PMID:24244770

  12. Alkaline serine protease AprE plays an essential role in poly-γ-glutamate production during natto fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kada, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Ohshima, Yoshifumi; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Natto is a traditional Japanese food made from soybeans fermented by natto starter strains of Bacillus subtilis natto. It has been suggested that extracellular protease activity released by the bacteria are involved in the production of poly-γ-glutamate (γ-PGA) during natto fermentation. One of the natto starters, strain r22, possesses at least seven genes, each of which encoded an extracellular protease orthologous to its counterpart in B. subtilis 168, aprE, bpr, epr, mpr, nprE, vpr, and wprA, but it was found to lack nprB. Inactivating the aprE ortholog alone resulted in a severe decrease in γ-PGA production and in the total extracellular protease activity. The defect in γ-PGA production of the mutant lacking the aprE ortholog was complemented when the medium was supplemented with sufficient glutamate. These results suggest that the alkaline serine protease encoded by aprE plays an indispensable role in supplying materials to produce γ-PGA. On the other hand, simultaneous inactivation of all the protease genes except for aprE did not significantly affect either γ-PGA production or total protease activity.

  13. Regulation of cuticle-degrading subtilisin proteases from the entomopathogenic fungi, Lecanicillium spp: implications for host specificity.

    PubMed

    Bye, Natasha J; Charnley, A Keith

    2008-01-01

    The ability to produce cuticle-degrading proteases to facilitate host penetration does not distinguish per se entomopathogenic fungi from saprophytes. However, adapted pathogens may produce host-protein specific enzymes in response to cues. This possibility prompted an investigation of the regulation of isoforms of the subtilisin Pr1-like proteases from five aphid-pathogenic isolates of Lecanicillium spp. Significant differences were found in substrate specificity and regulation of Pr1-like proteases between isoforms of the same isolate and between different isolates. For example, the pI 8.6 isoform from KV71 was considerably more active against aphid than locust cuticle and was induced specifically by N-acetylglucosamine (NAG). Isoform pI 9.1 from the same isolate was only produced on insect cuticle while most other isoforms were more prominent on chitin containing substrates but not induced by NAG. The ability to regulate isoforms independently may allow production at critical points in host penetration. Appearance of proteases (not subtilisins) with pI 4.2 and 4.4 only on aphid cuticle was a possible link with host specificity of KV71. The absence of C or N metabolite repression in subtilisins from KV42 is unusual for pathogen proteases and may help to account for differences in virulence strategy between aphid-pathogenic isolates of Lecanicillium longisporum (unpublished data).

  14. The effect of the addition of proteases and glucanases during yeast autolysis on the production and properties of yeast extracts.

    PubMed

    Conway, J; Gaudreau, H; Champagne, C P

    2001-01-01

    Yeast extracts (YE) were produced with the addition of proteases or glucanases during bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) autolysis. Chemical composition, physical properties, and biological value of the YE were examined. Proteases had the highest impact on the turbidity and filterability of YE. All 11 proteases and two glucanases increased YE yields (% yeast solids solubilized) obtained from heated (80 degrees C/15 min) bakers' yeast creams (BYC). However, when proteases were added to native (unheated) BYC during autolysis, few increased YE yields, with papain being the most effective. The increased yields were generally related to increased levels of total nitrogen (TN) and alpha-amino nitrogen (alpha-AN) in the YE. Media were supplemented with the various yeast extracts, and the highest growth rates (mumax) and biomass values (ODmax) of Lactobacillus acidophilus were noted. The best growth was obtained with YE produced with native BYC treated with a fungal protease, and results of this study show that some enzymes could be used to produce improved YE for microbiological media.

  15. Comparative study on the protease inhibitors from fish eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustadi; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    The protease inhibitor was purified from five different fish eggs. The molecular weights of Pacific herring, chum salmon, pond smelt, glassfish, and Alaska pollock egg protease inhibitors were 120, 89, 84.5, 17, and l6.8kDa, respectively. The specific inhibitory activity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor was the highest followed by those of Pacific herring and Alaska pollock in order. The specific inhibitory activity and purity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor were 19.70 Umg-1 protein and 164.70 folds of purification, respectively. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was reasonably stable at 50-65°C and pH 8, which was more stable at high temperature and pH than protease inhibitors from the other fish species. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was noncompetitive with inhibitor constant ( K i) of 4.44 nmolL-1.

  16. A Multifunctional Protease Inhibitor To Regulate Endolysosomal Function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Proteases constitute a major class of drug targets. Endosomal compartments harbor several protease families whose attenuation may be beneficial to a number of biological processes, including inflammation, cancer metastasis, antigen presentation, and parasite clearance. As a step toward the goal of generalized but targeted protease inhibition in the endocytic pathway, we describe here the synthesis, characterization, and cellular application of a novel multifunctional protease inhibitor. We show that pepstatin A, a potent but virtually insoluble inhibitor of cathepsins D and E, can be conjugated to a single site on cystatin C, a potent inhibitor of the papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCP) and of asparagine endopeptidease (AEP), to create a highly soluble compound capable of suppressing the activity of all 3 principal protease families found in endosomes and lysosomes. We demonstrate that this cystatin–pepstatin inhibitor (CPI) can be taken up by cells to modulate protease activity and affect biological responses. PMID:21910425

  17. A multifunctional protease inhibitor to regulate endolysosomal function.

    PubMed

    van Kasteren, Sander I; Berlin, Ilana; Colbert, Jeff D; Keane, Doreen; Ovaa, Huib; Watts, Colin

    2011-11-18

    Proteases constitute a major class of drug targets. Endosomal compartments harbor several protease families whose attenuation may be beneficial to a number of biological processes, including inflammation, cancer metastasis, antigen presentation, and parasite clearance. As a step toward the goal of generalized but targeted protease inhibition in the endocytic pathway, we describe here the synthesis, characterization, and cellular application of a novel multifunctional protease inhibitor. We show that pepstatin A, a potent but virtually insoluble inhibitor of cathepsins D and E, can be conjugated to a single site on cystatin C, a potent inhibitor of the papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCP) and of asparagine endopeptidease (AEP), to create a highly soluble compound capable of suppressing the activity of all 3 principal protease families found in endosomes and lysosomes. We demonstrate that this cystatin-pepstatin inhibitor (CPI) can be taken up by cells to modulate protease activity and affect biological responses.

  18. Purification and characterization of a protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, an antigen common to all the serotypes.

    PubMed

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; Guerrero, A L; García, R M; Reyes, M E; de la Garza, M

    1998-07-01

    A high molecular-mass proteolytic enzyme of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, was purified from culture supernatants (CSN) by using DEAE-cellulose and sepharose-4B-gelatin chromatography. In 10% SDS-polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with porcine gelatin, the protease showed a single band of activity of > 200 kDa. However, minor molecular-mass proteolytic bands were observed when the protease was electrophoresed in the presence of either 5% beta-mercaptoethanol, 50 mM dithiothreitol, or 0.25 M urea. Furthermore, when the > 200-kDa purified protein was passed through a sucrose gradient, several bands with proteolytic activity were found: 62, 90, 190, and 540 kDa. The proteolytic activity was increased in the presence of calcium or zinc and was not affected after being heated at 90 degrees C for 5 min. Proteolytic activities were also observed in CSN from all A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes and biotypes. The purified protease hydrolyzed porcine IgA and IgG in vitro. In addition, by immunoblot the protease was recognized by serum of naturally infected pigs with serotypes 1 and 5, and by serum of pigs experimentally infected with serotypes 1, 2, 8, or 9. Serum of a pig vaccinated with CSN of a serotype 3 strain also recognized the protease, but not sera of pigs vaccinated with a bacterin (serotype 1). Proteins from CSN of all the serotypes, which were precipitated with 70% (NH4)2SO4, were recognized by a polyclonal antibody raised against the purified protease. Taken together these results indicate that an antigenic protease is produced in vivo by all the serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. The results indicate that proteases could have a role in the disease and in the immune response of pigs infected with A. pleuropneumoniae.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Gut Bacterial Proteases Involved in Inducing Pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin in Cotton Bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Regode, Visweshwar; Kuruba, Sreeramulu; Mohammad, Akbar S.; Sharma, Hari C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxin proteins are deployed in transgenic plants for pest management. The present studies were aimed at characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in activation of inactive Cry1Ac protoxin (pro-Cry1Ac) to active toxin in Helicoverpa armigera. Bacterial strains were isolated from H. armigera midgut and screened for their proteolytic activation toward pro-Cry1Ac. Among 12 gut bacterial isolates seven isolates showed proteolytic activity, and proteases from three isolates (IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3) were found to be involved in the proteolytic conversion of pro-Cry1Ac into active toxin. The proteases from IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 isolates were purified to 11.90-, 15.50-, and 17.20-fold, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for gut bacterial protease activity was 8.0 and 40°C. Maximum inhibition of total proteolytic activity was exerted by phenylmethane sulfonyl fluoride followed by EDTA. Fluorescence zymography revealed that proteases from IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 were chymotrypsin-like and showing protease band at ~15, 65, and 15 kDa, respectively. Active Cry1Ac formed from processing pro-Cry1Ac by gut bacterial proteases exhibited toxicity toward H. armigera. The gut bacterial isolates IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 showed homology with B. thuringiensis (CP003763.1), Vibrio fischeri (CP000020.2), and Escherichia coli (CP011342.1), respectively. Proteases produced by midgut bacteria are involved in proteolytic processing of B. thuringiensis protoxin and play a major role in inducing pathogenicity of B. thuringiensis toxins in H. armigera. PMID:27766093

  20. Purification and characterization of a protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, an antigen common to all the serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Negrete-Abascal, E; Tenorio, V R; Guerrero, A L; García, R M; Reyes, M E; de la Garza, M

    1998-01-01

    A high molecular-mass proteolytic enzyme of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1, was purified from culture supernatants (CSN) by using DEAE-cellulose and sepharose-4B-gelatin chromatography. In 10% SDS-polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with porcine gelatin, the protease showed a single band of activity of > 200 kDa. However, minor molecular-mass proteolytic bands were observed when the protease was electrophoresed in the presence of either 5% beta-mercaptoethanol, 50 mM dithiothreitol, or 0.25 M urea. Furthermore, when the > 200-kDa purified protein was passed through a sucrose gradient, several bands with proteolytic activity were found: 62, 90, 190, and 540 kDa. The proteolytic activity was increased in the presence of calcium or zinc and was not affected after being heated at 90 degrees C for 5 min. Proteolytic activities were also observed in CSN from all A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes and biotypes. The purified protease hydrolyzed porcine IgA and IgG in vitro. In addition, by immunoblot the protease was recognized by serum of naturally infected pigs with serotypes 1 and 5, and by serum of pigs experimentally infected with serotypes 1, 2, 8, or 9. Serum of a pig vaccinated with CSN of a serotype 3 strain also recognized the protease, but not sera of pigs vaccinated with a bacterin (serotype 1). Proteins from CSN of all the serotypes, which were precipitated with 70% (NH4)2SO4, were recognized by a polyclonal antibody raised against the purified protease. Taken together these results indicate that an antigenic protease is produced in vivo by all the serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. The results indicate that proteases could have a role in the disease and in the immune response of pigs infected with A. pleuropneumoniae. Images Figure 2A. Figure 2B. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5A. Figure 5B. Figure 6A. Figure 6B. PMID:9684047

  1. Factors associated with virological rebound in HIV-infected patients receiving protease inhibitor monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Wolfgang; Dunn, David T; Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Orkin, Chloe; Clarke, Amanda; Williams, Ian; Johnson, Margaret; Beeching, Nicholas J; Wilkins, Edmund; Sanders, Karen; Paton, Nicholas I

    2016-11-13

    The Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy Versus Ongoing Triple Therapy (PIVOT) trial found that protease inhibitor monotherapy as a simplification strategy is well tolerated in terms of drug resistance but less effective than combination therapy in suppressing HIV viral load. We sought to identify factors associated with the risk of viral load rebound in this trial. PIVOT was a randomized controlled trial in HIV-positive adults with suppressed viral load for at least 24 weeks on combination therapy comparing a strategy of physician-selected ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor monotherapy versus ongoing triple therapy. In participants receiving monotherapy, we analysed time to confirmed viral load rebound and its predictors using flexible parametric survival models. Of 290 participants initiating protease inhibitor monotherapy (80% darunavir, 14% lopinavir, and 6% other), 93 developed viral load rebound on monotherapy. The risk of viral load rebound peaked at 9 months after starting monotherapy and then declined to approximately 5 per 100 person-years from 18 months onwards. Independent predictors of viral load rebound were duration of viral load suppression before starting monotherapy (hazard ratio 0.81 per additional year <50 copies/ml; P < 0.001), CD4 cell count (hazard ratio 0.73 per additional 100 cells/μl for CD4 nadir; P = 0.008); ethnicity (hazard ratio 1.87 for nonwhite versus white, P = 0.025) but not the protease inhibitor agent used (P = 0.27). Patients whose viral load was analysed with the Roche TaqMan-2 assay had a 1.87-fold risk for viral load rebound compared with Abbott RealTime assay (P = 0.012). A number of factors can identify patients at low risk of rebound with protease inhibitor monotherapy, and this may help to better target those who may benefit from this management strategy.

  2. Management of protease inhibitor-associated hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Penzak, Scott R; Chuck, Susan K

    2002-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated serum levels of triglycerides and reduced levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, has been recognized in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It is thought that elevated levels of circulating cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-alpha, may alter lipid metabolism in patients with HIV infection. Protease inhibitors, such as saquinavir, indinavir and ritonavir, have been found to decrease mortality and improve quality of life in patients with HIV infection. However, these drugs have been associated with a syndrome of fat redistribution, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. Elevations in serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, along with dyslipidemia that typically occurs in patients with HIV infection, may predispose patients to complications such as premature atherosclerosis and pancreatitis. It has been estimated that hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia occur in greater than 50% of protease inhibitor recipients after 2 years of therapy, and that the risk of developing hyperlipidemia increases with the duration of treatment with protease inhibitors. In general, treatment of hyperlipidemia should follow National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines; efforts should be made to modify/control coronary heart disease risk factors (i.e. smoking; hypertension; diabetes mellitus) and maximize lifestyle modifications, primarily dietary intervention and exercise, in these patients. Where indicated, treatment usually consists of either pravastatin or atorvastatin for patients with elevated serum levels of LDL-C and/or total cholesterol. Atorvastatin is more potent in lowering serum total cholesterol and triglycerides compared with other hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, but it is also associated with more drug interactions compared with pravastatin. Simvastatin

  3. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  4. Irreversible aggregation of the Fc fragment derived from polymeric but not monomeric serum IgA1--implications in IgA-mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Almogren, Adel; Kerr, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    IgA is by far the most abundant immunoglobulin in humans. It is found in serum and in secretions (SIgA). Unlike any other class of immunoglobulin, each form of IgA occurs naturally in different polymerisation states. In serum, the predominant form of IgA is IgA1 of which around 90% is monomeric and 10% is dimeric or polymeric. The proportion of dimeric/polymeric IgA increases in a number of important diseases, such as IgA nephropathy and in chronic liver disease. In both, there is evidence that further aggregation of dimeric/polymeric IgA is the cause of the characteristic tissue deposition. To investigate the effect of role of IgA polymerisation on the structure and function of IgA, we purified different molecular forms of IgA1 from myeloma serum (monomer, dimer and trimer) and SIgA1 from colostrum. Structural features of these different IgA1 forms were examined following proteolysis using Neisseria gonorrhoeae IgA1 type 2 protease and Streptococcus pneumoniae IgA1 protease. These IgA1 proteases cleave IgA1 at the hinge region and produce Fcalpha and Fab fragments. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the Fcalpha fragments of serum dimeric and trimeric but not monomeric IgA1 aggregated to form multimers resistant to disruption in SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions. Size exclusion chromatography under native conditions of cleaved serum dimeric IgA1 demonstrated that aggregation occurs because of structural changes in the IgA per se and was not an effect of the SDS-PAGE system. In the same assay, SIgA1 (dimeric) did not aggregate after digestion. The results suggest an important, previously unrecognised, property of dimeric/polymeric serum IgA1, which might explain its propensity to aggregate and deposit in tissues.

  5. [Chromatographic separation of activated proteases from human plasma].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, B; Taucher, M; Kühne, H; Scheuch, D W

    1988-01-01

    After separation of aceton and dextran sulfate activated human plasma by column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose three esterolytically and amidolytically active fractions, respectively, were obtained, which were assigned to the following species: plasma kallikrein (PK), PK.alpha-macroglobulin.HMW-Kininogen. Their percentage in the whole activity is variable. The proportion of free PK is low (0.11). For characterization of the products we studied inhibition by different polyvalent inhibitors. The Michaelis constant (Km) with p-toluene-sulfonyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) were determined. For simulation of in vivo conditions dextran sulfate activated plasma was inactivated at 37 degrees C. The residual activity and the spontaneous activity in plasma from patients with shock are produced by different active protease inhibitor complexes.

  6. Functional interplay between tetraspanins and proteases.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Gutiérrez-López, Maria Dolores; Cabañas, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Several recent publications have described examples of physical and functional interations between tetraspanins and specific membrane proteases belonging to the TM-MMP and α-(ADAMs) and γ-secretases families. Collectively, these examples constitute an emerging body of evidence supporting the notion that tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) represent functional platforms for the regulation of key cellular processes including the release of surface protein ectodomains ("shedding"), regulated intramembrane proteolysis ("RIPing") and matrix degradation and assembly. These cellular processes in turn play a crucial role in an array of physiological and pathological phenomena. Thus, TEMs may represent new therapeutical targets that may simultaneously affect the proteolytic activity of different enzymes and their substrates. Agonistic or antagonistic antibodies and blocking soluble peptides corresponding to tetraspanin functional regions may offer new opportunities in the treatment of pathologies such as chronic inflammation, cancer, or Alzheimer's disease. In this review article, we will discuss all these aspects of functional regulation of protease activities by tetraspanins.

  7. Orally administered proteases in aesthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Dusková, M; Wald, M

    1999-01-01

    Increasing demand for shortening the sequel period after aesthetic surgery has led to comparative testing of optional approaches. Systemic enzyme therapy with its pharmacological effects represents a preventive and curative option for inflammatory process including healing. Excellent results were presented, namely, in the treatment of secondary lymphoedema. The incidence of hematoma, edema, and pain was followed, and the results were compared in a randomized group of 20 patients with upper eyelid blepharoplasty treated with proteases (Wobenzym drg) and in a similar group treated with systemic antiedema and hemostyptic therapy (Dicynone drg and Reparil drg). No undesirable side effects were observed. In addition, proteases apparently have no limitation for patients with the risk of concurrent cardiovascular, hepatic, or renal diseases.

  8. Enteropeptidase, a type II transmembrane serine protease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X Long; Kitamoto, Yasunori; Sadler, J Evan

    2009-06-01

    Enteropeptidase, a type II transmembrane serine protease, is localized to the brush border of the duodenal and jejunal mucosa. It is synthesized as a zymogen (proenteropeptidase) that requires activation by another protease, either trypsin or possibly duodenase. Active enteropeptidase then converts the pancreatic precursor, trypsinogen, to trypsin by cleavage of the specific trypsinogen activation peptide, Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys- Ile that is highly conserved in vertebrates. Trypsin, in turn, activates other digestive zymogens such as chymotrypsinogen, proelastase, procarboxypeptidase and prolipase in the lumen of the gut. The important biological function of enteropeptidase is highlighted by the manifestation of severe diarrhea, failure to thrive, hypoproteinemia and edema as a result of congenital deficiency of enteropeptidase activity in the gut. Conversely, duodenopancreatic reflux of proteolytically active enteropeptidase may cause acute and chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Mycobacterial Caseinolytic Protease Gene Regulator ClgR Is a Substrate of Caseinolytic Protease

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mycobacterial caseinolytic protease ClpP1P2 is a degradative protease that recently gained interest as a genetically and pharmacologically validated drug target for tuberculosis. The first whole-cell active ClpP1P2 inhibitor, the human proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, is currently undergoing lead optimization to introduce selectivity for the bacterial target. How inhibition of ClpP1P2 translates into whole-cell antimicrobial activity is little understood. Previous work has shown that the caseinolytic protease gene regulator ClgR is an activator of the clpP1P2 genes and also suggested that this transcription factor may be a substrate of the protease. Here, we employ promoter activity reporters and direct mRNA level measurements showing that bortezomib treatment of Mycobacterium bovis BCG increased transcription of clpP1P2 and other ClgR-dependent promoters, suggesting that inhibition of ClpP1P2 increases cellular ClgR levels. Then, we carried out red fluorescent protein-ClgR fusion analyses to show that ClgR is indeed a substrate of ClpP1P2 and to identify ClgR’s C-terminal nonapeptide APVVSLAVA as the signal sufficient for recognition and efficient protein degradation by ClpP1P2. Interestingly, accumulation of ClgR appears to be toxic for bacilli, suggesting a mechanism for how pharmacological inhibition of ClpP1P2 protease activity by bortezomib translates into whole-cell antibacterial activity. IMPORTANCE With 9 million new cases and more than 1 million deaths per year, tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the biggest infectious disease killer globally. New drugs for the treatment of the drug-resistant forms of the disease are needed. Recently, a new target-lead couple, the mycobacterial protease ClpP1P2 and the human anticancer drug bortezomib, was identified. However, we know little about how expression of this protease is regulated, which proteins in the bacterium it degrades, how the protease recognizes its target proteins

  10. Uptake inhibitors but not substrates induce protease resistance in extracellular loop two of the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Gaffaney, Jon D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2004-03-01

    Changes in protease sensitivity of extracellular loop two (EL2) of the dopamine transporter (DAT) during inhibitor and substrate binding were examined using trypsin proteolysis and epitope-specific immunoblotting. In control rat striatal membranes, proteolysis of DAT in a restricted region of EL2 was produced by 0.001 to 10 microg/ml trypsin. However, in the presence of the dopamine uptake blockers [2-(diphenylmethoxyl) ethyl]-4-(3phenylpropyl) piperazine (GBR 12909), mazindol, 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-flourophenyl)tropane (beta-CFT), nomifensine, benztropine, or (-)-cocaine, 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations of trypsin were required to produce comparable levels of proteolysis. Protease resistance induced by ligands was correlated with their affinity for DAT binding, was not observed with Zn2+, (+)-cocaine, or inhibitors of norepinephrine or serotonin transporters, and was not caused by altered catalytic activity of trypsin. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the interaction of uptake inhibitors with DAT induces a protease-resistant conformation in EL2. In contrast, binding of substrates did not induce protease resistance in EL2, suggesting that substrates and inhibitors interact with DAT differently during binding. To assess the effects of EL2 proteolysis on DAT function, the binding and transport properties of trypsin-digested DAT were assayed with [3H]CFT and [3H]dopamine. Digestion decreased the Bmax for binding and the Vmax for uptake in amounts that were proportional to the extent of proteolysis, indicating that the structural integrity of EL2 is required for maintenance of both DAT binding and transport functions. Together this data provides novel information about inhibitor and substrate interactions at EL2, possibly relating the protease resistant DAT conformation to a mechanism of transport inhibition.

  11. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of SplD Protease from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zdzalik, Michal; Kalinska, Magdalena; Wysocka, Magdalena; Stec-Niemczyk, Justyna; Cichon, Przemyslaw; Stach, Natalia; Gruba, Natalia; Stennicke, Henning R.; Jabaiah, Abeer; Markiewicz, Michal; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Wladyka, Benedykt; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Lesner, Adam; Rolka, Krzysztof; Dubin, Adam; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous human pathogen. A number of the proteins secreted by this bacterium are implicated in its virulence, but many of the components of its secretome are poorly characterized. Strains of S. aureus can produce up to six homologous extracellular serine proteases grouped in a single spl operon. Although the SplA, SplB, and SplC proteases have been thoroughly characterized, the properties of the other three enzymes have not yet been investigated. Here, we describe the biochemical and structural characteristics of the SplD protease. The active enzyme was produced in an Escherichia coli recombinant system and purified to homogeneity. P1 substrate specificity was determined using a combinatorial library of synthetic peptide substrates showing exclusive preference for threonine, serine, leucine, isoleucine, alanine, and valine. To further determine the specificity of SplD, we used high-throughput synthetic peptide and cell surface protein display methods. The results not only confirmed SplD preference for a P1 residue, but also provided insight into the specificity of individual primed- and non-primed substrate-binding subsites. The analyses revealed a surprisingly narrow specificity of the protease, which recognized five consecutive residues (P4-P3-P2-P1-P1’) with a consensus motif of R-(Y/W)-(P/L)-(T/L/I/V)↓S. To understand the molecular basis of the strict substrate specificity, we crystallized the enzyme in two different conditions, and refined the structures at resolutions of 1.56 Å and 2.1 Å. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis studies allowed us to define a consensus model of substrate binding, and illustrated the molecular mechanism of protease specificity. PMID:24130791

  12. A tandem Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI106)-serine carboxypeptidase (SCP1) controls mycorrhiza establishment and arbuscule development in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Rech, Stefanie S; Heidt, Sven; Requena, Natalia

    2013-09-01

    Plant proteases and protease inhibitors are involved in plant developmental processes including those involving interactions with microbes. Here we show that a tandem between a Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI106) and a serine carboxypeptidase (SCP1) controls arbuscular mycorrhiza development in the root cortex of Medicago truncatula. Both proteins are only induced during mycorrhiza formation and belong to large families whose members are also mycorrhiza-specific. Furthermore, the interaction between KPI106 and SCP1 analysed using the yeast two-hybrid system is specific, indicating that each family member might have a defined counterpart. In silico docking analysis predicted a putative P1 residue in KPI106 (Lys173) that fits into the catalytic pocket of SCP1, suggesting that KPI106 might inhibit the enzyme activity by mimicking the protease substrate. In vitro mutagenesis of the Lys173 showed that this residue is important in determining the strength and specificity of the interaction. The RNA interference (RNAi) inactivation of the serine carboxypeptidase SCP1 produces aberrant mycorrhizal development with an increased number of septated hyphae and degenerate arbuscules, a phenotype also observed when overexpressing KPI106. Protease and inhibitor are both secreted as observed when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. Taken together we envisage a model in which the protease SCP1 is secreted in the apoplast where it produces a peptide signal critical for proper fungal development within the root. KPI106 also at the apoplast would modulate the spatial and/or temporal activity of SCP1 by competing with the protease substrate. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Dysregulation of Protease and Protease Inhibitors in a Mouse Model of Human Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Budatha, Madhusudhan; Silva, Simone; Montoya, Teodoro Ignacio; Suzuki, Ayako; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Wieslander, Cecilia Karin; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Word, Ruth Ann; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient for the fibulin-5 gene (Fbln5−/−) develop pelvic organ prolapse (POP) due to compromised elastic fibers and upregulation of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9. Here, we used casein zymography, inhibitor profiling, affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry to discover additional protease upregulated in the vaginal wall of Fbln5−/− mice, herein named V1 (25 kDa). V1 was a serine protease with trypsin-like activity similar to protease, serine (PRSS) 3, a major extrapancreatic trypsinogen, was optimum at pH 8.0, and predominantly detected in estrogenized vaginal epithelium of Fbln5−/− mice. PRSS3 was (a) localized in epithelial secretions, (b) detected in media of vaginal organ culture from both Fbln5−/− and wild type mice, and (c) cleaved fibulin-5 in vitro. Expression of two serine protease inhibitors [Serpina1a (α1-antitrypsin) and Elafin] was dysregulated in Fbln5−/− epithelium. Finally, we confirmed that PRSS3 was expressed in human vaginal epithelium and that SERPINA1 and Elafin were downregulated in vaginal tissues from women with POP. These data collectively suggest that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors contributes to support of the pelvic organs in humans and mice. PMID:23437119

  14. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES) proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25) in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  15. Antibacterial cysteine protease from Cissus quadrangularis L.

    PubMed

    Muthu, Sakthivel; Gopal, Venkatesh Babu; Karthik S, Narayan; Sivaji, Prabu; Malairaj, Sathuvan; Lakshmikanthan, Mythileeswari; Subramani, Nagaraj; Perumal, Palani

    2017-10-01

    An antibacterial Cp was extracted from the stem of Cissus quadrangularis and purified with a 5.39 fold increase in specific activity and 8.67% recovery. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 39kDa by SDS-PAGE. The purified enzyme appeared as a single band on Native-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature for protease activity were around 6.0 and 50°C respectively. The Cp showed pH stability from 3 to 10 and retained more than 90% of its relative protease activity. The addition of metal ions such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) also exhibited relative protease activity. Cp showed a potent antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria. About 4.74Uml(-1) of Cp from C. quadrangularis was tested for antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus and Bacillus megaterium which subsequently showed zone of inhibition of 21 and 20mm respectively. Cp from C. quadrangularis degraded the peptidoglycan layer of bacteria by Cp was confirmed by transmission electron microscopic analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of lanthanides on Porphyromonas gingivalis proteases.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Sasi K; Ciancio, Sebastian G; Sojar, Hakimuddin T

    2010-01-01

    Host and bacterial proteases play a vital role in periodontitis. Inhibitors of these proteases are necessary for control of this disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of lanthanides on proteins from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogen in periodontitis. Benzoyl-L-Arg-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA); H-Gly-Pro-pNA x HCl and gelatin were used to evaluate the activity of P. gingivalis proteins in the presence of lanthanides. Proteins extracted from cell surfaces and culture media of P. gingivalis were assessed for activity in the presence of different lanthanides by BAPNA assay. Only gadolinium chloride was used for H-Gly-Pro-pNA x HCl assay and gelatin-zymography. Concentration-dependent reduction of absorbance was observed in the presence of lanthanides with BAPNA and a similar observation was made with gadolinium chloride using H-Gly-Pro-pNa. Collagenolytic activity in cell surface extracts and culture media-precipitated proteins was absent in the presence of gadolinium chloride. These results suggest that the lanthanide gadolinium can be a potential inhibitor of P. gingivalis proteases.

  17. Corruption of innate immunity by bacterial proteases.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host's innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections.

  18. Corruption of Innate Immunity by Bacterial Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host’s innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections. PMID:19756242

  19. Role of rhomboid proteases in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rather, Philip

    2013-12-01

    The first member of the rhomboid family of intramembrane serine proteases in bacteria was discovered almost 20years ago. It is now known that rhomboid proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, with some bacteria containing multiple rhomboids. At the present time, only a single rhomboid-dependent function in bacteria has been identified, which is the cleavage of TatA in Providencia stuartii. Mutational analysis has shown that loss of the GlpG rhomboid in Escherichia coli alters cefotaxime resistance, loss of the YqgP (GluP) rhomboid in Bacillus subtilis alters cell division and glucose uptake, and loss of the MSMEG_5036 and MSMEG_4904 genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis results in altered colony morphology, biofilm formation and antibiotic susceptibilities. However, the cellular substrates for these proteins have not been identified. In addition, analysis of the rhombosortases, together with their possible Gly-Gly CTERM substrates, may shed new light on the role of these proteases in bacteria. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  20. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Tozer, Jozsef; Waugh, David

    2010-10-28

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-{angstrom} resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus ({approx}20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by {approx}10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1{prime} position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k{sub cat} and K{sub m} for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  1. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P; Tözsér, József; Waugh, David S

    2010-11-01

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-Å resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus (∼20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by ∼10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1' position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k(cat) and K(m) for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  2. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P; Tözsér, József; Waugh, David S

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-Å resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus (∼20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by ∼10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1′ position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters kcat and Km for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease. PMID:20862670

  3. Serine protease activity in developmental stages of Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fetterer, R H; Miska, K B; Lillehoj, H; Barfield, R C

    2007-04-01

    A number of complex processes are involved in Eimeria spp. survival, including control of sporulation, intracellular invasion, evasion of host immune responses, successful reproduction, and nutrition. Proteases have been implicated in many of these processes, but the occurrence and functions of serine proteases have not been characterized. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that the Eimeria tenella genome contains several serine proteases that lack homology to trypsin. Using RT-PCR, a gene encoding a subtilisin-like and a rhomboid protease-like serine protease was shown to be developmentally regulated, both being poorly expressed in sporozoites (SZ) and merozoites (MZ). Casein substrate gel electrophoresis of oocyst extracts during sporulation demonstrated bands of proteolytic activity with relative molecular weights (Mr) of 18, 25, and 45 kDa that were eliminated by coincubation with serine protease inhibitors. A protease with Mr of 25 kDa was purified from extracts of unsporulated oocysts by a combination of affinity and anion exchange chromatography. Extracts of SZ contained only a single band of inhibitor-sensitive proteolytic activity at 25 kDa, while the pattern of proteases from extracts of MZ was similar to that of oocysts except for the occurrence of a 90 kDa protease, resistant to protease inhibitors. Excretory-secretory products (ESP) from MZ contained AEBSF (4-[2-Aminoethyl] benzenesulphonyl fluoride)-sensitive protease activity with a specific activity about 10 times greater than that observed in MZ extracts. No protease activity was observed in the ESP from SZ. Pretreatment of SZ with AEBSF significantly reduced SZ invasion and the release of the microneme protein, MIC2. The current results suggest that serine proteases are present in all the developmental stages examined.

  4. Extracellular Proteolysis of Apolipoprotein E (apoE) by Secreted Serine Neuronal Protease

    PubMed Central

    Tamboli, Irfan Y.; Heo, Dongeun; Rebeck, G. William

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, brain apolipoprotein E (apoE) is secreted and lipidated by astrocytes, then taken up by neurons via receptor mediated endocytosis. Free apoE is either degraded in intraneuronal lysosomal compartments or released. Here we identified a novel way by which apoE undergoes proteolysis in the extracellular space via a secreted neuronal protease. We show that apoE is cleaved in neuronal conditioned media by a secreted serine protease. This apoE cleavage was inhibited by PMSF and α1-antichymotrypsin, but not neuroserpin-1 or inhibitors of thrombin and cathepsin G, supporting its identity as a chymotrypsin like protease. In addition, apoE incubation with purified chymotrypsin produced a similar pattern of apoE fragments. Analysis of apoE fragments by mass spectrometry showed cleavages occuring at the C-terminal side of apoE tryptophan residues, further supporting our identification of cleavage by chymotrypsin like protease. Hippocampal neurons were more efficient in mediating this apoE cleavage than cortical neurons. Proteolysis of apoE4 generated higher levels of low molecular weight fragments compared to apoE3. Primary glial cultures released an inhibitor of this proteolytic activity. Together, these studies reveal novel mechanism by which apoE can be regulated and therefore could be useful in designing apoE directed AD therapeutic approaches. PMID:24675880

  5. Extracellular proteolysis of apolipoprotein E (apoE) by secreted serine neuronal protease.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Irfan Y; Heo, Dongeun; Rebeck, G William

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, brain apolipoprotein E (apoE) is secreted and lipidated by astrocytes, then taken up by neurons via receptor mediated endocytosis. Free apoE is either degraded in intraneuronal lysosomal compartments or released. Here we identified a novel way by which apoE undergoes proteolysis in the extracellular space via a secreted neuronal protease. We show that apoE is cleaved in neuronal conditioned media by a secreted serine protease. This apoE cleavage was inhibited by PMSF and α1-antichymotrypsin, but not neuroserpin-1 or inhibitors of thrombin and cathepsin G, supporting its identity as a chymotrypsin like protease. In addition, apoE incubation with purified chymotrypsin produced a similar pattern of apoE fragments. Analysis of apoE fragments by mass spectrometry showed cleavages occurring at the C-terminal side of apoE tryptophan residues, further supporting our identification of cleavage by chymotrypsin like protease. Hippocampal neurons were more efficient in mediating this apoE cleavage than cortical neurons. Proteolysis of apoE4 generated higher levels of low molecular weight fragments compared to apoE3. Primary glial cultures released an inhibitor of this proteolytic activity. Together, these studies reveal novel mechanism by which apoE can be regulated and therefore could be useful in designing apoE directed AD therapeutic approaches.

  6. Negative Regulation of Pathogenesis in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 11528 by ATP-Dependent Lon Protease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun Ju; Lee, Jun Seung; Cha, Ji Young; Baik, Hyung Suk

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci causes wildfire disease in tobacco plants. The hrp pathogenicity island (hrp PAI) of P. syringae pv. tabaci encodes a type III secretion system (TTSS) and its regulatory system, which are required for pathogenesis in plants. Three important regulatory proteins- HrpR, HrpS, and HrpL-have been identified to activate hrp PAI gene expression. The bacterial Lon protease regulates the expression of various genes. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of the Lon protease in P. syringae pv. tabaci 11528, we cloned the lon gene, and then a Δlon mutant was generated by allelic exchange. lon mutants showed increased UV sensitivity, which is a typical feature of such mutants. The Δlon mutant produced higher levels of tabtoxin than the wild-type. The lacZ gene was fused with hrpA promoter and activity of β-galactosidase was measured in hrp-repressing and hrp-inducing media. The Lon protease functioned as a negative regulator of hrp PAI under hrp-repressing conditions. We found that strains with lon disruption elicited the host defense system more rapidly and strongly than the wild-type strain, suggesting that the Lon protease is essential for systemic pathogenesis. PMID:21904881

  7. Simultaneous production of alkaline lipase and protease by antibiotic and heavy metal tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Deepali; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Gautam, Pallavi; Darmwal, Nandan Singh

    2013-09-01

    An efficient bacterial strain capable of simultaneous production of lipase and protease in a single production medium was isolated. Thirty six bacterial strains, isolated from diverse habitats, were screened for their lipolytic and proteolytic activity. Of these, only one bacterial strain was found to be lipase and protease producer. The 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain (NSD-09) was in close identity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The maximum lipase (221.4 U/ml) and protease (187.9 U/ml) activities were obtained after 28 and 24 h of incubation, respectively at pH 9.0 and 37 °C. Castor oil and wheat bran were found to be the best substrate for lipase and protease production, respectively. The strain also exhibited high tolerance to lead (1450 µg/ml) and chromium (1000 µg/ml) in agar plates. It also showed tolerance to other heavy metals, such as Co(+2) , Zn(+2) , Hg(+2) , Ni(+2) and Cd(+2) . Therefore, this strain has scope for tailing bioremediation. Presumably, this is the first attempt on P. aeruginosa to explore its potential for both industrial and environmental applications.

  8. Antiretroviral activities of protease inhibitors against murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Black, P L; Downs, M B; Lewis, M G; Ussery, M A; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Lambert, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rationally designed synthetic inhibitors of retroviral proteases inhibit the processing of viral polyproteins in cultures of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected T lymphocytes and, as a result, inhibit the infectivity of HIV-1 for such cultures. The ability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors to suppress replication of the C-type retrovirus Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) and the HIV-related lentivirus simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was examined in plaque reduction assays and syncytium reduction assays, respectively. Three of seven compounds examined blocked production of infectious R-MuLV, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of < or = 1 microM. Little or no cellular cytotoxicity was detectable at concentrations up to 100 microM. The same compounds which inhibited the infectivity of HIV-1 also produced activity against SIV and R-MuLV. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of many virions with atypical morphologies in cultures treated with the active compounds. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the active compounds reduced the number of membrane-associated virus particles. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide analog inhibitors of retroviral proteases significantly inhibit proteolytic processing of the gag polyproteins of R-MuLV and SIV and inhibit the replication of these retroviruses. These results are similar to those for inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by these compounds, and thus, R-MuLV and SIV might be suitable models for the in vivo evaluation of the antiretroviral activities of these protease inhibitors.

  9. Antiretroviral activities of protease inhibitors against murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Black, P L; Downs, M B; Lewis, M G; Ussery, M A; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Lambert, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rationally designed synthetic inhibitors of retroviral proteases inhibit the processing of viral polyproteins in cultures of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected T lymphocytes and, as a result, inhibit the infectivity of HIV-1 for such cultures. The ability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors to suppress replication of the C-type retrovirus Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) and the HIV-related lentivirus simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was examined in plaque reduction assays and syncytium reduction assays, respectively. Three of seven compounds examined blocked production of infectious R-MuLV, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of < or = 1 microM. Little or no cellular cytotoxicity was detectable at concentrations up to 100 microM. The same compounds which inhibited the infectivity of HIV-1 also produced activity against SIV and R-MuLV. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of many virions with atypical morphologies in cultures treated with the active compounds. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the active compounds reduced the number of membrane-associated virus particles. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide analog inhibitors of retroviral proteases significantly inhibit proteolytic processing of the gag polyproteins of R-MuLV and SIV and inhibit the replication of these retroviruses. These results are similar to those for inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by these compounds, and thus, R-MuLV and SIV might be suitable models for the in vivo evaluation of the antiretroviral activities of these protease inhibitors. Images PMID:8381640

  10. Nepenthesin protease activity indicates digestive fluid dynamics in carnivorous nepenthes plants.

    PubMed

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E; Bikker, Floris J; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory.

  11. Nepenthesin Protease Activity Indicates Digestive Fluid Dynamics in Carnivorous Nepenthes Plants

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E.; Bikker, Floris J.; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory. PMID:25750992

  12. Fibrinolytic serine protease isolation from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens An6 grown on Mirabilis jalapa tuber powders.

    PubMed

    Agrebi, Rym; Hmidet, Noomen; Hajji, Mohamed; Ktari, Nawrez; Haddar, Anissa; Fakhfakh-Zouari, Nahed; Nasri, Moncef

    2010-09-01

    In this study, Mirabilis jalapa tuber powder (MJTP) was used as a new complex organic substrate for the growth and production of fibrinolytic enzymes by a newly isolated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens An6. Maximum protease activity (1,057 U/ml) with casein as a substrate was obtained when the strain was grown in medium containing (grams per liter) MJTP 30, yeast extract 6, CaCl(2) 1, K(2)HPO(4) 0.1, and K(2)HPO(4) 0.1. The strain was also found to grow and produce extracellular proteases in a medium containing only MJTP, indicating that it can obtain its carbon, nitrogen, and salts requirements directly from MJTP. The B. amyloliquefaciens An6 fibrinase (BAF1) was partially purified, and fibrinolytic activity was assayed in a test tube with an artificial fibrin clot. The molecular weight of the partially purified BAF1 fibrinolytic protease was estimated to be 30 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration. The optimum temperature and pH for the caseinolytic activity were 60 degrees C and 9.0, respectively. The enzyme was highly stable from pH 6.0 to 11.0 and retained 62% of its initial activity after 1 h incubation at 50 degrees C. However, the enzyme was inactivated at higher temperatures. The activity of the enzyme was totally lost in the presence of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, suggesting that BAF1 is a serine protease.

  13. Non-ribosomal halogenated protease inhibitors from cyanobacterial isolates as attractive drug targets.

    PubMed

    Silva-Stenico, M E; Rigonato, J; Leal, M G; Vaz, M G M V; Andreote, A P D; Fiore, M F

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the ability to produce compounds with remarkable biological activity, and have thus attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry. Cyanopeptides acting as protease inhibitors have shown potential in the field of pharmacotherapy through regulation of abnormal physiological processes in the human body. Despite the already described cyanopeptide protease inhibitors, the search for new congeners is of considerable interest which may pave the way for more efficient molecules. In this study, the presence of the protease inhibitors aeruginosin and cyanopeptolin with non-, mono- and dichlorination and also genes coding for their synthetases was investigated in 90 cyanobacterial strains. Mass spectrometry analyses highlighted production of 91, 19 and 3 non-, mono- and dichlorinated congeners, respectively. The purified extract of Microcystis botrys SPC759 inhibited 61% of pepsin protease. PCR amplifications of aeruginosin and cyanopeptolin synthetase gene regions were observed in 41 and 28% of evaluated strains, respectively. The sequences obtained for the aerA-aerB (aeruginosin) and mcnC-mcnE (cyanopeptolin) gene regions grouped together with their homologues found in other cyanobacterial strains in the phylogenetic analyses with high bootstrap support. Antimicrobial activity assays performed using all intracellular extracts inhibited 31 and 26% of Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogenic bacterial growth, respectively. The results of this study showed the production of aeruginosin and cyanopeptolin and the presence of their genes in several cyanobacterial genera for the first time besides the discovery of novel congeners.

  14. Stability of thermostable alkaline protease from Bacillus licheniformis RP1 in commercial solid laundry detergent formulations.

    PubMed

    Sellami-Kamoun, Alya; Haddar, Anissa; Ali, Nedra El-Hadj; Ghorbel-Frikha, Basma; Kanoun, Safia; Nasri, Moncef

    2008-01-01

    The stability of crude extracellular protease produced by Bacillus licheniformis RP1, isolated from polluted water, in various solid laundry detergents was investigated. The enzyme had an optimum pH and temperature at pH 10.0-11.0 and 65-70 degrees C. Enzyme activity was inhibited by PMSF, suggesting that the preparation contains a serine-protease. The alkaline protease showed extreme stability towards non-ionic (5% Tween 20% and 5% Triton X-100) and anionic (0.5% SDS) surfactants, which retained 100% and above 73%, respectively, of its initial activity after preincubation 60 min at 40 degrees C. The RP1 protease showed excellent stability and compatibility with a wide range of commercial solid detergents at temperatures from 40 to 50 degrees C, suggesting its further application in detergent industry. The enzyme retained 95% of its initial activity with Ariel followed by Axion (94%) then Dixan (93.5%) after preincubation 60 min at 40 degrees C in the presence of 7 mg/ml of detergents. In the presence of Nadhif and New Det, the enzyme retained about 83.5% of the original activity. The effects of additives such as maltodextrin, sucrose and PEG 4000 on the stability of the enzyme during spray-drying and during subsequent storage in New Det detergent were also examined. All additives tested enhanced stability of the enzyme.

  15. Characterization of proteases from Planomicrobium sp. L-2 isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of Octopus variabilis (Sasaki)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yulan; Wang, Yurong; Xiao, Lin; Lin, Xiukun

    2016-05-01

    A crude protease produced from Planomicrobium sp. L-2 is described, and its effectiveness as an additive in liquid detergent evaluated. We isolate the protease-producing Planomicrobium sp. L-2 from the gastrointestinal tract of Octopus variabilis. At least three caseinolytic protease clear bands were observed in zymogram analysis. The crude alkaline protease was highly tolerant of a pH range from 7.0 to 9.0, and temperatures to 50°C after incubation for 1 h. Proteolytic enzymes were stable towards three surfactants (5% Tween 80, 1% Triton X-100 and 0.05% SDS) and an oxidizing agent (1% hydrogen peroxide), in addition to being highly stable and compatible with popular commercial laundry powered detergent brands available in China. Our study demonstrates the potential these proteases have for development into novel classes of detergent additive. This study also suggests that the gastrointestinal tract of Octopus variabilis may be a rich source of commercially valuable strains of enzyme.

  16. Production and characterization of thermostable alkaline protease of Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633) from optimized solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Joyee; Giri, Sudipta; Maity, Sujan; Sinha, Ankan; Ranjan, Ashish; Rajshekhar; Gupta, Suvroma

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are the most important group of enzymes utilized commercially in various arenas of industries, such as food, detergent, leather, dairy, pharmaceutical, diagnostics, and waste management, accounting for nearly 20% of the world enzyme market. Microorganisms of specially Bacillus genera serve as a vast repository of diverse set of industrially important enzymes and utilized for the large-scale enzyme production using a fermentation technology. Approximately 30%-40% of the cost of industrial enzymes originates from the cost of the growth medium. This study is attempted to produce protease from Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633) after optimization of various process parameters with the aid of solid-state fermentation using a cheap nutrient source such as wheat bran. B. subtilis (ATCC 6633) produces proteases of molecular weight 36 and 20 kDa, respectively, in the fermented medium as evident from SDS zymogram. Alkaline protease activity has been detected with optimum temperature at 50 °C and is insensitive to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. This thermostable alkaline protease exhibits dual pH optimum at 7 and 10 with moderate pH stability at alkaline pH range. It preserves its activity in the presence of detergent such as SDS, Tween 20, and Triton X-100 and may be considered as an effective additive to detergent formulation with some industrial importance.

  17. Approach toward enhancement of halophilic protease production by Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 using statistical design response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chuprom, Julalak; Bovornreungroj, Preeyanuch; Ahmad, Mehraj; Kantachote, Duangporn; Dueramae, Sawitree

    2016-06-01

    A new potent halophilic protease producer, Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 was isolated from salt-fermented fish samples (budu) and identified by phenotypic analysis, and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Thereafter, sequential statistical strategy was used to optimize halophilic protease production from Halobacterium sp. strain LBU50301 by shake-flask fermentation. The classical one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) approach determined gelatin was the best nitrogen source. Based on Plackett-Burman (PB) experimental design; gelatin, MgSO4·7H2O, NaCl and pH significantly influenced the halophilic protease production. Central composite design (CCD) determined the optimum level of medium components. Subsequently, an 8.78-fold increase in corresponding halophilic protease yield (156.22 U/mL) was obtained, compared with that produced in the original medium (17.80 U/mL). Validation experiments proved the adequacy and accuracy of model, and the results showed the predicted value agreed well with the experimental values. An overall 13-fold increase in halophilic protease yield was achieved using a 3 L laboratory fermenter and optimized medium (231.33 U/mL).

  18. Production of GM-CSF mediated by cysteine protease of Der f in canine keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Sekido, Machiko; Chimura, Naoki; Shibata, Sanae; Kondo, Naho; Kamishina, Harumi; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Maeda, Sadatoshi

    2012-08-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergens are the most common allergens for induction of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. Recently, epicutaneous sensitization with HDM allergens has been emphasized in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD) by producing various soluble factors in keratinocytes. Among the soluble factors, GM-CSF is a key molecule that activates Langerhans cells, antigen-presenting cells in the epidermis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f) on GM-CSF production in a canine keratinocyte cell line, CPEK. CPEKs were found to produce GM-CSF upon stimulation by Der f. The GM-CSF production was suppressed by addition of a cysteine protease inhibitor. The present results suggest that cysteine protease-derived Der f may be an initiator of allergic inflammation by inducing the production of GM-CSF in keratinocytes.

  19. Cystatins, serpins and other families of protease inhibitors in plants.

    PubMed

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Leoni, Claudia; Costanza, Alessandra; De Leo, Francesca; Gallerani, Raffaele; Ceci, Luigi R

    2011-08-01

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are generally small proteins present in high concentrations in storage tissues (tubers and seeds), and to a lower level in leaves. Even if most of them are active against serine and cysteine proteases, PIs active against aspartic proteases and carboxypeptidases have also been identified. Inhibitors of serine proteases are further classifiable in several families on the basis of their structural features. They comprise the families known as Bowman-Birk, Kunitz, Potato I and Potato II, which are the subject of review articles included in this special issue. In the present article we aim to give an overview of other families of plant PIs, active either against serine proteases or other class of proteases, describing their distribution, activity and main structural characteristics.

  20. Economic Methods of Ginger Protease'sextraction and Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yuanyuan; Tong, Junfeng; Wei, Siqing; Du, Xinyong; Tang, Xiaozhen

    This article reports the ginger protease extraction and purification methods from fresh ginger rhizome. As to ginger protease extraction, we adapt the steps of organic solvent dissolving, ammonium sulfate depositing and freeze-drying, and this method can attain crude enzyme powder 0.6% weight of fresh ginger rhizome. The purification part in this study includes two steps: cellulose ion exchange (DEAE-52) and SP-Sephadex 50 chromatography, which can purify crude ginger protease through ion and molecular weight differences respectively.

  1. Human cathepsin V protease participates in production of enkephalin and NPY neuropeptide neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Funkelstein, Lydiane; Lu, W Douglas; Koch, Britta; Mosier, Charles; Toneff, Thomas; Taupenot, Laurent; O'Connor, Daniel T; Reinheckel, Thomas; Peters, Christoph; Hook, Vivian

    2012-05-04

    Proteases are required for processing precursors into active neuropeptides that function as neurotransmitters for cell-cell communication. This study demonstrates the novel function of human cathepsin V protease for producing the neuropeptides enkephalin and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Cathepsin V is a human-specific cysteine protease gene. Findings here show that expression of cathepsin V in neuroendocrine PC12 cells and human neuronal SK-N-MC cells results in production of (Met)enkephalin from proenkephalin. Gene silencing of cathepsin V by siRNA in human SK-N-MC cells results in reduction of (Met)enkephalin by more than 80%, illustrating the prominent role of cathepsin V for neuropeptide production. In vitro processing of proenkephalin by cathepsin V occurs at dibasic residue sites to generate enkephalin-containing peptides and an ∼24-kDa intermediate present in human brain. Cathepsin V is present in human brain cortex and hippocampus where enkephalin and NPY are produced and is present in purified human neuropeptide secretory vesicles. Colocalization of cathepsin V with enkephalin and NPY in secretory vesicles of human neuroblastoma cells was illustrated by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, expression of cathepsin V with proNPY results in NPY production. These findings indicate the unique function of human cathepsin V for producing enkephalin and NPY neuropeptides required for neurotransmission in health and neurological diseases.

  2. Partial characterization of cold active amylases and proteases of Streptomyces sp. from Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Cotârleţ, Mihaela; Negoiţă, Teodor Gh.; Bahrim, Gabriela E.; Stougaard, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate novel enzyme-producing bacteria from vegetation samples from East Antarctica and also to characterize them genetically and biochemically in order to establish their phylogeny. The ability to grow at low temperature and to produce amylases and proteases cold-active was also tested. The results of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the 4 Alga rRNA was 100% identical to the sequences of Streptomyces sp. rRNA from Norway and from the Solomon Islands. The Streptomyces grew well in submerged system at 20°C, cells multiplication up to stationary phase being drastically increased after 120 h of submerged cultivation. The beta-amylase production reached a maximum peak after seven days, while alpha-amylase and proteases were performing biosynthesis after nine days of submerged cultivation at 20°C. Newly Streptomyces were able to produce amylase and proteases in a cold environment. The ability to adapt to low temperature of these enzymes could make them valuable ingredients for detergents, the food industry and bioremediation processes which require low temperatures. PMID:24031702

  3. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  4. Extracellular Bacterial Proteases in Chronic Wounds: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed

    Suleman, Louise

    2016-10-01

    Significance: Bacterial biofilms are considered to be responsible for over 80% of persistent infections, including chronic lung infections, osteomyelitis, periodontitis, endocarditis, and chronic wounds. Over 60% of chronic wounds are colonized with bacteria that reside within a biofilm. The exaggerated proteolytic environment of chronic wounds, more specifically elevated matrix metalloproteinases, is thought to be one of the possible reasons as to why chronic wounds fail to heal. However, the role of bacterial proteases within chronic wounds is not fully understood. Recent Advances: Recent research has shown that bacterial proteases can enable colonization and facilitate bacterial immune evasion. The inhibition of bacterial proteases such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase B (LasB) has resulted in the disruption of the bacterial biofilm in vitro. P. aeruginosa is thought to be a key pathogen in chronic wound infection, and therefore, the disruption of these biofilms, potentially through the targeting of P. aeruginosa bacterial proteases, is an attractive therapeutic endeavor. Critical Issues: Disrupting biofilm formation through the inhibition of bacterial proteases may lead to the dissemination of bacteria from the biofilm, allowing planktonic cells to colonize new sites within the wound. Future Directions: Despite a plethora of evidence supporting the role of bacterial proteases as virulence factors in infection, there remains a distinct lack of research into the effect of bacterial proteases in chronic wounds. To assess the viability of targeting bacterial proteases, future research should aim to understand the role of these proteases in a variety of chronic wound subtypes.

  5. The effect of prime-site occupancy on the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease structure.

    PubMed

    Casbarra, Annarita; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Ingallinella, Paolo; Orrù, Stefania; Pucci, Piero; Pessi, Antonello; Bianchi, Elisabetta

    2002-09-01

    We recently reported a new class of inhibitors of the chymotrypsin-like serine protease NS3 of the hepatitis C virus. These inhibitors exploit the binding potential of the S' site of the protease, which is not generally used by the natural substrates. The effect of prime-site occupancy was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy and limited proteolysis-mass spectrometry. Generally, nonprime inhibitors cause a structural change in NS3. Binding in the S' site produces additional conformational changes with different binding modes, even in the case of the NS3/4A cofactor complex. Notably, inhibitor binding either in the S or S' site also has profound effects on the stabilization of the protease. In addition, the stabilization propagates to regions not in direct contact with the inhibitor. In particular, the N-terminal region, which according to structural studies is endowed with low structural stability and is not stabilized by nonprime inhibitors, was now fully protected from proteolytic degradation. From the perspective of drug design, P-P' inhibitors take advantage of binding pockets, which are not exploited by the natural HCV substrates; hence, they are an entry point for a novel class of NS3/4A inhibitors. Here we show that binding of each inhibitor is associated with a specific structural rearrangement. The development of a range of inhibitors belonging to different classes and an understanding of their interactions with the protease are required to address the issue of the most likely outcome of viral protease inhibitor therapy, that is, viral resistance.

  6. The effect of prime-site occupancy on the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease structure

    PubMed Central

    Casbarra, Annarita; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Ingallinella, Paolo; Orrù, Stefania; Pucci, Piero; Pessi, Antonello; Bianchi, Elisabetta

    2002-01-01

    We recently reported a new class of inhibitors of the chymotrypsin-like serine protease NS3 of the hepatitis C virus. These inhibitors exploit the binding potential of the S` site of the protease, which is not generally used by the natural substrates. The effect of prime-site occupancy was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy and limited proteolysis-mass spectrometry. Generally, nonprime inhibitors cause a structural change in NS3. Binding in the S` site produces additional conformational changes with different binding modes, even in the case of the NS3/4A cofactor complex. Notably, inhibitor binding either in the S or S` site also has profound effects on the stabilization of the protease. In addition, the stabilization propagates to regions not in direct contact with the inhibitor. In particular, the N-terminal region, which according to structural studies is endowed with low structural stability and is not stabilized by nonprime inhibitors, was now fully protected from proteolytic degradation. From the perspective of drug design, P-P` inhibitors take advantage of binding pockets, which are not exploited by the natural HCV substrates; hence, they are an entry point for a novel class of NS3/4A inhibitors. Here we show that binding of each inhibitor is associated with a specific structural rearrangement. The development of a range of inhibitors belonging to different classes and an understanding of their interactions with the protease are required to address the issue of the most likely outcome of viral protease inhibitor therapy, that is, viral resistance. PMID:12192066

  7. Isolation of Alkaline and Neutral Proteases from Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris, a Soy Sauce Koji Mold

    PubMed Central

    Impoolsup, Attawut; Bhumiratana, Amaret; Flegel, Timothy W.

    1981-01-01

    Two different extracellular proteases, protease I (P-I), an alkaline protease, and protease II (P-II) a neutral protease, from Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris were partially purified by using (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex A-50 chromatography, carboxymethylcellulose CM-52 chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. The degree of purity was followed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The activity of P-I was completely inhibited by 0.1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and that of P-II was completely inhibited by 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate. By using these inhibitors with extracts of wheat bran koji, the proportions of total activity that could be assigned to P-I and P-II were 80 and 20%, respectively. This compared favorably with activities estimated by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis slices (82 and 18%, respectively). Extracts from factory-run soybean koji gave comparable results. Both enzymes demonstrated maximum activity at 50 to 55°C and only small changes in activity between pH 6 and 11. For P-I, activity was somewhat higher from pH 8.0 to 11.0, whereas for P-II it was somewhat higher from pH 6 to 9. In the presence of 18% NaCl, the activities of both P-I and P-II dropped by approximately 90 and 85%, respectively. P-I was inferred to possess aminopeptidase activity since it could hydrolyze l-leucyl-p-nitroanilide hydrochloride. P-II was devoid of such activity. The ramifications of the results for factory-produced soy sauce koji are discussed. Images PMID:16345858

  8. The early years of retroviral protease crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Soon after its discovery, the attempts to develop anti-AIDS therapeutics focused on the retroviral protease (PR)-an enzyme used by lentiviruses to process the precursor polypeptide into mature viral proteins. An urgent need for the three-dimensional structure of PR to guide rational drug design prompted efforts to produce milligram quantities of this enzyme. However, only minute amounts of PR were present in the HIV-1 and HIV-2 viruses, and initial attempts to express this protein in bacteria were not successful. This review describes X-ray crystallographic studies of the retroviral proteases carried out at NCI-Frederick in the late 1980s and early 1990s and puts into perspective the crucial role that the total protein chemical synthesis played in unraveling the structure, mechanism of action, and inhibition of HIV-1 PR. Notably, the first fully correct structure of HIV-1 PR and the first cocrystal structure of its complex with an inhibitor (a substrate-derived, reduced isostere hexapeptide MVT-101) were determined using chemically synthesized protein. Most importantly, these sets of coordinates were made freely available to the research community and were used worldwide to solve X-ray structures of HIV-1 PR complexes with an array of inhibitors and set in motion a variety of theoretical studies. Publication of the structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 PR complexed with MVT-101 preceded only by six years the approval of the first PR inhibitor as an anti-AIDS drug. Copyright (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Expression, characterization, and cellular localization of knowpains, papain-like cysteine proteases of the Plasmodium knowlesi malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajesh; Atul; Soni, Awakash; Puri, Sunil Kumar; Sijwali, Puran Singh

    2012-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases of malaria parasites degrade haemoglobin in an acidic food vacuole to provide amino acids for intraerythrocytic parasites. These proteases are potential drug targets because their inhibitors block parasite development, and efforts are underway to develop chemotherapeutic inhibitors of these proteases as the treatments for malaria. Plasmodium knowlesi has recently been shown to be an important human pathogen in parts of Asia. We report expression and characterization of three P. knowlesi papain-like proteases, termed knowpains (KP2-4). Recombinant knowpains were produced using a bacterial expression system, and tested for various biochemical properties. Antibodies against recombinant knowpains were generated and used to determine their cellular localization in parasites. Inhibitory effects of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64 were assessed on P. knowlesi culture to validate drug target potential of knowpains. All three knowpains were present in the food vacuole, active in acidic pH, and capable of degrading haemoglobin at the food vacuolar pH (≈5.5), suggesting roles in haemoglobin degradation. The proteases showed absolute (KP2 and KP3) to moderate (KP4) preference for peptide substrates containing leucine at the P2 position; KP4 preferred arginine at the P2 position. While the three knowpains appear to have redundant roles in haemoglobin degradation, KP4 may also have a role in degradation of erythrocyte cytoskeleton during merozoite egress, as it displayed broad substrate specificity and was primarily localized at the parasite periphery. Importantly, E64 blocked erythrocytic development of P. knowlesi, with enlargement of food vacuoles, indicating inhibition of haemoglobin hydrolysis and supporting the potential for inhibition of knowpains as a strategy for the treatment of malaria. Functional expression and characterization of knowpains should enable simultaneous screening of available cysteine protease inhibitor libraries

  10. Serpin-9 and -13 regulate hemolymph proteases during immune responses of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Picheng; Rayaprolu, Subrahmanyam; Wang, Xiuhong; Cao, Xiaolong; Jiang, Haobo

    2017-10-04

    Serpins are a superfamily of proteins, most of which inhibit cognate serine proteases by forming inactive acyl-enzyme complexes. In the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta, serpin-1, -3 through -7 negatively regulate a hemolymph serine protease system that activates precursors of the serine protease homologs (SPHs), phenoloxidases (POs), Spätzles, and other cytokines. Here we report the cloning and characterization of M. sexta serpin-9 and -13. Serpin-9, a 402-residue protein most similar to Drosophila Spn77Ba, has R(366) at the P1 position right before the cleavage site; Serpin-13, a 444-residue ortholog of Drosophila Spn28Dc, is longer than the other seven serpins and has R(410) as the P1 residue. Both serpins are mainly produced in fat body and secreted into plasma to function. While their mRNA and protein levels were not up-regulated upon immune challenge, they blocked protease activities and affected proPO activation in hemolymph. Serpin-9 inhibited human neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, trypsin, and chymotrypsin to different extents; serpin-13 reduced trypsin activity to approximately 10% at a molar ratio of 4:1 (serpin: enzyme). Serpin-9 was cleaved at Arg(366) by the enzymes with different specificity, but serpin-13 had four P1 sites (Arg(410) for trypsin-like proteases, Gly(406) and Ala(409) for the elastase and Thr(404) for cathepsin G). Supplementation of induced cell-free hemolymph (IP, P for plasma) with recombinant serpin-9 did not noticeably affect proPO activation, but slightly reduced the PO activity increase after 0-50% ammonium sulfate fraction of the IP had been elicited by bacteria. In comparison, addition of recombinant serpin-13 significantly inhibited proPO activation in IP and the suppression was stronger in the fraction of IP. Serpin-9- and -13-containing protein complexes were isolated from IP using their antibodies. Hemolymph protease-1 precursor (proHP1), HP6 and HP8 were found to be associated with serpin-9, whereas proHP1, HP2 and HP6

  11. Cloning and analysis of WF146 protease, a novel thermophilic subtilisin-like protease with four inserted surface loops.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Bian, Yan; Tang, Bing; Chen, Xiangdong; Shen, Ping; Peng, Zhenrong

    2004-01-30

    Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding WF146 protease, an extracellular subtilisin-like protease from the thermophile Bacillus sp. WF146, revealed that the WF146 protease was translated as a 416-amino acid precursor consisting of a putative 18-amino acid signal peptide, a 10-kDa N-terminal propeptide and a 32-kDa mature protease region. The mature WF146 protease shares a high degree of amino acid sequence identity with two psychrophilic subtilisins, S41 (68.2%) and S39 (65.4%), and a mesophilic subtilisin, SSII (67.1%). Significantly, these closely related proteases adapted to different temperatures all had four inserted surface loops not found in other subtilisins. However, unlike those of S41, S39 and SSII, the inserted loops of the WF146 protease possessed stabilizing features, such as the introduction of Pro residues into the loop regions. Interestingly, the WF146 protease contained five of the seven mutations previously found in a hyperstable variant of subtilisin S41 obtained by directed evolution. The proform of WF146 protease (pro-WF146 protease) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in an inactive soluble form. After heat treatment, the 42-kDa pro-WF146 protease converted to a 32-kDa active mature form by processing the N-terminal propeptide. The purified mature WF146 protease hydrolyzed casein with an optimum temperature of 85 degrees C, and lost activity with a half-life of 30 min at 80 degrees C in the presence of 10 mM CaCl2.

  12. Reversible Unfolding of Rhomboid Intramembrane Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Gimpl, Katharina; Keller, Sandro; Lemieux, M. Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Denaturant-induced unfolding of helical membrane proteins provides insights into their mechanism of folding and domain organization, which take place in the chemically heterogeneous, anisotropic environment of a lipid membrane. Rhomboid proteases are intramembrane proteases that play key roles in various diseases. Crystal structures have revealed a compact helical bundle with a buried active site, which requires conformational changes for the cleavage of transmembrane substrates. A dimeric form of the rhomboid protease has been shown to be important for activity. In this study, we examine the mechanism of refolding for two distinct rhomboids to gain insight into their secondary structure-activity relationships. Although helicity is largely abolished in the unfolded states of both proteins, unfolding is completely reversible for HiGlpG but only partially reversible for PsAarA. Refolding of both proteins results in reassociation of the dimer, with a 90% regain of catalytic activity for HiGlpG but only a 70% regain for PsAarA. For both proteins, a broad, gradual transition from the native, folded state to the denatured, partly unfolded state was revealed with the aid of circular dichroism spectroscopy as a function of denaturant concentration, thus arguing against a classical two-state model as found for many globular soluble proteins. Thermal denaturation has irreversible destabilizing effects on both proteins, yet reveals important functional details regarding substrate accessibility to the buried active site. This concerted biophysical and functional analysis demonstrates that HiGlpG, with a simple six-transmembrane-segment organization, is more robust than PsAarA, which has seven predicted transmembrane segments, thus rendering HiGlpG amenable to in vitro studies of membrane-protein folding. PMID:27028647

  13. Purification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases and microscopic characterization of pseudomonal protease-induced rabbit corneal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Kreger, A S; Gray, L D

    1978-01-01

    Extracellular proteases of three cornea-virulent strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, Ultrogel AcA 54 gel filtration, and flat-bed isoelectric focusing. The purity of the preparations was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis , thin-layer isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel, immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoretic procedures, and tests for the presence of other known pseudomonal products. Light and electron microscopic examination of rabbit corneal lesions observed 4 to 6 h after the intracorneal injection of submicrogram amounts of the proteases revealed: (i) degeneration and necrosis of epithelium, endothelium, and keratocytes, (ii) infiltration, degeneration, and necrosis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, (iii) loss of the characteristic weblike pattern, colloidal iron staining, and ruthenium red staining of the stromal proteoglycan ground substance, (iv) dispersal of strucutrally normal appearing collagen fibrils, ground substance, (iv) dispersal of structurally normal appearing collagen fibrils, and (v) accumulation of plasma proteins and fibrin in the necrotic corneas. These structural alterations are very similar to those observed previously during experimental P. aeruginosa keratitis, and this similarity supports the idea that pseudomonal proteases are responsible, at least in part, for the rapid and extensive liquefaction necrosis characteristic of pseudomonal-induced keratitis. In addition, the results support the idea that pseudomonal proteases elicit severe corneal damage by causing the loss of the corneal proteoglycan ground substance, thus resulting in dispersal of undamaged collagen fibrils, weakening of the corneal stroma, and subsequent descemetocele formation and corneal perforation by the anterior chamber pressure. Images PMID:415981

  14. Multiple Proteases to Localize Oxidation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Liqing; Robinson, Renã A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins present in cellular environments with high levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and/or low levels of antioxidants are highly susceptible to oxidative post-translational modification (PTM). Irreversible oxidative PTMs can generate a complex distribution of modified protein molecules, recently termed as proteoforms. Using ubiquitin as a model system, we mapped oxidative modification sites using trypsin, Lys-C, and Glu-C peptides. Several M+16 Da proteoforms were detected as well as proteoforms that include other previously unidentified oxidative modifications. This work highlights the use of multiple protease digestions to give insights to the complexity of oxidative modifications possible in bottom-up analyses. PMID:25775238

  15. Protease sensing using nontoxic silicon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaoyu; McVey, Benjamin F. P.; Robinson, Andrew B.; Longatte, Guillaume; O'Mara, Peter B.; Tan, Vincent T. G.; Thordarson, Pall; Tilley, Richard D.; Gaus, Katharina; Justin Gooding, John

    2017-08-01

    Herein is presented a proof-of-concept study of protease sensing that combines nontoxic silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The SiQDs serve as the donor and an organic dye as the acceptor. The dye is covalently attached to the SiQDs using a peptide linker. Enzymatic cleavage of the peptide leads to changes in FRET efficiency. The combination of interfacial design and optical imaging presented in this work opens opportunities for use of nontoxic SiQDs relevant to intracellular sensing and imaging.

  16. Rapid Release of Protease Inhibitors from Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, David L.; Yang, Wen-Kuang; Foard, Donald E.; Lin, K.-T. -Davis

    1978-01-01

    Specific antisera were prepared against the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitor and four other trypsin inhibitors of low molecular weight isolated from soybeans (Glycine max L. cv. Tracy). These antisera were used to detect the presence and amount of the inhibitors in: (a) seeds and protein extracts of soybean meal; (b) seedlings; and (c) the water surrounding the seeds and roots of seedlings. Lectin activities in seeds, seedlings, and water were also determined at the same time as the protease inhibitor activities. By competitive inhibition of immunoprecipitation, the combined five low molecular weight protease inhibitors were found to constitute the following percentages of proteins (w/w): 6.3% in defatted soybean meal; 8.1% of the protein extracted from the meal by a buffer of pH 8.6; 8.3, 14.7, 15.2, 16.1, 17.2, and 18.9% of the protein in a lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, respectively; 8.2% in a lyophilisate of water in which roots of seedlings grew for 20 days; 1.5% in cotyledons; and less than 0.1% in epicotyls, hypocotyls, and roots of 12-day-old seedlings. Hemagglutination activities, expressed as the lowest amount of protein required to give a positive agglutination of 0.2 ml of 2% rabbit red blood cells, were as follows: purified soybean lectin, 0.08 μg; lyophilisate of water in which seeds were incubated for 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 hours, 10, 2.5, 5, 5, and 2.5 μg, respectively; lyophilisate of water in which roots grew for 20 days, 5 μg; 12-day-old cotyledons, roots, epicotyls, and hypocotyls, 12.5, 100, >1,000, and >500 μg, respectively. The results indicate that a large amount of protease inhibitors as well as lectins are released from seeds during the first 8 hours of imbibition. Neither lima bean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 10,000) nor Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (mol wt, 21,500) showed competitive inhibition in tests with antisera against low molecular weight soybean protease inhibitors

  17. Molecular mechanisms of tolerance to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors revealed by clonal differences in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Kuster, Christian J; Von Elert, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Protease inhibitors of primary producers are a major food quality constraint for herbivores. In nutrient-rich freshwater ecosystems, the interaction between primary producers and herbivores is mainly represented by Daphnia and cyanobacteria. Protease inhibitors have been found in many cyanobacterial blooms. These inhibitors have been shown (both in vitro and in situ) to inhibit the most important group of digestive proteases in the daphnid's gut, that is, trypsins and chymotrypsins. In this study, we fed four different Daphnia magna genotypes with the trypsin-inhibitor-containing cyanobacterial strain Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 Mut. Upon exposure to dietary trypsin inhibitors, all D. magna genotypes showed increased gene expression of digestive trypsins and chymotrypsins. Exposure to dietary trypsin inhibitors resulted in increased activity of chymotrypsins and reduced activity of trypsin. Strong intraspecific differences in tolerance of the four D. magna genotypes to the dietary trypsin inhibitors were found. The degree of tolerance depended on the D. magna genotype. The genotypes' tolerance was positively correlated with the residual trypsin activity and the different IC(50) values of the trypsins. On the genetic level, the different trypsin loci varied between the D. magna genotypes. The two tolerant Daphnia genotypes that both originate from the same lake, which frequently produces cyanobacterial blooms, clustered in a neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree based on the three trypsin loci. This suggests that the genetic variability of trypsin loci was an important cause for the observed intraspecific variability in tolerance to cyanobacterial trypsin inhibitors. Based on these findings, it is reasonable to assume that such genetic variability can also be found in natural populations and thus constitutes the basis for local adaptation of natural populations to dietary protease inhibitors.

  18. Increased activity of unlinked Zika virus NS2B/NS3 protease compared to linked Zika virus protease.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Benjamin D; Slater, Kristin; Spellmon, Nicholas; Holcomb, Joshua; Medapureddy, Prasanna; Muzzarelli, Kendall M; Yang, Zhe; Ovadia, Reuben; Amblard, Franck; Kovari, Iulia A; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kovari, Ladislau C

    2017-03-22

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus spread by daytime-active Aedes spp. mosquitoes such as A. aegypti and A. albopictus. Previously thought to be a mild infection, the latest ZIKV outbreak in the Americas is causally associated with more severe symptoms as well as severe birth defects, such as microcephaly. Currently no vaccine or antiviral exists. However, recent progress has demonstrated the viral NS2B/NS3 protease may be a suitable target for the development of small-molecule antiviral agents. To better understand the ZIKV protease, we expressed, purified, and characterized unlinked and linked NS2B/NS3 protease corresponding to an isolate from the recent outbreak in Puerto Rico. Unlinked ZIKV protease is more active and binds substrate with greater affinity than linked ZIKV protease. Therefore, we propose that unlinked ZIKV protease be used when evaluating or designing ZIKV protease inhibitors. Additionally, potent inhibitors of related viral proteases, like West Nile Virus and Dengue virus, may serve as advanced starting points to identify and develop ZIKV protease inhibitors.

  19. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  20. Chymotrypsin protease inhibitor gene family in rice: Genomic organization and evidence for the presence of a bidirectional promoter shared between two chymotrypsin protease inhibitor genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amanjot; Sahi, Chandan; Grover, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Protease inhibitors play important roles in stress and developmental responses of plants. Rice genome contains 17 putative members in chymotrypsin protease inhibitor (ranging in size from 7.21 to 11.9 kDa) gene family with different predicted localization sites. Full-length cDNA encoding for a putative subtilisin-chymotrypsin protease inhibitor (OCPI2) w